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Sample records for biogeography based satellite

  1. Biogeography based Satellite Image Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Panchal, V K; Kaur, Navdeep; Kundra, Harish

    2009-01-01

    Biogeography is the study of the geographical distribution of biological organisms. The mindset of the engineer is that we can learn from nature. Biogeography Based Optimization is a burgeoning nature inspired technique to find the optimal solution of the problem. Satellite image classification is an important task because it is the only way we can know about the land cover map of inaccessible areas. Though satellite images have been classified in past by using various techniques, the researchers are always finding alternative strategies for satellite image classification so that they may be prepared to select the most appropriate technique for the feature extraction task in hand. This paper is focused on classification of the satellite image of a particular land cover using the theory of Biogeography based Optimization. The original BBO algorithm does not have the inbuilt property of clustering which is required during image classification. Hence modifications have been proposed to the original algorithm and...

  2. Biogeography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As a field of study, biogeography may be considered a bricolage - it has been constructed from many different facets from an array of research disciplines including biology, botany, zoology, geography, and geology. Biogeography focuses on the study of the constantly changing ranges of plants and animals, over multitude of space and time scales. It also includes the study of the structure and dynamics of biotic communities and ecosystems as they relate to both natural and anthropogenic processes. As it exists today, biogeography is an interdisciplinary research area founded in both the biological and Earth sciences. From a purely biological perspective, biogeography may be perceived as one of two types of studies: 1. biotic distributions and broad scales, and interpretations of the evolutionary and dispersal history of a single taxon or a few taxa; or 2. biotic distributions at local-to-regional scales, and interpretations of these distributions in relation to contemporary environments and rates of immigration or extinction. The first type of study is what is most usually associated with the term "biogeography" as disciplinary research field. It is conventionally termed "classical biogeography" because it reflects the continuity of research foci on which biogeography was founded in the nineteenth-century. The second type of biogeographical study has more modern day roots and is termed "geographical ecology" to reflect the theoretical predilections of ecologists and population biologists. Geographical ecology for all intents has become merged with ecology and exists as a sub discipline within this larger field of study.

  3. Concentric Circular Antenna Array Synthesis Using Biogeography Based Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urvinder Singh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Biogeography based optimization (BBO is a new stochastic force based on the science of biogeography. Biogeography is the schoolwork of geographical allotment of biological organisms. BBO utilizes migration operator to share information between the problem solutions. The problem solutions are known as habitats and sharing of features is called migration. In this paper, BBO algorithm is developed to optimize the current excitations of concentric circular antenna arrays (CCAA. Concentric Circular Antenna Array (CCAA has numerous attractive features that make it essential in mobile and communication applications. The goal of the optimization is to reduce the side lobe levels and the primary lobe beam width as much as possible. To confirm the capabilities of BBO, three different CCAA antennas of different sizes are taken. The results obtained by BBO are compared with the Real coded Genetic Algorithm (RGA, Craziness based Particle Swarm Optimization (CRPSO and Hybrid Evolutionary Programming (HEP.

  4. Use of satellite remote sensing for determining cloud immersion and biogeography of cloud forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asefi Najafabady, S.; Welch, R. M.; Nair, U.; Lawton, R. O.; Ray, D.

    2006-12-01

    Tropical montane cloud forests (TMCFs) are ecosystems characterized by frequent and prolonged immersion in orographic clouds. TMCFs are biologically rich and diverse and they lie at the core of several of the global biological hotspots identified for conservation purposes. Recent studies show that TMCFs are sensitive to global and regional scale climate changes. Vegetation in TMCFs directly harvest water from clouds, which is usually termed horizontal precipitation, and is an important input to local hydrological cycle. Mosses and ferns present within the TMCFs absorbs moisture during rainfall and releases slowly over time thereby providing another important hydrological function, namely modulation of runoff. In spite of the ecological and hydrological importance of TMCFs, there is scant information regarding the geographical distribution of the TMCFs. One source of information that is currently available is the atlas of the potential cloud forest distribution published by the United Nations Environmental Program. However, this compilation does not directly consider the defining characteristics of cloud forests, namely frequency of immersion in cloud forests, in their classisification scheme. This talk will present the use of NASA MODIS satellite data to determine cloud immersion frequency and thus the biogeography of cloud forests. The MODIS derived cloud top heights and cloud thickness estimated from MODIS retrieval of cloud microphysical properties is used to estimate cloud base height. If the estimate cloud base height at a location is less than or equal to the surface elevation at that point, then that location is defined as experiencing cloud immersion. This classification procedure was applied to determine cloud immersion frequency at two study sites, namely Hawaii and Monteverde, Costa Rica. The cloud immersion frequency maps identifies some of the know cloud forest locations in these study areas. Comparison against a blended product created using numerical

  5. Biogeography-based optimisation of Cognitive Radio system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Kiranjot; Rattan, Munish; Singh Patterh, Manjeet

    2014-01-01

    Biogeography-based optimisation (BBO) is a novel population-based global optimisation algorithm that is stimulated by the science of biogeography. The mathematical models of biogeography describe how a species arises, migrates from one habitat (Island) to another or gets extinct. BBO searches for the global optimum mainly through two steps: migration and mutation. These steps are controlled by immigration and emigration rates of the species in the habitat which are also used to share information between the habitats. In this paper, BBO has been applied to Cognitive Radio (CR) system for optimising its various transmission parameters to meet the quality of service (QoS) that is defined by the user in terms of minimum transmit power, minimum bit error rate (BER), maximum throughput, minimum interference and maximum spectral efficiency. To confirm the capability of biogeography-based optimisation algorithm, the results obtained by BBO are compared with that obtained by using genetic algorithm (GA) for the various QoS parameters, and it has been observed that BBO outperforms GA in system optimisation.

  6. ESSENTIAL MODIFICATIONS ON BIOGEOGRAPHY-BASED OPTIMIZATION ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali R. Alroomi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Biogeography-based optimization (BBO is a new population-based evolutionary algorithm and is based on an old theory of island biogeography that explains the geographical distribution of biological organisms. BBO was introduced in 2008 and then a lot of modifications were employed to enhance its performance. This paper proposes two modifications; firstly, modifying the probabilistic selection process of the migration and mutation stages to give a fairly randomized selection for all the features of the islands. Secondly, the clear duplication process after the mutation stage is sized to avoid any corruption on the suitability index variables. The obtained results through wide variety range of test functions with different dimensions and complexities proved that the BBO performance can be enhanced effectively without using any complicated form of the immigration and emigration rates. This essential modification has to be considered as an initial step for any other modification.

  7. Hybrid Biogeography Based Optimization for Constrained Numerical and Engineering Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengqiang Mi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogeography based optimization (BBO is a new competitive population-based algorithm inspired by biogeography. It simulates the migration of species in nature to share information. A new hybrid BBO (HBBO is presented in the paper for constrained optimization. By combining differential evolution (DE mutation operator with simulated binary crosser (SBX of genetic algorithms (GAs reasonably, a new mutation operator is proposed to generate promising solution instead of the random mutation in basic BBO. In addition, DE mutation is still integrated to update one half of population to further lead the evolution towards the global optimum and the chaotic search is introduced to improve the diversity of population. HBBO is tested on twelve benchmark functions and four engineering optimization problems. Experimental results demonstrate that HBBO is effective and efficient for constrained optimization and in contrast with other state-of-the-art evolutionary algorithms (EAs, the performance of HBBO is better, or at least comparable in terms of the quality of the final solutions and computational cost. Furthermore, the influence of the maximum mutation rate is also investigated.

  8. Statistical Mechanics Approximation of Biogeography-Based Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haiping; Simon, Dan; Fei, Minrui

    2016-01-01

    Biogeography-based optimization (BBO) is an evolutionary algorithm inspired by biogeography, which is the study of the migration of species between habitats. This paper derives a mathematical description of the dynamics of BBO based on ideas from statistical mechanics. Rather than trying to exactly predict the evolution of the population, statistical mechanics methods describe the evolution of statistical properties of the population fitness. This paper uses the one-max problem, which has only one optimum and whose fitness function is the number of 1s in a binary string, to derive equations that predict the statistical properties of BBO each generation in terms of those of the previous generation. These equations reveal the effect of migration and mutation on the population fitness dynamics of BBO. The results obtained in this paper are similar to those for the simple genetic algorithm with selection and mutation. The paper also derives equations for the population fitness dynamics of general separable functions, and we find that the results obtained for separable functions are the same as those for the one-max problem. The statistical mechanics theory of BBO is shown to be in good agreement with simulation.

  9. Statistical Mechanics Approximation of Biogeography-Based Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haiping; Simon, Dan; Fei, Minrui

    2016-01-01

    Biogeography-based optimization (BBO) is an evolutionary algorithm inspired by biogeography, which is the study of the migration of species between habitats. This paper derives a mathematical description of the dynamics of BBO based on ideas from statistical mechanics. Rather than trying to exactly predict the evolution of the population, statistical mechanics methods describe the evolution of statistical properties of the population fitness. This paper uses the one-max problem, which has only one optimum and whose fitness function is the number of 1s in a binary string, to derive equations that predict the statistical properties of BBO each generation in terms of those of the previous generation. These equations reveal the effect of migration and mutation on the population fitness dynamics of BBO. The results obtained in this paper are similar to those for the simple genetic algorithm with selection and mutation. The paper also derives equations for the population fitness dynamics of general separable functions, and we find that the results obtained for separable functions are the same as those for the one-max problem. The statistical mechanics theory of BBO is shown to be in good agreement with simulation. PMID:26172435

  10. Complex System Optimization Using Biogeography-Based Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawei Du

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex systems are frequently found in modern industry. But with their multisubsystems, multiobjectives, and multiconstraints, the optimization of complex systems is extremely hard. In this paper, a new algorithm adapted from biogeography-based optimization (BBO is introduced for complex system optimization. BBO/Complex is the combination of BBO with a multiobjective ranking system, an innovative migration approach, and effective diversity control. Based on comparisons with three complex system optimization algorithms (multidisciplinary feasible (MDF, individual discipline feasible (IDF, and collaborative optimization (CO on four real-world benchmark problems, BBO/Complex demonstrates competitive performance. BBO/Complex provides the best performance in three of the benchmark problems and the second best in the fourth problem.

  11. A biogeography-based optimization for optimum discrete design of skeletal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalili, Shahin; Hosseinzadeh, Yousef; Taghizadieh, Nasser

    2016-09-01

    This article presents a modified biogeography-based optimization (MBBO) algorithm for optimum design of skeletal structures with discrete variables. The main idea of the biogeography-based optimization (BBO) algorithm is based on the science of biogeography, in which each habitat is a possible solution for the optimization problem in the search space. This algorithm consists of two main operators: migration and mutation. The migration operator helps the habitats to exploit the search space, while the mutation operator guides habitats to escape from the local optimum. To enhance the performance of the standard algorithm, some modifications are made and an MBBO algorithm is presented. The performance of the MBBO algorithm is evaluated by optimizing five benchmark design examples, and the obtained results are compared with other methods in the literature. The numerical results demonstrate that the MBBO algorithm is able to show very competitive results and has merits in finding optimum designs.

  12. Design of SVC Controller Based on Improved Biogeography-Based Optimization Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Feifei Dong; Dichen Liu; Jun Wu; Bingcheng Cen; Haolei Wang; Chunli Song; Lina Ke

    2014-01-01

    Considering that common subsynchronous resonance controllers cannot adapt to the characteristics of the time-varying and nonlinear behavior of a power system, the cosine migration model, the improved migration operator, and the mutative scale of chaos and Cauchy mutation strategy are introduced into an improved biogeography-based optimization (IBBO) algorithm in order to design an optimal subsynchronous damping controller based on the mechanism of suppressing SSR by static var compensator (SV...

  13. Fusion of Biogeography based optimization and Artificial bee colony for identification of Natural Terrain Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Arora

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Swarm Intelligence techniques expedite the configuration and collimation of the remarkable ability of group members to reason and learn in an environment of contingency and corrigendum from their peers by sharing information. This paper introduces a novel approach of fusion of two intelligent techniques generally to augment the performance of a single intelligent technique by means of information sharing. Biogeography-based optimization (BBO is a recently developed heuristic algorithm, which proves to be a strong entrant in swarm intelligence with the encouraging and consistent performance. But, as BBO lacks inbuilt property of clustering, its behavior can be replaced with the honey bees of artificial bee colony (ABC, a new swarm intelligent technique. These two methods can be combined to create a new method which is easy to implement and gives more optimized results than the results when BBO is used. We have successfully applied this fusion of techniques for classifying diversified land cover areas in a multispectral remote sensing satellite image. The results illustrate that the proposed approach is very efficient than BBO and highly accurate land cover features can be extracted by using this approach.

  14. Dynamic Deployment of Wireless Sensor Networks by Biogeography Based Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Liu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available As the usage and development of wireless sensor networks increases, problems related to these networks are becoming apparent. Dynamic deployment is one of the main topics that directly affects the performance of the wireless sensor networks. In this paper, biogeography-based optimization is applied to the dynamic deployment of static and mobile sensor networks to achieve better performance by trying to increase the coverage area of the network. A binary detection model is considered to obtain realistic results while computing the effectively covered area. Performance of the algorithm is compared with that of the artificial bee colony algorithm, Homo-H-VFCPSO and stud genetic algorithm that are also population-based optimization algorithms. Results show biogeography-based optimization can be preferable in the dynamic deployment of wireless sensor networks.

  15. On the Convergence of Biogeography-Based Optimization for Binary Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiping Ma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogeography-based optimization (BBO is an evolutionary algorithm inspired by biogeography, which is the study of the migration of species between habitats. A finite Markov chain model of BBO for binary problems was derived in earlier work, and some significant theoretical results were obtained. This paper analyzes the convergence properties of BBO on binary problems based on the previously derived BBO Markov chain model. Analysis reveals that BBO with only migration and mutation never converges to the global optimum. However, BBO with elitism, which maintains the best candidate in the population from one generation to the next, converges to the global optimum. In spite of previously published differences between genetic algorithms (GAs and BBO, this paper shows that the convergence properties of BBO are similar to those of the canonical GA. In addition, the convergence rate estimate of BBO with elitism is obtained in this paper and is confirmed by simulations for some simple representative problems.

  16. Fusion of Biogeography based optimization and Artificial bee colony for identification of Natural Terrain Features

    OpenAIRE

    Priya Arora; Harish Kundra; Dr. V.K Panchal

    2012-01-01

    Swarm Intelligence techniques expedite the configuration and collimation of the remarkable ability of group members to reason and learn in an environment of contingency and corrigendum from their peers by sharing information. This paper introduces a novel approach of fusion of two intelligent techniques generally to augment the performance of a single intelligent technique by means of information sharing. Biogeography-based optimization (BBO) is a recently developed heuristic algorithm, which...

  17. A Hybrid Grey Based KOHONEN Model and Biogeography-Based Optimization for Project Portfolio Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshad Faezy Razi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of selection and the best option are the main subject of operation research science in decision-making theory. Selection is a process that scrutinizes and investigates several quantitative and qualitative, and most often incompatible, factors. One of the most fundamental management issues in multicriteria selection literature is the multicriteria adoption of the projects portfolio. In such decision-making condition, manager is seeking for the best combination to build up a portfolio among the existing projects. In the present paper, KOHONEN algorithm was first employed to build up a portfolio of the projects. Next, each portfolio was evaluated using grey relational analysis (GRA and then scheduled risk of the project was predicted using Mamdani fuzzy inference method. Finally, the multiobjective biogeography-based optimization algorithm was utilized for drawing risk and rank Pareto analysis. A case study is used concurrently to show the efficiency of the proposed model.

  18. Voltage Profile Enhancement and Reduction of Real Power loss by Hybrid Biogeography Based Artificial Bee Colony algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Lenin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents Hybrid Biogeography algorithm for solving the multi-objective reactive power dispatch problem in a power system. Real Power Loss minimization and maximization of voltage stability margin are taken as the objectives. Artificial bee colony optimization (ABC is quick and forceful algorithm for global optimization. Biogeography-Based Optimization (BBO is a new-fangled biogeography inspired algorithm. It mainly utilizes the biogeography-based relocation operator to share the information among solutions. In this work, a hybrid algorithm with BBO and ABC is projected, and named as HBBABC (Hybrid Biogeography based Artificial Bee Colony Optimization, for the universal numerical optimization problem. HBBABC merge the searching behavior of ABC with that of BBO. Both the algorithms have different solution probing tendency like ABC have good exploration probing tendency while BBO have good exploitation probing tendency.  HBBABC used to solve the reactive power dispatch problem and the proposed technique has been tested in standard IEEE30 bus test system.

  19. A Biogeography-Based Optimization Algorithm Hybridized with Tabu Search for the Quadratic Assignment Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Wee Loon; Wibowo, Antoni; Desa, Mohammad Ishak; Haron, Habibollah

    2016-01-01

    The quadratic assignment problem (QAP) is an NP-hard combinatorial optimization problem with a wide variety of applications. Biogeography-based optimization (BBO), a relatively new optimization technique based on the biogeography concept, uses the idea of migration strategy of species to derive algorithm for solving optimization problems. It has been shown that BBO provides performance on a par with other optimization methods. A classical BBO algorithm employs the mutation operator as its diversification strategy. However, this process will often ruin the quality of solutions in QAP. In this paper, we propose a hybrid technique to overcome the weakness of classical BBO algorithm to solve QAP, by replacing the mutation operator with a tabu search procedure. Our experiments using the benchmark instances from QAPLIB show that the proposed hybrid method is able to find good solutions for them within reasonable computational times. Out of 61 benchmark instances tested, the proposed method is able to obtain the best known solutions for 57 of them. PMID:26819585

  20. Design of SVC Controller Based on Improved Biogeography-Based Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifei Dong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering that common subsynchronous resonance controllers cannot adapt to the characteristics of the time-varying and nonlinear behavior of a power system, the cosine migration model, the improved migration operator, and the mutative scale of chaos and Cauchy mutation strategy are introduced into an improved biogeography-based optimization (IBBO algorithm in order to design an optimal subsynchronous damping controller based on the mechanism of suppressing SSR by static var compensator (SVC. The effectiveness of the improved controller is verified by eigenvalue analysis and electromagnetic simulations. The simulation results of Jinjie plant indicate that the subsynchronous damping controller optimized by the IBBO algorithm can remarkably improve the damping of torsional modes and thus effectively depress SSR, and ensure the safety and stability of units and power grid operation. Moreover, the IBBO algorithm has the merits of a faster searching speed and higher searching accuracy in seeking the optimal control parameters over traditional algorithms, such as BBO algorithm, PSO algorithm, and GA algorithm.

  1. A Modified Biogeography-Based Optimization for the Flexible Job Shop Scheduling Problem

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    Yuzhen Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The flexible job shop scheduling problem (FJSSP is a practical extension of classical job shop scheduling problem that is known to be NP-hard. In this paper, an effective modified biogeography-based optimization (MBBO algorithm with machine-based shifting is proposed to solve FJSSP with makespan minimization. The MBBO attaches great importance to the balance between exploration and exploitation. At the initialization stage, different strategies which correspond to two-vector representation are proposed to generate the initial habitats. At global phase, different migration and mutation operators are properly designed. At local phase, a machine-based shifting decoding strategy and a local search based on insertion to the habitat with best makespan are introduced to enhance the exploitation ability. A series of experiments on two well-known benchmark instances are performed. The comparisons between MBBO and other famous algorithms as well as BBO variants prove the effectiveness and efficiency of MBBO in solving FJSSP.

  2. Natural Image Enhancement Using a Biogeography Based Optimization Enhanced with Blended Migration Operator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jasper

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses a novel and efficient algorithm for solving optimization problem in image processing applications. Image enhancement (IE is one of the complex optimization problems in image processing. The main goal of this paper is to enhance color images such that the eminence of the image is more suitable than the original image from the perceptual viewpoint of human. Traditional methods require prior knowledge of the image to be enhanced, whereas the aim of the proposed biogeography based optimization (BBO enhanced with blended migration operator (BMO algorithm is to maximize the objective function in order to enhance the image contrast by maximizing the parameters like edge intensity, edge information, and entropy. Experimental results are compared with the current state-of-the-art approaches and indicate the superiority of the proposed technique in terms of subjective and objective evaluation.

  3. Parameters Identification of Fluxgate Magnetic Core Adopting the Biogeography-Based Optimization Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenjuan; Shi, Yunbo; Zhao, Wenjie; Wang, Xiangxin

    2016-01-01

    The main part of the magnetic fluxgate sensor is the magnetic core, the hysteresis characteristic of which affects the performance of the sensor. When the fluxgate sensors are modelled for design purposes, an accurate model of hysteresis characteristic of the cores is necessary to achieve good agreement between modelled and experimental data. The Jiles-Atherton model is simple and can reflect the hysteresis properties of the magnetic material precisely, which makes it widely used in hysteresis modelling and simulation of ferromagnetic materials. However, in practice, it is difficult to determine the parameters accurately owing to the sensitivity of the parameters. In this paper, the Biogeography-Based Optimization (BBO) algorithm is applied to identify the Jiles-Atherton model parameters. To enhance the performances of the BBO algorithm such as global search capability, search accuracy and convergence rate, an improved Biogeography-Based Optimization (IBBO) algorithm is put forward by using Arnold map and mutation strategy of Differential Evolution (DE) algorithm. Simulation results show that IBBO algorithm is superior to Genetic Algorithm (GA), Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm, Differential Evolution algorithm and BBO algorithm in identification accuracy and convergence rate. The IBBO algorithm is applied to identify Jiles-Atherton model parameters of selected permalloy. The simulation hysteresis loop is in high agreement with experimental data. Using permalloy as core of fluxgate probe, the simulation output is consistent with experimental output. The IBBO algorithm can identify the parameters of Jiles-Atherton model accurately, which provides a basis for the precise analysis and design of instruments and equipment with magnetic core. PMID:27347974

  4. A hybrid biogeography-based optimization method for the inverse kinematics problem of an 8-DOF redundant humanoid manipulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-wu REN; Zhen-hua WANG; Li-ning SUN

    2015-01-01

    The redundant humanoid manipulator has characteristics of multiple degrees of freedom and complex joint structure, and it is not easy to obtain its inverse kinematics solution. The inverse kinematics problem of a humanoid manipulator can be formulated as an equivalent minimization problem, and thus it can be solved using some numerical optimization methods. Biogeography-based optimization (BBO) is a new biogeography inspired optimization algorithm, and it can be adopted to solve the inverse kinematics problem of a humanoid manipulator. The standard BBO algorithm that uses traditional migration and mutation operators suffers from slow convergence and prematurity. A hybrid biogeography-based optimization (HBBO) algorithm, which is based on BBO and differential evolution (DE), is presented. In this hybrid algorithm, new habitats in the ecosystem are produced through a hybrid migration operator, that is, the BBO migration strategy and DE/best/1/bin differential strategy, to alleviate slow convergence at the later evolution stage of the algorithm. In addition, a Gaussian mutation operator is adopted to enhance the exploration ability and improve the diversity of the population. Based on these, an 8-DOF (degree of freedom) redundant humanoid manipulator is employed as an example. The end-effector error (position and orientation) and the‘away limitation level’ value of the 8-DOF humanoid manipulator constitute the fi tness function of HBBO. The proposed HBBO algorithm has been used to solve the inverse kinematics problem of the 8-DOF redundant humanoid manipulator. Numerical simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of this method.

  5. A biogeography-based optimization algorithm with mutation strategies for model parameter estimation of solar and fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Solar cell and PEM fuel cell parameter estimations are investigated in the paper. • A new biogeography-based method (BBO-M) is proposed for cell parameter estimations. • In BBO-M, two mutation operators are designed to enhance optimization performance. • BBO-M provides a competitive alternative in cell parameter estimation problems. - Abstract: Mathematical models are useful tools for simulation, evaluation, optimal operation and control of solar cells and proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). To identify the model parameters of these two type of cells efficiently, a biogeography-based optimization algorithm with mutation strategies (BBO-M) is proposed. The BBO-M uses the structure of biogeography-based optimization algorithm (BBO), and both the mutation motivated from the differential evolution (DE) algorithm and the chaos theory are incorporated into the BBO structure for improving the global searching capability of the algorithm. Numerical experiments have been conducted on ten benchmark functions with 50 dimensions, and the results show that BBO-M can produce solutions of high quality and has fast convergence rate. Then, the proposed BBO-M is applied to the model parameter estimation of the two type of cells. The experimental results clearly demonstrate the power of the proposed BBO-M in estimating model parameters of both solar and fuel cells

  6. Improving the performance of the Egyptian second testing nuclear research reactor using interval type-2 fuzzy logic controller tuned by modified biogeography-based optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayed, M.M., E-mail: M.M.Sayed@ieee.org; Saad, M.S.; Emara, H.M.; Abou El-Zahab, E.E.

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • A modified version of the BBO was proposed. • A novel method for interval type-2 FLC design tuned by MBBO was proposed. • The performance of the ETRR-2 was improved by using IT2FLC tuned by MBBO. -- Abstract: Power stabilization is a critical issue in nuclear reactors. The conventional proportional derivative (PD) controller is currently used in the Egyptian second testing research reactor (ETRR-2). In this paper, we propose a modified biogeography-based optimization (MBBO) algorithm to design the interval type-2 fuzzy logic controller (IT2FLC) to improve the performance of the Egyptian second testing research reactor (ETRR-2). Biogeography-based optimization (BBO) is a novel evolutionary algorithm that is based on the mathematical models of biogeography. Biogeography is the study of the geographical distribution of biological organisms. In the BBO model, problem solutions are represented as islands, and the sharing of features between solutions is represented as immigration and emigration between the islands. A modified version of the BBO is applied to design the IT2FLC to get the optimal parameters of the membership functions of the controller. We test the optimal IT2FLC obtained by modified biogeography-based optimization (MBBO) using the integral square error (ISE) and is compared with the currently used PD controller.

  7. Improving the performance of the Egyptian second testing nuclear research reactor using interval type-2 fuzzy logic controller tuned by modified biogeography-based optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A modified version of the BBO was proposed. • A novel method for interval type-2 FLC design tuned by MBBO was proposed. • The performance of the ETRR-2 was improved by using IT2FLC tuned by MBBO. -- Abstract: Power stabilization is a critical issue in nuclear reactors. The conventional proportional derivative (PD) controller is currently used in the Egyptian second testing research reactor (ETRR-2). In this paper, we propose a modified biogeography-based optimization (MBBO) algorithm to design the interval type-2 fuzzy logic controller (IT2FLC) to improve the performance of the Egyptian second testing research reactor (ETRR-2). Biogeography-based optimization (BBO) is a novel evolutionary algorithm that is based on the mathematical models of biogeography. Biogeography is the study of the geographical distribution of biological organisms. In the BBO model, problem solutions are represented as islands, and the sharing of features between solutions is represented as immigration and emigration between the islands. A modified version of the BBO is applied to design the IT2FLC to get the optimal parameters of the membership functions of the controller. We test the optimal IT2FLC obtained by modified biogeography-based optimization (MBBO) using the integral square error (ISE) and is compared with the currently used PD controller

  8. Certain investigations on the reduction of side lobe level of an uniform linear antenna array using biogeography based optimization technique with sinusoidal migration model and simplified-BBO

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T S Jeyali Laseetha; R Sukanesh

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we propose biogeography based optimization technique, with linear and sinusoidal migration models and simplified biogeography based optimization (S-BBO), for uniformly spaced linear antenna array synthesis to maximize the reduction of side lobe level (SLL). This paper explores biogeography theory. It generalizes two migration models in BBO namely, linear migration model and sinusoidal migration model. The performance of SLL reduction in ULA is investigated. Our performance study shows that among the two, sinusoidal migration model is a promising candidate for optimization. In our work, simplified – BBO algorithmis also deployed. This determines an optimum set value for amplitude excitations of antenna array elements that generate a radiation pattern with maximum side lobe level reduction. Our detailed investigation also shows that sinusoidal migration model of BBO performs better compared to the other evolutionary algorithms discussed in this paper.

  9. Satellite-based laser windsounder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, J.F.; Czuchlewski, S.J.; Quick, C.R. [and others

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project`s primary objective is to determine the technical feasibility of using satellite-based laser wind sensing systems for detailed study of winds, aerosols, and particulates around and downstream of suspected proliferation facilities. Extensive interactions with the relevant operational organization resulted in enthusiastic support and useful guidance with respect to measurement requirements and priorities. Four candidate wind sensing techniques were evaluated, and the incoherent Doppler technique was selected. A small satellite concept design study was completed to identify the technical issues inherent in a proof-of-concept small satellite mission. Use of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer instead of a Fabry-Perot would significantly simplify the optical train and could reduce weight, and possibly power, requirements with no loss of performance. A breadboard Mach-Zehnder interferometer-based system has been built to verify these predictions. Detailed plans were made for resolving other issues through construction and testing of a ground-based lidar system in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin, and through numerical lidar wind data assimilation studies.

  10. 14 CFR 141.91 - Satellite bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Satellite bases. 141.91 Section 141.91... OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES PILOT SCHOOLS Operating Rules § 141.91 Satellite bases. The holder of a... assistant chief instructor is designated for each satellite base, and that assistant chief instructor...

  11. Polyphyletic migration operator and orthogonal learning aided biogeography-based optimization for dynamic economic dispatch with valve-point effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • New method for dynamic economic dispatch problem using POLBBO. • Considering valve-point effects, ramp rate limits, transmission network losses. • POLBBO is able to balance the global exploration and the local exploitation. • An effective simultaneous constraints handling technique is proposed. • The achieved results by POLBBO are better than those reported in other literatures. - Abstract: Shortage of energy resources, rising power generation cost, and increasing electric energy demand make the dynamic economic dispatch (DED) increasingly necessary in today’s competitive electricity market. In this paper, an enhanced biogeography-based optimization (BBO) referred to as POLBBO is proposed to solve the DED problem with valve-point effects. BBO is a relatively new powerful population-based meta-heuristic algorithm inspired by biogeography and has been extensively applied to many scientific and engineering problems. However, its direct-copying-based migration and random mutation operators make BBO possess good local exploitation ability but lack enough global exploration ability. To remedy the defect, on one hand, an efficient operator named polyphyletic migration operator is proposed to enhance the search ability of POLBBO. This operator can not only generate new features from more promising areas in the search space, but also effectively increase the population diversity. On the other hand, an orthogonal learning (OL) strategy based on orthogonal experimental design is presented. The OL strategy can quickly discover useful information from the search experiences and effectively utilize the information to construct a more promising solution, and thereby provide a systematic and elaborate reasoning method to guide the search directions of POLBBO. In addition, an effective simultaneous constraints handling technique without penalty factor settings is developed to handle various complicated constraints of the DED problem. Finally, four test

  12. Satellite-Based Sunshine Duration for Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodo Ahrens

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two different methods were applied to derive daily and monthly sunshine duration based on high-resolution satellite products provided by the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring using data from Meteosat Second Generation (MSG SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager. The satellite products were either hourly cloud type or hourly surface incoming direct radiation. The satellite sunshine duration estimates were not found to be significantly different using the native 15-minute temporal resolution of SEVIRI. The satellite-based sunshine duration products give additional spatial information over the European continent compared with equivalent in situ-based products. An evaluation of the satellite sunshine duration by product intercomparison and against station measurements was carried out to determine their accuracy. The satellite data were found to be within ±1 h/day compared to high-quality Baseline Surface Radiation Network or surface synoptic observations (SYNOP station measurements. The satellite-based products differ more over the oceans than over land, mainly because of the treatment of fractional clouds in the cloud type-based sunshine duration product. This paper presents the methods used to derive the satellite sunshine duration products and the performance of the different retrievals. The main benefits and disadvantages compared to station-based products are also discussed.

  13. Phylogeny and biogeography of Alyssum (Brassicaceae) based on nuclear ribosomal ITS DNA sequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yan Li; Yan Kong; Zhe Zhang; Yanqiang Yin; Bin Liu; Guanghui Lv; Xiyong Wang

    2014-08-01

    The genus Alyssum consists of about 195 species native to Europe, Asia and northern Africa. All species were assigned to six sections. Previous molecular phylogeny studies indicate that Alyssum is polyphyletic. However, the divergence time and dispersal of the genus are not well studied. In this study, the phylogenetic relationships within the genus Alyssum were studied with nrDNA ITS sequences obtained from five sections. The divergence time was estimated by fossil calibration and the biogeography was examined by spread analysis. The phylogeny indicated two main lineages: lineage 1 includes the section of Alyssum, Gamosepalum and Psilonema; lineage 2 includes the section of Odontarrhena, Meniocus and Clypeola. The phylogenetic relationship was not congruent with the previous sectional classifications. The age of Alyssum was dated to the upper Miocene. Molecular data suggested the diversification of Alyssum in Mediterranean areas and wide-ranging distribution such as North Africa, eastward into Central Asia and immigration into North America. Climatic aridification and arid/semiarid areas established in the Pliocene/Pleistocene could have provided favourable conditions for the migration and diversification of Alyssum.

  14. Phylogenetics and biogeography of Theaceae based on sequences of plastid genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mi-Mi LI; Jian-Hua LI; Peter DEL TREDICI; Jeffrey CORAJOD; Cheng-Xin FU

    2013-01-01

    Despite several morphological and molecular analyses of Theaceae,several outstanding issues remain in the phylogenetics and biogeography of the family including the disputed relationships among the tribes Gordonieae,Stewartieae,and Theeae,the controversial taxonomic status of Hartia and Stewartia,and the unclear biogeographic history of Gordonieae and Stewartieae.In this study we gathered DNA sequences of multiple plastid genes from 27 species of Theaceae representing all genera except Laplacea,conducted phylogenetic analyses using parsimony,likelihood,and Bayesian methods,and estimated divergence times within a Bayesian framework with fossil calibrations and molecular data.Our data provided further support for the three tribes in the family and for the sistergroup relationship of Theeae to Stewartieae plus Gordonieae.Within Gordonieae,our study for the first time offered strong molecular support for the sister relationship of Franklinia and Schima.Within Stewartieae,our data supported the paraphyly of Stewartia including Hartia.Within Stewartia,our data for the first time suggested that North American (NA) species Stewartia ovata was more closely related to eastern Asian (EA) species than to the other NA species Stewartia malacodendron.Biogeographic analyses indicated that disjunct endemic species of Gordonieae might have originated from NA and those of Stewartieae from EA.Divergence times of the EA-NA disjunct pairs identified in this study (Franklinia and Schima in Gordonieae and S.ovata (NA) and Asian species of Stewartia) were estimated to be in the Mid-Miocene.Population exchanges in Gordonieae and Stewartieae may have occurred over the Bering land bridge prior to the Mid-Miocene.

  15. Satellite-based interference analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varice, H.; Johannsen, K.; Sabaroff, S.

    1977-01-01

    System identifies terrestrial sources of radiofrequency interference and measures their frequency spectra and amplitudes. Designed to protect satellite communication networks, system measures entire noise spectrum over selected frequency band and can raster-scan geographical region to locate noise sources. Once interference is analyzed, realistic interference protection ratios are determined and mathematical models for predicting ratio-frequency noise spectra are established. This enhances signal-detection and locates optimum geographical positions and frequency bands for communication equipment.

  16. The historical biogeography of Pteroglossus aracaris (Aves, Piciformes, Ramphastidae based on Bayesian analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio L. Pereira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Most Neotropical birds, including Pteroglossus aracaris, do not have an adequate fossil record to be used as time constraints in molecular dating. Hence, the evolutionary timeframe of the avian biota can only be inferred using alternative time constraints. We applied a Bayesian relaxed clock approach to propose an alternative interpretation for the historical biogeography of Pteroglossus based on mitochondrial DNA sequences, using different combinations of outgroups and time constraints obtained from outgroup fossils, vicariant barriers and molecular time estimates. The results indicated that outgroup choice has little effect on the Bayesian posterior distribution of divergence times within Pteroglossus , that geological and molecular time constraints seem equally suitable to estimate the Bayesian posterior distribution of divergence times for Pteroglossus , and that the fossil record alone overestimates divergence times within the fossil-lacking ingroup. The Bayesian estimates of divergence times suggest that the radiation of Pteroglossus occurred from the Late Miocene to the Pliocene (three times older than estimated by the “standard” mitochondrial rate of 2% sequence divergence per million years, likely triggered by Andean uplift, multiple episodes of marine transgressions in South America, and formation of present-day river basins. The time estimates are in agreement with other Neotropical taxa with similar geographic distributions.

  17. Hybrid Differential Evolution with Biogeography-Based Optimization for Design of a Reconfigurable Antenna Array with Discrete Phase Shifters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangtao Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multibeam antenna arrays have important applications in communications and radar. This paper presents a new method of designing a reconfigurable antenna with quantized phase excitations using a new hybrid algorithm, called DE/BBO. The reconfigurable design problem is to find the element excitation that will result in a sector pattern main beam with low sidelobes with additional requirement that the same excitation amplitudes applied to the array with zero-phase should be in a high directivity, low sidelobe pencil-shaped main beam. In order to reduce the effect of mutual coupling between the antenna-array elements, the dynamic range ratio is minimized. Additionally, compared with the continuous realization and subsequent quantization, experimental results indicate that the performance of the discrete realization of the phase excitation value can be improved. In order to test the performances of hybrid differential evolution with biogeography-based optimization, the results of some state-of-art algorithms are considered, for the purposed of comparison. Experiment results indicate the better performance of the DE/BBO.

  18. Forest inventory improvement based on satellite images

    OpenAIRE

    Jonikavičius, Donatas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study – improvement of on-going in Lithuania forest inventories based on satellite images and GIS databases. Specific objective of the study – to explore the possibilities of methods applied for the collection of information from satellite images and GIS databases and its processing in order to determine various Lithuanian forest characteristics, focusing on a variety of forest inventory schemes. 4 The goals of the study: 1. To discuss methodological assumptions for...

  19. Wind Statistics Offshore based on Satellite Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Mouche, Alexis; Badger, Merete;

    2009-01-01

    ’s Master Environmental Library. At CLS the a priori wind direction is taken from the ECMWF (European Centre of Medium-range Weather Forecasting). It is also possible to use other sources of wind direction e.g. the satellite-based ASCAT wind directions as demonstrated by CLS. The wind direction has to known....... Results comparing satellite scatterometer winds to offshore meteorological observations have shown good results, and more comparisons are planned in this respect during the Norsewind project....

  20. Comparison of Genetic Algorithm, Particle Swarm Optimization and Biogeography-based Optimization for Feature Selection to Classify Clusters of Microcalcifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khehra, Baljit Singh; Pharwaha, Amar Partap Singh

    2016-06-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is one type of breast cancer. Clusters of microcalcifications (MCCs) are symptoms of DCIS that are recognized by mammography. Selection of robust features vector is the process of selecting an optimal subset of features from a large number of available features in a given problem domain after the feature extraction and before any classification scheme. Feature selection reduces the feature space that improves the performance of classifier and decreases the computational burden imposed by using many features on classifier. Selection of an optimal subset of features from a large number of available features in a given problem domain is a difficult search problem. For n features, the total numbers of possible subsets of features are 2n. Thus, selection of an optimal subset of features problem belongs to the category of NP-hard problems. In this paper, an attempt is made to find the optimal subset of MCCs features from all possible subsets of features using genetic algorithm (GA), particle swarm optimization (PSO) and biogeography-based optimization (BBO). For simulation, a total of 380 benign and malignant MCCs samples have been selected from mammogram images of DDSM database. A total of 50 features extracted from benign and malignant MCCs samples are used in this study. In these algorithms, fitness function is correct classification rate of classifier. Support vector machine is used as a classifier. From experimental results, it is also observed that the performance of PSO-based and BBO-based algorithms to select an optimal subset of features for classifying MCCs as benign or malignant is better as compared to GA-based algorithm.

  1. Comparative study of migration operator for Biogeography-Based Optimization%生物地理学优化算法中迁移算子的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴斌; 林锦国; 崔志勇

    2012-01-01

    Biogeography-Based Optimization (BBO) algorithm is a new kind of optimization algorithm based on biogeography. It is designed based on the migration strategy of species to solve global optimization problem. The migration and mutation operators play the key role in the BBO. Four migration patterns based on the selection model for the islands (which is guiding high emigration rate or high immigration rate) and the scale of migration (single or part variable) are analyzed and discussed. To compare the performance of the four migration operators, 13 experiments are carried out on a set of well-known benchmark global optimization problems. Simulation results show that the partial immigration strategy outperforms other three operators.%生物地理学优化算法(Biogeography-Based Optimization,BBO)是一种模仿物种迁移规律的智能优化算法,其中迁移算子是影响优化效果的关键环节.基于迁移地的选择模式(以迁出率高的栖息地为主导或者以迁入率高的栖息地为主导)和迁移量的规模(单变量和部分变量),提出了BBO算法中可能存在的四种迁移方式.通过对13个经典实例的实验仿真,比较4种迁移算子的优化结果,阐明了产生差异的原因.实验结果表明,迁入主导的部分迁移式算子优化效果最好.

  2. A Space Based Solar Power Satellite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, J. M.; Polling, D.; Ustamujic, F.; Yaldiz, R.; et al.

    2002-01-01

    (SPoTS) supplying other satellites with energy. SPoTS is due to be commercially viable and operative in 2020. of Technology designed the SPoTS during a full-time design period of six weeks as a third year final project. The team, organized according to the principles of systems engineering, first conducted a literature study on space wireless energy transfer to select the most suitable candidates for use on the SPoTS. After that, several different system concepts have been generated and evaluated, the most promising concept being worked out in greater detail. km altitude. Each SPoTS satellite has a 50m diameter inflatable solar collector that focuses all received sunlight. Then, the received sunlight is further redirected by means of four pointing mirrors toward four individual customer satellites. A market-analysis study showed, that providing power to geo-stationary communication satellites during their eclipse would be most beneficial. At arrival at geo-stationary orbit, the focused beam has expended to such an extent that its density equals one solar flux. This means that customer satellites can continue to use their regular solar arrays during their eclipse for power generation, resulting in a satellite battery mass reduction. the customer satellites in geo-stationary orbit, the transmitted energy beams needs to be pointed with very high accuracy. Computations showed that for this degree of accuracy, sensors are needed, which are not mainstream nowadays. Therefore further research must be conducted in this area in order to make these high-accuracy-pointing systems commercially attractive for use on the SPoTS satellites around 2020. Total 20-year system lifetime cost for 18 SPoT satellites are estimated at approximately USD 6 billion [FY2001]. In order to compete with traditional battery-based satellite power systems or possible ground based wireless power transfer systems the price per kWh for the customer must be significantly lower than the present one

  3. Lorentz Force Based Satellite Attitude Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Dipak Kumar; Sinha, Manoranjan

    2016-07-01

    Since the inception of attitude control of a satellite, various active and passive control strategies have been developed. These include using thrusters, momentum wheels, control moment gyros and magnetic torquers. In this present work, a new technique named Lorentz force based Coulombic actuators for the active control is proposed. This method uses electrostatic charged shells, which interact with the time varying earth's magnetic field to establish a full three axes control of the satellite. It is shown that the proposed actuation mechanism is similar to a satellite actuated by magnetic coils except that the resultant magnetic moment vanishes under two different conditions. The equation for the required charges on the the Coulomb shells attached to the satellite body axes is derived, which is in turn used to find the available control torque for actuating the satellite along the orbit. Stability of the proposed system for very high initial angular velocity and exponential stability about the origin are proved for a proportional-differential control input. Simulations are carried out to show the efficacy of the proposed system for the attitude control of the earth-pointing satellite.

  4. An Algorithm of Inter Satellite Two-Way Time Transfer Based on Mobile Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feijiang Huang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Two-way time transfer is one of the most accurate time synchronization methods applied to spacecrafts and ground stations to carry out time transfer. As this method doesn’t require the knowledge of locations of two satellites in advance and it offsets the negative influence of transmission path and other additional delays, this method has boosted the time synchronization accuracy. However, in the process of time synchronization, this method demands that the aircrafts, who conduct time synchronization, could be relatively static. So it is mainly used in GEO satellites for satellite-ground two-way time transfer. Based on the establishment of mobile satellite mutual visual model, the simulation of satellite mutual visual time on mobile satellite, including IGSO (Inclined Geo Synchronous Orbit satellite and MEO (Medium Earth Orbit satellite, has been conducted. The visual time and the variation range of IGSO-MEO link distance have been gained. The characteristics of the propagation delay of two-way time transfer signals between IGSO satellite and MEO satellite varying with inter satellite range were analyzed and the rule of inter satellite clock offset varying with inter satellite range obtained with this algorithm was deduced. This study presents a inter satellite dynamic two-way time transfer algorithm based on mobile satellite. The high-accuracy inter satellite clock offset is solved through the combination of inter satellite pseudo-range polynomial fitting and clock-offset polynomial fitting. Simulation results showed that with the algorithm the inter satellite time transfer error can be controlled within 1ns. The algorithm can be used high-accuracy time transfer between mobile satellites.

  5. Satellite-based Tropical Cyclone Monitoring Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, J.; Richardson, K.; Surratt, M.; Yang, S.; Lee, T. F.; Sampson, C. R.; Solbrig, J.; Kuciauskas, A. P.; Miller, S. D.; Kent, J.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing capabilities to monitor tropical cyclone (TC) location, structure, and intensity have evolved by utilizing a combination of operational and research and development (R&D) sensors. The microwave imagers from the operational Defense Meteorological Satellite Program [Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS)] form the "base" for structure observations due to their ability to view through upper-level clouds, modest size swaths and ability to capture most storm structure features. The NASA TRMM microwave imager and precipitation radar continue their 15+ yearlong missions in serving the TC warning and research communities. The cessation of NASA's QuikSCAT satellite after more than a decade of service is sorely missed, but India's OceanSat-2 scatterometer is now providing crucial ocean surface wind vectors in addition to the Navy's WindSat ocean surface wind vector retrievals. Another Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) onboard EUMETSAT's MetOp-2 satellite is slated for launch soon. Passive microwave imagery has received a much needed boost with the launch of the French/Indian Megha Tropiques imager in September 2011, basically greatly supplementing the very successful NASA TRMM pathfinder with a larger swath and more frequent temporal sampling. While initial data issues have delayed data utilization, current news indicates this data will be available in 2013. Future NASA Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) sensors starting in 2014 will provide enhanced capabilities. Also, the inclusion of the new microwave sounder data from the NPP ATMS (Oct 2011) will assist in mapping TC convective structures. The National Polar orbiting Partnership (NPP) program's VIIRS sensor includes a day night band (DNB) with the capability to view TC cloud structure at night when sufficient lunar illumination exits. Examples highlighting this new capability will be discussed in concert with additional data fusion efforts.

  6. Operational evapotranspiration based on Earth observation satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellens-Meulenberghs, Françoise; Ghilain, Nicolas; Arboleda, Alirio; Barrios, Jose-Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Geostationary satellites have the potential to follow fast evolving atmospheric and Earth surface phenomena such those related to cloud cover evolution and diurnal cycle. Since about 15 years, EUMETSAT has set up a network named 'Satellite Application Facility' (SAF, http://www.eumetsat.int/website/home/Satellites/GroundSegment/Safs/index.html) to complement its ground segment. The Land Surface Analysis (LSA) SAF (http://landsaf.meteo.pt/) is devoted to the development of operational products derived from the European meteorological satellites. In particular, an evapotranspiration (ET) product has been developed by the Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium. Instantaneous and daily integrated results are produced in near real time and are freely available respectively since the end of 2009 and 2010. The products cover Europe, Africa and the Eastern part of South America with the spatial resolution of the SEVIRI sensor on-board Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites. The ET product algorithm (Ghilain et al., 2011) is based on a simplified Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere transfer (SVAT) scheme, forced with MSG derived radiative products (LSA SAF short and longwave surface fluxes, albedo). It has been extensively validated against in-situ validation data, mainly FLUXNET observations, demonstrating its good performances except in some arid or semi-arid areas. Research has then been pursued to develop an improved version for those areas. Solutions have been found in reviewing some of the model parameterizations and in assimilating additional satellite products (mainly vegetation indices and land surface temperature) into the model. The ET products will be complemented with related latent and sensible heat fluxes, to allow the monitoring of land surface energy partitioning. The new algorithm version should be tested in the LSA-SAF operational computer system in 2016 and results should become accessible to beta-users/regular users by the end of 2016/early 2017. In

  7. Wind Statistics Offshore based on Satellite Images

    OpenAIRE

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Mouche, Alexis; Badger, Merete; Nielsen, Morten; Astrup, Poul; Karagali, Ioanna

    2009-01-01

    Ocean wind maps from satellites are routinely processed both at Risø DTU and CLS based on the European Space Agency Envisat ASAR data. At Risø the a priori wind direction is taken from the atmospheric model NOGAPS (Navel Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System) provided by the U.S. Navy’s Master Environmental Library. At CLS the a priori wind direction is taken from the ECMWF (European Centre of Medium-range Weather Forecasting). It is also possible to use other sources of wind direc...

  8. Global Ocean Surveillance With Electronic Intelligence Based Satellite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatramanan, Haritha

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this proposal is to design our own ELINT based satellite system to detect and locate the target by using satellite Trilateration Principle. The target position can be found by measuring the radio signals arrived at three satellites using Time Difference of Arrival(TDOA) technique. To locate a target it is necessary to determine the satellite position. The satellite motion and its position is obtained by using Simplified General Perturbation Model(SGP4) in MATLAB. This SGP4 accepts satellite Two Line Element(TLE) data and returns the position in the form of state vectors. These state vectors are then converted into observable parameters and then propagated in space. This calculations can be done for satellite constellation and non - visibility periods can be calculated. Satellite Trilateration consists of three satellites flying in formation with each other. The satellite constellation design consists of three satellites with an inclination of 61.3° maintained at equal distances between each other. The design is performed using MATLAB and simulated to obtain the necessary results. The target's position can be obtained using the three satellites ECEF Coordinate system and its position and velocity can be calculated in terms of Latitude and Longitude. The target's motion is simulated to obtain the Speed and Direction of Travel.

  9. Amplicon-Based Pyrosequencing Reveals High Diversity of Protistan Parasites in Ships' Ballast Water: Implications for Biogeography and Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagenkopp Lohan, K M; Fleischer, R C; Carney, K J; Holzer, K K; Ruiz, G M

    2016-04-01

    Ships' ballast water (BW) commonly moves macroorganisms and microorganisms across the world's oceans and along coasts; however, the majority of these microbial transfers have gone undetected. We applied high-throughput sequencing methods to identify microbial eukaryotes, specifically emphasizing the protistan parasites, in ships' BW collected from vessels calling to the Chesapeake Bay (Virginia and Maryland, USA) from European and Eastern Canadian ports. We utilized tagged-amplicon 454 pyrosequencing with two general primer sets, amplifying either the V4 or V9 domain of the small subunit (SSU) of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene complex, from total DNA extracted from water samples collected from the ballast tanks of bulk cargo vessels. We detected a diverse group of protistan taxa, with some known to contain important parasites in marine systems, including Apicomplexa (unidentified apicomplexans, unidentified gregarines, Cryptosporidium spp.), Dinophyta (Blastodinium spp., Euduboscquella sp., unidentified syndinids, Karlodinium spp., Syndinium spp.), Perkinsea (Parvilucifera sp.), Opisthokonta (Ichthyosporea sp., Pseudoperkinsidae, unidentified ichthyosporeans), and Stramenopiles (Labyrinthulomycetes). Further characterization of groups with parasitic taxa, consisting of phylogenetic analyses for four taxa (Cryptosporidium spp., Parvilucifera spp., Labyrinthulomycetes, and Ichthyosporea), revealed that sequences were obtained from both known and novel lineages. This study demonstrates that high-throughput sequencing is a viable and sensitive method for detecting parasitic protists when present and transported in the ballast water of ships. These data also underscore the potential importance of human-aided dispersal in the biogeography of these microbes and emerging diseases in the world's oceans. PMID:26476551

  10. Phylogeny of the Labeoninae (Teleostei, Cypriniformes) based on nuclear DNA sequences and implications on character evolution and biogeography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lanping ZHENG; Junxing YANG; Xiaoyong CHEN

    2012-01-01

    The Labeoninae is a subfamily of the family Cyprinidae,Order Cypriniformes.Oromandibular morphology within the Labeoninae is the greatest among cyprinid fishes.Although several phylogenetic studies about labeonines have been undertaken the results have been inconsistent and a comprehensive phylogeny is needed.Further,an incongruence between morphological and molecular phylogeny requires a systematic exploration of the significance of morphological characters on the basis of the molecular phylogeny.In this study,a total of 292 nucleotide sequences from 73 individuals (representing 24 genera and 73 species) of Labeoninae were analyzed.The results of the phylogenetic analysis indicate that there are four major clades within Labeoninae and three monophyletic lineages within the fourth clade.Results of the character evolution show that all oromandibular morphological characters are homoplastically distributed on the molecular phylogenetic tree and suggests that these characters evolved several times during the history of labeonines.In particular,the labeonine,a specific disc on the lower lip,has been acquired three times and reversed twice.These morphological characters do not have systematic significance but can be useful for taxonomy.The results of biogeography suggest that the Labeoninae originated from Southeast Asia and separately dispersed to Africa,East Asia and South Asia.

  11. Observer-based Satellite Attitude Control and Simulation Researches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王子才; 马克茂

    2002-01-01

    Observer design method is applied to the realization of satellite attitude control law baaed on simplified control model. Exact mathematical model of the satellite attitude control system is also constructed, together with the observer-based control law, to conduct simulation research. The simulation results justify the effectiveness andfeasibility of the observer-based control method.

  12. Fruit Classification by Wavelet-Entropy and Feedforward Neural Network Trained by Fitness-Scaled Chaotic ABC and Biogeography-Based Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuihua Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Fruit classification is quite difficult because of the various categories and similar shapes and features of fruit. In this work, we proposed two novel machine-learning based classification methods. The developed system consists of wavelet entropy (WE, principal component analysis (PCA, feedforward neural network (FNN trained by fitness-scaled chaotic artificial bee colony (FSCABC and biogeography-based optimization (BBO, respectively. The K-fold stratified cross validation (SCV was utilized for statistical analysis. The classification performance for 1653 fruit images from 18 categories showed that the proposed “WE + PCA + FSCABC-FNN” and “WE + PCA + BBO-FNN” methods achieve the same accuracy of 89.5%, higher than state-of-the-art approaches: “(CH + MP + US + PCA + GA-FNN ” of 84.8%, “(CH + MP + US + PCA + PSO-FNN” of 87.9%, “(CH + MP + US + PCA + ABC-FNN” of 85.4%, “(CH + MP + US + PCA + kSVM” of 88.2%, and “(CH + MP + US + PCA + FSCABC-FNN” of 89.1%. Besides, our methods used only 12 features, less than the number of features used by other methods. Therefore, the proposed methods are effective for fruit classification.

  13. Satellite-based monitoring of cotton evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalezios, Nicolas; Dercas, Nicholas; Tarquis, Ana Maria

    2016-04-01

    Water for agricultural use represents the largest share among all water uses. Vulnerability in agriculture is influenced, among others, by extended periods of water shortage in regions exposed to droughts. Advanced technological approaches and methodologies, including remote sensing, are increasingly incorporated for the assessment of irrigation water requirements. In this paper, remote sensing techniques are integrated for the estimation and monitoring of crop evapotranspiration ETc. The study area is Thessaly central Greece, which is a drought-prone agricultural region. Cotton fields in a small agricultural sub-catchment in Thessaly are used as an experimental site. Daily meteorological data and weekly field data are recorded throughout seven (2004-2010) growing seasons for the computation of reference evapotranspiration ETo, crop coefficient Kc and cotton crop ETc based on conventional data. Satellite data (Landsat TM) for the corresponding period are processed to estimate cotton crop coefficient Kc and cotton crop ETc and delineate its spatiotemporal variability. The methodology is applied for monitoring Kc and ETc during the growing season in the selected sub-catchment. Several error statistics are used showing very good agreement with ground-truth observations.

  14. A Cooperation-Based Fault Management Method for Satellite Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Zhang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to efficiently diagnose the satellite network, a three level management architecture was proposed and a cooperated-based fault management method was put forward. In this method the traditional fault management method was used through network management technique when a satellite agent could respond to the network management instruction received from the management station. However, if the satellite agent could not respond to the network management demands, the intra-domain cooperation or inter-domain cooperation would be activated. The suspected fault satellite could be tested through cooperation among the satellite agents. The simulation results shows that in the circumstance of the low faulty frequency, the new method could be effectively used in satellite network with short cooperative time and low throughput.

  15. Global trends in satellite-based emergency mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Stefan; Giulio-Tonolo, Fabio; Lyons, Josh; Kučera, Jan; Jones, Brenda; Schneiderhan, Tobias; Platzeck, Gabriel; Kaku, Kazuya; Hazarika, Manzul Kumar; Czaran, Lorant; Li, Suju; Pedersen, Wendi; James, Godstime Kadiri; Proy, Catherine; Muthike, Denis Macharia; Bequignon, Jerome; Guha-Sapir, Debarati

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, scientists and disaster responders have increasingly used satellite-based Earth observations for global rapid assessment of disaster situations. We review global trends in satellite rapid response and emergency mapping from 2000 to 2014, analyzing more than 1000 incidents in which satellite monitoring was used for assessing major disaster situations. We provide a synthesis of spatial patterns and temporal trends in global satellite emergency mapping efforts and show that satellite-based emergency mapping is most intensively deployed in Asia and Europe and follows well the geographic, physical, and temporal distributions of global natural disasters. We present an outlook on the future use of Earth observation technology for disaster response and mitigation by putting past and current developments into context and perspective.

  16. Global trends in satellite-based emergency mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Stefan; Giulio-Tonolo, Fabio; Lyons, Josh; Kučera, Jan; Jones, Brenda; Schneiderhan, Tobias; Platzeck, Gabriel; Kaku, Kazuya; Hazarika, Manzul Kumar; Czaran, Lorant; Li, Suju; Pedersen, Wendi; James, Godstime Kadiri; Proy, Catherine; Muthike, Denis Macharia; Bequignon, Jerome; Guha-Sapir, Debarati

    2016-07-01

    Over the past 15 years, scientists and disaster responders have increasingly used satellite-based Earth observations for global rapid assessment of disaster situations. We review global trends in satellite rapid response and emergency mapping from 2000 to 2014, analyzing more than 1000 incidents in which satellite monitoring was used for assessing major disaster situations. We provide a synthesis of spatial patterns and temporal trends in global satellite emergency mapping efforts and show that satellite-based emergency mapping is most intensively deployed in Asia and Europe and follows well the geographic, physical, and temporal distributions of global natural disasters. We present an outlook on the future use of Earth observation technology for disaster response and mitigation by putting past and current developments into context and perspective.

  17. Global trends in satellite-based emergency mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Stefan; Giulio-Tonolo, Fabio; Lyons, Josh; Kučera, Jan; Jones, Brenda; Schneiderhan, Tobias; Platzeck, Gabriel; Kaku, Kazuya; Hazarika, Manzul Kumar; Czaran, Lorant; Li, Suju; Pedersen, Wendi; James, Godstime Kadiri; Proy, Catherine; Muthike, Denis Macharia; Bequignon, Jerome; Guha-Sapir, Debarati

    2016-07-15

    Over the past 15 years, scientists and disaster responders have increasingly used satellite-based Earth observations for global rapid assessment of disaster situations. We review global trends in satellite rapid response and emergency mapping from 2000 to 2014, analyzing more than 1000 incidents in which satellite monitoring was used for assessing major disaster situations. We provide a synthesis of spatial patterns and temporal trends in global satellite emergency mapping efforts and show that satellite-based emergency mapping is most intensively deployed in Asia and Europe and follows well the geographic, physical, and temporal distributions of global natural disasters. We present an outlook on the future use of Earth observation technology for disaster response and mitigation by putting past and current developments into context and perspective. PMID:27418503

  18. An SDR based AIS receiver for satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper Abildgaard; Mortensen, Hans Peter; Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard

    2011-01-01

    For a few years now, there has been a high interest in monitoring the global ship traffic from space. A few satellite, capable of listening for ship borne AIS transponders have already been launched, and soon the AAUSAT3, carrying two different types of AIS receivers will also be launched. One...

  19. Digital, Satellite-Based Aeronautical Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarian, F.

    1989-01-01

    Satellite system relays communication between aircraft and stations on ground. System offers better coverage with direct communication between air and ground, costs less and makes possible new communication services. Carries both voice and data. Because many data exchanged between aircraft and ground contain safety-related information, probability of bit errors essential.

  20. An horizon scan of biogeography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dawson, Michael; Algar, Adam; Antonelli, Alexandre;

    2013-01-01

    The opportunity to reflect broadly on the accomplishments, prospects, and reach of a field may present itself relatively infrequently. Each biennial meeting of the International Biogeography Society showcases ideas solicited and developed largely during the preceding year, by individuals or teams...... from across the breadth of the discipline. Here, we highlight challenges, developments, and opportunities in biogeography from that biennial synthesis. We note the realized and potential impact of rapid data accumulation in several fields, a renaissance for inter‐disciplinary research, the importance...... hypothetico‐deductive branches and establish a greater role within and outside academia....

  1. Optimal Constellation Design for Satellite Based Augmentation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Isao

    Global Positioning System (GPS) is widely utilized in daily life, for instance car navigation. Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) and Local Area Augmentation System (LAAS) are proposed so as to provide GPS better navigation accuracy and integrity capability. Satellite Based Augmentation System (SBAS) is a kind of WAAS and Multi-functional Transportation Satellite (MTSAT) has been developed in Japan. To improve navigation accuracy most efficiently, augmentation satellites should be so placed that minimize Geometric Dilution of Precision (GDOP) of constellation. In this paper the result of optimal constellation design for SBAS is shown.

  2. Autonomous sensor-based dual-arm satellite grappling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Brian; Tso, Kam; Litwin, Todd; Hayati, Samad; Bon, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    Dual-arm satellite grappling involves the integration of technologies developed in the Sensing and Perception (S&P) Subsystem for object acquisition and tracking, and the Manipulator Control and Mechanization (MCM) Subsystem for dual-arm control. S&P acquires and tracks the position, orientation, velocity, and angular velocity of a slowly spinning satellite, and sends tracking data to the MCM subsystem. MCM grapples the satellite and brings it to rest, controlling the arms so that no excessive forces or torques are exerted on the satellite or arms. A 350-pound satellite mockup which can spin freely on a gimbal for several minutes, closely simulating the dynamics of a real satellite is demonstrated. The satellite mockup is fitted with a panel under which may be mounted various elements such as line replacement modules and electrical connectors that will be used to demonstrate servicing tasks once the satellite is docked. The subsystems are housed in three MicroVAX II microcomputers. The hardware of the S&P Subsystem includes CCD cameras, video digitizers, frame buffers, IMFEX (a custom pipelined video processor), a time-code generator with millisecond precision, and a MicroVAX II computer. Its software is written in Pascal and is based on a locally written vision software library. The hardware of the MCM Subsystem includes PUMA 560 robot arms, Lord force/torque sensors, two MicroVAX II computers, and unimation pneumatic parallel grippers. Its software is written in C, and is based on a robot language called RCCL. The two subsystems are described and test results on the grappling of the satellite mockup with rotational rates of up to 2 rpm are provided.

  3. A comparative study of satellite and ground-based phenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, S; Stöckli, R; Appenzeller, C; Vidale, P L

    2007-05-01

    Long time series of ground-based plant phenology, as well as more than two decades of satellite-derived phenological metrics, are currently available to assess the impacts of climate variability and trends on terrestrial vegetation. Traditional plant phenology provides very accurate information on individual plant species, but with limited spatial coverage. Satellite phenology allows monitoring of terrestrial vegetation on a global scale and provides an integrative view at the landscape level. Linking the strengths of both methodologies has high potential value for climate impact studies. We compared a multispecies index from ground-observed spring phases with two types (maximum slope and threshold approach) of satellite-derived start-of-season (SOS) metrics. We focus on Switzerland from 1982 to 2001 and show that temporal and spatial variability of the multispecies index correspond well with the satellite-derived metrics. All phenological metrics correlate with temperature anomalies as expected. The slope approach proved to deviate strongly from the temporal development of the ground observations as well as from the threshold-defined SOS satellite measure. The slope spring indicator is considered to indicate a different stage in vegetation development and is therefore less suited as a SOS parameter for comparative studies in relation to ground-observed phenology. Satellite-derived metrics are, however, very susceptible to snow cover, and it is suggested that this snow cover should be better accounted for by the use of newer satellite sensors.

  4. Island biogeography of the Anthropocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmus, Matthew R; Mahler, D Luke; Losos, Jonathan B

    2014-09-25

    For centuries, biogeographers have examined the factors that produce patterns of biodiversity across regions. The study of islands has proved particularly fruitful and has led to the theory that geographic area and isolation influence species colonization, extinction and speciation such that larger islands have more species and isolated islands have fewer species (that is, positive species-area and negative species-isolation relationships). However, experimental tests of this theory have been limited, owing to the difficulty in experimental manipulation of islands at the scales at which speciation and long-distance colonization are relevant. Here we have used the human-aided transport of exotic anole lizards among Caribbean islands as such a test at an appropriate scale. In accord with theory, as anole colonizations have increased, islands impoverished in native species have gained the most exotic species, the past influence of speciation on island biogeography has been obscured, and the species-area relationship has strengthened while the species-isolation relationship has weakened. Moreover, anole biogeography increasingly reflects anthropogenic rather than geographic processes. Unlike the island biogeography of the past that was determined by geographic area and isolation, in the Anthropocene--an epoch proposed for the present time interval--island biogeography is dominated by the economic isolation of human populations. PMID:25254475

  5. DIGITAL VIDEO BROADCAST RETURN CHANNEL VIA SATELLITE (DVB-RCS HUB FOR SATELLITE BASED E-LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.G.Vasantha Kumar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses in-house designed and developed scale-down DVB-RCS hub along with the performance of the realized hub. This development is intended to support the Satellite Based e-Learning initiative in India. The scale-down DVB-RCS HUB is implemented around a single PC with other subsystems making it very cost effective and unique of its kind. This realization will drastically reduce the total cost of Satellite based Education Networks as very low cost commercially available Satellite Interactive Terminals (SITs complying to open standard could be used at remote locations. The system is successfully tested to work with a commercial SIT using a GEO satellite EDUSAT which is especially dedicated for satellite based e-Learning. The internal detail of the DVB-RCS Forward and Return Link Organization and how it manages the Satellite Interactive Terminals access to the satellite channel using MF-TDMA approach has been described.

  6. Technology status of HNF-based monopropellants for satellite propulsion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marée, A.G.M.; Moerel, J.L.P.A.; Weiland-Veltmans, W.H.M.; Wierkx, F.J.M.; Zevenbergen, J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports on significant technological progress made over the last few years in determining the feasibility of HNF-based monopropellants. An HNF-based monopropellant is an interesting alternative for hydrazine as monopropellant for satellite propulsion. New non-toxic monopropellants based o

  7. GPS-based satellite tracking system for precise positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunck, T. P.; Melbourne, W. G.; Thornton, C. L.

    1985-01-01

    NASA is developing a Global Positioning System (GPS) based measurement system to provide precise determination of earth satellite orbits, geodetic baselines, ionospheric electron content, and clock offsets between worldwide tracking sites. The system will employ variations on the differential GPS observing technique and will use a network of nine fixed ground terminals. Satellite applications will require either a GPS flight receiver or an on-board GPS beacon. Operation of the system for all but satellite tracking will begin by 1988. The first major satellite application will be a demonstration of decimeter accuracy in determining the altitude of TOPEX in the early 1990's. By then the system is expected to yield long-baseline accuracies of a few centimeters and instantaneous time synchronization to 1 ns.

  8. Model-based satellite image fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanæs, Henrik; Sveinsson, J. R.; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg;

    2008-01-01

    A method is proposed for pixel-level satellite image fusion derived directly from a model of the imaging sensor. By design, the proposed method is spectrally consistent. It is argued that the proposed method needs regularization, as is the case for any method for this problem. A framework for pixel...... neighborhood regularization is presented. This framework enables the formulation of the regularization in a way that corresponds well with our prior assumptions of the image data. The proposed method is validated and compared with other approaches on several data sets. Lastly, the intensity......-hue-saturation method is revisited in order to gain additional insight of what implications the spectral consistency has for an image fusion method....

