WorldWideScience

Sample records for bioguid resolving discovering

  1. Theoretical Considerations of Bio-guided Music Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Eric B.

    2011-01-01

    Music therapists rarely have the opportunity to consider a new model of music therapy and need to review prior models and theoretical approaches to make an informed determination regarding Bio-guided Music Therapy. While initially appearing to fall within the confines of Behavioral Music Therapy, technical advances in sound reproduction, physiological data acquisition methods, as well as innovative application techniques are argued to bring the bio-guided approach into the realm of in-the-mom...

  2. Time-resolved 2-million-year-old supernova activity discovered in Earth's microfossil record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Peter; Bishop, Shawn; Egli, Ramon; Chernenko, Valentyna; Deneva, Boyana; Faestermann, Thomas; Famulok, Nicolai; Fimiani, Leticia; Gómez-Guzmán, José Manuel; Hain, Karin; Korschinek, Gunther; Hanzlik, Marianne; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg

    2016-08-01

    Massive stars (M≳10 M⊙M≳10 M⊙), which terminate their evolution as core-collapse supernovae, are theoretically predicted to eject >10-5M⊙>10-5M⊙ of the radioisotope 60Fe (half-life 2.61 Ma). If such an event occurs sufficiently close to our solar system, traces of the supernova debris could be deposited on Earth. Herein, we report a time-resolved 60Fe signal residing, at least partially, in a biogenic reservoir. Using accelerator mass spectrometry, this signal was found through the direct detection of live 60Fe atoms contained within secondary iron oxides, among which are magnetofossils, the fossilized chains of magnetite crystals produced by magnetotactic bacteria. The magnetofossils were chemically extracted from two Pacific Ocean sediment drill cores. Our results show that the 60Fe signal onset occurs around 2.6 Ma to 2.8 Ma, near the lower Pleistocene boundary, terminates around 1.7 Ma, and peaks at about 2.2 Ma.

  3. Theoretical Considerations of Bio-guided Music Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric B Miller

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Music therapists rarely have the opportunity to consider a new model of music therapy and need to review prior models and theoretical approaches to make an informed determination regarding Bio-guided Music Therapy. While initially appearing to fall within the confines of Behavioral Music Therapy, technical advances in sound reproduction, physiological data acquisition methods, as well as innovative application techniques are argued to bring the bio-guided approach into the realm of in-the-moment improvisation. Bio-guided Music Therapy distinguishes itself from other music therapy models by virtue of the client's physiological data being presented in real-time either musically or visually back to the client or the therapist during the therapy session. This real-time data may be presented in key, scale and tempo for flexibility in musical interaction with the music therapist or group. General treatment areas include ADHD, Stress/anxiety, dementia, depression and addictions. The resulting charts and graphs document the impact of the music therapy session in the language of mainstream medicine, readily accessible to other medical professionals.

  4. Bioguided isolation of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors from the seeds of Plantago asiatica L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Fang; Yang, Li; Chou, Guixin; Wang, Zhengtao

    2010-07-01

    Ethanolic extract of the seeds of Plantago asiatica L. showed significant inhibitory activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) determined by monitoring the transformation from a substrate hippuryl-histidyl-leucine (HHL) to the product hippuric acid (HA) in vitro using an UPLC-MS method. The bioguided fractionation of the extract resulted in the isolation of four ACE inhibitory active phenylpropanoid glycosides acteoside, isoacteoside, plantainoside D, and plantamajoside with IC(50) values of 2.69 mM, 2.46 mM, 2.17 mM, and 2.47 mM, respectively. Their structures were elucidated through the analysis of NMR, UV, IR and MS data. Our study is the first demonstration that Plantago asiatica L. and its major constituents have ACE inhibitory activity in vitro. It is assumed that the identified compounds contribute to the angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitory activity of the extract.

  5. Bioguided identification of antifungal and antiproliferative compounds from the Brazilian orchid Miltonia flavescens Lindl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porte, Leticia F; Santin, Silvana M O; Chiavelli, Lucas U R; Silva, Cleuza C; Faria, Terezinha J; Faria, Ricardo T; Ruiz, Ana L T G; Carvalho, João E; Pomini, Armando M

    2014-01-01

    The Orchidaceae family is appreciated worldwide for the beauty of its flowers, and hundreds of species of this family occur in Brazil. Yet little is known about the potential of orchids for therapeutic application. We have investigated bioactive compounds produced by the South Brazilian orchid Miltonia flavescens Lindl. Bioguided studies with the fungus Cladosporium herbarum allowed the identification of hydrocinnamic acid as the active antifungal compound. In addition, the chloroform fraction exhibited an interesting activity against human cancer cells, and 5,7-dihydroxy-6,4'-dimethoxyflavone isolated from this fraction was found to be active against seven human cancer cell lines, including NCI/ADR-RES ovary sarcoma, with an IC50 value of 2.6 microg/mL. This is the first report on the cytostatic activity of this flavone against human ovary sarcoma. PMID:24772822

  6. A bioguided identification of the active compounds that contribute to the antiproliferative/cytotoxic effects of rosemary extract on colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrás-Linares, Isabel; Pérez-Sánchez, Almudena; Lozano-Sánchez, Jesús; Barrajón-Catalán, Enrique; Arráez-Román, David; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Micol, Vicente; Carretero, Antonio Segura

    2015-06-01

    Rosemary extracts have exhibited potential cytostatic or cytotoxic effects in several cancer cell models but their bioactive compounds are yet to be discovered. In this work, the anticancer activity of a rosemary-leaf extract and its fractions were assayed to identify the phenolic compounds responsible for their antiproliferative/cytotoxic effects on a panel of human colon cancer cell lines. Bioguided fractionation of the rosemary-leaf extract was achieved by semi-preparative chromatography. The rosemary extract and the compounds in the fractions were characterized and quantified by HPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS. Cellular viability in the presence of these fractions and the whole extract was determined after 24 or 48 h incubations by using an MTT assay. Fractions containing diterpenes or triterpenes were the most active but not as much as the whole extract. In conclusion, carnosic acid, carnosol, 12-methoxycarnosic acid, taxodione, hinokione and betulinic acid were the putative candidates that contributed to the observed antiproliferative activity of rosemary in human colon cancer cells. Whether the effects of the extract and fractions are only cytostatic or cytotoxic needs to be elucidated. Nevertheless, the comparative antiproliferative study on the fractions and whole extract revealed potential synergistic effects between several components in the extract that may deserve further attention. PMID:25801906

  7. Discover Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Colleen

    1998-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-sponsored project for teachers of grades 5-12, designed to: (1) enhance understanding of the Earth as an integrated system; (2) enhance the interdisciplinary approach to science instruction; and (3) provide classroom materials that focus on those goals. Discover Earth is conducted by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies in collaboration with Dr. Eric Barron, Director, Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University; and Dr. Robert Hudson, Chair, the Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland at College Park. The enclosed materials: (1) represent only part of the Discover Earth materials; (2) were developed by classroom teachers who are participating in the Discover Earth project; (3) utilize an investigative approach and on-line data; and (4) can be effectively adjusted to classrooms with greater/without technology access. The Discover Earth classroom materials focus on the Earth system and key issues of global climate change including topics such as the greenhouse effect, clouds and Earth's radiation balance, surface hydrology and land cover, and volcanoes and climate change. All the materials developed to date are available on line at (http://www.strategies.org) You are encouraged to submit comments and recommendations about these materials to the Discover Earth project manager, contact information is listed below. You are welcome to duplicate all these materials.

  8. Bio-guided identification of proteins for the diagnosis of cysticercosis in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nativel, Priscilla; Rahantamalala, Anjanirina; Ramiandrisoa, Sitraka; Rasoamampianinaa, Virginie; Duchateau, Magalie; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Guebey, Remy; Rasamoelina-Andriamanivo, Harentsoaniaina; Jambou, Ronan

    2016-04-15

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is one of the most prevalent parasitic infection of the brain and the most common cause of seizures in adults in tropical countries. Cysticercosis is caused by larvae of Taenia solium, a human tapeworm. Pig or humans are infected by ingestion of eggs in food contaminated by human feces. Diagnosis and treatment of pigs is a pillar of the control of the disease in a country. However current diagnostic tests are based on ELISA and/or Western blot using native antigens needing laboratory facilities not available in rural areas. Development of a pen side diagnostic test for swines, makes sense. Immunochromatographic test should be adapted for this purpose. To design it we started a bio-guided identification of new proteins in cysticercus fluid. Proteins were analyzed using ion exchange chromatography and 2D separation and were selected by Western blot analysis using sera from infected/non infected pigs. Spots from the Coomassie-stained gel corresponding to these proteins were then analyzed by mass spectroscopy and proteins were identified using a bank of Expressed Sequence Tags (EST) of T. solium. Eighteen new proteins of interest were identified and nine were selected for further development. PMID:26995717

  9. Discovering Technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    R. Andersen, J.; Antipin, O.; Azuelos, G.;

    2011-01-01

    We provide a pedagogical introduction to extensions of the Standard Model in which the Higgs is composite. These extensions are known as models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking or, in brief, Technicolor. Material covered includes: motivations for Technicolor, the construction of underly...... the relevant experimental benchmarks for Vanilla, Running, Walking, and Custodial Technicolor, and a natural fourth family of leptons, by laying out the framework to discover these models at the Large Hadron Collider....... of underlying gauge theories leading to minimal models of Technicolor, the comparison with electroweak precision data, the low energy effective theory, the spectrum of the states common to most of the Technicolor models, the decays of the composite particles and the experimental signals at the Large Hadron...... Collider. The level of the presentation is aimed at readers familiar with the Standard Model but who have little or no prior exposure to Technicolor. Several extensions of the Standard Model featuring a composite Higgs can be reduced to the effective Lagrangian introduced in the text. We establish...

  10. Anesthetic activity and bio-guided fractionation of the essential oil of Aloysia gratissima (Gillies & Hook. Tronc. in silver catfish Rhamdia quelen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIMONE C. BENOVIT

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to determine the efficacy of the essential oil of A. gratissima as anesthetic for silver catfish, and to perform the bio-guided fractionation of essential oil aiming to isolate compounds responsible for the noted effects. Fish were submitted to anesthesia bath with essential oil, its fractions and isolated compounds to determine time of anesthetic induction and recovery. Eugenol (50 mg L-1 was used as positive control. Essential oil of A. gratissima was effective as an anesthetic at concentrations of 300 to 900 mg L-1. Fish presented involuntary muscle contractions during induction and recovery. The bio-guided fractionation of essential oil furnishedE-(--pinocamphone, (--caryophyllene oxide, (--guaiol and (+-spathulenol. E-(--pinocamphone caused the same side effects observed for essential oil. (--Caryophyllene oxide, (--guaiol and (+-spathulenol showed only sedative effects at proportional concentrations to those of the constituents in essential oil. (+-Spathulenol (51.2 mg L-1 promoted deep anesthesia without side effects. A higher concentration of (+-spathulenol, and lower or absent amounts ofE-(--pinocamphone could contribute to increase the activity and safety of the essential oil of A. gratissima. (+-Spathulenol showed potent sedative and anesthetic activities in silver catfish, and could be considered as a viable compound for the development of a new anesthetic.

  11. Anesthetic activity and bio-guided fractionation of the essential oil of Aloysia gratissima (Gillies & Hook.) Tronc. in silver catfish Rhamdia quelen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benovit, Simone C; Silva, Lenise L; Salbego, Joseânia; Loro, Vania L; Mallmann, Carlos A; Baldisserotto, Bernardo; Flores, Erico M M; Heinzmann, Berta M

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to determine the efficacy of the essential oil of A. gratissima as anesthetic for silver catfish, and to perform the bio-guided fractionation of essential oil aiming to isolate compounds responsible for the noted effects. Fish were submitted to anesthesia bath with essential oil, its fractions and isolated compounds to determine time of anesthetic induction and recovery. Eugenol (50 mg L(-1)) was used as positive control. Essential oil of A. gratissima was effective as an anesthetic at concentrations of 300 to 900 mg L(-1). Fish presented involuntary muscle contractions during induction and recovery. The bio-guided fractionation of essential oil furnished E-(-)-pinocamphone, (-)-caryophyllene oxide, (-)-guaiol and (+)-spathulenol. E-(-)-pinocamphone caused the same side effects observed for essential oil. (-)-Caryophyllene oxide, (-)-guaiol and (+)-spathulenol showed only sedative effects at proportional concentrations to those of the constituents in essential oil. (+)-Spathulenol (51.2 mg L(-1)) promoted deep anesthesia without side effects. A higher concentration of (+)-spathulenol, and lower or absent amounts ofE-(-)-pinocamphone could contribute to increase the activity and safety of the essential oil of A. gratissima. (+)-Spathulenol showed potent sedative and anesthetic activities in silver catfish, and could be considered as a viable compound for the development of a new anesthetic. PMID:26221984

  12. A Statistical Intelligence (STI) Approach To Discovering Spurious Correlation In A Physical Model And Resolving The Problem With An Example Of Designing A Pulse Jet Mixing System At Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulse jet mixing tests were conducted to support the design of mixing systems for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. A physical approach (based on hydro-dynamic behavior) and two semi-empirical (SE) approaches were applied to the data to develop models for predicting two response variables (critical-suspension velocity and cloud height). Tests were conducted at three geometric scales using multiple noncohesive simulants and levels of possibly influential factors. The physical modeling approach based on hydro- dynamic behavior was first attempted, but this approach can yield models with spurious correlation. To overcome this dilemma, two semi-empirical (SE) models were developed by generalizing the form of the physical model using dimensional and/or nondimensional (ND) variables. The results of applying statistical intelligence (STI) tools to resolve the spurious correlation problem via fitting the physical and SE models are presented and compared. Considering goodness-of-fit, prediction performance, spurious correlation, and the need to extrapolate, the SE models based on ND variables are recommended.

  13. Discovering the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Barrie W.

    1999-04-01

    Discovering the Solar System Barrie W. Jones The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK Discovering the Solar System is a comprehensive, up-to-date account of the Solar System and of the ways in which the various bodies have been investigated and modelled. The approach is thematic, with sequences of chapters on the interiors of planetary bodies, on their surfaces, and on their atmospheres. Within each sequence there is a chapter on general principles and processes followed by one or two chapters on specific bodies. There is also an introductory chapter, a chapter on the origin of the Solar System, and a chapter on asteroids, comets and meteorites. Liberally illustrated with diagrams, black and white photographs and colour plates, Discovering the Solar System also features: * tables of essential data * question and answers within the text * end of section review questions with answers and comments Discovering the Solar System is essential reading for all undergraduate students for whom astronomy or planetary science are components of their degrees, and for those at a more advanced level approaching the subject for the first time. It will also be of great interest to non-specialists with a keen interest in astronomy. A small amount of scientific knowledge is assumed plus familiarity with basic algebra and graphs. There is no calculus. Praise for this book includes: ".certainly qualifies as an authoritative text. The author clearly has an encyclopedic knowledge of the subject." Meteorics and Planetary Science ".liberally doused with relevant graphs, tables, and black and white figures of good quality." EOS, Transactions of the American Geophysical Union ".one of the best books on the Solar System I have seen. The general accuracy and quality of the content is excellent." Journal of the British Astronomical Association

  14. Students Discover Unique Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Three undergraduate students, from Leiden University in the Netherlands, have discovered an extrasolar planet. The extraordinary find, which turned up during their research project, is about five times as massive as Jupiter. This is also the first planet discovered orbiting a fast-rotating hot star. Omega Centauri ESO PR Photo 45a/08 A planet around a hot star The students were testing a method of investigating the light fluctuations of thousands of stars in the OGLE database in an automated way. The brightness of one of the stars was found to decrease for two hours every 2.5 days by about one percent. Follow-up observations, taken with ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile, confirmed that this phenomenon is caused by a planet passing in front of the star, blocking part of the starlight at regular intervals. According to Ignas Snellen, supervisor of the research project, the discovery was a complete surprise. "The project was actually meant to teach the students how to develop search algorithms. But they did so well that there was time to test their algorithm on a so far unexplored database. At some point they came into my office and showed me this light curve. I was completely taken aback!" The students, Meta de Hoon, Remco van der Burg, and Francis Vuijsje, are very enthusiastic. "It is exciting not just to find a planet, but to find one as unusual as this one; it turns out to be the first planet discovered around a fast rotating star, and it's also the hottest star found with a planet," says Meta. "The computer needed more than a thousand hours to do all the calculations," continues Remco. The planet is given the prosaic name OGLE2-TR-L9b. "But amongst ourselves we call it ReMeFra-1, after Remco, Meta, and myself," says Francis. The planet was discovered by looking at the brightness variations of about 15 700 stars, which had been observed by the OGLE survey once or twice per night for about four years between 1997 and 2000. Because the data had been made public

  15. Discovering system requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahill, A.T.; Bentz, B. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Systems and Industrial Engineering; Dean, F.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Cost and schedule overruns are often caused by poor requirements that are produced by people who do not understand the requirements process. This report provides a high-level overview of the system requirements process, explaining types, sources, and characteristics of good requirements. System requirements, however, are seldom stated by the customer. Therefore, this report shows ways to help you work with your customer to discover the system requirements. It also explains terminology commonly used in the requirements development field, such as verification, validation, technical performance measures, and the various design reviews.

  16. Discovering Phonemes of Bidayuh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jecky Misieng

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There are generally three views of the notion of a phoneme. The structuralist view of the phoneme focuses on this language phenomenon as a phonetic reality. In discovering phonemes of a language, phonologists who hold this view will look for minimal contrasting pairs as a way to determine contrasting sounds of that language. They will also look for allophones or two sounds of the same phoneme which may appear in complementary distribution. This paper will discuss the possible application of the structuralist approach to analyzing the phonemes of a dialect of Bidayuh, one of the Malayo-Polynesian languages spoken in the northern region of Borneo.

  17. A Bio-Guided Fractionation to Assess the Inhibitory Activity of Calendula officinalis L. on the NF-κB Driven Transcription in Human Gastric Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Elisa; Sangiovanni, Enrico; D'Ambrosio, Michele; Bosisio, Enrica; Ciocarlan, Alexandru; Fumagalli, Marco; Guerriero, Antonio; Harghel, Petru; Dell'Agli, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Calendula officinalis L. has been largely known for its topical anti-inflammatory properties; however, there are no experimental evidences about its antiphlogistic effect at the gastric level. To investigate whether marigold might exert an activity against gastric inflammation, a CH2Cl2 extract obtained from C. officinalis flowers was evaluated in vitro on the NF-κB pathway. The lipophilic extract demonstrated a significant inhibitory effect on the NF-κB driven transcription. The identification of active compounds was conducted by a bio-guided fractionation of the extract that afforded 16 fractions. Fraction J exhibited a concentration-dependent inhibitory activity on the NF-κB driven transcription and significantly contributed to the antiphlogistic effect showed by CH2Cl2 extract. The main components of fraction J were loliolide and the fucoside acetates of β-eudesmol and viridiflorol. HPLC analysis of fractions D and E led to the identification and isolation of triterpene esters that showed a concentration-dependent inhibition of the NF-κB driven transcription, with faradiol-3-myristate and the corresponding aglycone being the most active compounds. The present study provides some experimental evidences that Calendula officinalis L. may exert an anti-inflammatory activity on the gastric district by the inhibition of the NF-κB system, identifying the compounds responsible, at least in part, for the observed effect. PMID:26491463

  18. A Bio-Guided Fractionation to Assess the Inhibitory Activity of Calendula officinalis L. on the NF-κB Driven Transcription in Human Gastric Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Colombo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Calendula officinalis L. has been largely known for its topical anti-inflammatory properties; however, there are no experimental evidences about its antiphlogistic effect at the gastric level. To investigate whether marigold might exert an activity against gastric inflammation, a CH2Cl2 extract obtained from C. officinalis flowers was evaluated in vitro on the NF-κB pathway. The lipophilic extract demonstrated a significant inhibitory effect on the NF-κB driven transcription. The identification of active compounds was conducted by a bio-guided fractionation of the extract that afforded 16 fractions. Fraction J exhibited a concentration-dependent inhibitory activity on the NF-κB driven transcription and significantly contributed to the antiphlogistic effect showed by CH2Cl2 extract. The main components of fraction J were loliolide and the fucoside acetates of β-eudesmol and viridiflorol. HPLC analysis of fractions D and E led to the identification and isolation of triterpene esters that showed a concentration-dependent inhibition of the NF-κB driven transcription, with faradiol-3-myristate and the corresponding aglycone being the most active compounds. The present study provides some experimental evidences that Calendula officinalis L. may exert an anti-inflammatory activity on the gastric district by the inhibition of the NF-κB system, identifying the compounds responsible, at least in part, for the observed effect.

  19. Student Discovers New Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    A West Virginia high-school student has discovered a new pulsar, using data from the giant Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Shay Bloxton, 15, a participant in a project in which students analyze data from the radio telescope, spotted evidence of the pulsar on October 15. Bloxton, along with NRAO astronomers observed the object again one month later. The new observation confirmed that the object is a pulsar, a rotating, superdense neutron star. Bloxton is a sophomore at Nicholas County High School in Summersville, West Virginia. "I was very excited when I found out I had actually made a discovery," Bloxton said. She went to Green Bank in November to participate in the follow-up observation. She termed that visit "a great experience." "It also helped me learn a lot about how observations with the GBT are actually done," she added. The project in which she participated, called the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC), is a joint project of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and West Virginia University, funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation. Pulsars are known for their lighthouse-like beams of radio waves that sweep through space as the neutron star rotates, creating a pulse as the beam sweeps by the Earth. First discovered in 1967, pulsars serve as valuable natural "laboratories" for physicists studying exotic states of matter, quantum mechanics and General Relativity. The GBT, dedicated in 2000, has become one of the world's leading tools for discovering and studying pulsars. The PSC, led by NRAO Education Officer Sue Ann Heatherly and Project Director Rachel Rosen, includes training for teachers and student leaders, and provides parcels of data from the GBT to student teams. The project involves teachers and students in helping astronomers analyze data from 1500 hours of observing with the GBT. The 120 terabytes of data were produced by 70,000 individual pointings of the giant, 17-million-pound telescope. Some 300 hours of the

  20. Discovering Resume Information using linked data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujjal Marjit

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In spite of having different web applications to create and collect resumes, these web applications suffer mainly from a common standard data model, data sharing, and data reusing. Though, different web applications provide same quality of resume information, but internally there are many differences in terms of data structure and storage which makes computer difficult to process and analyse the information from different sources. The concept of Linked Data has enabled the web to share data among different data sources and to discover any kind of information while resolving the issues like heterogeneity, interoperability, and data reusing between different data sources and allowing machine process-able data on the web. In this paper we present Linked Data approach to discover resume information enabling the task aggregation, sharing and reusing the information among different resume information providers and organizations. We also demonstrate experimental results on semantically rich resume information.

  1. Discovering the Envionment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Bergesen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of JWSR presents new research on the environment from a distinctly world-system perspective. World-system studies have recently discovered the environment. The turn toward the environment in any number of disciplines has resulted in the greening of this and that area of study. Now it is world-system studies turn. It is a little late; but better late than never. Actually, environmental and world-system studies have a great deal to offer each other. For environmental studies the focus upon the world economy as a whole makes a great deal of sense. Industrial plants in one country, or one region of the world may generate acid rain, but it can fall on other countries. The environment knows no political borders, hence a focus upon the world economy rather than the French, American or Brazilian economy, makes more sense. It is also the case that looking for systemic effects of different types of economics and political systems on the environment should follow the general direction of political/economic theory, which has been ratcheting its level of analysis ever upward to include more and more parts of the world as components of a singular world system. In effect, if we now believe that the most primal locus of economic and political process resides at the level of global interactions then to study the effects of political/economic processes upon the environment means studying the dynamics of the world-system. It is somewhat inevitable.

  2. Discovering genes underlying QTL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanavichit, Apichart [Kasetsart University, Kamphaengsaen, Nakorn Pathom (Thailand)

    2002-02-01

    A map-based approach has allowed scientists to discover few genes at a time. In addition, the reproductive barrier between cultivated rice and wild relatives has prevented us from utilizing the germ plasm by a map-based approach. Most genetic traits important to agriculture or human diseases are manifested as observable, quantitative phenotypes called Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). In many instances, the complexity of the phenotype/genotype interaction and the general lack of clearly identifiable gene products render the direct molecular cloning approach ineffective, thus additional strategies like genome mapping are required to identify the QTL in question. Genome mapping requires no prior knowledge of the gene function, but utilizes statistical methods to identify the most likely gene location. To completely characterize genes of interest, the initially mapped region of a gene location will have to be narrowed down to a size that is suitable for cloning and sequencing. Strategies for gene identification within the critical region have to be applied after the sequencing of a potentially large clone or set of clones that contains this gene(s). Tremendous success of positional cloning has been shown for cloning many genes responsible for human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy as well as plant disease resistance genes. Genome and QTL mapping, positional cloning: the pre-genomics era, comparative approaches to gene identification, and positional cloning: the genomics era are discussed in the report. (M. Suetake)

  3. Discovering genes underlying QTL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A map-based approach has allowed scientists to discover few genes at a time. In addition, the reproductive barrier between cultivated rice and wild relatives has prevented us from utilizing the germ plasm by a map-based approach. Most genetic traits important to agriculture or human diseases are manifested as observable, quantitative phenotypes called Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). In many instances, the complexity of the phenotype/genotype interaction and the general lack of clearly identifiable gene products render the direct molecular cloning approach ineffective, thus additional strategies like genome mapping are required to identify the QTL in question. Genome mapping requires no prior knowledge of the gene function, but utilizes statistical methods to identify the most likely gene location. To completely characterize genes of interest, the initially mapped region of a gene location will have to be narrowed down to a size that is suitable for cloning and sequencing. Strategies for gene identification within the critical region have to be applied after the sequencing of a potentially large clone or set of clones that contains this gene(s). Tremendous success of positional cloning has been shown for cloning many genes responsible for human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy as well as plant disease resistance genes. Genome and QTL mapping, positional cloning: the pre-genomics era, comparative approaches to gene identification, and positional cloning: the genomics era are discussed in the report. (M. Suetake)

  4. Lightest exoplanet yet discovered

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Well-known exoplanet researcher Michel Mayor today announced the discovery of the lightest exoplanet found so far. The planet, "e", in the famous system Gliese 581, is only about twice the mass of our Earth. The team also refined the orbit of the planet Gliese 581 d, first discovered in 2007, placing it well within the habitable zone, where liquid water oceans could exist. These amazing discoveries are the outcome of more than four years of observations using the most successful low-mass-exoplanet hunter in the world, the HARPS spectrograph attached to the 3.6-metre ESO telescope at La Silla, Chile. ESO PR Photo 15a/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 e ESO PR Photo 15b/09 A planet in the habitable zone ESO PR Video 15a/09 ESOcast 6 ESO PR Video 15b/09 VNR A-roll ESO PR Video 15c/09 Zoom-in on Gliese 581 e ESO PR Video 15d/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 e ESO PR Video 15e/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 d ESO PR Video 15f/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 system ESO PR Video 15g/09 The radial velocity method ESO PR Video 15h/09 Statement in English ESO PR Video 15i/09 Statement in French ESO PR Video 15j/09 La Silla Observatory "The holy grail of current exoplanet research is the detection of a rocky, Earth-like planet in the ‘habitable zone' -- a region around the host star with the right conditions for water to be liquid on a planet's surface", says Michel Mayor from the Geneva Observatory, who led the European team to this stunning breakthrough. Planet Gliese 581 e orbits its host star - located only 20.5 light-years away in the constellation Libra ("the Scales") -- in just 3.15 days. "With only 1.9 Earth-masses, it is the least massive exoplanet ever detected and is, very likely, a rocky planet", says co-author Xavier Bonfils from Grenoble Observatory. Being so close to its host star, the planet is not in the habitable zone. But another planet in this system appears to be. From previous observations -- also obtained with the HARPS spectrograph

  5. Two Transients discovered by PSST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Young, D. R.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-08-01

    Two transients have been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  6. Bright Transients discovered by PSST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Young, D. R.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-08-01

    Six bright transients have been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  7. Discovering Natural Laws by Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴轶华

    1989-01-01

    A polynomial algorithm.called Reduction,is presented to discover natural laws by analysing a set of experimental data.instead of a heuristic exploration which,when adopted in BACON,can only lead to rediscovering simple laws.A complex law with multiple variables involved can be discovered by reducing it to a search.This search is so efficient that it does not need any backtracking and is able to cover most of possible laws.A reduction-based discovery system,called DISCOVER 2.0,was developed with a flexible knowledge base and an ability of dealing with imperfect data.The system has been verified to be valid computationally,practically,and theoretically,by discovering a great number o complex laws,and can be also viewed as a leaming engine embodied in any intelligent systems to improve their performance by obtaining a general rule from the accumulated data.

  8. Scientists Discover Sugar in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    . Glycolaldehyde is a simpler molecular cousin to table sugar, the scientists say. The sugar molecule was detected in a large cloud of gas and dust some 26,000 light-years away, near the center of our Galaxy. Such clouds, often many light-years across, are the material from which new stars are formed. Though very rarified by Earth standards, these interstellar clouds are the sites of complex chemical reactions that occur over hundreds of thousands or millions of years. So far, about 120 different molecules have been discovered in these clouds. Most of these molecules contain a small number of atoms, and only a few molecules with eight or more atoms have been found in interstellar clouds. The 12 Meter Telescope "Finding glycolaldehyde in one of these interstellar clouds means that such molecules can be formed even in very rarified conditions," said Hollis. "We don't yet understand how it could be formed there," he added. "A combination of more astronomical observations and theoretical chemistry work will be required to resolve the mystery of how this molecule is formed in space." "We hope this discovery inspires renewed efforts to find even more kinds of molecules, so that, with a better idea of the total picture, we may be able to deduce the details of the prebiotic chemistry taking place in interstellar clouds," Hollis said. The discovery was made by detecting faint radio emission from the sugar molecules in the interstellar cloud. Molecules rotate end-for-end, and as they change from one rotational energy state to another, they emit radio waves at precise frequencies. The "family" of radio frequencies emitted by a particular molecule forms a unique "fingerprint" that scientists can use to identify that molecule. The scientists identified glycolaldehyde by detecting six frequencies of radio emission in what is termed the millimeter-wavelength region of the electromagnetic spectrum -- a region between more-familiar microwaves and infrared radiation. The NRAO 12 Meter Telescope

  9. Discovering fuzzy spatial association rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacar, Esen; Cicekli, Nihan K.

    2002-03-01

    Discovering interesting, implicit knowledge and general relationships in geographic information databases is very important to understand and use these spatial data. One of the methods for discovering this implicit knowledge is mining spatial association rules. A spatial association rule is a rule indicating certain association relationships among a set of spatial and possibly non-spatial predicates. In the mining process, data is organized in a hierarchical manner. However, in real-world applications it may not be possible to construct a crisp structure for this data, instead some fuzzy structures should be used. Fuzziness, i.e. partial belonging of an item to more than one sub-item in the hierarchy, could be applied to the data itself, and also to the hierarchy of spatial relations. This paper shows that, strong association rules can be mined from large spatial databases using fuzzy concept and spatial relation hierarchies.

  10. Discovering Diversity in Introductory Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Robin L. Bartlett

    1996-01-01

    Instructors can begin the process of integrating race and gender issues into introductory economics by reexamining their courses with a new lens of diversity. The content of introductory economics can be expanded by 'adding and stirring' race and gender data from standard statistical sources or from the students themselves. This paper offers some 'add-and-stir' macro- and microeconomic examples. To discover the appropriate mix of these examples and how to present them, this paper also offers ...

  11. Who discovered the magnetocaloric effect?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anders

    2013-01-01

    A magnetic body changes its thermal state when subjected to a changing magnetic field. In particular, if done under adiabatic conditions, its temperature changes. For the past 15 years the magnetocaloric effect has been the focus of significant research due to its possible application for efficient...... refrigeration near room temperature. At the same time, it has become common knowledge within the magnetic refrigeration research community that the magnetocaloric effect was discovered by the German physicist E. Warburg in 1881. We re-examine the original literature and show that this is a misleading reading...

  12. Discovering evolution equations with applications

    CERN Document Server

    McKibben, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Most existing books on evolution equations tend either to cover a particular class of equations in too much depth for beginners or focus on a very specific research direction. Thus, the field can be daunting for newcomers to the field who need access to preliminary material and behind-the-scenes detail. Taking an applications-oriented, conversational approach, Discovering Evolution Equations with Applications: Volume 2-Stochastic Equations provides an introductory understanding of stochastic evolution equations. The text begins with hands-on introductions to the essentials of real and stochast

  13. Who discovered the expanding universe?

    CERN Document Server

    Nussbaumer, Harry

    2011-01-01

    Who discovered the expanding universe? Was it Hubble, or Lemaitre, or was it just the end result of a long series of investigations? In this article we summarise the main steps and contributions that led to one of the most exciting discoveries ever made, of which Lemaitre was the principal architect. In 1927 he combined his dynamical solutions of the Einstein equations with astronomical observations to conclude that the universe is expanding. He derived the linear velocity-distance relationship and calculated the first numerical value of what later was called the "Hubble constant". His discovery paper of 1927 was written in French and in 1931 it was translated into English and published in Monthly Notices. However, the translation omits the section where Lemaitre computed the "Hubble constant". Why was that done, and who was responsible? We do not speculate on this question, but present in a very condensed way the facts along the path of discovery. The documented details from primary sources can be found in o...

  14. Ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolved spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Zhi

    2007-01-01

    We review the technique and research of the ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolved spectroscopy and its applications in the field of the ultrafast dynamics of mesoscopic systems and nanomaterials. Combining femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy and scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM), we can obtain the spectra with ultrahigh temporal and spatial resolutions simultaneously. Some problems in doing so are discussed. Then we show the important applications of the ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolved spectroscopy with a few typical examples.……

  15. Discovering Mobile Social Networks by Semantic Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jason J.; Choi, Kwang Sun; Park, Sung Hyuk

    It has been important for telecommunication companies to discover social networks from mobile subscribers. They have attempted to provide a number of recommendation services, but they realized that the services were not successful. In this chapter, we present semantic technologies for discovering social networks. The process is mainly composed of two steps; (1) profile identification and (2) context understanding. Through developing a Next generation Contents dElivery (NICE) platform, we were able to generate various services based on the discovered social networks.

  16. Probable Bright Supernova discovered by PSST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Young, D. R.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-09-01

    A bright transient, which is a probable supernova, has been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  17. Did the ancient egyptians discover Algol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetsu, L.; Porceddu, S.; Porceddu, S.; Lyytinen, J.; Kajatkari, P.; Markkanen, T.; Toivari-Viitala, J.

    2013-02-01

    Fabritius discovered the first variable star, Mira, in 1596. Holwarda determined the 11 months period of Mira in 1638. Montanari discovered the next variable star, Algol, in 1669. Its period, 2.867 days, was determined by Goodricke (178). Algol was associated with demon-like creatures, "Gorgon" in ancient Greek and "ghoul" in ancient Arab mythology. This indicates that its variability was discovered much before 1669 (Wilk 1996), but this mythological evidence is ambiguous (Davis 1975). For thousands of years, the Ancient Egyptian Scribes (AES) observed stars for timekeeping in a region, where there are nearly 300 clear nights a year. We discovered a significant periodicity of 2.850 days in their calendar for lucky and unlucky days dated to 1224 BC, "the Cairo Calendar". Several astrophysical and astronomical tests supported our conclusion that this was the period of Algol three millennia ago. The "ghoulish habits" of Algol could explain this 0.017 days period increase (Battersby 2012).

  18. Discover Effective Pattern for Text Mining

    OpenAIRE

    Khade, A. D.; A. B. Karche

    2014-01-01

    Many data mining techniques have been discovered for finding useful patterns in documents like text document. However, how to use effective and bring to up to date discovered patterns is still an open research task, especially in the domain of text mining. Text mining is the finding of very interesting knowledge (or features) in the text documents. It is a challenging task to find appropriate knowledge (or features) in text documents to help users to find what they exactly want...

  19. A Bayesian Model for Discovering Typological Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Daumé, Hal

    2009-01-01

    A standard form of analysis for linguistic typology is the universal implication. These implications state facts about the range of extant languages, such as ``if objects come after verbs, then adjectives come after nouns.'' Such implications are typically discovered by painstaking hand analysis over a small sample of languages. We propose a computational model for assisting at this process. Our model is able to discover both well-known implications as well as some novel implications that deserve further study. Moreover, through a careful application of hierarchical analysis, we are able to cope with the well-known sampling problem: languages are not independent.

  20. How to discover and express subtext

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓冰

    2016-01-01

    Subtext is the spirit of actor's lines, and it is a must in performance. As a consequence, subtext is important in both performance and actor's lines. This paper will give subtext a comprehensive analysis and discussion in four sections, say, what subtext is, the significance and function of subtext, how to discover subtext and how to express subtext.

  1. Discovering the Sequential Structure of Thought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John R.; Fincham, Jon M.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-voxel pattern recognition techniques combined with Hidden Markov models can be used to discover the mental states that people go through in performing a task. The combined method identifies both the mental states and how their durations vary with experimental conditions. We apply this method to a task where participants solve novel…

  2. Did Viking discover life on Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, H. P.

    1999-01-01

    A major argument in the claim that life had been discovered during the Viking mission to Mars is that the results obtained in the Labeled Release (LR) experiment are analogous to those observed with terrestrial microorganisms. This assertion is critically examined and found to be implausible.

  3. Digging Deeper: Looking Beyond Behavior to Discover Meaning

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Behavior to Discover Meaning A Unit of Four Online Lessons Digging Deeper: Looking Beyond Behavior to Discover ... Behavior to Discover Meaning. A Unit of Four Online Lessons. HHS/ACF/OHS/EHSNRC. 2006. English. Last ...

  4. Discovering Recurrent Image Semantics from Class Discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Jesse S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Supervised statistical learning has become a critical means to design and learn visual concepts (e.g., faces, foliage, buildings, etc. in content-based indexing systems. The drawback of this approach is the need of manual labeling of regions. While several automatic image annotation methods proposed recently are very promising, they usually rely on the availability and analysis of associated text descriptions. In this paper, we propose a hybrid learning framework to discover local semantic regions and generate their samples for training of local detectors with minimal human intervention. A multiscale segmentation-free framework is proposed to embed the soft presence of discovered semantic regions and local class patterns in an image independently for indexing and matching. Based on 2400 heterogeneous consumer images with 16 semantic queries, both similarity matching based on individual index and integrated similarity matching have outperformed a feature fusion approach by 26% and 37% in average precisions, respectively.

  5. Transpleural central venous catheter discovered during thoracotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashima Malhotra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an uncommon complication of subclavian central venous catheterization, discovered at thoracotomy. The central venous catheter (CVC was placed by left infraclavicular route after induction of general anesthesia. CVC was secured after aspiration of blood and satisfactory central venous tracing. On thoracotomy, CVC was noticed to traverse the pleural cavity while the tracing was normal. CVC was thus removed consequent to which bleeding from each puncture site was noticed, that were secured surgically.

  6. Discovering Multidimensional Structure in Relational Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mikael Rune; Holmgren, Thomas; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2004-01-01

    On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP) systems based on multidimensional databases are essential elements of decision support. However, most existing data is stored in “ordinary” relational OLTP databases, i.e., data has to be (re-) modeled as multidimensional cubes before the advantages of OLAP to...... algorithms for discovering multidimensional schemas from relational databases. The algorithms take a wide range of available metadata into account in the discovery process, including functional and inclusion dependencies, and key and cardinality information....

  7. Discovering beautiful attributes for aesthetic image analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Marchesotti, Luca; Murray, Naila; Perronnin, Florent

    2014-01-01

    Aesthetic image analysis is the study and assessment of the aesthetic properties of images. Current computational approaches to aesthetic image analysis either provide accurate or interpretable results. To obtain both accuracy and interpretability by humans, we advocate the use of learned and nameable visual attributes as mid-level features. For this purpose, we propose to discover and learn the visual appearance of attributes automatically, using a recently introduced database, called AVA, w...

  8. How to discover and develop leadership potencial

    OpenAIRE

    Javorská, Anna

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on leadership development in the corporate environment. It aims to discover the most important competencies, skills and personal qualities necessary for a successful leader and the best ways to develop these. The theoretical part introduces the key issues of the topic and defines leadership and leadership development. The practical part investigates approach to the leadership development in three different companies and compares them based on a qualitative research using qu...

  9. What if Fleming had not discovered penicillin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Wainwright, Milton; Alahmadi, Tahani Awad; Salleeh, Hashim Bin; Faden, Asmaa A; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam

    2014-09-01

    What would have happened had Alexander Fleming not discovered penicillin in 1928? Perhaps the obvious answer is that, someone else would have discovered penicillin during 1930s and the Oxford group, would still have purified it sometime in the early 1940s. Here, however, in this counterfactual account of the penicillin story, it is argued that without Fleming, penicillin might still be undiscovered and the antibiotic age would never have dawned. As a result, many of the recent developments in medicine, such as organ transplantation, might have been delayed or, at best, made more hazardous. Penicillin might have come onto the scene a few years later but, had Fleming overlooked the discovery, it seems certain that penicillin would not have saved countless Allied lives, during and after D-Day. Instead of having enjoyed fifty and more years of the antibiotic age, it is argued here, that we would have had to rely upon highly developed sulphonamides, so-called "supasulfas", and other chemically-derived antibacterial drugs. Indeed, it might be the case that, even well into this new millennium, the antibiotic age has yet to dawn, and medicine is still waiting for someone to chance upon penicillin. Here we discuss what might have happened had Fleming not discovered penicillin and come to the conclusion that the medical armoury available today would have been far different and might have relied solely upon highly developed varieties of sulphonamides or similar, synthetic, non-antibiotic antibacterial agents.

  10. Discovering Attack Path Oriented-IP Traceback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Jianming(傅建明); Zhu Fuxi; Peng Guojun

    2003-01-01

    The technique of IP traceback may effectively block DOS (Denial Of Service) and meet the requirement of the computer forensic, but its accuracy depends upon that condition that each node in the Internet must support IP packet marking or detected agents. So far, this requirement is not satisfied. On the basis of traditional traceroute,this paper investigates the efficiency of discovering path methods from aspects of the size and order of detecting packets, and the length of paths.It points out that the size of padding in probed packets has a slight effect on discovering latency, and the latency with the method of bulk sending-receiving is much smaller than one with the traditional traceroute. Moreover, the loss rate of packets with the technique of TTL (Time To Live) which increases monotonously is less than that with the technique of TTL which decreases monotonously. Lastly,OS (Operating System) passive fingerprint is used as heuristic to predict the length of the discovered path so as to reduce disturbance in network traffic.

  11. Discovering Typed Communities in Mobile Social Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huai-Yu Wan; You-Fang Lin; Zhi-Hao Wu; Hou-Kuan Huang

    2012-01-01

    Mobile social networks,which consist of mobile users who communicate with each other using cell phones,are reflections of people's interactions in social lives.Discovering typed communities (e.g.,family communities or corporate communities) in mobile social networks is a very promising problem.For example,it can help mobile operators to determine the target users for precision marketing.In this paper we propose discovering typed communities in mobile social networks by utilizing the labels of relationships between users.We use the user logs stored by mobile operators,including communication and user movement records,to collectively label all the relationships in a network,by employing an undirected probabilistic graphical model,i.e.,conditional random fields.Then we use two methods to discover typed communities based on the results of relationship labeling:one is simply retaining or cutting relationships according to their labels,and the other is using sophisticated weighted community detection algorithms.The experimental results show that our proposed framework performs well in terms of the accuracy of typed community detection in mobile social networks.

  12. Resolvability in Circulant Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad SALMAN; Imran JAVAID; Muhammad Anwar CHAUDHRY

    2012-01-01

    A set W of the vertices of a connected graph G is called a resolving set for G if for every two distinct vertices u,v ∈ V(G) there is a vertex w ∈ W such that d(u,w) ≠ d(v,w).A resolving set of minimum cardinality is called a metric basis for G and the number of vertices in a metric basis is called the metric dimension of G,denoted by dim(G).For a vertex u of G and a subset S of V(G),the distance between u and S is the number mins∈s d(u,s).A k-partition H ={S1,S2,...,Sk} of V(G) is called a resolving partition if for every two distinct vertices u,v ∈ V(G) there is a set Si in Π such that d(u,Si) ≠ d(v,Si).The minimum k for which there is a resolving k-partition of V(G) is called the partition dimension of G,denoted by pd(G).The circulant graph is a graph with vertex set Zn,an additive group ofintegers modulo n,and two vertices labeled i and j adjacent if and only if i - j (mod n) ∈ C,where C C Zn has the property that C =-C and 0(∈) C.The circulant graph is denoted by Xn,△ where A =|C|.In this paper,we study the metric dimension of a family of circulant graphs Xn,3 with connection set C ={1,-n/2,n - 1} and prove that dim(Xn,3) is independent of choice of n by showing that 3 for all n =0 (mod 4),dim(X,n,3) ={ 4 for all n =2 (mod 4).We also study the partition dimension of a family of circulant graphs Xn,4 with connection set C ={±1,±2} and prove that pd(Xn,4) is independent of choice of n and show that pd(X5,4) =5 and 3 forall odd n≥9,pd(Xn,4) ={ 4 for all even n ≥ 6 and n =7.

  13. Dinosaur Footprint Fossils Discovered in Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Recently,a Chinese-German science fieldwork investigation team,composed of staff from the SinoGerman Paleontology and Geography Joint Lab and the Xinjiang Geological Work Station,announced that they discovered a batch of dinosaur footprint fossils in the dessert 20 kilometers to the east of Shanshan County in the Turpan Basin,Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region.These fossils spread around an area of 100 square meters and scientists believed that these footprints were left behind by carnivore dinosaurs.This major discovery has been published in Global Geology,an English journal published by the NorthEast Asia Geology Center.

  14. The discovered preference hypothesis - an empirical test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundhede, Thomas; Ladenburg, Jacob; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    Using stated preference methods for valuation of non-market goods is known to be vulnerable to a range of biases. Some authors claim that these so-called anomalies in effect render the methods useless for the purpose. However, the Discovered Preference Hypothesis, as put forth by Plott [31], offers...... an nterpretation and explanation of biases which entails that the stated preference methods need not to be completely written off. In this paper we conduct a test for the validity and relevance of the DPH interpretation of biases. In a choice experiment concerning preferences for protection of Danish nature areas...

  15. Georges Bank conflict resolved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, David W.

    1984-04-01

    The International Court of Justice has resolved the long-term conflict between the United States and Canada over claims to mineral and living resources lying along the countries' common Atlantic maritime border. On October 12, in a 4-1 decision, the World Court rejected the United States' claim to the entire Georges Bank area, a region of the Continental Shelf off Massachusetts and Nova Scotia that is a prime fishing ground and is believed to have good potential for oil and gas deposits as well. The disputed area is roughly the top third of the Georges Bank area. The court awarded each country approximately half of this disputed area. No appeals are allowed under this decision.

  16. Recently discovered pulsars and unidentified EGRET sources

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, D F; Camilo, F M; Torres, Diego F.; Butt, Yousaf M.; Camilo, Fernando

    2001-01-01

    We present a correlative study between all unidentified EGRET sources at low Galactic latitudes and the newly discovered pulsars in the released portion of the Parkes multibeam radio survey. We note 14 positional coincidences: eight of these are ``Vela-like'' pulsars, with relatively small periods, small characteristic ages, and high spin-down luminosities. Three of these coincidences have been investigated by D'Amico et al. (2001) and Camilo et al. (2001). Among the others, we argue that PSR J1015-5719 may plausibly generate part of the high energy radiation observed from 3EG J1014-5705. Three additional interesting cases are: 3EG J1410-6147 and either of PSRs J1412-6145 or J1413-6141, if the pulsars are at the estimated distance of the coincident SNR G312.4-0.4; and 3EG J1639-4702/PSR J1637-4642. The remaining positional coincidences between the EGRET sources and the newly discovered pulsars are almost certainly spurious.

  17. The Universe for all to discover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Gil, A.; Ballesteros, F.; Espinós, H.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Lanzara, M.; Moya, M. J.; Navarro, J.

    2015-05-01

    In the title of this paper, we have changed the slogan of the International Year of Astronomy, ``The Universe yours to discover" to ``The Universe for all to discover" in order to emphasize the need to think about broader audiences when we plan astronomical activities at school or during outreach events. The strategy we propose follows what is known as the Universal Design for Learning (UDL). UDL allows to reach to the general public as well as to audiences which might be regarded as ``special" because they have some disability. It has been shown that everybody has a preferred style of learning (some remember better what they see, others what they hear or what they touch) and therefore, everybody is more or less able under the different styles of learning. Through this talk I am going to outline some of the principles of the UDL that can be applied in the teaching and communication of Astronomy, along with an example of its implementation in the project ``A Touch of the Universe".

  18. Ongoing analysis of DISCOVER-AQ observations and their implications for remote sensing of air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, J. H.; Pickering, K. E.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Chen, G.; Clark, R. D.; Cohen, R. C.; Diskin, G. S.; Ferrare, R. A.; Fried, A.; Herman, J. R.; Hoff, R. M.; Hostetler, C. A.; Janz, S. J.; Kleb, M. M.; Szykman, J.; Thompson, A. M.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Wisthaler, A.; Yang, M. M.; Holben, B. N.

    2015-12-01

    Improving the remote sensing of air quality has been the primary focus of a series of four field studies conducted by a project called DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from COlumn and VERtically resolved observations relevant to AirQuality). Operating as an integrated observing system, DISCOVER-AQ has employed multiple aircraft and ground instrumentation to conduct multi-perspective observations of the distribution of gaseous and particulate pollution in the lower atmosphere over contrasting regions of the U.S. that are currently in violation of National Ambient Air Quality Standards. The four study areas include Maryland (Baltimore-Washington corridor), California (southern San Joaquin Valley), Texas (Greater Houston area), and Colorado (Denver/Northern Front Range). The DISCOVER-AQ observations are actively being used to promote improvements in remote sensing in the following ways: Characterizing vertical structure in the atmosphere and its diurnal patterns to develop improved a priori information for satellite retrievals; Examining horizontal variability to assess the spatial scales needed to resolve emissions and photochemistry; Determining correlative relationships between remotely sensed and in situ observations; Assessing the value of ground-based remote sensing to provide information on impact of boundary layer dynamics and mixing on air pollution. Current progress on analysis of these datasets and their relevance to future geostationary satellite observations as well as augmentation of air quality monitoring networks with ground-based remote sensing will be discussed.

  19. Challenges and opportunities for remote sensing of air quality: Insights from DISCOVER-AQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, J. H.; Pickering, K. E.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Clark, R. D.; Cohen, R. C.; Diskin, G. S.; Ferrare, R. A.; Fried, A.; Holben, B. N.; Herman, J. R.; Hoff, R. M.; Hostetler, C. A.; Janz, S. J.; Szykman, J.; Thompson, A. M.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Wisthaler, A.; Yang, M. M.; Chen, G.; Kleb, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Improving the remote sensing of air quality has been the primary focus of a series of four field studies conducted by a project called DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from COlumn and VERtically resolved observations relevant to Air Quality). Operating as an integrated observing system, DISCOVER-AQ has employed multiple aircraft and ground instrumentation to conduct multi-perspective observations of the distribution of gaseous and particulate pollution in the lower atmosphere over contrasting regions of the U.S. that are currently in violation of National Ambient Air Quality Standards. The four study areas include Maryland (Baltimore-Washington corridor), California (southern San Joaquin Valley), Texas (Greater Houston area), and Colorado (Denver/Northern Front Range). The DISCOVER-AQ observations are actively being used to promote improvements in remote sensing in the following ways: Characterizing vertical structure in the atmosphere and its diurnal patterns to develop improved a priori information for satellite retrievals; Examining horizontal variability to assess the spatial scales needed to resolve emissions and photochemistry; Determining correlative relationships between remotely sensed and in situ observations; Assessing the value of ground-based remote sensing to provide information on impact of boundary layer dynamics and mixing on air pollution. Examples of the ongoing analysis of these datasets and their relevance to future geostationary satellite observations as well as augmentation of air quality monitoring networks with ground-based remote sensing will be discussed.

  20. Discovering, Indexing and Interlinking Information Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celli, Fabrizio; Keizer, Johannes; Jaques, Yves; Konstantopoulos, Stasinos; Vudragović, Dušan

    2015-01-01

    The social media revolution is having a dramatic effect on the world of scientific publication. Scientists now publish their research interests, theories and outcomes across numerous channels, including personal blogs and other thematic web spaces where ideas, activities and partial results are discussed. Accordingly, information systems that facilitate access to scientific literature must learn to cope with this valuable and varied data, evolving to make this research easily discoverable and available to end users. In this paper we describe the incremental process of discovering web resources in the domain of agricultural science and technology. Making use of Linked Open Data methodologies, we interlink a wide array of custom-crawled resources with the AGRIS bibliographic database in order to enrich the user experience of the AGRIS website. We also discuss the SemaGrow Stack, a query federation and data integration infrastructure used to estimate the semantic distance between crawled web resources and AGRIS. PMID:26834982

  1. Discovering User Profiles for Web Personalized Recommendation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-Bo Song; Mao-Xian Zhao; Zuo-Peng Liang; Yi-Sheng Dong; Jun-Zhou Luo

    2004-01-01

    With the growing popularity of the World Wide Web, large volume of user access data has been gathered automatically by Web servers and stored in Web logs. Discovering and understanding user behavior patterns from log files can provide Web personalized recommendation services. In this paper, a novel clustering method is presented for log files called Clustering large Weblog based on Key Path Model (CWKPM), which is based on user browsing key path model, to get user behavior profiles. Compared with the previous Boolean model,key path model onsiders the major features of users' accessing to the Web: ordinal, contiguous and duplicate.Moreover, for clustering, it has fewer dimensions. The analysis and experiments show that CWKPM is an efficient and effective approach for clustering large and high-dimension Web logs.

