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Sample records for biogenic sulfide production

  1. Guar Gum Stimulates Biogenic Sulfide Production at Elevated Pressures: Implications for Shale Gas Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Sophie L; Walker, Leanne; Streets, Matthew D T; Eden, Bob; Boothman, Christopher; Taylor, Kevin G; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2017-01-01

    Biogenic sulfide production is a common problem in the oil industry, and can lead to costly hydrocarbon processing and corrosion of extraction infrastructure. The same phenomenon has recently been identified in shale gas extraction by hydraulic fracturing, and organic additives in fracturing fluid have been hypothesized to stimulate this process. Constraining the relative effects of the numerous organic additives on microbial metabolism in situ is, however, extremely challenging. Using a bespoke bioreactor system we sought to assess the potential for guar gum, the most commonly used gelling agent in fracturing fluids, to stimulate biogenic sulfide production by sulfate-reducing microorganisms at elevated pressure. Two pressurized bioreactors were fed with either sulfate-amended freshwater medium, or low-sulfate natural surface water, in addition to guar gum (0.05 w/v%) and an inoculum of sulfate-reducing bacteria for a period of 77 days. Sulfide production was observed in both bioreactors, even when the sulfate concentration was low. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicate that heterotrophic bacteria closely associated with the genera Brevundimonas and Acinetobacter became enriched early in the bioreactor experiments, followed by an increase in relative abundance of 16S rRNA genes associated with sulfate-reducing bacteria ( Desulfosporosinus and Desulfobacteraceae) at later time points. Results demonstrate that guar gum can stimulate acid- and sulfide-producing microorganisms at elevated pressure, and may have implications for the potential role in microbially induced corrosion during hydraulic fracturing operations. Key differences between experimental and in situ conditions are discussed, as well as additional sources of carbon and energy for biogenic sulfide production during shale gas extraction. Our laboratory approach can be tailored to better simulate deep subsurface conditions in order to probe the role of other fracturing fluid additives and downhole

  2. Guar Gum Stimulates Biogenic Sulfide Production at Elevated Pressures: Implications for Shale Gas Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Sophie L.; Walker, Leanne; Streets, Matthew D. T.; Eden, Bob; Boothman, Christopher; Taylor, Kevin G.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2017-01-01

    Biogenic sulfide production is a common problem in the oil industry, and can lead to costly hydrocarbon processing and corrosion of extraction infrastructure. The same phenomenon has recently been identified in shale gas extraction by hydraulic fracturing, and organic additives in fracturing fluid have been hypothesized to stimulate this process. Constraining the relative effects of the numerous organic additives on microbial metabolism in situ is, however, extremely challenging. Using a bespoke bioreactor system we sought to assess the potential for guar gum, the most commonly used gelling agent in fracturing fluids, to stimulate biogenic sulfide production by sulfate-reducing microorganisms at elevated pressure. Two pressurized bioreactors were fed with either sulfate-amended freshwater medium, or low-sulfate natural surface water, in addition to guar gum (0.05 w/v%) and an inoculum of sulfate-reducing bacteria for a period of 77 days. Sulfide production was observed in both bioreactors, even when the sulfate concentration was low. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicate that heterotrophic bacteria closely associated with the genera Brevundimonas and Acinetobacter became enriched early in the bioreactor experiments, followed by an increase in relative abundance of 16S rRNA genes associated with sulfate-reducing bacteria (Desulfosporosinus and Desulfobacteraceae) at later time points. Results demonstrate that guar gum can stimulate acid- and sulfide-producing microorganisms at elevated pressure, and may have implications for the potential role in microbially induced corrosion during hydraulic fracturing operations. Key differences between experimental and in situ conditions are discussed, as well as additional sources of carbon and energy for biogenic sulfide production during shale gas extraction. Our laboratory approach can be tailored to better simulate deep subsurface conditions in order to probe the role of other fracturing fluid additives and downhole

  3. Azo dye decolorization assisted by chemical and biogenic sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prato-Garcia, Dorian [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Cervantes, Francisco J. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Camino a la Presa de San José 2055, San Luis Potosí 78216 (Mexico); Buitrón, Germán, E-mail: gbuitronm@ii.unam.mx [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Azo dyes were reduced efficiently by chemical and biogenic sulfide. ► Biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide. ► There was no competition between dyes and sulfate for reducing equivalents. ► Aromatic amines barely affected the sulfate-reducing process. -- Abstract: The effectiveness of chemical and biogenic sulfide in decolorizing three sulfonated azo dyes and the robustness of a sulfate-reducing process for simultaneous decolorization and sulfate removal were evaluated. The results demonstrated that decolorization of azo dyes assisted by chemical sulfide and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) was effective. In the absence of AQDS, biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide for decolorizing the azo dyes. The performance of sulfate-reducing bacteria in attached-growth sequencing batch reactors suggested the absence of competition between the studied azo dyes and the sulfate-reducing process for the reducing equivalents. Additionally, the presence of chemical reduction by-products had an almost negligible effect on the sulfate removal rate, which was nearly constant (94%) after azo dye injection.

  4. Use of biogenic sulfide for ZnS precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, G.; Veeken, A.; Weijma, J.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2006-01-01

    A 600 ml continuously stirred tank reactor was used to assess the performance of a zinc sulfide precipitation process using a biogenic sulfide solution (the effluent of a sulfate-reducing bioreactor) as sulfide source. In all experiments, a proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm was used to

  5. Synthesis of Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles Using Biogenic H2S Produced by a Low-pH Sulfidogenic Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Colipai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of acidophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB for the treatment of acidic mine water has been recently developed to integrate mine water remediation and selective biomineralization. The use of biogenic hydrogen sulfide (H2S produced from the dissimilatory reduction of sulfate to fabricate valuable products such as metallic sulfide nanoparticles has potential applications in green chemistry. Here we report on the operation of a low-pH sulfidogenic bioreactor, inoculated with an anaerobic sediment obtained from an acid river in northern Chile, to recover copper via the production of copper sulfide nanoparticles using biogenic H2S. The laboratory-scale system was operated as a continuous flow mode for up to 100 days and the bioreactor pH was maintained by the automatic addition of a pH 2.2 influent liquor to compensate for protons consumed by biosulfidogenesis. The “clean” copper sulfide nanoparticles, produced in a two-step process using bacterially generated sulfide, were examined using transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, energy dispersive (X-ray spectroscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results demonstrated a uniform nanoparticle size distribution with an average diameter of less than 50 nm. Overall, we demonstrated the production of biogenic H2S using a system designed for the treatment of acid mine water that holds potential for large-scale abiotic synthesis of copper sulfide nanoparticles.

  6. Remediation of arsenic-contaminated groundwater by in-situ stimulating biogenic precipitation of iron sulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Kunfu; Wang, Yanxin; Xie, Xianjun; Ma, Teng; Liu, Yaqing; Su, Chunli; Zhu, Yapeng; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2017-02-01

    Severe health problems due to elevated arsenic (As) in groundwater have made it urgent to develop cost-effective technologies for As removal. This field experimental study tested the feasibility of in-situ As immobilization via As incorporation into newly formed biogenic Fe(II) sulfides in a typical As-affected strongly reducing aquifer at the central part of Datong Basin, China. After periodic supply of FeSO 4 into the aquifer for 25 d to stimulate microbial sulfate reduction, dissolved sulfide concentrations increased during the experiment, but the supplied Fe(II) reacted quickly with sulfide to form Fe(II)-sulfides existing majorly as mackinawite as well as a small amount of pyrite-like minerals in sediments, thereby restricting sulfide build-up in groundwater. After the completion of field experiment, groundwater As concentration decreased from an initial average value of 593 μg/L to 159 μg/L, with an overall As removal rate of 73%, and it further declined to 136 μg/L adding the removal rate up to 77% in 30 d after the experiment. The arsenite/As total ratio gradually increased over time, making arsenite to be the predominant species in groundwater residual As. The good correlations between dissolved Fe(II), sulfide and As concentrations, the increased abundance of As in newly-formed Fe sulfides as well as the reactive-transport modeling results all indicate that As could have been adsorbed onto and co-precipitated with Fe(II)-sulfide coatings once microbial sulfate reduction was stimulated after FeSO 4 supply. Under the strongly reducing conditions, sulfide may facilitate arsenate reduction into arsenite and promote As incorporation into pyrite or arsenopyrite. Therefore, the major mechanisms for the in-situ As-contaminated groundwater remediation can be As surface-adsorption on and co-precipitation with Fe(II) sulfides produced during the experimental period. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Microbial control of hydrogen sulfide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, A.D.; Bhupathiraju, V.K.; Wofford, N.; McInerney, M.J. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Tulsa, OK (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A sulfide-resistant strain of Thiobacillus denitrificans, strain F, prevented the accumulation of sulfide by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans when both organisms were grown in liquid medium. The wild-type strain of T. denitrificans did not prevent the accumulation of sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans. Strain F also prevented the accumulation of sulfide by a mixed population of sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from an oil field brine. Fermentation balances showed that strain F stoichiometrically oxidized the sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans and the oil field brine enrichment to sulfate. The ability of a strain F to control sulfide production in an experimental system of cores and formation water from the Redfield, Iowa, natural gas storage facility was also investigated. A stable, sulfide-producing biofilm was established in two separate core systems, one of which was inoculated with strain F while the other core system (control) was treated in an identical manner, but was not inoculated with strain F. When formation water with 10 mM acetate and 5 mM nitrate was injected into both core systems, the effluent sulfide concentrations in the control core system ranged from 200 to 460 {mu}M. In the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were lower, ranging from 70 to 110 {mu}M. In order to determine whether strain F could control sulfide production under optimal conditions for sulfate-reducing bacteria, the electron donor was changed to lactate and inorganic nutrients (nitrogen and phosphate sources) were added to the formation water. When nutrient-supplemented formation water with 3.1 mM lactate and 10 mM nitrate was used, the effluent sulfide concentrations of the control core system initially increased to about 3,800 {mu}M, and then decreased to about 1,100 {mu}M after 5 weeks. However, in the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were much lower, 160 to 330 {mu}M.

  8. Production of biogenic amines in "Salamini italiani alla cacciatora PDO".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coı X0308 Sson, Jean Daniel; Cerutti, Caterina; Travaglia, Fabiano; Arlorio, Marco

    2004-06-01

    Various fermented and seasoned foods such as cheese, sauerkraut, wine, beer and meat products may contain biogenic amines. The aim of this paper was to describe the presence of some biogenic amines (histamine, tyramine, tryptamine, 2-phenylethylamine) in "Salamini italiani alla cacciatora PDO", a typical fermented-ripened dry sausage widely consumed in Italy. Total level of biogenic amines in commercial samples ranged from 71 to 586 mg kg(-1). The amine recovered in higher concentrations was tyramine (372 mg kg(-1)) followed by histamine (165 mg kg(-1)). The second aim of this work was the quality control of the production in order to determine the parameters influencing the presence of biogenic amines in ripened salami. Sausages sampled for analysis during production, manipulation and ripening showed the presence of tyramine (64.4 mg kg(-1)) only after 15 days of fermentation. All investigated biogenic amines were detected in "Salamini" after 21 days of fermentation. We suggest the control of biogenic as important tool to establish the better condition of preservation of "Salamini italiani alla cacciatore PDO" during their shelf-life.

  9. Influence of biogenic gas production on coalbed methane recovery index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Guo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In investigating the effect of biogenic gas production on the recovery of coalbed methane (CBM, coal samples spanning different ranks were applied in the microbial-functioned simulation experiments for biogenic methane production. Based on the biogenic methane yield, testing of pore structures, and the isothermal adsorption data of coals used before and after the simulation experiments, several key parameters related to the recovery of CBM, including recovery rate, gas saturation and ratio of critical desorption pressure to reservoir pressure, etc., were calculated and the corresponding variations were further analyzed. The results show that one of the significant functions of microbial communities on coal is possibly to weaken its affinity for methane gas, especially with the advance of coal ranks; and that by enhancing the pore system of coal, which can be evidenced by the increase of porosity and permeability, the samples collected from Qianqiu (Yima in Henan and Shaqu (Liulin in Shanxi coal mines all see a notable increase in the critical desorption pressure, gas saturation and recovery rate, as compared to the moderate changes of that of Guandi (Xishan in Shanxi coal sample. It is concluded that the significance of enhanced biogenic gas is not only in the increase of CBM resources and the improvement of CBM recoverability, but in serving as an engineering reference for domestic coalbed biogenic gas production.

  10. Biogenic amine formation and bacterial contribution in Natto products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bitna; Byun, Bo Young; Mah, Jae-Hyung

    2012-12-01

    Twenty-one Natto products currently distributed in Korea were analysed for biogenic amine contents and tested to determine physicochemical and bacterial contributions to biogenic amine formation. Among them, nine products (about 43%) had β-phenylethylamine or tyramine contents greater than the toxic dose (30mg/kg and 100mg/kg, respectively) of each amine, although no products showed total amounts of biogenic amines above the harmful level (1000mg/kg), which indicates that the amounts of biogenic amines in some Natto products are not within the safe level for human health. From four different Natto products, that contained noticeable levels of β-phenylethylamine and tyramine, 80 bacterial strains were isolated. All the strains were identified to be Bacillus subtilis and highly capable of producing β-phenylethylamine and tyramine. Therefore, it seems likely that the remarkable contents of β-phenylethylamine and tyramine in Natto predominantly resulted from the strains highly capable of producing those amines present in the food. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide production from subgingival plaque samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic, A; Dahlén, G

    2015-10-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial anaerobe infection. Little is known about the dysbiotic microbiota and the role of bacterial metabolites in the disease process. It is suggested that the production of certain waste products in the proteolytic metabolism may work as markers for disease severity. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a gas produced by degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. It is highly toxic and believed to have pro-inflammatory properties. We aimed to study H2S production from subgingival plaque samples in relation to disease severity in subjects with natural development of the disease, using a colorimetric method based on bismuth precipitation. In remote areas of northern Thailand, adults with poor oral hygiene habits and a natural development of periodontal disease were examined for their oral health status. H2S production was measured with the bismuth method and subgingival plaque samples were analyzed for the presence of 20 bacterial species with the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique. In total, 43 subjects were examined (age 40-60 years, mean PI 95 ± 6.6%). Fifty-six percent had moderate periodontal breakdown (CAL > 3  7 mm) on at least one site. Parvimonas micra, Filifactor alocis, Porphyromonas endodontalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum were frequently detected. H2S production could not be correlated to periodontal disease severity (PPD or CAL at sampled sites) or to a specific bacterial composition. Site 21 had statistically lower production of H2S (p = 0.02) compared to 16 and 46. Betel nut chewers had statistically significant lower H2S production (p = 0.01) than non-chewers. Rapid detection and estimation of subgingival H2S production capacity was easily and reliably tested by the colorimetric bismuth sulfide precipitation method. H2S may be a valuable clinical marker for degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Factors Influencing Biogenic Amines Accumulation in Dairy Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Daniel M.; del Río, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Martínez, Noelia; Fernández, María; Martín, María Cruz; Álvarez, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Fermented foods are among the food products more often complained of having caused episodes of biogenic amines (BA) poisoning. Concerning milk-based fermented foods, cheese is the main product likely to contain potentially harmful levels of BA, specially tyramine, histamine, and putrescine. Prompted by the increasing awareness of the risks related to dietary uptake of high biogenic amine loads, in this review we report all those elaboration and processing technological aspects affecting BA biosynthesis and accumulation in dairy foods. Improved knowledge of the factors involved in the synthesis and accumulation of BA should lead to a reduction in their incidence in milk products. Synthesis of BA is possible only when three conditions converge: (i) availability of the substrate amino acids; (ii) presence of microorganisms with the appropriate catabolic pathway activated; and (iii) environmental conditions favorable to the decarboxylation activity. These conditions depend on several factors such as milk treatment (pasteurization), use of starter cultures, NaCl concentration, time, and temperature of ripening and preservation, pH, temperature, or post-ripening technological processes, which will be discussed in this chapter. PMID:22783233

  13. Estimation of bacterial hydrogen sulfide production in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Basic

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Oral bacterial hydrogen sulfide (H2S production was estimated comparing two different colorimetric methods in microtiter plate format. High H2S production was seen for Fusobacterium spp., Treponema denticola, and Prevotella tannerae, associated with periodontal disease. The production differed between the methods indicating that H2S production may follow different pathways.

  14. Biogenic amine content, histamine-forming bacteria, and adulteration of pork in tuna sausage products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Hsien-Feng; Tsai, Yung-Hsiang; Chang, Shih-Chih; Hong, Tang-Yao

    2012-10-01

    Twenty-five tuna sausage products were purchased from retail markets in Taiwan. The rates of occurrence of biogenic amines, histamine-forming bacteria, and adulteration by pork and poultry were determined. The average content of various biogenic amines in all tested samples was less than 2.0 mg/100 g (Makaira nigricans (blue marlin).

  15. Hydrogen sulfide oxidation without oxygen - oxidation products and pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossing, H.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation was studied in anoxic marine sediments-both in undisturbed sediment cores and in sediment slurries. The turn over of hydrogen sulfide was followed using 35 S-radiolabeled hydrogen sulfide which was injected into the sediment. However, isotope exchange reactions between the reduced sulfur compounds, in particular between elemental sulfur and hydrogen sulfide, influenced on the specific radioactivity of these pools. It was, therefore, not possible to measure the turn over rates of the reduced sulfur pools by the radiotracer technique but merely to use the radioisotope to demonstrate some of the oxidation products. Thiosulfate was one important intermediate in the anoxic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide and was continuously turned over by reduction, oxidation and disproportionation. The author discusses the importance of isotope exchange and also presents the results from experiments in which both 35 S-radiolabeled elemental sulfur, radiolabeled hydrogen sulfide and radiolabeled thiosulfate were used to study the intermediates in the oxidative pathways of the sulfur cycle

  16. Biogenic production of cyanide and its application to gold recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, S C; Olson, G J; Clark, T R; McFeters, G

    2001-03-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum is a cyanogenic (cyanide-producing) microorganism. Cyanide is used on an industrial scale to complex and recover gold from ores or concentrates of ores bearing the precious metal. A potentially useful approach in gold mining operations could be to produce cyanide biologically in relatively small quantities at the ore surface. In this study, C. violaceum grown in nutrient broth formed a biofilm and could complex and solubilize 100% of the gold on glass test slides within 4-7 days. Approximately 50% of the cyanide- recoverable gold could be mobilized from a biooxidized sulfidic-ore concentrate. Complexation of cyanide in solution by gold appeared to have a beneficial effect on cell growth--viable cell counts were nearly two orders of magnitude greater in the presence of gold-coated slides or biooxidized ore substrates than in their absence. C. violaceum was cyanogenic when grown in alternative feedstocks. When grown in a mineral salt solution supplemented with 13.3% v/v swine fecal material (SFM), cells exhibited pigmentation and suspended cell concentrations comparable to cultures grown in nutrient broth. Glycine supplements stimulated production of cyanide in 13.3% v/v SFM. In contrast, glycine was inhibitory when added at the time of inoculation in the more concentrated SFM, decreasing cell numbers and reducing ultimate bulk-solution cyanide concentrations. However, aeration and addition of glycine to stationary phase cells grown on 13.3% v/v SFM anaerobically resulted in rapid production and high concentrations (up to 38 mg l(-1)) of cyanide. This indicates that biogenesis of cyanide may be supported in remote areas using locally produced and inexpensive agricultural feedstocks in place of commercial media.

  17. Observations of oxidation products above a forest imply biogenic emissions of very reactive compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Holzinger

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertical gradients of mixing ratios of volatile organic compounds have been measured in a Ponderosa pine forest in Central California (38.90° N, 120.63° W, 1315m. These measurements reveal large quantities of previously unreported oxidation products of short lived biogenic precursors. The emission of biogenic precursors must be in the range of 13-66µmol m-2h-1 to produce the observed oxidation products. That is 6-30 times the emissions of total monoterpenes observed above the forest canopy on a molar basis. These reactive precursors constitute a large fraction of biogenic emissions at this site, and are not included in current emission inventories. When oxidized by ozone they should efficiently produce secondary aerosol and hydroxyl radicals.

  18. Hydrogen sulfide production from cysteine and homocysteine by periodontal and oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Mamiko; Ohara, Naoya; Yoshimura, Shigeru; Nagashima, Shiori; Takehara, Tadamichi; Nakayama, Koji

    2009-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is one of the predominant volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) produced by oral bacteria. This study developed and evaluated a system for detecting hydrogen sulfide production by oral bacteria. L-methionine-alpha-deamino-gamma-mercaptomethane-lyase (METase) and beta carbon-sulfur (beta C-S) lyase were used to degrade homocysteine and cysteine, respectively, to produce hydrogen sulfide. Enzymatic reactions resulting in hydrogen sulfide production were assayed by reaction with bismuth trichloride, which forms a black precipitate when mixed with hydrogen sulfide. The enzymatic activities of various oral bacteria that result in hydrogen sulfide production and the capacity of bacteria from periodontal sites to form hydrogen sulfide in reaction mixtures containing L-cysteine or DL-homocysteine were assayed. With L-cysteine as the substrate, Streptococcus anginosus FW73 produced the most hydrogen sulfide, whereas Porphyromonas gingivalis American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 33277 and W83 and Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 10953 produced approximately 35% of the amount produced by the P. gingivalis strains. Finally, the hydrogen sulfide found in subgingival plaque was analyzed. Using bismuth trichloride, the hydrogen sulfide produced by oral bacteria was visually detectable as a black precipitate. Hydrogen sulfide production by oral bacteria was easily analyzed using bismuth trichloride. However, further innovation is required for practical use.

  19. Impacts of Interannual Variability in Biogenic VOC Emissions near Transitional Ozone Production Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, J.

    2017-12-01

    Due to successful NOx emission controls, summertime ozone production chemistry in urban areas across North America is transitioning from VOC-limited to increasingly NOx-limited. In some regions where ozone production sensitivity is in transition, interannual variability in surrounding biogenic VOC emissions could drive fluctuations in the prevailing chemical regime and modify the impact of anthropogenic emission changes. I use satellite observations of HCHO and NO2 column density, along with a long-term simulation of atmospheric chemistry, to investigate the impact of interannual variability in biogenic isoprene sources near large metro areas. Peak emissions of isoprene in the model can vary by up to 20-60% in any given year compared to the long term mean, and this variability drives the majority of the variability in simulated local HCHO:NO2 ratios (a common proxy for ozone production sensitivity). The satellite observations confirm increasingly NOx-limited chemical regimes with large interannual variability. In several instances, the model and satellite observations suggest that variability in biogenic isoprene emissions could shift summertime ozone production from generally VOC- to generally NOx- sensitive (or vice versa). This would have implications for predicting the air quality impacts of anthropogenic emission changes in any given year, and suggests that drivers of biogenic emissions need to be well understood.

  20. Production and Preservation of Sulfide Layering in Mercury's Magma Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukare, C.-E.; Parman, S. W.; Parmentier, E. M.; Anzures, B. A.

    2018-05-01

    Mercury's magma ocean (MMO) would have been sulfur-rich. At some point during MMO solidification, it likely became sulfide saturated. Here we present physiochemical models exploring sulfide layer formation and stability.

  1. Effect of growth conditions on microbial activity and iron-sulfide production by Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Chen; Vannela, Raveender; Hayes, Kim F.; Rittmann, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Extended incubation time to 16 days allowed significant FeS crystallization. • A weakly acidic pH greatly enhanced particle growth of mackinawite. • Microbial metabolism of different donors systematically altered the ambient pH. • Greater sulfide accumulation stimulated mackinawite transformation to greigite. - Abstract: Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can produce iron sulfide (FeS) solids with mineralogical characteristics that may be beneficial for a variety of biogeochemical applications, such as long-term immobilization of uranium. In this study, the growth and metabolism of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, one of the best-studied SRB species, were comprehensively monitored in batch studies, and the biogenic FeS solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction. Controlling the pH by varying the initial pH, the iron-to-sulfate ratio, or the electron donor – affected the growth of D. vulgaris and strongly influenced the formation and growth of FeS solids. In particular, lower pH (from initial conditions or a decrease caused by less sulfate reduction, FeS precipitation, or using pyruvate as the electron donor) produced larger-sized mackinawite (Fe 1+x S). Greater accumulation of free sulfide, from more sulfate reduction by D. vulgaris, also led to larger-sized mackinawite and particularly stimulated mackinawite transformation to greigite (Fe 3 S 4 ) when the free sulfide concentration was 29.3 mM. Furthermore, sufficient free Fe 2+ led to the additional formation of vivianite [Fe 3 (PO 4 ) 2 ·8(H 2 O)]. Thus, microbially relevant conditions (initial pH, choice of electron donor, and excess or deficiency of sulfide) are tools to generate biogenic FeS solids of different characteristics

  2. Influence of the modulated two-step synthesis of biogenic hydroxyapatite on biomimetic products' surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miculescu, Florin; Mocanu, Aura Cătălina; Stan, George E.; Miculescu, Marian; Maidaniuc, Andreea; Cîmpean, Anisoara; Mitran, Valentina; Voicu, Stefan Ioan; Machedon-Pisu, Teodor; Ciocan, Lucian Toma

    2018-04-01

    Processing calcium-rich natural resources, such as marble and mussel seashells, into biomimetic products could constitute an environmentally-friendly and economically sustainable alternative given their geographical widespread. Hitherto, their value for biomedicine was demonstrated only for seashells, with the technological exploitation approaches still facing challenges with respect to the identification of generic synthesis parameters capable to allow the reproducible and designed synthesis of calcium phosphate at an industrial-ready level. In this study was targeted the optimization of Rathje synthesis method for the fabrication of biogenic calcium phosphates, by conveniently adjusting the chemical composition of employed reagents. It was shown that post-synthesis heat-treatment of compacted powders is the key step for inducing structural transformations suitable to attain biomimetic products for reconstructive orthopedic applications. The sintered materials have been multi-parametricallyevaluated from morpho-compositional, structural, wettability, mechanical and cytocompatibility points of view and the results have been cross-examined and discussed. Convenient and efficient preparation routes to produce biogenic hydroxyapatite have been identified. The functional performances of the as-prepared biogenic ceramics endorse their use as a solid and inexpensive alternative source material for the fabrication of various bone regenerative products and implant coatings.

  3. Liquid hydrogen production via hydrogen sulfide methane reformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Cunping; T-Raissi, Ali [University of Central Florida, Florida Solar Energy Center, 1769 Clearlake Road, Cocoa, FL 32922 (United States)

    2008-01-03

    Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) methane (CH{sub 4}) reformation (H{sub 2}SMR) (2H{sub 2}S + CH{sub 4} = CS{sub 2} + 4H{sub 2}) is a potentially viable process for the removal of H{sub 2}S from sour natural gas resources or other methane containing gases. Unlike steam methane reformation that generates carbon dioxide as a by-product, H{sub 2}SMR produces carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}), a liquid under ambient temperature and pressure - a commodity chemical that is also a feedstock for the synthesis of sulfuric acid. Pinch point analyses for H{sub 2}SMR were conducted to determine the reaction conditions necessary for no carbon lay down to occur. Calculations showed that to prevent solid carbon formation, low inlet CH{sub 4} to H{sub 2}S ratios are needed. In this paper, we analyze H{sub 2}SMR with either a cryogenic process or a membrane separation operation for production of either liquid or gaseous hydrogen. Of the three H{sub 2}SMR hydrogen production flowsheets analyzed, direct liquid hydrogen generation has higher first and second law efficiencies of exceeding 80% and 50%, respectively. (author)

  4. Liquid hydrogen production via hydrogen sulfide methane reformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cunping; T-Raissi, Ali

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2S) methane (CH 4) reformation (H 2SMR) (2H 2S + CH 4 = CS 2 + 4H 2) is a potentially viable process for the removal of H 2S from sour natural gas resources or other methane containing gases. Unlike steam methane reformation that generates carbon dioxide as a by-product, H 2SMR produces carbon disulfide (CS 2), a liquid under ambient temperature and pressure-a commodity chemical that is also a feedstock for the synthesis of sulfuric acid. Pinch point analyses for H 2SMR were conducted to determine the reaction conditions necessary for no carbon lay down to occur. Calculations showed that to prevent solid carbon formation, low inlet CH 4 to H 2S ratios are needed. In this paper, we analyze H 2SMR with either a cryogenic process or a membrane separation operation for production of either liquid or gaseous hydrogen. Of the three H 2SMR hydrogen production flowsheets analyzed, direct liquid hydrogen generation has higher first and second law efficiencies of exceeding 80% and 50%, respectively.

  5. Magnetic comparison of abiogenic and biogenic alteration products of lepidocrocite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, J. L.; Guyodo, Y.; Lagroix, F.; Ona-Nguema, G.; Brest, J.

    2014-06-01

    Lepidocrocite is a potentially important Fe-bearing precursor phase for the production of nanoscale Fe-oxide particles in the environment. We present a detailed magnetic characterization of various alteration products of lepidocrocite resulting from thermal dehydroxylation reactions and bacterially induced bioreduction and remineralization, accompanied by characterization with x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy. Dehydroxylation during annealing at moderate temperatures produces a topotactic transformation from lepidocrocite to maghemite when heated in an oxidizing atmosphere, or to magnetite when heated in a reducing atmosphere. The abiotic Fe-oxide products form an oriented framework of strongly interacting superparamagnetic crystallites and are characterized by a distinctive porous nanostructure observed by electron microscopy. Lepidocrocite bioreduction by the iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens ATCC 8071 produces nanoscale particles of a strongly magnetic phase. This Fe(II)-bearing mineral produced by bioreduction is highly crystalline and euhedral in shape, with a broad grain size distribution and is indicated by magnetic and XRD measurements to be a cation-excess magnetite. We highlight the distinguishing microscopic characteristics of magnetite from both abiotic and bacterially induced mineralization that should allow them to be identified in natural settings. Moreover, both mechanisms of alteration represent potential pathways for the direct formation of strongly magnetic fine-grained Fe-oxide particles in sedimentary environments.

  6. Comparison of regional and global land cover products and the implications for biogenic emission modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ling; McDonald-Buller, Elena; McGaughey, Gary; Kimura, Yosuke; Allen, David T

    2015-10-01

    Accurate estimates of biogenic emissions are required for air quality models that support the development of air quality management plans and attainment demonstrations. Land cover characterization is an essential driving input for most biogenic emissions models. This work contrasted the global Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land cover product against a regional land cover product developed for the Texas Commissions on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) over four climate regions in eastern Texas, where biogenic emissions comprise a large fraction of the total inventory of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and land cover is highly diverse. The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) was utilized to investigate the influences of land cover characterization on modeled isoprene and monoterpene emissions through changes in the standard emission potential and emission activity factor, both separately and simultaneously. In Central Texas, forest coverage was significantly lower in the MODIS land cover product relative to the TCEQ data, which resulted in substantially lower estimates of isoprene and monoterpene emissions by as much as 90%. Differences in predicted isoprene and monoterpene emissions associated with variability in land cover characterization were primarily caused by differences in the standard emission potential, which is dependent on plant functional type. Photochemical modeling was conducted to investigate the effects of differences in estimated biogenic emissions associated with land cover characterization on predicted ozone concentrations using the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions (CAMx). Mean differences in maximum daily average 8-hour (MDA8) ozone concentrations were 2 to 6 ppb with maximum differences exceeding 20 ppb. Continued focus should be on reducing uncertainties in the representation of land cover through field validation. Uncertainties in the estimation of biogenic emissions associated with

  7. Analysis of hydrogen sulfide releases in heavy water production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croitoru, Cornelia; Dumitrescu, Maria; Preda, Irina; Lazar, Roxana

    1996-01-01

    Safety analyses conducted at ICIS concern primarily the heavy water production installations. The quantitative risk assessment needs the frequency calculation of accident sequences and consequences. In heavy water plants which obtain primary isotopic concentration of water by H 2 O - H 2 S exchange, large amounts of hydrogen sulfide which is a toxic, inflammable and explosive gas, are circulated. The first stage in calculating the consequences consists in potential analysis of H 2 S release. This work presents a study of this types of releases for pilot installations of the heavy water production at ICIS (Plant 'G' at Rm. Valcea). The installations which contain and maneuver large quantities of H 2 S and the mathematical models for different types of releases are presented. The accidents analyzed are: catastrophic column, container, spy-hole failures or gas-duct rupture and wall cracks in the installation. The main results are given as tables while the time variations of the flow rate and quantities of H 2 O released by stack disposal are plotted

  8. Methyl chavicol: characterization of its biogenic emission rate, abundance, and oxidation products in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Bouvier-Brown

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We report measurements of ambient atmospheric mixing ratios for methyl chavicol and determine its biogenic emission rate. Methyl chavicol, a biogenic oxygenated aromatic compound, is abundant within and above Blodgett Forest, a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. Methyl chavicol was detected simultaneously by three in-situ instruments – a gas chromatograph with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS, a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS, and a thermal desorption aerosol GC-MS (TAG – and found to be abundant within and above Blodgett Forest. Methyl chavicol atmospheric mixing ratios are strongly correlated with 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO, a light- and temperature-dependent biogenic emission from the ponderosa pine trees at Blodgett Forest. Scaling from this correlation, methyl chavicol emissions account for 4–68% of the carbon mass emitted as MBO in the daytime, depending on the season. From this relationship, we estimate a daytime basal emission rate of 0.72–10.2 μgCg−1 h−1, depending on needle age and seasonality. We also present the first observations of its oxidation products (4-methoxybenzaldehyde and 4-methyoxy benzene acetaldehyde in the ambient atmosphere. Methyl chavicol is a major essential oil component of many plant species. This work suggests that methyl chavicol plays a significant role in the atmospheric chemistry of Blodgett Forest, and potentially other sites, and should be included explicitly in both biogenic volatile organic carbon emission and atmospheric chemistry models.

  9. Physiology and Genetics of Biogenic Methane-Production from Acetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowers, Kevin R

    2013-04-04

    Biomass conversion catalyzed by methanogenic consortia is a widely available, renewable resource for both energy production and waste treatment. The efficiency of this process is directly dependent upon the interaction of three metabolically distinct groups of microorganisms; the fermentative and acetogenic Bacteria and the methanogenic Archaea. One of the rate limiting steps in the degradation of soluble organic matter is the dismutation of acetate, a predominant intermediate in the process, which accounts for 70 % or more of the methane produced by the methanogens. Acetate utilization is controlled by regulation of expression of carbon monoxide dehydrogensase (COdh), which catalyzes the dismutation of acetate. However, physiological and molecular factors that control differential substrate utilization have not been identified in these Archaea. Our laboratory has identified sequence elements near the promoter of the gene (cdh) encoding for COdh and we have confirmed that these sequences have a role in the in vivo expression of cdh. The current proposal focuses on identifying the regulatory components that interact with DNA and RNA elements, and identifying the mechanisms used to control cdh expression. We will determine whether expression is controlled at the level of transcription or if it is mediated by coordinate interaction of transcription initiation with other processes such as transcription elongation rate and differential mRNA stability. Utilizing recently sequenced methanosarcinal genomes and a DNA microarray currently under development genes that encode regulatory proteins and transcription factors will be identified and function confirmed by gene disruption and subsequent screening on different substrates. Functional interactions will be determined in vivo by assaying the effects of gene dosage and site-directed mutagenesis of the regulatory gene on the expression of a cdh::lacZ operon fusion. Results of this study will reveal whether this critical

  10. Hydrogen sulfide production and volatilization in a polymictic eutrophic saline lake, Salton Sea, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Brandi Kiel; Anderson, Michael A; Amrhein, Christopher

    2008-11-15

    The Salton Sea is a large shallow saline lake located in southern California that is noted for high sulfate concentrations, substantial algal productivity, and very warm water column temperatures. These conditions are well-suited for sulfide production, and sulfide has been implicated in summer fish kills, although no studies have been conducted to specifically understand hydrogen sulfide production and volatilization there. Despite polymictic mixing patterns and relatively short accumulation periods, the amount of sulfide produced is comparable to meromictic lakes. Sulfide levels in the Salton Sea reached concentrations of 1.2 mmol L(-1) of total free sulfide in the hypolimnion and 5.6 mmol L(-1) in the sediment pore water. Strong winds in late July mixed H2S into the surface water, where it depleted the entire water column of dissolved oxygen and reached a concentration of 0.1 mmol L(-1). Sulfide concentrations exceeded the toxicity threshold of tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) and combined with strong anoxia throughout the water column, resulted in a massive fish kill. The mixing of sulfide into the surface waters also increased atmospheric H2S concentrations, reaching 1.0 micromol m(-3). The flux of sulfide from the sediment into the water column was estimated to range from 2-3 mmol m(-2) day(-1) during the winter and up to 8 mmol m(-2) day(-1) during the summer. Application of the two-layer model for volatilization indicates that up to 19 mmol m(-2) day(-1) volatilized from the surface during the mixing event. We estimate that as much as 3400 Mg year(-1) or approximately 26% of sulfide that diffused into the water column from the deepest sediments may have been volatilized to the atmosphere.

  11. The production of UV Absorber amorphous cerium sulfide thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kariper, İshak Afşin, E-mail: akariper@gmail.com [Faculty of Education, Erciyes University, Kayseri (Turkey)

    2017-10-15

    This study investigates the production of cerium sulfide (CeSx) amorphous thin films on substrates (commercial glass) by chemical bath deposition at different pH levels. The transmittance, absorption, optical band gap and refractive index of the films are measured by UV/VIS Spectrum. According to XRD analysis, the films show amorphous structure in the baths with pH: 1 to 5. It has been observed that the optical and structural properties of the films depend on pH value of the bath. The optical band gap (2.08 eV to 3.16 eV) of the films changes with the film thickness (23 nm to 1144 nm). We show that the refractive index has a positive relationship with the film thickness, where the values of 1.93, 1.45, 1.42, 2.60 and 1.39 are obtained for the former, and 34, 560, 509, 23 and 1144 nm (at 550 nm wavelength) for the latter. We compare the optical properties of amorphous and crystal form of CeSx thin films. We show that the optical band gaps of the amorphous CeS{sub x} are lower than that of crystal CeS{sub x} . (author)

  12. Biogenic metallic nanoparticles as catalyst for bioelectricity production: A novel approach in microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saravanakumar, Kandasamy, E-mail: saravana732@gmail.com [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Microbial Metabolism, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of Urban Agriculture (South), Ministry of Agriculture, Shanghai (China); MubarakAli, Davoodbasha [Microbial Genetic Engineering Laboratory, Division of Bioengineering, College of Life Science and Bioengineering, Incheon National University, Songdo 406772, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Microbiology, School of Lifesciences, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024 (India); Kathiresan, Kandasamy [Centre of Advanced Study in Marine Biology, Faculty of Marine Sciences, Annamalai University, Parangipettai 608 502, Tamil Nadu (India); Thajuddin, Nooruddin [Department of Microbiology, School of Lifesciences, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024 (India); Department of Botany and Microbiology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Alharbi, Naiyf S. [Department of Botany and Microbiology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Chen, Jie, E-mail: jiechen59@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Microbial Metabolism, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of Urban Agriculture (South), Ministry of Agriculture, Shanghai (China)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Trichoderma sp., showed an abilities to synthesis of AgNPs and AuNPs with an excellent stability. • AuNPs significantly enhanced the bioelectricity production by MFC of anaerobic fermentation as catalyst. • Maximum bioelectricity production was optimized and obtained the voltage of 432.80 mA using RSM. - Abstract: The present work aimed to use the biogenic metallic nanoparticles as catalyst for bioelectricity production in microbial fuel cell (MFC) approach under anaerobic condition. Silver and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized using Trichoderma sp. Particle size and cystallinity were measured by X-ray diffraction revealed the crystalline structure with average size of 36.17 nm. Electron microscopic studies showed spherical shaped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and cubical shaped AuNPs with size ranges from 50 to 150 nm. The concentration of biogenic metallic nanoparticles as catalyst for enhanced bioelectricity generations and estimated by response surface methodology (RSM) and found at the greatest of 342.80 mA under optimized conditions are time interval, temperature, nanoparticles used as 63 h, 28 ± 2.0 °C, 22.54 mg l{sup −1} (AgNPs) and 25.62 mg l{sup −1} (AuNPs) in a batch reactor. AuNPs acted as an excellent catalyst to enhance the bioelectricity production. This novel technique could be used for eco-friendly, economically feasible and facile electricity production.

  13. Biogenic metallic nanoparticles as catalyst for bioelectricity production: A novel approach in microbial fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saravanakumar, Kandasamy; MubarakAli, Davoodbasha; Kathiresan, Kandasamy; Thajuddin, Nooruddin; Alharbi, Naiyf S.; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Trichoderma sp., showed an abilities to synthesis of AgNPs and AuNPs with an excellent stability. • AuNPs significantly enhanced the bioelectricity production by MFC of anaerobic fermentation as catalyst. • Maximum bioelectricity production was optimized and obtained the voltage of 432.80 mA using RSM. - Abstract: The present work aimed to use the biogenic metallic nanoparticles as catalyst for bioelectricity production in microbial fuel cell (MFC) approach under anaerobic condition. Silver and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized using Trichoderma sp. Particle size and cystallinity were measured by X-ray diffraction revealed the crystalline structure with average size of 36.17 nm. Electron microscopic studies showed spherical shaped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and cubical shaped AuNPs with size ranges from 50 to 150 nm. The concentration of biogenic metallic nanoparticles as catalyst for enhanced bioelectricity generations and estimated by response surface methodology (RSM) and found at the greatest of 342.80 mA under optimized conditions are time interval, temperature, nanoparticles used as 63 h, 28 ± 2.0 °C, 22.54 mg l"−"1 (AgNPs) and 25.62 mg l"−"1 (AuNPs) in a batch reactor. AuNPs acted as an excellent catalyst to enhance the bioelectricity production. This novel technique could be used for eco-friendly, economically feasible and facile electricity production.

  14. Potential of biogenic hydrogen production for hydrogen driven remediation strategies in marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinkhani, Baharak; Hennebel, Tom; Boon, Nico

    2014-09-25

    Fermentative production of bio-hydrogen (bio-H2) from organic residues has emerged as a promising alternative for providing the required electron source for hydrogen driven remediation strategies. Unlike the widely used production of H2 by bacteria in fresh water systems, few reports are available regarding the generation of biogenic H2 and optimisation processes in marine systems. The present research aims to optimise the capability of an indigenous marine bacterium for the production of bio-H2 in marine environments and subsequently develop this process for hydrogen driven remediation strategies. Fermentative conversion of organics in marine media to H2 using a marine isolate, Pseudoalteromonas sp. BH11, was determined. A Taguchi design of experimental methodology was employed to evaluate the optimal nutritional composition in batch tests to improve bio-H2 yields. Further optimisation experiments showed that alginate-immobilised bacterial cells were able to produce bio-H2 at the same rate as suspended cells over a period of several weeks. Finally, bio-H2 was used as electron donor to successfully dehalogenate trichloroethylene (TCE) using biogenic palladium nanoparticles as a catalyst. Fermentative production of bio-H2 can be a promising technique for concomitant generation of an electron source for hydrogen driven remediation strategies and treatment of organic residue in marine ecosystems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. High-temperature removal of sulphur for biogenic gas products; Hochtemperatur-Entschwefelung fuer biogene Produktgase. Design und Optimierung - Schlussbericht/Jahresbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schildhauer, T.; Biollaz, S.

    2009-12-15

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a project concerning the development of basics ideas on the design and optimisation of high-temperature methods for the removal of sulphur from biogenic gas products. Tests made as part of the 'Methane from Wood' project at pilot installations in Switzerland and Austria are discussed. Low temperature and high-temperature methods are examined and discussed. A number of sulphur compounds were tested. Also, experiments made using nickel, HDS and CPO catalysers are discussed.

  16. Is climate influenced by biogenic atmospheric sulfur compounds. Beeinflussen biogene atmosphaerische Schwefelverbindungen das Klima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgii, H W

    1990-01-01

    About 10 years ago, traces of gaseous sulfur compounds were detected in the atmosphere which are of mainly biogenic origin and are formed in large areas in the oceans by phytoplankton. Continental sources, too, are important. These gases - dimethyl sulfide, carbon bisulfide and carbonyl sulfide - provide an important, if not the main, part to the natural sulfur budget of the atmosphere. While dimethyl sulfide and carbon bisulfide are quickly oxidized in the lower atmosphere forming sulfate particles in the process, carbonyl sulfide is an inert gas which is oxidized only after reaching the stratosphere. Lately, the relevance of these trace components to climate is being discussed. Conceivably, they might influence the radiation budget of the earth via the formation of aerosol particles: While, in the case of dimethyl sulfide, these would change the microphysical parameters of maritime clouds, an increase in the production of carbonyl sulfide would entail a strengthening of the stratospheric sulfate particle layer. Both processes might have a stabilizing effect on the climate as they act in opposite direction to the much discussed greenhouse effect. (orig.).

  17. Variability of Fe isotope compositions of hydrothermal sulfides and oxidation products at mid-ocean ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohu; Wang, Jianqiang; Chu, Fengyou; Wang, Hao; Li, Zhenggang; Yu, Xing; Bi, Dongwei; He, Yongsheng

    2018-04-01

    Significant Fe isotopic fractionation occurs during the precipitation and oxidative weathering of modern seafloor hydrothermal sulfides, which has an important impact on the cycling of Fe isotopes in the ocean. This study reports the Fe-isotope compositions of whole-rock sulfides and single-mineral pyrite collected from hydrothermal fields at the South Mid-Atlantic Ridge (SMAR) and the East Pacific Rise (EPR) and discusses the impacts of precipitation and late-stage oxidative weathering of sulfide minerals on Fe isotopic fractionation. The results show large variation in the Fe-isotope compositions of the sulfides from the different hydrothermal fields on the mid-oceanic ridges, indicating that relatively significant isotope fractionation occurs during the sulfide precipitation and oxidative weathering processes. The Fe-isotope compositions of the sulfides from the study area at the SMAR vary across a relatively small range, with an average value of 0.01‰. This Fe-isotope composition is similar to the Fe-isotope composition of mid-oceanic ridge basalt, which suggests that Fe was mainly leached from basalt. In contrast, the Fe-isotope composition of the sulfides from the study area at the EPR are significantly enriched in light Fe isotopes (average value - 1.63‰), mainly due to the kinetic fractionation during the rapid precipitation process of hydrothermal sulfide. In addition, the pyrite from different hydrothermal fields is enriched in light Fe isotopes, which is consistent with the phenomenon in which light Fe isotopes are preferentially enriched during the precipitation of pyrite. The red oxides have the heaviest Fe-isotope compositions (up to 0.80‰), indicating that heavy Fe isotopes are preferentially enriched in the oxidation product during the late-stage oxidation process. The data obtained from this study and previous studies show a significant difference between the Fe-isotope compositions of the sulfides from the SMAR and EPR. The relatively heavy

  18. Production of extremely low volatile organic compounds from biogenic emissions: Measured yields and atmospheric implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokinen, Tuija; Berndt, Torsten; Makkonen, Risto; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Junninen, Heikki; Paasonen, Pauli; Stratmann, Frank; Herrmann, Hartmut; Guenther, Alex B; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kulmala, Markku; Ehn, Mikael; Sipilä, Mikko

    2015-06-09

    Oxidation products of monoterpenes and isoprene have a major influence on the global secondary organic aerosol (SOA) burden and the production of atmospheric nanoparticles and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Here, we investigate the formation of extremely low volatility organic compounds (ELVOC) from O3 and OH radical oxidation of several monoterpenes and isoprene in a series of laboratory experiments. We show that ELVOC from all precursors are formed within the first minute after the initial attack of an oxidant. We demonstrate that under atmospherically relevant concentrations, species with an endocyclic double bond efficiently produce ELVOC from ozonolysis, whereas the yields from OH radical-initiated reactions are smaller. If the double bond is exocyclic or the compound itself is acyclic, ozonolysis produces less ELVOC and the role of the OH radical-initiated ELVOC formation is increased. Isoprene oxidation produces marginal quantities of ELVOC regardless of the oxidant. Implementing our laboratory findings into a global modeling framework shows that biogenic SOA formation in general, and ELVOC in particular, play crucial roles in atmospheric CCN production. Monoterpene oxidation products enhance atmospheric new particle formation and growth in most continental regions, thereby increasing CCN concentrations, especially at high values of cloud supersaturation. Isoprene-derived SOA tends to suppress atmospheric new particle formation, yet it assists the growth of sub-CCN-size primary particles to CCN. Taking into account compound specific monoterpene emissions has a moderate effect on the modeled global CCN budget.

  19. A batch assay to measure microbial hydrogen sulfide production from sulfur-containing solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Mei; Sun, Wenjie; Barlaz, Morton A.