  9. 一种生物地理学移动机器人路径规划算法%A biogeography-based mobile robot path planning algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫宏伟; 马靖雯

    2015-01-01

    目前,虽然有多种智能计算方法用于移动机器人路径规划问题,但在复杂环境下,多数智能计算方法表现出效率低下,结果较差的问题. 提出一种结合基于有效顶点的栅格编码法和改进的生物地理学优化算法的移动机器人路径规划方法,以解决该类问题. 结合已知的环境信息,从精英策略、降维机制和基于惯性算子的迁移操作3方面改进了生物地理学优化算法. 改进算法用于机器人移动路径,与人工蜂群算法、粒子群算法和人工鱼群算法等智能算法进行比较,实验的结果证实改进算法能够更有效地解决复杂环境下机器人路径规划问题.%At present, there are many intelligent computing methods used in mobile robot path planning;however, in complex environments, most of them have low efficiency and poor results. In order to solve such problems, this paper proposes a new method for mobile robot path planning, which combines the grid coding method based on the effective vertex with the improved biogeography-based optimization ( BBO) . On the basis of the environmental infor-mation that has been learned, the BBO is improved in three aspects:elite strategies, dimension reduction mecha-nisms and migration based on inertial operator. The improved BBO is applied in path planning. The method is com-pared with artificial bee colony ( ABC) , particle swarm optimization ( PSO) and artificial fish algorithm ( AFA) . Experiment results show that the improved method can solve the problem of mobile robot path planning in a complex environment more efficiently.

  10. Multi-spectral band selection for satellite-based systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of satellite based multispectral imaging systems requires the consideration of a number of tradeoffs between cost and performance. The authors have recently been involved in the design and evaluation of a satellite based multispectral sensor operating from the visible through the long wavelength IR. The criteria that led to some of the proposed designs and the modeling used to evaluate and fine tune the designs will both be discussed. These criteria emphasized the use of bands for surface temperature retrieval and the correction of atmospheric effects. The impact of cost estimate changes on the final design will also be discussed

  11. Tracking target objects orbiting earth using satellite-based telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries, Willem H; Olivier, Scot S; Pertica, Alexander J

    2014-10-14

    A system for tracking objects that are in earth orbit via a constellation or network of satellites having imaging devices is provided. An object tracking system includes a ground controller and, for each satellite in the constellation, an onboard controller. The ground controller receives ephemeris information for a target object and directs that ephemeris information be transmitted to the satellites. Each onboard controller receives ephemeris information for a target object, collects images of the target object based on the expected location of the target object at an expected time, identifies actual locations of the target object from the collected images, and identifies a next expected location at a next expected time based on the identified actual locations of the target object. The onboard controller processes the collected image to identify the actual location of the target object and transmits the actual location information to the ground controller.

  12. SOFT project: a new forecasting system based on satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Ananda; Orfila, A.; Alvarez, Alberto; Hernandez, E.; Gomis, D.; Barth, Alexander; Tintore, Joaquim

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the SOFT project is to develop a new ocean forecasting system by using a combination of satellite dat, evolutionary programming and numerical ocean models. To achieve this objective two steps are proved: (1) to obtain an accurate ocean forecasting system using genetic algorithms based on satellite data; and (2) to integrate the above new system into existing deterministic numerical models. Evolutionary programming will be employed to build 'intelligent' systems that, learning form the past ocean variability and considering the present ocean state, will be able to infer near future ocean conditions. Validation of the forecast skill will be carried out by comparing the forecasts fields with satellite and in situ observations. Validation with satellite observations will provide the expected errors in the forecasting system. Validation with in situ data will indicate the capabilities of the satellite based forecast information to improve the performance of the numerical ocean models. This later validation will be accomplished considering in situ measurements in a specific oceanographic area at two different periods of time. The first set of observations will be employed to feed the hybrid systems while the second set will be used to validate the hybrid and traditional numerical model results.

  13. Engineering satellite-based navigation and timing global navigation satellite systems, signals, and receivers

    CERN Document Server

    Betz, J

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the design and performance analysis of satnav systems, signals, and receivers. It also provides succinct descriptions and comparisons of all the world’s satnav systems. Its comprehensive and logical structure addresses all satnav signals and systems in operation and being developed. Engineering Satellite-Based Navigation and Timing: Global Navigation Satellite Systems, Signals, and Receivers provides the technical foundation for designing and analyzing satnav signals, systems, and receivers. Its contents and structure address all satnav systems and signals: legacy, modernized, and new. It combines qualitative information with detailed techniques and analyses, providing a comprehensive set of insights and engineering tools for this complex multidisciplinary field. Part I describes system and signal engineering including orbital mechanics and constellation design, signal design principles and underlying considerations, link budgets, qua tifying receiver performance in interference, and e...

  14. An horizon scan of biogeography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael N Dawson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The opportunity to reflect broadly on the accomplishments, prospects, and reach of a field may present itself relatively infrequently. Each biennial meeting of the International Biogeography Society showcases ideas solicited and developed largely during the preceding year, by individuals or teams from across the breadth of the discipline. Here, we highlight challenges, developments, and opportunities in biogeography from that biennial synthesis. We note the realized and potential impact of rapid data accumulation in several fields, a renaissance for inter-disciplinary research, the importance of recognizing the evolution-ecology continuum across spatial and temporal scales and at different taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional levels, and re-exploration of classical assumptions and hypotheses using new tools. However, advances are taxonomically and geographically biased, key theoretical frameworks await tools to handle, or strategies to simplify, the biological complexity seen in empirical systems. Current threats to biodiversity require unprecedented integration of knowledge and development of predictive capacity that may enable biogeography to unite its descriptive and hypothetico-deductive branches and establish a greater role within and outside academia.

  15. The principle of the positioning system based on communication satellites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    It is a long dream to realize the communication and navigation functionality in a satellite system in the world. This paper introduces how to establish the system, a positioning system based on communication satellites called Chinese Area Positioning System (CAPS). Instead of the typical navigation satellites, the communication satellites are configured firstly to transfer navigation signals from ground stations, and can be used to obtain service of the positioning, velocity and time, and to achieve the function of navigation and positioning. Some key technique issues should be first solved; they include the accuracy position determination and orbit prediction of the communication satellites, the measur- ing and calculation of transfer time of the signals, the carrier frequency drift in communication satellite signal transfer, how to improve the geometrical configuration of the constellation in the system, and the integration of navigation & communication. Several innovative methods are developed to make the new system have full functions of navigation and communication. Based on the development of crucial techniques and methods, the CAPS demonstration system has been designed and developed. Four communication satellites in the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) located at 87.5°E, 110.5°E, 134°E, 142°E and barometric altimetry are used in the CAPS system. The GEO satellites located at 134°E and 142°E are decommissioned GEO (DGEO) satellites. C-band is used as the navigation band. Dual frequency at C1=4143.15 MHz and C2=3826.02 MHz as well as dual codes with standard code (CA code and precision code (P code)) are adopted. The ground segment consists of five ground stations; the master station is in Lintong, Xi’an. The ground stations take a lot of responsibilities, including monitor and management of the operation of all system components, determination of the satellite position and prediction of the satellite orbit, accomplishment of the virtual atomic clock

  16. Biogeography of speciation of two sister species of neotropical amazona (Aves, Psittaciformes based on mitochondrial sequence data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda V Rocha

    Full Text Available Coalescent theory provides powerful models for population genetic inference and is now increasingly important in estimates of divergence times and speciation research. We use molecular data and methods based on coalescent theory to investigate whether genetic evidence supports the hypothesis of A. pretrei and A. tucumana as separate species and whether genetic data allow us to assess which allopatric model seems to better explain the diversification process in these taxa. We sampled 13 A. tucumana from two provinces in northern Argentina and 28 A. pretrei from nine localities of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. A 491 bp segment of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase I was evaluated using the haplotype network and phylogenetic methods. The divergence time and other demographic quantities were estimated using the isolation and migration model based on coalescent theory. The network and phylogenetic reconstructions showed similar results, supporting reciprocal monophyly for these two taxa. The divergence time of lineage separation was estimated to be approximately 1.3 million years ago, which corresponds to the lower Pleistocene. Our results enforce the current taxonomic status for these two Amazon species. They also support that A. pretrei and A. tucumana diverged with little or no gene flow approximately 1.3 million years ago, most likely after the establishment of a small population in the Southern Yungas forest by dispersion of a few founders from the A. pretrei ancestral population. This process may have been favored by habitat corridors formed in hot and humid periods of the Quaternary. Considering that these two species are considered threatened, the results were evaluated for their implications for the conservation of these two species.

  17. Stigmergy based behavioural coordination for satellite clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Howard; Palmer, Phil

    2010-04-01

    Multi-platform swarm/cluster missions are an attractive prospect for improved science return as they provide a natural capability for temporal, spatial and signal separation with further engineering and economic advantages. As spacecraft numbers increase and/or the round-trip communications delay from Earth lengthens, the traditional "remote-control" approach begins to break down. It is therefore essential to push control into space; to make spacecraft more autonomous. An autonomous group of spacecraft requires coordination, but standard terrestrial paradigms such as negotiation, require high levels of inter-spacecraft communication, which is nontrivial in space. This article therefore introduces the principals of stigmergy as a novel method for coordinating a cluster. Stigmergy is an agent-based, behavioural approach that allows for infrequent communication with decisions based on local information. Behaviours are selected dynamically using a genetic algorithm onboard. supervisors/ground stations occasionally adjust parameters and disseminate a "common environment" that is used for local decisions. After outlining the system, an analysis of some crucial parameters such as communications overhead and number of spacecraft is presented to demonstrate scalability. Further scenarios are considered to demonstrate the natural ability to deal with dynamic situations such as the failure of spacecraft, changing mission objectives and responding to sudden bursts of high priority tasks.

  18. An Ontology Based Methodology for Satellite Data Semantic Interoperability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABBURU, S.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Satellites and ocean based observing system consists of various sensors and configurations. These observing systems transmit data in heterogeneous file formats and heterogeneous vocabulary from various data centers. These data centers maintain a centralized data management system that disseminates the observations to various research communities. Currently, different data naming conventions are being used by existing observing systems, thus leading to semantic heterogeneity. In this work, sensor data interoperability and semantics of the data are being addressed through ontologies. The present work provides an effective technical solution to address semantic heterogeneity through semantic technologies. These technologies provide interoperability, capability to build knowledge base, and framework for semantic information retrieval by developing an effective concept vocabulary through domain ontologies. The paper aims at a new methodology to interlink the multidisciplinary and heterogeneous sensor data products. A four phase methodology has been implemented to address satellite data semantic interoperability. The paper concludes with the evaluation of the methodology by linking and interfacing multiple ontologies to arrive at ontology vocabulary for sensor observations. Data from Indian Meteorological satellite INSAT-3D satellite have been used as a typical example to illustrate the concepts. This work on similar lines can also be extended to other sensor observations.

  19. Phylogeny and biogeography of 91 species of heroine cichlids (Teleostei: Cichlidae) based on sequences of the cytochrome b gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Gustavo A Concheiro; Rícan, Oldrich; Ortí, Guillermo; Bermingham, Eldredge; Doadrio, Ignacio; Zardoya, Rafael

    2007-04-01

    Heroini constitute the second largest tribe of Neotropical cichlids and show their greatest diversity in Mesoamerica. Although heroine species are morphologically and ecologically very diverse, they were all historically assigned to one single genus, Cichlasoma that was never formally revised from a phylogenetic point of view. Here, we present the most comprehensive molecular phylogeny of the tribe Heroini to date, based on the complete DNA sequence of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome b, and the analysis of 204 individuals representing 91 species. Phylogenetic analyses did not support the monophyly of heroines because the genus Pterophyllum was placed as the sister group of all remaining heroines plus cichlasomatines. However, the recovered relative position of Pterophyllum was without strong statistical support. Within the remaining heroines, Hyspelecara and Hoplarchus are recovered with low support in a basal position with respect to a clade that includes Heros, Uaru, Mesonauta, and Symphysodon, and the circumamazonian (CAM) heroines. The first clade is restricted to South America. The largest clade of heroines, the CAM heroines, include more than 85% of the species within the tribe. This clade is mostly Mesoamerican, but also contains four species found in the Greater Antilles (Nandopsis), and three genera found in South America (the 'Heros' festae group, Australoheros, and Caquetaia). Up to eight major lineages can be recovered within the CAM heroines, but the phylogenetic relationships among them remain unresolved. Two large suprageneric groups can be distinguished, the amphilophines and the herichthyines. The amphilophines include Amphilophus, Archocentrus, Hypsophrys, Neetroplus, Parachromis, Petenia, and five additional unnamed genera (the 'Heros' istlanus group, the 'Amphilophus' calobrensis group, the 'Heros' urophthalmus group, the 'Heros' wesseli group, and the 'Heros' sieboldii group). The herichthyines include the crown-group herichthyines

  20. Price-Based Information Routing in Complex Satellite Networks for

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, I.; Su, J.; Wang, Y.; Wyglinski, A.

    Future space-based situational awareness and space surveillance systems are envisioned to include a large array of satellites that seek to cooperatively achieve full awareness over given space and terrestrial domains. Given the complexity of the communication network architecture of such a system, in this paper we build on the system architecture that was proposed by the presenting author in the 2008 AMOS conference and propose an efficient, adaptable and scalable price-based routing and bandwidth allocation algorithm for the generation, routing and delivery of surveillance information in distributed wireless satellite networks. Due to the potentially large deployments of these satellites, the access points employed in a centralized network control scheme would easily be overwhelmed due to lack of spectral bandwidth, synchronization issues, and multiple access coordination. Alternatively, decentralized schemes could facilitate the flow and transference of information between data gatherers and data collectors via mechanisms such as (multi-hop) routing, allocation of spectral bandwidths per relaying node, and coordination between adjacent nodes. Although there are numerous techniques and concepts focusing on the network operations, control, and management of sensor networks, existing solution approaches require the use of information for routing, allocation, and decision-making that may not be readily available to the satellites in a timely fashion. This is especially true in the literature on price-based routing, where the approach is almost always game theoretic or relies on optimization techniques. Instead of seeking such techniques, in this paper we present algorithms that will (1) be energy-aware, (2) be highly adaptable and responsive to demands and seek delivery of information to desired nodes despite the fact that the source and destination are not globally known, (3) be secure, (4) be efficient in allocating bandwidth, (5) be decentralized and allow for

  1. Phylogeny and biogeography of Poecilia (Cyprinodontiformes: Poeciliinae) across Central and South America based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Adeljean L F C; Pruett, Christin L; Lin, Junda

    2016-08-01

    Poeciliids are a diverse group of small Neotropical fishes, and despite considerable research attention as models in ecology and evolutionary biology, our understanding of their biogeographic and phylogenetic relationships is still limited. We investigated the phylogenetic relationships of South and Central American Poecilia, by examining 2395 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA (ATPase 8/6, COI) and nuclear DNA (S7) for 18 species across six subgenera. Fifty-eight novel sequences were acquired from newly collected specimens and 20 sequences were obtained from previously published material. Analyses of concatenated and partitioned mitochondrial DNA and nuclear DNA sets resulted in a well-supported phylogeny that resolved several monophyletic groups corresponding to previously hypothesized subgenera and species complexes. A divergence-dating analysis supported the hypothesis of the genus Poecilia dispersing into Central America in the early Pliocene (ancestors of Psychropoecilia+Allopoecilia+Mollienesia: 7.3-2.0Mya) from predominantly South America. Subsequently, one lineage (subgenus Allopoecilia: 5.1-1.3Mya) expanded deeper into South America from Lower-Central America, and one lineage expanded from Nuclear-Central America into South America (subgenus Mollienesia: 0.71-0.14Mya). The subgenus Mollienesia diverged into three monophyletic groups that can be identified by nuptial male dorsal fin morphology and inner jaw dentition. A subclade of the unicuspid short-fins (subgenus Mollienesia) was the lineage that expanded into South America during the middle Pleistocene. Species in this subclade are now distributed across northern South America, where they are partially sympatric with Allopoecilia. However the P. (A.) caucana complex was not monophyletic, with P. (A.) wandae clustering in the Mollienesia subclade that expanded into South America. It is apparent that characters (body size, scale count, pigmentation, and gonopodium morphology) used to define the P. (A

  2. Evaluating the hydrological consistency of satellite based water cycle components

    KAUST Repository

    Lopez, Oliver

    2016-06-15

    Advances in multi-satellite based observations of the earth system have provided the capacity to retrieve information across a wide-range of land surface hydrological components and provided an opportunity to characterize terrestrial processes from a completely new perspective. Given the spatial advantage that space-based observations offer, several regional-to-global scale products have been developed, offering insights into the multi-scale behaviour and variability of hydrological states and fluxes. However, one of the key challenges in the use of satellite-based products is characterizing the degree to which they provide realistic and representative estimates of the underlying retrieval: that is, how accurate are the hydrological components derived from satellite observations? The challenge is intrinsically linked to issues of scale, since the availability of high-quality in-situ data is limited, and even where it does exist, is generally not commensurate to the resolution of the satellite observation. Basin-scale studies have shown considerable variability in achieving water budget closure with any degree of accuracy using satellite estimates of the water cycle. In order to assess the suitability of this type of approach for evaluating hydrological observations, it makes sense to first test it over environments with restricted hydrological inputs, before applying it to more hydrological complex basins. Here we explore the concept of hydrological consistency, i.e. the physical considerations that the water budget impose on the hydrologic fluxes and states to be temporally and spatially linked, to evaluate the reproduction of a set of large-scale evaporation (E) products by using a combination of satellite rainfall (P) and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) observations of storage change, focusing on arid and semi-arid environments, where the hydrological flows can be more realistically described. Our results indicate no persistent hydrological

  3. Automatic Matching of High Resolution Satellite Images Based on RFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JI Shunping

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A matching method for high resolution satellite images based on RFM is presented.Firstly,the RFM parameters are used to predict the initial parallax of corresponding points and the prediction accuracy is analyzed.Secondly,the approximate epipolar equation is constructed based on projection tracking and its accuracy is analyzed.Thirdly,approximate 1D image matching is executed on pyramid images and least square matching on base images.At last RANSAC is imbedded to eliminate mis-matching points and matching results are obtained.Test results verified the method more robust and with higher matching rate,compared to 2D gray correlation method and the popular SIFT matching method,and the method preferably solved the question of high resolution satellite image matching with different stereo model,different time and large rotation images.

  4. Periodic material-based vibration isolation for satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinnan Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The vibration environment of a satellite is very severe during launch. Isolating the satellitevibrations during launch will significantly enhance reliability and lifespan, and reduce the weight of satellite structure and manufacturing cost. Guided by the recent advances in solid-state physics research, a new type of satellite vibration isolator is proposed by usingperiodic material that is hence called periodic isolator. The periodic isolator possesses a unique dynamic property, i.e., frequency band gaps. External vibrations with frequencies falling in the frequency band gaps of the periodic isolator are to be isolated. Using the elastodynamics and the Bloch-Floquet theorem, the frequency band gaps of periodic isolators are determined. A parametric study is conducted to provide guidelines for the design of periodic isolators. Based on these analytical results, a finite element model of a micro-satellite with a set of designed periodic isolators is built to show the feasibility of vibration isolation. The periodic isolator is found to be a multi-directional isolator that provides vibration isolation in the three directions.

  5. GPS SATELLITE SIMULATOR SIGNAL ESTIMATION BASED ON ANN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Multi-channel Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite signal simulator is used to provide realistic test signals for GPS receivers and navigation systems. In this paper, signals arriving the antenna of GPS receiver are analyzed from the viewpoint of simulator design. The estimation methods are focused of which several signal parameters are difficult to determine directly according to existing experiential models due to various error factors. Based on the theory of Artificial Neural Network (ANN), an approach is proposed to simulate signal propagation delay,carrier phase, power, and other parameters using ANN. The architecture of the hardware-in-the-loop test system is given. The ANN training and validation process is described. Experimental results demonstrate that the ANN designed can statistically simulate sample data in high fidelity.Therefore the computation of signal state based on this ANN can meet the design requirement,and can be directly applied to the development of multi-channel GPS satellite signal simulator.

  6. Detecting weather radar clutter using satellite-based nowcasting products

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Thomas B. S.; Gill, Rashpal S.; Overgaard, Søren; Hansen, Lars Kai; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents the initial results from experiments with detection of weather radar clutter by information fusion with satellite based nowcasting products. Previous studies using information fusion of weather radar data and first generation Meteosat imagery have shown promising results for the detecting and removal of clutter. Naturally, the improved spatio-temporal resolution of the Meteosat Second Generation sensors, coupled with its increased number of spectral bands, is expect...

  7. Market-based task allocation in distributed satellite systems

    OpenAIRE

    van der Horst, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of task allocation in a distributed satellite system. These spacecraft specialise in different functions, and must collaborate to complete the mission objectives. The energy available for task execution and communication is, however, extremely limited, which poses a challenging design problem. I propose the use of a market-based, multi-agent approach to achieve the necessary macro-level behaviour. The development and verification of this allocation mechanism ...

  8. Efficient enhancing scheme for TCP performance over satellite-based internet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lina; Gu Xuemai

    2007-01-01

    Satellite link characteristics drastically degrade transport control protocol (TCP) performance. An efficient performance enhancing scheme is proposed. The improvement of TCP performance over satellite-based Intemet is accomplished by protocol transition gateways at each end ora satellite link. The protocol which runs over a satellite link executes the receiver-driven flow control and acknowledgements- and timeouts-based error control strategies. The validity of this TCP performance enhancing scheme is verified by a series of simulation experiments. Results show that the proposed scheme can efficiently enhance the TCP performance over satellite-based Intemet and ensure that the available bandwidth resources of the satellite link are fully utilized.

  9. Biomass prediction model in maize based on satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, Herbei; Florin, Sala

    2016-06-01

    Monitoring of crops by satellite techniques is very useful in the context of precision agriculture, regarding crops management and agricultural production. The present study has evaluated the interrelationship between maize biomass production and satellite indices (NDVI and NDBR) during five development stages (BBCH code), highlighting different levels of correlation. Biomass production recorded was between 2.39±0.005 t ha-1 (12-13 BBCH code) and 51.92±0.028 t ha-1 (83-85 BBCH code), in relation to vegetation stages studied. Values of chlorophyll content ranged from 24.1±0.25 SPAD unit (12-13 BBCH code) to 58.63±0.47 SPAD unit (71-73 BBCH code), and the obtained satellite indices ranged from 0.035641±0.002 and 0.320839±0.002 for NDVI indices respectively 0.035095±0.034 and 0.491038±0.018 in the case of NDBR indices. By regression analysis it was possible to obtain predictive models of biomass in maize based on the satellite indices, in statistical accurate conditions. The most accurate prediction was possible based on NDBR index (R2 = 0.986, F = 144.23, p<0.001, RMSE = 1.446), then based on chlorophyll content (R2 = 0.834, F = 16.14, p = 0.012, RMSE = 6.927) and NDVI index (R2 = 0.682, F = 3.869, p = 0.116, RMSE = 12.178).

  10. SAMIRA - SAtellite based Monitoring Initiative for Regional Air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Philipp; Stebel, Kerstin; Ajtai, Nicolae; Diamandi, Andrei; Horalek, Jan; Nicolae, Doina; Stachlewska, Iwona; Zehner, Claus

    2016-04-01

    Here, we present a new ESA-funded project entitled Satellite based Monitoring Initiative for Regional Air quality (SAMIRA), which aims at improving regional and local air quality monitoring through synergetic use of data from present and upcoming satellites, traditionally used in situ air quality monitoring networks and output from chemical transport models. Through collaborative efforts in four countries, namely Romania, Poland, the Czech Republic and Norway, all with existing air quality problems, SAMIRA intends to support the involved institutions and associated users in their national monitoring and reporting mandates as well as to generate novel research in this area. Despite considerable improvements in the past decades, Europe is still far from achieving levels of air quality that do not pose unacceptable hazards to humans and the environment. Main concerns in Europe are exceedances of particulate matter (PM), ground-level ozone, benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). While overall sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions have decreased in recent years, regional concentrations can still be high in some areas. The objectives of SAMIRA are to improve algorithms for the retrieval of hourly aerosol optical depth (AOD) maps from SEVIRI, and to develop robust methods for deriving column- and near-surface PM maps for the study area by combining satellite AOD with information from regional models. The benefit to existing monitoring networks (in situ, models, satellite) by combining these datasets using data fusion methods will be tested for satellite-based NO2, SO2, and PM/AOD. Furthermore, SAMIRA will test and apply techniques for downscaling air quality-related EO products to a spatial resolution that is more in line with what is generally required for studying urban and regional scale air quality. This will be demonstrated for a set of study sites that include the capitals of the four countries and the highly polluted areas along the border of Poland and the

  11. Solving flexible Job-Shop scheduling problem based on biogeography-based optimization algorithm%生物地理学算法求解柔性作业车间调度问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guo-hui; NIE Li; MAO Xue-gang

    2014-01-01

    For the flexible Job-Shop scheduling problem (FJSP), this paper proposed the improved biogeography-based optimization algorithm (BBO), modified the migration operator and mutation operator. In the initial stage of the algorithm, it adopted hybrid initiali%针对柔性作业车间调度问题,对生物地理学优化算法中的迁移操作和突变操作进行改进,提出一种改进的生物地理学优化算法。在算法初始阶段采用混合初始化的方法,提高初始种群质量;对迁移操作和突变操作采用不同选择方法,提高算法全局搜索能力,加快收敛速度。通过编程仿真对柔性作业车间调度问题标准测试算例进行运算,并与其他文献中的计算结果进行比较,验证了该算法是可行和有效的,也可用于其他车间调度问题中。

  12. Satellite Imagery Assisted Road-Based Visual Navigation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, A.; Gibbens, P. W.

    2016-06-01

    There is a growing demand for unmanned aerial systems as autonomous surveillance, exploration and remote sensing solutions. Among the key concerns for robust operation of these systems is the need to reliably navigate the environment without reliance on global navigation satellite system (GNSS). This is of particular concern in Defence circles, but is also a major safety issue for commercial operations. In these circumstances, the aircraft needs to navigate relying only on information from on-board passive sensors such as digital cameras. An autonomous feature-based visual system presented in this work offers a novel integral approach to the modelling and registration of visual features that responds to the specific needs of the navigation system. It detects visual features from Google Earth* build a feature database. The same algorithm then detects features in an on-board cameras video stream. On one level this serves to localise the vehicle relative to the environment using Simultaneous Localisation and Mapping (SLAM). On a second level it correlates them with the database to localise the vehicle with respect to the inertial frame. The performance of the presented visual navigation system was compared using the satellite imagery from different years. Based on comparison results, an analysis of the effects of seasonal, structural and qualitative changes of the imagery source on the performance of the navigation algorithm is presented. * The algorithm is independent of the source of satellite imagery and another provider can be used

  13. Efficient Satellite Scheduling Based on Improved Vector Evaluated Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengyue Mao

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Satellite scheduling is a typical multi-peak, many-valley, nonlinear multi-objective optimization problem. How to effectively implement the satellite scheduling is a crucial research in space areas.This paper mainly discusses the performance of VEGA (Vector Evaluated Genetic Algorithm based on the study of basic principles of VEGA algorithm, algorithm realization and test function, and then improves VEGA algorithm through introducing vector coding, new crossover and mutation operators, new methods to assign fitness and hold good individuals. As a result, the diversity and convergence of improved VEGA algorithm of improved VEGA algorithm have been significantly enhanced and will be applied to Earth-Mars orbit optimization. At the same time, this paper analyzes the results of the improved VEGA, whose results of performance analysis and evaluation show that although VEGA has a profound impact upon multi-objective evolutionary research,  multi-objective evolutionary algorithm on the basis of Pareto seems to be a more effective method to get the non-dominated solutions from the perspective of diversity and convergence of experimental result. Finally, based on Visual C + + integrated development environment, we have implemented improved vector evaluation algorithm in the satellite scheduling.

  14. Covariance analysis of differential drag-based satellite cluster flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Yaacov, Ohad; Ivantsov, Anatoly; Gurfil, Pini

    2016-06-01

    One possibility for satellite cluster flight is to control relative distances using differential drag. The idea is to increase or decrease the drag acceleration on each satellite by changing its attitude, and use the resulting small differential acceleration as a controller. The most significant advantage of the differential drag concept is that it enables cluster flight without consuming fuel. However, any drag-based control algorithm must cope with significant aerodynamical and mechanical uncertainties. The goal of the current paper is to develop a method for examination of the differential drag-based cluster flight performance in the presence of noise and uncertainties. In particular, the differential drag control law is examined under measurement noise, drag uncertainties, and initial condition-related uncertainties. The method used for uncertainty quantification is the Linear Covariance Analysis, which enables us to propagate the augmented state and filter covariance without propagating the state itself. Validation using a Monte-Carlo simulation is provided. The results show that all uncertainties have relatively small effect on the inter-satellite distance, even in the long term, which validates the robustness of the used differential drag controller.

  15. Entropy-Based Block Processing for Satellite Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikhyun Lee

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Image registration is an important task in many computer vision applications such as fusion systems, 3D shape recovery and earth observation. Particularly, registering satellite images is challenging and time-consuming due to limited resources and large image size. In such scenario, state-of-the-art image registration methods such as scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT may not be suitable due to high processing time. In this paper, we propose an algorithm based on block processing via entropy to register satellite images. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated using different real images. The comparative analysis shows that it not only reduces the processing time but also enhances the accuracy.

  16. Dissemination of satellite-based river discharge and flood data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettner, A. J.; Brakenridge, G. R.; van Praag, E.; de Groeve, T.; Slayback, D. A.; Cohen, S.

    2014-12-01

    In collaboration with NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center and the European Commission Joint Research Centre, the Dartmouth Flood Observatory (DFO) daily measures and distributes: 1) river discharges, and 2) near real-time flood extents with a global coverage. Satellite-based passive microwave sensors and hydrological modeling are utilized to establish 'remote-sensing based discharge stations', and observed time series cover 1998 to the present. The advantages over in-situ gauged discharges are: a) easy access to remote or due to political reasons isolated locations, b) relatively low maintenance costs to maintain a continuous observational record, and c) the capability to obtain measurements during floods, hazardous conditions that often impair or destroy in-situ stations. Two MODIS instruments aboard the NASA Terra and Aqua satellites provide global flood extent coverage at a spatial resolution of 250m. Cloud cover hampers flood extent detection; therefore we ingest 6 images (the Terra and Aqua images of each day, for three days), in combination with a cloud shadow filter, to provide daily global flood extent updates. The Flood Observatory has always made it a high priority to visualize and share its data and products through its website. Recent collaborative efforts with e.g. GeoSUR have enhanced accessibility of DFO data. A web map service has been implemented to automatically disseminate geo-referenced flood extent products into client-side GIS software. For example, for Latin America and the Caribbean region, the GeoSUR portal now displays current flood extent maps, which can be integrated and visualized with other relevant geographical data. Furthermore, the flood state of satellite-observed river discharge sites are displayed through the portal as well. Additional efforts include implementing Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards to incorporate Water Markup Language (WaterML) data exchange mechanisms to further facilitate the distribution of the satellite

  17. Interoperability of satellite-based augmentation systems for aircraft navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Donghai

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is pioneering a transformation of the national airspace system from its present ground based navigation and landing systems to a satellite based system using the Global Positioning System (GPS). To meet the critical safety-of-life aviation positioning requirements, a Satellite-Based Augmentation System (SBAS), the Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS), is being implemented to support navigation for all phases of flight, including Category I precision approach. The system is designed to be used as a primary means of navigation, capable of meeting the Required Navigation Performance (RNP), and therefore must satisfy the accuracy, integrity, continuity and availability requirements. In recent years there has been international acceptance of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), spurring widespread growth in the independent development of SBASs. Besides the FAA's WAAS, the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service System (EGNOS) and the Japan Civil Aviation Bureau's MTSAT-Satellite Augmentation System (MSAS) are also being actively developed. Although all of these SBASs can operate as stand-alone, regional systems, there is increasing interest in linking these SBASs together to reduce costs while improving service coverage. This research investigated the coverage and availability improvements due to cooperative efforts among regional SBAS networks. The primary goal was to identify the optimal interoperation strategies in terms of performance, complexity and practicality. The core algorithms associated with the most promising concepts were developed and demonstrated. Experimental verification of the most promising concepts was conducted using data collected from a joint international test between the National Satellite Test Bed (NSTB) and the EGNOS System Test Bed (ESTB). This research clearly shows that a simple switch between SBASs made by the airborne equipment is the most effective choice for achieving the

  18. Superpixel-Based Roughness Measure for Multispectral Satellite Image Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Antonio Ortiz Toro

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The new generation of artificial satellites is providing a huge amount of Earth observation images whose exploitation can report invaluable benefits, both economical and environmental. However, only a small fraction of this data volume has been analyzed, mainly due to the large human resources needed for that task. In this sense, the development of unsupervised methodologies for the analysis of these images is a priority. In this work, a new unsupervised segmentation algorithm for satellite images is proposed. This algorithm is based on the rough-set theory, and it is inspired by a previous segmentation algorithm defined in the RGB color domain. The main contributions of the new algorithm are: (i extending the original algorithm to four spectral bands; (ii the concept of the superpixel is used in order to define the neighborhood similarity of a pixel adapted to the local characteristics of each image; (iii and two new region merged strategies are proposed and evaluated in order to establish the final number of regions in the segmented image. The experimental results show that the proposed approach improves the results provided by the original method when both are applied to satellite images with different spectral and spatial resolutions.

  19. Satellite-based delivery of educational content to geographically isolated communities: a service based approach

    OpenAIRE

    Serif, Tacha; Ghinea, Gheorghita; Stergioulas, Lampros; Chen, Sherry Y.; Tiropanis, Thanassis; Tsekeridou, Sofia

    2009-01-01

    Enabling learning for members of geographically isolated communities presents benefits in terms of promoting regional development and cost savings for governments and companies. However, notwithstanding recent advances in e-Learning, from both technological and pedagogical perspectives, there are very few, if any, recognised methodologies for user-led design of satellite-based e-learning infrastructures. In this paper, we present a methodology for designing a satellite and wireless based netw...

  20. Technology Status of HNF-based Monopropellants for Satellite Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marée, A. G. M.; Moerel, J.-L.; Welland-Veltmans, W.; Wierckx, F.; Zevenbergen, J.

    2004-10-01

    This paper reports on significant technological progress made over the last few years in determining the feasibility of HNF-based monopropellants. An HNF- based monopropellant is an interesting alternative for hydrazine as monopropellant for satellite propulsion. New non-toxic monopropellants based on dissolved energetic oxidizer salts (e.g. HNF, HAN and ADN) have better performance, lower toxicity and higher storage density than hydrazine. New HNF-monopropellant blends will be presented which have a 5% and 10% higher performance than hydrazine at minimum storage temperatures of 0 and 10 degrees Celsius respectively. This is a major improvement compared with earlier HNF monopropellant blends with a performance equal to hydrazine which must be stored at a minimum temperature of 20 degrees Celsius. Furthermore, these blends are characterized by very low vapour pressures, which is beneficial for two reasons: very low risk of inhalation of harmful vapours and in case of spillage during handling or transport there will be a very low risk of crystallization of solid HNF-crystals. These new blends will be submitted to an extensive characterization program this year. This will include determination of physical properties (e.g. density and viscosity), explosion sensitivity and compatibility with common materials of satellite propulsion systems. Also catalytic ignition and production methods will be demonstrated this year.

  1. Rice Blast Control and Polyvarietal Planting in the Philippines: A Study in Genotype by Environment Biogeography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Falvo

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Current approaches to biogeography are based on organismic biology. Certain biogeographical phenomena, however, cannot be fully understood using organismic approaches to biogeography. I employed an approach based on molecular biology and biochemistry that I call genotype by environment biogeography in order to provide a more complete understanding of why the dispersal of rice blast disease is less efficient in fields planted with mixtures of rice varieties. In a case study of an upland ricefield in the Philippines, I found that planting varietal mixtures results in a form of effective blast control that I call intrafield gene deployment. I suggest that intrafield gene deployment be used to design more effective methods of blast control in intensive rice agriculture.

  2. Estimation of PV energy production based on satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, G.

    2015-09-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) technology is an attractive source of power for systems without connection to power grid. Because of seasonal variations of solar radiation, design of such a power system requires careful analysis in order to provide required reliability. In this paper we present results of three-year measurements of experimental PV system located in Poland and based on polycrystalline silicon module. Irradiation values calculated from results of ground measurements have been compared with data from solar radiation databases employ calculations from of satellite observations. Good convergence level of both data sources has been shown, especially during summer. When satellite data from the same time period is available, yearly and monthly production of PV energy can be calculated with 2% and 5% accuracy, respectively. However, monthly production during winter seems to be overestimated, especially in January. Results of this work may be helpful in forecasting performance of similar PV systems in Central Europe and allow to make more precise forecasts of PV system performance than based only on tables with long time averaged values.

  3. Development of a Robotics-based Satellites Docking Simulator

    OpenAIRE

    Zebenay, M.

    2014-01-01

    The European Proximity Operation Simulator (EPOS) is a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) system aiming, among other objectives, at emulating on-orbit docking of spacecraft for verification and validation of the docking phase. This HIL docking simulator set-up essentially consists of docking interfaces, simulating the servicing satellite called chaser satellite, the serviced satellite called target satellite, a sensor of the forces and torques during contact, and two industrial robots that hold the d...

  4. Planning for a data base system to support satellite conceptual design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claydon, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    The conceptual design of an automated satellite design data base system is presented. The satellite catalog in the system includes data for all earth orbital satellites funded to the hardware stage for launch between 1970 and 1980, and provides a concise compilation of satellite capabilities and design parameters. The cost of satellite subsystems and components will be added to the base. Data elements are listed and discussed. Sensor and science and applications opportunities catalogs will be included in the data system. Capabilities of the BASIS storage, retrieval, and analysis system are used in the system design.

  5. Detecting weather radar clutter using satellite-based nowcasting products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas B.S.; Gill, Rashpal S.; Overgaard, Søren;

    2006-01-01

    by the resolution of the radar data. Subsequently, a supervised classifier was developed based on training data selected by a weather radar expert. Results of classification of data from several different meteorological events are shown. Cases of widespread sea clutter caused by anomalous propagation are especially......This contribution presents the initial results from experiments with detection of weather radar clutter by information fusion with satellite based nowcasting products. Previous studies using information fusion of weather radar data and first generation Meteosat imagery have shown promising results...... for the detecting and removal of clutter. Naturally, the improved spatio-temporal resolution of the Meteosat Second Generation sensors, coupled with its increased number of spectral bands, is expected to yield even better detection accuracies. Weather radar data from three C-band Doppler weather radars...

  6. Zenith Pass Problem of Inter-satellite Linkage Antenna Based on Program Guidance Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhai Kun; Yang Di

    2008-01-01

    While adopting an elevation-over-azimuth architecture by an inter-satellite linkage antenna of a user satellite, a zenith pass problem always occurs when the antenna is tracing the tracking and data relay satellite (TDRS). This paper deals with this problem by way of,firstly, introducing movement laws of the inter-satellite linkage to predict the movement of the user satellite antenna followed by analyzing the potential pass moment and the actual one of the zenith pass in detail. A number of specific orbit altitudes for the user satellite that can remove the blindness zone are obtained. Finally, on the base of the predicted results from the movement laws of the inter-satellite linkage, the zenith pass tracing strategies for the user satellite antenna are designed under the program guidance using a trajectory preprocessor. Simulations have confirmed the reasonability and feasibility of the strategies in dealing with the zenith pass problem.

  7. Optimization of nonlinear controller with an enhanced biogeography approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Salem

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is dedicated to the optimization of nonlinear controllers basing of an enhanced Biogeography Based Optimization (BBO approach. Indeed, The BBO is combined to a predator and prey model where several predators are used with introduction of a modified migration operator to increase the diversification along the optimization process so as to avoid local optima and reach the optimal solution quickly. The proposed approach is used in tuning the gains of PID controller for nonlinear systems. Simulations are carried out over a Mass spring damper and an inverted pendulum and has given remarkable results when compared to genetic algorithm and BBO.

  8. Parameterization of oceanic whitecap fraction based on satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. M. A. Albert

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study the utility of satellite-based whitecap fraction (W values for the prediction of sea spray aerosol (SSA emission rates is explored. More specifically, the study is aimed at improving the accuracy of the sea spray source function (SSSF derived by using the whitecap method through the reduction of the uncertainties in the parameterization of W by better accounting for its natural variability. The starting point is a dataset containing W data, together with matching environmental and statistical data, for 2006. Whitecap fraction W was estimated from observations of the ocean surface brightness temperature TB by satellite-borne radiometers at two frequencies (10 and 37 GHz. A global scale assessment of the data set to evaluate the wind speed dependence of W revealed a quadratic correlation between W and U10, as well as a relatively larger spread in the 37 GHz data set. The latter could be attributed to secondary factors affecting W in addition to U10. To better visualize these secondary factors, a regional scale assessment over different seasons was performed. This assessment indicates that the influence of secondary factors on W is for the largest part imbedded in the exponent of the wind speed dependence. Hence no further improvement can be expected by looking at effects of other factors on the variation in W explicitly. From the regional analysis, a new globally applicable quadratic W(U10 parameterization was derived. An intrinsic correlation between W and U10 that could have been introduced while estimating W from TB was determined, evaluated and presumed to lie within the error margins of the newly derived W(U10 parameterization. The satellite-based parameterization was compared to parameterizations from other studies and was applied in a SSSF to estimate the global SSA emission rate. The thus obtained SSA production for 2006 of 4.1 × 1012 kg is within previously reported estimates. While recent studies that account for

  9. Application of Satellite Based Augmentation Systems to Altitude Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magny, Jean Pierre

    This paper presents the application of GNSS1, or more precisely of Satellite Based Augmentation Systems (SBAS), to vertical separation for en-route, approach and landing operations. Potential improvements in terms of operational benefit and of safety are described for two main applications. First, vertical separation between en-route aircraft, which requires a system available across wide areas. SBAS (EGNOS, WAAS, and MSAS) are very well suited for this purpose before GNSS2 becomes available. And secondly, vertical separation from the ground during approach and landing, for which preliminary design principles of instrument approach procedures and safety issues are presented. Approach and landing phases are the subject of discussions within ICAO GNSS-P. En-route phases have been listed as GNSS-P future work and by RTCA for development of new equipments.

  10. Satellite-based Observation of Arctic River Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overeem, I.; Brakenridge, R.; Hudson, B.

    2015-12-01

    One of the indicators of a warming Arctic region is an intensification of the hydrological cycle, with increasing permafrost and glacial melt and possibly more precipitation resulting in higher river runoff. Indeed, a significant increase of nearly 10% in annual river flux has been observed in 13 major rivers throughout the entire Arctic region over the last 30 years. However, direct measurements are extremely sparse for 100's of smaller-scale tundra river systems, as well as for proglacial rivers around the Greenland Ice Sheet margin. Observations at in-situ gauging stations are hampered by seasonal ice coverage, break-up and freeze-up dynamics, unstable banks, and difficult access. To overcome such difficulties, we develop remote-sensing based river discharge measurement techniques using a variety of satellite sensors, including reflectance in the near-infrared band of MODIS, LANDSAT, and brightness temperature from the passive microwave sensors AMSR-E and AMSR-2. We use varying inundation of the river channel and floodplain throughout a season to quantify the changing Arctic river flux. A new approach to detect river ice break up in spring has been developed, and is now undergoing validation. To calibrate the remote sensing signal to daily river discharge, we employ either in-situ short observation records, or a numerical distributed hydrological model driven by daily reanalysis climate data. Quantitative reconstructions of meltwater fluxes in rivers along the Greenland Ice Sheet margin obtained so far show a dampened response of these rivers to Greenland Ice Sheet melt. Techniques are now deployed to map river dynamics along the Chukchi Sea and Beaufort Sea coasts, and show shifts in break-up dynamics and flooding patterns. Once calibrated, satellite-based reconstructions have the potential to lengthen short observational records to a ~15 year timespan.

  11. Conservation biogeography - foundations, concepts and challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Timothy; Whittaker, R.J.; Whittaker, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Conservation biogeography involves the application of biogeographical principles, theories, and analyses to problems regarding biodiversity conservation. The field was formally defined in 2005, and considerable research has been conducted in the ensuing 5 years. This editorial sets the context...... for 16 contributions in a special issue of Diversity and Distributions on developments and challenges in conservation biogeography. Papers are grouped into the following main themes: species distribution modelling; data requirements; approaches for assigning conservation priorities; approaches...... for integrating information from numerous disparate sources; special challenges involving invasive species; and the crucial issue of determining how elements of biodiversity are likely to respond to rapid climate change. One paper provides a synthesis of requirements for a robust conservation biogeography...

  12. Satellite-based Flood Modeling Using TRMM-based Rainfall Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Easson

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly available and a virtually uninterrupted supply of satellite-estimatedrainfall data is gradually becoming a cost-effective source of input for flood predictionunder a variety of circumstances. However, most real-time and quasi-global satelliterainfall products are currently available at spatial scales ranging from 0.25o to 0.50o andhence, are considered somewhat coarse for dynamic hydrologic modeling of basin-scaleflood events. This study assesses the question: what are the hydrologic implications ofuncertainty of satellite rainfall data at the coarse scale? We investigated this question onthe 970 km2 Upper Cumberland river basin of Kentucky. The satellite rainfall productassessed was NASA’s Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM Multi-satellitePrecipitation Analysis (TMPA product called 3B41RT that is available in pseudo real timewith a latency of 6-10 hours. We observed that bias adjustment of satellite rainfall data canimprove application in flood prediction to some extent with the trade-off of more falsealarms in peak flow. However, a more rational and regime-based adjustment procedureneeds to be identified before the use of satellite data can be institutionalized among floodmodelers.

  13. Satellite based wind resource assessment over the South China Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Merete; Astrup, Poul; Hasager, Charlotte Bay;

    2014-01-01

    surface. The satellite winds are compared against observations from a network of coastal meteorological masts. A statistical analysis is performed to estimate the wind resources. The outcome is a series of maps showing the mean wind speed, Weibull parameters, wind power density, and uncertainties. Wind...... satellite samples which can be collected due to the satellite orbit dynamics. Both challenges are addressed. A novel methodology is applied to project the satellite wind resource maps from 10 m to higher vertical levels by means of simulations from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Three...

  14. Dsm Based Orientation of Large Stereo Satellite Image Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Angelo, P.; Reinartz, P.

    2012-07-01

    High resolution stereo satellite imagery is well suited for the creation of digital surface models (DSM). A system for highly automated and operational DSM and orthoimage generation based on CARTOSAT-1 imagery is presented, with emphasis on fully automated georeferencing. The proposed system processes level-1 stereo scenes using the rational polynomial coefficients (RPC) universal sensor model. The RPC are derived from orbit and attitude information and have a much lower accuracy than the ground resolution of approximately 2.5 m. In order to use the images for orthorectification or DSM generation, an affine RPC correction is required. In this paper, GCP are automatically derived from lower resolution reference datasets (Landsat ETM+ Geocover and SRTM DSM). The traditional method of collecting the lateral position from a reference image and interpolating the corresponding height from the DEM ignores the higher lateral accuracy of the SRTM dataset. Our method avoids this drawback by using a RPC correction based on DSM alignment, resulting in improved geolocation of both DSM and ortho images. Scene based method and a bundle block adjustment based correction are developed and evaluated for a test site covering the nothern part of Italy, for which 405 Cartosat-1 Stereopairs are available. Both methods are tested against independent ground truth. Checks against this ground truth indicate a lateral error of 10 meters.

  15. Colonic biogeography in health and ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Aonghus; Lennon, Grainne; Winter, Desmond C; O'Connell, P Ronan

    2016-09-01

    The relevance of biogeography to the distal gut microbiota has been investigated in both health and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), however multiple factors, including sample type and methodology, microbiota characterization and interpersonal variability make the construction of a core model of colonic biogeography challenging. In addition, how phylogenetic classification relates to immunogenicity and whether consistent alterations in the microbiota are associated with ulcerative colitis (UC) remain open questions. This addendum seeks to review the human colonic microbiota in health and UC as currently understood, in the broader context of the human microbiome. PMID:27662587

  16. The Jena Diversity-Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (JeDi-DGVM: a diverse approach to representing terrestrial biogeography and biogeochemistry based on plant functional trade-offs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pavlick

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial biosphere models typically abstract the immense diversity of vegetation forms and functioning into a relatively small set of predefined semi-empirical plant functional types (PFTs. There is growing evidence, however, from the field ecology community as well as from modelling studies that current PFT schemes may not adequately represent the observed variations in plant functional traits and their effect on ecosystem functioning. In this paper, we introduce the Jena Diversity-Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (JeDi-DGVM as a new approach to terrestrial biosphere modelling with a richer representation of functional diversity than traditional modelling approaches based on a small number of fixed PFTs. JeDi-DGVM simulates the performance of a large number of randomly generated plant growth strategies, each defined by a set of 15 trait parameters which characterize various aspects of plant functioning including carbon allocation, ecophysiology and phenology. Each trait parameter is involved in one or more functional trade-offs. These trade-offs ultimately determine whether a strategy is able to survive under the climatic conditions in a given model grid cell and its performance relative to the other strategies. The biogeochemical fluxes and land surface properties of the individual strategies are aggregated to the grid-cell scale using a mass-based weighting scheme. We evaluate the simulated global biogeochemical patterns against a variety of field and satellite-based observations following a protocol established by the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project. The land surface fluxes and vegetation structural properties are reasonably well simulated by JeDi-DGVM, and compare favourably with other state-of-the-art global vegetation models. We also evaluate the simulated patterns of functional diversity and the sensitivity of the JeDi-DGVM modelling approach to the number of sampled strategies. Altogether, the results demonstrate the

  17. Fuel type characterization based on coarse resolution MODIS satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanorte A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuel types is one of the most important factors that should be taken into consideration for computing spatial fire hazard and risk and simulating fire growth and intensity across a landscape. In the present study, forest fuel mapping is considered from a remote sensing perspective. The purpose is to delineate forest types by exploring the use of coarse resolution satellite remote sensing MODIS imagery. In order to ascertain how well MODIS data can provide an exhaustive classification of fuel properties a sample area characterized by mixed vegetation covers and complex topography was analysed. The study area is located in the South of Italy. Fieldwork fuel type recognitions, performed before, after and during the acquisition of remote sensing MODIS data, were used as ground-truth dataset to assess the obtained results. The method comprised the following three steps: (I adaptation of Prometheus fuel types for obtaining a standardization system useful for remotely sensed classification of fuel types and properties in the considered Mediterranean ecosystems; (II model construction for the spectral characterization and mapping of fuel types based on two different approach, maximum likelihood (ML classification algorithm and spectral Mixture Analysis (MTMF; (III accuracy assessment for the performance evaluation based on the comparison of MODIS-based results with ground-truth. Results from our analyses showed that the use of remotely sensed MODIS data provided a valuable characterization and mapping of fuel types being that the achieved classification accuracy was higher than 73% for ML classifier and higher than 83% for MTMF.

  18. Fuel type characterization based on coarse resolution MODIS satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasaponara R

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Fuel types is one of the most important factors that should be taken into consideration for computing spatial fire hazard and risk and simulating fire growth and intensity across a landscape. In the present study, forest fuel mapping is considered from a remote sensing perspective. The purpose is to delineate forest types by exploring the use of coarse resolution satellite remote sensing MODIS imagery. In order to ascertain how well MODIS data can provide an exhaustive classification of fuel properties a sample area characterized by mixed vegetation covers and complex topography was analysed. The study area is located in the South of Italy. Fieldwork fuel type recognitions, performed before, after and during the acquisition of remote sensing MODIS data, were used as ground-truth dataset to assess the obtained results. The method comprised the following three steps: (Iadaptation of Prometheus fuel types for obtaining a standardization system useful for remotely sensed classification of fuel types and properties in the considered Mediterranean ecosystems; (II model construction for the spectral characterization and mapping of fuel types based on two different approach, maximum likelihood (ML classification algorithm and spectral Mixture Analysis (MTMF; (III accuracy assessment for the performance evaluation based on the comparison of MODIS-based results with ground-truth. Results from our analyses showed that the use of remotely sensed MODIS data provided a valuable characterization and mapping of fuel types being that the achieved classification accuracy was higher than 73% for ML classifier and higher than 83% for MTMF.

  19. The Jena Diversity-Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (JeDi-DGVM: a diverse approach to representing terrestrial biogeography and biogeochemistry based on plant functional trade-offs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pavlick

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs typically abstract the immense diversity of vegetation forms and functioning into a relatively small set of predefined semi-empirical Plant Functional Types (PFTs. There is growing evidence, however, from the field ecology community as well as from modelling studies that current PFT schemes may not adequately represent the observed variations in plant functional traits and their effect on ecosystem functioning. In this paper, we introduce the Jena Diversity DGVM (JeDi-DGVM as a new approach to global vegetation modelling with a richer representation of functional diversity than traditional modelling approaches based on a small number of fixed PFTs.

    JeDi-DGVM simulates the performance of a large number of randomly-generated plant growth strategies (PGSs, each defined by a set of 15 trait parameters which characterize various aspects of plant functioning including carbon allocation, ecophysiology and phenology. Each trait parameter is involved in one or more functional trade-offs. These trade-offs ultimately determine whether a PGS is able to survive under the climatic conditions in a given model grid cell and its performance relative to the other PGSs. The biogeochemical fluxes and land-surface properties of the individual PGSs are aggregated to the grid cell scale using a mass-based weighting scheme.

    Simulated global biogeochemical and biogeographical patterns are evaluated against a variety of field and satellite-based observations following a protocol established by the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project. The land surface fluxes and vegetation structural properties are reasonably well simulated by JeDi-DGVM, and compare favorably with other state-of-the-art terrestrial biosphere models. This is despite the parameters describing the ecophysiological functioning and allometry of JeDi-DGVM plants evolving as a function of vegetation survival in a given climate, as opposed to

  20. Global root zone storage capacity from satellite-based evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang-Erlandsson, Lan; Bastiaanssen, Wim G. M.; Gao, Hongkai; Jägermeyr, Jonas; Senay, Gabriel B.; van Dijk, Albert I. J. M.; Guerschman, Juan P.; Keys, Patrick W.; Gordon, Line J.; Savenije, Hubert H. G.

    2016-04-01

    This study presents an "Earth observation-based" method for estimating root zone storage capacity - a critical, yet uncertain parameter in hydrological and land surface modelling. By assuming that vegetation optimises its root zone storage capacity to bridge critical dry periods, we were able to use state-of-the-art satellite-based evaporation data computed with independent energy balance equations to derive gridded root zone storage capacity at global scale. This approach does not require soil or vegetation information, is model independent, and is in principle scale independent. In contrast to a traditional look-up table approach, our method captures the variability in root zone storage capacity within land cover types, including in rainforests where direct measurements of root depths otherwise are scarce. Implementing the estimated root zone storage capacity in the global hydrological model STEAM (Simple Terrestrial Evaporation to Atmosphere Model) improved evaporation simulation overall, and in particular during the least evaporating months in sub-humid to humid regions with moderate to high seasonality. Our results suggest that several forest types are able to create a large storage to buffer for severe droughts (with a very long return period), in contrast to, for example, savannahs and woody savannahs (medium length return period), as well as grasslands, shrublands, and croplands (very short return period). The presented method to estimate root zone storage capacity eliminates the need for poor resolution soil and rooting depth data that form a limitation for achieving progress in the global land surface modelling community.

  1. A Hybrid Algorithm for Satellite Data Transmission Schedule Based on Genetic Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yun-feng; WU Xiao-yue

    2008-01-01

    A hybrid scheduling algorithm based on genetic algorithm is proposed in this paper for reconnaissance satellite data transmission. At first, based on description of satellite data transmission request, satellite data transmission task modal and satellite data transmission scheduling problem model are established. Secondly, the conflicts in scheduling are discussed. According to the meaning of possible conflict, the method to divide possible conflict task set is given. Thirdly, a hybrid algorithm which consists of genetic algorithm and heuristic information is presented. The heuristic information comes from two concepts, conflict degree and conflict number. Finally, an example shows the algorithm's feasibility and performance better than other traditional algorithms.

  2. A Knowledge-Based Simulated Annealing Algorithm to Multiple Satellites Mission Planning Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Da-Wei Jin; Li-Ning Xing

    2013-01-01

    The multiple satellites mission planning is a complex combination optimization problem. A knowledge-based simulated annealing algorithm is proposed to the multiple satellites mission planning problems. The experimental results suggest that the proposed algorithm is effective to the given problem. The knowledge-based simulated annealing method will provide a useful reference for the improvement of existing optimization approaches.

  3. New dynamic routing algorithm based on MANET in LEO/MEO satellite network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhe; LI Dong-ni; WANG Guang-xing

    2006-01-01

    The features of low earth orbit/medium earth orbit (LEO/MEO) satellite networks routing algorithm based on inter-satellite link are analyzed and the similarities between satellite networks and mobile Ad Hoc network (MANET) are pointed out.The similar parts in MANET routing protocol are used in the satellite network for reference.A new dynamic routing algorithm based on MANET in LEO/MEO satellite networks,which fits for the LEO/MEO satellite communication system,is proposed.At the same time,the model of the algorithm is simulated and features are analyzed.It is shown that the algorithm has strong adaptability.It can give the network high autonomy,perfect function,low system overhead and great compatibility.

  4. Scheduling satellite-based SAR acquisition for sequential assimilation of water level observations into flood modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Pintado, Javier; Neal, Jeff; Mason, David,; Dance, Sarah; Bates, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-based Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has proved useful for obtaining information on flood extent, which, when intersected with a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the floodplain, provides water level observations that can be assimilated into a hydrodynamic model to decrease forecast uncertainty. With an increasing number of operational satellites with SAR capability, information on the relationship between satellite first visit and revisit times and forecast performance is required t...

  5. A Collective Detection Based GPS Receiver for Small Satellites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To solve the problem of autonomous navigation on small satellite platforms less than 20 kg, we propose to develop an onboard orbit determination receiver for small...

  6. Using Satellite Based Techniques to Combine Volcanic Ash Detection Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, B. T.; Kessinger, C.; Herzegh, P.; Blackburn, G.; Cowie, J.; Williams, E.

    2006-12-01

    Volcanic ash poses a serious threat to aircraft avionics due to the corrosive nature of the silicate particles. Aircraft encounters with ash have resulted in millions of dollars in damage and loss of power to aircraft engines. Accurate detection of volcanic ash for the purpose of avoiding these hazardous areas is of the utmost importance to ensure aviation safety as well as to minimize economic loss. Satellite-based detection of volcanic ash has been used extensively to warn the aviation community of its presence through the use of multi-band detection algorithms. However, these algorithms are generally used individually rather than in combination and require the intervention of a human analyst. Automation of the detection and warning of the presence of volcanic ash for the aviation community is a long term goal of the Federal Aviation Administration Oceanic Weather Product Development Team. We are exploring the use of data fusion techniques within a fuzzy logic framework to perform a weighted combination of several multi-band detection algorithms. Our purpose is to improve the overall performance of volcanic ash detection and to test whether automation is feasible. Our initial focus is on deep, stratospheric eruptions.

  7. Satellite-Based Study of Glaciers Retreat in Northern Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Siraj

    Glaciers serve as a natural regulator of regional water supplies. About 16933 Km 2 area of glaciers is covered by Pakistan. These glaciers are enormous reservoirs of fresh water and their meltwater is an important resource which feed rivers in Pakistan. Glacier depletion, especially recent melting can affect agriculture, drinking water supplies, hydro-electric power, and ecological habitats. This can also have a more immediate impact on Pakistan's economy that depends mainly on water from glacier melt. Melting of seasonal snowfall and permanent glaciers has resulted not only in reduction of water resources but also caused flash floods in many areas of Pakistan. With the advent of satellite technology, using optical and SAR data the study of glaciers, has become possible. Using temporal data, based on calculation of snow index, band ratios and texture reflectance it has been revealed that the rate of glacier melting has increased as a consequent of global warming. Comparison of Landsat images of Batura glacier for October 1992 and October 2000 has revealed that there is a decrease of about 17 sq km in Batura glaciers. Although accurate changes in glacier extent cannot be assessed without baseline information, these efforts have been made to analyze future changes in glaciated area.

  8. Satellite Image Time Series Decomposition Based on EEMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-long Kong

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Satellite Image Time Series (SITS have recently been of great interest due to the emerging remote sensing capabilities for Earth observation. Trend and seasonal components are two crucial elements of SITS. In this paper, a novel framework of SITS decomposition based on Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD is proposed. EEMD is achieved by sifting an ensemble of adaptive orthogonal components called Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs. EEMD is noise-assisted and overcomes the drawback of mode mixing in conventional Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD. Inspired by these advantages, the aim of this work is to employ EEMD to decompose SITS into IMFs and to choose relevant IMFs for the separation of seasonal and trend components. In a series of simulations, IMFs extracted by EEMD achieved a clear representation with physical meaning. The experimental results of 16-day compositions of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, and Global Environment Monitoring Index (GEMI time series with disturbance illustrated the effectiveness and stability of the proposed approach to monitoring tasks, such as applications for the detection of abrupt changes.

  9. Advances and Limitations of Disease Biogeography Using Ecological Niche Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Luis E; Craft, Meggan E

    2016-01-01

    Mapping disease transmission risk is crucial in public and animal health for evidence based decision-making. Ecology and epidemiology are highly related disciplines that may contribute to improvements in mapping disease, which can be used to answer health related questions. Ecological niche modeling is increasingly used for understanding the biogeography of diseases in plants, animals, and humans. However, epidemiological applications of niche modeling approaches for disease mapping can fail to generate robust study designs, producing incomplete or incorrect inferences. This manuscript is an overview of the history and conceptual bases behind ecological niche modeling, specifically as applied to epidemiology and public health; it does not pretend to be an exhaustive and detailed description of ecological niche modeling literature and methods. Instead, this review includes selected state-of-the-science approaches and tools, providing a short guide to designing studies incorporating information on the type and quality of the input data (i.e., occurrences and environmental variables), identification and justification of the extent of the study area, and encourages users to explore and test diverse algorithms for more informed conclusions. We provide a friendly introduction to the field of disease biogeography presenting an updated guide for researchers looking to use ecological niche modeling for disease mapping. We anticipate that ecological niche modeling will soon be a critical tool for epidemiologists aiming to map disease transmission risk, forecast disease distribution under climate change scenarios, and identify landscape factors triggering outbreaks. PMID:27547199

  10. Advances and Limitations of Disease Biogeography Using Ecological Niche Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Luis E; Craft, Meggan E

    2016-01-01

    Mapping disease transmission risk is crucial in public and animal health for evidence based decision-making. Ecology and epidemiology are highly related disciplines that may contribute to improvements in mapping disease, which can be used to answer health related questions. Ecological niche modeling is increasingly used for understanding the biogeography of diseases in plants, animals, and humans. However, epidemiological applications of niche modeling approaches for disease mapping can fail to generate robust study designs, producing incomplete or incorrect inferences. This manuscript is an overview of the history and conceptual bases behind ecological niche modeling, specifically as applied to epidemiology and public health; it does not pretend to be an exhaustive and detailed description of ecological niche modeling literature and methods. Instead, this review includes selected state-of-the-science approaches and tools, providing a short guide to designing studies incorporating information on the type and quality of the input data (i.e., occurrences and environmental variables), identification and justification of the extent of the study area, and encourages users to explore and test diverse algorithms for more informed conclusions. We provide a friendly introduction to the field of disease biogeography presenting an updated guide for researchers looking to use ecological niche modeling for disease mapping. We anticipate that ecological niche modeling will soon be a critical tool for epidemiologists aiming to map disease transmission risk, forecast disease distribution under climate change scenarios, and identify landscape factors triggering outbreaks.

  11. Advances and Limitations of Disease Biogeography Using Ecological Niche Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E Escobar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mapping disease transmission risk is crucial in public and animal health for evidence based decision-making. Ecology and epidemiology are highly related disciplines that may contribute to improvements in mapping disease, which can be used to answer health related questions. Ecological niche modeling is increasingly used for understanding the biogeography of diseases in plants, animals, and humans. However, epidemiological applications of niche modeling approaches can fail to generate robust study designs, generating incomplete or incorrect inferences. This manuscript is an overview of the history and conceptual bases behind ecological niche modeling, specifically as applied to epidemiology and public health; it does not pretend to be an exhaustive and detailed description of ecological niche modeling literature and methods. Instead, this review includes selected state-of-the-science approaches and tools, providing a short guide to designing studies incorporating information on the type and quality of the input data (i.e., occurrences and environmental variables, identification and justification of the extent of the study area, and encourages users to explore and test diverse algorithms for more informed conclusions. We provide a friendly introduction to the field of disease biogeography presenting an updated guide for researchers looking to use ecological niche modeling for disease mapping. We anticipate that ecological niche modeling will soon be a critical tool for epidemiologists aiming to map disease transmission risk, forecast disease distribution under climate change scenarios, and identify landscape factors triggering outbreaks.

  12. Advances and Limitations of Disease Biogeography Using Ecological Niche Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Luis E.; Craft, Meggan E.

    2016-01-01

    Mapping disease transmission risk is crucial in public and animal health for evidence based decision-making. Ecology and epidemiology are highly related disciplines that may contribute to improvements in mapping disease, which can be used to answer health related questions. Ecological niche modeling is increasingly used for understanding the biogeography of diseases in plants, animals, and humans. However, epidemiological applications of niche modeling approaches for disease mapping can fail to generate robust study designs, producing incomplete or incorrect inferences. This manuscript is an overview of the history and conceptual bases behind ecological niche modeling, specifically as applied to epidemiology and public health; it does not pretend to be an exhaustive and detailed description of ecological niche modeling literature and methods. Instead, this review includes selected state-of-the-science approaches and tools, providing a short guide to designing studies incorporating information on the type and quality of the input data (i.e., occurrences and environmental variables), identification and justification of the extent of the study area, and encourages users to explore and test diverse algorithms for more informed conclusions. We provide a friendly introduction to the field of disease biogeography presenting an updated guide for researchers looking to use ecological niche modeling for disease mapping. We anticipate that ecological niche modeling will soon be a critical tool for epidemiologists aiming to map disease transmission risk, forecast disease distribution under climate change scenarios, and identify landscape factors triggering outbreaks. PMID:27547199

  13. Preliminary Analysis of a Novel SAR Based Emergency System for Earth Orbit Satellites using Galileo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gill, E.K.A.; Helderweirt, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary analysis of a novel Search and Rescue (SAR) based emergency system for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites using the Galileo Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). It starts with a description of the space user SAR system including a concept description, mission ar

  14. Using NASA's Aura Satellite Data for Inquiry Based Classroom Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, B. L.; Stockman, S.; Bojkov, B.

    2007-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing Satellite Aura was launched in 2004, and since that time has been collecting a wealth of data that contributes to scientists' understanding of the complexity of air quality issues. The Aura spacecraft monitors five of the six EPA criteria pollutants (NO2, SO2, O3, aerosols, and CO). Data from one of the criteria pollutants, NO2, are now available in a format useful to educators and students. The data by itself is not enough for students to engage in the scientific reasoning process. Thus, inquiry-driven supporting material in the form of lessons, project based learning scenarios, and curricular support for online data have all been adapted as part of the scaffolding necessary to help students gain an understanding of issues pertaining to air quality. These materials are delivered online which makes them readily accessible to the education community. Currently, NO2 data are available for manipulation using tools such as GoogleEarth and MY NASA DATA (http://mynasadata.larc.nasa.gov). These tools are used to investigate common relationships between spatial distribution and variability of NO2 concentrations. Through guided investigations in the Earth Exploration Toolbook (http://serc.carleton.edu/eet/index.html) or MY NASA DATA, students gain an understanding of NO2 variability. Students are then asked to extrapolate their knowledge and understanding to investigate other air quality issues relating to NO2. Within the coming year, the lessons built around Aura data will be introduced in professional development workshops. Feedback from those attending the professional development workshops about how the data and lessons are used in the classroom will be used to help shape future lesson development on new data. Subsequent data on criteria pollutants of SO2, aerosols, and O3 will soon be made available in a similar format to the education community, helping to further student understanding of the complex nature of air quality issues.