  2. Discovering User Profiles for Web Personalized Recommendation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-BoSong; Mao-XianZhao; Zuo-PengLiang; Yi-ShengDong; Jun-ZhouLuo

    2004-01-01

    With the growing popularity of the World Wide Web, large volume of user access data has been gathered automatically by Web servers and stored in Web logs. Discovering and understanding user behavior patterns from log files can provide Web personalized recommendation services. In this paper, a novel clustering method is presented for log files called Clustering large Weblog based on Key Path Model (CWKPM), which is based on user browsing key path model, to get user behavior profiles. Compared with the previous Boolean model, key path model considers the major features of users' accessing to the Web: ordinal, contiguous and duplicate. Moreover, for clustering, it has fewer dimensions. The analysis and experiments show that CWKPM is an efficient and effective approach for clustering large and high-dimension Web logs.

  3. Michael Maier--nine newly discovered letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenke, Nils; Roudet, Nicolas; Tilton, Hereward

    2014-02-01

    The authors provide a transcription, translation, and evaluation of nine newly discovered letters from the alchemist Michael Maier (1568-1622) to Gebhardt Johann von Alvensleben (1576-1631), a noble landholder in the vicinity of Magdeburg. Stemming from the final year of his life, this correspondence casts new light on Maier's biography, detailing his efforts to secure patronage amid the financial crisis of the early Thirty Years' War. While his ill-fated quest to perfect potable gold continued to form the central focus of his patronage suits, Maier also offered his services in several arts that he had condemned in his printed works, namely astrology and "supernatural" magic. Remarks concerning his previously unknown acquaintance with Heinrich Khunrath call for a re-evaluation of Maier's negotiation of the discursive boundaries between Lutheran orthodoxy and Paracelsianism. The letters also reveal Maier's substantial contribution to a work previously ascribed solely to the English alchemist Francis Anthony. PMID:25241502

  4. Discovering general partial orders in event streams

    CERN Document Server

    Achar, Avinash; Raajay, V; Sastry, P S

    2009-01-01

    Sequence of time-ordered events arise in a variety of applications like customer transaction databases, alarm sequences in telecommunication networks, fault logs in manufacturing plant data, web interaction logs, etc. A popular framework for temporal pattern extraction from such data is the frequent episode discovery paradigm. An episode is a set of nodes with a partial order prescribed on it, with each node associated with an event type. Efficient algorithms exist for episode discovery when the associated partial order is total(serial episode) or trivial(parallel episode). In this paper, we propose efficient algorithms for discovering frequent episodes with general partial orders. The algorithms generalize the existing apriori-based discovery algorithms for serial and parallel episodes. There is an inherent combinatorial explosion in frequent partial order mining. We point out that frequency alone is not a sufficient measure of interestingness for general episodes. We present post-processing techniques to pr...

  5. Discovering New Drugs on the Cellular Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    With the Vision for Space Exploration calling for a sustained human presence in space, astronauts will need to grow plants, while in orbit, for nourishment that they will not receive from only consuming dehydrated foods. As a potential source of food for long-duration missions, space-grown plants could also give astronauts an important psychological boost, as fresh vegetables could serve as a welcomed change from monotonous meals consisting of reconstituted foods in plastic bags. Even more, these plants could likely aid in the recycling of air and wastewater on spacecraft. With a helping hand from a company by the name of Biolog, Inc., NASA is studying the impacts of decreased gravity and spaceborne bacteria on the plants being grown for food in space. With a helping hand from NASA, this very same company is creating powerful new cell- and bacteria-analysis tools for use in discovering and developing new drugs on Earth.

  6. Discovering, Indexing and Interlinking Information Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celli, Fabrizio; Keizer, Johannes; Jaques, Yves; Konstantopoulos, Stasinos; Vudragović, Dušan

    2015-01-01

    The social media revolution is having a dramatic effect on the world of scientific publication. Scientists now publish their research interests, theories and outcomes across numerous channels, including personal blogs and other thematic web spaces where ideas, activities and partial results are discussed. Accordingly, information systems that facilitate access to scientific literature must learn to cope with this valuable and varied data, evolving to make this research easily discoverable and available to end users. In this paper we describe the incremental process of discovering web resources in the domain of agricultural science and technology. Making use of Linked Open Data methodologies, we interlink a wide array of custom-crawled resources with the AGRIS bibliographic database in order to enrich the user experience of the AGRIS website. We also discuss the SemaGrow Stack, a query federation and data integration infrastructure used to estimate the semantic distance between crawled web resources and AGRIS. PMID:26834982

  7. Flupirtine, a re-discovered drug, revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szelenyi, Istvan

    2013-03-01

    Flupirtine was developed long before K(V)7 (KCNQ) channels were known. However, it was clear from the beginning that flupirtine is neither an opioid nor a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory analgesic. Its unique muscle relaxing activity was discovered by serendipity. In the meantime, broad and intensive research has resulted in a partial clarification of its mode of action. Flupirtine is the first therapeutically used K(V)7 channel activator with additional GABA(A)ergic mechanisms and thus the first representative of a novel class of analgesics. The presently accepted main mode of its action, potassium K(V)7 (KCNQ) channel activation, opens a series of further therapeutic possibilities. One of them has now been realized: its back-up compound, the bioisostere retigabine, has been approved for the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:23322112

  8. Automatically Discovering Hidden Transformation Chaining Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Chenouard, Raphael; 10.1007/978-3-642-04425-0_8

    2010-01-01

    Model transformations operate on models conforming to precisely defined metamodels. Consequently, it often seems relatively easy to chain them: the output of a transformation may be given as input to a second one if metamodels match. However, this simple rule has some obvious limitations. For instance, a transformation may only use a subset of a metamodel. Therefore, chaining transformations appropriately requires more information. We present here an approach that automatically discovers more detailed information about actual chaining constraints by statically analyzing transformations. The objective is to provide developers who decide to chain transformations with more data on which to base their choices. This approach has been successfully applied to the case of a library of endogenous transformations. They all have the same source and target metamodel but have some hidden chaining constraints. In such a case, the simple metamodel matching rule given above does not provide any useful information.

  9. Discovering and Mining Links for Protein Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Immaculate Mercy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work introduces a link analysis procedure for discovering relationships in a protein database or a relational database generalizing simple correspondence analysis. It is based on extracting the links to the rela ted protein database and malfunctioned protein database. The datasets are trained in order to find out missing interactions and the sequences related to them. Further the analysis of links proceeds by performing a random walk defining a Markov chain. The e lements of interest are analysed through stochastic complementation which gives a reduced Markov chain. This reduced map is then analysed by projecting the elements of interest through Principal component analysis. Several Protein datasets are analysed using the proposed methodology, showing the usefulness of the technique for extracting relationships in relational databases or graphs.

  10. Discovering and Mining Links for Protein Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Immaculate Mercy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available discovering relationships in a protein database or a relational database generalizing simple correspondence analysis. It is based on extracting the links to the related protein database and malfunctioned protein database. The datasets are trained in order to find out missing interactions and the sequences related to them. Further the analysis of links proceeds by performing a random walk defining a Markov chain. The elements of interest are analysed through stochastic complementation which gives a reduced Markov chain. This reduced map is then analysed by projecting the elements of interest through Principal component analysis. Several Protein datasets are analysed using the proposed methodology, showing the usefulness of the technique for extracting relationships in relational databases or graphs.

  11. Michael Maier--nine newly discovered letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenke, Nils; Roudet, Nicolas; Tilton, Hereward

    2014-02-01

    The authors provide a transcription, translation, and evaluation of nine newly discovered letters from the alchemist Michael Maier (1568-1622) to Gebhardt Johann von Alvensleben (1576-1631), a noble landholder in the vicinity of Magdeburg. Stemming from the final year of his life, this correspondence casts new light on Maier's biography, detailing his efforts to secure patronage amid the financial crisis of the early Thirty Years' War. While his ill-fated quest to perfect potable gold continued to form the central focus of his patronage suits, Maier also offered his services in several arts that he had condemned in his printed works, namely astrology and "supernatural" magic. Remarks concerning his previously unknown acquaintance with Heinrich Khunrath call for a re-evaluation of Maier's negotiation of the discursive boundaries between Lutheran orthodoxy and Paracelsianism. The letters also reveal Maier's substantial contribution to a work previously ascribed solely to the English alchemist Francis Anthony.

  12. Digging Deeper: Looking Beyond Behavior to Discover Meaning

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Email Client Print Español Digging Deeper: Looking Beyond Behavior to Discover Meaning A Unit of Four Online Lessons Digging Deeper: Looking Beyond Behavior to Discover Meaning is a unit of four ...

  13. Digging Deeper: Looking Beyond Behavior to Discover Meaning

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Digging Deeper: Looking Beyond Behavior to Discover Meaning A Unit of Four Online Lessons Digging Deeper: Looking Beyond Behavior to Discover Meaning is a unit of four lessons that explore and apply ...

  14. Time-resolved studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When new or more powerful probes become available that offer both shorter data-collection times and the opportunity to apply innovative approaches to established techniques, it is natural that investigators consider the feasibility of exploring the kinetics of time-evolving systems. This stimulating area of research not only can lead to insights into the metastable or excited states that a system may populate on its way to a ground state, but can also lead to a better understanding of that final state. Synchrotron radiation, with its unique properties, offers just such a tool to extend X-ray measurements from the static to the time-resolved regime. The most straight-forward application of synchrotron radiation to the study of transient phenomena is directly through the possibility of decreased data-collection times via the enormous increase in flux over that of a laboratory X-ray system. Even further increases in intensity can be obtained through the use of novel X-ray optical devices. Widebandpass monochromators, e.g., that utilize the continuous spectral distribution of synchrotron radiation, can increase flux on the sample several orders of magnitude over conventional X-ray optical systems thereby allowing a further shortening of the data-collection time. Another approach that uses the continuous spectral nature of synchrotron radiation to decrease data-collection times is the open-quote parallel data collectionclose quotes method. Using this technique, intensities as a function of X-ray energy are recorded simultaneously for all energies rather than sequentially recording data at each energy, allowing for a dramatic decrease in the data-collection time

  15. Imminent science what remains to be discovered

    CERN Document Server

    Bignami, Giovanni F

    2014-01-01

    This is not science fiction. It’s a voyage on the arrow of time to the coming fifty years. The legendary palindromic character Mr. Qfwfq from Italo Calvino’s collection of short stories, The Cosmicomics, will go with us – he who knows all the answers but will give out no hints. He will help us to discover the innovations that will have changed our lives by 2062, when, riding astride Halley’s Comet, our omniscient extraterrestrial will return to visit us.In this book, we shall learn how astronomers will devote themselves to the study of the mysterious force of dark energy, which makes up some three-quarters of the Universe. We shall also delve deeply into the study of our Earth, to exploit the immense thermal energy that lies beneath our feet. We shall solve another enigma in today’s science: the origin of life. We shall come to understand how to develop direct contacts between our brains and the rest of the world. We shall learn about the future of genetics, the reason for the longevity of Methusela...

  16. Discovering the Ancient Maya from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, T. L.

    2008-01-01

    The Pet6n region of northern Guatemala contains some of the most significant Mayan archeological sites in Latin America. It was in this region that the Maya civilization began, flourished, and abruptly disappeared. Remote sensing technology is helping to locate and map ancient Maya sites that are threatened today by accelerating deforestation and looting. Thematic Mapper, IKONOS, and QuickBird satellite, and airborne STAR-3i and AIRSAR radar data, combined with Global Positioning System (GPS) technology, are successfully detecting ancient Maya features such as sites, roadways, canals, and water reservoirs. Satellite imagery is also being used to map the bajos, which are seasonally flooded swamps that cover over 40% of the land surface. Through the use of various airborne and satellite sensor systems we have been able to detect and map ancient causeways, temples, reservoirs, and land forms, and locate these features on the ground through GPS technology. Recently, we have discovered that there is a strong relationship between a tropical forest vegetation signature in satellite imagery and the location of archeological sites. We believe that the use of limestone and lime plasters in ancient Maya construction affects the moisture, nutrition, and plant species of the surface vegetation. We have mapped these vegetation signatures in the imagery and verified through field survey that they are indicative of archeological sites. Through the use of remote sensing and GIS technology it is possible to identify unrecorded archeological features in a dense tropical forest environment and monitor these cultural features for their protection.

  17. How the antihypertensive losartan was discovered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Gaurab

    2006-11-01

    Based on interviews and publications, this case study is a history of how DuPont scientists discovered losartan, the first angiotensin II receptor antagonist. Essential aspects of the story include: i) the discovery occurred at a young and inexperienced pharmaceutical business; ii) three bench scientists had recently graduated from PhD programmes and only the fourth had any industrial research experience; iii) pivotal to its success was the support and risk-taking of the highly experienced and recently hired head of pharmaceutical research; iv) a timely patent issued to Takeda Chemical Industries suggested a new line of research; v) a mistake made by an inexperienced pharmacologist yielded pivotal information; vi) the bench scientists were given the freedom to explore while being supported by research managers; vii) luck favoured the scientists in losartan's subreceptor-binding and metabolite; and viii) the marketing group insisted that losartan not be developed until Merck expressed an interest in the drug candidate. Today, losartan is a multibillion dollar drug. PMID:23506070

  18. The Most Luminous Galaxies Discovered by WISE

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Chao-Wei; Wu, Jingwen; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto; Blain, Andrew; Bridge, Carrie; Benford, Dominic; Cutri, Roc; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas; Lonsdale, Carol; Masci, Frank; Moustakas, Leonidas; Petty, Sara; Sayers, Jack; Stanford, S Adam; Wright, Edward; Yan, Lin; Leisawitz, David; Liu, Fengchuan; Mainzer, Amy; McLean, Ian; Padgett, Deborah; Skrutskie, Michael; Gelino, Christopher; Beichman, Charles; Juneau, Stéphanie

    2014-01-01

    We present 20 WISE-selected galaxies with bolometric luminosities L_bol > 10^14 L_sun, including five with infrared luminosities L_IR = L(rest 8-1000 micron) > 10^14 L_sun. These "extremely luminous infrared galaxies," or ELIRGs, were discovered using the "W1W2-dropout" selection criteria (Eisenhardt et al. 2012) which requires marginal or non-detections at 3.4 and 4.6 micron (W1 and W2, respectively) but strong detections at 12 and 22 micron in the WISE survey. Their spectral energy distributions are dominated by emission at rest-frame 4-10 micron, suggesting that hot dust with T_d ~ 450K is responsible for the high luminosities. These galaxies are likely powered by highly obscured AGNs, and there is no evidence suggesting these systems are beamed or lensed. We compare this WISE-selected sample with 116 optically selected quasars that reach the same L_bol level, corresponding to the most luminous unobscured quasars in the literature. We find that the rest-frame 5.8 and 7.8 micron luminosities of the WISE-sel...

  19. Discover Space: an IYA program for libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenbery, P.

    2009-12-01

    Across the country, there is a growing concern regarding the number of students entering science and technology careers. While the focus for education reform is on school improvement, there is considerable research that supports the role that out-of-school experiences can play in student achievement. This is particularly true when family interactions are factored in. Libraries provide an untapped resource for engaging underserved youth and their families in fostering an appreciation and deeper understanding of science and technology topics. The nation’s more than 17,000 public libraries attract diverse audiences in almost every community. Science exhibits in libraries could potentially reach many adults and upper elementary and middle school students with STEM content. The Space Science Institute (SSI) is partnering with the American Library Association (ALA) to develop a pilot exhibit called Discover Space. The exhibit includes two areas: Space Storms and Star Quest and is currently on tour in Colorado. It is a featured IYA outreach project from SSI. This presentation will focus on the results of a national survey of libraries that SSI and ALA conducted in 2008 about interest in STEM exhibits as well as the development process that was used to design and fabricate the exhibit. Preliminary evaluation results will also be shared. The presentation will conclude with an examination of how this program could benefit underserved communities around the country.

  20. Astronomers Discover Fastest-Spinning Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope have discovered the fastest-spinning neutron star ever found, a 20-mile-diameter superdense pulsar whirling faster than the blades of a kitchen blender. Their work yields important new information about the nature of one of the most exotic forms of matter known in the Universe. Pulsar Graphic Pulsars Are Spinning Neutron Stars CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for larger version) "We believe that the matter in neutron stars is denser than an atomic nucleus, but it is unclear by how much. Our observations of such a rapidly rotating star set a hard upper limit on its size, and hence on how dense the star can be.," said Jason Hessels, a graduate student at McGill University in Montreal. Hessels and his colleagues presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Washington, DC. Pulsars are spinning neutron stars that sling "lighthouse beams" of radio waves or light around as they spin. A neutron star is what is left after a massive star explodes at the end of its "normal" life. With no nuclear fuel left to produce energy to offset the stellar remnant's weight, its material is compressed to extreme densities. The pressure squeezes together most of its protons and electrons to form neutrons; hence, the name "neutron star." "Neutron stars are incredible laboratories for learning about the physics of the fundamental particles of nature, and this pulsar has given us an important new limit," explained Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and one of Hessels' collaborators on this work. The scientists discovered the pulsar, named PSR J1748-2446ad, in a globular cluster of stars called Terzan 5, located some 28,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Sagittarius. The newly-discovered pulsar is spinning 716 times per second, or at 716 Hertz (Hz), readily beating the previous record of 642 Hz from a pulsar

  1. Discovering New R Coronae Borealis Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Tisserand, Patrick; Welch, Douglas L.; LeBleu, Amy

    2016-01-01

    The R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars are rare hydrogen-deficient, carbon-rich supergiants. Two evolutionary scenarios have been suggested, a double degenerate merger of two white dwarfs, or a final helium shell flash in a PN central star. The evidence pointing toward a white-dwarf merger or a final-flash origin for RCB stars is contradictory. The distribution on the sky and radial velocities of the RCB stars tend toward those of the bulge population but a much larger sample of stars is needed to determine the true population. We need to discover RCB stars much more efficiently. In order to do this, we have used a series of IR color-color cuts, using the recent release of the WISE All-Sky Catalog, to produce a sample of 2200 candidates that may yield over 200 new RCB star identifications. Most of these candidates do not have lightcurves, the traditional technique of identifying RCB stars from their characteristic large and irregular light variations. We have obtained optical spectra of several hundred candidates and have confirmed over 40 new RCB stars in the Galaxy. We are attempting to develop a quantitative spectral classification system for the RCB stars so that they can be identified without an accompanying light curve. The cooler RCB stars look like carbon stars with strong C2 bands, but they can be differentiated from carbon stars by their extreme hydrogen deficiency and very low 13C/12C ratio. Also, the red CN bands are much weaker in RCB stars than in carbon stars. The number of RCB stars in the Galaxy may be consistent with the predicted number of He/CO white-dwarf mergers. Solving the mystery of how the RCB stars evolve would be a watershed event in the study of stellar evolution that will lead to a better understanding of other important types of stellar merger events such as Type Ia SNe.

  2. ROSAT Discovers Unique, Distant Cluster of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Brightest X-ray Cluster Acts as Strong Gravitational Lens Based on exciting new data obtained with the ROSAT X-ray satellite and a ground-based telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory, a team of European astronomers [2] has just discovered a very distant cluster of galaxies with unique properties. It emits the strongest X-ray emission of any cluster ever observed by ROSAT and is accompanied by two extraordinarily luminous arcs that represent the gravitationally deflected images of even more distant objects. The combination of these unusual characteristics makes this cluster, now known as RXJ1347.5-1145, a most interesting object for further cosmological studies. DISCOVERY AND FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS This strange cluster of galaxies was discovered during the All Sky Survey with the ROSAT X-ray satellite as a moderately intense X-ray source in the constellation of Virgo. It could not be identified with any already known object and additional ground-based observations were therefore soon after performed with the Max-Planck-Society/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla observatory in Chile. These observations took place within a large--scale redshift survey of X-ray clusters of galaxies detected by the ROSAT All Sky Survey, a so-called ``ESO Key Programme'' led by astronomers from the Max-Planck-Institut fur Extraterrestrische Physik and the Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera. The main aim of this programme is to identify cluster X-ray sources, to determine the distance to the X-ray emitting clusters and to investigate their overall properties. These observations permitted to measure the redshift of the RXJ1347.5-1145 cluster as z = 0.45, i.e. it moves away from us with a velocity (about 106,000 km/sec) equal to about one-third of the velocity of light. This is an effect of the general expansion of the universe and it allows to determine the distance as about 5,000 million light-years (assuming a Hubble constant of 75 km/sec/Mpc). In other words, we see these

  3. Discovering biological progression underlying microarray samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Qiu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In biological systems that undergo processes such as differentiation, a clear concept of progression exists. We present a novel computational approach, called Sample Progression Discovery (SPD, to discover patterns of biological progression underlying microarray gene expression data. SPD assumes that individual samples of a microarray dataset are related by an unknown biological process (i.e., differentiation, development, cell cycle, disease progression, and that each sample represents one unknown point along the progression of that process. SPD aims to organize the samples in a manner that reveals the underlying progression and to simultaneously identify subsets of genes that are responsible for that progression. We demonstrate the performance of SPD on a variety of microarray datasets that were generated by sampling a biological process at different points along its progression, without providing SPD any information of the underlying process. When applied to a cell cycle time series microarray dataset, SPD was not provided any prior knowledge of samples' time order or of which genes are cell-cycle regulated, yet SPD recovered the correct time order and identified many genes that have been associated with the cell cycle. When applied to B-cell differentiation data, SPD recovered the correct order of stages of normal B-cell differentiation and the linkage between preB-ALL tumor cells with their cell origin preB. When applied to mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation data, SPD uncovered a landscape of ESC differentiation into various lineages and genes that represent both generic and lineage specific processes. When applied to a prostate cancer microarray dataset, SPD identified gene modules that reflect a progression consistent with disease stages. SPD may be best viewed as a novel tool for synthesizing biological hypotheses because it provides a likely biological progression underlying a microarray dataset and, perhaps more importantly, the

  4. THE MOST LUMINOUS GALAXIES DISCOVERED BY WISE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Chao-Wei; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Moustakas, Leonidas A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Wu, Jingwen; Wright, Edward L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Assef, Roberto J. [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad deIngeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército Libertador 441, Santiago (Chile); Blain, Andrew W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, 1 University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Bridge, Carrie R.; Sayers, Jack [Division of Physics, Math, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Benford, Dominic J.; Leisawitz, David T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Cutri, Roc M.; Masci, Frank J.; Yan, Lin [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Griffith, Roger L. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Jarrett, Thomas H. [Astronomy Department, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Lonsdale, Carol J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Petty, Sara M. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Stanford, S. Adam, E-mail: Chao-Wei.Tsai@jpl.nasa.gov [Department of Physics, University of California Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); and others

    2015-06-01

    We present 20 Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)-selected galaxies with bolometric luminosities L{sub bol} > 10{sup 14} L{sub ☉}, including five with infrared luminosities L{sub IR} ≡ L{sub (rest} {sub 8–1000} {sub μm)} > 10{sup 14} L{sub ☉}. These “extremely luminous infrared galaxies,” or ELIRGs, were discovered using the “W1W2-dropout” selection criteria which requires marginal or non-detections at 3.4 and 4.6 μm (W1 and W2, respectively) but strong detections at 12 and 22 μm in the WISE survey. Their spectral energy distributions are dominated by emission at rest-frame 4–10 μm, suggesting that hot dust with T{sub d} ∼ 450 K is responsible for the high luminosities. These galaxies are likely powered by highly obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and there is no evidence suggesting these systems are beamed or lensed. We compare this WISE-selected sample with 116 optically selected quasars that reach the same L{sub bol} level, corresponding to the most luminous unobscured quasars in the literature. We find that the rest-frame 5.8 and 7.8 μm luminosities of the WISE-selected ELIRGs can be 30%–80% higher than that of the unobscured quasars. The existence of AGNs with L{sub bol} > 10{sup 14} L{sub ☉} at z > 3 suggests that these supermassive black holes are born with large mass, or have very rapid mass assembly. For black hole seed masses ∼10{sup 3} M{sub ☉}, either sustained super-Eddington accretion is needed, or the radiative efficiency must be <15%, implying a black hole with slow spin, possibly due to chaotic accretion.

  5. VLA Discovers Giant Rings Around Galaxy Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope have discovered giant, ring-like structures around a cluster of galaxies. The discovery provides tantalizing new information about how such galaxy clusters are assembled, about magnetic fields in the vast spaces between galaxy clusters, and possibly about the origin of cosmic rays. Radio-Optical Image of Cluster Galaxy Cluster Abell 3376 (Radio/Optical) CREDIT: Joydeep Bagchi, IUCAA, NRAO/AUI/NSF Above, a combined radio/optical image shows the galaxy cluster Abell 3376 in visible light (blue) and radio (red) images. The giant radio arcs surrounding the cluster were discovered using the Very Large Array. The visible-light image is from the Digitized Sky survey. Below, an X-ray image of Abell 3376 made using the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton telescope shows a spectacular, bullet-shaped region of X-rays coming from gas heated to 60 million degrees Kelvin. The bullet shape results from the supersonic collision of a smaller smaller galaxy subcluster with the main body of the larger cluster. Click on images for larger version. X-Ray Image of Cluster Galaxy Cluster Abell 3376 (X-Ray) CREDIT: Joydeep Bagchi, IUCAA, ESA "These giant, radio-emitting rings probably are the result of shock waves caused by violent collisions of smaller groups of galaxies within the cluster," said Joydeep Bagchi, of the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics in Pune, India, who led an international research team. The scientists reported their findings in the November 3 edition of the journal Science. The newly-discovered ring segments, some 6 million light-years across, surround a galaxy cluster called Abell 3376, more than 600 million light-years from Earth. They were revealed because fast-moving electrons emitted radio waves as they spiraled around magnetic field lines in intergalactic space. "Even from this large distance, the feeble radio waves were easily picked up by the VLA

  6. The Impact of Discovering Life beyond Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Steven J.

    2015-10-01

    Introduction: astrobiology and society Steven J. Dick; Part I. Motivations and Approaches. How Do We Frame the Problems of Discovery and Impact?: Introduction; 1. Current approaches to finding life beyond earth, and what happens if we do Seth Shostak; 2. The philosophy of astrobiology: the Copernican and Darwinian presuppositions Iris Fry; 3. History, discovery, analogy: three approaches to the impact of discovering life beyond earth Steven J. Dick; 4. Silent impact: why the discovery of extraterrestrial life should be silent Clément Vidal; Part II. Transcending Anthropocentrism. How Do We Move beyond our Own Preconceptions of Life, Intelligence and Culture?: Introduction; 5. The landscape of life Dirk Schulze-Makuch; 6. The landscape of intelligence Lori Marino; 7. Universal biology: assessing universality from a single example Carlos Mariscal; 8. Equating culture, civilization, and moral development in imagining extraterrestrial intelligence: anthropocentric assumptions? John Traphagan; 9. Communicating with the other: infinity, geometry, and universal math and science Douglas Vakoch; Part III. Philosophical, Theological, and Moral Impact. How Do We Comprehend the Cultural Challenges Raised by Discovery?: Introduction; 10. Life, intelligence and the pursuit of value in cosmic evolution Mark Lupisella; 11. 'Klaatu barada nikto' - or, do they really think like us? Michael Ruse; 12. Alien minds Susan Schneider; 13. The moral subject of astrobiology: guideposts for exploring our ethical and political responsibilities towards extraterrestrial life Elspeth Wilson and Carol Cleland; 14. Astrobiology and theology Robin Lovin; 15. Would you baptize an extraterrestrial? Guy Consolmagno, SJ; Part IV. Practical Considerations: How Should Society Prepare for Discovery - and Non-Discovery?: Introduction; 16. Is there anything new about astrobiology and society? Jane Maienschein; 17. Evaluating preparedness for the discovery of extraterrestrial life: considering potential

  7. Discovering Extrasolar Planets with Microlensing Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambsganss, J.

    2016-06-01

    An astronomical survey is commonly understood as a mapping of a large region of the sky, either photometrically (possibly in various filters/wavelength ranges) or spectroscopically. Often, catalogs of objects are produced/provided as the main product or a by-product. However, with the advent of large CCD cameras and dedicated telescopes with wide-field imaging capabilities, it became possible in the early 1990s, to map the same region of the sky over and over again. In principle, such data sets could be combined to get very deep stacked images of the regions of interest. However, I will report on a completely different use of such repeated maps: Exploring the time domain for particular kinds of stellar variability, namely microlens-induced magnifications in search of exoplanets. Such a time-domain microlensing survey was originally proposed by Bohdan Paczynski in 1986 in order to search for dark matter objects in the Galactic halo. Only a few years later three teams started this endeavour. I will report on the history and current state of gravitational microlensing surveys. By now, routinely 100 million stars in the Galactic Bulge are monitored a few times per week by so-called survey teams. All stars with constant apparent brightness and those following known variability patterns are filtered out in order to detect the roughly 2000 microlensing events per year which are produced by stellar lenses. These microlensing events are identified "online" while still in their early phases and then monitored with much higher cadence by so-called follow-up teams. The most interesting of such events are those produced by a star-plus-planet lens. By now of order 30 exoplanets have been discovered by these combined microlensing surveys. Microlensing searches for extrasolar planets are complementary to other exoplanet search techniques. There are two particular advantages: The microlensing method is sensitive down to Earth-mass planets even with ground-based telecopes, and it

  8. New Galactic supernova remnants discovered with IPHAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, L.; Parker, Q. A.; Contreras, M. E.; Olguín, L.; Frew, D. J.; Stupar, M.; Vázquez, R.; Wright, N. J.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Morris, R. A. H.

    2013-05-01

    As part of a systematic search programme of a 10° wide strip of the northern Galactic plane, we present preliminary evidence for the discovery of four (and possibly five) new supernova remnants (SNRs). The pilot search area covered the 19-20 h right ascension zone sampling from +20° to +55° in declination using binned mosaic images from the Isaac Newton Telescope Photometric Hα Survey (IPHAS). The optical identification of the candidate SNRs was based mainly on their filamentary and arc-like emission morphologies, their apparently coherent, even if fractured, structure and clear disconnection from any diffuse neighbouring H II region type nebulosity. Follow-up optical spectroscopy was undertaken, sampling carefully across prominent features of these faint sources. The resulting spectra revealed typical emission-line ratios for shock-excited nebulae which are characteristic of SNRs, which, along with the latest diagnostic diagrams, strongly support the likely SNR nature of these sources: G038.7-1.3 (IPHASX J190640.5+042819), G067.6+0.9 (IPHASX J195744.9+305306), G066.0-0.0 (IPHASX J195749.2+290259) and G065.8-0.5 (IPHASX J195920.4+283740). A fifth possible younger, higher density nebula SNR candidate, G067.8+0.5 (IPHASX J200002.4+305035), was discovered ˜5 arcmin to the west of IPHASX J195744.9+305306, and it warrants further study. A multiwavelength cross-check from available archived data in the regions of these candidates was also performed with a focus on possible radio counterparts. A close positional match between previously unrecognized radio structures at several frequencies and across various components of the Hα optical image data was found for all SNR candidates. This lends further direct support for the SNR nature of these objects. Evolved SNRs may have very weak and/or highly fragmented radio emission which could explain why they had not been previously recognized, but the association becomes clear in combination with the optical emission.

  9. PSLQ: An Algorithm to Discover Integer Relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, J. M.

    2009-04-03

    Let x = (x{sub 1}, x{sub 2} {hor_ellipsis}, x{sub n}) be a vector of real or complex numbers. x is said to possess an integer relation if there exist integers a{sub i}, not all zero, such that a{sub 1}x{sub 1} + a{sub 2}x{sub 2} + {hor_ellipsis} + a{sub n}x{sub n} = 0. By an integer relation algorithm, we mean a practical computational scheme that can recover the vector of integers ai, if it exists, or can produce bounds within which no integer relation exists. As we will see in the examples below, an integer relation algorithm can be used to recognize a computed constant in terms of a formula involving known constants, or to discover an underlying relation between quantities that can be computed to high precision. At the present time, the most effective algorithm for integer relation detection is the 'PSLQ' algorithm of mathematician-sculptor Helaman Ferguson [10, 4]. Some efficient 'multi-level' implementations of PSLQ, as well as a variant of PSLQ that is well-suited for highly parallel computer systems, are given in [4]. PSLQ constructs a sequence of integer-valued matrices B{sub n} that reduces the vector y = xB{sub n}, until either the relation is found (as one of the columns of B{sub n}), or else precision is exhausted. At the same time, PSLQ generates a steadily growing bound on the size of any possible relation. When a relation is found, the size of smallest entry of the vector y abruptly drops to roughly 'epsilon' (i.e. 10{sup -p}, where p is the number of digits of precision). The size of this drop can be viewed as a 'confidence level' that the relation is real and not merely a numerical artifact - a drop of 20 or more orders of magnitude almost always indicates a real relation. Very high precision arithmetic must be used in PSLQ. If one wishes to recover a relation of length n, with coefficients of maximum size d digits, then the input vector x must be specified to at least nd digits, and one must employ nd

  10. Effective data management for the DISCOVER-AQ airborne field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G.; Ramapriyan, H. K.; Crawford, J. H.; Kleb, M. M.; Rinsland, P.; Kusterer, J.; Sorlie, S.; Perez, J.; Walter, J.

    2011-12-01

    DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) is an airborne study aimed at improving the interpretation of satellite observations to diagnose near-surface conditions relating to air quality. This project will increase fundamental understanding satellite trace gas and aerosol observations and enable the application of satellite data for societal benefit, which is highly relevant to NASA's goals to study the Earth from space. Because of the nature of the project, DISCOVER-AQ is an investigation that involves a wide range of observational assets, including airborne and ground based in-situ and remote sensing observations. It is a broad collaborative study with participants from NASA centers, universities, and research partners from agencies at federal, state and local levels. Therefore, successfully achieving the DISCOVER-AQ science objectives requires a comprehensive and cohesive data management plan to facilitate the sharing and broad use of data to enable research and comply with NASA data policies. This plan governs the science data generation, data exchange between the DISCOVER-AQ science team and its partners, and data transfer to the NASA Langley Research Center's Atmospheric Science Data Center (LaRC ASDC). The DISCOVER-AQ Data Management Plan (DMP) has been developed through a broad collaboration among the DISCOVER-AQ project, NASA LaRC ASDC staff, and NASA Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project. This DMP incorporates procedures that have evolved over more than 20 years of airborne field studies under NASA's Tropospheric Chemistry Program and draws upon experience from collaborations with NOAA, NSF, university, and international partners as well as NASA's experience in managing Earth science data from its various remote sensing missions. To be presented are highlights of the DISCOVER-AQ data management plan, including a brief description of the airborne

  11. RESOLVE and ECO: Survey Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannappan, Sheila; Moffett, Amanda J.; Norris, Mark A.; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Stark, David; Berlind, Andreas A.; Snyder, Elaine M.; Norman, Dara J.; Hoversten, Erik A.; RESOLVE Team

    2016-01-01

    The REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE (RESOLVE) survey is a volume-limited census of stellar, gas, and dynamical mass as well as star formation and galaxy interactions within >50,000 cubic Mpc of the nearby cosmic web, reaching down to dwarf galaxies of baryonic mass ~10^9 Msun and spanning multiple large-scale filaments, walls, and voids. RESOLVE is surrounded by the ~10x larger Environmental COntext (ECO) catalog, with matched custom photometry and environment metrics enabling analysis of cosmic variance with greater statistical power. For the ~1500 galaxies in its two equatorial footprints, RESOLVE goes beyond ECO in providing (i) deep 21cm data with adaptive sensitivity ensuring HI mass detections or upper limits deep NUV coverage and synergy with other equatorial surveys as well as unique northern and southern facilities such as Arecibo, the GBT, and ALMA. The RESOLVE and ECO surveys have been supported by funding from NSF grants AST-0955368 and OCI-1156614.

  12. Discovering motifs in ranked lists of DNA sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eran Eden

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Computational methods for discovery of sequence elements that are enriched in a target set compared with a background set are fundamental in molecular biology research. One example is the discovery of transcription factor binding motifs that are inferred from ChIP-chip (chromatin immuno-precipitation on a microarray measurements. Several major challenges in sequence motif discovery still require consideration: (i the need for a principled approach to partitioning the data into target and background sets; (ii the lack of rigorous models and of an exact p-value for measuring motif enrichment; (iii the need for an appropriate framework for accounting for motif multiplicity; (iv the tendency, in many of the existing methods, to report presumably significant motifs even when applied to randomly generated data. In this paper we present a statistical framework for discovering enriched sequence elements in ranked lists that resolves these four issues. We demonstrate the implementation of this framework in a software application, termed DRIM (discovery of rank imbalanced motifs, which identifies sequence motifs in lists of ranked DNA sequences. We applied DRIM to ChIP-chip and CpG methylation data and obtained the following results. (i Identification of 50 novel putative transcription factor (TF binding sites in yeast ChIP-chip data. The biological function of some of them was further investigated to gain new insights on transcription regulation networks in yeast. For example, our discoveries enable the elucidation of the network of the TF ARO80. Another finding concerns a systematic TF binding enhancement to sequences containing CA repeats. (ii Discovery of novel motifs in human cancer CpG methylation data. Remarkably, most of these motifs are similar to DNA sequence elements bound by the Polycomb complex that promotes histone methylation. Our findings thus support a model in which histone methylation and CpG methylation are mechanistically linked

  13. 76 FR 4393 - Discover Financial Services Negotiated Service Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... Financial Services negotiated service agreement to the market dominant product list. This notice addresses... 3020, et seq., to add a Discover Financial Services (DFS) negotiated service agreement to the market... Data and Request to Add Discover Financial Services Negotiated Service Agreement to the...

  14. Resolvability of positron decay channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many data analysis treatments of positron experiments attempt to resolve two or more positron decay or exist channels which may be open simultaneously. Examples of the need to employ such treatments of the experimental results can be found in the resolution of the constituents of a defect ensemble, or in the analysis of the complex spectra which arise from the interaction of slow positrons at or near the surfaces of solids. Experimental one- and two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation experiments in Al single crystals have shown that two defect species (mono- and divacancies) can be resolved under suitable conditions. Recent experiments at LLNL indicate that there are a variety of complex exit channels open to positrons interacting at surfaces, and ultimely these decay channels must also be suitably resolved from one another. 6 refs., 4 figs

  15. Resolving Boosted Jets with XCone

    CERN Document Server

    Thaler, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    We show how the recently proposed XCone jet algorithm smoothly interpolates between resolved and boosted kinematics. When using standard jet algorithms to reconstruct the decays of hadronic resonances like top quarks and Higgs bosons, one typically needs separate analysis strategies to handle the resolved regime of well-separated jets and the boosted regime of fat jets with substructure. XCone, by contrast, is an exclusive cone jet algorithm that always returns a fixed number of jets, so jet regions remain resolved even when (sub)jets are overlapping in the boosted regime. In this paper, we perform three LHC case studies---dijet resonances, Higgs decays to bottom quarks, and all-hadronic top pairs---that demonstrate the physics applications of XCone over a wide kinematic range.

  16. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1989) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. Also included are a number of enforcement actions that had been previously resolved but not published in this NUREG. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  17. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1990) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. Also included are a number of enforcement actions that had been previously resolved but not published in this NUREG. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  18. Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Distributions and Properties during the NASA DISCOVER-AQ Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Scarino, A. J.; Burton, S. P.; Harper, D. B.; Cook, A. L.; Berkoff, T.; Rogers, R. R.; Seaman, S. T.; Fenn, M. A.; Sawamura, P.; Clayton, M.; Mueller, D.; Chemyakin, E.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Crawford, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidars, HSRL-1 and HSRL-2, were deployed for the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from COlumn and VERtically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) missions. DISCOVER-AQ provided systematic and concurrent observations of column-integrated, surface, and vertically-resolved distributions of aerosols and trace gases to improve the interpretation of satellite observations related to air quality. HSRL-1, deployed during the first DISCOVER-AQ mission over the Washington DC-Baltimore region, measured profiles of aerosol backscatter and depolarization (532, 1064 nm) and aerosol extinction and optical thickness (AOT) (532 nm). HSRL-2, the first airborne multiwavelength HSRL, was deployed for the following three DISCOVER-AQ missions over the California Central Valley, Houston, and Denver. HSRL-2 measures profiles of aerosol backscatter and depolarization (355, 532, 1064 nm) and aerosol extinction and AOT (355, 532 nm). Additional HSRL-2 data products include aerosol type, mixed layer depth, and range-resolved aerosol microphysical parameters. The HSRL measurements reveal the temporal, spatial, and vertical variability of aerosol optical properties over these locations. HSRL measurements show that surface PM2.5 concentrations were better correlated with near surface aerosol extinction than AOT scaled by the mixed layer height. During the missions over Washington DC-Baltimore, Houston, and Denver, only about 20-65% of AOT was within the mixed layer. In contrast, nearly all of the AOT was within the mixed layer over the California Central Valley. HSRL-2 retrievals of aerosol fine mode volume concentration and effective radius compare well with coincident airborne in situ measurements and vary with relative humidity. HSRL-2 retrievals of aerosol fine mode volume concentration were also used to derive PM2.5 concentrations which compare well with surface PM2.5 measurements.

  19. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT (Conference Chair); Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE’s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE’s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  20. Time-resolved quantitative phosphoproteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verano-Braga, Thiago; Schwämmle, Veit; Sylvester, Marc;

    2012-01-01

    proteins involved in the Ang-(1-7) signaling, we performed a mass spectrometry-based time-resolved quantitative phosphoproteome study of human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) treated with Ang-(1-7). We identified 1288 unique phosphosites on 699 different proteins with 99% certainty of correct peptide...

  1. Digging Deeper: Looking Beyond Behavior to Discover Meaning

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Email Client Print Español Digging Deeper: Looking Beyond Behavior to Discover Meaning A Unit of Four Online ... started ZIP Code Search Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families Office of ...

  2. Strontium-90 Error Discovered in Subcontract Laboratory Spreadsheet. Topical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West Valley Demonstration Project health physicists and environment scientists discovered a series of errors in a subcontractor's spreadsheet being used to reduce data as part of their strontium-90 analytical process

  3. Discovering Patterns in Biological Sequences by Optimal Segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Bockhorst, Joseph; Jojic, Nebojsa

    2012-01-01

    Computational methods for discovering patterns of local correlations in sequences are important in computational biology. Here we show how to determine the optimal partitioning of aligned sequences into non-overlapping segments such that positions in the same segment are strongly correlated while positions in different segments are not. Our approach involves discovering the hidden variables of a Bayesian network that interact with observed sequences so as to form a set of independent mixture ...

  4. Approaches to resolving trade disputes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D W; Thiermann, A B

    2003-08-01

    The authors discuss the various approaches to resolving trade disputes available to Member Countries of the OIE (World organisation for animal health). The paper first describes the rights and obligations of Member Countries in setting health measures for the importation of animals and animal products, according to the provisions of the World Trade Organization (WTO) Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (the SPS Agreement). The authors indicate how OIE standards may be used to set import measures and introduce issues such as equivalence and the use of provisional measures, which are both areas of potential conflict. The authors then describe the options available for resolving disputes--bilateral discussions, mediation through the OIE, the use of the WTO SPS Committee and the formal WTO dispute settlement process, discussing the advantages and disadvantages of each. PMID:15884603

  5. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October - December 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  6. Time-resolved molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junliang; Blaga, Cosmin I.; Agostini, Pierre; DiMauro, Louis F.

    2016-06-01

    Time-resolved molecular imaging is a frontier of ultrafast optical science and physical chemistry. In this article, we review present and future key spectroscopic and microscopic techniques for ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics and show their differences and connections. The advent of femtosecond lasers and free electron x-ray lasers bring us closer to this goal, which eventually will extend our knowledge about molecular dynamics to the attosecond time domain.

  7. Resolved observations of transition disks

    CERN Document Server

    Casassus, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Resolved observations are bringing new constraints on the origin of radial gaps in protoplanetary disks. The kinematics, sampled in detail in one case-study, are indicative of non-Keplerian flows, corresponding to warped structures and accretion which may both play a role in the development of cavities. Disk asymmetries seen in the radio continuum are being interpreted in the context of dust segregation via aerodynamic trapping. We summarise recent observational progress, and also describe prospects for improvements in the near term.

  8. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July - September 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  9. Spectrally resolved fluorescent lifetime imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Hanley, Quentin S.

    2008-01-01

    Placing an imaging spectrograph or related components capable of generating a spectrum between a microscope and the image intensifier of a conventional fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) system creates a spectrally resolved FLIM (SFLIM). This arrangement provides a number of opportunities not readily available to conventional systems using bandpass filters. The examples include: simultaneous viewing of multiple fluorophores; tracking of both the donor and acceptor; and observation of a rang...

  10. Scalable peer-to-peer resource discovering scheme for wireless self-organized networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xi; JI Hong

    2009-01-01

    Peer-to-peer technologies have attracted increasing research attention with fruitful protocols and applications proposed for wired networks. As to mobile environments, there are currently no mature deployments. A novel resource managing and discovering protocol, Cheer, is proposed to realize scalable and effective peer-to-peer lookup in wireless self-organized networks. Cheer resolves the topologies mismatch problem between peer-to-peer overlay networks and actual nodes distribution, allowing for frequent nodes membership changes. With specially designed resource storage table, Cheer also supports multikey and fuzzy lookup. Its hybrid architecture and improved routing scheme based on small-world theory may realize effective lookup routing. Theoretical analysis and simulation results both prove that Cheer makes using peer-to-peer applications in large-scale self-organized mobile networks feasible and promising.

  11. Discovering governing equations from data by sparse identification of nonlinear dynamical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunton, Steven L; Proctor, Joshua L; Kutz, J Nathan

    2016-04-12

    Extracting governing equations from data is a central challenge in many diverse areas of science and engineering. Data are abundant whereas models often remain elusive, as in climate science, neuroscience, ecology, finance, and epidemiology, to name only a few examples. In this work, we combine sparsity-promoting techniques and machine learning with nonlinear dynamical systems to discover governing equations from noisy measurement data. The only assumption about the structure of the model is that there are only a few important terms that govern the dynamics, so that the equations are sparse in the space of possible functions; this assumption holds for many physical systems in an appropriate basis. In particular, we use sparse regression to determine the fewest terms in the dynamic governing equations required to accurately represent the data. This results in parsimonious models that balance accuracy with model complexity to avoid overfitting. We demonstrate the algorithm on a wide range of problems, from simple canonical systems, including linear and nonlinear oscillators and the chaotic Lorenz system, to the fluid vortex shedding behind an obstacle. The fluid example illustrates the ability of this method to discover the underlying dynamics of a system that took experts in the community nearly 30 years to resolve. We also show that this method generalizes to parameterized systems and systems that are time-varying or have external forcing. PMID:27035946

  12. Maintaining Discovered Frequent Itemsets: Cases for Changeable Database and Support

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU XiaoPing(杜孝平); TANG ShiWei(唐世渭); Akifumi Makinouchi(牧之内顕文)

    2003-01-01

    Mining frequent itemsets from large databases has played an essential role inmany data mining tasks. It is also important to maintain the discovered frequent itemsets forthese data mining tasks when the database is updated. All algorithms proposed so far for the maintenance of discovered frequent itemsets are only performed with a fixed minimum support,which is the same as that used to obtain the discovered frequent itemsets. That is, users cannot change the minimum support even if the new results are unsatisfactory to the users. In thispaper two new complementary algorithms, FMP (First Maintaining Process) and RMP (Repeated Maintaining Process), are proposed to maintain discovered frequent itemsets in the case that new transaction data are added to a transaction database. Both algorithms allow users to change theminimum support for the maintenance processes. FMP is used for the first maintaining process, andwhen the result derived from the FMP is unsatisfactory, RMP will be performed repeatedly untilsatisfactory results are obtained. The proposed algorithms re-use the previous results to cut downthe cost of maintenance. Extensive experiments have been conducted to assess the performance of the algorithms. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithms are very resultful compared with the previous mining and maintenance algorithms for maintenance of discovered frequent itemsets.

  13. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1990) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  14. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  15. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  16. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April-June 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  17. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1989) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  18. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  19. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  20. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1990) and includes copies of letters, notices, and orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  1. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  2. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1990) and includes copies of letters, notices, and orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  3. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  4. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  5. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  6. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1989) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  7. The Magic of Mathematics Discovering the Spell of Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Pappas, Theoni

    2011-01-01

    Delves into the world of ideas, explores the spell mathematics casts on our lives, and helps you discover mathematics where you least expect it. Be spellbound by the mathematical designs found in nature. Learn how knots may untie the mysteries of life. Be mesmerized by the computer revolution. Discover how the hidden forces of mathematics hold architectural structures together connect your telephone calls help airplanes get off the ground solve the mysteries of the living cell. See how some artists use a mathematical palette in their works and how many writers draw upon the wealth of its ideas

  8. Swift Follow-up Observations of MAXI Discovered Galactic Transients

    OpenAIRE

    Kennea, J. A.; Romano, P; Mangano, V.; Beardmore, A. P.; Evans, P A; Curran, P. A.; Krimm, H.A.; Yamaoka, K.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the results of the first year of a program to localize new Galactic Transient sources discovered by MAXI with NASA's Swift mission. Swift is ideally suited for follow-up of MAXI discovered transients as its X-ray Telescope (XRT) field of view (~0.2 degrees radius) is closely matched to the typical MAXI error circle. The XRT is capable of localizing new sources to an accuracy of up to 1.5 arc-seconds radius (90% confidence), and the Swift Optical/UV Telescope also provides optical ...

  9. Ontology Building Using Classification Rules and Discovered Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorskis Henrihs

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Building an ontology is a difficult and time-consuming task. In order to make this task easier and faster, some automatic methods can be employed. This paper examines the feasibility of using rules and concepts discovered during the classification tree building process in the C4.5 algorithm, in a completely automated way, for the purposes of building an ontology from data. By building the ontology directly from continuous data, concepts and relations can be discovered without specific knowledge about the domain. This paper also examines how this method reproduces the classification capabilities of the classification three within an ontology using concepts and class expression axioms.

  10. Chlorophyll d: the puzzle resolved

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larkum, Anthony W D; Kühl, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Chlorophyll a (Chl a) has always been regarded as the sole chlorophyll with a role in photochemical conversion in oxygen-evolving phototrophs, whereas chlorophyll d (Chl d), discovered in small quantities in red algae in 1943, was often regarded as an artefact of isolation. Now, as a result...... of discoveries over the past year, it has become clear that Chl d is the major chlorophyll of a free-living and widely distributed cyanobacterium that lives in light environments depleted in visible light and enhanced in infrared radiation. Moreover, Chl d not only has a light-harvesting role but might also...... replace Chl a in the special pair of chlorophylls in both reactions centers of photosynthesis. Udgivelsesdato: 2005-Aug...

  11. Discovering Fuzzy Censored Classification Rules (Fccrs: A Genetic Algorithm Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Bala

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Classification Rules (CRs are often discovered in the form of ‘If-Then’ Production Rules (PRs. PRs, beinghigh level symbolic rules, are comprehensible and easy to implement. However, they are not capable ofdealing with cognitive uncertainties like vagueness and ambiguity imperative to real word decision makingsituations. Fuzzy Classification Rules (FCRs based on fuzzy logic provide a framework for a flexiblehuman like reasoning involving linguistic variables. Moreover, a classification system consisting of simple‘If-Then’ rules is not competent in handling exceptional circumstances. In this paper, we propose aGenetic Algorithm approach to discover Fuzzy Censored Classification Rules (FCCRs. A FCCR is aFuzzy Classification Rule (FCRs augmented with censors. Here, censors are exceptional conditions inwhich the behaviour of a rule gets modified. The proposed algorithm works in two phases. In the firstphase, the Genetic Algorithm discovers Fuzzy Classification Rules. Subsequently, these FuzzyClassification Rules are mutated to produce FCCRs in the second phase. The appropriate encodingscheme, fitness function and genetic operators are designed for the discovery of FCCRs. The proposedapproach for discovering FCCRs is then illustrated on a synthetic dataset.

  12. Discovering Site-Specific Qualities in Venice and Marseille

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    When “site-specificity” becomes a central value in city and harbor transfor-mation, it soon proves necessary to address the ways in which scholars and professionals actually come to determine site-specific qualities in urban fab-rics and social life. How are certain traits and habits discovered...

  13. US NSF: scientists discover planetary system similar to our own

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    An international team of scientists has discovered a planet and star that may share the same relationship as Jupiter and our Sun, the closest comparison that researchers have found since they began their search for extra-solar planets nearly a decade ago (1 page).

  14. Scientists discover planetary system similar to our own

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    'An international team of scientists has discovered a planet and star that may share the same relationship as Jupiter and our Sun, the closest comparison that researchers have found since they began their search for extra-solar planets nearly a decade ago' (1 page).