    2016-01-01

    Large volumes of sulfur-containing wastes enter municipal solid waste landfills each year. Under the anaerobic conditions that prevail in landfills, oxidized forms of sulfur, primarily sulfate, are converted to sulfide. Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is corrosive to landfill gas collection and treatment systems, and its presence in landfill gas often necessitates the installation of expensive removal systems. For landfill operators to understand the cost of managing sulfur-containing wastes, an estimate of the H 2 S production potential is needed. The objective of this study was to develop and demonstrate a biochemical sulfide potential (BSP) test to measure the amount of H 2 S produced by different types of sulfur-containing wastes in a relatively fast (30 days) and inexpensive (125 mL serum bottles) batch assay. This study confirmed the toxic effect of H 2 S on both sulfate reduction and methane production in batch systems, and demonstrated that removing accumulated H 2 S by base adsorption was effective for mitigating inhibition. H 2 S production potentials of coal combustion fly ash, flue gas desulfurization residual, municipal solid waste combustion ash, and construction and demolition waste were determined in BSP assays. After 30 days of incubation, most of the sulfate in the wastes was converted to gaseous or aqueous phase sulfide, with BSPs ranging from 0.8 to 58.8 mL H 2 S/g waste, depending on the chemical composition of the samples. Selected samples contained solid phase sulfide which contributed to the measured H 2 S yield. A 60 day incubation in selected samples resulted in 39–86% additional sulfide production. H 2 S production measured in BSP assays was compared with that measured in simulated landfill reactors and that calculated from chemical analyses. H 2 S production in BSP assays and in reactors was lower than the stoichiometric values calculated from chemical composition for all wastes tested, demonstrating the importance of assays to estimate the

  20. A batch assay to measure microbial hydrogen sulfide production from sulfur-containing solid wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Mei, E-mail: msun8@uncc.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7908, Raleigh, NC (United States); Sun, Wenjie, E-mail: wsun@smu.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7908, Raleigh, NC (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Southern Methodist University, PO Box 750340, Dallas, TX (United States); Barlaz, Morton A., E-mail: barlaz@ncsu.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7908, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Large volumes of sulfur-containing wastes enter municipal solid waste landfills each year. Under the anaerobic conditions that prevail in landfills, oxidized forms of sulfur, primarily sulfate, are converted to sulfide. Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) is corrosive to landfill gas collection and treatment systems, and its presence in landfill gas often necessitates the installation of expensive removal systems. For landfill operators to understand the cost of managing sulfur-containing wastes, an estimate of the H{sub 2}S production potential is needed. The objective of this study was to develop and demonstrate a biochemical sulfide potential (BSP) test to measure the amount of H{sub 2}S produced by different types of sulfur-containing wastes in a relatively fast (30 days) and inexpensive (125 mL serum bottles) batch assay. This study confirmed the toxic effect of H{sub 2}S on both sulfate reduction and methane production in batch systems, and demonstrated that removing accumulated H{sub 2}S by base adsorption was effective for mitigating inhibition. H{sub 2}S production potentials of coal combustion fly ash, flue gas desulfurization residual, municipal solid waste combustion ash, and construction and demolition waste were determined in BSP assays. After 30 days of incubation, most of the sulfate in the wastes was converted to gaseous or aqueous phase sulfide, with BSPs ranging from 0.8 to 58.8 mL H{sub 2}S/g waste, depending on the chemical composition of the samples. Selected samples contained solid phase sulfide which contributed to the measured H{sub 2}S yield. A 60 day incubation in selected samples resulted in 39–86% additional sulfide production. H{sub 2}S production measured in BSP assays was compared with that measured in simulated landfill reactors and that calculated from chemical analyses. H{sub 2}S production in BSP assays and in reactors was lower than the stoichiometric values calculated from chemical composition for all wastes tested, demonstrating

  1. Consistent quantification of climate impacts due to biogenic carbon storage across a range of bio-product systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guest, Geoffrey; Bright, Ryan M.; Cherubini, Francesco; Strømman, Anders H.

    2013-01-01

    Temporary and permanent carbon storage from biogenic sources is seen as a way to mitigate climate change. The aim of this work is to illustrate the need to harmonize the quantification of such mitigation across all possible storage pools in the bio- and anthroposphere. We investigate nine alternative storage cases and a wide array of bio-resource pools: from annual crops, short rotation woody crops, medium rotation temperate forests, and long rotation boreal forests. For each feedstock type and biogenic carbon storage pool, we quantify the carbon cycle climate impact due to the skewed time distribution between emission and sequestration fluxes in the bio- and anthroposphere. Additional consideration of the climate impact from albedo changes in forests is also illustrated for the boreal forest case. When characterizing climate impact with global warming potentials (GWP), we find a large variance in results which is attributed to different combinations of biomass storage and feedstock systems. The storage of biogenic carbon in any storage pool does not always confer climate benefits: even when biogenic carbon is stored long-term in durable product pools, the climate outcome may still be undesirable when the carbon is sourced from slow-growing biomass feedstock. For example, when biogenic carbon from Norway Spruce from Norway is stored in furniture with a mean life time of 43 years, a climate change impact of 0.08 kg CO 2 eq per kg CO 2 stored (100 year time horizon (TH)) would result. It was also found that when biogenic carbon is stored in a pool with negligible leakage to the atmosphere, the resulting GWP factor is not necessarily − 1 CO 2 eq per kg CO 2 stored. As an example, when biogenic CO 2 from Norway Spruce biomass is stored in geological reservoirs with no leakage, we estimate a GWP of − 0.56 kg CO 2 eq per kg CO 2 stored (100 year TH) when albedo effects are also included. The large variance in GWPs across the range of resource and carbon storage

  2. Consistent quantification of climate impacts due to biogenic carbon storage across a range of bio-product systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guest, Geoffrey, E-mail: geoffrey.guest@ntnu.no; Bright, Ryan M., E-mail: ryan.m.bright@ntnu.no; Cherubini, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.cherubini@ntnu.no; Strømman, Anders H., E-mail: anders.hammer.stromman@ntnu.no

    2013-11-15

    Temporary and permanent carbon storage from biogenic sources is seen as a way to mitigate climate change. The aim of this work is to illustrate the need to harmonize the quantification of such mitigation across all possible storage pools in the bio- and anthroposphere. We investigate nine alternative storage cases and a wide array of bio-resource pools: from annual crops, short rotation woody crops, medium rotation temperate forests, and long rotation boreal forests. For each feedstock type and biogenic carbon storage pool, we quantify the carbon cycle climate impact due to the skewed time distribution between emission and sequestration fluxes in the bio- and anthroposphere. Additional consideration of the climate impact from albedo changes in forests is also illustrated for the boreal forest case. When characterizing climate impact with global warming potentials (GWP), we find a large variance in results which is attributed to different combinations of biomass storage and feedstock systems. The storage of biogenic carbon in any storage pool does not always confer climate benefits: even when biogenic carbon is stored long-term in durable product pools, the climate outcome may still be undesirable when the carbon is sourced from slow-growing biomass feedstock. For example, when biogenic carbon from Norway Spruce from Norway is stored in furniture with a mean life time of 43 years, a climate change impact of 0.08 kg CO{sub 2}eq per kg CO{sub 2} stored (100 year time horizon (TH)) would result. It was also found that when biogenic carbon is stored in a pool with negligible leakage to the atmosphere, the resulting GWP factor is not necessarily − 1 CO{sub 2}eq per kg CO{sub 2} stored. As an example, when biogenic CO{sub 2} from Norway Spruce biomass is stored in geological reservoirs with no leakage, we estimate a GWP of − 0.56 kg CO{sub 2}eq per kg CO{sub 2} stored (100 year TH) when albedo effects are also included. The large variance in GWPs across the range of

  3. Selective production of hydrogen peroxide and oxidation of hydrogen sulfide in an unbiased solar photoelectrochemical cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zong, Xu; Chen, Hongjun; Seger, Brian

    2014-01-01

    A solar-to-chemical conversion process is demonstrated using a photoelectrochemical cell without external bias for selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) to produce hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and sulfur (S). The process integrates two redox couples anthraquinone/anthrahydroquinone and I−/I3......−, and conceptually illustrates the remediation of a waste product for producing valuable chemicals....

  4. Bacteria isolated from Korean black raspberry vinegar with low biogenic amine production in wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nho-Eul Song

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A high concentration of histamine, one of the biogenic amines (BAs usually found in fermented foods, can cause undesirable physiological side effects in sensitive humans. The objective of this study is to isolate indigenous Acetobacter strains from naturally fermented Bokbunja vinegar in Korea with reduced histamine production during starter fermentation. Further, we examined its physiological and biochemical properties, including BA synthesis. The obtained strain MBA-77, identified as Acetobacter aceti by 16S rDNA homology and biochemical analysis and named A. aceti MBA-77. A. aceti MBA-77 showed optimal acidity % production at pH 5; the optimal temperature was 25 °C. When we prepared and examined the BAs synthesis spectrum during the fermentation process, Bokbunja wine fermented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that the histamine concentration increased from 2.72 of Bokbunja extract to 5.29 mg/L and cadaverine and dopamine was decreased to 2.6 and 10.12 mg/L, respectively. Bokbunja vinegar prepared by A. aceti MBA-77 as the starter, the histamine concentration of the vinegar preparation step was decreased up to 3.66 mg/L from 5.29 mg/L in the wine preparation step. To our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate acetic acid bacteria isolated from Bokbunja seed vinegar with low spectrum BA and would be useful for wellbeing vinegar preparation.

  5. Bacteria isolated from Korean black raspberry vinegar with low biogenic amine production in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Nho-Eul; Cho, Hyoun-Suk; Baik, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    A high concentration of histamine, one of the biogenic amines (BAs) usually found in fermented foods, can cause undesirable physiological side effects in sensitive humans. The objective of this study is to isolate indigenous Acetobacter strains from naturally fermented Bokbunja vinegar in Korea with reduced histamine production during starter fermentation. Further, we examined its physiological and biochemical properties, including BA synthesis. The obtained strain MBA-77, identified as Acetobacter aceti by 16S rDNA homology and biochemical analysis and named A. aceti MBA-77. A. aceti MBA-77 showed optimal acidity % production at pH 5; the optimal temperature was 25°C. When we prepared and examined the BAs synthesis spectrum during the fermentation process, Bokbunja wine fermented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that the histamine concentration increased from 2.72 of Bokbunja extract to 5.29mg/L and cadaverine and dopamine was decreased to 2.6 and 10.12mg/L, respectively. Bokbunja vinegar prepared by A. aceti MBA-77 as the starter, the histamine concentration of the vinegar preparation step was decreased up to 3.66mg/L from 5.29mg/L in the wine preparation step. To our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate acetic acid bacteria isolated from Bokbunja seed vinegar with low spectrum BA and would be useful for wellbeing vinegar preparation. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Determination of biogenic amine profiles in conventional and organic cocoa-based products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restuccia, Donatella; Spizzirri, U Gianfranco; Puoci, Francesco; Picci, Nevio

    2015-01-01

    Cocoa contains many compounds such as biogenic amines (BAs), known to influence consumer health. Spermidine, spermidine, putrescine, histamine, tyramine, β-phenylethylamine, cadaverine and serotonine have been found in several cocoa-based products using HPLC with UV detection after derivatisation with dansyl-chloride. Once optimised in terms of linearity, percentage recovery, LOD, LOQ and repeatability, this method was applied to real samples. Total concentrations of BAs ranged from 5.7 to 79.0 µg g(-)(1) with wide variations depending on the type of sample. BAs present in all samples were in decreasing order: histamine (1.9-38.1 µg g(-)(1)) and tyramine (1.7-31.7 µg g(-)(1)), while putrescine (0.9-32.7 µg g(-)(1)), spermidine (1.0-9.7 µg g(-)(1)) and spermidine (0.6-9.3 µg g(-)(1)) were present in most of the samples. Cadaverine, serotonine and β-phenylethylamine were present in a few samples at much lower concentrations. Organic samples always contained much lower levels of BAs than their conventional counterparts and, generally speaking, the highest amounts of BAs were found in the most processed products.

  7. Quantitative and qualitative sensing techniques for biogenic volatile organic compounds and their oxidation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Saewung; Guenther, Alex; Apel, Eric

    2013-07-01

    The physiological production mechanisms of some of the organics in plants, commonly known as biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), have been known for more than a century. Some BVOCs are emitted to the atmosphere and play a significant role in tropospheric photochemistry especially in ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) productions as a result of interplays between BVOCs and atmospheric radicals such as hydroxyl radical (OH), ozone (O3) and NOX (NO + NO2). These findings have been drawn from comprehensive analysis of numerous field and laboratory studies that have characterized the ambient distribution of BVOCs and their oxidation products, and reaction kinetics between BVOCs and atmospheric oxidants. These investigations are limited by the capacity for identifying and quantifying these compounds. This review highlights the major analytical techniques that have been used to observe BVOCs and their oxidation products such as gas chromatography, mass spectrometry with hard and soft ionization methods, and optical techniques from laser induced fluorescence (LIF) to remote sensing. In addition, we discuss how new analytical techniques can advance our understanding of BVOC photochemical processes. The principles, advantages, and drawbacks of the analytical techniques are discussed along with specific examples of how the techniques were applied in field and laboratory measurements. Since a number of thorough review papers for each specific analytical technique are available, readers are referred to these publications rather than providing thorough descriptions of each technique. Therefore, the aim of this review is for readers to grasp the advantages and disadvantages of various sensing techniques for BVOCs and their oxidation products and to provide guidance for choosing the optimal technique for a specific research task.

  8. The Potential for Electrofuels Production in Sweden Utilizing Fossil and Biogenic CO2 Point Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansson, Julia; Hackl, Roman; Taljegard, Maria; Brynolf, Selma; Grahn, Maria

    2017-01-01

    This paper maps, categorizes, and quantifies all major point sources of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from industrial and combustion processes in Sweden. The paper also estimates the Swedish technical potential for electrofuels (power-to-gas/fuels) based on carbon capture and utilization. With our bottom-up approach using European databases, we find that Sweden emits approximately 50 million metric tons of CO 2 per year from different types of point sources, with 65% (or about 32 million tons) from biogenic sources. The major sources are the pulp and paper industry (46%), heat and power production (23%), and waste treatment and incineration (8%). Most of the CO 2 is emitted at low concentrations (<15%) from sources in the southern part of Sweden where power demand generally exceeds in-region supply. The potentially recoverable emissions from all the included point sources amount to 45 million tons. If all the recoverable CO 2 were used to produce electrofuels, the yield would correspond to 2–3 times the current Swedish demand for transportation fuels. The electricity required would correspond to about 3 times the current Swedish electricity supply. The current relatively few emission sources with high concentrations of CO 2 (>90%, biofuel operations) would yield electrofuels corresponding to approximately 2% of the current demand for transportation fuels (corresponding to 1.5–2 TWh/year). In a 2030 scenario with large-scale biofuels operations based on lignocellulosic feedstocks, the potential for electrofuels production from high-concentration sources increases to 8–11 TWh/year. Finally, renewable electricity and production costs, rather than CO 2 supply, limit the potential for production of electrofuels in Sweden.

  9. Biofilm-forming capacity in biogenic amine-producing bacteria isolated from dairy products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eDiaz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms on the surface of food industry equipment are reservoirs of potentially food-contaminating bacteria - both spoilage and pathogenic. However, the capacity of biogenic amine (BA-producers to form biofilms has remained largely unexamined. BAs are low molecular weight, biologically active compounds that in food can reach concentrations high enough to be a toxicological hazard. Fermented foods, especially some types of cheese, accumulate the highest BA concentrations of all. The present work examines the biofilm-forming capacity of 56 BA-producing strains belonging to three genera and 10 species (12 Enterococcus faecalis, 6 Enterococcus faecium, 6 Enterococcus durans, 1 Enterococcus hirae, 12 Lactococcus lactis, 7 Lactobacillus vaginalis, 2 Lactobacillus curvatus, 2 Lactobacillus brevis, 1 Lactobacillus reuteri and 7 Lactobacillus parabuchneri, all isolated from dairy products. Strains of all the tested species - except for L. vaginalis - were able to produce biofilms on polystyrene and adhered to stainless steel. However, the biomass produced in biofilms was strain-dependent. These results suggest that biofilms may provide a route via which fermented foods can become contaminated by BA-producing microorganisms.

  10. Determination of the products from the oxidation of aqueous hydrogen sulfide by sulfur K-edge XANES spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vairavamurthy, A.; Manowitz, B.; Jeon, Yongseog; Zhou, Weiqing.

    1993-01-01

    The application of synchrotron radiation based XANES spectroscopy is described for determining the products formed from oxidation of aqueous sulfide.This technique allows simultaneous characterization of all the different forms of sulfur both qualitatively and quantitatively. Thus, it is superior to other commonly used techniques, such as chromatography, which are usually targeted at specific compounds. Since the use of XANES-based technique is relatively new in geochemistry, we present here an overview of the principles of the technique as well as the approach used for quantitative analysis. We studied the sulfide oxidation under conditions of high sulfide to oxygen ratio using 0.1 M sulfide solutions and the catalytic effects of sea sand, Fe 2+ , and Ni 2+ , were also examined. Significant results obtained from this study are presented to illustrate the value of the XANES technique for the determination of the products formed from the oxidation of sulfide at high concentrations

  11. Colorimetric detection of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yong Jin; Lee, Young Ju; Lee, Jaemyeon; Lee, Doyeon; Park, Hun-Kuk; Lee, Gi-Ja

    2017-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has received great attention as a third gaseous signal transmitter, following nitric oxide and carbon monoxide. In particular, H2S plays an important role in the regulation of cancer cell biology. Therefore, the detection of endogenous H2S concentrations within biological systems can be helpful to understand the role of gasotransmitters in pathophysiology. Although a simple and inexpensive method for the detection of H2S has been developed, its direct and precise measurement in living cells remains a challenge. In this study, we introduced a simple, facile, and inexpensive colorimetric system for selective H2S detection in living cells using a silver-embedded Nafion/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) membrane. This membrane could be easily applied onto a polystyrene microplate cover. First, we optimized the composition of the coating membrane, such as the PVP/Nafion mixing ratio and AgNO3 concentration, as well as the pH of the Na2S (H2S donor) solution and the reaction time. Next, the in vitro performance of a colorimetric detection assay utilizing the silver/Nafion/PVP membrane was evaluated utilizing a known concentration of Na2S standard solution both at room temperature and at 37 °C in a 5% CO2 incubator. As a result, the sensitivity of the colorimetric assay for H2S at 37 °C in the incubator (0.0056 Abs./μM Na2S, R2 = 0.9948) was similar to that at room temperature (0.0055 Abs./μM Na2S, R2 = 0.9967). Moreover, these assays were less sensitive to interference from compounds such as glutathione, L-cysteine (Cys), and dithiothreitol than to the H2S from Na2S. This assay based on the silver/Nafion/PVP membrane also showed excellent reproducibility (2.8% RSD). Finally, we successfully measured the endogenous H2S concentrations in live C6 glioma cells by s-(5‧-adenosyl)-L-methionine stimulation with and without Cys and L-homocysteine, utilizing the silver/Nafion/PVP membrane. In summary, colorimetric assays using silver

  12. Microbially-Enhanced Coal Bed Methane: Strategies for Increased Biogenic Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, K.; Barhart, E. P.; Schweitzer, H. D.; Cunningham, A. B.; Gerlach, R.; Hiebert, R.; Fields, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    Coal is the largest fossil fuel resource in the United States. Most of this coal is deep in the subsurface making it costly and potentially dangerous to extract. However, in many of these deep coal seams, methane, the main component of natural gas, has been discovered and successfully harvested. Coal bed methane (CBM) currently accounts for approximately 7.5% of the natural gas produced in the U.S. Combustion of natural gas produces substantially less CO2 and toxic emissions (e.g. heavy metals) than combustion of coal or oil thereby making it a cleaner energy source. In the large coal seams of the Powder River Basin (PRB) in southeast Montana and northeast Wyoming, CBM is produced almost entirely by biogenic processes. The in situ conversion of coal to CBM by the native microbial community is of particular interest for present and future natural gas sources as it provides the potential to harvest energy from coal seams with lesser environmental impacts than mining and burning coal. Research at Montana State University has shown the potential for enhancing the subsurface microbial processes that produce CBM. Long-term batch enrichments have investigated the methane enhancement potential of yeast extract as well as algal and cyanobacterial biomass additions with increased methane production observed with all three additions when compared to no addition. Future work includes quantification of CBM enhancement and normalization of additions. This presentation addresses the options thus far investigated for increasing CBM production and the next steps for developing the enhanced in situ conversion of coal to CBM.

  13. Production of hydrogen from organic waste via hydrogen sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, M.; Davis, B.R.; Roy, A.; Daugulis, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper an integrated process is proposed that converts organic waste to hydrogen via hydrogen sulphide. The designed bioreactor has achieved high volumetric productivities comparable to methanogenic bioreactors. Proposed process has advantages of bio-methane production and is more resilient to process upset. Thermochemical conversion of hydrogen sulphide to hydrogen is exothermic and also requires smaller plant infrastructure

  14. Insights into biogenic and chemical production of inorganic nanomaterials and nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Sadighi, Armin

    2013-03-01

    The synthesis of inorganic nanomaterials and nanostructures by the means of diverse physical, chemical, and biological principles has been developed in recent decades. The nanoscale materials and structures creation continue to be an active area of researches due to the exciting properties of the resulting nanomaterials and their innovative applications. Despite physical and chemical approaches which have been used for a long time to produce nanomaterials, biological resources as green candidates that can replace old production methods have been focused in recent years to generate various inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) or other nanoscale structures. Cost-effective, eco-friendly, energy efficient, and nontoxic produced nanomaterials using diverse biological entities have been received increasing attention in the last two decades in contrast to physical and chemical methods owe using toxic solvents, generate unwanted by-products, and high energy consumption which restrict the popularity of these ways employed in nanometric science and engineering. In this review, the biosynthesis of gold, silver, gold-silver alloy, magnetic, semiconductor nanocrystals, silica, zirconia, titania, palladium, bismuth, selenium, antimony sulfide, and platinum NPs, using bacteria, actinomycetes, fungi, yeasts, plant extracts and also informational bio-macromolecules including proteins, polypeptides, DNA, and RNA have been reported extensively to mention the current status of the biological inorganic nanomaterial production. In other hand, two well-known wet chemical techniques, namely chemical reduction and sol-gel methods, used to produce various types of nanocrystalline powders, metal oxides, and hybrid organic-inorganic nanomaterials have presented. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of an Alternative to Proteus vulgaris as a Laboratory Standard for Hydrogen Sulfide Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nar'Asha Randall

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This project involved the evaluation of a biosafety level 1 alternative to Proteus vulgaris as a positive control for the production of hydrogen sulfide. We determined that Citrobacter freundii could serve as an excellent substitute for P. vulgaris, and that lead acetate strips used in conjunction with triple sugar iron media allows for consistent results following evaluation after up to one week.

  16. Evaluation of feed COD/sulfate ratio as a control criterion for the biological hydrogen sulfide production and lead precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasco, Antonio; Ramirez, Martha; Volke-Sepulveda, Tania; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Armando; Revah, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    The ability of sulfate-reducing bacteria to produce hydrogen sulfide and the high affinity of sulfide to react with divalent metallic cations represent an excellent option to remove heavy metals from wastewater. Different parameters have been proposed to control the hydrogen sulfide production by anaerobic bacteria, such as the organic and sulfate loading rates and the feed COD/SO 4 2- ratio. This work relates the feed COD/SO 4 2- ratio with the hydrogen sulfide production and dissolved lead precipitation, using ethanol as carbon and energy source in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor. A maximum dissolved sulfide concentration of 470 ± 7 mg S/L was obtained at a feed COD/SO 4 2- ratio of 2.5, with sulfate and ethanol conversions of approximately 94 and 87%, respectively. The lowest dissolved sulfide concentration (145 ± 10 mg S/L) was observed with a feed COD/SO 4 2- ratio of 0.67. Substantial amounts of acetate (510-1730 mg/L) were produced and accumulated in the bioreactor from ethanol oxidation. Although only incomplete oxidation of ethanol to acetate was observed, the consortium was able to remove 99% of the dissolved lead (200 mg/L) with a feed COD/SO 4 2- ratio of 1.5. It was found that the feed COD/SO 4 2- ratio could be an adequate parameter to control the hydrogen sulfide production and the consequent precipitation of dissolved lead

  17. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minh, Nguyen Q.; Loutfy, Raouf O.; Yao, Neng-Ping

    1984-01-01

    Production of metallic aluminum by the electrolysis of Al.sub.2 S.sub.3 at 700.degree.-800.degree. C. in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  18. Radiation method of sulfide compound transformation in petroleum products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadirov, N.K.; Zajkina, R.F.; Zajkin, Yu.A.; Mamonova, T.B.; Bakirova, S.F.

    1997-01-01

    Processes of sulphuric compounds transformation for petroleum and heavy residuals under radiation and thermal treatment action are studied. It is shown that sulphuric compounds are concentrated in heavy fractions as a result of radiation processing. Heavy petroleum products irradiation provokes considerable decrease in the content of mercaptans, disulphides and sulphides, which transfer to sulphoxides and sulphones appearing during radiation-induced oxidation process. (author)

  19. Structural and Mechanistic Insights into Hemoglobin-catalyzed Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation and the Fate of Polysulfide Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitvitsky, Victor; Yadav, Pramod K.; An, Sojin; Seravalli, Javier; Cho, Uhn-Soo; Banerjee, Ruma (Michigan-Med); (UNL)

    2017-02-17

    Hydrogen sulfide is a cardioprotective signaling molecule but is toxic at elevated concentrations. Red blood cells can synthesize H2S but, lacking organelles, cannot dispose of H2S via the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway. We have recently shown that at high sulfide concentrations, ferric hemoglobin oxidizes H2S to a mixture of thiosulfate and iron-bound polysulfides in which the latter species predominates. Here, we report the crystal structure of human hemoglobin containing low spin ferric sulfide, the first intermediate in heme-catalyzed sulfide oxidation. The structure provides molecular insights into why sulfide is susceptible to oxidation in human hemoglobin but is stabilized against it in HbI, a specialized sulfide-carrying hemoglobin from a mollusk adapted to life in a sulfide-rich environment. We have also captured a second sulfide bound at a postulated ligand entry/exit site in the α-subunit of hemoglobin, which, to the best of our knowledge, represents the first direct evidence for this site being used to access the heme iron. Hydrodisulfide, a postulated intermediate at the junction between thiosulfate and polysulfide formation, coordinates ferric hemoglobin and, in the presence of air, generated thiosulfate. At low sulfide/heme iron ratios, the product distribution between thiosulfate and iron-bound polysulfides was approximately equal. The iron-bound polysulfides were unstable at physiological glutathione concentrations and were reduced with concomitant formation of glutathione persulfide, glutathione disulfide, and H2S. Hence, although polysulfides are unlikely to be stable in the reducing intracellular milieu, glutathione persulfide could serve as a persulfide donor for protein persulfidation, a posttranslational modification by which H2S is postulated to signal.

  20. Biogenic oxidized organic functional groups in aerosol particles from a mountain forest site and their similarities to laboratory chamber products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Schwartz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Submicron particles collected at Whistler, British Columbia, at 1020 m a.s.l. during May and June 2008 on Teflon filters were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR and X-ray fluorescence (XRF techniques for organic functional groups (OFG and elemental composition. Organic mass (OM concentrations ranged from less than 0.5 to 3.1 μg m−3, with a project mean and standard deviation of 1.3±1.0 μg m−3 and 0.21±0.16 μg m−3 for OM and sulfate, respectively. On average, organic hydroxyl, alkane, and carboxylic acid groups represented 34%, 33%, and 23% of OM, respectively. Ketone, amine and organosulfate groups constituted 6%, 5%, and <1% of the average organic aerosol composition, respectively. Measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC, including isoprene and monoterpenes from biogenic VOC (BVOC emissions and their oxidation products (methyl-vinylketone / methacrolein, MVK/MACR, were made using co-located proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS. We present chemically-specific evidence of OFG associated with BVOC emissions. Positive matrix factorization (PMF analysis attributed 65% of the campaign OM to biogenic sources, based on the correlations of one factor to monoterpenes and MVK/MACR. The remaining fraction was attributed to anthropogenic sources based on a correlation to sulfate. The functional group composition of the biogenic factor (consisting of 32% alkane, 25% carboxylic acid, 21% organic hydroxyl, 16% ketone, and 6% amine groups was similar to that of secondary organic aerosol (SOA reported from the oxidation of BVOCs in laboratory chamber studies, providing evidence that the magnitude and chemical composition of biogenic SOA simulated in the laboratory is similar to that found in actual atmospheric conditions. The biogenic factor OM is also correlated to dust elements, indicating that dust may act as a non-acidic SOA sink. This role is supported by the organic functional

  1. Biogenic oxidized organic functional groups in aerosol particles from a mountain forest site and their similarities to laboratory chamber products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, R. E.; Russell, L. M.; Sjostedt, S. J.; Vlasenko, A.; Slowik, J. G.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; MacDonald, A. M.; Li, S. M.; Liggio, J.; Toom-Sauntry, D.; Leaitch, W. R.

    2010-06-01

    Submicron particles collected at Whistler, British Columbia, at 1020 m a.s.l. during May and June 2008 on Teflon filters were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) techniques for organic functional groups (OFG) and elemental composition. Organic mass (OM) concentrations ranged from less than 0.5 to 3.1 μg m-3, with a project mean and standard deviation of 1.3±1.0 μg m-3 and 0.21±0.16 μg m-3 for OM and sulfate, respectively. On average, organic hydroxyl, alkane, and carboxylic acid groups represented 34%, 33%, and 23% of OM, respectively. Ketone, amine and organosulfate groups constituted 6%, 5%, and volatile organic compounds (VOC), including isoprene and monoterpenes from biogenic VOC (BVOC) emissions and their oxidation products (methyl-vinylketone / methacrolein, MVK/MACR), were made using co-located proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). We present chemically-specific evidence of OFG associated with BVOC emissions. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis attributed 65% of the campaign OM to biogenic sources, based on the correlations of one factor to monoterpenes and MVK/MACR. The remaining fraction was attributed to anthropogenic sources based on a correlation to sulfate. The functional group composition of the biogenic factor (consisting of 32% alkane, 25% carboxylic acid, 21% organic hydroxyl, 16% ketone, and 6% amine groups) was similar to that of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) reported from the oxidation of BVOCs in laboratory chamber studies, providing evidence that the magnitude and chemical composition of biogenic SOA simulated in the laboratory is similar to that found in actual atmospheric conditions. The biogenic factor OM is also correlated to dust elements, indicating that dust may act as a non-acidic SOA sink. This role is supported by the organic functional group composition and morphology of single particles, which were analyzed by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy near edge X

  2. Removal of hydrogen sulfide as ammonium sulfate from hydropyrolysis product vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marker, Terry L.; Felix, Larry G.; Linck, Martin B.; Roberts, Michael J.

    2017-03-14

    A system and method for processing biomass into hydrocarbon fuels that includes processing a biomass in a hydropyrolysis reactor resulting in hydrocarbon fuels and a process vapor stream and cooling the process vapor stream to a condensation temperature resulting in an aqueous stream. The aqueous stream is sent to a catalytic reactor where it is oxidized to obtain a product stream containing ammonia and ammonium sulfate. A resulting cooled product vapor stream includes non-condensable process vapors comprising H.sub.2, CH.sub.4, CO, CO.sub.2, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide.

  3. Removal of hydrogen sulfide as ammonium sulfate from hydropyrolysis product vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marker, Terry L; Felix, Larry G; Linck, Martin B; Roberts, Michael J

    2014-10-14

    A system and method for processing biomass into hydrocarbon fuels that includes processing a biomass in a hydropyrolysis reactor resulting in hydrocarbon fuels and a process vapor stream and cooling the process vapor stream to a condensation temperature resulting in an aqueous stream. The aqueous stream is sent to a catalytic reactor where it is oxidized to obtain a product stream containing ammonia and ammonium sulfate. A resulting cooled product vapor stream includes non-condensable process vapors comprising H.sub.2, CH.sub.4, CO, CO.sub.2, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide.

  4. Biogenic Amines as Quality Marker in Organic and Fair-Trade Cocoa-Based Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Restuccia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the quantitative determination of eight biogenic amines (cadaverine, serotonin, histamine, spermidine, spermine, tyramine, putrescine and β-phenylethylamine by an liquid chromatography method with evaporative light scattering detection was performed. The analysis of several samples of conventional, organic and fair trade cocoa-derivatives showed that organic and fair trade samples always contain much lower amine concentrations in comparison with their conventional counterparts, supporting the idea that biogenic amines can be regarded as cocoa quality markers. Irrespective of the kind of sample, results also showed that the most abundant amines were histamine, tyramine, spermidine, putrescine and spermine while β-phenylethylamine, cadaverine and serotonine have been found more rarely, all the amines never reaching dangerous amounts for consumer health. With the aim to confirm the experimental results, clustering analysis was performed on samples and instrumental results using principal component analysis.

  5. Extraction and determination of biogenic amines in fermented sausages and other meat products using reversed-phase-HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, B; Schollenberger, M; Kicherer, M; Luckas, B; Hammes, W P

    1993-09-01

    A convenient method is described for the analysis of biogenic amines (BA) by means of reversed-phase-HPLC. The method is characterized by multi-channel UV detection (diodearray), subsequent post-column derivatization with o-phthaldialdehyde and 3-mercaptopropionic acid, and fluorescence detection. For the analysis of meat products and especially fermented sausages an optimized perchloric acid extraction process was introduced to determine putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine and 2-phenylethylamine. BA recoveries from meat ranged between 96 and 113% with a detection limit for amines of 0.5 mg/kg.

  6. The proteins of Fusobacterium spp. involved in hydrogen sulfide production from L-cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic, Amina; Blomqvist, Madeleine; Dahlén, Gunnar; Svensäter, Gunnel

    2017-03-14

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is a toxic foul-smelling gas produced by subgingival biofilms in patients with periodontal disease and is suggested to be part of the pathogenesis of the disease. We studied the H 2 S-producing protein expression of bacterial strains associated with periodontal disease. Further, we examined the effect of a cysteine-rich growth environment on the synthesis of intracellular enzymes in F. nucleatum polymorphum ATCC 10953. The proteins were subjected to one-dimensional (1DE) and two-dimensional (2DE) gel electrophoresis An in-gel activity assay was used to detect the H 2 S-producing enzymes; Sulfide from H 2 S, produced by the enzymes in the gel, reacted with bismuth forming bismuth sulfide, illustrated as brown bands (1D) or spots (2D) in the gel. The discovered proteins were identified with liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Cysteine synthase and proteins involved in the production of the coenzyme pyridoxal 5'phosphate (that catalyzes the production of H 2 S) were frequently found among the discovered enzymes. Interestingly, a higher expression of H 2 S-producing enzymes was detected from bacteria incubated without cysteine prior to the experiment. Numerous enzymes, identified as cysteine synthase, were involved in the production of H 2 S from cysteine and the expression varied among Fusobacterium spp. and strains. No enzymes were detected with the in-gel activity assay among the other periodontitis-associated bacteria tested. The expression of the H 2 S-producing enzymes was dependent on environmental conditions such as cysteine concentration and pH but less dependent on the presence of serum and hemin.

  7. Control of Microbial Sulfide Production with Biocides and Nitrate in Oil Reservoir Simulating Bioreactors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan eXue

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Oil reservoir souring by the microbial reduction of sulfate to sulfide is unwanted, because it enhances corrosion of metal infrastructure used for oil production and processing. Reservoir souring can be prevented or remediated by the injection of nitrate or biocides, although injection of biocides into reservoirs is not commonly done. Whether combined application of these agents may give synergistic reservoir souring control is unknown. In order to address this we have used up-flow sand-packed bioreactors injected with 2 mM sulfate and volatile fatty acids (VFA, 3 mM each of acetate, propionate and butyrate at a flow rate of 3 or 6 pore volumes per day. Pulsed injection of the biocides glutaraldehyde (Glut, benzalkonium chloride (BAC and cocodiamine was used to control souring. Souring control was determined as the recovery time (RT needed to re-establish an aqueous sulfide concentration of 0.8-1 mM (of the 1.7-2 mM before the pulse. Pulses were either for a long time (120 h at low concentration (long-low or for a short time (1 h at high concentration (short-high. The short-high strategy gave better souring control with Glut, whereas the long-low strategy was better with cocodiamine. Continuous injection of 2 mM nitrate alone was not effective, because 3 mM VFA can fully reduce both 2 mM nitrate to nitrite and N2 and, subsequently, 2 mM sulfate to sulfide. No synergy was observed for short-high pulsed biocides and continuously injected nitrate. However, use of continuous nitrate and long-low pulsed biocide gave synergistic souring control with BAC and Glut, as indicated by increased RTs in the presence, as compared to the absence of nitrate. Increased production of nitrite, which increases the effectiveness of souring control by biocides, is the most likely cause for this synergy.

  8. Influence of commercial (Fluka) naphthenic acids on acid volatile sulfide (AVS) production and divalent metal precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, Andrew D; Kinley, Ciera M; Rodgers, John H; Friesen, Vanessa; Bergsveinson, Jordyn; Haakensen, Monique C

    2016-12-01

    Energy-derived waters containing naphthenic acids (NAs) are complex mixtures often comprising a suite of potentially problematic constituents (e.g. organics, metals, and metalloids) that need treatment prior to beneficial use, including release to receiving aquatic systems. It has previously been suggested that NAs can have biostatic or biocidal properties that could inhibit microbially driven processes (e.g. dissimilatory sulfate reduction) used to transfer or transform metals in passive treatment systems (i.e. constructed wetlands). The overall objective of this study was to measure the effects of a commercially available (Fluka) NA on sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), production of sulfides (as acid-volatile sulfides [AVS]), and precipitation of divalent metals (i.e. Cu, Ni, Zn). These endpoints were assessed following 21-d aqueous exposures of NAs using bench-scale reactors. After 21-days, AVS molar concentrations were not statistically different (pAVS production was sufficient in all NA treatments to achieve ∑SEM:AVS AVS) could be used to treat metals occurring in NAs affected waters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of feed COD/sulfate ratio as a control criterion for the biological hydrogen sulfide production and lead precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasco, Antonio [Direccion General del Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Capacitacion Ambiental-Instituto Nacional de Ecologia, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina. Iztapalapa, Mexico 09340, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: jvelasco@ine.gob.mx; Ramirez, Martha [Direccion General del Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Capacitacion Ambiental-Instituto Nacional de Ecologia, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina. Iztapalapa, Mexico 09340, D.F. (Mexico); Volke-Sepulveda, Tania [Departamento de Biotecnologia, UAM-Cuajimalpa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina. Iztapalapa, Mexico 09340, D.F. (Mexico); Gonzalez-Sanchez, Armando [Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, UAM-Cuajimalpa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina. Iztapalapa, Mexico 09340, D.F. (Mexico); Revah, Sergio [Departamento de Procesos y Tecnologia, UAM-Cuajimalpa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina. Iztapalapa, Mexico 09340, D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-03-01

    The ability of sulfate-reducing bacteria to produce hydrogen sulfide and the high affinity of sulfide to react with divalent metallic cations represent an excellent option to remove heavy metals from wastewater. Different parameters have been proposed to control the hydrogen sulfide production by anaerobic bacteria, such as the organic and sulfate loading rates and the feed COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio. This work relates the feed COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio with the hydrogen sulfide production and dissolved lead precipitation, using ethanol as carbon and energy source in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor. A maximum dissolved sulfide concentration of 470 {+-} 7 mg S/L was obtained at a feed COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio of 2.5, with sulfate and ethanol conversions of approximately 94 and 87%, respectively. The lowest dissolved sulfide concentration (145 {+-} 10 mg S/L) was observed with a feed COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio of 0.67. Substantial amounts of acetate (510-1730 mg/L) were produced and accumulated in the bioreactor from ethanol oxidation. Although only incomplete oxidation of ethanol to acetate was observed, the consortium was able to remove 99% of the dissolved lead (200 mg/L) with a feed COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio of 1.5. It was found that the feed COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio could be an adequate parameter to control the hydrogen sulfide production and the consequent precipitation of dissolved lead.

  10. Effect of Soybean Meal and Soluble Starch on Biogenic Amine Production and Microbial Diversity Using Rumen Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Dae Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the effect of soybean meal (SM and soluble starch (SS on biogenic amine production and microbial diversity using in vitro ruminal fermentation. Treatments comprised of incubation of 2 g of mixture (expressed as 10 parts containing different ratios of SM to SS as: 0:0, 10:0, 7:3, 5:5, 3:7, or 0:10. In vitro ruminal fermentation parameters were determined at 0, 12, 24, and 48 h of incubation while the biogenic amine and microbial diversity were determined at 48 h of incubation. Treatment with highest proportion of SM had higher (p<0.05 gas production than those with higher proportions of SS. Samples with higher proportion of SS resulted in lower pH than those with higher proportion of SM after 48 h of incubation. The largest change in NH3-N concentration from 0 to 48 h was observed on all SM while the smallest was observed on exclusive SS. Similarly, exclusive SS had the lowest NH3-N concentration among all groups after 24 h of incubation. Increasing methane (CH4 concentrations were observed with time, and CH4 concentrations were higher (p<0.05 with greater proportions of SM than SS. Balanced proportion of SM and SS had the highest (p<0.05 total volatile fatty acid (TVFA while propionate was found highest in higher proportion of SS. Moreover, biogenic amine (BA was higher (p<0.05 in samples containing greater proportions of SM. Histamines, amine index and total amines were highest in exclusive SM followed in sequence mixtures with increasing proportion of SS (and lowered proportion of SM at 48 h of incubation. Nine dominant bands were identified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE and their identity ranged from 87% to 100% which were mostly isolated from rumen and feces. Bands R2 (uncultured bacterium clone RB-5E1 and R4 (uncultured rumen bacterium clone L7A_C10 bands were found in samples with higher proportions of SM while R3 (uncultured Firmicutes bacterium clone NI_52, R7 (Selenomonas sp

  11. Production of biogenic manganese oxides coupled with methane oxidation in a bioreactor for removing metals from wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Shuji; Komizo, Daisuke; Cao, Linh Thi Thuy; Aoi, Yoshiteru; Kindaichi, Tomonori; Ozaki, Noriatsu; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Akiyoshi

    2018-03-01

    Biogenic manganese oxide (BioMnO x ) can efficiently adsorb various minor metals. The production of BioMnO x in reactors to remove metals during wastewater treatment processes is a promising biotechnological method. However, it is difficult to preferentially enrich manganese-oxidizing bacteria (MnOB) to produce BioMnO x during wastewater treatment processes. A unique method of cultivating MnOB using methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) to produce soluble microbial products is proposed here. MnOB were successfully enriched in a methane-fed reactor containing MOB. BioMnO x production during the wastewater treatment process was confirmed. Long-term continual operation of the reactor allowed simultaneous removal of Mn(II), Co(II), and Ni(II). The Co(II)/Mn(II) and Ni(II)/Mn(II) removal ratios were 53% and 19%, respectively. The degree to which Mn(II) was removed indicated that the enriched MnOB used utilization-associated products and/or biomass-associated products. Microbial community analysis revealed that methanol-oxidizing bacteria belonging to the Hyphomicrobiaceae family played important roles in the oxidation of Mn(II) by using utilization-associated products. Methane-oxidizing bacteria were found to be inhibited by MnO 2 , but the maximum Mn(II) removal rate was 0.49 kg m -3  d -1 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hydrogen sulfide production by sulfate-reducing bacteria utilizing additives eluted from plastic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Daisuke; Kajihara, Yusuke; Shimidzu, Nobuhiro; Hamamura, Kengo; Nagase, Makoto

    2011-06-01

    In the present study it was demonstrated that organic additives eluted from plastic resins could be utilized as substrates by sulfate-reducing bacteria. Two laboratory-scale experiments, a microcosm experiment and a leaching experiment, were conducted using polyvinyl chloride (PVC) as a model plastic resin. In the former experiment, the conversion of sulfate to sulfide was evident in microcosms that received plasticized PVC as the sole carbon source, but not in those that received PVC homopolymer. Additionally, dissolved organic carbon accumulated only in microcosms that received plasticized PVC, indicating that the dissolved organic carbon originated from additives. In the leaching experiment, phenol and bisphenol A were found in the leached solutions. These results suggest that the disposal of waste plastics in inert waste landfills may result in the production of H(2)S.

  13. Hydrogen sulfide increases nitric oxide production from endothelial cells by an Akt-dependent mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo J Cardounel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S and nitric oxide (NO are both gasotransmitters that can elicit synergistic vasodilatory responses in the in the cardiovascular system, but the mechanisms behind this synergy are unclear. In the current study we investigated the molecular mechanisms through which H2S regulates endothelial NO production. Initial studies were performed to establish the temporal and dose-dependent effects of H2S on NO generation using EPR spin trapping techniques. H2S stimulated a two-fold increase in NO production from endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, which was maximal 30 min after exposure to 25-150 µM H2S. Following 30 min H2S exposure, eNOS phosphorylation at Ser 1177 was significantly increased compared to control, consistent with eNOS activation. Pharmacological inhibition of Akt, the kinase responsible for Ser 1177 phosphorylation, attenuated the stimulatory effect of H2S on NO production. Taken together, these data demonstrate that H2S up-regulates NO production from eNOS through an Akt-dependent mechanism. These results implicate H2S in the regulation of NO in endothelial cells, and suggest that deficiencies in H2S signaling can directly impact processes regulated by NO.

  14. A breeding strategy to harness flavor diversity of Saccharomyces interspecific hybrids and minimize hydrogen sulfide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizaj, Etjen; Cordente, Antonio G; Bellon, Jennifer R; Raspor, Peter; Curtin, Chris D; Pretorius, Isak S

    2012-06-01

    Industrial food-grade yeast strains are selected for traits that enhance their application in quality production processes. Wine yeasts are required to survive in the harsh environment of fermenting grape must, while at the same time contributing to wine quality by producing desirable aromas and flavors. For this reason, there are hundreds of wine yeasts available, exhibiting characteristics that make them suitable for different fermentation conditions and winemaking practices. As wine styles evolve and technical winemaking requirements change, however, it becomes necessary to improve existing strains. This becomes a laborious and costly process when the targets for improvement involve flavor compound production. Here, we demonstrate a new approach harnessing preexisting industrial yeast strains that carry desirable flavor phenotypes - low hydrogen sulfide (H(2) S) production and high ester production. A low-H(2) S Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain previously generated by chemical mutagenesis was hybridized independently with two ester-producing natural interspecies hybrids of S. cerevisiae and Saccharomyces kudriavzevii. Deficiencies in sporulation frequency and spore viability were overcome through use of complementary selectable traits, allowing successful isolation of several novel hybrids exhibiting both desired traits in a single round of selection. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Type and amount of organic amendments affect enhanced biogenic methane production from coal and microbial community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Katherine J.; Lu, Shipeng; Barnhart, Elliott P.; Parker, Albert E.; Fields, Matthew W.; Gerlach, Robin

    2018-01-01

    Slow rates of coal-to-methane conversion limit biogenic methane production from coalbeds. This study demonstrates that rates of coal-to-methane conversion can be increased by the addition of small amounts of organic amendments. Algae, cyanobacteria, yeast cells, and granulated yeast extract were tested at two concentrations (0.1 and 0.5 g/L), and similar increases in total methane produced and methane production rates were observed for all amendments at a given concentration. In 0.1 g/L amended systems, the amount of carbon converted to methane minus the amount produced in coal only systems exceeded the amount of carbon added in the form of amendment, suggesting enhanced coal-to-methane conversion through amendment addition. The amount of methane produced in the 0.5 g/L amended systems did not exceed the amount of carbon added. While the archaeal communities did not vary significantly, the bacterial populations appeared to be strongly influenced by the presence of coal when 0.1 g/L of amendment was added; at an amendment concentration of 0.5 g/L the bacterial community composition appeared to be affected most strongly by the amendment type. Overall, the results suggest that small amounts of amendment are not only sufficient but possibly advantageous if faster in situcoal-to-methane production is to be promoted.

  16. Grazing-Activated Production of Dimethyl Sulfide (DMS) by two clones of Emiliania huxleyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Gordon V.; Steinke, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Emiliania huxleyi clones CCMP 370 and CCMP 373 produced similar amounts of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) during axenic exponential growth, averaging 109 mM internal DMSP. Both clones had detectable DMSP lyase activity, as measured by production of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) during in vitro assays of crude cell preparations, but activities and conditions differed considerably between clones. Clone 373 had high activity; clone 370 had low activity and required chloride. For both strains, enzyme activity per cell was constant during exponential growth, but little DMS was produced by healthy cells. Rather, DMS production was activated when cells were subjected to physical or chemical stresses that caused cell lysis. We propose that DMSP lyase and DMSP are segregated within these cells and re-action only under conditions that result in cell stress or damage. Such activation occurs during microzooplankton grazing. When these clones were grazed by the dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina, DMS was produced; ungrazed cells, as well as those exposed to grazer exudates and associated bacteria, generated no DMS. Grazing of clone 373 produced much more DMS than grazing of clone 370, consistent with their relative in vitro DMSP lyase activities. DMS was only generated when cells were actually being grazed, indicating that ingested cells were responsible for the DMS formation. We suggest that even low levels of grazing can greatly accelerate DMS production.