  15. Global Crop Monitoring: A Satellite-Based Hierarchical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingfang Wu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Taking advantage of multiple new remote sensing data sources, especially from Chinese satellites, the CropWatch system has expanded the scope of its international analyses through the development of new indicators and an upgraded operational methodology. The approach adopts a hierarchical system covering four spatial levels of detail: global, regional, national (thirty-one key countries including China and “sub-countries” (for the nine largest countries. The thirty-one countries encompass more that 80% of both production and exports of maize, rice, soybean and wheat. The methodology resorts to climatic and remote sensing indicators at different scales. The global patterns of crop environmental growing conditions are first analyzed with indicators for rainfall, temperature, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR as well as potential biomass. At the regional scale, the indicators pay more attention to crops and include Vegetation Health Index (VHI, Vegetation Condition Index (VCI, Cropped Arable Land Fraction (CALF as well as Cropping Intensity (CI. Together, they characterize crop situation, farming intensity and stress. CropWatch carries out detailed crop condition analyses at the national scale with a comprehensive array of variables and indicators. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, cropped areas and crop conditions are integrated to derive food production estimates. For the nine largest countries, CropWatch zooms into the sub-national units to acquire detailed information on crop condition and production by including new indicators (e.g., Crop type proportion. Based on trend analysis, CropWatch also issues crop production supply outlooks, covering both long-term variations and short-term dynamic changes in key food exporters and importers. The hierarchical approach adopted by CropWatch is the basis of the analyses of climatic and crop conditions assessments published in the quarterly “CropWatch bulletin” which

  16. Improving the Projections of Vegetation Biogeography by Integrating Climate Envelope Models and Dynamic Global Vegetation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, M. J.; Kim, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Assessing changes in vegetation is increasingly important for conservation planning in the face of climate change. Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) are important tools for assessing such changes. DGVMs have been applied at regional scales to create projections of range expansions and contractions of plant functional types. Many DGVMs use a number of algorithms to determine the biogeography of plant functional types. One such DGVM, MC2, uses a series of decision trees based on bioclimatic thresholds while others, such as LPJ, use constraining emergent properties with a limited set of bioclimatic threshold-based rules. Although both approaches have been used widely, we demonstrate that these biogeography outputs perform poorly at continental scales when compared to existing potential vegetation maps. Specifically, we found that with MC2, the algorithm for determining leaf physiognomy is too simplistic to capture arid and semi-arid vegetation in much of the western U.S., as well as is the algorithm for determining the broadleaf and needleleaf mix in the Southeast. With LPJ, we found that the bioclimatic thresholds used to allow seedling establishment are too broad and fail to capture regional-scale biogeography of the plant functional types. In response, we demonstrate a new approach to determining the biogeography of plant functional types by integrating the climatic thresholds produced for individual tree species by a series of climate envelope models with the biogeography algorithms of MC2 and LPJ. Using this approach, we find that MC2 and LPJ perform considerably better when compared to potential vegetation maps.

  17. Evaluation of satellite-based precipitation estimates in winter season using an object-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Hsu, K.; AghaKouchak, A.; Sorooshian, S.

    2012-12-01

    Verification has become an integral component of satellite precipitation algorithms and products. A number of object-based verification methods have been proposed to provide diagnostic information regarding the precipitation products' ability to capture the spatial pattern, intensity, and placement of precipitation. However, most object-based methods are not capable of investigating precipitation objects at the storm-scale. In this study, an image processing approach known as watershed segmentation was adopted to detect the storm-scale rainfall objects. Then, a fuzzy logic-based technique was utilized to diagnose and analyze storm-scale object attributes, including centroid distance, area ratio, intersection area ratio and orientation angle difference. Three verification metrics (i.e., false alarm ratio, missing ratio and overall membership score) were generated for validation and verification. Three satellite-based precipitation products, including PERSIANN, CMORPH, 3B42RT, were evaluated against NOAA stage IV MPE multi-sensor composite rain analysis at 0.25° by 0.25° on a daily scale in the winter season of 2010 over the contiguous United States. Winter season is dominated by frontal systems which usually have larger area coverage. All three products and the stage IV observation tend to find large size storm objects. With respect to the evaluation attributes, PERSIANN tends to obtain larger area ratio and consequently has larger centroid distance to the stage IV observations, while 3B42RT are found to be closer to the stage IV for the object size. All evaluation products give small orientation angle differences but vary significantly for the missing ratio and false alarm ratio. This implies that satellite estimates can fail to detect storms in winter. The overall membership scores are close for all three different products which indicate that all three satellite-based precipitation products perform well for capturing the spatial and geometric characteristics of

  18. Bipartite graph-based control flow checking for COTS-based small satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Honghao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Single event upset (SEU effect, caused by highly energized particles in aerospace, threatens the reliability and security of small satellites composed of commercial-off-the-shelves (COTS. SEU-induced control flow errors (CFEs may cause unpredictable behavior or crashes of COTS-based small satellites. This paper proposes a generic software-based control flow checking technique (CFC and bipartite graph-based control flow checking (BGCFC. To simplify the types of illegal branches, it transforms the conventional control flow graph into the equivalent bipartite graph. It checks the legality of control flow at runtime by comparing a global signature with the expected value and introduces consecutive IDs and bitmaps to reduce the time and memory overhead. Theoretical analysis shows that BGCFC can detect all types of inter-node CFEs with constant time and memory overhead. Practical tests verify the result of theoretical analysis. Compared with previous techniques, BGCFC achieves the highest error detection rate, lower time and memory overhead; the composite result in evaluation factor shows that BGCFC is the most effective one among all these techniques. The results in both theory and practice verify the applicability of BGCFC for COTS-based small satellites.

  19. The improved model of estimating global whitecap coverage based on satellite data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Danqin; HUA Feng; YANG Yongzeng; SUN Baonan

    2016-01-01

    The pro and con of whitecap parameterizations and a statistical wave breaking model are discussed. An improved model is derived by combining satellite-based parameterization and the wave breaking model. The appropriate constants for the general wave state are obtained by considering the breaking condition of the wave slope and fitting with the satellite-based parameterization. The result is close to the constants based on the whitecap data from Monahan. Comparing with satellite-based data and the original model’s results, the improved model's results are consistent with satellite-based data and previous studies. The global seasonal distributions of the whitecap coverage averaged from 1998 to 2008 are presented. Spatial and seasonal features of the whitecap coverage are analyzed.

  20. Development of methods for inferring cloud thickness and cloud-base height from satellite radiance data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, William L., Jr.; Minnis, Patrick; Alvarez, Joseph M.; Uttal, Taneil; Intrieri, Janet M.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Clothiaux, Eugene

    1993-01-01

    Cloud-top height is a major factor determining the outgoing longwave flux at the top of the atmosphere. The downwelling radiation from the cloud strongly affects the cooling rate within the atmosphere and the longwave radiation incident at the surface. Thus, determination of cloud-base temperature is important for proper calculation of fluxes below the cloud. Cloud-base altitude is also an important factor in aircraft operations. Cloud-top height or temperature can be derived in a straightforward manner using satellite-based infrared data. Cloud-base temperature, however, is not observable from the satellite, but is related to the height, phase, and optical depth of the cloud in addition to other variables. This study uses surface and satellite data taken during the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Phase-2 Intensive Field Observation (IFO) period (13 Nov. - 7 Dec. 1991, to improve techniques for deriving cloud-base height from conventional satellite data.

  1. A near real-time satellite-based global drought climate data record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliable drought monitoring requires long-term and continuous precipitation data. High resolution satellite measurements provide valuable precipitation information on a quasi-global scale. However, their short lengths of records limit their applications in drought monitoring. In addition to this limitation, long-term low resolution satellite-based gauge-adjusted data sets such as the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) one are not available in near real-time form for timely drought monitoring. This study bridges the gap between low resolution long-term satellite gauge-adjusted data and the emerging high resolution satellite precipitation data sets to create a long-term climate data record of droughts. To accomplish this, a Bayesian correction algorithm is used to combine GPCP data with real-time satellite precipitation data sets for drought monitoring and analysis. The results showed that the combined data sets after the Bayesian correction were a significant improvement compared to the uncorrected data. Furthermore, several recent major droughts such as the 2011 Texas, 2010 Amazon and 2010 Horn of Africa droughts were detected in the combined real-time and long-term satellite observations. This highlights the potential application of satellite precipitation data for regional to global drought monitoring. The final product is a real-time data-driven satellite-based standardized precipitation index that can be used for drought monitoring especially over remote and/or ungauged regions. (letter)

  2. Biogeography of time partitioning in mammals

    OpenAIRE

    J Bennie; JP Duffy; R Inger; KJ Gaston

    2014-01-01

    The majority of mammal species are nocturnal, but many are diurnal (active during the day), crepuscular (active mostly during twilight), or cathemeral (active during hours of daylight and darkness). These different strategies for regulating activity over a 24-h cycle are associated with suites of adaptations to light or semidarkness. The biogeography of these time partitioning strategies is, however, poorly understood. We show that global patterns in mammal diversity with different diel activ...

  3. An Image-Based Sensor System for Autonomous Rendez-Vous with Uncooperative Satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Miravet, Carlos; Krouch, Eloise; del Cura, Juan Manuel

    2008-01-01

    In this paper are described the image processing algorithms developed by SENER, Ingenieria y Sistemas to cope with the problem of image-based, autonomous rendez-vous (RV) with an orbiting satellite. The methods developed have a direct application in the OLEV (Orbital Life Extension Extension Vehicle) mission. OLEV is a commercial mission under development by a consortium formed by Swedish Space Corporation, Kayser-Threde and SENER, aimed to extend the operational life of geostationary telecommunication satellites by supplying them control, navigation and guidance services. OLEV is planned to use a set of cameras to determine the angular position and distance to the client satellite during the complete phases of rendez-vous and docking, thus enabling the operation with satellites not equipped with any specific navigational aid to provide support during the approach. The ability to operate with un-equipped client satellites significantly expands the range of applicability of the system under development, compar...

  4. Evaluation of satellite-based and reanalysis soil moisture products using ground-based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jian; Niesel, Jonathan; Loew, Alexander; Zhang, Shiqiang; Wang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Long-term global satellite-based and reanalysis soil moisture products have been available for several years. Comprehensive evaluation of these products is significant before using them. In this study, in-situ soil moisture measurements from 2008 to 2012 over Southwest China are used to examine the reliability of four satellite-based and one reanalysis soil moisture products. This study evaluates satellite data products (AMSR-E, ASCAT, ESA-CCI, SMOS) and reanalysis data (ERA-Interim) over Southwest China using new in situ soil moisture data. Evaluation of soil moisture absolute values and anomalies shows that all the products except for AMSR-E and SMOS can capture well the temporal dynamics of in-situ soil moisture. The bias and noise in AMSR-E and SMOS are probably due to the severe effects of radio frequency interference (RFI) over this region. In general, the ERA-Interim and CCI SM perform the best compared to the in situ data. The accuracy levels are comparable to validations over other regions worldwide. Therefore, local hydrological applications and water resources managements are expected to benefit a lot from the long-term ERA-Interim and CCI SM soil moisture products.

  5. Fuel type characterization based on coarse resolution MODIS satellite data

    OpenAIRE

    Lasaponara R; Lanorte A

    2007-01-01

    Fuel types is one of the most important factors that should be taken into consideration for computing spatial fire hazard and risk and simulating fire growth and intensity across a landscape. In the present study, forest fuel mapping is considered from a remote sensing perspective. The purpose is to delineate forest types by exploring the use of coarse resolution satellite remote sensing MODIS imagery. In order to ascertain how well MODIS data can provide an exhaustive classification of fuel ...

  6. Simultaneous ground- and satellite-based observation of MF/HF auroral radio emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuka; Kumamoto, Atsushi; Katoh, Yuto; Shinbori, Atsuki; Kadokura, Akira; Ogawa, Yasunobu

    2016-05-01

    We report on the first simultaneous measurements of medium-high frequency (MF/HF) auroral radio emissions (above 1 MHz) by ground- and satellite-based instruments. Observational data were obtained by the ground-based passive receivers in Iceland and Svalbard, and by the Plasma Waves and Sounder experiment (PWS) mounted on the Akebono satellite. We observed two simultaneous appearance events, during which the frequencies of the auroral roar and MF bursts detected at ground level were different from those of the terrestrial hectometric radiation (THR) observed by the Akebono satellite passing over the ground-based stations. This frequency difference confirms that auroral roar and THR are generated at different altitudes across the F peak. We did not observe any simultaneous observations that indicated an identical generation region of auroral roar and THR. In most cases, MF/HF auroral radio emissions were observed only by the ground-based detector, or by the satellite-based detector, even when the satellite was passing directly over the ground-based stations. A higher detection rate was observed from space than from ground level. This can primarily be explained in terms of the idea that the Akebono satellite can detect THR emissions coming from a wider region, and because a considerable portion of auroral radio emissions generated in the bottomside F region are masked by ionospheric absorption and screening in the D/E regions associated with ionization which results from auroral electrons and solar UV radiation.

  7. Assessing satellite-based start-of-season trends in the US High Plains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To adequately assess the effects of global warming it is necessary to address trends and impacts at the local level. This study examines phenological changes in the start-of-season (SOS) derived from satellite observations from 1982–2008 in the US High Plains region. The surface climate-based SOS was also evaluated. The averaged profiles of SOS from 37° to 49°N latitude by satellite- and climate-based methods were in reasonable agreement, especially for areas where croplands were masked out and an additional frost date threshold was adopted. The statistically significant trends of satellite-based SOS show a later spring arrival ranging from 0.1 to 4.9 days decade−1 over nine Level III ecoregions. We found the croplands generally exhibited larger trends (later arrival) than the non-croplands. The area-averaged satellite-based SOS for non-croplands (i.e. mostly grasslands) showed no significant trends. We examined the trends of temperatures, precipitation, and standardized precipitation index (SPI), as well as the strength of correlation between the satellite-based SOS and these climatic drivers. Our results indicate that satellite-based SOS trends are spatially and primarily related to annual maximum normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, mostly in summertime) and/or annual minimum NDVI (mostly in wintertime) and these trends showed the best correlation with six-month SPI over the period 1982–2008 in the US High Plains region. (letter)

  8. Research on Coal Exploration Technology Based on Satellite Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coal is the main source of energy. In China and Vietnam, coal resources are very rich, but the exploration level is relatively low. This is mainly caused by the complicated geological structure, the low efficiency, the related damage, and other bad situations. To this end, we need to make use of some advanced technologies to guarantee the resource exploration is implemented smoothly and orderly. Numerous studies show that remote sensing technology is an effective way in coal exploration and measurement. In this paper, we try to measure the distribution and reserves of open-air coal area through satellite imagery. The satellite picture of open-air coal mining region in Quang Ninh Province of Vietnam was collected as the experimental data. Firstly, the ENVI software is used to eliminate satellite imagery spectral interference. Then, the image classification model is established by the improved ELM algorithm. Finally, the effectiveness of the improved ELM algorithm is verified by using MATLAB simulations. The results show that the accuracies of the testing set reach 96.5%. And it reaches 83% of the image discernment precision compared with the same image from Google.

  9. A Novel Method for Optimum Global Positioning System Satellite Selection Based on a Modified Genetic Algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiancai Song

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel method for selecting a navigation satellite subset for a global positioning system (GPS based on a genetic algorithm is presented. This approach is based on minimizing the factors in the geometric dilution of precision (GDOP using a modified genetic algorithm (MGA with an elite conservation strategy, adaptive selection, adaptive mutation, and a hybrid genetic algorithm that can select a subset of the satellites represented by specific numbers in the interval (4 ∼ n while maintaining position accuracy. A comprehensive simulation demonstrates that the MGA-based satellite selection method effectively selects the correct number of optimal satellite subsets using receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM or fault detection and exclusion (FDE. This method is more adaptable and flexible for GPS receivers, particularly for those used in handset equipment and mobile phones.

  10. A Novel Method for Optimum Global Positioning System Satellite Selection Based on a Modified Genetic Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiancai; Xue, Guixiang; Kang, Yanan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel method for selecting a navigation satellite subset for a global positioning system (GPS) based on a genetic algorithm is presented. This approach is based on minimizing the factors in the geometric dilution of precision (GDOP) using a modified genetic algorithm (MGA) with an elite conservation strategy, adaptive selection, adaptive mutation, and a hybrid genetic algorithm that can select a subset of the satellites represented by specific numbers in the interval (4 ∼ n) while maintaining position accuracy. A comprehensive simulation demonstrates that the MGA-based satellite selection method effectively selects the correct number of optimal satellite subsets using receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM) or fault detection and exclusion (FDE). This method is more adaptable and flexible for GPS receivers, particularly for those used in handset equipment and mobile phones. PMID:26943638

  11. A Novel Method for Optimum Global Positioning System Satellite Selection Based on a Modified Genetic Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiancai; Xue, Guixiang; Kang, Yanan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel method for selecting a navigation satellite subset for a global positioning system (GPS) based on a genetic algorithm is presented. This approach is based on minimizing the factors in the geometric dilution of precision (GDOP) using a modified genetic algorithm (MGA) with an elite conservation strategy, adaptive selection, adaptive mutation, and a hybrid genetic algorithm that can select a subset of the satellites represented by specific numbers in the interval (4 ∼ n) while maintaining position accuracy. A comprehensive simulation demonstrates that the MGA-based satellite selection method effectively selects the correct number of optimal satellite subsets using receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM) or fault detection and exclusion (FDE). This method is more adaptable and flexible for GPS receivers, particularly for those used in handset equipment and mobile phones.

  12. A Novel Onboard-gateway-based Mechanism to Improve TCP Performance in Aeronautical Satellite Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The IP-based networks on aircraft serve to support Internet services via satellites. However, in aeronautical satellite hybrid networks, the TCP protocol performance often deteriorates due to improper decreases and slow recovery of the congestion window. This paper proposes a window size determination and notification mechanism, onboard-gateway-based mechanism (OGBM), which is based on the onboard gateway in the networks on aircraft. A cross-layer approach is adopted by the onboard gateway to obtain the satellite link bandwidth information. And then, by the gateway, through changing the receiver's advertised window field in ACK packets, TCP sources are notified of the window size of each TCP source calculated on the ground of bandwidth delay product and flow numbers. The mechanism is able to avoid improper changes of TCP window and serve multiple users. Simulation results show that the mechanism with the fairness index close to 1 improves TCP performance in aeronautical satellite networks.

  13. A comparing design of satellite attitude control system based on reaction wheel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Hao; GE Sheng-min; SHEN Yi

    2008-01-01

    The disturbance caused by the reaction wheel with a current controller greatly influences the accuracy and stability of the satellite attitude control system.To solve this problem,the idea of speed feedback compensation control reaction wheel is put forward.This paper introduces the comparison on design and performance of two satellite attitude control systems,which are separately based on the current control reaction wheel and the speed feedback compensation control reaction wheel.Analysis shows that the speed feedback compensation control flywheel system may effectively suppress the torque fluctuation.Simulation results indicate that the satellite attitude control system with the speed feedback compensation control flywheel has improved performance.

  14. A DISTRIBUTED QOS ROUTING BASED ON ANT ALGORITHM FOR LEO SATELLITE NETWORK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites provide short round-trip delays and are becoming increasingly important. One of the challenges in LEO satellite networks is the development of specialized and efficient routing algorithms. To satisfy the QoS requirements of multimedia applications, satellite routing protocols should consider handovers and minimize their effect on the active connections. A distributed QoS routing scheme based on heuristic ant algorithm is proposed for satisfying delay bound and avoiding link congestion. Simulation results show that the call blocking probabilities of this algorithm are less than that of Shortest Path First (SPF) with different delay bound.

  15. Scattering height estimation using scintillating Wide Area Augmentation System/Satellite Based Augmentation System and GPS satellite signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerruti, A. P.; Ledvina, B. M.; Kintner, P. M.

    2006-12-01

    An experiment to measure equatorial amplitude scintillations on the geostationary Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) Satellite Based Augmentation System (SBAS) signal was conducted in Cachoeira Paulista (22.70°S, 45.01°W geographic coordinates; -17.74°N, 21.74°E geomagnetic coordinates), Brazil from December 2003 through February 2004. The purpose of this paper is to estimate the scattering height of the irregularities using the WAAS signal scintillations as compared to nearby Global Positioning System (GPS) signal scintillations. Estimating the scattering height is important because the calculated zonal drift velocity of the irregularities using the measured scintillation pattern velocity on the ground is height dependent. Accurate height estimation is also required if one wishes to develop phase screen scintillation models. The difference in the pattern velocities is due to the different signal puncture point velocities with respect to the ionospheric drift. Two east-west receivers are used to measure the scintillation pattern drift velocity and to compare the results of the geostationary WAAS satellite signal to that of a GPS satellite signal, which has a nonzero ionospheric signal puncture point velocity. By varying the assumed scattering height for the measurements from the nearby GPS signal, the zonal velocity measurements from the GPS scintillations can be matched to those of the WAAS scintillations, and a scattering height estimate can be made. When the puncture points have minimal separation, the inferred ionospheric irregularity zonal velocities should be equal. On the two nights for which data are available, scattering height estimates of 669 ± 209 km for the first night and 388 ± 139 km for the second night were obtained. On the second night, the reported mean hmF2 as calculated using a collocated Digisonde was 385 ± 17 km over the same period as the GPS/WAAS scattering height estimate. The geometry of this experiment was not optimal, but

  16. Design and simulation of satellite attitude control system based on Simulink and VR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Gan, Qingbo; Kang, Jingshu

    2016-01-01

    In order to research satellite attitude control system design and visual simulation, the simulation framework of satellite dynamics and attitude control using Simulink were established. The design of satellite earth-oriented control system based on quaternion feedback was completed. The 3D scene based on VR was created and models in the scene were driven by simulation data of Simulink. By coordinate transformation. successful observing the scene in inertial coordinate system, orbit coordinate system and body coordinate system. The result shows that application of simulation method of Simulink combined with VR in the design of satellite attitude control system field, has the advantages of high confidence level, hard real-time property, multi-perspective and multi-coordinate system observing the scene, and improves the comprehensibility and accuracy of the design.

  17. Simulation and emulation of orbit parameters of spacecraft based on satellite passive detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lihua; Xu, Kun; Bao, Yuhai; Li, Jijun; Yan, Lan

    2016-01-01

    The medium-low orbit satellite is used as observation satellite to make parameters estimation and error analysis of the spacecraft orbit. Based on the variable mass particle dynamics, the simplified motion equation of observation satellite was numerically solved by the Runge-Kutta method, and the position of the observation satellite at any time was calculated more accurately. Based on the variable mass particle dynamics, the orbit estimation equation of the spacecraft was given, and the position and the velocity data of the spacecraft at any time were numerically solved by the Runge- Kutta method, and then the fitting curves of these data were obtained. The residual analysis was made to test the output from the model, which indicated that this model is acceptable and valid.

  18. Conference program and abstracts. International Biogeography Society 6th Biennial Meeting – 9-13 January 2013, Miami, Florida, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Hortal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Proceedings of the Sixth biennial conference of the International Biogeography Society, an international and interdisciplinary society contributing to the advancement of all studies of the geography of nature. Held at Miami, Florida, USA, 9 – 13 January 2013.Abstracts include:(i the Opening, MacArthur & Wilson Award and Alfred Russel Award Plenary Lectures;(ii four symposia entitled "Island Biogeography: New Syntheses", "Beyond Bergmann: New perspectives on the biogeography of traits", "The Convergence of Conservation Paleontology and Biogeography" and "Predicting species and biodiversity in a warmer world: are we doing a good job?";(iii oral presentations from contributed papers on Phylogeography, Marine Biogeography, Biogeography of the Anthropocene, Hot Topics in biogeography, Island Biogeography, Neotropical Biogeography, Global Change Biogeography, Historical and Paleo-biogeography, Conservation Biogeography and Global-Scale Biogeography; and(iv contributions presented as posters on Phylogeography, Geospatial techniques and land cover, Biodiversity gradients and macroecology, Biogeography of traits, Island Biogeography, Neotropical Biogeography, Conservation Biogeography, Disturbance and Disease Biogeography, Climate Change Biogeography and Historical and Paleo-Biogeography.

  19. Satellite -Based Networks for U-Health & U-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graschew, G.; Roelofs, T. A.; Rakowsky, S.; Schlag, P. M.

    2008-08-01

    The use of modern Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) as enabling tools for healthcare services (eHealth) introduces new ways of creating ubiquitous access to high-level medical care for all, anytime and anywhere (uHealth). Satellite communication constitutes one of the most flexible methods of broadband communication offering high reliability and cost-effectiveness of connections meeting telemedicine communication requirements. Global networks and the use of computers for educational purposes stimulate and support the development of virtual universities for e-learning. Especially real-time interactive applications can play an important role in tailored and personalised services.

  20. UKF-based attitude determination method for gyroless satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张红梅; 邓正隆

    2004-01-01

    UKF (unscented Kalman filtering) is a new filtering method suitable to nonlinear systems. The method need not linearize nonlinear systems at the prediction stage of filtering, which is indispensable in EKF (extended Kalman filtering). As a result, the linearization error is avoided, and the filtering accuracy is greatly improved. UKF is applied to the attitude determination for gyroless satellite. Simulations are made to compare the new filter with the traditional EKF.The results indicate that under same conditions, compared with EKF, UKF has faster convergence speed, higher filtering accuracy and more stable estimation performance.

  1. A Ground-Based Prototype of a CMOS Navigational Star Camera for Small Satellite Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Shucker, Brian

    2001-01-01

    Small satellites are now capable of performing missions that require accurate attitude determination and control. However, low size, power, and cost requirements limit the types of attitude sensors that can be used on a small craft, making attitude estimation difficult. In particular, star trackers—often the attitude sensors of choice for larger spacecraft—are not practical for small satellites. This paper describes a miniature navigational star camera based on CMOS sensor technology that is ...

  2. DebriSat - A Planned Laboratory-Based Satellite Impact Experiment for Breakup Fragment Characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Clark, S.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Huynh, T.; Opiela, J.; Polk, M.; Roebuck, B.; Rushing, R.; Sorge, M.; Werremeyer, M.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the DebriSat project is to characterize fragments generated by a hypervelocity collision involving a modern satellite in low Earth orbit (LEO). The DebriSat project will update and expand upon the information obtained in the 1992 Satellite Orbital Debris Characterization Impact Test (SOCIT), which characterized the breakup of a 1960 s US Navy Transit satellite. There are three phases to this project: the design and fabrication of DebriSat - an engineering model representing a modern, 60-cm/50-kg class LEO satellite; conduction of a laboratory-based hypervelocity impact to catastrophically break up the satellite; and characterization of the properties of breakup fragments down to 2 mm in size. The data obtained, including fragment size, area-to-mass ratio, density, shape, material composition, optical properties, and radar cross-section distributions, will be used to supplement the DoD s and NASA s satellite breakup models to better describe the breakup outcome of a modern satellite.

  3. Biogeography in the air: fungal diversity over land and oceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fröhlich-Nowoisky

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic aerosols are relevant for the Earth system, climate, and public health on local, regional, and global scales. Up to now, however, little is known about the diversity and biogeography of airborne microorganisms. We present the first DNA-based analysis of airborne fungi on global scales, showing pronounced geographic patterns and boundaries. In particular we found that the ratio of species richness between Basidiomycota and Ascomycota is much higher in continental air than in marine air. This may be an important difference between the "blue ocean" and "green ocean" regimes in the formation of clouds and precipitation, for which fungal spores can act as nuclei. Our findings also suggest that air flow patterns and the global atmospheric circulation are important for the evolution of microbial ecology and for the understanding of global changes in biodiversity.

  4. Biogeography in the air: fungal diversity over land and oceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fröhlich-Nowoisky

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic aerosols are relevant for the Earth system, climate, and public health on local, regional, and global scales. Up to now, however, little is known about the diversity and biogeography of airborne microorganisms. We present the first DNA-based analysis of airborne fungi on global scales, showing pronounced geographic patterns and boundaries. In particular we find that the ratio of species richness between Basidiomycota and Ascomycota is much higher in continental air than in marine air. This may be an important difference between the "blue ocean" and "green ocean" regimes in the formation of clouds and precipitation, for which fungal spores can act as nuclei. Our findings also suggest that air flow patterns and the global atmospheric circulation are important for the understanding of global changes in biodiversity.

  5. A scalable satellite-based crop yield mapper: Integrating satellites and crop models for field-scale estimation in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, M.; Singh, B.; Srivastava, A.; Lobell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Food security will be challenged over the upcoming decades due to increased food demand, natural resource degradation, and climate change. In order to identify potential solutions to increase food security in the face of these changes, tools that can rapidly and accurately assess farm productivity are needed. With this aim, we have developed generalizable methods to map crop yields at the field scale using a combination of satellite imagery and crop models, and implement this approach within Google Earth Engine. We use these methods to examine wheat yield trends in Northern India, which provides over 15% of the global wheat supply and where over 80% of farmers rely on wheat as a staple food source. In addition, we identify the extent to which farmers are shifting sow date in response to heat stress, and how well shifting sow date reduces the negative impacts of heat stress on yield. To identify local-level decision-making, we map wheat sow date and yield at a high spatial resolution (30 m) using Landsat satellite imagery from 1980 to the present. This unique dataset allows us to examine sow date decisions at the field scale over 30 years, and by relating these decisions to weather experienced over the same time period, we can identify how farmers learn and adapt cropping decisions based on weather through time.

  6. Validation of PV performance models using satellite-based irradiance measurements : a case study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Parkins, Andrew (Clean Power Research); Perez, Richard (University at Albany)

    2010-05-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) system performance models are relied upon to provide accurate predictions of energy production for proposed and existing PV systems under a wide variety of environmental conditions. Ground based meteorological measurements are only available from a relatively small number of locations. In contrast, satellite-based radiation and weather data (e.g., SUNY database) are becoming increasingly available for most locations in North America, Europe, and Asia on a 10 x 10 km grid or better. This paper presents a study of how PV performance model results are affected when satellite-based weather data is used in place of ground-based measurements.

  7. Automatic Mrf-Based Registration of High Resolution Satellite Video Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platias, C.; Vakalopoulou, M.; Karantzalos, K.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we propose a deformable registration framework for high resolution satellite video data able to automatically and accurately co-register satellite video frames and/or register them to a reference map/image. The proposed approach performs non-rigid registration, formulates a Markov Random Fields (MRF) model, while efficient linear programming is employed for reaching the lowest potential of the cost function. The developed approach has been applied and validated on satellite video sequences from Skybox Imaging and compared with a rigid, descriptor-based registration method. Regarding the computational performance, both the MRF-based and the descriptor-based methods were quite efficient, with the first one converging in some minutes and the second in some seconds. Regarding the registration accuracy the proposed MRF-based method significantly outperformed the descriptor-based one in all the performing experiments.

  8. Energy-Efficient Network Transmission between Satellite Swarms and Earth Stations Based on Lyapunov Optimization Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Fang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent advent of satellite swarm technologies has enabled space exploration with a massive number of picoclass, low-power, and low-weight spacecraft. However, developing swarm-based satellite systems, from conceptualization to validation, is a complex multidisciplinary activity. One of the primary challenges is how to achieve energy-efficient data transmission between the satellite swarm and terrestrial terminal stations. Employing Lyapunov optimization techniques, we present an online control algorithm to optimally dispatch traffic load among different satellite-ground links for minimizing overall energy consumption over time. Our algorithm is able to independently and simultaneously make control decisions on traffic dispatching over intersatellite-links and up-down-links so as to offer provable energy and delay guarantees, without requiring any statistical information of traffic arrivals and link condition. Rigorous analysis and extensive simulations have demonstrated the performance and robustness of the proposed new algorithm.

  9. A new algorithm for agile satellite-based acquisition operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunkheila, Federico; Ortore, Emiliano; Circi, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Taking advantage of the high manoeuvrability and the accurate pointing of the so-called agile satellites, an algorithm which allows efficient management of the operations concerning optical acquisitions is described. Fundamentally, this algorithm can be subdivided into two parts: in the first one the algorithm operates a geometric classification of the areas of interest and a partitioning of these areas into stripes which develop along the optimal scan directions; in the second one it computes the succession of the time windows in which the acquisition operations of the areas of interest are feasible, taking into consideration the potential restrictions associated with these operations and with the geometric and stereoscopic constraints. The results and the performances of the proposed algorithm have been determined and discussed considering the case of the Periodic Sun-Synchronous Orbits.

  10. Fairness based channel borrowing strategy in multimedia LEO satellite communications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Fei; XU Hui; WU Shiqi

    2007-01-01

    A novel bandwidth allocation strategy along with a connection admission control technique was proposed to improve the utilization of network resources.It provides the network with better quality-of-service (QoS) guarantees,such as new call blocking probability (CBP) and handoff call dropping probability (CDP) in multimedia low earth orbit (LEO) satellite networks.Simulation results show that,compared with other bandwidth allocation schemes,the proposed scheme offers very low call dropping probability for real-time connections while,at the same time,keeping resource utilization high.Finally we discussed the fairness for the borrowed nonreal-time connections under three different channel borrowing methods.

  11. Wave energy resource assessment based on satellite observations around Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribal, Agustinus; Zieger, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    A preliminary assessment of wave energy resource around Indonesian's ocean has been carried out by means of analyzing satellite observations. The wave energy flux or wave power can be approximated using parameterized sea states. Wave power scales with significant wave height, characteristic wave period and water depth. In this approach, the significant wave heights were obtained from ENVISAT (Environmental Satellite) data which have been calibrated. However, as the characteristic wave period is rarely specified and therefore must be estimated from other variables when information about the wave spectra is unknown. Here, the characteristic wave period was calculated with an empirical model that utilizes altimeter estimates of wave height and backscatter coefficient originally proposed. For the Indonesian region, wave power energy is calculated over two periods of one year each and was compared with the results from global hindcast carried out with a recent release of wave model WAVEWATCH III. We found that, the most promising wave power energy regions around the Indonesian archipelago are located in the south of Java island and the south west of Sumatera island. In these locations, about 20 - 30 kW/m (90th percentile: 30-50 kW/m, 99th percentile: 40-60 kW/m) wave power energy on average has been found around south of Java island during 2010. Similar results have been found during 2011 at the same locations. Some small areas which are located around north of Irian Jaya (West Papua) are also very promising and need further investigation to determine its capacity as a wave energy resource.

  12. Characterization of satellite based proxies for estimating nucleation mode particles over South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-M. Sundström

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work satellite observations from the NASA's A-Train constellation were used to derive the values of primary emission and regional nucleation proxies over South Africa to estimate the potential for new particle formation. As derived in Kulmala et al. (2011, the satellite based proxies consist of source terms (NO2, SO2 and UV-B radiation, and a sink term describing the pre-existing aerosols. The first goal of this work was to study in detail the use of satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD as a substitute to the in situ based condensation sink (CS. One of the major factors affecting the agreement of CS and AOD was the elevated aerosol layers that increased the value of column integrated AOD but not affected the in situ CS. However, when the AOD in the proxy sink was replaced by an estimate from linear bivariate fit between AOD and CS, the agreement with the actual nucleation mode number concentration improved somewhat. The second goal of the work was to estimate how well the satellite based proxies can predict the potential for new particle formation. For each proxy the highest potential for new particle formation were observed over the Highveld industrial area, where the emissions were high but the sink due to pre-existing aerosols was relatively low. Best agreement between the satellite and in situ based proxies were obtained for NO2/AOD and UV-B/AOD2, whereas proxies including SO2 in the source term had lower correlation. Even though the OMI SO2 boundary layer product showed reasonable spatial pattern and detected the major sources over the study area, some of the known minor point sources were not detected. When defining the satellite proxies only for days when new particle formation event was observed, it was seen that for all the satellite based proxies the event day medians were higher than the entire measurement period median.

  13. Evaluation of quantitative satellite-based retrievals of volcanic ash clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, D. J.; Pavolonis, M. J.; Bojinski, S.; Siddans, R.; Thomas, G.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic ash clouds are a serious hazard to aviation, and mitigation requires a robust system of volcano monitoring, eruption detection, characterization of cloud properties, forecast of cloud movement, and communication of warnings. Several research groups have developed quantitative satellite-based volcanic ash products and some of these are in operational use by Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers around the world to aid in characterizing cloud properties and forecasting regions of ash hazard. The algorithms applied to the satellite data utilize a variety of techniques, and thus produce results that differ. The World Meteorological Organization has recently sponsored an intercomparison study of satellite-based retrievals with four goals: 1) to establish a validation protocol for satellite-based volcanic ash products, 2) to quantify and understand differences in products, 3) to develop best practices, and 4) to standardize volcanic cloud geophysical parameters. Six volcanic eruption cases were considered in the intercomparison: Eyjafallajökull, Grimsvötn, Kelut, Kirishimayama, Puyehue-Cordón Caulle, and Sarychev Peak. Twenty-four algorithms were utilized, which retrieved parameters including: ash cloud top height, ash column mass loading, ash effective radius, and ash optical depth at visible and thermal-infrared wavelengths. Results were compared to space-based, airborne, and ground-based lidars; complementary satellite retrievals; and manual "expert evaluation" of ash extent. The intercomparison results will feed into the International Civil Aviation Organization "Roadmap for International Airways Volcano Watch", which integrates volcanic meteorological information into decision support systems for aircraft operations.

  14. DebriSat - A Planned Laboratory-Based Satellite Impact Experiment for Breakup Fragment Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, J.-C.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Werremeyer, M.; Huynh, T.; Voelker, M.; Opiela, J.

    2012-01-01

    DebriSat is a planned laboratory ]based satellite hypervelocity impact experiment. The goal of the project is to characterize the orbital debris that would be generated by a hypervelocity collision involving a modern satellite in low Earth orbit (LEO). The DebriSat project will update and expand upon the information obtained in the 1992 Satellite Orbital Debris Characterization Impact Test (SOCIT), which characterized the breakup of a 1960 's US Navy Transit satellite. There are three phases to this project: the design and fabrication of an engineering model representing a modern, 50-cm/50-kg class LEO satellite known as DebriSat; conduction of a laboratory-based hypervelocity impact to catastrophically break up the satellite; and characterization of the properties of breakup fragments down to 2 mm in size. The data obtained, including fragment size, area ]to ]mass ratio, density, shape, material composition, optical properties, and radar cross ]section distributions, will be used to supplement the DoD fs and NASA fs satellite breakup models to better describe the breakup outcome of a modern satellite. Updated breakup models will improve mission planning, environmental models, and event response. The DebriSat project is sponsored by the Air Force fs Space and Missile Systems Center and the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office. The design and fabrication of DebriSat is led by University of Florida with subject matter experts f support from The Aerospace Corporation. The major milestones of the project include the complete fabrication of DebriSat by September 2013, the hypervelocity impact of DebriSat at the Air Force fs Arnold Engineering Development Complex in early 2014, and fragment characterization and data analyses in late 2014.

  15. Simulation and Analysis of Autonomous Time Synchronization Based on Asynchronism Two-way Inter-satellite Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, L.; Yang, X. H.; Sun, B. Q.; Qin, W. J.; Kong, Y.

    2013-09-01

    The measurement of the inter-satellite link is one of the key techniques in the autonomous operation of satellite navigation system. Based on the asynchronism inter-satellite two-way measurement mode in GPS constellation, the reduction formula of the inter-satellite time synchronization is built in this paper. Moreover, the corrective method of main systematic errors is proposed. Inter-satellite two-way time synchronization is simulated on the basis of IGS (International GNSS Service) precise ephemeris. The impacts of the epoch domestication of asynchronism inter-satellite link pseudo-range, the initial orbit, and the main systematic errors on satellite time synchronization are analyzed. Furthermore, the broadcast clock error of each satellite is calculated by the ``centralized'' inter-satellite autonomous time synchronization. Simulation results show that the epoch domestication of asynchronism inter-satellite link pseudo-range and the initial orbit have little impact on the satellite clock errors, and thus they needn't be taken into account. The errors caused by the relativistic effect and the asymmetry of path travel have large impact on the satellite clock errors. These should be corrected with theoretical formula. Compared with the IGS precise clock error, the root mean square of the broadcast clock error of each satellite is about 0.4 ns.

  16. Detecting Anomaly Regions in Satellite Image Time Series Based on Sesaonal Autocorrelation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Z.-G.; Tang, P.; Zhou, M.

    2016-06-01

    Anomaly regions in satellite images can reflect unexpected changes of land cover caused by flood, fire, landslide, etc. Detecting anomaly regions in satellite image time series is important for studying the dynamic processes of land cover changes as well as for disaster monitoring. Although several methods have been developed to detect land cover changes using satellite image time series, they are generally designed for detecting inter-annual or abrupt land cover changes, but are not focusing on detecting spatial-temporal changes in continuous images. In order to identify spatial-temporal dynamic processes of unexpected changes of land cover, this study proposes a method for detecting anomaly regions in each image of satellite image time series based on seasonal autocorrelation analysis. The method was validated with a case study to detect spatial-temporal processes of a severe flooding using Terra/MODIS image time series. Experiments demonstrated the advantages of the method that (1) it can effectively detect anomaly regions in each of satellite image time series, showing spatial-temporal varying process of anomaly regions, (2) it is flexible to meet some requirement (e.g., z-value or significance level) of detection accuracies with overall accuracy being up to 89% and precision above than 90%, and (3) it does not need time series smoothing and can detect anomaly regions in noisy satellite images with a high reliability.

  17. Evaluation of the Geomagnetic Field Models based on Magnetometer Measurements for Satellite's Attitude Determination System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilden, Demet; Kaymaz, Zerefsan; Hajiyev, Chingiz

    2016-07-01

    Magnetometers are common attitude determination sensors for small satellites at low Earth orbit; therefore, magnetic field model of the Earth is necessary to estimate the satellite's attitude angles. Difference in the components of the magnetic field vectors -mostly used as unit vector. Therefore the angle between them (model and measurement data) affects the estimation accuracy of the satellite's attitude. In this study, geomagnetic field models are compared with satellite magnetic field observations in order to evaluate the models using the magnetometer results with high accuracy. For attitude determination system, IGRF model is used in most of the cases but the difference between the sensor and model increases when the geomagnetic activity occurs. Hence, several models including the empirical ones using the external variations in the Earth's geomagnetic field resulting from the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field are of great importance in determination of the satellite's attitude correctly. IGRF model describes the internal-part of the geomagnetic field, on the other hand candidate models to IGRF, such as recently developed POMME-6 model based on Champ data, CHAOS-5 (CHAmp, Oersted, Swarm), T89 (Tsyganenko's model), include simple parameterizations of external fields of magnetospheric sources in addition to the internal field especially for low Earth orbiting satellites. Those models can be evaluated to see noticeable difference on extraterrestrial field effects on satellite's attitude determination system changing with its height. The comparisons are made between the models and observations and between the models under various magnetospheric activities. In this study, we will present our preliminary results from the comparisons and discuss their implications from the satellite attitude perspective.

  18. Satellite-Based actual evapotranspiration over drying semiarid terrain in West-Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuttemeyer, D.; Schillings, Ch.; Moene, A.F.; Bruin, de H.A.R.

    2007-01-01

    A simple satellite-based algorithm for estimating actual evaporation based on Makkink¿s equation is applied to a seasonal cycle in 2002 at three test sites in Ghana, West Africa: at a location in the humid tropical southern region and two in the drier northern region. The required input for the algo

  19. Study of wind speed attenuation at Kavaratti Island using land-based, offshore, and satellite measurements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Rivankar, P.; Balakrishnan Nair, T.M.B.

    The role of dense coconut palms in attenuating the wind speed at Kavaratti Island, which is located in the southeastern Arabian Sea, is examined based on land-based and offshore wind measurements (U sub(10)) using anchored-buoy-mounted and satellite...

  20. Region of Interest Detection Based on Histogram Segmentation for Satellite Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiadtikornthaweeyot, Warinthorn; Tatnall, Adrian R. L.

    2016-06-01

    High resolution satellite imaging is considered as the outstanding applicant to extract the Earth's surface information. Extraction of a feature of an image is very difficult due to having to find the appropriate image segmentation techniques and combine different methods to detect the Region of Interest (ROI) most effectively. This paper proposes techniques to classify objects in the satellite image by using image processing methods on high-resolution satellite images. The systems to identify the ROI focus on forests, urban and agriculture areas. The proposed system is based on histograms of the image to classify objects using thresholding. The thresholding is performed by considering the behaviour of the histogram mapping to a particular region in the satellite image. The proposed model is based on histogram segmentation and morphology techniques. There are five main steps supporting each other; Histogram classification, Histogram segmentation, Morphological dilation, Morphological fill image area and holes and ROI management. The methods to detect the ROI of the satellite images based on histogram classification have been studied, implemented and tested. The algorithm is be able to detect the area of forests, urban and agriculture separately. The image segmentation methods can detect the ROI and reduce the size of the original image by discarding the unnecessary parts.

  1. Japanese Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission status and application of satellite-based global rainfall map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachi, Misako; Shimizu, Shuji; Kubota, Takuji; Yoshida, Naofumi; Oki, Riko; Kojima, Masahiro; Iguchi, Toshio; Nakamura, Kenji

    2010-05-01

    As accuracy of satellite precipitation estimates improves and observation frequency increases, application of those data to societal benefit areas, such as weather forecasts and flood predictions, is expected, in addition to research of precipitation climatology to analyze precipitation systems. There is, however, limitation on single satellite observation in coverage and frequency. Currently, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is scheduled under international collaboration to fulfill various user requirements that cannot be achieved by the single satellite, like the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM). The GPM mission is an international mission to achieve high-accurate and high-frequent rainfall observation over a global area. GPM is composed of a TRMM-like non-sun-synchronous orbit satellite (GPM core satellite) and constellation of satellites carrying microwave radiometer instruments. The GPM core satellite carries the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR), which is being developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), and microwave radiometer provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Development of DPR instrument is in good progress for scheduled launch in 2013, and DPR Critical Design Review has completed in July - September 2009. Constellation satellites, which carry a microwave imager and/or sounder, are planned to be launched around 2013 by each partner agency for its own purpose, and will contribute to extending coverage and increasing frequency. JAXA's future mission, the Global Change Observation Mission (GCOM) - Water (GCOM-W) satellite will be one of constellation satellites. The first generation of GCOM-W satellite is scheduled to be launched in 2011, and it carries the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2), which is being developed based on the experience of the AMSR-E on EOS Aqua satellite

  2. Model-Based RAMS & FDIR Co-Engineering at Astrium Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Dave; Blanquart, Jean-Paul

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents the new model-based process developed within Astrium Satellites in order to support and improve RAMS & FDIR Co-Engineering. The first part of the paper focuses on the proposed RAMS & FDIR model-based process and its objectives. The second part analyses the needs and depicts the specific requirements that the modelling language and the tool(s) have to meet in order to support fully such a process in an industrial context. Finally the third section describes current implementation within Astrium Satellites where an overall RAMS / FDIR Modelling Framework has been developed and is being pushed into operation.

  3. PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZATION BASED ON PYRAMID MODEL FOR SATELLITE MODULE LAYOUT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Bao; Teng Hongfei

    2005-01-01

    To improve the global search ability of particle swarm optimization (PSO), a multi-population PSO based on pyramid model (PPSO) is presented. Then, it is applied to solve the layout optimization problems against the background of an international commercial communication satellite (INTELSAT-Ⅲ) module. Three improvements are developed, including multi-population search based on pyramid model, adaptive collision avoidance among particles, and mutation of degraded particles. In the numerical examples of the layout design of this simplified satellite module, the performance of PPSO is compared to global version PSO and local version PSO (ring and Neumann PSO). The results show that PPSO has higher computational accuracy, efficiency and success ratio.

  4. Evaluation of satellite soil moisture products over Norway using ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesfeller, A.; Lahoz, W. A.; Jeu, R. A. M. de; Dorigo, W.; Haugen, L. E.; Svendby, T. M.; Wagner, W.

    2016-03-01

    In this study we evaluate satellite soil moisture products from the advanced SCATterometer (ASCAT) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) over Norway using ground-based observations from the Norwegian water resources and energy directorate. The ASCAT data are produced using the change detection approach of Wagner et al. (1999), and the AMSR-E data are produced using the VUA-NASA algorithm (Owe et al., 2001, 2008). Although satellite and ground-based soil moisture data for Norway have been available for several years, hitherto, such an evaluation has not been performed. This is partly because satellite measurements of soil moisture over Norway are complicated owing to the presence of snow, ice, water bodies, orography, rocks, and a very high coastline-to-area ratio. This work extends the European areas over which satellite soil moisture is validated to the Nordic regions. Owing to the challenging conditions for soil moisture measurements over Norway, the work described in this paper provides a stringent test of the capabilities of satellite sensors to measure soil moisture remotely. We show that the satellite and in situ data agree well, with averaged correlation (R) values of 0.72 and 0.68 for ASCAT descending and ascending data vs in situ data, and 0.64 and 0.52 for AMSR-E descending and ascending data vs in situ data for the summer/autumn season (1 June-15 October), over a period of 3 years (2009-2011). This level of agreement indicates that, generally, the ASCAT and AMSR-E soil moisture products over Norway have high quality, and would be useful for various applications, including land surface monitoring, weather forecasting, hydrological modelling, and climate studies. The increasing emphasis on coupled approaches to study the earth system, including the interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere, will benefit from the availability of validated and improved soil moisture satellite datasets, including those

  5. An ASIFT-Based Local Registration Method for Satellite Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangjun Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Imagery registration is a fundamental step, which greatly affects later processes in image mosaic, multi-spectral image fusion, digital surface modelling, etc., where the final solution needs blending of pixel information from more than one images. It is highly desired to find a way to identify registration regions among input stereo image pairs with high accuracy, particularly in remote sensing applications in which ground control points (GCPs are not always available, such as in selecting a landing zone on an outer space planet. In this paper, a framework for localization in image registration is developed. It strengthened the local registration accuracy from two aspects: less reprojection error and better feature point distribution. Affine scale-invariant feature transform (ASIFT was used for acquiring feature points and correspondences on the input images. Then, a homography matrix was estimated as the transformation model by an improved random sample consensus (IM-RANSAC algorithm. In order to identify a registration region with a better spatial distribution of feature points, the Euclidean distance between the feature points is applied (named the S criterion. Finally, the parameters of the homography matrix were optimized by the Levenberg–Marquardt (LM algorithm with selective feature points from the chosen registration region. In the experiment section, the Chang’E-2 satellite remote sensing imagery was used for evaluating the performance of the proposed method. The experiment result demonstrates that the proposed method can automatically locate a specific region with high registration accuracy between input images by achieving lower root mean square error (RMSE and better distribution of feature points.

  6. Diversity and biogeography of present-day magnetotactic bacteria in eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, W.; Wang, Y.; Pan, Y.

    2012-12-01

    A number of microorganisms are able to biomineralize iron minerals. Among them, magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) mineralize intracellular membrane-enveloped magnetite and/or greigite, known as magnetosomes that help cells to swim along the Earth's magnetic field. In recent years, MTB have become an attractive model system for investigating the biogeomagnetism. The occurrence of MTB has been reported in aquatic environments from freshwater to marine ecosystems. And, fossil magnetosomes are found to be potential carriers of natural remanent magnetization and indicators of paleoenvironmental changes. However, their distribution across heterogeneous habitats remains unclear. Here we report the diversity and biogeography of MTB from more than 20 locations from freshwater to saline habitats in eastern China. Great morphological variability was observed in MTB communities through light and transmission electron microscope observation. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA genes has revealed that identified MTB belonged to the Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and the phylum Nitrospirae. The overall composition of MTB communities was compared, and we found a restricted distribution of MTB communities across a large spatial scale with pronounced endemicity. Variation partitioning analyses indicated that the biogeography of MTB is relatively more influenced by environmental factors (e.g., salinity, sulfate, total iron, Eh, and temperature) than geographic distance. More interestingly, we found, for the first time, that the strength of the Earth's magnetic field appears to influence the biogeography of MTB, implying an impact of geophysical effects on these microorganisms. Our results infer that MTB community represents a biogeographic distribution across the studied heterogeneous environments. Knowledge of the present-day MTB biogeography may be applied towards the reconstruction of paleo-environments and assessment of contribution of bacterial

  7. Biogeography and ecology: towards the integration of two disciplines

    OpenAIRE

    Ricklefs, Robert E.; David G Jenkins

    2011-01-01

    Although ecology and biogeography had common origins in the natural history of the nineteenth century, they diverged substantially during the early twentieth century as ecology became increasingly hypothesis-driven and experimental. This mechanistic focus narrowed ecology's purview to local scales of time and space, and mostly excluded large-scale phenomena and historical explanations. In parallel, biogeography became more analytical with the acceptance of plate tectonics and the development ...

  8. Developing an improved soil moisture dataset by blending passive and active microwave satellite-based retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Y. Liu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Combining information derived from satellite-based passive and active microwave sensors has the potential to offer improved retrievals of surface soil moisture variations at global scales. Here we propose a technique to take advantage of retrieval characteristics of passive (AMSR-E and active (ASCAT microwave satellite estimates over sparse-to-moderately vegetated areas to obtain an improved soil moisture product. To do this, absolute soil moisture values from AMSR-E and relative soil moisture derived from ASCAT are rescaled against a reference land surface model date set using a cumulative distribution function (CDF matching approach. While this technique imposes the bias of the reference to the rescaled satellite products, it adjusts both satellite products to the same range and almost preserves the correlation between satellite products and in situ measurements. Comparisons with in situ data demonstrated that over the regions where the correlation coefficient between rescaled AMSR-E and ASCAT is above 0.65 (hereafter referred to as transitional regions, merging the different satellite products together increases the number of observations while minimally changing the accuracy of soil moisture retrievals. These transitional regions also delineate the boundary between sparsely and moderately vegetated regions where rescaled AMSR-E and ASCAT are respectively used in the merged product. Thus the merged product carries the advantages of better spatial coverage overall and increased number of observations particularly for the transitional regions. The combination approach developed in this study has the potential to be applied to existing microwave satellites as well as to new microwave missions. Accordingly, a long-term global soil moisture dataset can be developed and extended, enhancing basic understanding of the role of soil moisture in the water, energy and carbon cycles.

  9. Research of Multi-Agent System based satellite fault diagnosis technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范显峰; 姜兴渭; 黄文虎; 谷吉海

    2002-01-01

    Following the theory of Multi-Agent System (MAS) and using series-wound structure and shunt-wound structure of Agents, the performance of Agent was improved to satisfy the need of satellite fault diagno-sis, and a tridimensional MAS model of satellite fault diagnosis was thus established for the MAS based planardiagnosis system, which decentralizes the whole diagnosing task into subtasks to be performed by different func-tional Agents to make the complicated fault diagnosis very simple and the diagnosis system more intelligent.This method improved the reliability and accuracy of diagnosis and made the maintenance and upgrading of thesatellite fault diagnosis system very easy as well.

  10. Evaluation of Clear Sky Models for Satellite-Based Irradiance Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.

    2013-12-01

    This report describes an intercomparison of three popular broadband clear sky solar irradiance model results with measured data, as well as satellite-based model clear sky results compared to measured clear sky data. The authors conclude that one of the popular clear sky models (the Bird clear sky model developed by Richard Bird and Roland Hulstrom) could serve as a more accurate replacement for current satellite-model clear sky estimations. Additionally, the analysis of the model results with respect to model input parameters indicates that rather than climatological, annual, or monthly mean input data, higher-time-resolution input parameters improve the general clear sky model performance.

  11. MISAT : Designing a Series of Powerful Small Satellites Based upon Micro Systems Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gill, E.; Monna, G.L.E.; Scherpen, J.M.A.; Verhoeven, C.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    MISAT is a research and development cluster which will create a small satellite platform based on Micro Systems Technology (MST) aiming at innovative space as well as terrestrial applications. MISAT is part of the Dutch MicroNed program which has established a microsystems infrastructure to fully ex

  12. Satellite-based empirical models linking river plume dynamics with hypoxic area andvolume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satellite-based empirical models explaining hypoxic area and volume variation were developed for the seasonally hypoxic (O2 < 2 mg L−1) northern Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Mississippi River. Annual variations in midsummer hypoxic area and ...

  13. Optimization control of systemic condition of satellite prototype based on hybrid system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Shi; LONG Jiang

    2010-01-01

    This article proposes an optimization control model of the"systemic condition of satellite prototype based on the hybrid system.A dynamic programming algorithm is also proposed because the problem is NPhard.An empirical study validates the model and the algorithm,and proves that the pointed important management resources can be recognized and allocated optimally and correctly.

  14. Observations uncertainty of satellite soil moisture products determined with physically-based modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, N.; Karssenberg, D.; Bierkens, M.F.P.; Parinussa, R.M.; Jeu, de R.A.M.; Dam, van J.C.; Jong, de S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate estimates of soil moisture as initial conditions to hydrological models are expected to greatly increase the accuracy of flood and drought predictions. As in-situ soil moisture observations are scarce, satellite-based estimates are a suitable alternative. The validation of remotely sensed s

  15. Observation uncertainty of satellite soil moisture products determined with physically-based modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, N.; Karssenberg, D.; Bierkens, M.F.P.; Parinussa, R.; Jeu, de R.; Dam, van J.C.; Jong, de S.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate estimates of soil moisture as initial conditions to hydrological models are expected to greatly increase the accuracy of flood and drought predictions. As in-situ soil moisture observations are scarce, satellite-based estimates are a suitable alternative. The validation of remotely sensed s

  16. Observation uncertainty of satellite soil moisture products determined with physically-based modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, N.; Karssenberg, D.J.; Bierkens, M.F.P.; Parinussa, R.M.; Jeu, R.A.M. de; Dam, J.C. van; Jong, S.M. de

    2012-01-01

    Accurate estimates of soil moisture as initial conditions to hydrological models are expected to greatly increase the accuracy of flood and drought predictions. As in-situ soil moisture observations are scarce, satellite-based estimates are a suitable alternative. The validation of remotely sensed s

  17. Topic Modelling for Object-Based Classification of Vhr Satellite Images Based on Multiscale Segmentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li; Wu, Linmei; Li, Zhipeng

    2016-06-01

    Multiscale segmentation is a key prerequisite step for object-based classification methods. However, it is often not possible to determine a sole optimal scale for the image to be classified because in many cases different geo-objects and even an identical geo-object may appear at different scales in one image. In this paper, an object-based classification method based on mutliscale segmentation results in the framework of topic modelling is proposed to classify VHR satellite images in an entirely unsupervised fashion. In the stage of topic modelling, grayscale histogram distributions for each geo-object class and each segment are learned in an unsupervised manner from multiscale segments. In the stage of classification, each segment is allocated a geo-object class label by the similarity comparison between the grayscale histogram distributions of each segment and each geo-object class. Experimental results show that the proposed method can perform better than the traditional methods based on topic modelling.

  18. A Handover Strategy in the LEO Satellite-Based Constellation Networks with ISLs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Gang; GOU Dingyong; WU Shiqi

    2003-01-01

    A new handover strategy named minimal-hops handover(MHH) strategy for the low earth orbit(LEO) satellite constellations networks equipped with inter-satellite links(ISLs) is proposed.MHH strategy, which is based on the hops of the end-to-end connection paths and makes good use of the regularity of the constellation network topology, can appropriately combine the handover procedure with routing and efficiently solve the inter-satellite handover issue. Moreover, MHH strategy can provide quality of services( QoS) guarantees to some extent. The system performances of the MHH strategy, such as time propagation delay and handover frequency, are evaluated and compared with that of other previous strategies. The simulation results show that MHH strategy performs better than other previous handover strategies.

  19. THE SATELLITE STRUCTURE TOPOLOGY OPTIMIZATION BASED ON HOMOGENIZATION METHOD AND ITS SIZE SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChenChangya; PanJin; WangDeyu

    2005-01-01

    With the development of satellite structure technology, more and more design parameters will affect its structural performance. It is desirable to obtain an optimal structure design with a minimum weight, including optimal configuration and sizes. The present paper aims to describe an optimization analysis for a satellite structure, including topology optimization and size optimization. Based on the homogenization method, the topology optimization is carried out for the main supporting frame of service module under given constraints and load conditions, and then the sensitivity analysis is made of 15 structural size parameters of the whole satellite and the optimal sizes are obtained. The numerical result shows that the present optimization design method is very effective.

  20. Satellites vs. fiber optics based networks and services - Road map to strategic planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marandi, James H. R.

    An overview of a generic telecommunications network and its components is presented, and the current developments in satellite and fiber optics technologies are discussed with an eye on the trends in industry. A baseline model is proposed, and a cost comparison of fiber- vs satellite-based networks is made. A step-by-step 'road map' to the successful strategic planning of telecommunications services and facilities is presented. This road map provides for optimization of the current and future networks and services through effective utilization of both satellites and fiber optics. The road map is then applied to different segments of the telecommunications industry and market place, to show its effectiveness for the strategic planning of executives of three types: (1) those heading telecommunications manufacturing concerns, (2) those leading communication service companies, and (3) managers of telecommunication/MIS departments of major corporations. Future networking issues, such as developments in integrated-services digital network standards and technologies, are addressed.

  1. A Framework for Building an Interactive Satellite TV Based M-Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassan Issa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a description of an interactive satellite TV based mobile learning (STV-ML framework, in which a satellite TV station is used as an integral part of a comprehensive interactive mobile learning (M-Learning environment. The proposed framework assists in building a reliable, efficient, and cost-effective environment to meet the growing demands of M-Learning all over the world, especially in developing countries. It utilizes recent advances in satellite reception, broadcasting technologies, and interactive TV to facilitate the delivery of gigantic learning materials. This paper also proposed a simple and flexible three-phase implementation methodology which includes construction of earth station, expansion of broadcasting channels, and developing true user interactivity. The proposed framework and implementation methodology ensure the construction of a true, reliable, and cost effective M-Learning system that can be used efficiently and effectively by a wide range of users and educational institutions to deliver ubiquitous learning.

  2. The functional biogeography of species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, D.W.; Dalsgaard, B.; Svenning, J.-C.;

    2013-01-01

    Biogeographical systems can be analyzed as networks of species and geographical units. Within such a biogeographical network, individual species may differ fundamentally in their linkage pattern, and therefore hold different topological roles. To advance our understanding of the relationship...... between species traits and large-scale species distribution patterns in archipelagos, we use a network approach to classify birds as one of four biogeographical species roles: peripherals, connectors, module hubs, and network hubs. These roles are based upon the position of species within the modular...... network of islands and species in Wallacea and the West Indies. We test whether species traits - including habitat requirements, altitudinal range-span, feeding guild, trophic level, and body length - correlate with species roles. In both archipelagos, habitat requirements, altitudinal range-span and body...

  3. Intercontinental and intracontinental biogeography patterns and methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun WEN; Qiu-Yun (Jenny) XIANG; Hong QIAN; Jian-hua LI; Xiao-Quan WANG; Stefanie M. ICKERT-BOND

    2009-01-01

    @@ The study of biogeography has benefited from the exponential increase of DNA sequence data from recent molecular systematic studies, the development of analytical methods in the last decade concerning divergence time estimation and geographic area analyses, and the availability of large-scale distribution data of species in many groups of organisms. The underlying principle of divergence time estimation from DNA and protein data is that sequence divergence depends on the product of evolutionary rate and time. With their molecular clock hypothesis, Zuckerkandl and Pauling (1965) separated rates of molecular evolution from time by incorporating fossil evidence. Originally, a constant rate of sequence evolution was assumed, but soon it became evident that many data sets do not obey the constant rate assumption of a strict molecular clock.

  4. Satellite and ground-based sensors for the Urban Heat Island analysis in the city of Rome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabrizi, Roberto; Bonafoni, Stefania; Biondi, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the trend of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) of Rome is analyzed by both ground-based weather stations and a satellite-based infrared sensor. First, we have developed a suitable algorithm employing satellite brightness temperatures for the estimation of the air temperature belonging...

  5. Evaluation of Satellite and Ground Based Precipitation Products for Flood Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintalapudi, S.; Sharif, H.; Yeggina, S.

    2012-04-01

    The development in satellite-derived rainfall estimates encouraged the hydrological modeling in sparse gauged basins or ungauged basins. Especially, physically-based distributed hydrological models can benefit from the good spatial and temporal coverage of satellite precipitation products. In this study, three satellite derived precipitation datasets (TRMM, CMORPH, and PERSIANN), NEXRAD, and rain gauge precipitation datasets were used to drive the hydrological model. The physically-based, distributed hydrological model Gridded Surface Subsurface Hydrological Analysis (GSSHA) was used in this study. Focus will be on the results from the Guadalupe River Basin above Canyon Lake and below Comfort, Texas. The Guadalupe River Basin above Canyon Lake and below Comfort Texas drains an area of 1232 km2. Different storm events will be used in these simulations. August 2007 event was used as calibration and June 2007 event was used as validation. Results are discussed interms of accuracy of satellite precipitation estimates with the ground based precipitation estimates, predicting peak discharges, runoff volumes, time lag, and spatial distribution. The initial results showed that, model was able to predict the peak discharges and runoff volumes when using NEXRAD MPE data, and TRMM 3B42 precipitation product. The results also showed that there was time lag in hydrographs driven by both PERSIANN and CMORPH data sets.

  6. Spacetime effects on satellite-based quantum communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, David Edward; Ralph, Timothy C.; Fuentes, Ivette; Jennewein, Thomas; Razavi, Mohsen

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the consequences of space-time being curved on space-based quantum communication protocols. We analyze tasks that require either the exchange of single photons in a certain entanglement distribution protocol or beams of light in a continuous-variable quantum key distribution scheme. We find that gravity affects the propagation of photons, therefore adding additional noise to the channel for the transmission of information. The effects could be measured with current technology.

  7. Spacetime effects on satellite-based quantum communications

    CERN Document Server

    Bruschi, David Edward; Fuentes, Ivette; Jennewein, Thomas; Razavi, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effects of space-time curvature on space-based quantum communication protocols. We analyze tasks that require either the exchange of single photons in a certain entanglement distribution protocol or beams of light in a continuous-variable quantum key distribution scheme. We find that gravity affects the propagation of photons, therefore acting as a noisy channel for the transmission of information. The effects can be measured with current technology.

  8. Linear and Nonlinear Relative Navigation Strategies for Small Satellite Formation Flying Based on Relative Position Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Zheng, You

    Based on linear and nonlinear mathematical model of spacecraft formation flying and technology of relative position measurement of small satellites, the linear and nonlinear relative navigation strategies are developed in this paper. The dynamical characteristics of multi spacecraft formation flying have been researched in many references, including the authors' several International Astronautical Congress papers with numbers of IAF-98-A.2.06, IAA-99-IAA.11.1.09, IAA-01-IAA.11.4.08. Under conditions of short distance and short time, the linear model can describe relative orbit motion; otherwise, nonlinear model must be adopted. Furthermore the means of measurement and their error will influence relative navigation. Thus three kinds of relative navigation strategy are progressed. With consideration of difficulty in relative velocity measurement of small satellites, the three relative navigation strategies are proposed and only depend on sequential data of relative position through measuring the relative distance and relative orientation. The first kind of relative navigation strategy is based on linear model. The second relative navigation strategy is based on nonlinear model, with inclusion of the second order item. In fact the measurement error can not be avoided especially for small satellites, it is mainly considered in the third relative navigation strategy. This research is theoretical yet and a series of formulas of relative navigation are presented in this paper. Also the authors analyzed the three strategies qualitatively and quantitatively. According to results of simulation, the ranges of application are indicated and suggested in allusion to the three strategies of relative navigation. On the view of authors, the relative navigation strategies for small satellite formation flying based on relative position measurement are significant for engineering of small satellite formation flying.

  9. Neural network-based recognition of whistlers on spectrograms detected by satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Livio

    2016-04-01

    We present a system to automatically recognize and classify the occurrence of whistler waves on spectrograms of electric field measurements performed by satellite. Whistlers - VLF waves generated by lightning, with a specific spectral dispersion relation - can induce precipitation of trapped Van Allen particles and have a role in the chemistry of some atmospheric components (mainly NOx). Moreover, it has also been suggested that the increase of the number of anomalous whistlers (i.e. whistlers with high value of dispersion constant) could be induced by disturbances in the Earth-ionosphere wave-guide, generated by seismo-electromagnetic emissions. On satellite, the recognition of whistlers asks for analyzing high-resolution spectrograms that cannot be downloaded to Earth, due to the limits of data transmission. For this reason, a real time identification and classification must be performed on satellite, by avoiding downloading all the unprocessed data. The procedure that we have developed is based on a Time Delay Neural Network (TDNN). The TDNN, proposed some years ago for speech recognition, can be fruitfully also applied in real-time analysis of electromagnetic spectrograms in order to detect phenomena characterized by a specific shape/signature such as those of the whistler waves. Some studies have been performed by the RNF experiment on board of the DEMETER satellite and our algorithm could be adopted on board of the satellite CSES (China Seismo-Electromagnetic Satellite), launch scheduled by the end of 2016. Moreover, the procedure can be also adopted to automatic analysis of whistlers detected on ground.

  10. Satellite-based emission constraint for nitrogen oxides: Capability and uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J.; McElroy, M. B.; Boersma, F.; Nielsen, C.; Zhao, Y.; Lei, Y.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, Q.; Liu, Z.; Liu, H.; Mao, J.; Zhuang, G.; Roozendael, M.; Martin, R.; Wang, P.; Spurr, R. J.; Sneep, M.; Stammes, P.; Clemer, K.; Irie, H.