  15. The Spy VI child : A newly discovered Neandertal infant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crevecoeur, Isabelle; Bayle, Priscilla; Rougier, Helene; Maureille, Bruno; Higham, Thomas; van der Plicht, Johannes; De Clerck, Nora; Semal, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Spy cave (Jemeppe-sur-Sambre Belgium) is reputed for the two adult Neandertal individuals discovered in situ in 1886 Recent reassessment of the Spy collections has allowed direct radiocarbon dating of these individuals The sorting of all of the faunal collections has also led to the discovery of the

  16. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article addresses the evolution in time of light emitted by a molecular system after a brief photo-excitation. The authors first describe fluorescence from a photo-physical point of view and discuss the characterization of the excited state. Then, they explain some basic notions related to fluorescence characterization (lifetime and decays, quantum efficiency, so on). They present the different experimental methods and techniques currently used to study time-resolved fluorescence. They discuss basic notions of time resolution and spectral reconstruction. They briefly present some conventional methods: intensified Ccd cameras, photo-multipliers and photodiodes associated with a fast oscilloscope, and phase modulation. Other methods and techniques are more precisely presented: time-correlated single photon counting (principle, examples, and fluorescence lifetime imagery), streak camera (principle, examples), and optical methods like the Kerr optical effect (principle and examples) and fluorescence up-conversion (principle and theoretical considerations, examples of application)

  17. Effects of local meteorology and aerosols on ozone and nitrogen dioxide retrievals from OMI and pandora spectrometers in Maryland, USA during DISCOVER-AQ 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, Andra J.; Thompson, Anne M.; Kollonige, Debra E.; Martins, Douglas K.; Tzortziou, Maria A.; Herman, Jay R.; Berkoff, Timothy A.; Abuhassan, Nader K.; Cede, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    An analysis is presented for both ground- and satellite-based retrievals of total column ozone and nitrogen dioxide levels from the Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Maryland, metropolitan area during the NASA-sponsored July 2011 campaign of Deriving Information on Surface COnditions from Column and VERtically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ). Satellite retrievals of total column ozone and nitrogen dioxide from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satell...

  18. Fundamental Parameters of Some New Discovered Open star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    El-Bendary, R

    2010-01-01

    We present here the fundamental properties of some newly discovered open star clusters (Teutsch 144, Alessi 53, Riddle 4 and Juchrt 12) using the JHK Near-IR photometry (2MASS survey) of Cutri et al. (2003). These clusters have been selected from Kronberger et al. (2006) who presented some new discovered stellar groups on the basis of 2MASS photometry and the DSS visual images. The astrometry and photometric parameters are determined using the stellar density distributions and color-magnitude diagrams fittings. Center, radius, membership, distances, reddening, age, luminosity function, mass function, total mass, and the dynamical relaxation time have been estimated for the first time. This paper is a part of Reda's PhD project.

  19. Newly discovered angiogenesis inhibitors and their mechanisms of action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ze-hong MIAO; Jian-ming FENG; Jian DING

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade,the success of angiogenesis inhibitors in clinical contexts has established the antiangiogenic strategy as an important part of cancer therapy,During that time period,we have discovered and reported 17 compounds that exert potent inhibition on angiogenesis.These compounds exhibit tremendous diversity in their sources,structures,targets and mechanisms.These studies have generated new models for further modification and optimization of inhibitory compounds,new information for mechanistic studies and a new drug candidate for clinical development.In particular,through studies on the antiangiogenic mechanism of pseudolaric acid B,we discovered a novel mechanism by which the stability of hypoxia-irducible factor 1α is regulated by the transcription factor c-Jun.We also completed a preclinical study of AL3810,a compound with the potential to circumvent tumor drug resistance to a certain extent.All of these findings will be briefly reviewed in this article.

  20. Discovering Glaser: My Experience of Doing Grounded Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Margaret Piko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available For my investigation into how general practitioners (GPs experience their medical careers, I used a grounded theory methodology based on the early work of Glaser and Strauss (1967 and Glaser’s subsequent work (Glaser, 1978, 1998. Glaser (1998 suggested you need to do grounded theory in order to understand the methodology. I found as I engaged in the process I began to understand the meaning of Glaser’s teachings and to discover Glaser. In this article, I share my experience of discovering my theory of optimising professional life. This theory explains how GPs develop their professional life in response to their need for sustainment—a need that encapsulates self-care to sustain wellbeing, work interest to sustain motivation and income to sustain lifestyle.

  1. Line drawing of anomaly discovered in redesigned shuttle motor nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Line drawing titled 'DM-9 Case-to-Nozzle Joint' shows anomaly discovered in redesigned shuttle motor nozzle. The second full-duration test firing of NASA's redesigned Space Shuttle solid rocket motor (SRM), designated DM-9, was conducted 12-23-87 at Morton Thiokol's Wasatch facility in Utah. A post-test examination of the motor has revealed an anomaly in one nozzle component. Material was discovered missing from the nozzle outer boot ring, a large carbon phenolic composite ring used to anchor one end of the flexible boot that allows the nozzle to move and 'steer' the vehicle. About one-third of the missing 160 degrees of missing ring material was found adjacent to the forward nozzle section inside the motor. This diagram shows the location of the nozzle joint on an assembled SRM, and points out the shaded location of the outer boot ring that circles the motor within the nozzle joint.

  2. Discovering simple DNA sequences by the algorithmic significance method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosavljević, A; Jurka, J

    1993-08-01

    A new method, 'algorithmic significance', is proposed as a tool for discovery of patterns in DNA sequences. The main idea is that patterns can be discovered by finding ways to encode the observed data concisely. In this sense, the method can be viewed as a formal version of the Occam's Razor principle. In this paper the method is applied to discover significantly simple DNA sequences. We define DNA sequences to be simple if they contain repeated occurrences of certain 'words' and thus can be encoded in a small number of bits. Such definition includes minisatellites and microsatellites. A standard dynamic programming algorithm for data compression is applied to compute the minimal encoding lengths of sequences in linear time. An electronic mail server for identification of simple sequences based on the proposed method has been installed at the Internet address pythia/anl.gov. PMID:8402207

  3. Metagenomic approach for discovering new pathogens in infection disease outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Giombini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses represent the most abundant biological components on earth.They can be found in every environment, from deep layers of oceans to animal bodies.Although several viruses have been isolated and sequenced, in each environment there are millions of different types of viruses that have not been identified yet.The advent of nextgeneration sequencing technologies with their high throughput capabilities make possible to study in a single experiment all the community of microorganisms present in a particular sample “microbioma”.They made more feasible the application of the metagenomic approach, by which it is also possible to discover and identify new pathogens, that may pose a threat to public health.This paper summarizes the most recent applications of nextgeneration sequencing to discover new viral pathogens during the occurrence of infection disease outbreaks.

  4. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chen-Ting; Sergienko, Eduard A

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence-based detection techniques are popular in high throughput screening due to sensitivity and cost-effectiveness. Four commonly used techniques exist, each with distinct characteristics. Fluorescence intensity assays are the simplest to run, but suffer the most from signal interference. Fluorescence polarization assays show less interference from the compounds or the instrument, but require a design that results in change of fluorophore-containing moiety size and usually have narrow assay signal window. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is commonly used for detecting protein-protein interactions and is constrained not by the sizes of binding partners, but rather by the distance between fluorophores. Time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET), an advanced modification of FRET approach utilizes special fluorophores with long-lived fluorescence and earns its place near the top of fluorescent techniques list by its performance and robustness, characterized by larger assay window and minimized compound spectral interference. TR-FRET technology can be applied in biochemical or cell-based in vitro assays with ease. It is commonly used to detect modulation of protein-protein interactions and in detection of products of biochemical reactions and cellular activities. PMID:27316992

  5. Discovering and Promoting Commodity Health Attributes: Programs and Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Carman, Hoy F.

    2007-01-01

    There is a growing consumer segment demanding healthy foods and diets, health and nutrition messages can expand food demand, and governments in the U.S. and EU, faced with increasing obesity and associated health outcomes, want consumers to have reliable information to choose healthy diets. California commodity organizations, charged with expanding the demand for almonds, avocados, strawberries and walnuts, are funding health and nutrition research as a means to discover a unique selling prop...

  6. A Precious Fern Species Discovered in Jiulong, Sichuan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Supported by the US National Science Foundation and the National Natural Science Foundation of China, a rare and endangered fern, Isoetes hypsophila, was discovered by a Sino-US research team headed by Prof. SUN Hang from the CAS Kunming Institute of Botany (KIB) and Dr. David E. Boufford from Harvard University in a recent trip to Jiulong, Sichuan, during its botanical survey in the Hengduan Mountains in south China. Scientists say the plant is found for the first time in the region.

  7. MASTER: OT discovered during inspection of HESE 58537957 trigger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyurina, N.; Lipunov, V.; Buckley, D.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Kornilov, V.; Kuvshinov, D.; Vlasenko, D.; Gress, O.; Ivanov, K.; Shumkov, V.; Potter, S.

    2016-08-01

    MASTER-SAAO auto-detection system ( Lipunov et al., "MASTER Global Robotic Net", Advances in Astronomy, 2010, 349171 ) discovered OT source at (RA, Dec) = 13h 08m 45.02s -32d 32m 54.9s on 2016-08-24.73811 UT during inspection of HESE alert ( 58537957 trigger number ) http://gcn.gsfc.nasa.gov/notices_amon/58537957_128340.amon . The OT unfiltered magnitude is 19.6m (limit 20.5m).

  8. Discovering Light Pseudoscalar Bosons in Double-Pulsar Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Dupays, Arnaud; Roncadelli, Marco

    2006-01-01

    The axion is just one from a general class of new particles -- called Light Pseudoscalar Bosons (LPBs) -- predicted by many realistic extensions of the Standard Model. We offer a somewhat pedagogical review of their main properties, with particular emphasis on the effects they induce in a light beam travelling in an external magnetic field, like photon-LPB oscillations, birefringence and dichroism. Moreover, we discuss a new strategy whereby LPBs can be discovered by high-precision observatio...

  9. Classifying transcription factor targets and discovering relevant biological features

    OpenAIRE

    DeLisi Charles; Kon Mark; Holloway Dustin T

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background An important goal in post-genomic research is discovering the network of interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and the genes they regulate. We have previously reported the development of a supervised-learning approach to TF target identification, and used it to predict targets of 104 transcription factors in yeast. We now include a new sequence conservation measure, expand our predictions to include 59 new TFs, introduce a web-server, and implement an improved r...

  10. A new hard X-ray transient discovered by INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibaud, L.; Bazzano, A.; Bozzo, E.;

    2011-01-01

    INTEGRAL discovered a new hard X-ray transient, IGR J17498-2921, during the observations performed from 2011-08-11 22:45 to 2011-08-12 05:54 UTC. The source is detected in the IBIS/ISGRI mosaic at a preliminary significance level of 11 and 9 sigma in the 20-40 keV and 40-80 keV energy bands...

  11. VITAMIN D: Newly Discovered Actions Require Reconsideration of Physiologic Requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Bikle, Daniel D.

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D is not just for preventing rickets and osteomalacia. Recent findings in animal experiments, epidemiologic studies and clinical trials, indicate that adequate vitamin D levels are important for cancer prevention, controlling hormone levels, and regulating the immune response. Although 25 Hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels above 10ng/ml may prevent rickets and osteomalacia, these levels are not sufficient to provide these more recently discovered clinical benefits. Rather, levels of 25OH...

  12. Discovering health topics in social media using topic models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Paul

    Full Text Available By aggregating self-reported health statuses across millions of users, we seek to characterize the variety of health information discussed in Twitter. We describe a topic modeling framework for discovering health topics in Twitter, a social media website. This is an exploratory approach with the goal of understanding what health topics are commonly discussed in social media. This paper describes in detail a statistical topic model created for this purpose, the Ailment Topic Aspect Model (ATAM, as well as our system for filtering general Twitter data based on health keywords and supervised classification. We show how ATAM and other topic models can automatically infer health topics in 144 million Twitter messages from 2011 to 2013. ATAM discovered 13 coherent clusters of Twitter messages, some of which correlate with seasonal influenza (r = 0.689 and allergies (r = 0.810 temporal surveillance data, as well as exercise (r =  .534 and obesity (r =  -.631 related geographic survey data in the United States. These results demonstrate that it is possible to automatically discover topics that attain statistically significant correlations with ground truth data, despite using minimal human supervision and no historical data to train the model, in contrast to prior work. Additionally, these results demonstrate that a single general-purpose model can identify many different health topics in social media.

  13. DISCOVER-AQ: An Overview and Initial Comparisons of NO2 with OMI Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Kenneth; Crawford, James; Krotkov, Nickolay; Bucsela, Eric; Lamsal, Lok; Celarier, Edward; Herman, Jay; Janz, Scott; Cohen, Ron; Weinheimer, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The first deployment of the Earth Venture -1 DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) project was conducted during July 2011 in the Baltimore-Washington region. Two aircraft (a P-3B for in-situ sampling and a King Air for remote sensing) were used along with an extensive array of surface-based in-situ and remote sensing instrumentation. Fourteen flight days were accomplished by both aircraft and over 250 profiles of trace gases and aerosols were performed by the P-3B over surface air quality monitoring stations, which were specially outfitted with sunphotometers and Pandora UV/Vis spectrometers. The King Air flew with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar for aerosols and the ACAM UV/Vis spectrometer for trace gases. This suite of observations allows linkage of surface air quality with the vertical distributions of gases and aerosols, with remotely-sensed column amounts observed from the surface and from the King Air, and with satellite observations from Aura (OMI and TES), GOME-2, MODIS and GOES. The DISCOVER-AQ data will allow determination of under what conditions satellite retrievals are indicative of surface air quality, and they will be useful in planning new satellites. In addition to an overview of the project, a preliminary comparison of tropospheric column NO2 densities from the integration of in-situ P-3B observations, from the Pandoras and ACAM, and from the new Goddard OMI NO2 algorithm will be presented.

  14. Discovering Astronomy: An Astro 101 e-book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawl, Stephen J.; Byrd, Gene; Deustua, Susana E.; LoPresto, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Discovering Astronomy, now available in its 6th edition as an eText, has many advantages and features for your students. We have partnered with etextink.com and WebAssign.net to produce an affordable set of cost-saving options for your students. Also available is the Discovering Astronomy Activity Manual, which provides students with an active-learning experience.Our etext is device independent and thus accessible through any web browser. Americans with Disabilities Act compatibility provides access for all students. Hotlinks to outside sites provide further information for interested students. Lecture demonstration videos of important concepts, made specifically for this new edition, are embedded within the text as appropriate. Students can highlight text, take notes, and bookmark locations within the text. Important terms are linked to the glossary. Search capabilities allow students to easily find what they want.Instructors can interact with their students directly through the etext once the class roster has been provided. For example, instructors can embed assignments into their students' etext and add their own notes and updates, which are immediately visible to their students.Updates can be quickly made by us as new findings become available. For example, updates from New Horizons were added at the time of the closest approach to Pluto, and an update on the recent announcement of current water on Mars was added the day of the announcement.We will present results of our own experience with college and high school students' use of Discovering Astronomy in online courses.Details of the book, a sample chapter, and other information are available at discoveringastronomy.weebly.com.

  15. Discovering sequence motifs with arbitrary insertions and deletions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin C Frith

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available BIOLOGY IS ENCODED IN MOLECULAR SEQUENCES: deciphering this encoding remains a grand scientific challenge. Functional regions of DNA, RNA, and protein sequences often exhibit characteristic but subtle motifs; thus, computational discovery of motifs in sequences is a fundamental and much-studied problem. However, most current algorithms do not allow for insertions or deletions (indels within motifs, and the few that do have other limitations. We present a method, GLAM2 (Gapped Local Alignment of Motifs, for discovering motifs allowing indels in a fully general manner, and a companion method GLAM2SCAN for searching sequence databases using such motifs. glam2 is a generalization of the gapless Gibbs sampling algorithm. It re-discovers variable-width protein motifs from the PROSITE database significantly more accurately than the alternative methods PRATT and SAM-T2K. Furthermore, it usefully refines protein motifs from the ELM database: in some cases, the refined motifs make orders of magnitude fewer overpredictions than the original ELM regular expressions. GLAM2 performs respectably on the BAliBASE multiple alignment benchmark, and may be superior to leading multiple alignment methods for "motif-like" alignments with N- and C-terminal extensions. Finally, we demonstrate the use of GLAM2 to discover protein kinase substrate motifs and a gapped DNA motif for the LIM-only transcriptional regulatory complex: using GLAM2SCAN, we identify promising targets for the latter. GLAM2 is especially promising for short protein motifs, and it should improve our ability to identify the protein cleavage sites, interaction sites, post-translational modification attachment sites, etc., that underlie much of biology. It may be equally useful for arbitrarily gapped motifs in DNA and RNA, although fewer examples of such motifs are known at present. GLAM2 is public domain software, available for download at http://bioinformatics.org.au/glam2.

  16. Growing Self-Estemm and Discovering Intelligences through Oral Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochoa Dora Liliana

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available After having applied a needs analysis in an eleventh grade course of English, I could notice that there was a big lack of security and self-confidence in the students. They expressed in different data-gathering instruments their fear when speaking in front of the class. Also, they talked about their insecurity when pronouncing English and the need for more opportunities for developing speaking. Therefore, the implementation of an innovation in class was carried out in order to respond to the students¿ needs and make them discover their talents. The implementation was successful and students improved some areas of their communicative competence.

  17. Astrophysical parameters of ten new discovered open star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Tadross, A L; Osman, A; Ismail, N; Bakry, A

    2011-01-01

    We present here the fundamental parameters of ten open star clusters, nominated from Kronberger et al. (2006) who presented some new discovered stellar groups on the basis of 2MASS photometry and DSS visual images. Star counts and photometric parameters (radius, membership, distances, color excess, age, luminosity function, mass function, total mass, and the dynamical relaxation time) have been determined for these ten clusters for the first time. In order to calibrate our procedures, the main parameters (distance, age, and color excesses) have been re-estimated for another five clusters, which are studied by Kronberger et al. (2006) as well.

  18. Insights into newly discovered marks and readers of epigenetic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Forest H; Strahl, Brian D; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2016-08-18

    The field of chromatin biology has been advancing at an accelerated pace. Recent discoveries of previously uncharacterized sites and types of post-translational modifications (PTMs) and the identification of new sets of proteins responsible for the deposition, removal, and reading of these marks continue raising the complexity of an already exceedingly complicated biological phenomenon. In this Perspective article we examine the biological importance of new types and sites of histone PTMs and summarize the molecular mechanisms of chromatin engagement by newly discovered epigenetic readers. We also highlight the imperative role of structural insights in understanding PTM-reader interactions and discuss future directions to enhance the knowledge of PTM readout. PMID:27538025

  19. Discovering New Oilfield within 18 Months Using Integrated Geophysical Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JiLiansheng; KongFanshu; SunJianchen

    2003-01-01

    The Yanqi basin is small and located at the northeastern corner of the Tarim basin. Before April 1993, the Yanqi basin was only surveyed with surface geology and seldom known among the explorers. After that, the gravitational, magnetic and MT prospecting were carried out and found some interesting local structures, which might be oil-and-gas-bearing. A few seismic lines were utilized to confirm them. An exploratory well was drilled in the summer of 1994 and discovered oil flow with industrial value in Oct., the same year. The petroleum exploration obtained breakthrough in the Yanqi basin in only 18 months.

  20. Sir Alexander Fleming: Scottish researcher who discovered penicillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligon, B Lee

    2004-01-01

    The discovery and development of penicillin changed the entire direction of approaches to treating infectious diseases and saved the lives of millions of people. Indeed, the development of penicillin was a watershed event in the battle against infectious diseases, and the individual who discovered it, Sir Alexander Fleming, remains a prominent individual in the annals of medical history. This article focuses primarily on the personal life of Alexander Fleming, an individual who had a remarkable diversity of interests and who made many contributions to science and medicine.

  1. An approach for discovering keywords from Spanish tweets using Wikipedia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel AYALA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Most approaches to keywords discovery when analyzing microblogging messages (among them those from Twitter are based on statistical and lexical information about the words that compose the text. The lack of context in the short messages can be problematic due to the low co-occurrence of words. In this paper, we present a new approach for keywords discovering from Spanish tweets based on the addition of context information using Wikipedia as a knowledge base. We present four different ways to use Wikipedia and two ways to rank the new keywords. We have tested these strategies using more than 60000 Spanish tweets, measuring performance and analyzing particularities of each strategy.

  2. Three low surface brightness dwarfs discovered around NGC 4631

    OpenAIRE

    Karachentsev, Igor D.; Bautzmann, Dirk; Neyer, Fabian; Polzl, Robert; Riepe, Peter; Zilch, Thorsten; Mattern, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of three low surface brightness companions to the spiral galaxy NGC 4631, made with small amateur telescopes. Assuming their distances to be 7.4 Mpc, the same as that of NGC 4631, the absolute magnitudes and linear diameters of the dwarfs are ranged within [-12.5, -9.6] mag and [4.7 - 1.3] kpc, respectively. These new three dwarfs, together with the discovered by us diffuse structure called "bridge", look like parts of a tidal filament directed towards NGC 4656 at tota...

  3. Electron–Rotor Interaction in Organic–Inorganic Lead Iodide Perovskites Discovered by Isotope Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Jue; Yang, Mengjin; Ma, Xiangchao; Schaller, Richard D.; Liu, Gang; Kong, Lingping; Yang, Ye; Beard, Matthew C.; Lesslie, Michael; Dai, Ying; Huang, Baibiao; Zhu, Kai; Xu, Tao

    2016-08-04

    We report on the carrier-rotor coupling effect in perovskite organic-inorganic hybrid lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) compounds discovered by isotope effects. Deuterated organic-inorganic perovskite compounds including CH3ND3PbI3, CD3NH3PbI3, and CD3ND3PbI3 were synthesized. Devices made from regular CH3NH3PbI3 and deuterated CH3ND3PbI3 exhibit comparable performance in band gap, current-voltage, carrier mobility, and power conversion efficiency. However, a time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) study reveals that CH3NH3PbI3 exhibits notably longer carrier lifetime than that of CH3ND3PbI3, in both thin-film and single-crystal formats. Furthermore, the comparison in carrier lifetime between CD3NH3PbI3 and CH3ND3PbI3 single crystals suggests that vibrational modes in methylammonium (MA+) have little impact on carrier lifetime. In contrast, the fully deuterated compound CD3ND3PbI3 reconfirmed the trend of decreasing carrier lifetime upon the increasing moment of inertia of cationic MA+. Polaron model elucidates the electron-rotor interaction.

  4. NEOKepler: Discovering Near-Earth Objects Using the Kepler Spacecraft

    CERN Document Server

    Stevenson, Kevin B; Jedicke, Robert; Bottke, William; Denneau, Larry

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new Kepler mission, called NEOKepler, that would survey near Earth's orbit to identify potentially hazardous objects (PHOs). To understand its surveying power, Kepler's large field of view produces an 'etendue' (A*Omega) that is 4.5 times larger than the best survey telescope currently in operation. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of NEOKepler using a double "fence post" survey pattern that efficiently detects PHOs. In a simulated 12-month survey, we estimate that NEOKepler would detect ~150 new NEOs with absolute magnitudes of less than 21.5, ~50 of which would be new PHOs. This would increase the annual PHO discovery rate by at least 50% and improve upon our goal of discovering 90% of PHOs by the end of 2020. Due to its heliocentric orbit, Kepler would also be sensitive to objects inside Earth's orbit, discovering more objects in its first year than are currently known to exist. Understanding this undersampled sub-population of NEOs will reveal new insights into the actual PHO dis...

  5. Discovering link communities in complex networks by exploiting link dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discovery of communities in complex networks is a fundamental data analysis problem with applications in various domains. Most of the existing approaches have focused on discovering communities of nodes, while recent studies have shown great advantages and utilities of the knowledge of communities of links in networks. From this new perspective, we propose a link dynamics based algorithm, called UELC, for identifying link communities of networks. In UELC, the stochastic process of a link–node–link random walk is employed to unfold an embedded bipartition structure of links in a network. The local mixing properties of the Markov chain underlying the random walk are then utilized to extract two emerging link communities. Further, the random walk and the bipartitioning processes are wrapped in an iterative subdivision strategy to recursively identify link partitions that segregate the network links into multiple subdivisions. We evaluate the performance of the new method on synthetic benchmarks and demonstrate its utility on real-world networks. Our experimental results show that our method is highly effective for discovering link communities in complex networks. As a comparison, we also extend UELC to extracting communities of nodes, and show that it is effective for node community identification. (paper)

  6. Novel virophages discovered in a freshwater lake in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaowen eGong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Virophages are small double-stranded DNA viruses that are parasites of giant DNA viruses that infect unicellular eukaryotes. Here we identify a novel group of virophages, named Dishui Lake virophages (DSLVs that were discovered in Dishui Lake (DSL: an artificial freshwater lake in Shanghai, China. Based on PCR and metagenomic analysis, the complete genome of DSLV1 was found to be circular and 28,788 base pairs in length, with a G+C content 43.2%, and 28 predicted open reading frames (ORFs. Fifteen of the DSLV1 ORFs have sequence similarity to known virophages. Two DSLV1 ORFs exhibited sequence similarity to that of prasinoviruses (Phycodnaviridae and chloroviruses (Phycodnaviridae, respectively, suggesting horizontal gene transfer occurred between these large algal DNA viruses and DSLV1. 46 other virophages-related contigs were also obtained, including six homologous major capsid protein (MCP gene. Phylogenetic analysis of these MCPs showed that DSLVs are closely related to OLV (Organic Lake virophage and YSLVs (Yellowstone Lake virophages, especially to YSLV3, except for YSLV7. These results indicate that freshwater ecotopes are the hotbed for discovering novel virophages as well as understanding their diversity and properties.

  7. Discover protein sequence signatures from protein-protein interaction data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haasl Ryan J

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of high-throughput technologies such as yeast two-hybrid systems and mass spectrometry technologies has made it possible to generate large protein-protein interaction (PPI datasets. Mining these datasets for underlying biological knowledge has, however, remained a challenge. Results A total of 3108 sequence signatures were found, each of which was shared by a set of guest proteins interacting with one of 944 host proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. Approximately 94% of these sequence signatures matched entries in InterPro member databases. We identified 84 distinct sequence signatures from the remaining 172 unknown signatures. The signature sharing information was then applied in predicting sub-cellular localization of yeast proteins and the novel signatures were used in identifying possible interacting sites. Conclusion We reported a method of PPI data mining that facilitated the discovery of novel sequence signatures using a large PPI dataset from S. cerevisiae genome as input. The fact that 94% of discovered signatures were known validated the ability of the approach to identify large numbers of signatures from PPI data. The significance of these discovered signatures was demonstrated by their application in predicting sub-cellular localizations and identifying potential interaction binding sites of yeast proteins.

  8. Learning Faster by Discovering and Exploiting Object Similarities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadej Janež

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we explore the question: “Is it possible to speed up the learning process of an autonomous agent by performing experiments in a more complex environment (i.e., an environment with a greater number of different objects?” To this end, we use a simple robotic domain, where the robot has to learn a qualitative model predicting the change in the robot’s distance to an object. To quantify the environment’s complexity, we defined cardinal complexity as the number of objects in the robot’s world, and behavioural complexity as the number of objects’ distinct behaviours. We propose Error reduction merging (ERM, a new learning method that automatically discovers similarities in the structure of the agent’s environment. ERM identifies different types of objects solely from the data measured and merges the observations of objects that behave in the same or similar way in order to speed up the agent’s learning. We performed a series of experiments in worlds of increasing complexity. The results in our simple domain indicate that ERM was capable of discovering structural similarities in the data which indeed made the learning faster, clearly superior to conventional learning. This observed trend occurred with various machine learning algorithms used inside the ERM method.

  9. Novel Virophages Discovered in a Freshwater Lake in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chaowen; Zhang, Weijia; Zhou, Xuewen; Wang, Hongming; Sun, Guowei; Xiao, Jinzhou; Pan, Yingjie; Yan, Shuling; Wang, Yongjie

    2016-01-01

    Virophages are small double-stranded DNA viruses that are parasites of giant DNA viruses that infect unicellular eukaryotes. Here we identify a novel group of virophages, named Dishui Lake virophages (DSLVs) that were discovered in Dishui Lake (DSL): an artificial freshwater lake in Shanghai, China. Based on PCR and metagenomic analysis, the complete genome of DSLV1 was found to be circular and 28,788 base pairs in length, with a G+C content 43.2%, and 28 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). Fifteen of the DSLV1 ORFs have sequence similarity to known virophages. Two DSLV1 ORFs exhibited sequence similarity to that of prasinoviruses (Phycodnaviridae) and chloroviruses (Phycodnaviridae), respectively, suggesting horizontal gene transfer occurred between these large algal DNA viruses and DSLV1. 46 other virophages-related contigs were also obtained, including six homologous major capsid protein (MCP) gene. Phylogenetic analysis of these MCPs showed that DSLVs are closely related to OLV (Organic Lake virophage) and YSLVs (Yellowstone Lake virophages), especially to YSLV3, except for YSLV7. These results indicate that freshwater ecotopes are the hotbed for discovering novel virophages as well as understanding their diversity and properties. PMID:26834726

  10. Discovering Color Styles from Fine Art Images of Impressionism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man-Kwan Shan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Content-based image retrieval (CBIR has attracted much interest since the last decade. Finding painting styles from fine art images is useful for CBIR. However, little research has been done on the painting style mining. In this paper, we investigated the color style mining technique for fine art of Impressionism. Three design issues for the color style mining are the feature extraction, the feature representation, and the style mining algorithm. For the feature extraction and presentation, dominate colors, adjacent color combinations and some MPEG-7 color descriptors, are utilized to represent the color features. Above all, we utilize the spatial data structure, 2D string, to represent color layout descriptor. For the style mining algorithms, we proposed a two-stage color style mining scheme. The first stage discovers the common properties of paintings of the same style. The second stage discovers the discriminative properties among styles. The experiment on the art work of European Impressionist was conducted. The performance of effectiveness is measure by the classification accuracy of the proposed style mining scheme. The classification accuracy ranges from 70% to 90%.

  11. Component resolved testing for allergic sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skamstrup Hansen, Kirsten; Poulsen, Lars K

    2010-01-01

    Component resolved diagnostics introduces new possibilities regarding diagnosis of allergic diseases and individualized, allergen-specific treatment. Furthermore, refinement of IgE-based testing may help elucidate the correlation or lack of correlation between allergenic sensitization and allergic...

  12. High-resolving mass spectrographs and spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollnik, Hermann, E-mail: hwollnik@gmail.com [New Mexico State University, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Discussed are different types of high resolving mass spectrographs and spectrometers. In detail outlined are (1) magnetic and electric sector field mass spectrographs, which are the oldest systems, (2) Penning Trap mass spectrographs and spectrometers, which have achieved very high mass-resolving powers, but are technically demanding (3) time-of-flight mass spectrographs using high energy ions passing through accelerator rings, which have also achieved very high mass-resolving powers and are equally technically demanding, (4) linear time-of-flight mass spectrographs, which have become the most versatile mass analyzers for low energy ions, while the even higher performing multi-pass systems have only started to be used, (5) orbitraps, which also have achieved remarkably high mass-resolving powers for low energy ions.

  13. Time resolved studies of bond activation by organometallic complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkens, M J [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-05-01

    In 1971, Jetz and Graham discovered that the silicon-hydrogen bond in silanes could be broken under mild photochemical conditions in the presence of certain transition metal carbonyls. Such reactions fall within the class of oxidative addition. A decade later, similar reactivity was discovered in alkanes. In these cases a C-H bond in non-functionalized alkanes was broken through the oxidative addition of Cp*Ir(H){sub 2}L (Cp* = (CH{sub 3}){sub 5}C{sub 5}, L = PPh{sub 3}, Ph = C{sub 6}H{sub 5}) to form Cp*ML(R)(H) or of Cp*Ir(CO){sub 2} to form Cp*Ir(CO)(R)(H). These discoveries opened an entirely new field of research, one which naturally included mechanistic studies aimed at elucidating the various paths involved in these and related reactions. Much was learned from these experiments but they shared the disadvantage of studying under highly non-standard conditions a system which is of interest largely because of its characteristics under standard conditions. Ultrafast time-resolved IR spectroscopy provides an ideal solution to this problem; because it allows the resolution of chemical events taking place on the femto-through picosecond time scale, it is possible to study this important class of reactions under the ambient conditions which are most of interest to the practicing synthetic chemist. Certain of the molecules in question are particularly well-suited to study using the ultrafast IR spectrophotometer described in the experimental section because they contain one or more carbonyl ligands.

  14. The Conforming Brain and Deontological Resolve

    OpenAIRE

    Melanie Pincus; Lisa LaViers; Michael J Prietula; Gregory Berns

    2014-01-01

    Our personal values are subject to forces of social influence. Deontological resolve captures how strongly one relies on absolute rules of right and wrong in the representation of one's personal values and may predict willingness to modify one's values in the presence of social influence. Using fMRI, we found that a neurobiological metric for deontological resolve based on relative activity in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) during the passive processing of sacred values predicted...

  15. A systematic approach to discover and characterize natural plant biostimulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni ePovero

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of natural plant biostimulants is proposed as an innovative solution to address the challenges to sustainable agriculture, to ensure optimal nutrient uptake, crop yield, quality, and tolerance to abiotic stress. However, the process of selection and characterization of plant biostimulant matrices is complex and involves a series of rigorous evaluations customized to the needs of the plant.Here, we propose a highly differentiated plant biostimulant development and production platform, which involves a combination of technology, processes, and know-how. Chemistry, biology and omic concepts are combined/integrated to investigate and understand the specific mode(s of action of bioactive ingredients. The proposed approach allows to predict and characterize the function of natural compounds as biostimulants. By managing and analyzing massive amounts of complex data, it is therefore possible to discover, evaluate and validate new product candidates, thus expanding the uses of existing products to meet the emerging needs of agriculture.

  16. Drifting sub-pulses in two newly discovered pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ord, S. M.; Edwards, R.; Bailes, M.

    2001-12-01

    We have detected the rare phenomenon of stable, drifting sub-pulse behaviour in two pulsars discovered in the recent Swinburne intermediate latitude pulsar survey. The pulsars, PSR J1231-47 and PSR J1919+0134, have approximate periods (P) of 1.873 and 1.6039s respectively. Both pulsars have multicomponent profiles, and distinct drifting is observed across them. We have identified a single drift mode in both pulsars: the drift rate for PSR J1231-47 being 5.4(1) ms P-1 and 5.8(2) ms P-1 for PSR 1919+0134. The drifting is linear across the profile with no departure from linearity at the edges within the sensitivity of our observations.

  17. Communication Boot Camp: Discover the Speaker in You!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuraidah Binti Ali

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Learning can take place almost anywhere, and this is especially true for our undergraduates who wish to become public speakers. Besides university course and public speaking workshops on campus grounds, undergraduates are now looking for a different learning environment – communication boot camps!! This study presents a compilation of learners’ experience, fun-filled activities, insightful feedback and memorable boot camp moments as captured in camp photos and feedback surveys. It involves a total of thirty seven undergraduates who enrolled in a Communication Boot Camp at Janda Baik, Pahang. Results show that Communication Boot Camp is a successful strategy to groom public speakers with a positive correlation between camp success and camp objectives, particularly in reducing shyness, motivating participants to become public speakers and discovering their talent and skills. In short, the study adds to the promise of zest and delight in public speaking.

  18. Discovered DNAs of Protein with Using Parallel Prefixspan Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Sobhkhiz Talouki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Discovery of Sequential pattern mining is an important data mining mission with wide applications. There is no model that used multi coring techniques for parallel mining of closed sequential patterns. The parallelization of a prefixspan method to discover DNAs is proposed in this study. The prefixspan method is used to extract the frequent pattern from a sequence database. This system requires the use of multiple computers connected in local area network. This algorithm includes multi-coring to achieve communication between a master process and multiple slave processes. This algorithm applies dynamic scheduling to avoid tasks idling. Moreover we employ a technique, called selective sampling. We implement this algorithm with using a 4G memory and AMD phenomX4. Our experimental results show that this algorithm attains good efficiencies on motifs extraction.

  19. David Levy's Guide to Observing and Discovering Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, David H.

    2003-05-01

    Preface; Part I. Why Observe Comets?: 1. Of history, superstition, magic, and science; 2. Comet science progresses; Part II. Discovering Comets: 3. Comet searching begins; 4. Tails and trails; 5. Comet searching in the twentieth century; 6. How I search for comets; 7. Searching for comets photographically; 8. Searching for comets with CCDs; 9. Comet hunting by reading; 10. Hunting for sungrazers over the Internet; 11. What to do when you think you've found a comet; Part III. A New Way of Looking at Comets: 12. When comets hit planets; 13. The future of visual comet hunting; Part IV. How to Observe Comets: 14. An introduction to comet hunting; 15. Visual observing of comets; 16. Estimating the magnitude of a comet; 17. Taking a picture of a comet; 18. Measuring where a comet is in the sky; Part V. Closing Notes: 19. My passion for comets.

  20. Gastrointestinal parasitoses discovered in agricultural workers in South Bohemia, Czechoslovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stĕrba, J; Ditrich, O; Prokopic, J; Kadlcík, K

    1988-01-01

    In the years from 1975 to 1982 1,750 persons, mostly employed by agricultural enterprises in the South Bohemian Region in Czechoslovakia, were examined. We discovered seven species of parasites: Taenia saginata in 0.3%, Enterobius vermicularis in 10.1%, Giardia lamblia in 1.0%, Endolimax nana in 0.8%, Entamoeba coli in 0.7%, Entamoeba hartmanni in 0.2%, and Chilomastix mesnili in 0.5%. The greatest number of parasites was found in students of the Secondary agricultural and technical school. Only two species of parasites were diagnosed in children of the employees. The incidence of E. vermicularis was 75% in children, in adult employees of agricultural enterprises, however, only 9.8%. PMID:3169645

  1. [Recently discovered hormones with a role in energy homeostasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krykorková, I; Nedvídková, J

    2003-02-01

    Adipocytal hormones resistin and adiponectin and gastric peptide ghrelin are recently discovered hormones, which are considered to take part in energy metabolism regulation. Resistin is expressed in adipose tissue only and its increased levels could cause insulin resistance and thus link obesity with type 2 diabetes. Adiponectin, as well as resistin, are products of genes, expressed in adipose tissue. Adiponectin could prevent development of aterosclerosis and it could play a role in anti-inflammatory reactions. Ghrelin is produced mainly in the stomach. Beside its role in long-term regulation of energy metabolism, it is involved in the short-term regulation of feeding. Main roles of resistin, adiponectin and ghrelin are summarised in the presented overview.

  2. Discovering shared and individual latent structure in multiple time series

    CERN Document Server

    Saria, Suchi; Penn, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a nonparametric Bayesian method for exploratory data analysis and feature construction in continuous time series. Our method focuses on understanding shared features in a set of time series that exhibit significant individual variability. Our method builds on the framework of latent Diricihlet allocation (LDA) and its extension to hierarchical Dirichlet processes, which allows us to characterize each series as switching between latent ``topics'', where each topic is characterized as a distribution over ``words'' that specify the series dynamics. However, unlike standard applications of LDA, we discover the words as we learn the model. We apply this model to the task of tracking the physiological signals of premature infants; our model obtains clinically significant insights as well as useful features for supervised learning tasks.

  3. Discovering opinion leaders for medical topics using news articles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonnalagadda Siddhartha

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapid identification of subject experts for medical topics helps in improving the implementation of discoveries by speeding the time to market drugs and aiding in clinical trial recruitment, etc. Identifying such people who influence opinion through social network analysis is gaining prominence. In this work, we explore how to combine named entity recognition from unstructured news articles with social network analysis to discover opinion leaders for a given medical topic. Methods We employed a Conditional Random Field algorithm to extract three categories of entities from health-related new articles: Person, Organization and Location. We used the latter two to disambiguate polysemy and synonymy for the person names, used simple rules to identify the subject experts, and then applied social network analysis techniques to discover the opinion leaders among them based on their media presence. A network was created by linking each pair of subject experts who are mentioned together in an article. The social network analysis metrics (including centrality metrics such as Betweenness, Closeness, Degree and Eigenvector are used for ranking the subject experts based on their power in information flow. Results We extracted 734,204 person mentions from 147,528 news articles related to obesity from January 1, 2007 through July 22, 2010. Of these, 147,879 mentions have been marked as subject experts. The F-score of extracting person names is 88.5%. More than 80% of the subject experts who rank among top 20 in at least one of the metrics could be considered as opinion leaders in obesity. Conclusion The analysis of the network of subject experts with media presence revealed that an opinion leader might have fewer mentions in the news articles, but a high network centrality measure and vice-versa. Betweenness, Closeness and Degree centrality measures were shown to supplement frequency counts in the task of finding subject experts. Further

  4. Discovering Tradeoffs, Vulnerabilities, and Dependencies within Water Resources Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing recognition and interest in using emerging computational tools for discovering the tradeoffs that emerge across complex combinations infrastructure options, adaptive operations, and sign posts. As a field concerned with "deep uncertainties", it is logically consistent to include a more direct acknowledgement that our choices for dealing with computationally demanding simulations, advanced search algorithms, and sensitivity analysis tools are themselves subject to failures that could adversely bias our understanding of how systems' vulnerabilities change with proposed actions. Balancing simplicity versus complexity in our computational frameworks is nontrivial given that we are often exploring high impact irreversible decisions. It is not always clear that accepted models even encompass important failure modes. Moreover as they become more complex and computationally demanding the benefits and consequences of simplifications are often untested. This presentation discusses our efforts to address these challenges through our "many-objective robust decision making" (MORDM) framework for the design and management water resources systems. The MORDM framework has four core components: (1) elicited problem conception and formulation, (2) parallel many-objective search, (3) interactive visual analytics, and (4) negotiated selection of robust alternatives. Problem conception and formulation is the process of abstracting a practical design problem into a mathematical representation. We build on the emerging work in visual analytics to exploit interactive visualization of both the design space and the objective space in multiple heterogeneous linked views that permit exploration and discovery. Many-objective search produces tradeoff solutions from potentially competing problem formulations that can each consider up to ten conflicting objectives based on current computational search capabilities. Negotiated design selection uses interactive visualization

  5. Discovering multiple realistic TFBS motifs based on a generalized model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leung Kwong-Sak

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs is a central problem in Bioinformatics on gene regulation. de novo motif discovery serves as a promising way to predict and better understand TFBSs for biological verifications. Real TFBSs of a motif may vary in their widths and their conservation degrees within a certain range. Deciding a single motif width by existing models may be biased and misleading. Additionally, multiple, possibly overlapping, candidate motifs are desired and necessary for biological verification in practice. However, current techniques either prohibit overlapping TFBSs or lack explicit control of different motifs. Results We propose a new generalized model to tackle the motif widths by considering and evaluating a width range of interest simultaneously, which should better address the width uncertainty. Moreover, a meta-convergence framework for genetic algorithms (GAs, is proposed to provide multiple overlapping optimal motifs simultaneously in an effective and flexible way. Users can easily specify the difference amongst expected motif kinds via similarity test. Incorporating Genetic Algorithm with Local Filtering (GALF for searching, the new GALF-G (G for generalized algorithm is proposed based on the generalized model and meta-convergence framework. Conclusion GALF-G was tested extensively on over 970 synthetic, real and benchmark datasets, and is usually better than the state-of-the-art methods. The range model shows an increase in sensitivity compared with the single-width ones, while providing competitive precisions on the E. coli benchmark. Effectiveness can be maintained even using a very small population, exhibiting very competitive efficiency. In discovering multiple overlapping motifs in a real liver-specific dataset, GALF-G outperforms MEME by up to 73% in overall F-scores. GALF-G also helps to discover an additional motif which has probably not been annotated in the dataset

  6. Spatial and Temporal Variability of Trace Gases during DISCOVER-AQ: Planning for Geostationary Observations of Atmospheric Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follette-Cook, M. B.; Pickering, K. E.; Crawford, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    We quantify spatial and temporal variability of both in-situ mixing ratios and column integrated O3, NO2, CO, SO2, and HCHO during the four deployments of the NASA Earth Venture mission DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality). Using structure function analyses, we compare simulated variability of output from the regional chemical models WRF/Chem and CMAQ with variability observed during the campaigns. The Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) instrument will be the first NASA mission to make atmospheric composition observations from geostationary orbit and partially fulfills the goals of the Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) mission. We compare both observed and simulated variability to the precision requirements defined by the science traceability matrices of these space-borne missions to explore how they relate to the science questions they are tasked to address.

  7. Phase-resolved polarization properties of the pulsar striped wind synchrotron emission

    CERN Document Server

    Petri, J

    2013-01-01

    Since the launch of the Fermi telescope more than five years ago, many new gamma-ray pulsars have been discovered with intriguing properties challenging our current understanding of pulsar physics. Observation of the Crab pulsar furnish today a broad band analysis of the pulsed spectrum with phase-resolved variability allowing to refine existing model to explain pulse shape, spectra and polarization properties. The latter gives inside into the geometry of the emitting region as well as on the structure of the magnetic field. Based on an exact analytical solution of the striped wind with finite current sheet thickness, we analyze in detail the phase-resolved polarization variability emanating from the synchrotron radiation. We assume that the main contribution to the wind emissivity comes from a thin transition layer where the dominant toroidal magnetic field reverses its polarity, the so-called current sheet. The resulting radiation is mostly linearly polarized. In the off-pulse region, the electric vector li...

  8. Spatially-Resolved Spectra of the "Teacup" AGN: Tracing the History of a Dying Quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Gagne, J P; Kraemer, S B; Schmitt, H R; Keel, W C; Rafter, S; Fischer, T C; Bennert, V N; Schawinski, K

    2014-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Galaxy Zoo project has revealed a number of spectacular galaxies possessing Extended Emission-Line Regions (EELRs), the most famous being Hanny's Voorwerp galaxy. We present another EELR object discovered in the SDSS endeavor: the Teacup Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN), nicknamed for its EELR, which has a handle like structure protruding 15 kpc into the northeast quadrant of the galaxy. We analyze physical conditions of this galaxy with long-slit ground based spectroscopy from Lowell, Lick, and KPNO observatories. With the Lowell 1.8m Perkin's telescope we took multiple observations at different offset positions, allowing us to recover spatially resolved spectra across the galaxy. Line diagnostics indicate the ionized gas is photoionized primarily by the AGN. Additionally we are able to derive the hydrogen density from the [S II] 6716/6731 ratio. We generated two-component photoionization models for each spatially resolved Lowell spectrum. These models allow us to calculate t...

  9. 4 km Forecasting System to Support DISCOVER-AQ Campaigns: Model Configuration, Testing and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, P.; Pan, L.; Kim, H. C.; Chai, T.; Hu, Y.; Tong, D.; Ngan, F.; Wong, D.; Dornblaser, B.; Tanrikulu, S.; Pickering, K. E.

    2012-12-01

    This work presents the development and evaluation of a high-resolution air quality forecasting system to support two NASA Earth Venture campaigns (DISCOVER-AQ) in 2013. These campaigns aim to further understanding of column-integrated and vertically resolved observations in determining air pollution conditions near the surface (http://science.nasa.gov/missions/discover-aq/). The first one will be carried out in San Joaquin Valley (SJV) in winter and the second one in Houston (HOU) area in late summer. Accurate forecast of pollution plumes is critical for on-site deployment and co-ordination of the various observation platforms. We develop of a fine resolution forecasting system to provide dynamic prediction of the chemical fields over these regions. This system utilizes meteorology fields from the US National Centers for Environmental Prediction North American Model (NAM) that is equipped with an elaborative NAM Data Assimilation System (NDAS) for its Land Surface Model (LSM) and initialization processes. NAM output is used to drive the US EPA Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) with identical horizontal resolution. The SJV campaign is believed to be subjected to rather high particulate matter loading and possible frequent occurrence of multiple-day fog. NDAS provides advanced methodology to constrain atmospheric stability and soil moisture characteristics. These meteorological parameters are critical for the winter campaign. Special attention is paid to emission modeling for agricultural dust aerosols, which were found important for the SJV area. In contrast to the winter campaign where strong atmospheric stability will likely be a challenge, the HOU campaign in September of 2013 will be challenged with strong atmospheric convection and rather rapid growth of and a sustained deep Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) during mid-morning and afternoon, respectively. Convection often results in lightning. Wild-fires can contribute significantly to pollution

  10. Toward discovering new anti-cancer agents targeting topoisomerase IIα: a facile screening strategy adaptable to high throughput platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Shih Lin

    Full Text Available Topoisomerases are a family of vital enzymes capable of resolving topological problems in DNA during various genetic processes. Topoisomerase poisons, blocking reunion of cleaved DNA strands and stabilizing enzyme-mediated DNA cleavage complex, are clinically important antineoplastic and anti-microbial agents. However, the rapid rise of drug resistance that impedes the therapeutic efficacy of these life-saving drugs makes the discovering of new lead compounds ever more urgent. We report here a facile high throughput screening system for agents targeting human topoisomerase IIα (Top2α. The assay is based on the measurement of fluorescence anisotropy of a 29 bp fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotide duplex. Since drug-stabilized Top2α-bound DNA has a higher anisotropy compared with free DNA, this assay can work if one can use a dissociating agent to specifically disrupt the enzyme/DNA binary complexes but not the drug-stabilized ternary complexes. Here we demonstrate that NaClO4, a chaotropic agent, serves a critical role in our screening method to differentiate the drug-stabilized enzyme/DNA complexes from those that are not. With this strategy we screened a chemical library of 100,000 compounds and obtained 54 positive hits. We characterized three of them on this list and demonstrated their effects on the Top2α-mediated reactions. Our results suggest that this new screening strategy can be useful in discovering additional candidates of anti-cancer agents.

  11. Assessment of emerging contaminants including organophosphate esters and pyrethroids during DISCOVER-AQ in Houston, Texas, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usenko, Sascha; Clark, Addie; Sheesley, Rebecca

    2015-04-01

    DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) is a NASA-funded air quality research program that focused on Houston, Texas, United States in September 2013. In conjunction with DISCOVER-AQ, particulate matter was collected for the month of September from four ground-based sampling sites across the Houston metropolitan area. The Houston metropolitan area is one of the most populous cities in the United States. Sampling sites included an upwind and downwind site as well as an urban (i.e. downtown) and industrial/port areas (i.e. Houston Ship Channel). Particulate matter samples were collected to examine both spatial and temporal trends (including day versus night). Particulate matter was collected on quartz fiber filters, which were analyzed for emerging classes of concern including organophosphate esters (OPEs; including flame retardants) and pyrethroids. OPEs have in recent years increased in both use and production as they replaced polybrominated diphenyl ethers flame retardants. Permethrin is one of the most commonly used mosquito adulticides in the United States.

  12. The conforming brain and deontological resolve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Pincus

    Full Text Available Our personal values are subject to forces of social influence. Deontological resolve captures how strongly one relies on absolute rules of right and wrong in the representation of one's personal values and may predict willingness to modify one's values in the presence of social influence. Using fMRI, we found that a neurobiological metric for deontological resolve based on relative activity in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC during the passive processing of sacred values predicted individual differences in conformity. Individuals with stronger deontological resolve, as measured by greater VLPFC activity, displayed lower levels of conformity. We also tested whether responsiveness to social reward, as measured by ventral striatal activity during social feedback, predicted variability in conformist behavior across individuals but found no significant relationship. From these results we conclude that unwillingness to conform to others' values is associated with a strong neurobiological representation of social rules.

  13. The conforming brain and deontological resolve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincus, Melanie; LaViers, Lisa; Prietula, Michael J; Berns, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Our personal values are subject to forces of social influence. Deontological resolve captures how strongly one relies on absolute rules of right and wrong in the representation of one's personal values and may predict willingness to modify one's values in the presence of social influence. Using fMRI, we found that a neurobiological metric for deontological resolve based on relative activity in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) during the passive processing of sacred values predicted individual differences in conformity. Individuals with stronger deontological resolve, as measured by greater VLPFC activity, displayed lower levels of conformity. We also tested whether responsiveness to social reward, as measured by ventral striatal activity during social feedback, predicted variability in conformist behavior across individuals but found no significant relationship. From these results we conclude that unwillingness to conform to others' values is associated with a strong neurobiological representation of social rules.

  14. Imposing resolved turbulence in CFD simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, L.; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2011-01-01

    In large‐eddy simulations, the inflow velocity field should contain resolved turbulence. This paper describes and analyzes two methods for imposing resolved turbulence in the interior of the domain in Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations. The intended application of the methods is to impose...... resolved turbulence immediately upstream of the region or structure of interest. Comparing to the alternative of imposing the turbulence at the inlet, there is a large potential to reduce the computational cost of the simulation by reducing the total number of cells. The reduction comes from a lower demand...... modifying the source terms. None of the two methods can impose synthetic turbulence with good results, but it is shown that by running the turbulence field through a short precursor simulation, very good results are obtained. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  15. 南充市应用生物导弹防治玉米螟效果和效益研究%Control Effect of Bio-guide Wasp Virus Missile on Ostrinia furnacalis and Its Benefits for Maize Production in Nanchong City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭昌家; 苟建华; 罗怀海; 白体坤; 丁攀; 冯礼斌; 尹怀中; 龙维国; 杨宇衡; 杨建华; 何海燕

    2016-01-01

    为了推进"绿色植保",减少农药用量及残留和环境污染与防治成本,确保玉米生产、品质和生态环境安全,促进玉米增产增收,采用灯下诱蛾和田间剥查与试验示范相结合等方法,开展生物导弹防治玉米螟效果和效益研究。结果表明,每公顷投放生物导弹30~37对,平均防效78.0%,防治成本139.50~172.50元,比化学农药防治少142.50~168.00元,玉米产量比空白对照区平均高817.8 kg,增产11.0%,增加产值1799.16元,增收节支1941.66~1967.16元。2003~2014年累计示范推广24507.33 hm2,增产2004.21万 kg,新增产值4409.26万元,节省防治费用349.23~411.72万元,增收节支4758.49~4820.98万元,减少农药5%杀虫双大粒剂551.41 t或90%杀虫单使用12.87 t。且生物导弹使用简便,劳动强度小,适于老、弱、妇、幼操作,对人畜和环境安全,节省药械和用水,是有机农业、现代农业、绿色和无公害农产品及IBM绿色防控示范园区防治玉米螟、减少化学农药的理想替代产品。%In order to promote "green plant protection", reduce the administration dosage and residue of pesticides and control cost of environment pol ution, and im-prove maize production, quality and agricultural ecological environment safety. In this study, the control effect and benefit of bio-guide wasp virus missile (BGWVM) on Ostrinia furnacalis in Nanchong City was investigated by using insect light traps and combined method of field investigation and experimental demonstration. According to the results, applying 30-37 pairs of BGWVM per hectare exhibited an average con-trol efficiency of 78.0%, and the control cost was 139.50-172.50 CNY/hm2, which was reduced by 142.50-168.00 CNY/hm2 compared with conventional chemical con-trol. Average maize yield in BGWVM demonstration plot was 817.8 kg/hm2 higher and improved by 11.0% compared with blank control plot. The output value was improved by 1 799

  16. Discovering Patterns in Brain Signals Using Decision Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narusci S. Bastos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Even with emerging technologies, such as Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI systems, understanding how our brains work is a very difficult challenge. So we propose to use a data mining technique to help us in this task. As a case of study, we analyzed the brain’s behaviour of blind people and sighted people in a spatial activity. There is a common belief that blind people compensate their lack of vision using the other senses. If an object is given to sighted people and we asked them to identify this object, probably the sense of vision will be the most determinant one. If the same experiment was repeated with blind people, they will have to use other senses to identify the object. In this work, we propose a methodology that uses decision trees (DT to investigate the difference of how the brains of blind people and people with vision react against a spatial problem. We choose the DT algorithm because it can discover patterns in the brain signal, and its presentation is human interpretable. Our results show that using DT to analyze brain signals can help us to understand the brain’s behaviour.