  17. Evaluation of corrosion products formed by sulfidation as inhibitors of the naphthenic corrosion of AISI-316 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria-Cala, J. A.; Montañez, N. D.; Laverde Cataño, D.; Y Peña Ballesteros, D.; Mejía, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    Naphthenic acids present in oil from most regions worldwide currently stand as the main responsible for the naphthenic corrosion problems, affecting the oil-refining industry. The phenomenon of sulfidation, accompanying corrosion processes brought about by naphthenic acids in high-temperature refining plant applications, takes place when the combination of sulfidic acid (H2S) with Fe forms layers of iron sulphide (FeS) on the material surface, layers with the potential to protect the material from attack by other corrosive species like naphthenic acids. This work assessed corrosion products formed by sulfidation as inhibitors of naphthenic corrosion rate in AISI-316 steel exposed to processing conditions of simulated crude oil in a dynamic autoclave. Calculation of the sulfidation and naphthenic corrosion rates were determined by gravimetry. The surfaces of the AISI-316 gravimetric coupons exposed to acid systems; were characterized morphologically by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and X-ray Fluorescence by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) combined with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). One of the results obtained was the determination of an inhibiting effect of corrosion products at 250 and 300°C, where lower corrosion rate levels were detected. For the temperature of 350°C, naphthenic corrosion rates increased due to deposition of naphthenic acids on the areas where corrosion products formed by sulfidation have lower homogeneity and stability on the surface, thus accelerating the destruction of AISI-316 steel. The above provides an initial contribution to oil industry in search of new alternatives to corrosion control by the attack of naphthenic acids, from the formation of FeS layers on exposed materials in the processing of heavy crude oils with high sulphur content.

  18. High-time resolved measurements of biogenic and anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol precursors and products in urban air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Rosa M.; Doskey, Paul V.

    2016-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are present in the atmosphere entirely in the gas phase are directly emitted by biogenic (~1089 Tg yr-1) and anthropogenic sources (~185 Tg yr-1). However, the sources and molecular speciation of intermediate VOCs (IVOCs), which are for the most part also present almost entirely in the gas phase, are not well characterized. The VOCs and IVOCs participate in reactions that form ozone and semivolatile OC (SVOC) that partition into the aerosol phase. Formation and evolution of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are part of a complex dynamic process that depends on the molecular speciation and concentration of VOCs, IVOCs, primary organic aerosol (POA), and the level of oxidants (NO3, OH, O3). The current lack of understanding of OA properties and their impact on radiative forcing, ecosystems, and human health is partly due to limitations of models to predict SOA production on local, regional, and global scales. More accurate forecasting of SOA production requires high-temporal resolution measurement and molecular characterization of SOA precursors and products. For the subject study, the IVOCs and aerosol-phase organic matter were collected using the high-volume sampling technique and were analyzed by multidimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-ToFMS). The IVOCs included terpenes, terpenoids, n-alkanes, branched alkanes, isoprenoids, alkylbenzenes, cycloalkylbenzenes, PAH, alkyl PAH, and an unresolved complex mixture (UCM). Diurnal variations of OA species containing multiple oxygenated functionalities and selected SOA tracers of isorprene, α-pinene, toluene, cyclohexene, and n-dodecane oxidation were also quantified. The data for SOA precursor and oxidation products presented here will be useful for evaluating the ability of molecular-specific SOA models to forecast SOA production in and downwind of urban areas.

  19. Yeast genes involved in regulating cysteine uptake affect production of hydrogen sulfide from cysteine during fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Wei; Walker, Michelle E; Fedrizzi, Bruno; Gardner, Richard C; Jiranek, Vladimir

    2017-08-01

    An early burst of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae during fermentation could increase varietal thiols and therefore enhance desirable tropical aromas in varieties such as Sauvignon Blanc. Here we attempted to identify genes affecting H2S formation from cysteine by screening yeast deletion libraries via a colony colour assay on media resembling grape juice. Both Δlst4 and Δlst7 formed lighter coloured colonies and produced significantly less H2S than the wild type on high concentrations of cysteine, likely because they are unable to take up cysteine efficiently. We then examined the nine known cysteine permeases and found that deletion of AGP1, GNP1 and MUP1 led to reduced production of H2S from cysteine. We further showed that deleting genes involved in the SPS-sensing pathway such as STP1 and DAL81 also reduced H2S from cysteine. Together, this study indirectly confirms that Agp1p, Gnp1p and Mup1p are the major cysteine permeases and that they are regulated by the SPS-sensing and target of rapamycin pathways under the grape juice-like, cysteine-supplemented, fermentation conditions. The findings highlight that cysteine transportation could be a limiting factor for yeast to generate H2S from cysteine, and therefore selecting wine yeasts without defects in cysteine uptake could maximise thiol production potential. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The Potential for Electrofuels Production in Sweden Utilizing Fossil and Biogenic CO{sub 2} Point Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansson, Julia, E-mail: julia.hansson@ivl.se [Climate and Sustainable Cities, IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Division of Physical Resource Theory, Department of Energy and Environment, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg (Sweden); Hackl, Roman [Climate and Sustainable Cities, IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Taljegard, Maria [Division of Energy Technology, Department of Energy and Environment, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg (Sweden); Brynolf, Selma; Grahn, Maria [Division of Physical Resource Theory, Department of Energy and Environment, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg (Sweden)

    2017-03-13

    This paper maps, categorizes, and quantifies all major point sources of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from industrial and combustion processes in Sweden. The paper also estimates the Swedish technical potential for electrofuels (power-to-gas/fuels) based on carbon capture and utilization. With our bottom-up approach using European databases, we find that Sweden emits approximately 50 million metric tons of CO{sub 2} per year from different types of point sources, with 65% (or about 32 million tons) from biogenic sources. The major sources are the pulp and paper industry (46%), heat and power production (23%), and waste treatment and incineration (8%). Most of the CO{sub 2} is emitted at low concentrations (<15%) from sources in the southern part of Sweden where power demand generally exceeds in-region supply. The potentially recoverable emissions from all the included point sources amount to 45 million tons. If all the recoverable CO{sub 2} were used to produce electrofuels, the yield would correspond to 2–3 times the current Swedish demand for transportation fuels. The electricity required would correspond to about 3 times the current Swedish electricity supply. The current relatively few emission sources with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (>90%, biofuel operations) would yield electrofuels corresponding to approximately 2% of the current demand for transportation fuels (corresponding to 1.5–2 TWh/year). In a 2030 scenario with large-scale biofuels operations based on lignocellulosic feedstocks, the potential for electrofuels production from high-concentration sources increases to 8–11 TWh/year. Finally, renewable electricity and production costs, rather than CO{sub 2} supply, limit the potential for production of electrofuels in Sweden.

  1. Monitoring of biogenic amines in cheeses manufactured at small-scale farms and in fermented dairy products in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buňková, Leona; Adamcová, Gabriela; Hudcová, Kateřina; Velichová, Helena; Pachlová, Vendula; Lorencová, Eva; Buňka, František

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was the monitoring of six biogenic amines (histamine, tyramine, phenylethylamine, tryptamine, putrescine, and cadaverine) and two polyamines (spermidine and spermine) in 112 samples of dairy products purchased in the Czech Republic, namely in 55 cheeses made in small-scale farms and in 57 fermented dairy products. The products were tested at the end of their shelf-life period. Neither tryptamine nor phenylethylamine was detected in the monitored samples; histamine was found only in four cheese samples containing up to 25mg/kg. The contents of spermine and spermidine were low and did not exceed the values of 35 mg/kg. Significant amounts of tyramine, putrescine, and cadaverine occurred especially in cheeses produced from ewe's milk or in long-term ripened cheeses. In about 10% of the tested cheeses, the total concentration of all the monitored biogenic amines and polyamines exceeded the level of 200mg/kg, which can be considered toxicologically significant. In fermented dairy products, the tested biogenic amines occurred in relatively low amounts (generally up to 30 mg/kg) that are regarded safe for the consumer's health. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Discrimination of the oral microbiota associated with high hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Toru; Suzuki, Nao; Nakano, Yoshio; Yasui, Masaki; Yoneda, Masahiro; Shimazaki, Yoshihiro; Hirofuji, Takao; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2012-01-01

    Both hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and methyl mercaptan (CH(3)SH) are frequently detected in large amounts in malodorous mouth air. We investigated the bacterial composition of saliva of 30 subjects with severe oral malodor exhibiting extreme CH(3)SH/H(2)S ratios (high H(2)S but low CH(3)SH concentrations, n 5 14; high CH(3)SH but low H2S concentrations, n 5 16) and 13 subjects without malodor, using barcoded pyrosequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. Phylogenetic community analysis with the UniFrac distance metric revealed a distinct bacterial community structure in each malodor group. The H2S group showed higher proportions of the genera Neisseria, Fusobacterium, Porphyromonas and SR1 than the other two groups, whereas the CH(3)SH group had higher proportions of the genera Prevotella, Veillonella,Atopobium, Megasphaera, and Selenomonas. Our results suggested that distinct bacterial populations in the oral microbiota are involved in production of high levels of H2S and CH3SH in the oral cavity.

  3. Biogenic nanomaterials from photosynthetic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffryes, Clayton; Agathos, Spiros N; Rorrer, Gregory

    2015-06-01

    The use of algal cell cultures represents a sustainable and environmentally friendly platform for the biogenic production of nanobiomaterials and biocatalysts. For example, advances in the production of biogeneic nanomaterials from algal cell cultures, such as crystalline β-chitin nanofibrils and gold and silver nanoparticles, could enable the 'green' production of biomaterials such as tissue-engineering scaffolds or drug carriers, supercapacitors and optoelectric materials. The in vivo functionalization, as well as newly demonstrated methods of production and modification, of biogenic diatom biosilica have led to the development of organic-inorganic hybrid catalytic systems as well as new biomaterials for drug delivery, biosensors and heavy-metal adsorbents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Selenium Sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenium sulfide, an anti-infective agent, relieves itching and flaking of the scalp and removes the dry, ... Selenium sulfide comes in a lotion and is usually applied as a shampoo. As a shampoo, selenium ...

  5. The sensitivity of dimethyl sulfide production to simulated climate change in the Eastern Antarctic Southern Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabric, Albert J.; Cropp, Roger; Marchant, Harvey

    2003-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is a radiatively active trace gas produced by enzymatic cleavage of its precursor compound, dimethyl sulfoniopropionate (DMSP), which is released by marine phytoplankton in the upper ocean. Once ventilated to the atmosphere, DMS is oxidised to form non-sea-salt sulfate and methane sulfonate (MSA) aerosols, which are a major source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in remote marine air and may thus play a role in climate regulation. Here we simulate the change in DMS flux in the Eastern Antarctic ocean from 1960-2086, corresponding to equivalent CO 2 tripling relative to pre-industrial levels. Calibration to contemporary climate conditions was carried out using a genetic algorithm to fit the model to surface chlorophyll from the 4-yr SeaWiFs satellite archive and surface DMS from an existing global database. Following the methodology used previously in the Subantarctic Southern Ocean, we then simulated DMS emissions under enhanced greenhouse conditions by forcing the DMS model with output from a coupled atmospheric-ocean general circulation model (GCM). The GCM was run in transient mode under the IPCC/IS92a radiative forcing scenario. By 2086, the change simulated in annual integrated DMS flux is around 20% in ice-free waters, with a greater increase of 45% in the seasonal ice zone (SIZ). Interestingly, the large increase in flux in the SIZ is not due to higher in situ production but mainly because of a loss of ice cover during summer-autumn and an increase in sea-to-air ventilation of DMS. These proportional changes in areal mean flux (25%) are much higher than previously estimated for the Subantarctic Southern Ocean (5%), and point to the possibility of a significant DMS-climate feedback at high Southern latitudes. Due to the nexus between ice cover and food-web structure, the potential for ecological community shifts under enhanced greenhouse conditions is high, and the implications for DMS production are discussed

  6. Role of Earthworms in Soil Fertility Maintenance through the Production of Biogenic Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhadauria, T.; Saxena, K.G.

    2010-01-01

    The soil biota benefits soil productivity and contributes to the sustainable function of all ecosystems. The cycling of nutrients is a critical function that is essential to life on earth. Earthworms (EWs) are a major component of soil fauna communities in most ecosystems and comprise a large proportion of macro fauna biomass. Their activity is beneficial because it can enhance soil nutrient cycling through the rapid incorporation of detritus into mineral soils. In addition to this mixing effect, mucus production associated with water excretion in earthworm guts also enhances the activity of other beneficial soil microorganisms. This is followed by the production of organic matter. So, in the short term, a more significant effect is the concentration of large quantities of nutrients (N, P, K, and Ca) that are easily assimilable by plants in fresh cast depositions. In addition, earthworms seem to accelerate the mineralization as well as the turnover of soil organic matter. Earthworms are known also to increase nitrogen mineralization, through direct and indirect effects on the microbial community. The increased transfer of organic C and N into soil aggregates indicates the potential for earthworms to facilitate soil organic matter stabilization and accumulation in agricultural systems, and that their influence depends greatly on differences in land management practices. This paper summarises information on published data on the described subjects.

  7. Role of Earthworms in Soil Fertility Maintenance through the Production of Biogenic Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunira Bhadauria

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The soil biota benefits soil productivity and contributes to the sustainable function of all ecosystems. The cycling of nutrients is a critical function that is essential to life on earth. Earthworms (EWs are a major component of soil fauna communities in most ecosystems and comprise a large proportion of macrofauna biomass. Their activity is beneficial because it can enhance soil nutrient cycling through the rapid incorporation of detritus into mineral soils. In addition to this mixing effect, mucus production associated with water excretion in earthworm guts also enhances the activity of other beneficial soil microorganisms. This is followed by the production of organic matter. So, in the short term, a more significant effect is the concentration of large quantities of nutrients (N, P, K, and Ca that are easily assimilable by plants in fresh cast depositions. In addition, earthworms seem to accelerate the mineralization as well as the turnover of soil organic matter. Earthworms are known also to increase nitrogen mineralization, through direct and indirect effects on the microbial community. The increased transfer of organic C and N into soil aggregates indicates the potential for earthworms to facilitate soil organic matter stabilization and accumulation in agricultural systems, and that their influence depends greatly on differences in land management practices. This paper summarises information on published data on the described subjects.

  8. Effect of γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA Producing Bacteria on Rumen Fermentation, Biogenic Amine Production and Anti-oxidation Using Corn Meal as Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bum Seung Ku

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects and significance of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA producing bacteria (GPB on in vitro rumen fermentation and reduction of biogenic amines (histamine, methylamine, ethylamine, and tyramine using corn meal as a substrate were determined. Ruminal samples collected from ruminally fistulated Holstein cows served as inoculum and corn was used as substrate at 2% dry matter (DM. Different inclusion rates of GPB and GABA were evaluated. After incubation, addition of GPB had no significant effect on in vitro fermentation pH and total gas production, but significantly increased the ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N concentration and reduced the total biogenic amines production (p<0.05. Furthermore, antioxidation activity was improved as indicated by the significantly higher concentration of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px among treated samples when compared to the control (p<0.05. Additionally, 0.2% GPB was established as the optimum inclusion level. Taken together, these results suggest the potential of utilizing GPB as feed additives to improve growth performance in ruminants by reducing biogenic amines and increasing anti-oxidation.

  9. Elemental mobility in sulfidic mine tailings reclaimed with paper mill by-products as sealing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yu; Stahre, Nanna; Mäkitalo, Maria; Maurice, Christian; Öhlander, Björn

    2017-09-01

    Sealing layers made of two alkaline paper mill by-products, fly ash and green liquor dregs, were placed on top of 50-year-old sulfide-containing tailings as a full-scale remediation approach. The performance and effectiveness of the sealing layers with high water content for an oxygen barrier and low hydraulic conductivity for a sealing layer in preventing the formation of acid rock drainage were evaluated 5 years after the remediation. The leaching behavior of the covered tailings was studied using batch leaching tests (L/S ratio 10 L/kg). The leaching results revealed that, in general, the dregs- and ash-covered tailings released relatively lower concentrations of many elements contained in acid rock drainage compared to those from the uncovered tailings. A change in the chemical composition and mineralogical state of the tailings was observed for the tailings beneath the covers. The increase in pH caused by the alkaline materials promoted metal precipitation. Geochemical modeling using PHREEQC confirmed most of the geochemical changes of the covered tailings. Both the ash and dregs showed potential to function as sealing materials in terms of their geochemical properties. However, mobilization of Zn and Ni from the lower part of the dregs-covered tailings was observed. The same phenomenon was observed for the lower part of the ash-covered tailings. Ash showed advantages over dregs as a cover material; based on geochemical studies, the ash immobilized more elements than the dregs did. Lysimeters were installed below the sealing layers, and infiltrating water chemistry and hydrology were studied to monitor the amount and quality of the leachate percolating through.

  10. Hydrogen Sulfide Increases Nitric Oxide Production and Subsequent S-Nitrosylation in Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Ho Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S and nitric oxide (NO, two endogenous gaseous molecules in endothelial cells, got increased attention with respect to their protective roles in the cardiovascular system. However, the details of the signaling pathways between H2S and NO in endothelia cells remain unclear. In this study, a treatment with NaHS profoundly increased the expression and the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Elevated gaseous NO levels were observed by a novel and specific fluorescent probe, 5-amino-2-(6-hydroxy-3-oxo-3H-xanthen-9-ylbenzoic acid methyl ester (FA-OMe, and quantified by flow cytometry. Further study indicated an increase of upstream regulator for eNOS activation, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, and protein kinase B (Akt. By using a biotin switch, the level of NO-mediated protein S-nitrosylation was also enhanced. However, with the addition of the NO donor, NOC-18, the expressions of cystathionine-γ-lyase, cystathionine-β-synthase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase were not changed. The level of H2S was also monitored by a new designed fluorescent probe, 4-nitro-7-thiocyanatobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD-SCN with high specificity. Therefore, NO did not reciprocally increase the expression of H2S-generating enzymes and the H2S level. The present study provides an integrated insight of cellular responses to H2S and NO from protein expression to gaseous molecule generation, which indicates the upstream role of H2S in modulating NO production and protein S-nitrosylation.

  11. Biogenic nanopalladium production by self-immobilized granular biomass: application for contaminant remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suja, E; Nancharaiah, Y V; Venugopalan, V P

    2014-11-15

    Microbial granules cultivated in an aerobic bubble column sequencing batch reactor were used for reduction of Pd(II) and formation of biomass associated Pd(0) nanoparticles (Bio-Pd) for reductive transformation of organic and inorganic contaminants. Addition of Pd(II) to microbial granules incubated under fermentative conditions resulted in rapid formation of Bio-Pd. The reduction of soluble Pd(II) to biomass associated Pd(0) was predominantly mediated by H2 produced through fermentation. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope analysis revealed that the produced Pd nanoparticles were associated with the microbial granules. The catalytic activity of Bio-Pd was determined using p-nitrophenol and Cr(VI) as model compounds. Reductive transformation of p-nitrophenol by Bio-Pd was ∼20 times higher in comparison to microbial granules without Pd. Complete reduction of up to 0.25 mM of Cr(VI) by Bio-Pd was achieved in 24 h. Bio-Pd synthesis using self-immobilized microbial granules is advantageous and obviates the need for nanoparticle encapsulation or use of barrier membranes for retaining Bio-Pd in practical applications. In short, microbial granules offer a dual purpose system for Bio-Pd production and retention, wherein in situ generated H2 serves as electron donor powering biotransformations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Photovoltaic semiconductor materials based on alloys of tin sulfide, and methods of production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lany, Stephan

    2016-06-07

    Photovoltaic thin-film materials comprising crystalline tin sulfide alloys of the general formula Sn.sub.1-x(R).sub.xS, where R is selected from magnesium, calcium and strontium, as well as methods of producing the same, are disclosed.

  13. Hydrogen production through microheterogeneous photocatalysis of hydrogen sulfide cleavage. The thiosulfate cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgarello, E; Serpone, N; Graetzel, M; Pelizzetti, E

    1985-01-01

    Cleavage of hydrogen sulfide into hydrogen and sulfur occurs in alkaline aqueous CdS dispersions under visible light illumination. Small quantities of a noble metal catalyst (RuO/sub 2/) loaded onto 'naked' CdS particles markedly improve the yield of hydrogen formation. The effect of RuO/sub 2/ is ascribed to catalysis of electron transfer to proton. Simultaneous and efficient photogeneration of hydrogen and thiosulfate occurs in CdS dispersions containing both sulfite and bisulfide (or sulfide) ions. Electron transfer from the conduction band of CdS to that of TiO/sub 2/ particles occurs in alkaline suspensions containing these HS/sup -/ ions and has been exploited to improve the performance of a system achieving decomposition of H/sub 2/S by visible light. Equally important is a recent finding that the performance of a system containing 'naked' CdS in combination with RuO/sub 2/-loaded TiO/sub 2/ particles is far better than that of CdS/RuO/sub 2/ alone. Additionally, conduction band electrons produced by bandgap excitation of TiO/sub 2/ particles efficiently reduce thiosulfate to sulfide and sulfite. The valence band process in alklaine TiO/sub 2/ dispersions is thought to involve oxidation of S/sub 2/O/sub 3//sup 2 -/ to tetrathionate, S/sub 4/O/sub 6//sup 2 -/, which quantitatively dismutates into sulfite and thiosulfate. The photodriven disproportionation of thiosulfate into sulfide and sulfate is of great interest in systems that photochemically cleave hydrogen sulfide into hydrogen and sulfur. (author).

  14. Production of 99mTc-anatomy sulfide colloid for lymphoscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabani, G. A.; Hamzeh, H.; Najafi, R.

    2002-01-01

    The lymphatic system provides one of the chief paths for the spread (metastasis) of cancer from one part of body to another. Hodgkin's diseases, lymphocytic leukemia, various metastatic diseases and many lymph ode disorders can be assessed by lymphoscintigraphy. Radionuclide lymphoscintigraphy has been used for many years to define the lymphatic drainage of melanoma. The most common radiopharmaceuticals used for lymphoscintigraphy are 99 mTc-Sc, 99 mTc-antimony sulfide colloid has been chosen between other colloids. For antimony sulfide colloid preparation, hydrogen sulfide gas was passed through D.E. until saturation. Antimony potassium tartrate is then added to the solution to form Sb 2 S 3 ol lide. The colloid was stabilized with P.V.P. Excess H 2 S was removed by bubbling with nitrogen. The preparation was then filtered through a 0.22 μm membrane filter and aliquots containing 1.017 mg Sb 2 S 3 were dispensed into the reaction vials. Labeling was accomplished by adding 99 mTcO 4 and HCl to the vial and then heating it at 100 deg C in boiling water bath for 10 min. The P H was adjust by adding a phosphate buffer. The radiochemical purity of 99 mTc-antimony disulfide colloid by I TLC-S G/normal saline was more than 95 percent. The amount of Sb in reaction vial was 0. 729 mg. The study demonstrated that our formulation of antimony-sulfide which has 0.0486 mg (Sb) in 0.2 ml of 99 mTc-Sb 2 S 3 colloid per patient (total volume after labeling with 99 mTc is 3 ml)

  15. A Reaction Involving Oxygen and Metal Sulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, William D. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a procedure for oxygen generation by thermal decomposition of potassium chlorate in presence of manganese dioxide, reacted with various sulfides. Provides a table of sample product yields for various sulfides. (JM)

  16. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S...

  17. Blood Cockle Shells Waste as Renewable Source for the Production of Biogenic CaCO3 and Its Characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmi, D.; Zulfia, A.

    2017-11-01

    The prowess to reuse and recycle of blood cockle shells for raw material in bio-ceramics applications is an attractive component of integrated waste management program. In this paper an attempt is made to introduce a simple process to manufacture biogenic CaCO3 powder from blood cockle shells waste. The biogenic CaCO3 powder was produced from rinsing of blood cockle shells waste using deionised water and oxalic acid for cleaning the dirt and stain on the shells, then drying and grinding followed by heat treatment at 500 and 800 °C for 5 h. The powder obtained was characterised by XRF, DTA/TG, SEM, FTIR, and XRD analysis. The amount of 97.1 % CaO was obtained from XRF result. The thermal decomposition of CaCO3 become CaO due to mass loss was observed in the TG curve. The SEM result shows the needle-like aragonite morphology of blood cockle shells powder transformed to cubic-like calcite after heat treated at 500 °C. These results were consistent with FTIR and XRD results.

  18. Effect of salt-tolerant yeast of Candida versatilis and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii on the production of biogenic amines during soy sauce fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wei; Hou, Li-Hua; Guo, Hong-Lian; Wang, Chun-Ling; Fan, Zhen-Chuan; Liu, Jin-Fu; Cao, Xiao-Hong

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to enhance and improve the quality and safety of soy sauce. In the present work, the change of biogenic amines, such as histamine, tyramine, cadaverine, spermidine, was examined by the treatment of Candida versatilis and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, and the influence of salt-tolerant yeast on biogenic amines was analysed during the whole fermentation process. The results showed that the content of biogenic amines was elevated after yeast treatment and the content of biogenic amines was influenced by using yeast. The dominating biogenic amine in soy sauce was tyramine. At the end of fermentation, the concentrations of biogenic amines produced by Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Candida versatilis in the soy mash were 122.71 mg kg(-1) and 69.96 mg kg(-1) . The changes of biogenic amines in high-salt liquid soy mash during fermentation process indicated that a variety of biogenic amines were increased in the fermentation ageing period, which may be due to amino acid decarboxylation to form biogenic amines by yeast decarboxylase. The fermentation period of soy sauce should be longer than 5 months because biogenic amines began to decline after this time period. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Valorizing waste iron powder in biogas production: Hydrogen sulfide control and process performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriamanohiarisoamanana, Fetra J; Shirai, Tomoya; Yamashiro, Takaki; Yasui, Seiichi; Iwasaki, Masahiro; Ihara, Ikko; Nishida, Takehiro; Tangtaweewipat, Suchon; Umetsu, Kazutaka

    2018-02-15

    Biogas is composed of different gases including hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), which is a hazardous gas that damages pipes and generators in anaerobic digestion system. The objective of this study was to control H 2 S by waste iron powder produced by laser cutting machine in a steel and iron industry. Waste iron powder was mixed with dairy manure at a concentration between 2.0 and 20.0 g/L in batch experiments, while the concentration was varied between 1.0 and 4.0 g/L in bench experiment. In batch experiment, a reduction of up to 93% of H 2 S was observed at waste iron powder of 2.0 g/L (T1), while the reduction was of more than 99% at waste iron powder beyond 8.0 g/L (T4 ∼ T6). The total sulfide concentration (S T ) increased together with waste iron powder concentration and was fitted with a quadratic equation with a maximum S T of 208.0 mg/L at waste iron powder of 20.2 g/L. Waste iron powder did not have significant effect on methane yield in batch and bench experiments. However, hydrolysis rate constant was increased by almost 100%, while the lag-phase period was reduced to half in test digesters compared to that in control digester. In bench experiment, H 2 S concentration was reduced by 89% at 2.0 g/L, while 50% at 1.0 g/L. Therefore, waste iron powder was effectively removed H 2 S and did not affect negatively anaerobic digestion process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Microbial production and consumption of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) in a sea grass (Zostera noltii)-dominated marine intertidal sediment ecosystem (Bassin d'Arcachon, France)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, HM; van Bergeijk, SA; van Gemerden, H

    The relation between net dimethyl sulfide (DMS) production and changes in near surface (0-5 mm) oxygen concentrations in a sea grass (Zostera noltii Hornem)-covered intertidal sediment ecosystem was examined during a diel cycle. Sediment covered with Zostera was found to be more oxygenated than

  1. Framework for Assessing Biogenic CO2 Emissions from ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This revision of the 2011 report, Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources, evaluates biogenic CO2 emissions from stationary sources, including a detailed study of the scientific and technical issues associated with assessing biogenic carbon dioxide emissions from stationary sources. EPA developed the revised report, Framework for Assessing Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources, to present a methodological framework for assessing the extent to which the production, processing, and use of biogenic material at stationary sources for energy production results in a net atmospheric contribution of biogenic CO2 emissions. Biogenic carbon dioxide emissions are defined as CO2 emissions related to the natural carbon cycle, as well as those resulting from the production, harvest, combustion, digestion, decomposition, and processing of biologically-based materials. The EPA is continuing to refine its technical assessment of biogenic CO2 emissions through another round of targeted peer review of the revised study with the EPA Science Advisory Board (SAB). This study was submitted to the SAB's Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel in February 2015. http://yosemite.epa.gov/sab/sabproduct.nsf/0/3235dac747c16fe985257da90053f252!OpenDocument&TableRow=2.2#2 The revised report will inform efforts by policymakers, academics, and other stakeholders to evaluate the technical aspects related to assessments of biogenic feedstocks used for energy at s

  2. A multi-purpose tool for food inspection: Simultaneous determination of various classes of preservatives and biogenic amines in meat and fish products by LC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molognoni, Luciano; Daguer, Heitor; de Sá Ploêncio, Leandro Antunes; De Dea Lindner, Juliano

    2018-02-01

    This paper describes an innovative fast and multipurpose method for the chemical inspection of meat and fish products by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Solid-liquid extraction and low temperature partitioning were applied to 17 analytes, which included large bacteriocins (3.5kDa) and small molecules (organic acids, heterocyclic compounds, polyene macrolides, alkyl esters of the p-hydroxybenzoic acid, aromatic, and aliphatic biogenic amines and polyamines). Chromatographic separation was achieved in 10min, using stationary phase of di-isopropyl-3-aminopropyl silane bound to hydroxylated silica. Method validation was in accordance to Commission Decision 657/2002/CE. Linear ranges were among 1.25-10.0mgkg -1 (natamycin and parabens), 2.50-10.0mgkg -1 (sorbate and nisin), 25.0-200mgkg -1 (biogenic amines, hexamethylenetetramine, benzoic and lactic acids), and 50.0-400mgkg -1 (citric acid). Expanded measurement uncertainty (U) was estimated by single laboratory validation combined to modeling in two calculation approaches: internal (U = 5%) and external standardization (U = 24%). Method applicability was checked on 89 real samples among raw, cooked, dry fermented and cured products, yielding acceptable recoveries. Many regulatory issues were revealed, corroborating the need for enhancement of the current analytical methods. This simple execution method dispenses the use of additional procedures of extraction and, therefore, reduces costs over time. It is suitable for routine analysis as a screening or confirmatory tool for both qualitative and quantitative results, replacing many time consuming analytical procedures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Reduction of Net Sulfide Production Rate by Nitrate in Wastewater Bioreactors. Kinetics and Changes in the Microbial Community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villahermosa, Desiree; Corzo, Alfonso; Gonzalez, J M

    2013-01-01

    Nitrate addition stimulated sulfide oxidation by increasing the activity of nitrate-reducing sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB), decreasing the concentration of dissolved H2S in the water phase and, consequently, its release to the atmosphere of a pilot-scale anaerobic bioreactor. The effect of ...

  4. Biogenic Amine Production in Olomouc Curd Cheese (Olomoucké tvarůžky at Various Storage Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Standarová

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of temperature and storage time on the formation of biogenic amines (BAs in the traditional Czech curd cheese (Olomoucké tvarůžky. Samples were stored for 7 weeks at 5 °C and 20 °C. BAs were studied as dansyl derivatives by the RP-HPLC method with fluorescence detection, histamine was determined using a photodiode array detector. Physical and chemical properties were analyzed as specified by the Czech National Standard, as were the sensory characteristics (colour, odour, texture and flavour. The major amines found were cadaverine (124–2413 mg kg-1 and tyramine (117–1058 mg kg-1, followed by putrescine (75–767 mg kg-1 and histamine (74–411 mg kg-1. Low concentrations of tryptamine, spermine and spermidine were present. Total concentrations of BAs significantly increased with storage time (P P -1 at the end of storage. The toxicologically critical value of 900 mg kg-1 for the sum of histamine + tyramine + putrescine + cadaverine was reached 17 days later in the cheese stored at 5 °C compared to 20 °C. When stored at 5 °C, the samples retained adequate sensory characteristics for the entire safe storage time. The effects of storage conditions on BAs formation are relevant to reducing the risk associated with consumption of cheese high in BAs.

  5. Productivity Contribution of Paleozoic Woodlands to the Formation of Shale-Hosted Massive Sulfide Deposits in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (Tharsis, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Remolar, David C.; Harir, Mourad; Carrizo, Daniel; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Amils, Ricardo

    2018-03-01

    The geological materials produced during catastrophic and destructive events are an essential source of paleobiological knowledge. The paleobiological information recorded by such events can be rich in information on the size, diversity, and structure of paleocommunities. In this regard, the geobiological study of late Devonian organic matter sampled in Tharsis (Iberian Pyrite Belt) provided some new insights into a Paleozoic woodland community, which was recorded as massive sulfides and black shale deposits affected by a catastrophic event. Sample analysis using TOF-SIMS (Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer), and complemented by GC/MS (Gas Chromatrograph/Mass Spectrometer) identified organic compounds showing a very distinct distribution in the rock. While phytochemical compounds occur homogeneously in the sample matrix that is composed of black shale, the microbial-derived organics are more abundant in the sulfide nodules. The cooccurrence of sulfur bacteria compounds and the overwhelming presence of phytochemicals provide support for the hypothesis that the formation of the massive sulfides resulted from a high rate of vegetal debris production and its oxidation through sulfate reduction under suboxic to anoxic conditions. A continuous supply of iron from hydrothermal activity coupled with microbial activity was strictly necessary to produce this massive orebody. A rough estimate of the woodland biomass was made possible by accounting for the microbial sulfur production activity recorded in the metallic sulfide. As a result, the biomass size of the late Devonian woodland community was comparable to modern woodlands like the Amazon or Congo rainforests.

  6. Production of volatiles by the red seaweed Gelidium arbuscula (Rhodophyta): emission of ethylene and dimethyl sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Jimenez, Pilar; Brito-Romano, Olegario; Robaina, Rafael R

    2013-08-01

    The effects of different light conditions and exogenous ethylene on the emission of volatile compounds from the alga Gelidium arbuscula Bory de Saint-Vincent were studied. Special emphasis was placed on the possibility that the emission of ethylene and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) are related through the action of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) lyase. The conversion of DMSP to DMS and acrylate, which is catalyzed by DMSP lyase, can indirectly support the synthesis of ethylene through the transformation of acrylate to ethylene. After mimicking the desiccation of G. arbuscula thalli experienced during low tides, the volatile compounds emitted were trapped in the headspace of 2 mL glass vials for 1 h. Two methods based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry revealed that the range of organic volatile compounds released was affected by abiotic factors, such as the availability and spectral quality of light, salinity, and exogenous ethylene. Amines and methyl alkyl compounds were produced after exposure to white light and darkness but not after exposure to exogenous ethylene or red light. Volatiles potentially associated with the oxidation of fatty acids, such as alkenes and low-molecular-weight oxygenated compounds, accumu-lated after exposure to exogenous ethylene and red light. Ethylene was produced in all treatments, especially after exposure to exogenous ethylene. Levels of DMS, the most abundant sulfur-compound that was emitted in all of the conditions tested, did not increase after incubation with ethylene. Thus, although DMSP lyase is active in G. arbuscula, it is unlikely to contribute to ethylene synthesis. The generation of ethylene and DMS do not appear to be coordinated in G. arbuscula. © 2013 Phycological Society of America.

  7. Biogenic Emission Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biogenic emissions sources come from natural sources and need to accounted for in photochemical grid models. They are computed using a model which utilizes spatial information on vegetation and land use.

  8. Realizing high-rate sulfur reduction under sulfate-rich conditions in a biological sulfide production system to treat metal-laden wastewater deficient in organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rongrong; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Zefeng; Chen, Guang-Hao; Jiang, Feng

    2017-12-22

    Biological sulfur reduction can theoretically produce sufficient sulfide to effectively remove and recover heavy metals in the treatment of organics-deficient sulfate-rich metal-laden wastewater such as acid mine drainage and metallurgic wastewater, using 75% less organics than biological sulfate reduction. However, it is still unknown whether sulfur reduction can indeed compete with sulfate reduction, particularly under high-strength sulfate conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term feasibility of biological sulfur reduction under high sulfate conditions in a lab-scale sulfur-reducing biological sulfide production (BSP) system with sublimed sulfur added. In the 169-day trial, an average sulfide production rate (SPR) as high as 47 ± 9 mg S/L-h was achieved in the absence of sulfate, and the average SPR under sulfate-rich conditions was similar (53 ± 10 mg S/L-h) when 1300 mg S/L sulfate were fed with the influent. Interestingly, sulfate was barely reduced even at such a high strength and contributed to only 1.5% of total sulfide production. Desulfomicrobium was identified as the predominant sulfidogenic bacterium in the bioreactor. Batch tests further revealed that this sulfidogenic bacteria used elemental sulfur as the electron acceptor instead of the highly bioavailable sulfate, during which polysulfide acted as an intermediate, leading to an even higher bioavailability of sulfur than sulfate. The pathway of sulfur to sulfide conversion via polysulfide in the presence of both sulfur and sulfate was discussed. Collectively, when conditions favor polysulfide formation, sulfur reduction can be a promising and attractive technology to realize a high-rate and low-cost BSP process for treating sulfate-rich metal-laden wastewater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Low-molecular-weight regulators of biogenic polyamine metabolism affect cytokine production and expression of hepatitis С virus proteins in Huh7.5 human hepatocarcinoma cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masalova, O V; Lesnova, E I; Samokhvalov, E I; Permyakova, K Yu; Ivanov, A V; Kochetkov, S N; Kushch, A A

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces the expression of the genes of proinflammatory cytokines, the excessive production of which may cause cell death, and contribute to development of liver fibrosis and hepatocarcinoma. The relationship between cytokine production and metabolic disorders in HCV-infected cells remains obscure. The levels of biogenic polyamines, spermine, spermidine, and their precursor putrescine, may be a potential regulator of these processes. The purpose of the present work was to study the effects of the compounds which modulate biogenic polyamines metabolism on cytokine production and HCV proteins expression. Human hepatocarcinoma Huh7.5 cells have been transfected with the plasmids that encode HCV proteins and further incubated with the following low-molecular compounds that affect different stages of polyamine metabolism: (1) difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), the inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, the enzyme that catalyzes the biosynthesis of polyamines; (2) N,N'-bis(2,3-butane dienyl)-1,4-diaminobutane (MDL72.527), the inhibitor of proteins involved in polyamine degradation; and (3) synthetic polyamine analog N^(I),N^(II)-diethylnorspermine (DENSpm), an inducer of polyamine degradation enzyme. The intracellular accumulation and secretion of cytokines (IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, and TGF-β) was assessed by immunocytochemistry and in the immunoenzyme assay, while the cytokine gene expression was studied using reverse transcription and PCR. The effects of the compounds under analysis on the expression of HCV proteins were analyzed using the indirect immunofluorescence with anti-HCV monoclonal antibodies. It has been demonstrated that, in cells transfected with HCV genes, DFMO reduces the production of three out of four tested cytokines, namely, TNF-α and TGF-β in cells that express HCV core, Е1Е2, NS3, NS5A, and NS5B proteins, and IL-1β in the cells that express HCV core, Е1Е2, and NS3 proteins. MDL72527 and DENSpm decreased cytokine production

  10. In vitro synthesis of biogenic amines by Brochothrix thermosphacta isolates from meat and meat products and the influence of other microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Agnieszka; Czyzowska, Agata

    2011-07-01

    Twenty Brochothrix thermosphacta strains tested for biogenic amines (BAs) production, formed histamine (6.6-16.2 mg/kg) and tyramine (18.7-35.4 mg/kg) but neither putrescine nor cadaverine. Six of the twenty strains were also investigated in respect of their influence on the synthesis of BAs by Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas sp., Proteus mirabilis and Lactobacillus sakei. In pure culture Escherichia coli produced all of the studied amines (histamine, tyramine, putrescine and cadaverine) with a total concentration of 167.7 mg/kg, P. mirabilis produced a total of 56.7 mg/kg histamine, tyramine and cadaverine, while Lactobacillus sakei and Pseudomonas sp. produced histamine and tyramine, totaling 37.9 and 35.2 mg/kg respectively. All B. thermosphacta promoted cadaverine production by Escherichia coli which increased by 12-68%, and some of them contributed to the appearance of this amine among the metabolites of Pseudomonas. The presence of B. thermosphacta decreased the potential ability of P. mirabilis to produce BAs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Chemometric analysis for the detection of biogenic amines in Chilean Cabernet Sauvignon wines: a comparative study between organic and nonorganic production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yañez, L; Saavedra, J; Martínez, C; Córdova, A; Ganga, M A

    2012-08-01

    In this work, the presence of biogenic amines (BAs) was correlated with the type of wine grape culture (traditional or organic) and their concentration in the different stages of winemaking (must, alcoholic fermentation [AF] and malolactic fermentation [MLF]). The formation of BA occurred mainly during MLF in which the percentages for putrescine, cadaverine, phenylethylamine, histamine, and tyramine were 100%, 70%, 13%, 61%, and 44% for the wines produced with traditional grapes and 100%, 94%, 25%, 88%, and 13% for the wines produced with organic grapes, respectively. In general, these latter wines exhibited a lower concentration of total amines. The principal component analysis and partial least-square discriminate analysis indicated that the generation of BA has a certain behavioral pattern in the wines analyzed, which is associated with the different stages of wine production and with the type of culture (traditional or organic) used in the wine grapes. Chemometrics tools can be useful as a method of characterization and classification in a global overview of the process variables involved in the development of toxic chemicals in foods, such as the production of BA in wine. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. Effect of grazing-mediated dimethyl sulfide (DMS) production on the swimming behavior of the copepod Calanus helgolandicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckels, Mark N; Bode, Nikolai W F; Codling, Edward A; Steinke, Michael

    2013-07-15

    Chemical interactions play a fundamental role in the ecology of marine foodwebs. Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is a ubiquitous marine trace gas that acts as a bioactive compound by eliciting foraging behavior in a range of marine taxa including the copepod Temora longicornis. Production of DMS can rapidly increase following microzooplankton grazing on phytoplankton. Here, we investigated whether grazing-induced DMS elicits an increase in foraging behavior in the copepod Calanus helgolandicus. We developed a semi-automated method to quantify the effect of grazing-mediated DMS on the proportion of the time budget tethered females allocate towards slow swimming, typically associated with feeding. The pooled data showed no differences in the proportion of the 25 min time budget allocated towards slow swimming between high (23.6 ± 9.74%) and low (29.1 ± 18.33%) DMS treatments. However, there was a high degree of variability between behavioral responses of individual copepods. We discuss the need for more detailed species-specific studies of individual level responses of copepods to chemical signals at different spatial scales to improve our understanding of chemical interactions between copepods and their prey.

  13. Implications of sea-ice biogeochemistry for oceanic production and emissions of dimethyl sulfide in the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hayashida

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sea ice represents an additional oceanic source of the climatically active gas dimethyl sulfide (DMS for the Arctic atmosphere. To what extent this source contributes to the dynamics of summertime Arctic clouds is, however, not known due to scarcity of field measurements. In this study, we developed a coupled sea ice–ocean ecosystem–sulfur cycle model to investigate the potential impact of bottom-ice DMS and its precursor dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP on the oceanic production and emissions of DMS in the Arctic. The results of the 1-D model simulation were compared with field data collected during May and June of 2010 in Resolute Passage. Our results reproduced the accumulation of DMS and DMSP in the bottom ice during the development of an ice algal bloom. The release of these sulfur species took place predominantly during the earlier phase of the melt period, resulting in an increase of DMS and DMSP in the underlying water column prior to the onset of an under-ice phytoplankton bloom. Production and removal rates of processes considered in the model are analyzed to identify the processes dominating the budgets of DMS and DMSP both in the bottom ice and the underlying water column. When openings in the ice were taken into account, the simulated sea–air DMS flux during the melt period was dominated by episodic spikes of up to 8.1 µmol m−2 d−1. Further model simulations were conducted to assess the effects of the incorporation of sea-ice biogeochemistry on DMS production and emissions, as well as the sensitivity of our results to changes of uncertain model parameters of the sea-ice sulfur cycle. The results highlight the importance of taking into account both the sea-ice sulfur cycle and ecosystem in the flux estimates of oceanic DMS near the ice margins and identify key uncertainties in processes and rates that should be better constrained by new observations.

  14. Investigations of the diverse corrosion products on steel in a hydrogen sulfide environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Pengpeng; Zheng, Shuqi; Zhao, Hui; Ding, Yu; Wu, Jian; Chen, Changfeng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Diverse corrosion products on steel are investigated in H 2 S environment. • The sequence of the main corrosion products is mackinawite + cubic FeS → troilite. • The large single beam-shaped troilite has a growth pattern along the c axis. • The flower-like troilite develops from beam- or hexagonal wire-shaped grains. • The corresponding crystal structure and morphology of the products are provided. - Abstract: The corrosion products of carbon steel in aqueous H 2 S environment are investigated. The products, which include mackinawite, cubic FeS, troilite, and pyrite, are characterized through their shapes, chemical compositions and crystal structures. Mackinawite appears with a flake shape. Cubic FeS has a perfect/truncated octahedral shape, and pyrite is framboid-shaped. Flower-shaped troilite is developed from beam- or hexagonal wire-shaped grains by electrostatic interactions along a certain lattice plane. The large single beam-shaped troilite has a growth pattern along the c axis. The corresponding crystal structure and micro-morphology of the corrosion products are provided, and the three-dimensional models of them are generated

  15. Impacts of Marine Ecodynamics on the Dimethyl Sulfide(DMS) Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shanlin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Maltrud, Mathew Einar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Elliott, Scott M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cameron-Smith, Philip [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-05

    Given the new explicit Phaeocystis representation, the DMS distribution shows significant improvements, especially regarding the amplitude and location of high latitude peaks. The production of DMS varies with climate. It is therefore necessary to couple the dynamics DMS module in climate projections.

  16. The interactive effect of fungicide residues and yeast assimilable nitrogen on fermentation kinetics and hydrogen sulfide production during cider fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Thomas F; Peck, Gregory M; O'Keefe, Sean F; Stewart, Amanda C

    2017-01-01

    Fungicide residues on fruit may adversely affect yeast during cider fermentation, leading to sluggish or stuck fermentation or the production of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), which is an undesirable aroma compound. This phenomenon has been studied in grape fermentation but not in apple fermentation. Low nitrogen availability, which is characteristic of apples, may further exacerbate the effects of fungicides on yeast during fermentation. The present study explored the effects of three fungicides: elemental sulfur (S 0 ) (known to result in increased H 2 S in wine); fenbuconazole (used in orchards but not vineyards); and fludioxonil (used in post-harvest storage of apples). Only S 0 led to increased H 2 S production. Fenbuconazole (≥0.2 mg L -1 ) resulted in a decreased fermentation rate and increased residual sugar. An interactive effect of yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) concentration and fenbuconazole was observed such that increasing the YAN concentration alleviated the negative effects of fenbuconazole on fermentation kinetics. Cidermakers should be aware that residual fenbuconazole (as low as 0.2 mg L -1 ) in apple juice may lead to stuck fermentation, especially when the YAN concentration is below 250 mg L -1 . These results indicate that fermentation problems attributed to low YAN may be caused or exacerbated by additional factors such as fungicide residues, which have a greater impact on fermentation performance under low YAN conditions. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Biogenic sulfur and the acidity of rainfall in remote areas of Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nriagu, J.O.; Holdway, D.A.; Coker, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    Sulfur released from any given natural or anthropogenic source carries an isotopic signature that can be used to trace its flow through the environment. Measurements of the concentration and isotopic composition of sulfur in weekly bulk precipitation samples collected over a 4-year period at a remote location in location in northern Ontario were recorded. The long-term isotopic data and the measurement on the production and release of dimethyl sulfide from boreal wetlands show that biogenic sources can account for up to 30% of the acidifying sulfur burden in the atmosphere in remote areas of Canada. The data suggest that significant biological reemission of anthropogenic sulfur is occurring. The role of this process in the continuing acidification of the environment for years to come must be a matter of concern

  18. Sulfide Generation by Dominant Halanaerobium Microorganisms in Hydraulically Fractured Shales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booker, Anne E.; Borton, Mikayla A.; Daly, Rebecca A.; Welch, Susan A.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Hoyt, David W.; Wilson, Travis; Purvine, Samuel O.; Wolfe, Richard A.; Sharma, Shikha; Mouser, Paula J.; Cole, David R.; Lipton, Mary S.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Wilkins, Michael J.; McMahon, Katherine

    2017-07-05

    ABSTRACT

    Hydraulic fracturing of black shale formations has greatly increased United States oil and natural gas recovery. However, the accumulation of biomass in subsurface reservoirs and pipelines is detrimental because of possible well souring, microbially induced corrosion, and pore clogging. Temporal sampling of produced fluids from a well in the Utica Shale revealed the dominance ofHalanaerobiumstrains within thein situmicrobial community and the potential for these microorganisms to catalyze thiosulfate-dependent sulfidogenesis. From these field data, we investigated biogenic sulfide production catalyzed by aHalanaerobiumstrain isolated from the produced fluids using proteogenomics and laboratory growth experiments. Analysis ofHalanaerobiumisolate genomes and reconstructed genomes from metagenomic data sets revealed the conserved presence of rhodanese-like proteins and anaerobic sulfite reductase complexes capable of converting thiosulfate to sulfide. Shotgun proteomics measurements using aHalanaerobiumisolate verified that these proteins were more abundant when thiosulfate was present in the growth medium, and culture-based assays identified thiosulfate-dependent sulfide production by the same isolate. Increased production of sulfide and organic acids during the stationary growth phase suggests that fermentativeHalanaerobiumuses thiosulfate to remove excess reductant. These findings emphasize the potential detrimental effects that could arise from thiosulfate-reducing microorganisms in hydraulically fractured shales, which are undetected by current industry-wide corrosion diagnostics.