    2013-12-01

    Vertical column densities (VCDs) of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) retrieved from satellite remote sensing have been employed widely to constrain emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx). A major strength of satellite-based emission constraint is analysis of emission trends and variability, while a crucial limitation is errors both in satellite NO2 data and in model simulations relating NOx emissions to NO2 columns. Through a series of studies, we have explored these aspects over China. We separate anthropogenic from natural sources of NOx by exploiting their different seasonality. We infer trends of NOx emissions in recent years and effects of a variety of socioeconomic events at different spatiotemporal scales including the general economic growth, global financial crisis, Chinese New Year, and Beijing Olympics. We further investigate the impact of growing NOx emissions on particulate matter (PM) pollution in China. As part of recent developments, we identify and correct errors in both satellite NO2 retrieval and model simulation that ultimately affect NOx emission constraint. We improve the treatments of aerosol optical effects, clouds and surface reflectance in the NO2 retrieval process, using as reference ground-based MAX-DOAS measurements to evaluate the improved retrieval results. We analyze the sensitivity of simulated NO2 to errors in the model representation of major meteorological and chemical processes with a subsequent correction of model bias. Future studies will implement these improvements to re-constrain NOx emissions.

  11. Planetary gearbox condition monitoring of ship-based satellite communication antennas using ensemble multiwavelet analysis method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinglong; Zhang, Chunlin; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zi, Yanyang; He, Shuilong; Yang, Zhe

    2015-03-01

    Satellite communication antennas are key devices of a measurement ship to support voice, data, fax and video integration services. Condition monitoring of mechanical equipment from the vibration measurement data is significant for guaranteeing safe operation and avoiding the unscheduled breakdown. So, condition monitoring system for ship-based satellite communication antennas is designed and developed. Planetary gearboxes play an important role in the transmission train of satellite communication antenna. However, condition monitoring of planetary gearbox still faces challenges due to complexity and weak condition feature. This paper provides a possibility for planetary gearbox condition monitoring by proposing ensemble a multiwavelet analysis method. Benefit from the property on multi-resolution analysis and the multiple wavelet basis functions, multiwavelet has the advantage over characterizing the non-stationary signal. In order to realize the accurate detection of the condition feature and multi-resolution analysis in the whole frequency band, adaptive multiwavelet basis function is constructed via increasing multiplicity and then vibration signal is processed by the ensemble multiwavelet transform. Finally, normalized ensemble multiwavelet transform information entropy is computed to describe the condition of planetary gearbox. The effectiveness of proposed method is first validated through condition monitoring of experimental planetary gearbox. Then this method is used for planetary gearbox condition monitoring of ship-based satellite communication antennas and the results support its feasibility.

  12. Heavy precipitation retrieval from combined satellite observations and ground-based lightning measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugnai, A.; Dietrich, S.; Casella, D.; di Paola, F.; Formenton, M.; Sanò, P.

    2010-09-01

    We have developed a series of algorithms for the retrieval of precipitation (especially, heavy precipitation) over the Mediterranean area using satellite observations from the available microwave (MW) radiometers onboard low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites and from the visible-infrared (VIS-IR) SEVIRI radiometer onboard the European geosynchronous (GEO) satellite Meteosat Second Generation (MSG), in conjunction with lightning data from ground-based networks - such as ZEUS and LINET. These are: • A new approach for precipitation retrieval from space (which we call the Cloud Dynamics and Radiation Database approach, CDRD) that incorporates lightning and environmental/dynamical information in addition to the upwelling microwave brightness temperatures (TB’s) so as to reduce the retrieval uncertainty and improve the retrieval performance; • A new combined MW-IR technique for producing frequent precipitation retrievals from space (which we call PM-GCD technique), that uses passive-microwave (PM) retrievals in conjunction with lightning information and the Global Convection Detection (GCD) technique to discriminate deep convective clouds within the GEO observations; • A new morphing approach (which we call the Lightning-based Precipitation Evolving Technique, L-PET) that uses the available lightning measurements for propagating the rainfall estimates from satellite-borne MW radiometers to a much higher time resolution than the MW observations. We will present and discuss our combined MW/IR/lightning precipitation algorithms and analyses with special reference to some case studies over the western Mediterranean.

  13. Studying Satellite Image Quality Based on the Fusion Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Wassai, Firouz Abdullah; Al-Zaky, Ali A

    2011-01-01

    Various and different methods can be used to produce high-resolution multispectral images from high-resolution panchromatic image (PAN) and low-resolution multispectral images (MS), mostly on the pixel level. However, the jury is still out on the benefits of a fused image compared to its original images. There is also a lack of measures for assessing the objective quality of the spatial resolution for the fusion methods. Therefore, an objective quality of the spatial resolution assessment for fusion images is required. So, this study attempts to develop a new qualitative assessment to evaluate the spatial quality of the pan sharpened images by many spatial quality metrics. Also, this paper deals with a comparison of various image fusion techniques based on pixel and feature fusion techniques.

  14. Species tree estimation and the historical biogeography of heroine cichlids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsey, C Darrin; Keck, Benjamin P; Hollingsworth, Phillip R

    2011-01-01

    Heroine cichlids are major components of the fish faunas in both Central America and the Caribbean. To examine the evolutionary patterns of how cichlids colonized both of these regions, we reconstructed the phylogenetic relationships among 23 cichlid lineages. We used three phylogenetically novel nuclear markers (Dystropin b, Myomesin1, and Wnt7b) in combination with sequence data from seven other gene regions (Nd2, Rag1, Enc1, Sreb2, Ptr, Plagl2, and Zic1) to elucidate the species tree of these cichlids. The species examined represent major heroine lineages in South America, Central America, and the Greater Antilles. The individual gene trees of these groups were topologically quite discordant. Therefore, we combined the genetic partitions and inferred the species tree using both concatenation and a coalescent-based Bayesian method. The two resulting phylogenetic topologies were largely concordant but differed in two fundamental ways. First, more nodes in the concatenated tree were supported with substantial or 100% Bayesian posterior support than in the coalescent-based tree. Second, there was a minor, but biogeographically critical, topological difference between the concatenated and coalescent-based trees. Nevertheless, both analyses recovered topologies consistent with the Greater Antillean heroines being phylogenetically nested within the largely Central American heroine radiation. This study suggests that reconstructions of cichlid phylogeny and historical biogeography should account for the vagaries of individual gene histories.

  15. Volcview: A Web-Based Platform for Satellite Monitoring of Volcanic Activity and Eruption Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, D. J.; Randall, M.; Parker, T.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with University and State partners, operates five volcano observatories that employ specialized software packages and computer systems to process and display real-time data coming from in-situ geophysical sensors and from near-real-time satellite sources. However, access to these systems both inside and from outside the observatory offices are limited in some cases by factors such as software cost, network security, and bandwidth. Thus, a variety of Internet-based tools have been developed by the USGS Volcano Science Center to: 1) Improve accessibility to data sources for staff scientists across volcano monitoring disciplines; 2) Allow access for observatory partners and for after-hours, on-call duty scientists; 3) Provide situational awareness for emergency managers and the general public. Herein we describe VolcView (volcview.wr.usgs.gov), a freely available, web-based platform for display and analysis of near-real-time satellite data. Initial geographic coverage is of the volcanoes in Alaska, the Russian Far East, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Coverage of other volcanoes in the United States will be added in the future. Near-real-time satellite data from NOAA, NASA and JMA satellite systems are processed to create image products for detection of elevated surface temperatures and volcanic ash and SO2 clouds. VolcView uses HTML5 and the canvas element to provide image overlays (volcano location and alert status, annotation, and location information) and image products that can be queried to provide data values, location and measurement capabilities. Use over the past year during the eruptions of Pavlof, Veniaminof, and Cleveland volcanoes in Alaska by the Alaska Volcano Observatory, the National Weather Service, and the U.S. Air Force has reinforced the utility of shared situational awareness and has guided further development. These include overlay of volcanic cloud trajectory and

  16. Satellite-based RAR performance simulation for measuring directional ocean wave spectrum based on SAR inversion spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Lin; MAO Zhihua; HUANG Haiqing; GONG Fang

    2010-01-01

    Some missions have been carried out to measure wave directional spectrum by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and airborne real aperture radar (RAR) at a low incidence. Both them have their own advantages and limitations. Scientists hope that SAR and satellite-based RAR can complement each other for the research on wave properties in the future. For this study, the authors aim to simulate the satellite-based RAR system to validate performance for measuring the directional wave spectrum. The principal measurements are introduced and the simulation methods based on the one developed by Hauser are adopted and slightly modified. To enhance the authenticity of input spectrum and the wave spectrum measuring consistency for SAR and satellite-based RAR, the wave height spectrum inversed from Envisat ASAR data by cross spectrum technology is used as the input spectrum of the simulation system. In the process of simulation, the sea surface, backscattering signal, modulation spectrum and the estimated wave height spectrum are simulated in each look direction. Directional wave spectrum are measured based on the simulated observations from 0° to 360~. From the estimated wave spectrum, it has an 180° ambiguity like SAR, but it has no special high wave number cut off in all the direction. Finally, the estimated spectrum is compared with the input one in terms of the dominant wave wavelength, direction and SWH and the results are promising. The simulation shows that satellite-based RAR should be capable of measuring the directional wave properties. Moreover, it indicates satellite-based RAR basically can measure waves that SAR can measure.

  17. Integration between terrestrial-based and satellite-based land mobile communications systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcidiancono, Antonio

    A survey is given of several approaches to improving the performance and marketability of mobile satellite systems (MSS). The provision of voice/data services in the future regional European Land Mobile Satellite System (LMSS), network integration between the Digital Cellular Mobile System (GSM) and LMSS, the identification of critical areas for the implementation of integrated GSM/LMSS areas, space segment scenarios, LMSS for digital trunked private mobile radio (PMR) services, and code division multiple access (CDMA) techniques for a terrestrial/satellite system are covered.

  18. Integration between terrestrial-based and satellite-based land mobile communications systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcidiancono, Antonio

    1990-01-01

    A survey is given of several approaches to improving the performance and marketability of mobile satellite systems (MSS). The provision of voice/data services in the future regional European Land Mobile Satellite System (LMSS), network integration between the Digital Cellular Mobile System (GSM) and LMSS, the identification of critical areas for the implementation of integrated GSM/LMSS areas, space segment scenarios, LMSS for digital trunked private mobile radio (PMR) services, and code division multiple access (CDMA) techniques for a terrestrial/satellite system are covered.

  19. Formulation of geopotential difference determination using optical-atomic clocks onboard satellites and on ground based on Doppler cancellation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ziyu; Shen, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Shuangxi

    2016-06-01

    In this study we propose an approach for determining the geopotential difference using high-frequency-stability microwave links between satellite and ground station based on Doppler cancelation system. Suppose a satellite and a ground station are equipped with precise optical-atomic clocks and oscillators. The ground oscillator emits a signal with frequency fa towards the satellite and the satellite receiver (connected with the satellite oscillator) receives this signal with frequency fb which contains the gravitational frequency shift effect and other signals and noises. After receiving this signal, the satellite oscillator transmits and emits respectively two signals with frequencies fb and fc towards the ground station. Via Doppler cancellation technique, the geopotential difference between the satellite and the ground station can be determined based on gravitational frequency shift equation by a combination of these three frequencies. For arbitrary two stations on ground, based on similar procedures as described above, we may determine the geopotential difference between these two stations via a satellite. Our analysis shows that the accuracy can reach 1 {m^2/s^2} based on the clocks' inaccuracy of about 10-17 (s/s) level. Since optical-atomic clocks with instability around 10-18 in several hours and inaccuracy around 10-18 level have been generated in laboratory, the proposed approach may have prospective applications in geoscience, and especially, based on this approach a unified world height system could be realized with one-centimeter level accuracy in the near future.

  20. Formulation of geopotential difference determination using optical-atomic clocks onboard satellites and on ground based on Doppler cancellation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ziyu; Shen, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Shuangxi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we propose an approach for determining the geopotential difference using high-frequency-stability microwave links between satellite and ground station based on Doppler cancellation system. Suppose a satellite and a ground station are equipped with precise optical-atomic clocks (OACs) and oscillators. The ground oscillator emits a signal with frequency fa towards the satellite and the satellite receiver (connected with the satellite oscillator) receives this signal with frequency fb which contains the gravitational frequency shift effect and other signals and noises. After receiving this signal, the satellite oscillator transmits and emits, respectively, two signals with frequencies fb and fc towards the ground station. Via Doppler cancellation technique, the geopotential difference between the satellite and the ground station can be determined based on gravitational frequency shift equation by a combination of these three frequencies. For arbitrary two stations on ground, based on similar procedures as described above, we may determine the geopotential difference between these two stations via a satellite. Our analysis shows that the accuracy can reach 1 m2 s- 2 based on the clocks' inaccuracy of about 10-17 (s s-1) level. Since OACs with instability around 10-18 in several hours and inaccuracy around 10-18 level have been generated in laboratory, the proposed approach may have prospective applications in geoscience, and especially, based on this approach a unified world height system could be realized with one-centimetre level accuracy in the near future.

  1. Satellite-based phenology detection in broadleaf forests in South-Western Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Gourav; Buras, Allan; Menzel, Annette

    2016-04-01

    Many techniques exist for extracting phenological information from time series of satellite data. However, there have been only a few successful attempts to temporarily match satellite-derived observations with ground based phenological observations (Fisher et al., 2006; Hamunyela et al., 2013; Galiano et al., 2015). Such studies are primarily plagued with problems relating to shorter time series of satellite data including spatial and temporal resolution issues. A great challenge is to correlate spatially continuous and pixel-based satellite information with spatially discontinuous and point-based, mostly species-specific, ground observations of phenology. Moreover, the minute differences in phenology observed by ground volunteers might not be sufficient to produce changes in satellite-measured reflectance of vegetation, which also exposes the difference in the definitions of phenology (Badeck et al., 2004; White et al., 2014). In this study Start of Season (SOS) was determined for broadleaf forests at a site in south-western Germany using MODIS-sensor time series of Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data for the years covering 2001 to 2013. The NDVI time series raster data was masked for broadleaf forests using Corine Land Cover dataset, filtered and corrected for snow and cloud contaminations, smoothed with a Gaussian filter and interpolated to daily values. Several SOS techniques cited in literature, namely thresholds of amplitudes (20%, 50%, 60% and 75%), rates of change (1st, 2nd and 3rd derivative) and delayed moving average (DMA) were tested for determination of satellite SOS. The different satellite SOS were then compared with a species-rich ground based phenology information (e.g. understory leaf unfolding, broad leaf unfolding and greening of evergreen tree species). Working with all the pixels at a finer resolution, it is seen that the temporal trends in understory and broad leaf species are well captured. Initial analyses show promising

  2. DroughtView: Satellite Based Drought Monitoring and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartfield, K. A.; Van Leeuwen, W. J. D.; Crimmins, M.; Marsh, S. E.; Torrey, Y.; Rahr, M.; Orr, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Drought is an ever growing concern within the United States and Mexico. Extended periods of below-average precipitation can adversely affect agricultural production and ecosystems, impact local water resources and create conditions prime for wildfire. DroughtView (www.droughtview.arizona.edu) is a new on-line resource for scientists, natural resource managers, and the public that brings a new perspective to remote-sensing based drought impact assessment that is not currently available. DroughtView allows users to monitor the impact of drought on vegetation cover for the entire continental United States and the northern regions of Mexico. As a spatially and temporally dynamic geospatial decision support tool, DroughtView is an excellent educational introduction to the relationship between remotely sensed vegetation condition and drought. The system serves up Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) data generated from 250 meter 16-day composite Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery from 2000 to the present. Calculation of difference from average, previous period and previous year greenness products provide the user with a proxy for drought conditions and insight on the secondary impacts of drought, such as wildfire. The various image products and overlays are served up via the ArcGIS Server platform. DroughtView serves as a useful tool to introduce and teach vegetation time series analysis to those unfamiliar with the science. High spatial resolution imagery is available as a reference layer to locate points of interest, zoom in and export images for implementation in reports and presentations. Animation of vegetation time series allows users to examine ecosystem disturbances and climate data is also available to examine the relationship between precipitation, temperature and vegetation. The tool is mobile friendly allowing users to access the system while in the field. The systems capabilities and

  3. A space weather forecasting system with multiple satellites based on a self-recognizing network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokumitsu, Masahiro; Ishida, Yoshiteru

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a space weather forecasting system at geostationary orbit for high-energy electron flux (>2 MeV). The forecasting model involves multiple sensors on multiple satellites. The sensors interconnect and evaluate each other to predict future conditions at geostationary orbit. The proposed forecasting model is constructed using a dynamic relational network for sensor diagnosis and event monitoring. The sensors of the proposed model are located at different positions in space. The satellites for solar monitoring equip with monitoring devices for the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind speed. The satellites orbit near the Earth monitoring high-energy electron flux. We investigate forecasting for typical two examples by comparing the performance of two models with different numbers of sensors. We demonstrate the prediction by the proposed model against coronal mass ejections and a coronal hole. This paper aims to investigate a possibility of space weather forecasting based on the satellite network with in-situ sensing.

  4. A Space Weather Forecasting System with Multiple Satellites Based on a Self-Recognizing Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Tokumitsu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a space weather forecasting system at geostationary orbit for high-energy electron flux (>2 MeV. The forecasting model involves multiple sensors on multiple satellites. The sensors interconnect and evaluate each other to predict future conditions at geostationary orbit. The proposed forecasting model is constructed using a dynamic relational network for sensor diagnosis and event monitoring. The sensors of the proposed model are located at different positions in space. The satellites for solar monitoring equip with monitoring devices for the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind speed. The satellites orbit near the Earth monitoring high-energy electron flux. We investigate forecasting for typical two examples by comparing the performance of two models with different numbers of sensors. We demonstrate the prediction by the proposed model against coronal mass ejections and a coronal hole. This paper aims to investigate a possibility of space weather forecasting based on the satellite network with in-situ sensing.

  5. Detecting aircrafts from satellite images using saliency and conical pyramid based template representation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SAMIK BANERJEE; NITIN GUPTA; SUKHENDU DAS; PINAKI ROY CHOWDHURY; L K SINHA

    2016-10-01

    Automatic target localization in satellite images still remains as a challenging problem in the field of computer vision. The issues involved in locating targets in satellite images are viewpoint, spectral (intensity) and scale variations. Diversity in background texture and target clutter also adds up to the complexity of the problem of localizing aircrafts in satellite images. Failure of modern feature extraction and object detection methods highlight the complexity of the problem. In the proposed work, pre-processing techniques, viz.denoising and contrast enhancement, are first used to improve the quality of the images. Then, the concept of unsupervised saliency is used to detect the potential regions of interest, which reduces the search space. Parts from the salient regions are further processed using clustering and morphological processing to get the probable regions of isolated aircraft targets. Finally, a novel conical pyramid based framework for template representation of the target samples is proposed for matching. Experimental results shown on a few satellite images exhibit the superior performance of the proposed methods.

  6. Star-based defocus computing technique for PLEIADES-HR satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amberg, Virginie; Bernard, Laurent; Latry, Christophe

    2015-10-01

    PLEIADES-HR is an earth observing system developed by the French National Space Agency, CNES. It consists of two satellites launched on December 2011 (PHR-1A) and December 2012 (PHR-1B). Each satellite is designed to provide optical 70 cm resolution panchromatic and 2.80m colored images to civilian and defense users. During commissioning period of these satellites, thanks to their extreme agility, new calibration methods have been tested based on the observation of celestial bodies, and stars in particular. It has then been made possible to perform MTF and defocus measurement (in order to refocus), geometrical bias computation, focal plane assessment, absolute calibration, ghost images localization, micro-vibrations measurement, etc… This article deals with the problem of satellite refocusing. By using images of stars, the problem can be considered as a phase diversity inverse problem. Significant evolution has been brought to the previous method developed during the commissioning period in order to improve accuracy and reduce operating constraints of the method.

  7. Sensitivity of Distributed Hydrologic Simulations to Ground and Satellite Based Rainfall Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singaiah Chintalapudi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, seven precipitation products (rain gauges, NEXRAD MPE, PERSIANN 0.25 degree, PERSIANN CCS-3hr, PERSIANN CCS-1hr, TRMM 3B42V7, and CMORPH were used to force a physically-based distributed hydrologic model. The model was driven by these products to simulate the hydrologic response of a 1232 km2 watershed in the Guadalupe River basin, Texas. Storm events in 2007 were used to analyze the precipitation products. Comparison with rain gauge observations reveals that there were significant biases in the satellite rainfall products and large variations in the estimated amounts. The radar basin average precipitation compared very well with the rain gauge product while the gauge-adjusted TRMM 3B42V7 precipitation compared best with observed rainfall among all satellite precipitation products. The NEXRAD MPE simulated streamflows matched the observed ones the best yielding the highest Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency correlation coefficient values for both the July and August 2007 events. Simulations driven by TRMM 3B42V7 matched the observed streamflow better than other satellite products for both events. The PERSIANN coarse resolution product yielded better runoff results than the higher resolution product. The study reveals that satellite rainfall products are viable alternatives when rain gauge or ground radar observations are sparse or non-existent.

  8. Evaluation of satellite based indices for primary production estimates in a sparse savanna in the Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sjöström

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the more frequently applied methods for integrating controls on primary production through satellite data is the Light Use Efficiency (LUE approach. Satellite indices such as the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI and the Shortwave Infrared Water Stress Index (SIWSI have previously shown promise as predictors of primary production in several different environments. In this study, we evaluate EVI and SIWSI derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS satellite sensor against in-situ measurements from central Sudan in order to asses their applicability in LUE-based primary production modelling within a water limited environment. Results show a strong correlation between EVI against gross primary production (GPP, demonstrating the significance of EVI for deriving information on primary production with relatively high accuracy at similar areas. Evaluation of SIWSI however, reveal that the fraction of vegetation apparently is to low for the index to provide accurate information on canopy water content, indicating that the use of SIWSI as a predictor of water stress in satellite data-driven primary production modelling in similar semi-arid ecosystems is limited.

  9. A Positioning System based on Communication Satellites and the Chinese Area Positioning System (CAPS)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The Chinese Area Positioning System (CAPS) is a positioning system based on satellite communication that is fundamentally different from the 3"G" (GPS, GLONASS and GALILEO) systems. The latter use special-purpose navigation satellites to broadcast navi-gation information generated on-board to users, while the CAPS transfers ground-generated navigation information to users via the communication satellite. In order to achieve accurate Positioning, Velocity and Time (PVT), the CAPS employs the following strategies to over-come the three main obstacles caused by using the communication satellite: (a) by real-time following-up frequency stabilization to achieve stable frequency; (b) by using a single carrier in the transponder with 36 MHz band-width to gain sufficient power; (c) by incorporating Decommissioned Geostationary Orbit communication satellite (DGEO), barometric pressure and Inclined Geostationary Orbit communication satellite (IGSO) to achieve the 3-D posi-tioning. Furthermore, the abundant transponders available on DGEO can be used to realize the large capacity of communication as well as the integrated navigation and communication. With the communication functions incorporated, five new functions appear in the CAPS: (1) combination of navigation and communication; (2) combination of navigation and high accu-racy orbit measurement; (3) combination of navigation message and wide/local area differen-tial processing; (4) combination of the switching of satellites, frequencies and codes; and (5) combination of the navigation message and the barometric altimetry. The CAPS is thereby labelled a PVT5C system of high accuracy. In order to validate the working principle and the performance of the CAPS, a trial system was established in the course of two years at a cost of about 20 million dollars. The trial constellation consists of two GEO satellites located at E87.5°and E110.5°, two DGEOs located at E130° and E142°, as well as barometric altimetry as a virtual

  10. Forecasting front displacements with a satellite based ocean forecasting (SOFT) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, A.; Orfila, A.; Basterretxea, G.; Tintoré, J.; Vizoso, G.; Fornes, A.

    2007-03-01

    Relatively long term time series of satellite data are nowadays available. These spatio-temporal time series of satellite observations can be employed to build empirical models, called satellite based ocean forecasting (SOFT) systems, to forecast certain aspects of future ocean states. The forecast skill of SOFT systems predicting the sea surface temperature (SST) at sub-basin spatial scale (from hundreds to thousand kilometres), has been extensively explored in previous works. Thus, these works were mostly focussed on predicting large scale patterns spatially stationary. At spatial scales smaller than sub-basin (from tens to hundred kilometres), spatio-temporal variability is more complex and propagating structures are frequently present. In this case, traditional SOFT systems based on Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) decompositions could not be optimal prediction systems. Instead, SOFT systems based on Complex Empirical Orthogonal Functions (CEOFs) are, a priori, better candidates to resolve these cases. In this work we study and compare the performance of an EOF and CEOF based SOFT systems forecasting the SST at weekly time scales of a propagating mesoscale structure. The SOFT system was implemented in an area of the Northern Balearic Sea (Western Mediterranean Sea) where a moving frontal structure is recurrently observed. Predictions from both SOFT systems are compared with observations and with the predictions obtained from persistence models. Results indicate that the implemented SOFT systems are superior in terms of predictability to persistence. No substantial differences have been found between the EOF and CEOF-SOFT systems.

  11. Satellite-based climate information within the WMO RA VI Regional Climate Centre on Climate Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obregón, A.; Nitsche, H.; Körber, M.; Kreis, A.; Bissolli, P.; Friedrich, K.; Rösner, S.

    2014-05-01

    The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) established Regional Climate Centres (RCCs) around the world to create science-based climate information on a regional scale within the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS). The paper introduces the satellite component of the WMO Regional Climate Centre on Climate Monitoring (RCC-CM) for Europe and the Middle East. The RCC-CM product portfolio is based on essential climate variables (ECVs) as defined by the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS), spanning the atmospheric (radiation, clouds, water vapour) and terrestrial domains (snow cover, soil moisture). In the first part, the input data sets are briefly described, which are provided by the EUMETSAT (European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites) Satellite Application Facilities (SAF), in particular CM SAF, and by the ESA (European Space Agency) Climate Change Initiative (CCI). In the second part, the derived RCC-CM products are presented, which are divided into two groups: (i) operational monitoring products (e.g. monthly means and anomalies) based on near-real-time environmental data records (EDRs) and (ii) climate information records (e.g. climatologies, time series, trend maps) based on long-term thematic climate data records (TCDRs) with adequate stability, accuracy and homogeneity. The products are provided as maps, statistical plots and gridded data, which are made available through the RCC-CM website (www.dwd.de/rcc-cm).

  12. Massive information sharing among global data centers based on satellite laser communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Longteng; Li, Cong; Liu, Naijin

    2015-10-01

    With the development of big data and information globalization, the requirements of massive information transmitting and sharing among data centers are expanding, especially among those data centers which are extremely far away from each other. In the above field, conventional optical fiber transmission faces many problems such as complex networking, poor security, long node switching delay, high lease and maintain cost and low migration flexibility. Besides, in the near future, data centers may tend to be built in the remote Polar Regions or on the sea for natural cooling. For the above situation, sharing the massive information among global data centers based on satellite laser communication is proposed in this paper. This proposal includes advantage analysis, research of restraining atmosphere interference, etc. At last, by comparison with conventional technology, the research result shows that massive information transmitting and sharing among global data centers based on satellite laser communication has far reaching application potential.

  13. Study on TT&C resources scheduling technique based on inter-satellite link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaosong; Bai, Jian; Zhang, Chunze; Gao, Huili

    2014-11-01

    The navigation constellation will have the capability of supporting Tracking Telemetry and Command (TT&C) operations by inter-satellite link (ISL). The ISL will become an important solution to reduce the shortage of ground TT&C resources. The problems need to be studied urgently in the field of space TT&C network resources scheduling management are how to determine the availability of ISL and how to allocate TT&C resources of ISL. The performance and scheduling constraints of navigation constellation's ISL are analyzed, and three utilization strategies of ISL to perform TT&C operations are proposed. The allocation of TT&C resources based on ISL falls into two successive phases. Firstly, master satellite determination equation is established by using 0-1 Programming model based on the availability matrix. Mathematical method is used to solve the equation to determine the master satellite and the topology of ISL. Secondly, Constraint Programming (CP) model is used to describe the ground TT&C resources scheduling problem with special requirements of TT&C operations based on master satellite, and a heuristic algorithm is designed to solve the CP model. The equations and algorithm are verified by simulation examples. The algorithm of TT&C resources scheduling based on ISL has realized the synthesized usage of both the ISL and ground resources on TT&C field. This algorithm can improve TT&C supports of territorial ground TT&C network for global navigation constellation, and provides technical reference for the TT&C mission planning of global constellation by using ISL.

  14. Evaluation of Multiple Satellite-Based Precipitation Products over Complex Topography

    OpenAIRE

    Derin, Yagmur; Yilmaz, Koray Kamil

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the performance of four satellite-based precipitation (SBP) products over the western Black Sea region of Turkey, a region characterized by complex topography that exerts strong controls on the precipitation regime. The four SBP products include the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis version 7 experimental near-real-time product (TMPA-7RT) and postreal-time research-quality product (TMPA-7A), the Climate Prediction Center morp...

  15. Aerosol climatology over Nile Delta based on MODIS, MISR and OMI satellite data

    OpenAIRE

    H. S. Marey; J. C. Gille; H. M. El-Askary; Shalaby, E. A.; M. E. El-Raey

    2011-01-01

    Since 1999 Cairo and the Nile delta region have suffered from air pollution episodes called the "black cloud" during the fall season. These have been attributed to either burning of agriculture waste or long-range transport of desert dust. Here we present a detailed analysis of the optical and microphysical aerosol properties, based on satellite data. Monthly mean values of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm were examined for the 10 yr ...

  16. Satellite-based assessment of climate controls on US burned area

    OpenAIRE

    D. C. Morton; G. J. Collatz; Wang, D.; Randerson, J. T.; Giglio, L.; Chen, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Climate regulates fire activity through the buildup and drying of fuels and the conditions for fire ignition and spread. Understanding the dynamics of contemporary climate–fire relationships at national and sub-national scales is critical to assess the likelihood of changes in future fire activity and the potential options for mitigation and adaptation. Here, we conducted the first national assessment of climate controls on US fire activity using two satellite-based estimates of monthly burne...

  17. Satellite Based Downward Long Wave Radiation by Various Models in Northeast Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Chanyang Sur; Hyunwoo Kim; and Minha Choi

    2014-01-01

    Satellite-based downward long wave radiation measurement under clear sky conditions in Northeast Asia was conducted using five well-known physical models (Brunt 1932, Idso and Jackson 1969, Brutsaert 1975, Satterlund 1979, Prata 1996) with a newly proposed global Rld model (Abramowitz et al. 2012). Data from two flux towers in South Korea were used to validate downward long wave radiation. Moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) atmospheric profile products were used to develop ...

  18. Air traffic management system design using satellite based geo-positioning and communications assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horkin, Phil

    1995-01-01

    The current FAA and ICAO FANS vision of Air Traffic Management will transition the functions of Communications, Navigation, and Surveillance to satellite based assets in the 21st century. Fundamental to widespread acceptance of this vision is a geo-positioning system that can provide worldwide access with best case differential GPS performance, but without the associated problems. A robust communications capability linking-up aircraft and towers to meet the voice and data requirements is also essential. The current GPS constellation does not provide continuous global coverage with a sufficient number of satellites to meet the precision landing requirements as set by the world community. Periodic loss of the minimum number of satellites in view creates an integrity problem, which prevents GPS from becoming the primary system for navigation. Furthermore, there is reluctance on the part of many countries to depend on assets like GPS and GLONASS which are controlled by military communities. This paper addresses these concerns and provides a system solving the key issues associated with navigation, automatic dependent surveillance, and flexible communications. It contains an independent GPS-like navigation system with 27 satellites providing global coverage with a minimum of six in view at all times. Robust communications is provided by a network of TDMA/FDMA communications payloads contained on these satellites. This network can support simultaneous communications for up to 30,000 links, nearly enough to simultaneously support three times the current global fleet of jumbo air passenger aircraft. All of the required hardware is directly traceable to existing designs.

  19. A New Algorithm for the Satellite-Based Retrieval of Solar Surface Irradiance in Spectral Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Hammer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Accurate solar surface irradiance data is a prerequisite for an efficient planning and operation of solar energy systems. Further, it is essential for climate monitoring and analysis. Recently, the demand on information about spectrally resolved solar surface irradiance has grown. As surface measurements are rare, satellite derived information with high accuracy might fill this gap. This paper describes a new approach for the retrieval of spectrally resolved solar surface irradiance from satellite data. The method combines a eigenvector-hybrid look-up table approach for the clear sky case with satellite derived cloud transmission (Heliosat method. The eigenvector LUT approach is already used to retrieve the broadband solar surface irradiance of data sets provided by the Climate Monitoring Satellite Application Facility (CM-SAF. This paper describes the extension of this approach to wavelength bands and the combination with spectrally resolved cloud transmission values derived with radiative transfer corrections of the broadband cloud transmission. Thus, the new approach is based on radiative transfer modeling and enables the use of extended information about the atmospheric state, among others, to resolve the effect of water vapor and ozone absorption bands. The method is validated with spectrally resolved measurements from two sites in Europe and by comparison with radiative transfer calculations. The validation results demonstrate the ability of the method to retrieve accurate spectrally resolved irradiance from satellites. The accuracy is in the range of the uncertainty of surface measurements, with exception of the UV and NIR ( ≥ 1200 nm part of the spectrum, where higher deviations occur.

  20. An emission source inversion model based on satellite data and its application in air quality forecasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims at constructing an emission source inversion model using a variational processing method and adaptive nudging scheme for the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) based on satellite data to investigate the applicability of high resolution OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) column concentration data for air quality forecasts over the North China. The results show a reasonable consistency and good correlation between the spatial distributions of NO2 from surface and OMI satellite measurements in both winter and summer. Such OMI products may be used to implement integrated variational analysis based on observation data on the ground. With linear and variational corrections made, the spatial distribution of OMI NO2 clearly revealed more localized distributing characteristics of NO2 concentration. With such information, emission sources in the southwest and southeast of North China are found to have greater impacts on air quality in Beijing. When the retrieved emission source inventory based on high-resolution OMI NO2 data was used, the coupled Weather Research Forecasting CMAQ model (WRF-CMAQ) performed significantly better in forecasting NO2 concentration level and its tendency as reflected by the more consistencies between the NO2 concentrations from surface observation and model result. In conclusion, satellite data are particularly important for simulating NO2 concentrations on urban and street-block scale. High-resolution OMI NO2 data are applicable for inversing NOx emission source inventory, assessing the regional pollution status and pollution control strategy, and improving the model forecasting results on urban scale.

  1. Global biogeography of microbial nitrogen-cycling traits in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michaeline B; Martiny, Adam C; Martiny, Jennifer B H

    2016-07-19

    Microorganisms drive much of the Earth's nitrogen (N) cycle, but we still lack a global overview of the abundance and composition of the microorganisms carrying out soil N processes. To address this gap, we characterized the biogeography of microbial N traits, defined as eight N-cycling pathways, using publically available soil metagenomes. The relative frequency of N pathways varied consistently across soils, such that the frequencies of the individual N pathways were positively correlated across the soil samples. Habitat type, soil carbon, and soil N largely explained the total N pathway frequency in a sample. In contrast, we could not identify major drivers of the taxonomic composition of the N functional groups. Further, the dominant genera encoding a pathway were generally similar among habitat types. The soil samples also revealed an unexpectedly high frequency of bacteria carrying the pathways required for dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium, a little-studied N process in soil. Finally, phylogenetic analysis showed that some microbial groups seem to be N-cycling specialists or generalists. For instance, taxa within the Deltaproteobacteria encoded all eight N pathways, whereas those within the Cyanobacteria primarily encoded three pathways. Overall, this trait-based approach provides a baseline for investigating the relationship between microbial diversity and N cycling across global soils. PMID:27432978

  2. Biogeography of a human oral microbiome at the micron scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Welch, Jessica L; Rossetti, Blair J; Rieken, Christopher W; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Borisy, Gary G

    2016-02-01

    The spatial organization of complex natural microbiomes is critical to understanding the interactions of the individual taxa that comprise a community. Although the revolution in DNA sequencing has provided an abundance of genomic-level information, the biogeography of microbiomes is almost entirely uncharted at the micron scale. Using spectral imaging fluorescence in situ hybridization as guided by metagenomic sequence analysis, we have discovered a distinctive, multigenus consortium in the microbiome of supragingival dental plaque. The consortium consists of a radially arranged, nine-taxon structure organized around cells of filamentous corynebacteria. The consortium ranges in size from a few tens to a few hundreds of microns in radius and is spatially differentiated. Within the structure, individual taxa are localized at the micron scale in ways suggestive of their functional niche in the consortium. For example, anaerobic taxa tend to be in the interior, whereas facultative or obligate aerobes tend to be at the periphery of the consortium. Consumers and producers of certain metabolites, such as lactate, tend to be near each other. Based on our observations and the literature, we propose a model for plaque microbiome development and maintenance consistent with known metabolic, adherence, and environmental considerations. The consortium illustrates how complex structural organization can emerge from the micron-scale interactions of its constituent organisms. The understanding that plaque community organization is an emergent phenomenon offers a perspective that is general in nature and applicable to other microbiomes. PMID:26811460

  3. Reconstructing ancestral ranges in historical biogeography: properties and prospects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kristin S. LAMM; Benjamin D. REDELINGS

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a proliferation of quantitative methods for biogeographic inference. In particular, novel parametric approaches represent exciting new opportunities for the study of range evolution. Here, we review a selection of current methods for biogeographic analysis and discuss their respective properties. These methods include generalized parsimony approaches, weighted ancestral area analysis, dispersal-vicariance analysis, the dispersal-extinction-cladogenesis model and other maximum likelihood approaches, and Bayesian stochastic mapping of ancestral ranges, including a novel approach to inferring range evolution in the context of island biogeography. Some of these methods were developed specifically for problems of ancestral range reconstruction, whereas others were designed for more general problems of character state reconstruction and subsequently applied to the study of ancestral ranges. Methods for reconstructing ancestral history on a phylogenetic tree differ not only in the types of ancestral range states that are allowed, but also in the various historical events that may change the ancestral ranges. We explore how the form of allowed ancestral ranges and allowed transitions can both affect the outcome of ancestral range estimation. Finally, we mention some promising avenues for future work in the development of model-based approaches to biogeographic analysis.

  4. Biogeography and divergence times in the mulberry family (Moraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerega, Nyree J C; Clement, Wendy L; Datwyler, Shannon L; Weiblen, George D

    2005-11-01

    The biogeographical history of the mulberry family (Moraceae) was investigated using phylogenetic inferences from nuclear and chloroplast DNA, molecular dating with multiple fossil calibrations, and independent geological evidence. The Moraceae are centered in the tropics which has invited the hypothesis that the family has Gondwanan origins and extant distribution is the result of vicariance due to the break-up of Gondwana. However, the cosmopolitan distribution of Moraceae suggests a more complicated biogeographical history. The timing and location of Moraceae diversification also bears on the origin of the fig pollination mutualism, a model for the study of coevolution and specialization. Recent molecular dating of pollinating fig wasps suggested that an ancient Gondwanan origin coupled with vicariance and dispersal could account for the present day distribution of the mutualism. Here, we provide the first assessment of this hypothesis based on dating of figs and their relatives. Minimum age estimates suggest that the Moraceae had diversified by at least the mid-Cretaceous and major clades including the figs may have radiated during the Tertiary after the break-up of Gondwanaland. Molecular evidence together with Eurasian fossils suggest that the early diversification of Moraceae in Eurasia and subsequent migration into the southern hemisphere is at least as plausible as the Gondwanan hypothesis. These findings invite a reevaluation of the biogeography of fig pollination and highlight the need for incorporating multiple sources of evidence in biogeographical reconstructions.

  5. Implementing earth observation and advanced satellite based atmospheric sounders for water resource and climate modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boegh, E.; Dellwik, Ebba; Hahmann, Andrea N.;

    This paper discusses preliminary remote sensing (MODIS) based hydrological modelling results for the Danish island Sjælland (7330 km2) in relation to project objectives and methodologies of a new research project “Implementing Earth observation and advanced satellite based atmospheric sounders...... for effective land surface representation in water resource modeling” (2009- 2012). The purpose of the new research project is to develop remote sensing based model tools capable of quantifying the relative effects of site-specific land use change and climate variability at different spatial scales...

  6. Satellite-advection based solar forecasting: lessons learned and progress towards probabalistic solar forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Using satellite observations from GOES-E and GOES-W platforms in concert with GFS-derived cloud-level winds and a standalone radiative transfer model, an advection-derived forecast for surface GHI over the continental United States, with intercomparison between forecasts for four zones over the CONUS and Central Pacific with SURFRAD results. Primary sources for error in advection-based forecasts, primarily driven by false- or mistimed ramp events are discussed, with identification of error sources quantified along with techniques used to improve advection-based forecasts to approximately 10% MAE for designated surface locations. Development of a blended steering wind product utilizing NWP output combined with satellite-derived winds from AMV techniques to improve 0-1 hour advection forecasts will be discussed. Additionally, the use of two years' of solar forecast observations in the development of a prototype probablistic forecast for ramp events will be shown, with the intent of increasing the use of satellite-derived forecasts for grid operators and optimizing integration of renewable resources into the power grid. Elements of the work were developed under the 'Public-Private-Academic Partnership to Advance Solar Power Forecasting' project spearheaded by the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

  7. Simulation of seagrass bed mapping by satellite images based on the radiative transfer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagawa, Tatsuyuki; Komatsu, Teruhisa

    2015-06-01

    Seagrass and seaweed beds play important roles in coastal marine ecosystems. They are food sources and habitats for many marine organisms, and influence the physical, chemical, and biological environment. They are sensitive to human impacts such as reclamation and pollution. Therefore, their management and preservation are necessary for a healthy coastal environment. Satellite remote sensing is a useful tool for mapping and monitoring seagrass beds. The efficiency of seagrass mapping, seagrass bed classification in particular, has been evaluated by mapping accuracy using an error matrix. However, mapping accuracies are influenced by coastal environments such as seawater transparency, bathymetry, and substrate type. Coastal management requires sufficient accuracy and an understanding of mapping limitations for monitoring coastal habitats including seagrass beds. Previous studies are mainly based on case studies in specific regions and seasons. Extensive data are required to generalise assessments of classification accuracy from case studies, which has proven difficult. This study aims to build a simulator based on a radiative transfer model to produce modelled satellite images and assess the visual detectability of seagrass beds under different transparencies and seagrass coverages, as well as to examine mapping limitations and classification accuracy. Our simulations led to the development of a model of water transparency and the mapping of depth limits and indicated the possibility for seagrass density mapping under certain ideal conditions. The results show that modelling satellite images is useful in evaluating the accuracy of classification and that establishing seagrass bed monitoring by remote sensing is a reliable tool.

  8. The first estimates of global nucleation mode aerosol concentrations based on satellite measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kulmala

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosols play a key role in the Earth's climate system by scattering and absorbing solar radiation and by acting as cloud condensation nuclei. Satellites are increasingly used to obtain information on properties of aerosol particles with a diameter larger than about 100 nm. However, new aerosol particles formed by nucleation are initially much smaller and grow into the optically active size range on time scales of many hours. In this paper we derive proxies, based on process understanding and ground-based observations, to determine the concentrations of these new particles and their spatial distribution using satellite data. The results are applied to provide seasonal variation of nucleation mode concentration. The proxies describe the concentration of nucleation mode particles over continents. The source rates are related to both regional nucleation and nucleation associated with more restricted sources. The global pattern of nucleation mode particle number concentration predicted by satellite data using our proxies is compared qualitatively against both observations and global model simulations.

  9. Evaluation of cloud base height measurements from ceilometer CL31 and MODIS satellite over Ahmedabad, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sharma

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Clouds play a tangible role in the Earth's atmosphere and in particular, the cloud base height (CBH which is linked to cloud type is one of the important characteristic to describe the influence of clouds on the environment. In present study, CBH observations from ceilometer CL31 have been extensively studied during May 2013 to January 2015 over Ahmedabad (23.03° N, 72.54° E, India. A detail comparison has been performed with the use of ground-based CBH measurements from ceilometer CL31 and CBH retrieved from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer onboard Aqua and Terra satellite. Some interesting features of cloud dynamics viz. strong downdraft and updraft have been observed over Ahmedabad which revealed different cloud characteristics during monsoon and post-monsoon periods. CBH shows seasonal variation during Indian summer monsoon and post-monsoon period. Results indicate that ceilometer is one of the excellent instruments to precisely detect low and mid-level clouds and MODIS satellite provides accurate retrieval of high-level clouds over this region. The CBH algorithm used for MODIS satellite is also able to capture the low-level clouds.

  10. Pc5 Oscillation Analysis by the Satellite and Ground-Based Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. Potapov; T. Polyushkina; T. L. Zhang; H. Zhao; A. Guglielmi; J. Kultima

    2005-01-01

    Large amplitude Pc5 event was observed in the space and on ground on August 3, 2001, about three hours after contact of the strong discontinuity in the solar wind with the magnetosphere according to data from ACE and Wind satellites. The Pc5 amplitude was as high as 15 nT in the tail of magnetosphere and about 5 nT at the ground based stations. In the magnetosphere Pc5 waves were observed by Cluster and Polar satellites, which occupied positions in the morning part of the near tail at the close field lines but were parted by distance of 11.5 Re, mainly along the x-axis of the GSM coordinate system. Both compressional and transverse components of the Pc5 wave activity were observed in the space, with the transverse component having the larger amplitude. Time delay between the Cluster and Polar satellites was about 8 minutes, which could be interpreted as a wave propagation from the geomagnetic tail to the Earth with the 150km/s group velocity.The ground-based Pc5 activity was analysed by using data from the Image magnetometer network. Doubtless demonstrations of a field line resonant structure were found in variations of amplitude and polarization with latitude. Finnish chain of search coil magnetometers observed modulated Pc1 emission simultaneously with the Pc5 wave train. A possibility of non-linear impact of Pc5 wave energy on the plasma and waves in the magnetosphere is discussed.

  11. Evaluation of cloud base height measurements from Ceilometer CL31 and MODIS satellite over Ahmedabad, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Som; Vaishnav, Rajesh; Shukla, Munn V.; Kumar, Prashant; Kumar, Prateek; Thapliyal, Pradeep K.; Lal, Shyam; Acharya, Yashwant B.

    2016-02-01

    Clouds play a tangible role in the Earth's atmosphere and in particular, the cloud base height (CBH), which is linked to cloud type, is one of the most important characteristics to describe the influence of clouds on the environment. In the present study, CBH observations from Ceilometer CL31 were extensively studied during May 2013 to January 2015 over Ahmedabad (23.03° N, 72.54° E), India. A detailed comparison has been performed with the use of ground-based CBH measurements from Ceilometer CL31 and CBH retrieved from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) onboard Aqua and Terra satellite. CBH retrieved from MODIS is ˜ 1.955 and ˜ 1.093 km on 25 July 2014 and 1 January 2015 respectively, which matches well with ceilometer-measured CBH ( ˜ 1.92 and ˜ 1.097 km). Some interesting features of cloud dynamics viz. strong downdraft and updraft have been observed over Ahmedabad which revealed different cloud characteristics during monsoon and post-monsoon periods. CBH shows seasonal variation during the Indian summer monsoon and post-monsoon period. Results indicate that the ceilometer is an excellent instrument to precisely detect low- and mid-level clouds, and the MODIS satellite provides accurate retrieval of high-level clouds over this region. The CBH algorithm used for the MODIS satellite is also able to capture the low-level clouds.

  12. Computational Research on Mobile Pastoralism Using Agent-Based Modeling and Satellite Imagery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuto Sakamoto

    Full Text Available Dryland pastoralism has long attracted considerable attention from researchers in diverse fields. However, rigorous formal study is made difficult by the high level of mobility of pastoralists as well as by the sizable spatio-temporal variability of their environment. This article presents a new computational approach for studying mobile pastoralism that overcomes these issues. Combining multi-temporal satellite images and agent-based modeling allows a comprehensive examination of pastoral resource access over a realistic dryland landscape with unpredictable ecological dynamics. The article demonstrates the analytical potential of this approach through its application to mobile pastoralism in northeast Nigeria. Employing more than 100 satellite images of the area, extensive simulations are conducted under a wide array of circumstances, including different land-use constraints. The simulation results reveal complex dependencies of pastoral resource access on these circumstances along with persistent patterns of seasonal land use observed at the macro level.

  13. Computational Research on Mobile Pastoralism Using Agent-Based Modeling and Satellite Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Takuto

    2016-01-01

    Dryland pastoralism has long attracted considerable attention from researchers in diverse fields. However, rigorous formal study is made difficult by the high level of mobility of pastoralists as well as by the sizable spatio-temporal variability of their environment. This article presents a new computational approach for studying mobile pastoralism that overcomes these issues. Combining multi-temporal satellite images and agent-based modeling allows a comprehensive examination of pastoral resource access over a realistic dryland landscape with unpredictable ecological dynamics. The article demonstrates the analytical potential of this approach through its application to mobile pastoralism in northeast Nigeria. Employing more than 100 satellite images of the area, extensive simulations are conducted under a wide array of circumstances, including different land-use constraints. The simulation results reveal complex dependencies of pastoral resource access on these circumstances along with persistent patterns of seasonal land use observed at the macro level. PMID:26963526

  14. A Large Scale Problem Based Learning inter-European Student Satellite Construction Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard; Alminde, Lars; Bisgaard, Morten;

    2006-01-01

    . The satellite was successfully launched on October 27th 2005 (http://www.express.space.aau.dk). The project was a student driven project with student project responsibility adding at lot of international experiences and project management skills to the outcome of more traditional one semester, single group......A LARGE SCALE PROBLEM BASED LEARNING INTER-EUROPEAN STUDENT SATELLITE CONSTRUCTION PROJECT This paper describes the pedagogical outcome of a large scale PBL experiment. ESA (European Space Agency) Education Office launched January 2004 an ambitious project: Let students from all over Europe build...... management and system integration, they delivered four subsystems including the main computer and the communication system and finally they developed two ground stations, one at Aalborg University and one remote controlled ground station at Svaldbard in the North Atlantic. The launch operations were...

  15. A university-based distributed satellite mission control network for operating professional space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitts, Christopher; Rasay, Mike

    2016-03-01

    For more than a decade, Santa Clara University's Robotic Systems Laboratory has operated a unique, distributed, internet-based command and control network for providing professional satellite mission control services for a variety of government and industry space missions. The system has been developed and is operated by students who become critical members of the mission teams throughout the development, test, and on-orbit phases of these missions. The mission control system also supports research in satellite control technology and hands-on student aerospace education. This system serves as a benchmark for its comprehensive nature, its student-centric nature, its ability to support NASA and industry space missions, and its longevity in providing a consistent level of professional services. This paper highlights the unique features of this program, reviews the network's design and the supported spacecraft missions, and describes the critical programmatic features of the program that support the control of professional space missions.

  16. A Quantitative Evaluation Method of Satellite Network Control Protocol based on Multi-attribute Utility Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Jun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Satellite network control protocol plays an important part in satellite communication system. Different design schemes of protocol have very different protocol attribute values. It is difficult to select a proper protocol solution from many solution alternatives with quite different protocol attributes, especially some mutual conflicted protocol attributes. Thereupon, this paper provides a multi-attribute utility theory based quantitative method to evaluate these protocol design schemes, in order to make a wise decision on how to select protocol solution. This method introduces several critical protocol attributes by utilizing a Petri net model, and aggregates them into a decision making matrix. On the basis of multi-attribute utility theory, quantitative evaluation values are achieved with the support of user attribute preference weight vectors. In the end, the paper presents experiments and discussions.

  17. An Experimental Biotelemetric Study Based on Satellite Tracking During Post-nesting Migrations of Green Turtles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A biotelemetry experiment is conducted to study the migrant behavior of green turtles (Chelonia mydas) in South China Sea and acquire the physical environment data. The method in use is to track the post-nesting migrant routes of green turtles through the satellite linked transmitters attached on the back of turtles and the global satellite signal transmitting system of Argos. We obtained the posinestions of the post-nesting migrant routes of three green turtles and environment data, which are important in conservation of green turtles and the research of physical oceanography. Based on the test, the concept, principle and method of biotelemetry are also introduced in this paper with a discussion of the further development of this technique and its applying prospection in future.

  18. Satellite-based detection of volcanic sulphur dioxide from recent eruptions in Central and South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Loyola

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic eruptions can emit large amounts of rock fragments and fine particles (ash into the atmosphere, as well as several gases, including sulphur dioxide (SO2. These ejecta and emissions are a major natural hazard, not only to the local population, but also to the infrastructure in the vicinity of volcanoes and to aviation. Here, we describe a methodology to retrieve quantitative information about volcanic SO2 plumes from satellite-borne measurements in the UV/Visible spectral range. The combination of a satellite-based SO2 detection scheme and a state-of-the-art 3D trajectory model enables us to confirm the volcanic origin of trace gas signals and to estimate the plume height and the effective emission height. This is demonstrated by case-studies for four selected volcanic eruptions in South and Central America, using the GOME, SCIAMACHY and GOME-2 instruments.

  19. Satellite Remote Sensing-Based In-Season Diagnosis of Rice Nitrogen Status in Northeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanyu Huang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Rice farming in Northeast China is crucially important for China’s food security and sustainable development. A key challenge is how to optimize nitrogen (N management to ensure high yield production while improving N use efficiency and protecting the environment. Handheld chlorophyll meter (CM and active crop canopy sensors have been used to improve rice N management in this region. However, these technologies are still time consuming for large-scale applications. Satellite remote sensing provides a promising technology for large-scale crop growth monitoring and precision management. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of using FORMOSAT-2 satellite images to diagnose rice N status for guiding topdressing N application at the stem elongation stage in Northeast China. Five farmers’ fields (three in 2011 and two in 2012 were selected from the Qixing Farm in Heilongjiang Province of Northeast China. FORMOSAT-2 satellite images were collected in late June. Simultaneously, 92 field samples were collected and six agronomic variables, including aboveground biomass, leaf area index (LAI, plant N concentration (PNC, plant N uptake (PNU, CM readings and N nutrition index (NNI defined as the ratio of actual PNC and critical PNC, were determined. Based on the FORMOSAT-2 imagery, a total of 50 vegetation indices (VIs were computed and correlated with the field-based agronomic variables. Results indicated that 45% of NNI variability could be explained using Ratio Vegetation Index 3 (RVI3 directly across years. A more practical and promising approach was proposed by using satellite remote sensing to estimate aboveground biomass and PNU at the panicle initiation stage and then using these two variables to estimate NNI indirectly (R2 = 0.52 across years. Further, the difference between the estimated PNU and the critical PNU can be used to guide the topdressing N application rate adjustments.

  20. OPTIS a satellite-based test of Special and General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Lämmerzahl, C; Peters, A; Schiller, S; Dittus, Hansj\\"org; Peters, Achim; Schiller, Stephan

    2001-01-01

    A new satellite based test of Special and General Relativity is proposed. For the Michelson-Morley experiment we expect an improvement of at least three orders of magnitude, and for the Kennedy-Thorndike experiment an improvement of more than one order of magnitude. Furthermore, an improvement by two orders of the test of the universality of the gravitational red shift by comparison of an atomic clock with an optical clock is projected. The tests are based on ultrastable optical cavities, an atomic clock and a comb generator.

  1. Geo-correction Algorithm Based on Equivalent RD Model for ScanSAR of HJ-1-C Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jia-yin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available HJ-1-C satellite is the first Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR satellite for civilian use in China, and it has a strip and scan mode. According to the characteristics of the ScanSAR of the HJ-1-C satellite, a geo-correction algorithm based on an equivalent RD model has been outlined in this paper on the basis of an ECS image processing algorithm and a traditional Range-Doppler location method. An azimuth mosaic was presented by a time series relationship, then the different burst was stitched by range, and the equivalent parameters were fitted to locations on the RD model. Finally, the ScanSAR image was geo-corrected. The HJ-1-C satellite data results showed that the location accuracy of ScanSAR for the HJ-1-C satellite was less than 100 m, and the geo-correction algorithm was realized in 10 s in fewer than 24 parallel cores.

  2. A simulation study of the ensemble-based data assimilation of satellite-borne lidar aerosol observations

    OpenAIRE

    Sekiyama, T. T.; T. Y. Tanaka; T. Miyoshi

    2012-01-01

    A four-dimensional ensemble-based data assimilation system was assessed by observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs), in which the CALIPSO satellite was emulated via simulated satellite-borne lidar aerosol observations. Its performance over athree-month period was validated according to the Method for Object-based Diagnostic Evaluation (MODE), using aerosol optical thickness (AOT) distributions in East Asia as the objects of analysis. Consequently, this data a...

  3. Cloud invigoration and suppression by aerosols over the tropical region based on satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Niu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols may modify cloud properties and precipitation via a variety of mechanisms with varying and contradicting consequences. Using a large ensemble of satellite data acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer onboard the Earth Observing System's Aqua platform, the CloudSat cloud profiling radar and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO satellite over the tropical oceans, we identified two distinct responses of clouds and precipitation to increases in aerosol loading. Cloud-top temperatures decrease significantly with increasing aerosol index (AI over oceans and aerosol optical depth (AOT over land for mixed-phase clouds with warm cloud bases; no significant changes were found for liquid clouds. The distinct responses are explained by two mechanisms, namely, the aerosol invigoration effect and the microphysical effect. Aerosols can significantly invigorate convection mainly through ice processes, while precipitation from liquid clouds is suppressed through aerosol microphysical processes. Precipitation rates are found to increase with AI for mixed-phase clouds, but decrease for liquid clouds, suggesting that the dominant effect differs for the two types of clouds. These effects change the overall distribution of precipitation rates, leading to more or heavier rains in dirty environments than in cleaner ones.

  4. Satellite-based detection of global urban heat-island temperature influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, K.P.; Adegoke, Jimmy O.; Owen, T.W.; Elvidge, C.D.

    2002-01-01

    This study utilizes a satellite-based methodology to assess the urban heat-island influence during warm season months for over 4400 stations included in the Global Historical Climatology Network of climate stations. The methodology includes local and regional satellite retrievals of an indicator of the presence green photosynthetically active vegetation at and around the stations. The difference in local and regional samples of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is used to estimate differences in mean air temperature. Stations classified as urban averaged 0.90??C (N. Hemisphere) and 0.92??C (S. Hemisphere) warmer than the surrounding environment on the basis of the NDVI-derived temperature estimates. Additionally, stations classified as rural averaged 0.19??C (N. Hemisphere) and 0.16??C (S. Hemisphere) warmer than the surrounding environment. The NDVI-derived temperature estimates were found to be in reasonable agreement with temperature differences observed between climate stations. The results suggest that satellite-derived data sets can be used to estimate the urban heat-island temperature influence on a global basis and that a more detailed analysis of rural stations and their surrounding environment may be necessary to assure that temperature trends derived from assumed rural environments are not influenced by changes in land use/land cover. Copyright 2002 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Satellite-based enhancement of archaeological marks through data fusion techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasaponara, Rosa; Masini, Nicola; Aiazzi, Bruno; Alparone, Luciano; Baronti, Stefano

    2008-10-01

    The application of space technology to archaeological research has been paid great attention worldwide, mainly because the current availability of very high resolution (VHR) satellite imagery, such as, IKONOS (1999) and QuickBird (2001), provide valuable data for searching large areas to find potential archaeological sites. Data from VHR satellite can be very useful for the identification, management and documentation of archaeological resources. Archaeological investigation based on the use of VHR satellite images may take benefits from the integration and synergic use of both panchromatic and multispectral data. This can be achieved by using pansharpening techniques, which allow multispectral and panchromatic images to be merged. The two basic frameworks of pansharpening techniques are Component Substitution (CS), such as Intensity-Hue-Saturation (IHS) Gram-Schmidt (GS), and multiresolution analysis (MRA), such as wavelets and Laplacian pyramids (LP). In this paper, both Gram-Schmidt and Laplacian pyramids with context adaptive (CA) detail injection models were used. QB images were processed for a relevant archaeological area in Southern Italy, the ancient Siris-Heraclea, a very significant test area because it is characterized by the presence of both surface and subsurface ancient remains. Outcomes of different pansharpening techniques have been qualitatively evaluated for both surface and subsurface remains. The visual inspection clearly suggests that the quantitative evaluation of the fusion performance for archaeological applications is a critical issue, and "ad hoc" local (i.e. context-adaptive) indices need to be developed.

  6. Development and validation of satellite-based estimates of surface visibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, J.; Pierce, R. B.; Lenzen, A.

    2016-02-01

    A satellite-based surface visibility retrieval has been developed using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements as a proxy for Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) data from the next generation of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES-R). The retrieval uses a multiple linear regression approach to relate satellite aerosol optical depth, fog/low cloud probability and thickness retrievals, and meteorological variables from numerical weather prediction forecasts to National Weather Service Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) surface visibility measurements. Validation using independent ASOS measurements shows that the GOES-R ABI surface visibility retrieval (V) has an overall success rate of 64.5 % for classifying clear (V ≥ 30 km), moderate (10 km ≤ V < 30 km), low (2 km ≤ V < 10 km), and poor (V < 2 km) visibilities and shows the most skill during June through September, when Heidke skill scores are between 0.2 and 0.4. We demonstrate that the aerosol (clear-sky) component of the GOES-R ABI visibility retrieval can be used to augment measurements from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and National Park Service (NPS) Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network and provide useful information to the regional planning offices responsible for developing mitigation strategies required under the EPA's Regional Haze Rule, particularly during regional haze events associated with smoke from wildfires.

  7. Multiscale Estimation of Leaf Area Index from Satellite Observations Based on an Ensemble Multiscale Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyi Jiang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, multiple leaf area index (LAI products retrieved from remote sensing data are widely used in crop growth monitoring, land-surface process simulation and studies of climate change. However, most LAI products are only retrieved from individual satellite observations, which may result in spatial-temporal discontinuities and low accuracy in these products. In this paper, a new method was developed to simultaneously retrieve multiscale LAI data from satellite observations with different spatial resolutions based on an ensemble multiscale filter (EnMsF. The LAI average values corresponding to the date of satellite observations were calculated from the multi-year Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS LAI product and were used as a priori knowledge for LAI in order to construct an initial ensemble multiscale tree (EnMsT. Satellite observations obtained at different spatial resolutions were then applied to update the LAI values at each node of the EnMsT using a two-sweep filtering procedure. Next, the retrieved LAI values at the finest scale were used as a priori knowledge for LAI for the new round of construction and updating of the EnMsT, until the sum of the difference of LAI values at each node of the EnMsT between two adjacent updates is less than a given threshold. The method was tested using Thematic Mapper (TM or Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+ surface reflectance data and MODIS surface reflectance data from five sites that have different vegetation types. The results demonstrate that the retrieved LAI values for each spatial resolution were in good agreement with the aggregated LAI reference map values for the corresponding spatial resolution. The retrieved LAI values at the coarsest scale provided better accuracy with the aggregated LAI reference map values (root mean square error (RMSE = 0.45 compared with that obtained from the MODIS LAI values (RMSE = 1.30.

  8. Satellite-based estimate of aerosol direct radiative effect over the South-East Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, L.; Bréon, F.-M.

    2013-09-01

    The net effect of aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing (DRF) is the balance between the scattering effect that reflects solar radiation back to space (cooling), and the absorption that decreases the reflected sunlight (warming). The amplitude of these two effects and their balance depends on the aerosol load, its absorptivity, the cloud fraction and the respective position of aerosol and cloud layers. In this study, we use the information provided by CALIOP (CALIPSO satellite) and MODIS (AQUA satellite) instruments as input data to a Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTM) and quantify the shortwave (SW) aerosol direct atmospheric forcing, over the South-East Atlantic. The combination of the passive and active measurements allows estimates of the horizontal and vertical distributions of the aerosol and cloud parameters. We use a parametrization of the Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) based on the satellite-derived Angstrom coefficient. The South East Atlantic is a particular region, where bright stratocumulus clouds are often topped by absorbing smoke particles. Results from radiative transfer simulations confirm the similar amplitude of the cooling effect, due to light scattering by the aerosols, and the warming effect, due to the absorption by the same particles. Over six years of satellite retrievals, from 2005 to 2010, the South-East Atlantic all-sky SW DRF is -0.03 W m-2, with a spatial standard deviation of 8.03 W m-2. In good agreement with previous estimates, statistics show that a cloud fraction larger than 0.5 is generally associated with positive all-sky DRF. In case of cloudy-sky and aerosol located only above the cloud top, a SSA larger than 0.91 and cloud optical thickness larger than 4 can be considered as threshold values, beyond which the resulting radiative forcing becomes positive.

  9. Satellite-based estimate of aerosol direct radiative effect over the South-East Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Costantino

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The net effect of aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing (DRF is the balance between the scattering effect that reflects solar radiation back to space (cooling, and the absorption that decreases the reflected sunlight (warming. The amplitude of these two effects and their balance depends on the aerosol load, its absorptivity, the cloud fraction and the respective position of aerosol and cloud layers. In this study, we use the information provided by CALIOP (CALIPSO satellite and MODIS (AQUA satellite instruments as input data to a Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTM and quantify the shortwave (SW aerosol direct atmospheric forcing, over the South-East Atlantic. The combination of the passive and active measurements allows estimates of the horizontal and vertical distributions of the aerosol and cloud parameters. We use a parametrization of the Single Scattering Albedo (SSA based on the satellite-derived Angstrom coefficient. The South East Atlantic is a particular region, where bright stratocumulus clouds are often topped by absorbing smoke particles. Results from radiative transfer simulations confirm the similar amplitude of the cooling effect, due to light scattering by the aerosols, and the warming effect, due to the absorption by the same particles. Over six years of satellite retrievals, from 2005 to 2010, the South-East Atlantic all-sky SW DRF is −0.03 W m−2, with a spatial standard deviation of 8.03 W m−2. In good agreement with previous estimates, statistics show that a cloud fraction larger than 0.5 is generally associated with positive all-sky DRF. In case of cloudy-sky and aerosol located only above the cloud top, a SSA larger than 0.91 and cloud optical thickness larger than 4 can be considered as threshold values, beyond which the resulting radiative forcing becomes positive.

  10. Kalman Filter-based Single-baseline GNSS Data Processing without Pivot Satellite Changing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Baocheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Single-baseline global navigation satellite system (GNSS data are able to be processed into a batch of parameters such as positions, timing information as well as atmospheric delays. The applications of relevance, therefore, consist of relative positioning, time and frequency transfer and so forth. To achieve real-time capability, these parameters are usually estimated by means of Kalman-filter. Moreover, the reliability of these parameters can be further strengthened by forming and then successfully fixing a set of independent double-differenced (DD integer ambiguities. For this purpose, the filter function model is commonly set up based on the DD observation equations (DD filter model. In order to preserve the continuity of the filter, DD filter model needs to explicitly refer to another pivot satellite once the previous one becomes invisible. This thereby implies that, before being predicted to the next epoch, the former filtered DD ambiguity vector has to be “mapped” with respect to the newly-defined pivot satellite. In addition to that, the estimated receiver phase clocks using DD filter model may soak up distinct between-receiver single-differenced (SD ambiguities belonging to different pivot satellites and would thereby be subject to apparent “integer jumps”. In this contribution, SD observation equations involving estimable DD ambiguity parameters are alternatively selected as the filter function model (SD filter model. Our analyses suggest that, both DD and SD filter models are equivalent in theory, but differ from each other as far as their implementations are concerned. Typically, for SD filter model, no effort should be made to map DD ambiguities, thus implying less intensive computational burden and better flexibility than DD filter model. At the same time, receiver phase clocks determined by SD filter model are free from “integer jumps” and thus are particularly beneficial for frequency transfer.

  11. Interference Mitigating Satellite Broadcast Receiver using Reduced Complexity List-Based Detection in Correlated Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Abu-Shaban, Zohair; Mehrpouyan, Hani; Ottersten, Björn; others

    2014-01-01

    The recent commercial trends towards using smaller dish antennas for satellite receivers, and the growing density of broadcasting satellites, necessitate the application of robust adjacent satellite interference (ASI) cancellation schemes. This orbital density growth along with the wider beamwidth of a smaller dish have imposed an overloaded scenario at the satellite receiver, where the number of transmitting satellites exceeds the number of receiving elements at the dish antenna. To ensure s...

  12. Dust aerosol characterization and transport features based on combined ground-based, satellite and model-simulated data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, K.; Devara, P. C. S.; Rao, S. Vijaya Bhaskara; Jayasankar, C. K.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study aerosol characteristics over an urban station in Western India, during a dust event that occurred between 19 and 26 March 2012, with the help of ground-based and satellite measurements and model simulation data. The aerosol parameters are found to change significantly during dust events and they suggest dominance of coarse mode aerosols. The fine mode fraction, size distribution and single scattering albedo reveal that dust (natural) aerosols dominate the anthropogenic aerosols over the study region. Ground-based measurements show drastic reduction in visibility on the dust-laden day (22 March 2012). Additionally, HYSPLIT model and satellite daily data have been used to trace the source, path and spatial extent of dust storm events. Most of the dust aerosols, during the study period, travel from west-to-east pathway from source-to-sink region. Furthermore, aerosol vertical profiles from CALIPSO and synoptic meteorological parameters from ECMWF re-analysis data reveal a layer of thick dust extending from surface to an altitude of about 4 km, and decrease in temperature and increase in specific humidity, respectively. The aerosol radiative forcing calculations indicate more cooling at the surface and warming in the atmosphere during dust event. The results of satellite observations are found to have good consistency with ground-based air quality measurements. Synthesis of satellite data integrated with ground-based observations, supplemented by model analysis, is found to be a promising technique for improved understanding of dust storm phenomenon and its impact on regional climate.