  17. Can we discover multi-component WIMP dark matter?

    CERN Document Server

    Profumo, Stefano; Ubaldi, Lorenzo

    2009-01-01

    We address the question of whether the upcoming generation of dark matter search experiments and colliders will be able to discover if the dark matter in the Universe has more than one weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) component. We outline a model-independent approach, and we study the specific cases of (1) indirect detection of dark matter via the discovery of gamma-ray lines corresponding to direct dark matter annihilation into monochromatic gamma rays, (2) direct detection with low-background 0.1 and 1 ton noble-gas detectors and (3) a 0.5 TeV center of mass energy electron-positron linear collider. For each search "channel", we outline a few assumptions to relate the very small set of parameters we consider (defining the masses of the two WIMPs and their relative abundance in the overall dark matter density) with the relevant detection rates. We then draw general conclusions on which corners of a generic multi-partite dark matter scenario can be explored with current and next generation experime...

  18. Oxygen and carbon discovered in exoplanet atmosphere `blow-off'

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-01

    Oxygen and carbon discovered in exoplanet atmosphere ‘blow-off’ hi-res Size hi-res: 1096 kb Credits: ESA/Alfred Vidal-Madjar (Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, France) Oxygen and carbon discovered in exoplanet atmosphere ‘blow-off’ This artist’s impression shows an extended ellipsoidal envelope - the shape of a rugby-ball - of oxygen and carbon discovered around the well-known extrasolar planet HD 209458b. An international team of astronomers led by Alfred Vidal-Madjar (Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, France) observed the first signs of oxygen and carbon in the atmosphere of a planet beyond our Solar System for the first time using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The atoms of carbon and oxygen are swept up from the lower atmosphere with the flow of escaping atmospheric atomic hydrogen - like dust in a supersonic whirlwind - in a process called atmospheric ‘blow off’. Oxygen and carbon have been detected in the atmosphere of a planet beyond our Solar System for the first time. Scientists using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have observed the famous extrasolar planet HD 209458b passing in front of its parent star, and found oxygen and carbon surrounding the planet in an extended ellipsoidal envelope - the shape of a rugby-ball. These atoms are swept up from the lower atmosphere with the flow of the escaping atmospheric atomic hydrogen, like dust in a supersonic whirlwind. The team led by Alfred Vidal-Madjar (Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, France) reports this discovery in a forthcoming issue of Astrophysical Journal Letters. The planet, called HD 209458b, may sound familiar. It is already an extrasolar planet with an astounding list of firsts: the first extrasolar planet discovered transiting its sun, the first with an atmosphere, the first observed to have an evaporating hydrogen atmosphere (in 2003 by the same team of scientists) and now the first to have an atmosphere containing oxygen and carbon. Furthermore

  19. Inner solar system material discovered in the Oort cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meech, Karen J; Yang, Bin; Kleyna, Jan; Hainaut, Olivier R; Berdyugina, Svetlana; Keane, Jacqueline V; Micheli, Marco; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Wainscoat, Richard J

    2016-04-01

    We have observed C/2014 S3 (PANSTARRS), a recently discovered object on a cometary orbit coming from the Oort cloud that is physically similar to an inner main belt rocky S-type asteroid. Recent dynamical models successfully reproduce the key characteristics of our current solar system; some of these models require significant migration of the giant planets, whereas others do not. These models provide different predictions on the presence of rocky material expelled from the inner solar system in the Oort cloud. C/2014 S3 could be the key to verifying these predictions of the migration-based dynamical models. Furthermore, this object displays a very faint, weak level of comet-like activity, five to six orders of magnitude less than that of typical ice-rich comets on similar Orbits coming from the Oort cloud. For the nearly tailless appearance, we are calling C/2014 S3 a Manx object. Various arguments convince us that this activity is produced by sublimation of volatile ice, that is, normal cometary activity. The activity implies that C/2014 S3 has retained a tiny fraction of the water that is expected to be present at its formation distance in the inner solar system. We may be looking at fresh inner solar system Earth-forming material that was ejected from the inner solar system and preserved for billions of years in the Oort cloud.

  20. Unified Photo Enhancement by Discovering Aesthetic Communities From Flickr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Richang; Zhang, Luming; Tao, Dacheng

    2016-03-01

    Photo enhancement refers to the process of increasing the aesthetic appeal of a photo, such as changing the photo aspect ratio and spatial recomposition. It is a widely used technique in the printing industry, graphic design, and cinematography. In this paper, we propose a unified and socially aware photo enhancement framework which can leverage the experience of photographers with various aesthetic topics (e.g., portrait and landscape). We focus on photos from the image hosting site Flickr, which has 87 million users and to which more than 3.5 million photos are uploaded daily. First, a tagwise regularized topic model is proposed to describe the aesthetic topic of each Flickr user, and coherent and interpretable topics are discovered by leveraging both the visual features and tags of photos. Next, a graph is constructed to describe the similarities in aesthetic topics between the users. Noticeably, densely connected users have similar aesthetic topics, which are categorized into different communities by a dense subgraph mining algorithm. Finally, a probabilistic model is exploited to enhance the aesthetic attractiveness of a test photo by leveraging the photographic experiences of Flickr users from the corresponding communities of that photo. Paired-comparison-based user studies show that our method performs competitively on photo retargeting and recomposition. Moreover, our approach accurately detects aesthetic communities in a photo set crawled from nearly 100000 Flickr users. PMID:26742134

  1. AN EFFICIENT WEB PERSONALIZATION APPROACH TO DISCOVER USER INTERESTED DIRECTORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Robinson Joel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Web Usage Mining is the application of data mining technique used to retrieve the web usage from web proxy log file. Web Usage Mining consists of three major stages: preprocessing, clustering and pattern analysis. This paper explains each of these stages in detail. In this proposed approach, the web directories are discovered based on the user’s interestingness. The web proxy log file undergoes a preprocessing phase to improve the quality of data. Fuzzy Clustering Algorithm is used to cluster the user and session into disjoint clusters. In this paper, an effective approach is presented for Web personalization based on an Advanced Apriori algorithm. It is used to select the user interested web directories. The proposed method is compared with the existing web personalization methods like Objective Probabilistic Directory Miner (OPDM, Objective Community Directory Miner (OCDM and Objective Clustering and Probabilistic Directory Miner (OCPDM. The result shows that the proposed approach provides better results than the aforementioned existing approaches. At last, an application is developed with the user interested directories and web usage details.

  2. Inner solar system material discovered in the Oort cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meech, Karen J; Yang, Bin; Kleyna, Jan; Hainaut, Olivier R; Berdyugina, Svetlana; Keane, Jacqueline V; Micheli, Marco; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Wainscoat, Richard J

    2016-04-01

    We have observed C/2014 S3 (PANSTARRS), a recently discovered object on a cometary orbit coming from the Oort cloud that is physically similar to an inner main belt rocky S-type asteroid. Recent dynamical models successfully reproduce the key characteristics of our current solar system; some of these models require significant migration of the giant planets, whereas others do not. These models provide different predictions on the presence of rocky material expelled from the inner solar system in the Oort cloud. C/2014 S3 could be the key to verifying these predictions of the migration-based dynamical models. Furthermore, this object displays a very faint, weak level of comet-like activity, five to six orders of magnitude less than that of typical ice-rich comets on similar Orbits coming from the Oort cloud. For the nearly tailless appearance, we are calling C/2014 S3 a Manx object. Various arguments convince us that this activity is produced by sublimation of volatile ice, that is, normal cometary activity. The activity implies that C/2014 S3 has retained a tiny fraction of the water that is expected to be present at its formation distance in the inner solar system. We may be looking at fresh inner solar system Earth-forming material that was ejected from the inner solar system and preserved for billions of years in the Oort cloud. PMID:27386512

  3. SUBic: A Scalable Unsupervised Framework for Discovering High Quality Biclusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jooil Lee; Yanhua Jin; Won Suk Lee

    2013-01-01

    A biclustering algorithm extends conventional clustering techniques to extract all of the meaningful subgroups of genes and conditions in the expression matrix of a microarray dataset.However,such algorithms are very sensitive to input parameters and show poor scalability.This paper proposes a scalable unsupervised biclustering framework,SUBic,to find high quality constant-row biclusters in an expression matrix effectively.A one-dimensional clustering algorithm is proposed to partition the attributes,that is,columns of an expression matrix into disjoint groups based on the similarity of expression values.These groups form a set of short transactions and are used to discover a set of frequent itemsets each of which corresponds to a bicluster.However,a bicluster may include any attribute whose expression value is not similar enough to others,so a bicluster refinement is used to enhance the quality of a bicluster by removing those attributes based on its distribution of expression values.The performance of the proposed method is comparatively analyzed through a series of experiments on synthetic and real datasets.

  4. Timing of Five PALFA-Discovered Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Stovall, K; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Cardoso, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J S; Ferdman, R; Freire, P C C; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F; Kaplan, D L; Karako-Argaman, C; Kaspi, V M; Knispel, B; Kotulla, R; Lazarus, P; Lee, K J; van Leeuwen, J; Lynch, R; Lyne, A G; Madsen, E; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Scholz, P; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Swiggum, J; Zhu, W W; Venkataraman, A

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery and timing results for five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) from the Arecibo PALFA survey: PSRs J1906+0055, J1914+0659, J1933+1726, J1938+2516, and J1957+2516. Timing observations of the 5 pulsars were conducted with the Arecibo and Lovell telescopes for time spans ranging from 1.5 to 3.3 yr. All of the MSPs except one (PSR J1914+0659) are in binary systems with low eccentricities. PSR J1957+2516 is likely a redback pulsar, with a ~0.1 $M_\\odot$ companion and possible eclipses that last ~10% of the orbit. The position of PSR J1957+2516 is also coincident with a NIR source. All 5 MSPs are distant (>3.1 kpc) as determined from their dispersion measures, and none of them show evidence of $\\gamma$-ray pulsations in a search of Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope data. These 5 MSPs bring the total number of MSPs discovered by the PALFA survey to 26 and further demonstrate the power of this survey in finding distant, highly dispersed MSPs deep in the Galactic plane.

  5. Timing of 29 Pulsars Discovered in the PALFA Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Lyne, A G; Bogdanov, S; Ferdman, R; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Knispel, B; Lynch, R; Allen, B; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Cardoso, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J S; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F A; Lazarus, P; van Leeuwen, J; Lorimer, D R; Madsen, E; McKee, J; McLaughlin, M A; Parent, E; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Scholz, P; Seymour, A; Siemens, X; Spitler, L G; Stairs, I H; Stovall, K; Swiggum, J; Wharton, R S; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    We report on the discovery and timing observations of 29 distant long-period pulsars discovered in the ongoing Arecibo PALFA pulsar survey. Following discovery with the Arecibo Telescope, confirmation and timing observations of these pulsars over several years at Jodrell Bank Observatory have yielded high-precision positions and measurements of rotation and radiation properties. We have used multi-frequency data to measure the interstellar scattering properties of some of these pulsars. Most of the pulsars have properties that mirror those of the previously known pulsar population, although four show some notable characteristics. PSRs J1907+0631 and J1925+1720 are young and are associated with supernova remnants or plerionic nebulae: J1907+0631 lies close to the center of SNR G40.5-0.5, while J1925+1720 is coincident with a high-energy Fermi gamma-ray source. One pulsar, J1932+1500, is in a surprisingly eccentric, 199-day binary orbit with a companion having a minimum mass of 0.33 solar masses. Several of the...

  6. Two Radio Supernova Remnants Discovered in the Outer Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Foster, Tyler; Reich, Wolfgang; Kothes, Roland; West, Jennifer; 10.1051/0004-6361/201220362

    2013-01-01

    We report on the discovery of two supernova remnants (SNRs) designated G152.4-2.1 and G190.9-2.2, using Canadian Galactic Plane Survey data. The aims of this paper are, first, to present evidence that favours the classification of both sources as SNRs, and, second, to describe basic parameters (integrated flux density, spectrum, and polarization) as well as properties (morphology, line-of-sight velocity, distance and physical size) to facilitate and motivate future observations. Spectral and polarization parameters are derived from multiwavelength data from existing radio surveys carried out at wavelengths between 6 and 92cm. In particular for the source G152.4-2.1 we also use new observations at 11cm done with the Effelsberg 100m telescope. The interstellar medium around the discovered sources is analyzed using 1-arcminute line data from neutral hydrogen (HI) and 45-arcsecond 12CO(J=1-0). G152.4-2.1 is a barrel shaped SNR with two opposed radio-bright polarized flanks on the North and South. The remnant, whi...

  7. Discovering Topology of MultiSubnet LAN using MIB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapna Harishankar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Today, Ethernet is the dominant local area network(LAN technology. These networks, typically, comprise large number of elements from different vendors. This raises considerable difficulties in performing network management tasks, such as resource management and root cause analysis, which are practically impossible without an up-to-date knowledge of the physical network topology. Given the dynamic nature of today's LANs, keeping track of topology information manually is a daunting (if not impossible task. Therefore, it is essential to develop practical schemes for automatic inference of the physical topology of Ethernet networks. In this paper, we propose a simple and efficient algorithmic solution for discovering the physical topology of large, heterogeneous Ethernet LANs that may include multiple subnets as well as uncooperative network elements, like hubs. Our scheme utilizes only generic MIB information and does not required any hardware or software modification of the underlying network elements. By rigorous analysis, we prove that our method correctly infers the network topology and has low communication and computational overheads.

  8. Discovering High-Quality Threaded Discussions in Online Forums

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jung-Tae Lee; Min-Chul Yang; Hae-Chang Rim

    2014-01-01

    Archives of threaded discussions generated by users in online forums and discussion boards contain valuable knowledge on various topics. However, not all threads are useful because of deliberate abuses, such as trolling and flaming, that are commonly observed in online conversations. The existence of various users with different levels of expertise also makes it difficult to assume that every discussion thread stored online contains high-quality contents. Although finding high-quality threads automatically can help both users and search engines sift through a huge amount of thread archives and make use of these potentially useful resources effectively, no previous work to our knowledge has performed a study on such task. In this paper, we propose an automatic method for distinguishing high-quality threads from low-quality ones in online discussion sites. We first suggest four different artificial measures for inducing overall quality of a thread based on ratings of its posts. We then propose two tasks involving prediction of thread quality without using post rating information. We adopt a popular machine learning framework to solve the two prediction tasks. Experimental results on a real world forum archive demonstrate that our method can significantly improve the prediction performance across all four measures of thread quality on both tasks. We also compare how different types of features derived from various aspects of threads contribute to the overall performance and investigate key features that play a crucial role in discovering high-quality threads in online discussion sites.

  9. Chandra Observations of Eight Sources Discovered by INTEGRAL

    CERN Document Server

    Tomsick, John A; Wang, Qinan; Bodaghee, Arash; Chaty, Sylvain; Rahoui, Farid; Rodriguez, Jerome; Fornasini, Francesca M

    2015-01-01

    We report on 0.3-10 keV observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory of eight hard X-ray sources discovered within 8 degrees of the Galactic plane by the INTEGRAL satellite. The short (5 ks) Chandra observations of the IGR source fields have yielded very likely identifications of X-ray counterparts for three of the IGR sources: IGR J14091-6108, IGR J18088-2741, and IGR J18381-0924. The first two have very hard spectra in the Chandra band that can be described by a power-law with photon indices of Gamma = 0.6+/-0.4 and -0.7(+0.4)(-0.3), respectively (90% confidence errors are given), and both have a unique near-IR counterpart consistent with the Chandra position. IGR J14091-6108 also displays a strong iron line and a relatively low X-ray luminosity, and we argue that the most likely source type is a Cataclysmic Variable (CV), although we do not completely rule out the possibility of a High Mass X-ray Binary. IGR J18088-2741 has an optical counterpart with a previously measured 6.84 hr periodicity, which may...

  10. Discovering Light Pseudoscalar Bosons in Double-Pulsar Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Dupays, A; Dupays, Arnaud; Roncadelli, Marco

    2006-01-01

    The axion is just one from a general class of new particles -- called Light Pseudoscalar Bosons (LPBs) -- predicted by many realistic extensions of the Standard Model. We offer a somewhat pedagogical review of their main properties, with particular emphasis on the effects they induce in a light beam travelling in an external magnetic field, like photon-LPB oscillations, birefringence and dichroism. Moreover, we discuss a new strategy whereby LPBs can be discovered by high-precision observations of certain binary neutron-star systems. Basically, in a double pulsar seen almost edge-on, photon-LPB oscillations can give rise to a characteristic attenuation pattern of the light beam emitted by one of the pulsars when it goes through the magnetosphere of the companion. Depending on the actual values of the LPB mass and its two-photon coupling constant, the effect can be seen in the $\\gamma$-ray band with the upcoming GLAST mission. We also shown that this method provides a remarkable cross-check for the recent clai...

  11. Unified Photo Enhancement by Discovering Aesthetic Communities From Flickr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Richang; Zhang, Luming; Tao, Dacheng

    2016-03-01

    Photo enhancement refers to the process of increasing the aesthetic appeal of a photo, such as changing the photo aspect ratio and spatial recomposition. It is a widely used technique in the printing industry, graphic design, and cinematography. In this paper, we propose a unified and socially aware photo enhancement framework which can leverage the experience of photographers with various aesthetic topics (e.g., portrait and landscape). We focus on photos from the image hosting site Flickr, which has 87 million users and to which more than 3.5 million photos are uploaded daily. First, a tagwise regularized topic model is proposed to describe the aesthetic topic of each Flickr user, and coherent and interpretable topics are discovered by leveraging both the visual features and tags of photos. Next, a graph is constructed to describe the similarities in aesthetic topics between the users. Noticeably, densely connected users have similar aesthetic topics, which are categorized into different communities by a dense subgraph mining algorithm. Finally, a probabilistic model is exploited to enhance the aesthetic attractiveness of a test photo by leveraging the photographic experiences of Flickr users from the corresponding communities of that photo. Paired-comparison-based user studies show that our method performs competitively on photo retargeting and recomposition. Moreover, our approach accurately detects aesthetic communities in a photo set crawled from nearly 100000 Flickr users.

  12. Decision Tree Approach to Discovering Fraud in Leasing Agreements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horvat Ivan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fraud attempts create large losses for financing subjects in modern economies. At the same time, leasing agreements have become more and more popular as a means of financing objects such as machinery and vehicles, but are more vulnerable to fraud attempts. Objectives: The goal of the paper is to estimate the usability of the data mining approach in discovering fraud in leasing agreements. Methods/Approach: Real-world data from one Croatian leasing firm was used for creating tow models for fraud detection in leasing. The decision tree method was used for creating a classification model, and the CHAID algorithm was deployed. Results: The decision tree model has indicated that the object of the leasing agreement had the strongest impact on the probability of fraud. Conclusions: In order to enhance the probability of the developed model, it would be necessary to develop software that would enable automated, quick and transparent retrieval of data from the system, processing according to the rules and displaying the results in multiple categories.

  13. Chandra Identification of Two AGN Discovered by INTEGRAL

    CERN Document Server

    Tomsick, John A; Rahoui, Farid; Ajello, Marco; Rodriguez, Jerome; Barriere, Nicolas; Bodaghee, Arash; Chaty, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report on observations of two hard X-ray sources that were originally discovered with the INTEGRAL satellite: IGR J04059+5416 and IGR J08297-4250. We use the Chandra X-ray Observatory to localize the sources and then archival near-IR images to identify the counterparts. Both sources have counterparts in the catalog of extended 2 Micron All-Sky Survey sources, and the counterpart to IGR J04059+5416 has been previously identified as a galaxy. Thus, we place IGR J04059+5416 in the class of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), and we suggest that IGR J08297-4250 is also an AGN. If this identification is correct, the near-IR images suggest that the host galaxy of IGR J08297-4250 may be merging with a smaller nearby galaxy. For IGR J04059+5416, the 0.3-86 keV spectrum from Chandra and INTEGRAL is consistent with an absorbed power-law with a column density of N_H = 3.1(+2.0)(-1.5)e22 cm-2 and a photon index of Gamma = 1.4+/-0.7, and we suggest that it is a Seyfert galaxy. For IGR J08297-4250, the photon index is s...

  14. Discovering English tense-backshift parameters through discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Orel Kos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available English grammars and teaching materials often fail to include references to specific discoursal and communicative functions. This facilitates the foreign language acquisition process during which learners acquire basic linguistic skills. The teaching of indirect discourse or so-called reported speech is no exception in this respect: easy-to-learn grammatical rules governing tense-backshift are combined with rather open-ended communicative functions. The CEFR 2011, however, aims at developing the user’s communicative competence, which at its most naturally-occurring level includes the pragmatic-discursive components. The article presents a discourse-oriented approach to indirect discourse teaching and learning, in which the role of the communication mediator, i.e. the indirect discourse producer, is presented as one of the most significant parameters that have been analytically disregarded, yet it provides an identification model for the learner as an active language user. Our approach focuses on further important parameters of indirect discourse, i.e. the discoursal macrotextual type, the focus on the original communicator or the message, the communication mediator’s attitude or involvement, semantic, stylistic and syntactic restrictions. The suggested discourse-oriented approach encourages students to discover “grammatical rules” on their own, which should enable them to develop more internalized and confident language production skills.

  15. Discovering Psychological Principles by Mining Naturally Occurring Data Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstone, Robert L; Lupyan, Gary

    2016-07-01

    The very expertise with which psychologists wield their tools for achieving laboratory control may have had the unwelcome effect of blinding psychologists to the possibilities of discovering principles of behavior without conducting experiments. When creatively interrogated, a diverse range of large, real-world data sets provides powerful diagnostic tools for revealing principles of human judgment, perception, categorization, decision-making, language use, inference, problem solving, and representation. Examples of these data sets include patterns of website links, dictionaries, logs of group interactions, collections of images and image tags, text corpora, history of financial transactions, trends in twitter tag usage and propagation, patents, consumer product sales, performance in high-stakes sporting events, dialect maps, and scientific citations. The goal of this issue is to present some exemplary case studies of mining naturally existing data sets to reveal important principles and phenomena in cognitive science, and to discuss some of the underlying issues involved with conducting traditional experiments, analyses of naturally occurring data, computational modeling, and the synthesis of all three methods. PMID:27404718

  16. Discovering Tau and Muon Solar Neutrino Flares above backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Fargion, D

    2004-01-01

    Solar neutrino flares astronomy is at the edge of its discover. High energy flare particles (protons, alpha) whose self scattering within the solar corona is source of a rich prompt charged pions are also source of sharp solar neutrino "burst" (at tens-hundred MeV) produced by their pion-muon primary decay in flight. This brief (minute) solar neutrino "burst" at largest peak overcome by four-five order of magnitude the steady atmospheric neutrino noise at the Earth. Later on, solar flare particles hitting the terrestrial atmosphere may marginally increase the atmospheric neutrino flux without relevant consequences. Largest prompt "burst" solar neutrino flare may be detected in present or better in future largest neutrino underground neutrino detectors. Our estimate for the recent and exceptional October - November 2003 solar flares gives a number of events above or just near unity for Super-Kamiokande. The neutrino spectra may reflect in a subtle way the neutrino flavour mixing in flight. A surprising tau app...

  17. Fast Algorithms for Discovering Sequential Patterns in Massive Datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dharani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Sequential pattern mining is one of the specific data mining tasks, particularly from retail data. The task is to discover all sequential patterns with a user-specified minimum support, where support of a pattern is the number of data-sequences that contain the pattern. Approach: To find a sequence patterns variety of algorithm like AprioriAll and Generalized Sequential Patterns (GSP were there. We present fast and efficient algorithms called AprioriAllSID and GSPSID for mining sequential patterns that were fundamentally different from known algorithms. Results: The proposed algorithm had been implemented and compared with AprioriAll and Generalized Sequential Patterns (GSP. Its performance was studied on an experimental basis. We combined the AprioriAllSID algorithm with AprioriAll algorithm into a Hybrid algorithm, called AprioriAll Hybrid. Conclusion: Implementation shows that the execution time of the algorithm to find sequential pattern depends on total no of candidates generated at each level and the time taken to scan the database. Our performance study shows that the proposed algorithms have an excellent performance over the best existing algorithms.

  18. Prediction of Human Activity by Discovering Temporal Sequence Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kang; Fu, Yun

    2014-08-01

    Early prediction of ongoing human activity has become more valuable in a large variety of time-critical applications. To build an effective representation for prediction, human activities can be characterized by a complex temporal composition of constituent simple actions and interacting objects. Different from early detection on short-duration simple actions, we propose a novel framework for long -duration complex activity prediction by discovering three key aspects of activity: Causality, Context-cue, and Predictability. The major contributions of our work include: (1) a general framework is proposed to systematically address the problem of complex activity prediction by mining temporal sequence patterns; (2) probabilistic suffix tree (PST) is introduced to model causal relationships between constituent actions, where both large and small order Markov dependencies between action units are captured; (3) the context-cue, especially interactive objects information, is modeled through sequential pattern mining (SPM), where a series of action and object co-occurrence are encoded as a complex symbolic sequence; (4) we also present a predictive accumulative function (PAF) to depict the predictability of each kind of activity. The effectiveness of our approach is evaluated on two experimental scenarios with two data sets for each: action-only prediction and context-aware prediction. Our method achieves superior performance for predicting global activity classes and local action units. PMID:26353344

  19. Prasinoxanthin-constaining Prasinophyceae Discovered in Jiaozhou Bay, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Gang Yu; Chun-Mei Deng; Peng Yao; Yu Zhen; Shu-Ben Qian

    2007-01-01

    The class Prasinophyceae (Chlorophyta) contains some photosynthetic eukaryotlc ultraplankton species characterized by containing prasinoxanthin. The existence and abundance of these organisms can be estimated by the diagnostic pigment. We detected the unique pigments of prasinoxanthin-contalning Prasinophyceae in Jlaozhou Bay, China using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This was the first finding of this kind in Chinese seas. Using the ratio of prasinoxanthin to chlorophyll a, the abundance of prasinoxanthin-containing Prasinophyceae has been calculated. The average contribution of prasinoxanthin-contalning Prasinophyceae to the chlorophyll a pool was 8.5% and 17.0% in May and August 2004 in Jiaozhou Bay, and the maximums were 25.9% and 36.3%. Size fractionated pigment analysis suggested that more than 80% of prasinoxanthin were in the fraction of 2-20 μm.According to the results of pigment and morphological analysis, the possible genera of prasinoxanthin-containing Prasinophyceae and the reasons for causing this high abundant phytoplankton in Jiaozhou Bay were discussed.This kind of phytoplankton can not be discovered in traditional biological investigation, but its contribution to the coastal ecosystem is significant enough to be studied further.

  20. Energy resolved X-ray grating interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thuering, T.; Stampanoni, M. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Barber, W. C.; Iwanczyk, J. S. [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States); Seo, Y.; Alhassen, F. [UCSF Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States)

    2013-05-13

    Although compatible with polychromatic radiation, the sensitivity in X-ray phase contrast imaging with a grating interferometer is strongly dependent on the X-ray spectrum. We used an energy resolving detector to quantitatively investigate the dependency of the noise from the spectral bandwidth and to consequently optimize the system-by selecting the best energy band matching the experimental conditions-with respect to sensitivity maximization and, eventually, dose. Further, since theoretical calculations of the spectrum are usually limited due to non-ideal conditions, an energy resolving detector accurately quantifies the spectral changes induced by the interferometer including flux reduction and beam hardening.

  1. Time resolved thermal lens in edible oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, T. A. S.; Pedreira, P. R. B.; Medina, A. N.; Pereira, J. R. D.; Bento, A. C.; Baesso, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    In this work time resolved thermal lens spectrometry is applied to investigate the optical properties of the following edible oils: soya, sunflower, canola, and corn oils. The experiments were performed at room temperature using the mode mismatched thermal lens configuration. The results showed that when the time resolved procedure is adopted the technique can be applied to investigate the photosensitivity of edible oils. Soya oil presented a stronger photochemical reaction as compared to the other investigated samples. This observation may be relevant for future studies evaluating edible oils storage conditions and also may contribute to a better understanding of the physical and chemical properties of this important foodstuff.

  2. Multi-wavelength Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Observations of Aerosol Above Clouds in California during DISCOVER-AQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetler, C. A.; Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Rogers, R. R.; Mueller, D.; Chemyakin, E.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Anderson, B. E.

    2013-12-01

    Accurately representing the vertical profile of aerosols is important for determining their radiative impact, which is still one of the biggest uncertainties in climate forcing. Aerosol radiative forcing can be either positive or negative depending on aerosol absorption properties and underlying albedo. Therefore, accurately characterizing the vertical distribution of aerosols, and specifically aerosols above clouds, is vital to understanding climate change. Unlike passive sensors, airborne lidar has the capability to make vertically resolved aerosol measurements of aerosols above and between clouds. Recently, NASA Langley Research Center has built and deployed the world's first airborne multi-wavelength High Spectral Resolution Lidar, HSRL-2. The HSRL-2 instrument employs the HSRL technique to measure extinction at both 355 nm and 532 nm and also measures aerosol depolarization and backscatter at 355 nm, 532 nm and 1064 nm. Additional HSRL-2 data products include aerosol type and range-resolved aerosol microphysical parameters (e.g., effective radius, number concentration, and single scattering albedo). HSRL-2 was deployed in the San Joaquin Valley, California, from January 16 to February 6, 2013, on the DISCOVER-AQ field campaign (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality). On February 6, the observation region was mostly cloudy, and HSRL-2 saw two distinct aerosol layers above the clouds. One layer was aged boundary-layer pollution located just above cloud top at approximately 1.5 km above sea level. An aged smoke layer was also observed over land and over the ocean at altitudes 4-7 km ASL. In this study, we will show HSRL-2 products for these cases, and compare them with airborne in situ measurements of the 1.5-km layer from a coincident flight of the NASA P3B. We will also compare and contrast the HSRL-2 measurements of these two aerosol layers with each other and the clear-air boundary

  3. MICROLENSING BINARIES DISCOVERED THROUGH HIGH-MAGNIFICATION CHANNEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microlensing can provide a useful tool to probe binary distributions down to low-mass limits of binary companions. In this paper, we analyze the light curves of eight binary-lensing events detected through the channel of high-magnification events during the seasons from 2007 to 2010. The perturbations, which are confined near the peak of the light curves, can be easily distinguished from the central perturbations caused by planets. However, the degeneracy between close and wide binary solutions cannot be resolved with a 3σ confidence level for three events, implying that the degeneracy would be an important obstacle in studying binary distributions. The dependence of the degeneracy on the lensing parameters is consistent with a theoretical prediction that the degeneracy becomes severe as the binary separation and the mass ratio deviate from the values of resonant caustics. The measured mass ratio of the event OGLE-2008-BLG-510/MOA-2008-BLG-369 is q ∼ 0.1, making the companion of the lens a strong brown dwarf candidate.

  4. Talkoot Portals: Discover, Tag, Share, and Reuse Collaborative Science Workflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, B. D.; Ramachandran, R.; Lynnes, C.

    2009-05-01

    A small but growing number of scientists are beginning to harness Web 2.0 technologies, such as wikis, blogs, and social tagging, as a transformative way of doing science. These technologies provide researchers easy mechanisms to critique, suggest and share ideas, data and algorithms. At the same time, large suites of algorithms for science analysis are being made available as remotely-invokable Web Services, which can be chained together to create analysis workflows. This provides the research community an unprecedented opportunity to collaborate by sharing their workflows with one another, reproducing and analyzing research results, and leveraging colleagues' expertise to expedite the process of scientific discovery. However, wikis and similar technologies are limited to text, static images and hyperlinks, providing little support for collaborative data analysis. A team of information technology and Earth science researchers from multiple institutions have come together to improve community collaboration in science analysis by developing a customizable "software appliance" to build collaborative portals for Earth Science services and analysis workflows. The critical requirement is that researchers (not just information technologists) be able to build collaborative sites around service workflows within a few hours. We envision online communities coming together, much like Finnish "talkoot" (a barn raising), to build a shared research space. Talkoot extends a freely available, open source content management framework with a series of modules specific to Earth Science for registering, creating, managing, discovering, tagging and sharing Earth Science web services and workflows for science data processing, analysis and visualization. Users will be able to author a "science story" in shareable web notebooks, including plots or animations, backed up by an executable workflow that directly reproduces the science analysis. New services and workflows of interest will be

  5. Discovering the Role of Grain Boundary Complexions in Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmer, Martin P. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

    2015-03-19

    in a range of materials systems, and to characterize their structures, range of stability and selected physical properties. First, an Au-based bilayer interfacial phase was discovered at a bicrystal boundary in the Si-Au system. This bilayer transitioned abruptly to an intrinsic (“clean”) grain boundary phase, suggesting first-order phase behavior. This study represents the discovery of grain boundary complexions in a completely new system, i.e., a semiconductor-metal system, giving further support to the expectation that grain boundary complexions are a general phenomenon not limited to any particular class of materials. The TiO2-CuO system exhibited four grain boundary interfacial phases: a monolayer, disordered bilayer, disordered trilayer, and non-wetting nanoscale amorphous drop (which likely resulted from dewetting of a nanoscale IGF). SiO2 contamination was discovered in the TiO2-CuO samples, and we hypothesize that this impurity may have caused an “order-disorder” transition to occur. In other words, we expect that pure TiO2-CuO may have a higher tendency to exhibit ordered bilayer and trilayer complexions, which may also exhibit a well-defined order-disorder transition temperature. In this effort we have also identified unique complexion transitions in yttria and strontium titanate.

  6. First hydrothermal active vent discovered on the Galapagos Microplate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, C.; Li, H.; Wu, G.; Su, X.; Zhang, G.; Chinese DY115-21 Leg 3 Scientific Party

    2011-12-01

    The Galapagos Microplate (GM) lies on the western Gaplapagos Spreading Center (GSC), representing one of the classic Ridge-Ridge-Ridge (R-R-R) plate boundaries of the Nazca, Cocos, and Pacific plates. The presence of the 'black smoke' and hydrothermal vent community were firstly confirmed on the GSC. Lots of hydrothermal fields were discovered on the center and eastern GSC, while the western GSC has not been well investigated. During 17th Oct. to 9th Nov. 2009, the 3rd leg of Chinese DY115-21 cruise with R/V Dayangyihao has been launched along 2°N-5°S near equatorial East Pacific Rise (EPR). Two new hydrothermal fields were confirmed. One is named 'Precious Stone Mountain', which is the first hydrothermal field on the GM. The other is found at 101.47°W, 0.84°S EPR. The 'Precious Stone Mountain' hydrothermal field (at 101.49°W, 1.22°N) is located at an off-axial seamount on the southern GM boundary, with a depth from 1,450 to 1,700m. Hydrothermal fluids emitting from the fissures and hydrothermal fauna were captured by deep-tow video. Few mineral clasts of pyrite and chalcopyrite were separated from one sediment sample, but no sulfide chimney was found yet. Hydrothermal fauna such as alive mussels, crabs, shrimps, tubeworms, giant clams, as well as rock samples were collected by TV-Grab. The study of the seafloor classification with Simrad EM120 multi-beam echosounder has been conducted on the 'Precious Stone Mountain' hydrothermal field. The result indicates that seafloor materials around the hydrothermal field can be characterized into three types, such as the fresh lava, hydrothermal sediment, and altered rock.

  7. Can we discover dual-component thermal WIMP dark matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We address the question of whether the upcoming generation of dark matter search experiments and colliders will be able to discover if the dark matter in the Universe has two components of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). We outline a model-independent approach, and we study the specific cases of (1) direct detection with low-background 1 ton noble-gas detectors and (2) a 0.5 TeV center of mass energy electron-positron linear collider. We also analyze the case of indirect detection via two gamma-ray lines, which would provide a verification of such a discovery, although multiple gamma-ray lines can in principle originate from the annihilation of a single dark matter particle. For each search ''channel'', we outline a few assumptions to relate the very small set of parameters we consider (defining the masses of the two WIMPs and their relative abundance in the overall dark matter density) with the relevant detection rates. We then draw general conclusions on which corners of a generic dual-component dark matter scenario can be explored with current and next generation experiments. We find that in all channels the ideal setup is one where the relative mass splitting between the two WIMP species is of order 1, and where the two dark matter components contribute in a ratio close to 1:1 to the overall dark matter content of the Universe. Interestingly, in the case of direct detection, future experiments might detect multiple states even if only ∼ 10% of the energy-density of dark matter in the Universe is in the subdominant species

  8. Discovering Higgs Bosons of the MSSM using Jet Substructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kribs, Graham D.; Martin, Adam; Roy, Tuhin S.; Spannowsky, Michael

    2010-06-01

    We present a qualitatively new approach to discover Higgs bosons of the MSSM at the LHC using jet substructure techniques applied to boosted Higgs decays. These techniques are ideally suited to the MSSM, since the lightest Higgs boson overwhelmingly decays to b{bar b} throughout the entire parameter space, while the heavier neutral Higgs bosons, if light enough to be produced in a cascade, also predominantly decay to b{bar b}. The Higgs production we consider arises from superpartner production where superpartners cascade decay into Higgs bosons. We study this mode of Higgs production for several superpartner hierarchies: m{sub {tilde q}},m{sub {tilde g}} > m{sub {tilde W}},{sub {tilde B}} > m{sub h} + {mu}; m{tilde q};m{sub {tilde q}},m{sub {tilde g}} > m{sub {tilde W}},{sub {tilde B}} > m {sub h,H,A} + {mu}; and m{sub {tilde q}},m{sub {tilde g}} > m{sub {tilde W}} > m{sub h} + {mu} with m{sub {tilde B}} {approx} {mu}. In these cascades, the Higgs bosons are boosted, with pT > 200 GeV a large fraction of the time. Since Higgs bosons appear in cascades originating from squarks and/or gluinos, the cross section for events with at least one Higgs boson can be the same order as squark/gluino production. Given 10 fb{sup -1} of 14 TeV LHC data, with m{sub {tilde q}} {approx}< 1 TeV, and one of the above superpartner mass hierarchies, our estimate of S{radical} B of the Higgs signal is sufficiently high that the b{bar b} mode can become the discovery mode of the lightest Higgs boson of the MSSM.

  9. An integrated framework for discovering digital library collections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CALHOUN Karen

    2005-01-01

    Information seekers are generally on their own to discover and use a research library's growing array of digital collections, and coordination of these collections' development and maintenance is often not optimal. The frequent lack of a conscious design for how collections fit together is of equal concern because it means that research libraries are not making the most of the substantial investments they are making in digital initiatives. This paper proposes a framework for a research library's digital collections that offers integrated discovery and a set of best practices to underpin collection building, federated access, and sustainability. The framework's purpose is to give information seekers a powerful and easy way to search across existing and future collections and to retrieve integrated sets of results. The paper and its recommendations are based upon research undertaken by the author and a team of librarians and technologists at Cornell University Library. The team conducted structured interviews of forty-five library staff members involved in digital collection building at Cornell, studied an inventory of the library's more than fifty digital collections, and evaluated seven existing Open Archives Initiative (OAI) and federated search production or prototype systems. The author will discuss herteam's research and the rationale for their recommendations to: present a cohesive view of the library's digital collections for both browsing and searching at the object level; take a programmatic (rather than project-based)approach to digital collection building; require that all new digital collections conform to library-developed and agreed-upon OAI best practices for data providers; and implement organizational structures to sustain the library's digital collections over the long term.

  10. High-School Student Discovers Strange Astronomical Object

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    A West Virginia high-school student analyzing data from a giant radio telescope has discovered a new astronomical object -- a strange type of neutron star called a rotating radio transient. Lucas Bolyard, a sophomore at South Harrison High School in Clarksburg, WV, made the discovery while participating in a project in which students are trained to scrutinize data from the National Science Foundation's giant Robert C. Byrd Green The project, called the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC), is a joint project of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and West Virginia University (WVU), funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation. Bolyard made the discovery in March, after he already had studied more than 2,000 data plots from the GBT and found nothing. "I was home on a weekend and had nothing to do, so I decided to look at some more plots from the GBT," he said. "I saw a plot with a pulse, but there was a lot of radio interference, too. The pulse almost got dismissed as interference," he added. Nonetheless, he reported it, and it went on a list of candidates for West Virginia University astronomers Maura McLaughlin and Duncan Lorimer to re-examine, scheduling new observations of the region of sky from which the pulse came. Disappointingly, the follow-up observations showed nothing, indicating that the object was not a normal pulsar. However, the astronomers explained to Bolyard that his pulse still might have come from a rotating radio transient. Confirmation didn't come until July. Bolyard was at the NRAO's Green Bank Observatory with fellow PSC students. The night before, the group had been observing with the GBT in the wee hours, and all were very tired. Then Lorimer showed Bolyard a new plot of his pulse, reprocessed from raw data, indicating that it is real, not interference, and that Bolyard is likely the discoverer of one of only about 30 rotating radio transients known. Suddenly, Bolyard said, he wasn't tired anymore. "That news made me full

  11. Radiofrequency encoded angular-resolved light scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buckley, Brandon W.; Akbari, Najva; Diebold, Eric D.;

    2015-01-01

    Encoded Angular-resolved Light Scattering (REALS), this technique multiplexes angular light scattering in the radiofrequency domain, such that a single photodetector captures the entire scattering spectrum from a particle over approximately 100 discrete incident angles on a single shot basis. As a proof...

  12. Decomposition of time-resolved tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmid, P.J.; Violato, D.; Scarano, F.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted on a transitional water jet at a Reynolds number of Re = 5,000. Flow fields have been obtained by means of time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry capturing all relevant spatial and temporal scales. The measured threedimensional flow fields have

  13. Approaches for Resolving Dynamic IP Addressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Schubert; Hui, Siu Cheung; Yip, See Wai; He, Yulan

    1997-01-01

    A problem with dynamic Internet protocol (IP) addressing arises when the Internet connection is through an Internet provider since the IP address is allocated only at connection time. This article examines a number of online and offline methods for resolving the problem. Suggests dynamic domain name system (DNS) and directory service look-up are…

  14. Rotationally resolved infrared spectroscopy of adamantane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Pirali; V. Boudon; J. Oomens; M. Vervloet

    2012-01-01

    We present the first rotationally resolved spectra of adamantane (C10H16) applying gas-phase Fourier transform infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy. High-resolution IR spectra are recorded in the 33-4500 cm−1range using as source of IR radiation both synchrotron radiation (at the AILES beamline of

  15. Rotationally resolved infrared spectroscopy of adamantane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pirali, O.; Boudon, V.; Oomens, J.; Vervloet, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first rotationally resolved spectra of adamantane (C(10)H(16)) applying gas-phase Fourier transform infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy. High-resolution IR spectra are recorded in the 334500 cm(-1)range using as source of IR radiation both synchrotron radiation (at the AILES beamlin

  16. Inverse Computation and the Universal Resolving Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We survey fundamental concepts for inverse programming and thenpresent the Uni v ersal Resolving Algorithm, an algorithm for inverse computation in a first-orde r , functional programming language. We discuss the key concepts of the algorithm, including a three-step approach based on the notion of a perfect process tree, and demonstrate our implementation with several examples of inverse computation.

  17. Resolving Negotiations Impasses in Public Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Richard G., Ed.

    This publication is intended to help school management personnel become more familiar with the nature of and the means for resolving negotiations impasses. Aspects of mediation and arbitration are discussed, and basic negotiating techniques that help school boards win arbitration cases are presented. Also provided are a sample arbitration case…

  18. Resolved resonance parameters for 236Np

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multilevel Breit-Wigner parameters were obtained for fission cross-section representation in the 0.01-33 eV energy region from evaluation of a 236Np experimental fission cross-section in the resolved resonance region. (author)

  19. Resolving deconvolution ambiguity in gene alternative splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubbell Earl

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many gene structures it is impossible to resolve intensity data uniquely to establish abundances of splice variants. This was empirically noted by Wang et al. in which it was called a "degeneracy problem". The ambiguity results from an ill-posed problem where additional information is needed in order to obtain an unique answer in splice variant deconvolution. Results In this paper, we analyze the situations under which the problem occurs and perform a rigorous mathematical study which gives necessary and sufficient conditions on how many and what type of constraints are needed to resolve all ambiguity. This analysis is generally applicable to matrix models of splice variants. We explore the proposal that probe sequence information may provide sufficient additional constraints to resolve real-world instances. However, probe behavior cannot be predicted with sufficient accuracy by any existing probe sequence model, and so we present a Bayesian framework for estimating variant abundances by incorporating the prediction uncertainty from the micro-model of probe responsiveness into the macro-model of probe intensities. Conclusion The matrix analysis of constraints provides a tool for detecting real-world instances in which additional constraints may be necessary to resolve splice variants. While purely mathematical constraints can be stated without error, real-world constraints may themselves be poorly resolved. Our Bayesian framework provides a generic solution to the problem of uniquely estimating transcript abundances given additional constraints that themselves may be uncertain, such as regression fit to probe sequence models. We demonstrate the efficacy of it by extensive simulations as well as various biological data.

  20. Data mining algorithm for discovering matrix association regions (MARs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gautam B.; Krawetz, Shephan A.

    2000-04-01

    Lately, there has been considerable interest in applying Data Mining techniques to scientific and data analysis problems in bioinformatics. Data mining research is being fueled by novel application areas that are helping the development of newer applied algorithms in the field of bioinformatics, an emerging discipline representing the integration of biological and information sciences. This is a shift in paradigm from the earlier and the continuing data mining efforts in marketing research and support for business intelligence. The problem described in this paper is along a new dimension in DNA sequence analysis research and supplements the previously studied stochastic models for evolution and variability. The discovery of novel patterns from genetic databases as described is quite significant because biological patterns play an important role in a large variety of cellular processes and constitute the basis for gene therapy. Biological databases containing the genetic codes from a wide variety of organisms, including humans, have continued their exponential growth over the last decade. At the time of this writing, the GenBank database contains over 300 million sequences and over 2.5 billion characters of sequenced nucleotides. The focus of this paper is on developing a general data mining algorithm for discovering regions of locus control, i.e. those regions that are instrumental for determining cell type. One such type of element of locus control are the MARs or the Matrix Association Regions. Our limited knowledge about MARs has hampered their detection using classical pattern recognition techniques. Consequently, their detection is formulated by utilizing a statistical interestingness measure derived from a set of empirical features that are known to be associated with MARs. This paper presents a systematic approach for finding associations between such empirical features in genomic sequences, and for utilizing this knowledge to detect biologically interesting

  1. Classifying transcription factor targets and discovering relevant biological features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeLisi Charles

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important goal in post-genomic research is discovering the network of interactions between transcription factors (TFs and the genes they regulate. We have previously reported the development of a supervised-learning approach to TF target identification, and used it to predict targets of 104 transcription factors in yeast. We now include a new sequence conservation measure, expand our predictions to include 59 new TFs, introduce a web-server, and implement an improved ranking method to reveal the biological features contributing to regulation. The classifiers combine 8 genomic datasets covering a broad range of measurements including sequence conservation, sequence overrepresentation, gene expression, and DNA structural properties. Principal Findings (1 Application of the method yields an amplification of information about yeast regulators. The ratio of total targets to previously known targets is greater than 2 for 11 TFs, with several having larger gains: Ash1(4, Ino2(2.6, Yaf1(2.4, and Yap6(2.4. (2 Many predicted targets for TFs match well with the known biology of their regulators. As a case study we discuss the regulator Swi6, presenting evidence that it may be important in the DNA damage response, and that the previously uncharacterized gene YMR279C plays a role in DNA damage response and perhaps in cell-cycle progression. (3 A procedure based on recursive-feature-elimination is able to uncover from the large initial data sets those features that best distinguish targets for any TF, providing clues relevant to its biology. An analysis of Swi6 suggests a possible role in lipid metabolism, and more specifically in metabolism of ceramide, a bioactive lipid currently being investigated for anti-cancer properties. (4 An analysis of global network properties highlights the transcriptional network hubs; the factors which control the most genes and the genes which are bound by the largest set of regulators. Cell-cycle and

  2. Chandra Observations of Eight Sources Discovered by INTEGRAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsick, John A.; Krivonos, Roman; Wang, Qinan; Bodaghee, Arash; Chaty, Sylvain; Rahoui, Farid; Rodriguez, Jerome; Fornasini, Francesca M.

    2016-01-01

    We report on 0.3-10 keV observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory of eight hard X-ray sources discovered within 8° of the Galactic plane by the International Gamma-ray Astrophysics Laboratory satellite. The short (˜5 ks) Chandra observations of the IGR source fields have yielded very likely identifications of X-ray counterparts for three of the IGR sources: IGR J14091-6108, IGR J18088-2741, and IGR J18381-0924. The first two have very hard spectra in the Chandra band that can be described by a power law with photon indices of Γ = 0.6 ± 0.4 and -{0.7}-0.3+0.4, respectively (90% confidence errors are given), and both have a unique near-IR counterpart consistent with the Chandra position. IGR J14091-6108 also displays a strong iron line and a relatively low X-ray luminosity, and we argue that the most likely source type is a cataclysmic variable (CV), although we do not completely rule out the possibility of a high mass X-ray binary. IGR J18088-2741 has an optical counterpart with a previously measured 6.84 hr periodicity, which may be the binary orbital period. We also detect five cycles of a possible 800-950 s period in the Chandra light curve, which may be the compact object spin period. We suggest that IGR J18088-2741 is also most likely a CV. For IGR J18381-0924, the spectrum is intrinsically softer with {{Γ }}={1.5}-0.4+0.5, and it is moderately absorbed, NH = (4 ± 1) × 1022 cm-2. There are two near-IR sources consistent with the Chandra position, and they are both classified as galaxies, making it likely that IGR J18381-0924 is an active galactic nucleus. For the other five IGR sources, we provide lists of nearby Chandra sources, which may be used along with further observations to identify the correct counterparts, and we discuss the implications of the low inferred Chandra count rates for these five sources.

  3. The Most Distant Object Yet Discovered in the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    ESO's Very Large Telescope has shown that a faint gamma-ray burst detected last Thursday is the signature of the explosion of the earliest, most distant known object in the Universe (a redshift of 8.2). The explosion apparently took place more than 13 billion years ago, only about 600 million years after the Big Bang. ESO PR Photo 17a/09 Artist's impression of a gamma-ray burst Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are powerful flashes of energetic gamma-rays lasting from less than a second to several minutes. They release a tremendous amount of energy in this short time making them the most powerful events in the Universe. They are thought to be mostly associated with the explosion of stars that collapse into black holes. The gamma-ray burst GRB 090423 was detected by the NASA/STFC/ASI Swift satellite during the morning (CEST) of Thursday 23 April 2009. The 10 second burst was located in the constellation of Leo (the Lion). It was soon being followed by a whole range of telescopes on the ground, including the 2.2-metre ESO/MPG telescope at La Silla and ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at Paranal, both in Chile. VLT infrared observations, made 17 hours after the burst detection, allowed astronomers to establish the distance to the explosion. "We find that the light coming from the explosion has been stretched, or redshifted, considerably by the expansion of the Universe", says Nial Tanvir, the leader of the team who made the VLT observations. "With a redshift of 8.2 this is the most remote gamma-ray burst ever detected, and also the most distant object ever discovered -- by some way." Because light moves at a finite speed, looking farther into the Universe means looking back in time. The explosion occurred when the Universe was about 600 million years old, less than 5 percent of its current age. It is believed that the very first stars only formed when the Universe was between 200 and 400 million years old. "This discovery proves the importance of gamma-ray bursts in probing the

  4. Time-resolved photoemission using attosecond streaking

    CERN Document Server

    Nagele, Stefan; Wais, Michael; Wachter, Georg; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically study time-resolved photoemission in atoms as probed by attosecond streaking. We review recent advances in the study of the photoelectric effect in the time domain and show that the experimentally accessible time shifts can be decomposed into distinct contributions that stem from the field-free photoionization process itself and from probe-field induced corrections. We perform accurate quantum-mechanical as well as classical simulations of attosecond streaking for effective one-electron systems and determine all relevant contributions to the time delay with attosecond precision. In particular, we investigate the properties and limitations of attosecond streaking for the transition from short-ranged potentials (photodetachment) to long-ranged Coulomb potentials (photoionization). As an example for a more complex system, we study time-resolved photoionization for endohedral fullerenes $A$@$\\text{C}_{60}$ and discuss how streaking time shifts are modified due to the interaction of the $\\text{C}_...