    IMPORTANCEAlthough thousands of wells in deep shale formations across the United States have been hydraulically fractured for oil and gas recovery, the impact of microbial metabolism within these environments is poorly understood. Our

  19. The Deep-Sea Natural Products, Biogenic Polyphosphate (Bio-PolyP and Biogenic Silica (Bio-Silica, as Biomimetic Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering: Fabrication of a Morphogenetically-Active Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Draenert

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone defects in human, caused by fractures/nonunions or trauma, gain increasing impact and have become a medical challenge in the present-day aging population. Frequently, those fractures require surgical intervention which ideally relies on autografts or suboptimally on allografts. Therefore, it is pressing and likewise challenging to develop bone substitution materials to heal bone defects. During the differentiation of osteoblasts from their mesenchymal progenitor/stem cells and of osteoclasts from their hemopoietic precursor cells, a lineage-specific release of growth factors and a trans-lineage homeostatic cross-talk via signaling molecules take place. Hence, the major hurdle is to fabricate a template that is functioning in a way mimicking the morphogenetic, inductive role(s of the native extracellular matrix. In the last few years, two naturally occurring polymers that are produced by deep-sea sponges, the biogenic polyphosphate (bio-polyP and biogenic silica (bio-silica have also been identified as promoting morphogenetic on both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. These polymers elicit cytokines that affect bone mineralization (hydroxyapatite formation. In this manner, bio-silica and bio-polyP cause an increased release of BMP-2, the key mediator activating the anabolic arm of the hydroxyapatite forming cells, and of RANKL. In addition, bio-polyP inhibits the progression of the pre-osteoclasts to functionally active osteoclasts. Based on these findings, new bioinspired strategies for the fabrication of bone biomimetic templates have been developed applying 3D-printing techniques. Finally, a strategy is outlined by which these two morphogenetically active polymers might be used to develop a novel functionally active polymer.

  20. The Deep-Sea Natural Products, Biogenic Polyphosphate (Bio-PolyP) and Biogenic Silica (Bio-Silica), as Biomimetic Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering: Fabrication of a Morphogenetically-Active Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Schröder, Heinz C.; Feng, Qingling; Draenert, Florian; Müller, Werner E. G.

    2013-01-01

    Bone defects in human, caused by fractures/nonunions or trauma, gain increasing impact and have become a medical challenge in the present-day aging population. Frequently, those fractures require surgical intervention which ideally relies on autografts or suboptimally on allografts. Therefore, it is pressing and likewise challenging to develop bone substitution materials to heal bone defects. During the differentiation of osteoblasts from their mesenchymal progenitor/stem cells and of osteoclasts from their hemopoietic precursor cells, a lineage-specific release of growth factors and a trans-lineage homeostatic cross-talk via signaling molecules take place. Hence, the major hurdle is to fabricate a template that is functioning in a way mimicking the morphogenetic, inductive role(s) of the native extracellular matrix. In the last few years, two naturally occurring polymers that are produced by deep-sea sponges, the biogenic polyphosphate (bio-polyP) and biogenic silica (bio-silica) have also been identified as promoting morphogenetic on both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. These polymers elicit cytokines that affect bone mineralization (hydroxyapatite formation). In this manner, bio-silica and bio-polyP cause an increased release of BMP-2, the key mediator activating the anabolic arm of the hydroxyapatite forming cells, and of RANKL. In addition, bio-polyP inhibits the progression of the pre-osteoclasts to functionally active osteoclasts. Based on these findings, new bioinspired strategies for the fabrication of bone biomimetic templates have been developed applying 3D-printing techniques. Finally, a strategy is outlined by which these two morphogenetically active polymers might be used to develop a novel functionally active polymer. PMID:23528950

  1. Effects of composition of labile organic matter on biogenic production of methane in the coastal sediments of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gonsalves, M.J.B.D.; Fernandes, C.E.G.; Fernandes, S.O.; Kirchman, D.L.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    the high sedimentation rates in the Arabian Sea (Ramaswamy et al. 1991). These rates could also be enhanced by the delivery of fine-grained riverine particles which in turn contribute to enhancing methane production (Kvenvolden & Lorenson 2001...

  2. Highly Efficient Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production of Flower-like Cadmium Sulfide Decorated by Histidine

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Qizhao; Lian, Juhong; Li, Jiajia; Wang, Rongfang; Huang, Haohao; Su, Bitao; Lei, Ziqiang

    2015-01-01

    Morphology-controlled synthesis of CdS can significantly enhance the efficiency of its photocatalytic hydrogen production. In this study, a novel three-dimensional (3D) flower-like CdS is synthesized via a facile template-free hydrothermal process using Cd(NO3)2•4H2O and thiourea as precursors and L-Histidine as a chelating agent. The morphology, crystal phase, and photoelectrochemical performance of the flower-like CdS and pure CdS nanocrystals are carefully investigated via various characte...

  3. Effects of composition of labile organic matter on biogenic production of methane in the coastal sediments of the Arabian Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Maria-Judith; Fernandes, Christabelle E G; Fernandes, Sheryl Oliveira; Kirchman, David L; Bharathi, P A Loka

    2011-11-01

    Coastal regions are potential zones for production of methane which could be governed by ecological/environmental differences or even sediment properties of a niche. In order to test the hypothesis that methanogenesis in most marine sediments could be driven more by proteins than by carbohydrates and lipid content of labile organic matter (LOM), incubation experiments were carried out with sediments from different environmental niches to measure methane production. The methane production rates were examined in relationship to the sediment biochemistry, i.e., carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids. The gas production measured by head space method ranged from 216 ng g( -1) day( -1) in the mangrove sediments to 3.1 μg g( -1) day( -1) in the shallow Arabian Sea. LOM ranged from 1.56 to 2.85 mg g( -1) in the shallow Arabian Sea, from 3.35 to 5.43 mg g( -1) in the mangrove estuary, and from 0.66 to 0.70 mg g( -1) in the sandy sediments with proteins contributing maximum to the LOM pool. Proteins influenced methane production in the clayey sediments of shallow depths of the Arabian Sea (r = 0.933, p methane production. The gas production was more pronounced in shallow and surface sediments and it decreased with depth apparently governed by the decrease in lability index. Thus, the lability index and protein content are important factors that determine methane production rates in these coastal ecosystems.

  4. The ABAG biogenic emissions inventory project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson-Henry, C. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The ability to identify the role of biogenic hydrocarbon emissions in contributing to overall ozone production in the Bay Area, and to identify the significance of that role, were investigated in a joint project of the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) and NASA/Ames Research Center. Ozone, which is produced when nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons combine in the presence of sunlight, is a primary factor in air quality planning. In investigating the role of biogenic emissions, this project employed a pre-existing land cover classification to define areal extent of land cover types. Emission factors were then derived for those cover types. The land cover data and emission factors were integrated into an existing geographic information system, where they were combined to form a Biogenic Hydrocarbon Emissions Inventory. The emissions inventory information was then integrated into an existing photochemical dispersion model.

  5. Highly Efficient Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production of Flower-like Cadmium Sulfide Decorated by Histidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qizhao; Lian, Juhong; Li, Jiajia; Wang, Rongfang; Huang, Haohao; Su, Bitao; Lei, Ziqiang

    2015-09-01

    Morphology-controlled synthesis of CdS can significantly enhance the efficiency of its photocatalytic hydrogen production. In this study, a novel three-dimensional (3D) flower-like CdS is synthesized via a facile template-free hydrothermal process using Cd(NO3)2•4H2O and thiourea as precursors and L-Histidine as a chelating agent. The morphology, crystal phase, and photoelectrochemical performance of the flower-like CdS and pure CdS nanocrystals are carefully investigated via various characterizations. Superior photocatalytic activity relative to that of pure CdS is observed on the flower-like CdS photocatalyst under visible light irradiation, which is nearly 13 times of pure CdS. On the basis of the results from SEM studies and our analysis, a growth mechanism of flower-like CdS is proposed by capturing the shape evolution. The imidazole ring of L-Histidine captures the Cd ions from the solution, and prevents the growth of the CdS nanoparticles. Furthermore, the photocatalytic contrast experiments illustrate that the as-synthesized flower-like CdS with L-Histidine is more stable than CdS without L-Histidine in the hydrogen generation.

  6. Hydrogen Sulfide Prevents Advanced Glycation End-Products Induced Activation of the Epithelial Sodium Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiushi Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs are complex and heterogeneous compounds implicated in diabetes. Sodium reabsorption through the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC at the distal nephron plays an important role in diabetic hypertension. Here, we report that H2S antagonizes AGEs-induced ENaC activation in A6 cells. ENaC open probability (PO in A6 cells was significantly increased by exogenous AGEs and that this AGEs-induced ENaC activity was abolished by NaHS (a donor of H2S and TEMPOL. Incubating A6 cells with the catalase inhibitor 3-aminotriazole (3-AT mimicked the effects of AGEs on ENaC activity, but did not induce any additive effect. We found that the expression levels of catalase were significantly reduced by AGEs and both AGEs and 3-AT facilitated ROS uptake in A6 cells, which were significantly inhibited by NaHS. The specific PTEN and PI3K inhibitors, BPV(pic  and LY294002, influence ENaC activity in AGEs-pretreated A6 cells. Moreover, after removal of AGEs from AGEs-pretreated A6 cells for 72 hours, ENaC PO remained at a high level, suggesting that an AGEs-related “metabolic memory” may be involved in sodium homeostasis. Our data, for the first time, show that H2S prevents AGEs-induced ENaC activation by targeting the ROS/PI3K/PTEN pathway.

  7. Acid production potentials of massive sulfide minerals and lead-zinc mine tailings: a medium-term study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelebi, Emin Ender; Öncel, Mehmet Salim; Kobya, Mehmet

    2018-01-01

    Weathering of sulfide minerals is a principal source of acid generation. To determine acid-forming potentials of sulfide-bearing materials, two basic approaches named static and kinetic tests are available. Static tests are short-term, and easily undertaken within a few days and in a laboratory. In contrast, kinetic tests are long-term procedures and mostly carried out on site. In this study, experiments were conducted over a medium-term period of 2 months, not as short as static tests and also not as long as kinetic tests. As a result, pH and electrical conductivity oscillations as a function of time, acid-forming potentials and elemental contents of synthetically prepared rainwater leachates of massive sulfides and sulfide-bearing lead-zinc tailings from abandoned and currently used deposition areas have been determined. Although the lowest final pH of 2.70 was obtained in massive pyrite leachate, massive chalcopyrite leachate showed the highest titrable acidity of 1.764 g H 2 SO 4 /L. On the other hand, a composite of currently deposited mine tailings showed no acidic characteristic with a final pH of 7.77. The composite abandoned mine tailing leachate had a final pH of 6.70, close to the final pH of massive galena and sphalerite leachates, and produced a slight titrable acidity of 0.130 g H 2 SO 4 /L.

  8. Molecular extinction coefficients of lead sulfide and polymerized diaminobenzidine as final reaction products of histochemical phosphatase reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noorden, C. J.; Jonges, G. N.

    1992-01-01

    Molar extinction coefficients of precipitated lead sulfide (PbS) and polymerized diaminobenzidine (polyDAB) have been determined at wavelengths of 450 nm and 480 nm, respectively, for quantitative histochemical analysis of phosphatase reactions. These values are essential for the conversion of

  9. Hydrogen Production Using a Molybdenum Sulfide Catalyst on a Titanium-Protected n+p-Silicon Photocathode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seger, Brian; Laursen, Anders Bo; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard

    2012-01-01

    A low-cost substitute: A titanium protection layer on silicon made it possible to use silicon under highly oxidizing conditions without oxidation of the silicon. Molybdenum sulfide was electrodeposited on the Ti-protected n+p-silicon electrode. This electrode was applied as a photocathode for wat...

  10. Approaching Mars-like geochemical conditions in the laboratory: omission of artificial buffers and reductants in a study of biogenic methane production on a smectite clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastain, Brendon K; Kral, Timothy A

    2010-11-01

    Methanogens have not been shown to metabolize in conditions exactly analogous to those present in Mars' subsurface. In typical studies of methanogenic metabolism, nutrient-rich buffered media and reducing agents are added to the cultures in an attempt to optimize the environment for methanogen survival and growth. To study methanogens in more Mars-relevant laboratory conditions, efforts should be made to eliminate artificial media, buffers, and reducing agents from investigations of methanogenic metabolism. After preliminary work to compare methanogen viability on montmorillonite clay and JSC Mars-1 regolith simulant, a study was conducted to determine whether biological methanogenesis could occur in non-reduced, non-buffered environments containing only H(2), CO(2), montmorillonite, and the liquid fraction extracted from a montmorillonite/deionized water suspension. Biogenic methane was observed in the microenvironments despite the omission of traditional media, buffers, and reducing agents. Mean headspace methane concentration after 96 days of observation was 10.23% ± 0.64% (% vol ± SEM, n = 4). However, methane production was severely decreased with respect to reduced, buffered microenvironments (Day 28: 31.98% ± 0.19%, n = 3). Analysis of results and comparison to previous work indicate that montmorillonite clay has a strong ability to supply micronutrients necessary for methanogenic metabolism, and the liquid fraction from a montmorillonite/deionized water slurry can successfully be used as an alternative to reduced and buffered nutritive media in Mars-relevant studies of methanogenic metabolism.

  11. Ice nuclei in marine air: biogenic particles or dust?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Burrows

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ice nuclei impact clouds, but their sources and distribution in the atmosphere are still not well known. Particularly little attention has been paid to IN sources in marine environments, although evidence from field studies suggests that IN populations in remote marine regions may be dominated by primary biogenic particles associated with sea spray. In this exploratory model study, we aim to bring attention to this long-neglected topic and identify promising target regions for future field campaigns. We assess the likely global distribution of marine biogenic ice nuclei using a combination of historical observations, satellite data and model output. By comparing simulated marine biogenic immersion IN distributions and dust immersion IN distributions, we predict strong regional differences in the importance of marine biogenic IN relative to dust IN. Our analysis suggests that marine biogenic IN are most likely to play a dominant role in determining IN concentrations in near-surface-air over the Southern Ocean, so future field campaigns aimed at investigating marine biogenic IN should target that region. Climate-related changes in the abundance and emission of biogenic marine IN could affect marine cloud properties, thereby introducing previously unconsidered feedbacks that influence the hydrological cycle and the Earth's energy balance. Furthermore, marine biogenic IN may be an important aspect to consider in proposals for marine cloud brightening by artificial sea spray production.

  12. Effect of pH buffering capacity and sources of dietary sulfur on rumen fermentation, sulfide production, methane production, sulfate reducing bacteria, and total Archaea in in vitro rumen cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Meng, Qingxiang; Yu, Zhongtang

    2015-06-01

    The effects of three types of dietary sulfur on in vitro fermentation characteristics, sulfide production, methane production, and microbial populations at two different buffer capacities were examined using in vitro rumen cultures. Addition of dry distilled grain with soluble (DDGS) generally decreased total gas production, degradation of dry matter and neutral detergent fiber, and concentration of total volatile fatty acids, while increasing ammonia concentration. High buffering capacity alleviated these adverse effects on fermentation. Increased sulfur content resulted in decreased methane emission, but total Archaea population was not changed significantly. The population of sulfate reducing bacteria was increased in a sulfur type-dependent manner. These results suggest that types of dietary sulfur and buffering capacity can affect rumen fermentation and sulfide production. Diet buffering capacity, and probably alkalinity, may be increased to alleviate some of the adverse effects associated with feeding DDGS at high levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds and subsequent photochemical production of secondary organic aerosol in mesocosm studies of temperate and tropical plant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyche, K. P.; Ryan, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.; Alfarra, M. R.; McFiggans, G.; Carr, T.; Monks, P. S.; Smallbone, K. L.; Capes, G.; Hamilton, J. F.; Pugh, T. A. M.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Silver birch (Betula pendula) and three Southeast Asian tropical plant species (Ficus cyathistipula, Ficus benjamina and Caryota millis) from the pantropical fig and palm genera were grown in a purpose-built and environment-controlled whole-tree chamber. The volatile organic compounds emitted from these trees were characterised and fed into a linked photochemical reaction chamber where they underwent photo-oxidation under a range of controlled conditions (relative humidity or RH ~65-89%, volatile organic compound-to-NOx or VOC / NOx ~3-9 and NOx ~2 ppbV). Both the gas phase and the aerosol phase of the reaction chamber were monitored in detail using a comprehensive suite of on-line and off-line chemical and physical measurement techniques. Silver birch was found to be a high monoterpene and sesquiterpene but low isoprene emitter, and its emissions were observed to produce measurable amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) via both nucleation and condensation onto pre-existing seed aerosol (YSOA 26-39%). In contrast, all three tropical species were found to be high isoprene emitters with trace emissions of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. In tropical plant experiments without seed aerosol there was no measurable SOA nucleation, but aerosol mass was shown to increase when seed aerosol was present. Although principally isoprene emitting, the aerosol mass produced from tropical fig was mostly consistent (i.e. in 78 out of 120 aerosol mass calculations using plausible parameter sets of various precursor specific yields) with condensation of photo-oxidation products of the minor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) co-emitted; no significant aerosol yield from condensation of isoprene oxidation products was required in the interpretations of the experimental results. This finding is in line with previous reports of organic aerosol loadings consistent with production from minor biogenic VOCs co-emitted with isoprene in principally isoprene-emitting landscapes in Southeast

  14. Cysteine Addition Promotes Sulfide Production and 4-Fold Hg(II)-S Coordination in Actively Metabolizing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sara A; Gaillard, Jean-François

    2017-04-18

    The bacterial uptake of mercury(II), Hg(II), is believed to be energy-dependent and is enhanced by cysteine in diverse species of bacteria under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To gain insight into this Hg(II) biouptake pathway, we have employed X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to investigate the relationship between exogenous cysteine, cellular metabolism, cellular localization, and Hg(II) coordination in aerobically respiring Escherichia coli (E. coli). We show that cells harvested in exponential growth phase consistently display mixtures of 2-fold and 4-fold Hg(II) coordination to sulfur (Hg-S 2 and Hg-S 4 ), with added cysteine enhancing Hg-S 4 formation. In contrast, cells in stationary growth phase or cells treated with a protonophore causing a decrease in cellular ATP predominantly contain Hg-S 2 , regardless of cysteine addition. Our XAS results favor metacinnabar (β-HgS) as the Hg-S 4 species, which we show is associated with both the cell envelope and cytoplasm. Additionally, we observe that added cysteine abiotically oxidizes to cystine and exponentially growing E. coli degrade high cysteine concentrations (100-1000 μM) into sulfide. Thermodynamic calculations confirm that cysteine-induced sulfide biosynthesis can promote the formation of dissolved and particulate Hg(II)-sulfide species. This report reveals new complexities arising in Hg(II) bioassays with cysteine and emphasizes the need for considering changes in chemical speciation as well as growth stage.

  15. The relationship between Al and Si in biogenic silica as determined by PIXE and XAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, L.; Gehlen, M.; Flank, A.-M.; Bennekom, A.J. van; Beusekom, J.E.E. van

    2002-01-01

    Biogenic silica, one of the major constituents of marine sediments, is a potentially powerful paleoceanographic tool, revealing information on past productivity. Interpreting the sedimentary records of the biogenic silica requires, however, an understanding of its preservation. Dissolution of biogenic silica is controlled by the presence of trace elements such as Al. The work in this paper focuses on the association of Al and Si in biogenic silica. The composition and the atomic structure of cultured and natural diatoms were determined by using PIXE and XAS techniques. This study provides the first evidence for a structural association of Al and Si in biogenic silica

  16. Sulfidation behavior of Fe20Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillis, Marina Fuser

    2001-01-01

    Alloys for use in high temperature environments rely on the formation of an oxide layer for their protection. Normally, these protective oxides are Cr 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 and, some times, SiO 2 . Many industrial gaseous environments contain sulfur. Sulfides, formed in the presence of sulfur are thermodynamically less stable, have lower melting points and deviate much more stoichiometrically, compared to the corresponding oxides. The mechanism of sulfidation of various metals is as yet not clear, in spite of the concerted efforts during the last decade. To help address this situation, the sulfidation behavior of Fe20Cr has been studied as a function of compositional modifications and surface state of the alloy. The alloys Fe20Cr, Fe20Cr0.7Y, Fe20Cr5Al and Fe20Cr5Al0.6Y were prepared and three sets of sulfidation tests were carried out. In the first set, the alloys were sulfidized at 700 deg C and 800 deg C for 10h. In the second set, the alloys were pre-oxidized at 1000 deg C and then sulfidized at 800 deg C for up to 45h. In the third set of tests, the initial stages of sulfidation of the alloys was studied. All the tests were carried out in a thermobalance, in flowing H 2 /2%H 2 S, and the sulfidation behavior determined as mass change per unit area. Scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis were used to characterize the reaction products. The addition of Y and Al increased sulfidation resistance of Fe20Cr. The addition of Y altered the species that diffused predominantly during sulfide growth. It changed from predominant cationic diffusion to predominant anionic diffusion. The addition of Al caused an even greater increase in sulfidation resistance of Fe20Cr, with the parabolic rate constant decreasing by three orders of magnitude. Y addition to the FeCrAl alloy did not cause any appreciable alteration in sulfidation resistance. Pre-oxidation of the FeCrAl and FeCrAlY alloys resulted in an extended

  17. Non-enzymatic U(VI) interactions with biogenic mackinawite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeramani, H.; Qafoku, N. P.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Murayama, M.; Hochella, M. F.

    2011-12-01

    Reductive immobilization of hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] by stimulation of dissimilatory metal and/or sulfate reducing bacteria (DMRB or DSRB) has been extensively researched as a remediation strategy for subsurface U(VI) contamination. These bacteria derive energy by reducing oxidized metals as terminal electron acceptors, often utilizing organic substrates as electron donors. Thus, when evaluating the potential for in-situ uranium remediation in heterogeneous subsurface media, it is important to understand how the presence of alternative electron acceptors such as Fe(III) and sulfate affect U(VI) remediation and the long term behavior and reactivity of reduced uranium. Iron, an abundant subsurface element, represents a substantial sink for electrons from DMRB, and the reduction of Fe(III) leads to the formation of dissolved Fe(II) or to reactive biogenic Fe(II)- and mixed Fe(II)/Fe(III)- mineral phases. Consequently, abiotic U(VI) reduction by reactive forms of biogenic Fe(II) minerals could be a potentially important process for uranium immobilization. In our study, the DMRB Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 was used to synthesize a biogenic Fe(II)-bearing sulfide mineral: mackinawite, that has been characterized by XRD, SEM, HRTEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Batch experiments involving treated biogenic mackinawite and uranium (50:1 molar ratio) were carried out at room temperature under strict anoxic conditions. Following complete removal of uranium from solution, the biogenic mackinawite was analyzed by a suite of analytical techniques including XAS, HRTEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy to determine the speciation of uranium and investigate concomitant Fe(II)-phase transformation. Determining the speciation of uranium is critical to success of a remediation strategy. The present work elucidates non-enzymatic/abiotic molecular scale redox interactions between biogenic mackinawite and uranium.

  18. Synthesis of Zn-Cu-Cd sulfide nanospheres with controlled copper locations and their effects on photocatalytic activities for H{sub 2} production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yabo; Xu, Rong [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637459 (Singapore); Wang, Yongsheng [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2010-06-15

    In this work, a two-step solvothermal method was used to synthesize Zn-Cu-Cd sulfide nanospheres with controlled copper locations. The structural and other physical properties of the nanospheres were investigated by XRD, FESEM, TEM, energy-filtered TEM, XPS, ICP and UV-vis DRS methods. By varying the addition of the copper precursor during the two synthesis steps, Zn-Cu-Cd sulfide nanospheres with three distinctive copper distribution patterns can be obtained with copper (i) only in the core, (ii) only on the surface shell, and (iii) both in the core and on the surface shell. The influence of the location and concentration of copper on the photocatalytic activity for hydrogen production from water under visible light was investigated. It was found that the activity of the sample with copper only on the surface shell is about two times of that with copper only in the core. The highest hydrogen production rate was obtained on the nanosphere sample with copper both in the core and on the surface shell. The possible mechanism was discussed. The findings from this study are important for the development of efficient photocatalysts based on ternary or multinary systems. (author)

  19. SULFIDE MINERALS IN SEDIMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The formation processes of metal sulfides in sediments, especially iron sulfides, have been the subjects of intense scientific research because of linkages to the global biogeochemical cycles of iron, sulfur, carbon, and oxygen. Transition metal sulfides (e.g., NiS, CuS, ZnS, Cd...

  20. Biogenic amines degradation by microorganisms isolated from cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Butor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the isolation and characterization of microorganisms able to degrade biogenic amines and their identification. Individual microorganisms were obtained by isolation from commercially available foodstuffs and food produced in the technological laboratories of Faculty of Technology, Tomas Bata University in Zlín and subsequently identified by MALDI-TOF MS. The results of MALDI-TOF MS identification were verified by 16S rRNA sequenation. In this work was studied the ability of 5 bacterial strains positive to biogenic amines degradation isolated from dairy products to decrease biogenic amines content in vitro and quantified reduction in the concentration of biogenic amines tryptamine, β-phenylethylamine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine and tyramine. The level of degradation (decrease of biogenic amines was determined on the base of the ability to grow in media with biogenic amines as the sole source carbon and nitrogen. The isolated strains with the ability of degradation of one or more biogenic amines were cultured in medium supplemented with relevant biogenic amines, the media derivatized with dansyl chloride and these amines separated by HPLC at a wavelength of 254 nm. From five tested strains identified as Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumilus, Enterobacter cloacae, Rhizobium radiobacter and Acinetobacter pitii, isolated from gouda type cheese, the greatest ability of degradation was observed in Bacillus subtilis, which was capable to degrade almost all amount of histamine, cadaverine and putrescine. Other four strains showed a lower rate of degradation than Bacillus subtilis, but the ability to degrade biogenic amines with these microorganisms was still significant.

  1. Biocompetitive exclusion technology: A field system to control reservoir souring and increasing production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandbeck, K.A.; Hitzman, D.O.

    1995-12-31

    Biogenic formation of sulfide in reservoirs by Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB) causes serious plugging, corrosion, and environmental safety problems. The production of sulfide can be decreased, and its concentration reduced, by the establishment and growth of an indigenous microbial population which results in a replacement of the SRB population. This approach to modify the reservoir ecology utilizing preexisting carbon sources coupled with the introduction of an alternate electron acceptor forms the basis of a new Biocompetitive Exclusion technology which has the potential to enhance oil recovery and decrease paraffin deposition and corrosion. Preliminary field results from an ongoing DOE-sponsored research program will be discussed.

  2. Long term evolution and internal architecture of high-energy banner ridges of Mer d'Iroise (Western Brittany, France) : interplay of sea-level, basement morphology, biogenic productivity and hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roy, P., Sr.; Le Dantec, N.; Franzetti, M.; Delacourt, C.; Ehrhold, A.

    2016-12-01

    The recent completion of a coupled seismic and swath bathymetric survey, conducted across the Mer d'Iroise (Atlantic continental shelf, France), provided new data for the study of the long term evolution of deep tidal sand ridges. Three major banner sand ridges composed of biogenic sands were investigated: the Banc du Four, the Haut Fond d'Ouessant and the Banc d'Ar Men. Seismic interpretation reveals a compound internal architecture of these sand ridges with a sedimentary core forming the lower units interpreted to be shoreface deposits and overlain by sandwaves. Sandwave climbing, which combines progradation and accretion, is the major process controlling the growth of the ridges. The elevation of the preserved dune foresets reaches values of about 20 to 30 m and indicate a combination of giant dunes characterized by numerous steep (up to 20°) clinoforms corresponding to a high-energy depositional environment. All of the radiocarbon ages of the biogenic surficial deposits of the Banc du Four range from 10,036 to 2,748 cal years B.P. and suggest it has grown during the last sea-level rise. The apparent absence of recent surface deposits could be caused by a change in benthic biogenic productivity or the non-conservation of recent deposits. The multiphase accretion of the ridge is closely linked to the progressive flooding of the coastal promontories and straits that structured the igneous basement. A comparable evolutionary scheme is observed for the Haut-Fond d'Ouessant where a counter-clock wise migration of dunes characterizes the surface of the ridge. In contrast, the Banc d'Ar Men located above a regular basement displays a simpler structure with a consistent Northwestward migration of steep clinoforms. Therefore, the sand ridges of the Mer d'Iroise should be thought of as a representative example of large-scale high-energy banner banks controlled by interaction of sea-level, basement morphology, biogenic productivity, tidal and wave hydrodynamics.

  3. New cyclic sulfides, garlicnins I2, M, N, and O, from Allium sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohara, Toshihiro; Ono, Masateru; Nishioka, Naho; Masuda, Fuka; Fujiwara, Yukio; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Nakano, Daisuke; Kinjo, Junei

    2018-01-01

    One atypical thiolane-type sulfide, garlicnin I 2 (1), two 3,4-dimethylthiolane-type sulfides, garlicnins M (2) and N (3), and one thiabicyclic-type sulfide, garlicnin O (4), were isolated from the acetone extracts of Chinese garlic bulbs, Allium sativum and their structures were characterized. Hypothetical pathways for the production of the respective sulfides were discussed.

  4. Determination of biogenic component in waste and liquid fuels by the 14C method

    OpenAIRE

    Krajcar Bronić, Ines; Barešić, Jadranka; Horvatinčić, Nada

    2015-01-01

    Intensive use of fossil fuels for energy production and transport during 20th century caused an increase of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. The increase of CO2 concentration can be slowed down by the use of biogenic materials for energy production and/or transport. One of the method for determination of the fraction of the biogenic component in any type of fuel or waste is the 14C method, which is based on different content of 14C in biogenic and in fossil component: while the biogenic c...

  5. Biogenic Emission Inventory System (BEIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biogenic Emission Inventory System (BEIS) estimates volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from vegetation and nitric oxide (NO) emission from soils. Recent BEIS development has been restricted to the SMOKE system

  6. A new method for the simultaneous enhancement of methane yield and reduction of hydrogen sulfide production in the anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaohu; Hu, Chongliang; Zhang, Dong; Chen, Yinguang

    2017-11-01

    The biogas generated from anaerobic digestion (AD) also includes undesirable by-product such as hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), which must be removed before the biogas can be used as a clean energy source. Therefore, it is necessary to find an appropriate strategy to simultaneously enhance the methane yield and reduce H 2 S production. An efficient strategy-pretreating sludge at pH 10 for 8d and adjusting the system at neutral pH to produce methane for 20d-is reported for the synchronous enhancement of methane production and reduction of H 2 S production during AD. The experimental results showed that the cumulative methane yield was 861.2±6.1mL/g volatile solids (VS) of sludge pretreated at pH 10 in semi-continuous stirred anaerobic reactors for 84d, an increase of 49.6% over the yield in the control. Meanwhile, the cumulative production of H 2 S was 144.1×10 -4 mL/g VS, 54.2% lower than that in the control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hydrogen sulfide potentiates interleukin-1β-induced nitric oxide production via enhancement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation in rat vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Sun-Oh; Pae, Hyun-Ock; Oh, Gi-Su; Jeong, Gil-Saeng; Lee, Bok-Soo; Lee, Seoul; Kim, Du Yong; Rhew, Hyun Yul; Lee, Kang-Min; Chung, Hun-Taeg

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) and nitric oxide (NO) are endogenously synthesized from L-cysteine and L-arginine, respectively. They might constitute a cooperative network to regulate their effects. In this study, we investigated whether H 2 S could affect NO production in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) stimulated with interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Although H 2 S by itself showed no effect on NO production, it augmented IL-β-induced NO production and this effect was associated with increased expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. IL-1β activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and this activation was also enhanced by H 2 S. Inhibition of ERK1/2 activation by the selective inhibitor U0126 inhibited IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation, iNOS expression, and NO production either in the absence or presence of H 2 S. Our findings suggest that H 2 S enhances NO production and iNOS expression by potentiating IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation through a mechanism involving ERK1/2 signaling cascade in rat VSMCs

  8. Iron-sulfide crystals in probe deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Karin; Frandsen, Flemming

    1998-01-01

    Iron-sulfides were observed in deposits collected on a probe inserted at the top of the furnace of a coal-fired power station in Denmark. The chemical composition of the iron-sulfides is equivalent to pyrrhotite (FeS). The pyrrhotites are present as crystals and, based on the shape of the crystals......: (1) impact of low viscous droplets of iron sulfide; and (2) sulfur diffusion. Previous research on the influence of pyrite on slagging focused on the decomposition of pyrite into pyrrhotite and especially on the oxidation stage of this product during impact on the heat transfer surfaces...

  9. Importance of Dissolved Neutral Hg-Sulfides, Energy Rich Organic Matter and total Hg Concentrations for Methyl Mercury Production in Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drott, A.; Skyllberg, U.

    2007-12-01

    brackish waters (palgae and bacteria) in the sediment and a high annual temperature sum, resulted in high methylation rates. In conclusion, concentrations of neutral Hg-sulfides and availability of energy rich organic matter, but also total Hg concentrations in sediments are important factors behind net production and accumulation of MeHg . References: (1) Drott et. al. submitted, (2) Drott, A.; Lambertsson, L.; Björn, E.; Skyllberg, U. Importance of dissolved neutral mercury sulfides for methyl mercury production in contaminated sediments. Environmental Science & Technology 2007, 41, 2270-2276.

  10. Hydropower's Biogenic Carbon Footprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Laura; Pfister, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is accelerating and the world urgently needs a shift to clean and renewable energy. Hydropower is currently the largest renewable source of electricity, but its contribution to climate change mitigation is not yet fully understood. Hydroelectric reservoirs are a source of biogenic greenhouse gases and in individual cases can reach the same emission rates as thermal power plants. Little is known about the severity of their emissions at the global scale. Here we show that the carbon footprint of hydropower is far higher than previously assumed, with a global average of 173 kg CO2 and 2.95 kg CH4 emitted per MWh of electricity produced. This results in a combined average carbon footprint of 273 kg CO2e/MWh when using the global warming potential over a time horizon of 100 years (GWP100). Nonetheless, this is still below that of fossil energy sources without the use of carbon capture and sequestration technologies. We identified the dams most promising for capturing methane for use as alternative energy source. The spread among the ~1500 hydropower plants analysed in this study is large and highlights the importance of case-by-case examinations.

  11. Hydropower's Biogenic Carbon Footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is accelerating and the world urgently needs a shift to clean and renewable energy. Hydropower is currently the largest renewable source of electricity, but its contribution to climate change mitigation is not yet fully understood. Hydroelectric reservoirs are a source of biogenic greenhouse gases and in individual cases can reach the same emission rates as thermal power plants. Little is known about the severity of their emissions at the global scale. Here we show that the carbon footprint of hydropower is far higher than previously assumed, with a global average of 173 kg CO2 and 2.95 kg CH4 emitted per MWh of electricity produced. This results in a combined average carbon footprint of 273 kg CO2e/MWh when using the global warming potential over a time horizon of 100 years (GWP100). Nonetheless, this is still below that of fossil energy sources without the use of carbon capture and sequestration technologies. We identified the dams most promising for capturing methane for use as alternative energy source. The spread among the ~1500 hydropower plants analysed in this study is large and highlights the importance of case-by-case examinations. PMID:27626943

  12. Purification of hydrogen sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsao, U.

    1978-01-01

    A process is described for purifying a hydrogen sulfide gas stream containing carbon dioxide, comprising (a) passing the gas stream through a bed of solid hydrated lime to form calcium hydrosulfide and calcium carbonate and (b) regenerating hydrogen sulfide from said calcium hydrosulfide by reacting the calcium hydrosulfide with additional carbon dioxide. The process is especially applicable for use in a heavy water recovery process wherein deuterium is concentrated from a feed water containing carbon dioxide by absorption and stripping using hydrogen sulfide as a circulating medium, and the hydrogen sulfide absorbs a small quantity of carbon dioxide along with deuterium in each circulation

  13. Perception of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) by loggerhead sea turtles: a possible mechanism for locating high-productivity oceanic regions for foraging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Courtney S; Lohmann, Kenneth J

    2012-10-15

    During their long-distance migrations, sea turtles of several species feed on jellyfish and other invertebrates that are particularly abundant in ocean regions characterized by high productivity. An ability to distinguish productive oceanic regions from other areas, and to concentrate foraging activities in locations where prey density is highest, might therefore be adaptive. The volatile compound dimethyl sulfide (DMS) accumulates in the air above productive ocean areas such as upwelling and frontal zones. In principle, DMS might therefore serve as an indicator of high prey density for turtles. To determine whether turtles perceive DMS, juvenile loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) were placed into a water-filled arena in which DMS and other odorants could be introduced to the air above the water surface. Turtles exposed to air that had passed over a cup containing 10 nmol l(-1) DMS spent more time at the surface with their noses out of the water than control turtles, which were exposed to air that had passed over a cup containing distilled water. Odors that do not occur in the sea (cinnamon, jasmine and lemon) did not elicit increased surface time, implying that the response to DMS is unlikely to reflect a generalized response to any novel odor. The results demonstrate for the first time that sea turtles can detect DMS, an ability that might enable the identification of favorable foraging areas.

  14. A comparative study of nitrite reduction by synthetic and biogenic Fe(II-III) hydroxysalts green rusts: Evidence for hydroxyl-nitrite green rust formation as an intermediate reaction product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ona-Nguema, G.; Guerbois, D.; Morin, G.; Zhang, Y.; Noel, V.; Brest, J.

    2013-12-01

    -GR(Cl) led to the reduction of nitrite ions to ammonium, and that the production of ammonium depended on their Fe(II) content. XRD patterns indicated that both synthetic green rusts were fully oxidized into magnetite during the reaction with nitrite. For biogenic green rusts, the study revealed that both bio-GR(CO3)F and bio-GR(CO3)L were capable of reducing nitrite ions without ammonium production, suggesting the conversion of nitrite ions to nitrogen gas. Moreover, we provided evidence for the first time that the interactions of bio-GR(CO3)F with nitrite led to the formation of an hydroxy-nitrite green rust as a result of the incorporation of nitrite in the interlayer region of bio-GR(CO3)F; such an intercalation of nitrite ions was not observed in experiments with bio-GR(CO3)L. XRD analysis indicated that GR(NO2) was formed as an intermediate reaction product prior to the fully oxidation of GR to ferric oxyhydroxides. [1] Philips S., Laanbroek H. J. and Verstraete W. (2002). Rev. Environ. Sci. Biotechnol. 1, 115-141.

  15. Biogenic amines in dry fermented sausages: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzzi, Giovanna; Gardini, Fausto

    2003-11-15

    Biogenic amines are compounds commonly present in living organisms in which they are responsible for many essential functions. They can be naturally present in many foods such as fruits and vegetables, meat, fish, chocolate and milk, but they can also be produced in high amounts by microorganisms through the activity of amino acid decarboxylases. Excessive consumption of these amines can be of health concern because their not equilibrate assumption in human organism can generate different degrees of diseases determined by their action on nervous, gastric and intestinal systems and blood pressure. High microbial counts, which characterise fermented foods, often unavoidably lead to considerable accumulation of biogenic amines, especially tyramine, 2-phenylethylamine, tryptamine, cadaverine, putrescine and histamine. However, great fluctuations of amine content are reported in the same type of product. These differences depend on many variables: the quali-quantitative composition of microbial microflora, the chemico-physical variables, the hygienic procedure adopted during production, and the availability of precursors. Dry fermented sausages are worldwide diffused fermented meat products that can be a source of biogenic amines. Even in the absence of specific rules and regulations regarding the presence of these compounds in sausages and other fermented products, an increasing attention is given to biogenic amines, especially in relation to the higher number of consumers with enhanced sensitivity to biogenic amines determined by the inhibition of the action of amino oxidases, the enzymes involved in the detoxification of these substances. The aim of this paper is to give an overview on the presence of these compounds in dry fermented sausages and to discuss the most important factors influencing their accumulation. These include process and implicit factors as well as the role of starter and nonstarter microflora growing in the different steps of sausage production

  16. Production of Hydrogen by Superadiabatic Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide - Final Technical Report for the Period June 1, 1999 - September 30, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachid B. Slimane; Francis S. Lau; Javad Abbasian

    2000-10-01

    The objective of this program is to develop an economical process for hydrogen production, with no additional carbon dioxide emission, through the thermal decomposition of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in H{sub 2}S-rich waste streams to high-purity hydrogen and elemental sulfur. The novel feature of the process being developed is the superadiabatic combustion (SAC) of part of the H{sub 2}S in the waste stream to provide the thermal energy required for the decomposition reaction such that no additional energy is required. The program is divided into two phases. In Phase 1, detailed thermochemical and kinetic modeling of the SAC reactor with H{sub 2}S-rich fuel gas and air/enriched air feeds is undertaken to evaluate the effects of operating conditions on exit gas products and conversion efficiency, and to identify key process parameters. Preliminary modeling results are used as a basis to conduct a thorough evaluation of SAC process design options, including reactor configuration, operating conditions, and productivity-product separation schemes, with respect to potential product yields, thermal efficiency, capital and operating costs, and reliability, ultimately leading to the preparation of a design package and cost estimate for a bench-scale reactor testing system to be assembled and tested in Phase 2 of the program. A detailed parametric testing plan was also developed for process design optimization and model verification in Phase 2. During Phase 2 of this program, IGT, UIC, and industry advisors UOP and BP Amoco will validate the SAC concept through construction of the bench-scale unit and parametric testing. The computer model developed in Phase 1 will be updated with the experimental data and used in future scale-up efforts. The process design will be refined and the cost estimate updated. Market survey and assessment will continue so that a commercial demonstration project can be identified.

  17. A chromatographic method to analyze products from photo-oxidation of anthropogenic and biogenic mixtures of volatile organic compounds in smog chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindado Jiménez, Oscar; Pérez Pastor, Rosa M; Vivanco, Marta G; Santiago Aladro, Manuel

    2013-03-15

    A method for quantifying secondary organic aerosol compounds (SOA) and water soluble secondary organic aerosol compounds (WSOA) produced from photo-oxidation of complex mixtures of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in smog chambers by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been developed. This method employs a double extraction with water and methanol jointly to a double derivatization with N,O-bis (trimethylsilil) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) and O-(2,3,4,5,6)-pentafluorobenzyl-hydroxylamine hydrochloride (PFBHA) followed by an analysis performed by GC/MS. The analytical procedure complements other methodologies because it can analyze SOA and WSOA compounds simultaneously at trace levels. As application, the methodology was employed to quantify the organic composition of aerosols formed in a smog chamber as a result of photo-oxidation of two different mixtures of volatile organic compounds: an anthropogenic mixture and a biogenic mixture. The analytical method allowed us to quantify up to 17 SOA compounds at levels higher than 20 ng m(-3) with reasonable recovery and a precision below 11%. Values found for applicability, selectivity, linearity, precision, recovery, detection limit, quantification limit and sensitivity demonstrated that the methodology can be satisfactorily applied to quantify SOA and WSOA. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishanina, Tatiana V.; Yadav, Pramod K.; Ballou, David P.; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be −123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. PMID:26318450

  19. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishanina, Tatiana V; Yadav, Pramod K; Ballou, David P; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-10-09

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be -123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. The origin and isotopic composition of dissolved sulfide in groundwater from carbonate aquifers in Florida and Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rye, R.O.; Back, W.; Hanshaw, B.B.; Rightmire, C.T.; Pearson, F.J. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The delta 34 S values of dissolved sulfide and the sulfur isotope fractionations between dissolved sulfide and sulfate species in Floridan ground water generally correlate with dissolved sulfate concentrations which are related to flow patterns and residence time within the aquifer. The dissolved sulfide derives from the slow in situ biogenic reduction of sulfate dissolved from sedimentary gypsum in the aquifer. In areas where the water is oldest, the dissolved sulfide has apparently attained isotopic equilibrium with the dissolved sulfate at the temperature of the system. This approach to equilibrium reflects an extremely slow reduction rate of the dissolved sulfate by bacteria; this slow rate probably results from very low concentrations of organic matter in the aquifer. In the reducing part of the Edwards aquifer, Texas, there is a general down-gradient increase in both dissolved sulfide and sulfate concentrations, but neither the delta 34 S values of sulfide nor the sulfide-sulfate isotope fractionation correlates with the ground-water flow pattern. The dissolved sulfide species appear to be derived primarily from biogenic reduction of sulfate ions whose source is gypsum dissolution although upgradient diffusion of H 2 S gas from deeper oil field brines may be important in places. (author)

  1. Determination of biogenic amines in fermented product from soya beans by high performance liquid chromatography%高效液相色谱法测定大豆发酵制品中的生物胺

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王充; 易少凌

    2015-01-01

    目的:从生物胺角度初步探讨大豆发酵制品的食用安全性,为确定大豆发酵制品的推荐安全摄入水平提供初步参考。方法采用柱前衍生高效液相色谱法检测大豆发酵制品中生物胺的含量,以0.4 mol/L高氯酸为提取液,以丹酰氯为衍生试剂,紫外检测波长254 nm。结果样品组分分离及测定结果重现性较好,豆豉、豆酱、酱油3种大豆发酵制品均有部分品牌组胺含量超过危害作用水平(即500 mg/kg),8个样品中有7种超过100 mg/kg,同类不同品牌大豆发酵制品间组胺含量没有明显差别;色胺均未检出;除组胺外,3种大豆发酵制品中尚可能存在2-苯乙胺、腐胺及尸胺。结论大豆发酵制品的色胺未检出,组胺含量较高,大量食用可能影响人体健康。%ABSTRACT:Objective To assess the security of fermented product from soya beans, and give a reference for their reference intakes. Methods To determine biogenic amines in lobster sauce, soy sauce and soybean paste by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the biogenic amines were extracted with 0.4 mol/L perchloric acid solution, the pre-column derivatising agent was dansyl chloride, the mobile phase was acetonitrile and water (V:V=60:40), and the flow rate was 1.0 mL/min. UV detector was used to determine the biogenic amines, and the wavelength was 254 nm. Results Histamine was found in every kind of the fermented product with soya beans, and the concentration was higher than 500 mg/kg, which was the level in food that would cause harm to human body made by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in America. The average concentration of histamine in the fermented product with soya beans determined was 469.19 mg/kg, and different kinds of fermented products with soya beans had almost the same concentration of histamine. While no tryptamine was found in these samples, there were 2-phenylethylamine, putrescine and cadaverine in these fermented product from

  2. Accounting for urban biogenic fluxes in regional carbon budgets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Brady S; Wang, Jonathan A; Hutyra, Lucy R; Gately, Conor K; Getson, Jackie M; Friedl, Mark A

    2017-08-15

    Many ecosystem models incorrectly treat urban areas as devoid of vegetation and biogenic carbon (C) fluxes. We sought to improve estimates of urban biomass and biogenic C fluxes using existing, nationally available data products. We characterized biogenic influence on urban C cycling throughout Massachusetts, USA using an ecosystem model that integrates improved representation of urban vegetation, growing conditions associated with urban heat island (UHI), and altered urban phenology. Boston's biomass density is 1/4 that of rural forests, however 87% of Massachusetts' urban landscape is vegetated. Model results suggest that, kilogram-for-kilogram, urban vegetation cycles C twice as fast as rural forests. Urban vegetation releases (R E ) and absorbs (GEE) the equivalent of 11 and 14%, respectively, of anthropogenic emissions in the most urban portions of the state. While urban vegetation in Massachusetts fully sequesters anthropogenic emissions from smaller cities in the region, Boston's UHI reduces annual C storage by >20% such that vegetation offsets only 2% of anthropogenic emissions. Asynchrony between temporal patterns of biogenic and anthropogenic C fluxes further constrains the emissions mitigation potential of urban vegetation. However, neglecting to account for biogenic C fluxes in cities can impair efforts to accurately monitor, report, verify, and reduce anthropogenic emissions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantification of dimethyl sulfide (DMS production in the sea anemone Aiptasia sp. to simulate the sea-to-air flux from coral reefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Franchini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The production of dimethyl sulfide (DMS is poorly quantified in tropical reef environments but forms an essential process that couples marine and terrestrial sulfur cycles and affects climate. Here we quantified net aqueous DMS production and the concentration of its cellular precursor dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP in the sea anemone Aiptasia sp., a model organism to study coral-related processes. Bleached anemones did not show net DMS production whereas symbiotic anemones produced DMS concentrations (mean ± standard error of 160.7 ± 44.22 nmol g−1 dry weight (DW after 48 h incubation. Symbiotic and bleached individuals showed DMSP concentrations of 32.7 ± 6.00 and 0.6 ± 0.19 µmol g−1 DW, respectively. We applied these findings to a Monte Carlo simulation to demonstrate that net aqueous DMS production accounts for only 20 % of gross aqueous DMS production. Monte Carlo-based estimations of sea-to-air fluxes of gaseous DMS showed that reefs may release 0.1 to 26.3 µmol DMS m−2 coral surface area (CSA d−1 into the atmosphere with 40 % probability for rates between 0.5 and 1.5 µmol m−2 CSA d−1. These predictions were in agreement with directly quantified fluxes in previous studies. Conversion to a flux normalised to sea surface area (SSA (range 0.1 to 17.4, with the highest probability for 0.3 to 1.0 µmol DMS m−2 SSA d−1 suggests that coral reefs emit gaseous DMS at lower rates than the average global oceanic DMS flux of 4.6 µmol m−2 SSA d−1 (19.6 Tg sulfur per year. The large difference between simulated gross and quantified net aqueous DMS production in corals suggests that the current and future potential for its production in tropical reefs is critically governed by DMS consumption processes. Hence, more research is required to assess the sensitivity of DMS-consumption pathways to ongoing environmental change in order to address the impact of predicted

  4. Quantification of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) production in the sea anemone Aiptasia sp. to simulate the sea-to-air flux from coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, Filippo; Steinke, Michael

    2017-12-01

    The production of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is poorly quantified in tropical reef environments but forms an essential process that couples marine and terrestrial sulfur cycles and affects climate. Here we quantified net aqueous DMS production and the concentration of its cellular precursor dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) in the sea anemone Aiptasia sp., a model organism to study coral-related processes. Bleached anemones did not show net DMS production whereas symbiotic anemones produced DMS concentrations (mean ± standard error) of 160.7 ± 44.22 nmol g-1 dry weight (DW) after 48 h incubation. Symbiotic and bleached individuals showed DMSP concentrations of 32.7 ± 6.00 and 0.6 ± 0.19 µmol g-1 DW, respectively. We applied these findings to a Monte Carlo simulation to demonstrate that net aqueous DMS production accounts for only 20 % of gross aqueous DMS production. Monte Carlo-based estimations of sea-to-air fluxes of gaseous DMS showed that reefs may release 0.1 to 26.3 µmol DMS m-2 coral surface area (CSA) d-1 into the atmosphere with 40 % probability for rates between 0.5 and 1.5 µmol m-2 CSA d-1. These predictions were in agreement with directly quantified fluxes in previous studies. Conversion to a flux normalised to sea surface area (SSA) (range 0.1 to 17.4, with the highest probability for 0.3 to 1.0 µmol DMS m-2 SSA d-1) suggests that coral reefs emit gaseous DMS at lower rates than the average global oceanic DMS flux of 4.6 µmol m-2 SSA d-1 (19.6 Tg sulfur per year). The large difference between simulated gross and quantified net aqueous DMS production in corals suggests that the current and future potential for its production in tropical reefs is critically governed by DMS consumption processes. Hence, more research is required to assess the sensitivity of DMS-consumption pathways to ongoing environmental change in order to address the impact of predicted degradation of coral reefs on DMS production in tropical coastal ecosystems and its impact on

  5. Biomass burning - Combustion emissions, satellite imagery, and biogenic emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joel S.; Cofer, Wesley R., III; Winstead, Edward L.; Rhinehart, Robert P.; Cahoon, Donald R., Jr.; Sebacher, Daniel I.; Sebacher, Shirley; Stocks, Brian J.