  13. NIR- and SWIR-based on-orbit vicarious calibrations for satellite ocean color sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Menghua; Shi, Wei; Jiang, Lide; Voss, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    The near-infrared (NIR) and shortwave infrared (SWIR)-based atmospheric correction algorithms are used in satellite ocean color data processing, with the SWIR-based algorithm particularly useful for turbid coastal and inland waters. In this study, we describe the NIR- and two SWIR-based on-orbit vicarious calibration approaches for satellite ocean color sensors, and compare results from these three on-orbit vicarious calibrations using satellite measurements from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP). Vicarious calibration gains for VIIRS spectral bands are derived using the in situ normalized water-leaving radiance nLw(λ) spectra from the Marine Optical Buoy (MOBY) in waters off Hawaii. The SWIR vicarious gains are determined using VIIRS measurements from the South Pacific Gyre region, where waters are the clearest and generally stable. Specifically, vicarious gain sets for VIIRS spectral bands of 410, 443, 486, 551, and 671 nm derived from the NIR method using the NIR 745 and 862 nm bands, the SWIR method using the SWIR 1238 and 1601 nm bands, and the SWIR method using the SWIR 1238 and 2257 nm bands are (0.979954, 0.974892, 0.974685, 0.965832, 0.979042), (0.980344, 0.975344, 0.975357, 0.965531, 0.979518), and (0.980820, 0.975609, 0.975761, 0.965888, 0.978576), respectively. Thus, the NIR-based vicarious calibration gains are consistent with those from the two SWIR-based approaches with discrepancies mostly within ~0.05% from three data processing methods. In addition, the NIR vicarious gains (745 and 862 nm) derived from the two SWIR methods are (0.982065, 1.00001) and (0.981811, 1.00000), respectively, with the difference ~0.03% at the NIR 745 nm band. This is the fundamental basis for the NIR-SWIR combined atmospheric correction algorithm, which has been used to derive improved satellite ocean color products over open oceans and turbid coastal/inland waters. Therefore, a unified

  14. NIR- and SWIR-based on-orbit vicarious calibrations for satellite ocean color sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Menghua; Shi, Wei; Jiang, Lide; Voss, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    The near-infrared (NIR) and shortwave infrared (SWIR)-based atmospheric correction algorithms are used in satellite ocean color data processing, with the SWIR-based algorithm particularly useful for turbid coastal and inland waters. In this study, we describe the NIR- and two SWIR-based on-orbit vicarious calibration approaches for satellite ocean color sensors, and compare results from these three on-orbit vicarious calibrations using satellite measurements from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP). Vicarious calibration gains for VIIRS spectral bands are derived using the in situ normalized water-leaving radiance nLw(λ) spectra from the Marine Optical Buoy (MOBY) in waters off Hawaii. The SWIR vicarious gains are determined using VIIRS measurements from the South Pacific Gyre region, where waters are the clearest and generally stable. Specifically, vicarious gain sets for VIIRS spectral bands of 410, 443, 486, 551, and 671 nm derived from the NIR method using the NIR 745 and 862 nm bands, the SWIR method using the SWIR 1238 and 1601 nm bands, and the SWIR method using the SWIR 1238 and 2257 nm bands are (0.979954, 0.974892, 0.974685, 0.965832, 0.979042), (0.980344, 0.975344, 0.975357, 0.965531, 0.979518), and (0.980820, 0.975609, 0.975761, 0.965888, 0.978576), respectively. Thus, the NIR-based vicarious calibration gains are consistent with those from the two SWIR-based approaches with discrepancies mostly within ~0.05% from three data processing methods. In addition, the NIR vicarious gains (745 and 862 nm) derived from the two SWIR methods are (0.982065, 1.00001) and (0.981811, 1.00000), respectively, with the difference ~0.03% at the NIR 745 nm band. This is the fundamental basis for the NIR-SWIR combined atmospheric correction algorithm, which has been used to derive improved satellite ocean color products over open oceans and turbid coastal/inland waters. Therefore, a unified

  15. Countryside biogeography of Neotropical reptiles and amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendenhall, Chase D; Frishkoff, Luke O; Santos-Barrera, Georgina; Pacheco, Jesús; Mesfun, Eyobed; Mendoza Quijano, Fernando; Ehrlich, Paul R; Ceballos, Gerardo; Daily, Gretchen C; Pringle, Robert M

    2014-04-01

    The future of biodiversity and ecosystem services depends largely on the capacity of human-dominated ecosystems to support them, yet this capacity remains largely unknown. Using the framework of countryside biogeography, and working in the Las Cruces system of Coto Brus, Costa Rica, we assessed reptile and amphibian assemblages within four habitats that typify much of the Neotropics: sun coffee plantations (12 sites), pasture (12 sites), remnant forest elements (12 sites), and a larger, contiguous protected forest (3 sites in one forest). Through analysis of 1678 captures of 67 species, we draw four primary conclusions. First, we found that the majority of reptile (60%) and amphibian (70%) species in this study used an array of habitat types, including coffee plantations and actively grazed pastures. Second, we found that coffee plantations and pastures hosted rich, albeit different and less dense, reptile and amphibian biodiversity relative to the 326-ha Las Cruces Forest Reserve and neighboring forest elements. Third, we found that the small ribbons of "countryside forest elements" weaving through farmland collectively increased the effective size of a 326-ha local forest reserve 16-fold for reptiles and 14-fold for amphibians within our 236-km2 study area. Therefore, countryside forest elements, often too small for most remote sensing techniques to identify, are contributing -95% of the available habitat for forest-dependent reptiles and amphibians in our largely human-dominated study region. Fourth, we found large and pond-reproducing amphibians to prefer human-made habitats, whereas small, stream-reproducing, and directly developing species are more dependent on forest elements. Our investigation demonstrates that tropical farming landscapes can support substantial reptile and amphibian biodiversity. Our approach provides a framework for estimating the conservation value of the complex working landscapes that constitute roughly half of the global land surface

  16. GIO-EMS and International Collaboration in Satellite based Emergency Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Jan; Lemoine, Guido; Broglia, Marco

    2013-04-01

    During the last decade, satellite based emergency mapping has developed into a mature operational stage. The European Union's GMES Initial Operations - Emergency Management Service (GIO-EMS), is operational since April 2012. It's set up differs from other mechanisms (for example from the International Charter "Space and Major Disasters"), as it extends fast satellite tasking and delivery with the value adding map production as a single service, which is available, free of charge, to the authorized users of the service. Maps and vector datasets with standard characteristics and formats ranging from post-disaster damage assessment to recovery and disaster prevention are covered by this initiative. Main users of the service are European civil protection authorities and international organizations active in humanitarian aid. All non-sensitive outputs of the service are accessible to the public. The European Commission's in-house science service Joint Research Centre (JRC) is the technical and administrative supervisor of the GIO-EMS. The EC's DG ECHO Monitoring and Information Centre acts as the service's focal point and DG ENTR is responsible for overall service governance. GIO-EMS also aims to contribute to the synergy with similar existing mechanisms at national and international level. The usage of satellite data for emergency mapping has increased during the last years and this trend is expected to continue because of easier accessibility to suitable satellite and other relevant data in the near future. Furthermore, the data and analyses coming from volunteer emergency mapping communities are expected to further enrich the content of such cartographic products. In the case of major disasters the parallel activity of more providers is likely to generate non-optimal use of resources, e.g. unnecessary duplication; whereas coordination may lead to reduced time needed to cover the disaster area. Furthermore the abundant number of geospatial products of different

  17. A Web-based Google-Earth Coincident Imaging Tool for Satellite Calibration and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killough, B. D.; Chander, G.; Gowda, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is coordinating international efforts to build a Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) to meet the needs of its nine “Societal Benefit Areas”, of which the most demanding, in terms of accuracy, is climate. To accomplish this vision, satellite on-orbit and ground-based data calibration and validation (Cal/Val) of Earth observation measurements are critical to our scientific understanding of the Earth system. Existing tools supporting space mission Cal/Val are often developed for specific campaigns or events with little desire for broad application. This paper describes a web-based Google-Earth based tool for the calculation of coincident satellite observations with the intention to support a diverse international group of satellite missions to improve data continuity, interoperability and data fusion. The Committee on Earth Observing Satellites (CEOS), which includes 28 space agencies and 20 other national and international organizations, are currently operating and planning over 240 Earth observation satellites in the next 15 years. The technology described here will better enable the use of multiple sensors to promote increased coordination toward a GEOSS. The CEOS Systems Engineering Office (SEO) and the Working Group on Calibration and Validation (WGCV) support the development of the CEOS Visualization Environment (COVE) tool to enhance international coordination of data exchange, mission planning and Cal/Val events. The objective is to develop a simple and intuitive application tool that leverages the capabilities of Google-Earth web to display satellite sensor coverage areas and for the identification of coincident scene locations along with dynamic menus for flexibility and content display. Key features and capabilities include user-defined evaluation periods (start and end dates) and regions of interest (rectangular areas) and multi-user collaboration. Users can select two or more CEOS missions from a

  18. BIOGEOGRAPHY. The dispersal of alien species redefines biogeography in the Anthropocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capinha, César; Essl, Franz; Seebens, Hanno; Moser, Dietmar; Pereira, Henrique Miguel

    2015-06-12

    It has been argued that globalization in human-mediated dispersal of species breaks down biogeographic boundaries, yet empirical tests are still missing. We used data on native and alien ranges of terrestrial gastropods to analyze dissimilarities in species composition among 56 globally distributed regions. We found that native ranges confirm the traditional biogeographic realms, reflecting natural dispersal limitations. However, the distributions of gastropods after human transport are primarily explained by the prevailing climate and, to a smaller extent, by distance and trade relationships. Our findings show that human-mediated dispersal is causing a breakdown of biogeographic barriers, and that climate and to some extent socioeconomic relationships will define biogeography in an era of global change. PMID:26068851

  19. BIOGEOGRAPHY. The dispersal of alien species redefines biogeography in the Anthropocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capinha, César; Essl, Franz; Seebens, Hanno; Moser, Dietmar; Pereira, Henrique Miguel

    2015-06-12

    It has been argued that globalization in human-mediated dispersal of species breaks down biogeographic boundaries, yet empirical tests are still missing. We used data on native and alien ranges of terrestrial gastropods to analyze dissimilarities in species composition among 56 globally distributed regions. We found that native ranges confirm the traditional biogeographic realms, reflecting natural dispersal limitations. However, the distributions of gastropods after human transport are primarily explained by the prevailing climate and, to a smaller extent, by distance and trade relationships. Our findings show that human-mediated dispersal is causing a breakdown of biogeographic barriers, and that climate and to some extent socioeconomic relationships will define biogeography in an era of global change.

  20. Biogeography and ecology of southern Portuguese butterflies and burnets (Lepidoptera)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, T.

    2003-01-01

    Biogeography and ecology of southern Portuguese butterflies and burnets (Lepidoptera) During several visits to the western part of the Algarve (southern Portugal), the author mapped the butterflies and burnets of this region. In total, I observed 58 butterfly species (51 Papilionoidea, 7 Hesperiidae

  1. Influence of Satellite-Based Heterogeneous Vegetation Momentum Roughness on Mesoscale Model Dynamics During IHOP 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, Michael; Eastman, Joseph; Borak, Jordan

    2010-01-01

    The sensitivity of mesoscale weather prediction model to a vegetation roughness initialization is investigated for the south central United States. Three different roughness databases are employed: i) a control or standard lookup table roughness that is a function only of land cover type, ii) a spatially heterogeneous roughness database previously derived using a physically based procedure and MODIS imagery, and iii) a MODIS climatologic roughness database that possesses the same spatial heterogeneity as (i) but with mean land class values from (ii). The model used is the Weather Research and Forecast Model (WRF) coupled to the Community Land Model within the Land Information System (LIS). For each simulation, a statistical comparison is made between modeled results and ground observations from meteorological stations within the Oklahoma mesonet and surrounding region during IHOP20O2. A sensitivity analysis on the impact the MODIS-based roughness fields is also made through a time-series intercomparison of temperature bias, probability of detection (POD), average wind speed, boundary layer height, and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) the results that, for the current replacement of the standard land-cover type based roughness values with the satellite-derived fields statistically improves model performance for most of the observed variables. Further, the satellite-based roughness enhances the surface wind speed, PBL height and TKE production on the order of 3 to l0 percent, with a lesser effect over grassland and cropland domains, and the greater effect over mixed land cover domains

  2. Geo-correction Algorithm Based on Equivalent RD Model for ScanSAR of HJ-1-C Satellite

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Jia-yin; Wen Shuang-yan; Zhang Hong-yi; Hong Wen

    2014-01-01

    HJ-1-C satellite is the first Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite for civilian use in China, and it has a strip and scan mode. According to the characteristics of the ScanSAR of the HJ-1-C satellite, a geo-correction algorithm based on an equivalent RD model has been outlined in this paper on the basis of an ECS image processing algorithm and a traditional Range-Doppler location method. An azimuth mosaic was presented by a time series relationship, then the different burst was stitched b...

  3. An entropy-based approach to automatic image segmentation of satellite images

    CERN Document Server

    Barbieri, A L; Rodrigues, F A; Bruno, O M; Costa, L da F

    2009-01-01

    An entropy-based image segmentation approach is introduced and applied to color images obtained from Google Earth. Segmentation refers to the process of partitioning a digital image in order to locate different objects and regions of interest. The application to satellite images paves the way to automated monitoring of ecological catastrophes, urban growth, agricultural activity, maritime pollution, climate changing and general surveillance. Regions representing aquatic, rural and urban areas are identified and the accuracy of the proposed segmentation methodology is evaluated. The comparison with gray level images revealed that the color information is fundamental to obtain an accurate segmentation.

  4. Motivating Students to Develop Satellites in a Problem and Project-Based Learning Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper Abildgaard; Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard; Zhou, Chunfang

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, a total of three student satellites have been developed by engineering students in a Problem and Project-Based Learning (PBL) environment at Aalborg University (AAU), Denmark. As solving such a complex project, we emphasize that a high level of motivation is needed...... for the students. Thus some efforts have been done on project management style with this aim. However, it is necessary continuous to discuss this issue from the students’ perspective for a better PBL environment. This leads to the research question of how the students perceive their motivation in developing...

  5. Taking the Politics Out of Satellite and Space-Based Communications Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.

    2006-01-01

    After many years of studies, experimentation, and deployment, large amounts of misinformation and misconceptions remain regarding applicability of various communications protocols for use in satellite and space-based networks. This paper attempts to remove much of the politics, misconceptions, and misinformation that have plagued spacebased communications protocol development and deployment. This paper provides a common vocabulary for communications; a general discussion of the requirements for various communication environments; an evaluation of tradeoffs between circuit and packet-switching technologies, and the pros and cons of various link, network, transport, application, and security protocols. Included is the applicability of protocol enhancing proxies to NASA, Department of Defense (DOD), and commercial space communication systems.

  6. A Novel Efficient Cluster-Based MLSE Equalizer for Satellite Communication Channels with -QAM Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalakas Vassilis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In satellites, nonlinear amplifiers used near saturation severely distort the transmitted signal and cause difficulties in its reception. Nevertheless, the nonlinearities introduced by memoryless bandpass amplifiers preserve the symmetries of the -ary quadrature amplitude modulation ( -QAM constellation. In this paper, a cluster-based sequence equalizer (CBSE that takes advantage of these symmetries is presented. The proposed equalizer exhibits enhanced performance compared to other techniques, including the conventional linear transversal equalizer, Volterra equalizers, and RBF network equalizers. Moreover, this gain in performance is obtained at a substantially lower computational cost.

  7. A MEMS-based Adaptive AHRS for Marine Satellite Tracking Antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yunlong; Hussain, Dil Muhammed Akbar; Soltani, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Satellite tracking is a challenging task for marine applications. An attitude determination system should estimate the wave disturbances on the ship body accurately. To achieve this, an Attitude Heading Reference System (AHRS) based on Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) sensors, composed of ...... frequency is then used to adjust the gain matrix in Kalman filter. The designed algorithms are implemented in ARM processor and the attitude obtained is compared to a high-precision commercial Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) to validate the performance of designed AHRS....

  8. Analysis of Satellite-Based Navigation Signal Reflectometry: Simulations and Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benzon, Hans-Henrik; Høeg, Per; Durgonics, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    on the Hawaiian island of Maui. The GPS receiver was during the experiments running in an open-loop configuration. The analysis of both the simulated surface-reflection signals and the measured reflection signals will in general reveal spectral structures of the reflected signals that can lead to extraction......A new wave propagator that can be used to simulate global navigation satellite systems reflected signals from ocean surfaces is presented. The wave propagator simulates the characteristics of a bistatic scattering system. Simulated GPS ocean surface reflections will be presented and discussed based...

  9. An entropy-based approach to automatic image segmentation of satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Andre L.; de Arruda, G. F.; Rodrigues, Francisco A.; Bruno, Odemir M.; Costa, Luciano da Fontoura

    2011-02-01

    An entropy-based image segmentation approach is introduced and applied to color images obtained from Google Earth. Segmentation refers to the process of partitioning a digital image in order to locate different objects and regions of interest. The application to satellite images paves the way to automated monitoring of ecological catastrophes, urban growth, agricultural activity, maritime pollution, climate changing and general surveillance. Regions representing aquatic, rural and urban areas are identified and the accuracy of the proposed segmentation methodology is evaluated. The comparison with gray level images revealed that the color information is fundamental to obtain an accurate segmentation.

  10. Highly Sensitive Plasmonic Optical Sensors Based on Gold Core-Satellite Nanostructures Immobilized on Glass Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ode, Kentaro; Honjo, Mai; Takashima, Yohei; Tsuruoka, Takaaki; Akamatsu, Kensuke

    2016-08-17

    Fabrication of discrete nanostructures consisting of noble metal nanoparticles immobilized on substrates is challenging because of structural complexity but important for chip-based plasmonic sensor technology. Here we report optical sensing capabilities of core-satellite nanostructures made of gold nanoparticles immobilized on glass substrate, which were fabricated by combining stepwise interconnection of gold nanoparticles through dithiol linkers and surface treatment using vacuum ultraviolet light. The nanostructures exhibit large changes in coupled plasmon resonance peak upon surrounding refractive index, with sensitibity of ca. 350 nm RIU(-1), thus providing highly sensitive optical sensors for determining the surrounding refractive index and detecting organic vapors. PMID:27482968

  11. The Matsu Wheel: A Cloud-based Framework for Efficient Analysis and Reanalysis of Earth Satellite Imagery

    CERN Document Server

    Patterson, Maria T; Bennett, Collin; Bruggemann, Jacob; Grossman, Robert; Handy, Matthew; Ly, Vuong; Mandl, Dan; Pederson, Shane; Pivarski, Jim; Powell, Ray; Spring, Jonathan; Wells, Walt

    2016-01-01

    Project Matsu is a collaboration between the Open Commons Consortium and NASA focused on developing open source technology for the cloud-based processing of Earth satellite imagery. A particular focus is the development of applications for detecting fires and floods to help support natural disaster detection and relief. Project Matsu has developed an open source cloud-based infrastructure to process, analyze, and reanalyze large collections of hyperspectral satellite image data using OpenStack, Hadoop, MapReduce, Storm and related technologies. We describe a framework for efficient analysis of large amounts of data called the Matsu "Wheel." The Matsu Wheel is currently used to process incoming hyperspectral satellite data produced daily by NASA's Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite. The framework is designed to be able to support scanning queries using cloud computing applications, such as Hadoop and Accumulo. A scanning query processes all, or most of the data, in a database or data repository. We also descri...

  12. A Comparison of Satellite-Based Radar and Passive Microwave Estimates of Global Wilson Current Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, M. J.; Deierling, W.; Liu, C.; Mach, D. M.; Kalb, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    A passive microwave algorithm for estimating the electrical footprint of charged clouds has been developed and applied to satellite observations taken by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI), which has a domain spanning the entire tropics up to 36 degrees latitude, and compared with lightning-based estimates of global electricity and the Carnegie curve. While these results show considerable agreement with historical observations for convective storms, this method has difficulty characterizing electricity in stratiform clouds and storms at different stages of the convective lifecycle. The algorithm also does not take advantage of the full suite of observations available in the 16-year TRMM dataset, which also includes Precipitation Radar (PR) observations of the structure of storms overflown by the satellite. As a first step towards building an algorithm that can characterize electrical input to the Global Electric Circuit (GEC) from a wide variety of storms across the globe, this study compares passive microwave-based approximations of global electricity with precipitation radar-based approximations in order to determine the relative skill each platform has in describing the "battery" of the GEC and to identify a possible pathway towards a combined metric that can use the strengths of both instruments to better describe electrified clouds.

  13. Point Cloud Based Relative Pose Estimation of a Satellite in Close Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lujiang; Zhao, Gaopeng; Bo, Yuming

    2016-01-01

    Determination of the relative pose of satellites is essential in space rendezvous operations and on-orbit servicing missions. The key problems are the adoption of suitable sensor on board of a chaser and efficient techniques for pose estimation. This paper aims to estimate the pose of a target satellite in close range on the basis of its known model by using point cloud data generated by a flash LIDAR sensor. A novel model based pose estimation method is proposed; it includes a fast and reliable pose initial acquisition method based on global optimal searching by processing the dense point cloud data directly, and a pose tracking method based on Iterative Closest Point algorithm. Also, a simulation system is presented in this paper in order to evaluate the performance of the sensor and generate simulated sensor point cloud data. It also provides truth pose of the test target so that the pose estimation error can be quantified. To investigate the effectiveness of the proposed approach and achievable pose accuracy, numerical simulation experiments are performed; results demonstrate algorithm capability of operating with point cloud directly and large pose variations. Also, a field testing experiment is conducted and results show that the proposed method is effective. PMID:27271633

  14. STANDARD BASED RELIABILITY PREDICTION OF TRAVELING WAVE TUBE IN COMMUNICATION SATELLITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. SIVANANDAM

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A Traveling Wave Tube (TWT is a vital component of satellite communication transponder. Before launch, it is essential to ensure that TWT meets the life of the satellite in the orbit.. Standard based reliability prediction is fairly accurate, widely used in USA and Europe and specified to the contractors. Part stress and parts count analysis are considered in all the standards. In this paper, part stress analysis based on US Military standard,MIL – HDBK – 217F is considered. Since the standard does not provide the failure rate of individual components used in TWT, Preferred Reliability Practices specified by NASA USA in their documents No PD – ED – 1216 is considered for parts count analysis. The reliability estimated by the above standards does not meet the life of 10 years .In the past five years, tremendous improvements have occurred in the materials,design, fabrication, testing and simulation of TWT. Based on these improvements, reliability is recalculated. The revised reliability estimate meets the life of 10 years and coincides with the reliability claimed by the global suppliers of space TWT.

  15. Validation of the Global NASA Satellite-based Flood Detection System in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, C. B.

    2009-12-01

    Floods are one of the most destructive natural forces on earth, affecting millions of people annually. Nations lying in the downstream end of an international river basin often suffer the most damage during flooding and could benefit from the real-time communication of rainfall and stream flow data from countries upstream. This is less likely to happen among developing nations due to a lack of freshwater treaties (Balthrop and Hossain, Water Policy, 2009). A more viable option is for flood-prone developing nations to utilize the global satellite rainfall and modeled runoff data that is independently and freely available from the NASA Satellite-based Global Flood Detection System. Although the NASA Global Flood Detection System has been in operation in real-time since 2006, the ‘detection’ capability of flooding has only been validated against qualitative reports in news papers and other types of media. In this study, a more quantitative validation against in-situ measurements of the flood detection system over Bangladesh is presented. Using ground-measured stream flow data as well as satellite-based flood potential and rainfall data, the study looks into the relationship between rainfall and flood potential, rainfall and stream flow, and stream flow and flood potential for three very distinct river systems in Bangladesh - 1) Ganges- a snow-fed river regulated by upstream India 2) Brahmaputra - a snow-fed river that is also braided 3) Meghna - a rain-fed river. The quantitative assessment will show the effectiveness of the NASA Global Flood Detection System for a very humid and flood prone region like Bangladesh that is also faced with tremendous transboundary hurdles that can only be resolved from the vantage of space.

  16. Visual attention based detection of signs of anthropogenic activities in satellite imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skurikhin, Alexei N [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-10-13

    With increasing deployment of satellite imaging systems, only a small fraction of collected data can be subject to expert scrutiny. We present and evaluate a two-tier approach to broad area search for signs of anthropogenic activities in high-resolution commercial satellite imagery. The method filters image information using semantically oriented interest points by combining Harris corner detection and spatial pyramid matching. The idea is that anthropogenic structures, such as rooftop outlines, fence corners, road junctions, are locally arranged in specific angular relations to each other. They are often oriented at approximately right angles to each other (which is known as rectilinearity relation). Detecting the rectilinearity provides an opportunity to highlight regions most likely to contain anthropogenic activity. This is followed by supervised classification of regions surrounding the detected corner points as man-made vs. natural scenes. We consider, in particular, a search for anthropogenic activities in uncluttered areas. In this paper, we proposed and evaluated a two-tier approach to broad area search for signs of anthropogenic activities. Results from experiments on high-resolution ({approx}0.6m) commercial satellite image data showed the potential applicability of this approach and its ability of achieving both high precision and recall rates. The main advantage of combining corner-based cueing with general object recognition is that the incorporation of domain specific knowledge even in its more general form, such as presence of comers, provides a useful cue to narrow the focus of search for signs of anthropogenic activities. Combination of comer based cueing with spatial pyramid matching addressed the issue of comer categorization. An important practical issue for further research is optimizing the balance between false positive and false negative rates. While the results presented in the paper are encouraging, the problem of an automated broad area

  17. Evaluation of Bias Correction Method for Satellite-Based Rainfall Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haris Akram Bhatti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available With the advances in remote sensing technology, satellite-based rainfall estimates are gaining attraction in the field of hydrology, particularly in rainfall-runoff modeling. Since estimates are affected by errors correction is required. In this study, we tested the high resolution National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA Climate Prediction Centre (CPC morphing technique (CMORPH satellite rainfall product (CMORPH in the Gilgel Abbey catchment, Ethiopia. CMORPH data at 8 km-30 min resolution is aggregated to daily to match in-situ observations for the period 2003–2010. Study objectives are to assess bias of the satellite estimates, to identify optimum window size for application of bias correction and to test effectiveness of bias correction. Bias correction factors are calculated for moving window (MW sizes and for sequential windows (SW’s of 3, 5, 7, 9, …, 31 days with the aim to assess error distribution between the in-situ observations and CMORPH estimates. We tested forward, central and backward window (FW, CW and BW schemes to assess the effect of time integration on accumulated rainfall. Accuracy of cumulative rainfall depth is assessed by Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE. To systematically correct all CMORPH estimates, station based bias factors are spatially interpolated to yield a bias factor map. Reliability of interpolation is assessed by cross validation. The uncorrected CMORPH rainfall images are multiplied by the interpolated bias map to result in bias corrected CMORPH estimates. Findings are evaluated by RMSE, correlation coefficient (r and standard deviation (SD. Results showed existence of bias in the CMORPH rainfall. It is found that the 7 days SW approach performs best for bias correction of CMORPH rainfall. The outcome of this study showed the efficiency of our bias correction approach.

  18. Categorizing natural disaster damage assessment using satellite-based geospatial techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, S.W.; Yuan, M.; Cerveny, R.S.; Giri, C.

    2008-01-01

    Remote sensing of a natural disaster's damage offers an exciting backup and/or alternative to traditional means of on-site damage assessment. Although necessary for complete assessment of damage areas, ground-based damage surveys conducted in the aftermath of natural hazard passage can sometimes be potentially complicated due to on-site difficulties (e.g., interaction with various authorities and emergency services) and hazards (e.g., downed power lines, gas lines, etc.), the need for rapid mobilization (particularly for remote locations), and the increasing cost of rapid physical transportation of manpower and equipment. Satellite image analysis, because of its global ubiquity, its ability for repeated independent analysis, and, as we demonstrate here, its ability to verify on-site damage assessment provides an interesting new perspective and investigative aide to researchers. Using one of the strongest tornado events in US history, the 3 May 1999 Oklahoma City Tornado, as a case example, we digitized the tornado damage path and co-registered the damage path using pre- and post-Landsat Thematic Mapper image data to perform a damage assessment. We employed several geospatial approaches, specifically the Getis index, Geary's C, and two lacunarity approaches to categorize damage characteristics according to the original Fujita tornado damage scale (F-scale). Our results indicate strong relationships between spatial indices computed within a local window and tornado F-scale damage categories identified through the ground survey. Consequently, linear regression models, even incorporating just a single band, appear effective in identifying F-scale damage categories using satellite imagery. This study demonstrates that satellite-based geospatial techniques can effectively add spatial perspectives to natural disaster damages, and in particular for this case study, tornado damages.

  19. On the value of satellite-based river discharge and river flood data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettner, A. J.; Brakenridge, R.; van Praag, E.; Borrero, S.; Slayback, D. A.; Young, C.; Cohen, S.; Prades, L.; de Groeve, T.

    2015-12-01

    Flooding is the most common natural hazard worldwide. According to the World Resources Institute, floods impact 21 million people every year and affect the global GDP by $96 billion. Providing accurate flood maps in near-real time (NRT) is critical to their utility to first responders. Also, in times of flooding, river gauging stations on location, if any, are of less use to monitor stage height as an approximation for water surface area, as often the stations themselves get washed out or peak water levels reach much beyond their design measuring capacity. In a joint effort with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, the European Commission Joint Research Centre and the University of Alabama, the Dartmouth Flood Observatory (DFO) measures NRT: 1) river discharges, and 2) water inundation extents, both with a global coverage on a daily basis. Satellite-based passive microwave sensors and hydrological modeling are utilized to establish 'remote-sensing based discharge stations'. Once calibrated, daily discharge time series span from 1998 to the present. Also, the two MODIS instruments aboard the NASA Terra and Aqua satellites provide daily floodplain inundation extent with global coverage at a spatial resolution of 250m. DFO's mission is to provide easy access to NRT river and flood data products. Apart from the DFO web portal, several water extent products can be ingested by utilizing a Web Map Service (WMS), such as is established with for Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) region through the GeoSUR program portal. This effort includes implementing over 100 satellite discharge stations showing in NRT if a river is flooding, normal, or in low flow. New collaborative efforts have resulted in flood hazard maps which display flood extent as well as exceedance probabilities. The record length of our sensors allows mapping the 1.5 year, 5 year and 25 year flood extent. These can provide key information to water management and disaster response entities.

  20. Graph-tree-based software control flow checking for COTS processors on pico-satellites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Mu; Wang Hao; Zheng Yangming; Jin Zhonghe

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a generic high-performance and low-time-overhead software control flow checking solution,graph-tree-based control flow checking (GTCFC) for space-borne commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) processors.A graph tree data structure with a topology similar to common trees is introduced to transform the control flow graphs of target programs.This together with design of IDs and signatures of its vertices and edges allows for an easy check of legality of actual branching during target program execution.As a result,the algorithm not only is capable of detecting all single and multiple branching errors with low latency and time overheads along with a linear-complexity space overhead,but also remains generic among arbitrary instruction sets and independent of any specific hardware.Tests of the algorithm using a COTS-processor-based on-board computer (OBC) of in-service ZDPS-1A pico-satellite products show that GTCFC can detect over 90% of the randomly injected and all-pattern-covering branching errors for different types of target programs,with performance and overheads consistent with the theoretical analysis; and beats well-established preeminent control flow checking algorithms in these dimensions.Furthermore,it is validated that GTCGC not only can be accommodated in pico-satellites conveniently with still sufficient system margins left,but also has the ability to minimize the risk of control flow errors being undetected in their space missions.Therefore,due to its effectiveness,efficiency,and compatibility,the GTCFC solution is ready for applications on COTS processors on pico-satellites in their real space missions.

  1. An automated fog monitoring system for the Indo-Gangetic Plains based on satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Dinesh; Chourey, Reema; Rizvi, Sarwar; Singh, Manoj; Gautam, Ritesh

    2016-05-01

    Fog is a meteorological phenomenon that causes reduction in regional visibility and affects air quality, thus leading to various societal and economic implications, especially disrupting air and rail transportation. The persistent and widespread winter fog impacts the entire the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP), as frequently observed in satellite imagery. The IGP is a densely populated region in south Asia, inhabiting about 1/6th of the world's population, with a strong upward pollution trend. In this study, we have used multi-spectral radiances and aerosol/cloud retrievals from Terra/Aqua MODIS data for developing an automated web-based fog monitoring system over the IGP. Using our previous and existing methodologies, and ongoing algorithm development for the detection of fog and retrieval of associated microphysical properties (e.g. fog droplet effective radius), we characterize the widespread fog detection during both daytime and nighttime. Specifically, for the night time fog detection, the algorithm employs a satellite-based bi-spectral brightness temperature difference technique between two spectral channels: MODIS band-22 (3.9μm) and band-31 (10.75μm). Further, we are extending our algorithm development to geostationary satellites, for providing continuous monitoring of the spatial-temporal variation of fog. We anticipate that the ongoing and future development of a fog monitoring system would be of assistance to air, rail and vehicular transportation management, as well as for dissemination of fog information to government agencies and general public. The outputs of fog detection algorithm and related aerosol/cloud parameters are operationally disseminated via http://fogsouthasia.com/.

  2. Replacing climatological potential evapotranspiration estimates with dynamic satellite-based observations in operational hydrologic prediction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, K. J.; Bowman, A. L.; Hogue, T. S.; Kim, J.; Spies, R.

    2011-12-01

    In the face of a changing climate, growing populations, and increased human habitation in hydrologically risky locations, both short- and long-range planners increasingly require robust and reliable streamflow forecast information. Current operational forecasting utilizes watershed-scale, conceptual models driven by ground-based (commonly point-scale) observations of precipitation and temperature and climatological potential evapotranspiration (PET) estimates. The PET values are derived from historic pan evaporation observations and remain static from year-to-year. The need for regional dynamic PET values is vital for improved operational forecasting. With the advent of satellite remote sensing and the adoption of a more flexible operational forecast system by the National Weather Service, incorporation of advanced data products is now more feasible than in years past. In this study, we will test a previously developed satellite-derived PET product (UCLA MODIS-PET) in the National Weather Service forecast models and compare the model results to current methods. The UCLA MODIS-PET method is based on the Priestley-Taylor formulation, is driven with MODIS satellite products, and produces a daily, 250m PET estimate. The focus area is eight headwater basins in the upper Midwest U.S. There is a need to develop improved forecasting methods for this region that are able to account for climatic and landscape changes more readily and effectively than current methods. This region is highly flood prone yet sensitive to prolonged dry periods in late summer and early fall, and is characterized by a highly managed landscape, which has drastically altered the natural hydrologic cycle. Our goal is to improve model simulations, and thereby, the initial conditions prior to the start of a forecast through the use of PET values that better reflect actual watershed conditions. The forecast models are being tested in both distributed and lumped mode.

  3. Ground- and satellite-based evidence of the biophysical mechanisms behind the greening Sahel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Martin; Mbow, Cheikh; Diouf, Abdoul A; Verger, Aleixandre; Samimi, Cyrus; Fensholt, Rasmus

    2015-04-01

    After a dry period with prolonged droughts in the 1970s and 1980s, recent scientific outcome suggests that the decades of abnormally dry conditions in the Sahel have been reversed by positive anomalies in rainfall. Various remote sensing studies observed a positive trend in vegetation greenness over the last decades which is known as the re-greening of the Sahel. However, little investment has been made in including long-term ground-based data collections to evaluate and better understand the biophysical mechanisms behind these findings. Thus, deductions on a possible increment in biomass remain speculative. Our aim is to bridge these gaps and give specifics on the biophysical background factors of the re-greening Sahel. Therefore, a trend analysis was applied on long time series (1987-2013) of satellite-based vegetation and rainfall data, as well as on ground-observations of leaf biomass of woody species, herb biomass, and woody species abundance in different ecosystems located in the Sahel zone of Senegal. We found that the positive trend observed in satellite vegetation time series (+36%) is caused by an increment of in situ measured biomass (+34%), which is highly controlled by precipitation (+40%). Whereas herb biomass shows large inter-annual fluctuations rather than a clear trend, leaf biomass of woody species has doubled within 27 years (+103%). This increase in woody biomass did not reflect on biodiversity with 11 of 16 woody species declining in abundance over the period. We conclude that the observed greening in the Senegalese Sahel is primarily related to an increasing tree cover that caused satellite-driven vegetation indices to increase with rainfall reversal. PMID:25400243

  4. Vision-based localization for on-orbit servicing of a partially cooperative satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oumer, Nassir W.; Panin, Giorgio; Mülbauer, Quirin; Tseneklidou, Anastasia

    2015-12-01

    This paper proposes ground-in-the-loop, model-based visual localization system based on transmitted images to ground, to aid rendezvous and docking maneuvers between a servicer and a target satellite. In particular, we assume to deal with a partially cooperative target, i.e. passive and without fiducial markers, but supposed at least to keep a controlled attitude, up to small fluctuations, so that the approach mainly involves translational motion. For the purpose of localization, video cameras provide an effective and relatively inexpensive solution, working at a wide range of distances with an increasing accuracy and robustness during the approach. However, illumination conditions in space are especially challenging, due to the direct sunlight exposure and to the glossy surface of a satellite, that creates strong reflections and saturations and therefore a high level of background clutter and missing detections. We employ a monocular camera for mid-range tracking (20 - 5 m) and stereo camera at close-range (5 - 0.5 m), with the respective detection and tracking methods, both using intensity edges and robustly dealing with the above issues. Our tracking system has been extensively verified at the facility of the European Proximity Operations Simulator (EPOS) of DLR, which is a very realistic ground simulation able to reproduce sunlight conditions through a high power floodlight source, satellite surface properties using multilayer insulation foils, as well as orbital motion trajectories with ground-truth data, by means of two 6 DOF industrial robots. Results from this large dataset show the effectiveness and robustness of our method against the above difficulties.

  5. Suborbital Reusable Launch Vehicles as an Opportunity to Consolidate and Calibrate Ground Based and Satellite Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, K.

    2014-12-01

    XCOR Aerospace, a commercial space company, is planning to provide frequent, low cost access to near-Earth space on the Lynx suborbital Reusable Launch Vehicle (sRLV). Measurements in the external vacuum environment can be made and can launch from most runways on a limited lead time. Lynx can operate as a platform to perform suborbital in situ measurements and remote sensing to supplement models and simulations with new data points. These measurements can serve as a quantitative link to existing instruments and be used as a basis to calibrate detectors on spacecraft. Easier access to suborbital data can improve the longevity and cohesiveness of spacecraft and ground-based resources. A study of how these measurements can be made on Lynx sRLV will be presented. At the boundary between terrestrial and space weather, measurements from instruments on Lynx can help develop algorithms to optimize the consolidation of ground and satellite based data as well as assimilate global models with new data points. For example, current tides and the equatorial electrojet, essential to understanding the Thermosphere-Ionosphere system, can be measured in situ frequently and on short notice. Furthermore, a negative-ion spectrometer and a Faraday cup, can take measurements of the D-region ion composition. A differential GPS receiver can infer the spatial gradient of ionospheric electron density. Instruments and optics on spacecraft degrade over time, leading to calibration drift. Lynx can be a cost effective platform for deploying a reference instrument to calibrate satellites with a frequent and fast turnaround and a successful return of the instrument. A calibrated reference instrument on Lynx can make collocated observations as another instrument and corrections are made for the latter, thus ensuring data consistency and mission longevity. Aboard a sRLV, atmospheric conditions that distort remotely sensed data (ground and spacecraft based) can be measured in situ. Moreover, an

  6. Molecular phylogenetics and historical biogeography amid shifting continents in the cockles and giant clams (Bivalvia: Cardiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Nathanael D; Ter Poorten, Jan Johan; Bieler, Rüdiger; Mikkelsen, Paula M; Strong, Ellen E; Jablonski, David; Steppan, Scott J

    2015-12-01

    Reconstructing historical biogeography of the marine realm is complicated by indistinct barriers and, over deeper time scales, a dynamic landscape shaped by plate tectonics. Here we present the most extensive examination of model-based historical biogeography among marine invertebrates to date. We conducted the largest phylogenetic and molecular clock analyses to date for the bivalve family Cardiidae (cockles and giant clams) with three unlinked loci for 110 species representing 37 of the 50 genera. Ancestral ranges were reconstructed using the dispersal-extinction-cladogenesis (DEC) method with a time-stratified paleogeographic model wherein dispersal rates varied with shifting tectonics. Results were compared to previous classifications and the extensive paleontological record. Six of the eight prior subfamily groupings were found to be para- or polyphyletic. Cardiidae originated and subsequently diversified in the tropical Indo-Pacific starting in the Late Triassic. Eastern Atlantic species were mainly derived from the tropical Indo-Mediterranean region via the Tethys Sea. In contrast, the western Atlantic fauna was derived from Indo-Pacific clades. Our phylogenetic results demonstrated greater concordance with geography than did previous phylogenies based on morphology. Time-stratifying the DEC reconstruction improved the fit and was highly consistent with paleo-ocean currents and paleogeography. Lastly, combining molecular phylogenetics with a rich and well-documented fossil record allowed us to test the accuracy and precision of biogeographic range reconstructions. PMID:26234273

  7. Patterns and processes in microbial biogeography: do molecules and morphologies give the same answers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoferrara, Luciana F; Grattepanche, Jean-David; Katz, Laura A; McManus, George B

    2016-07-01

    Our knowledge on microbial biogeography depends on the way we define and study diversity. In contrast to most microbes, some protist lineages have conspicuous structures that allow comparisons of diversity concepts and measures-those based on molecules and those based on morphology. We analyzed a group of shell-bearing planktonic ciliates, the tintinnids, in a coast-to-ocean gradient using high-throughput sequencing and microscopy. First, we compared molecular operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and morphospecies in terms of assemblage composition, distribution and relationships with the environment. OTUs revealed potentially novel and rare taxa, while morphospecies showed clearer correlations with environmental factors, and both approaches coincided in supporting a coastal versus oceanic pattern. Second, we explored which processes influence assembly across the environmental gradient examined. Assemblage fluctuations were associated with significant distance-decay and changes in morphospecies size and prey proxies, thus suggesting niche partitioning as a key structuring mechanism. Our conclusion is that molecules and morphologies generally agreed, but they provided complementary data, the first revealing hidden diversity, and the latter making better connections between distribution patterns and ecological processes. This highlights the importance of linking genotypes and phenotypes (using multidisciplinary analyses and/or reliable databases of barcoded species), to understand the diversity, biogeography and ecological roles of microbes. PMID:26849313

  8. Molecular phylogenetics and historical biogeography amid shifting continents in the cockles and giant clams (Bivalvia: Cardiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Nathanael D; Ter Poorten, Jan Johan; Bieler, Rüdiger; Mikkelsen, Paula M; Strong, Ellen E; Jablonski, David; Steppan, Scott J

    2015-12-01

    Reconstructing historical biogeography of the marine realm is complicated by indistinct barriers and, over deeper time scales, a dynamic landscape shaped by plate tectonics. Here we present the most extensive examination of model-based historical biogeography among marine invertebrates to date. We conducted the largest phylogenetic and molecular clock analyses to date for the bivalve family Cardiidae (cockles and giant clams) with three unlinked loci for 110 species representing 37 of the 50 genera. Ancestral ranges were reconstructed using the dispersal-extinction-cladogenesis (DEC) method with a time-stratified paleogeographic model wherein dispersal rates varied with shifting tectonics. Results were compared to previous classifications and the extensive paleontological record. Six of the eight prior subfamily groupings were found to be para- or polyphyletic. Cardiidae originated and subsequently diversified in the tropical Indo-Pacific starting in the Late Triassic. Eastern Atlantic species were mainly derived from the tropical Indo-Mediterranean region via the Tethys Sea. In contrast, the western Atlantic fauna was derived from Indo-Pacific clades. Our phylogenetic results demonstrated greater concordance with geography than did previous phylogenies based on morphology. Time-stratifying the DEC reconstruction improved the fit and was highly consistent with paleo-ocean currents and paleogeography. Lastly, combining molecular phylogenetics with a rich and well-documented fossil record allowed us to test the accuracy and precision of biogeographic range reconstructions.

  9. A web-based tool that combines satellite and weather station observations to support irrigation scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: The Satellite Irrigation Management Support (SIMS) project combines NASA's Terrestrial Observation and Prediction System (TOPS), Landsat and MODIS satellite imagery, and reference evapotranspiration from surface weather station networks to map daily crop irrigation demand in California in ...

  10. Satellite-Delivered Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnall, Gail C.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the application of satellite information delivery to training. Describes a new trend, horizontal programming. Also discusses vertical programming and in-house production of training materials. Lists vendors of satellite-based training. (CH)

  11. Can satellite-based monitoring techniques be used to quantify volcanic CO2 emissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandner, Florian M.; Carn, Simon A.; Kuze, Akihiko; Kataoka, Fumie; Shiomi, Kei; Goto, Naoki; Popp, Christoph; Ajiro, Masataka; Suto, Hiroshi; Takeda, Toru; Kanekon, Sayaka; Sealing, Christine; Flower, Verity

    2014-05-01

    Since 2010, we investigate and improve possible methods to regularly target volcanic centers from space in order to detect volcanic carbon dioxide (CO2) point source anomalies, using the Japanese Greenhouse gas Observing SATellite (GOSAT). Our long-term goals are: (a) better spatial and temporal coverage of volcano monitoring techniques; (b) improvement of the currently highly uncertain global CO2 emission inventory for volcanoes, and (c) use of volcanic CO2 emissions for high altitude, strong point source emission and dispersion studies in atmospheric science. The difficulties posed by strong relief, orogenic clouds, and aerosols are minimized by a small field of view, enhanced spectral resolving power, by employing repeat target mode observation strategies, and by comparison to continuous ground based sensor network validation data. GOSAT is a single-instrument Earth observing greenhouse gas mission aboard JAXA's IBUKI satellite in sun-synchronous polar orbit. GOSAT's Fourier-Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) has been producing total column XCO2 data since January 2009, at a repeat cycle of 3 days, offering great opportunities for temporal monitoring of point sources. GOSAT's 10 km field of view can spatially integrate entire volcanic edifices within one 'shot' in precise target mode. While it doesn't have any spatial scanning or mapping capability, it does have strong spectral resolving power and agile pointing capability to focus on several targets of interest per orbit. Sufficient uncertainty reduction is achieved through comprehensive in-flight vicarious calibration, in close collaboration between NASA and JAXA. Challenges with the on-board pointing mirror system have been compensated for employing custom observation planning strategies, including repeat sacrificial upstream reference points to control pointing mirror motion, empirical individualized target offset compensation, observation pattern simulations to minimize view angle azimuth. Since summer 2010

  12. Multitemporal Monitoring of the Air Quality in Bulgaria by Satellite Based Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolov, Hristo; Borisova, Denitsa

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays the effect on climate changes on the population and environment caused by air pollutants at local and regional scale by pollution concentrations higher than allowed is undisputable. Main sources of gas releases are due to anthropogenic emissions caused by the economic and domestic activities of the inhabitants, and to less extent having natural origin. Complementary to pollutants emissions the local weather parameters such as temperature, precipitation, wind speed, clouds, atmospheric water vapor, and wind direction control the chemical reactions in the atmosphere. It should be noted that intrinsic property of the air pollution is its "transboundary-ness" and this is why the air quality (AQ) is not affecting the population of one single country only. This why the exchange of information concerning AQ at EU level is subject to well established legislation and one of EU flagship initiatives for standardization in data exchange, namely INSPIRE, has to cope with. It should be noted that although good reporting mechanism with regard to AQ is already established between EU member states national networks suffer from a serious disadvantage - they don't form a regular grid which is a prerequisite for verification of pollutants transport modeling. Alternative sources of information for AQ are the satellite observations (i.e. OMI, TOMS instruments) providing daily data for ones of the major contributors to air pollution such as O3, NOX and SO2. Those data form regular grids and are processed the same day of the acquisition so they could be used in verification of the outputs generated by numerical modeling of the AQ and pollution transfer. In this research we present results on multitemporal monitoring of several regional "hot spots" responsible for greenhouse gases emissions in Bulgaria with emphasis on satellite-based instruments. Other output from this study is a method for validation of the AQ forecasts and also providing feedback to the service that prepares

  13. Improved GPS-based Satellite Relative Navigation Using Femtosecond Laser Relative Distance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyungjik; Park, Han-Earl; Lee, Kwangwon; Park, Sang-Young; Park, Chandeok

    2016-03-01

    This study developed an approach for improving Carrier-phase Differential Global Positioning System (CDGPS) based realtime satellite relative navigation by applying laser baseline measurement data. The robustness against the space operational environment was considered, and a Synthetic Wavelength Interferometer (SWI) algorithm based on a femtosecond laser measurement model was developed. The phase differences between two laser wavelengths were combined to measure precise distance. Generated laser data were used to improve estimation accuracy for the float ambiguity of CDGPS data. Relative navigation simulations in real-time were performed using the extended Kalman filter algorithm. The GPS and laser-combined relative navigation accuracy was compared with GPS-only relative navigation solutions to determine the impact of laser data on relative navigation. In numerical simulations, the success rate of integer ambiguity resolution increased when laser data was added to GPS data. The relative navigational errors also improved five-fold and two-fold, relative to the GPS-only error, for 250 m and 5 km initial relative distances, respectively. The methodology developed in this study is suitable for application to future satellite formation-flying missions.

  14. Validation of a satellite-based cyclogenesis technique over the North Indian Ocean

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suman Goyal; M Mohapatra; Ashish Kumar; S K Dube; Kushagra Rajendra; P Goswami

    2016-10-01

    Indian region is severely affected by the tropical cyclones (TCs) due to the long coast line of about 7500 km. Hence, whenever any low level circulation (LLC) forms over the Indian Seas, the prediction of its intensification into a TC is very essential for the management of TC disaster. Satellite Application Centre (SAC) of Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO), Ahmedabad, has developed a techniqueto predict TCs based on scatterometer-derived winds from the polar orbiting satellite, QuikSCAT and Oceansat-II. The India Meteorological Department (IMD) has acquired the technique and verified it for the years 2010–2013 for operational use. The model is based on the concept of analogs of the sea surfacewind distribution at the stage of LLC or vortex (T1.0) as per Dvorak’s classifications, which eventually leads to cyclogenesis (T2.5). The results indicate that the developed model could predict cyclogenesis with a probability of detection of 61% and critical success index of 0.29. However, it shows high overpredictionof the model is better over the Bay of Bengal than over Arabian Sea and during post-monsoon season (September–December) than in pre-monsoon season (March–June).

  15. Estimation of volcanic ash emissions from satellite data using trajectory-based 4D-Var

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sha; Lin, Haixiang; Heemink, Arnold; Segers, Arjo; Fu, Guangliang

    2016-04-01

    An accurate determination of emission parameters are crucial to the volcanic ash forecast for aviation, health and climate interests. In this study, we reconstruct the vertical profile of the volcanic ash emission from satellite ash mass loading data using trajectory-based 4D-Var (Trj4DVar) approach with Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruptive event and the corresponding SEVIRI data as a study case. Since the Eyjafjallajökull eruption in April 2010, besides ash mass loadings retrieved from satellite data, the additional information of plume height and mass eruption rate is always available from volcanic ash detections and observations. Modifications is made in Trj4DVar to integrate the additional information into the data assimilation system to improve the estimation of volcanic ash emissions and achieve a better initial condition for quantitative predictions. The modified Trj4DVar has been tested in twin experiments designed based on the study case, and shows significant improvement on straightforward Trj4DVar since it has great correction impact to recognize the injection height and produce more accurate emission estimation and reliable initial field of volcanic ash loading. To apply the approach to the real case with SEVIRI data, two strategies was proposed: observational mask matrix and separate time windows. The results produced a better initial condition and predictive forecast that were more fitter the SEVIRI ash mass loading fields, which showed a great potential of applying the method in practice.

  16. A global ETCCDI based precipitation climatology from satellite and rain gauge measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzsch, Felix; Andersson, Axel; Schröder, Marc; Ziese, Markus; Becker, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The project framework MiKlip ("Mittelfristige Klimaprognosen") is focused onto the development of an operational forecast system for decadal climate predictions. The objective of the "Daily Precipitation Analysis for the validation of Global medium-range Climate predictions Operationalized" (DAPAGLOCO) project, is the development and operationalization of a global precipitation dataset for forecast validation of the MPI-ESM experiments used in MiKlip. The dataset is a combination of rain gauge measurement data over land and satellite-based precipitation retrievals over ocean. Over land, gauge data from the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) at Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD) are used. Over ocean, retrievals from the Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data (HOAPS) dataset are used as data source. The currently available dataset consists of 21 years of data (1988-2008) and has a spatial resolution of 1°. So far, the MiKlip forecast validation is based upon the Expert Team on Climate Change and Detection Indices (ETCCDI). These indices focus on precipitation extrema in terms of spell durations, percentiles, averaged precipitation amounts and further more. The application of these indices on the DAPAGLOCO dataset in its current state delivers insight into the global distribution of precipitation characteristics and extreme events. The resulting global patterns of these characteristics and extrema are the main objective of the presentation.

  17. Vehicle detection in WorldView-2 satellite imagery based on Gaussian modeling and contextual learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bichuan; Chen, Chi-Hau; Marchisio, Giovanni B.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we aim to study the detection of vehicles from WorldView-2 satellite imagery. For this purpose, accurate modeling of vehicle features and signatures and efficient learning of vehicle hypotheses are critical. We present a joint Gaussian and maximum likelihood based modeling and machine learning approach using SVM and neural network algorithms to describe the local appearance densities and classify vehicles from non-vehicle buildings, objects, and backgrounds. Vehicle hypotheses are fitted by elliptical Gaussians and the bottom-up features are grouped by Gabor orientation filtering based on multi-scale analysis and distance transform. Global contextual information such as road networks and vehicle distributions can be used to enhance the recognition. In consideration of the problem complexity the practical vehicle detection task faces due to dense and overlapping vehicle distributions, partial occlusion and clutters by building, shadows, and trees, we employ a spectral clustering strategy jointly combined with bootstrapped learning to estimate the parameters of centroid, orientation, and extents for local densities. We demonstrate a high detection rate 94.8%,with a missing rate 5.2% and a false alarm rate 5.3% on the WorldView-2 satellite imagery. Experimental results show that our method is quite effective to model and detect vehicles.

  18. Intrusion of coastal waters into the pelagic Eastern Mediterranean: in situ and satellite-based characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Efrati

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A combined dataset of near real time multi-satellite observations and in situ measurements from a high-resolution survey, is used for characterizing physical-biogeochemical properties of a patch stretching from the coast to the open sea in the Levantine basin of the Eastern Mediterranean. Spatial analysis of the combined dataset indicates that the patch is a semi-enclosed system, bounded within the mixed layer and separated from ambient waters by transport barriers induced by horizontal stirring. As such, the patch is characterized by physical-biogeochemical properties that significantly differ from those of the waters surrounding it, with lower salinity, higher temperatures, higher concentrations of silicic acid and chlorophyll a, and higher abundance of Synechococcus and Picoeukaryotes cells. Based on estimates of patch dimensions (~ 40 km width and ~ 25 m depth and propagation speed (~ 0.09 m s−1, the volume flux associated with the patch is found to be in the order of 0.1 Sv. Our observations suggest that horizontal stirring by surface currents is likely to have an important impact on the ultra-oligotrophic Levantine basin ecosystem, through (1 transport of nutrients and coastal derived material, and (2 formation of local, dynamically isolated, niches. In addition, this work provides a satellite-based framework for planning and executing high resolution sampling strategies in the interface between coast and the open sea.

  19. Intrusion of coastal waters into the pelagic eastern Mediterranean: in situ and satellite-based characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Efrati

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A combined dataset of near-real-time multi-satellite observations and in situ measurements from a high-resolution survey is used for characterizing physical-biogeochemical properties of a patch stretching from the coast to the open sea in the Levantine Basin (LB of the eastern Mediterranean (EM. Spatial analysis of the combined dataset indicates that the patch is a semi-enclosed system, bounded within the mixed layer and separated from ambient waters by transport barriers induced by horizontal stirring. As such, the patch is characterized by physical-biogeochemical properties that significantly differ from those of the waters surrounding it, with lower salinity and higher temperatures, concentrations of silicic acid and chlorophyll a, and abundance of Synechococcus and picoeukaryote cells. Based on estimates of patch dimensions (∼40 km width and ∼25 m depth and propagation speed (∼0.09 m s−1, the volume flux associated with the patch is found to be on the order of 0.1 Sv. Our observations suggest that horizontal stirring by surface currents is likely to have an important impact on the ultra-oligotrophic Levantine Basin ecosystem, through (1 transport of nutrients and coastally derived material, and (2 formation of local, dynamically isolated niches. In addition, this work provides a satellite-based framework for planning and executing high-resolution sampling strategies in the interface between the coast and the open sea.

  20. A new algorithm and results of ionospheric delay correction for satellite-based augmentation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Z.; Yuan, H.

    Ionospheric delay resulted from radio signals traveling ionosphere is the largest source of errors for single-frequency users of the Global Positioning System GPS In order to improve users position accuracy augmentation systems based on satellite have been developed to provide accurate calibration since the nineties A famous one is Wide Area Augmentation System WAAS which is aimed to the efficiency of navigation over the conterminous United States and has been operating successfully so far The main idea of ionospheric correction algorithm for WAAS is to establish ionospheric grid model i e ionosphere is discretized into a set of regularly-spaced intervals in latitude and longitude at an altitude of 350km above the earth surface The users calculate their pseudoranges by interpolating estimates of vertical ionospheric delay modeled at ionospheric grid points The Chinese crust deformation monitoring network has been established since the eighties and now it is in good operation with 25 permanent GPS stations which provide feasibility to construct similar satellite-based augmentation system SBAS in China For the west region of China the distribution of stations is relatively sparse not to ensure sufficient data If we follow the ionospheric grid correction algorithm some grid points can t obtain their estimate and lost availability Consequently ionospheric correction measurement on the users situated in that region is inestimable which constitute a fatal threat to navigation users In this paper we presented a new algorithm that

  1. Estimating Reliability of Disturbances in Satellite Time Series Data Based on Statistical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Z.-G.; Tang, P.; Zhou, M.

    2016-06-01

    Normally, the status of land cover is inherently dynamic and changing continuously on temporal scale. However, disturbances or abnormal changes of land cover — caused by such as forest fire, flood, deforestation, and plant diseases — occur worldwide at unknown times and locations. Timely detection and characterization of these disturbances is of importance for land cover monitoring. Recently, many time-series-analysis methods have been developed for near real-time or online disturbance detection, using satellite image time series. However, the detection results were only labelled with "Change/ No change" by most of the present methods, while few methods focus on estimating reliability (or confidence level) of the detected disturbances in image time series. To this end, this paper propose a statistical analysis method for estimating reliability of disturbances in new available remote sensing image time series, through analysis of full temporal information laid in time series data. The method consists of three main steps. (1) Segmenting and modelling of historical time series data based on Breaks for Additive Seasonal and Trend (BFAST). (2) Forecasting and detecting disturbances in new time series data. (3) Estimating reliability of each detected disturbance using statistical analysis based on Confidence Interval (CI) and Confidence Levels (CL). The method was validated by estimating reliability of disturbance regions caused by a recent severe flooding occurred around the border of Russia and China. Results demonstrated that the method can estimate reliability of disturbances detected in satellite image with estimation error less than 5% and overall accuracy up to 90%.

  2. PlumeSat: A Micro-Satellite Based Plume Imagery Collection Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledebuhr, A.G.; Ng, L.C.

    2002-06-30

    This paper describes a technical approach to cost-effectively collect plume imagery of boosting targets using a novel micro-satellite based platform operating in low earth orbit (LEO). The plume collection Micro-satellite or PlueSat for short, will be capable of carrying an array of multi-spectral (UV through LWIR) passive and active (Imaging LADAR) sensors and maneuvering with a lateral divert propulsion system to different observation altitudes (100 to 300 km) and different closing geometries to achieve a range of aspect angles (15 to 60 degrees) in order to simulate a variety of boost phase intercept missions. The PlumeSat will be a cost effective platform to collect boost phase plume imagery from within 1 to 10 km ranges, resulting in 0.1 to 1 meter resolution imagery of a variety of potential target missiles with a goal of demonstrating reliable plume-to-hardbody handover algorithms for future boost phase intercept missions. Once deployed on orbit, the PlumeSat would perform a series phenomenology collection experiments until expends its on-board propellants. The baseline PlumeSat concept is sized to provide from 5 to 7 separate fly by data collects of boosting targets. The total number of data collects will depend on the orbital basing altitude and the accuracy in delivering the boosting target vehicle to the nominal PlumeSat fly-by volume.

  3. Frequency of Arrival-based Interference Localization Using a Single Satellite

    OpenAIRE

    Kalantari, Ashkan; Maleki, Sina; Chatzinotas, Symeon; Ottersten, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Intentional and unintentional interferences are an increasing threat for the satellite communications industry. In this paper, we aim to localize an interference with unknown location using frequency of arrival (FoA) technique by only relying on the measurements obtained through a single satellite. In each time instance, the satellite samples the interference and forwards it to the gateway to estimate its frequency. Since the satellite moves, each estimated frequency includes a Doppler shift,...

  4. Evaluation of methods to derive green-up dates based on daily NDVI satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktor, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Bridging the gap between satellite derived green-up dates and in situ phenological observations has been the purpose of many studies over the last decades. Despite substantial advancements in satellite technology and data quality checks there is as yet no universally accepted method for extracting phenological metrics based on satellite derived vegetation indices. Dependent on the respective method derived green-up dates can vary up to serveral weeks using identical data sets. Consequently, it is difficult to compare various studies and to accurately determine an increased vegetation length due to changing temperature patterns as observed by ground phenological networks. Here, I compared how the characteristic NDVI increase over temperate deciduous forests in Germany in spring relates to respective budburst events observed on the ground. MODIS Terra daily surface reflectances with a 250 m resolution (2000-2008) were gathered to compute daily NDVI values. As ground truth, observations of the extensive phenological network of the German Weather Service were used. About 1500 observations per year and species (Beech, Oak and Birch) were available evenly distributed all over Germany. Two filtering methods were tested to reduce the noisy raw data. The first method only keeps NDVI values which are classified as ‚ideal global quality' and applies on those a temporal moving window where values are removed which differ more than 20% of the mean. The second method uses an adaptation of the BISE (Best Index Slope Extraction) algorithm. Subsequently, three functions were fitted to the selected observations: a simple linear interpolation, a sigmoidal function and a double logistic sigmoidal function allowing to approximate two temporally separated green-up signals. The green-up date was then determined at halfway between minimum and maximum (linear interpolation) or at the inflexion point of the sigmoidal curve. A number of global threshold values (NDVI 0.4,0.5,0.6) and

  5. Passivity Based Nonlinear Attitude Control of the Rømer Satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quottrup, Michael Melholt; Krogh-Sørensen, J.; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2001-01-01

    This paper suggests nonlinear attitude control of the Danish satellite Rømer. This satellite will be designed to fulfil two scientific objectives: The observation of stellar oscillations and the detection and localisation of gamma-ray bursts. The satellite will be equipped with a tetrahedron...

  6. Reconstruction of incomplete satellite SST data sets based on EOF method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Youzhuan; WEI Zhihui; MAO Zhihua; WANG Xiaofei; PAN Delu

    2009-01-01

    As for the satellite remote sensing data obtained by the visible and infrared bands inversion, the clouds coverage in the sky over the ocean often results in missing data of inversion products on a large scale, and thin clouds difficult to be detected would cause the data of the inversion products to be abnormal. Alvera et al.(2005) proposed a method for the reconstruction of missing data based on an Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOF) decomposition, but his method couldn't process these images presenting extreme cloud coverage(more than 95%), and required a long time for reconstruction. Besides, the abnormal data in the images had a great effect on the reconstruction result.Therefore, this paper tries to improve the study result. It has reconstructed missing data sets by twice applying EOF decomposition method. Firstly, the abnormity time has been detected by analyzing the temporal modes of EOF decomposition, and the abnormal data have been eliminated.Secondly, the data sets, excluding the abnormal data, are analyzed by using EOF decomposition,and then the temporal modes undergo a filtering process so as to enhance the ability of reconstructing the images which are of no or just a little data, by using EOF. At last, this method has been applied to a large data set, i.e. 43 Sea Surface Temperature (SST) satellite images of the Changjiang River (Yangtze River) estuary and its adjacent areas, and the total reconstruction root mean square error (RMSE) is 0.82℃. And it has been proved that this improved EOF reconstruction method is robust for reconstructing satellite missing data and unreliable data.

  7. Luobei graphite mines surrounding ecological environment monitoring based on high-resolution satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lifeng; Liu, Xiaosha; Wan, Huawei; Liu, Xiaoman

    2014-11-01

    Graphite is one of the important industrial mineral raw materials, but the high content of heavy metals in tailings may cause soil pollution and other regional ecological environmental problems. Luobei has already become the largest production base of graphite. To find out the ecological situation in the region, further ecological risk analysis has been carried out. Luobei graphite mine which is located in Yabdanhe basin has been selected as the study area, SVM classifiers method with the support of GF-1 Satellite remote sensing data has been used, which is the first high-resolution earth observation satellite in China. The surrounding ecological environment was monitored and its potential impact on the ecological environment was analyzed by GIS platform. The results showed that the Luobei graphite mine located Yadanhe basin covers an area of 499.65 km2, the main types of forest ecosystems ( 44.05% of the total basin area ), followed by agricultural area( 35.14% ), grass area( 15.52% ), residential area ( 4.34% ), mining area ( 0.64% ) and water area( 0.30% ). By confirming the classification results, the total accuracy is 91.61%, the Kappa coefficient is 0.8991. Overall, GF-1 Satellite data can obtain regional ecosystems quickly, and provide a better data support for regional ecological resource protection zone. For Luobei graphite mines area, farmland and residential areas within its watershed are most vulnerable to mining, the higher proportion of farmland in duck river basin. The regulatory tailings need to be strengthened in the process of graphite mining processing.

  8. Preliminary study on migration pattern of the Tibetan antelope ( Pantholops hodgsonii) based on satellite tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buho, Hoshino; Jiang, Z.; Liu, C.; Yoshida, T.; Mahamut, Halik; Kaneko, M.; Asakawa, M.; Motokawa, M.; Kaji, K.; Wu, X.; Otaishi, N.; Ganzorig, Sumiya; Masuda, R.

    2011-07-01

    The spatial and temporal patterns of the endangered Tibetan antelope or chiru ( Pantholops hodgsonii) have been studied using satellite-based ARGOS platform transmitter terminal (PTT) tracking data. The data was obtained from the satellite tracking of two female Tibetan antelopes that were collared with satellite transmitters and have been tracked from August 2007 to April 2009. Analysis of the locality data (LC) obtained, shows that both antelopes were migrant individuals, they shared the same calving ground surrounding lake Huiten (or Zhuonai lake), but different wintering pastures. Each antelope covered 250-300 km from the wintering to summer pastures. Annual range consisted of a core area that was used for at least 9 months; a calving ground used for a short time (from 8-20 days); and temporal pastures used during migration to and from the calving ground. Seasonal migration cycle was about 3 months, 27-30 days to reach the calving ground; 8-20 days staying there; and 36-40 days returning to the core area. Examination of the spatial distribution during migration showed that both chiru crossed the Qinghai-Tibetan railway (QTR) and the Golmud-Lhasa highway (GLH) at least two times, and reached calving ground (118-120 km from there) in 8 days, maintaining an average speed of 15 km per day. However, the return migration took twice as long (from 14 to 16 days). Each time, after reaching the QTR and GLH, the antelopes spent 20-40 days in that area, probably looking for passages and waiting. So far, we suppose that the QTR and the GLH have become a hindrance to the migration of the Tibetan antelopes and seriously delay their movement to and from the calving area. Extended aggregation of the herds of Tibetan antelopes along the QTR and the GLH may impact negatively with increased mortality among offspring, the spread of various diseases and overgrazing of pastures.