  5. Resolving resonances in R-matrix calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a technique to obtain detailed resonance structures from R-matrix calculations of atomic cross sections for both collisional and radiative processes. The resolving resonances (RR) method relies on the QB method of Quigley-Berrington (Quigley L, Berrington K A and Pelan J 1998 Comput. Phys. Commun. 114 225) to find the position and width of resonances directly from the reactance matrix. Then one determines the symmetry parameters of these features and generates an energy mesh whereby fully resolved cross sections are calculated with minimum computational cost. The RR method is illustrated with the calculation of the photoionization cross sections and the unified recombination rate coefficients of Fe XXIV, O VI, and Fe XVII. The RR method reduces numerical errors arising from unresolved R-matrix cross sections in the computation of synthetic bound-free opacities, thermally averaged collision strengths and recombination rate coefficients. (author)

  6. Component resolved testing for allergic sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skamstrup Hansen, Kirsten; Poulsen, Lars K

    2010-01-01

    Component resolved diagnostics introduces new possibilities regarding diagnosis of allergic diseases and individualized, allergen-specific treatment. Furthermore, refinement of IgE-based testing may help elucidate the correlation or lack of correlation between allergenic sensitization and allergic...... disease. Novel tools to predict severe outcomes and to plan for allergen-specific treatment are necessary, and because only a small amount of blood is needed to test for a multitude of allergens and allergenic components, component resolved diagnostics is promising. A drawback is the risk of overdiagnosis...... and misinterpretation of the complex results of such tests. Also, the practical use and selection of allergenic components need to be evaluated in large studies including well-characterized patients and healthy, sensitized controls and with representation of different geographical regions....

  7. Photon-Number Resolving by Superconductive Devices

    OpenAIRE

    LOLLI Lapo

    2012-01-01

    Strong interests on optical quantum based metrology, quantum information and particularly in quantum cryptography are continuously growing. The main limitations to the developments in these fields are due to non-ideal devices: both single photon sources and single photon detectors. In these field of applications, detectors require to be able to resolve the number of photons in a light pulse. Presently state of the art indicates that classical semiconductor light detectors (i.e. avalanche phot...

  8. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy with SDSS

    CERN Document Server

    Bickerton, Steven; Hettinger, Thomas; Beers, Timothy; Huang, Sonya

    2011-01-01

    We present a brief technical outline of the newly-formed 'Detection of Spectroscopic Differences over Time' (DS/DT) project. Our collaboration is using the individual exposures from the SDSS spectroscopic archive to produce a uniformly-processed set of time-resolved spectra. Here we provide an overview of the properties and processing of the available data, and highlight the wide range of time baselines present in the archive.

  9. Resolving Bias in Laser Ablation Geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowring, James; Horstwood, Matthew; Gehrels, George

    2013-06-01

    Increasingly, scientific investigations requiring geochronology utilize laser ablation (LA)-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), taking advantage of the efficiency and throughput possible for uranium-thorium-lead (U-Th-Pb) dating. A number of biases exist when comparing data among laboratories and an ongoing community-based effort is working to resolve and eliminate these biases to improve the accuracy of scientific interpretation based on these data.

  10. The Mass Census for RESOLVE and ECO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Kathleen D.; Kannappan, Sheila; Stark, David; Moffett, Amanda J.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Baker, Ashley; Lagos, Claudia; Norris, Mark A.; RESOLVE Team

    2016-01-01

    We quantify the stellar, baryonic, and dynamical mass census for galaxies and groups in the volume-limited RESOLVE and ECO surveys, which are complete for galaxies with baryonic mass >10^9 Msun. First, we present optimized methods of stellar and gas mass estimation based on newly reprocessed multi-wavelength imaging, deep fractional mass-limited 21cm data, and a probability density field approach to the photometric gas fractions technique. Second, we examine the stellar and baryonic mass functions for RESOLVE and ECO, including an analysis of how galaxy mass functions vary between distinct, physically motivated group halo mass regimes. These "conditional" mass functions display complex substructure suggesting that the galaxy population is shaped through satellite destruction and merging during the process of multiple-occupancy group formation. Third, we present the group-integrated stellar and baryonic mass functions and examine the cold baryon fraction of groups as a function of group halo mass. We find that group halo mass measurements based on abundance matching and dynamical mass estimates sometimes disagree, pointing to the existence of a wide range of cold baryon fractions in groups at intermediate halo mass. Finally, we provide a brief overview of RESOLVE's dynamical mass census, which relies on new 3D optical spectroscopy probing both stellar and gas kinematics. This work has been supported by the NSF through grants AST-0955368 and OCI-1156614, the NC Space Grant Graduate Research Fellowship Program, and a UNC Royster Society of Fellows Dissertation Completion Fellowship.

  11. Resolved Debris Discs Around A Stars in the Herschel DEBRIS Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, Mark; Sibthorpe, Bruce; Matthews, Brenda C; Wyatt, Mark C; Duchêne, Gaspard; Kavelaars, J J; Rodriguez, David; Greaves, Jane S; Koning, Alice; Vican, Laura; Rieke, George H; Su, Kate Y L; Moro-Martín, Amaya; Kalas, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The majority of debris discs discovered so far have only been detected through infrared excess emission above stellar photospheres. While disc properties can be inferred from unresolved photometry alone under various assumptions for the physical properties of dust grains, there is a degeneracy between disc radius and dust temperature that depends on the grain size distribution and optical properties. By resolving the disc we can measure the actual location of the dust. The launch of Herschel, with an angular resolution superior to previous far-infrared telescopes, allows us to spatially resolve more discs and locate the dust directly. Here we present the nine resolved discs around A stars between 20 and 40 pc observed by the DEBRIS survey. We use these data to investigate the disc radii by fitting narrow ring models to images at 70, 100 and 160 {\\mu}m and by fitting blackbodies to full spectral energy distributions. We do this with the aim of finding an improved way of estimating disc radii for unresolved sys...

  12. Time-resolved study of Higgs mode in superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimano, Ryo

    The behavior of superconductors far from equilibrium has been intensively studied over decades. Goals of these studies are the elucidation of bosonic fluctuations essential for the pairing mechanisms, the manifestation of competing orders or hidden phases, and the optical manipulation of superconductivity. The study of collective modes is crucially important for these perspectives as it provides the information on the dynamics of order parameters in non-equilibirium states. Generally, collective modes in ordered phases associated with spontaneous symmetry breaking are classified into 1) gapless phase modes and 2) gapped amplitude modes. In superconductors, the phase mode is eaten by gauge field, according to the Anderson-Higgs mechanism. The remaining amplitude mode is recently termed as Higgs mode from its analogy to the Higgs boson in particle physics. Despite its long history of investigation, unambiguous observation of Higgs mode has remained elusive. This is because the Higgs mode does not have a charge nor electric dipole and therefore it does not couple directly to the electromagnetic field. Here we report on our recent observation of Higgs mode in s-wave superconductors by using THz-pump and THz-probe spectroscopy technique. After nonadiabatic excitation near the superconducting gap energy with monocycle THz pulses, Higgs mode was observed as oscillations in the transmission of THz probe pulse. The resonant nonlinear coupling between the Higgs mode and coherent radiation field was also discovered, resulting in an efficient third order harmonic generation of the incident THz radiation. The extension of experiments to multiband superconductors and unconventional superconductors will be discussed. Time-resolved study of Higgs mode in superconductors.

  13. Aerosol Optical Thickness comparisons between NASA LaRC Airborne HSRL and AERONET during the DISCOVER-AQ field campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarino, A. J.; Ferrare, R. A.; Burton, S. P.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R. R.; Berkoff, T.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Hoff, R. M.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J.; McGill, M. J.; Yorks, J. E.; Lantz, K. O.; Michalsky, J. J.; Hodges, G.

    2013-12-01

    The first- and second-generation NASA airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidars (HSRL-1 and HSRL-2) have been deployed on board the NASA Langley Research Center King Air aircraft during the Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and VERtically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) field campaigns. These included deployments during July 2011 over Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, MD and during January and February 2013 over the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of California and also a scheduled deployment during September 2013 over Houston, TX. Measurements of aerosol extinction, backscatter, and depolarization are available from both HSRL-1 and HSRL-2 in coordination with other participating research aircraft and ground sites. These measurements constitute a diverse data set for use in characterizing the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols, aerosol optical thickness (AOT), as well as the Mixing Layer Height (MLH). HSRL AOT is compared to AOT measured by the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) and long-term AERONET sites. For the 2011 campaign, comparisons of AOT at 532nm between HSRL-1 and AERONET showed excellent agreement (r = 0.98, slope = 1.01, intercept = 0.037) when the King Air flights were within 2.5 km of the ground site and 10 min from the retrieval time. The comparison results are similar for the 2013 DISCOVER-AQ campaign in the SJV. Additional ground-based (MPL) and airborne (CPL) lidar data were used to help screen for clouds in the AERONET observations during the SJV portion. AOT values from a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) located at the Porterville, CA site during the SJV campaign are also compared to HSRL-2 AOT. Lastly, using the MLH retrieved from HSRL aerosol backscatter profiles, we describe the distribution of AOT relative to the MLH.

  14. Open Imaging Nephelometer Scattering Measurements from the 2014 Discover-AQ Field Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, R.; Orozco, D.; Dolgos, G.; Martins, J. V.

    2014-12-01

    After greenhouse gases, aerosols are thought to have the largest contribution to total atmospheric radiative forcing, but they are frequently cited as the single largest source of uncertainty among all anthropogenic radiative forcing components. Remote sensing allows for global measurements of aerosol properties, however validation of these measurements and the climatological assumptions used in their retrieval algorithms require high quality in situ sampling. The Laboratory for Aerosols, Clouds and Optics (LACO) at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) has developed the Imaging Nephelometer, a novel and highly accurate instrument concept designed to significantly aid in situ optical scattering measurements. Imaging Nephelometers allow for measurements of scattering coefficient, phase function and polarized phase function over a wide angular range of 2 to 178 degrees with an angular resolution of less than half of a degree. The simple layout of these devices also permits the construction of an instrument that is compact enough to be deployed on a variety of airborne platforms. Additionally, a version of this instrument that is capable of in situ sampling in open-air, free from sample biases potentially introduced by an inlet or containment apparatus, has recently been constructed. This instrument, known as the Open Imaging NEPHelometer (OI-NEPH), was flown on the P3 aircraft in the summer of 2014 during the Colorado portion of the Discover-AQ field mission (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality). This presentation will focus on the results of the OI-NEPH's successful science flights during this field experiment. The P3's flights during this mission focused primarily on vehicle, agriculture, biomass burning and industrial processing emissions over the Colorado Front Range. Emphasis will be placed on any observed differences in scattering properties between the measurements

  15. Astronomers Discover Most Massive Neutron Star Yet Known

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Green Bank Telescope (GBT) have discovered the most massive neutron star yet found, a discovery with strong and wide-ranging impacts across several fields of physics and astrophysics. "This neutron star is twice as massive as our Sun. This is surprising, and that much mass means that several theoretical models for the internal composition of neutron stars now are ruled out," said Paul Demorest, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "This mass measurement also has implications for our understanding of all matter at extremely high densities and many details of nuclear physics," he added. Neutron stars are the superdense "corpses" of massive stars that have exploded as supernovae. With all their mass packed into a sphere the size of a small city, their protons and electrons are crushed together into neutrons. A neutron star can be several times more dense than an atomic nucleus, and a thimbleful of neutron-star material would weigh more than 500 million tons. This tremendous density makes neutron stars an ideal natural "laboratory" for studying the most dense and exotic states of matter known to physics. The scientists used an effect of Albert Einstein's theory of General Relativity to measure the mass of the neutron star and its orbiting companion, a white dwarf star. The neutron star is a pulsar, emitting lighthouse-like beams of radio waves that sweep through space as it rotates. This pulsar, called PSR J1614-2230, spins 317 times per second, and the companion completes an orbit in just under nine days. The pair, some 3,000 light-years distant, are in an orbit seen almost exactly edge-on from Earth. That orientation was the key to making the mass measurement. As the orbit carries the white dwarf directly in front of the pulsar, the radio waves from the pulsar that reach Earth must travel very close to the white dwarf. This close passage causes them to be delayed in their arrival by the distortion of

  16. Chandra Discovers Eruption and Pulsation in Nova Outburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has discovered a giant outburst of X-rays and unusual cyclical pulsing from a white dwarf star that is closely orbiting another star -- the first time either of these phenomena has been seen in X-rays. The observations are helping scientists better understand the thermonuclear explosions that occur in certain binary star systems. The observations of Nova Aquilae were reported today at the "Two Years of Science with Chandra" symposium by an international team led by Sumner Starrfield of Arizona State University. "We found two important results in our Chandra observations. The first was an underlying pulsation every 40 minutes in the X-ray brightness, which we believe comes from the cyclical expansion and contraction of the outer layers of the white dwarf," said Starrfield. "The other result was an enormous flare of X-rays that lasted for 15 minutes. Nothing like this has been seen before from a nova, and we don't know how to explain it." Novas occur on a white dwarf (a star which used up all its nuclear fuel and shrank to roughly the size of the Earth) that is orbiting a normal size star. Strong gravity tides drag hydrogen gas off the normal star and onto the white dwarf, where it can take more than 100,000 years for enough hydrogen to accumulate to ignite nuclear fusion reactions. Gradually, these reactions intensify until a cosmic-sized hydrogen bomb blast results. The outer layers of the white dwarf are then blown away, producing a nova outburst that can be observed for a period of months to years as the material expands into space. "Chandra has allowed us to see deep into the gases ejected by this giant explosion and extract unparalleled information on the evolution of the white dwarf whose surface is exploding," said Jeremy Drake of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. The brightening of Nova Aquilae was first detected by optical astronomers in December 1999. "Although this star is at a distance of more than 6

  17. 32 CFR 644.533 - Contamination discovered after return of land to owner, or sale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Contamination discovered after return of land to owner, or sale. 644.533 Section 644.533 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF... Other Contamination from Proposed Excess Land and Improvements § 644.533 Contamination discovered...

  18. LIGO Discovers the Merger of Two Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    is: how do binary black holes form? Two primary mechanisms have been proposed:A binary star system contains two stars that are each massive enough to individually collapse into a black hole. If the binary isnt disrupted during the two collapse events, this forms an isolated black-hole binary.Single black holes form in dense cluster environments and then because they are the most massive objects sink to the center of the cluster. There they form pairs through dynamical interactions.Now that were able to observe black-hole binaries through gravitational-wave detections, one way we could distinguish between the two formation mechanisms is from spin measurements. If we discover a clear preference for the misalignment of the two black holes spins, this would favor formation in clusters, where theres no reason for the original spins to be aligned.The current, single detection is not enough to provide constraints, but if we can compile a large enough sample of events, we can start to present a statistical case favoring one channel over the other.What does GW150914 mean for the future of gravitational-wave detection?The fact that Advanced LIGO detected an event even before the start of its first official observing run is certainly promising! The LIGO team estimates that the volume the detectors can probe will still increase by at least a factor of ~10 as the observing runs become more sensitive and of longer duration.Aerial view of the Virgo interferometer near Pisa, Italy. [Virgo Collaboration]In addition, LIGO is not alone in the gravitational-wave game. LIGOs counterpart in Europe, Virgo, is also undergoing design upgrades to increase its sensitivity. Within this year, Virgo should be able to take data simultaneously with LIGO, allowing for better localization of sources. And the launch of (e)LISA, ESAs planned space-based interferometer, will grant us access to a new frequency range, opening a further window to the gravitational-wave sky.The detection of GW150914 marks

  19. Time resolved spectroscopic studies on some nanophosphors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Harish Chander; Santa Chawla

    2008-06-01

    Time resolved spectroscopy is an important tool for studying photophysical processes in phosphors. Present work investigates the steady state and time resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopic characteristics of ZnS, ZnO and (Zn, Mg)O nanophosphors both in powder as well as thin film form. Photoluminescence (PL) of ZnS nanophosphors typically exhibit a purple/blue emission peak termed as self activated (SA) luminescence and emission at different wavelengths arising due to dopant impurities e.g. green emission for ZnS : Cu, orange emission for ZnS : Mn and red emission for ZnS : Eu. The lifetimes obtained from decay curves range from ns to ms level and suggest the radiative recombination path involving donor–acceptor pair recombination or internal electronic transitions of the impurity atom. A series of ZnMgO nanophosphor thin films with varied Zn : Mg ratios were prepared by chemical bath deposition. Photoluminescence (PL) excitation and emission spectra exhibit variations with changing Mg ratio. Luminescence lifetime as short as 10-10 s was observed for ZnO and ZnMgO (100 : 10) nanophosphors. With increasing Mg ratio, PL decay shifts into microsecond range. ZnO and ZnMgO alloys up to 50% Mg were prepared as powder by solid state mixing and sintering at high temperature in reducing atmosphere. Time resolved decay of PL indicated lifetime in the microsecond time scale. The novelty of the work lies in clear experimental evidence of dopants (Cu, Mn, Eu and Mg) in the decay process and luminescence life times in II–VI semiconductor nanocrystals of ZnS and ZnO. For ZnS, blue self activated luminescence decays faster than Cu and Mn related emission. For undoped ZnO nanocrystals, PL decay is in the nanosecond range whereas with Mg doping the decay becomes much slower in the microsecond range.

  20. Superlubricity: A Paradox about Confined Fluids Resolved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingxi; Granick, Steve

    2004-08-01

    Using the method of Frantz and Salmeron to cleave mica [Tribol. Lett.TRLEFS1023-8883 5, 151 (1998)10.1023/A:1019149910047] we investigate alkane fluids in a surface forces apparatus and confirm several predictions of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. An oscillatory force-distance profile is observed for the methyl-branched alkane, squalane. Boundary slip is inferred from the frictional sliding of molecularly thin fluids and also from the hydrodynamic flow of thicker films. These findings resolve the paradox that prior experiments disagreed with these aspects of MD predictions, and demonstrate that exceptionally low energy dissipation is possible when fluids move past solid surfaces that are sufficiently smooth.

  1. Spatially Resolved Analysis of Bragg Selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Sabel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper targets an inherent control of optical shrinkage in photosensitive polymers, contributing by means of spatially resolved analysis of volume holographic phase gratings. Point by point scanning of the local material response to the Gaussian intensity distribution of the recording beams is accomplished. Derived information on the local grating period and grating slant is evaluated by mapping of optical shrinkage in the lateral plane as well as through the depth of the layer. The influence of recording intensity, exposure duration and the material viscosity on the Bragg selectivity is investigated.

  2. Some results on resolvable incomplete block designs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Minqian; FANG; Kaitai

    2005-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the uniformity of a certain kind of resolvable incomplete block (RIB for simplicity) design which is called the PRIB design here. A sufficient and necessary condition is obtained, under which a PRIB design is the most uniform in the sense of a discrete discrepancy measure, and the uniform PRIB design is shown to be connected. A construction method for such designs via a kind of U-type designs is proposed, and an existence result of these designs is given. This method sets up an important bridge between PRIB designs and U-type designs.

  3. Spatially resolved measurement of rock core porosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marica, F; Chen, Q; Hamilton, A; Hall, C; Al, T; Balcom, B J

    2006-01-01

    Density weighted, centric scan, Conical SPRITE MRI techniques are applied in the current work for local porosity measurements in fluid saturated porous media. The methodology is tested on a series of sandstone core samples. These samples vary in both porosity and degree of local heterogeneity due to bedding plane structure. The MRI porosity measurement is in good agreement with traditional gravimetric measurements of porosity. Spatially resolved porosity measurements reveal significant porosity variation in some samples. This novel MRI technique should have applications to the characterization of local porosity in a wide variety of porous media.

  4. Degenerated codimension 1 crossings and resolvent estimates

    CERN Document Server

    Duyckaerts, Thomas; Jecko, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we analyze the propagation of Wigner measures of a family of solutions to a system of semi-classical pseudodifferential equations presenting eigenvalues crossings on hypersurfaces. We prove the propagation along classical trajectories under a geometric condition which is satisfied for example as soon as the Hamiltonian vector fields are transverse or tangent at finite order to the crossing set. We derive resolvent estimates for semi-classical Schr\\"odinger operator with matrix-valued potential under a geometric condition of the same type on the crossing set and we analyze examples of degenerate situations where one can prove transfers between the modes.

  5. Angle-resolved time delay in photoemission

    CERN Document Server

    Wätzel, Jonas; Pavlyukh, Yaroslav; Berakdar, Jamal

    2014-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the relative time delay of photoelectrons originating from different atomic subshells of noble gases. This quantity was measured via attosecond streaking and studied theoretically by Schultze et al. [Science 328, 1658 (2010)] for neon. A substantial discrepancy was found between the measured and the calculated values of the relative time delay. Several theoretical studies were put forward to resolve this issue, e.g., by including correlation effects. In the present paper we explore a further aspect, namely the directional dependence of time delay. In contrast to neon, for argon target a strong angular dependence of time delay is found near a Cooper minimum.

  6. Resolving The Moth at Millimeter Wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Ricarte, Angelo; Hughes, A Meredith; Duchêne, Gaspard; Williams, Jonathan P; Andrews, Sean M; Wilner, David J

    2013-01-01

    HD 61005, also known as "The Moth," is one of only a handful of debris disks that exhibit swept-back "wings" thought to be caused by interaction with the ambient interstellar medium (ISM). We present 1.3 mm Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of the debris disk around HD 61005 at a spatial resolution of 1.9 arcsec that resolve the emission from large grains for the first time. The disk exhibits a double-peaked morphology at millimeter wavelengths, consistent with an optically thin ring viewed close to edge-on. To investigate the disk structure and the properties of the dust grains we simultaneously model the spatially resolved 1.3 mm visibilities and the unresolved spectral energy distribution. The temperatures indicated by the SED are consistent with expected temperatures for grains close to the blowout size located at radii commensurate with the millimeter and scattered light data. We also perform a visibility-domain analysis of the spatial distribution of millimeter-wavelength flux, incorporating constr...

  7. Characterization and verification of ACAM slit functions for trace gas retrievals during the 2011 DISCOVER-AQ flight campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Liu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Airborne Compact Atmospheric Mapper (ACAM, an ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared spectrometer, has been flown on board the NASA UC-12 aircraft during the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality campaigns to provide remote sensing observations of tropospheric and boundary layer pollutants from its radiance measurements. To improve the trace gas retrieval from ACAM measurements, we perform detailed characterization and verification of ACAM slit functions. The wavelengths and slit functions of ACAM measurements are characterized for the air quality channel (~304–500 nm through cross-correlation with a high-resolution solar irradiance reference spectrum after necessarily accounting for atmospheric gas absorption and the Ring effect in the calibration process. The derived slit functions, assuming a hybrid combination of asymmetric Gaussian and top-hat slit functions, agree very well with the laboratory-measured slit functions. Comparisons of trace gas retrievals between using derived and measured slit functions demonstrate that the cross-correlation technique can be reliably used to characterize slit functions for trace gas retrievals.

  8. Resolving the Issues with Flywheel Position Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehrmann, Elizabeth A.

    2004-01-01

    For the past few years, the Advanced Electrical Systems Branch here at NASA Glenn has been pursuing research in the area of flywheels. The purpose of these pursuits has been t o explore the potential for flywheels to replace current battery-powered systems in space. So far it has been learned that flywheels offer large momentum storage capacity, comparatively small volume, high durability, and near- complete discharge capabilities, all of which are advancements over the existing nickel hydrogen and nickel cadmium batteries. Another significant advantage of flywheels is the potential they offer for combining the function of attitude control with energy storage. During the summer of 2004, I worked with Dr. Barbara Kenny in the Advanced Electrical Systems Branch, supporting the work she is doing by analyzing and testing some new components for the new Generation-2 flywheel. To monitor the speed and angular position of the flywheel rotor, a once-around (OAR) signal along with a sensorless algorithm is used. The OAR signal is used for the magnetic bearings that keep the flywheel suspended for frictionless operation. The sensorless algorithm is used for the flywheel motor/generator control. The OAR is generated from position sensors that monitor a circular plate. The plate has a cut down the middle such that one half of the circle is on a slightly lower level than the other. Every half-turn, or 180, the sensors detect the "cut" on the plate, and trigger the OAR, telling the computer that the rotor has made half a revolution. This, however, doesn't provide needed detailed information about the angular position of the rotor, since it only provides a signal alert every half- revolution. This is enough information for the magnetic bearing control but is insufficient for the motor/generator control. A new resolver was designed such that it would give continuous angle information rather than the 180 degree information of the OAR. The new resolver has two separate observable

  9. Resolved motion rate and resolved acceleration servo-control of wheeled mobile robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muir, P.F.; Neuman, C.P. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA); Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1989-01-01

    Accurate motion control of wheeled mobile robots (WMRs) is required for their application to autonomous, semi-autonomous and teleoperated tasks. The similarities between WMRs and stationary manipulators suggest that current, successful, model-based manipulator control algorithms may be applied to WMRs. Special characteristics of WMRs including higher-pairs, closed-chains, friction and unactuated and unsensed joints require innovative modeling methodologies. The WMR modeling challenge has been recently overcome, thus enabling the application of manipulator control algorithms to WMRs. This realization lays the foundation for significant technology transfer from manipulator control to WMR control. We apply two Cartesian-space manipulator control algorithms: resolved motion rate (kinematics-based) and resolved acceleration (dynamics-based) control to WMR servo-control. We evaluate simulation studies of two exemplary WMRs: Uranus (a three degree-of-freedom WMR constructed at Carnegie Mellon University), and Bicsun-Bicas (a two degree-of-freedom WMR being constructed at Sandia National Laboratories) under the control of these algorithms. Although resolved motion rate servo-control is adequate for the control of Uranus, resolved acceleration servo-control is required for the control of the mechanically simpler Bicsun-Bicas because it exhibits more dynamic coupling and nonlinearities. Successful accurate motion control of these WMRs in simulation is driving current experimental research studies. 18 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Resolving the agriculture-petroleum conflict: the experience of cacao smallholders in Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherr, S.J.

    1983-01-01

    In 1972, PEMEX, the Mexican national oil company, discovered huge reserves of oil and natural gas along the Gulf Coast, and began intensive exploitation in Tabasco and northern Chiapas states. Severe conflict between PEMEX and the agricultural economy of Tabasco seemed certain. But despite problems of labor scarcity, inflation, migration, pollution, agricultural production 1974 to 1979 increased for the state's major products - cacao, coconut, beef, and bananas. This study analyzes how agriculture-petroleum conflicts have been resolved in Tabasco, and how relevant its experience is to other agricultural areas undergoing rapid large-scale industrial development. Cacao farming was chosen as a case study. Detailed farm budget, family employment, and technical production data were used to document farm production strategies. Research results suggest that resolution of agriculture-petroleum conflicts depends on: demographic conditions, employment conditions, agricultural prices, petroleum company flexibility, government development policy, and farmer political strength. Support for the campesino sector is critical.

  11. Time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy of structurally disordered K3WO3F3 crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omelkov, S. I.; Spassky, D. A.; Pustovarov, V. A.; Kozlov, A. V.; Isaenko, L. I.

    2016-08-01

    Three emission centers of exciton-like origin, with distinct relaxation time, emission and excitation spectra were revealed in K3WO3F3 and described taking into account its structural disordering. Low-temperature monoclinic phase of K3WO3F3 features few anion sites with mixed oxygen/fluorine occupancy per [WO3F3] octahedron. Therefore, different kinds of distorted octahedra form, providing different luminescence centers. The time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy technique was applied to distinguish these centers. The simultaneous thermal quenching of them above ∼200 K was qualitatively explained involving dynamic structural disorder of the compound. The energy transfer mechanism between centers was found and tentatively described by the diffusion of excitons. Apart from intrinsic luminescence, the PL of defect-related centers was discovered and the role of shallow charge carrier traps in the low-temperature persistent luminescence was revealed.

  12. Time-resolved photoabsorption in finite systems: A first-principles NEGF approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetto, E.; Uimonen, A.-M.; van Leeuwen, R.; Stefanucci, G.

    2016-03-01

    We describe a first-principles NonEquilibrium Green's Function (NEGF) approach to time-resolved photoabsortion spectroscopy in atomic and nanoscale systems. The method is used to highlight a recently discovered dynamical correlation effect in the spectrum of a Krypton gas subject to a strong ionizing pump pulse. We propose a minimal model that captures the effect, and study the performance of time-local approximations versus time-nonlocal ones. In particular we implement the time-local Hartree-Fock and Markovian second Born (2B) approximation as well as the exact adiabatic approximation within the Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory framework. For the time-nonlocal approximation we instead use the 2B one. We provide enough convincing evidence for the fact that a proper description of the spectrum of an evolving admixture of ionizing atoms requires the simultaneous occurrence of correlation and memory effects.

  13. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the S(1s) core level of a c(2 x 2)S/Ni(001) are analyzed to determine the spacing between the S overlayer and the first and second Ni layers. ARPEFS is a type of photoelectron diffraction measurement in which the photoelectron kinetic energy is swept typically from 100 to 600 eV. By using this wide range of intermediate energies we add high precision and theoretical simplification to the advantages of the photoelectron diffraction technique for determining surface structures. We report developments in the theory of photoelectron scattering in the intermediate energy range, measurement of the experimental photoemission spectra, their reduction to ARPEFS, and the surface structure determination from the ARPEFS by combined Fourier and multiple-scattering analyses. 202 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Resolved CCD Photometry of Pluto and Charon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly resolved CCD images of Pluto and Charon near maximum separation are measured with point spread function fitting techniques to determine independent magnitudes and an accurate separation for Pluto and Charon. A measured separation of 0.923 + or - 0.005 arcsec at a position angle of 173.3 + or - 0.3 deg on June 18, 1987 UT produced a value of 19558.0 + or - 153.0 km for the radius of Charon's orbit. An apparent B magnitude of 14.877 + or - 0.009 and (B-I) color of 1.770 + or - 0.015 are determined for Pluto, while Charon is fainter with B = 18.826 + or - 0.011 and slightly bluer with (B-I) = 1.632 + or - 0.018. 18 references

  15. Resolved Host Studies of Stellar Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Levesque, Emily M

    2016-01-01

    The host galaxies of nearby (z<0.3) core-collapse supernovae and long-duration gamma-ray bursts offer an excellent means of probing the environments and populations that produce these events' varied massive progenitors. These same young stellar progenitors make LGRBs and SNe valuable and potentially powerful tracers of star formation, metallicity, the IMF, and the end phases of stellar evolution. However, properly utilizing these progenitors as tools requires a thorough understanding of their formation and, consequently, the physical properties of their parent host environments. This review looks at some of the recent work on LGRB and SN hosts with resolved environments that allows us to probe the precise explosion sites and surrounding environments of these events in incredible detail.

  16. Atomically resolved images of lithium purple bronze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinke, Melanie; Bienert, Robert; Waelsch, Michael; Podlich, Tatjana; Matzdorf, Rene [Experimentalphysik II, Universitaet Kassel (Germany); Jin, Rongying [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lousiana State University (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The lithium molybdenum purple bronze Li{sub 0.9}Mo{sub 6}O{sub 17} is a quasi 1D metal at room temperature showing Luttinger liquid physics. The highly anisotropic conductivity runs along the crystallographic b axis where Mo-O chains, formed by the shared edges of the MoO{sub 6} octahedra, provide the electrical transport. Li{sub 0.9}Mo{sub 6}O{sub 17} samples were investigated with low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. By cleaving the samples at low temperatures (60 K) we obtained atomically resolved images of the surface. In these images the Mo-O chains are visible, which are covered by layers of MoO{sub 6} octahedra and MoO{sub 4} tetrahedra.

  17. Resolving Microlensing Events with Triggered VLBI

    CERN Document Server

    Karami, M; Rahvar, S; Reid, M

    2016-01-01

    Microlensing events provide a unique capacity to study the stellar remnant population of the Galaxy. Optical microlensing suffers from a near complete degeneracy between the mass, the velocity and the distance. However, a subpopulation of lensed stars, Mira variable stars, are also radio bright, exhibiting strong SiO masers. These are sufficiently bright and compact to permit direct imaging using existing very long baseline interferometers such as the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). We show that these events are relatively common, occurring at a rate of ~ 40 per year of which 1.3 per year are associated with Galactic black holes. Features in the associated images, e.g., the Einstein ring, are sufficiently well resolved to fully reconstruct the lens properties, enabling the measurement of mass, distance, and tangential velocity of the lensing object to a precision better than 15%. Future radio microlensing surveys conducted with upcoming radio telescopes combined with modest improvements in the VLBA could inc...

  18. Spatially Resolved Images and Solar Irradiance Variability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Kariyappa

    2008-03-01

    The Sun is the primary source of energy that governs both the terrestrial climate and near-earth space environment. Variations in UV irradiances seen at earth are the sum of global (solar dynamo) to regional (active region, plage, network, bright points and background) solar magnetic activities that can be identified through spatially resolved photospheric, chromospheric and coronal features. In this research, the images of CaII K-line (NSO/Sac Peak) have been analysed to segregate the various chromospheric features.We derived the different indices and estimated their contribution from the time series data to total CaII K emission flux and UV irradiance variability. A part of the important results from this research is discussed in this paper.

  19. Spatially resolved spectroscopy on semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roessler, Johanna

    2009-02-20

    Cleared edge overgrowth (CEO) nanostructures are identified and studied by 1D und 2D {mu}PL mapping scans and by time-resolved and power-dependent measurements. Distinct excitonic ground states of 2fold CEO QDs with large localization energies are achieved. The deeper localization reached as compared to the only other report on 2fold CEO QDs in literature is attributed to a new strain-free fabrication process and changed QW thickness in [001] growth. In order to achieve controlled manipulation of 2fold CEO QDs the concept of a CEO structure with three top gates and one back gate is presented. Due to the complexity of this device, a simpler test structure is realized. Measurements on this test structure confirm the necessity to either grow significantly thicker overgrowth layers or to provide separate top gates in all three spatial direction to controllably manipulate 2fold CEO QDs with an external electric field. (orig.)

  20. Flip-flop resolving time test circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, F.; Chaney, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    Integrated circuit (IC) flip-flop resolving time parameters are measured by wafer probing, without need of dicing or bonding, throught the incorporation of test structures on an IC together with the flip-flop to be measured. Several delays that are fabricated as part of the test circuit, including a voltage-controlled delay with a resolution of a few picosecs, are calibrated as part of the test procedure by integrating them into, and out of, the delay path of a ring oscillator. Each of the delay values is calculated by subtracting the period of the ring oscillator with the delay omitted from the period with the delay included. The delay measurement technique is sufficiently general for other applications. The technique is illustrated for the case of the flip-flop parameters of a 5-micron feature size NMOS circuit.

  1. Resolving unfinished business: relating process to outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Leslie S; Malcolm, Wanda

    2002-04-01

    This study related the process of the resolution of unfinished business with a significant other to therapeutic outcome in a population of 26 clients who suffered from various forms of interpersonal problems and childhood maltreatment. Clients were treated in emotion-focused, experiential therapy with gestalt empty-chair dialogues. Those clients who expressed previously unmet interpersonal needs to the significant other, and manifested a shift in their view of the other, had significantly better treatment outcomes. The presence of the specific process of resolution in the clients' empty-chair dialogues was also found to be a better predictor of outcome than the working alliance. Degree of emotional arousal was found to discriminate between resolvers and nonresolvers. PMID:11952199

  2. Resolving mixing in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Read, J I; Agertz, O

    2009-01-01

    Standard formulations of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) are unable to resolve mixing at fluid boundaries. We use an error and stability analysis of the generalised SPH equations of motion to prove that this is due to two distinct problems. The first is a leading order error in the momentum equation. This should decrease with increasing neighbour number, but does not because numerical instabilities cause the kernel to be irregularly sampled. We identify two important instabilities: the clumping instability and the banding instability, and we show that both are cured by a suitable choice of kernel. The second problem is the local mixing instability (LMI). This occurs as particles attempt to mix on the kernel scale, but are unable to due to entropy conservation. The result is a pressure discontinuity at boundaries that pushes fluids of different entropy apart. We cure the LMI by using a temperature weighted density estimate that both reduces errors in the continuity equation and allows individual particle...

  3. Resolvent-Techniques for Multiple Exercise Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Sören, E-mail: christensen@math.uni-kiel.de [Christian–Albrechts-University in Kiel, Mathematical Institute (Germany); Lempa, Jukka, E-mail: jukka.lempa@hioa.no [Oslo and Akershus University College, School of business, Faculty of Social Sciences (Norway)

    2015-02-15

    We study optimal multiple stopping of strong Markov processes with random refraction periods. The refraction periods are assumed to be exponentially distributed with a common rate and independent of the underlying dynamics. Our main tool is using the resolvent operator. In the first part, we reduce infinite stopping problems to ordinary ones in a general strong Markov setting. This leads to explicit solutions for wide classes of such problems. Starting from this result, we analyze problems with finitely many exercise rights and explain solution methods for some classes of problems with underlying Lévy and diffusion processes, where the optimal characteristics of the problems can be identified more explicitly. We illustrate the main results with explicit examples.

  4. Resolving singularities in (0,2) models

    CERN Document Server

    Distler, Jacques; Morrison, D

    1996-01-01

    In contrast to the familiar (2,2) case, the singularities which arise in the (0,2) setting can be associated with degeneration of the base Calabi-Yau manifold {\\it and/or}\\/ with degenerations of the gauge bundle. We study a variety of such singularities and give a procedure for resolving those which can be cured perturbatively. Among the novel features which emerge are models in which smoothing singularities in the base yields a gauge {\\it sheaf}\\/ as opposed to a gauge bundle as the structure to which left moving fermions couple. Supersymmetric \\sigma-models with target data being an appropriate sheaf on a Calabi-Yau space therefore appear to be the natural arena for N=1 string models in four dimensions. We also indicate a variety of singularities which would require a nonperturbative treatment for their resolution and briefly discuss applications to heterotic models on K3.

  5. Fermions in a warped resolved conifold

    CERN Document Server

    Dantas, D M; Almeida, C A S

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the localization of the spinorial field in a braneworld built as a warped product between a 3-brane and a 2-cycle of the resolved conifold. This scenario provides a geometric flow that controls the singularity at the origin and changes the properties of the fermion in this background. Furthermore, due the cylindrical symmetry according to the 3-brane and a smoothed warp factor, this geometry can be regarded as a near brane correction of the string-like branes. This geometry allows a normalizable and well-defined massless mode whose decay and value on the brane depend on the resolution parameter. For the Kaluza-Klein modes, resolution parameter also controls the height of the barrier of the volcano potential.

  6. From anorthite to vesuvianite: an excursion through the minerals first discovered in Italy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GiovanniFerraris; MarcoCiriotti

    2003-01-01

    With regard to the number of mineral species first dis-covered in a particular country, Italy ranks fourth, being preceded only by USA, Russia and Germany. Important rock-forming minerals like analcime, anorthite, anortho-clase, antigorite, celadonite, diopside, dolomite,forsterite, humite, leucite, lime, lizardite, magnesiochlo-ritoid, magnesite, nepheline, and sepiolite are among the 240 species first discovered in Italy. Other significant first Italian findings are some important index mineralsof the UHP metamorphism (ellenbergerite, phosphoel-lenbergerite, magnesiodumortierite, and magnesiostau-rolite; second occurrence of coesite) which were discov-ered in the well-known and first reported UHP outcrop of the Dora-Màira massif Italy is also the native land of about 30 zeolites and of the two most abundant modern species: balangeroite and carlosturanite, which are rock-forming asbestos-like minerals of serpentinites in the western Alps.

  7. Discovering Patterns in Multi-neuronal Spike Trains using the Frequent Episode Method

    CERN Document Server

    Unnikrishnan, K P; Sastry, P S

    2007-01-01

    Discovering the 'Neural Code' from multi-neuronal spike trains is an important task in neuroscience. For such an analysis, it is important to unearth interesting regularities in the spiking patterns. In this report, we present an efficient method for automatically discovering synchrony, synfire chains, and more general sequences of neuronal firings. We use the Frequent Episode Discovery framework of Laxman, Sastry, and Unnikrishnan (2005), in which the episodes are represented and recognized using finite-state automata. Many aspects of functional connectivity between neuronal populations can be inferred from the episodes. We demonstrate these using simulated multi-neuronal data from a Poisson model. We also present a method to assess the statistical significance of the discovered episodes. Since the Temporal Data Mining (TDM) methods used in this report can analyze data from hundreds and potentially thousands of neurons, we argue that this framework is appropriate for discovering the `Neural Code'.

  8. Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan. Discovering Sustainable Solutions to Power and Secure America’s Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2010-09-01

    Sustainability is fundamental to the Department of Energy’s research mission and operations as reflected in the Department’s Strategic Plan. Our overarching mission is to discover the solutions to power and secure America’s future.

  9. Discover Earth: Earth's Energy Budget or Can You Spare a Sun?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Tom; Peters, Dale E.; Steeley, Jeanne

    1999-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-sponsored project for teachers of grades 5-12, designed to: enhance understanding of the Earth as an integrated system enhance the interdisciplinary approach to science instruction, and provide classroom materials that focus on those goals. Discover Earth is conducted by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies in collaboration with Dr. Eric Barron, Director, Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University; and Dr. Robert Hudson, Chair, the Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland at College Park.

  10. What Can the Duration of Discovered Cartels Tell Us About the Duration of Cartels?

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph E. Harrington, Jr.; Yanhao Wei

    2014-01-01

    There are many data sets based on the population of discovered cartels and it is from this data that average cartel duration and the annual probability of cartel death are estimated. It is recognized, however, that these estimates could be biased because the population of discovered cartels may not be a representative sample of the population of cartels. This paper constructs a simple birth-death-discovery process to theoretically investigate what it is we can learn about cartels from data on...

  11. The Best and the Brightest: Tidal Disruption Events Discovered by ASAS-SN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren-Son Holoien, Thomas; ASAS-SN

    2016-01-01

    Even today only human eyes scan the entire optical sky for the violent, variable, and transient events that shape our universe. The All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") is changing this by monitoring the visible sky to 17th magnitude every 2-3 days using multiple telescopes in the northern and southern hemispheres. Having been in operation for two years, ASAS-SN is discovering new transient objects daily, and while the primary goal of ASAS-SN is a complete survey of bright, nearby supernovae, ASAS-SN also discovers many other interesting nearby transients. Notably, ASAS-SN has discovered three bright tidal disruption events (TDEs), the three closest such events ever discovered at optical wavelengths, providing the opportunity to obtain detailed follow-up data at many wavelengths. ASAS-SN is discovering roughly 1 TDE for every 60 Type Ia supernovae, a rate that is significantly higher than other surveys. By virtue of their brightness, TDEs discovered by ASAS-SN can also be studied in unprecedented detail for many months, allowing deeper insight into their physics.

  12. A resolved debris disk around the candidate planet-hosting star HD95086

    CERN Document Server

    Moór, A; Kóspál, Á; Szabó, Gy M; Apai, D; Balog, Z; Csengeri, T; Grady, C; Henning, Th; Juhász, A; Kiss, Cs; Pascucci, I; Szulágyi, J; Vavrek, R

    2013-01-01

    Recently, a new planet candidate was discovered on direct images around the young (10-17 Myr) A-type star HD95086. The strong infrared excess of the system indicates that, similarly to HR8799, {\\ss} Pic, and Fomalhaut, the star harbors a circumstellar disk. Aiming to study the structure and gas content of the HD95086 disk, and to investigate its possible interaction with the newly discovered planet, here we present new optical, infrared and millimeter observations. We detected no CO emission, excluding the possibility of an evolved gaseous primordial disk. Simple blackbody modeling of the spectral energy distribution suggests the presence of two spatially separate dust belts at radial distances of 6 and 64 AU. Our resolved images obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory reveal a characteristic disk size of ~6.0x5.4 arcsec (540x490 AU) and disk inclination of ~25 degree. Assuming the same inclination for the planet candidate's orbit, its re-projected radial distance from the star is 62 AU, very close to th...

  13. Resolving issues concerning Eskdalemuir geomagnetic hourly values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Macmillan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The hourly values of the geomagnetic field from 1911 to 1931 derived from measurements made at Eskdalemuir observatory in the UK, and available online from the World Data Centre for Geomagnetism at http://www.wdc.bgs.ac.uk/, have now been corrected. Previously they were 2-point averaged and transformed from the original north, east and vertical down values in the tables in the observatory yearbooks. This paper documents the course of events from discovering the post-processing done to the data to the final resolution of the problem. As it was through the development of a new index, the Inter-Hour Variability index, that this post-processing came to light, we provide a revised series of this index for Eskdalemuir and compare it with that from another European observatory. Conclusions of studies concerning long-term magnetic field variability and inferred solar variability, whilst not necessarily consistent with one another, are not obviously invalidated by the incorrect hourly values from Eskdalemuir. This series of events illustrates the challenges that lie ahead in removing any remaining errors and inconsistencies in the data holdings of different World Data Centres.

  14. Regolith Volatile Characterization (RVC) in RESOLVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Captain, Janine; Lueck, Dale; Gibson, Tracy; Levine, Lanfang

    2010-01-01

    Resource investigation in the lunar poles is of importance to the potential impact of in-situ resource utilization (ISRU). The RESOLVE project developed a payload to investigate the permanently shadowed areas of the lunar poles and demonstrate ISRU technology. As a part of the RESOLVE project, the regolith volatile characterization (RVC) subsystem was designed to examine the release of volatiles from sample cores. The test sample was heated in the reactor to release the volatiles where they were analyzed with gas chromatography. Subsequently, the volatile sample was introduced into the lunar water resource demonstration (LWRD) subsystem where the released hydrogen and water were selectively captured. The objective of the Regolith Volatile Characterization (RVC) subsystem was to heat the crushed core sample and determine the desorption of volatile species of interest. The RVC subsystem encompasses the reactor and the system for volatile analysis. The system was designed to analyze H2, He, CO, CO2, N2, 02, CH4, H2S and H2O. The GC chosen for this work is a Siemens MicroSAM process GC with 3 columns and 8 TCD detectors. Neon was chosen as the carrier gas to enhance the analysis of hydrogen and helium.The limit of detection for the gases is approx.1000ppm for H2, CO. CO2 , N2, O2 and H2 S. The limit of detection for CH4 is approx.4000ppm and the water limit of detection is -10000 ppm with a sample analysis time of 2-3 minutes. These values (with the exception of water and H2S) were determined by dilution of a six gas mixture from Scott Gas (5% CO2, CO, O2, N2, 4% CH4 and H2) using mass flow controllers (MFC5). Water was calibrated at low levels using an in house relative humidity (RH) generator. H 2S and high concentrations of H2 were calibrated by diluting a pure stream of gas with MFCs. Higher concentrations of N2 and 02 were calibrated using Air again diluting with MFCs. There were three modification goals for the GC in EBU2 that would allow this process GC to be

  15. Young segment-scale eruption discovered on the eastern Galapagos rift during the GALREX 2011 Expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embley, R. W.; White, S. M.; Hammond, S. R.; McClinton, J. T.; Rex, C.

    2011-12-01

    New high resolution mapping with an EM302 multibeam system and seafloor observations made with the Little Hercules remotely operated vehicle (ROV) during the July 2011 GALREX expedition have discovered a very recent eruption along Segment III (Christie et al., 2005) centered at 88 deg 19.5'W on the eastern Galapagos spreading center (GSC). The site was chosen for detailed study after a water column survey using a towed CTD package identified intense particle plumes rising up to 250m above seafloor along the entire segment (see abstracts by Baker et al. and Holden et al., this meeting). The segment is characterized by ridge-and-valley terrain with the most recent neovolcanic ridge extending, respectively, 25 km west and 20 km east of a central low-relief area that is quasi-circular, ~2 km radius, less than 30 m high. The neovolcanic ridge, revealed by the EM302 bathymetry to be a generally hummocky edifice less than 1 km wide and under ~40 m high, is cut by a very small axial graben barely resolved in the EM302 bathymetry. Two areas were surveyed during five ROV dives, four on the central area near 88 deg 18.5'W and one dive at 14 km east at 88 deg 10.8'W. A third high intensity plume target near the western extremity of the segment at 88 deg 27.2'W was not investigated using the ROV. The recent lobate and pillow lava flows were emplaced in narrow grabens along and adjacent to the neovolcanic ridge. In several places, the flow was observed to fill the axial graben. It is likely that the flow thickness ranges from meters to 10's of meters, depending upon the pre-eruption graben size and local effusion variations. However, no long, channel-fed lava flows were found. Flow boundaries based on preliminary ROV navigation average less than 100 meters across-axis. The lobate lavas all had a very similar glassy appearance and negligible sediment cover, making them easy to recognize amid the surrounding, older flows. The age of these lavas appeared visually younger than the

  16. Resolving the inner disk of UX Orionis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreplin, A.; Madlener, D.; Chen, L.; Weigelt, G.; Kraus, S.; Grinin, V.; Tambovtseva, L.; Kishimoto, M.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: The cause of the UX Ori variability in some Herbig Ae/Be stars is still a matter of debate. Detailed studies of the circumstellar environment of UX Ori objects (UXORs) are required to test the hypothesis that the observed drop in photometry might be related to obscuration events. Methods: Using near- and mid-infrared interferometric AMBER and MIDI observations, we resolved the inner circumstellar disk region around UX Ori. Results: We fitted the K-, H-, and N-band visibilities and the spectral energy distribution (SED) of UX Ori with geometric and parametric disk models. The best-fit K-band geometric model consists of an inclined ring and a halo component. We obtained a ring-fit radius of 0.45 ± 0.07 AU (at a distance of 460 pc), an inclination of 55.6 ± 2.4°, a position angle of the system axis of 127.5 ± 24.5°, and a flux contribution of the over-resolved halo component to the total near-infrared excess of 16.8 ± 4.1%. The best-fit N-band model consists of an elongated Gaussian with a HWHM ~ 5 AU of the semi-major axis and an axis ration of a/b ~ 3.4 (corresponding to an inclination of ~72°). With a parametric disk model, we fitted all near- and mid-infrared visibilities and the SED simultaneously. The model disk starts at an inner radius of 0.46 ± 0.06 AU with an inner rim temperature of 1498 ± 70 K. The disk is seen under an nearly edge-on inclination of 70 ± 5°. This supports any theories that require high-inclination angles to explain obscuration events in the line of sight to the observer, for example, in UX Ori objects where orbiting dust clouds in the disk or disk atmosphere can obscure the central star. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at Paranal Observatory under program IDs: 090.C-0769, 074.C-0552.

  17. Discovering Technicolor

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, J R; Azuelos, G; Del Debbio, L; Del Nobile, E; Di Chiara, S; Hapola, T; Jarvinen, M; Lowdon, P J; Maravin, Y; Masina, I; Nardecchia, M; Pica, C; Sannino, F

    2011-01-01

    We provide a pedagogical introduction to extensions of the Standard Model in which the Higgs is composite. These extensions are known as models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking or, in brief, Technicolor. Material covered includes: motivations for Technicolor, the construction of underlying gauge theories leading to minimal models of Technicolor, the comparison with electroweak precision data, the low energy effective theory, the spectrum of the states common to most of the Technicolor models, the decays of the composite particles and the experimental signals at the Large Hadron Collider. The level of the presentation is aimed at readers familiar with the Standard Model but who have little or no prior exposure to Technicolor. Several extensions of the Standard Model featuring a composite Higgs can be reduced to the effective Lagrangian introduced in the text. We establish the relevant experimental benchmarks for Vanilla, Running, Walking, and Custodial Technicolor, and a natural fourth family of lept...

  18. Discovering Treewidth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodlaender, H.L.

    2005-01-01

    Treewidth is a graph parameter with several interesting theoretical and practical applications. This survey reviews algorithmic results on determining the treewidth of a given graph, and finding a tree decomposition of small width. Both theoretical results, establishing the asymptotic computational

  19. Discovering Ningxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU YUE

    2010-01-01

    @@ Crystal rivers, blue skies and flowering woods surround this city-you probably won't believe it is Yinchuan, the capital city of the Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region in less developed northwest China. Shrugging off its former image of being a badly polluted region due to the coal mining industry, a lifeline for millions of local people for decades,the region is stunning tourists from around the globe with its natural and cultural wonders.

  20. Selecting Resolving Agents with Respect to Their Eutectic Compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeleczky, Zsolt; Semsey, Sándor; Bagi, Péter; Pálovics, Emese; Faigl, Ferenc; Fogassy, Elemér

    2016-03-01

    In order to develop a resolution procedure for a given racemic compound, the first and the most important step is finding the most suitable resolving agent. We studied 18 individual resolutions that were carried out with resolving agents having high eutectic composition. We found that very high enantiomeric excess values were obtained in all cases. We assume that the eutectic composition of a given resolving agent is one of the most important properties that should always be considered during the search for the most efficient resolving agent. PMID:26797938

  1. Enzyme reactions and their time resolved measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses experimental strategies in data collection with the Laue method and summarises recent results using synchrotron radiation. Then, an assessment is made of the progress towards time resolved studies with protein crystals and the problems that remain. The paper consists of three parts which respectively describe some aspects of Laue diffraction, recent examples of structural results from Laue diffraction, and kinetic Laue crystallography. In the first part, characteristics of Laue diffraction is discussed first, focusing on the harmonics problems, spatials problem, wavelength normalization, low resolution hole, data completeness, and uneven coverage of reciprocal space. Then, capture of the symmetry unique reflection set is discussed focusing on the effect of wavelength range on the number of reciprocal lattice points occupying diffracting positions, effect of crystal to film distance and the film area and shape on the number of reflections captured, and effect of crystal symmetry on the number of unique reflections within the number of reflections captured. The second part addresses the determination of the structure of turkey egg white lysozyme, and calcium binding in tomato bushy stunt virus. The third part describes the initiation of reactions in enzyme crystals, picosecond Laue diffraction at high energy storage rings, and detectors. (N.K.)