    1991-01-01

    After detailing a technique for the estimation of the instantaneous emission of trace gases produced by biomass burning, using satellite imagery, attention is given to the recent discovery that burning results in significant enhancement of biogenic emissions of N2O, NO, and CH4. Biomass burning accordingly has an immediate and long-term impact on the production of atmospheric trace gases. It is presently demonstrated that satellite imagery of fires may be used to estimate combustion emissions, and could be used to estimate long-term postburn biogenic emission of trace gases to the atmosphere.

  6. Chemical dissolution of sulfide minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    Chemical dissolution treatments involving the use of aqua regia, 4 N HNO3, H2O2-ascorbic acid, oxalic acid, KClO3+HCl, and KClO3+HCl followed by 4 N HNO3 were applied to specimens of nine common sulfide minerals (galena, chalcopyrite, cinnabar, molybdenite, orpiment, pyrite, stibnite, sphalerite, and tetrahedrite) mixed individually with a clay loam soil. The resultant decrease in the total sulfur content of the mixture, as determined by using the Leco induction furnace, was used to evaluate the effectiveness of each chemical treatment. A combination of KClO3+HCl followed by 4 N HNO3 boiling gently for 20 min has been shown to be very effective in dissolving all the sulfide minerals. This treatment is recommended to dissolve metals residing in sulfide minerals admixed with secondary weathering products, as one step in a fractionation scheme whereby metals in soluble and adsorbed forms, and those associated with organic materials and secondary oxides, are first removed by other chemical extractants.

  7. Mesostructured metal germanium sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLachlan, M.J.; Coombs, N.; Bedard, R.L.; White, S.; Thompson, L.K.; Ozin, G.A.

    1999-12-29

    A new class of mesostructured metal germanium sulfide materials has been prepared and characterized. The synthesis, via supramolecular assembly of well-defined germanium sulfide anionic cluster precursors and transition-metal cations in formamide, represents a new strategy for the formation of this class of solids. A variety of techniques were employed to examine the structure and composition of the materials. Structurally, the material is best described as a periodic mesostructured metal sulfide-based coordination framework akin to periodic hexagonal mesoporous silica, MCM-41. At the molecular scale, the materials strongly resemble microstructured metal germanium sulfides, in which the structure of the [Ge{sub 4}S{sub 10}]{sup 4{minus}} cluster building-blocks are intact and linked via {mu}-S-M-S bonds. Evidence for a metal-metal bond in mesostructured Cu/Ge{sub 4}S{sub 10} is also provided.

  8. Biogenic emissions of isoprenoids and NO in China and comparison to anthropogenic emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tie Xuexi; Li Guohui; Ying, Zhuming; Guenther, Alex; Madronich, Sasha

    2006-01-01

    In this study, a regional dynamical model (WRF) is used to drive biogenic emission models to calculate high resolution (10 x 10 km) biogenic emissions of isoprene (C 5 H 8 ), monoterpenes (C 1 H 16 ), and nitric oxide (NO) in China. This high resolution biogenic inventory will be available for the community to study the effect of biogenic emissions on photochemical oxidants in China. The biogenic emissions are compared to anthropogenic emissions to gain insight on the potential impact of the biogenic emissions on tropospheric chemistry, especially ozone production in this region. The results show that the biogenic emissions in China exhibit strongly diurnal, seasonal, and spatial variations. The isoprenoid (including both isoprene and monoterpenes) emissions are closely correlated to tree density and strongly vary with season and local time. During winter (January), the biogenic isoprenoid emissions are the lowest, resulting from lower temperature and solar radiation, and highest in summer (July) due to higher temperature and solar radiation. The biogenic NO emissions are also higher during summer and lower during winter, but the magnitude of the seasonal variation is smaller than the emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes. The biogenic emissions of NO are widely spread out in the northern, eastern, and southern China regions, where high-density agricultural soil lands are located. Both biogenic NO and isoprenoid emissions are very small in western China. The calculated total biogenic emission budget is smaller than the total anthropogenic VOC emission budget in China. The biogenic isoprenoid and anthropogenic VOC emissions are 10.9 and 15.1 Tg year -1 , respectively. The total biogenic and anthropogenic emissions of NO are 5.9 and 11.5 Tg(NO) year -1 , respectively. The study shows that in central eastern China, the estimated biogenic emissions of isoprenoids are very small, and the anthropogenic emissions of VOCs are dominant in this region. However, in

  9. Biogenic emissions of isoprenoids and NO in China and comparison to anthropogenic emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Xuexi; Li, Guohui; Ying, Zhuming; Guenther, Alex; Madronich, Sasha

    2006-12-01

    In this study, a regional dynamical model (WRF) is used to drive biogenic emission models to calculate high resolution (10x10 km) biogenic emissions of isoprene (C(5)H(8)), monoterpenes (C(10)H(16)), and nitric oxide (NO) in China. This high resolution biogenic inventory will be available for the community to study the effect of biogenic emissions on photochemical oxidants in China. The biogenic emissions are compared to anthropogenic emissions to gain insight on the potential impact of the biogenic emissions on tropospheric chemistry, especially ozone production in this region. The results show that the biogenic emissions in China exhibit strongly diurnal, seasonal, and spatial variations. The isoprenoid (including both isoprene and monoterpenes) emissions are closely correlated to tree density and strongly vary with season and local time. During winter (January), the biogenic isoprenoid emissions are the lowest, resulting from lower temperature and solar radiation, and highest in summer (July) due to higher temperature and solar radiation. The biogenic NO emissions are also higher during summer and lower during winter, but the magnitude of the seasonal variation is smaller than the emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes. The biogenic emissions of NO are widely spread out in the northern, eastern, and southern China regions, where high-density agricultural soil lands are located. Both biogenic NO and isoprenoid emissions are very small in western China. The calculated total biogenic emission budget is smaller than the total anthropogenic VOC emission budget in China. The biogenic isoprenoid and anthropogenic VOC emissions are 10.9 and 15.1 Tg year(-1), respectively. The total biogenic and anthropogenic emissions of NO are 5.9 and 11.5 Tg(NO) year(-1), respectively. The study shows that in central eastern China, the estimated biogenic emissions of isoprenoids are very small, and the anthropogenic emissions of VOCs are dominant in this region. However, in

  10. Biogenic methane potential of marine sediments. Application of chemical thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arning, E.T.; Schulz, H.M. [Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ, Potsdam (Germany); Berk, W. van [Technical Univ. of Clausthal (Germany). Dept. of Hydrogeology

    2013-08-01

    Accumulations of biogenic methane-dominated gas are widespread and occur in a variety of depositional settings and rock types. However, the potential of biogenic methane remains underexplored. This is mainly due to the fact that quantitative assessments applying numerical modeling techniques for exploration purposes are generally lacking to date. Biogenic methane formation starts in relatively shallow marine sediments below the sulfate reduction zone. When sulfate is exhausted, methanogenesis via the CO{sub 2} reduction pathway is often the dominant biogenic methane formation process in marine sediments (Claypool and Kaplan, 1974). The process can be simplified by the reaction: 2CH{sub 2}O + Ca{sup 2+} + H{sub 2}O {yields} CH{sub 4} + CaCO{sub 3} + 2H{sup +}. The products of early diagenetic reactions initiate coupled equilibrium reactions that induce a new state of chemical equilibrium among minerals, pore water and gas. The driving force of the complex biogeochemical reactions in sedimentary environments during early diagenesis is the irreversible redox-conversion of organic matter. Early diagenetic formation of biogenic methane shortly after deposition ('early diagenesis') was retraced using PHREEQC computer code that is applied to calculate homogenous and heterogeneous mass-action equations in combination with one-dimensional diffusion driven transport (Parkhurst and Appelo, 1999). Our modeling approach incorporates interdependent diagenetic reactions evolving into a diffusive multi-component and multiphase system by means of thermodynamic equilibrium calculations of species distribution (Arning et al., 2011, 2012, 2013). Reaction kinetics of organic carbon conversion is integrated into the set of equilibrium reactions by defining type and amount of converted organic matter in a certain time step. It is the aim (1) to calculate quantitatively thermodynamic equilibrium conditions (composition of pore water, mineral phase and gas phase assemblage) in

  11. Biogenic Amines in Insect Antennae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna I. Zhukovskaya

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Insect antenna is a multisensory organ, each modality of which can be modulated by biogenic amines. Octopamine (OA and its metabolic precursor tyramine (TA affect activity of antennal olfactory receptor neurons. There is some evidence that dopamine (DA modulates gustatory neurons. Serotonin can serve as a neurotransmitter in some afferent mechanosensory neurons and both as a neurotransmitter and neurohormone in efferent fibers targeted at the antennal vessel and mechanosensory organs. As a neurohormone, serotonin affects the generation of the transepithelial potential by sensillar accessory cells. Other possible targets of biogenic amines in insect antennae are hygro- and thermosensory neurons and epithelial cells. We suggest that the insect antenna is partially autonomous in the sense that biologically active substances entering its hemolymph may exert their effects and be cleared from this compartment without affecting other body parts.

  12. Sulindac Sulfide, but Not Sulindac Sulfone, Inhibits Colorectal Cancer Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S. Williams

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Sulindac sulfide, a metabolite of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID sulindac sulfoxide, is effective at reducing tumor burden in both familial adenomatous polyposis patients and in animals with colorectal cancer. Another sulindac sulfoxide metabolite, sulindac sulfone, has been reported to have antitumor properties without inhibiting cyclooxygenase activity. Here we report the effect of sulindac sulfone treatment on the growth of colorectal carcinoma cells. We observed that sulindac sulfide or sulfone treatment of HCA-7 cells led to inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited HCA-7 and HCT-116 cell growth in vitro. Sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of either HCA-7 or HCT-116 xenografts, whereas the sulfide derivative inhibited HCA-7 growth in vivo. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited colon carcinoma cell growth and prostaglandin production in vitro, but sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of colon cancer cell xenografts in nude mice.

  13. Acute inhalation toxicity of carbonyl sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, J.M.; Hahn, F.F.; Barr, E.B. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS), a colorless gas, is a side product of industrial procedures sure as coal hydrogenation and gasification. It is structurally related to and is a metabolite of carbon disulfide. COS is metabolized in the body by carbonic anhydrase to hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), which is thought to be responsible for COS toxicity. No threshold limit value for COS has been established. Results of these studies indicate COS (with an LC{sub 50} of 590 ppm) is slightly less acutely toxic than H{sub 2}S (LC{sub 50} of 440 ppm).

  14. Girdler-sulfide process physical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuburg, H.J.; Atherley, J.F.; Walker, L.G.

    1977-05-01

    Physical properties of pure hydrogen sulfide and of gaseous and liquid solutions of the H 2 S-H 2 O system have been formulated. Tables for forty-nine different properties in the pressure and temperature range of interest to the Girdler-Sulfide (GS) process for heavy water production are given. All properties are presented in SI units. A computer program capable of calculating properties of the pure components as well as gaseous mixtures and liquid solutions at saturated and non-saturated conditions is included. (author)

  15. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Dezhao, Liu; Hansen, Michael Jørgen

    Observed hydrogen sulfide uptake rates in a biofilter treating waste air from a pig farm were too high to be explained within conventional limits of sulfide solubility, diffusion in a biofilm and bacterial metabolism. Clone libraries of 16S and 18S rRNA genes from the biofilter found no sulfide...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  16. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Liu, Dezhao; Hansen, Michael Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Observed hydrogen sulfide uptake rates in a biofilter treating waste air from a pig farm were too high to be explained within conventional limits of sulfide solubility, diffusion in a biofilm and bacterial metabolism. Clone libraries of 16S and 18S rRNA genes from the biofilter found no sulfide...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  17. Operation of Marine Diesel Engines on Biogenic Fuels: Modification of Emissions and Resulting Climate Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Petzold, A.; Lauer, P.; Fritsche, U.; Hasselbach, J.; Lichtenstern, M.; Schlager, H.; Fleischer, F.

    2011-01-01

    The modification of emissions of climate-sensitive exhaust compounds such as CO2, NOx, hydrocarbons, and particulate matter from medium-speed marine diesel engines was studied for a set of fossil and biogenic fuels. Applied fossil fuels were the reference heavy fuel oil (HFO) and the low-sulfur marine gas oil (MGO); biogenic fuels were palm oil, soybean oil, sunflower oil, and animal fat. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to the production of biogenic fuels were treated by means of a fue...

  18. Titanocene sulfide chemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáček, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 314, MAY 2016 (2016), s. 83-102 ISSN 0010-8545 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/12/2368 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : titanocene sulfide chemistry * photolysis * titanocene hydrosulfides Ti-(SH)n Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 13.324, year: 2016

  19. Electron transfer to sulfides:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneses, Ana Belen; Antonello, Sabrina; Arevalo, Maria Carmen; Maran, Flavio

    2005-01-01

    The problem of characterizing the steps associated with the dissociative reduction of sulfides has been addressed. The electrochemical reduction of diphenylmethyl para-methoxyphenyl sulfide in N,N-dimethylformamide, on both glassy carbon and mercury electrodes, was chosen as a test system. The electrode process involves the slow heterogeneous outer-sphere electron transfer to the sulfide, the fast cleavage of the C-S bond, the reduction of the ensuing carbon radical, and the self-protonation triggered by the generation of the strong base Ph 2 CH - . The latter reaction is rather slow, in agreement with the large intrinsic barriers characterizing proton transfers between CH-acids and carbon bases. The dissociative reduction was studied in the presence of an exogenous acid. The results, obtained by convolution analysis, point to a stepwise DET mechanism in which the ET step is accompanied by rather large reorganization energy. Similar results were obtained on both electrode materials. Analysis of the heterogeneous electron transfer and associated C-S bond cleavage indicate that the reduction of this and other sulfides lies between the stepwise dissociative electron transfers leading to the formation of stiff π* radical anions and those going through the intermediacy of loose σ* radical anions

  20. Framework for Assessing Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    This revision of the 2011 report, Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources, evaluates biogenic CO2 emissions from stationary sources, including a detailed study of the scientific and technical issues associated with assessing biogenic carbon dioxide...

  1. Oxidation and Precipitation of Sulfide in Sewer Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A. H.

    risks and corrosion of concrete and metals. Most of the problems relate to the buildup of hydrogen sulfide in the atmosphere of sewer networks. In this respect, the processes of the sulfur cycle are of fundamental importance in ultimately determining the extent of such problems. This study focused...... calibrated and validated against field data. In the extension to the WATS model, sulfur transformations were described by six processes: 1. Sulfide production taking place in the biofilm and sediments covering the permanently wetted sewer walls; 2. Biological sulfide oxidation in the permanently wetted...... to the sewer atmosphere, potentially resulting in concrete corrosion. The extended WATS model represents a major improvement over previously developed models for prediction of sulfide buildup in sewer networks. Compared to such models, the major processes governing sulfide buildup in sewer networks...

  2. The effectiveness of sulfidic materials as a source of sulfur fertilizer for the production of rice in two sulfur deficient soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abul Hasnat M. Shamim

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of sulfidic materials (SM and gypsum (G application at the rates of 0, 40, 80, 120, and 160 kg S ha-1on the growth, yield, and mineral nutrition of rice (Oryza sativa L.; BR 16: Shahi balam cultivated in two sulfur deficient soilsof Sirajgonj (Typic Haplaquept and Gazipur (Typic Paleustult were evaluated in a greenhouse study. The best growth, yieldperformance, and nutrition of rice were recorded by the SM160 treatment in both the Sirajgonj (e.g. grain: 9.8 g/plant andGazipur (8.6 soils, followed by the SM120 (8.5, 7.5 > SM80 (7.3, 7.3 > G160 (7.1, 6.9 treatments. The application of SMincreased the average grain yield by 82% (increased over control: IOC for Sirajgonj soil and 78% for Gazipur soil, irrespectiveof application rates. In the case of gypsum, these increments were 40 and 37% for Sirajgonj and Gazipur soils, respectively. Theapplication of gypsum at the highest rate of G160 was not as effective as even the dose of SM80 in both of the soils. However,almost similar and significant (p<0.05 effects were observed for the grain weight, percent filled grains, and harvest index ofrice grown in both the soils. The applied SM increased the average organic matter and available sulfur contents in the soilsby 20 to 46%, and 140 to 228% IOC, respectively, while these increments were 6 to 20% and 88 to 187% for gypsum treatments,indicating that the SM was potential and effective than gypsum not only as a source of sulfur fertilizer but also to enrich thefertility and productivity status of the soils. Moreover, the SM treatment was found to be maintained the high nutrient statusin both the soils till the final harvest at maturity of rice, reflecting a good indication for its long term use. The use of SM didnot show any adverse effect on the plant and soil.

  3. Contribution of biogenic emissions to the formation of ozone and particulate matter in the eastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Betty K; Wu, Shiang-Yuh; Seigneur, Christian

    2002-08-15

    As anthropogenic emissions of ozone (O3) precursors, fine particulate matter (PM2.5), and PM2.5 precursors continue to decrease in the United States, the fraction of O3 and PM2.5 attributable to natural sources may become significant in some locations, reducing the efficacy that can be expected from future controls of anthropogenic sources. Modeling studies were conducted to estimate the contribution of biogenic emissions to the formation of O3 and PM2.5 in Nashville/TN and the northeastern United States. Two approaches were used to bound the estimates. In an anthropogenic simulation, biogenic emissions and their influence at the domain boundaries were eliminated. Contributions of biogenic compounds to the simulated concentrations of O3 and PM2.5 were determined by the deviation of the concentrations in the anthropogenic case from those in the base case. A biogenic simulation was used to assess the amounts of O3 and PM2.5 produced in an environment free from anthropogenic influences in emissions and boundary conditions. In both locations, the contribution of biogenic emissions to O3 was small (production of O3 was much more sensitive to biogenic emissions in urban areas (22-34%). Therefore, the effects of biogenic emissions on O3 manifested mostly via their interaction with anthropogenic emissions of NOx. In the anthropogenic simulations, the average contribution of biogenic and natural sources to PM2.5 was estimated at 9% in Nashville/TN and 12% in the northeast domain. Because of the long atmospheric lifetimes of PM2.5, the contribution of biogenic/natural PM2.5 from the boundary conditions was higher than the contribution of biogenic aerosols produced within the domain. The elimination of biogenic emissions also affected the chemistry of other secondary PM2.5 components. Very little PM2.5 was formed in the biogenic simulations.

  4. Intolerance to dietary biogenic amines: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, S.C.; Dusseldorp, M. van; Bottema, K.C.; Dubois, A.E.J.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the scientific evidence for purported intolerance to dietary biogenic amines. Data Sources: MEDLINE was searched for articles in the English language published between January 1966 and August 2001. The keyword biogenic amin* was combined with hypersens*, allerg*, intoler*, and

  5. Intolerance to dietary biogenic amines : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, SC; van Dusseldorp, M; Bottema, KC; Dubois, AEJ

    Objective: To evaluate the scientific evidence for purported intolerance to dietary biogenic amines. Data Sources: MEDLINE was searched for articles in the English language published between January 1966 and August 2001. The keyword biogenic amin* was combined with hypersens*, allergen intoler*, and

  6. Hydroprocessing of Jatropha Oil for Production of Green Diesel over Non-sulfided Ni-PTA/Al2O3 Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Lei, Jiandu; He, Jing; Deng, Lihong; Wang, Luying; Fan, Kai; Rong, Long

    2015-01-01

    The non-sulfided Ni-PTA/Al2O3 catalyst was developed to produce green diesel from the hydroprocessing of Jatropha oil. The Ni-PTA/Al2O3 catalyst was prepared by one-pot synthesis of Ni/Al2O3 with the co-precipitation method and then impregnanting Ni/Al2O3 with PTA solution. The catalysts were characterized with BET, SEM-EDX, TEM, XRD, XPS, TGA and NH3-TPD. The Ni and W species of the Ni-PTA/Al2O3 catalyst were much more homogeneously distributed on the surface than that of commercial Al2O3. Catalytic performance in the hydroprocessing of Jatropha oil was evaluated by GC. The maximum conversion of Jatropha oil (98.5 wt%) and selectivity of the C15-C18 alkanes fraction (84.5 wt %) occurred at 360 °C, 3.0 MPa, 0.8 h−1. The non-sulfided Ni-PTA/Al2O3 catalyst is more environmentally friendly than the conventional sulfided hydroprocessing catalyst, and it exhibited the highest catalytic activity than the Ni-PTA catalyst supported with commercial Al2O3 grain and Al2O3 powder. PMID:26162092

  7. Assessment of sulfide production risk in soil during the infiltration of domestic wastewater treated by a sulfur-utilizing denitrification process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbel, L; Coudert, L; Gilbert, Y; Mercier, G; Blais, J F

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to determine the potential of sulfide generation during infiltration through soil of domestic wastewater treated by a sulfur-utilizing denitrification process. Three types of soil with different permeability rates (K s = 0.028, 0.0013, and 0.00015 cm/s) were investigated to evaluate the potential risk of sulfur generation during the infiltration of domestic wastewater treated by a sulfur-utilizing denitrification system. These soils were thoroughly characterized and tested to assess their capacity to be used as drainages for wastewaters. Experiments were conducted under two operating modes (saturated and unsaturated). Sulfate, sulfide, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) levels were determined over a period of 100 days. Despite the high concentration of sulfates (200 mg/L) under anaerobic conditions (ORP = -297 mV), no significant amount of sulfide was generated in the aqueous (soil permeability did not have a noticeable effect on the infiltration of domestic wastewater treated by a sulfur-utilizing denitrification system due to low contents of organic matter (i.e., dissolved organic carbon, DOC). The autotrophic denitrification process used to treat the domestic wastewater allowed the reduction of the concentration of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) below 5 mg/L, of DOC below 7 mg/L, and of COD below 100 mg/L.

  8. Modeling Global Biogenic Emission of Isoprene: Exploration of Model Drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Susan E.; Potter, Christopher S.; Coughlan, Joseph C.; Klooster, Steven A.; Lerdau, Manuel T.; Chatfield, Robert B.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Vegetation provides the major source of isoprene emission to the atmosphere. We present a modeling approach to estimate global biogenic isoprene emission. The isoprene flux model is linked to a process-based computer simulation model of biogenic trace-gas fluxes that operates on scales that link regional and global data sets and ecosystem nutrient transformations Isoprene emission estimates are determined from estimates of ecosystem specific biomass, emission factors, and algorithms based on light and temperature. Our approach differs from an existing modeling framework by including the process-based global model for terrestrial ecosystem production, satellite derived ecosystem classification, and isoprene emission measurements from a tropical deciduous forest. We explore the sensitivity of model estimates to input parameters. The resulting emission products from the global 1 degree x 1 degree coverage provided by the satellite datasets and the process model allow flux estimations across large spatial scales and enable direct linkage to atmospheric models of trace-gas transport and transformation.

  9. Effects of ionophores and antibiotics on in vitro hydrogen sulfide production, dry matter disappearance, and total gas production in cultures with a steam-flaked corn-based substrate with or without added sulfur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, M J; May, M L; Hales, K E; DiLorenzo, N; Leibovich, J; Smith, D R; Galyean, M L

    2009-05-01

    Effects of 3 ionophores and 2 antibiotics on in vitro H(2)S production, IVDMD, total gas production, and VFA profile with or without added S were examined. In Exp. 1, ruminal fluid from 2 ruminally cannulated steers fed a steam-flaked corn-based diet (75% concentrate) without ionophore and antibiotics for 28 d before collection was used to inoculate in vitro cultures. Treatments were control (no ionophore or antibiotic), 3 ionophores (lasalocid sodium and monensin sodium at 5 mg/L or laidlomycin propionate at 1.65 mg/L), and 2 antibiotics (chlortetracycline hydrochloride at 5 mg/L and tylosin tartarate at 1.25 mg/L). Cultures also had 0 or 1.75 mg of S/L (from sodium sulfate). No S x ionophore-antibiotic treatment interactions were noted (P > 0.53) for IVDMD, total gas production, and H(2)S production. Hydrogen sulfide (mumol/g of fermentable DM) was increased (P production tended (P = 0.09) to be increased with additional S; however, IVDMD was not affected by added S (P = 0.90). Production of H(2)S was not affected by ionophores or antibiotics (P > 0.18). On average, IVDMD (P = 0.05) was greater for ionophores than for antibiotics, whereas total gas production was less for ionophores than for control (P antibiotics (P 0.20) in acetate, propionate, or acetate:propionate between ionophores and control (S x treatment interaction, P = 0.03). In Exp. 2, the effects of ionophore-antibiotic combinations with added S were examined using the same procedures as in Exp. 1. Treatments were control, monensin plus tylosin (MT), and lasalocid plus chlortetracycline (LCTC), with concentrations of the ionophores and antibiotics as in Exp. 1. No differences were observed among treatments for H(2)S production (P > 0.55). Treatments MT and LCTC tended (P = 0.06) to increase IVDMD and decreased (P = 0.02) gas production vs. control. Proportion of acetate (P = 0.01) and acetate:propionate (P antibiotics we evaluated did not affect production of H(2)S gas in an in vitro rumen culture

  10. Fishmeal with different levels of biogenic amines in Aquafeed: Comparison of feed protein quality, fish growth performance, and metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasour, Mohammad Sedigh; Wagner, Liane; Sundekilde, Ulrik Kræmer

    2018-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of fishmeal quality (low (LB) and high (HB) levels of endogenous biogenic amines) and feed extrusion temperatures (100 and 130 °C) on protein oxidation indicators and amino acids racemization (AAR) in extruded fish feed. Furthermore, the study investigated......, secondary oxidation products, and racemized methionine correlated positively with a low content of biogenic amines, whereas the primary oxidation product, protein hydroperoxides, and in vivo AAs digestibility correlated positively with high content of biogenic amines. At an extrusion temperature of 100 °C......, the growth performance of the fish decreased when the content of biogenic amines increased. In contrast, at an extrusion temperature of 130 °C, the growth performance was unaffected by the level of biogenic amines. The latter could be a consequence of the higher level of protein oxidation of LB fishmeal...

  11. Process for scavenging hydrogen sulfide from hydrocarbon gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, I.

    1981-01-01

    A process for scavenging hydrogen sulfide from hydrocarbon gases utilizes iron oxide particles of unique chemical and physical properties. These particles have large surface area, and are comprised substantially of amorphous Fe 2 O 3 containing a crystalline phase of Fe 2 O 3 , Fe 3 O 4 and combinations thereof. In scavenging hydrogen sulfide, the iron oxide particles are suspended in a liquid which enters into intimate mixing contact with hydrocarbon gases; the hydrogen sulfide is reacted at an exceptional rate and only acid-stable reaction products are formed. Thereafter, the sweetened hydrocarbon gases are collected

  12. Sulfide Oxidation in the Anoxic Black-Sea Chemocline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB; FOSSING, H.; WIRSEN, CO

    1991-01-01

    per day, occurred in anoxic water at the top of the sulfide zone concurrent with the highest rates of dark CO2 assimilation. The main soluble oxidized products of sulfide were thiosulfate (68-82%) and sulfate. Indirect evidence was presented for the formation of elemental sulfur which accumulated...... that the measured H2S oxidation rates were 4-fold higher than could be explained by the downward flux of organic carbon and too high to balance the availability of electron acceptors such as oxidized iron or manganese. A nitrate maximum at the lower boundary of the O2 zone did not extend down to the sulfide zone....

  13. Formation of mercury sulfide from Hg(II)−thiolate complexes in natural organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alain Manceau,; Cyprien Lemouchi,; Mironel Enescu,; Anne-Claire Gaillot,; Martine Lanson,; Valerie Magnin,; Pieter Glatzel,; Poulin, Brett; Ryan, Joseph N.; Aiken, George R.; Isabelle Gautier-Lunea,; Kathryn L. Nagy,

    2015-01-01

    Methylmercury is the environmental form of neurotoxic mercury that is biomagnified in the food chain. Methylation rates are reduced when the metal is sequestered in crystalline mercury sulfides or bound to thiol groups in macromolecular natural organic matter. Mercury sulfide minerals are known to nucleate in anoxic zones, by reaction of the thiol-bound mercury with biogenic sulfide, but not in oxic environments. We present experimental evidence that mercury sulfide forms from thiol-bound mercury alone in aqueous dark systems in contact with air. The maximum amount of nanoparticulate mercury sulfide relative to thiol-bound mercury obtained by reacting dissolved mercury and soil organic matter matches that detected in the organic horizon of a contaminated soil situated downstream from Oak Ridge, TN, in the United States. The nearly identical ratios of the two forms of mercury in field and experimental systems suggest a common reaction mechanism for nucleating the mineral. We identified a chemical reaction mechanism that is thermodynamically favorable in which thiol-bound mercury polymerizes to mercury–sulfur clusters. The clusters form by elimination of sulfur from the thiol complexes via breaking of mercury–sulfur bonds as in an alkylation reaction. Addition of sulfide is not required. This nucleation mechanism provides one explanation for how mercury may be immobilized, and eventually sequestered, in oxygenated surface environments.

  14. Operation of marine diesel engines on biogenic fuels: modification of emissions and resulting climate effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Andreas; Lauer, Peter; Fritsche, Uwe; Hasselbach, Jan; Lichtenstern, Michael; Schlager, Hans; Fleischer, Fritz

    2011-12-15

    The modification of emissions of climate-sensitive exhaust compounds such as CO(2), NO(x), hydrocarbons, and particulate matter from medium-speed marine diesel engines was studied for a set of fossil and biogenic fuels. Applied fossil fuels were the reference heavy fuel oil (HFO) and the low-sulfur marine gas oil (MGO); biogenic fuels were palm oil, soybean oil, sunflower oil, and animal fat. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to the production of biogenic fuels were treated by means of a fuel life cycle analysis which included land use changes associated with the growth of energy plants. Emissions of CO(2) and NO(x) per kWh were found to be similar for fossil fuels and biogenic fuels. PM mass emission was reduced to 10-15% of HFO emissions for all low-sulfur fuels including MGO as a fossil fuel. Black carbon emissions were reduced significantly to 13-30% of HFO. Changes in emissions were predominantly related to particulate sulfate, while differences between low-sulfur fossil fuels and low-sulfur biogenic fuels were of minor significance. GHG emissions from the biogenic fuel life cycle (FLC) depend crucially on energy plant production conditions and have the potential of shifting the overall GHG budget from positive to negative compared to fossil fuels.

  15. Biomass burning: Combustion emissions, satellite imagery, and biogenic emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, J.S.; Cofer, W.R III; Rhinehart, R.P.; Cahoon, D.R. J.; Winstead, E.L.; Sebacher, S.; Sebacher, D.I.; Stocks, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    This chapter deals with two different, but related, aspects of biomass burning. The first part of the chapter deals with a technique to estimate the instantaneous emissions of trace gases produced by biomass burning using satellite imagery. The second part of the chapter concerns the recent discovery that burning results in significantly enhanced biogenic emissions of N 2 O, NO, and CH 4 . Hence, biomass burning has both an immediate and long-term impact on the production of trace gases to the atmosphere. The objective of this research is to better assess and quantify the role of this research is to better assess and quantify the role and impact of biomass as a driver for global change. It will be demonstrated that satellite imagery of fires may be used to estimate combustion emissions and may in the future be used to estimate the long-term postburn biogenic emissions of trace gases to the atmosphere

  16. On Mineral Retrosynthesis of a Complex Biogenic Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashit Rao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Synergistic relations between organic molecules and mineral precursors regulate biogenic mineralization. Given the remarkable material properties of the egg shell as a biogenic ceramic, it serves as an important model to elucidate biomineral growth. With established roles of complex anionic biopolymers and a heterogeneous organic scaffold in egg shell mineralization, the present study explores the regulation over mineralization attained by applying synthetic polymeric counterparts (polyethylene glycol, poly(acrylic acid, poly(aspartic acid and poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid as additives during remineralization of decalcified eggshell membranes. By applying Mg2+ ions as a co-additive species, mineral retrosynthesis is achieved in a manner that modulates the polymorph and structure of mineral products. Notable features of the mineralization process include distinct local wettability of the biogenic organic scaffold by mineral precursors and mineralization-induced membrane actuation. Overall, the form, structure and polymorph of the mineralization products are synergistically affected by the additive and the content of Mg2+ ions. We also revisit the physicochemical nature of the biomineral scaffold and demonstrate the distinct spatial distribution of anionic biomolecules associated with the scaffold-mineral interface, as well as highlight the hydrogel-like properties of mammillae-associated macromolecules.

  17. "Sizing" Heterogeneous Chemistry in the Conversion of Gaseous Dimethyl Sulfide to Atmospheric Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enami, Shinichi; Sakamoto, Yosuke; Hara, Keiichiro; Osada, Kazuo; Hoffmann, Michael R; Colussi, Agustín J

    2016-02-16

    The oxidation of biogenic dimethyl sulfide (DMS) emissions is a global source of cloud condensation nuclei. The amounts of the nucleating H2SO4(g) species produced in such process, however, remain uncertain. Hydrophobic DMS is mostly oxidized in the gas phase into H2SO4(g) + DMSO(g) (dimethyl sulfoxide), whereas water-soluble DMSO is oxidized into H2SO4(g) in the gas phase and into SO4(2-) + MeSO3(-) (methanesulfonate) on water surfaces. R = MeSO3(-)/(non-sea-salt SO4(2-)) ratios would therefore gauge both the strength of DMS sources and the extent of DMSO heterogeneous oxidation if Rhet = MeSO3(-)/SO4(2-) for DMSO(aq) + ·OH(g) were known. Here, we report that Rhet = 2.7, a value obtained from online electrospray mass spectra of DMSO(aq) + ·OH(g) reaction products that quantifies the MeSO3(-) produced in DMSO heterogeneous oxidation on aqueous aerosols for the first time. On this basis, the inverse R dependence on particle radius in size-segregated aerosol collected over Syowa station and Southern oceans is shown to be consistent with the competition between DMSO gas-phase oxidation and its mass accommodation followed by oxidation on aqueous droplets. Geographical R variations are thus associated with variable contributions of the heterogeneous pathway to DMSO atmospheric oxidation, which increase with the specific surface area of local aerosols.

  18. Isolation and characterization of biogenic calcium carbonate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biogenic calcium carbonate/phosphate were isolated and characterized from oral bacteria (CPOB). The crystalline nature ... XRD analysis revealed the cubic phase of ... subjected to identify upto genus level according to Bergey's. Manual of ...

  19. Nitrogen in biogenic and abiogenic minerals from Paleozoic black shales: an NRA study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallien, J.-P.; Orberger, B.; Daudin, L.; Pinti, D.L.; Pasava, J.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear reaction analyses were performed on feldspars, quartz, abiogenic and biogenic sulfides and phosphates in organic matter-rich black shales. The goal was to study N-fractionation in black shales during diagenesis and contemporaneous hydrothermalism. Light elements (N, C) together with heavier ones (K, Ca, Ni, Fe, Zn) were analyzed by PIXE. Due to the heterogeneous sample composition, a scanning mode was used. Each phase was identified before extracting the corresponding spectra for quantification. Six phases, carrying nitrogen (and C), have been identified. K-feldspars are the richest in N (1.0-2.4 wt.%), followed by organic carbon (0.67 wt.%). Quartz, biogenic and abiogenic sulfides and phosphates contain N in the range of 0.56-1.08 wt.%. The present N-distribution in the black shales is explained by a two-step nitrogen release: (1) organic matter decay produces N, P, S nutriments for the development of a hydrothermal vent fauna and (2) biomineralization of this vent fauna liberates nitrogen to early diagenetic fluids. The extreme N enrichment of feldspars is related to its crystal structure, favoring the potassium substitution by NH 4 + , and the N-uptake during organic matter replacement

  20. Assessing the Role of Iron Sulfides in the Long Term Sequestration of Uranium by Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, Kim F. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bi, Yuqiang [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Carpenter, Julian [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hyng, Sung Pil [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Rittmann, Bruce E. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Zhou, Chen [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Vannela, Raveender [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Davis, James A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    This overarching aim of this project was to identify the role of biogenic and synthetic iron-sulfide minerals in the long-term sequestration of reduced U(IV) formed under sulfate-reducing conditions when subjected to re-oxidizing conditions. The work reported herein was achieved through the collaborative research effort conducted at Arizona State University (ASU) and the University of Michigan (UM). Research at ASU, focused on the biogenesis aspects, examined the biogeochemical bases for iron-sulfide production by Desulfovibrio vulgaris, a Gram-negative bacterium that is one of the most-studied strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A series of experimental studies were performed to investigate comprehensively important metabolic and environmental factors that affect the rates of sulfate reduction and iron-sulfide precipitation, the mineralogical characteristics of the iron sulfides, and how uranium is reduced or co-reduced by D. vulagaris. FeS production studies revealed that controlling the pH affected the growth of D. vulgaris and strongly influenced the formation and growth of FeS solids. In particular, lower pH produced larger-sized mackinawite (Fe1+xS). Greater accumulation of free sulfide, from more sulfate reduction by D. vulgaris, also led to larger-sized mackinawite and stimulated mackinawite transformation to greigite (Fe3S4) when the free sulfide concentration was 29.3 mM. On the other hand, using solid Fe(III) (hydr)oxides as the iron source led to less productivity of FeS due to their slow and incomplete dissolution and scavenging of sulfide. Furthermore, sufficient free Fe2+, particularly during Fe(III) (hydr)oxide reductions, led to the additional formation of vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2•8(H2O)]. The U(VI) reduction studies revealed that D. vulgaris reduced U(VI) fastest when accumulating sulfide from concomitant sulfate reduction, since direct enzymatic and sulfide

  1. Optimization of biological sulfide removal in a CSTR bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosta, Aliakbar; Jahanmiri, Abdolhossein; Mowla, Dariush; Niazi, Ali; Sotoodeh, Hamidreza

    2012-08-01

    In this study, biological sulfide removal from natural gas in a continuous bioreactor is investigated for estimation of the optimal operational parameters. According to the carried out reactions, sulfide can be converted to elemental sulfur, sulfate, thiosulfate, and polysulfide, of which elemental sulfur is the desired product. A mathematical model is developed and was used for investigation of the effect of various parameters on elemental sulfur selectivity. The results of the simulation show that elemental sulfur selectivity is a function of dissolved oxygen, sulfide load, pH, and concentration of bacteria. Optimal parameter values are calculated for maximum elemental sulfur selectivity by using genetic algorithm as an adaptive heuristic search. In the optimal conditions, 87.76% of sulfide loaded to the bioreactor is converted to elemental sulfur.

  2. Biogenic iron mineralization at Iron Mountain, CA with implications for detection with the Mars Curiosity rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amy J.; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Alpers, Charles N.; Campbell, Kate M.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    2014-01-01

    (Introduction) Microbe-mineral interactions and biosignature preservation in oxidized sulfidic ore bodies (gossans) are prime candidates for astrobiological study. Such oxidized iron systems have been proposed as analogs for some Martian environments. Recent studies identified microbial fossils preserved as mineral-coated filaments. This study documents microbially-mediated mineral biosignatures in hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) and ferric oxyhydroxysulfates (FOHS) in three environments at Iron Mountain, CA. We investigated microbial community preservation via HFO and FOHS precipitation and the formation of filamentous mineral biosignatures. These environments included 1) actively precipitating (1000's yrs), naturally weathered HFO from in situ gossan, and 3) remobilized iron deposits, which contained lithified clastics and zones of HFO precipitate. We used published biogenicity criteria as guidelines to characterize the biogenicity of mineral filaments. These criteria included A) an actively precipitating environment where microbes are known to be coated in minerals, B) presence of extant microbial communities with carbon signatures, C) structures observable as a part of the host rock, and D) biological morphology, including cellular lumina, multiple member population, numerous taxa, variable and 3-D preservation, biological size ranges, uniform diameter, and evidence of flexibility. This study explores the relevance and detection of these biosignatures to possible Martian biosignatures. Similar filamentous biosignatures are resolvable by the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, Curiosity, and may be identifiable as biogenic if present on Mars.

  3. Efeito da aplicação de nitrato na redução biogênica de sulfeto sob diferentes concentrações iniciais de bactérias redutoras de nitrato e sulfato Effect of nitrate application on reduction of biogenic sulphide under different initial concentrations of nitrate and sulphate-reducing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kally Alves de Sousa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sodium nitrate application in the reduction of biogenic sulphide was evaluated through a 2k complete factorial design, using as variable response the production of sulfide at intervals of incubation of 7, 14 and 28 days. The most effective condition for reducing the sulphide production (final concentrations from 0.4 to 1.6 mg S2- L-1 was obtained with an initial population of sulphate-reducing bacteria and nitrate-reducing bacteria of 10(4 MPN mL-1 and 427.5 mg L-1 nitrate. The results also suggested that the applications of nitrate to control the process of souring should follow a continuous scheme.

  4. Biogenic uraninite precipitation and its reoxidation by iron(III) (hydr)oxides: A reaction modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spycher, Nicolas F.; Issarangkun, Montarat; Stewart, Brandy D.; Sevinç Şengör, S.; Belding, Eileen; Ginn, Tim R.; Peyton, Brent M.; Sani, Rajesh K.

    2011-08-01

    One option for immobilizing uranium present in subsurface contaminated groundwater is in situ bioremediation, whereby dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria and/or sulfate-reducing bacteria are stimulated to catalyze the reduction of soluble U(VI) and precipitate it as uraninite (UO 2). This is typically accomplished by amending groundwater with an organic electron donor. It has been shown, however, that once the electron donor is entirely consumed, Fe(III) (hydr)oxides can reoxidize biogenically produced UO 2, thus potentially impeding cleanup efforts. On the basis of published experiments showing that such reoxidation takes place even under highly reducing conditions (e.g., sulfate-reducing conditions), thermodynamic and kinetic constraints affecting this reoxidation are examined using multicomponent biogeochemical simulations, with particular focus on the role of sulfide and Fe(II) in solution. The solubility of UO 2 and Fe(III) (hydr)oxides are presented, and the effect of nanoscale particle size on stability is discussed. Thermodynamically, sulfide is preferentially oxidized by Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, compared to biogenic UO 2, and for this reason the relative rates of sulfide and UO 2 oxidation play a key role on whether or not UO 2 reoxidizes. The amount of Fe(II) in solution is another important factor, with the precipitation of Fe(II) minerals lowering the Fe +2 activity in solution and increasing the potential for both sulfide and UO 2 reoxidation. The greater (and unintuitive) UO 2 reoxidation by hematite compared to ferrihydrite previously reported in some experiments can be explained by the exhaustion of this mineral from reaction with sulfide. Simulations also confirm previous studies suggesting that carbonate produced by the degradation of organic electron donors used for bioreduction may significantly increase the potential for UO 2 reoxidation through formation of uranyl carbonate aqueous complexes.

  5. Emissions of biogenic sulfur gases from Alaskan tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Mark E.; Morrison, Michael C.

    1992-01-01

    Results of sulfur emission measurements made in freshwater and marine wetlands in Alaskan tundra during the Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition 2A (ABLE 3A) in July 1988 are presented. The data indicate that this type of tundra emits very small amounts of gaseous sulfur and, when extrapolated globally, accounts for a very small percentage of the global flux of biogenic sulfur to the atmosphere. Sulfur emissions from marine sites are up to 20-fold greater than fluxes from freshwater habitats and are dominated by dimethyl sulfide (DMS). Highest emissions, with a mean of 6.0 nmol/sq m/h, occurred in water-saturated wet meadow areas. In drier upland tundra sites, highest fluxes occurred in areas inhabited by mixed vegetation and labrador tea at 3.0 nmol/sq m/h and lowest fluxes were from lichen-dominated areas at 0.9 nmol/sq m/h. DMS was the dominant gas emitted from all these sites. Emissions of DMS were highest from intertidal soils inhabited by Carex subspathacea.

  6. Sulfide Mineral Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Vaughan, David J.

    2006-01-01

    The past twenty years or so have seen dramatic development of the experimental and theoretical tools available to study the surfaces of solids at the molecular (?atomic resolution?) scale. On the experimental side, two areas of development well illustrate these advances. The first concerns the high intensity photon sources associated with synchrotron radiation; these have both greatly improved the surface sensitivity and spatial resolution of already established surface spectroscopic and diffraction methods, and enabled the development of new methods for studying surfaces. The second centers on the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques initially developed in the 1980's with the first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments. The direct 'observation' of individual atoms at surfaces made possible with these methods has truly revolutionized surface science. On the theoretical side, the availability of high performance computers coupled with advances in computational modeling has provided powerful new tools to complement the advances in experiment. Particularly important have been the quantum mechanics based computational approaches such as density functional theory (DFT), which can now be easily used to calculate the equilibrium crystal structures of solids and surfaces from first principles, and to provide insights into their electronic structure. In this chapter, we review current knowledge of sulfide mineral surfaces, beginning with an overview of the principles relevant to the study of the surfaces of all crystalline solids. This includes the thermodynamics of surfaces, the atomic structure of surfaces (surface crystallography and structural stability, adjustments of atoms at the surface through relaxation or reconstruction, surface defects) and the electronic structure of surfaces. We then discuss examples where specific crystal surfaces have been studied, with the main sulfide minerals organized by structure type

  7. Sulfide Mineral Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Vaughan, David J.

    2006-08-01

    The past twenty years or so have seen dramatic development of the experimental and theoretical tools available to study the surfaces of solids at the molecular (?atomic resolution?) scale. On the experimental side, two areas of development well illustrate these advances. The first concerns the high intensity photon sources associated with synchrotron radiation; these have both greatly improved the surface sensitivity and spatial resolution of already established surface spectroscopic and diffraction methods, and enabled the development of new methods for studying surfaces. The second centers on the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques initially developed in the 1980's with the first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments. The direct 'observation' of individual atoms at surfaces made possible with these methods has truly revolutionized surface science. On the theoretical side, the availability of high performance computers coupled with advances in computational modeling has provided powerful new tools to complement the advances in experiment. Particularly important have been the quantum mechanics based computational approaches such as density functional theory (DFT), which can now be easily used to calculate the equilibrium crystal structures of solids and surfaces from first principles, and to provide insights into their electronic structure. In this chapter, we review current knowledge of sulfide mineral surfaces, beginning with an overview of the principles relevant to the study of the surfaces of all crystalline solids. This includes the thermodynamics of surfaces, the atomic structure of surfaces (surface crystallography and structural stability, adjustments of atoms at the surface through relaxation or reconstruction, surface defects) and the electronic structure of surfaces. We then discuss examples where specific crystal surfaces have been studied, with the main sulfide minerals organized by

  8. Assessing the Role of Iron Sulfides in the Long Term Sequestration of U by Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rittman, Bruce; Zhou, Chen; Vannela, Raveender

    2013-12-31

    This four-year project’s overarching aim was to identify the role of biogenic and synthetic iron-sulfide minerals in the long-term sequestration of reduced U(IV) formed under sulfate-reducing conditions when subjected to re-oxidizing conditions. As stated in this final report, significant progress was achieved through the collaborative research effort conducted at Arizona State University (ASU) and the University of Michigan (UM).