  9. Assessment of satellite-based aerosol optical depth using continuous lidar observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. Q.; Li, C. C.; Lau, A. K. H.; Yuan, Z. B.; Lu, X. C.; Tse, K. T.; Fung, J. C. H.; Li, Y.; Yao, T.; Su, L.; Li, Z. Y.; Zhang, Y. Q.

    2016-09-01

    Due to a reliance on solar radiation, the aerosol optical depth (AOD) is observed only during the day by passive satellite-based instruments such as the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Research on urban air quality, atmospheric turbidity, and evolution of aerosols in the atmospheric boundary layer, however, requires 24-h measurement of aerosols. A lidar system is capable of detecting the vertical distribution of the aerosol extinction coefficient and calculating the AOD throughout the day, but routinely lidar observation is still quite limited and the results from MODIS and lidar sometimes are contradictory in China. In this study, long-term lidar observations from 2005 to 2009 over Hong Kong were analyzed with a focus on identification of the reasons for different seasonal variation in the AOD data obtained from MODIS and lidar. The lidar-retrieved AOD shows the lowest average level, but has the most significant diurnal variation during the summer. When considering only a 5-h period between 10:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. local time to match satellite passages, the average of the lidar-retrieved AOD doubles during the summer and exceeds that during the winter. This finding is consistent with the MODIS observation of a higher AOD during the summer and a lower AOD during the winter. The increase in the aerosol extinction coefficient in the upper level of the mixing layer makes the greatest contribution to the increase in the AOD at midday during the summer. These assessments suggest that large over-estimation may occur when long-term averages of AOD are estimated from passive satellite observations.

  10. Dynamic autonomous routing technology for IP-based satellite ad hoc networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofei; Deng, Jing; Kostas, Theresa; Rajappan, Gowri

    2014-06-01

    IP-based routing for military LEO/MEO satellite ad hoc networks is very challenging due to network and traffic heterogeneity, network topology and traffic dynamics. In this paper, we describe a traffic priority-aware routing scheme for such networks, namely Dynamic Autonomous Routing Technology (DART) for satellite ad hoc networks. DART has a cross-layer design, and conducts routing and resource reservation concurrently for optimal performance in the fluid but predictable satellite ad hoc networks. DART ensures end-to-end data delivery with QoS assurances by only choosing routing paths that have sufficient resources, supporting different packet priority levels. In order to do so, DART incorporates several resource management and innovative routing mechanisms, which dynamically adapt to best fit the prevailing conditions. In particular, DART integrates a resource reservation mechanism to reserve network bandwidth resources; a proactive routing mechanism to set up non-overlapping spanning trees to segregate high priority traffic flows from lower priority flows so that the high priority flows do not face contention from low priority flows; a reactive routing mechanism to arbitrate resources between various traffic priorities when needed; a predictive routing mechanism to set up routes for scheduled missions and for anticipated topology changes for QoS assurance. We present simulation results showing the performance of DART. We have conducted these simulations using the Iridium constellation and trajectories as well as realistic military communications scenarios. The simulation results demonstrate DART's ability to discriminate between high-priority and low-priority traffic flows and ensure disparate QoS requirements of these traffic flows.

  11. Modeling the effects of ionospheric scintillation on GPS/Satellite-Based Augmentation System availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conker, Robert S.; El-Arini, M. Bakry; Hegarty, Christopher J.; Hsiao, Thomas

    2003-02-01

    Ionospheric scintillation is a rapid change in the phase and/or amplitude of a radio signal as it passes through small-scale plasma density irregularities in the ionosphere. These scintillations not only can reduce the accuracy of GPS/Satellite-Based Augmentation System (SBAS) receiver pseudorange and carrier phase measurements but also can result in a complete loss of lock on a satellite. In a worst case scenario, loss of lock on enough satellites could result in lost positioning service. Scintillation has not had a major effect on midlatitude regions (e.g., the continental United States) since most severe scintillation occurs in a band approximately 20° on either side of the magnetic equator and to a lesser extent in the polar and auroral regions. Most scintillation occurs for a few hours after sunset during the peak years of the solar cycle. Typical delay locked loop/phase locked loop designs of GPS/SBAS receivers enable them to handle moderate amounts of scintillation. Consequently, any attempt to determine the effects of scintillation on GPS/SBAS must consider both predictions of scintillation activity in the ionosphere and the residual effect of this activity after processing by a receiver. This paper estimates the effects of scintillation on the availability of GPS and SBAS for L1 C/A and L2 semicodeless receivers. These effects are described in terms of loss of lock and degradation of accuracy and are related to different times, ionospheric conditions, and positions on the Earth. Sample results are presented using WAAS in the western hemisphere.

  12. Severe thunderstorm activity over Bihar on 21st April, 2015: a simulation study by satellite based Nowcasting technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Suman; Kumar, Ashish; Sangar, Ghansham; Mohapatra, M.

    2016-05-01

    Satellite based Nowcasting technique is customized version of Forecast and Tracking the Evolution of Cloud Clusters (ForTraCC), it uses the extrapolation technique that allows for the tracking of Mesoscale convective systems (MCS) radiative and morphological properties and forecasts the evolution of these properties (based on cloud-top brightness temperature and area of the cloud cluster) up to 360 minutes, using infrared satellite imagery. The Thermal Infrared (TIR) channel of the weather satellite has been broadly used to study the behaviour of the cloud systems associated with deep convection. The main advantage of this approach is that for most of the globe the best statistics can only be obtained from satellite observations. Such a satellite survey would provide the statistics of MCSs covering the range of meteorological conditions needed to generalize the result and on the other hand only satellite observations can cover the very large range of space and time scale. The algorithm script is taken from Brazilian Scientist Dr. Danial Vila and implemented it into the Indian environment and made compatible with INSAT-3D hdf5 data format. For Indian region it utilizes the INSAT-3D satellite data of TIR1 (10.8 μm) channel and creates nowcast. The output is made compatible with GUI based software MIAS by generating the output in hdf5 format for better understanding and analysis of forecast. The main features of this algorithm are detection of Cloud Cluster based on Cloud Top Brightness Temperature (CTBT) and area i.e. ≤235 ºK and ≥2400 km2 respectively. The tracking technique based on MCS overlapping areas in successive images. The script has been automized in Auxiliary Data Processing System (ADPS) and generating the forecast file in every half an hour and convert the output file in geotiff format. The geotiff file is easily converted into KMZ file format using ArcGIS software to overlay it on google map and hosted on the web server.

  13. Object-based Evaluation of Satellite Precipitation Retrievals: A Case Study of the Summer Season over CONUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Xu, P.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite precipitation retrievals that have high spatial and temporal resolutions are suitable for various applications, such as hydrologic modeling and watershed management. Many validation studies have been established to understand the strengths and limitations of these satellite precipitation retrievals. In this study, an object-based validation approach is adopted to evaluate several satellite precipitation retrievals focusing on the spatial and geometric patterns of precipitation. This object-based validation approach identifies precipitation objects using an image processing technique referred to as watershed transform. Several object attributes are diagnosed and analyzed based on the distance measurement. Three object-based verification scores are summarized to determine the overall performances of satellite precipitation retrievals. The Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) and Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks (PERSIANN) were evaluated using the object-based approach. The NOAA stage IV MPE multi-sensor composite rain analysis was utilized as the ground observations. The comparative assessments were conducted at 0.25° by 0.25° on a daily scale in the summer season of 2014 over the continental United States (CONUS). The results suggest that IMERG possesses the similar spatial pattern of local-scale precipitation areas against stage IV observations. In addition, IMERG depicts the sizes and locations of precipitation areas more accurately against stage IV.

  14. Phenology model from weather station meteorology does not predict satellite-based onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, J. I.; Richardson, A. D.; Mustard, J. F.

    2006-12-01

    Seasonal temperature changes in temperate forests are known to trigger the start of spring growth, and both interannual and spatial variations in spring growth have been tied to climatic variability. Satellite data are finding increased use in regional and global phenological studies, but to date there have been few efforts to rigorously tie remotely sensed phenology to surface climate records. Where satellite records have been compared to broad-scale climate patterns, broadleaf deciduous forests have typically been characterized as a single functional type and differences between communities ignored. We used a simple two-parameter spring warming model to explore the relationship between interannual climate variability and satellite-based phenology in New England broadleaf temperate forests. We employed daily air temperature records between 2000 and 2005 from 171 NOAA meteorological stations to parameterize a simple spring warming model predicting the date of MODIS half-maximum greenness (spring onset). We find that the best model starts accumulating heating degree days (HDD) after March 20th and when average daily temperatures exceed 5°C. Critical heat sums to reach onset range from 150 to 300 degree-days, with increasing requirements southward and in coastal regions. In our findings, the spring warming model offers little improvement on the photoperiod null model (i.e. the average date of onset). However, differences between the relative goodness-of-fit of the spring warming model compared to the null (coined the 'climate sensitivity ratio', or CSR) displayed unexpected spatial coherency. The spatial variation in CSR appears to be related to differences in forest composition, with clear differences between northern (beech-maple-birch) and central (oak-hickory) hardwood forests. The two forest types may respond to climate differently, with disparate sensitivities to the minimum temperature initiating spring growth (3 and 6°C, respectively). We conclude that

  15. Study on Cell Error Rate of a Satellite ATM System Based on CDMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵彤宇; 张乃通

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the cell error rate (CER) of a CDMA-based satellite ATM system is analyzed. Two fading models, i.e. the partial fading model and the total fading model are presented according to multi-path propagation fading and shadow effect. Based on the total shadow model, the relation of CER vs. the number of subscribers at various elevations under 2D-RAKE receiving and non-diversity receiving is got. The impact on cell error rate with pseudo noise (PN) code length is also considered. The result that the maximum likelihood combination of multi-path signal would not improve the system performance when multiple access interference (MAI) is small, on the contrary the performance may be even worse is abtained.

  16. Land cover classification of Landsat 8 satellite data based on Fuzzy Logic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taufik, Afirah; Sakinah Syed Ahmad, Sharifah

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a method to classify the land covers of a satellite image based on fuzzy rule-based system approach. The study uses bands in Landsat 8 and other indices, such as Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), Normalized difference built-up index (NDBI) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) as input for the fuzzy inference system. The selected three indices represent our main three classes called water, built- up land, and vegetation. The combination of the original multispectral bands and selected indices provide more information about the image. The parameter selection of fuzzy membership is performed by using a supervised method known as ANFIS (Adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system) training. The fuzzy system is tested for the classification on the land cover image that covers Klang Valley area. The results showed that the fuzzy system approach is effective and can be explored and implemented for other areas of Landsat data.

  17. A Novel Probability-Based Handoff Strategy for Multimedia LEO Satellite Communications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Fei; ZHU Li-dong; WU Shi-qi

    2007-01-01

    A novel bandwidth allocation strategy and a connection admission control technique are proposed to improve the utilization of network resource and provide the network with better quality of service (QoS) guarantees in multimedia low earth orbit (LEO) satellite networks. Our connection admission control scheme, we call the probability based dynamic channel reservation strategy (PDR), dynamically reserves bandwidth for real-time services based on their handoff probability. And the reserved bandwidth for real-time handoff connection can also be used by new connections under a certain probability determined by the mobility characteristics and bandwidth usage of the system. Simulation results show that our scheme not only lowers the call dropping probability (CDP) for Class I real-time service but also maintains the call blocking probability (CBP) to certain degree. Consequently, the scheme can offer very low CDP for real-time connections while keeping resource utilization high.

  18. Satellite-based Studies on Large-Scale Vegetation Changes in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Zhao; Daojing Zhou; Jingyun Fang

    2012-01-01

    Remotely-sensed vegetation indices,which indicate the density and photosynthetic capacity of vegetation,have been widely used to monitor vegetation dynamics over broad areas.In this paper,we reviewed satellite-based studies on vegetation cover changes,biomass and productivity variations,phenological dynamics,desertification,and grassland degradation in China that occurred over the past 2-3 decades.Our review shows that the satellite-derived index (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index,NDVI) during growing season and the vegetation net primary productivity in major terrestrial ecosystems (for example forests,grasslands,shrubs,and croplands) have significantly increased,while the number of fresh lakes and vegetation coverage in urban regions have experienced a substantial decline.The start of the growing season continually advanced in China's temperate regions until the 1990s,with a large spatial heterogeneity.We also found that the coverage of sparsely-vegetated areas declined,and the NDVI per unit in vegetated areas increased in arid and semi-arid regions because of increased vegetation activity in grassland and oasis areas.However,these results depend strongly not only on the periods chosen for investigation,but also on factors such as data sources,changes in detection methods,and geospatial heterogeneity.Therefore,we should be cautious when applying remote sensing techniques to monitor vegetation structures,functions,and changes.

  19. All solid-state high-efficiency source for satellite-based UV ozone DIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Darrell J.; Smith, Arlee V.

    2005-01-01

    During the past several years Sandia National Laboratories has carried out proof-of-concept experiments to demonstrate tunable, efficient, high-energy ultraviolet nanosecond light sources for satellite-based ozone DIAL. We designed our UV sources to generate pulse energies > 200 mJ at 10 Hz in the range of 308-320 nm with optical-to-optical efficiency approaching 25%. We use sum-frequency generation to mix the 532 nm second harmonic of Nd:YAG with near-IR light derived from a self-injection-seeded image-rotating nonplanar-ring optical parametric oscillator. Laboratory configurations using extra- and intra-cavity sum-frequency generation were designed and tested, yielding 1064 nm to 320 nm conversion efficiencies of 21% and 23% respectively, with pulse energies of 190 mJ and 70 mJ. These energies and efficiencies require pump depletion in the parametric oscillator of at least 80% and SFG efficiency approaching 60%. While the results reported here fall slightly short of our original goals, we believe UV pulse energies exceeding 250mJ are possible with additional refinements to our technology. Although the sources tested to date are laboratory prototypes with extensive diagnostics, the core components are compact and mechanically robust and can easily be packaged for satellite deployment.

  20. Satellite-Based Derivation of High-Resolution Forest Information Layers for Operational Forest Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Stoffels

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A key factor for operational forest management and forest monitoring is the availability of up-to-date spatial information on the state of forest resources. Earth observation can provide valuable contributions to these information needs. The German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate transferred its inherited forest information system to a new architecture that is better able to serve the needs of centralized inventory and planning services, down to the level of forest districts. During this process, a spatially adaptive classification approach was developed to derive high-resolution forest information layers (e.g., forest type, tree species distribution, development stages based on multi-temporal satellite data. This study covers the application of the developed approach to a regional scale (federal state level and the further adaptation of the design to meet the information needs of the state forest service. The results confirm that the operational requirements for mapping accuracy can, in principle, be fulfilled. However, the state-wide mapping experiment also revealed that the ability to meet the required level of accuracy is largely dependent on the availability of satellite observations within the optimum phenological time-windows.

  1. A satellite based study of tropospheric bromine explosion events and their linkages to polar cyclone development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blechschmidt, Anne-Marlene; Richter, Andreas; Burrows, John P.; Kaleschke, Lars; Strong, Kimberly; Theys, Nicolas; Weber, Mark; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Zien, Achim; Hodges, Kevin I.

    2016-04-01

    Intense, cyclone-like shaped plumes of tropospheric bromine monoxide (BrO) are regularly observed by the UV-vis satellite instruments GOME-2/MetOp-A and SCIAMACHY/Envisat over Arctic and Antarctic sea ice in polar spring. The plumes are associated with an autocatalytic chemical chain reaction involving tropospheric ozone depletion and initiated by the release of bromine from cold brine-covered ice or snow to the atmosphere. This influences atmospheric chemistry as it affects the oxidising capacity of the troposphere through OH production and may also influence the local weather/temperature of the polar atmosphere, as ozone is a major greenhouse gas. Here, we make combined use of satellite retrievals and numerical model simulations to study individual BrO plume cases in the polar atmosphere. In agreement with previous studies, our analysis shows that the plumes are often transported by high latitude cyclones, sometimes over several days despite the short atmospheric lifetime of BrO. Moreover, general characteristics of bromine explosion events linked to transport by polar weather systems, such as frequency, spatial distribution and favourable weather conditions are derived based on a new detection method. Our results show that BrO cyclone transport events are by far more common in the Antarctic than in the Arctic.

  2. Geostationary satellite estimation of biomass burning in Amazonia during BASE-A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter presents the results of using Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Visible Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) infrared window (3.9 and 11.2 microns) data to monitor biomass burning several times per day in Amazonia. The technique of Matson and Dozier using two window channels was adapted to GOES VAS infrared data to estimate the size and temperature of fires associated with deforestation in the vicinity of Alta Floresta, Brazil, during the Biomass Burning Airborne and Spaceborne Experiment - Amazonia (BASE-A). Although VAS data do not offer the spatial resolution available with AVHRR data 97 km versus 1 km, respectively, this decreased resolution does not seem to hinder the ability of the VAS instrument to detect fires; in some cases it proves to be advantageous in that saturation does not occur as often. VAS visible data are additionally helpful in verifying that the hot spots sensed in the infrared are actually related to fires. Furthermore, the fire plumes can be tracked in time to determine their motion and extent. In this way, the GOES satellite offers a unique ability to monitor diurnal variations in fire activity and transport of related aerosols

  3. Heavy rainfall prediction applying satellite-based cloud data assimilation over land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Rie; Koike, Toshio; Rasmy, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    To optimize flood management, it is crucial to determine whether rain will fall within a river basin. This requires very fine precision in prediction of rainfall areas. Cloud data assimilation has great potential to improve the prediction of precipitation area because it can directly obtain information on locations of rain systems. Clouds can be observed globally by satellite-based microwave remote sensing. Microwave observation also includes information of latent heat and water vapor associated with cloud amount, which enables the assimilation of not only cloud itself but also the cloud-affected atmosphere. However, it is difficult to observe clouds over land using satellite microwave remote sensing, because their emissivity is much lower than that of the land surface. To overcome this challenge, we need appropriate representation of heterogeneous land emissivity. We developed a coupled atmosphere and land data assimilation system with the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (CALDAS-WRF), which can assimilate soil moisture, vertically integrated cloud water content over land, and heat and moisture within clouds simultaneously. We applied this system to heavy rain events in Japan. Results show that the system effectively assimilated cloud signals and produced very accurate cloud and precipitation distributions. The system also accurately formed a consistent atmospheric field around the cloud. Precipitation intensity was also substantially improved by appropriately representing the local atmospheric field. Furthermore, combination of the method and operationally analyzed dynamical and moisture fields improved prediction of precipitation duration. The results demonstrate the method's promise in dramatically improving predictions of heavy rain and consequent flooding.

  4. Thermal Physical Property-Based Fusion of Geostationary Meteorological Satellite Visible and Infrared Channel Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Han

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Geostationary meteorological satellite infrared (IR channel data contain important spectral information for meteorological research and applications, but their spatial resolution is relatively low. The objective of this study is to obtain higher-resolution IR images. One common method of increasing resolution fuses the IR data with high-resolution visible (VIS channel data. However, most existing image fusion methods focus only on visual performance, and often fail to take into account the thermal physical properties of the IR images. As a result, spectral distortion occurs frequently. To tackle this problem, we propose a thermal physical properties-based correction method for fusing geostationary meteorological satellite IR and VIS images. In our two-step process, the high-resolution structural features of the VIS image are first extracted and incorporated into the IR image using regular multi-resolution fusion approach, such as the multiwavelet analysis. This step significantly increases the visual details in the IR image, but fake thermal information may be included. Next, the Stefan-Boltzmann Law is applied to correct the distortion, to retain or recover the thermal infrared nature of the fused image. The results of both the qualitative and quantitative evaluation demonstrate that the proposed physical correction method both improves the spatial resolution and preserves the infrared thermal properties.

  5. New perspectives for satellite-based archaeological research in the ancient territory of Hierapolis (Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lasaponara

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the use of satellite QuickBird images to find traces of past human activity in the ancient territory of Hierapolis (Turkey. This is one of the most important archaeological sites in Turkey, and in 1988 it was inscribed in the UNESCO World Heritage list. Although over the years the archaeological site of Hierapolis has been excavated, restored and well documented, up to now the territory around the ancient urban area is still largely unknown. The current research project, still in progress, aims to search the area neighbouring Hierapolis believed to have been under the control of the city for a long time and, therefore, expected to be very rich in archaeological evidence. In order to investigate a large area around the ancient Hierapolis and discover potential archaeological remains, QuickBird images were adopted.

    Results from satellite-based analysis allowed us to find several unknown rural settlements dating back to early Imperial Roman and the Byzantine age. Two significant test sites were focused on in this paper in order to characterize the different spectral responses observed for different types of archaeological features (shadow and soil marks. Principal Component Analysis and spectral indices were computed to enhance archaeological marks and make identification easier. The capability of the QuickBird data set (panchromatic, multispectral channel, PCA and spectral indices in searching for archaeological marks was assessed in a quantitative way by using a specific indicator.

  6. Retrieve sea surface salinity using principal component regression model based on SMOS satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong; Li, Changjun; Li, Hongping; Lv, Kebo; Zhao, Qinghui

    2016-06-01

    The sea surface salinity (SSS) is a key parameter in monitoring ocean states. Observing SSS can promote the understanding of global water cycle. This paper provides a new approach for retrieving sea surface salinity from Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite data. Based on the principal component regression (PCR) model, SSS can also be retrieved from the brightness temperature data of SMOS L2 measurements and Auxiliary data. 26 pair matchup data is used in model validation for the South China Sea (in the area of 4°-25°N, 105°-125°E). The RMSE value of PCR model retrieved SSS reaches 0.37 psu (practical salinity units) and the RMSE of SMOS SSS1 is 1.65 psu when compared with in-situ SSS. The corresponding Argo daily salinity data during April to June 2013 is also used in our validation with RMSE value 0.46 psu compared to 1.82 psu for daily averaged SMOS L2 products. This indicates that the PCR model is valid and may provide us with a good approach for retrieving SSS from SMOS satellite data.

  7. Evaluation of Satellite and Reanalysis Soil Moisture Products over Southwest China Using Ground-Based Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Peng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Long-term global satellite and reanalysis soil moisture products have been available for several years. In this study, in situ soil moisture measurements from 2008 to 2012 over Southwest China are used to evaluate the accuracy of four satellite-based products and one reanalysis soil moisture product. These products are the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth observing system (AMSR-E, the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT, the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS, the European Space Agency’s Climate Change Initiative soil moisture (CCI SM, and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF Interim Reanalysis (ERA-Interim. The evaluation of soil moisture absolute values and anomalies shows that all the products can capture the temporal dynamics of in situ soil moisture well. For AMSR-E and SMOS, larger errors occur, which are likely due to the severe effects of radio frequency interference (RFI over the test region. In general, the ERA-Interim (R = 0.782, ubRMSD = 0.035 m3/m3 and CCI SM (R = 0.723, ubRMSD = 0.046 m3/m3 perform the best compared to the other products. The accuracy levels obtained are comparable to validation results from other regions. Therefore, local hydrological applications and water resource management will benefit from the long-term ERA-Interim and CCI SM soil moisture products.

  8. Monitoring and remote failure detection of grid-connected PV systems based on satellite observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drews, A.; Lorenz, E.; Betcke, J.; Heinemann, D. [Oldenburg University, Institute of Physics, Carl-von-Ossietzky-Str. 9-11, 26129 Oldenburg (Germany); de Keizer, A.C.; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M. [University of Utrecht, Copernicus Institute, Department of Science, Technology, and Society, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Beyer, H.G. [University of Applied Sciences Magdeburg-Stendal (FH), Institute of Electrical Engineering, Breitscheidstr. 2, 39114 Magdeburg (Germany); Heydenreich, W.; Wiemken, E. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Stettler, S.; Toggweiler, P. [Enecolo AG, Lindhofstr. 52, 8617 Moenchaltorf (Switzerland); Bofinger, S.; Schneider, M.; Heilscher, G. [Meteocontrol GmbH, Spicherer Strasse 48, 86157 Augsburg (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    Small grid-connected photovoltaic systems up to 5 kW{sub p} are often not monitored because advanced surveillance systems are not economical. Hence, some system failures which lead to partial energy losses stay unnoticed for a long time. Even a failure that results in a larger energy deficit can be difficult to detect by PV laymen due to the fluctuating energy yields. Within the EU project PVSAT-2, a fully automated performance check has been developed to assure maximum energy yields and to optimize system maintenance for small grid-connected PV systems. The aim is the early detection of system malfunctions and changing operating conditions to prevent energy and subsequent financial losses for the operator. The developed procedure is based on satellite-derived solar irradiance information that replaces on-site measurements. In conjunction with a simulation model the expected energy yield of a PV system is calculated. In case of the occurrence of a defined difference between the simulated and actual energy yield, an automated failure detection routine searches for the most probable failure sources and notifies the operator. This paper describes the individual components of the developed procedure - the satellite-derived irradiance, the used PV simulation model, and the principles of the automated failure detection routine. Moreover, it presents results of an 8-months test phase with 100 PV systems in three European countries. (author)

  9. A data mining based approach to predict spatiotemporal changes in satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulila, W.; Farah, I. R.; Ettabaa, K. Saheb; Solaiman, B.; Ghézala, H. Ben

    2011-06-01

    The interpretation of remotely sensed images in a spatiotemporal context is becoming a valuable research topic. However, the constant growth of data volume in remote sensing imaging makes reaching conclusions based on collected data a challenging task. Recently, data mining appears to be a promising research field leading to several interesting discoveries in various areas such as marketing, surveillance, fraud detection and scientific discovery. By integrating data mining and image interpretation techniques, accurate and relevant information (i.e. functional relation between observed parcels and a set of informational contents) can be automatically elicited. This study presents a new approach to predict spatiotemporal changes in satellite image databases. The proposed method exploits fuzzy sets and data mining concepts to build predictions and decisions for several remote sensing fields. It takes into account imperfections related to the spatiotemporal mining process in order to provide more accurate and reliable information about land cover changes in satellite images. The proposed approach is validated using SPOT images representing the Saint-Denis region, capital of Reunion Island. Results show good performances of the proposed framework in predicting change for the urban zone.

  10. An automatic water body area monitoring algorithm for satellite images based on Markov Random Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmi, Omid; Tourian, Mohammad J.; Sneeuw, Nico

    2016-04-01

    Our knowledge about spatial and temporal variation of hydrological parameters are surprisingly poor, because most of it is based on in situ stations and the number of stations have reduced dramatically during the past decades. On the other hand, remote sensing techniques have proven their ability to measure different parameters of Earth phenomena. Optical and SAR satellite imagery provide the opportunity to monitor the spatial change in coastline, which can serve as a way to determine the water extent repeatedly in an appropriate time interval. An appropriate classification technique to separate water and land is the backbone of each automatic water body monitoring. Due to changes in the water level, river and lake extent, atmosphere, sunlight radiation and onboard calibration of the satellite over time, most of the pixel-based classification techniques fail to determine accurate water masks. Beyond pixel intensity, spatial correlation between neighboring pixels is another source of information that should be used to decide the label of pixels. Water bodies have strong spatial correlation in satellite images. Therefore including contextual information as additional constraint into the procedure of water body monitoring improves the accuracy of the derived water masks significantly. In this study, we present an automatic algorithm for water body area monitoring based on maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation of Markov Random Fields (MRF). First we collect all available images from selected case studies during the monitoring period. Then for each image separately we apply a k-means clustering to derive a primary water mask. After that we develop a MRF using pixel values and the primary water mask for each image. Then among the different realizations of the field we select the one that maximizes the posterior estimation. We solve this optimization problem using graph cut techniques. A graph with two terminals is constructed, after which the best labelling structure for

  11. Core-based Shared Tree Multicast Routing Algorithms for LEO Satellite IP Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Lianzhen; Zhang Jun; Liu Kai

    2007-01-01

    A new core-based shared tree algorithm, viz core-cluster combination-based shared tree (CCST) algorithm and the weighted version (i.e. w-CCST algorithm) are proposed in order to resolve the channel resources waste problem in typical source-based multicast routing algorithms in low earth orbit (LEO) satellite IP networks. The CCST algorithm includes the dynamic approximate center (DAC)core selection method and the core-cluster combination multicast route construction scheme. Without complicated onboard computation,the DAC method is uniquely developed for highly dynamic networks of periodical and regular movement. The core-cluster combination method takes core node as the initial core-cluster, and expands it stepwise to construct an entire multicast tree at the lowest tree cost by a shortest path scheme between the newly-generated core-cluster and surplus group members, which results in great bandwidth utilization.Moreover, the w-CCST algorithm is able to strike a balance between performance of tree cost and that of end-to-end propagation delay by adjusting the weighted factor to meet strict end-to-end delay requirements of some real-time multicast services at the expense of a slight increase in tree cost. Finally, performance comparison is conducted between the proposed algorithms and typical algorithms in LEO satellite IP networks. Simulation results show that the CCST algorithm significantly decreases the average tree cost against to the others, and also the average end-to-end propagation delay of w-CCST algorithm is lower than that of the CCST algorithm.

  12. Validity and feasibility of a satellite imagery-based method for rapid estimation of displaced populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Checchi Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimating the size of forcibly displaced populations is key to documenting their plight and allocating sufficient resources to their assistance, but is often not done, particularly during the acute phase of displacement, due to methodological challenges and inaccessibility. In this study, we explored the potential use of very high resolution satellite imagery to remotely estimate forcibly displaced populations. Methods Our method consisted of multiplying (i manual counts of assumed residential structures on a satellite image and (ii estimates of the mean number of people per structure (structure occupancy obtained from publicly available reports. We computed population estimates for 11 sites in Bangladesh, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Kenya and Mozambique (six refugee camps, three internally displaced persons’ camps and two urban neighbourhoods with a mixture of residents and displaced ranging in population from 1,969 to 90,547, and compared these to “gold standard” reference population figures from census or other robust methods. Results Structure counts by independent analysts were reasonably consistent. Between one and 11 occupancy reports were available per site and most of these reported people per household rather than per structure. The imagery-based method had a precision relative to reference population figures of Conclusions In settings with clearly distinguishable individual structures, the remote, imagery-based method had reasonable accuracy for the purposes of rapid estimation, was simple and quick to implement, and would likely perform better in more current application. However, it may have insurmountable limitations in settings featuring connected buildings or shelters, a complex pattern of roofs and multi-level buildings. Based on these results, we discuss possible ways forward for the method’s development.

  13. Advances in the Validation of Satellite-Based Maps of Volcanic Sulfur Dioxide Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realmuto, V. J.; Berk, A.; Acharya, P. K.; Kennett, R.

    2013-12-01

    The monitoring of volcanic gas emissions with gas cameras, spectrometer arrays, tethersondes, and UAVs presents new opportunities for the validation of satellite-based retrievals of gas concentrations. Gas cameras and spectrometer arrays provide instantaneous observations of the gas burden, or concentration along an optical path, over broad sections of a plume, similar to the observations acquired by nadir-viewing satellites. Tethersondes and UAVs provide us with direct measurements of the vertical profiles of gas concentrations within plumes. This presentation will focus on our current efforts to validate ASTER-based maps of sulfur dioxide plumes at Turrialba and Kilauea Volcanoes (located in Costa Rica and Hawaii, respectively). These volcanoes, which are the subjects of comprehensive monitoring programs, are challenging targets for thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing due the warm and humid atmospheric conditions. The high spatial resolution of ASTER in the TIR (90 meters) allows us to map the plumes back to their source vents, but also requires us to pay close attention to the temperature and emissivity of the surfaces beneath the plumes. Our knowledge of the surface and atmospheric conditions is never perfect, and we employ interactive mapping techniques that allow us to evaluate the impact of these uncertainties on our estimates of plume composition. To accomplish this interactive mapping we have developed the Plume Tracker tool kit, which integrates retrieval procedures, visualization tools, and a customized version of the MODTRAN radiative transfer (RT) model under a single graphics user interface (GUI). We are in the process of porting the RT calculations to graphics processing units (GPUs) with the goal of achieving a 100-fold increase in the speed of computation relative to conventional CPU-based processing. We will report on our progress with this evolution of Plume Tracker. Portions of this research were conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  14. New ERP predictions based on (sub-)daily ocean tides from satellite altimetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzak, Matthias; Böhm, Sigrid; Böhm, Johannes; Bosch, Wolfgang; Schuh, Harald

    2013-04-01

    A new model for Earth rotation variations based on ocean tide models is highly desirable in order to close the gap between geophysical Earth rotation models and geodetic observations. We have started a project, SPOT (Short Period Ocean Tidal variations in Earth Rotation), with the goal to develop a new model of short period Earth rotation variations based on one of the best currently available empirical ocean tide models obtained from satellite altimetry. We employ the EOT11a model which is an upgrade of EOT08a, developed at DGFI, Munich. As EOT11a does not provide the tidal current velocities which are fundamental contributors to Earth rotation excitation, the calculation of current velocities from the tidal elevations is one of three main areas of research in project SPOT. The second key aspect is the conversion from ocean tidal angular momentum to the corresponding ERP variations using state-of-the-art transfer functions. A peculiar innovation at this step will be to consider the Earth's response to ocean tidal loading based on a realistic Earth model, including an anelastic mantle. The third part of the project deals with the introduction of the effect of minor tides. Ocean tide models usually only provide major semi-diurnal and diurnal tidal terms and the minor tides have to be inferred through admittance assumptions. Within the proposed project, selected minor tidal terms and the corresponding ERP variations shall be derived directly from satellite altimetry data. We determine ocean tidal angular momentum of four diurnal and five sub-daily tides from EOT11a and apply the angular momentum approach to derive a new model of ocean tidal Earth rotation variations. This poster gives a detailed description of project SPOT as well as the status of work progress. First results are presented as well.

  15. Estimating the global oceanic net freshwater flux from Argo and comparing it with satellite-based freshwater flux products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Li; Hackert, Eric; Arkin, Phillip; Busalacchi, Antonio J.

    2014-11-01

    Following the idea that analysis of in situ information in the salt budget could be used as a surrogate for global "ocean rain gauge," the annual mean oceanic net freshwater flux (E-P) was estimated from the Argo profiles and the wind stress data on a global scale. The comparison between the independent E-P estimation from Argo and the E-P product sets, including the combination of precipitation from TRMM, GPCP, CMAP and evaporation from OAFlux, GSSTF3 and IFREMER and E-P set from NEWS formed from satellite, generally show similar spatial patterns, particularly on the large scale. However, there are differences among the different satellite-based E-P estimates and between satellite estimates and independent in situ estimates. Based on the pattern correlation and the RMSD, the evaporation and precipitation from OAFlux and TRMM agrees best with the E-P estimated from the independent Argo-based estimates.

  16. Ecology and biogeography of marine parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    A review is given of (mainly recent) work on the biodiversity, ecology, biogeography and practical importance of marine parasites. Problems in estimating species numbers have been thoroughly discussed for free-living species, and the main points of these discussions are reviewed here. Even rough estimates of the richness of most parasite groups in the oceans are premature for the following reasons: species numbers of host groups, in particular in the deep sea and the meiofauna, are not known; most host groups have been examined only insufficiently for parasites or not at all; even in some of the best known groups, latitudinal, longitudinal and depth gradients in species richness are only poorly understood or not known at all; effects of hosts on parasite morphology and geographical variation have been studied only in a few cases; there are few studies using techniques of molecular biology to distinguish sibling species. Estimates of species richness in the best known groups, trematodes, monogeneans and copepods of marine fishes, are given. Parasites are found in almost all taxa of eukaryotes, but most parasitic species are concentrated in a few taxa. Important aspects of the ecology of marine parasites are discussed. It is emphasized that host specificity and host ranges should be distinguished, and an index that permits calculation of host specificity is discussed. The same index can be applied to measure site specificity. Central problems in ecology are the importance of interspecific competition and whether equilibrium or non-equilibrium conditions prevail. Marine parasites are among the few groups of organisms that have been extensively examined in this regard. A holistic approach, i.e. application of many methods, has unambiguously shown that metazoan ecto- (and probably endo-) parasites of marine fish live in largely non-saturated niche space under non-equilibrium conditions, i.e. they live in assemblages rather than in communities structured by competition

  17. Phylogeny and biogeography of the remarkable genus Bondarzewia (Basidiomycota, Russulales)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jie; Chen, Jia-Jia; Wang, Min; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Cui, Bao-Kai

    2016-01-01

    Bondarzewia is a conspicuous and widely distributed mushroom genus, but little is known about its origin and biogeography. Here, we investigated the systematics and biogeography of Bondarzewia species using multi-locus phylogenetic analysis. Four genetic markers, including the internal transcribed spacer (ITS), large nuclear ribosomal RNA subunit (nLSU), elongation factor 1-α (tef1) and mitochondrial small subunit rDNA (mtSSU), were used to infer the phylogenetic relationships of Bondarzewia. We performed Bayesian evolutionary analysis on the gene datasets of the largest and second largest subunits of RNA polymerase II (RPB1 and RPB2). From the results, we inferred that the maximum crown age of Bondarzewia is approximately 25.5 million-years-ago (Mya) and that tropical East Asia is likely to be its ancestral area, with three possible expansions leading to its distribution in North America, Europe and Oceania. PMID:27680391

  18. Life with compass: diversity and biogeography of magnetotactic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Wei [Institute of Geology and Geophysics; Bazylinski, Dennis A [Ames Laboratory; Xiao, Tian [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Wu, Long-Fei [v; Pan, Yongxin [Institute of Geology and Geophysics

    2013-11-12

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are unique in their ability to synthesize intracellular nano-sized minerals of magnetite and/or greigite magnetosomes for magnetic orientation. Thus, they provide an excellent model system to investigate mechanisms of biomineralization. MTB play important roles in bulk sedimentary magnetism and have numerous versatile applications in paleoenvironmental reconstructions, and biotechnological and biomedical fields. Significant progress has been made in recent years in describing the composition of MTB communities and distribution through innovative cultivation-dependent and -independent techniques. In this review, the most recent contributions to the field of diversity and biogeography of MTB are summarized and reviewed. Emphasis is on the novel insights into various factors/processes potentially affecting MTB community distribution. An understanding of the present-day biogeography of MTB, and the ruling parameters of their spatial distribution, will eventually help us predict MTB community shifts with environmental changes and assess their roles in global iron cycling.

  19. Life with compass: diversity and biogeography of magnetotactic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei; Bazylinski, Dennis A; Xiao, Tian; Wu, Long-Fei; Pan, Yongxin

    2014-09-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are unique in their ability to synthesize intracellular nano-sized minerals of magnetite and/or greigite magnetosomes for magnetic orientation. Thus, they provide an excellent model system to investigate mechanisms of biomineralization. MTB play important roles in bulk sedimentary magnetism and have numerous versatile applications in paleoenvironmental reconstructions, and biotechnological and biomedical fields. Significant progress has been made in recent years in describing the composition of MTB communities and distribution through innovative cultivation-dependent and -independent techniques. In this review, the most recent contributions to the field of diversity and biogeography of MTB are summarized and reviewed. Emphasis is on the novel insights into various factors/processes potentially affecting MTB community distribution. An understanding of the present-day biogeography of MTB, and the ruling parameters of their spatial distribution, will eventually help us predict MTB community shifts with environmental changes and assess their roles in global iron cycling. PMID:24148107

  20. Comparison of the characteristic energy of precipitating electrons derived from ground-based and DMSP satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ashrafi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy maps are important for ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling studies, because quantitative determination of field-aligned currents requires knowledge of the conductances and their spatial gradients. By combining imaging riometer absorption and all-sky auroral optical data it is possible to produce high temporal and spatial resolution maps of the Maxwellian characteristic energy of precipitating electrons within a 240240 common field of view. These data have been calibrated by inverting EISCAT electron density profiles into equivalent energy spectra. In this paper energy maps produced by ground-based instruments (optical and riometer are compared with DMSP satellite data during geomagnetic conjunctions. For the period 1995-2002, twelve satellite passes over the ground-based instruments' field of view for the cloud-free conditions have been considered. Four of the satellite conjunctions occurred during moderate geomagnetic, steady-state conditions and without any ion precipitation. In these cases with Maxwellian satellite spectra, there is 71% agreement between the characteristic energies derived from the satellite and the ground-based energy map method.

  1. Cuckoo search algorithm based satellite image contrast and brightness enhancement using DWT-SVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, A K; Soni, V; Kumar, A; Singh, G K

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a new contrast enhancement approach which is based on Cuckoo Search (CS) algorithm and DWT-SVD for quality improvement of the low contrast satellite images. The input image is decomposed into the four frequency subbands through Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT), and CS algorithm used to optimize each subband of DWT and then obtains the singular value matrix of the low-low thresholded subband image and finally, it reconstructs the enhanced image by applying IDWT. The singular value matrix employed intensity information of the particular image, and any modification in the singular values changes the intensity of the given image. The experimental results show superiority of the proposed method performance in terms of PSNR, MSE, Mean and Standard Deviation over conventional and state-of-the-art techniques. PMID:24893835

  2. Automatic registration of geometric distortions in satellite images based on control points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an automatic registration scheme to register geometric distortion in satellite images; A novel feature based matching scheme is proposed which establishes correspondence between the corner points in the reference and target images either by correlating the intensity values around a circular neighborhood of these corner points or by exploiting the relative orientation of lines connecting these corner points. Affine transformation model is used to estimate transformation parameters. Re-sampling is carried out by nearest neighborhood interpolation. The registration process is automatic and can efficiently serve as preprocessing stage for multitemporal analysis, image fusion, image mosaicking and change detection. The effectiveness of the algorithm has been verified by an intensive experiment on a large number of real images. Experimental results reveal high supremacy of the proposed registration method. (author)

  3. CAPS satellite spread spectrum communication blind multi-user detecting system based on chaotic sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Multiple Path Interference (MPI) and Multiple Access Interference (MAI) are important factors that affect the performance of Chinese Area Positioning System (CAPS). These problems can be solved by using spreading sequences with ideal properties and multi-user detectors. Chaotic sequences based on Chebyshev map are studied and the satellite communication system model is set up to investigate the application of chaotic sequences for CAPS in this paper. Simulation results show that chaotic sequences have desirable correlation properties and it is easy to generate a large number of chaotic sequences with good security. It has great practical value to apply chaotic sequences to CAPS together with multi-user detecting technology and the system performance can be improved greatly.

  4. High-throughput-sequencing-based identification of a grapevine fanleaf virus satellite RNA in Vitis vinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiumenti, Michela; Mohorianu, Irina; Roseti, Vincenzo; Saldarelli, Pasquale; Dalmay, Tamas; Minafra, Angelantonio

    2016-05-01

    A new satellite RNA (satRNA) of grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) was identified by high-throughput sequencing of high-definition (HD) adapter libraries from grapevine plants of the cultivar Panse precoce (PPE) affected by enation disease. The complete nucleotide sequence was obtained by automatic sequencing using primers designed based on next-generation sequencing (NGS) data. The full-length sequence, named satGFLV-PPE, consisted of 1119 nucleotides with a single open reading frame from position 15 to 1034. This satRNA showed maximum nucleotide sequence identity of 87 % to satArMV-86 and satGFLV-R6. Symptomatic grapevines were surveyed for the presence of the satRNA, and no correlation was found between detection of the satRNA and enation symptom expression. PMID:26873812

  5. Recognization of Satellite Images of Large Scale Data Based on Map- Reduce Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya Jadhav,

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Today in the world of cloud and grid computing integration of data from heterogeneous databases is inevitable.This will become complex when size of the database is very large. M-R is a new framework specifically designed for processing huge datasets on distributed sources. Apache’s Hadoop is an implementation of M-R.Currently Hadoop has been applied successfully for file based datasets. This project proposes to utilize the parallel and distributed processing capability of Hadoop M-R for handling Images on large datasets.The presented methodology of land-cover recognition provides a scalable solution for automatic satellite imagery analysis, especially when GIS data is not readily available, or surface change may occur due to catastrophic events such as flooding, hurricane, and snow storm, etc.Here,we are using algorithms such as Image Differentiation,Image Duplication,Zoom-In,Gray-Scale.

  6. Polar low climatology over the Nordic and Barents seas based on satellite passive microwave data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Julia E.; Golubkin, Pavel A.; Bobylev, Leonid P.; Zabolotskikh, Elizaveta V.; Chapron, Bertrand

    2015-07-01

    A new climatology of polar lows over the Nordic and Barents seas for 14 seasons (1995/1996-2008/2009) is presented. For the first time in climatological studies of polar lows an approach based on satellite passive microwave data was adopted for polar low identification. A total of 637 polar lows were found in 14 extended winter seasons by combining total atmospheric water vapor content and sea surface wind speed fields retrieved from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager data. As derived, the polar low activity in the Norwegian and Barents Seas is found to be almost equal, and the main polar low genesis area is located northeastward of the North Cape. For the Barents Sea, a significant correlation is found between the number of polar lows and mean sea ice extent. Individual indicative polar low characteristics (i.e., diameter, lifetime, distance traveled, translation speed, and maximum wind speed) are also presented.

  7. Sensor integration for satellite-based vehicular navigation using neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf, Rashad; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2007-03-01

    Land vehicles rely mainly on global positioning system (GPS) to provide their position with consistent accuracy. However, GPS receivers may encounter frequent GPS outages within urban areas where satellite signals are blocked. In order to overcome this problem, GPS is usually combined with inertial sensors mounted inside the vehicle to obtain a reliable navigation solution, especially during GPS outages. This letter proposes a data fusion technique based on radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) that integrates GPS with inertial sensors in real time. A field test data was used to examine the performance of the proposed data fusion module and the results discuss the merits and the limitations of the proposed technique. PMID:17385643

  8. CAPS satellite spread spectrum communication blind multi-user detecting system based on chaotic sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI LiHua; SHI HuLi; MA GuanYi

    2009-01-01

    Multiple Path Interference (MPI) and Multiple Access Interference (MAI) are Important factors that affect the performance of Chinese Area Positioning System (CAPS),These problems can be solved by using spreading sequences with ideal properties and multi-user detectors.Chaotic sequences based on Chebyshev map are studied and the satellite communication system model is set up to investigate the application of chaotic sequences for CAPS in this paper,Simulation results show that chaotic sequences have desirable correlation properties and it is easy to generate a large number of chaotic sequences with good security.It has great practical value to apply chaotic sequences to CAPS together with multi-user detecting technology and the system performance can be improved greatly.

  9. A new strategy of counterattacking anti-satellite based on motion camouflage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RADICE; Gianmarco

    2010-01-01

    Motion Camouflage (MC) is illuminated as a novel strategy in counterattacking anti-satellite by way of stealth trajectory scheduling. The dynamics model of MC in space is developed and a quadratic function with three boundary constraints is employed for trajectory determination. Based on the model a scenario is set to run the simulation. The results indicate given the designed acceleration input, the predator will be moved following a prescribed route, which precisely locates the predator between two objects at each time instant. In the last approaching phase, the motion is achieved with a big bumping rate which guarantees the power of this striking. Methods for deriving minimum fuel cost in the fixed approaching duration and the minimum approaching duration in limited acceleration input are proposed and are verified in the simulation. At last, camouflage is recognized as a multi-faceted affair, in which stealth trajectory design is considered an effective technique in stealth cooperation.

  10. How ground-based observations can support satellite greenhouse gas retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J. H.; Tans, P. P.; Sweeney, C.; Dlugokencky, E. J.

    2012-04-01

    Global society will eventually accelerate efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in a variety of ways. These would likely involve international treaties, national policies, and regional strategies that will affect a number of economic, social, and environmental sectors. Some strategies will work better than others and some will not work at all. Because trillions of dollars will be involved in pursuing greenhouse gas emission reductions - through realignment of energy production, improvement of efficiencies, institution of taxes, implementation of carbon trading markets, and use of offsets - it is imperative that society be given all the tools at its disposal to ensure the ultimate success of these efforts. Providing independent, globally coherent information on the success of these efforts will give considerable strength to treaties, policies, and strategies. Doing this will require greenhouse gas observations greatly expanded from what we have today. Satellite measurements may ultimately be indispensable in achieving global coverage, but the requirements for accuracy and continuity of measurements over time are demanding if the data are to be relevant. Issues such as those associated with sensor drift, aging electronics, and retrieval artifacts present challenges that can be addressed in part by close coordination with ground-based and in situ systems. This presentation identifies the information that ground-based systems provide very well, but it also looks at what would be deficient even in a greatly expanded surface system, where satellites can fill these gaps, and how on-going, ground and in situ measurements can aid in addressing issues associated with accuracy, long-term continuity, and retrieval artifacts.

  11. Addressing and Presenting Quality of Satellite Data via Web-Based Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leptoukh, Gregory; Lynnes, C.; Ahmad, S.; Fox, P.; Zednik, S.; West, P.

    2011-01-01

    With the recent attention to climate change and proliferation of remote-sensing data utilization, climate model and various environmental monitoring and protection applications have begun to increasingly rely on satellite measurements. Research application users seek good quality satellite data, with uncertainties and biases provided for each data point. However, different communities address remote sensing quality issues rather inconsistently and differently. We describe our attempt to systematically characterize, capture, and provision quality and uncertainty information as it applies to the NASA MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth data product. In particular, we note the semantic differences in quality/bias/uncertainty at the pixel, granule, product, and record levels. We outline various factors contributing to uncertainty or error budget; errors. Web-based science analysis and processing tools allow users to access, analyze, and generate visualizations of data while alleviating users from having directly managing complex data processing operations. These tools provide value by streamlining the data analysis process, but usually shield users from details of the data processing steps, algorithm assumptions, caveats, etc. Correct interpretation of the final analysis requires user understanding of how data has been generated and processed and what potential biases, anomalies, or errors may have been introduced. By providing services that leverage data lineage provenance and domain-expertise, expert systems can be built to aid the user in understanding data sources, processing, and the suitability for use of products generated by the tools. We describe our experiences developing a semantic, provenance-aware, expert-knowledge advisory system applied to NASA Giovanni web-based Earth science data analysis tool as part of the ESTO AIST-funded Multi-sensor Data Synergy Advisor project.

  12. Surface solar radiation variability over Eastern Mediterranean: A high spatial resolution view from satellite and ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandri, Georgia; Georgoulias, Aristeidis K.; Meleti, Charikleia; Balis, Dimitris

    2013-04-01

    Surface Solar Radiation (SSR) has been measured for decades from ground-based observations for several spots around the planet. On the other hand, during the last decades, satellite observations made possible the assessment of the spatial variability of the SSR at a global as well as regional scale. In this study, a detailed view of the SSR spatiotemporal variability is presented at a high spatial resolution, focusing on the region of Eastern Mediterranean. This is a region of particular interest since it is affected by aerosols of various origins (continental, sea, dust and biomass burning particles) and encloses countries with significant socioeconomical changes during the last decades. The SSR satellite data used in this study have been obtained from the Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) (www.cmsaf.eu). The CM SAF SSR dataset is based on reflections in the visible channel of Meteosat First Generation, has a spatial resolution of 0.03ox0.03o and spans from 1983 to 2005. The satellite observations are validated against ground-based measurements for the city of Thessaloniki, a coastal city of ~1 million inhabitants in northern Greece, situated in the heart of Eastern Mediterranean. Measurements from two pyranometers, an Eppley Precision pyranometer (1983-1992) and a Kipp & Zonen CM-11 pyranometer (1993-2005), both located at the center of the city, were homogenized and a uniform time series for the 23 year period was constructed. SSR was also calculated with the use of MODIS level-2 aerosol and cloud satellite data for the region of Thessaloniki and the Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model. These new satellite-based results are compared to both CM SAF and ground-based observations in order to examine whether SBDART and MODIS could be further used for the investigation of the spatial patterns of SSR in the area.

  13. Galileo satellite antenna modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigenberger, Peter; Dach, Rolf; Prange, Lars; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    The space segment of the European satellite navigation system Galileo currently consists of six satellites. Four of them belong to the first generation of In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites whereas the other two are Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellites. High-precision geodetic applications require detailed knowledge about the actual phase center of the satellite and receiver antenna. The deviation of this actual phase center from a well-defined reference point is described by phase center offsets (PCOs) and phase center variations (PCVs). Unfortunately, no public information is available about the Galileo satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs, neither for the IOV, nor the FOC satellites. Therefore, conventional values for the IOV satellite antenna PCOs have been adopted for the Multi-GNSS experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The effect of the PCVs is currently neglected and no PCOs for the FOC satellites are available yet. To overcome this deficiency in GNSS observation modeling, satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs are estimated for the Galileo IOV satellites based on global GNSS tracking data of the MGEX network and additional stations of the legacy IGS network. Two completely independent solutions are computed with the Bernese and Napeos software packages. The PCO and PCV values of the individual satellites are analyzed and the availability of two different solutions allows for an accuracy assessment. The FOC satellites are built by a different manufacturer and are also equipped with another type of antenna panel compared to the IOV satellites. Signal transmission of the first FOC satellite has started in December 2014 and activation of the second satellite is expected for early 2015. Based on the available observations PCO estimates and, optionally PCVs of the FOC satellites will be presented as well. Finally, the impact of the new antenna model on the precision and accuracy of the Galileo orbit determination is analyzed.

  14. Real-time agent middleware experiments on java-based processors towards distributed satellite systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bridges, CP; Vladimirova, T.

    2011-01-01

    Distributed satellite systems are large research topics, spanning many fields such as communications, networking schemes, high performance computing, and distributed operations. DARPA's F6 fractionated spacecraft mission is a prime example, culminating in the launch of technology demonstration satellites for autonomous and rapidly configurable satellite architectures. Recent developments at Surrey Space Centre have included the development of a Java enabled system-on-a-chip solution towards r...

  15. An AI Planning-based Tool for Scheduling Satellite Nominal Operations

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Moreno, Maria Dolores; Borrajo, Daniel; Meziat, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Satellite domains are becoming a fashionable area of research within the AI community due to the complexity of the problems that satellite domains need to solve. With the current U.S. and European focus on launching satellites for communication, broadcasting, or localization tasks, among others, the automatic control of these machines becomes an important problem. Many new techniques in both the planning and scheduling fields have been applied successfully, but still much work is left to be d...

  16. Ensembles of satellite aerosol retrievals based on three AATSR algorithms within aerosol_cci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmale, Miriam; Popp, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Ensemble techniques are widely used in the modelling community, combining different modelling results in order to reduce uncertainties. This approach could be also adapted to satellite measurements. Aerosol_cci is an ESA funded project, where most of the European aerosol retrieval groups work together. The different algorithms are homogenized as far as it makes sense, but remain essentially different. Datasets are compared with ground based measurements and between each other. Three AATSR algorithms (Swansea university aerosol retrieval, ADV aerosol retrieval by FMI and Oxford aerosol retrieval ORAC) provide within this project 17 year global aerosol records. Each of these algorithms provides also uncertainty information on pixel level. Within the presented work, an ensembles of the three AATSR algorithms is performed. The advantage over each single algorithm is the higher spatial coverage due to more measurement pixels per gridbox. A validation to ground based AERONET measurements shows still a good correlation of the ensemble, compared to the single algorithms. Annual mean maps show the global aerosol distribution, based on a combination of the three aerosol algorithms. In addition, pixel level uncertainties of each algorithm are used for weighting the contributions, in order to reduce the uncertainty of the ensemble. Results of different versions of the ensembles for aerosol optical depth will be presented and discussed. The results are validated against ground based AERONET measurements. A higher spatial coverage on daily basis allows better results in annual mean maps. The benefit of using pixel level uncertainties is analysed.

  17. Oceanic island biogeography through the lens of the general dynamic model: assessment and prospect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borregaard, Michael; Amorim, Isabel; Borges, Paulo;

    2016-01-01

    The general dynamic model of oceanic island biogeography (GDM) has added a new dimension to theoretical island biogeography in recognizing that geological processes are key drivers of the evolutionary processes of diversification and extinction within remote islands. It provides a dynamic and ess...

  18. South African Weather Service operational satellite based precipitation estimation technique: applications and improvements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. de Coning

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Extreme weather related to heavy or more frequent precipitation events seem to be a likely possibility for the future of our planet. While precipitation measurements can be done by means of rain gauges, the obvious disadvantages of point measurements are driving meteorologists towards remotely sensed precipitation methods. In South Africa more sophisticated and expensive nowcasting technology such as radar and lightning networks are available, supported by a fairly dense rain gauge network of about 1500 gauges. In the rest of southern Africa rainfall measurements are more difficult to obtain. The availability of the local version of the Unified Model and the Meteosat Second Generation satellite data make these products ideal components of precipitation measurement in data sparse regions such as Africa. In this article the local version of the Hydroestimator (originally from NOAA/NESDIS is discussed as well as its applications for precipitation measurement in this region. Hourly accumulations of the Hydroestimator are currently used as a satellite based precipitation estimator for the South African Flash Flood Guidance system. However, the Hydroestimator is by no means a perfect representation of the real rainfall. In this study the Hydroestimator and the stratiform rainfall field from the Unified Model are both bias corrected and then combined into a new precipitation field which can feed into the South African Flash Flood Guidance system. This new product should provide a more accurate and comprehensive input to the Flash Flood Guidance systems in South Africa as well as southern Africa. In this way the southern African region where data is sparse and very few radars are available can have access to more accurate flash flood guidance.

  19. Aerosol Climatology over Nile Delta based on MODIS, MISR and OMI satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Marey

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Since 1999 Cairo and the Nile delta region have suffered from air pollution episodes called the "black cloud" during the fall season. These have been attributed to either burning of agriculture waste or long-range transport of desert dust. Here we present a detailed analysis of the optical and microphysical aerosol properties, based on satellite data. Monthly mean values of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD at 550 nm were examined for the 10 yr 2000–2009. Significant monthly variability is observed with maxima in April or May (~0.5 and October (~0.45, and a minimum in December and January (~0.2. Monthly mean values of UV Aerosol Index (UVAI retrieved by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI for 4 yr (2005–2008 exhibit the same AOD pattern. The carbonaceous aerosols during the black cloud periods are confined to the planetary boundary layer (PBL, while dust aerosols exist over a wider range of altitudes, as shown by Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO aerosol profiles. The monthly climatology of Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR data show that the aerosols during the black cloud periods are spherical with a higher percentage of small and medium size particles, whereas the spring aerosols are mostly large non-spherical particles. All of the results show that the air quality in Cairo and the Nile delta region is subject to a complex mixture of air pollution types, especially in the fall season, when biomass burning contributes to a background of urban pollution and desert dust.

  20. Aerosol climatology over Nile Delta based on MODIS, MISR and OMI satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Marey

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Since 1999 Cairo and the Nile delta region have suffered from air pollution episodes called the "black cloud" during the fall season. These have been attributed to either burning of agriculture waste or long-range transport of desert dust. Here we present a detailed analysis of the optical and microphysical aerosol properties, based on satellite data. Monthly mean values of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD at 550 nm were examined for the 10 yr period from 2000–2009. Significant monthly variability is observed in the AOD with maxima in April or May (~0.5 and October (~0.45, and a minimum in December and January (~0.2. Monthly mean values of UV Aerosol Index (UVAI retrieved by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI for 4 yr (2005–2008 exhibit the same AOD pattern. The carbonaceous aerosols during the black cloud periods are confined to the planetary boundary layer (PBL, while dust aerosols exist over a wider range of altitudes, as shown by Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO aerosol profiles. The monthly climatology of Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR data show that the aerosols during the black cloud periods are spherical with a higher percentage of small and medium size particles, whereas the spring aerosols are mostly large non-spherical particles. All of the results show that the air quality in Cairo and the Nile delta region is subject to a complex mixture of air pollution types, especially in the fall season, when biomass burning contributes to a background of urban pollution and desert dust.

  1. Internet-Based Laboratory Activities Designed for Studying the Sun with Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, T. F.

    1998-12-01

    Yohkoh Public Outreach Project (YPOP) is a collaborative industry, university, and K-16 project bringing fascinating and dynamic images of the Sun to the public in real-time. Partners have developed an extensive public access and educational WWW site containing more than 100 pages of vibrant images with current information that focuses on movies of the X-ray output of our Sun taken by the Yohkoh Satellite. More than 5 Gb of images and movies are available on the WWW site from the Yohkoh satellite, a joint project of the Institute for Space and Astronautical Sciences (ISAS) and NASA. Using a movie theater motif, the site was created by teams working at Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, Palo Alto, CA in the Solar and Astrophysics Research Group, the Montana State University Solar Physics Research Group, and the Montana State University Conceptual Astronomy and Physics Education Research Group with funding from the NASA Learning Technology Project (LTP) program (NASA LTP SK30G4410R). The Yohkoh Movie Theater Internet Site is found at URL: http://www.lmsal.com/YPOP/ and mirrored at URL: http://solar.physics.montana.edu/YPOP/. In addition to being able to request automated movies for any dates in a 5 Gb on-line database, the user can view automatically updated daily images and movies of our Sun over the last 72 hours. Master science teachers working with the NASA funded Yohkoh Public Outreach Project have developed nine technology-based on-line lessons for K-16 classrooms. These interdisciplinary science, mathematics, and technology lessons integrate Internet resources, real-time images of the Sun, and extensive NASA image databases. Instructors are able to freely access each of the classroom-ready activities. The activities require students to use scientific inquiry skills and manage electronic information to solve problems consistent with the emphasis of the NRC National Science Education Standards.

  2. Array-based satellite phase bias sensing: theory and GPS/BeiDou/QZSS results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-receiver integer ambiguity resolution (IAR) is a measurement concept that makes use of network-derived non-integer satellite phase biases (SPBs), among other corrections, to recover and resolve the integer ambiguities of the carrier-phase data of a single GNSS receiver. If it is realized, the very precise integer ambiguity-resolved carrier-phase data would then contribute to the estimation of the receiver’s position, thus making (near) real-time precise point positioning feasible. Proper definition and determination of the SPBs take a leading part in developing the idea of single-receiver IAR. In this contribution, the concept of array-based between-satellite single-differenced (SD) SPB determination is introduced, which is aimed to reduce the code-dominated precision of the SD-SPB corrections. The underlying model is realized by giving the role of the local reference network to an array of antennas, mounted on rigid platforms, that are separated by short distances so that the same ionospheric delay is assumed to be experienced by all the antennas. To that end, a closed-form expression of the array-aided SD-SPB corrections is presented, thereby proposing a simple strategy to compute the SD-SPBs. After resolving double-differenced ambiguities of the array’s data, the variance of the SD-SPB corrections is shown to be reduced by a factor equal to the number of antennas. This improvement in precision is also affirmed by numerical results of the three GNSSs GPS, BeiDou and QZSS. Experimental results demonstrate that the integer-recovered ambiguities converge to integers faster, upon increasing the number of antennas aiding the SD-SPB corrections. (paper)

  3. Design and Implementation of Auto-aim Satellite Instrument of Satellite Antenna Based on ARM%基于ARM的卫星天线自动对星仪设计和实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张爱民; 梁书剑; 任德成; 刘晓祥

    2011-01-01

    The operation of aim Satellite is very complex, because aim Satellite precision of narrow beam Satellite antenna is high. A scheme of auto-aim satellite instrument of Satellite antenna is put forward, the scheme adopt some technologies, for example, embedded development technology based on ARM, detection technology of sensor and position technology of GPS, implementation of function module is introduced in detain, when adopting the auto-aim satellite instrument, the speed of aim satellite is quick, the operation of aim Satellite is handy, the foreground of application is expansive.%针对卫星窄波束天线对星精度要求高,对星操作复杂的现状,采用基于ARM的嵌入式开发技术、传感器检测技术和GPS定位技术,提出了一种卫星天线自动对星仪研制方案,详细介绍了各功能模块的实现方法.采用该对星仪可以大大加快对星速度,而且操作简便,有广泛的应用前景.

  4. Intercomparison of total precipitable water measurements made by satellite-borne microwave radiometers and ground-based GPS instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mears, Carl A.; Wang, Junhong; Smith, Deborah; Wentz, Frank J.

    2015-03-01

    High-quality, high temporal resolution measurements of total precipitable water (TPW) can be made by evaluating the vapor-dependent delay of radio signals reaching land-based Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers from GPS satellites. These measurements are available since the mid-1990s when the GPS system became operational. Over the world's oceans, satellite-borne microwave imaging radiometers have been making measurements of TPW for more than 25 years. In this work, we perform an intercomparison of collocated TPW measurements made by these two disparate systems using measurements from 26 GPS stations located on small islands. The two types of measurements agree well, with typical satellite-station mean differences of less than 1.0 kg m-2. Analysis revealed several cases of inhomogeneities in the GPS data set, and two deficiencies in the Remote Sensing Systems satellite data, demonstrating the usefulness of intercomparison for improving the accuracy of both types of data. After the individual station, biases were removed, the standard deviation of the overall differences between individual satellites and GPS measurements ranged between 1.60 and 1.94 kg m-2. Twelve GPS stations had overlap time periods long enough to evaluate difference trends, yielding 59 satellite-station pairs when paired with different satellites. More than half of the pairs (39 of 59) did not show a significant trend. The 20 pairs with significant trends did not show trends of predominantly one sign, suggesting that neither system is plagued by a system-wide drift in TPW.

  5. Lightning climatology over Jakarta, Indonesia, based on long-term surface operational, satellite, and campaign observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shuichi; Wu, Peiming; Yamanaka, Manabu D.; Hattori, Miki; Hamada, Jun-Ichi; Arbain, Ardhi A.; Lestari, Sopia; Sulistyowati, Reni; Syamsudin, Fadli

    2016-04-01

    Lightning frequency over Indonesian Maritime Continent (MC) is quite high (Petersen and Rutledge 2001, Christian et al. 2003, Takayabu 2006, etc). In particular, Bogor (south of Jakarta, west Jawa) had 322 days of lightning in one year (Guinness Book in 1988). Lightning causes serious damage on nature and society over the MC; forest fore, power outage, inrush/surge currents on many kinds of electronics. Lightning climatology and meso-scale characteristics of thunderstorm over the MC, in particular over Jakarta, where social damage is quite serious, were examined. We made Statistical analysis of lightning and thunderstorm based on TRMM Lightning Image Sensor (LIS) and Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMaP) together with long-term operational surface observation data (SYNOP) in terms of diurnal, intraseasonal, monsoonal, and interannual variations. In addition, we carried out a campaign observation in February 2015 in Bogor to obtain meso-scale structure and dynamics of thunderstorm over Jakarta to focus on graupel and other ice phase particles inside by using an X-band dual-polarimetric (DP) radar. Recently, Virts et al. (2013a, b) showed comprehensive lightning climatology based on the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). However, they also reported problems with its detection efficiency (< 10%) and small sampling frequency (< 0.1% of the time fly over tropics) by satellites. Therefore, we firstly examine in situ lightning data based on SYNOP observed by the Indonesian Agency for Meteorology, Climatology, and Geophysics (BMKG) because lightning is quite local and sporadic phenomena. We've started to analyze lightning characteristics over Jakarta region based on SYNOP as the ground truth data and GSMaP. Variability of lightning frequency around Jakarta was affected much by local conditions, e.g., topography (elevation) and proximity to the coastline. We confirmed the lightning frequency and its diurnal variation around Jakarta were much

  6. Evaluation and Application of Satellite-Based Latent Heating Profile Estimation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, William S.; Grecu, Mircea; Yang, Song; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, methods for estimating atmospheric latent heating vertical structure from both passive and active microwave remote sensing have matured to the point where quantitative evaluation of these methods is the next logical step. Two approaches for heating algorithm evaluation are proposed: First, application of heating algorithms to synthetic data, based upon cloud-resolving model simulations, can be used to test the internal consistency of heating estimates in the absence of systematic errors in physical assumptions. Second, comparisons of satellite-retrieved vertical heating structures to independent ground-based estimates, such as rawinsonde-derived analyses of heating, provide an additional test. The two approaches are complementary, since systematic errors in heating indicated by the second approach may be confirmed by the first. A passive microwave and combined passive/active microwave heating retrieval algorithm are evaluated using the described approaches. In general, the passive microwave algorithm heating profile estimates are subject to biases due to the limited vertical heating structure information contained in the passive microwave observations. These biases may be partly overcome by including more environment-specific a priori information into the algorithm s database of candidate solution profiles. The combined passive/active microwave algorithm utilizes the much higher-resolution vertical structure information provided by spaceborne radar data to produce less biased estimates; however, the global spatio-temporal sampling by spaceborne radar is limited. In the present study, the passive/active microwave algorithm is used to construct a more physically-consistent and environment-specific set of candidate solution profiles for the passive microwave algorithm and to help evaluate errors in the passive algorithm s heating estimates. Although satellite estimates of latent heating are based upon instantaneous, footprint- scale data, suppression

  7. Assimilation of Satellite Based Soil Moisture Data in the National Weather Service's Flash Flood Guidance System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, D.; Lakhankar, T.; Cosgrove, B.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change and variability increases the probability of frequency, timing, intensity, and duration of flood events. After rainfall, soil moisture is the most important factor dictating flash flooding, since rainfall infiltration and runoff are based on the saturation of the soil. It is difficult to conduct ground-based measurements of soil moisture consistently and regionally. As such, soil moisture is often derived from models and agencies such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Weather Service (NOAA/NWS) use proxy estimates of soil moisture at the surface in order support operational flood forecasting. In particular, a daily national map of Flash Flood Guidance (FFG) is produced that is based on surface soil moisture deficit and threshold runoff estimates. Flash flood warnings are issued by Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) and are underpinned by information from the Flash Flood Guidance (FFG) system operated by the River Forecast Centers (RFCs). This study analyzes the accuracy and limitations of the FFG system using reported flash flood cases in 2010 and 2011. The flash flood reports were obtained from the NWS Storm Event database for the Arkansas-Red Basin RFC (ABRFC). The current FFG system at the ABRFC provides gridded flash flood guidance (GFFG) System using the NWS Hydrology Laboratory-Research Distributed Hydrologic Model (HL-RDHM) to translate the upper zone soil moisture to estimates of Soil Conservation Service Curve Numbers. Comparison of the GFFG and real-time Multi-sensor Precipitation Estimator derived Quantitative Precipitation Estimate (QPE) for the same duration and location were used to analyze the success of the system. Improved flash flood forecasting requires accurate and high resolution soil surface information. The remote sensing observations of soil moisture can improve the flood forecasting accuracy. The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellites are two

  8. Small satellite attitude determination based on GPS/IMU data fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovan, Andrey [Navigation and Control Laboratory, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, GSP-1, Leninskie Gory, Moscow (Russian Federation); Cepe, Ali [Department of Applied Mechanics and Control, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-10

    In this paper, we present the mathematical models and algorithms that describe the problem of attitude determination for a small satellite using measurements from three angular rate sensors (ARS) and aiding measurements from multiple GPS receivers/antennas rigidly attached to the platform of the satellite.