  2. Numerical solution of under-resolved detonations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosatto, Luca; Vigevano, Luigi

    2008-02-01

    A new fractional-step method is proposed for the numerical solution of high speed reacting flows, where the chemical time scales are often much smaller than the fluid dynamical time scales. When the problem is stiff, because of insufficient spatial/temporal resolution, a well-known spurious numerical phenomenon occurs in standard finite volume schemes: the incorrect calculation of the speed of propagation of discontinuities. The new method is first illustrated considering a one-dimensional scalar hyperbolic advection/reaction equation with stiff source term, which may be considered as a model problem to under-resolved detonations. During the reaction step, the proposed scheme replaces the cell average representation with a two-value reconstruction, which allows us to locate the discontinuity position inside the cell during the computation of the source term. This results in the correct propagation of discontinuities even in the stiff case. The method is proved to be second-order accurate for smooth solutions of scalar equations and is applied successfully to the solution of the one-dimensional reactive Euler equations for Chapman-Jouguet detonations.

  3. Temperature resolved reproduction of medieval luster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradell, T.; Molera, J.; Pantos, E.; Smith, A. D.; Martin, C. M.; Labrador, A.

    2008-01-01

    Luster is a golden metallic-like decoration produced on glazed ceramics since early Islamic times (Iraq, 9th AD). Luster is obtained by the reaction of a luster paint and the glaze surface over which it is applied. A temperature-resolved XRD experiment was designed to study the high temperature reactions in the luster paint while the luster layer is formed. The luster paint composition has been made based on the original luster paints found during the excavation of the 13th AD workshop site at Paterna (Valencia). The sulfo-reducing atmosphere created during the decomposition of cinnabar promotes the reduction of Cu2+ containing compounds to Cu+ and the presence of Hg vapours delays the precipitation of metal silver. Moreover, evidence of the formation of a melt in which the copper and silver-containing compounds dissolve has also been obtained. The thickness of the luster paint applied results in the formation of luster layers of different hues and colours. The use of a mixture of copper and silver paint results in the formation of dark-brown luster layer similar to the ones produced in early Islamic times in Iraq and showed also the characteristic blue iridescences.

  4. Comparing and Aggregating Partially Resolved Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Bansal, Mukul S; Fernández-Baca, David

    2009-01-01

    We define, analyze, and give efficient algorithms for two kinds of distance measures for rooted and unrooted phylogenies. For rooted trees, our measures are based on the topologies the input trees induce on triplets; that is, on three-element subsets of the set of species. For unrooted trees, the measures are based on quartets (four-element subsets). Triplet and quartet-based distances provide a robust and fine-grained measure of the similarities between trees. The distinguishing feature of our distance measures relative to traditional quartet and triplet distances is their ability to deal cleanly with the presence of unresolved nodes, also called polytomies. For rooted trees, these are nodes with more than two children; for unrooted trees, they are nodes of degree greater than three. Our first class of measures are parametric distances, where there is a parameter that weighs the difference between an unresolved triplet/quartet topology and a resolved one. Our second class of measures are based on Hausdorff d...

  5. The Resolved Stellar Halo of NGC 253

    CERN Document Server

    Bailin, Jeremy; Chappell, Samantha N; Radburn-Smith, David J; de Jong, Roelof S

    2011-01-01

    We have obtained Magellan/IMACS and HST/ACS imaging data that resolve red giant branch stars in the stellar halo of the starburst galaxy NGC 253. The HST data cover a small area, and allow us to accurately interpret the ground-based data, which cover 30% of the halo to a distance of 30 kpc, allowing us to make detailed quantitative measurements of the global properties and structure of a stellar halo outside of the Local Group. The geometry of the halo is significantly flattened in the same sense as the disk, with a projected axis ratio of b/a ~ 0.35 +/- 0.1. The total stellar mass of the halo is estimated to be M_halo ~ 2.5 +/- 1.5 x 10^9 M_sun, or 6% of the total stellar mass of the galaxy, and has a projected radial dependence that follows a power law of index -2.8 +/- 0.6, corresponding to a three-dimensional power law index of ~ -4. The total luminosity and profile shape that we measure for NGC 253 are somewhat larger and steeper than the equivalent values for the Milky Way and M31, but are well within t...

  6. Spatially resolved elemental distributions in articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, T.; Reibetanz, U.; Vogt, J.; Butz, T.; Werner, A.; Gründer, W.

    2001-07-01

    In this study, the nuclear microprobe technique is employed to analyse the chemistry of joint cartilage in order to correlate internal structures of the collagen network with the elemental distribution. The samples were taken from pig's knee joint. 30 μm thick coronar cross-sections were prepared by means of cryosectioning and freeze-drying. We performed simultaneously particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). Thus we obtained spatially resolved distributions of the elements H, C, N, O, P, S, Cl, K and Ca. The main components of the organic matrix are H, C, N and O. It was shown that their relations vary with the cartilage structures. It could be shown that zones with aligned collagen fibrils contain less sulphur and potassium but more chlorine. The higher chlorine concentration is remarkable because newest biochemical studies found that hypochloric acid is involved in cartilage degradation. Furthermore, the calcium distribution is still of great interest. Its correlation to structural changes inside the cartilage is still being discussed. It could be disproved that zones of higher calcium concentration are related to the aligned structures of the collagen network.

  7. Resolved Multifrequency Radio Observations of GG Tau

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, Sean M; Isella, Andrea; Birnstiel, Tilman; Rosenfeld, Katherine A; Wilner, David J; Perez, Laura M; Ricci, Luca; Carpenter, John M; Calvet, Nuria; Corder, Stuartt A; Deller, Adam T; Dullemond, Cornelis P; Greaves, Jane S; Harris, Robert J; Henning, Thomas; Kwon, Woojin; Lazio, Joseph; Linz, Hendrik; Mundy, Lee G; Sargent, Anneila I; Storm, Shaye; Testi, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    We present sub-arcsecond resolution observations of continuum emission associated with the GG Tau quadruple star system at wavelengths of 1.3, 2.8, 7.3, and 50 mm. These data confirm that the GG Tau A binary is encircled by a circumbinary ring at a radius of 235 AU with a FWHM width of ~60 AU. We find no clear evidence for a radial gradient in the spectral shape of the ring, suggesting that the particle size distribution is spatially homogeneous on angular scales of ~0.1". A central point source, likely associated with the primary component (GG Tau Aa), exhibits a composite spectrum from dust and free-free emission. Faint emission at 7.3 mm is observed toward the low-mass star GG Tau Ba, although its origin remains uncertain. Using these measurements of the resolved, multifrequency emission structure of the GG Tau A system, models of the far-infrared to radio spectrum are developed to place constraints on the grain size distribution and dust mass in the circumbinary ring. The non-negligible curvature present ...

  8. The role of refinery flaring events and bay breezes on a high surface ozone episode during the Houston, Texas DISCOVER-AQ field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughner, C.; Follette-Cook, M. B.; Fried, A.; Pickering, K. E.

    2015-12-01

    The highest observed surface ozone concentrations in the Houston metropolitan area in 2013 occurred on September 25, which coincided with the Texas DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) field campaign. Surface ozone was elevated throughout the Houston metropolitan area with maximum 8-hour average ozone peaking along the western shore of Galveston Bay, reaching 124 ppbv, almost 50 ppbv above the current EPA standard of 75 ppbv. The NASA P-3B aircraft observed plumes from refinery flares west and northwest of Galveston Bay that were transported over the water. Continental air pollution from the north was transported into the Houston metropolitan area where it mixed with locally generated emissions. A bay breeze circulation formed causing pollutants that were transported out over the water in the morning to recirculate back inland where they mixed with freshly emitted pollution near the bay breeze convergence zone. The highest surface ozone concentrations were reported near the bay breeze front. This ozone episode will be presented using measurements made during the DISCOVER-AQ field campaign and a CMAQ model simulation with integrated source apportionment, which tracks the contribution of emissions source groups and regions on ozone concentrations.

  9. The role of bay breezes and regional transport on a high surface ozone episode during the Houston, Texas DISCOVER-AQ field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughner, C.; Follette-Cook, M. B.; Pickering, K. E.; Estes, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The highest observed surface ozone concentrations in the Houston metropolitan area in 2013 occurred on September 25, which coincided with the Texas DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) field campaign. Surface ozone was elevated throughout the Houston metropolitan area. Maximum 8-hour average ozone peaked along the western shore of Galveston Bay, reaching 124 ppbv, almost 50 ppbv above the current EPA standard of 75 ppbv, at La Porte Sylvan Beach. Continental air pollution from the north and northeast was transported into the Houston metropolitan area where it mixed with locally generated emissions. A bay breeze circulation formed causing pollutants that were transported out over the water in the morning to recirculate back inland where they mixed with freshly emitted pollution near the bay breeze convergence zone. The highest surface ozone concentrations were reported near the bay breeze front at La Porte Sylvan Beach. This ozone episode will be presented using measurements made during the DISCOVER-AQ field campaign and WRF and CMAQ model simulations.

  10. Effects of PBL Mixing on Simulated NO2 Profile Shapes in the Coupled WRF/CMAQ Model and Comparison to Observations during DISCOVER-AQ July 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, C.; Follette-Cook, M. B.; Pickering, K. E.; Loughner, C.; Crawford, J. H.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Diskin, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    The first deployment of the NASA Earth Venture -1 DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) project was conducted during July 2011 in the Baltimore-Washington region. The P-3B aircraft provided in situ vertical profiles of meteorological quantities, trace gases, and aerosols over six Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) air quality monitoring sites over fourteen flight days. A major goal of DISCOVER-AQ is to better understand the processes, such as vertical mixing, controlling profile shape and linking column abundances to surface concentrations for NO2. Model vertical profiles are vital for obtaining accurate satellite retrievals of NO2 and thereby improving the applicability of satellite data for air quality analyses. Accurate simulatiions of the diurnal evolution of the NO2 profiles will be especially important for geostationary satellite retrievals. Model simulations performed using six commonly used PBL schemes with the coupled WRF/CMAQ model will be used to investigate the impact of vertical mixing on NO2 profile shapes. These modeled profiles will also be compared to the observed profiles to evaluate which PBL scheme (if any) best captures the in situ profiles, as well as PBL depth and the observed state of mixing. Lastly, the impact of PBL scheme on the column-surface relationship for NO2 will also be evaluated, and compared to observations.

  11. Large vertical gradient of reactive nitrogen oxides in the boundary layer: Modeling analysis of DISCOVER-AQ 2011 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuzhong; Wang, Yuhang; Chen, Gao; Smeltzer, Charles; Crawford, James; Olson, Jennifer; Szykman, James; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Knapp, David J.; Montzka, Denise D.; Wisthaler, Armin; Mikoviny, Tomas; Fried, Alan; Diskin, Glenn

    2016-02-01

    An often used assumption in air pollution studies is a well-mixed boundary layer (BL), where pollutants are evenly distributed. Because of the difficulty in obtaining vertically resolved measurements, the validity of the assumption has not been thoroughly evaluated. In this study, we use more than 200 vertical profiles observed in the Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) aircraft campaign in July 2011 to examine the vertical distributions of pollutants over the Washington-Baltimore area. While many long-lived species are well mixed in daytime, the observed average vertical profile of NOx shows a large negative gradient with increasing altitude in the BL. Our analysis suggests that the magnitude of the NOx gradient is highly sensitive to atmospheric stability. We investigate how parameterizations of the BL and land-surface processes impact vertical profiles in a 1-D chemical transport model, using three BL schemes (Asymmetric Convective Model version 2 (ACM2), Yonsei University (YSU), and Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ)) and two land-surface schemes (Noah and Rapid Update Cycle (RUC)). The model reasonably reproduces the median vertical profiles of NOx under different BL stability conditions within 30% of observations, classified based on potential temperature gradient and BL height. Comparisons with NOx observations for individual vertical profiles reveal that while YSU performs better in the turbulent and deep BL case, in general, ACM2 (RMSE = 2.0 ppbv) outperforms YSU (RMSE = 2.5 ppbv) and MYJ (RMSE = 2.2 ppbv). Results also indicate that the land-surface schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model have a small impact on the NOx gradient. Using model simulations, we analyze the impact of BL NOx gradient on the calculation of the ozone production rate and satellite NO2 retrieval. We show that using surface measurements and the well-mixed BL assumption causes a

  12. Extragalactic Transients Discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jonathan; Warren-Son Holoien, Thomas; ASAS-SN

    2016-01-01

    Even in the modern era, only human eyes can scan the entire optical sky for the violent, variable, and transient events that shape our universe. The "All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae" (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") is changing this by monitoring the extra-galactic sky down to V~17 mag every 2-3 days using multiple telescopes, hosted by Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, in the northern and southern hemispheres. The primary goal of ASAS-SN is to discover bright, nearby supernovae (SNe), we are discovering more than 60% of supernovae with V<17. Since June 2013, we have discovered 224 supernovae, 133 in 2015 alone (as of September 30, 2015). ASAS-SN has also discovered many other interesting extragalactic transients, including the three closest tidal disruption events (TDEs) ever discovered at optical wavelengths. The nearby nature of ASASSN discoveries allows detailed follow-up across a wide wavelength coverage; here we present some of these data on recent ASAS-SN extragalactic transients.

  13. Mode resolved density of atmospheric aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Aalto

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate the mode resolved density of ultrafine atmospheric particles measured in boreal forest environment. The method used here enables us to find the distinct density information for each mode in atmospheric fine particle population: the density values for nucleation, Aitken, and accumulation mode particles are presented. The experimental data was gained during 2 May 2005–19 May 2005 at the boreal forest measurement station "SMEAR II" in Hyytiälä, Southern Finland. The density values for accumulation mode varied from 1.1 to 2 g/cm3 (average 1.5 g/cm3 and for Aitken mode from 0.4 to 2 g/cm3 (average 0.97 g/cm3. As an overall trend during the two weeks campaign, the density value of Aitken mode was seen to gradually increase. With the present method, the time dependent behaviour of the particle density can be investigated in the time scale of 10 min. This allows us to follow the density evolution of the nucleation mode particles during the particle growth process following the nucleation burst. The density of nucleation mode particles decreased during the growth process. The density values for 15 nm particles were 1.2–1.5 g/cm3 and for grown 30 nm particles 0.5–1 g/cm3. These values are consistent with the present knowledge that the condensing species are semi-volatile organics, emitted from the boreal forest.

  14. /sup 238/U issues resolved and unresolved

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Saussure, G.; Smith, A.B.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction of 1 eV to 20 MeV neutrons with /sup 238/U is discussed with emphasis on recently resolved and remaining issues relevant to both application need and physical understanding. The apparent inability of older /sup 238/U evaluations to predict the measured /sup 238/U capture rate in thermal critical lattices has stimulated several recent precise measurements of the /sup 238/U cross sections, reanalysis of older data, and improved evaluations. The recent evaluations predict satisfactorily the /sup 238/U capture rate in thermal critical lattices. In the region from 1.5 to 4 keV there are differences of the order of 15%, sometimes larger, between the values of the neutron widths of the main resonances reported by several experimenters or obtained by different evaluators. Above 4 keV there are only sparse results of resonance analysis and most evaluations adopt a statistical treatment of the resonance structure. Some factors affecting the determination of the average properties of the resonance parameters are discussed. Above the inelastic-scattering threshold, energy-averaged neutron total, scattering, capture and fission cross sections are reviewed in a unified manner integrating measurement, calculation and evaluation. (n;n') and (n;2n') energy-transfer mechanisms are addressed. Particular attention is given to neutron capture, stressing precisions consistent with applied need. Fission properties are discussed including: prompt and delayed fission-neutron spectra and nubar, and fission-product yields. Physical understanding is assayed, with attention to compound-nucleus and direct-reaction mechanisms, and applications impact is illustrated in the context of fast-breeder-reactor performance. 95 references.

  15. 48 CFR 229.101 - Resolving tax problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Resolving tax problems..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS TAXES General 229.101 Resolving tax problems. (a... Counsels of the Navy and Air Force, and for the Army, the Chief, Contract Law Division, Office of the...

  16. On the generalized resolvents of isometric operators with gaps

    CERN Document Server

    Zagorodnyuk, Sergey M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we obtain some slight correction and generalization of the results of Ryabtseva on the generalized resolvents for isometric operators with a gap in their spectrum. Also, analogs of some McKelvey's results and a short proof of Inin's formula for the generalized resolvents of an isometric operator are obtained.

  17. Time-resolved pulsed EPR: microwave and optical detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trifunac, A.D.; Smith, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    Time-resolved pulsed EPR spectrometers are described. EPR spectra, kinetic profiles, and relaxation studies are used to illustrate some capabilities of the pulsed EPR experiment. Optical detection of time-resolved EPR spectra of radical ion pairs is used to study radical-ion recombination kinetics, recombination pathways, and the structure of radical anions and cations. 17 figures.

  18. Time-resolved pulsed EPR: microwave and optical detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-resolved pulsed EPR spectrometers are described. EPR spectra, kinetic profiles, and relaxation studies are used to illustrate some capabilities of the pulsed EPR experiment. Optical detection of time-resolved EPR spectra of radical ion pairs is used to study radical-ion recombination kinetics, recombination pathways, and the structure of radical anions and cations. 17 figures

  19. Deciding to Change OpenURL Link Resolvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Megan; Leonard, Andrea; Wiswell, John

    2015-01-01

    This article will be of interest to librarians, particularly those in consortia that are evaluating OpenURL link resolvers. This case study contrasts WebBridge (an Innovative Interface product) and LinkSource (EBSCO's product). This study assisted us in the decision-making process of choosing an OpenURL link resolver that was sustainable to…

  20. 48 CFR 1329.101 - Resolving tax problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Resolving tax problems. 1329.101 Section 1329.101 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS TAXES General 1329.101 Resolving tax problems. Legal questions relating to tax...

  1. A strategy to discover new organizers identifies a putative heart organizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Claire; Khan, Mohsin A F; Wong, Frances; Solovieva, Tatiana; Oliveira, Nidia M M; Baldock, Richard A; Tickle, Cheryll; Burt, Dave W; Stern, Claudio D

    2016-01-01

    Organizers are regions of the embryo that can both induce new fates and impart pattern on other regions. So far, surprisingly few organizers have been discovered, considering the number of patterned tissue types generated during development. This may be because their discovery has relied on transplantation and ablation experiments. Here we describe a new approach, using chick embryos, to discover organizers based on a common gene expression signature, and use it to uncover the anterior intestinal portal (AIP) endoderm as a putative heart organizer. We show that the AIP can induce cardiac identity from non-cardiac mesoderm and that it can pattern this by specifying ventricular and suppressing atrial regional identity. We also uncover some of the signals responsible. The method holds promise as a tool to discover other novel organizers acting during development. PMID:27557800

  2. Ozone Profiles in the Baltimore-Washington Region (2006-2011): Satellite Comparisons and DISCOVER-AQ Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Stauffer, Ryan M.; Miller, Sonya K.; Martins, Douglas K.; Joseph, Everette; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Diskin, Glenn S.

    2014-01-01

    Much progress has been made in creating satellite products for tracking the pollutants ozone and NO2 in the troposphere. Yet, in mid-latitude regions where meteorological interactions with pollutants are complex, accuracy can be difficult to achieve, largely due to persistent layering of some constituents. We characterize the layering of ozone soundings and related species measured from aircraft over two ground sites in suburban Washington, DC (Beltsville, MD, 39.05N; 76.9W) and Baltimore (Edgewood, MD, 39.4N; 76.3W) during the July 2011 DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) experiment. First, we compare column-ozone amounts from the Beltsville and Edgewood sondes with data from overpassing satellites. Second, processes influencing ozone profile structure are analyzed using Laminar Identification and tracers: sonde water vapor, aircraft CO and NOy. Third, Beltsville ozone profiles and meteorological influences in July 2011 are compared to those from the summers of 2006-2010. Sonde-satellite offsets in total ozone during July 2011 at Edgewood and Beltsville, compared to the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), were 3 percent mean absolute error, not statistically significant. The disagreement between an OMIMicrowave Limb Sounder-based tropospheric ozone column and the sonde averaged 10 percent at both sites, with the sonde usually greater than the satellite. Laminar Identification (LID), that distinguishes ozone segments influenced by convective and advective transport, reveals that on days when both stations launched ozonesondes, vertical mixing was stronger at Edgewood. Approximately half the lower free troposphere sonde profiles have very dry laminae, with coincident aircraft spirals displaying low CO (80-110 ppbv), suggesting stratospheric influence. Ozone budgets at Beltsville in July 2011, determined with LID, as well as standard meteorological indicators, resemble those

  3. Wave-Group Resolving vs Wave-Resolving Modeling of Surf and Swash Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelvink, J. A.; McCall, R. T.; Mehvar, S.; Dastgheib, A.

    2014-12-01

    Numerical modeling of beach and dune erosion, overwashing and breaching has gained much from inclusion of wave-group related infragravity motions in models such as XBeach (Roelvink et al, 2009). The main assumption in this model is that on the upper beach the incident-band, short waves are to a large extent dissipated, whereas infragravity wave motions have more oomph and are the ones making it to the dune foot and even over it. It is then justified to resolve the variations in short-wave energy and resulting long-wave motions, while parameterizing the short wave motions. This model has been applied successfully in many cases, both lab and field, concerning sandy beaches and dunes. However, as the sand gets coarser and beaches steeper, more and more incident wave energy is found in the swash, and at some point the parameterizations and associated coefficients start dominating the process. For gravel beaches, McCall et al (2014) have made use of a wave-resolving mode of XBeach, which makes use of a one-layer, nonhydrostatic approach developed by Zijlema et al. (2011). They have included a groundwater model and have shown that both the infiltration-exfiltration processes and the incident-band swash are important in getting the swash hydrodynamics on gravel beaches right. This work is continuing with promising results for morphodynamic response during extreme events. At the same time, we are investigating the skill of both approaches for wave runup and overtopping and are testing the morphodynamic behavior of the wave-resolving model in comparison with data and the original XBeach. So far, at the sandy end of the spectrum, both approaches give good and very similar results. In our presentation we will highlight some of these results and will present a sensitivity study where both approaches will be run and compared for a range of coastal profiles, including hard end structures. This will allow us to give clear guidelines for when to use the (much more computer

  4. Study on sociological approach to resolve maintenance related social problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study proposes a sociological approach to resolve maintenance related social problems. As a result of consideration, the followings were found. (1) In general, solutions to some kinds of questions can be deduced from basic laws using some theories or methodologies in the field of the natural science or engineering. The approach to resolve maintenance related social problems is similar to the approach in the natural science or engineering. (2) The points of view based on fundamental human rights, market principles and community principles, and so on, are very important in resolving maintenance related social problems and can be placed as theories or tools for resolution. (3) If such theories or tools for resolving maintenance related social problems as described above are systematically prepared, it is estimated that it becomes very much easier to resolve maintenance related social problems. (author)

  5. Starlight detectives how astronomers, inventors, and eccentrics discovered the modern universe

    CERN Document Server

    Hirshfeld, Alan

    2014-01-01

    NBC News “Top Science and Tech Books of the Year" selectionScientific American/FSG “Favorite Science Books of the Year" selectionNature.com “Top Reads of the Year" selectionKirkus Reviews “Best Books of the Year" selectionDiscover magazine “Top 5 Summer Read"“A masterful balance of science, history and rich narrative." —Discover magazine“Hirshfeld tells this climactic discovery of the expanding universe with great verve and sweep, as befits a story whose scope, characters and import leave

  6. Resolving the forbidden band of SF6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudon, V; Manceron, L; Kwabia Tchana, F; Loëte, M; Lago, L; Roy, P

    2014-01-28

    Sulfur hexafluoride is an important molecule for modeling thermophysical and polarizability properties. It is also a potent greenhouse gas of anthropogenic origin, whose concentration in the atmosphere, although very low is increasing rapidly; its global warming power is mostly conferred by its strong infrared absorption in the ν3 S-F stretching region near 948 cm(-1). This heavy species, however, features many hot bands at room temperature (at which only 31% of the molecules lie in the ground vibrational state), especially those originating from the lowest, v6 = 1 vibrational state. Unfortunately, the ν6 band itself (near 347 cm(-1)), in the first approximation, is both infrared- and Raman-inactive, and no reliable spectroscopic information could be obtained up to now and this has precluded a correct modeling of the hot bands. It has been suggested theoretically and experimentally that this band might be slightly activated through Coriolis interaction with infrared-active fundamentals and appears in high pressure measurements as a very faint, unresolved band. Using a new cryogenic multipass cell with 93 m optical path length and regulated at 163 ± 2 K temperature, coupled to synchrotron radiation and a high resolution interferometer, the spectrum of the ν6 far-infrared region has been recorded. Low temperature was used to avoid the presence of hot bands. We are thus able to confirm that the small feature in this region, previously viewed at low-resolution, is indeed ν6. The fully resolved spectrum has been analyzed, thanks to the XTDS software package. The band appears to be activated by faint Coriolis interactions with the strong ν3 and ν4 fundamental bands, resulting in the appearance of a small first-order dipole moment term, inducing unusual selection rules. The band center (ν6 = 347.736707(35) cm(-1)) and rovibrational parameters are now accurately determined for the v6 = 1 level. The ν6 perturbation-induced dipole moment is estimated to be 33 ± 3

  7. Direct chemical characterization of natural wood resins by temperature-resolved and space-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-bo; Zhou, Qun; Sun, Su-qin

    2016-07-01

    Wood resins are valuable natural products with wide utilizations. Either in the form of resin exudates or in the form of resin-containing woods, natural wood resins are usually complex mixtures consisting of various compounds. Therefore, effective chemical characterization methods are necessary for the research and quality control of natural wood resins. No need for separation or labeling, wood resin samples can be measured directly by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, which reduces the testing costs and avoids the possible distortions caused by the pretreatments. However, the absorption bands of various compositions in the resin sample are assembled in a single spectrum by the separation-free measurement, which makes it difficult to identify the compounds of interest and decreases the limits of detection. In this research, the temperature-resolved and space-resolved FT-IR techniques are proposed to resolve the overlapped signals for the direct, selective, and sensitive characterization of natural wood resins. For resin exudates, the temperature-resolved FT-IR spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation analysis can resolve the absorption bands of different compounds according to their responses to the thermal perturbations. For resin-containing woods, the FT-IR microspectroscopic imaging and principal component analysis can resolve the absorption bands of different compounds according to their positions. The study of six kinds of wood resins proves the feasibility of temperature-resolved and space-resolved FT-IR techniques for the direct, selective, and sensitive chemical characterization of natural wood resins.

  8. PROSPECTS FOR MEASURING THE MASS OF BLACK HOLES AT HIGH REDSHIFTS WITH RESOLVED KINEMATICS USING GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hezaveh, Yashar D. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-08-20

    Application of the most robust method of measuring black hole masses, spatially resolved kinematics of gas and stars, is presently limited to nearby galaxies. The Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) and 30m class telescopes (the Thirty Meter Telescope, the Giant Magellan Telescope, and the European Extremely Large Telescope) with milli-arcsecond resolution are expected to extend such measurements to larger distances. Here, we study the possibility of exploiting the angular magnification provided by strong gravitational lensing to measure black hole masses at high redshifts (z ∼ 1-6), using resolved gas kinematics with these instruments. We show that in ∼15% and ∼20% of strongly lensed galaxies, the inner 25 and 50 pc could be resolved, allowing the mass of ≳ 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉} black holes to be dynamically measured with ALMA, if moderately bright molecular gas is present at these small radii. Given the large number of strong lenses discovered in current millimeter surveys and future optical surveys, this fraction could constitute a statistically significant population for studying the evolution of the M-σ relation at high redshifts.

  9. The Social Influence of Two Computer-Assisted Career Guidance Systems: DISCOVER and SIGI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, James P., Jr.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Compared perceptions of expertness, attractiveness, and trustworthiness of computer-assisted guidance systems, as measured by adapted version of Counselor Rating Form, for 107 college students in two treatment conditions (DISCOVER and SIGI) and computer imaging control condition. Findings showed that students in both treatment conditions had more…

  10. Who Can Be a Hero?: Helen Keller, Annie Sullivan, and Discovering Strength of Character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Kathleen Dunlevy; Bernheim, Rachel Oestreicher

    2005-01-01

    "A Study of Heroes: Making a Difference Using Your Heart, Intellect, and Talents" is a program originally developed in diverse school communities. Students learn to distinguish between the concepts of hero and celebrity and to discover the real heroes in their own families, schools, communities, and most importantly--within themselves. This…

  11. Proposed Nomenclature for Surface Features on Pluto and Its Satellites and Names for Newly Discovered Satellites

    OpenAIRE

    Mamajek, Eric E.; Rapson, Valerie A.; Cameron, David A; Olmedo, Manuel; Fogerty, Shane; Franklin, Eric; Lambrides, Erini; Hasan, Imran; Sarkis, Richard E.; Thorndike, Stephen; Nordhaus, Jason

    2015-01-01

    In anticipation of the July 2015 flyby of the Pluto system by NASA's New Horizons mission, we propose naming conventions and example names for surface features on Pluto and its satellites (Charon, Nix, Hydra, Kerberos, Styx) and names for newly discovered satellites.

  12. A Phenomenological Study to Discover Low-Income Adults' Perceptions and Expectations Regarding Financial Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Brigid Ann

    2013-01-01

    This phenomenological study explored the perceptions and expectations of low income adults regarding financial literacy to discover ways to increase attendance in financial literacy programs designs for this cohort. The study utilized interviews with closed-ended questions to establish the participants' backgrounds, then opened-ended questions to…

  13. Separation Anxiety: An in-Class Game Designed to Help Students Discover Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samide, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    An in-class activity has been developed to assist students in discovering chromatographic separations. Designed on the basis of plate theory, the game has students use instructor-provided partition coefficients to establish equilibrium for two different items between a stationary and mobile phase. As students work through equilibration and mobile…

  14. First records of Nocomis biguttatus (Hornyhead Chub) from West Virginia discovered in museum voucher specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Stuart; Cincotta, Daniel A.; Starnes, Wayne C.

    2013-01-01

    Specimens of Nocomis biguttatus (Hornyhead Chub) from South Fork Hughes River (Little Kanawha River drainage, WV) were discovered in two museum lots at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. These accessions, collected in 1960 and 1966, represent an addition to the state fauna and are the first distribution records for this species from the Appalachian Plateau, WV

  15. Jiangxi Again Discovered Worldclass Tungsten Mine with Controlled Volume Topping 1 million tonnes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>The reporter recently learned from Jiangxi Province Geological Mineral Prospecting & Development Bureau that following the discovery of ultra large tungsten mine in northwestern Jiangxi in 2010, Jiangxi Province again discovered a world-class large tungsten mine in Zhuxi Mining Zone in Fuliang County in northeastern Jiangxi.

  16. "Discovering the Cell": An Educational Game about Cell and Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Carolina N.; Alves, Gutemberg G.; Cardona, Tania da S.; Melim, Leandra M. C.; Luz, Mauricio R. M. P.; Araujo-Jorge, Tania C.; Henriques-Pons, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    The role of games within education becomes clearer as students become more active and are able to take decisions, solve problems and react to the results of those decisions. The educational board game "Discovering the Cell" ("Celula Adentro"), is based on problem-solving learning. This investigative game attempts to stimulate reasoning and…

  17. Examining Pre-K Professional Development Programs: Discovering the Road to Exceptional Instructional Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sheila D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research study was to discover and interpret the experiences of pre-k teachers in an urban school district located in a Northeastern region of the United States. Using a basic qualitative research design, fifteen participants were recruited by a purposeful sampling method to be interviewed after the implementation…

  18. Review of Discovering Craven, Richard Harland Collection and Craven Museum Lithics Collections CD-Roms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail Falkingham

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Discovering Craven is aimed at the general reader, and provides a beautifully illustrated and presented interactive CD-Rom, created with Illuminatus Interactive. Craven is one of the seven districts within the county of North Yorkshire, a large area of which falls within the Yorkshire Dales National Park.

  19. A non-parametric hierarchical model to discover behavior dynamics from tracks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F.P. Kooij; G. Englebienne; D.M. Gavrila

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel non-parametric Bayesian model to jointly discover the dynamics of low-level actions and high-level behaviors of tracked people in open environments. Our model represents behaviors as Markov chains of actions which capture high-level temporal dynamics. Actions may be shared by vari

  20. Discovering Inexpensive, Effective Catalysts for Solar Energy Conversion: An Authentic Research Laboratory Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, Sarah E.; Hooker, Paul D.; Nickel, Anne-Marie; Leichtfuss, Amanda R.; Adams, Carissa S.; de la Cerda, Dionisia; She, Yuqi; Gerken, James B.; Pokhrel, Ravi; Ambrose, Nicholas J.; Khaliqi, David; Stahl, Shannon S.; Schuttlefield Christus, Jennifer D.

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical water oxidation is a major focus of solar energy conversion efforts. A new laboratory experiment has been developed that utilizes real-time, hands-on research to discover catalysts for solar energy conversion. The HARPOON, or Heterogeneous Anodes Rapidly Perused for Oxygen Overpotential Neutralization, experiment allows an array of…

  1. Discovering Trigonometric Relationships Implied by the Law of Sines and the Law of Cosines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurnick, Ronald; Javadi, Mohammad

    2006-01-01

    The Law of Sines and The Law of Cosines are of paramount importance in the field of trigonometry because these two theorems establish relationships satisfied by the three sides and the three angles of any triangle. In this article, the authors use these two laws to discover a host of other trigonometric relationships that exist within any…

  2. Exploring National Parks & Monuments: Students Can Discover National Monuments, National Parks & Natural Wonders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curriculum Review, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Cynthia Light Brown, author of "Discover National Monuments, National Parks: Natural Wonders," a book that introduces readers ages 8-12 to the history and science behind some of the amazing natural sites in the United States. In this interview, Cynthia Light Brown describes how she became interested in…

  3. Final Technical Report: Discovering the Nature of Dark Energy: Towards Better Distances from Type Ia Supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saurabh W. Jha

    2012-10-03

    The final technical report from the project "Discovering the Nature of Dark Energy: Towards Better Distances from Type Ia Supernovae" led at Rutgers the State University of New Jersey by Prof. Saurabh W. Jha is presented, including all publications resulting from this award.

  4. Discovering Valuable Growth Opportunities: An Analysis of Equity Alliances with IPO Firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Reuer (Jeffrey); T.W. Tong (Tony)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractFirms often use alliances to access external resources and explore new market or technological opportunities, yet they also can face obstacles to discovering these opportunities in the first place. In this paper, we examine how firms can overcome these obstacles and form equity alliances

  5. Radio detection of the near-IR discovered supernova 2010P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Illana, R.; Romero-Canizales, C.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Alberdi, A.; Kankare, E.; Mattila, S.; Ryder, S. D.

    2012-09-01

    We report the radio detection of supernova 2010P (cf. CBETs 2145, 2149) in Arp 299 in EVLA (8459 MHz) observations from 15th Jun 2011. SN2010P was discovered in near-IR images on 18th Jan 2010, and classified as a Type Ib/IIb SN based on its optical spectrum obtained on 11th Feb 2010 (cf. CBET 2189).

  6. Caught in the act: discovering secreted proteins from fungi and oomycetes in action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roth, Doris; Grell, Morten Nedergaard; Jensen, Annette Bruun;

    Host-microbe relationships largely rely on secreted proteins like enzymes, virulence factors and antimicrobial peptides. To discover proteins secreted by microbe and host during the interaction with each other, we produced dual-organism cDNA libraries from three different fungus- or oomycete...

  7. When Two Circles Determine a Triangle. Discovering and Proving a Geometrical Condition in a Computer Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metaxas, Nikolaos; Karagiannidou, Andromachi

    2010-01-01

    Visualization of mathematical relationships enables students to formulate conjectures as well as to search for mathematical arguments to support these conjectures. In this project students are asked to discover the sufficient and necessary condition so that two circles form the circumscribed and inscribed circle of a triangle and investigate how…

  8. A highly abundant bacteriophage discovered in the unknown sequences of human faecal metagenomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutilh, B.E.; Cassman, N.; McNair, K.; Sanchez, S.E.; Silva, G.G.; Boling, L.; Barr, J.J.; Speth, D.R.; Seguritan, V.; Aziz, R.K.; Felts, B.; Dinsdale, E.A.; Mokili, J.L.; Edwards, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomics, or sequencing of the genetic material from a complete microbial community, is a promising tool to discover novel microbes and viruses. Viral metagenomes typically contain many unknown sequences. Here we describe the discovery of a previously unidentified bacteriophage present in the ma

  9. Discovering the Art of Mathematics: Using String Art to Investigate Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Renesse, Christine; Ecke, Volker

    2016-01-01

    One goal of our Discovering the Art of Mathematics project is to empower students in the liberal arts to become confident creators of art and imaginative creators of mathematics. In this paper, we describe our experience with using string art to guide liberal arts students in exploring ideas of calculus. We provide excerpts from our inquiry-based…

  10. SWeMoF: A semantic framework to discover patterns in learning networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco; Beekman, Niels; Karsten, Anton; Oudshoorn, Diederik; Van Rosmalen, Peter; Van Bruggen, Jan; Koper, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Kalz, M., Beekman, N., Karsten, A., Oudshoorn, D., Van Rosmalen, P., Van Bruggen, J., & Koper, R. (2009). SWeMoF: A semantic framework to discover patterns in learning networks. In U. Cress, V. Dimitrova & M. Specht (Eds.), Learning in the Synergy of Multiple Disciplines. Proceedings of the Fourth E

  11. John Ellis, theoretical physicists: Are we close to discovering the Higgs Boson?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video Productions; Silvano de Gennaro

    2012-01-01

    John Ellis, theoretical physicists, answers the question "Are we close to discovering the Higgs Boson and why is it so difficult to find it?" in preparation of the Press Conference following the scientific seminar announcing results of the searches for the Higgs boson on July 4 2012.

  12. Characteristic of gravity waves resolved in ECMWF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preusse, Peter; Eckermann, Stephen; Ern, Manfred; Riese, Martin

    Gravity waves (GWs) influence the circulation of the atmosphere on global scale. Because of insufficient measurements and the difficulty to involve all relevant scales in a single model run, they are one of the chief uncertainties in climate and weather prediction. More information, in particular on global scale, is required. Can we employ global models such as the ECMWF high-resolution GCM to infer quantities of resolved GWs? Does this give us insight for the characteristics and relative importance of real GW sources? And can we use such data safely for, e.g., planning measurement campaigns on GWs? Also trajectory studies of cloud formation (cirrus in the UTLS, PSCs) and related dehydration and denitrification rely heavily on realistic temperature structures due to GWs. We here apply techniques developed for an ESA study proving the scientifc break-through which could be reached by a novel infrared limb imager. The 3D temperature structure of mesoscale GWs is exploited to determine amplitudes and 3D wave vectors of GWs at different levels (25km, 35km and 45km altitude) in the stratosphere. Similar to real observations, GW momentum flux is largest in the winter polar vortex and exhibits a second maximum in the summer subtropics. Based on the 3D wavevectors backward ray-tracing is employed to characterize specific sources. For instance, we find for the northern winter strong GW momentum flux (GWMF) associated with mountain waves from Norway and Greenland as well as waves emitted in the lower troposphere from a storm approaching Norway. Waves from these sources spread up to several thousand km in the stratosphere. Together these three events form a burst in the total hemispheric GWMF of a factor of 3. Strong mountain wave events are also found e.g. at Tierra del Fuego and the Antarctic Peninsula, regions which are in the focus of observational and modeling studies for a decade. Gravity waves in the tropical region are associated with deep convection in the upper

  13. NASA Chandra X-ray Observatory Selected as Editor's Choice in 2000 Discover Magazine Awards for Technological Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    laureate Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, was launched in July 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia and deployed to a highly elliptical Earth orbit. Over the next five years, it will use the world's most powerful X-ray telescope to probe the mysteries of a universe that cannot be seen by the human eye or conventional optical telescopes. Its array of exquisite mirrors, ground and polished by Raytheon Optical Systems, Inc., and assembled and aligned by Eastman Kodak, will allow Chandra to gather and focus X-rays from celestial sources billions of light years away. Chandra's science instrument module was designed and built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., then integrated with instruments provided by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Penn State University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Space Research Organization of The Netherlands, and the Max Planck Institute in Germany. Ball Aerospace also produced Chandra's aspect camera. The Discover Awards for Technological Innovation, now in their 11th year, are designed to acknowledge the creativity of men, women, corporations and institutions who have reached superior levels of ingenuity. Each year, Discover Magazine's editorial staff reviews thousands of new products and ideas presented in the scientific literature or nominated by leading technology-based companies and research organizations. The editorial staff selects semi-finalists in each of eight technology categories, then submits the nominations to an independent panel of experts. The panel then selects the finalists and the winner in each area of technology. The Editor's choice category is reserved for innovations so unique or promising that they go beyond the magazine's established innovation categories by providing a marked advance in their field. Chandra's powerful X-ray telescope can resolve distant images eight times sharper and detect X-ray sources 20 times fainter than any previous X-ray space telescope. Chandra, along with the rest of the winners

  14. Time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy for molecular science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and its application in molecular science are reviewed. STM can image individual atoms and molecules and thus is able to observe the results of molecular processes such as diffusion, desorption, configuration switching, bond-breaking and chemistry, on the atomic scale. This review will introduce time-resolved STM, its experimental limitations and implementations with particular emphasis on thermally activated and tunnelling current induced molecular processes. It will briefly examine the push towards ultrafast imaging. In general, results achieved by time-resolved STM demonstrate the necessity of both space and time resolution for fully characterizing molecular processes on the atomic scale.

  15. An analytic approach to resolving problems in medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candee, D; Puka, B

    1984-06-01

    Education in ethics among practising professionals should provide a systematic procedure for resolving moral problems. A method for such decision-making is outlined using the two classical orientations in moral philosophy, teleology and deontology. Teleological views such as utilitarianism resolve moral dilemmas by calculating the excess of good over harm expected to be produced by each feasible alternative for action. The deontological view focuses on rights, duties, and principles of justice. Both methods are used to resolve the 1971 Johns Hopkins case of a baby born with Down's syndrome and duodenal atresia.

  16. Triangle orientation discrimination: the alternative to minimum resolvable temperature difference and minimum resolvable contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijl, Piet; Valeton, J. Mathieu

    1998-07-01

    The characterization of electro-optical system performance by means of the minimum resolvable temperature difference (MRTD) or the minimum resolvable contrast (MRC) has at least three serious disadvantages: (1) the bar pattern stimulus is theoretically and practically unsuitable for 1D or 2D spatially sampled systems such as pixel-array cameras, (2) spatial phase is not taken into account, and (3) the results depend on the observer's subjective decision criterion. We propose an adequate and easily applicable alternative: the triangle orientation discrimination (TOD) threshold. The TOD is based on an improved test pattern, a better defined observer task, and a solid psychophysical measurement procedure. The method has a large number of theoretical and practical advantages: it is suitable for pixel-array cameras, scanning systems and other electro-optical and optical imaging system sin both the thermal and visual domains, it has a close relationship to real target acquisition, and the observer task is easy. The results are free from observer bias and allow statistical significance tests. The method lends itself very well to automatic measurements, and can be extended for future sensor systems that include advanced image processing. The TOD curve can be implemented easily in a target acquisition (TA) model such as ACQUIRE. An observer performance study with real targets shows that the TOD curve better predicts TA performance than the mRC does. The method has been implemented successfully in a thermal imager field test apparatus called the thermal imager performance indicator and may be implemented in current MRTD test equipment with little effort.

  17. Using a referee to resolve shipper-receiver differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the nuclear community, shipper-receiver differences generate considerable concern. Current methods of resolving these differences are discussed, prticularly the use of an umpire or referee. Numerous statistical problems connected with the present procedures are also considered

  18. Sensing cell metabolism by time-resolved autofluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yicong; Zheng, Wei; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2006-11-01

    We built a time-resolved confocal fluorescence spectroscopy system equipped with the multichannel time-correlated single-photon-counting technique. The instrument provides a unique approach to study the fluorescence sensing of cell metabolism via analysis of the wavelength- and time-resolved intracellular autofluorescence. The experiments on monolayered cell cultures show that with UV excitation at 365 nm the time-resolved autofluorescence decays, dominated by free-bound reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide signals, are sensitive indicators for cell metabolism. However, the sensitivity decreases with the increase of excitation wavelength possibly due to the interference from free-bound flavin adenine dinucleotide fluorescence. The results demonstrate that time-resolved autofluorescence can be potentially used as an important contrast mechanism to detect epithelial precancer.

  19. SQL level global query resolving for web based GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Huang, Fengru; Huang, Zhou; Sun, Yumei; Fang, Yu

    2007-06-01

    This paper introduced a SQL level approach to resolve global spatial query in Web based heterogeneous distributed spatial database environment. The main prohibit of this SQL level approach was its widespread compatibility and standardization. Firstly, a SQL based Equivalent Distributed Program (EDP) was introduced to express distributed spatial processing transactions. Then global resource directories for virtual global view describing were discussed to organize information that resolving need. The contents of global resource directories included data storage directory, hosts directory and working status directory. With these mechanisms, relational algebra expression equivalence principles were utilized to resolve global spatial queries to EDPs. Finally, several samples were presented to show the process of resolving. This approach was suitable to all sorts of distributed computing environments either centralized such as CORBA or decentralized such as P2P computing platforms.

  20. Steady state and time resolved spectroscopy of photoswitchable systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hou, Lili

    2013-01-01

    Steady state en time resolved spectroscopie zijn twee fundamentele methodes voor het bestuderen van fotochemische processen. In dit proefschrift zijn drie zelf-opgezette spectroscopische systemen beschreven, waarmee samen met andere spectroscopische methoden verscheidende met licht schakelbare syste

  1. A Resolved Debris Disk Around the Candidate Planet-hosting Star HD 95086

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moor, A.; Abraham, P.; Kospal, A.; Szabo, Gy. M.; Apai, D.; Balog, Z.; Csengeri, T.; Grady, C.; Henning, Th.; Juhasz, J.; Kiss, Cs.; Pasucci, I.; Szulagyi, J.; Vavrek, R.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, a new planet candidate was discovered on direct images around the young (10-17 Myr) A-type star HD 95086. The strong infrared excess of the system indicates that, similar to HR8799, Beta Pic, and Fomalhaut, the star harbors a circumstellar disk. Aiming to study the structure and gas content of the HD 95086 disk, and to investigate its possible interaction with the newly discovered planet, here we present new optical, infrared, and millimeter observations. We detected no CO emission, excluding the possibility of an evolved gaseous primordial disk. Simple blackbody modeling of the spectral energy distribution suggests the presence of two spatially separate dust belts at radial distances of 6 and 64 AU. Our resolved images obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory reveal a characteristic disk size of approx. 6.0 × 5.4 (540 × 490 AU) and disk inclination of approx 25 deg. Assuming the same inclination for the planet candidate's orbit, its reprojected radial distance from the star is 62 AU, very close to the blackbody radius of the outer cold dust ring. The structure of the planetary system at HD 95086 resembles the one around HR8799. Both systems harbor a warm inner dust belt and a broad colder outer disk and giant planet(s) between the two dusty regions. Modeling implies that the candidate planet can dynamically excite the motion of planetesimals even out to 270 AU via their secular perturbation if its orbital eccentricity is larger than about 0.4. Our analysis adds a new example to the three known systems where directly imaged planet(s) and debris disks coexist.

  2. An important cause of non-resolving pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoki, Alborz; Gomes, Marcio M; Gupta, Ashish; Kify, Omar; Pakhale, Smita; Mulpuru, Sunita

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a young patient with a history of non-resolving pneumonia. She was diagnosed with a limited form of Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (GPA), by percutaneous core needle lung biopsy. In this report, we discuss the definition and clinical implications of limited GPA, treatment options, and highlight the importance of considering vasculitis in the differential diagnosis of non-resolving pneumonia. PMID:27482510

  3. A spin- and angle-resolving photoelectron spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of hemispherical electron energy analyzer that permits angle and spin resolved photoelectron spectroscopy has been developed. The analyzer permits standard angle resolved spectra to be recorded with a two-dimensional detector in parallel with spin detection using a mini-Mott polarimeter. General design considerations as well as technical solutions are discussed and test results from the Au(111) surface state are presented.

  4. Spectrally resolved bioluminescence tomography using the reciprocity approach

    OpenAIRE

    Dehghani, Hamid; Davis, Scott C.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2008-01-01

    Spectrally resolved bioluminescence optical tomography is an approach to recover images of, for example, Luciferase activity within a volume using multiwavelength emission data from internal bioluminescence sources. The underlying problem of uniqueness associated with nonspectrally resolved intensity-based bioluminescence tomography is demonstrated and it is shown that using a non-negative constraint inverse algorithm, an accurate solution for the source distribution can be calculated from th...

  5. Nonlocal Problems for Fractional Differential Equations via Resolvent Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenbin Fan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the continuity of analytic resolvent in the uniform operator topology and then obtain the compactness of Cauchy operator by means of the analytic resolvent method. Based on this result, we derive the existence of mild solutions for nonlocal fractional differential equations when the nonlocal item is assumed to be Lipschitz continuous and neither Lipschitz nor compact, respectively. An example is also given to illustrate our theory.

  6. Super-resolved imaging geometrical and diffraction approaches

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    In this brief we review several approaches that provide super resolved imaging, overcoming the geometrical limitation of the detector as well as the diffraction effects set by the F number of the imaging lens. In order to obtain the super resolved enhancement, we use spatially non-uniform and/or random transmission structures to encode the image or the aperture planes. The desired resolution enhanced images are obtained by post-processing decoding of the captured data.

  7. Discovering Land Cover Web Map Services from the Deep Web with JavaScript Invocation Rules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyang Hou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Automatic discovery of isolated land cover web map services (LCWMSs can potentially help in sharing land cover data. Currently, various search engine-based and crawler-based approaches have been developed for finding services dispersed throughout the surface web. In fact, with the prevalence of geospatial web applications, a considerable number of LCWMSs are hidden in JavaScript code, which belongs to the deep web. However, discovering LCWMSs from JavaScript code remains an open challenge. This paper aims to solve this challenge by proposing a focused deep web crawler for finding more LCWMSs from deep web JavaScript code and the surface web. First, the names of a group of JavaScript links are abstracted as initial judgements. Through name matching, these judgements are utilized to judge whether or not the fetched webpages contain predefined JavaScript links that may prompt JavaScript code to invoke WMSs. Secondly, some JavaScript invocation functions and URL formats for WMS are summarized as JavaScript invocation rules from prior knowledge of how WMSs are employed and coded in JavaScript. These invocation rules are used to identify the JavaScript code for extracting candidate WMSs through rule matching. The above two operations are incorporated into a traditional focused crawling strategy situated between the tasks of fetching webpages and parsing webpages. Thirdly, LCWMSs are selected by matching services with a set of land cover keywords. Moreover, a search engine for LCWMSs is implemented that uses the focused deep web crawler to retrieve and integrate the LCWMSs it discovers. In the first experiment, eight online geospatial web applications serve as seed URLs (Uniform Resource Locators and crawling scopes; the proposed crawler addresses only the JavaScript code in these eight applications. All 32 available WMSs hidden in JavaScript code were found using the proposed crawler, while not one WMS was discovered through the focused crawler

  8. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H. [comps.

    1997-04-01

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  9. Getting to Know You: Discovering User Behaviors and Their Implications for Service Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Public services librarians are often in the position of training patrons how to use technology. They adopt new technologies such as discovery layers, link resolvers, subject guides, virtual reference services, OPACs, content management systems, and institutional repositories to provide access to materials and facilitate collaboration, but…

  10. HATS-1b: The First Transiting Planet Discovered by the HATSouth Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Penev, K; Bayliss, D; Jordán, A; Mohler, M; Zhou, G; Suc, V; Rabus, M; Hartman, J D; Mancini, L; Béky, B; Csubry, Z; Buchhave, L; Henning, T; Nikolov, N; Csák, B; Brahm, R; Espinoza, N; Conroy, P; Noyes, R W; Sasselov, D D; Schmidt, B; Wright, D J; Tinney, C G; Addison, B C; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-1b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting the moderately bright V=12.05 G dwarf star GSC 6652-00186, and the first planet discovered by HATSouth, a global network of autonomous wide-field telescopes. HATS-1b has a period P~3.4465 d, mass Mp~1.86MJ, and radius Rp~1.30RJ. The host star has a mass of 0.99Msun, and radius of 1.04Rsun. The discovery light curve of HATS-1b has near continuous coverage over several multi-day periods, demonstrating the power of using a global network of telescopes to discover transiting planets.

  11. Discover & eXplore Neural Network (DXNN) Platform, a Modular TWEANN

    CERN Document Server

    Sher, Gene I

    2010-01-01

    In this paper I present a novel type of Topology and Weight Evolving Artificial Neural Network (TWEANN) system called Discover & eXplore Neural Network (DXNN) Platform. DXNN utilizes a modular and hierarchical topology which promotes highly scalable and dynamically granular systems to evolve. Among the novel features discussed in this paper is a simple and database friendly encoding for hierarchical/modular NNs, a new selection method aimed at producing highly compact and fit individuals within the population, and a new training phase referred to as "Tuning Phase" which is aimed at removing the need for speciation algorithms. Mutation operators aimed at improving diversity, expandability, and capabilities of the DXNN through a built in feature selection method that allows for the evolved system to expand, discover and explore new sensors and actuators is also covered. Finally, DXNN platform is then compared to other state of the art TWEANNs on a control task to demonstrate its ability to produce highly co...

  12. Fitting a mixture model by expectation maximization to discover motifs in biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, T.L.; Elkan, C. [Univ. of California, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The algorithm described in this paper discovers one or more motifs in a collection of DNA or protein sequences by using the technique of expectation maximization to fit a two-component finite mixture model to the set of sequences. Multiple motifs are found by fitting a mixture model to the data, probabilistically erasing the occurrences of the motif thus found, and repeating the process to find successive motifs. The algorithm requires only a set of unaligned sequences and a number specifying the width of the motifs as input. It returns a model of each motif and a threshold which together can be used as a Bayes-optimal classifier for searching for occurrences of the motif in other databases. The algorithm estimates how many times each motif occurs in each sequence in the dataset and outputs an alignment of the occurrences of the motif. The algorithm is capable of discovering several different motifs with differing numbers of occurrences in a single dataset.