  9. Influence of pipe material and surfaces on sulfide related odor and corrosion in sewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Vollertsen, Jes; Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Wium-Andersen, Tove; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild

    2008-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation on sewer pipe surfaces was investigated in a pilot scale experimental setup. The experiments were aimed at replicating conditions in a gravity sewer located immediately downstream of a force main where sulfide related concrete corrosion and odor is often observed. During the experiments, hydrogen sulfide gas was injected intermittently into the headspace of partially filled concrete and plastic (PVC and HDPE) sewer pipes in concentrations of approximately 1,000 ppm(v). Between each injection, the hydrogen sulfide concentration was monitored while it decreased because of adsorption and subsequent oxidation on the pipe surfaces. The experiments showed that the rate of hydrogen sulfide oxidation was approximately two orders of magnitude faster on the concrete pipe surfaces than on the plastic pipe surfaces. Removal of the layer of reaction (corrosion) products from the concrete pipes was found to reduce the rate of hydrogen sulfide oxidation significantly. However, the rate of sulfide oxidation was restored to its background level within 10-20 days. A similar treatment had no observable effect on hydrogen sulfide removal in the plastic pipe reactors. The experimental results were used to model hydrogen sulfide oxidation under field conditions. This showed that the gas-phase hydrogen sulfide concentration in concrete sewers would typically amount to a few percent of the equilibrium concentration calculated from Henry's law. In the plastic pipe sewers, significantly higher concentrations were predicted because of the slower adsorption and oxidation kinetics on such surfaces.

  10. BIOGENIC AMINES CONTENT IN DIFFERENT WINE SAMPLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Kántor

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-five samples of different Slovak wines before and after filtration were analysed in order to determine the content of eight biogenic amines (tryptamine, phenylalanine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, spermidine and spermine. The method involves extraction of biogenic amines from wine samples with used dansyl chloride. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC was used for determination of biogenic amines equipped with a Rapid Resolution High Definition (RRHD, DAD detectors and Extend-C18 LC column (50 mm x 3.0 mm ID, 1.8 μm particle size. In this study the highest level of biogenic amine in all wine samples represent tryptamine (TRM with the highest content 170.9±5.3 mg/L in Pinot Blanc wine. Phenylalanine (PHE cadaverine (CAD, histamine (HIS and spermidine (SPD were not detected in all wines; mainly SPD was not detected in 16 wines, HIS not detected in 14 wines, PHE and CAD not detected in 2 wines. Tyramine (TYR, spermine (SPN and putrescine (PUT were detected in all wines, but PUT and SPN in very low concentration. The worst wine samples with high biogenic amine content were Saint Laurent (BF, Pinot Blanc (S and Pinot Noir (AF.

  11. Biogenic amines in Italian Pecorino cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eSchirone

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The quality of distinctive artisanal cheeses is closely associated with the territory of production and its traditions. Pedoclimatic characteristics, genetic autochthonous variations and anthropic components create an environment so specific that it would be extremely difficult to reproduce elsewhere. Pecorino cheese is included in this sector of the market and is widely diffused in Italy (approximately 53.727t of production. Pecorino is a common name given to indicate Italian cheeses made exclusively from pure ewes' milk characterized by a high content of fat matter and it is mainly produced in the middle and south of Italy by traditional procedures from raw or thermized milk. The microbiota plays a major role in the development of the organoleptic characteristics of the cheese but it can also be responsible for the accumulation of undesirable substances, such as biogenic amines (BA. Several factors can contribute to the qualitative and quantitative profiles of BA’s in Pecorino cheese such as environmental hygienic conditions, pH, salt concentration, aw, fat content, pasteurization of milk, decarboxylase microorganisms, starter cultures, temperature and time of ripening, storage, part of the cheese (core, edge and the presence of cofactor. Generally, the total content of BA’s can range from about 100-2400 mg/kg, with a prevalence of toxicologically important BA’s, tyramine and histamine. The presence of BA in Pecorino cheeses is becoming increasingly important to consumers and cheese-maker alike, due to the potential threats of toxicity to humans and consequent trade implications.

  12. Direct night-time ejection of particle-phase reduced biogenic sulfur compounds from the ocean to the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Cassandra J; Furutani, Hiroshi; Guazzotti, Sergio A; Coffee, Keith R; Jung, Jinyoung; Uematsu, Mitsuo; Prather, Kimberly A

    2015-04-21

    The influence of oceanic biological activity on sea spray aerosol composition, clouds, and climate remains poorly understood. The emission of organic material and gaseous dimethyl sulfide (DMS) from the ocean represents well-documented biogenic processes that influence particle chemistry in marine environments. However, the direct emission of particle-phase biogenic sulfur from the ocean remains largely unexplored. Here we present measurements of ocean-derived particles containing reduced sulfur, detected as elemental sulfur ions (e.g., (32)S(+), (64)S2(+)), in seven different marine environments using real-time, single particle mass spectrometry; these particles have not been detected outside of the marine environment. These reduced sulfur compounds were associated with primary marine particle types and wind speeds typically between 5 and 10 m/s suggesting that these particles themselves are a primary emission. In studies with measurements of seawater properties, chlorophyll-a and atmospheric DMS concentrations were typically elevated in these same locations suggesting a biogenic source for these sulfur-containing particles. Interestingly, these sulfur-containing particles only appeared at night, likely due to rapid photochemical destruction during the daytime, and comprised up to ∼67% of the aerosol number fraction, particularly in the supermicrometer size range. These sulfur-containing particles were detected along the California coast, across the Pacific Ocean, and in the southern Indian Ocean suggesting that these particles represent a globally significant biogenic contribution to the marine aerosol burden.

  13. Hydrothermal, biogenic, and seawater components in metalliferous black shales of the Brooks Range, Alaska: Synsedimentary metal enrichment in a carbonate ramp setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, John F.; Selby, David; Dumoulin, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    being linked to early diagenetic processes within sulfidic pore fluids.Initial Os isotope ratios (187Os/188Os) calculated for a paleontologically based depositional age of 335 Ma reveal moderately unradiogenic values of 0.24 to 0.88 for four samples of metalliferous black shale. A proxy for the ratio of coeval early Chesterian seawater is provided by initial (187Os/188Os)335 Ma ratios of four unaltered black shales of the coeval Kuna Formation that average 1.08, nearly identical to the initial ratio of 1.06 for modern seawater. Evaluation of possible sources of unradiogenic Os in the metalliferous black shales suggests that the most likely source was mafic igneous rocks that were leached by externally derived hydrothermal fluids. This unradiogenic Os is interpreted to have been leached by deeply circulating hydrothermal fluids in the Kuna basin, followed by venting of the fluids into overlying seawater.We propose that metal-bearing hydrothermal fluids that formed Zn-Pb-Ag deposits such as Red Dog or Drenchwater vented into seawater in a marginal basin, were carried by upwelling currents onto the margins of a shallow-water carbonate platform, and were then deposited in organic-rich muds, together with seawater- and biogenically derived components, by syngenetic sedimentary processes. Metal concentration in the black shales was promoted by high biologic productivity, sorption onto organic matter, diffusion across redox boundaries, a low sedimentation rate, and availability of H2S in bottom waters and pore fluids.

  14. Effect of Sulfide Concentration on Copper Corrosion in Anoxic Chloride-Containing Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Decheng; Dong, Chaofang; Xu, Aoni; Man, Cheng; He, Chang; Li, Xiaogang

    2017-04-01

    The structure and property of passive film on copper are strongly dependent on the sulfide concentration; based on this, a series of electrochemical methods were applied to investigate the effect of sulfide concentration on copper corrosion in anaerobic chloride-containing solutions. The cyclic voltammetry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis demonstrated that the corrosion products formed on copper in anaerobic sulfide solutions comprise Cu2S and CuS. And the corrosion resistance of copper decreased with increasing sulfide concentration and faster sulfide addition, owing to the various structures of the passive films observed by the atomic force microscope and scanning electron microscope. A p-type semiconductor character was obtained under all experimental conditions, and the defect concentration, which had a magnitude of 1022-1023 cm-3, increased with increasing sulfide concentration, resulting in a higher rate of both film growth and dissolution.

  15. When can Electrochemical Techniques give Reliable Corrosion Rates on Carbon Steel in Sulfide Media?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Hemmingsen, Tor; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    2005-01-01

    in combination with ferrous sulfide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 with electrochemical techniques - both by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Oxygen entering the system accelerates......Effects of film formation on carbon steel in hydrogen sulfide media may corrupt corrosion rate monitoring by electrochemical techniques. Electrochemical data from hydrogen sulfide solutions, biological sulfide media and natural sulfide containing geothermal water have been collected and the process...... of film formation in sulfide solutions was followed by video. It can be shown that capacitative and diffusional effects due to porous reactive deposits tend to dominate the data resulting in unreliable corrosion rates measured by electrochemical techniques. The effect is strongly increased if biofilm...

  16. Technological factors affecting biogenic amine content in foods: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Gardini

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic amines (BAs are molecules which can be present in foods and, due to their toxicity, can cause adverse effects on the consumers. BAs are generally produced by microbial decarboxylation of amino acids in food products. The most significant BAs occurring in foods are histamine, tyramine, putrescine, cadaverine, tryptamine, 2-phenylethylamine, spermine, spermidine and agmatine. The importance of preventing the excessive accumulation of BAs in food is related to their impact on human health and food quality. Quality criteria in connection with the presence of BAs in food and food products are necessary from a toxicological point of view. This is particularly important in fermented foods in which the massive microbial proliferation required for obtaining specific products is often relater with BA accumulation. In this review, up-to-date information and recent discoveries about technological factors affecting biogenic amine content in foods are reviewed. Specifically, BA forming-microorganism and decarboxylation activity, genetic and metabolic organization of decarboxylases, risk associated to BAs (histamine, tyramine toxicity and other BAs, environmental factors influencing BA formation (temperature, salt concentration, pH. In addition, the technological factors for controlling BA production (use of starter culture, technological additives, effects of packaging, other non-thermal treatments, metabolising BA by microorganisms, effects of pressure treatments on BA formation and antimicrobial substances are addressed.

  17. Mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balaz, P.; Takacs, L.; Jiang, Jianzhong

    2002-01-01

    The mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide with iron was induced in a Fritsch P-6 planetary mill, using WC vial filled with argon and WC balls. Samples milled for specific intervals were analyzed by XRD and Mossbauer spectroscopy. Most of the reaction takes place during the first 10 min...... of milling and only FeS and Cu are found after 60 min. The main chemical process is accompanied by phase transformations of the sulfide phases as a result of milling. Djurleite partially transformed to chalcocite and a tetragonal copper sulfide phase before reduction. The cubic modification of FeS was formed...... first, transforming to hexagonal during the later stages of the process. The formation of off-stoichiometric phases and the release of some elemental sulfur by copper sulfide are also probable....

  18. PROSPECTS OF MODIFICATION OF BALNEOLOGICAL REMEDIES WITH BIOGENEOUS METALLS NANOPARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Mamuchieva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the issues of mineral waters modification with biogeneous metals nanoparticles, since they have extremely important meaning for human's organism and their production in green and biologically compliant form is hard to overestimate. Russian scientists discovered low toxicity of these nanomaterials. So the use of biogeneuos metals in form of nanoparticles allows lowering of their toxicity compared with its use in forms of ions.

  19. Extracellular Proteins Limit the Dispersal of BiogenicNanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, John W.; Weber, Peter K.; Martin, Michael C.; Gilbert,Benjamin; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2007-04-27

    High spatial-resolution secondaryion microprobespectrometry, synchrotron radiation Fourier-transform infraredspectroscopy and polyacrylamide gel analysis demonstrate the intimateassociation of proteins with spheroidal aggregates of biogenic zincsulfide nanocrystals, an example of extracellular biomineralization.Experiments involving synthetic ZnS nanoparticles and representativeamino acids indicate a driving role for cysteine in rapid nanoparticleaggregation. These findings suggest that microbially-derivedextracellular proteins can limit dispersal of nanoparticulatemetal-bearing phases, such as the mineral products of bioremediation,that may otherwise be transported away from their source by subsurfacefluid flow.

  20. LIGNOCELLULOSE NANOCOMPOSITE CONTAINING COPPER SULFIDE

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchi Nenkova; Peter Velev; Mirela Dragnevska; Diyana Nikolova; Kiril Dimitrov

    2011-01-01

    Copper sulfide-containing lignocellulose nanocomposites with improved electroconductivity were obtained. Two methods for preparing the copper sulfide lignocellulose nanocomposites were developed. An optimization of the parameters for obtaining of the nanocomposites with respect to obtaining improved electroconductivity, economy, and lower quantities and concentration of copper and sulfur ions in waste waters was conducted. The mechanisms and schemes of delaying and subsequent connection of co...

  1. Impact of biogenic terpene emissions from Brassica napus on tropospheric ozone over Saxony (Germany): numerical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Eberhard; Münzenberg, Annette

    2003-01-01

    The role of biogenic emissions in tropospheric ozone production is currently under discussion and major aspects are not well understood yet. This study aims towards the estimation of the influence of biogenic emissions on tropospheric ozone concentrations over Saxony in general and of biogenic emissions from brassica napus in special. MODELLING TOOLS: The studies are performed by utilizing a coupled numerical modelling system consisting of the meteorological model METRAS and the chemistry transport model MUSCAT. For the chemical part, the Euro-RADM algorithm is used. EMISSIONS: Anthropogenic and biogenic emissions are taken into account. The anthropogenic emissions are introduced by an emission inventory. Biogenic emissions, VOC and NO, are calculated within the chemical transport model MUSCAT at each time step and in each grid cell depending on land use type and on the temperature. The emissions of hydrocarbons from forest areas as well as biogenic NO especially from agricultural grounds are considered. Also terpene emissions from brassica napus fields are estimated. SIMULATION SETUP AND METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS: The simulations were performed over an area with an extension of 160 x 140 km2 which covers the main parts of Saxony and neighboring areas of Brandenburg, Sachsen-Anhalt and Thuringia. Summer smog with high ozone concentrations can be expected during high pressure conditions on hot summer days. Typical meteorological conditions for such cases were introduced in an conceptual way. It is estimated that biogenic emissions change tropospheric ozone concentrations in a noticeable way (up to 15% to 20%) and, therefore, should not be neglected in studies about tropospheric ozone. Emissions from brassica napus do have a moderate potential to enhance tropospheric ozone concentrations, but emissions are still under consideration and, therefore, results vary to a high degree. Summing up, the effect of brassica napus terpene emissions on ozone concentrations is

  2. An approach for verifying biogenic greenhouse gas emissions inventories with atmospheric CO2 concentration data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogle, Stephen M; Davis, Kenneth; Lauvaux, Thomas; Miles, Natasha L; Richardson, Scott; Schuh, Andrew; Cooley, Dan; Breidt, F Jay; West, Tristram O; Heath, Linda S; Smith, James E; McCarty, Jessica L; Gurney, Kevin R; Tans, Pieter; Denning, A Scott

    2015-01-01

    Verifying national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventories is a critical step to ensure that reported emissions data to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) are accurate and representative of a country’s contribution to GHG concentrations in the atmosphere. Furthermore, verifying biogenic fluxes provides a check on estimated emissions associated with managing lands for carbon sequestration and other activities, which often have large uncertainties. We report here on the challenges and results associated with a case study using atmospheric measurements of CO 2 concentrations and inverse modeling to verify nationally-reported biogenic CO 2 emissions. The biogenic CO 2 emissions inventory was compiled for the Mid-Continent region of United States based on methods and data used by the US government for reporting to the UNFCCC, along with additional sources and sinks to produce a full carbon balance. The biogenic emissions inventory produced an estimated flux of −408 ± 136 Tg CO 2 for the entire study region, which was not statistically different from the biogenic flux of −478 ± 146 Tg CO 2 that was estimated using the atmospheric CO 2 concentration data. At sub-regional scales, the spatial density of atmospheric observations did not appear sufficient to verify emissions in general. However, a difference between the inventory and inversion results was found in one isolated area of West-central Wisconsin. This part of the region is dominated by forestlands, suggesting that further investigation may be warranted into the forest C stock or harvested wood product data from this portion of the study area. The results suggest that observations of atmospheric CO 2 concentration data and inverse modeling could be used to verify biogenic emissions, and provide more confidence in biogenic GHG emissions reporting to the UNFCCC. (letter)

  3. Synthesis of hydroxyapatite from biogenic wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teerawat Laonapakul

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite (HAp is a major component of human bone, teeth and hard tissue. It is one of only a few bioactive materials. Since HAp is the most widely used ceramic biomaterial, various techniques have been developed to synthesize HAp. In recent years, the use of natural biogenic structures and materials for medical proposes has been motivated by limitations in producing synthetic materials. This article mainly focuses on the use of biogenic wastes to prepare HAp. These include bio-wastes, marine corals, eggshells, seashells and bio-membranes. In the present review, useful information about HAp preparation methodologies has been summarized for further research and development.

  4. Biogenic amines and radiosensitivity of solitary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharenko, E.N.

    1978-01-01

    Different stability of cells to ionizing radiation is considered from a position of the ''elevated biochemical radioresistance background'' concept. Experimental evidence presented indicates an important role of endogenic amines (serotonin and histamine) possessing radioprotector properties in the cell radioresistance formation. The concept about their effect as being solely a result of circulatory hypoxia is critically discussed. The experimental results favor the existence of a ''cellular'' component, along with the ''hypoxic'' one, in the mechanism of action of biogenic amines. These compounds can affect the initial stages of peroxide oxidation of lipids, thereby favoring a less intensive oxidation induced by radiation. Biogenic amines can also exert influence on the cyclic nucleotide system

  5. Role of aqueous sulfide and sulfate-reducing bacteria in the kinetics and mechanisms of the reduction of uranyl ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohagheghi, A.

    1985-01-01

    Formation of sedimentary rock-hosted uranium ore deposits is thought to have resulted from the reduction by aqueous sulfide species of relatively soluble uranyl ion (U(VI)) to insoluble uranium(IV) oxides and silicates. The origin of this H 2 S in such deposits can be either biogenic or abiogenic. Therefore, the kinetics and mechanism of uranyl ion reduction by aqueous sulfide, and the effect of several key variables on the reduction process in non-bacterial (sterile) systems was studied. The role of both pure and mixed cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria on the reduction process was also investigated. In sterile systems the reduction reaction generally occurred by a two step reaction sequence. Uranium(V) (as UO 2 + ) and U(IV) (as UO 2 the mineral uraninite) were the intermediate and final products, respectively. The initial concentration of uranyl ion required for reaction initiation had a minimum value of 0.8 ppm at pH 7, and was higher at pH values less than or greater than 7. An induction period was observed in all experiments. No reduction was observed after 8 hours at pH 8. Although increasing ionic strength increased the length of the induction period, it also increased the rate of the reduction of UO 2 + in the second step. No reaction was observed under any experimental conditions with initial UO 2 2+ concentration less than 0.1 ppm, which is thought to be typical for ore forming solutions. However, by absorbing uranyl ion onto kaolinite, the reduction by H 2 S occurred at lower UO 2 2+ concentrations (∼ 0.1 ppm) in that in the homogeneous system. Thus, adsorption may play a significant role in the reduction and therefore in the formation of ore deposits

  6. Pyrite formation and mineral transformation pathways upon sulfidation of ferric hydroxides depend on mineral type and sulfide concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peiffer, Stefan; Behrends, Thilo; Hellige, Katrin; Larese-Casanova, Philip; Wan, Moli; Pollok, Kilian

    2015-01-01

    The reaction of ferric (hydr)oxides with dissolved sulfide does not lead to the instantaneous production of thermodynamically stable products but can induce a variety of mineral transformations including the formation of metastable intermediates. The importance of the various transformation pathways

  7. Nano Transition Metal Sulfide Catalyst for Solvolysis Liquefaction of Soda Lignin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fei-Ling, P.; Chin-Hua, C.; Sarani Zakaria; Soon-Keong, N.; Tze-Khong, L.

    2011-01-01

    Solvolysis liquefaction of soda lignin in the presence of various transition metal sulfide catalysts was studied to investigate the catalyst effects on the oil and gas yields, conversion rate and higher heating value (HHV) of oil. Nano sized copper sulfide, iron sulfide and molybdenum sulfide were successfully synthesized via a simple hydrothermal method under reaction temperature 200 degree Celsius for 90 min. The addition of transition metal sulfide based catalysts (CuS, MoS 2 and FeS 2 ) enhanced both production of the oils and gas and the higher heating value (HHV) of oil products. A high oil and gas yields of 82.1 % and 2890 cm 3 was obtained with MoS 2 at 250 degree Celsius for 60 min. Elemental analyses for the oils revealed that the liquid products have much higher heating values than the crude soda lignin powder. (author)

  8. New cyclic sulfides extracted from Allium sativum: garlicnins P, J2, and Q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohara, Toshihiro; Ono, Masateru; Nishioka, Naho; Masuda, Fuka; Fujiwara, Yukio; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Nakano, Daisuke; Kinjo, Junei

    2018-01-01

    Two atypical cyclic-type sulfides, garlicnin P (1) and garlicnin J 2 (2), and one thiabicyclic-type sulfide, garlicnin Q (3), were isolated from the acetone extracts of garlic, Allium sativum, bulbs cultivated in the Kumamoto city area, and their structures characterized. Their production pathways are also discussed.

  9. Safety assessment of the biogenic amines in fermented soya beans and fermented bean curd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; Ding, Xiaowen; Qin, Yingrui; Zeng, Yitao

    2014-08-06

    To evaluate the safety of biogenic amines, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to evaluate the levels of biogenic amines in fermented soya beans and fermented bean curd. In fermented soya beans, the total biogenic amines content was in a relatively safe range in many samples, although the concentration of histamine, tyramine, and β-phenethylamine was high enough in some samples to cause a possible safety threat, and 8 of the 30 samples were deemed unsafe. In fermented bean curd, the total biogenic amines content was more than 900 mg/kg in 19 white sufu amples, a level that has been determined to pose a safety hazard; putrescine was the only one detected in all samples and also had the highest concentration, which made samples a safety hazard; the content of tryptamine, β-phenethylamine, tyramine, and histamine had reached the level of threat to human health in some white and green sufu samples, and that may imply another potential safety risk; and 25 of the 33 samples were unsafe. In conclusion, the content of biogenic amines in all fermented soya bean products should be studied and appropriate limits determined to ensure the safety of eating these foods.

  10. Microbiological, physicochemical properties and biogenic amine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty three strained yoghurt samples were collected from local open markets in different provinces of Turkey (Afyon [AF], Aydın [AY], Burdur [B], Isparta [I] and Muğla [M]). Physicochemical and microbiological properties, as well as biogenic amine content, were examined in each of the samples. The dry matter (17.90 to ...

  11. Measurements of atmospheric hydrocarbons and biogenic emission fluxes in the Amazon boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, P. R.; Greenberg, J. P.; Westberg, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    Tropospheric mixing ratios of methane, C2-C10 hydrocarbons, and carbon monoxide were measured over the Amazon tropical forest near Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil, in July and August 1985. The measurements, consisting mostly of altitude profiles of these gases, were all made within the atmospheric boundary layer up to an altitude of 1000 m above ground level. Data characterize the diurnal hydrocarbon composition of the boundary layer. Biogenic emissions of isoprene control hydroxyl radical concentrations over the forest. Biogenic emission fluxes of isoprene and terpenes are estimated to be 25,000 micrograms/sq m per day and 5600 micrograms/sq m per day, respectively. This isoprene emission is equivalent to 2 percent of the net primary productivity of the tropical forest. Atmospheric oxidation of biogenic isoprene and terpenes emissions from the Amazon forest may account for daily increases of 8-13 ppb for carbon monoxide in the planetary boundary layer.

  12. Effect of sulfide concentration on the location of the metal precipitates in inversed fluidized bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa-Gomez, D., E-mail: d.villagomez@unesco-ihe.org [Core Pollution Prevention and Control, UNESCO-IHE, Institute for Water Education, PO Box 3015, 2601 DA Delft (Netherlands); Ababneh, H.; Papirio, S.; Rousseau, D.P.L.; Lens, P.N.L. [Core Pollution Prevention and Control, UNESCO-IHE, Institute for Water Education, PO Box 3015, 2601 DA Delft (Netherlands)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Sulfide concentration governs the location of metal precipitates in sulfate reducing bioreactors. {yields} High dissolved sulfide induces metal precipitation in the bulk liquid as fines. {yields} Low dissolved sulfide concentrations yield local supersaturation and thus metal precipitation in the biofilm. -- Abstract: The effect of the sulfide concentration on the location of the metal precipitates within sulfate-reducing inversed fluidized bed (IFB) reactors was evaluated. Two mesophilic IFB reactors were operated for over 100 days at the same operational conditions, but with different chemical oxygen demand (COD) to SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio (5 and 1, respectively). After a start up phase, 10 mg/L of Cu, Pb, Cd and Zn each were added to the influent. The sulfide concentration in one IFB reactor reached 648 mg/L, while it reached only 59 mg/L in the other one. In the high sulfide IFB reactor, the precipitated metals were mainly located in the bulk liquid (as fines), whereas in the low sulfide IFB reactor the metal preciptiates were mainly present in the biofilm. The latter can be explained by local supersaturation due to sulfide production in the biofilm. This paper demonstrates that the sulfide concentration needs to be controlled in sulfate reducing IFB reactors to steer the location of the metal precipitates for recovery.

  13. Excellent photocatalytic hydrogen production over CdS nanorods via using noble metal-free copper molybdenum sulfide (Cu2MoS4) nanosheets as co-catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sangyeob; Kumar, D. Praveen; Reddy, D. Amaranatha; Choi, Jiha; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2017-02-01

    Charge carrier recombination and durability issues are major problems in photocatalytic hydrogen (H2) evolution processes. Thus, there is a very important necessitate to extend an efficient photocatalyst to control charge-carrier dynamics in the photocatalytic system. We have developed copper molybdenum sulfide (Cu2MoS4) nanosheets as co-catalysts with CdS nanorods for controlling charge carriers without recombination for use in photocatalytic H2 evolution under simulated solar light irradiation. Effective control and utilization of charge carriers are possible by loading Cu2MoS4 nanosheets onto the CdS nanorods. The loading compensates for the restrictions of CdS, and stimulated synergistic effects, such as efficient photoexcited charge separation, lead to an improvement in photostability because of the layered structure of the Cu2MoS4nanosheets. These layered Cu2MoS4 nanosheets have emerged as novel and active replacements for precious noble metal co-catalysts in photocatalytic H2 production by water splitting. We have obtained superior H2 production rates by using Cu2MoS4 loaded CdS nanorods. The physicochemical properties of the composites are analyzed by diverse characterization techniques.

  14. Intolerance to dietary biogenic amines: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Sophia C; van Dusseldorp, Marijke; Bottema, Kathelijne C; Dubois, Anthony E J

    2003-09-01

    To evaluate the scientific evidence for purported intolerance to dietary biogenic amines. MEDLINE was searched for articles in the English language published between January 1966 and August 2001. The keyword biogenic amin* was combined with hypersens*, allerg*, intoler*, and adverse. Additionally, the keywords histamine, tyramine, and phenylethylamine were combined with headache, migraine, urticaria, oral challenge, and oral provocation. Articles were also selected from references in relevant literature. Only oral challenge studies in susceptible patients were considered. Studies with positive results (ie, studies in which an effect was reported) were only eligible when a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design was used. Eligible positive result studies were further evaluated according to a number of scientific criteria. Studies with negative results (ie, studies in which no effect was reported) were examined for factors in their design or methods that could be responsible for a false-negative outcome. Results of methodologically weak or flawed studies were considered inconclusive. A total of 13 oral challenge studies (5 with positive results and 8 with negative results) were found. Three of them (all with positive results) were considered ineligible. By further evaluation of the 10 eligible studies, 6 were considered inconclusive. The 4 conclusive studies all reported negative results. One conclusive study showed no relation between biogenic amines in red wine and wine intolerance. Two conclusive studies found no effect of tyramine on migraine. One conclusive study demonstrated no relation between the amount of phenylethylamine in chocolate and headache attacks in individuals with headache. The current scientific literature shows no relation between the oral ingestion of biogenic amines and food intolerance reactions. There is therefore no scientific basis for dietary recommendations concerning biogenic amines in such patients.

  15. Growth kinetics of hydrogen sulfide oxidizing bacteria in corroded concrete from sewers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Lens, Piet N.L.; Nielsen, Jeppe L.; Bester, Kai; Nielsen, Asbjorn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation by microbes present on concrete surfaces of sewer pipes is a key process in sewer corrosion. The growth of aerobic sulfur oxidizing bacteria from corroded concrete surfaces was studied in a batch reactor. Samples of corrosion products, containing sulfur oxidizing bacteria, were suspended in aqueous solution at pH similar to that of corroded concrete. Hydrogen sulfide was supplied to the reactor to provide the source of reduced sulfur. The removal of hydrogen sulfide and oxygen was monitored. The utilization rates of both hydrogen sulfide and oxygen suggested exponential bacterial growth with median growth rates of 1.25 d -1 and 1.33 d -1 as determined from the utilization rates of hydrogen sulfide and oxygen, respectively. Elemental sulfur was found to be the immediate product of the hydrogen sulfide oxidation. When exponential growth had been achieved, the addition of hydrogen sulfide was terminated leading to elemental sulfur oxidation. The ratio of consumed sulfur to consumed oxygen suggested that sulfuric acid was the ultimate oxidation product. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first study to determine the growth rate of bacteria involved in concrete corrosion with hydrogen sulfide as source of reduced sulfur.

  16. Reactive Transport Modeling Investigation of High Dissolved Sulfide Concentrations in Sedimentary Basin Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, M.; Mayer, U. K.; MacQuarrie, K. T. B.

    2017-12-01

    Water with total dissolved sulfide in excess of 1 mmol L-1is widely found in groundwater at intermediate depths in sedimentary basins, including regions of the Michigan basin in southeastern Ontario, Canada. Conversely, at deeper and shallower depths, relatively low total dissolved sulfide concentrations have been reported. The mechanisms responsible for the occurrence of these brackish sulfide-containing waters are not fully understood. Anaerobic microbial sulfate reduction is a common process resulting in the formation of high sulfide concentrations. Sulfate reduction rates depend on many factors including the concentration of sulfate, the abundance of organic substances, redox conditions, temperature, salinity and the species of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). A sedimentary basin-specific conceptual model considering the effect of salinity on the rate of sulfate reduction was developed and implemented in the reactive transport model MIN3P-THCm. Generic 2D basin-scale simulations were undertaken to provide a potential explanation for the dissolved sulfide distribution observed in the Michigan basin. The model is 440 km in the horizontal dimension and 4 km in depth, and contains fourteen sedimentary rock units including shales, sandstones, limestones, dolostone and evaporites. The main processes considered are non-isothermal density dependent flow, kinetically-controlled mineral dissolution/precipitation and its feedback on hydraulic properties, cation exchange, redox reactions, biogenic sulfate reduction, and hydromechanical coupling due to glaciation-deglaciation events. Two scenarios were investigated focusing on conditions during an interglacial period and the transient evolution during a glaciation-deglaciation cycle. Inter-glaciation simulations illustrate that the presence of high salinity brines strongly suppress biogenic sulfate reduction. The transient simulations show that glaciation-deglaciation cycles can have an impact on the maximum depth of

  17. The role of biogenic structures on the biogeochemical functioning of mangrove constructed wetlands sediments - A mesocosm approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penha-Lopes, Gil; Kristensen, Erik; Flindt, Mogens; Mangion, Perrine; Bouillon, Steven; Paula, Jose

    2010-01-01

    Benthic metabolism (measured as CO 2 production) and carbon oxidation pathways were evaluated in 4 mangrove mesocosms subjected daily to seawater or 60% sewage in the absence or presence of mangrove trees and biogenic structures (pneumatophores and crab burrows). Total CO 2 emission from darkened sediments devoid of biogenic structures at pristine conditions was comparable during inundation (immersion) and air exposure (emersion), although increased 2-7 times in sewage contaminated mesocosms. Biogenic structures increased low tide carbon gas emissions at contaminated (30%) and particularly pristine conditions (60%). When sewage was loaded into the mesocosms under unvegetated and planted conditions, iron reduction was substituted by sulfate reduction and contribution of aerobic respiration to total metabolism remained above 50%. Our results clearly show impacts of sewage on the partitioning of electron acceptors in mangrove sediment and confirm the importance of biogenic structures for biogeochemical functioning but also on greenhouse gases emission.

  18. Biological consilience of hydrogen sulfide and nitric oxide in plants: Gases of primordial earth linking plant, microbial and animal physiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Hideo; Cohen, Michael F

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is produced in the mammalian body through the enzymatic activities of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST). A growing number of studies have revealed that biogenic H2S produced in tissues is involved in a variety of physiological responses in mammals including vasorelaxation and neurotransmission. It is now evident that mammals utilize H2S to regulate multiple signaling systems, echoing the research history of the gaseous signaling molecules nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) that had previously only been recognized for their cytotoxicity. In the human diet, meats (mammals, birds and fishes) and vegetables (plants) containing cysteine and other sulfur compounds are the major dietary sources for endogenous production of H2S. Plants are primary producers in ecosystems on the earth and they synthesize organic sulfur compounds through the activity of sulfur assimilation. Although plant H2S-producing activities have been known for a long time, our knowledge of H2S biology in plant systems has not been updated to the extent of mammalian studies. Here we review recent progress on H2S studies, highlighting plants and bacteria. Scoping the future integration of H2S, NO and O2 biology, we discuss a possible linkage between physiology, ecology and evolutional biology of gas metabolisms that may reflect the historical changes of the Earth's atmospheric composition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Red coloration by heat treatment of the coprecipitate of cadmium sulfide and mercury(II) sulfide prepared from the nitrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Fujiya

    1979-01-01

    The effects of starting salts on the color, particle size and crystal structure of mercury-cadmium-sulfide pigments were investigated. The coprecipitate (N-S) of cadmium sulfide and mercury (II) sulfide was prepared by adding sodium sulfide solution to a mixed cadmium-mercury (II) nitrate solution. The coprecipitate (C-S) of cadmium sulfide and mercury (II) sulfide was also prepared from the mixed solution of their chlorides by the same method as described above. The coprecipitated products were heat-treated (calcination or hydrothermal treatment) at 350 0 C for 2 hours and subsequent changes in powder properties of both products were compared from each other. The powder properties of N-S, C-S and their heat-treated products were investigated by spectral reflectance, electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and specific surface area measurements. Sample (N-C) obtained by the calcination of N-S was brown, indicating no red coloration, but the calcined product (C-C) of C-S developed a red color. Cl - and hot water were found to be effective for the red color development of the pigment. The effectiveness was confirmed by calcining N-S in the presence of NaCl or by treating it hydrothermally. It was found that halides other than NaCl, (e.g., NH 4 Cl, KCl, KBr and KI), were also effective for the color development of the pigment. The red samples are solid solutions with a basically hexagonal CdS structure, and it appears that CdS takes up HgS without any apparent structural changes. The particle size of the red samples are larger than those of the non red samples. (author)

  20. Biogenic iron oxyhydroxide formation at mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal vents: Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toner, Brandy M.; Santelli, Cara M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Wirth, Richard; Chan, Clara S.; McCollom, Thomas; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2008-05-22

    Here we examine Fe speciation within Fe-encrusted biofilms formed during 2-month seafloor incubations of sulfide mineral assemblages at the Main Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The biofilms were distributed heterogeneously across the surface of the incubated sulfide and composed primarily of particles with a twisted stalk morphology resembling those produced by some aerobic Fe-oxidizing microorganisms. Our objectives were to determine the form of biofilm-associated Fe, and identify the sulfide minerals associated with microbial growth. We used micro-focused synchrotron-radiation X-ray fluorescence mapping (mu XRF), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (mu EXAFS), and X-ray diffraction (mu XRD) in conjunction with focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning, and highresolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The chemical and mineralogical composition of an Fe-encrusted biofilm was queried at different spatial scales, and the spatial relationship between primary sulfide and secondary oxyhydroxide minerals was resolved. The Fe-encrusted biofilms formed preferentially at pyrrhotite-rich (Fe1-xS, 0<_ x<_ 0.2) regions of the incubated chimney sulfide. At the nanometer spatial scale, particles within the biofilm exhibiting lattice fringing and diffraction patterns consistent with 2-line ferrihydrite were identified infrequently. At the micron spatial scale, Fe mu EXAFS spectroscopy and mu XRD measurements indicate that the dominant form of biofilm Fe is a short-range ordered Fe oxyhydroxide characterized by pervasive edge-sharing Fe-O6 octahedral linkages. Double corner-sharing Fe-O6 linkages, which are common to Fe oxyhydroxide mineral structures of 2-line ferrihydrite, 6-line ferrihydrite, and goethite, were not detected in the biogenic iron oxyhydroxide (BIO). The suspended development of the BIO mineral structure is consistent with Fe(III) hydrolysis and polymerization in the presence of high concentrations of Fe-complexing ligands. We hypothesize that

  1. Biogenic iron oxyhydroxide formation at mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal vents: Juan de Fuca Ridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toner, Brandy M.; Santelli, Cara M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Wirth, Richard; Chan, Clara S.; McCollom, Thomas; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2008-01-01

    Here we examine Fe speciation within Fe-encrusted biofilms formed during 2-month seafloor incubations of sulfide mineral assemblages at the Main Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The biofilms were distributed heterogeneously across the surface of the incubated sulfide and composed primarily of particles with a twisted stalk morphology resembling those produced by some aerobic Fe-oxidizing microorganisms. Our objectives were to determine the form of biofilm-associated Fe, and identify the sulfide minerals associated with microbial growth. We used micro-focused synchrotron-radiation X-ray fluorescence mapping (mu XRF), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (mu EXAFS), and X-ray diffraction (mu XRD) in conjunction with focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The chemical and mineralogical composition of an Fe-encrusted biofilm was queried at different spatial scales, and the spatial relationship between primary sulfide and secondary oxyhydroxide minerals was resolved. The Fe-encrusted biofilms formed preferentially at pyrrhotite-rich (Fe 1-x S, 0 (le) x (le) 0.2) regions of the incubated chimney sulfide. At the nanometer spatial scale, particles within the biofilm exhibiting lattice fringing and diffraction patterns consistent with 2-line ferrihydrite were identified infrequently. At the micron spatial scale, Fe mu EXAFS spectroscopy and mu XRD measurements indicate that the dominant form of biofilm Fe is a short-range ordered Fe oxyhydroxide characterized by pervasive edge-sharing Fe-O 6 octahedral linkages. Double corner-sharing Fe-O 6 linkages, which are common to Fe oxyhydroxide mineral structures of 2-line ferrihydrite, 6-line ferrihydrite, and goethite, were not detected in the biogenic iron oxyhydroxide (BIO). The suspended development of the BIO mineral structure is consistent with Fe(III) hydrolysis and polymerization in the presence of high concentrations of Fe-complexing ligands. We hypothesize that

  2. Effects of Wood Pollution on Pore-Water Sulfide Levels and Eelgrass Germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekelem, C.

    2016-02-01

    Historically, sawmills released wood waste onto coastal shorelines throughout the Pacific Northwest of the USA, enriching marine sediments with organic material. The increase in organic carbon boosts the bacterial reduction of sulfate and results in the production of a toxic metabolite, hydrogen sulfide. Hydrogen sulfide is a phytotoxin and can decrease the growth and survival of eelgrass. This is a critical issue since eelgrass, Zostera marina, forms habitat for many species, stabilizes sediment, and plays a role in nutrient cycling and sediment chemistry. The objective of our study was to determine the effects of wood debris on sediment pore-water hydrogen sulfide concentrations and eelgrass germination. To test the impact of wood inputs on sulfide production and seed germination, we conducted a laboratory mesocosm experiment, adding sawdust to marine sediments and measuring the sulfide levels weekly. We subsequently planted seeds in the mesocosms and measured germination rates. Higher concentrations of sawdust led to higher levels of pore-water hydrogen sulfide and drastically slower eelgrass germination rates. Treatments with greater than 10% wood enrichment developed free sulfide concentrations of 0.815 (± 0.427) mM after 118 days, suggesting sediments with greater than 10% wood pollution may have threateningly high pore-water hydrogen sulfide levels. These results can be used to set thresholds for remediation efforts and guide seed distribution in wood polluted areas.

  3. Sulfide-conducting solid electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinina, L.A.; Shirokova, G.I.; Murin, I.V.; Ushakova, Yu.N.; Fominykh, E.G.; Lyalina, M.Yu.

    2000-01-01

    Feasibility of sulfide transfer in phases on the basis of BaZrS 3 and MLn 2 S 4 ( M = Ca, Ba; Ln = La, Y, Tm, Nd, Sm, Pr) is considered. Solid solution regions on the basis of ternary compounds are determined. Systematic study of the phases is carried out making use of the methods of conductometry, emf in chemical concentration chains without/with transfer, potentiostatic chronoamperometry. Possible mechanism of defect formation during successive alloying of ternary sulfides by binary ones in suggested [ru

  4. Preparation of transition metal sulfide nanoparticles via hydrothermal route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fei-Ling, P.; Chin-Hua, C.; Sarani Zakaria; Tze-Khong, L.; Mohd Ambar Yarmo; Nay-Ming, H.

    2010-01-01

    Nano sized copper sulfide, iron sulfide and molybdenum sulfide were successfully synthesised via a simple hydrothermal method. Sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate (Na 2 S 2 O 3 ·5H 2 O) and hydroxylamine sulfate ((H 3 NO) 2 ·H 2 SO 4 ) were used as the starting materials and reacted with the transition metal source at 200 degree Celsius for 90 min. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Spherical shape CuS and FeS 2 nanoparticles with high crystallinity were successfully produced. The transmission electron micrographs revealed the well-dispersibility of the produced nanoparticles. Scanning electron micrograph showed the MoS 2 nanoparticles possessed a spherical shape with sheet-like structure covering on the outer surface of the particles. (author)

  5. An eco-friendly oxidation of sulfide compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An improved green route has been developed for the oxidation of sulfide compounds. Albendazole is converted to ricobendazole or albendazole sulfone using H₂O₂ as an oxidant and H₂O as the solvent. High yields of the corresponding products were obtained by carrying out the reaction at room temperature.

  6. A physiologically based kinetic model for bacterial sulfide oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klok, Johannes B M; de Graaff, Marco; van den Bosch, Pim L F; Boelee, Nadine C; Keesman, Karel J; Janssen, Albert J H

    2013-02-01

    In the biotechnological process for hydrogen sulfide removal from gas streams, a variety of oxidation products can be formed. Under natron-alkaline conditions, sulfide is oxidized by haloalkaliphilic sulfide oxidizing bacteria via flavocytochrome c oxidoreductase. From previous studies, it was concluded that the oxidation-reduction state of cytochrome c is a direct measure for the bacterial end-product formation. Given this physiological feature, incorporation of the oxidation state of cytochrome c in a mathematical model for the bacterial oxidation kinetics will yield a physiologically based model structure. This paper presents a physiologically based model, describing the dynamic formation of the various end-products in the biodesulfurization process. It consists of three elements: 1) Michaelis-Menten kinetics combined with 2) a cytochrome c driven mechanism describing 3) the rate determining enzymes of the respiratory system of haloalkaliphilic sulfide oxidizing bacteria. The proposed model is successfully validated against independent data obtained from biological respiration tests and bench scale gas-lift reactor experiments. The results demonstrate that the model is a powerful tool to describe product formation for haloalkaliphilic biomass under dynamic conditions. The model predicts a maximum S⁰ formation of about 98 mol%. A future challenge is the optimization of this bioprocess by improving the dissolved oxygen control strategy and reactor design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hydrogen sulfide release from dairy manure storages containing gypsum bedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recycled gypsum products can provide a cost-effective bedding alternative for dairy producers. Manufacturers report reduced odors, moisture and bacteria in the stall environment when compared to traditional bedding. Gypsum provides a sulfate source that can be converted to hydrogen sulfide under ana...

  8. Nanostructured metal sulfides for energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Xianhong; Tan, Huiteng; Yan, Qingyu

    2014-08-01

    Advanced electrodes with a high energy density at high power are urgently needed for high-performance energy storage devices, including lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs), to fulfil the requirements of future electrochemical power sources for applications such as in hybrid electric/plug-in-hybrid (HEV/PHEV) vehicles. Metal sulfides with unique physical and chemical properties, as well as high specific capacity/capacitance, which are typically multiple times higher than that of the carbon/graphite-based materials, are currently studied as promising electrode materials. However, the implementation of these sulfide electrodes in practical applications is hindered by their inferior rate performance and cycling stability. Nanostructures offering the advantages of high surface-to-volume ratios, favourable transport properties, and high freedom for the volume change upon ion insertion/extraction and other reactions, present an opportunity to build next-generation LIBs and SCs. Thus, the development of novel concepts in material research to achieve new nanostructures paves the way for improved electrochemical performance. Herein, we summarize recent advances in nanostructured metal sulfides, such as iron sulfides, copper sulfides, cobalt sulfides, nickel sulfides, manganese sulfides, molybdenum sulfides, tin sulfides, with zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional morphologies for LIB and SC applications. In addition, the recently emerged concept of incorporating conductive matrices, especially graphene, with metal sulfide nanomaterials will also be highlighted. Finally, some remarks are made on the challenges and perspectives for the future development of metal sulfide-based LIB and SC devices.

  9. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in...

  10. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Workover Operations § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in...

  11. Effects of storage temperature on biogenic amine concentrations in meat of uneviscerated pheasants (Phasianus colchicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeňka Hutařová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the hygienic quality of the pheasants reared for high-quality meat production by the biogenic amine concentrations in their meat. The content of biogenic amines was measured in the meat of sixty male pheasants killed by pithing and stored uneviscerated for 21 days under different storage temperatures (0 °C, 7 °C and 15 °C. The samples of breast and thigh muscles of pheasant were tested at weekly intervals. Biogenic amines were analysed by reverse phase liquid chromatography and detected by tandem mass spectrometry. Concentrations of biogenic amines (except spermin and spermidin in thigh muscle were higher than in breast muscle. Highly significant difference (P < 0.01 was found in tyramine (5.80 mg/kg and 1.38 mg/kg for thigh and breast muscle, respectively, cadaverine (40.80 mg/kg and 14.43 mg/kg for thigh and breast muscle, respectively, putrescine (13.42 mg/kg and 3.16 mg/kg for thigh and breast muscle, respectively and histamine (5.51 mg/kg and 1.70 mg/kg for thigh and breast muscle, respectively concentrations after 21 days of storage at 15 °C. This study provides information on the dynamics of biogenic amine formation in pheasant meat during 21 days of storage at different temperatures. Based on our results, we can recommend storing pithed uneviscerated pheasants at 0–7°C for up to 21 days, or at 15 °C for up to 7 days. Concentrations of biogenic amines gained in our study can be helpful in evaluating freshness and hygienic quality of the pheasant game meat.

  12. Excellent photocatalytic hydrogen production over CdS nanorods via using noble metal-free copper molybdenum sulfide (Cu{sub 2}MoS{sub 4}) nanosheets as co-catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sangyeob; Kumar, D. Praveen; Reddy, D. Amaranatha; Choi, Jiha; Kim, Tae Kyu, E-mail: tkkim@pusan.ac.kr

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Developed Cu{sub 2}MoS{sub 4} nanosheets as co-catalysts. • Cu{sub 2}MoS{sub 4} as active replacements for precious noble metal. • Controlled charge recombination for use in photocatalytic H{sub 2} evolution. • Obtained superior rate of H{sub 2} production by using Cu{sub 2}MoS{sub 4} loaded CdS nanorods. - Abstract: Charge carrier recombination and durability issues are major problems in photocatalytic hydrogen (H{sub 2}) evolution processes. Thus, there is a very important necessitate to extend an efficient photocatalyst to control charge-carrier dynamics in the photocatalytic system. We have developed copper molybdenum sulfide (Cu{sub 2}MoS{sub 4}) nanosheets as co-catalysts with CdS nanorods for controlling charge carriers without recombination for use in photocatalytic H{sub 2} evolution under simulated solar light irradiation. Effective control and utilization of charge carriers are possible by loading Cu{sub 2}MoS{sub 4} nanosheets onto the CdS nanorods. The loading compensates for the restrictions of CdS, and stimulated synergistic effects, such as efficient photoexcited charge separation, lead to an improvement in photostability because of the layered structure of the Cu{sub 2}MoS{sub 4}nanosheets. These layered Cu{sub 2}MoS{sub 4} nanosheets have emerged as novel and active replacements for precious noble metal co-catalysts in photocatalytic H{sub 2} production by water splitting. We have obtained superior H{sub 2} production rates by using Cu{sub 2}MoS{sub 4} loaded CdS nanorods. The physicochemical properties of the composites are analyzed by diverse characterization techniques.

  13. New technology for sulfide reductions and increased oil recovery: Petroleum project fact sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-12-14

    This Fact Sheet is written for the Inventions and Innovations Program about a new technology for sulfide reduction and increased oil recovery. The new technology, called Bio-Competitive Exclusion (BCX), results in greater oil production and prevents the production of corrosive hydrogen sulfide in oil and gas reservoirs. This BCX process is initiated and maintained by a new product, called Max-Well 2000, in which nutrients are custom designed to stimulate targeted beneficial microorganisms that live in every oil and gas reservoir. Rapid growth of these microorganisms excludes activity of harmful sulfide-producing bacteria and produces by-products that serve as effective tertiary oil recovery agents and as sulfide degradation agents. Oil and gas production is both increased and sweetened.