  9. Global Land-surface Evaporation Estimated from Satellite-based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper outlines a new methodology to derive evaporation from satellite observations. The approach uses a variety of satellite-sensor products to estimate daily evaporation at a global scale, with a 0.25 degree spatial resolution. Central to this approach is the use of the Priestley and Taylor (P...

  10. Small satellite attitude determination based on GPS/IMU data fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we present the mathematical models and algorithms that describe the problem of attitude determination for a small satellite using measurements from three angular rate sensors (ARS) and aiding measurements from multiple GPS receivers/antennas rigidly attached to the platform of the satellite

  11. High Resolution Imaging of Satellites with Ground-Based 10-m Astronomical Telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marois, C

    2007-01-04

    High resolution imaging of artificial satellites can play an important role in current and future space endeavors. One such use is acquiring detailed images that can be used to identify or confirm damage and aid repair plans. It is shown that a 10-m astronomical telescope equipped with an adaptive optics system (AO) to correct for atmospheric turbulence using a natural guide star can acquire high resolution images of satellites in low-orbits using a fast shutter and a near-infrared camera even if the telescope is not capable of tracking satellites. With the telescope pointing towards the satellite projected orbit and less than 30 arcsec away from a guide star, multiple images of the satellite are acquired on the detector using the fast shutter. Images can then be shifted and coadded by post processing to increase the satellite signal to noise ratio. Using the Keck telescope typical Strehl ratio and anisoplanatism angle as well as a simple diffusion/reflection model for a satellite 400 km away observed near Zenith at sunset or sunrise, it is expected that such system will produced > 10{sigma} K-band images at a resolution of 10 cm inside a 60 arcsec diameter field of view. If implemented, such camera could deliver the highest resolution satellite images ever acquired from the ground.

  12. Molecular biogeography of Europe: Pleistocene cycles and postglacial trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitt Thomas

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The climatic cycles with subsequent glacial and intergalcial periods have had a great impact on the distribution and evolution of species. Using genetic analytical tools considerably increased our understanding of these processes. In this review I therefore give an overview of the molecular biogeography of Europe. For means of simplification, I distinguish between three major biogeographical entities: (i "Mediterranean" with Mediterranean differentiation and dispersal centres, (ii "Continental" with extra-Mediterranean centres and (iii "Alpine" and/or "Arctic" with recent alpine and/or arctic distribution patterns. These different molecular biogeographical patterns are presented using actual examples. Many "Mediterranean" species are differentiated into three major European genetic lineages, which are due to glacial isolation in the three major Mediterranean peninsulas. Postglacial expansion in this group of species is mostly influenced by the barriers of the Pyrenees and the Alps with four resulting main patterns of postglacial range expansions. However, some cases are known with less than one genetic lineage per Mediterranean peninsula on the one hand, and others with a considerable genetic substructure within each of the Mediterranean peninsulas, Asia Minor and the Maghreb. These structures within the Mediterranean sub-centres are often rather strong and in several cases even predate the Pleistocene. For the "Continental" species, it could be shown that the formerly supposed postglacial spread from eastern Palearctic expansion centres is mostly not applicable. Quite the contrary, most of these species apparently had extra-Mediterranean centres of survival in Europe with special importance of the perialpine regions, the Carpathian Basin and parts of the Balkan Peninsula. In the group of "Alpine" and/or "Arctic" species, several molecular biogeographical patterns have been found, which support and improve the postulates based on

  13. Analysis of rain fade duration models for Earth-to-satellite path based on data measured in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statistical analysis of rain fade duration is crucial information for system engineer to design and plan a fade mitigation technique (FMT) for the satellite communication system. An investigation is carried out based on data measured of one year period in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from satellite path of MEASAT3. This paper presents statistical analysis of measured fade duration on high elevation angle (77.4°) in Ku-band compared to three prediction models of fade duration. It is found that none of the models could predict measured fade duration distribution accurately

  14. Prediction of ionizing radiation effects induced performance degradation in homodyne BPSK based inter-satellite optical communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Zhao, Shanghong; Gong, Zizheng; Zhao, Jing; Li, Xuan; Dong, Chen

    2016-03-01

    Ionizing radiation effects induced on-orbit performance degradation in homodyne binary phase shift keying (BPSK) based inter-satellite optical communication system is predicted in this paper. Essential optoelectronic devices involved in optical communication system were irradiated by Co60 gamma ray and ionizing radiation environment of three general orbits was analyzed. On this basis, variations of terminal performance loss and system BER degradation along with on-orbit working time were simulated. Influences of terminal location and orbit environment were further discussed. Radiation protection on laser transmitters requires more strengthening, especially for those located in MEO and GEO satellites.

  15. Satellite based radar interferometry to estimate large-scale soil water depletion from clay shrinkage: possibilities and limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brake, te B.; Hanssen, R.F.; Ploeg, van der M.J.; Rooij, de G.H.

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-based radar interferometry is a technique capable of measuring small surface elevation changes at large scales and with a high resolution. In vadose zone hydrology, it has been recognized for a long time that surface elevation changes due to swell and shrinkage of clayey soils can serve as

  16. First extended validation of satellite microwave liquid water path with ship-based observations of marine low clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painemal, David; Greenwald, Thomas; Cadeddu, Maria; Minnis, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    We present the first extended validation of satellite microwave (MW) liquid water path (LWP) for low nonprecipitating clouds, from four operational sensors, against ship-borne observations from a three-channel MW radiometer collected along ship transects over the northeast Pacific during May-August 2013. Satellite MW retrievals have an overall correlation of 0.84 with ship observations and a bias of 9.3 g/m2. The bias for broken cloud scenes increases linearly with water vapor path and remains below 17.7 g/m2. In contrast, satellite MW LWP is unbiased in overcast scenes with correlations up to 0.91, demonstrating that the retrievals are accurate and reliable under these conditions. Satellite MW retrievals produce a diurnal cycle amplitude consistent with ship-based observations (33 g/m2). Observations taken aboard extended ship cruises to evaluate not only satellite MW LWP but also LWP derived from visible/infrared sensors offer a new way to validate this important property over vast oceanic regions.

  17. The Satellite Based Hydrological Model (SHM): Routing Scheme and its Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    kumari, Nikul; Paul, Pranesh Kumar; Singh, Rajendra; Panigrahy, Niranjan; Mishra, Ashok; Gupta, Praveen Kumar; Singh, Raghavendra P.

    2016-04-01

    The collection of spatially extensive data by using the traditional methods of data acquisition is a challenging task for a large territory like India. To overcome such problems, the Satellite based Hydrological Model (SHM), a large scale conceptual hydrological model for the Indian Territory, is being developed under the PRACRITI-2 program of the Space Applications Centre (SAC), Ahmedabad. The model aims at preparing sustainable water management scenarios using remote sensing data from Indian satellites to handle the fresh water crisis in India. There are five modules namely, Surface Water (SW), Forest (F), Snow (S), Groundwater (GW) and Routing (ROU) in the SHM. The SW, F and S modules convert rainfall into surface runoff and generate input (infiltration and percolation) for the GW module, and GW generates baseflow using that input. In this study, a cell-to-cell routing (ROU) module has been developed for SHM. It is based on the principle of Time Variant Spatially Distributed Direct Hydrograph (SDDH) to route the generated runoff and baseflow generated by various modules upto the outlet. The entire India is divided into 5km x 5km grid cells and properties at the center of the cell are assumed to represent the property of the cell. In the routing scheme, for each cell a single downstream cell is defined in the direction of steepest descent, to create the flow network. These grid cells are classified into overland cells and channel cells based on the threshold value taken into consideration. The overland flow travel time of each overland cell is estimated by combining a steady state kinematic wave approximation with Manning's equation and the channel flow travel time of each channel cell is estimated using Manning's equation and the steady state continuity equation. The travel time for each cell is computed by dividing the travel distance through that cell with cell velocity. The cumulative travel time from each grid cell to the watershed outlet is the sum of

  18. Satellite Heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The usefulness of China’s own global navigation system is being extended by technological breakthroughs China has successfully developed the country’s first navigation chip that is expected to be the heart of the country’s satellite-based navigation system,according to a report released on February 21. The Navigation I chip,developed by the Shanghai Fukong Hualong Micro-system

  19. Exploring the uncertainty associated with satellite-based estimates of premature mortality due to exposure to fine particulate matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Bonne; Heald, Colette L.

    2016-03-01

    The negative impacts of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) exposure on human health are a primary motivator for air quality research. However, estimates of the air pollution health burden vary considerably and strongly depend on the data sets and methodology. Satellite observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) have been widely used to overcome limited coverage from surface monitoring and to assess the global population exposure to PM2.5 and the associated premature mortality. Here we quantify the uncertainty in determining the burden of disease using this approach, discuss different methods and data sets, and explain sources of discrepancies among values in the literature. For this purpose we primarily use the MODIS satellite observations in concert with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. We contrast results in the United States and China for the years 2004-2011. Using the Burnett et al. (2014) integrated exposure response function, we estimate that in the United States, exposure to PM2.5 accounts for approximately 2 % of total deaths compared to 14 % in China (using satellite-based exposure), which falls within the range of previous estimates. The difference in estimated mortality burden based solely on a global model vs. that derived from satellite is approximately 14 % for the US and 2 % for China on a nationwide basis, although regionally the differences can be much greater. This difference is overshadowed by the uncertainty in the methodology for deriving PM2.5 burden from satellite observations, which we quantify to be on the order of 20 % due to uncertainties in the AOD-to-surface-PM2.5 relationship, 10 % due to the satellite observational uncertainty, and 30 % or greater uncertainty associated with the application of concentration response functions to estimated exposure.

  20. Exploring the uncertainty associated with satellite-based estimates of premature mortality due to exposure to fine particulate matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ford

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The negative impacts of fine particulate matter (PM2.5 exposure on human health are a primary motivator for air quality research. However, estimates of the air pollution health burden vary considerably and strongly depend on the datasets and methodology. Satellite observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD have been widely used to overcome limited coverage from surface monitoring and to assess the global population exposure to PM2.5 and the associated premature mortality. Here we quantify the uncertainty in determining the burden of disease using this approach, discuss different methods and datasets, and explain sources of discrepancies among values in the literature. For this purpose we primarily use the MODIS satellite observations in concert with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. We contrast results in the United States and China for the years 2004–2011. We estimate that in the United States, exposure to PM2.5 accounts for approximately 4 % of total deaths compared to 22 % in China (using satellite-based exposure, which falls within the range of previous estimates. The difference in estimated mortality burden based solely on a global model vs. that derived from satellite is approximately 9 % for the US and 4 % for China on a nationwide basis, although regionally the differences can be much greater. This difference is overshadowed by the uncertainty in the methodology for deriving PM2.5 burden from satellite observations, which we quantify to be on order of 20 % due to uncertainties in the AOD-to-surface-PM2.5 relationship, 10 % due to the satellite observational uncertainty, and 30 % or greater uncertainty associated with the application of concentration response functions to estimated exposure.

  1. Satellite-based GNSS-R observations from TDS-1 for soil moisture studies in agricultural vegetation landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, P. W.; Clarizia, M. P.; Judge, J.; Camps, A.; Ruf, C. S.; Bongiovanni, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture (SM) is a critical factor governing the water and energy fluxes at the land surface that are important for near-term climate forecasting, drought monitoring, crop yield estimation, and better water resources management. Remotely sensed observations at microwave frequencies are the most sensitive to changes of water in the soil. Particularly, frequencies at L-band (1-2 GHz) have been widely used for SM studies under the vegetated land covers because of their minimal atmospheric interference and attenuation by vegetation, allowing observations from the soil surface. In addition to current satellite based microwave sensors, such as the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) missions, the Global Navigation Satellite System-Reflectometry technique is capable of observing the GNSS signal reflected from the terrain that contains combined information of soil and vegetation characteristics. The technique has recently attracted attention for global SM monitoring because its receiver is small in size and light weight and can be on board the low orbit, small satellites with low power consumption and low cost. Therefore the GNSS-R remote sensing may lead to affordable multi-satellite constellations that enable improved temporal resolution for highly dynamic hydrologic conditions. The current UK Technology Demonstration Satellite (TDS-1) has been providing global GNSS-R observations since September 2014 for experimental purposes and the receiver is accessed and operated for 2 days during every 8-day cycle. In the near future, the NASA Cyclone GNSS (CYGNSS) mission, scheduled to be launched in 2016, will consist of 8 satellites observing GPS L1 signal at a frequency of 1.5754 GHz with a spatial resolution of 10-25 km and a temporal resolution of satellite-based GNSS-R observations. The GNSS-R observations from TDS-1 will be used to investigate the correlation of the GNSS-R signals to SMAP, ALOS-2 PALSAR-2, vegetation indices from MODIS, and the in-situ SM observations

  2. Impacts of real-time satellite clock errors on GPS precise point positioning-based troposphere zenith delay estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Junbo; Xu, Chaoqian; Li, Yihe; Gao, Yang

    2015-08-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) has become a cost-effective tool to determine troposphere zenith total delay (ZTD) with accuracy comparable to other atmospheric sensors such as the radiosonde, the water vapor radiometer, the radio occultation and so on. However, the high accuracy of GPS troposphere ZTD estimates relies on the precise satellite orbit and clock products available with various latencies. Although the International GNSS Service (IGS) can provide predicted orbit and clock products for real-time applications, the predicted clock accuracy of 3 ns cannot always guarantee the high accuracy of troposphere ZTD estimates. Such limitations could be overcome by the use of the newly launched IGS real-time service which provides 5 cm orbit and 0.2-1.0 ns (an equivalent range error of 6-30 cm) clock products in real time. Considering the relatively larger magnitude of the clock error than that of the orbit error, this paper investigates the effect of real-time satellite clock errors on the GPS precise point positioning (PPP)-based troposphere ZTD estimation. Meanwhile, how the real-time satellite clock errors impact the GPS PPP-based troposphere ZTD estimation has also been studied to obtain the most precise ZTD solutions. First, two types of real-time satellite clock products are assessed with respect to the IGS final clock product in terms of accuracy and precision. Second, the real-time GPS PPP-based troposphere ZTD estimation is conducted using data from 34 selected IGS stations over three independent weeks in April, July and October, 2013. Numerical results demonstrate that the precision, rather than the accuracy, of the real-time satellite clock products impacts the real-time PPP-based ZTD solutions more significantly. In other words, the real-time satellite clock product with better precision leads to more precise real-time PPP-based troposphere ZTD solutions. Therefore, it is suggested that users should select and apply real-time satellite products with

  3. Global root zone storage capacity from satellite-based evaporation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang-Erlandsson, Lan; Bastiaanssen, Wim; Gao, Hongkai; Jägermeyr, Jonas; Senay, Gabriel; van Dijk, Albert; Guerschman, Juan; Keys, Patrick; Gordon, Line; Savenije, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    We present an "earth observation-based" method for estimating root zone storage capacity - a critical, yet uncertain parameter in hydrological and land surface modelling. By assuming that vegetation optimises its root zone storage capacity to bridge critical dry periods, we were able to use state-of-the-art satellite-based evaporation data computed with independent energy balance equations to derive gridded root zone storage capacity at global scale. This approach does not require soil or vegetation information, is model independent, and is in principle scale-independent. In contrast to traditional look-up table approaches, our method captures the variability in root zone storage capacity within land cover type, including in rainforests where direct measurements of root depth otherwise are scarce. Implementing the estimated root zone storage capacity in the global hydrological model STEAM improved evaporation simulation overall, and in particular during the least evaporating months in sub-humid to humid regions with moderate to high seasonality. We find that evergreen forests are able to create a large storage to buffer for extreme droughts (with a return period of up to 60 years), in contrast to short vegetation and crops (which seem to adapt to a drought return period of about 2 years). The presented method to estimate root zone storage capacity eliminates the need for soils and rooting depth information, which could be a game-changer in global land surface modelling.

  4. Aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) viewed by satellite and ground-based remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoo-Jun; Kim, Byung-Gon

    2013-05-01

    Various aerosol and cloud microphysical properties have been compared and examined for several years using ground-based remote sensing data from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM), which showed that the clouds with strong above-cloud inversions are more immune to variations in the meteorological environment and the associated aerosol-cloud interactions appear to be more dominant in nearly adiabatic clouds by comparing different environmental conditions. Meanwhile, MODIS (Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and NCEP/NCAR (National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research) reanalysis data from 2001 to 2008 have been analysed to understand long-term aerosol and cloud optical properties, and their relationships in East Asia. Specifically only relationships between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud fraction (CF) for the low-level liquid-phase clouds exhibit the overall positive correlation, being consistent with cloud lifetime effect. The results imply that ground-based remote sensing is probably better for the study of aerosol-cloud microphysical interactions, whereas satellite remote sensing is more appropriate for the study of aerosol and cloud macroscopic interactions.

  5. Scale effects of leaf area index inversion based on environmental and disaster monitoring satellite data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The spatial distribution of sub-pixel components has an impact on retrieval accuracy,and should be accounted for when inverting a three-dimensional adiative transfer model to retrieve leaf area index(LAI).To investigate this effect,we constructed three realistic scenarios with the same LAI values and other properties,except that the simulated plants had different distributions.We implemented the radiosity method to subsequently produce synthetic bidirectional reflectance factor(BRF) datasets based upon these simulated scenes.The inversion was conducted using these data,which showed that spatial distribution affects retrieval accuracy.The inversion was also conducted for LAI based on charge-coupled device(CCD) data from the Environment and Disaster Monitor Satellite(HJ-1),which depicted both forest and drought-resistant crop land cover.This showed that heterogeneity in coarse-resolution remote sensing data is the main error source in LAI inversion.The spatial distribution of global fractal dimension index,which can be used to describe the area of sub-pixel components and their spatial distribution modes,shows good consistency with the coarse resolution LAI inversion error.

  6. Object-based approach to national land cover mapping using HJ satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Xiaosong; Yuan, Quanzhi; Liu, Yu

    2014-01-01

    To meet the carbon storage estimate in ecosystems for a national carbon strategy, we introduce a consistent database of China land cover. The Chinese Huan Jing (HJ) satellite is proven efficient in the cloud-free acquisition of seasonal image series in a monsoon region and in vegetation identification for mesoscale land cover mapping. Thirty-eight classes of level II land cover are generated based on the Land Cover Classification System of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization that follows a standard and quantitative definition. Twenty-four layers of derivative spectral, environmental, and spatial features compose the classification database. Object-based approach characterizing additional nonspectral features is conducted through mapping, and multiscale segmentations are applied on object boundary match to target real-world conditions. This method sufficiently employs spatial information, in addition to spectral characteristics, to improve classification accuracy. The algorithm of hierarchical classification is employed to follow step-by-step procedures that effectively control classification quality. This algorithm divides the dual structures of universal and local trees. Consistent universal trees suitable to most regions are performed first, followed by local trees that depend on specific features of nine climate stratifications. The independent validation indicates the overall accuracy reaches 86%.

  7. Improved Traceability of a Small Satellite Mission Concept to Requirements Using Model Based System Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reil, Robin L.

    2014-01-01

    Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) has recently been gaining significant support as a means to improve the "traditional" document-based systems engineering (DBSE) approach to engineering complex systems. In the spacecraft design domain, there are many perceived and propose benefits of an MBSE approach, but little analysis has been presented to determine the tangible benefits of such an approach (e.g. time and cost saved, increased product quality). This paper presents direct examples of how developing a small satellite system model can improve traceability of the mission concept to its requirements. A comparison of the processes and approaches for MBSE and DBSE is made using the NASA Ames Research Center SporeSat CubeSat mission as a case study. A model of the SporeSat mission is built using the Systems Modeling Language standard and No Magic's MagicDraw modeling tool. The model incorporates mission concept and requirement information from the mission's original DBSE design efforts. Active dependency relationships are modeled to demonstrate the completeness and consistency of the requirements to the mission concept. Anecdotal information and process-duration metrics are presented for both the MBSE and original DBSE design efforts of SporeSat.

  8. Biogeografía de la Zona de Transición Mexicana con base en un análisis de árboles reconciliados Biogeography of the Mexican Transition Zone based on a reconciled trees analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Miguez-Gutiérrez

    2013-03-01

    of the Mexican Transition Zone through 3 hypotheses of regionalization. We used a reconciled trees method based on the phylogenies of 10 genera of beetles, gymnosperms, lizards and snakes. Seven general area cladograms were generated using assumptions 0 and 1 and the Nelson and majority consensus. They showed 2 groups of areas, 1 with Neotropical affinities and the other with Nearctic affinities. The Sierra Madre del Sur resulted as the sister area of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Other constant patterns were the area that involves Tamaulipas and Texas as sister area of the Chihuahuan and Sonoran deserts, and the highlands of Chiapas and Guatemala were always recovered as the sister area of the Talamanca ridge. Our results suggest that the most important vicariant events within the Mexican Transition Zone are the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, which divides the majority of the endemism areas with Neartic affinities (north to this from those endemism areas of Neotropical affinities (south to this and the Tehuantepec Isthmus; which together with the Nicaraguan depression isolates Nuclear Central America. Other patterns appear in either regionalization proposal, but not within the 3, and require future studies in order to find well supported explanations. Even though our results have appeared in previous hypotheses, there are worth due to the fact that we include phylogenetic information of different taxa, we employed reconciled trees, an insufficiently used method, and we searched for congruence between results using 3 regionalization proposals.

  9. Air-sea fluxes and satellite-based estimation of water masses formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabia, Roberto; Klockmann, Marlene; Fernandez-Prieto, Diego; Donlon, Craig

    2015-04-01

    Recent work linking satellite-based measurements of sea surface salinity (SSS) and sea surface temperature (SST) with traditional physical oceanography has demonstrated the capability of generating routinely satellite-derived surface T-S diagrams [1] and analyze the distribution/dynamics of SSS and its relative surface density with respect to in-situ measurements. Even more recently [2,3], this framework has been extended by exploiting these T-S diagrams as a diagnostic tool to derive water masses formation rates and areas. A water mass describes a water body with physical properties distinct from the surrounding water, formed at the ocean surface under specific conditions which determine its temperature and salinity. The SST and SSS (and thus also density) at the ocean surface are largely determined by fluxes of heat and freshwater. The surface density flux is a function of the latter two and describes the change of the density of seawater at the surface. To obtain observations of water mass formation is of great interest, since they serve as indirect observations of the thermo-haline circulation. The SSS data which has become available through the SMOS [4] and Aquarius [5] satellite missions will provide the possibility of studying also the effect of temporally-varying SSS fields on water mass formation. In the present study, the formation of water masses as a function of SST and SSS is derived from the surface density flux by integrating the latter over a specific area and time period in bins of SST and SSS and then taking the derivative of the total density flux with respect to density. This study presents a test case using SMOS SSS, OSTIA SST, as well as Argo ISAS SST and SSS for comparison, heat fluxes from the NOCS Surface Flux Data Set v2.0, OAFlux evaporation and CMORPH precipitation. The study area, initially referred to the North Atlantic, is extended over two additional ocean basins and the study period covers the 2011-2012 timeframe. Yearly, seasonal

  10. Satellite and Ground Based Thermal Observation of the 2014 Effusive Eruption at Stromboli Volcano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klemen Zakšek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As specifically designed platforms are still unavailable at this point in time, lava flows are usually monitored remotely with the use of meteorological satellites. Generally, meteorological satellites have a low spatial resolution, which leads to uncertain results. This paper presents the first long term satellite monitoring of active lava flows on Stromboli volcano (August–November 2014 at high spatial resolution (160 m and relatively high temporal resolution (~3 days. These data were retrieved by the small satellite Technology Experiment Carrier-1 (TET-1, which was developed and built by the German Aerospace Center (DLR. The satellite instrument is dedicated to high temperature event monitoring. The satellite observations were accompanied by field observations conducted by thermal cameras. These provided short time lava flow dynamics and validation for satellite data. TET-1 retrieved 27 datasets over Stromboli during its effusive activity. Using the radiant density approach, TET-1 data were used to calibrate the MODVOLC data and estimate the time averaged lava discharge rate. With a mean output rate of 0.87 m3/s during the three-month-long eruption, we estimate the total erupted volume to be 7.4 × 106 m3.

  11. Comparison of Satellite-based Basal and Adjusted Evapotranspiration for Several California Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L.; Lund, C.; Melton, F. S.

    2013-12-01

    There is a continuing need to develop new sources of information on agricultural crop water consumption in the arid Western U.S. Pursuant to the California Water Conservation Act of 2009, for instance, the stakeholder community has developed a set of quantitative indicators involving measurement of evapotranspiration (ET) or crop consumptive use (Calif. Dept. Water Resources, 2012). Fraction of reference ET (or, crop coefficients) can be estimated from a biophysical description of the crop canopy involving green fractional cover (Fc) and height as per the FAO-56 practice standard of Allen et al. (1998). The current study involved 19 fields in California's San Joaquin Valley and Central Coast during 2011-12, growing a variety of specialty and commodity crops: lettuce, raisin, tomato, almond, melon, winegrape, garlic, peach, orange, cotton, corn and wheat. Most crops were on surface or subsurface drip, though micro-jet, sprinkler and flood were represented as well. Fc was retrospectively estimated every 8-16 days by optical satellite data and interpolated to a daily timestep. Crop height was derived as a capped linear function of Fc using published guideline maxima. These variables were used to generate daily basal crop coefficients (Kcb) per field through most or all of each respective growth cycle by the density coefficient approach of Allen & Pereira (2009). A soil water balance model for both topsoil and root zone, based on FAO-56 and using on-site measurements of applied irrigation and precipitation, was used to develop daily soil evaporation and crop water stress coefficients (Ke, Ks). Key meteorological variables (wind speed, relative humidity) were extracted from the California Irrigation Management Information System (CIMIS) for climate correction. Basal crop ET (ETcb) was then derived from Kcb using CIMIS reference ET. Adjusted crop ET (ETc_adj) was estimated by the dual coefficient approach involving Kcb, Ke, and incorporating Ks. Cumulative ETc

  12. Impacts of Satellite-Based Snow Albedo Assimilation on Offline and Coupled Land Surface Model Simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    Full Text Available Seasonal snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere is the largest component of the terrestrial cryosphere and plays a major role in the climate system through strong positive feedbacks related to albedo. The snow-albedo feedback is invoked as an important cause for the polar amplification of ongoing and projected climate change, and its parameterization across models is an important source of uncertainty in climate simulations. Here, instead of developing a physical snow albedo scheme, we use a direct insertion approach to assimilate satellite-based surface albedo during the snow season (hereafter as snow albedo assimilation into the land surface model ORCHIDEE (ORganizing Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic EcosystEms and assess the influences of such assimilation on offline and coupled simulations. Our results have shown that snow albedo assimilation in both ORCHIDEE and ORCHIDEE-LMDZ (a general circulation model of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique improve the simulation accuracy of mean seasonal (October throughout May snow water equivalent over the region north of 40 degrees. The sensitivity of snow water equivalent to snow albedo assimilation is more pronounced in the coupled simulation than the offline simulation since the feedback of albedo on air temperature is allowed in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ. We have also shown that simulations of air temperature at 2 meters in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ due to snow albedo assimilation are significantly improved during the spring in particular over the eastern Siberia region. This is a result of the fact that high amounts of shortwave radiation during the spring can maximize its snow albedo feedback, which is also supported by the finding that the spatial sensitivity of temperature change to albedo change is much larger during the spring than during the autumn and winter. In addition, the radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere induced by snow albedo assimilation during the spring is estimated to be -2.50 W m-2, the

  13. Satellite-based Estimates of Ambient Air Pollution and Global Variations in Childhood Asthma Prevalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, H. Ross; Butland, Barbara K.; Donkelaar, Aaron Matthew Van; Brauer, Michael; Strachan, David P.; Clayton, Tadd; van Dingenen, Rita; Amann, Marcus; Brunekreef, Bert; Cohen, Aaron; Dentener, Frank; Lai, Christopher; Lamsal, Lok N.; Martin, Randall V.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The effect of ambient air pollution on global variations and trends in asthma prevalence is unclear. Objectives: Our goal was to investigate community-level associations between asthma prevalence data from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) and satellite-based estimates of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 microm (PM2.5) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and modelled estimates of ozone. Methods: We assigned satellite-based estimates of PM2.5 and NO2 at a spatial resolution of 0.1deg × 0.1deg and modeled estimates of ozone at a resolution of 1deg × 1deg to 183 ISAAC centers. We used center-level prevalence of severe asthma as the outcome and multilevel models to adjust for gross national income (GNI) and center- and country-level sex, climate, and population density. We examined associations (adjusting for GNI) between air pollution and asthma prevalence over time in centers with data from ISAAC Phase One (mid-1900s) and Phase Three (2001-2003). Results: For the 13- to 14-year age group (128 centers in 28 countries), the estimated average within-country change in center-level asthma prevalence per 100 children per 10% increase in center-level PM2.5 and NO2 was -0.043 [95% confidence interval (CI): -0.139, 0.053] and 0.017 (95% CI: -0.030, 0.064) respectively. For ozone the estimated change in prevalence per parts per billion by volume was -0.116 (95% CI: -0.234, 0.001). Equivalent results for the 6- to 7-year age group (83 centers in 20 countries), though slightly different, were not significantly positive. For the 13- to 14-year age group, change in center-level asthma prevalence over time per 100 children per 10% increase in PM2.5 from Phase One to Phase Three was -0.139 (95% CI: -0.347, 0.068). The corresponding association with ozone (per ppbV) was -0.171 (95% CI: -0.275, -0.067). Conclusion: In contrast to reports from within-community studies of individuals exposed to traffic pollution, we did not find

  14. Phylogeny and Biogeography of Thuja L. (Cupressaceae), an Eastern Asian and North American Disjunct Genus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Hua LI; Qiao-Ping XIANG

    2005-01-01

    In order to develop better insights into biogeographic patterns of eastern Asian and North American disjunct plant genera, sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (nr DNA ITS) region were used to estimate interspecific relationships of Thuja L. (Cupressaceae) and infer its biogeography based on the phylogeny. According to the phylogenetic analysis, two clades were recognized. The first clade included Thuja plicata D. Don (western North America) and T. koraiensis Nakai (northeastern Asia), and the second one contained T. occidentalis (Gord.) Carr. (Japan). The ancestral area of Thuja was inferred to be eastern Asia, and two dispersal events were responsible for the modern distribution of Thuja in North America. Both the North Atlantic land bridge and Bering land bridge were possible routes for the migration of ancestral populations to North America.

  15. Advancing satellite-based solar power forecasting through integration of infrared channels for automatic detection of coastal marine inversion layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostylev, Vladimir; Kostylev, Andrey; Carter, Chris; Mahoney, Chad; Pavlovski, Alexandre; Daye, Tony [Green Power Labs Inc., Dartmouth, NS (Canada); Cormier, Dallas Eugene; Fotland, Lena [San Diego Gas and Electric Co., San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The marine atmospheric boundary layer is a layer or cool, moist maritime air with the thickness of a few thousand feet immediately below a temperature inversion. In coastal areas as moist air rises from the ocean surface, it becomes trapped and is often compressed into fog above which a layer of stratus clouds often forms. This phenomenon is common for satellite-based solar radiation monitoring and forecasting. Hour ahead satellite-based solar radiation forecasts are commonly using visible spectrum satellite images, from which it is difficult to automatically differentiate low stratus clouds and fog from high altitude clouds. This provides a challenge for cloud motion tyracking and cloud cover forecasting. San Diego Gas and Electric {sup registered} (SDG and E {sup registered}) Marine Layer Project was undertaken to obtain information for integration with PV forecasts, and to develop a detailed understanding of long-term benefits from forecasting Marine Layer (ML) events and their effects on PV production. In order to establish climatological ML patterns, spatial extent and distribution of marine layer, we analyzed visible and IR spectrum satellite images (GOES WEST) archive for the period of eleven years (2000 - 2010). Historical boundaries of marine layers impact were established based on the cross-classification of visible spectrum (VIS) and infrared (IR) images. This approach is successfully used by us and elsewhere for evaluating cloud albedo in common satellite-based techniques for solar radiation monitoring and forecasting. The approach allows differentiation of cloud cover and helps distinguish low laying fog which is the main consequence of marine layer formation. ML occurrence probability and maximum extent inland was established for each hour and day of the analyzed period and seasonal/patterns were described. SDG and E service area is the most affected region by ML events with highest extent and probability of ML occurrence. Influence of ML was the

  16. High resolution surface solar radiation patterns over Eastern Mediterranean: Satellite, ground-based, reanalysis data and radiative transfer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandri, G.; Georgoulias, A.; Meleti, C.; Balis, D.

    2013-12-01

    Surface solar radiation (SSR) and its long and short term variations play a critical role in the modification of climate and by extent of the social and financial life of humans. Thus, SSR measurements are of primary importance. SSR is measured for decades from ground-based stations for specific spots around the planet. During the last decades, satellite observations allowed for the assessment of the spatial variability of SSR at a global as well as regional scale. In this study, a detailed spatiotemporal view of the SSR over Eastern Mediterranean is presented at a high spatial resolution. Eastern Mediterranean is affected by various aerosol types (continental, sea, dust and biomass burning particles) and encloses countries with significant socioeconomical changes during the last decades. For the aims of this study, SSR data from satellites (Climate Monitoring Satellite Application Facility - CM SAF) and our ground station in Thessaloniki, a coastal city of ~1 million inhabitants in northern Greece, situated in the heart of Eastern Mediterranean (Eppley Precision pyranometer and Kipp & Zonen CM-11 pyranometer) are used in conjunction with radiative transfer simulations (Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer - SBDART). The CM SAF dataset used here includes monthly mean SSR observations at a high spatial resolution of 0.03x0.03 degrees for the period 1983-2005. Our ground-based SSR observations span from 1983 until today. SBDART radiative transfer simulations were implemented for a number of spots in the area of study in order to calculate the SSR. High resolution (level-2) aerosol and cloud data from MODIS TERRA and AQUA satellite sensors were used as input, as well as ground-based data from the AERONET. Data from other satellites (Earth Probe TOMS, OMI, etc) and reanalysis projects (ECMWF) were used where needed. The satellite observations, the ground-based measurements and the model estimates are validated against each other. The good agreement

  17. Satellite- and ground-based observations of atmospheric water vapor absorption in the 940 nm region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ground-based measurements of direct absorption of solar radiation between 9000 and 13,000 cm-1 (770-1100 nm) with a spectral resolution of 0.05 cm-1 are compared with line-by-line simulations of atmospheric absorption based on different molecular databases (HITRAN 2000, HITRAN 99, HITRAN 96 and ESA-WVR). Differences between measurements and simulations can be reduced to a great amount by scaling the individual line intensities with spectral and database dependent scaling factors. Scaling factors are calculated for the selected databases using a Marquardt non-linear least-squares fit together with a forward model for 100 cm-1 wide intervals between 10,150 and 11,250 cm-1 as well as for the water vapor absorption channels of the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) onboard the European Space Agency's (ESA) ENVISAT platform and the Modular Optoelectronic Scanner (MOS) on the Indian IRSP-3 platform, developed by the German Aerospace Centre (DLR). For the latter, the scaling coefficients are converted into correction factors for retrieved total columnar water vapor content and used for a comparison of MOS-based retrievals of total columnar atmospheric water vapor above cloud-free land surfaces with radio soundings. The scaling factors determined for 100 cm-1 wide intervals range from 0.85 for the ESA-WVR molecular database to 1.15 for HITRAN 96. The best agreement between measurements and simulations is achieved with HITRAN 99 and HITRAN 2000, respectively, using scaling factors between 0.9 and 1. The effects on the satellite-based retrievals of columnar atmospheric water vapor range from 2% (HITRAN 2000) to 12% (ESA-WVR)

  18. Advances In Global Aerosol Modeling Applications Through Assimilation of Satellite-Based Lidar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James; Hyer, Edward; Zhang, Jianglong; Reid, Jeffrey; Westphal, Douglas; Xian, Peng; Vaughan, Mark

    2010-05-01

    Modeling the instantaneous three-dimensional aerosol field and its downwind transport represents an endeavor with many practical benefits foreseeable to air quality, aviation, military and science agencies. The recent proliferation of multi-spectral active and passive satellite-based instruments measuring aerosol physical properties has served as an opportunity to develop and refine the techniques necessary to make such numerical modeling applications possible. Spurred by high-resolution global mapping of aerosol source regions, and combined with novel multivariate data assimilation techniques designed to consider these new data streams, operational forecasts of visibility and aerosol optical depths are now available in near real-time1. Active satellite-based aerosol profiling, accomplished using lidar instruments, represents a critical element for accurate analysis and transport modeling. Aerosol source functions, alone, can be limited in representing the macrophysical structure of injection scenarios within a model. Two-dimensional variational (2D-VAR; x, y) assimilation of aerosol optical depth from passive satellite observations significantly improves the analysis of the initial state. However, this procedure can not fully compensate for any potential vertical redistribution of mass required at the innovation step. The expense of an inaccurate vertical analysis of aerosol structure is corresponding errors downwind, since trajectory paths within successive forecast runs will likely diverge with height. In this paper, the application of a newly-designed system for 3D-VAR (x,y,z) assimilation of vertical aerosol extinction profiles derived from elastic-scattering lidar measurements is described [Campbell et al., 2009]. Performance is evaluated for use with the U. S. Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) by assimilating NASA/CNES satellite-borne Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) 0.532 μm measurements [Winker et al., 2009

  19. Dynamic Neural Network-Based Pulsed Plasma Thruster (PPT) Fault Detection and Isolation for Formation Flying of Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, A.; Khorasani, K.

    The main objective of this paper is to develop a dynamic neural network-based fault detection and isolation (FDI) scheme for the Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPTs) that are used in the Attitude Control Subsystem (ACS) of satellites that are tasked to perform a formation flying mission. By using data collected from the relative attitudes of the formation flying satellites our proposed "High Level" FDI scheme can detect the pair of thrusters which is faulty, however fault isolation cannot be accomplished. Based on the "High Level" FDI scheme and the DNN-based "Low Level" FDI scheme developed earlier by the authors, an "Integrated" DNN-based FDI scheme is then proposed. To demonstrate the FDI capabilities of the proposed schemes various fault scenarios are simulated.

  20. Microfluidic Trap Arrays: Passive Sensors for Studying Aquatic Protozoan Ecology and Biogeography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, J. F.; Bouchillon, G.; Shor, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    Microscopic organisms such as bacteria and protozoa are the engine that drives global biogeochemical processes: microbes fix carbon, produce oxygen, mediate nutrient cycling, and break down anthropogenic contaminants. In many habitats, the bacterial community structure and its net production is controlled in a top-down fashion by predation by protozoa. Despite their importance, many researchers have noted a significant gap in our understanding of their diversity, biogeography, and ecosystem function. We developed a microfluidic field sampling and analysis tool to study the biogeography and function of microbial eukaryotes. Microfluidic samplers were created to systematically target the morphology, function, and habitat of different microbial eukaryotes. Features such as channel dimensions, branching angles and radii of curvature were varied to allow organisms to be selected and captured based on cell size, shape, plasticity, and swimming or crawling modalities. We also developed genetic analysis protocols to extract and amplify DNA from a single trapped cell, allowing for molecular identification of trapped species. Results from freshwater sediment and water column deployments confirmed design efficiencies in trapping and concentrating protozoa based on biomass density, allowed for analysis of body plasticity and cell size, and also confirmed the viability of this technology for future real time monitoring of protozoa in aquatic ecosystems. This research offers a radical departure from existing approaches to study microbial eukaryotic communities in the field. Our novel methodology involving trapping, observation and recording of physical characteristics and genetic analysis of single cells allows comparison with bulk samples to place trapped microbes within a function- and habitat-specific context.

  1. All satellites total ozone evaluation in the tropics by comparison with SAOZ-NDACC ground-based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommereau, Jean-Pierre; Lerot, Christophe; Van Roozendael, Michel; Goutail, Florence; Pazmino, Andrea; Frihi, Aymen; Bekki, Slimane; Clerbaux, Cathy

    2016-07-01

    All satellites total ozone measurements available from SBUV, OMI-T, OMI-D, OMI-CCI, GOME-CCI, GOME2-CCI, SCIAMACHY-CCI, NPP and IASI, since 2001 until 2015 are compared to those provided by the UV-Vis SAOZ/NDACC spectrometer at the two tropical stations of Reunion Island in the Indian Ocean and Bauru in Southern Brazil. The differences between satellites and SAOZ except IASI do show systematic seasonal variations of 0-3% (0-9 DU) amplitude and sharp negative peaks in Jan-Mar in Reunion Is in the austral summer. Whereas the summer negative peaks seen particularly on IASI, OMI-T, NPP and OMI-CCI at Reunion are shown to correlate with hurricanes and those seen in Brazil with high altitude overshooting convective clouds both not properly removed, ozone minima outside these events are shown to correlate with high altitude volcanic plumes impacting all satellites as well as ground-based total ozone measurements The seasonality of the Sat-SAOZ difference of varying amplitude from 0 to 3% with the satellite is attributed to the satellite retrieval. Surprisingly and though there has been no change in either SAOZ instruments or data analysis processes, the amplitude of the seasonal cycle of the Sat-SAOZ difference reduces in 2012 and drops to less than ± 0.5% (1.5 DU) after 2013 in Reunion Island and less than ±1% in Bauru, reduction for which there is no clear explanation yet. Shown in the presentation will be the demonstration of the impact of hurricanes, high altitude convective clouds and volcanic plumes on satellites total ozone retrievals, followed by a discussion of possible causes of seasonality of Sat-SAOZ amplitude drop after 2012.

  2. Site-adaptation of satellite-based DNI and GHI time series: Overview and SolarGIS approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebecauer, Tomas; Suri, Marcel

    2016-05-01

    Site adaptation is an approach of reducing uncertainty in the satellite-based longterm estimates of solar radiation by combining them with short-term high-accuracy measurements at a project site. We inventory the existing approaches and introduce the SolarGIS method that is optimized for providing bankable data for energy simulation in Concentrating Solar Power. We also indicate the achievable uncertainty of SolarGIS model outputs based on site-adaptation of projects executed in various geographical conditions.

  3. Prediction of bathymetry from satellite altimeter based gravity in the Arabian Sea: Mapping of two unnamed deep seamounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, B.; Kurian, P. J.; Swain, D.; Tyagi, A.; Ravindra, R.

    2012-06-01

    This work attempts to predict bathymetry from satellite altimeter based gravity in the Arabian Sea. A collocated match-up database (n = 17,016) was created on Multibeam Echosounder (MBES) bathymetry and satellite gravity values (˜1 min spatial resolution) derived from remote sensing satellites. A Radial Basis Function (RBF) based Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model was developed to predict bathymetry from satellite gravity values. The ANN model was trained with variable undersea features such as seamount, knoll, abyssal plain, hill, etc. to familiarize the network with all possible geomorphic features as inputs through learning and the corresponding target outputs. The performance of the predictive model was evaluated by comparing bathymetric values with MBES datasets that were not used during the training and verification steps of the ANN model formulation. The model was then compared with MBES surveyed seamount observations (those were not used during ANN analysis) and global model bathymetry products. Results demonstrate better performance of ANN model compared to global model products for mapping of two unnamed seamounts in the Arabian Sea. These two unnamed seamounts have been predicted, mapped and their morphology is reported for the first time through this work.

  4. [In-Flight Radiometric Calibration for ZY-3 Satellite Multispectral Sensor by Modified Reflectance-Based Method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Xie, Yong; Gu, Xing-fa; Yu, Tao; Liu, Qi-yue; Gao, Rong-jun

    2015-03-01

    Through integrating multi-spectral sensor characteristics of ZY-3 satellite, a modified reflectance-based method is proposed and used to achieve ZY-3 satellite multispectral sensor in-flight radiometric calibration. This method chooses level 1A image as data source and establishes geometric model to get an accurate observation geometric parameters at calibration site according to the information provided in image auxiliary documentation, which can reduce the influences on the calibration accuracy from image resampling and observation geometry errors. We use two-point and multi-points methods to calculate the absolute radiometric calibration coefficients of ZY-3 satellite multispectral sensor based on the large campaign at Dongying city, Shan Dong province. Compared with ZY-3 official calibration coefficients, multi-points method has higher accuracy than two-point method. Through analyzing the dispersion between each calibration point and the fitting line, we find that the residual error of water calibration site is larger than others, which of green band is approximately 67.39%. Treating water calibration site as an error, we filter it out using 95.4% confidence level as standard and recalculate the calibration coefficients with multi-points method. The final calibration coefficients show that the relative differences of the first three bands are less than 2% and the last band is less than 5%, which manifests that the proposed radiometric calibration method can obtain accurate and reliable calibration coefficients and is useful for other similar satellites in future.

  5. Global solar radiation: comparison of satellite-based climatology with station records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalak, Petr; Zahradnicek, Pavel; Stepanek, Petr; Farda, Ales

    2016-04-01

    We analyze surface incoming shortwave radiation (SIS) from the SARAH dataset prepared by the EUMETSAT Climate Monitoring Satellite Applications Facility from satellite observations of the visible channels of the MVIRI and SEVIRI instruments onboard the geostationary Meteosat satellites. The satellite SIS data are evaluated within the period 1984-2014 on various time scales: from individual months and years to long-term climate means. The validation is performed using the ground measurements of global solar radiation (GLBR) carried out on 11 meteorological stations of the Czech Hydrometeorological Institute in the Czech Republic with at least 30 years long data series. Our aim is to explore whether the SIS data could potentially serve as an alternative source of information on GLBR outside of a relatively sparse network of meteorological stations recording GLBR. Acknowledgement: Supported by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic within the National Sustainability Program I (NPU I), grant number LO1415.

  6. ESA personal communications and digital audio broadcasting systems based on non-geostationary satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logalbo, P.; Benedicto, J.; Viola, R.

    Personal Communications and Digital Audio Broadcasting are two new services that the European Space Agency (ESA) is investigating for future European and Global Mobile Satellite systems. ESA is active in promoting these services in their various mission options including non-geostationary and geostationary satellite systems. A Medium Altitude Global Satellite System (MAGSS) for global personal communications at L and S-band, and a Multiregional Highly inclined Elliptical Orbit (M-HEO) system for multiregional digital audio broadcasting at L-band are described. Both systems are being investigated by ESA in the context of future programs, such as Archimedes, which are intended to demonstrate the new services and to develop the technology for future non-geostationary mobile communication and broadcasting satellites.

  7. ESA personal communications and digital audio broadcasting systems based on non-geostationary satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logalbo, P.; Benedicto, J.; Viola, R.

    1993-01-01

    Personal Communications and Digital Audio Broadcasting are two new services that the European Space Agency (ESA) is investigating for future European and Global Mobile Satellite systems. ESA is active in promoting these services in their various mission options including non-geostationary and geostationary satellite systems. A Medium Altitude Global Satellite System (MAGSS) for global personal communications at L and S-band, and a Multiregional Highly inclined Elliptical Orbit (M-HEO) system for multiregional digital audio broadcasting at L-band are described. Both systems are being investigated by ESA in the context of future programs, such as Archimedes, which are intended to demonstrate the new services and to develop the technology for future non-geostationary mobile communication and broadcasting satellites.

  8. Fundamentals of Inertial Navigation, Satellite-based Positioning and their Integration

    CERN Document Server

    Noureldin, Aboelmagd; Georgy, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Fundamentals of Inertial Navigation, Satellite-based Positioning and their Integration is an introduction to the field of Integrated Navigation Systems. It serves as an excellent reference for working engineers as well as textbook for beginners and students new to the area. The book is easy to read and understand with minimum background knowledge. The authors explain the derivations in great detail. The intermediate steps are thoroughly explained so that a beginner can easily follow the material. The book shows a step-by-step implementation of navigation algorithms and provides all the necessary details. It provides detailed illustrations for an easy comprehension. The book also demonstrates real field experiments and in-vehicle road test results with professional discussions and analysis. This work is unique in discussing the different INS/GPS integration schemes in an easy to understand and straightforward way. Those schemes include loosely vs tightly coupled, open loop vs closed loop, and many more.

  9. Application of Object Based Classification and High Resolution Satellite Imagery for Savanna Ecosystem Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Southworth

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Savanna ecosystems are an important component of dryland regions and yet are exceedingly difficult to study using satellite imagery. Savannas are composed are varying amounts of trees, shrubs and grasses and typically traditional classification schemes or vegetation indices cannot differentiate across class type. This research utilizes object based classification (OBC for a region in Namibia, using IKONOS imagery, to help differentiate tree canopies and therefore woodland savanna, from shrub or grasslands. The methodology involved the identification and isolation of tree canopies within the imagery and the creation of tree polygon layers had an overall accuracy of 84%. In addition, the results were scaled up to a corresponding Landsat image of the same region, and the OBC results compared to corresponding pixel values of NDVI. The results were not compelling, indicating once more the problems of these traditional image analysis techniques for savanna ecosystems. Overall, the use of the OBC holds great promise for this ecosystem and could be utilized more frequently in studies of vegetation structure.

  10. Road Network Extraction from High Resolution Multispectral Satellite Imagery Based on Object Oriented Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M.; Singh, R. K.; Raju, P. L. N.; Krishnamurthy, Y. V. N.

    2014-11-01

    High Resolution satellite Imagery is an important source for road network extraction for urban road database creation, refinement and updating. However due to complexity of the scene in an urban environment, automated extraction of such features using various line and edge detection algorithms is limited. In this paper we present an integrated approach to extract road network from high resolution space imagery. The proposed approach begins with segmentation of the scene with Multi-resolution Object Oriented segmentation. This step focuses on exploiting both spatial and spectral information for the target feature extraction. The road regions are automatically identified using a soft fuzzy classifier based on a set of predefined membership functions. A number of shape descriptors are computed to reduce the misclassifications between road and other spectrally similar objects. The detected road segments are further refined using morphological operations to form final road network, which is then evaluated for its completeness, correctness and quality. The experiments were carried out of fused IKONOS 2 , Quick bird ,Worldview 2 Products with fused resolution's ranging from 0.5m to 1 m. Results indicate that the proposed methodology is effective in extracting accurate road networks from high resolution imagery.

  11. Characterization of aerosol pollution events in France using ground-based and POLDER-2 satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kacenelenbogen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the relationship between daily fine particle mass concentration (PM2.5 and columnar aerosol optical thickness derived from the Polarization and Directionality of Earth's Reflectances (POLDER satellite sensor. The study is focused over France during the POLDER-2 lifetime between April and October 2003. We have first compared the POLDER derived aerosol optical thickness (AOT with integrated volume size distribution derived from ground-based Sun Photometer observations. The good correlation (R=0.72 with sub-micron volume fraction indicates that POLDER derived AOT is sensitive to the fine aerosol mass concentration. Considering 1974 match-up data points over 28 fine particle monitoring sites, the POLDER-2 derived AOT is fairly well correlated with collocated PM2.5 measurements, with a correlation coefficient of 0.55. The correlation coefficient reaches a maximum of 0.80 for particular sites. We have analyzed the probability to find an appropriate air quality category (AQC as defined by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA from POLDER-2 AOT measurements. The probability can be up to 88.8% (±3.7% for the "Good" AQC and 89.1% (±3.6% for the "Moderate" AQC.

  12. Comprehensive Spectral Signal Investigation of a Larch Forest Combining - and Satellite-Based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landmann, J. M.; Rutzinger, M.; Bremer, M.; chmidtner, K.

    2016-06-01

    Collecting comprehensive knowledge about spectral signals in areas composed by complex structured objects is a challenging task in remote sensing. In the case of vegetation, shadow effects on reflectance are especially difficult to determine. This work analyzes a larch forest stand (Larix decidua MILL.) in Pinnis Valley (Tyrol, Austria). The main goal is extracting the larch spectral signal on Landsat 8 (LS8) Operational Land Imager (OLI) images using ground measurements with the Cropscan Multispectral Radiometer with five bands (MSR5) simultaneously to satellite overpasses in summer 2015. First, the relationship between field spectrometer and OLI data on a cultivated grassland area next to the forest stand is investigated. Median ground measurements for each of the grassland parcels serve for calculation of the mean difference between the two sensors. Differences are used as "bias correction" for field spectrometer values. In the main step, spectral unmixing of the OLI images is applied to the larch forest, specifying the larch tree spectral signal based on corrected field spectrometer measurements of the larch understory. In order to determine larch tree and shadow fractions on OLI pixels, a representative 3D tree shape is used to construct a digital forest. Benefits of this approach are the computational savings compared to a radiative transfer modeling. Remaining shortcomings are the limited capability to consider exact tree shapes and nonlinear processes. Different methods to implement shadows are tested and spectral vegetation indices like the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Greenness Index (GI) can be computed even without considering shadows.

  13. Optical frequency comb based multi-band microwave frequency conversion for satellite applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinwu; Xu, Kun; Yin, Jie; Dai, Yitang; Yin, Feifei; Li, Jianqiang; Lu, Hua; Liu, Tao; Ji, Yuefeng

    2014-01-13

    Based on optical frequency combs (OFC), we propose an efficient and flexible multi-band frequency conversion scheme for satellite repeater applications. The underlying principle is to mix dual coherent OFCs with one of which carrying the input signal. By optically channelizing the mixed OFCs, the converted signal in different bands can be obtained in different channels. Alternatively, the scheme can be configured to generate multi-band local oscillators (LO) for widely distribution. Moreover, the scheme realizes simultaneous inter- and intra-band frequency conversion just in a single structure and needs only three frequency-fixed microwave sources. We carry out a proof of concept experiment in which multiple LOs with 2 GHz, 10 GHz, 18 GHz, and 26 GHz are generated. A C-band signal of 6.1 GHz input to the proposed scheme is successfully converted to 4.1 GHz (C band), 3.9 GHz (C band) and 11.9 GHz (X band), etc. Compared with the back-to-back (B2B) case measured at 0 dBm input power, the proposed scheme shows a 9.3% error vector magnitude (EVM) degradation at each output channel. Furthermore, all channels satisfy the EVM limit in a very wide input power range.

  14. Dust absorption over the ``Great Indian Desert'' inferred using ground-based and satellite remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthy, K. Krishna; Babu, S. Suresh; Satheesh, S. K.; Srinivasan, J.; Dutt, C. B. S.

    2007-05-01

    Mineral dust is the single largest contributor of natural aerosols over land. Dust aerosols exhibit high variability in their radiative effects because their composition varies locally. This arises because of the regional distinctiveness of the soil characteristics as well as the accumulation of other aerosol species, such as black carbon, on dust while airborne. To accurately estimate the climate impact of dust, spatial and temporal distribution of its radiative properties are essential. However, this is poorly understood over many regions of the world, including the Indian region. In this paper, infrared (IR) radiance (10.5-12.5 μm) acquired from METEOSAT-5 satellite (˜5-km resolution) is used to retrieve dust aerosol characteristics over the "Great Indian Desert" and adjacent regions. The infrared radiance depression on account of the presence of dust in the atmosphere has been used as an index of dust load, called the Infrared Difference Dust Index (IDDI). Simultaneous, ground-based spectral optical depths estimated at visible and near-infrared wavelengths (using a multiwavelength solar radiometer) are used along with the IDDI to infer the dust absorption. The inferred single scattering albedo of dust was in the range of 0.88-0.94. We infer that dust over the Indian desert is of more absorbing nature (compared with African dust). Seasonally, the absorption is least in summer and most in winter. The large dust absorption leads to lower atmospheric warming of 0.7-1.2 K day-1.

  15. Application of Satellite-Based Spectrally-Resolved Solar Radiation Data to PV Performance Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Gracia Amillo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, satellite-based solar radiation data resolved in spectral bands have become available. This has for the first time made it possible to produce maps of the geographical variation in the solar spectrum. It also makes it possible to estimate the influence of these variations on the performance of photovoltaic (PV modules. Here, we present a study showing the magnitude of the spectral influence on PV performance over Europe and Africa. The method has been validated using measurements of a CdTe module in Ispra, Italy, showing that the method predicts the spectral influence to within ±2% on a monthly basis and 0.1% over a 19-month period. Application of the method to measured spectral responses of crystalline silicon, CdTe and single-junction amorphous silicon (a-Si modules shows that the spectral effect is smallest over desert areas for all module types, higher in temperate Europe and highest in tropical Africa, where CdTe modules would be expected to yield +6% and single- junction a-Si modules up to +10% more energy due to spectral effects. In contrast, the effect for crystalline silicon modules is less than ±1% in nearly all of Africa and Southern Europe, rising to +1% or +2% in Northern Europe.

  16. An Exploitation of Satellite-based Observation for Health Information: The UFOS Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangin, A.; Morel, M.; Fanton d' Andon, O

    2000-07-01

    Short, medium and long-term trends of UV intensity levels are of crucial importance for either assessing effective biological impacts on human population, or implementing adequate preventive behaviours. Better information on a large spatial scale and increased public awareness of the short-term variations in UV values will help to support health agencies' goals of educating the public on UV risks. The Ultraviolet Forecast Operational Service Project (UFAS), financed in part by the European Commission/DG Information Society (TEN-TELECOM programme), aims to exploit satellite-based observations and to supply a set of UV products directly useful to health care. The short-term objective is to demonstrate the technical and economical feasibility and benefits that could be brought by such a system. UFOS is carried out by ACRI, with the support of an Advisory Group chaired by WHO and involving representation from the sectors of Health (WHO, INTERSUN collaborating centres, ZAMBON), Environment (WMO, IASB), and Telecommunications (EURECOM, IMET). (author)

  17. Object-Based Greenhouse Mapping Using Very High Resolution Satellite Data and Landsat 8 Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel A. Aguilar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Greenhouse mapping through remote sensing has received extensive attention over the last decades. In this article, the innovative goal relies on mapping greenhouses through the combined use of very high resolution satellite data (WorldView-2 and Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI time series within a context of an object-based image analysis (OBIA and decision tree classification. Thus, WorldView-2 was mainly used to segment the study area focusing on individual greenhouses. Basic spectral information, spectral and vegetation indices, textural features, seasonal statistics and a spectral metric (Moment Distance Index, MDI derived from Landsat 8 time series and/or WorldView-2 imagery were computed on previously segmented image objects. In order to test its temporal stability, the same approach was applied for two different years, 2014 and 2015. In both years, MDI was pointed out as the most important feature to detect greenhouses. Moreover, the threshold value of this spectral metric turned to be extremely stable for both Landsat 8 and WorldView-2 imagery. A simple decision tree always using the same threshold values for features from Landsat 8 time series and WorldView-2 was finally proposed. Overall accuracies of 93.0% and 93.3% and kappa coefficients of 0.856 and 0.861 were attained for 2014 and 2015 datasets, respectively.

  18. GPU-based normalized cuts for road extraction using satellite imagery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Senthilnath; S Sindhu; S N Omkar

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a GPU implementation of normalized cuts for road extraction problem using panchromatic satellite imagery. The roads have been extracted in three stages namely pre-processing, image segmentation and post-processing. Initially, the image is pre-processed to improve the tolerance by reducing the clutter (that mostly represents the buildings, vegetation, and fallow regions). The road regions are then extracted using the normalized cuts algorithm. Normalized cuts algorithm is a graph-based partitioning approach whose focus lies in extracting the global impression (perceptual grouping) of an image rather than local features. For the segmented image, post-processing is carried out using morphological operations – erosion and dilation. Finally, the road extracted image is overlaid on the original image. Here, a GPGPU (General Purpose Graphical Processing Unit) approach has been adopted to implement the same algorithm on the GPU for fast processing. A performance comparison of this proposed GPU implementation of normalized cuts algorithm with the earlier algorithm (CPU implementation) is presented. From the results, we conclude that the computational improvement in terms of time as the size of image increases for the proposed GPU implementation of normalized cuts. Also, a qualitative and quantitative assessment of the segmentation results has been projected.

  19. Dust forecast over North Africa: verification with satellite and ground based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aditi; Kumar, Sumit; George, John P.

    2016-05-01

    Arid regions of North Africa are considered as one of the major dust source. Present study focuses on the forecast of aerosol optical depth (AOD) of dust over different regions of North Africa. NCMRWF Unified Model (NCUM) produces dust AOD forecasts at different wavelengths with lead time upto 240 hr, based on 00UTC initial conditions. Model forecast of dust AOD at 550 nm up to 72 hr forecast, based on different initial conditions are verified against satellite and ground based observations of total AOD during May-June 2014 with the assumption that except dust, presence of all other aerosols type are negligible. Location specific and geographical distribution of dust AOD forecast is verified against Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) station observations of total and coarse mode AOD. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) dark target and deep blue merged level 3 total aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) retrieved dust AOD at 532 nm are also used for verification. CALIOP dust AOD was obtained by vertical integration of aerosol extinction coefficient at 532 nm from the aerosol profile level 2 products. It is found that at all the selected AERONET stations, the trend in dust AODs is well predicted by NCUM up to three days advance. Good correlation, with consistently low bias (~ +/-0.06) and RMSE (~ 0.2) values, is found between model forecasts and point measurements of AERONET, except over one location Cinzana (Mali). Model forecast consistently overestimated the dust AOD compared to CALIOP dust AOD, with a bias of 0.25 and RMSE of 0.40.

  20. A survey of architectures and scenarios in satellite-based wireless sensor networks: system design aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Celandroni, Nedo; Ferro, Erina; Gotta, Alberto; Oligeri, Gabriele; Roseti, C.; Luglio, M.; Bisio, I.; Cello, M.; Davoli, F; Panagopoulos, A. D.; Poulakis, M.; Vassaki, S.; De Cola, Tomaso; Marchitti, M. A.; Hu, Y. F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is not a survey related to generic wireless sensor networks (WSNs), which have been largely treated by Akyildiz et al. in [1], and later in a number of survey papers addressing more focused issues; rather, it specifically addresses architectural aspects related to WSNs in some way connected with a satellite link, a topic that presents challenging interworking aspects. The main objective is to provide an overview of the potential role of a satellite segment in the future wireless se...

  1. Asteroseismology with the WIRE satellite. I. Combining Ground- and Space-based Photometry of the Delta Scuti Star Epsilon Cephei

    CERN Document Server

    Bruntt, H; Bedding, T R; Buzasi, D L; Moya, A; Amado, P J; Martin-Ruiz, S; Garrido, R; De Coca, P L; Rolland, A; Costa, V; Olivares, I; Garcia-Pelayo, J M

    2006-01-01

    We have analysed ground-based multi-colour Stromgren photometry and single-filter photometry from the star tracker on the WIRE satellite of the delta scuti star Epsilon Cephei. The ground-based data set consists of 16 nights of data collected over 164 days, while the satellite data are nearly continuous coverage of the star during 14 days. The spectral window and noise level of the satellite data are superior to the ground-based data and this data set is used to locate the frequencies. However, we can use the ground-based data to improve the accuracy of the frequencies due to the much longer time baseline. We detect 26 oscillation frequencies in the WIRE data set, but only some of these can be seen clearly in the ground-based data. We have used the multi-colour ground-based photometry to determine amplitude and phase differences in the Stromgren b-y colour and the y filter in an attempt to identify the radial degree of the oscillation frequencies. We conclude that the accuracies of the amplitudes and phases a...

  2. Launch Vehicles Based on Advanced Hybrid Rocket Motors: An Enabling Technology for the Commercial Small and Micro Satellite Planetary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabeyoglu, Arif; Tuncer, Onur; Inalhan, Gokhan

    2016-07-01

    Mankind is relient on chemical propulsion systems for space access. Nevertheless, this has been a stagnant area in terms of technological development and the technology base has not changed much almost for the past forty years. This poses a vicious circle for launch applications such that high launch costs constrain the demand and low launch freqencies drive costs higher. This also has been a key limiting factor for small and micro satellites that are geared towards planetary science. Rather this be because of the launch frequencies or the costs, the access of small and micro satellites to orbit has been limited. With today's technology it is not possible to escape this circle. However the emergence of cost effective and high performance propulsion systems such as advanced hybrid rockets can decrease launch costs by almost an order or magnitude. This paper briefly introduces the timeline and research challenges that were overcome during the development of advanced hybrid LOX/paraffin based rockets. Experimental studies demonstrated effectiveness of these advanced hybrid rockets which incorporate fast burning parafin based fuels, advanced yet simple internal balistic design and carbon composite winding/fuel casting technology that enables the rocket motor to be built from inside out. A feasibility scenario is studied using these rocket motors as building blocks for a modular launch vehicle capable of delivering micro satellites into low earth orbit. In addition, the building block rocket motor can be used further solar system missions providing the ability to do standalone small and micro satellite missions to planets within the solar system. This enabling technology therefore offers a viable alternative in order to escape the viscous that has plagued the space launch industry and that has limited the small and micro satellite delivery for planetary science.

  3. Evaluation of the satellite-based Global Flood Detection System for measuring river discharge: influence of local factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla-Romero, B.; Thielen, J.; Salamon, P.; De Groeve, T.; Brakenridge, G. R.

    2014-11-01

    One of the main challenges for global hydrological modelling is the limited availability of observational data for calibration and model verification. This is particularly the case for real-time applications. This problem could potentially be overcome if discharge measurements based on satellite data were sufficiently accurate to substitute for ground-based measurements. The aim of this study is to test the potentials and constraints of the remote sensing signal of the Global Flood Detection System for converting the flood detection signal into river discharge values. The study uses data for 322 river measurement locations in Africa, Asia, Europe, North America and South America. Satellite discharge measurements were calibrated for these sites and a validation analysis with in situ discharge was performed. The locations with very good performance will be used in a future project where satellite discharge measurements are obtained on a daily basis to fill the gaps where real-time ground observations are not available. These include several international river locations in Africa: the Niger, Volta and Zambezi rivers. Analysis of the potential factors affecting the satellite signal was based on a classification decision tree (random forest) and showed that mean discharge, climatic region, land cover and upstream catchment area are the dominant variables which determine good or poor performance of the measurement sites. In general terms, higher skill scores were obtained for locations with one or more of the following characteristics: a river width higher than 1km; a large floodplain area and in flooded forest, a potential flooded area greater than 40%; sparse vegetation, croplands or grasslands and closed to open and open forest; leaf area index > 2; tropical climatic area; and without hydraulic infrastructures. Also, locations where river ice cover is seasonally present obtained higher skill scores. This work provides guidance on the best locations and limitations

  4. Evaluation of the satellite-based Global Flood Detection System for measuring river discharge: influence of local factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Revilla-Romero

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the main challenges for global hydrological modelling is the limited availability of observational data for calibration and model verification. This is particularly the case for real time applications. This problem could potentially be overcome if discharge measurements based on satellite data were sufficiently accurate to substitute for ground-based measurements. The aim of this study is to test the potentials and constraints of the remote sensing signal of the Global Flood Detection System for converting the flood detection signal into river discharge values. The study uses data for 322 river measurement locations in Africa, Asia, Europe, North America and South America. Satellite discharge measurements were calibrated for these sites and a validation analysis with in situ discharge was performed. The locations with very good performance will be used in a future project where satellite discharge measurements are obtained on a daily basis to fill the gaps where real time ground observations are not available. These include several international river locations in Africa: Niger, Volta and Zambezi rivers. Analysis of the potential factors affecting the satellite signal was based on a classification decision tree (Random Forest and showed that mean discharge, climatic region, land cover and upstream catchment area are the dominant variables which determine good or poor performance of the measurement sites. In general terms, higher skill scores were obtained for locations with one or more of the following characteristics: a river width higher than 1 km; a large floodplain area and in flooded forest; with a potential flooded area greater than 40%; sparse vegetation, croplands or grasslands and closed to open and open forest; Leaf Area Index > 2; tropical climatic area; and without hydraulic infrastructures. Also, locations where river ice cover is seasonally present obtained higher skill scores. The work provides guidance on the best

  5. Floristics and biogeography of vegetation in seasonally dry tropical regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dexter, K.G.; Smart, B.; Baldauf, C.;

    2015-01-01

    To provide an inter-continental overview of the floristics and biogeography of drought-adapted tropical vegetation formations, we compiled a dataset of inventory plots in South America (n=93), Africa (n=84), and Asia (n=92) from savannas (subject to fire), seasonally dry tropical forests (not...... formations are separate. We suggest that because of their propensity to burn, many formations termed 舠dry forest舡 in Africa and Asia are best considered as savannas. The floristic differentiation of similar vegetation formations from different continents suggests that cross-continental generalisations...