  13. Virtual and Dynamic Hierarchical Architecture: an overlay network topology for discovering grid services with high performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄理灿; 吴朝晖; 潘云鹤

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an overlay network topology called Virtual and Dynamic Hierarchical Architecture (VDHA) for discovering Grid services with high performance. Service discovery based on VDHA has scalable, autonomous, efficient, reliable and quick responsive. We propose two service discovery algorithms. Full Search Query and Discovery Protocol (FSQDP) discovers the nodes that match the request message from all N nodes, which has time complexity O(logN), space complexity O(nvg) (nvg being node numbers of each virtual group), and message-cost O(N), and Domain-Specific Query and Discovery Protocol (DSQDP) searches nodes in only specific domains with time complexity O(nvg), space complexity O(nvg), and message-cost O(nvg). In this paper, we also describe VDHA, its formal definition, and Grid Group Management Protocol.

  14. A Hybrid Multi Objective Particle Swarm Optimization Method to Discover Biclusters in Microarray Data

    CERN Document Server

    lashkargir, Mohsen; Dastjerdi, Ahmad Baraani

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, with the development of microarray technique, discovery of useful knowledge from microarray data has become very important. Biclustering is a very useful data mining technique for discovering genes which have similar behavior. In microarray data, several objectives have to be optimized simultaneously and often these objectives are in conflict with each other. A Multi Objective model is capable of solving such problems. Our method proposes a Hybrid algorithm which is based on the Multi Objective Particle Swarm Optimization for discovering biclusters in gene expression data. In our method, we will consider a low level of overlapping amongst the biclusters and try to cover all elements of the gene expression matrix. Experimental results in the bench mark database show a significant improvement in both overlap among biclusters and coverage of elements in the gene expression matrix.

  15. Discovering words in fluent speech: the contribution of two kinds of statistical information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiessen, Erik D; Erickson, Lucy C

    2012-01-01

    To efficiently segment fluent speech, infants must discover the predominant phonological form of words in the native language. In English, for example, content words typically begin with a stressed syllable. To discover this regularity, infants need to identify a set of words. We propose that statistical learning plays two roles in this process. First, it provides a cue that allows infants to segment words from fluent speech, even without language-specific phonological knowledge. Second, once infants have identified a set of lexical forms, they can learn from the distribution of acoustic features across those word forms. The current experiments demonstrate both processes are available to 5-month-old infants. This demonstration of sensitivity to statistical structure in speech, weighted more heavily than phonological cues to segmentation at an early age, is consistent with theoretical accounts that claim statistical learning plays a role in helping infants to adapt to the structure of their native language from very early in life. PMID:23335903

  16. Discovering Words in Fluent Speech: The Contribution of Two Kinds of Statistical Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik D Thiessen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To efficiently segment fluent speech, infants must discover the predominant phonological form of words in the native language. In English, for example, content words typically begin with a stressed syllable. To discover this regularity, infants need to identify a set of words. We propose that statistical learning plays two roles in this process. First, it provides a cue that allows infants to segment words from fluent speech, even without language-specific phonological knowledge. Second, once infants have identified a set of lexical forms, they can learn from the distribution of acoustic features across those word forms. The current experiments demonstrate both processes are available to 5-month-old infants. This is an earlier age than prior demonstration of sensitivity to statistical structure in speech, and consistent with theoretical accounts that claim statistical learning plays a role in helping infants to adapt to the structure of their native language from very early in life.

  17. Spiking neurons can discover predictive features by aggregate-label learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gütig, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The brain routinely discovers sensory clues that predict opportunities or dangers. However, it is unclear how neural learning processes can bridge the typically long delays between sensory clues and behavioral outcomes. Here, I introduce a learning concept, aggregate-label learning, that enables biologically plausible model neurons to solve this temporal credit assignment problem. Aggregate-label learning matches a neuron's number of output spikes to a feedback signal that is proportional to the number of clues but carries no information about their timing. Aggregate-label learning outperforms stochastic reinforcement learning at identifying predictive clues and is able to solve unsegmented speech-recognition tasks. Furthermore, it allows unsupervised neural networks to discover reoccurring constellations of sensory features even when they are widely dispersed across space and time.

  18. Earth impact threat of newly discovered asteroids: an a posteriori analysis

    CERN Document Server

    D'Abramo, Germano

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade many of us, both scientists and laymen, have probably heard at least once through the newspapers, TV and Internet that a new asteroid has been discovered with an alarming high probability of collision with the Earth in the near future. We guess that, as personal reaction, some of the most common questions probably have been: how should I handle all this? Is there something really serious in today's impact threat announcement to worry about? The present paper aims to put in the proper perspective these impact threat announcements. Moreover, it aims to suggest what we consider the right interpretation of the asteroid impact probabilities calculated and dispatched by the current impact monitoring systems set up by astronomers. We provide a probability measure which is more proper in expressing the impact threat and it is somewhat independent from the specific value of the impact probability calculated by monitoring systems for newly discovered asteroids.

  19. RAT J1953+1859: a dwarf nova discovered through high amplitude QPOs in quiescence

    CERN Document Server

    Ramsay, Gavin; Barclay, Thomas; Wheatley, Peter; Marshall, George; Lehto, Harry; Napiwotzki, Ralf; Nelemans, Gijs; Potter, Stephen; Todd, Ian

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery of an accreting binary, RAT J1953+1859, made during the RApid Temporal Survey (RATS) on the Isaac Newton Telescope. It showed high amplitude (0.3 mag) quasi-periodic oscillations on a timescale of ~20 mins. Further observations made using the Nordic Optical Telescope showed it to be ~4 mag brighter than in the discovery images. These photometric observations, together with radial velocity data taken using the William Herschel Telescope, point to an orbital period of ~90 mins. These data suggest that RAT J1953+1859 is a dwarf novae of the SU UMa type. What makes RAT J1953+1859 unusual is that it is the first such system to be discovered as a result of high amplitude QPOs during quiescence. This suggests that high-cadence wide-field surveys could be another means to discover cataclysmic variables as a result of their short period variability.

  20. Extra large bauxite mines with 120 million tons discovered in Guangxi Congzuo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>According to Guangxi General Institute of Geological Prospecting,after 3 years of hard work,prospecting team has discovered extra large bauxite mines with resources of 120 mil- lion tons in Youjiang area in Guangxi. It is said that the newly-found extra large baux- ite mines are situated in the city of Congzuo. The ore belt lays generally northeast with 50

  1. The HBV E Genotype Discover in Dai Nationality in Xishuangbanna, Yunnan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-ping ZHAO; Yuan-ying SHEN; Ru SHEN; Yuan-yi WANG; Mei-ya FU

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the distribution of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes among the population of Dai nationality in Xishuangbanna, Yurman Province HBV genotypes of the Serum samples were tested by PCR-RFLP. This is the first time to discover the B+E genotypes in China. This finding provides new information for understanding the distribution of HBV genotype in China and a provides a basis for establishing a Chinese gene bank.

  2. Atypical and clinically silent multiple sclerosis: a report of 12 cases discovered unexpectedly at necropsy.

    OpenAIRE

    Phadke, J G; Best, P. V.

    1983-01-01

    Twelve cases are reported in which multiple sclerosis was discovered unexpectedly at necropsy. Four of the patients had no known previous history of neurological illness, four did have a previous neurological or neuropsychiatric disturbance, but multiple sclerosis was never entertained in the differential diagnosis and four had a history of disorder in the nervous system, but a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis was either rejected or regarded as unlikely. In six of the eight patients with a pre...

  3. Violence against children in families and role of kindergarden in discovering, suspect

    OpenAIRE

    Brandstatter, Olga

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this diploma is to analyse how well teachers in kindergartens and their assistants know the legislation that deals with violence against children within families. The goal is also to discover, how well they are aware of child abuse, how well they are able to recognize signs of violence and if they know how to intervene. In theoretical part of diploma I describe possible forms and symptoms of violence against children within families. I present the role of kindergarten when ...

  4. A New Version of the Ant-Miner Algorithm Discovering Unordered Rule Sets

    OpenAIRE

    Smaldon, James; Freitas, Alex A

    2006-01-01

    The Ant-Miner algorithm, first proposed by Parpinelli and colleagues, applies an ant colony optimization heuristic to the classification task of data mining to discover an ordered list of classification rules. In this paper we present a new version of the Ant-Miner algorithm, which we call Unordered Rule Set Ant-Miner, that produces an unordered set of classification rules. The proposed version was evaluated against the original Ant-Miner algorithm in six public-domain da...

  5. Discovering Unordered Rule Sets for Mixed Variables Using an Ant-Miner Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Nalini, C; Balasubramanie, P

    2008-01-01

    This work proposes a data mining algorithm called Unordered Rule Sets using a continuous Ant-Miner algorithm. The goal of this work is to extract classification rules from data. Swarm intelligence (SI) is a technique whereby rules may be discovered through the study of collective behavior in decentralized, self-organized systems, such as ants. The Ant-Miner algorithm, first proposed by Parpinelli and his colleagues (2002), applies an ant colony optimization (ACO) heuristic to the classificati...

  6. Dialogue and Roles in a Strategy Workshop: Discovering Patterns through Discourse Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Duffy, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Strategy workshops are frequently used by Executive management teams to discuss and formulate strategy but are under-researched and under-reported in the academic literature. This study uses Discourse Analysis to discover participant roles and dialogic patterns in an Executive management team’s strategy workshop, together with their effect on the workshop’s operation and outcome. The study shows how the workshop participants adopt different roles through their language and content. It then...

  7. Discovering Patterns in Symbolic Streams%符号流中的模式发现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李刚; 童铑

    2000-01-01

    The idea of discovering patterns in data seems to be essential for decision making in our social activities. This paper presents a simple algorithm which can be used to detect such patterns in elementary sequences of symbols. It adopts a data compression algorithm to seek for interesting patterns, which is important in understanding the way that the input symbol stream repeats itself. In this paper, the algorithm and related data structures are described in detail, and an illustrative example is given.

  8. Discovering Patterns in Symbolic Streams%符号流中的模式发现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李刚; 童頫

    2001-01-01

    The idea of discovering patterns in data seems to be essential for decision making in our social activities. This paper presents a simple algorithm which can be used to detect such patterns in elementary sequences of symbols. It adopts a data compression algorithm to seek for interesting patterns, which is important in understanding the way that the input symbol stream repeats itself. In this paper, the algorithm and related data structures are described in detail, and an illustrative example is given.

  9. Building on the International Polar Year: Discovering Interdisciplinary Data Through Federated Search

    OpenAIRE

    Yarmey, L.; Khalsa, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    The legacy of the International Polar Year 2007–2008 (IPY) includes advances in open data and meaningful progress towards interoperability of data, systems, and standards. Enabled by metadata brokering technologies and by the growing adoption of international metadata standards, federated data search welcomes diversity in Arctic data and recognizes the value of expertise in community data repositories. Federated search enables specialized data holdings to be discovered by broader audiences an...

  10. DeBi: Discovering Differentially Expressed Biclusters using a Frequent Itemset Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Vingron Martin; Serin Akdes

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The analysis of massive high throughput data via clustering algorithms is very important for elucidating gene functions in biological systems. However, traditional clustering methods have several drawbacks. Biclustering overcomes these limitations by grouping genes and samples simultaneously. It discovers subsets of genes that are co-expressed in certain samples. Recent studies showed that biclustering has a great potential in detecting marker genes that are associated wit...

  11. A Hybrid Multi Objective Particle Swarm Optimization Method to Discover Biclusters in Microarray Data

    OpenAIRE

    lashkargir, Mohsen; Monadjemi, S. Amirhassan; Dastjerdi, Ahmad Baraani

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, with the development of microarray technique, discovery of useful knowledge from microarray data has become very important. Biclustering is a very useful data mining technique for discovering genes which have similar behavior. In microarray data, several objectives have to be optimized simultaneously and often these objectives are in conflict with each other. A Multi Objective model is capable of solving such problems. Our method proposes a Hybrid algorithm which is based on ...

  12. Discovering biclusters in gene expression data based on high-dimensional linear geometries

    OpenAIRE

    Liew Alan; Gan Xiangchao; Yan Hong

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background In DNA microarray experiments, discovering groups of genes that share similar transcriptional characteristics is instrumental in functional annotation, tissue classification and motif identification. However, in many situations a subset of genes only exhibits consistent pattern over a subset of conditions. Conventional clustering algorithms that deal with the entire row or column in an expression matrix would therefore fail to detect these useful patterns in the data. Rece...

  13. Discovering Ce-rich oxygen evolution catalysts, from high throughput screening to water electrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Haber, Joel A.; Cai, Yun; Jung, Suho; Xiang, Chengxiang; Mitrovic, Slobodan; Jin, Jian; Bell, Alexis T.; Gregoire, John M.

    2014-01-01

    We report a new Ce-rich family of active oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysts composed of earth abundant elements, discovered using high-throughput methods. High resolution inkjet printing was used to produce 5456 discrete oxide compositions containing the elements nickel, iron, cobalt and cerium. The catalytic performance of each of these compositions was measured under conditions applicable to distributed solar fuels generation using a three-electrode scanning drop electrochemical cell...

  14. Meta-analysis for Discovering Rare-Variant Associations: Statistical Methods and Software Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Zheng-Zheng; Lin, Dan-Yu

    2015-01-01

    There is heightened interest in using next-generation sequencing technologies to identify rare variants that influence complex human diseases and traits. Meta-analysis is essential to this endeavor because large sample sizes are required for detecting associations with rare variants. In this article, we provide a comprehensive overview of statistical methods for meta-analysis of sequencing studies for discovering rare-variant associations. Specifically, we discuss the calculation of relevant ...

  15. Discovering speech phones using convolutive non-negative matrix factorisation with a sparseness constraint

    OpenAIRE

    O'Grady, Paul D.; Pearlmutter, Barak A.

    2008-01-01

    Discovering a representation that allows auditory data to be parsimoniously represented is useful for many machine learning and signal processing tasks. Such a representation can be constructed by Non-negative Matrix Factorisation (NMF), a method for finding parts-based representations of non-negative data. Here, we present an extension to convolutive NMF that includes a sparseness constraint, where the resultant algorithm has multiplicative updates and utilises the beta divergence as its rec...

  16. Market Analysis to Discover New Restaurant Business Opportunities in Imatra Region

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Sayed Fahid

    2015-01-01

    This is a research based thesis, which focuses on market analysis in Imatra region, Finland. The purpose of the thesis was to discover new restaurant business opportunities in Imatra Region. Another objective of this thesis was to understand Imatra’s prospective customers’ requirements, needs and expectations. The first part of theory of the thesis focuses on Imatra’s overview, food culture, region development and restaurant demand. Next theoretical part of the thesis emphasizes research ...

  17. Discovering Distinct Functional Modules of Specific Cancer Types Using Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ru Shen; Xiaosheng Wang; Chittibabu Guda

    2015-01-01

    Background. The molecular profiles exhibited in different cancer types are very different; hence, discovering distinct functional modules associated with specific cancer types is very important to understand the distinct functions associated with them. Protein-protein interaction networks carry vital information about molecular interactions in cellular systems, and identification of functional modules (subgraphs) in these networks is one of the most important applications of biological networ...

  18. GeoWeb Crawler: An Extensible and Scalable Web Crawling Framework for Discovering Geospatial Web Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Chih-Yuan Huang; Hao Chang

    2016-01-01

    With the advance of the World-Wide Web (WWW) technology, people can easily share content on the Web, including geospatial data and web services. Thus, the “big geospatial data management” issues start attracting attention. Among the big geospatial data issues, this research focuses on discovering distributed geospatial resources. As resources are scattered on the WWW, users cannot find resources of their interests efficiently. While the WWW has Web search engines addressing web resource disco...

  19. Footprints of the Newly-Discovered Vela Supernova in Antarctic Ice Cores?

    OpenAIRE

    Burgess, C. P.; Zuber, K.

    1999-01-01

    The recently-discovered, nearby young supernova remnant in the southeast corner of the older Vela supernova remnant may have been seen in measurements of nitrate abundances in Antarctic ice cores. Such an interpretation of this twenty-year-old ice-core data would provide a more accurate dating of this supernova than is possible purely using astrophysical techniques. It permits an inference of the supernova4s ${}^{44}$Ti yield purely on an observational basis, without reference to supernova mo...

  20. From DBpedia to Wikipedia: Filling the Gap by Discovering Wikipedia Conventions

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, Diego; Molli, Pascal; Skaf-Molli, Hala; Diaz, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    Many relations existing in DBpedia are missing in Wikipedia yielding up an information gap between the semantic web and the social web. Inserting these missing relations requires to automatically discover Wikipedia con- ventions. From pairs linked by a property p in DBpedia, we find path queries that link the same pairs in Wikipedia. We make the hypothesis that the shortest path query with maximal containment captures the Wikipedia convention for p. We computed missing links and conventions f...

  1. A Novel CalB-Type Lipase Discovered by Fungal Genomes Mining

    OpenAIRE

    Vaquero, Maria E.; de Eugenio, Laura I.; Martínez, Maria J.; Jorge Barriuso

    2015-01-01

    The fungus Pseudozyma antarctica produces a lipase (CalB) with broad substrate specificity, stability, high regio- and enantio-selectivity. It is active in non-aqueous organic solvents and at elevated temperatures. Hence, CalB is a robust biocatalyst for chemical conversions on an industrial scale. Here we report the in silico mining of public metagenomes and fungal genomes to discover novel lipases with high homology to CalB. The candidates were selected taking into account homology and cons...

  2. Microgenetic experiment in developmental psychology: A new approach to discover cognitive change

    OpenAIRE

    Matija Svetina

    2002-01-01

    Microgenetic experiment is relatively new tool in a developmental psychology research. It is primarily used in discovering broad range of cognitive processes such as the development of logical operations, memory and attention as well as beliefs or school adaptation. Designed as an extension of simple longitudinal and cross-sectional approaches it is convinient to research mental processes in all developmental stages of human being, from infancy to the old age. Microgenetic approach is charact...

  3. Discover Earth: an earth system science program for libraries and their communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenbery, P.

    2011-12-01

    The view from space has deepened our understanding of Earth as a global, dynamic system. Instruments on satellites and spacecraft, coupled with advances in ground-based research, have provided us with astonishing new perspectives of our planet. Now more than ever, enhancing the public's understanding of Earth's physical and biological systems is vital to helping citizens make informed policy decisions especially when they are faced with the consequences of global climate change. While the focus for education reform is on school improvement, there is considerable research that supports the role that out-of-school experiences can play in student achievement. Libraries provide an untapped resource for engaging underserved youth and their families in fostering an appreciation and deeper understanding of science and technology topics. The Space Science Institute's National Center for Interactive Learning (NCIL) in partnership with the American Library Association (ALA), the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI), and the National Girls Collaborative Project (NGCP) have received funding from NSF to develop a national project called the STAR Library Education Network: a hands-on learning program for libraries and their communities (or STAR-Net for short). STAR stands for Science-Technology, Activities and Resources. STAR-Net includes two exhibitions: Discover Earth and Discover Tech. The Discover Earth exhibition will focus on local earth science topics-such as weather, water cycle, and ecosystem changes-as well as a global view of our changing planet. The main take-away message (or Big Idea) for this exhibition is that the global environment changes - and is changed by - the host community's local environment. The project team is testing whether this approach will be a good strategy for engaging the public, especially in rural America. This presentation will provide an overview of the Discover Earth project and how it is integrating climate change ideas into the exhibit

  4. Discovering approximate-associated sequence patterns for protein-DNA interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Chan, Tak Ming

    2010-12-30

    Motivation: The bindings between transcription factors (TFs) and transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) are fundamental protein-DNA interactions in transcriptional regulation. Extensive efforts have been made to better understand the protein-DNA interactions. Recent mining on exact TF-TFBS-associated sequence patterns (rules) has shown great potentials and achieved very promising results. However, exact rules cannot handle variations in real data, resulting in limited informative rules. In this article, we generalize the exact rules to approximate ones for both TFs and TFBSs, which are essential for biological variations. Results: A progressive approach is proposed to address the approximation to alleviate the computational requirements. Firstly, similar TFBSs are grouped from the available TF-TFBS data (TRANSFAC database). Secondly, approximate and highly conserved binding cores are discovered from TF sequences corresponding to each TFBS group. A customized algorithm is developed for the specific objective. We discover the approximate TF-TFBS rules by associating the grouped TFBS consensuses and TF cores. The rules discovered are evaluated by matching (verifying with) the actual protein-DNA binding pairs from Protein Data Bank (PDB) 3D structures. The approximate results exhibit many more verified rules and up to 300% better verification ratios than the exact ones. The customized algorithm achieves over 73% better verification ratios than traditional methods. Approximate rules (64-79%) are shown statistically significant. Detailed variation analysis and conservation verification on NCBI records demonstrate that the approximate rules reveal both the flexible and specific protein-DNA interactions accurately. The approximate TF-TFBS rules discovered show great generalized capability of exploring more informative binding rules. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  5. Mixture of Switching Linear Dynamics to Discover Behavior Patterns in Object Tracks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooij, Julian F P; Englebienne, Gwenn; Gavrila, Dariu M

    2016-02-01

    We present a novel non-parametric Bayesian model to jointly discover the dynamics of low-level actions and high-level behaviors of tracked objects. In our approach, actions capture both linear, low-level object dynamics, and an additional spatial distribution on where the dynamic occurs. Furthermore, behavior classes capture high-level temporal motion dependencies in Markov chains of actions, thus each learned behavior is a switching linear dynamical system. The number of actions and behaviors is discovered from the data itself using Dirichlet Processes. We are especially interested in cases where tracks can exhibit large kinematic and spatial variations, e.g. person tracks in open environments, as found in the visual surveillance and intelligent vehicle domains. The model handles real-valued features directly, so no information is lost by quantizing measurements into 'visual words', and variations in standing, walking and running can be discovered without discrete thresholds. We describe inference using Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling and validate our approach on several artificial and real-world pedestrian track datasets from the surveillance and intelligent vehicle domain. We show that our model can distinguish between relevant behavior patterns that an existing state-of-the-art hierarchical model for clustering and simpler model variants cannot. The software and the artificial and surveillance datasets are made publicly available for benchmarking purposes. PMID:26761737

  6. GeoWeb Crawler: An Extensible and Scalable Web Crawling Framework for Discovering Geospatial Web Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yuan Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available With the advance of the World-Wide Web (WWW technology, people can easily share content on the Web, including geospatial data and web services. Thus, the “big geospatial data management” issues start attracting attention. Among the big geospatial data issues, this research focuses on discovering distributed geospatial resources. As resources are scattered on the WWW, users cannot find resources of their interests efficiently. While the WWW has Web search engines addressing web resource discovery issues, we envision that the geospatial Web (i.e., GeoWeb also requires GeoWeb search engines. To realize a GeoWeb search engine, one of the first steps is to proactively discover GeoWeb resources on the WWW. Hence, in this study, we propose the GeoWeb Crawler, an extensible Web crawling framework that can find various types of GeoWeb resources, such as Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC web services, Keyhole Markup Language (KML and Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc (ESRI Shapefiles. In addition, we apply the distributed computing concept to promote the performance of the GeoWeb Crawler. The result shows that for 10 targeted resources types, the GeoWeb Crawler discovered 7351 geospatial services and 194,003 datasets. As a result, the proposed GeoWeb Crawler framework is proven to be extensible and scalable to provide a comprehensive index of GeoWeb.

  7. Mixture of Switching Linear Dynamics to Discover Behavior Patterns in Object Tracks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooij, Julian F P; Englebienne, Gwenn; Gavrila, Dariu M

    2016-02-01

    We present a novel non-parametric Bayesian model to jointly discover the dynamics of low-level actions and high-level behaviors of tracked objects. In our approach, actions capture both linear, low-level object dynamics, and an additional spatial distribution on where the dynamic occurs. Furthermore, behavior classes capture high-level temporal motion dependencies in Markov chains of actions, thus each learned behavior is a switching linear dynamical system. The number of actions and behaviors is discovered from the data itself using Dirichlet Processes. We are especially interested in cases where tracks can exhibit large kinematic and spatial variations, e.g. person tracks in open environments, as found in the visual surveillance and intelligent vehicle domains. The model handles real-valued features directly, so no information is lost by quantizing measurements into 'visual words', and variations in standing, walking and running can be discovered without discrete thresholds. We describe inference using Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling and validate our approach on several artificial and real-world pedestrian track datasets from the surveillance and intelligent vehicle domain. We show that our model can distinguish between relevant behavior patterns that an existing state-of-the-art hierarchical model for clustering and simpler model variants cannot. The software and the artificial and surveillance datasets are made publicly available for benchmarking purposes.

  8. Concept of proton radiography using energy resolved dose measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentefour, El H; Schnuerer, Roland; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2016-08-21

    Energy resolved dosimetry offers a potential path to single detector based proton imaging using scanned proton beams. This is because energy resolved dose functions encrypt the radiological depth at which the measurements are made. When a set of predetermined proton beams 'proton imaging field' are used to deliver a well determined dose distribution in a specific volume, then, at any given depth x of this volume, the behavior of the dose against the energies of the proton imaging field is unique and characterizes the depth x. This concept applies directly to proton therapy scanning delivery methods (pencil beam scanning and uniform scanning) and it can be extended to the proton therapy passive delivery methods (single and double scattering) if the delivery of the irradiation is time-controlled with a known time-energy relationship. To derive the water equivalent path length (WEPL) from the energy resolved dose measurement, one may proceed in two different ways. A first method is by matching the measured energy resolved dose function to a pre-established calibration database of the behavior of the energy resolved dose in water, measured over the entire range of radiological depths with at least 1 mm spatial resolution. This calibration database can also be made specific to the patient if computed using the patient x-CT data. A second method to determine the WEPL is by using the empirical relationships between the WEPL and the integral dose or the depth at 80% of the proximal fall off of the energy resolved dose functions in water. In this note, we establish the evidence of the fundamental relationship between the energy resolved dose and the WEPL at the depth of the measurement. Then, we illustrate this relationship with experimental data and discuss its imaging dynamic range for 230 MeV protons. PMID:27435446

  9. Concept of proton radiography using energy resolved dose measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentefour, El H.; Schnuerer, Roland; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Energy resolved dosimetry offers a potential path to single detector based proton imaging using scanned proton beams. This is because energy resolved dose functions encrypt the radiological depth at which the measurements are made. When a set of predetermined proton beams ‘proton imaging field’ are used to deliver a well determined dose distribution in a specific volume, then, at any given depth x of this volume, the behavior of the dose against the energies of the proton imaging field is unique and characterizes the depth x. This concept applies directly to proton therapy scanning delivery methods (pencil beam scanning and uniform scanning) and it can be extended to the proton therapy passive delivery methods (single and double scattering) if the delivery of the irradiation is time-controlled with a known time-energy relationship. To derive the water equivalent path length (WEPL) from the energy resolved dose measurement, one may proceed in two different ways. A first method is by matching the measured energy resolved dose function to a pre-established calibration database of the behavior of the energy resolved dose in water, measured over the entire range of radiological depths with at least 1 mm spatial resolution. This calibration database can also be made specific to the patient if computed using the patient x-CT data. A second method to determine the WEPL is by using the empirical relationships between the WEPL and the integral dose or the depth at 80% of the proximal fall off of the energy resolved dose functions in water. In this note, we establish the evidence of the fundamental relationship between the energy resolved dose and the WEPL at the depth of the measurement. Then, we illustrate this relationship with experimental data and discuss its imaging dynamic range for 230 MeV protons.

  10. Revealing of photon-number splitting attack on quantum key distribution system by photon-number resolving devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaidash, A. A.; Egorov, V. I.; Gleim, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum cryptography allows distributing secure keys between two users so that any performed eavesdropping attempt would be immediately discovered. However, in practice an eavesdropper can obtain key information from multi-photon states when attenuated laser radiation is used as a source of quantum states. In order to prevent actions of an eavesdropper, it is generally suggested to implement special cryptographic protocols, like decoy states or SARG04. In this paper, we describe an alternative method based on monitoring photon number statistics after detection. We provide a useful rule of thumb to estimate approximate order of difference of expected distribution and distribution in case of attack. Formula for calculating a minimum value of total pulses or time-gaps to resolve attack is shown. Also formulas for actual fraction of raw key known to Eve were derived. This method can therefore be used with any system and even combining with mentioned special protocols.

  11. Understanding healthcare professionals' self-efficacy to resolve interprofessional conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Martha; Orchard, Carole

    2016-05-01

    Conflict within interprofessional healthcare teams, when not effectively resolved, has been linked to detrimental consequences; however, effective conflict resolution has been shown to enhance team performance, increase patient safety, and improve patient outcomes. Alarmingly, knowledge of healthcare professionals' ability to resolve conflict has been limited, largely due to the challenges that arise when researchers attempt to observe a conflict occurring in real time. Research literature has identified three central components that seem to influence healthcare professional's perceived ability to resolve conflict: communication competence, problem-solving ability, and conflict resolution education and training. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of communication competence, problem-solving ability, and conflict resolution education and training on healthcare professionals' perceived ability to resolve conflicts. This study employed a cross-sectional survey design. Multiple regression analyses demonstrated that two of the three central components-conflict resolution education and training and communication competence-were found to be statistically significant predictors of healthcare professionals' perceived ability to resolve conflict. Implications include a call to action for clinicians and academicians to recognize the importance of communication competence and conflict resolution education and training as a vital area in interprofessional pre- and post-licensure education and collaborative practice. PMID:27152535

  12. THE DEBRIS DISK AROUND {gamma} DORADUS RESOLVED WITH HERSCHEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda C.; Booth, Mark; Kavelaars, J. J.; Koning, Alice [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Kennedy, Grant M.; Wyatt, Mark C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Sibthorpe, Bruce [UK Astronomy Technology Center, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Lawler, Samantha M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Qi, Chenruo [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Su, Kate Y. L.; Rieke, George H. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Wilner, David J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Greaves, Jane S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-01

    We present observations of the debris disk around {gamma} Doradus, an F1V star, from the Herschel Key Programme DEBRIS (Disc Emission via Bias-free Reconnaissance in the Infrared/Submillimetre). The disk is well resolved at 70, 100, and 160 {mu}m, resolved along its major axis at 250 {mu}m, detected but not resolved at 350 {mu}m, and confused with a background source at 500 {mu}m. It is one of our best resolved targets and we find it to have a radially broad dust distribution. The modeling of the resolved images cannot distinguish between two configurations: an arrangement of a warm inner ring at several AU (best fit 4 AU) and a cool outer belt extending from {approx}55 to 400 AU or an arrangement of two cool, narrow rings at {approx}70 AU and {approx}190 AU. This suggests that any configuration between these two is also possible. Both models have a total fractional luminosity of {approx}10{sup -5} and are consistent with the disk being aligned with the stellar equator. The inner edge of either possible configuration suggests that the most likely region to find planets in this system would be within {approx}55 AU of the star. A transient event is not needed to explain the warm dust's fractional luminosity.

  13. Understanding healthcare professionals' self-efficacy to resolve interprofessional conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Martha; Orchard, Carole

    2016-05-01

    Conflict within interprofessional healthcare teams, when not effectively resolved, has been linked to detrimental consequences; however, effective conflict resolution has been shown to enhance team performance, increase patient safety, and improve patient outcomes. Alarmingly, knowledge of healthcare professionals' ability to resolve conflict has been limited, largely due to the challenges that arise when researchers attempt to observe a conflict occurring in real time. Research literature has identified three central components that seem to influence healthcare professional's perceived ability to resolve conflict: communication competence, problem-solving ability, and conflict resolution education and training. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of communication competence, problem-solving ability, and conflict resolution education and training on healthcare professionals' perceived ability to resolve conflicts. This study employed a cross-sectional survey design. Multiple regression analyses demonstrated that two of the three central components-conflict resolution education and training and communication competence-were found to be statistically significant predictors of healthcare professionals' perceived ability to resolve conflict. Implications include a call to action for clinicians and academicians to recognize the importance of communication competence and conflict resolution education and training as a vital area in interprofessional pre- and post-licensure education and collaborative practice.

  14. Resolving the Extragalactic Background Light with gamma-ray spectra from distant blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borrel, V; Braun, I; Breitling, F; Brown, A M; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ata, A; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubus, G; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Fontaine, G; Fuchs, Y; Funk, S; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Gillessen, S; Glicenstein, J F; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; De Jager, O C; Khelifi, B; Klages, S; Komin, Nu; Konopelko, A; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemiere, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Leroy, N; Lohse, T; Martin, J M; Martineau--, O; Huynh; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; McComb, T J L; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Raux, J; Rayner, S M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V V; Sauge, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schuster, C; Schwanke, U; Siewert, M; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Theoret, C G; Tluczykont, M; Van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J

    2006-01-01

    The diffuse Extragalactic Background Light (EBL) contains unique information about the epochs of formation and the history of evolution of galaxies. Unfortunately, direct measurements are subject to large systematic uncertainties due to the difficulties in the accurate model-based subtraction of the bright foregrounds. An alternative approach is based on the detection and identification of EBL absorption features in high-energy spectra of objects of known redshift. Here we exploit this method on the blazars H 2356-309 (z=0.165) and 1ES 1101-232 (z=0.186), newly discovered at TeV energies by the H.E.S.S. Collaboration. They are the most distant sources with measured spectra known so far at these energies. Their hard spectra provide the most stringent upper limit to date on the EBL in the Opt--NIR band, which appears significantly lower than expected from the current "direct" estimates and very close to the absolute lower limit represented by the integrated light of resolved galaxies. In addition to important c...

  15. Resolving Gas Flows in the Ultraluminous Starburst IRAS23365+3604 with Keck LGSAO/OSIRIS

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Crystal L

    2015-01-01

    Keck OSIRIS/LGSAO observations of the ultraluminous galaxy IRAS 23365+3604 resolve a non-axisymmetric, circumnuclear structure of semi-major axis 0.42" (520 pc) in Paschen-alpha emission. The line-of-sight velocity of the ionized gas increases from the northeast towards the southwest; this gradient is perpendicular to the photometric major axis of the infrared emission. Two pairs of bends in the zero velocity line are detected. The inner bend provides evidence for gas inflow onto the circumnuclear structure. We interpret the gas kinematics on kiloparsec scales in relation to the molecular gas disk and multiphase outflow discovered previously. In particular, the fast component of the outflow (detected previously with lower spatial resolution) is not detected, adding support to the conjecture that the fast wind originates well-beyond the nucleus. These data directly show the dynamics of gas inflow and outflow in the central kiloparsec of a late-stage, gas-rich merger and demonstrate the potential of integral fi...

  16. Dirac cones, Floquet side bands, and theory of time-resolved angle-resolved photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Aaron; Arsenault, A.; Pereg-Barnea, T.

    2016-10-01

    Pump-probe techniques with high temporal resolution allow one to drive a system of interest out of equilibrium and at the same time probe its properties. Recent advances in these techniques open the door to studying new, nonequilibrium phenomena such as Floquet topological insulators and superconductors. These advances also necessitate the development of theoretical tools for understanding the experimental findings and predicting new ones. In the present paper, we provide a theoretical foundation to understand the nonequilibrium behavior of a Dirac system. We present detailed numerical calculations and simple analytic results for the time evolution of a Dirac system irradiated by light. These results are framed by appealing to the recently revitalized notion of side bands [A. Farrell and T. Pereg-Barnea, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 106403 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.106403; Phys. Rev. B 93, 045121 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.045121], extended to the case of nonperiodic drive where the fast oscillations are modified by an envelope function. We apply this formalism to the case of photocurrent generated by a second probe pulse. We find that, under the application of circularly polarized light, a Dirac point only ever splits into two copies of side bands. Meanwhile, the application of linearly polarized light leaves the Dirac point intact while producing side bands. In both cases the population of the side bands are time dependent through their nonlinear dependence on the envelope of the pump pulse. Our immediate interest in this work is in connection to time- and angle-resolved photoemission experiments, where we find excellent qualitative agreement between our results and those in the literature [Wang et al., Science 342, 453 (2013), 10.1126/science.1239834]. However, our results are general and may prove useful beyond this particular application and should be relevant to other pump-probe experiments.

  17. EPICS oscilloscope for time-resolved data acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sector 7 undulator beamline (7 ID) of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is dedicated to time-resolved X-ray research . Silicon avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are used as the primary point detector for time-resolved Bragg diffraction experiments for their fast recovery time (5 photons/s) at the detector, however, deadtime corrections to the counting statistics become appreciable . Common practice has been to attenuate the monochromatic beam entering the experimental hutch to an appropriately low flux . For these high-flux experiments, an APD operated in proportional mode is a better detector choice due to a large dynamic range and linearity. With the ZT4212 ZTEC, EPICS based oscilloscope, the operating procedure to use an APD in proportional mode has been improved. This article shows the setup and operating procedure for this oscilloscope and demonstrates its application to measuring time-resolved rocking curves of laser excited semiconductors.

  18. Super-resolved imaging with ultimate time resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Ashida, Yuto

    2015-01-01

    Precisely and accurately locating point objects is a long-standing common thread in science. Super-resolved imaging of single molecules has revolutionized our view of quasi-static nanostructures $\\it{in-vivo}$. A wide-field approach based on localizing individual fluorophores has emerged as a versatile method to surpass the standard resolution limit. In those techniques, the super-resolution is realized by sparse photoactivation and localization together with the statistical analysis based on point spread functions. Nevertheless, the slow temporal resolution of super-resolved imaging severely restricts the utility to the study of live-cell phenomena. Clearly, a major breakthrough to observe fast, nanoscale dynamics needs to be made. Here we present a super-resolved imaging method that achieves the theoretical-limit time resolution. By invoking information theory, we can achieve the robust localization of overlapped light emitters at an order of magnitude faster speed than the conventional super-resolution mic...

  19. RESOLVE's Field Demonstration on Mauna Kea, Hawaii 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Captain, Janine; Quinn, Jacqueline; Moss, Thomas; Weis, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    In cooperation with the Canadian Space Agency, and the Northern Centre for Advanced Technology, Inc., NASA has undertaken the In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) project called RESOLVE (Regolith and Environment Science & Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction). This project is an Earth-based lunar precursor demonstration of a system that could be sent to explore permanently shadowed polar lunar craters, where it would drill into regolith, quantify the volatiles that are present, and extract oxygen by hydrogen reduction of iron oxides. The resulting water could be electrolyzed into oxygen to support exploration and hydrogen, which would be recycled through the process. The RESOLVE chemical processing system was mounted on a Canadian Space Agency mobility chasis and successfully demonstrated on Hawaii's Mauna Kea volcano in February 2010. The RESOLVE unit is the initial prototype of a robotic prospecting mission to the Moon. RESOLVE is designed to go to the poles of the Moon to "ground truth" the form and concentration of the hydrogen/water/hydroxyl that has been seen from orbit (M3, Lunar Prospector and LRO) and to test technologies to extract oxygen from the lunar regolith. RESOLVE has the ability to capture a one-meter core sample of lunar regolith and heat it to determine the volatiles that may be released and then demonstrate the production of oxygen from minerals found in the regolith. The RESOLVE project, which is led by KSC, is a multi-center and multi-organizational effort that includes representatives from KSC, JSC, GRC, the Canadian Space Agency, and the Northern Center for Advanced Technology (NORCAT). This paper details the results obtained from four days of lunar analog testing that included gas chromatograph analysis for volatile components, remote control of chemistry and drilling operations via satalite communications, and real-time water quantification using a novel capacitance measurement technique.

  20. Adaptive Subchip Multipath Resolving for Wireless Location Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Nabil R

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliable positioning of cellular users in a mobile environment requires accurate resolving of overlapping multipath components. However, this task is difficult due to fast channel fading conditions and data ill-conditioning, which limit the performance of least-squares-based techniques. This paper develops two overlapping multipath resolving methods (adaptive and nonadaptive, and shows how the adaptive solution can be made robust to the above limitations by extracting and exploiting a priori information about the fading channel. Also the proposed techniques are extended when there are antenna arrays at the base station. Simulation results illustrate the performance of the proposed techniques.

  1. The role of mediation in resolving workplace relationship conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Donna Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Stress triggered by workplace-based interpersonal conflict can result in damaged relationships, loss of productivity, diminished job satisfaction and increasingly, workers' compensation claims for psychological injury. This paper examined the literature on the role and effectiveness of mediation, as the most common method of Alternative Dispute Resolution, in resolving workplace relationship conflict. Available evidence suggests that mediation is most effective when supported by organisational commitment to ADR strategies, policies and processes, and conducted by independent, experienced and qualified mediators. The United States Postal Service program REDRESS™ is described as an illustration of the successful use of mediation to resolve conflict in the workplace.

  2. Channel-resolved above-threshold double ionization of acetylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiaochun; Song, Qiying; Ji, Qinying; Lin, Kang; Pan, Haifeng; Ding, Jingxin; Zeng, Heping; Wu, Jian

    2015-04-24

    We experimentally investigate the channel-resolved above-threshold double ionization (ATDI) of acetylene in the multiphoton regime using an ultraviolet femtosecond laser pulse centered at 395 nm by measuring all the ejected electrons and ions in coincidence. As compared to the sequential process, diagonal lines in the electron-electron joint energy spectrum are observed for the nonsequential ATDI owing to the correlative sharing of the absorbed multiphoton energies. We demonstrate that the distinct channel-resolved sequential and nonsequential ATDI spectra can clearly reveal the photon-induced acetylene-vinylidene isomerization via proton migration on the cation or dication states. PMID:25955049

  3. Local resolved electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of PEFC single cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, M.; Gulzow, E. [German Aerospace Center, Inst. of Technical Thermodynamics, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Experimental data on a spatial resolved level is needed to understand the integral behaviour of fuel cells as well as to validate models describing fuel cell behaviour. This paper described a new tool developed to increase the accuracy of current density measurements. Based on a printed circuit board, the tool integrated local electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques in order to determine local membrane resistance, electrochemical reactions, and transport processes. Solutions for locally resolved impedance spectroscopy measurements were presented. It was concluded that the tool will help to provide a more detailed understanding of fuel cell behaviour.

  4. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P.; Nir, Talia M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hansell, Narelle K.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Liu, Enchi; Green, Robert C.; Montine, Tom; Petersen, Ronald; Aisen, Paul; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Beckett, Laurel; Harvey, Danielle; Gamst, Anthony; Donohue, Michael; Kornak, John; Jack, Clifford R.; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Jagust, William; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Morris, John; Cairns, Nigel J.; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Trojanowki, J.Q.; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Khachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Petersen, Ronald; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Romirowsky, Aliza; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; Kielb, Stephanie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Coleman, R. Edward; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristina; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan; Belden, Christine; Jacobson, Sandra; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Bwayo, Salome K.; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T.-Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain’s connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain’s wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases. PMID:23471985

  5. Discovering functional modules by topic modeling RNA-Seq based toxicogenomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ke; Gong, Binsheng; Lee, Mikyung; Liu, Zhichao; Xu, Joshua; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida

    2014-09-15

    Toxicogenomics (TGx) endeavors to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms through exploring gene expression profiles in response to toxic substances. Recently, RNA-Seq is increasingly regarded as a more powerful alternative to microarrays in TGx studies. However, realizing RNA-Seq's full potential requires novel approaches to extracting information from the complex TGx data. Considering read counts as the number of times a word occurs in a document, gene expression profiles from RNA-Seq are analogous to a word by document matrix used in text mining. Topic modeling aiming at to discover the latent structures in text corpora would be helpful to explore RNA-Seq based TGx data. In this study, topic modeling was applied on a typical RNA-Seq based TGx data set to discover hidden functional modules. The RNA-Seq based gene expression profiles were transformed into "documents", on which latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) was used to build a topic model. We found samples treated by the compounds with the same modes of actions (MoAs) could be clustered based on topic similarities. The topic most relevant to each cluster was identified as a "marker" topic, which was interpreted by gene enrichment analysis with MoAs then confirmed by compound and pathways associations mined from literature. To further validate the "marker" topics, we tested topic transferability from RNA-Seq to microarrays. The RNA-Seq based gene expression profile of a topic specifically associated with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) signaling pathway was used to query samples with similar expression profiles in two different microarray data sets, yielding accuracy of about 85%. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the applicability of topic modeling to discover functional modules in RNA-Seq data and suggests a valuable computational tool for leveraging information within TGx data in RNA-Seq era. PMID:25083553

  6. New variable stars discovered in the fields of three Galactic open clusters using the VVV survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, T.; Minniti, D.; Dékány, I.; Clariá, J. J.; Alonso-García, J.; Gramajo, L. V.; Ramírez Alegría, S.; Bonatto, C.

    2016-11-01

    This project is a massive near-infrared (NIR) search for variable stars in highly reddened and obscured open cluster (OC) fields projected on regions of the Galactic bulge and disk. The search is performed using photometric NIR data in the J-, H- and Ks- bands obtained from the Vista Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) Survey. We performed in each cluster field a variability search using Stetson's variability statistics to select the variable candidates. Later, those candidates were subjected to a frequency analysis using the Generalized Lomb-Scargle and the Phase Dispersion Minimization algorithms. The number of independent observations range between 63 and 73. The newly discovered variables in this study, 157 in total in three different known OCs, are classified based on their light curve shapes, periods, amplitudes and their location in the corresponding color-magnitude (J -Ks ,Ks) and color-color (H -Ks , J - H) diagrams. We found 5 possible Cepheid stars which, based on the period-luminosity relation, are very likely type II Cepheids located behind the bulge. Among the newly discovered variables, there are eclipsing binaries, δ Scuti, as well as background RR Lyrae stars. Using the new version of the Wilson & Devinney code as well as the "Physics Of Eclipsing Binaries" (PHOEBE) code, we analyzed some of the best eclipsing binaries we discovered. Our results show that these studied systems turn out to be ranging from detached to double-contact binaries, with low eccentricities and high inclinations of approximately 80°. Their surface temperatures range between 3500 K and 8000 K.

  7. Discover, Visualize, and Deliver Geospatial Data through OGC Standards-based WebGIS System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; SanthanaVannan, Suresh K [ORNL; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Geospatial data are important to understand the Earth - ecosystem dynamics, land cover changes, resource management, and human interactions with the Earth to name a few. One of the biggest difficulties users face is to discover, access, and assemble distributed, large volume, heterogeneous geospatial data to conduct geo-analysis. Traditional methods of geospatial data discovery, visualization, and delivery lack the capabilities of resource sharing and automation across systems or organizational boundaries. They require users to download the data ldquoas-isrdquo in their original file format, projection, and extent. Also, discovering data served by traditional methods requires prior knowledge of data location, and processing requires specialized expertise. These drawbacks of traditional methods create additional burden to users, introduce too much overhead to research, and also reduce the potential usage of the data. At the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), researchers working on NASA-sponsored projects: Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) and Modeling and Synthesis Thematic Data Center (MAST-DC) have tapped into the benefits of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards to overcome the drawbacks of traditional methods of geospatial data discovery, visualization, and delivery. The OGC standards-based approach facilitates data sharing and interoperability across network, organizational, and geopolitical boundaries. Tools and services based on OGC standards deliver the data in many user defined formats and allow users to visualize the data prior to download. This paper introduces an approach taken to visualize and deliver ORNL DAAC, MAST-DC, and other relevant geospatial data through OGC standards-based Web Services, including Web Map Service (WMS), Web Coverage Service (WCS), and Web Feature Service (WFS). It also introduces a WebGIS system built on top of OGC services that helps users discover, visualize, and access geospatial data.

  8. Swarm intelligence in bioinformatics: methods and implementations for discovering patterns of multiple sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhihua; Zhang, Yi

    2014-02-01

    As a promising and innovative research field, bioinformatics has attracted increasing attention recently. Beneath the enormous number of open problems in this field, one fundamental issue is about the accurate and efficient computational methodology that can deal with tremendous amounts of data. In this paper, we survey some applications of swarm intelligence to discover patterns of multiple sequences. To provide a deep insight, ant colony optimization, particle swarm optimization, artificial bee colony and artificial fish swarm algorithm are selected, and their applications to multiple sequence alignment and motif detecting problem are discussed. PMID:24749453

  9. Kinematics and chemistry of recently discovered Reticulum 2 and Horologium 1 dwarf galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Koposov, S. E.; Casey, A. R.; Belokurov, V.; Lewis, J.R.; Gilmore, G.; Worley, C.; Hourihane, A.; Randich, S.; Bensby, T.; Bragaglia, A.; Bergemann, M.; Carraro, G.; Costado, M. T.; Flaccomio, E.; Francois, P.

    2015-01-01

    Photometry alone is not sufficient to unambiguously distinguish between ultra-faint star clusters and dwarf galaxies because of their overlap in morphological properties. Here we report on VLT/GIRAFFE spectra of candidate member stars in two recently discovered ultra-faint satellites Reticulum 2 and Horologium 1, obtained as part of the ongoing Gaia-ESO Survey. We identify 18 members in Reticulum 2 and 5 in Horologium 1. We find Reticulum 2 to have a velocity dispersion of ~3.22 km/s, implyin...

  10. Chromospheric activity of ROSAT discovered weak-lined T Tauri stars

    OpenAIRE

    Montes, D.; Ramsey, L. W.

    1998-01-01

    We have started a high resolution optical observation program dedicated to the study of chromospheric activity in weak-lined T Tauri stars (WTTS) recently discovered by the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS). It is our purpose to quantify the phenomenology of the chromospheric activity of each star determining stellar surface fluxes in the more important chromospheric activity indicators (Ca II H & K, H_beta, H_alpha, Ca II IRT) as well as obtain the Li I abundance, a better determination of the ste...

  11. Tidal Streams in Newly Discovered compact elliptical (cE) galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Huxor, Avon; Price, James; Harniman, Rob

    2010-01-01

    We present two newly-discovered, compact elliptical (cE) galaxies, which exhibit clear evidence of tidal steams, found in a search of SDSS DR7. The structural parameters of the cEs are derived using GALFIT and give effective radii < 400 pc. They also possess young to intermediate-age stellar populations. These two cEs provide direct evidence, a "smoking gun", for the process of tidal stripping that is believed to be the origin of M32-type galaxies. Both are found in small group environments with many late-type galaxies, suggesting that we may be seeing the formation of such galaxies in dynamically young galaxy groups.

  12. [Discovering a masterpiece--the Russian physician and author Leonid Tsypkin (1926-82)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skårderud, Finn

    2008-11-01

    The paper presents a literary work unknown to most readers. The Russian author Leonid Tsypkin (1926 - 82) is among those who were discovered and even declared literary geniuses after their dead. He never saw a line of his own fiction published. Tsypkin studied medicine in Minsk in Belarus and later practiced as a pathologist in Moscow where he obtained two PhDs and authored numerous scientific publications. In his novel "Summer in Baden-Baden", the Jew Tsypkin declares his love to the anti-Semitic author Fjodor Dostojevskij. Tsypkins' own life became more and more complicated due to anti-Semitism in the Soviet Union. PMID:19096477

  13. Palomar Transient Factory Discovers Another Possible super- Chandrasekhar Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, P. E.; Howell, D. A.; Sullivan, M.; Suzuki, N.; Cucchiara, A.; Botyanszki, J.; Hsiao, E. Y.

    2010-10-01

    The Type Ia supernova science working group of the Palomar Transient Factory (ATEL#1964) reports the discovery of a possible super-Chandrasekhar mass supernova, PTF10xgx. The supernova is at RA = 00:12:23.15, Dec = +02:30:44.1 (J2000) in the galaxy identified as APMUKS(BJ) B000949.39+021401.7 (Maddox et al. 1990, MNRAS, 243, 692). The supernova was discovered and classified by Oarical, an autonomous software framework of the PTF collaboration, based on observations made with the Palomar 48-inch Oschin Schmidt telescope.

  14. Study by X-ray fluorescence technique of some Roman brooches discovered at Tomis - Constanta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    XRF method was used in order to determine the concentration of the main chemical components in the raw materials and on the other hand to make a classification of the different types of brooches discovered at Tomis, an archaeological site in Romania. From determinations of concentration through XRF and also through metallographic interpretation of the structure, we deduced that the brooches can be divided in two main types according to the age estimation. The simple brooches, manufactured from a single piece, are from the Pre-Roman civilization and those manufactured in a complex way, rich ornamented, are from the Roman civilization. (authors)

  15. Spitzer Observations of Exoplanets Discovered with The Kepler K2 Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Beichman, Charles; Werner, Michael; Gorjian, Varoujan; Krick, Jessica; Deck, Katherine; Knutson, Heather; Wong, Ian; Petigura, Erik A; Christiansen, Jessie; Ciardi, David; Greene, Thomas P; Schlieder, Joshua E; Line, Mike; Crossfield, Ian; Howard, Andrew; Sinukoff, Evan

    2016-01-01

    We have used the {\\it Spitzer Space Telescope} to observe two transiting planetary systems orbiting low mass stars discovered in the \\Kepler \\Ktwo mission. The system K2-3 (EPIC 201367065) hosts three planets while EPIC 202083828 (K2-26) hosts a single planet. Observations of all four objects in these two systems confirm and refine the orbital and physical parameters of the planets. The refined orbital information and more precise planet radii possible with \\Spitzer will be critical for future observations of these and other \\Ktwo targets. For K2-3b we find marginally significant evidence for a Transit Timing Variation between the \\Ktwo and \\Spitzer\\ epochs.

  16. Using Electronic Patient Records to Discover Disease Correlations and Stratify Patient Cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roque, Francisco S.; Jensen, Peter B.; Schmock, Henriette;

    2011-01-01

    phenotype information from the free-text in such records we demonstrate that we can extend the information contained in the structured record data, and use it for producing fine-grained patient stratification and disease co-occurrence statistics. The approach uses a dictionary based on the International......Electronic patient records remain a rather unexplored, but potentially rich data source for discovering correlations between diseases. We describe a general approach for gathering phenotypic descriptions of patients from medical records in a systematic and non-cohort dependent manner. By extracting...