  14. Formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, D.A.; Lawson, M.; Davis, C.L.; Ferreira, A.A.; Santos Neto, E. V.; Ellis, G.S.; Lewan, M.D.; Martini, Anna M.; Tang, Y.; Schoell, M.; Sessions, A.L.; Eiler, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and energy resource generated dominantly by methanogens at low temperatures and through the breakdown of organic molecules at high temperatures. However, methane-formation temperatures in nature are often poorly constrained. We measured formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane using a “clumped isotope” technique. Thermogenic gases yield formation temperatures between 157° and 221°C, within the nominal gas window, and biogenic gases yield formation temperatures consistent with their comparatively lower-temperature formational environments (<50°C). In systems where gases have migrated and other proxies for gas-generation temperature yield ambiguous results, methane clumped-isotope temperatures distinguish among and allow for independent tests of possible gas-formation models.

  15. Impact of biogenic emissions on feedbacks in the climate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Olaf

    2017-04-01

    Impact of biogenic emissions on feedbacks in the climate system Bio-geophysical feedback between marine or continental ecosystems and the atmosphere potentially can alter climate change. A prominent feedback loop which is under discussion since 1983 bases on the emission of biologically produced gases - molecular oxygen, sulphur containing compounds and possibly isoprene, supersaturated in oceanic waters - into the marine troposphere. These by-products of phytoplankton metabolism lead to aerosol production and procure sustained influence on climate via modulation of cloud optical properties. In this contribution some findings related to the above mentioned climate processes are presented with special emphasis on marine ecosystems. A comparison of marine and continental ecosystems is made and different processes with major impact on feedbacks in the climate system are discussed.

  16. Structural investigation of biogenic ferrihydrite nanoparticles dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasoiu, M.; Ishchenko, L.A.; Stolyar, S.V.; Iskhakov, R.S.; Rajkher, Yu.L.; Kuklin, A.I.; Solov'ev, D.V.; Arzumanyan, G.M.; Kurkin, T.S.; Aranghel, D.

    2010-01-01

    Structural properties of biogenic ferrihydrite nanoparticles produced by bacteria Klebsiella oxytoca are investigated. Investigations of morphology and size of particles dispersed in water by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering measurements were performed. By model calculations followed by fitting procedure the structural parameters of a cylinder of radius R = (4.87 ± 0.02) nm and height L = (2.12 ± 0.04) nm are obtained

  17. Substantial Seasonal Contribution of Observed Biogenic Sulfate Particles to Cloud Condensation Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Kevin J; Chen, Chia-Li; Russell, Lynn M; Betha, Raghu; Liu, Jun; Price, Derek J; Massoli, Paola; Ziemba, Luke D; Crosbie, Ewan C; Moore, Richard H; Müller, Markus; Schiller, Sven A; Wisthaler, Armin; Lee, Alex K Y; Quinn, Patricia K; Bates, Timothy S; Porter, Jack; Bell, Thomas G; Saltzman, Eric S; Vaillancourt, Robert D; Behrenfeld, Mike J

    2018-02-19

    Biogenic sources contribute to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the clean marine atmosphere, but few measurements exist to constrain climate model simulations of their importance. The chemical composition of individual atmospheric aerosol particles showed two types of sulfate-containing particles in clean marine air masses in addition to mass-based Estimated Salt particles. Both types of sulfate particles lack combustion tracers and correlate, for some conditions, to atmospheric or seawater dimethyl sulfide (DMS) concentrations, which means their source was largely biogenic. The first type is identified as New Sulfate because their large sulfate mass fraction (63% sulfate) and association with entrainment conditions means they could have formed by nucleation in the free troposphere. The second type is Added Sulfate particles (38% sulfate), because they are preexisting particles onto which additional sulfate condensed. New Sulfate particles accounted for 31% (7 cm -3 ) and 33% (36 cm -3 ) CCN at 0.1% supersaturation in late-autumn and late-spring, respectively, whereas sea spray provided 55% (13 cm -3 ) in late-autumn but only 4% (4 cm -3 ) in late-spring. Our results show a clear seasonal difference in the marine CCN budget, which illustrates how important phytoplankton-produced DMS emissions are for CCN in the North Atlantic.

  18. The mechanism of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide: II. Kinetics and mechanism of hydrogen sulfide oxidation catalyzed by sulfur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijns, M.; Derks, F.; Verloop, A.; Mars, P.

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide by molecular oxygen have been studied in the temperature range 20–250 °C. The primary reaction product is sulfur which may undergo further oxidation to SO2 at temperatures above 200 °C. From the kinetics of this autocatalytic reaction we

  19. Recent trends in the determination of biogenic amines in fermented beverages – A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordóñez, José Luis; Troncoso, Ana Maria; García-Parrilla, Maria Del Carmen; Callejón, Raquel Maria, E-mail: rcallejon@us.es

    2016-10-05

    Biogenic amines (BA) are generally considered as a food hazard, even though there is not a threshold for these biomolecules in the European legislation, except for histamine in fishery products. These compounds are formed during the storage and processing of certain foods through microbiological activity, and when present in high concentrations, could have toxicological effects, causing health problems in consumers, especially to sensitive persons. This fact, in addition to the economical concern involved, makes it necessary to control the amounts of biogenic amines in foods. For all these reasons, literature on biogenic amines in different food products, especially in fermented beverages, is extensive. This review provides an overview of the most recent trends in the determination of biogenic amines in fermented beverages focusing on novelty, improvement and optimization of analytical methods. Hence, the different sample treatment procedures (including derivatization), the most important analytical techniques and the most frequent applications are described and discussed. Although biogenic amines have been determined in wine and other fermented beverages for decades, new advancements and technical possibilities have allowed to increase the accuracy and sensitivity of analytical methods, in order to overcome the challenges posed by the complex matrices and their high intrinsic variability. Thus, the different purposes of BA determination (food safety, production process or food microbiology research) and the most widely employed analytical techniques have been reviewed. - Highlights: • A critical review on analytical methods for BA in fermented beverages is presented. • Recent sample treatments and analytical techniques are described and discussed. • A previous derivatization is needed in most liquid chromatographic methods. • BA determination is related to food safety, production process or microbiology research.

  20. Recent trends in the determination of biogenic amines in fermented beverages – A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordóñez, José Luis; Troncoso, Ana Maria; García-Parrilla, Maria Del Carmen; Callejón, Raquel Maria

    2016-01-01

    Biogenic amines (BA) are generally considered as a food hazard, even though there is not a threshold for these biomolecules in the European legislation, except for histamine in fishery products. These compounds are formed during the storage and processing of certain foods through microbiological activity, and when present in high concentrations, could have toxicological effects, causing health problems in consumers, especially to sensitive persons. This fact, in addition to the economical concern involved, makes it necessary to control the amounts of biogenic amines in foods. For all these reasons, literature on biogenic amines in different food products, especially in fermented beverages, is extensive. This review provides an overview of the most recent trends in the determination of biogenic amines in fermented beverages focusing on novelty, improvement and optimization of analytical methods. Hence, the different sample treatment procedures (including derivatization), the most important analytical techniques and the most frequent applications are described and discussed. Although biogenic amines have been determined in wine and other fermented beverages for decades, new advancements and technical possibilities have allowed to increase the accuracy and sensitivity of analytical methods, in order to overcome the challenges posed by the complex matrices and their high intrinsic variability. Thus, the different purposes of BA determination (food safety, production process or food microbiology research) and the most widely employed analytical techniques have been reviewed. - Highlights: • A critical review on analytical methods for BA in fermented beverages is presented. • Recent sample treatments and analytical techniques are described and discussed. • A previous derivatization is needed in most liquid chromatographic methods. • BA determination is related to food safety, production process or microbiology research.

  1. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of biogenic silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, R; Feitosa, L O; Ballottin, D; Tasic, L; Durán, N; Marcato, P D

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic silver nanoparticles with 40.3 ± 3.5 nm size and negative surface charge (− 40 mV) were prepared with Fusarium oxysporum. The cytotoxicity of 3T3 cell and human lymphocyte were studied by a TaliTM image-based cytometer and the genotoxicity through Allium cepa and comet assay. The results of BioAg-w (washed) and BioAg-nw (unwashed) biogenic silver nanoparticles showed cytotoxicity exceeding 50 μg/mL with no significant differences of response in 5 and 10 μg/mL regarding viability. Results of genotoxicity at concentrations 5.0 and 10.0 ug/mL show some response, but at concentrations 0.5 and 1.0 μg/mL the washed and unwashed silver nanoparticles did not present any effect. This in an important result since in tests with different bacteria species and strains, including resistant, MIC (minimal inhibitory concentration) had good answers at concentrations less than 1.9 μg/mL. This work concludes that biogenic silver nanoparticles may be a promising option for antimicrobial use in the range where no cyto or genotoxic effect were observed. Furthermore, human cells were found to have a greater resistance to the toxic effects of silver nanoparticles in comparison with other cells.

  2. Reliability of Electrochemical Techniques for Determining Corrosion Rates on Carbon Steel in Sulfide Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Hemmingsen, T.; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    2007-01-01

    if the biofilm in combination with ferrous sulfide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 with electrochemical techniques - both by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and electrochemicel impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Oxygen entering the system......Effects of film formation on carbon steel in hydrogen sulfide (H2S) media may corrupt corrosion rate monitoring by electrochemical techniques. Electrochemical data from H2S solutions, biological sulfide media, and natural sulfide containing geothermal water have been collected, and the process...... of film formation in sulfide solutins was followed by video. It can be shown that capacitative and diffusional effects due to porous reactive deposits tend to dominate the data, resulting in unreliable corrosion rates measured using electrochemical techniques. The effect is strongly increased...

  3. Arsenic species in weathering mine tailings and biogenic solids at the Lava Cap Mine Superfund Site, Nevada City, CA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Roger P

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A realistic estimation of the health risk of human exposure to solid-phase arsenic (As derived from historic mining operations is a major challenge to redevelopment of California's famed "Mother Lode" region. Arsenic, a known carcinogen, occurs in multiple solid forms that vary in bioaccessibility. X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (XAFS was used to identify and quantify the forms of As in mine wastes and biogenic solids at the Lava Cap Mine Superfund (LCMS site, a historic "Mother Lode" gold mine. Principal component analysis (PCA was used to assess variance within water chemistry, solids chemistry, and XAFS spectral datasets. Linear combination, least-squares fits constrained in part by PCA results were then used to quantify arsenic speciation in XAFS spectra of tailings and biogenic solids. Results The highest dissolved arsenic concentrations were found in Lost Lake porewater and in a groundwater-fed pond in the tailings deposition area. Iron, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, specific conductivity, and As were the major variables in the water chemistry PCA. Arsenic was, on average, 14 times more concentrated in biologically-produced iron (hydroxide than in mine tailings. Phosphorous, manganese, calcium, aluminum, and As were the major variables in the solids chemistry PCA. Linear combination fits to XAFS spectra indicate that arsenopyrite (FeAsS, the dominant form of As in ore material, remains abundant (average: 65% in minimally-weathered ore samples and water-saturated tailings at the bottom of Lost Lake. However, tailings that underwent drying and wetting cycles contain an average of only 30% arsenopyrite. The predominant products of arsenopyrite weathering were identified by XAFS to be As-bearing Fe (hydroxide and arseniosiderite (Ca2Fe(AsO43O3•3H2O. Existence of the former species is not in question, but the presence of the latter species was not confirmed by additional measurements, so its identification is

  4. Synthesis and Surface-Specific Analysis of Molecular Constituents Relevant to Biogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Be, A. G.; Upshur, M. A.; Chase, H. M.; Geiger, F.; Thomson, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles formed from the oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) remain a principal, yet elusive, class of airborne particulate matter that impacts the Earth's radiation budget. Given the characteristic molecular complexity comprising biogenic SOA particles, chemical information selective to the gas-aerosol interface may be valuable in the investigation of such systems, as surface considerations likely dictate the phenomena driving particle evolution mechanisms and climate effects. In particular, cloud activation processes may be parameterized using the surface tension depression that coincides with partitioning of surface-active organic species to the gas-droplet interface. However, the extent to which surface chemical processes, such as cloud droplet condensation, are influenced by the chemical structure and reactivity of individual surface-active molecules in SOA particles is largely unknown. We seek to study terpene-derived organic species relevant to the surfaces of biogenic SOA particles via synthesis of putative oxidation products followed by analysis using surface-selective physicochemical measurements. Using dynamic surface tension measurements, considerable differences are observed in the surface tension depression of aqueous pendant droplets that contain synthetically prepared ozonolysis products derived from abundant terpene precursors. Furthermore, sum frequency generation spectroscopy is utilized for comparison of the surface vibrational spectral responses of synthesized reference compounds with those observed for laboratory aerosol toward probing the surface composition of SOA material. Such ongoing findings highlight the underlying importance of molecular structure and reactivity when considering the surface chemistry of biogenic terpene-derived atmospheric aerosols.

  5. STUDY OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE REMOVAL FROM GROUNDWATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lupascu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the underground water of the Hancesti town has been investigated. By oxygen bubbling through the water containing hydrogen sulfide, from the Hancesti well tube, sulfur is deposited in the porous structure of studied catalysts, which decreases their catalytic activity. Concomitantly, the process of adsorption / oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate take place. The kinetic research of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the Hancesti underground water, after its treatment by hydrogen peroxide, proves greater efficiency than in the case of modified carbonic adsorbents. As a result of used treatment, hydrogen sulfide is completely oxidized to sulfates

  6. Surface modification of malachite with ethanediamine and its effect on sulfidization flotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qicheng; Zhao, Wenjuan; Wen, Shuming

    2018-04-01

    Ethanediamine was used to modify the mineral surface of malachite to improve its sulfidization and flotation behavior. The activation mechanism was investigated by adsorption experiments, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, and zeta potential measurements. Microflotation experiments showed that the flotation recovery of malachite was enhanced after the pretreatment of the mineral particles with ethanediamine prior to the addition of Na2S. Adsorption tests revealed that numerous sulfide ion species in the pulp solution were transferred onto the mineral surface through the formation of more copper sulfide species. This finding was confirmed by the results of the XPS measurements. Ethanediamine modification not only increased the contents of copper sulfide species on the malachite surface but also enhanced the reactivity of the sulfidization products. During sulfidization, Cu(II) species on the mineral surface were reduced into Cu(I) species, and the percentages of S22- and Sn2- relative to the total S increased after modification, resulting in increased surface hydrophobicity. The results of zeta potential measurements showed that the ethanediamine-modified mineral surface adsorbed with more sulfide ion species was advantageous to the attachment of xanthate species, thereby improving malachite floatability. The proposed ethanediamine modification followed by sulfidization xanthate flotation exhibits potential for industrial application.

  7. Isolation of Ochrobactrum sp.QZ2 from sulfide and nitrite treatment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, Qaisar; Hu Baolan; Cai Jing; Zheng Ping; Azim, Muhammad Rashid; Jilani, Ghulam; Islam, Ejazul

    2009-01-01

    A bacterial strain QZ2 was isolated from sludge of anoxic sulfide-oxidizing (ASO) reactor. Based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis and morphology, the isolate was identified as Ochrobactrum sp. QZ2. The strain was facultative chemolithotroph, able of using sulfide to reduce nitrite anaerobically. It produced either elemental sulfur or sulfate as the product of sulfide oxidation, depending on the initial sulfide and nitrite concentrations. The optimum growth pH and temperature for Ochrobactrum sp. QZ2 were found as 6.5-7.0 and 30 deg. C, respectively. The specific growth rate (μ) was found as 0.06 h -1 with a doubling time of 19.75 h; the growth seemed more sensitive to highly alkaline pH. Ochrobactrum sp. QZ2 catalyzed sulfide oxidation to sulfate was more sensitive to sulfide compared with nitrite as indicated by IC 50 values for sulfide and nitrite utilization implying that isolate was relatively more tolerant to nitrite. The comparison of physiology of Ochrobactrum sp. QZ2 with those of other known sulfide-oxidizing bacteria suggested that the present isolate resembled to Ochrobactrum anthropi in its denitrification ability.

  8. Effects of sulfur and monensin concentrations on in vitro dry matter disappearance, hydrogen sulfide production, and volatile fatty acid concentrations in batch culture ruminal fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D R; Dilorenzo, N; Leibovich, J; May, M L; Quinn, M J; Homm, J W; Galyean, M L

    2010-04-01

    Effects of monensin (MON) and S on in vitro fermentation and H(2)S production were evaluated in 2 experiments. In Exp. 1, 2 ruminally cannulated steers were adapted (>14 d) to a 75% concentrate diet [steam-flaked corn (SFC)-based], and ruminal fluid was collected approximately 4 h after feeding. Substrate composed (DM basis) of 85.2% SFC, 9% alfalfa hay, 5% cottonseed meal, and 0.8% urea was added with ruminal fluid and buffer to sealed 125-mL serum bottles to allow for gas collection. A Na(2)SO(4) solution was added to yield S equivalent to 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8% of substrate DM, and MON was included at 0, 2, 4, and 6 mg/L of culture volume. Bottle head-space gas was analyzed for H(2)S. No MON (P = 0.29) or MON x S interaction (P = 0.41) effects were detected for H(2)S production. Increasing S linearly increased (P molar proportions of acetate, butyrate, and the acetate:propionate ratio (A:P), and linearly increased (P 21 d) to a 75% concentrate diet (SFC base) that contained 15% (DM basis) wet corn distillers grains plus solubles (WDGS) and MON at 22 mg/kg of DM. In vitro substrate DM was composed of 75.4% SFC, 15% WDGS, 9% alfalfa hay, and 0.6% urea, and S and MON concentrations were the same as in Exp. 1. No effects of MON (P = 0.93) or the MON x S interaction (P = 0.99) were noted for H(2)S production; however, increasing S linearly increased (P molar proportions of acetate, butyrate, and A:P and linearly increased (P molar proportions were evident with MON regardless of S concentration.

  9. Sustainable use of biogenic fuels resources through industrial synergies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuech, Andrea; Nelles, Michael; Nassour, Abdallah

    2017-01-01

    The term industrial symbiosis is used when traditionally separate companies and industries work together in a collective approach to physically exchange materials, energy, water and by-products with a mutual competitive advantage. Aim of the European project ''UBIS - Urban Baltic Industrial Symbiosis'' (INTERREG South-Baltic Programme) is to use biogenic resources as well as waste and residues sustainable in industrial symbiosis and to reduce emissions at the same time. Even if a lot has already been achieved in this area, there are still many unused material flows and there are possibilities to use them even more efficiently. In the project existing collaborations will be investigated as well as new ones identified and evaluated. This article introduces the UBIS project and provides an insight into the subject of industrial symbiosis as well examples described.

  10. New procedure of selected biogenic amines determination in wine samples by HPLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piasta, Anna M.; Jastrzębska, Aneta, E-mail: aj@chem.uni.torun.pl; Krzemiński, Marek P.; Muzioł, Tadeusz M.; Szłyk, Edward

    2014-06-27

    Highlights: • We proposed new procedure for derivatization of biogenic amines. • The NMR and XRD analysis confirmed the purity and uniqueness of derivatives. • Concentration of biogenic amines in wine samples were analyzed by RP-HPLC. • Sample contamination and derivatization reactions interferences were minimized. - Abstract: A new procedure for determination of biogenic amines (BA): histamine, phenethylamine, tyramine and tryptamine, based on the derivatization reaction with 2-chloro-1,3-dinitro-5-(trifluoromethyl)-benzene (CNBF), is proposed. The amines derivatives with CNBF were isolated and characterized by X-ray crystallography and {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 19}F NMR spectroscopy in solution. The novelty of the procedure is based on the pure and well-characterized products of the amines derivatization reaction. The method was applied for the simultaneous analysis of the above mentioned biogenic amines in wine samples by the reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography. The procedure revealed correlation coefficients (R{sup 2}) between 0.9997 and 0.9999, and linear range: 0.10–9.00 mg L{sup −1} (histamine); 0.10–9.36 mg L{sup -1} (tyramine); 0.09–8.64 mg L{sup −1} (tryptamine) and 0.10–8.64 mg L{sup −1} (phenethylamine), whereas accuracy was 97%–102% (recovery test). Detection limit of biogenic amines in wine samples was 0.02–0.03 mg L{sup −1}, whereas quantification limit ranged 0.05–0.10 mg L{sup −1}. The variation coefficients for the analyzed amines ranged between 0.49% and 3.92%. Obtained BA derivatives enhanced separation the analytes on chromatograms due to the inhibition of hydrolysis reaction and the reduction of by-products formation.

  11. Radiocarbon AMS determination of the biogenic component in CO2 emitted from waste incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcagnile, L.; Quarta, G.; D’Elia, M.; Ciceri, G.; Martinotti, V.

    2011-01-01

    The thermal utilization of waste for energy production is gaining importance in European countries. Nevertheless, the combustion of waste leads to significant CO 2 emissions in the atmosphere which, depending on the fraction of biogenic and fossil materials, have to be only partially accounted for the national greenhouse gas inventory. For this reason the development of proper methodologies for the measurement of the biogenic fraction in the combusted waste is an active research field. In fact the determination of the radiocarbon concentration in the carbon dioxide stack emissions allows to have a direct indication of the biogenic component in the burned fuel. We present the results of the AMS radiocarbon analyses carried out on carbon dioxide sampled at the stack of three power plants located in Northern Italy burning natural gas, landfill biogas and SRF (Solid Recovered Fuel) derived from MSW (Municipal Solid Waste). The sampling apparatus and the applied processing protocols are described together with the calculation procedures used to determine, from the measured radiocarbon concentrations, the proportion of biogenic and fossil component in the flue gas and in the combusted fuel. The results confirm the high potentialities of this approach in the analysis of industrial CO 2 emissions.

  12. Experimental constraints on gold and silver solubility in iron sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal' yanova, Galina [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Koptyuga, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Russia, 2, Pirogova, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Mikhlin, Yuri [Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akademgorodok, 50/24, Krasnoyarsk, 660036 (Russian Federation); Kokh, Konstantin, E-mail: k.a.kokh@gmail.com [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Koptyuga, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Russia, 2, Pirogova, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Siberian Physical–Technical Institute of Tomsk State University, 1, Novosobornaya, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Karmanov, Nick [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Koptyuga, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Seryotkin, Yurii [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Koptyuga, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Russia, 2, Pirogova, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    Experiments were performed to determine crystallization of Fe,S-melts (pyriti≿ and troilitic with molar ratio S/Fe ratios of 2 and 1, respectively) containing traces of gold and silver at (Ag/Au){sub wt} ratios varying from 10 to 0.1. The solid products were studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in order to reveal the concentration limits of “invisible” gold and silver in magmatic iron sulfides, and to determine the influence of sulfur on forms of precious metals in the Fe–S system with different Ag/Au ratios. Au–Ag phases do not form inclusions but instead concentrate on the grain boundaries in the synthetic pyrrhotite and troilite, while pyrite comprises micro- (1–5 μm) and macroinclusions of Au–Ag alloys and Au–Ag sulfides. In “pyriti≿” systems, the fineness of alloys increases from 650 to 970‰ and the composition of sulfides changes from acanthite (Ag{sub 2}S) to uytenbogaardtite (Ag{sub 3}AuS{sub 2}) and petrovskaite (AgAuS) as the Ag/Au ratio decreases. The concentrations of “invisible” precious metals revealed in troilite were 0.040 ± 0.013 wt.% Au and 0.079 ± 0.016 wt.% Ag. Measured concentrations in pyrite and pyrrhotite were <0.024 wt.% Au and <0.030 wt.% Ag. The surface layers of iron sulfides probed with XPS were enriched in the precious metals, and in silver relative to gold, especially in the systems with Fe/S = 1, probably, due to depletion of the metallic alloy surfaces with gold. Au- and Ag-bearing iron sulfides crystallized primarily from melts may be the source of redeposited phases in hydrothermal and hypergene processes. - Highlights: • The samples of Fe–S–Au–Ag system were synthesized. • Coupled solubility of gold and silver in iron sulfides was specified. • Ag–Au inclusions on surfaces of iron sulfides are likely to be enriched in silver. • Au–Ag sulfides can exist along with

  13. Biogenic VOC Emissions from Tropical Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, A.; Greenberg, J.; Harley, P.; Otter, L.; Vanni Gatti, L.; Baker, B.

    2003-04-01

    Biogenic VOC have an important role in determining the chemical composition of atmosphere. As a result, these compounds are important for visibility, biogeochemical cycling, climate and radiative forcing, and the health of the biosphere. Tropical landscapes are estimated to release about 80% of total global biogenic VOC emissions but have been investigated to lesser extent than temperate regions. Tropical VOC emissions are particularly important due to the strong vertical transport and the rapid landuse change that is occurring there. This presentation will provide an overview of field measurements of biogenic VOC emissions from tropical landscapes in Amazonia (Large-scale Biosphere-atmosphere experiment in Amazonia, LBA) Central (EXPRESSO) and Southern (SAFARI 2000) Africa, Asia and Central America. Flux measurement methods include leaf-scale (enclosure measurements), canopy-scale (above canopy tower measurements), landscape-scale (tethered balloon), and regional-scale (aircraft measurements) observations. Typical midday isoprene emission rates for different landscapes vary by more than a factor of 20 with the lowest emissions observed from degraded forests. Emissions of alpha-pinene vary by a similar amount with the highest emissions associated with landscapes dominated by light dependent monoterpene emitting plants. Isoprene emissions tend to be higher for neotropical forests (Amazon and Costa Rica) in comparison to Africa and Asian tropical forests but considerable differences are observed within regions. Strong seasonal variations were observed in both the Congo and the Amazon rainforests with peak emissions during the dry seasons. Substantial emissions of light dependent monoterpenes, methanol and acetone are characteristic of at least some tropical landscapes.

  14. Volcanic sulfur degassing and the role of sulfides in controlling volcanic metal emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, M.; Liu, E.

    2017-12-01

    Volcanoes emit prodigious quantities of sulfur and metals, their behaviour inextricably linked through pre-eruptive sulfide systematics and through degassing and speciation in the volcanic plume. Fundamental differences exist in the metal output of ocean island versus arc volcanoes, with volcanoes in Hawaii and Iceland outgassing large fluxes of gaseous and particulate chalcophiles; and arc volcanoes' plumes, in contrast, enriched in Zn, Cu, Tl and Pb. Metals and metalloids partition into a magmatic vapor phase from silicate melt at crustal pressures. Their abundance in magmatic vapor is influenced strongly by sulfide saturation and by the composition of the magmatic vapor phase, particularly with respect to chloride. These factors are highly dependent on tectonic setting. Metal outgassing is controlled by magma water content and redox: deep saturation in vapor and minimal sulfide in arc basalts yields metal-rich vapor; shallow degassing and resorption of sulfides feeds the metal content of volcanic gas in ocean islands. We present a detailed study of the sulfide systematics of the products of the 2014-2015 Holuhraun basaltic fissure eruption (Bárðarbunga volcanic system, Iceland) to illustrate the interplay between late water and sulfur outgassing; sulfide saturation and breakdown; and metal partitioning into a vapor phase. Sulfide globules, representing quenched droplets of an immiscible sulfide liquid, are preserved within erupted tephra. Sulfide globules in rapidly quenched tephra are preserved within both matrix glass and as inclusions in crystals. The stereologically-corrected 3D size distribution of sulfide globules ranges from importance in supplying sulfur and metals to the atmosphere during eruption.

  15. Investigations on the role of hemoglobin in sulfide metabolism by intact human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Christopher L; Savitsky, Anton; Feelisch, Martin; Cortese-Krott, Miriam M

    2018-03-01

    In addition to their role as oxygen transporters, red blood cells (RBCs) contribute to cardiovascular homeostasis by regulating nitric oxide (NO) metabolism via interaction of hemoglobin (Hb) with nitrite and NO itself. RBCs were proposed to also participate in sulfide metabolism. Although Hb is known to react with sulfide, sulfide metabolism by intact RBCs has not been characterized so far. Therefore we explored the role of Hb in sulfide metabolism in intact human RBCs. We find that upon exposure of washed RBCs to sulfide, no changes in oxy/deoxyhemoglobin (oxy/deoxyHb) are observed by UV-vis and EPR spectroscopy. However, sulfide reacts with methemoglobin (metHb), forming a methemoglobin-sulfide (metHb-SH) complex. Moreover, while metHb-SH is stable in cell-free systems even in the presence of biologically relevant thiols, it gradually decomposes to produce oxyHb, inorganic polysulfides and thiosulfate in intact cells, as detected by EPR and mass spectrometry. Taken together, our results demonstrate that under physiological conditions RBCs are able to metabolize sulfide via intermediate formation of a metHb-SH complex, which subsequently decomposes to oxyHb. We speculate that decomposition of metHb-SH is preceded by an inner-sphere electron transfer, forming reduced Hb (which binds oxygen to form oxyHb) and thiyl radical (a process we here define as "reductive sulfhydration"), which upon release, gives rise to the oxidized products, thiosulfate and polysulfides. Thus, not only is metHb an efficient scavenger and regulator of sulfide in blood, intracellular sulfide itself may play a role in keeping Hb in the reduced oxygen-binding form and, therefore, be involved in RBC physiology and function. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Secondary biogeneous radiation of human organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzin, A.M.; Surkenova, G.N.

    1999-01-01

    When studying samples of three types of tissues of alive healthy human organism (hands, surface of breast, hair) it is shown that hair permanently emit secondary biogeneous radiation (SBR) which may registered with biological detectors. The hypothesis is suggested that natural background radiation permanently exciting biopolymers (proteins, nuclei acids) being present in alive organism in condensed state induces permanently present electromagnetic field of SBR which is vitally important for human organism. The field partly extends beyond the organism, where it is registered with sensitive biological detectors [ru

  17. Sustainable use of biogenic fuels resources through industrial synergies; Nachhaltige energetische Nutzung biogener Ressourcen durch industrielle Synergien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuech, Andrea [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Professur Abfall- und Stoffstromwirtschaft; Nelles, Michael [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Agrar- und Umweltwissenschaftliche Fakultaet; Nassour, Abdallah

    2017-08-01

    The term industrial symbiosis is used when traditionally separate companies and industries work together in a collective approach to physically exchange materials, energy, water and by-products with a mutual competitive advantage. Aim of the European project ''UBIS - Urban Baltic Industrial Symbiosis'' (INTERREG South-Baltic Programme) is to use biogenic resources as well as waste and residues sustainable in industrial symbiosis and to reduce emissions at the same time. Even if a lot has already been achieved in this area, there are still many unused material flows and there are possibilities to use them even more efficiently. In the project existing collaborations will be investigated as well as new ones identified and evaluated. This article introduces the UBIS project and provides an insight into the subject of industrial symbiosis as well examples described.

  18. LIGNOCELLULOSE NANOCOMPOSITE CONTAINING COPPER SULFIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchi Nenkova

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Copper sulfide-containing lignocellulose nanocomposites with improved electroconductivity were obtained. Two methods for preparing the copper sulfide lignocellulose nanocomposites were developed. An optimization of the parameters for obtaining of the nanocomposites with respect to obtaining improved electroconductivity, economy, and lower quantities and concentration of copper and sulfur ions in waste waters was conducted. The mechanisms and schemes of delaying and subsequent connection of copper sulfides in the lignocellulosic matrix were investigated. The modification with a system of 2 components: cupric sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO4. 5H2O and sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate (Na2S2O3.5H2O for wood fibers is preferred. Optimal parameters were established for the process: 40 % of the reduction system; hydromodule M=1:6; and ratio of cupric sulfate pentahydrate:sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate = 1:2. The coordinative connection of copper ions with oxygen atoms of cellulose OH groups and aromatic nucleus in lignin macromolecule was observed.

  19. Biogenic gas in the Cambrian-Ordovcian Alum Shale (Denmark and Sweden)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, H.M.; Wirth, R.; Biermann, S.; Arning, E.T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Potsdam - Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum GFZ, Potsdam (Germany); Krueger, M.; Straaten, N. [BGR Hannover (Germany); Bechtel, A. [Montanuniv. Leoben (Austria); Berk, W. van [Technical Univ. of Clausthal (Germany); Schovsbo, N.H. [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland - GEUS, Copenhagen (Denmark); Crabtree, Stephen [Gripen Gas (Sweden)

    2013-08-01

    Shale gas is mainly produced from thermally mature black shales. However, biogenic methane also represents a resource which is often underestimated. Today biogenic methane is being produced from the Upper Devonian Antrim Shale in the Michigan Basin which was the most successfully exploited shale gas system during the 1990-2000 decade in the U.S.A. before significant gas production from the Barnett Shale started (Curtis et al., 2008). The Cambro-Ordovician Alum Shale in northern Europe has thermal maturities ranging from overmature in southern areas (Denmark and southern Sweden) to immature conditions (central Sweden). Biogenic methane is recorded during drilling in central Sweden. The immature Alum Shale in central Sweden has total organic carbon (TOC) contents up to 20 wt%. The hydrogen index HI ranges from 380 to 560 mgHC/gTOC at very low oxygen index (OI) values of around 4 mg CO{sub 2}/gTOC, Tmax ranges between 420 - 430 C. The organic matter is highly porous. In general, the Alum Shale is a dense shale with intercalated sandy beds which may be dense due to carbonate cementation. Secondary porosity is created in some sandy beds due to feldspar dissolution and these beds serve as gas conduits. Methane production rates with shale as substrate in the laboratory are dependent on the kind of hydrocarbon-degrading microbial enrichment cultures used in the incubation experiments, ranging from 10-620 nmol/(g*d). In these experiments, the CO{sub 2} production rate was always higher than for methane. Like the northern part of North America, also Northern European has been covered by glaciers during the Pleistocene and similar geological processes may have developed leading to biogenic shale gas formation. For the Antrim Shale one hypothesis suggests that fresh waters, recharged from Pleistocene glaciation and modern precipitation, suppressed basinal brine salinity along the northern margins of the Michigan Basin to greater depths and thereby enhancing methanogenesis

  20. Sulfide intrusion in seagrasses assessed by stable sulfur isotopes—a synthesis of current results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmer, Marianne; Hasler-Sheetal, Harald

    2014-01-01

    of sedimentary sulfide in the plant increases, and accumulation of elemental sulfur (S0) inside the plant with δ34S values similar to the sedimentary sulfide suggests that S0 is an important reoxidation product of the sedimentary sulfide. The accumulation of S0 can, however, not account for the increase...... in sulfur in the tissue, and other sulfur containing compounds such as thiols, organic sulfur, and sulfate contribute to the accumulated sulfur pool. Experimental studies with seagrasses exposed to environmental and biological stressors show decreasing δ34S in the tissues along with reduction in growth...

  1. Tracking the transformation and transport of arsenic sulfide pigments in paints: synchrotron-based X-ray micro-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keune, K.; Mass, J.; Meirer, F.; Pottasch, C.; van Loon, A.; Hull, A.; Church, J.; Pouyet, E.; Cotte, M.; Mehta, A.

    2015-01-01

    Realgar and orpiment, arsenic sulfide pigments used in historic paints, degrade under the influence of light, resulting in transparent, whitish, friable and/or crumbling paints. So far, para-realgar and arsenic trioxide have been identified as the main oxidation products of arsenic sulfide pigments.

  2. Tracking the transformation and transport of arsenic sulfide pigments in paints : synchrotron-based X-ray micro-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keune, Katrien; Mass, Jennifer; Meirer, Florian; Pottasch, Carol; van Loon, Annelies; Hull, Alyssa; Church, Jonathan; Pouyet, Emeline; Cotte, Marine; Mehta, Apurva

    2015-01-01

    Realgar and orpiment, arsenic sulfide pigments used in historic paints, degrade under the influence of light, resulting in transparent, whitish, friable and/or crumbling paints. So far, para-realgar and arsenic trioxide have been identified as the main oxidation products of arsenic sulfide pigments.

  3. Hydrogen sulfide waste treatment by microwave plasma-chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.

    1994-03-01

    A waste-treatment process that recovers both hydrogen and sulfur from industrial acid-gas waste streams is being developed to replace the Claus technology, which recovers only sulfur. The proposed process is derived from research reported in the Soviet technical literature and uses microwave (or radio-frequency) energy to initiate plasma-chemical reactions that dissociate hydrogen sulfide into elemental hydrogen and sulfur. This process has several advantages over the current Claus-plus-tail-gas-cleanup technology, which burns the hydrogen to water. The primary advantage of the proposal process is its potential for recovering and recycling hydrogen more cheaply than the direct production of hydrogen. Since unconverted hydrogen sulfide is recycled to the plasma reactor, the plasma-chemical process has the potential for sulfur recoveries in excess of 99% without the additional complexity of the tail-gas-cleanup processes associated with the Claus technology. There may also be some environmental advantages to the plasma-chemical process, because the process purge stream would primarily be the carbon dioxide and water contained in the acid-gas waste stream. Laboratory experiments with pure hydrogen sulfide have demonstrated the ability of the process to operate at or above atmospheric pressure with an acceptable hydrogen sulfide dissociation energy. Experiments with a wide range of acid-gas compositions have demonstrated that carbon dioxide and water are compatible with the plasma-chemical dissociation process and that they do not appear to create new waste-treatment problems. However, carbon dioxide does have negative impacts on the overall process. First, it decreases the hydrogen production, and second, it increases the hydrogen sulfide dissociation energy.

  4. Sulfide intrusion and detoxification in seagrasses ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    Sulfide intrusion in seagrasses represents a global threat to seagrasses and thereby an important parameter in resilience of seagrass ecosystems. In contrast seegrasses colonize and grow in hostile sediments, where they are constantly exposed to invasion of toxic gaseous sulfide. Remarkably little...... strategies of seagrasses to sustain sulfide intrusion. Using stable isotope tracing, scanning electron microscopy with x-ray analysis, tracing sulfur compounds combined with ecosystem parameters we found different spatial, intraspecific and interspecific strategies to cope with sulfidic sediments. 1...... not present in terrestrial plants at that level. Sulfide is not necessarily toxic but used as sulfur nutrition, presupposing healthy seagrass ecosystems that can support detoxification mechanisms. Presence or absence of those mechanisms determines susceptibility of seagrass ecosystems to sediment sulfide...

  5. Methyl chavicol: characterization of its biogenic emission rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouvier-Brown, N.C.; Goldstein, A.H.; Worton, D.R.; Matross, D.M.; Gilman, J.B.; Kuster, W.C.; Welsh-Bon, D.; Warneke, C.; de Gouw, J.A.; Cahill, M.J.; Holzinger, R.

    2009-01-01

    We report measurements of ambient atmospheric mixing ratios for methyl chavicol and determine its biogenic emission rate. Methyl chavicol, a biogenic oxygenated aromatic compound, is abundant within and above Blodgett Forest, a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California.

  6. The Labrador Sea during the Last Glacial Maximum: Calcite dissolution or low biogenic carbonate fluxes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Nicole; de Vernal, Anne; Mucci, Alfonso; Filippova, Alexandra; Kienast, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Low concentrations of biogenic carbonate characterize the sediments deposited in the Labrador Sea during the last glaciation. This may reflect poor calcite preservation and/or low biogenic carbonate productivity and fluxes. Regional bottom water ventilation was reduced during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), so the calcite lysocline might have been shallower than at present in the deep Labrador Sea making dissolution of calcite shells in the deep Labrador Sea possible. To address the issue, a multi-proxy approach based on micropaleontological counts (coccoliths, foraminifers, palynomorphs) and biogeochemical analyses (alkenones) was applied in the investigation of core HU2008-029-004-PC recovered in the northwestern Labrador Sea. Calcite dissolution indices based on the relative abundance benthic foraminifera shells to their organic linings as well as on fragmentation of planktonic foraminifera shells were used to evaluate changes in calcite dissolution/ preservation since the LGM. In addition, the ratio of the concentrations of coccoliths, specifically of the alkenone-producer Emiliania huxleyi, and alkenones (Emiliania huxleyi: alkenones) was explored as a potential new proxy of calcite dissolution. A sharp increase in coccoliths, foraminifers and organic linings from nearly none to substantial concentrations at 12 ka, reflect a jump to significantly greater biogenic fluxes at the glacial-interglacial transition. Furthermore, conventional dissolution indices (shells/linings of benthic foraminifera and fragmentation of planktic foraminifers) reveal that dissolution is not likely responsible for the lower glacial abundances of coccoliths and foraminifers. Only the low Emiliania huxleyi: alkenones ratios in glacial sediments could be interpreted as evidence of increased dissolution during the LGM. Given the evidence of allochthonous alkenone input into the glacial Labrador Sea, the latter observations must be treated with caution. Overall, the records indicate that

  7. Neutron diffraction investigations of the superionic conductors lithium sulfide and sodium sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altorfer, F.

    1990-03-01

    Statics and dynamics of the superionic conductors lithium sulfide and sodium sulfide were investigated using the following experimental methods: elastic scattering on sodium sulfide powder in the temperature range 20 - 1000 C, elastic scattering on a lithium sulfide single crystal in the temperature range 20 - 700 C, inelastic scattering on a 7 Li 2 S single crystal at 10 K. 34 figs., 2 tabs., 10 refs

  8. Kinetics of Indigenous Nitrate Reducing Sulfide Oxidizing Activity in Microaerophilic Wastewater Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villahermosa, Desirée; Corzo, Alfonso; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; González, Juan M.; Papaspyrou, Sokratis

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate decreases sulfide release in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), but little is known on how it affects the microzonation and kinetics of related microbial processes within the biofilm. The effect of nitrate addition on these properties for sulfate reduction, sulfide oxidation, and oxygen respiration were studied with the use of microelectrodes in microaerophilic wastewater biofilms. Mass balance calaculations and community composition analysis were also performed. At basal WWTP conditions, the biofilm presented a double-layer system. The upper microaerophilic layer (~300 μm) showed low sulfide production (0.31 μmol cm-3 h-1) and oxygen consumption rates (0.01 μmol cm-3 h-1). The anoxic lower layer showed high sulfide production (2.7 μmol cm-3 h-1). Nitrate addition decreased net sulfide production rates, caused by an increase in sulfide oxidation rates (SOR) in the upper layer, rather than an inhibition of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). This suggests that the indigenous nitrate reducing-sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) were immediately activated by nitrate. The functional vertical structure of the biofilm changed to a triple-layer system, where the previously upper sulfide-producing layer in the absence of nitrate split into two new layers: 1) an upper sulfide-consuming layer, whose thickness is probably determined by the nitrate penetration depth within the biofilm, and 2) a middle layer producing sulfide at an even higher rate than in the absence of nitrate in some cases. Below these layers, the lower net sulfide-producing layer remained unaffected. Net SOR varied from 0.05 to 0.72 μmol cm-3 h-1 depending on nitrate and sulfate availability. Addition of low nitrate concentrations likely increased sulfate availability within the biofilm and resulted in an increase of both net sulfate reduction and net sulfide oxidation by overcoming sulfate diffusional limitation from the water phase and the strong coupling between SRB and NR-SOB syntrophic

  9. Kinetics of Indigenous Nitrate Reducing Sulfide Oxidizing Activity in Microaerophilic Wastewater Biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desirée Villahermosa

    Full Text Available Nitrate decreases sulfide release in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP, but little is known on how it affects the microzonation and kinetics of related microbial processes within the biofilm. The effect of nitrate addition on these properties for sulfate reduction, sulfide oxidation, and oxygen respiration were studied with the use of microelectrodes in microaerophilic wastewater biofilms. Mass balance calaculations and community composition analysis were also performed. At basal WWTP conditions, the biofilm presented a double-layer system. The upper microaerophilic layer (~300 μm showed low sulfide production (0.31 μmol cm-3 h-1 and oxygen consumption rates (0.01 μmol cm-3 h-1. The anoxic lower layer showed high sulfide production (2.7 μmol cm-3 h-1. Nitrate addition decreased net sulfide production rates, caused by an increase in sulfide oxidation rates (SOR in the upper layer, rather than an inhibition of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB. This suggests that the indigenous nitrate reducing-sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB were immediately activated by nitrate. The functional vertical structure of the biofilm changed to a triple-layer system, where the previously upper sulfide-producing layer in the absence of nitrate split into two new layers: 1 an upper sulfide-consuming layer, whose thickness is probably determined by the nitrate penetration depth within the biofilm, and 2 a middle layer producing sulfide at an even higher rate than in the absence of nitrate in some cases. Below these layers, the lower net sulfide-producing layer remained unaffected. Net SOR varied from 0.05 to 0.72 μmol cm-3 h-1 depending on nitrate and sulfate availability. Addition of low nitrate concentrations likely increased sulfate availability within the biofilm and resulted in an increase of both net sulfate reduction and net sulfide oxidation by overcoming sulfate diffusional limitation from the water phase and the strong coupling between SRB and NR

  10. Concentration of floating biogenic material in convergence zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandonneau, Yves; Menkes, Christophe; Duteil, Olaf; Gorgues, Thomas

    Some organisms that live just below the sea surface (the neuston) are known more as a matter of curiosity than as critical players in biogeochemical cycles. The hypothesis of this work is that their existence implies that they receive some food from an upward flux of organic matter. The behaviour of these organisms and of the associated organic matter, hereafter mentioned as floating biogenic material (FBM) is explored using a global physical-biogeochemical coupled model, in which its generation is fixed to 1% of primary production, and decay rate is of the order of 1 month. The model shows that the distribution of FBM should depart rapidly from that of primary production, and be more sensitive to circulation patterns than to the distribution of primary production. It is trapped in convergence areas, where it reaches concentrations larger by a factor 10 than in divergences, thus enhancing and inverting the contrast between high and low primary productivity areas. Attention is called on the need to better understand the biogeochemical processes in the first meter of the ocean, as they may impact the distribution of food for fishes, as well as the conditions for air-sea exchange and for the interpretation of sea color.

  11. Fungal spores overwhelm biogenic organic aerosols in a midlatitudinal forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Zhu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Both primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs and oxidation products of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs contribute significantly to organic aerosols (OAs in forested regions. However, little is known about their relative importance in diurnal timescales. Here, we report biomarkers of PBAP and secondary organic aerosols (SOAs for their diurnal variability in a temperate coniferous forest in Wakayama, Japan. Tracers of fungal spores, trehalose, arabitol and mannitol, showed significantly higher levels in nighttime than daytime (p < 0.05, resulting from the nocturnal sporulation under near-saturated relative humidity. On the contrary, BVOC oxidation products showed higher levels in daytime than nighttime, indicating substantial photochemical SOA formation. Using tracer-based methods, we estimated that fungal spores account for 45 % of organic carbon (OC in nighttime and 22 % in daytime, whereas BVOC oxidation products account for 15 and 19 %, respectively. To our knowledge, we present for the first time highly time-resolved results that fungal spores overwhelmed BVOC oxidation products in contributing to OA especially in nighttime. This study emphasizes the importance of both PBAPs and SOAs in forming forest organic aerosols.

  12. Development of biogenic VOC emission inventories for the boreal forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarvainen, V.