  6. Application of knowledge-based classification techniques and geographic information systems (GIS) on satellite imagery for stormwater management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellera, Lourdes Villanueva

    Stormwater management is concerned with runoff control and water quality optimization. A stormwater model is a tool applied to reach this goal. Hydrologic variables required to run this model are usually obtained from field surveys and aerial photo-interpretation. However, these procedures are slow and difficult. An alternative is the automated processing of satellite imagery. We examined various studies that utilized satellite data to provide inputs to stormwater models. The overall results of the modeling effort are acceptable even if the outputs of satellite data processing are used instead of those obtained from standard techniques. One important model input parameter is land use because it is associated with the amounts of runoff and pollutants generated in a parcel of land. Hence, we also explored new ways that land use can be identified from satellite imagery. Next, we demonstrated how the combined technologies of satellite remote sensing, knowledge-based systems, and geographic information systems (GIS) are used to delineate impervious surfaces from a Landsat ETM+ data. Imperviousness is a critical model input parameter because it is proportional to runoff rates and volumes. We found that raw satellite image, normalized difference vegetation image, and ancillary data can provide rules to distinguish impervious surfaces satisfactorily. We also identified different levels of pollutant loadings (high, medium, low) from the same satellite imagery using similar techniques. It is useful to identify areas with high stormwater pollutant emissions so that they can be prioritized for the implementation of best management practices. The contaminants studied were total suspended solids, biochemical oxygen demand, total phosphorus, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, copper, and oil and grease. We observed that raw data, tasseled cap transformed images, and ancillary data can be utilized to make rules for mapping pollution levels. Finally, we devised a method to compute weights

  7. Assessing the Relative Performance of Microwave-Based Satellite Rain Rate Retrievals Using TRMM Ground Validation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, David B.; Fisher, Brad L.

    2011-01-01

    Space-borne microwave sensors provide critical rain information used in several global multi-satellite rain products, which in turn are used for a variety of important studies, including landslide forecasting, flash flood warning, data assimilation, climate studies, and validation of model forecasts of precipitation. This study employs four years (2003-2006) of satellite data to assess the relative performance and skill of SSM/I (F13, F14 and F15), AMSU-B (N15, N16 and N17), AMSR-E (Aqua) and the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) in estimating surface rainfall based on direct instantaneous comparisons with ground-based rain estimates from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Ground Validation (GV) sites at Kwajalein, Republic of the Marshall Islands (KWAJ) and Melbourne, Florida (MELB). The relative performance of each of these satellite estimates is examined via comparisons with space- and time-coincident GV radar-based rain rate estimates. Because underlying surface terrain is known to affect the relative performance of the satellite algorithms, the data for MELB was further stratified into ocean, land and coast categories using a 0.25deg terrain mask. Of all the satellite estimates compared in this study, TMI and AMSR-E exhibited considerably higher correlations and skills in estimating/observing surface precipitation. While SSM/I and AMSU-B exhibited lower correlations and skills for each of the different terrain categories, the SSM/I absolute biases trended slightly lower than AMSR-E over ocean, where the observations from both emission and scattering channels were used in the retrievals. AMSU-B exhibited the least skill relative to GV in all of the relevant statistical categories, and an anomalous spike was observed in the probability distribution functions near 1.0 mm/hr. This statistical artifact appears to be related to attempts by algorithm developers to include some lighter rain rates, not easily detectable by its scatter-only frequencies. AMSU

  8. 2D Satellite Image Registration Using Transform Based and Correlation Based Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. H.B. Kekre, Dr. Tanuja K. Sarode, Ms. Ruhina B. Karani

    2012-01-01

    Image registration is the process of geometrically aligning one image to another image of the same scene taken from different viewpoints or by different sensors. It is a fundamental image processing technique and is very useful in integrating information from different sensors, finding changes in images taken at different times and inferring three-dimensional information from stereo images. Image registration can be done by using two matching method: transform based methods and correlation ba...

  9. Molecular systematic and historical biogeography of the armored Neotropical catfishes Hypoptopomatinae and Neoplecostominae (Siluriformes: Loricariidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiachio, Márcio Cesar; Oliveira, Claudio; Montoya-Burgos, Juan I

    2008-11-01

    The Neotropics possess the greatest freshwater fish diversity of the world, rendering the study of their evolutionary history extremely challenging. Loricariidae catfishes are one of the most diverse components of the Neotropical ichthyofauna and despite a long history of classification, major issues still need elucidation. Based on a nuclear gene, we present a robust phylogeny of two former loricariid subfamilies: Hypoptopomatinae and Neoplecostominae. Our results show that Neoplecostominae is nested within Hypoptopomatinae, and is the sister group to the former Otothyrini tribe. According to our results, supplemented by morphological observations, we erect two new subfamilies, the Otothyrinae and a new Hypoptopomatinae, and modify the Neoplecostominae by including the genus Pseudotocinclus. The uncovered evolutionary relationships allow a detailed analysis of their historical biogeography. We tested two Dispersal-Extinction-Cladogenesis models for inferring the distribution range evolution of the new subfamilies, and show that the model having no constrains performs better than a model constraining long-range dispersal. The Maximum Likelihood reconstructions of ancestral ranges showed a marked division between the Amazonian origin of the Hypoptopomatinae and the eastern coastal Brazil+Upper Paraná origin of the Neoplecostominae and Otothyrinae. Markedly few instances of dispersal across the border separating the Amazon basin and the Paraná-Paraguay+eastern coastal Brazil+Uruguay were reconstructed. This result is in clear contrast with the historical biogeography of many Neotropical fishes, including other Loricariidae. Part of the dispersal limitation may be explained by divergent ecological specialization: lowland rivers versus mountain streams habitats. Moreover, because most species of the new subfamilies are small, we hypothesize that body size-related effects might limit their dispersal, like predation and energetic cost to migration. Finally

  10. Projected impacts of climate change and ocean acidification on the global biogeography of planktonic foraminifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Roy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Planktonic foraminifera are a major contributor to the deep carbonate-flux and the planktonic biomass of the global ocean. Their microfossil deposits form one of the richest databases for reconstructing paleoenvironments, particularly through changes in their taxonomic and shell composition. Using an empirically-based foraminifer model that incorporates three known major physiological drivers of foraminifer biogeography – temperature, food and light – we investigate (i the global redistribution of planktonic foraminifera under anthropogenic climate change, and (ii the alteration of the carbonate chemistry of foraminifer habitat with ocean acidification. The present-day and future (2090–2100 3-D distributions of foraminifera are simulated using temperature, plankton biomass, and light from an Earth system model forced with historical and a future (IPCC A2 high CO2 emission scenario. The broadscale patterns of present day foraminifer biogeography are well reproduced. Foraminifer abundance and diversity are projected to decrease in the tropics and subpolar regions and increase in the subtropics and around the poles. In the tropics, the geographical shifts are driven by temperature, while the vertical shifts are driven by both temperature and food availability. In the high-latitudes, vertical shifts are driven by food availability, while geographical shifts are driven by both food availability and temperature. Changes in the marine carbon cycle would be expected in response to (i the large-scale rearrangements in foraminifer abundance, and (ii the reduction of the carbonate concentration in the habitat range of planktonic foraminifers: from 10–30 μmol kg−1 in the polar/subpolar regions to 30–70 μmol kg−1 in the subtropical/tropical regions. High-latitude species are most vulnerable to anthropogenic change: their abundance and available habitat decrease and up to 10% of their habitat drops below the calcite saturation horizon.

  11. Integrated molecular and morphological biogeography of the calanoid copepod family Eucalanidae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetze, Erica; Ohman, Mark D.

    2010-12-01

    Species range information forms the empirical data of pelagic biogeography. Early descriptions of canonical zooplankton distributions in the Pacific Ocean were based, in part, on distributional data from the planktonic copepod family Eucalanidae. A large-scale molecular survey of this group, covering Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans (1295 individuals), increased the total diversity from 24 to 39 evolutionarily significant units (ESUs). New biogeographies are presented here for 18 lineages within 10 described species in the genera Subeucalanus, Pareucalanus, and Rhincalanus. Integration of molecular and morphological data on diversity and distribution resulted in three primary outcomes: (1) the morphological species was confirmed to be valid, and the biogeographic distribution remains largely unchanged from prior reports, (2) the species was found to contain multiple ESUs, each of which has a more restricted distribution than the parent taxon, and (3) the species was found to contain multiple ESUs, whose biogeographic distributions remain unclear. Subeucalanus subtenuis, S. mucronatus, S. subcrassus, Pareucalanus attenuatus, P. langae, and P. parki are all valid genetic and morphological species, and prior distribution records from Fleminger (1973) and Lang (1965) are confirmed to be accurate. New records in the western Indian Ocean extend the biogeographic range of S. subtenuis, S. mucronatus, S. subcrassus, and P. langae. Subeucalanus pileatus, P. sewelli, and R. rostrifrons, all species with Indo-Pacific or circumglobal distributions, consist of genetically divergent, allopatric populations that subdivide the original biogeographic range. Subeucalanus crassus and Rhincalanus nasutus are species complexes containing 4-8 genetically divergent lineages, whose distributions are inadequately characterized. Although results suggest more restricted pelagic habitats for some eucalanid species, those habitats have been previously described for other zooplanktonic taxa

  12. Fossil biogeography: a new model to infer dispersal, extinction and sampling from palaeontological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestro, Daniele; Zizka, Alexander; Bacon, Christine D; Cascales-Miñana, Borja; Salamin, Nicolas; Antonelli, Alexandre

    2016-04-01

    Methods in historical biogeography have revolutionized our ability to infer the evolution of ancestral geographical ranges from phylogenies of extant taxa, the rates of dispersals, and biotic connectivity among areas. However, extant taxa are likely to provide limited and potentially biased information about past biogeographic processes, due to extinction, asymmetrical dispersals and variable connectivity among areas. Fossil data hold considerable information about past distribution of lineages, but suffer from largely incomplete sampling. Here we present a new dispersal-extinction-sampling (DES) model, which estimates biogeographic parameters using fossil occurrences instead of phylogenetic trees. The model estimates dispersal and extinction rates while explicitly accounting for the incompleteness of the fossil record. Rates can vary between areas and through time, thus providing the opportunity to assess complex scenarios of biogeographic evolution. We implement the DES model in a Bayesian framework and demonstrate through simulations that it can accurately infer all the relevant parameters. We demonstrate the use of our model by analysing the Cenozoic fossil record of land plants and inferring dispersal and extinction rates across Eurasia and North America. Our results show that biogeographic range evolution is not a time-homogeneous process, as assumed in most phylogenetic analyses, but varies through time and between areas. In our empirical assessment, this is shown by the striking predominance of plant dispersals from Eurasia into North America during the Eocene climatic cooling, followed by a shift in the opposite direction, and finally, a balance in biotic interchange since the middle Miocene. We conclude by discussing the potential of fossil-based analyses to test biogeographic hypotheses and improve phylogenetic methods in historical biogeography.

  13. Functional biogeography as evidence of gene transfer in hypersaline microbial communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Jacob Parnell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Horizontal gene transfer (HGT plays a major role in speciation and evolution of bacteria and archaea by controlling gene distribution within an environment. However, information that links HGT to a natural community using relevant population-genetics parameters and spatial considerations is scarce. The Great Salt Lake (Utah, USA provides an excellent model for studying HGT in the context of biogeography because it is a contiguous system with dispersal limitations due to a strong selective salinity gradient. We hypothesize that in spite of the barrier to phylogenetic dispersal, functional characteristics--in the form of HGT--expand beyond phylogenetic limitations due to selective pressure. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: To assay the functional genes and microorganisms throughout the GSL, we used a 16S rRNA oligonucleotide microarray (Phylochip and a functional gene array (GeoChip to measure biogeographic patterns of nine microbial communities. We found a significant difference in biogeography based on microarray analyses when comparing Sørensen similarity values for presence/absence of function and phylogeny (Student's t-test; p = 0.005. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: Biogeographic patterns exhibit behavior associated with horizontal gene transfer in that informational genes (16S rRNA have a lower similarity than functional genes, and functional similarity is positively correlated with lake-wide selective pressure. Specifically, high concentrations of chromium throughout GSL correspond to an average similarity of chromium resistance genes that is 22% higher than taxonomic similarity. This suggests active HGT may be measured at the population level in microbial communities and these biogeographic patterns may serve as a model to study bacteria adaptation and speciation.

  14. Transferring and implementing the general dynamic model of oceanic island biogeography at the scale of island fragments: the role of geological age and topography in plant diversification in the Canaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otto, Rüdiger; Whittaker, Robert J.; von Gaisberg, Markus;

    2016-01-01

    Aim The general dynamic model (GDM) of oceanic island biogeography integrates rates of immigration, speciation and extinction in relation to a humped trajectory of island area and topographic complexity through time, based on a simplified island ontogeny. In practice, many islands have more compl...

  15. Long-range transport of dust aerosols over the Arabian Sea and Indian region – A case study using satellite data and ground-based measurements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Badarinath, K.V.S.; Kharol, S.K.; Kaskaoutis, D.G.; Sharma, A.R.; Ramaswamy, V.; Kambezidis, H.D.

    particles from dust storms and smoke from naturally occurring biomass burning (Ichoku et al., 2004). Satellite-based measurements for monitoring these atmospheric constituents are a viable proposition since ground-based measurements are limited in space...

  16. The Matsu Wheel: A Cloud-Based Framework for Efficient Analysis and Reanalysis of Earth Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Maria T.; Anderson, Nicholas; Bennett, Collin; Bruggemann, Jacob; Grossman, Robert L.; Handy, Matthew; Ly, Vuong; Mandl, Daniel J.; Pederson, Shane; Pivarski, James; Powell, Ray; Spring, Jonathan; Wells, Walt; Xia, John

    2016-01-01

    Project Matsu is a collaboration between the Open Commons Consortium and NASA focused on developing open source technology for cloud-based processing of Earth satellite imagery with practical applications to aid in natural disaster detection and relief. Project Matsu has developed an open source cloud-based infrastructure to process, analyze, and reanalyze large collections of hyperspectral satellite image data using OpenStack, Hadoop, MapReduce and related technologies. We describe a framework for efficient analysis of large amounts of data called the Matsu "Wheel." The Matsu Wheel is currently used to process incoming hyperspectral satellite data produced daily by NASA's Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite. The framework allows batches of analytics, scanning for new data, to be applied to data as it flows in. In the Matsu Wheel, the data only need to be accessed and preprocessed once, regardless of the number or types of analytics, which can easily be slotted into the existing framework. The Matsu Wheel system provides a significantly more efficient use of computational resources over alternative methods when the data are large, have high-volume throughput, may require heavy preprocessing, and are typically used for many types of analysis. We also describe our preliminary Wheel analytics, including an anomaly detector for rare spectral signatures or thermal anomalies in hyperspectral data and a land cover classifier that can be used for water and flood detection. Each of these analytics can generate visual reports accessible via the web for the public and interested decision makers. The result products of the analytics are also made accessible through an Open Geospatial Compliant (OGC)-compliant Web Map Service (WMS) for further distribution. The Matsu Wheel allows many shared data services to be performed together to efficiently use resources for processing hyperspectral satellite image data and other, e.g., large environmental datasets that may be analyzed for

  17. An image based information system - Architecture for correlating satellite and topological data bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, N. A.; Zobrist, A. L.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the development of an image based information system and its use to process a Landsat thematic map showing land use or land cover in conjunction with a census tract polygon file to produce a tabulation of land use acreages per census tract. The system permits the efficient cross-tabulation of two or more geo-coded data sets, thereby setting the stage for the practical implementation of models of diffusion processes or cellular transformation. Characteristics of geographic information systems are considered, and functional requirements, such as data management, geocoding, image data management, and data analysis are discussed. The system is described, and the potentialities of its use are examined.

  18. Design Concepts for a Small Space-Based GEO Relay Satellite for Missions Between Low Earth and near Earth Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasin, Kul B.; Warner, Joseph D.; Oleson, Steven; Schier, James

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of the Small Space-Based Geosynchronous Earth orbiting (GEO) satellite is to provide a space link to the user mission spacecraft for relaying data through ground networks to user Mission Control Centers. The Small Space Based Satellite (SSBS) will provide services comparable to those of a NASA Tracking Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) for the same type of links. The SSBS services will keep the user burden the same or lower than for TDRS and will support the same or higher data rates than those currently supported by TDRS. At present, TDRSS provides links and coverage below GEO; however, SSBS links and coverage capability to above GEO missions are being considered for the future, especially for Human Space Flight Missions (HSF). There is also a rising need for the capability to support high data rate links (exceeding 1 Gbps) for imaging applications. The communication payload on the SSBS will provide S/Ka-band single access links to the mission and a Ku-band link to the ground, with an optical communication payload as an option. To design the communication payload, various link budgets were analyzed and many possible operational scenarios examined. To reduce user burden, using a larger-sized antenna than is currently in use by TDRS was considered. Because of the SSBS design size, it was found that a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket could deliver three SSBSs to GEO. This will greatly reduce the launch costs per satellite. Using electric propulsion was also evaluated versus using chemical propulsion; the power system size and time to orbit for various power systems were also considered. This paper will describe how the SSBS will meet future service requirements, concept of operations, and the design to meet NASA users' needs for below and above GEO missions. These users' needs not only address the observational mission requirements but also possible HSF missions to the year 2030. We will provide the trade-off analysis of the communication payload design in terms of

  19. OAFlux Satellite-Based High-Resolution Analysis of Air-Sea Turbulent Heat, Moisture, and Momentum Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lisan

    2016-04-01

    The Objectively Analyzed air-sea Fluxes (OAFlux) project at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has recently developed a new suite of products: the satellite-based high-resolution (HR) air-sea turbulent heat, moisture, and momentum fluxes over the global ocean from 1987 to the present. The OAFlux-HR fluxes are computed from the COARE bulk algorithm using air-sea variables (vector wind, near-surface humidity and temperature, and ocean surface temperature) derived from multiple satellite sensors and multiple missions. The vector wind time series are merged from 14 satellite sensors, including 4 scatterometers and 10 passive microwave radiometers. The near-surface humidity and temperature time series are retrieved from 11 satellite sensors, including 7 microwave imagers and 4 microwave sounders. The endeavor has greatly improved the depiction of the air-sea turbulent exchange on the frontal and meso-scales. The OAFlux-HR turbulent flux products are valuable datasets for a broad range of studies, including the study of the long-term change and variability in the oean-surface forcing functions, quantification of the large-scale budgets of mass, heat, and freshwater, and assessing the role of the ocean in the change and variability of the Earth's climate.

  20. Evaluation of satellite based indices for gross primary production estimates in a sparse savanna in the Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sjöström

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the more frequently applied methods for integrating controls on primary production through satellite data is the Light Use Efficiency (LUE approach. Satellite indices such as the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI and the Shortwave Infrared Water Stress Index (SIWSI have previously shown promise as predictors of primary production in several different environments. In this study, we evaluate NDVI, EVI and SIWSI derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS satellite sensor against in-situ measurements from central Sudan in order to asses their applicability in LUE-based primary production modeling within a water limited environment. Results show a strong correlation between vegetation indices and gross primary production (GPP, demonstrating the significance of vegetation indices for deriving information on primary production with relatively high accuracy at similar areas. Evaluation of SIWSI however, reveal that the fraction of vegetation apparently is to low for the index to provide accurate information on canopy water content, indicating that the use of SIWSI as a predictor of water stress in satellite data-driven primary production modeling in similar semi-arid ecosystems is limited.

  1. Estimation of daily rainfall over Italy by merging multiple microwave-based satellite products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panegrossi, Giulia; Casella, Daniele; Cinzia Marra, Anna; Sano, Paolo; Dietrich, Stefano; Brocca, Luca; Ciabatta, Luca; Massari, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Precipitation retrieval from space has seen great advances thanks to the improving quality of PMW measurements, the refinement of precipitation retrieval techniques, and the increasing number of microwave radiometers on board LEO satellites orbiting around the Earth. With the recent advent of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission the constellation of cross-track and conically scanning microwave radiometers with precipitation-sensing capabilities currently ensures 1- to 3-hourly coverage at mid/high latitudes. Traditionally passive microwave (PMW) retrieval algorithms are based on the principle that surface precipitation can be estimated from the multichannel brightness temperature (TB) measurements because these are affected (in different ways depending on channel frequency, viewing geometry, spatial resolution, and surface background conditions) by the microphysical properties and 3-D distribution of liquid and frozen hydrometeors within the precipitating cloud, and, therefore, can be related to surface precipitation. These approaches can be categorized as top-down approaches and they provide instantaneous precipitation rate estimate at the surface at the time of the satellite observation. Recently a new perspective for surface precipitation estimate has been proposed, the bottom-up approach, based on the principle that the soil moisture can be considered as a "natural raingauge" and can be employed for "measuring" rainfall. The algorithm, called SM2RAIN, allows estimating rainfall directly from soil moisture retrieved from spaceborne sensors (i.e., ASCAT). Several recent studies have demonstrated that the approach is very effective for precipitation estimation from the daily to 5-daily scale, even though not applicable in regions where soil moisture retrieval is not feasible (i.e., highly vegetated areas, frozen surfaces, oceans). This study shows that the precipitation estimates obtained by PMW observations using the two approaches (top-down and

  2. Numerical Representation of Web Sites of Remote Sensing Satellite Data Providers and Its Application to Knowledge Based Information Retrievals with Natural Language

    OpenAIRE

    Kohei Arai

    2013-01-01

    A method for numerical expression of web site which is relating to satellite remote sensing and its application to knowledge based information retrieval system which allows retrievals with natural language is proposed and implemented. Through experiments with remote sensing related information, it is found that the proposed information retrieval system does work in particular for remote sensing satellite data retrievals with natural language.

  3. Web-Based Satellite Products Database for Meteorological and Climate Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Dung; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Palikonda, Rabindra; Khaiyer, Mandana M.; Nordeen, Michele L.; Nguyen, Louis; Minnis, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    The need for ready access to satellite data and associated physical parameters such as cloud properties has been steadily growing. Air traffic management, weather forecasters, energy producers, and weather and climate researchers among others can utilize more satellite information than in the past. Thus, it is essential that such data are made available in near real-time and as archival products in an easy-access and user friendly environment. A host of Internet web sites currently provide a variety of satellite products for various applications. Each site has a unique contribution with appeal to a particular segment of the public and scientific community. This is no less true for the NASA Langley's Clouds and Radiation (NLCR) website (http://www-pm.larc.nasa.gov) that has been evolving over the past 10 years to support a variety of research projects This website was originally developed to display cloud products derived from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) over the Southern Great Plains for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. It has evolved into a site providing a comprehensive database of near real-time and historical satellite products used for meteorological, aviation, and climate studies. To encourage the user community to take advantage of the site, this paper summarizes the various products and projects supported by the website and discusses future options for new datasets.

  4. Using NASA's Giovanni Web Portal to Access and Visualize Satellite-Based Earth Science Data in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, S. A.; Acker, J. G.; Prados, A. I.; Leptoukh, G. G.

    2008-12-01

    One of the biggest obstacles for the average Earth science student today is locating and obtaining satellite- based remote sensing datasets in a format that is accessible and optimal for their data analysis needs. At the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES-DISC) alone, on the order of hundreds of Terabytes of data are available for distribution to scientists, students and the general public. The single biggest and time-consuming hurdle for most students when they begin their study of the various datasets is how to slog through this mountain of data to arrive at a properly sub-setted and manageable dataset to answer their science question(s). The GES DISC provides a number of tools for data access and visualization, including the Google-like Mirador search engine and the powerful GES-DISC Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure (Giovanni) web interface. Giovanni provides a simple way to visualize, analyze and access vast amounts of satellite-based Earth science data. Giovanni's features and practical examples of its use will be demonstrated, with an emphasis on how satellite remote sensing can help students understand recent events in the atmosphere and biosphere. Giovanni is actually a series of sixteen similar web-based data interfaces, each of which covers a single satellite dataset (such as TRMM, TOMS, OMI, AIRS, MLS, HALOE, etc.) or a group of related datasets (such as MODIS and MISR for aerosols, SeaWIFS and MODIS for ocean color, and the suite of A-Train observations co-located along the CloudSat orbital path). Recently, ground-based datasets have been included in Giovanni, including the Northern Eurasian Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI), and EPA fine particulate matter (PM2.5) for air quality. Model data such as the Goddard GOCART model and MERRA meteorological reanalyses (in process) are being increasingly incorporated into Giovanni to facilitate model- data intercomparison. A full suite of data

  5. A method to develop mission critical data processing systems for satellite based instruments. The spinning mode case

    CERN Document Server

    Lazzarotto, Francesco; Costa, Enrico; Del Monte, Ettore; Di Persio, Giuseppe; Donnarumma, Immacolata; Evangelista, Yuri; Feroci, Marco; Pacciani, Luigi; Rubini, Alda; Soffitta, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Modern satellite based experiments are often very complex real-time systems, composed by flight and ground segments, that have challenging resource related constraints, in terms of size, weight, power, requirements for real-time response, fault tolerance, and specialized input/output hardware-software, and they must be certified to high levels of assurance. Hardware-software data processing systems have to be responsive to system degradation and to changes in the data acquisition modes, and actions have to be taken to change the organization of the mission operations. A big research & develop effort in a team composed by scientists and technologists can lead to produce software systems able to optimize the hardware to reach very high levels of performance or to pull degraded hardware to maintain satisfactory features. We'll show real-life examples describing a system, processing the data of a X-Ray detector on satellite-based mission in spinning mode.

  6. Understanding predicted shifts in diazotroph biogeography using resource competition theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dutkiewicz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We examine the sensitivity of the biogeography of nitrogen fixers to a warming climate and increased aeolian iron deposition in the context of a global Earth System Model. We employ concepts from Resource Ratio Theory to provide a simplifying and transparent interpretation of the results. First we demonstrate that a set of clearly defined, easily diagnosed provinces are consistent with the theory. Using the framework we show that the regions most vulnerable to province shifts and changes in diazotroph biogeography are the Equatorial and South Pacific, and central Atlantic. Warmer and dustier climates favor diazotrophs due to an increase in the ratio of supply rate of iron to fixed nitrogen. The analysis suggests that monitoring of real world province boundaries, indicated by transitions in surface nutrient concentrations, would provide a clear and easily interpreted indicator of ongoing global change. We suggest that the emergent provinces could be a standard diagnostic for global change models, allowing for rapid and transparent interpretation and comparison of model predictions and the underlying mechanisms.

  7. Understanding predicted shifts in diazotroph biogeography using resource competition theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dutkiewicz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We examine the sensitivity of the biogeography of nitrogen fixers to a warming climate and increased aeolian iron deposition in the context of a global earth system model. We employ concepts from the resource-ratio theory to provide a simplifying and transparent interpretation of the results. First we demonstrate that a set of clearly defined, easily diagnosed provinces are consistent with the theory. Using this framework we show that the regions most vulnerable to province shifts and changes in diazotroph biogeography are the equatorial and South Pacific, and central Atlantic. Warmer and dustier climates favor diazotrophs due to an increase in the ratio of supply rate of iron to fixed nitrogen. We suggest that the emergent provinces could be a standard diagnostic for global change models, allowing for rapid and transparent interpretation and comparison of model predictions and the underlying mechanisms. The analysis suggests that monitoring of real world province boundaries, indicated by transitions in surface nutrient concentrations, would provide a clear and easily interpreted indicator of ongoing global change.

  8. Biogeography as critical nursing pedagogy: Breathing life into nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Richard G; Atherton, Iain M

    2016-09-01

    Insights from the social sciences, including geography, sociology, and anthropology, have long been incorporated into pre-registration nursing programmes. However, scholars have suggested that their inclusion has been sporadic and lacks clear theoretical rationale. In this paper we argue anew that the social sciences - and particularly, human geography - could be central to nurse education. Specifically, we recast the concept of 'biogeography' drawn from human geography that emphasises the interplay between life (bio) and place (geo) to propose pedagogy that theoretically justifies and practically enables the inclusion of the social sciences in nurse education. Biogeography can breathe new life into nursing curricula by animating our students through the cultivation of three 'spirits of nursing'. First, a 'spirit of empathy' that can shatter patient-professional dualisms by facilitating person-centred and place-sensitive care. Second, a 'spirit of engagement' that situates practice in social structures awakening a desire to effect change by fomenting an acute sense of social justice. Third, a 'spirit of enquiry' that holds in critical tension the theory-practice gap by fostering continual questioning and pursuit of evidence. In so doing, biogeographical pedagogy releases the latent potential of the social sciences to revitalise nurse education, reinvigorate our students, and renew ourselves as nurse educators. PMID:27505689

  9. Phylogeny and Biogeography of Cyanobacteria and Their Produced Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostinho Antunes

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Phylogeny is an evolutionary reconstruction of the past relationships of DNA or protein sequences and it can further be used as a tool to assess population structuring, genetic diversity and biogeographic patterns. In the microbial world, the concept that everything is everywhere is widely accepted. However, it is much debated whether microbes are easily dispersed globally or whether they, like many macro-organisms, have historical biogeographies. Biogeography can be defined as the science that documents the spatial and temporal distribution of a given taxa in the environment at local, regional and continental scales. Speciation, extinction and dispersal are proposed to explain the generation of biogeographic patterns. Cyanobacteria are a diverse group of microorganisms that inhabit a wide range of ecological niches and are well known for their toxic secondary metabolite production. Knowledge of the evolution and dispersal of these microorganisms is still limited, and further research to understand such topics is imperative. Here, we provide a compilation of the most relevant information regarding these issues to better understand the present state of the art as a platform for future studies, and we highlight examples of both phylogenetic and biogeographic studies in non-symbiotic cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins.

  10. Supporting a Diverse Community of Undergraduate Researchers in Satellite and Ground-Based Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, R.; Liou-Mark, J.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. remains in grave danger of losing its global competitive edge in STEM. To find solutions to this problem, the Obama Administration proposed two new national initiatives: the Educate to Innovate Initiative and the $100 million government/private industry initiative to train 100,000 STEM teachers and graduate 1 million additional STEM students over the next decade. To assist in ameliorating the national STEM plight, the New York City College of Technology has designed its NSF Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) program in satellite and ground-based remote sensing to target underrepresented minority students. Since the inception of the program in 2008, a total of 45 undergraduate students of which 38 (84%) are considered underrepresented minorities in STEM have finished or are continuing with their research or are pursuing their STEM endeavors. The program is comprised of the three primary components. The first component, Structured Learning Environments: Preparation and Mentorship, provides the REU Scholars with the skill sets necessary for proficiency in satellite and ground-based remote sensing research. The students are offered mini-courses in Geographic Information Systems, MATLAB, and Remote Sensing. They also participate in workshops on the Ethics of Research. Each REU student is a member of a team that consists of faculty mentors, post doctorate/graduate students, and high school students. The second component, Student Support and Safety Nets, provides undergraduates a learning environment that supports them in becoming successful researchers. Special networking and Brown Bag sessions, and an annual picnic with research scientists are organized so that REU Scholars are provided with opportunities to expand their professional community. Graduate school support is provided by offering free Graduate Record Examination preparation courses and workshops on the graduate school application process. Additionally, students are supported by college

  11. Soil moisture on Polish territory - comparison of satellite and ground-based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojek, Edyta; Łukowski, Mateusz; Marczewski, Wojciech; Usowicz, Bogusław

    2014-05-01

    Assessment of water resources due to changing climatic conditions in time and space is still very uncertain. The territory of Poland has a limited resource of waters, occasionally resulting in small agricultural droughts. From the other side intense rainfalls, floods or run-offs, causing soil erosion are observed. Therefore, it is important to predict and prevent of this adverse phenomena. Huge spatial variability of soil moisture does not allow for accurate estimation of its distribution using ground-based measurements. SMOS soil moisture data are quite much inherently consistent in time and space, but their validation is still a challenge for further use in the climate and hydrology studies. This is the motivation for the research: to examine soil moisture from SMOS and ground based stations of the SWEX network held over eastern Poland. The presented results are related to changes of the soil moisture on regional scales for Poland in the period 2010-2013. Some results with SMOS L2 data are extended on continental scales for Europe. Time series from ground and satellite SMOS data sources were compared by regression methods. The region of Poland indicates clearly some genetic spatial distributions in weekly averaged values. In continental scales, the country territory contrasts evidently to Lithuania and in Polesie, and indicates seasonal cycling observed in archives and well known traditional records. The central part of Poland is repeatedly susceptible on droughts with soil moisture values ranging from about 0.02 to 0.20 m3 m-3. SMOS data allows on creating systematic drought data for Poland and watching annual changes, and differences to other drought services kept on national scales for agricultural purposes. We bound that drought susceptibility to the content of sand clay components and the land use there. Lack of rainfall in the late 2011 summer, caused a significant deficit of water in soil moisture content (below 0.05 m3 m-3) throughout the entire country

  12. Photosynthetically active radiation retrieval based on HJ-1A/B satellite data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Photosynthetically active radiation(PAR) is essential for plant photosynthesis and carbon cycle,and is also important for meteorological and environmental monitoring.To advance China’s disaster and environmental monitoring capabilities,the HJ-1A/B satellites have been placed in Earth orbit.One of their environmental monitoring objectives is the study of PAR.We simulated direct solar,scattered and environment radiation between 400 and 700 nm under different atmospheric parameters(solar zenith angle,atmospheric water vapor,atmospheric ozone,aerosol optical thickness,surface elevation and surface albedo),and then established a look-up table between these input parameters and PAR.Based on the look-up table,we used HJ-1A/B aerosol and surface albedo outputs to derive the corresponding PAR.Validation of inversed instantaneous and observed PAR values using HJ-1 Heihe experimental data had a root mean square error of 25.2 W m-2,with a relative error of 5.9%.The root mean square error for accumulated daily PAR and observed values was 0.49 MJ m-2,with a relative error of 3.5%.Our approach improved significantly the computational efficiency,compared with using directly radiation transfer equations.We also studied the sensitivity of various input parameters to photosynthetically active radiation,and found that solar zenith angle and atmospheric aerosols were sensitive PAR parameters.Surface albedo had some effect on PAR,but water vapor and ozone had minimal impact on PAR.

  13. Comparison of satellite-based evapotranspiration estimates over the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jian; Loew, Alexander; Chen, Xuelong; Ma, Yaoming; Su, Zhongbo

    2016-08-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) plays a major role in regional and global climate. The understanding of latent heat (LE) flux can help to better describe the complex mechanisms and interactions between land and atmosphere. Despite its importance, accurate estimation of evapotranspiration (ET) over the TP remains challenging. Satellite observations allow for ET estimation at high temporal and spatial scales. The purpose of this paper is to provide a detailed cross-comparison of existing ET products over the TP. Six available ET products based on different approaches are included for comparison. Results show that all products capture the seasonal variability well with minimum ET in the winter and maximum ET in the summer. Regarding the spatial pattern, the High resOlution Land Atmosphere surface Parameters from Space (HOLAPS) ET demonstrator dataset is very similar to the LandFlux-EVAL dataset (a benchmark ET product from the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment), with decreasing ET from the south-east to north-west over the TP. Further comparison against the LandFlux-EVAL over different sub-regions that are decided by different intervals of normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI), precipitation, and elevation reveals that HOLAPS agrees best with LandFlux-EVAL having the highest correlation coefficient (R) and the lowest root mean square difference (RMSD). These results indicate the potential for the application of the HOLAPS demonstrator dataset in understanding the land-atmosphere-biosphere interactions over the TP. In order to provide more accurate ET over the TP, model calibration, high accuracy forcing dataset, appropriate in situ measurements as well as other hydrological data such as runoff measurements are still needed.

  14. Observation of TGFs onboard "Vernov" satellite and TGEs in ground-based experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolov, Vitaly; Panasyuk, Mikhail; Svertilov, Sergey; Garipov, Gali; Iyudin, Anatoly; Klimov, Pavel; Morozenko, Violetta; Maximov, Ivan; Mishieva, Tatiana; Klimov, Stanislav; Pozanenko, Alexey; Rothkaehl, Hanna

    2016-04-01

    "Vernov" satellite with RELEC experiment on-board was launched on 2014 July, 8 into a polar solar-synchronous orbit. The payload includes DRGE gamma-ray spectrometer providing measurements in 10-3000 keV energy range with four detectors directed to atmosphere. Total area of DRGE detectors is ~500 cm2. The data were recorded both in monitoring and gamma by gamma modes with timing accuracy ~15 us. Several TGF candidates with 10-40 gammas in a burst with duration thunderstorms connected with most of detected TGF candidates. Possible connection of these flashes with electron precipitations is discussed. Ground-based experiments, with similar gamma-spectrometers were conducted, to study the spectral, temporal and spatial characteristics of TGEs in 20-3000 keV energy range, as well, as to search the fast hard X-ray and gamma-ray flashes possibly appearing at the moment of lightning. The time of each gamma-quantum interaction was recorded with an ~15 us s accuracy together with detailed spectral data. Measurements were done on the ground at Moscow region, and at mountain altitude in Armenia at Aragatz station. During the time interval covering spring, summer and autumn of 2015 a number of TGEs were detected. Measured low-energy gamma-ray spectra usually contain a set of lines that can be interpreted as radiation of Rn-222 daughter isotopes. The increase of Rn-222 radiation was detected during rainfalls with thunderstorm, as well, as during rainy weather without thunderstorms. Variations of Rn-222 radiation dominate at low energies (<2.6MeV) and must be taken into account in the experiments performed to measure low energy gamma-radiation from the electrons accelerated in thunderclouds. There were no significant flashes with duration of ~1ms detected in coincidence with a nearby lightnings.

  15. Water Accounting Plus (WA+) - a water accounting procedure for complex river basins based on satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, P.; Bastiaanssen, W. G. M.; Molden, D.

    2013-07-01

    Coping with water scarcity and growing competition for water among different sectors requires proper water management strategies and decision processes. A pre-requisite is a clear understanding of the basin hydrological processes, manageable and unmanageable water flows, the interaction with land use and opportunities to mitigate the negative effects and increase the benefits of water depletion on society. Currently, water professionals do not have a common framework that links depletion to user groups of water and their benefits. The absence of a standard hydrological and water management summary is causing confusion and wrong decisions. The non-availability of water flow data is one of the underpinning reasons for not having operational water accounting systems for river basins in place. In this paper, we introduce Water Accounting Plus (WA+), which is a new framework designed to provide explicit spatial information on water depletion and net withdrawal processes in complex river basins. The influence of land use and landscape evapotranspiration on the water cycle is described explicitly by defining land use groups with common characteristics. WA+ presents four sheets including (i) a resource base sheet, (ii) an evapotranspiration sheet, (iii) a productivity sheet, and (iv) a withdrawal sheet. Every sheet encompasses a set of indicators that summarise the overall water resources situation. The impact of external (e.g., climate change) and internal influences (e.g., infrastructure building) can be estimated by studying the changes in these WA+ indicators. Satellite measurements can be used to acquire a vast amount of required data but is not a precondition for implementing WA+ framework. Data from hydrological models and water allocation models can also be used as inputs to WA+.

  16. Satellite-based quantification of the bottom trawling induced sediment resuspension over an entire shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberle, F. J.; Cheriton, O. M.; Hanebuth, T. J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of bottom trawling activities on continental shelves has been a topic of interest for both fishery resource studies and ecological impact studies for a while. However, the impact of demersal fishing gear was almost exclusively studied from a perspective of its effects on benthic fauna, but recently it has also attracted attention due to its profound impact on sediments. Here we present the first study to quantify the trawling-induced sediment resuspension effect by combining satellite-based spatial patterns of bottom trawling with quantitative measurements of induced sediment plumes. This study examined high-resolution GPS vessel monitoring data from one year (2011-2012) to quantify the sedimentary budget caused by bottom trawling activity for the entire NW Iberian shelf, an area that is widely affected by chronic (continuous and intensive) commercial bottom trawling and is exemplary for many other narrow shelves worldwide. By filtering the GPS data by vessel type, vessel speed, and geometry of the trawl path, we resolved geographically detailed bottom trawling activities with varying local trawling intensities depending both on legal restrictions and bedrock geomorphology. Initial results show that trawling-induced resuspended sediments mark a significant if not dominant factor for a source to sink sedimentary budget, as they are calculated to be approximately two times as large as fluvial sedimentary input to the shelf. Ultimately, these results not only allow for a trawling affected sediment budget but also significantly help with marine management decisions by allowing to predict the mobilization and transport of sediment caused by bottom trawling gear at the level of a specific fishing fleet or ecosystem.

  17. A satellite-based perspective of convective systems over the Maritime Continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, A.; Houze, R.; Virts, K.; Zuluaga, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Data from TRMM, the A-Train satellites, and the Worldwide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) have been used to study extreme weather throughout low latitudes, from deep convection over the Himalayas to oceanic mesoscale systems associated with the MJO. This study presents a more in-depth examination of convection over the Maritime Continent (Indonesia and Malaysia). During November to February, this area is the rainiest regional climate on Earth, thus constituting one of the atmosphere's primary heat sources. On multiple temporal and spatial scales, it is a complex region with clouds and precipitation having both oceanic and orographic influence. The November-February season encompasses both the eastward propagation of the MJO through this region and rainfall associated with the Asian-Australian monsoon. More specifically, the precipitation in this region is strongly modulated by MJO phases, pulsations of the monsoon, and the powerful diurnal effects of the islands and ocean. Through a feature-based analysis of convective and stratiform components of storms, the evolution of precipitating clouds in this region will be described using data from the November-February time period over multiple years. This analysis leads to an increased understanding of the characteristics of convection associated with the intraseasonal and diurnal variability during these months over the Maritime Continent. Previous work using A-Train data noted the prevalence of smaller separated MCSs over the region during the locally active phase of the MJO, and WWLLN data have shown a peak in lightning density as convection becomes deeper and more numerous leading up to this active period. By applying the analysis of the TRMM data in addition to the A-Train and WWLLN datasets, the relative roles of convective and stratiform components of MCSs to the behavior of convection can be determined during the MJO and monsoonal maxima of rainfall over the Maritime Continent.

  18. Modeling Bird Migration in Changing Habitats: Space-based Ornithology using Satellites and GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James A.; Deppe, Jill L.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding bird migration and avian biodiversity is one of the most compelling and challenging problems of modern biology with major implications for human health and conservation biology. Migration and conservation efforts cross national boundaries and are subject to numerous international agreements and treaties presenting challenges in both geographic space and time. Space based technology, coupled with geographic information systems, yields new opportunities to shed light on the distribution and movement of organisms on the planet and their sensitivity to human disturbances and environmental changes. At NASA, we are creating ecological forecasting tools for science and application users to address the consequences of loss of wetlands, flooding, drought or other natural disasters such as hurricanes on avian biodiversity and bird migration. In our work, we use individual organism biophysical models and drive these models with satellite observations and numerical weather predictions of the spatio-temporal gradients in climate and habitat. Geographic information system technology comprises one component of our overall simulation framework, especially for characterizing the changing habitats and conditions encountered by en-route migratory birds. Simulation provides a tool for studying bird migration across multiple scales and can be linked to mechanistic processes describing the time and energy budget states of migrating birds. Such models yield an understanding of how a migratory flyway and its component habitats function as a whole and link stop-over ecology with biological conservation and management. We present examples of our simulation of shorebirds, principally, pectoral sandpipers, along the central flyways of the United States and Canada from the Gulf of Mexico to Alaska.

  19. Avalanche Debris Detection Using Satellite- and Drone Based Radar and Optical Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckerstorfer, M.; Malnes, E.; Vickers, H.; Solbø, S. A.; Tøllefsen, A.

    2014-12-01

    The mountainous fjord landscape in the county of Troms, around its capital Tromsø in Northern Norway is prone to high avalanche activity during the snow season. Large avalanches pose a hazard to infrastructure, such as buildings and roads, located between the steep mountainsides and the fjords. A prolonged cold spell during January and February 2014 was followed by rapid new-snow loading during March 2014, inducing a significant avalanche cycle with many spontaneous, size D4 avalanches that affected major transport veins. During and shortly after the avalanche cycle of March 2014, we obtained 11 Radarsat-2 Ultrafine mode scenes, chosen according to reported avalanche activity. We further collected four Radarsat-2 ScanSAR mode scenes and two Landsat-8 scenes covering the entire county of Troms. For one particular avalanche, we obtained a drone-based orthophoto, from which a DEM of the avalanche debris surface was derived, using structure-from-motion photogrammetry. This enabled us to calculate the debris volume accurately. We detected avalanche debris in the radar images visually, by applying two detection algorithms that make use of the increased backscatter in avalanche debris. This backscatter increase is a product of increased snow water equivalent and surface roughness, roughly of the order of 3 dB. In addition, we applied a multi-temporal approach by repeatedly detecting avalanche debris at different acquisition times, as well as a multi-sensor approach, covering similar areas with different sensors. This multi-temporal and multi-sensor approach enabled us to map the spatial extent and magnitude of the March 2014 avalanche cycle in the county Troms. With ESA's Sentinel-1 satellite, providing high-resolution, large swath radar images with a short repeat cycle, a complete avalanche record for a forecasting region could become feasible. In this first test season, we detected more than 550 avalanches that were released during a one-month period over an area of

  20. A globally nonsingular quaternion-based formulation for all-electric satellite trajectory optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libraro, Paola

    The general electric propulsion orbit-raising maneuver of a spacecraft must contend with four main limiting factors: the longer time of flight, multiple eclipses prohibiting continuous thrusting, long exposure to radiation from the Van Allen belt and high power requirement of the electric engines. In order to optimize a low-thrust transfer with respect to these challenges, the choice of coordinates and corresponding equations of motion used to describe the kinematical and dynamical behavior of the satellite is of critical importance. This choice can potentially affect the numerical optimization process as well as limit the set of mission scenarios that can be investigated. To increase the ability to determine the feasible set of mission scenarios able to address the challenges of an all-electric orbit-raising, a set of equations free of any singularities is required to consider a completely arbitrary injection orbit. For this purpose a new quaternion-based formulation of a spacecraft translational dynamics that is globally nonsingular has been developed. The minimum-time low-thrust problem has been solved using the new set of equations of motion inside a direct optimization scheme in order to investigate optimal low-thrust trajectories over the full range of injection orbit inclinations between 0 and 90 degrees with particular focus on high-inclinations. The numerical results consider a specific mission scenario in order to analyze three key aspects of the problem: the effect of the initial guess on the shape and duration of the transfer, the effect of Earth oblateness on transfer time and the role played by, radiation damage and power degradation in all-electric minimum-time transfers. Finally trade-offs between mass and cost savings are introduced through a test case.

  1. The evaluation of satellite-borne weather radar system designs using real ground-based radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, E. B.; Kalshoven, J. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents method of evaluating proposed satellite radar systems using real radar data, and discusses methods of displaying the results which will hopefully facilitate easy comparison of systems. A single pencil beam pulsed radar system is considered while the precipitation data base comes from six rain days observed by SPANDAR. The many additional factors that must be considered in the radar equation such as attenuation and scattering (Mie and Rayleigh) are discussed along with some indication where possible errors lie.

  2. Comparison of Historical Satellite-Based Estimates of Solar Radiation Resources with Recent Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Measurements: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D. R.

    2009-03-01

    The availability of rotating shadow band radiometer measurement data at several new stations provides an opportunity to compare historical satellite-based estimates of solar resources with measurements. We compare mean monthly daily total (MMDT) solar radiation data from eight years of NSRDB and 22 years of NASA hourly global horizontal and direct beam solar estimates with measured data from three stations, collected after the end of the available resource estimates.

  3. Assessing regional crop water demand using a satellite-based combination equation with a land surface temperature componen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moyano, Carmen; Garcia, Monica; Tornos, Lucia;

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of daily evapotranspiration at regional levels is fundamental for improving agricultural and hydrological management, especially in water-scarce and climatic change vulnerable regions, like the Mediterranean basin. Regional estimates of daily crop evapotranspiration (ET) have been ...... rainfall-runoff model, requiring several meteorological and in-situ data to quantify irrigation, the satellite-based model presents a great advantage for regionalization of ET....

  4. LINKING SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING BASED ENVIRONMENTAL PREDICTORS TO DISEASE: AN APPLICATION TO THE SPATIOTEMPORAL MODELLING OF SCHISTOSOMIASIS IN GHANA

    OpenAIRE

    Wrable, M.; Liss, A.; Kulinkina, A.; Koch, M.; Biritwum, N. K.; Ofosu, A.; Kosinski, K. C.; Gute, D M; Naumova, E. N.

    2016-01-01

    90% of the worldwide schistosomiasis burden falls on sub-Saharan Africa. Control efforts are often based on infrequent, small-scale health surveys, which are expensive and logistically difficult to conduct. Use of satellite imagery to predictively model infectious disease transmission has great potential for public health applications. Transmission of schistosomiasis requires specific environmental conditions to sustain freshwater snails, however has unknown seasonality, and is difficult to s...

  5. A method to develop mission critical data processing systems for satellite based instruments. The spinning mode case

    OpenAIRE

    Lazzarotto, Francesco; Fabiani, Sergio; Costa, Enrico; Del Monte, Ettore; Di Persio, Giuseppe; Donnarumma, Immacolata; Evangelista, Yuri; Feroci, Marco; Pacciani, Luigi; Rubini, Alda; Soffitta, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Modern satellite based experiments are often very complex real-time systems, composed by flight and ground segments, that have challenging resource related constraints, in terms of size, weight, power, requirements for real-time response, fault tolerance, and specialized input/output hardware-software, and they must be certified to high levels of assurance. Hardware-software data processing systems have to be responsive to system degradation and to changes in the data acquisition modes, and a...

  6. Tropospheric BrO column densities in the Arctic from satellite: retrieval and comparison to ground-based measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sihler

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available During polar spring, halogen radicals like bromine monoxide (BrO play an important role in the chemistry of tropospheric ozone destruction. Satellite measurements of the BrO-distribution have become a particularly useful tool to investigate this probably natural phenomenon, but the separation of stratospheric and tropospheric partial columns of BrO is challenging. In this study, an algorithm was developed to retrieve tropospheric vertical column densities of BrO from data of high-resolution spectroscopic satellite instruments such as the second Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2. Unlike recently published approaches, the presented algorithm is capable of separating the fraction of BrO in the activated troposphere from the total BrO column solely based on remotely measured properties. The sensitivity of each satellite pixel to BrO in the boundary-layer is quantified using the measured UV-radiance and the column density of the oxygen collision complex O4. A comparison of the sensitivities with CALIPSO LIDAR observations demonstrates that clouds shielding near-surface trace-gas columns can be reliably detected even over ice and snow. Retrieved tropospheric BrO columns are then compared to ground-based BrO measurements from two Arctic field campaigns in the Amundsen Gulf and at Barrow in 2008 and 2009, respectively. Our algorithm was found to be capable of retrieving enhanced near-surface BrO during both campaigns in good agreement to ground-based data. Some differences between ground-based and satellite measurements observed at Barrow can be explained by both, elevated and shallow surface layers of BrO. The observations strongly suggest that surface release processes are the dominating source of BrO and that boundary-layer meteorology influences the vertical distribution.

  7. Tropospheric BrO column densities in the Arctic derived from satellite: retrieval and comparison to ground-based measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sihler

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available During polar spring, halogen radicals like bromine monoxide (BrO play an important role in the chemistry of tropospheric ozone destruction. Satellite measurements of the BrO distribution have become a particularly useful tool to investigate this probably natural phenomenon, but the separation of stratospheric and tropospheric partial columns of BrO is challenging. In this study, an algorithm was developed to retrieve tropospheric vertical column densities of BrO from data of high-resolution spectroscopic satellite instruments such as the second Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2. Unlike recently published approaches, the presented algorithm is capable of separating the fraction of BrO in the activated troposphere from the total BrO column solely based on remotely measured properties. The presented algorithm furthermore allows to estimate a realistic measurement error of the tropospheric BrO column. The sensitivity of each satellite pixel to BrO in the boundary layer is quantified using the measured UV radiance and the column density of the oxygen collision complex O4. A comparison of the sensitivities with CALIPSO LIDAR observations demonstrates that clouds shielding near-surface trace-gas columns can be reliably detected even over ice and snow. Retrieved tropospheric BrO columns are then compared to ground-based BrO measurements from two Arctic field campaigns in the Amundsen Gulf and at Barrow in 2008 and 2009, respectively. Our algorithm was found to be capable of retrieving enhanced near-surface BrO during both campaigns in good agreement with ground-based data. Some differences between ground-based and satellite measurements observed at Barrow can be explained by both elevated and shallow surface layers of BrO. The observations strongly suggest that surface release processes are the dominating source of BrO and that boundary layer meteorology influences the vertical distribution.

  8. Analytical satellite theories based on a new set of canonical elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheifele, G.; Graf, O.

    1974-01-01

    A new analytical satellite theory is presented. Instead of the 6 classical elements of Delaunay, a set of 8 canonical elements is used. Whereas the time is the independent variable in classical theory, the true anomaly is the independent variable in the new theory. The new approach has four features: (1) The amount of formulas in the solution is reduced considerably. (2) The first order results are almost as accurate as second order results in classical theory. (3) The theory is easier to understand from a didactical point of view. (4) The problems connected with the inaccuracy of the mean motion that are typical for classical satellite theory are no longer present. The new elements are applied to analytical solutions of the zonal oblateness problem and to the problem of the 24 hour satellite.

  9. Using satellite time series for remote sensing based investigations of ancient acqueduct systems: the case of the Nasca puquios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasaponara, R.; Masini, N.

    2012-04-01

    Satellite time series can provide valuable information to reconstruct ancient environmental changes, still fossilized in the present landscape. In particular, satellite derived moisture content and moisture patter variations over the seasons and years may facilitate the identification of areas involved in early environmental manipulation. Up to now, only a few number of archaeological studies on spatial patterns of moisture have been carried out through the world using satellite optical data. We focus on Landsat and ASTER multitemporal data acquired for some areas near Nasca basin (Peru) to extract information on ancient irrigation systems and artificial wet agro-ecosystems. The study area is particularly interesting mainly because it was populated since millennia ago despite its drought and critical environment conditions presented serious obstacles to human occupation. Considering this extreme drought, which characterizes this area today as several centuries ago, ancient populations of the Nasca River valley devised an efficient system for retrieval water and to face the drought conditions. This system was based on underground aqueducts called puquios, which in part are still used today. Archaeological record put in evidence that during the Nasca flourishing period, the number and spatial distribution of puquios were larger than today. On the basis of satellite multitemporal moisture maps, Unknown puquios were identified and confirmed by ground survey. This information can be a basic The successful results achieved in the Nasca Basin area may be also rejoined in similar environmental conditions (in Meso-America, Middle East, North Africa, Asia) where ancient populations devised aqueducts to face drought and retrieve water for domestic, ritual and agricultural needs. Reference Lasaponara R., Masini N., Following the Ancient Nasca Puquios from Space, in Lasaponara R. and Masini N. (Eds), Satellite Remote Sensing: A New Tool for Archaeology (Remote Sensing and

  10. A Satellite-Based Surface Radiation Climatology Derived by Combining Climate Data Records and Near-Real-Time Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodo Ahrens

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a method for adjusting long-term climate data records (CDRs for the integrated use with near-real-time data using the example of surface incoming solar irradiance (SIS. Recently, a 23-year long (1983–2005 continuous SIS CDR has been generated based on the visible channel (0.45–1 μm of the MVIRI radiometers onboard the geostationary Meteosat First Generation Platform. The CDR is available from the EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF. Here, it is assessed whether a homogeneous extension of the SIS CDR to the present is possible with operationally generated surface radiation data provided by CM SAF using the SEVIRI and GERB instruments onboard the Meteosat Second Generation satellites. Three extended CM SAF SIS CDR versions consisting of MVIRI-derived SIS (1983–2005 and three different SIS products derived from the SEVIRI and GERB instruments onboard the MSG satellites (2006 onwards were tested. A procedure to detect shift inhomogeneities in the extended data record (1983–present was applied that combines the Standard Normal Homogeneity Test (SNHT and a penalized maximal T-test with visual inspection. Shift detection was done by comparing the SIS time series with the ground stations mean, in accordance with statistical significance. Several stations of the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN and about 50 stations of the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA over Europe were used as the ground-based reference. The analysis indicates several breaks in the data record between 1987 and 1994 probably due to artefacts in the raw data and instrument failures. After 2005 the MVIRI radiometer was replaced by the narrow-band SEVIRI and the broadband GERB radiometers and a new retrieval algorithm was applied. This induces significant challenges for the homogenisation across the satellite generations. Homogenisation is performed by applying a mean-shift correction depending on the shift size of

  11. Research and Realization of Deformation Monitoring Algorithm with Millimeter Level Precision Based on BeiDou Navigation Satellite System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XIAO Yugang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The deformation monitoring algorithm with millimeter level precision based on BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS was researched. The TurboEdit method was improved to detect small cycle slips, e.g. 1 cycle. Focusing on BDS constellation, a more efficient algorithm used to construct double-differenced observations was developed. The Bootstrap+Decision function method was utilized to improve the probability of biases fixing. Based on the improved algorithm above, a deformation monitoring software based on BDS was achieved. Afterwards, the availability of BDS in the field of deformation monitoring was analyzed in terms of satellites distribution and precision and accuracy of solutions, utilizing the observations acquired from the experimental platform. The conclusion was drawn that currently BDS is similar to GPS in terms of satellites distribution in the test area. The precision of short baselines derived from BDS is better than 1 mm for the horizontal components, better than 2 mm for the vertical components, which is still a little lower than GPS.

  12. The development of potassium tantalate niobate thin films for satellite-based pyroelectric detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherry, H B.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering

    1997-05-01

    Potassium tantalate niobate (KTN) pyroelectric detectors are expected to provide detectivities, of 3.7 x 10{sup 11} cmHz {sup {1/2}}W{sup {minus}1} for satellite-based infrared detection at 90 K. The background limited detectivity for a room-temperature thermal detector is 1.8 x 10{sup 10} cmHz{sup {1/2}}W{sup {minus}1}. KTN is a unique ferroelectric for this application because of the ability to tailor the temperature of its pyroelectric response by adjusting its ratio of tantalum to niobium. The ability to fabricate high quality KTN thin films on Si-based substrates is crucial to the development of KTN pyroelectric detectors. Si{sub x}N{sub y} membranes created on the Si substrate will provide the weak thermal link necessary to reach background limited detectivities. The device dimensions obtainable by thin film processing are expected to increase the ferroelectric response by 20 times over bulk fabricated KTN detectors. In addition, microfabrication techniques allow for easier array development. This is the first reported attempt at growth of KTN films on Si-based substrates. Pure phase perovskite films were grown by pulsed laser deposition on SrRuO{sub 3}/Pt/Ti/Si{sub x}N{sub y}/Si and SrRuO{sub 3}/Si{sub x}N{sub y}/Si structures; room temperature dielectric permittivities for the KTN films were 290 and 2.5, respectively. The dielectric permittivity for bulk grown, single crystal KTN is {approximately}380. In addition to depressed dielectric permittivities, no ferroelectric hysteresis was found between 80 and 300 K for either structure. RBS, AES, TEM and multi-frequency dielectric measurements were used to investigate the origin of this apparent lack of ferroelectricity. Other issues addressed by this dissertation include: the role of oxygen and target density during pulsed laser deposition of KTN thin films; the use of YBCO, LSC and Pt as direct contact bottom electrodes to the KTN films, and the adhesion of the bottom electrode layers to Si{sub x}N{sub y}/Si.

  13. Performance Analysis for Regional Satellite Positioning System Based upon GEO/HEO Hybrid Constellation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Scheme of positioning constellation would greatly influence the positioning performance. In this paper, a GEO/HEO hybrid constellation with 3 HEO satellites deployed in 3 orbits and 3 GEO satellites for regional positioning is presented. Firstly, elements for 3 GEO and 3 HEO are optimized from regional visibility for the selected region of interest. Secondly, positioning performance is provided through GDOP(geometric dilution of precision) and PDOP(positional dilution of precision). Simulation results show that similar accuracy with GPS can be gained by this constellation.

  14. Ground-based and Satellite Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Aerosols and Ultraviolet Solar Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Muyimbwa, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Satellite remote sensed data have been used to determine the aerosol climatology and to investigate the influence of the aerosol index (AI) on the ultraviolet (UV) index in coastal land areas in Serrekunda (13.28◦ N, 16.34◦ W, 17 m), The Gambia, and Dar-es- Salaam (6.8◦ S, 39.26◦ E, 24 m), Tanzania, as well as in inland areas in Kampala (0.31◦ N, 32.58◦ E, 1200 m), Uganda. Over three decades of satellite data (1979–1994 and 1996–2012) from total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) and ozone moni...

  15. Comparison of Coordinated Satellite and Ground-based X-Band Radar Collections for the Retrieval of Snow Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, E. J.; Marshall, H.; LeWinter, A. L.; Finnegan, D. C.; Deems, J. S.; Landry, C.

    2012-12-01

    In many regions of the world, snow is a major source of runoff contributing to human existence/sustenance, agriculture, and industry. The uncertainties in quantifying snow mass at both spatial and temporal scales have limited the vital management of this significant component to the global water cycle. With the sensitivity of radar backscatter to physical properties of snow at higher frequencies and the availability of high resolution commercial satellite imaging radars at X-Band frequencies (e.g. 9.6 GHz), snow experiments have been conducted to examine these relationships at finer spatial and temporal scales. For the past several winters, satellite radar acquisitions (at X-Band with co- and cross-polarizations) have been coordinated with ground-based radar collections within a well-instrumented southwestern Colorado basin exhibiting a wide range of snow conditions. Snow-free satellite radar collections (at X-Band with the same viewing geometry) have also been acquired to separate the backscatter contributions of the snow volume from the underlying background target. Ancillary data sets including ground-based LiDAR-derived snow depths and scientific snow pit sampling are also incorporated into the analysis. Despite the fact that it may not be possible to retrieve snow water equivalent from multi-polarization X-Band frequency alone, preliminary results of these comparisons are shown where the ground-based radar transects overlap the satellite radar coverage. Snow parameters such as saturated surface or internal snow layers, snow surface and stratigraphic roughness, and grain size variations may be of particular interest.

  16. Studies on phylogeny and biogeography of damselflies (Odonata) with emphasis on the Argiolestidae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalkman, Vincent J.

    2013-01-01

    he papers in which are part of this theses describe the global diversity and conservation status of damselflies and dragonflies, contain a moleculair revision of the damselflies and discuss the biogeography of damselflies and dragonflies in the Australasian region.

  17. Satellite-based assessment of climate controls on US burned area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Morton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate regulates fire activity through the buildup and drying of fuels and the conditions for fire ignition and spread. Understanding the dynamics of contemporary climate–fire relationships at national and sub-national scales is critical to assess the likelihood of changes in future fire activity and the potential options for mitigation and adaptation. Here, we conducted the first national assessment of climate controls on US fire activity using two satellite-based estimates of monthly burned area (BA, the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED, 1997–2010 and Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity (MTBS, 1984–2009 BA products. For each US National Climate Assessment (NCA region, we analyzed the relationships between monthly BA and potential evaporation (PE derived from reanalysis climate data at 0.5° resolution. US fire activity increased over the past 25 yr, with statistically significant increases in MTBS BA for the entire US and the Southeast and Southwest NCA regions. Monthly PE was strongly correlated with US fire activity, yet the climate driver of PE varied regionally. Fire season temperature and shortwave radiation were the primary controls on PE and fire activity in Alaska, while water deficit (precipitation – PE was strongly correlated with fire activity in the Plains regions and Northwest US. BA and precipitation anomalies were negatively correlated in all regions, although fuel-limited ecosystems in the Southern Plains and Southwest exhibited positive correlations with longer lead times (6–12 months. Fire season PE increased from the 1980's–2000's, enhancing climate-driven fire risk in the southern and western US where PE–BA correlations were strongest. Spatial and temporal patterns of increasing fire season PE and BA during the 1990's–2000's highlight the potential sensitivity of US fire activity to climate change in coming decades. However, climate-fire relationships at the national scale are complex, based on the

  18. Satellite-based assessment of climate controls on US burned area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Morton

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Climate regulates fire activity through the buildup and drying of fuels and the conditions for fire ignition and spread. Understanding the dynamics of contemporary climate-fire relationships at national and sub-national scales is critical to assess the likelihood of changes in future fire activity and the potential options for mitigation and adaptation. Here, we conducted the first national assessment of climate controls on US fire activity using two satellite-based estimates of monthly burned area (BA, the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED, 1997–2010 and Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity (MTBS, 1984–2009 BA products. For each US National Climate Assessment (NCA region, we analyzed the relationships between monthly BA and potential evaporation (PE derived from reanalysis climate data at 0.5° resolution. US fire activity increased over the past 25 yr, with statistically significant increases in MTBS BA for entire US and the Southeast and Southwest NCA regions. Monthly PE was strongly correlated with US fire activity, yet the climate driver of PE varied regionally. Fire season temperature and shortwave radiation were the primary controls on PE} and fire activity in the Alaska, while water deficit (precipitation – PE was strongly correlated with fire activity in the Plains regions and Northwest US. BA and precipitation anomalies were negatively correlated in all regions, although fuel-limited ecosystems in the Southern Plains and Southwest exhibited positive correlations with longer lead times (6–12 months. Fire season PE increased from the 1980s–2000s, enhancing climate-driven fire risk in the southern and western US where PE-BA correlations were strongest. Spatial and temporal patterns of increasing fire season PE and BA during the 1990s–2000s highlight the potential sensitivity of US fire activity to climate change in coming decades. However, climate-fire relationships at the national scale are complex, based on the diversity of

  19. Satellite-based assessment of climate controls on US burned area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, D. C.; Collatz, G. J.; Wang, D.; Randerson, J. T.; Giglio, L.; Chen, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Climate regulates fire activity through the buildup and drying of fuels and the conditions for fire ignition and spread. Understanding the dynamics of contemporary climate-fire relationships at national and sub-national scales is critical to assess the likelihood of changes in future fire activity and the potential options for mitigation and adaptation. Here, we conducted the first national assessment of climate controls on US fire activity using two satellite-based estimates of monthly burned area (BA), the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED, 1997-2010) and Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity (MTBS, 1984-2009) BA products. For each US National Climate Assessment (NCA) region, we analyzed the relationships between monthly BA and potential evaporation (PE) derived from reanalysis climate data at 0.5° resolution. US fire activity increased over the past 25 yr, with statistically significant increases in MTBS BA for the entire US and the Southeast and Southwest NCA regions. Monthly PE was strongly correlated with US fire activity, yet the climate driver of PE varied regionally. Fire season temperature and shortwave radiation were the primary controls on PE and fire activity in Alaska, while water deficit (precipitation - PE) was strongly correlated with fire activity in the Plains regions and Northwest US. BA and precipitation anomalies were negatively correlated in all regions, although fuel-limited ecosystems in the Southern Plains and Southwest exhibited positive correlations with longer lead times (6-12 months). Fire season PE increased from the 1980's-2000's, enhancing climate-driven fire risk in the southern and western US where PE-BA correlations were strongest. Spatial and temporal patterns of increasing fire season PE and BA during the 1990's-2000's highlight the potential sensitivity of US fire activity to climate change in coming decades. However, climate-fire relationships at the national scale are complex, based on the diversity of fire types

  20. GPS-based precise orbit determination and accelerometry for low flying satellites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den IJssel, J.A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric density models are currently the limiting factor in the accuracy of the dynamic orbit determination and prediction of satellites in a low Earth orbit. Any improvement in these models would greatly aid in applications such as re-entry prediction, ground-track maintenance of Earth observat