  17. A new hard X-ray source discovered by INTEGRAL: IGR J16442-554

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozzo, E.; Ferrigno, C.; Chenevez, Jérôme;

    2009-01-01

    During a key program observation of the inner Galactic disc performed between 2009-08-30 14:04 and 2009-09-01 12:03 (UTC), a new source was discovered in the INTEGRAL/IBIS mosaic image. The best localization is RA: 251.088 DEC: -55.808, with a 90% error radius of 3.6 arcmin. The source, IGR J16442...... Simbad database within the INTEGRAL error box. A Swift follow-up is ongoing and multi-wavelength observations are encouraged....

  18. Swarm intelligence in bioinformatics: methods and implementations for discovering patterns of multiple sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhihua; Zhang, Yi

    2014-02-01

    As a promising and innovative research field, bioinformatics has attracted increasing attention recently. Beneath the enormous number of open problems in this field, one fundamental issue is about the accurate and efficient computational methodology that can deal with tremendous amounts of data. In this paper, we survey some applications of swarm intelligence to discover patterns of multiple sequences. To provide a deep insight, ant colony optimization, particle swarm optimization, artificial bee colony and artificial fish swarm algorithm are selected, and their applications to multiple sequence alignment and motif detecting problem are discussed.

  19. Discovering habitable Earths, hot Jupiters and other close planets with microlensing

    OpenAIRE

    Di Stefano, Rosanne

    2011-01-01

    Searches for planets via gravitational lensing have focused on cases in which the projected separation, a, between planet and star is comparable to the Einstein radius, R_E. This paper considers smaller orbital separations and demonstrates that evidence of close-orbit planets can be found in the low-magnification portion of the light curves generated by the central star. We develop a protocol to discover hot Jupiters as well as Neptune-mass and Earth-mass planets in the stellar habitable zone...

  20. G313.3+00.3: A New Planetary Nebula discovered by the Australia Telescope Compact Array and the Spitzer Space Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, M; Roberts, M S E; Meade, M R; Babler, B; Indebetouw, R; Whitney, B A; Watson, C; Wolfire, M; Wolff, M J; Mathis, J S; Churchwell, E B; Cohen, Martin; Green, Anne J.; Roberts, Mallory S.E.; Meade, Marilyn R.; Babler, Brian; Indebetouw, Remy; Whitney, Barbara A.; Watson, Christer; Wolfire, Mark; Wolff, Mike J.; Mathis, John S.; Churchwell, Edward B.

    2005-01-01

    We present a new planetary nebula, first identified in images from the Australia Telescope Compact Array, although not recognized at that time. Recent observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope during the GLIMPSE Legacy program have rediscovered the object. The high-resolution radio and infrared images enable the identification of the central star or its wind, the recognition of the radio emission as thermal, and the probable presence of polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons in and around the source. These lead to the conclusion that G313.3+00.3 is a planetary nebula. This object is of particular interest because it was discovered solely through radio and mid-infrared imaging, without any optical (or near-infrared) confirmation, and acts as a proof of concept for the discovery of many more highly extinguished planetary nebulae. G313.3+00.3 is well-resolved by both the instruments with which it was identified, and suffers extreme reddening due to its location in the Scutum-Crux spiral arm.

  1. Time-Resolved 2PPE and Time-Resolved PEEM as a Probe of LSP's in Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bayer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The time-resolved two-photon photoemission technique (TR-2PPE has been applied to study static and dynamic properties of localized surface plasmons (LSP in silver nanoparticles. Laterally, integrated measurements show the difference between LSP excitation and nonresonant single electron-hole pair creation. Studies below the optical diffraction limit were performed with the detection method of time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy (TR-PEEM. This microscopy technique with a resolution down to 40 nm enables a systematic study of retardation effects across single nanoparticles. In addition, as will be shown in this paper, it is a highly sensitive sensor for coupling effects between nanoparticles.

  2. Ultrashort pulse characterization by frequency-resolved pump-probe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pshenichnikov, MS; Baltuska, A; de Haan, F; Wiersma, DA; Elsaesser, T; Mukamel, S; Murnane, MM; Scherer, NF

    2001-01-01

    We present a novel method for measuring amplitude and phase of ultrashort optical pulses. The technique makes use of frequency-resolved pump-probe geometry that is widely used in femtochemistry and femtobiology. The experimental realization of the method is demonstrated.

  3. Task Analysis Exemplified: The Process of Resolving Unfinished Business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Leslie S.; Foerster, Florence S.

    1996-01-01

    The steps of a task analysis research program designed to identify the in-session performances involved in resolving lingering bad feelings toward a significant other are described. A rational-empirical methodology of repeatedly cycling between rational conjecture and empirical observations is demonstrated as a method of developing an intervention…

  4. Detectors for Energy-Resolved Fast Neutron Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Dangendorf, V.; Breskin, A.; Chechik, R.; Feldman, G.; Goldberg, M B; Jagutzki, O.; Kersten, C.; Laczko, G; Mor, I.; Spillman, U.; Vartsky, D.

    2004-01-01

    Two detectors for energy-resolved fast-neutron imaging in pulsed broad-energy neutron beams are presented. The first one is a neutron-counting detector based on a solid neutron converter coupled to a gaseous electron multiplier (GEM). The second is an integrating imaging technique, based on a scintillator for neutron conversion and an optical imaging system with fast framing capability.

  5. Time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy: a differential absorption approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taroni, Paola; Bassi, Andrea; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Pifferi, Antonio

    2009-07-01

    A method was developed to estimate spectral changes of the absorption properties of turbid media from time-resolved reflectance/transmittance measurements. It was derived directly from the microscopic Beer-Lambert law, and tested against simulations and phantom measurements.

  6. Nested Genetic Algorithm for Resolving Overlapped Spectral Bands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A nested genetic algorithm, including genetic parameter level and genetic implemented level for peak parameters, was proposed and applied for resolving overlapped spectral bands. By the genetic parameter level, parameters of genetic algorithm were optimized; moreover, the number of overlapped peaks was determined simultaneously. Then parameters of individual peaks were computed with the genetic implemented level.

  7. Resolved Virtual Photon Contributions to inelastic $e-p$ Scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Borzumati, F.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of dealing with the resolved photon contribution to $P^2$-integrated $ep$ cross sections is discussed. Suitable approximations have to be found, since no parametrization of the photon structure function in the full range of virtuality of the exchanged photon exists.

  8. Music Education Preservice Teachers' Confidence in Resolving Behavior Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedden, Debra G.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there would be a change in preservice teachers' (a) confidence concerning the resolution of behavior problems, (b) tactics for resolving them, (c) anticipation of problems, (d) fears about management issues, and (e) confidence in methodology and pedagogy over the time period of a one-semester…

  9. Spatially resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the space-resolved soft x-ray (1-33nm) instrumentation developed for the Tore Supra tokamak. By using a programmable hydraulic jack to move the spectrometer, several spatial profiles (up to ten) of many impurity lines are obtained during a single plasma discharge, with a time resolution which can be as short as 600 ms. (author)

  10. Advances in Time-Resolved Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lynch, K.P.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis details advanced developments in 3-D particle image velocimetry (PIV) based on the tomographic PIV technique, with an emphasis on time-resolved experiments. Tomographic PIV is a technique introduced in 2006 to measure the flow velocity in a three-dimensional volume. When measurements are

  11. 30 CFR 706.19 - Resolving prohibited interests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... effect resolution. If an employee has a prohibited financial interest, the head of the organizational entity (Department, bureau, office, etc.) where the employee works shall promptly advise the employee that remedial action which will resolve the prohibited interest is required within 90 days....

  12. 30 CFR 705.19 - Resolving prohibited interests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... effect resolution. If an employee has a prohibited financial interest, the Head of the State Regulatory Authority shall promptly advise the employee that remedial action which will resolve the prohibited interest is required within 90 days. (2) Remedial action may include: (i) Reassignment of the employee to...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy Spatially Resolved NMR Techniques and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Codd, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    This handbook and ready reference covers materials science applications as well as microfluidic, biomedical and dental applications and the monitoring of physicochemical processes. It includes the latest in hardware, methodology and applications of spatially resolved magnetic resonance, such as portable imaging and single-sided spectroscopy. For materials scientists, spectroscopists, chemists, physicists, and medicinal chemists.

  14. Time resolved two- and three-dimensional plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This collection of papers on diagnostics in fusion plasmas contains work on the data analysis of inverse problems and on the experimental arrangements presently used to obtain spatially and temporally resolved plasma radial profiles, including electron and ion temperature, plasma density and plasma current profiles. Refs, figs and tabs

  15. An x-ray detector for time-resolved studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of ultrahigh-brightness x-ray sources makes time-resolved x-ray studies more and more feasible. Improvements in x-ray optics components are also critical for obtaining the appropriate beam for a particular type of experiment. Moreover, fast parallel detectors will be essential in order to exploit the combination of high intensity x-ray sources and novel optics for time-resolved experiments. A CCD detector with a time resolution of microseconds has been developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). This detector is fully programmable using CAMAC electronics and a Micro Vax computer. The techniques of time-resolved x-ray studies, which include scattering, microradiography, microtomography, stroboscopy, etc., can be applied to a range of phenomena (including rapid thermal annealing, surface ordering, crystallization, and the kinetics of phase transition) in order to understand these time-dependent microscopic processes. Some of these applications will be illustrated by recent results performed at synchrotrons. New powerful x-ray sources now under construction offer the opportunity to apply innovative approaches in time-resolved work

  16. Resolving Semantic Interference during Word Production Requires Central Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The semantic picture-word interference task has been used to diagnose how speakers resolve competition while selecting words for production. The attentional demands of this resolution process were assessed in 2 dual-task experiments (tone classification followed by picture naming). In Experiment 1, when pictures and distractor words were presented…

  17. Optimizing a time-resolved X-ray absorption experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bressler, C; Chergui, M; Abela, R; Pattison, P

    2001-01-01

    Calculations are presented of the optimum conditions for performing a laser-pump X-ray probe time-resolved X-ray absorption experiment. The results concerning sensitivity and feasibility for implementing the method are illustrated for the case of the nascent I radical environment following I sup - photolysis in H sub 2 O.

  18. Retrieving the susceptibility from time-resolved terahertz experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schins, J.M.; Hendry, E.; Bonn, M.; Muller, H.G.

    2007-01-01

    We present an analytical expression for the observed signal in time- and phase-resolved pump-probe studies, with particular emphasis on terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. Maxwell’s equations are solved for the response of damped, harmonic oscillators to a driving probe field in the perturbative reg

  19. Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy of black silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porte, Henrik; Turchinovich, Dmitry; Jepsen, Peter Uhd;

    2010-01-01

    The ultrafast photoconductivity dynamics of black silicon is measured by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. Black silicon is produced by laser annealing of an a-Si:H film. We show that the decay time of the photoconductivity depends on the annealing method and fluence used in the production...

  20. GEOSS Registry System: Enabling the Registering and Discovering of Geospatial Web Services Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y.; di, L.; Nebert, D.; Wei, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Web Service registry, as a key infrastructural component and cornerstone for Service-Oriented-Architecture deployments, meets the critical need to register, discover, and govern available Web services that provide a promising plan to promote the online discovering and sharing of massive valuable geospatial data. The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) Registry System includes mechanisms to register components and have them approved by the GEO Secretariat, to register services and associate them with GEOSS-recognized standards -- and special arrangements for implementations using non-recognized approaches. A taxonomy of standard types is also proposed to assist in the discovery and classification of GEOSS service implementations. This GEOSS registry exposes Universal Description, Discovery and Integration (UDDI), OASIS ebXML-ebRS, and OpenGIS Consortium (OGC) Catalogue Service for Web (CSW) interfaces to be accessed by other applications, including GEOSS Web Portal solutions. Clearinghouse implementations can use the GEOSS registry to register and locate GEOSS catalog services as a basis for evaluation, configuration, harvest, and distributed query. The details of the system design and implementation will be presented, along with the lessons learned from this effort to promote the discovery and system integration of geospatial Web Services worldwide.

  1. A density-based algorithm for discovering clusters in large spatial databases with noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ester, M.; Kriegel, H.P.; Sander, J.; Xu Xiaowei [Univ. of Munich (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    Clustering algorithms are attractive for the task of class identification in spatial databases. However, the application to large spatial databases rises the following requirements for clustering algorithms: minimal requirements of domain knowledge to determine the input parameters, discovery of clusters with arbitrary shape and good efficiency on large databases. The well-known clustering algorithms offer no solution to the combination of these requirements. In this paper, we present the new clustering algorithm DBSCAN relying on a density-based notion of clusters which is designed to discover clusters of arbitrary shape. DB SCAN requires only one input parameter and supports the user in determining an appropriate value for it. We performed an experimental evaluation of the effectiveness and efficiency of DBSCAN using synthetic data and real data of the SEQUOIA 2000 benchmark. The results of our experiments demonstrate that (1) DBSCAN is significantly more effective in discovering clusters of arbitrary shape than the well-known algorithm CLARANS, and that (2) DBSCAN outperforms CLARANS by a factor of more than 100 in terms of efficiency.

  2. R Coronae Borealis stars in the Galactic Bulge discovered by EROS-2

    CERN Document Server

    Tisserand, P; Wood, P R; Lesquoy, E; Beaulieu, J P; Milsztajn, A; Hamadache, C; Afonso, C; Albert, J N; Andersen, J; Ansari, R; Aubourg, E; Bareyre, P; Charlot, X; Coutures, C; Ferlet, R; Fouqué, P; Glicenstein, J F; Goldman, B; Gould, A; Gros, M; Haïssinski, J; De Kat, J; Guillou, L Le; Loup, C; Magneville, C; Maurice, E; Maury, A; Moniez, M; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Perdereau, O; Rahal, Y; Rich, J; Spiro, M; Vidal-Madjar, A; Zylberajch, S

    2008-01-01

    Rare types of variable star may give unique insight into short-lived stages of stellar evolution. The systematic monitoring of millions of stars and advanced light curve analysis techniques of microlensing surveys make them ideal for discovering also such rare variable stars. One example is the R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars, a rare type of evolved carbon-rich supergiant. We have conducted a systematic search of the EROS-2 database for the Galactic catalogue Bulge and spiral arms to find Galactic RCB stars. The light curves of $\\sim$100 million stars, monitored for 6.7 years (from July 1996 to February 2003), have been analysed to search for the main signature of RCB stars, large and rapid drops in luminosity. Follow-up spectroscopy has been used to confirm the photometric candidates. We have discovered 14 new RCB stars, all in the direction of the Galactic Bulge, bringing the total number of confirmed Galactic RCB stars to about 51. After reddening correction, the colours and absolute magnitudes of at least ...

  3. 2MASSJ22560844+5954299: the newly discovered cataclysmic star with the deepest eclipse

    CERN Document Server

    Kjurkchieva, D; Dimitrov, D; Groebel, R; Ibryamov, S; Nikolov, G

    2015-01-01

    Context: The SW Sex stars are assumed to represent a distinguished stage in CV evolution, making it especially important to study them. Aims: We discovered a new cataclysmic star and carried out prolonged and precise photometric observations, as well as medium-resolution spectral observations. Modelling these data allowed us to determine the psysical parameters and to establish its peculiarities. Results: The newly discovered vataclysmic variable 2MASSJ22560844+5954299 shows the deepest eclipse amongst the known nova-like stars. It was reproduced by totally covering a very luminous accretion disk by a red secondary component. The temperature distribution of the disk is flatter than that of steady-state disk. The target is unusual with the combination of a low mass ratio q~1.0 (considerably below the limit q=1.2 of stable mass transfer of CVs) and an M-star secondary. The intensity of the observed three emission lines, H_alpha, He 5875, and He 6678, sharply increases around phase 0.0, accompanied by a Doppler ...

  4. Discover Gene Specific Local Co-Regulations from Time-Course Gene Expression Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Discovering gene co-regulatory relationships is one of most important research in DNA microarray data analysis. The problem of gene specific co-regulation discovery is to, for a particular gene of interest (called target gene, identify the condition subsets where strong gene co-regulations of the target gene are observed and its co-regulated genes in these condition subsets. The co-regulations are local in the sense that they occur in some subsets of full experimental conditions. The study on this problem can contribute to better understanding and characterizing the target gene during the biological activity involved. In this paper, we propose an innovative method for finding gene specific co-regulations using genetic algorithm (GA. A sliding window is used to delimit the allowed length of conditions in which gene co-regulations occur and an ad hoc GA, called the progressive GA, is performed in each window position to find those condition subsets having high fitness. It is called progressive because the initial population for the GA in a window position inherits the top-ranked individuals obtained in its preceding window position, enabling the GA to achieve a better accuracy than the non-progressive algorithm. kNN Lookup Table is utilized to substantially speed up fitness evaluation in the GA. Experimental results with a real-life gene expression data demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of our technique in discovering gene specific co-regulations.

  5. Eight gamma-ray pulsars discovered in blind frequency searches of Fermi LAT data

    CERN Document Server

    Parkinson, P M Saz; Ziegler, M; Ray, P S; Abdo, A A; Ballet, J; Baring, M G; Belfiore, A; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Camilo, F; Caraveo, P A; de Luca, A; Ferrara, E C; Freire, P C C; Grove, J E; Gwon, C; Harding, A K; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnston, S; Keith, M; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Michelson, P F; Parent, D; Ransom, S M; Reimer, O; Romani, R W; Smith, D A; Thompson, D J; Watters, K; Weltevrede, P; Wolff, M T; Wood, K S

    2010-01-01

    We report the discovery of eight gamma-ray pulsars in blind frequency searches using the LAT, onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Five of the eight pulsars are young (tau_c10^36 erg/s), and located within the Galactic plane (|b|<3 deg). The remaining three are older, less energetic, and located off the plane. Five pulsars are associated with sources included in the LAT bright gamma-ray source list, but only one, PSR J1413-6205, is clearly associated with an EGRET source. PSR J1023-5746 has the smallest characteristic age (tau_c=4.6 kyr) and is the most energetic (Edot=1.1E37 erg/s) of all gamma-ray pulsars discovered so far in blind searches. PSRs J1957+5033 and J2055+25 have the largest characteristic ages (tau_c~1 Myr) and are the least energetic (Edot~5E33 erg/s) of the newly-discovered pulsars. We present the timing models, light curves, and detailed spectral parameters of the new pulsars. We used recent XMM observations to identify the counterpart of PSR J2055+25 as XMMU J205549.4+253959. In ...

  6. DeBi: Discovering Differentially Expressed Biclusters using a Frequent Itemset Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vingron Martin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of massive high throughput data via clustering algorithms is very important for elucidating gene functions in biological systems. However, traditional clustering methods have several drawbacks. Biclustering overcomes these limitations by grouping genes and samples simultaneously. It discovers subsets of genes that are co-expressed in certain samples. Recent studies showed that biclustering has a great potential in detecting marker genes that are associated with certain tissues or diseases. Several biclustering algorithms have been proposed. However, it is still a challenge to find biclusters that are significant based on biological validation measures. Besides that, there is a need for a biclustering algorithm that is capable of analyzing very large datasets in reasonable time. Results Here we present a fast biclustering algorithm called DeBi (Differentially Expressed BIclusters. The algorithm is based on a well known data mining approach called frequent itemset. It discovers maximum size homogeneous biclusters in which each gene is strongly associated with a subset of samples. We evaluate the performance of DeBi on a yeast dataset, on synthetic datasets and on human datasets. Conclusions We demonstrate that the DeBi algorithm provides functionally more coherent gene sets compared to standard clustering or biclustering algorithms using biological validation measures such as Gene Ontology term and Transcription Factor Binding Site enrichment. We show that DeBi is a computationally efficient and powerful tool in analyzing large datasets. The method is also applicable on multiple gene expression datasets coming from different labs or platforms.

  7. Phenomena Discovered During Immersion of Steel Parts into Liquid Quenchants (Overview)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobasko, Nikolai I.

    2014-12-01

    In the paper, new phenomena are discussed which were discovered during investigation of the intensive quenching processes. It is shown that in many cases film boiling is prevented completely during quenching of steel parts in cold liquids, especially in water salt solutions. In this case, the part surface temperature drops almost immediately to the liquid boiling point at the beginning of the quench and then maintains at this level for a relatively long time, i.e., the so-called self-regulated thermal process is established. A simple equation for determining the duration of the self-regulated thermal process is proposed. Thermal waves are generated during an immersion of steel parts into a cold liquid and after the self-regulated thermal process is completed. The thermal waves move in opposite direction from where the cooling process starts. The self-regulated thermal process was used to develop an original intensive quenching technology (IQ-2 process). It can be a basis for developing other new technologies such as an austempering and a martempering in cold liquids under pressure. Discovered effects of thermal waves can be used for determining a duration of the self-regulated thermal process and for reconstructing an existing theory on the double electrical layer. Practical examples of calculations of the duration of the self-regulated thermal process are provided in the paper.

  8. Hitchhiking Effect Mapping: A New Approach for Discovering Agronomic Important Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xue-yong; TONG Yi-ping; YOU Guang-xia; HAO Chen-yang; GE Hong-mei; WANG Lan-fen; LI Bin; DONG Yu-shen; LI Zhen-sheng

    2007-01-01

    Besides the natural selection, the crops cultivated today have experienced two episodes of strong artificial selection,domestic and modern breeding. Domestication led to giant genetic structure differentiation between cultivars and their wild species, while modern breeding made further genetic structure differentiation between the modern varieties and the landraces. In a population, diversity of the loci under strong selection is significantly lower than that of other loci. At the same time, diversity in the genomic regions flanking these selected loci also declines in the process of selection. This phenomenon is called hitchhiking effects or selection sweep in genetics. Genomic regions with selection sweep (haplotype block) could be detected after draft genome scanning (genome typing) with molecular markers in a number of released varieties or natural populations. Marker/trait association analysis in these regions would detect the loci (or QTLs) even the favored alleles (genes) in breeding or natural adaptation. Fine scanning of these genomic regions would help to determine the sizes of haplotype blocks and to discover the key genes, thereby providing very valuable information for isolation of the key genes and molecular design of new varieties. Establishment of high density genetic linkage maps in the major crops and availability of high throughput genotyping platform make it possible to discover agronomic important genes through marker/trait association analysis. On the basis of available publications, we give a brief introduction of the hitchhiking effect mapping approach in this paper using plant height, 1 000-grain weight, and phosphorus-deficiency tolerance as examples in wheat.

  9. Lema\\^itre and Hubble: What was discovered - if any - in 1927-29?

    CERN Document Server

    Chernin, A D

    2011-01-01

    The Big Bang predicted theoretically by Friedmann could not be discovered in the 1920th, since global cosmological distances (more than 300-1000 Mpc) were not available for observations at that time. In 1927-29, Lema\\^itre and Hubble studied receding motions of galaxies at local distances of less than 20-30 Mpc and found that the motions followed the (nearly) linear velocity-distance relation, known now as Hubble's law. For decades, the real nature of this phenomenon has remained a mystery, in Sandage's words. After the discovery of dark energy, it was suggested that the dynamics of local expansion flows is dominated by omnipresent dark energy, and it is the dark energy antigravity that is able to introduce the linear velocity-distance relation to the flows. It implies that Hubble's law observed at local distances was in fact the first observational manifestation of dark energy. If this is the case, the commonly accepted criteria of scientific discovery lead to the conclusion: In 1927, Lema\\^itre discovered d...

  10. Fragment virtual screening based on Bayesian categorization for discovering novel VEGFR-2 scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanmin; Jiao, Yu; Xiong, Xiao; Liu, Haichun; Ran, Ting; Xu, Jinxing; Lu, Shuai; Xu, Anyang; Pan, Jing; Qiao, Xin; Shi, Zhihao; Lu, Tao; Chen, Yadong

    2015-11-01

    The discovery of novel scaffolds against a specific target has long been one of the most significant but challengeable goals in discovering lead compounds. A scaffold that binds in important regions of the active pocket is more favorable as a starting point because scaffolds generally possess greater optimization possibilities. However, due to the lack of sufficient chemical space diversity of the databases and the ineffectiveness of the screening methods, it still remains a great challenge to discover novel active scaffolds. Since the strengths and weaknesses of both fragment-based drug design and traditional virtual screening (VS), we proposed a fragment VS concept based on Bayesian categorization for the discovery of novel scaffolds. This work investigated the proposal through an application on VEGFR-2 target. Firstly, scaffold and structural diversity of chemical space for 10 compound databases were explicitly evaluated. Simultaneously, a robust Bayesian classification model was constructed for screening not only compound databases but also their corresponding fragment databases. Although analysis of the scaffold diversity demonstrated a very unevenly distribution of scaffolds over molecules, results showed that our Bayesian model behaved better in screening fragments than molecules. Through a literature retrospective research, several generated fragments with relatively high Bayesian scores indeed exhibit VEGFR-2 biological activity, which strongly proved the effectiveness of fragment VS based on Bayesian categorization models. This investigation of Bayesian-based fragment VS can further emphasize the necessity for enrichment of compound databases employed in lead discovery by amplifying the diversity of databases with novel structures.

  11. VLT/MUSE discovers a jet from the evolved B[e] star MWC 137

    CERN Document Server

    Mehner, A; Groh, J H; Oudmaijer, R D; Baade, D; Rivinius, T; Selman, F; Boffin, H M J; Martayan, C

    2016-01-01

    Not all stars exhibiting the optical spectral characteristics of B[e] stars share the same evolutionary stage. The Galactic B[e] star MWC 137 is a prime example of an object with uncertain classification, with previous work suggesting pre- and post-main sequence classification. Our goal is to settle this debate and provide reliable evolutionary classification. Integral field spectrograph observations with VLT MUSE of the cluster SH 2-266 are used to analyze the nature of MWC 137. A collimated outflow is discovered that is geometrically centered on MWC 137. The central position of MWC 137 in the cluster SH 2-266 within the larger nebula suggests strongly that it is a member of this cluster and that it is both at the origin of the nebula and the newly discovered jet. Comparison of the color-magnitude diagram of the brightest cluster stars with stellar evolutionary models results in a distance of about 5.2$\\pm$1.4 kpc. We estimate that the cluster is at least 3 Myr old. The jet extends over 66" (1.7 pc) projecte...

  12. RESOLVE and ECO: Galaxy Refueling Transitions in Environmental Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannappan, Sheila; Moffett, A. J.; Eckert, K. D.; Stark, D.; Norris, M. A.; Berlind, A. A.; the RESOLVE Team

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that galaxies undergo two key transitions in refueling. Below the threshold mass (baryonic mass Mbar 10^10 Msun or 125 km/s), gas-dominated late-type galaxies and blue, disk-building E/S0 galaxies become abundant, reflecting an increase in accretion-dominated states. Between the threshold mass and the bimodality mass (Mbar 10^10.6 Msun or 200 km/s), "normal" intermediate gas content bulged spiral galaxies like our Milky Way become most common, reflecting reduced accretion, while at higher masses quenched E/S0s start to dominate. Notwithstanding these results, the high scatter in gas and long-term star formation trends as a function of galaxy mass implies that mass is a secondary driver of refueling, motivating an inquiry into the role of environment. We present two surveys designed to meet this need: the REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE (RESOLVE) survey and the Environmental COntext (ECO) catalog encompassing it. Initially selected from the SDSS, both surveys offer enhanced redshift completeness and custom reprocessed NUV+ugriz+JHK photometry. RESOLVE comprises >1500 galaxies down to baryonic mass ~10^9 Msun, for which we are building a comprehensive census of stellar, gas, and dynamical mass as well as star formation and environment data. The RESOLVE database includes spatially resolved optical spectroscopy from SOAR, SALT, and Gemini in both high-resolution kinematic mode and low-resolution stellar population mode, as well as deep 21cm observations from the GBT and Arecibo aimed at detecting HI down to 5%-10% of each galaxy's stellar mass. ECO has nearly ten times larger volume than RESOLVE, with matched environment and stellar mass metrics as well as shallower HI data inherited from the 21cm ALFALFA survey, but only SDSS spectroscopy. Here we use the first wave of gas, star formation, and environment data for RESOLVE and ECO to explore the halo mass dependence of refueling, finding that both gas-dominated galaxies and blue

  13. Discovering patterns of correlation and similarities in software project data with the Circos visualization tool

    CERN Document Server

    Kosti, Makrina Viola; Bourazani, Nikoleta; Angelis, Lefteris

    2011-01-01

    Software cost estimation based on multivariate data from completed projects requires the building of efficient models. These models essentially describe relations in the data, either on the basis of correlations between variables or of similarities between the projects. The continuous growth of the amount of data gathered and the need to perform preliminary analysis in order to discover patterns able to drive the building of reasonable models, leads the researchers towards intelligent and time-saving tools which can effectively describe data and their relationships. The goal of this paper is to suggest an innovative visualization tool, widely used in bioinformatics, which represents relations in data in an aesthetic and intelligent way. In order to illustrate the capabilities of the tool, we use a well known dataset from software engineering projects.

  14. G306.3-0.9: A NEWLY DISCOVERED YOUNG GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, Mark T.; Miller, Jon M.; Maitra, Dipankar; Gueltekin, Kayhan; Reis, Rubens C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Loi, Shyeh T.; Murphy, Tara; Moss, Vanessa; Reeves, Sarah; Robbins, William J.; Gaensler, B. M. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Gehrels, Neil; Petre, Robert [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kennea, Jamie A.; Siegel, Michael H.; Gelbord, Jonathan [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kuin, Paul, E-mail: markrey@umich.edu [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-01

    We present X-ray and radio observations of the new Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G306.3-0.9, recently discovered by Swift. Chandra imaging reveals a complex morphology, dominated by a bright shock. The X-ray spectrum is broadly consistent with a young SNR in the Sedov phase, implying an age of 2500 yr for a distance of 8 kpc, plausibly identifying this as one of the 20 youngest Galactic SNRs. Australia Telescope Compact Array imaging reveals a prominent ridge of radio emission that correlates with the X-ray emission. We find a flux density of {approx}160 mJy at 1 GHz, which is the lowest radio flux recorded for a Galactic SNR to date. The remnant is also detected at 24 {mu}m, indicating the presence of irradiated warm dust. The data reveal no compelling evidence for the presence of a compact stellar remnant.

  15. Local NASA Scientists Discover New Species of Organism in Mars-Like Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Microbiologist Dr. Elena V. Pikuta, and Astrobiologist Richard Hoover culture extremophiles, microorganisms that can live in extreme environments, in the astrobiology laboratory at the National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC) in Huntsville, Alabama. The scientists recently discovered a new species of extremophiles, Spirochaeta Americana. The species was found in Northern California's Mono Lake, an alkaline, briny oxygen-limited lake in a closed volcanic crater that Hoover believes may offer new clues to help identify sites to research for potential life on Mars. Hoover is an astrobiologist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and Pikuta is a microbiologist with the Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomy Research Laboratory at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The NSSTC is a partnership with MSFC, Alabama universities, industry, research institutes, and federal agencies.

  16. Discovering the Rhyme of Digital Reading%发现数字阅读之美

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    麦敏华

    2011-01-01

    文章通过分析传统阅读与数字阅读的发展现状,探讨当前数字阅读推广存在的难题以及数字阅读在图书馆服务中的定位,阐述了图书馆界应积极面对阅读转型,寻找与发现数字阅读内在之美的观点。%The paper analyzes the development status of traditional reading and digital reading,discusses the difficulties to promote digital reading.It states that libraries should face the change of reading and discover the rhyme of digital reading.

  17. Mining a clinical data warehouse to discover disease-finding associations using co-occurrence statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui; Markatou, Marianthi; Melton, Genevieve B; Chiang, Michael F; Hripcsak, George

    2005-01-01

    This paper applies co-occurrence statistics to discover disease-finding associations in a clinical data warehouse. We used two methods, chi2 statistics and the proportion confidence interval (PCI) method, to measure the dependence of pairs of diseases and findings, and then used heuristic cutoff values for association selection. An intrinsic evaluation showed that 94 percent of disease-finding associations obtained by chi2 statistics and 76.8 percent obtained by the PCI method were true associations. The selected associations were used to construct knowledge bases of disease-finding relations (KB-chi2, KB-PCI). An extrinsic evaluation showed that both KB-chi2 and KB-PCI could assist in eliminating clinically non-informative and redundant findings from problem lists generated by our automated problem list summarization system.

  18. G306.3-0.9: A Newly Discovered Young Galactic Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Mark T.; Loi, Syheh T.; Murphy, Tara; Miller, Jon M.; Maitra, Dipankar; Gueltekin, Kayhan; Gehrels, Neil; Kennea, Jamie A.; Siegel, Michael H.; Gelbord, Jonathan; Kuin, Paul; Moss, Vanessa; Reeves, Sarah; Robbins, William J.; Gaensler, B. M.; Reis, Rubens C.; Petre, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We present X-ray and radio observations of the new Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G306.3-0.9, recently discovered by Swift. Chandra imaging reveals a complex morphology, dominated by a bright shock. The X-ray spectrum is broadly consistent with a young SNR in the Sedov phase, implying an age of 2500 yr for a distance of 8 kpc, plausibly identifying this as one of the 20 youngest Galactic SNRs. Australia Telescope Compact Array imaging reveals a prominent ridge of radio emission that correlates with the X-ray emission. We find a flux density of 160 mJy at 1 GHz, which is the lowest radio flux recorded for a Galactic SNR to date. The remnant is also detected at 24µm, indicating the presence of irradiated warm dust. The data reveal no compelling evidence for the presence of a compact stellar remnant.

  19. INTEGRAL discovered a new hard X-ray source: IGRJ17511-3057

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldovin, C.; Kuulkers, E.; Ferrigno, C.;

    2009-01-01

    During the latest observations of the Galactic Bulge monitoring (see ATel #438), carried out between 2009-09-12 03:21:34 and 2009-09-12 05:27:22 (UTC), INTEGRAL discovered a new bright hard X-ray source, which we designate IGRJ17511-3057. The source is detected in the INTEGRAL/IBIS mosaic image w...... by a single power-law with photon index 2.0+/-0.2. The source flux is 5.7e-10 erg/cm2/s in the 3-20 keV energy band and 4.8e-10 erg/cm2/s in the 20-100 keV energy band....

  20. Discovering potential user browsing behaviors using custom-built apriori algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Rawat, Sandeep Singh

    2010-01-01

    Most of the organizations put information on the web because they want it to be seen by the world. Their goal is to have visitors come to the site, feel comfortable and stay a while and try to know completely about the running organization. As educational system increasingly requires data mining, the opportunity arises to mine the resulting large amounts of student information for hidden useful information (patterns like rule, clustering, and classification, etc). The education domain offers ground for many interesting and challenging data mining applications like astronomy, chemistry, engineering, climate studies, geology, oceanography, ecology, physics, biology, health sciences and computer science. Collecting the interesting patterns using the required interestingness measures, which help us in discovering the sophisticated patterns that are ultimately used for developing the site. We study the application of data mining to educational log data collected from Guru Nanak Institute of Technology, Ibrahimpatn...

  1. PTF discovers and follows-up nearby, young, Type II supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasliwal, M. M.; Quimby, R. M.; Ofek, E. O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Gal-Yam, A.; Arcavi, I.; Green, Y.; Walker, E.; Mazzali, P.; Nugent, P. E.; Poznanski, D.; Howell, D. A.; Dilday, B.; Fox, D. B.

    2010-09-01

    On UT 2010 Sep 15.243, the Palomar Transient Factory discovered an optical transient, PTF10vdl at RA(J2000) = 23:05:49.001 and DEC(J2000)=03:31:20.50 near NGC 7483. We obtained Target Of Opportunity spectra with Gemini-S/GMOS (PI Kasliwal) on Sep 16.29. The spectrum was extremely blue (f_nu proportional to nu^4.5) and nearly featureless. We further obtained a spectrum with the TNG/DOLORES (PI Walker) on Sep 17.40 and P-Cygni profiles of four Balmer lines were clearly visible, consistent with the redshift of NGC 7483, suggesting this is a Type II supernova.

  2. An Archived Multi Objective Simulated Annealing Method to Discover Biclusters in Microarray Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Lashkargir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of microarray technology it has been possible to measure thousands of expression values of genes in a single experiment. Analysis of large scale geonomics data, notably gene expression, has initially focused on clustering methods. Recently, biclustering techniques were proposed for revealing submatrices showing unique patterns. Biclustering or simultaneous clustering of both genes and conditions is challenging particularly for the analysis of high-dimensional gene expression data in information retrieval, knowledge discovery, and data mining. In biclustering of microarray data, several objectives have to be optimized simultaneously and often these objectives are in conflict with each other. A multi objective model is very suitable for solving this problem. Our method proposes a algorithm which is based on multi objective Simulated Annealing for discovering biclusters in gene expression data. Experimental result in bench mark data base present a significant improvement in overlap among biclusters and coverage of elements in gene expression and quality of biclusters.

  3. Discovering relations between mind, brain, and mental disorders using topic mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell A Poldrack

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging research has largely focused on the identification of associations between brain activation and specific mental functions. Here we show that data mining techniques applied to a large database of neuroimaging results can be used to identify the conceptual structure of mental functions and their mapping to brain systems. This analysis confirms many current ideas regarding the neural organization of cognition, but also provides some new insights into the roles of particular brain systems in mental function. We further show that the same methods can be used to identify the relations between mental disorders. Finally, we show that these two approaches can be combined to empirically identify novel relations between mental disorders and mental functions via their common involvement of particular brain networks. This approach has the potential to discover novel endophenotypes for neuropsychiatric disorders and to better characterize the structure of these disorders and the relations between them.

  4. Timing and Interstellar Scattering of Thirty-five Distant Pulsars Discovered in the PALFA Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Nice, D J; Bogdanov, S; Cordes, J M; Farrington, D; Hessels, J W T; Kaspi, V M; Lyne, A G; Popa, L; Ransom, S M; Sanpa-arsa, S; Stappers, B W; Wang, Y; Allen, B; Bhat, N D R; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Champion, D J; Chatterjee, S; Crawford, F; Deneva, J S; Desvignes, G; Freire, P C C; Jenet, F A; Knispel, B; Lazarus, P; Lee, K J; van Leeuwen, J; Lorimer, D R; Lynch, R; McLaughlin, M A; Scholz, P; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; Stovall, K; Venkataraman, A; Zhu, W

    2013-01-01

    We have made extensive observations of 35 distant slow (non-recycled) pulsars discovered in the ongoing Arecibo PALFA pulsar survey. Timing observations of these pulsars over several years at Arecibo Observatory and Jodrell Bank Observatory have yielded high-precision positions and measurements of rotation properties. Despite being a relatively distant population, the properties of these pulsars mirror those of the previously known pulsar population. Many of the sources exhibit timing noise, and one underwent a small glitch. We have used multifrequency data to measure the interstellar scattering properties of these pulsars. We find scattering to be higher than predicted along some lines of sight, particularly in the Cygnus region. Lastly, we present XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the youngest and most energetic of the pulsars, J1856+0245, which has previously been associated with the GeV-TeV pulsar wind nebula HESS J1857+026.

  5. Technical photography for mural paintings: the newly discovered frescoes in Aci Sant’Antonio (Sicily, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cosentino

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A cycle of 18th century frescoes, depicting the last days of Christ on earth, were recently discovered in Aci Sant’Antonio (Sicily, Italy. The paintings survive along the corners of an originally square chapel that was altered in the early 20th century, acquiring the current octagonal plan. This paper presents the results of the technical photography documentation of these wall paintings and illustrates the methodological challenges that were posed during their examination. Raking light photography was used to reveal the paintings’ state of conservation, details of the plaster work and painting techniques. Ultraviolet fluorescence and infrared false color photography were also performed to evaluate areas of interest for further analytical and diagnostic studies. The first striking feature is the lack of giornate. Only pontate are clearly seen in all the scenes thus indicating that in the larger paint areas, a mixed of fresco and secco technique would have been used.

  6. Footprints of the Newly-Discovered Vela Supernova in Antarctic Ice Cores?

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, C P

    2000-01-01

    The recently-discovered, nearby young supernova remnant in the southeast corner of the older Vela supernova remnant may have been seen in measurements of nitrate abundances in Antarctic ice cores. Such an interpretation of this twenty-year-old ice-core data would provide a more accurate dating of this supernova than is possible purely using astrophysical techniques. The resulting estimates of the supernova distance and light-arrival time are 200 pc and 700 years ago, implying an expansion speed of 5,000 km/s for the supernova remnant. Such an expansion speed has been argued elsewhere to imply the explosion to have been a 15 solar mass Type II supernova. This interpretation also adds new evidence to the debate as to whether nearby supernovae can measurably affect nitrate abundances in polar ice cores.

  7. Discovering Performance Measurement System to Evaluate the Efficiency of E-Business Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Uturytė  -Vrubliauskienė

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the significant growth of information technologies investments, evidence of their influence on organization performance remains inconclusive. Nowadays it is very important to realize whether expected economic benefits of information technologies investments are being recognized in organizations. Currently organizations can no longer afford basically to lose their money in e-business initiatives without developing and using suitable metrics to measure the effectiveness of such investments and to find out the relationship between e-business and organization performance. The study describes research aimed at determining the exact nature of such e-business performance measurement systems. The basic objective of this study is to discover performance measurement system for evaluating the efficiency of e-business solutions.Article in Lithuanian

  8. A New Strategy to Discover Heavy Colored Vectors at the Early LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Vignaroli, Natascia

    2011-01-01

    We perform a study of the LHC discovery reach on a heavy gluon (G*) and heavy fermions (top and bottom excitations), coming from a new composite sector. We find that heavy fermion resonances have a great impact on the composite gluon phenomenology. If the composite gluon is heavier than composite fermions, as flavor observables seem to suggest, the search in the channel where G* decays into a heavy fermion plus its Standard Model partner is very promising, with the possibility for both the G* and heavy fermions to be discovered at the early stage of the LHC. The channel offers also the possibility to extract important information on model parameters, such as the top degree of compositeness.

  9. G306.3-0.9: A newly discovered young galactic supernova remnant

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, Mark; Murphy, Tara; Miller, Jon; Maitra, Dipankar; Gultekin, Kayhan; Gehrels, Neil; Kennea, Jamie; Siegel, Michael; Gelbord, Jonathan; Kuin, Paul; Moss, Vanessa; Reeves, Sarah; Robbins, William; Gaensler, Bryan; Reis, Rubens; Petre, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We present X-ray and radio observations of the new Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G306.3-0.9, recently discovered by Swift. Chandra imaging reveals a complex morphology, dominated by a bright shock. The X-ray spectrum is broadly consistent with a young SNR in the Sedov phase, implying an age of 2500 yr for a distance of 8 kpc, plausibly identifying this as one of the 20 youngest Galactic SNRs. Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) imaging reveals a prominent ridge of radio emission that correlates with the X-ray emission. We find a flux density of ~ 160 mJy at 1 GHz, which is the lowest radio flux recorded for a Galactic SNR to date. The remnant is also detected at 24microns, indicating the presence of irradiated warm dust. The data reveal no compelling evidence for the presence of a compact stellar remnant.

  10. SDSS J115517.35+634622.0: A Newly Discovered Gravitationally Lensed Quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Pindor, B; Inada, N; Gregg, M D; Becker, R H; Brinkmann, J; Burles, S; Frieman, J A; Johnston, D E; Richards, G T; Schneider, D P; Scraton, R; Sekiguchi, M; Turner, E L; York, D G; Pindor, Bart; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Inada, Naohisa; Gregg, Michael D.; Becker, Robert H.; Brinkmann, Jon; Burles, Scott; Frieman, Joshua A.; Johnston, David E.; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Scraton, Ryan; Sekiguchi, Maki; Turner, Edwin L.; York, Donald G.

    2003-01-01

    We report the discovery of SDSSJ115517.35+634622.0, a previously unknown gravitationally lensed quasar. The lens system exhibits two images of a $z = 2.89$ quasar, with an image separation of $1{\\farcs}832 \\pm 0.007$ . Near-IR imaging of the system reveals the presence of the lensing galaxy between the two quasar images. Based on absorption features seen in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectrum, we determine a lens galaxy redshift of $z = 0.1756$. The lens is rather unusual in that one of the quasar images is only $0{\\farcs}22\\pm0{\\farcs}07$ ($\\sim 0.1 R_{\\rm eff}$) from the center of the lens galaxy and photometric modeling indicates that this image is significantly brighter than predicted by a SIS model. This system was discovered in the course of an ongoing search for strongly lensed quasars in the dataset from the SDSS.

  11. Restoration and Preservation of Engraved Limestone Blocks Discovered in Abu Mousa Excavation, Suez - Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil A. Abd El-Tawab BADER

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A lot of engraved limestone blocks were discovered at Awlad Abu Musa (east of Suez, Egypt in 1995/2007 by Supreme Council of Antiquities. The stone blocks were seriously affected by archaeological environments during burial environment in agriculture land. They were covered with thick clay layer with soil particles that disfigured them and hid their inscriptions. Prior to the conservation intervention, the materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Chemical analyses of ground water and microbiological study. After the material characterization, the conservation and restoration of the stone blocks were carried out including cleaning, consolidation, reduction of salts, Re-jointing, restoration and completion of lost parts. After that the blocks were exhibited in Suez museum.

  12. sp3-hybridized framework structure of group-14 elements discovered by genetic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Manh Cuong [Ames Laboratory; Zhao, Xin [Ames Laboratory; Wang, Cai-Zhuang [Ames Laboratory; Ho, Kai-Ming [Ames Laboratory

    2014-05-01

    Group-14 elements, including C, Si, Ge, and Sn, can form various stable and metastable structures. Finding new metastable structures of group-14 elements with desirable physical properties for new technological applications has attracted a lot of interest. Using a genetic algorithm, we discovered a new low-energy metastable distorted sp3-hybridized framework structure of the group-14 elements. It has P42/mnm symmetry with 12 atoms per unit cell. The void volume of this structure is as large as 139.7Å3 for Si P42/mnm, and it can be used for gas or metal-atom encapsulation. Band-structure calculations show that P42/mnm structures of Si and Ge are semiconducting with energy band gaps close to the optimal values for optoelectronic or photovoltaic applications. With metal-atom encapsulation, the P42/mnm structure would also be a candidate for rattling-mediated superconducting or used as thermoelectric materials.

  13. DEVELOPING A NOVEL MULTIDIMENSIONAL MULTIGRANULARITY DATA MINING APPROACH FOR DISCOVERING ASSOCIATION RULES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes K. Chiang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Data Mining is one of the most significant tools for discovering association patterns that are useful for many knowledge domains. Yet, there are some drawbacks in existing mining techniques. Three main weaknesses of current data-mining techniques are: 1 re-scanning of the entire database must be done whenever new attributes are added. 2 An association rule may be true on a certain granularity but fail on a smaller ones and vise verse. 3 Current methods can only be used to find either frequent rules or infrequent rules, but not both at the same time. This research proposes a novel data schema and an algorithm that solves the above weaknesses while improving on the efficiency and effectiveness of data mining strategies. Crucial mechanisms in each step will be clarified in this paper. Finally, this paper presents experimental results regarding efficiency, scalability, information loss, etc. of the proposed approach to prove its advantages.

  14. Identification of the Drosophila and Tribolium receptors for the recently discovered insect RYamide neuropeptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collin, Caitlin; Hauser, Frank; Krogh-Meyer, Peter;

    2011-01-01

    One year ago, we discovered a new family of insect RYamide neuropeptides, which has the C-terminal consensus sequence FFXXXRYamide, and which is widely occurring in most insects, including the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum (F. Hauser et al., J....... Proteome Res. 9 (2010) 5296-5310). Here, we identify a Drosophila G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) coded for by gene CG5811 and its Tribolium GPCR ortholog as insect RYamide receptors. The Drosophila RYamide receptor is equally well activated (EC(50), 1×10(-9)M) by the two Drosophila RYamide neuropeptides......), which might be due to the fact that the last peptide does not completely follow the RYamide consensus sequence rule. There are other neuropeptides in insects that have similar C-terminal sequences (RWamide or RFamide), such as the FMRFamides, sulfakinins, myosuppressins, neuropeptides F, and the various...

  15. Health status of a recently discovered population of feral swine in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, P.S.; Veatch, J.K.; Matlack, R.S.; Jones, D.P.

    1999-01-01

    Twenty feral hogs (Sus scrofa) from a newly discovered population on Fort Riley Army Base (Kansas, USA) were shot and examined from November 1993 through February 1994 to assess the health of the population. The hogs were generally healthy, although serologic evidence indicated that some individuals had been exposed to parvovirus, enterovirus, and swine influenza. We found no indications of brucellosis, pseudorabies, or porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome. Lung worms (Metastrongylus spp.), round worms (Ascaris suum), and whipworms (Trichuris suis) were found in nine, four and two of the hogs, respectively. Seven hogs had infestations of lice (Haematopinus suis). Fence-line contacts were documented between four wild boars and domestic sows, and in three cases wild boars entered pens containing domestic sows. We recommend that hogs be examined periodically from this and other wild populations to monitor health status since new animals may enter populations through deliberate translocation, escape from shooting preserves or domestic swine producers, or dispersal from other feral populations.

  16. ASAS-SN 13cl : A Newly-Discovered Cataclysmic Binary with an Anomalously Warm Secondary

    CERN Document Server

    Thorstensen, John R

    2015-01-01

    The spectrum of the recently discovered cataclysmic variable star (CV) ASAS-SN 13cl shows that a secondary star with spectral type K4 (+- 2 subclasses) contributes roughly half the optical light. The radial velocities of the secondary are modulated on an orbital period P_orb = 4.86 hr with a velocity semiamplitude K = 246 +- 9 km/s, and the light curve shows ellipsoidal variations and an apparent grazing eclipse. At this orbital period, the secondary stars in most CVs are substantially cooler, with spectral types near M3. ASN-13cl therefore joins the small group of CVs with anomalously warm secondary stars, which apparently form when the onset of mass transfer occurs after the secondary has undergone significant nuclear evolution.

  17. Discovering operating modes in telemetry data from the Shuttle Reaction Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganaris, Stefanos; Fisher, Doug; Kulkarni, Deepak

    1994-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of detecting and diagnosing faults in physical systems, for which suitable system models are not available. An architecture is proposed that integrates the on-line acquisition and exploitation of monitoring and diagnostic knowledge. The focus is on the component of the architecture that discovers classes of behaviors with similar characteristics by observing a system in operation. A characterization of behaviors based on best fitting approximation models is investigated. An experimental prototype has been implemented to test it. Preliminary results in diagnosing faults of the reaction control system of the space shuttle are presented. The merits and limitations of the approach are identified and directions for future work are set.

  18. Discovering, Indexing and Interlinking Information Resources [version 2; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Celli

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The social media revolution is having a dramatic effect on the world of scientific publication. Scientists now publish their research interests, theories and outcomes across numerous channels, including personal blogs and other thematic web spaces where ideas, activities and partial results are discussed. Accordingly, information systems that facilitate access to scientific literature must learn to cope with this valuable and varied data, evolving to make this research easily discoverable and available to end users. In this paper we describe the incremental process of discovering web resources in the domain of agricultural science and technology. Making use of Linked Open Data methodologies, we interlink a wide array of custom-crawled resources with the AGRIS bibliographic database in order to enrich the user experience of the AGRIS website. We also discuss the SemaGrow Stack, a query federation and data integration infrastructure used to estimate the semantic distance between crawled web resources and AGRIS.

  19. Sequence Length Limits for Controlling False Positives in Discovering Nucleotide Sequence Motifs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Lei; QiAN Zi-liang

    2008-01-01

    In the study of motif discovery, especially the transcription factor DNA binding sites discovery, a too long input sequence would return non-informative motifs rather than those biological functional motifs. This paper gave theoretical analyses and computational experiments to suggest the length limits of the input sequence. When the sequence length exceeds a certain critical point, the probability of discovering the motif decreases sharply. The work not only gave an explanation on the unsatisfying results of the existed motif discovery problems that the input sequence length might be too long and exceed the point, but also provided an estimation of input sequence length we should accept to get more meaningful and reliable results in motif discovery.

  20. Time-resolved and position-resolved X-ray spectrometry with a pixelated detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, Peter

    2012-12-07

    show a good agreement. Up to now the measurements of impinging spectra with a Timepix detector have been performed in radiation fields with a relatively high fluence. To cope with the requirement of measuring in radiation fields with a low fluence, there had to be changes in the method of analysis compared to those performed formerly. An important improvement in this context was the employment of the Bayesian deconvolution method. The spectra reconstructed with this method were then compared to the results of two different and established detection systems. Firstly, the shape of the deconvolved spectrum was compared to the one measured with a hpGe detector. Secondly, the calculated value of the kerma rate was compared to the one measured with an ionization chamber. This gave an estimate on the correctness of the absolute number of photons. Both comparisons have shown a good agreement and thus I was able to validate that the method delivers precise results. Compared to the formerly used spectrum-stripping method the Bayesian deconvolution turned out to be very stable and reliable. This robustness of the deconvolution method and the development of a pixel-by-pixel energy calibration were the keys towards position-resolved spectrometry. With such a precise energy calibration the energy resolution was enhanced by up to 45%. This improved accuracy in the measurement has been very demanding on the improvements of the simulation of the response matrix needed for deconvolution. Both this enhanced simulation and a pixel-by-pixel calibrated detector opened the possibility of measuring the anode heel effect. Not only the relative angular dependency of the spectrum emitted but also the change in the absolute photon fluence were measured. Furthermore, it is possible to even use small ROIs down to 4x4 pixels to evaluate a spectrum. This was then applied for the spectrometry of small focal spots of a miniature X-ray source used in therapeutics. Furthermore, the robustness and the