    2008-07-01

    The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by vegetation, especially forests, can affect local and regional atmospheric photochemistry through their reactions with atmospheric oxidants. Their reaction products may also participate in the formation and growth of new particles which affect the radiation balance of the atmosphere, and thus climate, by scattering and absorbing shortwave and longwave radiation and by modifying the radiative properties, amount and lifetime of clouds. Globally, anthropogenic VOC emissions are far surpassed by the biogenic ones, making biogenic emission inventories an integral element in the development of efficient air quality and climate strategies. The inventories are typically constructed based on landcover information, measured emissions of different plants or vegetation types, and empirical dependencies of the emissions on environmental variables such as temperature and light. This thesis is focused on the VOC emissions from the boreal forest, the largest terrestrial biome with characteristic vegetation patterns and strong seasonality. The isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions of the most prevalent boreal tree species in Finland, Scots pine, have been measured and their seasonal variation and dependence on temperature and light have been studied. The measured emission data and other available observations of the emissions of the principal boreal trees have been used in a biogenic emission model developed for the boreal forests in Finland. The model utilizes satellite landcover information, Finnish forest classification and hourly meteorological data to calculate isoprene, monoterpene, sesquiterpene and other VOC emissions over the growing season. The principal compounds emitted by Scots pine are DELTA3-carene and alpha-pinene in the south boreal zone and alpha- and beta-pinene in the north boreal zone. The monoterpene emissions are dependent on temperature and have a clear seasonal cycle with high emissions in spring

  13. Interaction of biogenic amines with ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A A

    1975-01-01

    Ethanol through its primary catabolite, acetaldehyde, competitively inhibits oxidation of aldehyde dehydrogenase substrates. As a consequence biogenic amines form increased quantities of alcohols rather than the corresponding acids. During this biotransformation, condensation reactions between deaminated and intact amines may occur which can yield tetrahydropapaverolines. These compounds are closely related to precursors of opioids which is cause to link ethanol abuse to morphine addiction. There is, however, no pharmacological or clinical evidence suggesting similarities between ethanol dependence or opiod addiction. Acetaldehyde plays an additional role in alkaloidal formation in vitro. Biogenic amines may react with acetaldehyde to form isoquinoline or carboline compounds. Some of these substances have significant pharmacological activity. Furthermore, they may enter neural stores and displace the natural neurotransmitter. Thus, they can act as false neurotransmitters. Some investigators believe that chronic ethanol ingestion leads to significant formation of such aberrant compounds which may then upset autonomic nervous system balance. This disturbance may explain the abnormal sympathetic activity seen in withdrawal. While these ideas about the etiology of alcohol abuse have a definite appeal, they are naturally based on in vitro preliminary work. Much study of the quantitative pharmacology of these compounds in animals is required before judgement can be made as to the merits of the proposed hypotheses. In the meantime, pharmacological studies on the ability of ethanol to depress respiration in the mouse has revealed that unlike opioids or barbituates, respiratory depression induced by ethanol requires the presence in brain of serotonin. This neurotransmitter also mediates the respiratory effects of several other alcohols but curiously, not chloral hydrate, yet this compound is purported to alter biogenic amine metabolism much like ethanol. Thus, the response

  14. Total balance of biogenic fuels for thermal uses; Ganzheitliche Bilanzierung verschiedener biogener Festbrennstoffe zur thermischen Nutzung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher, S.; Kaltschmitt, M. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER)

    1996-12-31

    In this situation of unfavourable energy price levels, the use of biogenic fuels for power supply can be recommended only if it serves to reduce environmental pollution. Against this background and on the basis of a primary energy balance, the authors attempted a total balance of selected enfironmental effects (global heating and acidification potential) of biomass use as compared to fossil fuel combustion. (orig) [Deutsch] ie Nutzung biogener Festbrennstoffe zur Energienachfragedeckung ist bei dem gegenwaertigen unguenstigen Energiepreisniveau nur dann zu rechtfertigen, wenn es durch die Biomassenutzung zu einer Reduzierung der energiebedingten Umwelteffekte kommt. Vor disem Hintergrund werden ausgehend von der Primaerenergiebilanz ausgewaehlte Umwelteffekte (d.h. das Treibhaus- und das Versauerungspotential) einer Biomassenutzung im Vergleich zu einer Nutzung fossiler Energietraeger ganzheitlich bilanziert. Die wesentlichen Ergebnisse werden zusammengefasst und interpretiert. (orig)

  15. Total balance of biogenic fuels for thermal uses; Ganzheitliche Bilanzierung verschiedener biogener Festbrennstoffe zur thermischen Nutzung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher, S; Kaltschmitt, M [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER)

    1997-12-31

    In this situation of unfavourable energy price levels, the use of biogenic fuels for power supply can be recommended only if it serves to reduce environmental pollution. Against this background and on the basis of a primary energy balance, the authors attempted a total balance of selected enfironmental effects (global heating and acidification potential) of biomass use as compared to fossil fuel combustion. (orig) [Deutsch] ie Nutzung biogener Festbrennstoffe zur Energienachfragedeckung ist bei dem gegenwaertigen unguenstigen Energiepreisniveau nur dann zu rechtfertigen, wenn es durch die Biomassenutzung zu einer Reduzierung der energiebedingten Umwelteffekte kommt. Vor disem Hintergrund werden ausgehend von der Primaerenergiebilanz ausgewaehlte Umwelteffekte (d.h. das Treibhaus- und das Versauerungspotential) einer Biomassenutzung im Vergleich zu einer Nutzung fossiler Energietraeger ganzheitlich bilanziert. Die wesentlichen Ergebnisse werden zusammengefasst und interpretiert. (orig)

  16. Mechanism of hydrodenitrogenation on phosphides and sulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, S Ted; Lee, Yong-Kul

    2005-02-17

    The mechanism of hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) of 2-methylpiperidine was studied over a silica-supported nickel phosphide catalyst (Ni2P/SiO2, Ni/P = 1/2) and a commercial Ni-Mo-S/Al2O3 catalyst in a three-phase trickle-bed reactor operated at 3.1 MPa and 450-600 K. Analysis of the product distribution as a function of contact time indicated that the reaction proceeded in both cases predominantly by a substitution mechanism, with a smaller contribution of an elimination mechanism. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of the 2-methylpiperidine indicated that at reaction conditions a piperidinium ion intermediate was formed on both the sulfide and the phosphide. It is concluded that the mechanism of HDN on nickel phosphide is very similar to that on sulfides. The mechanism on the nickel phosphide was also probed by comparing the reactivity of piperidine and several of its derivatives in the presence of 3000 ppm S. The relative elimination rates depended on the structure of the molecules, and followed the sequence: 4-methylpiperidine approximately piperidine > 3-methylpiperidine > 2,6-dimethylpiperidine > 2-methylpiperidine. [Chemical structure: see text] This order of reactivity was not dependent on the number of alpha-H or beta-H atoms in the molecules, ruling out their reaction through a single, simple mechanism. It is likely that the unhindered piperidine molecules reacted by an S(N)2 substitution process and the more hindered 2,6-dimethylpiperidine reacted by an E2 elimination process.

  17. Climate/chemistry feedbacks and biogenic emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, John A; Warwick, Nicola; Yang, Xin; Young, Paul J; Zeng, Guang

    2007-07-15

    The oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere is affected by anthropogenic emissions and is projected to change in the future. Model calculations indicate that the change in surface ozone at some locations could be large and have significant implications for human health. The calculations depend on the precise scenarios used for the anthropogenic emissions and on the details of the feedback processes included in the model. One important factor is how natural biogenic emissions will change in the future. We carry out a sensitivity calculation to address the possible increase in isoprene emissions consequent on increased surface temperature in a future climate. The changes in ozone are significant but depend crucially on the background chemical regime. In these calculations, we find that increased isoprene will increase ozone in the Northern Hemisphere but decrease ozone in the tropics. We also consider the role of bromine compounds in tropospheric chemistry and consider cases where, in a future climate, the impact of bromine could change.

  18. Reaction between vanadium trichloride oxide and hydrogen sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yajima, Akimasa; Matsuzaki, Ryoko; Saeki, Yuzo

    1978-01-01

    The details of the reaction between vanadium trichloride oxide and hydrogen sulfide were examined at 20 and 60 0 C. The main products by the reaction were vanadium dichloride oxide, sulfur, and hydrogen chloride. In addition to these products, small amounts of vanadium trichloride, vanadium tetrachloride, disulfur dichloride, and sulfur dioxide were formed. The formations of the above-mentioned reaction products can be explained as follows: The first stage is the reaction between vanadium trichloride oxide and hydrogen sulfide, 2VOCl 3 (l) + H 2 S(g)→2VOCl 2 (s) + S(s) + 2HCl(g). Then the resulting sulfur reacts with the unreacted vanadium trichloride oxide, 2VOCl 3 (l) + 2S(s)→2VOCl 2 (s) + S 2 Cl 2 (l). The resulting disulfur dichloride subsequently reacts with the unreacted vanadium trichloride oxide, 2VOCl 3 (l) + S 2 Cl 2 (l)→2VCl 4 (l) + S(s) + SO 2 (g). The resulting vanadium tetrachloride reacts with the sulfur formed during the reaction, 2VCl 4 (l) + 2S(s)→2VCl 3 (s) + S 2 Cl 2 (l), and also reacts with hydrogen sulfide, 2VCl 4 (l) + H 2 S(g)→2VCl 3 (s) + S(s) + 2HCl(g). (auth.)

  19. Control of malodorous hydrogen sulfide compounds using microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaktasang, Numfon; Min, Hyeong-Sik; Kang, Christina; Kim, Han S

    2013-10-01

    In this study, a microbial fuel cell (MFC) was used to control malodorous hydrogen sulfide compounds generated from domestic wastewaters. The electricity production demonstrated a distinct pattern of a two-step increase during 170 h of system run: the first maximum current density was 118.6 ± 7.2 mA m⁻² followed by a rebound of current density increase, reaching the second maximum of 176.8 ± 9.4 mA m⁻². The behaviors of the redox potential and the sulfate level in the anode compartment indicated that the microbial production of hydrogen sulfide compounds was suppressed in the first stage, and the hydrogen sulfide compounds generated from the system were removed effectively as a result of their electrochemical oxidation, which contributed to the additional electricity production in the second stage. This was also directly supported by sulfur deposits formed on the anode surface, which was confirmed by analyses on those solids using a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy as well as an elemental analyzer. To this end, the overall reduction efficiencies for HS⁻ and H₂S(g) were as high as 67.5 and 96.4 %, respectively. The correlations among current density, redox potential, and sulfate level supported the idea that the electricity signal generated in the MFC can be utilized as a potential indicator of malodor control for the domestic wastewater system.

  20. Dissolution of biogenic silica: Roles of pH, salinity, pressure, electrical charging and reverse weathering. Geologica Ultraiectina (302)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loucaides, S.

    2009-01-01

    The recycling of biogenic silica (bSiO2) produced by diatoms is a vital process sustaining a significant fraction of primary production in the oceans. The efficiency with which bSiO2 dissolves controls the availability of nutrient silicon in the water column, and modulates the export of organic

  1. Influence of ripening time on the amount of certain biogenic amines in rind and core of cow milk Livno cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonela Marijan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Determining the levels of biogenic amines in cheese except that it has significance for determining the nutritional value and hygienic accuracy, cheese as food can be used as a parameter to evaluate the conditions of production and/or ripening of products, and particularly in the selection of bacterial cultures. The purpose of this paper was to determine the effect of the ripening process on the amount of biogenic amines in cheese. For this purpose were conducted physico-chemical analysis, determination of biogenic amines and microbiological analysis. During the process of ripening Livno cheese from three different batches was taken one cheese from prime day and 9th, 20th, 29th, 50th, 60th and 105th day. From each cheese two samples were taken, one from the middle and one from the cheese rind. During 105th day of ripening Livno cheese, the presence of triptamin, ß-feniletlamine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, spermine and spermidine were determinated. The maximum total values of searched biogenic amines were found 105th day, in the middle 184.13 mg/kg and 76.26 mg/kg in the rind of cheese. With an indication that the largest share of value rep¬resent histamine with 43.9 % and tyramine with 38.2 % in the middle, respectively histamine with 31.6 % and tyramine with 31.5 % in the rind of cheese. The values of putrescine and spermine were in small ranges and they are not identified in all samples. The values of histamine and tyramine are almost a third more at 105th than 60th day. There was a significant difference between the middle and the rind of cheese in the values of biogenic amines. Correlation between biogenic amines and microorganisms has not been determined.

  2. Sulfide toxicity kinetics of a uasb reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Paula Jr.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sulfide toxicity on kinetic parameters of anaerobic organic matter removal in a UASB (up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor is presented. Two lab-scale UASB reactors (10.5 L were operated continuously during 12 months. The reactors were fed with synthetic wastes prepared daily using glucose, ammonium acetate, methanol and nutrient solution. One of the reactors also received increasing concentrations of sodium sulfide. For both reactors, the flow rate of 16 L.d-1 was held constant throughout the experiment, corresponding to a hydraulic retention time of 15.6 hours. The classic model for non-competitive sulfide inhibition was applied to the experimental data for determining the overall kinetic parameter of specific substrate utilization (q and the sulfide inhibition coefficient (Ki. The application of the kinetic parameters determined allows prediction of methanogenesis inhibition and thus the adoption of operating parameters to minimize sulfide toxicity in UASB reactors.

  3. Occurrence model for magmatic sulfide-rich nickel-copper-(platinum-group element) deposits related to mafic and ultramafic dike-sill complexes: Chapter I in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Klaus J.; Woodruff, Laurel G.; Nicholson, Suzanne W.; Seal, Robert R.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Chandler, Val W.; Mars, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Magmatic sulfide deposits containing nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu), with or without (±) platinum-group elements (PGE), account for approximately 60 percent of the world’s nickel production. Most of the remainder of the Ni production is derived from lateritic deposits, which form by weathering of ultramafic rocks in humid tropical conditions. Magmatic Ni-Cu±PGE sulfide deposits are spatially and genetically related to bodies of mafic and/or ultramafic rocks. The sulfide deposits form when the mantle-derived mafic and/or ultramafic magmas become sulfide-saturated and segregate immiscible sulfide liquid, commonly following interaction with continental crustal rocks.

  4. Characterizing the effect of carbon steel exposure in sulfide containing solutions to microbially induced corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherar, B.W.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Power, I.M. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Keech, P.G.; Mitlin, S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Southam, G. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Shoesmith, D.W., E-mail: dwshoesm@uwo.c [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: Compares inorganic sulfide and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) on steel corrosion. Mackinawite was the dominant iron sulfide phase. SRBs can form nanowires, presumably grown to acquire energy. - Abstract: This article compares the electrochemical effects induced by inorganic sulfide and sulfate reducing bacteria on the corrosion of carbon steel - a subject of concern for pipelines. Biological microcosms, containing varying concentrations of bioorganic content, were studied to investigate changes to the morphology of biofilms and corrosion product deposits. Raman analysis indicated mackinawite (FeS{sub 1-x}) was the dominant iron sulfide phase grown both abiotically and biotically. A fascinating feature of biological media, void of an organic electron donor, was the formation of putative nanowires that may be grown to acquire energy from carbon steel by promoting the measured cathodic reaction.

  5. BIOGENIC AMINES CONTENT IN SELECTED WINES DURING WINEMAKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radka Flasarová

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the development of selected biogenic amines (histamine; tyramine; phenylethylamine; putrescine; agmatine; and cadaverine during the winemaking in 10 selected species grown in Central Europe in 2008. The analysis was performed using ion-exchange chromatography by the sodium-citrate buffers with the post-column ninhydrin derivatization and photometric detection. A comparison of the content of biogenic amines in red and wine varieties showed that red wines have higher concentrations of biogenic amines.

  6. Protective Effects of Hydrogen Sulfide in the Ageing Kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Cui-Lan; Wang, Ming-Jie; Sun, Chen; Huang, Yong; Jin, Sheng; Mu, Xue-Pan; Chen, Ying; Zhu, Yi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Aims . The study aimed to examine whether hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) generation changed in the kidney of the ageing mouse and its relationship with impaired kidney function. Results . H 2 S levels in the plasma, urine, and kidney decreased significantly in ageing mice. The expression of two known H 2 S-producing enzymes in kidney, cystathionine γ -lyase (CSE) and cystathionine- β -synthase (CBS), decreased significantly during ageing. Chronic H 2 S donor (NaHS, 50  μ mol/kg/day, 10 weeks) treatment could alleviate oxidative stress levels and renal tubular interstitial collagen deposition. These protective effects may relate to transcription factor Nrf2 activation and antioxidant proteins such as HO-1, SIRT1, SOD1, and SOD2 expression upregulation in the ageing kidney after NaHS treatment. Furthermore, the expression of H 2 S-producing enzymes changed with exogenous H 2 S administration and contributed to elevated H 2 S levels in the ageing kidney. Conclusions . Endogenous hydrogen sulfide production in the ageing kidney is insufficient. Exogenous H 2 S can partially rescue ageing-related kidney dysfunction by reducing oxidative stress, decreasing collagen deposition, and enhancing Nrf2 nuclear translocation. Recovery of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production may also contribute to the beneficial effects of NaHS treatment.

  7. Biogenic hardparts: Difficult archives of the geological past (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immenhauser, A.; Schone, B. R.; Hoffmann, R.; Niedermayr, A.

    2013-12-01

    Biomineralized exo- or endoskeletons of fossil marine invertebrates are widespread and diverse components of the Phanerozoic rock record of Earth's past and present oceans. Exoskeletons serve as protection against environmental pressure or predators, whilst endoskeletons can act as support or serve as an attachment for muscles and ligaments and hence as a mechanism for transmitting muscular forces. Biogenic hard parts represent sophisticated products resulting from the hierarchical interaction of inorganic minerals (95%) and macromolecular organic matrices, forming commonly less than 5%. The significance of many biogenic carbonate archives lies in the time-resolved growth patterns and their ability to record ambient environmental conditions in the form of multiple geochemical properties (multi-proxy archives) that have been widely used to assess past oceanic seawater properties. Here, we compile and review published work dealing with crystallization pathways of skeletal hard parts secreted by mollusks (i.e., bivalves and cephalopods) as well as brachiopods as widely used archives of ancient neritic epeiric settings. Bivalves and cephalopods (e.g., extinct ammonoids and belemnites and extant Sepia, Nautilus and Spirula) all form accretionary calcitic, aragonitic or vateritic skeletal hard parts. Despite the fact that mollusks and brachiopods form part of very different branches of the animal phylogenetic tree, their biomineralization strategies are surprisingly similar. Our main focus lies in a critical assessment of the complex pathways of ions and aquo-complexes from their source (seawater) to the final product (biomineral). We do this as an attempt to critically test the commonly held hypothesis that many fossil hard parts precipitated (under favorable conditions and pending subsequent diagenetic alteration) in equilibrium with seawater. Two main observations stand out: (1) the present knowledge on pathways and mechanisms (e.g., ion channel trans-membrane or

  8. Biogenic sulfur compounds and the global sulfur cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aneja, V.P.; Aneja, A.P.; Adams, D.F.

    1982-01-01

    Field measurements of biogenic sulfur compounds shows a great variation in concentrations and emission rates for H 2 S, DMS, CS 2 and COS. Measurements by the chamber method and estimates from micrometeorological sampling are employed to determine the earth-atmosphere flux of these gases. Much of the variation can be attributed to differences of climate and surface conditions, with marshes being a large source of biogenic sulfur (mean contribution 4 x 10 to the 6th ton/year maximum contribution 142 x 10 to the 6th ton/year). Considering that the estimated biogenic contribution needed to balance the global sulfur cycle ranges from 40- 230 x 10 to the 6th tons/year, the mean values are not sufficient to balance this cycle. Further experimental investigations are suggested in order to characterize the biogenic processes adequately

  9. Quantifying the Global Marine Biogenic Nitrogen Oxides Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, H.; Wang, S.; Lin, J.; Hao, N.; Poeschl, U.; Cheng, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are among the most important molecules in atmospheric chemistry and nitrogen cycle. The NOx over the ocean areas are traditionally believed to originate from the continental outflows or the inter-continental shipping emissions. By comparing the satellite observations (OMI) and global chemical transport model simulation (GEOS-Chem), we suggest that the underestimated modeled atmospheric NO2 columns over biogenic active ocean areas can be possibly attributed to the biogenic source. Nitrification and denitrification in the ocean water produces nitrites which can be further reduced to NO through microbiological processes. We further report global distributions of marine biogenic NO emissions. The new added emissions improve the agreement between satellite observations and model simulations over large areas. Our model simulations manifest that the marine biogenic NO emissions increase the atmospheric oxidative capacity and aerosol formation rate, providing a closer link between atmospheric chemistry and ocean microbiology.

  10. Sulfidation/oxidation resistant alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.D.; Tassen, C.S.

    1989-01-01

    The patent describes a nickel-base, high chromium alloy. It is characterized by excellent resistance to sulfidation and oxidation at elevated temperatures as high as 2000 degrees F. (1093 degrees C.) and higher, a stress-rupture life of about 200 hours or more at a temperature at least as high as 1800 degrees F. (990:0083 degrees C.) and under a stress of 2000 psi, good tensile strength and good ductility both at room and elevated temperature. The alloy consists essentially of about 27 to 35% chromium, about 2.5 to 5% aluminum, about 2.5 to about 6% iron, 0.5 to 2.5% columbium, up to 0.1% carbon, up to 1% each of titanium and zirconium, up to 0.05% cerium, up to 0.05% yttrium, up to 1% silicon, up to 1% manganese, and the balance nickel

  11. Sulfide Intrusion and Detoxification in the Seagrass Zostera marina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Gaseous sulfide intrusion into seagrasses growing in sulfidic sediments causes little or no harm to the plant, indicating the presence of an unknown sulfide tolerance or detoxification mechanism. We assessed such mechanism in the seagrass Zostera marina in the laboratory and in the field...... as sulfate throughout the plant. We conclude that avoidance of sulfide exposure by reoxidation of sulfide in the rhizosphere or aerenchyma and tolerance of sulfide intrusion by incorporation of sulfur in the plant are likely major survival strategies of seagrasses in sulfidic sediments....

  12. Biogenic non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC). Nature`s contribution to regional and global atmospheric chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klockow, D.; Hoffman, T. [Inst. of Spectrochemistry and Applied Spectroscopy, Dortmund (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    Terrestrial vegetation provides an important source of volatile hydrocarbons, especially isoprene, monoterpenes and in addition possibly sesquiterpenes as well as oxygenated compounds. Although there exist considerable uncertainties in the estimation of the magnitude of these biogenic NMHC emissions, it is generally accepted that the majority of global NMHC release is from natural and not from anthropogenic sources. Taking into consideration the high reactivity of the mostly unsaturated biogenic emissions, their impact on tropospheric processes can be assumed to be of great importance. Together with anthropogenic NO{sub x} emissions, the highly reactive natural alkenes can act as precursors in photochemical oxidant formation and contribute to regional-scale air pollution. Their oxidation in the atmosphere and the subsequent gas-to-particle conversion of the products lead to the formation of organic aerosols. Because of the formation of phytotoxic compounds, the interaction of the biogenic hydrocarbons with ozone inside or outside the leaves and needles of plants has been suggested to play a role in forest decline. (author)

  13. Amino Acids and Biogenic Amines Evolution during the Estufagem of Fortified Wines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanda Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study was focused on the impact of accelerated ageing (heating step on the amino acid and biogenic amine profiles of fortified wines. In this sense, three Madeira wines from two commonly used grape varieties (one red and the other white were analysed during the heating, at standard (45°C, 3 months and overheating (70°C, 1 month conditions, following a precolumn derivatization procedure using iodoacetic acid, o-phthaldialdehyde, and 2-mercaptoethanol, carried out in the injection loop prior to RP-HPLC-FLD detection. Eighteen amino acids were identified, with arginine being the most abundant. An important decrease of the amino acid levels was detected during the standard heating (up to 30%, enhanced up to 61% by the temperature increase. Cysteine, histidine, and asparagine revealed the greatest decreases at 45°C. Conversely, some amino acids, such as asparagine, slightly increased. Four biogenic amines were identified but always in trace amounts. Finally, it was observed that the accelerated ageing did not favour the biogenic amine development. The results also indicate that the heating process promotes the amino acid transformation into new ageing products.

  14. Biogenic non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC). Nature`s contribution to regional and global atmospheric chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klockow, D; Hoffman, T [Inst. of Spectrochemistry and Applied Spectroscopy, Dortmund (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    Terrestrial vegetation provides an important source of volatile hydrocarbons, especially isoprene, monoterpenes and in addition possibly sesquiterpenes as well as oxygenated compounds. Although there exist considerable uncertainties in the estimation of the magnitude of these biogenic NMHC emissions, it is generally accepted that the majority of global NMHC release is from natural and not from anthropogenic sources. Taking into consideration the high reactivity of the mostly unsaturated biogenic emissions, their impact on tropospheric processes can be assumed to be of great importance. Together with anthropogenic NO{sub x} emissions, the highly reactive natural alkenes can act as precursors in photochemical oxidant formation and contribute to regional-scale air pollution. Their oxidation in the atmosphere and the subsequent gas-to-particle conversion of the products lead to the formation of organic aerosols. Because of the formation of phytotoxic compounds, the interaction of the biogenic hydrocarbons with ozone inside or outside the leaves and needles of plants has been suggested to play a role in forest decline. (author)

  15. Biogenic sedimentation beneath the California Current system for the past 30 kyr and its paleoceanographic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, J.V.; Dean, W.E.; Dartnell, P.

    1997-01-01

    A north-south transect of 17 cores was constructed along the eastern boundary of the California Current system from 33?? to 42?? N to investigate the changes in biogenic sedimentation over the past 30 kyr. Percentages and mass accumulation rates of CaCO3, Corg, and biogenic opal were assembled at 500 to 1000 years/sample to provide relatively high resolution. Time-space maps reveal a complex pattern of changes that do not follow a simple glacial-interglacial two-mode model. Biogenic sedimentation shows responses that are sometimes time-transgressive and sometimes coeval, and most of the responses show more consistency within a limited geographic area than any temporal consistency. Reconstructed conditions during late oxygen isotope stage 3 were more like early Holocene conditions than any other time during the last 30 kyr. Coastal upwelling and productivity during oxygen isotope stage 3 were relatively strong along the central California margin but were weak along the northern California margin. Precipitation increased during the last glacial interval in the central California region, and the waters of the southern California margin had relatively low productivity. Productivity on the southern Oregon margin was relatively low at the beginning of the last glacial interval, but by about 20 ka, productivity in this area significantly increased. This change suggests that the center of the divergence of the West Wind Drift shifted south at this time. The end of the last glacial interval was characterized by increased productivity in the southern California margin and increased upwelling along the central California margin but upwelling remained weak along the northern California margin. A sudden (biosphere as the northern latitudes were reforested following retreat of the glaciers. The Holocene has been a period of relatively high productivity in the southern California margin, relatively strong coastal upwelling along the central California margin, relatively weak

  16. Red soil as a regenerable sorbent for high temperature removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, T.-H.; Chu Hsin; Lin, H.-P.; Peng, C.-Y.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) was removed from coal gas by red soil under high temperature in a fixed-bed reactor. Red soil powders were collected from the northern, center and southern of Taiwan. They were characterized by XRPD, porosity analysis and DCB chemical analysis. Results show that the greater sulfur content of LP red soils is attributed to the higher free iron oxides and suitable sulfidation temperature is around 773 K. High temperature has a negative effect for use red soil as a desulfurization sorbent due to thermodynamic limitation in a reduction atmosphere. During 10 cycles of regeneration, after the first cycle the red soil remained stable with a breakthrough time between 31 and 36 min. Hydrogen adversely affects sulfidation reaction, whereas CO exhibits a positive effect due to a water-shift reaction. COS was formed during the sulfidation stage and this was attributed to the reaction of H 2 S and CO. Results of XRPD indicated that, hematite is the dominant active species in fresh red soil and iron sulfide (FeS) is a product of the reaction between hematite and hydrogen sulfide in red soils. The spinel phase FeAl 2 O 4 was found during regeneration, moreover, the amount of free iron oxides decreased after regeneration indicating the some of the free iron oxide formed a spinel phase, further reducting the overall desulfurization efficiency

  17. Sulfidation treatment of copper-containing plating sludge towards copper resource recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchar, D; Fukuta, T; Onyango, M S; Matsuda, H

    2006-11-02

    The present study is concerned with the sulfidation treatment of copper-containing plating sludge towards copper resource recovery by flotation of copper sulfide from treated sludge. The sulfidation treatment was carried out by contacting simulated or real copper plating sludge with Na(2)S solution for a period of 5 min to 24 h. The initial molar ratio of S(2-) to Cu(2+) (S(2-) to Me(2+) in the case of real sludge) was adjusted to 1.00, 1.25 or 1.50, while the solid to liquid ratio was set at 1:50. As a result, it was found that copper compounds were converted to various copper sulfides within the first 5 min. In the case of simulated copper sludge, CuS was identified as the main sulfidation product at the molar ratio of S(2-) to Cu(2+) of 1.00, while Cu(7)S(4) (Roxbyite) was mainly found at the molar ratios of S(2-) to Cu(2+) of 1.50 and 1.25. Based on the measurements of oxidation-reduction potential, the formation of either CuS or Cu(7)S(4) at different S(2-) to Cu(2+) molar ratios was attributed to the changes in the oxidation-reduction potential. By contrast, in the case of sulfidation treatment of real copper sludge, CuS was predominantly formed, irrespective of S(2-) to Me(2+) molar ratio.

  18. Electrochemical oxidation of iron and alkalinity generation for efficient sulfide control in sewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Wen; Kustermans, Caroline; Vaiopoulou, Eleni; Prévoteau, Antonin; Rabaey, Korneel; Yuan, Zhiguo; Pikaar, Ilje

    2017-07-01

    The addition of iron salts is one of the most commonly used dosing strategies for sulfide control in sewers. However, iron salts decrease the sewage pH which not only reduces the effectiveness of sulfide precipitation but also enhances the release of residual sulfide to the sewer atmosphere. Equally important, concentrated iron salt solutions are corrosive and their frequent transport, handling, and on-site storage often come with Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S) concerns. Here, we experimentally demonstrated a novel sulfide control approach using electrochemical systems with parallel placed iron electrodes. This enabled combining anodic dissolved iron species release with cathodic hydroxyl anion production, which alleviates all the aforementioned concerns. A long-term experiment was successfully carried out achieving an average sulfide removal efficiency of 95.4 ± 4.4% at low voltage input of 2.90 ± 0.54 V over the course of 8 weeks. This electrochemical method was demonstrated to successfully achieve efficient sulfide control. In addition, it increases the sewage pH, thereby overcoming the drawbacks associated with the pH decrease in the case of conventional iron salt dosing. Ferrous ions were produced at an overall coulombic efficiency (CE) of 98.2 ± 1.2%, whereas oxygen evolution and direct sulfide oxidation were not observed. Short-term experiments showed that increasing either inter-electrode gap or current density increased the cell voltage associated with the increase in the ohmic drop of the system. Overall, this study highlights the practical potential of in-situ generation of dissolved iron species and simultaneous hydroxyl anion generation for efficient sulfide control in sewers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Biogenic volatile emissions from the soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñuelas, J; Asensio, D; Tholl, D; Wenke, K; Rosenkranz, M; Piechulla, B; Schnitzler, J P

    2014-08-01

    Volatile compounds are usually associated with an appearance/presence in the atmosphere. Recent advances, however, indicated that the soil is a huge reservoir and source of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs), which are formed from decomposing litter and dead organic material or are synthesized by underground living organism or organs and tissues of plants. This review summarizes the scarce available data on the exchange of VOCs between soil and atmosphere and the features of the soil and particle structure allowing diffusion of volatiles in the soil, which is the prerequisite for biological VOC-based interactions. In fact, soil may function either as a sink or as a source of bVOCs. Soil VOC emissions to the atmosphere are often 1-2 (0-3) orders of magnitude lower than those from aboveground vegetation. Microorganisms and the plant root system are the major sources for bVOCs. The current methodology to detect belowground volatiles is described as well as the metabolic capabilities resulting in the wealth of microbial and root VOC emissions. Furthermore, VOC profiles are discussed as non-destructive fingerprints for the detection of organisms. In the last chapter, belowground volatile-based bi- and multi-trophic interactions between microorganisms, plants and invertebrates in the soil are discussed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Biogenic antimicrobial silver nanoparticles produced by fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Alexandre G; Ping, Liu Yu; Marcato, Priscyla D; Alves, Oswaldo L; Silva, Maria C P; Ruiz, Rita C; Melo, Itamar S; Tasic, Ljubica; De Souza, Ana O

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus tubingensis and Bionectria ochroleuca showed excellent extracellular ability to synthesize silver nanoparticles (Ag NP), spherical in shape and 35 ± 10 nm in size. Ag NP were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and photon correlation spectroscopy for particle size and zeta potential. Proteins present in the fungal filtrate and in Ag NP dispersion were analyzed by electrophoresis (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis). Ag NP showed pronounced antifungal activity against Candida sp, frequently occurring in hospital infections, with minimal inhibitory concentration in the range of 0.11-1.75 μg/mL. Regarding antibacterial activity, nanoparticles produced by A. tubingensis were more effective compared to the other fungus, inhibiting 98.0 % of Pseudomonas. aeruginosa growth at 0.28 μg/mL. A. tubingensis synthesized Ag NP with surprisingly high and positive surface potential, differing greatly from all known fungi. These data open the possibility of obtaining biogenic Ag NP with positive surface potential and new applications.

  1. Nitrate radicals and biogenic volatile organic compounds ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) by the nitrate radical (NO3) represents one of the important interactions between anthropogenic emissions related to combustion and natural emissions from the biosphere. This interaction has been recognized for more than 3 decades, during which time a large body of research has emerged from laboratory, field, and modeling studies. NO3-BVOC reactions influence air quality, climate and visibility through regional and global budgets for reactive nitrogen (particularly organic nitrates), ozone, and organic aerosol. Despite its long history of research and the significance of this topic in atmospheric chemistry, a number of important uncertainties remain. These include an incomplete understanding of the rates, mechanisms, and organic aerosol yields for NO3-BVOC reactions, lack of constraints on the role of heterogeneous oxidative processes associated with the NO3 radical, the difficulty of characterizing the spatial distributions of BVOC and NO3 within the poorly mixed nocturnal atmosphere, and the challenge of constructing appropriate boundary layer schemes and non-photochemical mechanisms for use in state-of-the-art chemical transport and chemistry–climate models. This review is the result of a workshop of the same title held at the Georgia Institute of Technology in June 2015. The first half of the review summarizes the current literature on NO3-BVOC chemistry, with a particular focus on recent advances in

  2. Photochemistry of biogenic emissions over the Amazon forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Daniel J.; Wofsy, Steven C.

    1988-01-01

    The boundary layer chemistry over the Amazon forest during the dry season is simulated with a photochemical model. Results are in good agreement with measurements of isoprene, NO, ozone, and organic acids. Photochemical reactions of biogenic isoprene and NOx can supply most of the ozone observed in the boundary layer. Production of ozone is very sensitive to the availability of NOx, but is insensitive to the isoprene source strength. High concentrations of total odd nitrogen (NOy) are predicted for the planetary boundary layer, about 1 ppb in the mixed layer and 0.75 ppb in the convective cloud layer. Most of the odd nitrogen is present as PAN-type species, which are removed by dry deposition to the forest. The observed daytime variations of isoprene are explained by a strong dependence of the isoprene emission flux on sun angle. Nighttime losses of isoprene exceed rates of reaction with NO3 and O3 and appear to reflect dry-deposition processes. The 24-hour averaged isoprene emission flux is calculated to be 38 mg/sq m per day. Photooxidation of isoprene could account for a large fraction of the CO enrichment observed in the boundary layer under unpolluted conditions and could constitute an important atmospheric source of formic acid, methacrylic acid, and pyruvic acid.

  3. HOx Radical Behavior in Urban, Biogenic and Mixed Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, C. A.; Mauldin, L.; Schardt, N.; Mukherjee, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of HOx radicals in tropospheric chemistry is well-recognized. These roles include control of the lifetimes of a wide variety of trace gases, and control of photochemical ozone formation. The continued advance in understanding comes from laboratory investigations and field observations especially as part of comprehensive measurement campaigns. We participated in two recent observational campaigns aboard the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft platform: NOMADSS (Nitrogen, Oxidants, Mercury and Aerosol Distributions, Sources and Sinks) and FRAPPE (Front Range Atmospheric Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment). During these studies, a wide varieties of air masses were sampled ranging from fresh urban to rural both without and without biogenic influence to marine, and including the impacts of emissions from oil and gas extraction and animal production. Among the wide variety of parameters and species related to tropospheric chemistry that were measured, our group made observations of HOx and related species: OH, HO2, HO2+RO2, H2SO4, and stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCIs) using selected ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The paper discusses the functional dependence of these species on other measures of the chemical environment (e.g. NO, VOCs, j-values) as well as comparison of model estimates with the observations.

  4. Biogenic volatile organic compound emissions from vegetation fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccioli, Paolo; Centritto, Mauro; Loreto, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide an overview of the current state of the art on research into the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from vegetation fires. Significant amounts of VOCs are emitted from vegetation fires, including several reactive compounds, the majority belonging to the isoprenoid family, which rapidly disappear in the plume to yield pollutants such as secondary organic aerosol and ozone. This makes determination of fire-induced BVOC emission difficult, particularly in areas where the ratio between VOCs and anthropogenic NOx is favourable to the production of ozone, such as Mediterranean areas and highly anthropic temperate (and fire-prone) regions of the Earth. Fire emissions affecting relatively pristine areas, such as the Amazon and the African savannah, are representative of emissions of undisturbed plant communities. We also examined expected BVOC emissions at different stages of fire development and combustion, from drying to flaming, and from heatwaves coming into contact with unburned vegetation at the edge of fires. We conclude that forest fires may dramatically change emission factors and the profile of emitted BVOCs, thereby influencing the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere, the physiology of plants and the evolution of plant communities within the ecosystem. © 2014 The Authors. Plant, Cell & Environment published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Addressing biogenic greenhouse gas emissions from hydropower in LCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertwich, Edgar G

    2013-09-03

    The ability of hydropower to contribute to climate change mitigation is sometimes questioned, citing emissions of methane and carbon dioxide resulting from the degradation of biogenic carbon in hydropower reservoirs. These emissions are, however, not always addressed in life cycle assessment, leading to a bias in technology comparisons, and often misunderstood. The objective of this paper is to review and analyze the generation of greenhouse gas emissions from reservoirs for the purpose of technology assessment, relating established emission measurements to power generation. A literature review, data collection, and statistical analysis of methane and CO2 emissions are conducted. In a sample of 82 measurements, methane emissions per kWh hydropower generated are log-normally distributed, ranging from micrograms to 10s of kg. A multivariate regression analysis shows that the reservoir area per kWh electricity is the most important explanatory variable. Methane emissions flux per reservoir area are correlated with the natural net primary production of the area, the age of the power plant, and the inclusion of bubbling emissions in the measurement. Even together, these factors fail to explain most of the variation in the methane flux. The global average emissions from hydropower are estimated to be 85 gCO2/kWh and 3 gCH4/kWh, with a multiplicative uncertainty factor of 2. GHG emissions from hydropower can be largely avoided by ceasing to build hydropower plants with high land use per unit of electricity generated.

  6. Evaluation of methods for monitoring air concentrations of hydrogen sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Janoszka

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of different branches of industry and a growing fossil fuels mining results in a considerable emission of by-products. Major air pollutants are: CO, CO₂, SO₂, SO₃, H₂S, nitrogen oxides, as well as compounds of an organic origin. The main aspects of this paper is to review and evaluate methods used for monitoring of hydrogen sulfide in the air. Different instrumental techniques were discussed, electrochemical, chromatographic and spectrophotometric (wet and dry, to select the method most suitable for monitoring low levels of hydrogen sulfide, close to its odor threshold. Based on the literature review the method for H₂S determination in the air, involving absorption in aqueous zinc acetate and reaction with N,N-dimethylo-p-phenylodiamine and FeCl₃, has been selected and preliminary verified. The adopted method allows for routine measurements of low concentration of hydrogen sulfide, close to its odor threshold in workplaces and ambient air. Med Pr 2013;64(3:449–454

  7. Crossett Hydrogen Sulfide Air Sampling Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report summarizes the results of the EPA’s hydrogen sulfide air monitoring conducted along Georgia Pacific’s wastewater treatment system and in surrounding Crossett, AR, neighborhoods in 2017.

  8. Using Biogenic Sulfur Gases as Remotely Detectable Biosignatures on Anoxic Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Victoria S.; Claire, Mark W.; Kasting, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We used one-dimensional photochemical and radiative transfer models to study the potential of organic sulfur compounds (CS2, OCS, CH3SH, CH3SCH3, and CH3S2CH3) to act as remotely detectable biosignatures in anoxic exoplanetary atmospheres. Concentrations of organic sulfur gases were predicted for various biogenic sulfur fluxes into anoxic atmospheres and were found to increase with decreasing UV fluxes. Dimethyl sulfide (CH3SCH3, or DMS) and dimethyl disulfide (CH3S2CH3, or DMDS) concentrations could increase to remotely detectable levels, but only in cases of extremely low UV fluxes, which may occur in the habitable zone of an inactive M dwarf. The most detectable feature of organic sulfur gases is an indirect one that results from an increase in ethane (C2H6) over that which would be predicted based on the planet's methane (CH4) concentration. Thus, a characterization mission could detect these organic sulfur gases—and therefore the life that produces them—if it could sufficiently quantify the ethane and methane in the exoplanet's atmosphere. Key Words: Exoplanets—Biosignatures—Anoxic atmospheres—Planetary atmospheres—Remote life detection—Photochemistry. Astrobiology 11, 419–441. PMID:21663401

  9. Using biogenic sulfur gases as remotely detectable biosignatures on anoxic planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D; Meadows, Victoria S; Claire, Mark W; Kasting, James F

    2011-06-01

    We used one-dimensional photochemical and radiative transfer models to study the potential of organic sulfur compounds (CS(2), OCS, CH(3)SH, CH(3)SCH(3), and CH(3)S(2)CH(3)) to act as remotely detectable biosignatures in anoxic exoplanetary atmospheres. Concentrations of organic sulfur gases were predicted for various biogenic sulfur fluxes into anoxic atmospheres and were found to increase with decreasing UV fluxes. Dimethyl sulfide (CH(3)SCH(3), or DMS) and dimethyl disulfide (CH(3)S(2)CH(3), or DMDS) concentrations could increase to remotely detectable levels, but only in cases of extremely low UV fluxes, which may occur in the habitable zone of an inactive M dwarf. The most detectable feature of organic sulfur gases is an indirect one that results from an increase in ethane (C(2)H(6)) over that which would be predicted based on the planet's methane (CH(4)) concentration. Thus, a characterization mission could detect these organic sulfur gases-and therefore the life that produces them-if it could sufficiently quantify the ethane and methane in the exoplanet's atmosphere.

  10. Control of Redox Events by Dye Encapsulation Applied to Light-Driven Splitting of Hydrogen Sulfide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jing, X.; Yang, Y.; He, C.; Chang, Z.; Reek, J.N.H.; Duan, C.

    2017-01-01

    Solar production of hydrogen by consuming low-value waste products is an attractive pathway that has both economic and environmental benefits. Inspired by the reactive pocket of enzymes, a synthetic platform to combine photocatalytic hydrogen evolution with sulfide oxidation in a one-pot process via

  11. Simulation for estimation of hydrogen sulfide scavenger injection dose rate for treatment of crude oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M. Elshiekh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of hydrogen sulfide in the hydrocarbon fluids is a well known problem in many oil and gas fields. Hydrogen sulfide is an undesirable contaminant which presents many environmental and safety hazards. It is corrosive, malodorous, and toxic. Accordingly, a need has been long left in the industry to develop a process which can successfully remove hydrogen sulfide from the hydrocarbons or at least reduce its level during the production, storage or processing to a level that satisfies safety and product specification requirements. The common method used to remove or reduce the concentration of hydrogen sulfide in the hydrocarbon production fluids is to inject the hydrogen sulfide scavenger into the hydrocarbon stream. One of the chemicals produced by the Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute (EPRI is EPRI H2S scavenger. It is used in some of the Egyptian petroleum producing companies. The injection dose rate of H2S scavenger is usually determined by experimental lab tests and field trials. In this work, this injection dose rate is mathematically estimated by modeling and simulation of an oil producing field belonging to Petrobel Company in Egypt which uses EPRI H2S scavenger. Comparison between the calculated and practical values of injection dose rate emphasizes the real ability of the proposed equation.

  12. Hydrothermal, biogenic, and seawater components in metalliferous black shales of the Brooks Range, Alaska: Synsedimentary metal enrichment in a carbonate ramp setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, John F.; Selby, David; Dumoulin, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Trace element and Os isotope data for Lisburne Group metalliferous black shales of Middle Mississippian (early Chesterian) age in the Brooks Range of northern Alaska suggest that metals were sourced chiefly from local seawater (including biogenic detritus) but also from externally derived hydrothermal fluids. These black shales are interbedded with phosphorites and limestones in sequences 3 to 35 m thick; deposition occurred mainly on a carbonate ramp during intermittent upwelling under varying redox conditions, from suboxic to anoxic to sulfidic. Deposition of the black shales at ~335 Ma was broadly contemporaneous with sulfide mineralization in the Red Dog and Drenchwater Zn-Pb-Ag deposits, which formed in a distal marginal basin.Relative to the composition of average black shale, the metalliferous black shales (n = 29) display large average enrichment factors (>10) for Zn (10.1), Cd (11.0), and Ag (20.1). Small enrichments (>2–rare earth elements except Ce, Nd, and Sm. A detailed stratigraphic profile over 23 m in the Skimo Creek area (central Brooks Range) indicates that samples from at and near the top of the section, which accumulated during a period of major upwelling and is broadly correlative with the stratigraphic levels of the Red Dog and Drenchwater Zn-Pb-Ag deposits, have the highest Zn/TOC (total organic carbon), Cu/TOC, and Tl/TOC ratios for calculated marine fractions (no detrital component) of these three metals.Average authigenic (detrital-free) contents of Mo, V, U, Ni, Cu, Cd, Pb, Ge, Re, Se, As, Sb, Tl, Pd, and Au show enrichment factors of 4.3 × 103 to 1.2 × 106 relative to modern seawater. Such moderate enrichments, which are common in other metalliferous black shales, suggest wholly marine sources (seawater and biogenic material) for these metals, given similar trends for enrichment factors in organic-rich sediments of modern upwelling zones on the Namibian, Peruvian, and Chilean shelves. The largest enrichment factors for Zn and Ag

  13. Photocatalytic properties of zinc sulfide nanocrystals biofabricated by metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Xiang; Ma, Xiao-Bo; Yuan, Hang; Liu, Peng-Cheng; Lei, Yu-Bin; Xu, Hui; Du, Dao-Lin; Sun, Jian-Fan; Feng, Yu-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • S. oneidensis MR-1 biofabricated ZnS nanocrystals using artificial wastewater. • ZnS nanocrystals were 5 nm in diameter and aggregated extracellularly. • ZnS had good catalytic activity in the degradation of RHB under UV irradiation. • Photogenerated holes mainly contributed to the degradation of RhB. - Abstract: Accumulation and utilization of heavy metals from wastewater by biological treatment system has aroused great interest. In the present study, a metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was used to explore the biofabrication of ZnS nanocrystals from the artificial wastewater. The biogenic H 2 S produced via the reduction of thiosulfate precipitated the Zn(II) as sulfide extracellularly. Characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) confirmed the precipitates as ZnS nanocrystals. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals appeared spherical in shape with an average diameter of 5 nm and mainly aggregated in the medium and cell surface of S. oneidensis MR-1. UV–vis DRS spectra showed ZnS nanoparticles appeared a strong absorption below 360 nm. Thus, the photocatalytic activity of ZnS was evaluated by the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under UV irradiation. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals showed a high level of photodegradation efficiency to RhB coupled with a significant blue-shift of maximum adsorption peak. A detailed analysis indicated the photogenerated holes, rather than hydroxyl radicals, contributed to the photocatalytic decolorization of RhB. This approach of coupling biosynthesis of nanoparticles with heavy metal removal may offer a potential avenue for efficient bioremediation of heavy metal wastewater

  14. Photocatalytic properties of zinc sulfide nanocrystals biofabricated by metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xiang [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Ma, Xiao-Bo [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Yuan, Hang [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Technical Biology & Agriculture Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu, Peng-Cheng; Lei, Yu-Bin; Xu, Hui [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Du, Dao-Lin, E-mail: ddl@ujs.edu.cn [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Sun, Jian-Fan [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Feng, Yu-Jie, E-mail: yujief@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • S. oneidensis MR-1 biofabricated ZnS nanocrystals using artificial wastewater. • ZnS nanocrystals were 5 nm in diameter and aggregated extracellularly. • ZnS had good catalytic activity in the degradation of RHB under UV irradiation. • Photogenerated holes mainly contributed to the degradation of RhB. - Abstract: Accumulation and utilization of heavy metals from wastewater by biological treatment system has aroused great interest. In the present study, a metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was used to explore the biofabrication of ZnS nanocrystals from the artificial wastewater. The biogenic H{sub 2}S produced via the reduction of thiosulfate precipitated the Zn(II) as sulfide extracellularly. Characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) confirmed the precipitates as ZnS nanocrystals. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals appeared spherical in shape with an average diameter of 5 nm and mainly aggregated in the medium and cell surface of S. oneidensis MR-1. UV–vis DRS spectra showed ZnS nanoparticles appeared a strong absorption below 360 nm. Thus, the photocatalytic activity of ZnS was evaluated by the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under UV irradiation. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals showed a high level of photodegradation efficiency to RhB coupled with a significant blue-shift of maximum adsorption peak. A detailed analysis indicated the photogenerated holes, rather than hydroxyl radicals, contributed to the photocatalytic decolorization of RhB. This approach of coupling biosynthesis of nanoparticles with heavy metal removal may offer a potential avenue for efficient bioremediation of heavy metal wastewater.

  15. Air-water transfer of hydrogen sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yongsiri, C.; Vollertsen, J.; Rasmussen, M. R.

    2004-01-01

    The emissions process of hydrogen sulfide was studied to quantify air–water transfer of hydrogen sulfide in sewer networks. Hydrogen sulfide transfer across the air–water interface was investigated at different turbulence levels (expressed in terms of the Froude number) and pH using batch...... experiments. By means of the overall mass–transfer coefficient (KLa), the transfer coefficient of hydrogen sulfide (KLaH2S), referring to total sulfide, was correlated to that of oxygen (KLaO2) (i.e., the reaeration coefficient). Results demonstrate that both turbulence and pH in the water phase play...... a significant role for KLaH2S. An exponential expression is a suitable representation for the relationship between KLaH2S and the Froude number at all pH values studied (4.5 to 8.0). Because of the dissociation of hydrogen sulfide, KLaH2S increased with decreasing pH at a constant turbulence level. Relative...

  16. Sensitivity of modeled ozone concentrations to uncertainties in biogenic emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roselle, S.J.

    1992-06-01

    The study examines the sensitivity of regional ozone (O3) modeling to uncertainties in biogenic emissions estimates. The United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Regional Oxidant Model (ROM) was used to simulate the photochemistry of the northeastern United States for the period July 2-17, 1988. An operational model evaluation showed that ROM had a tendency to underpredict O3 when observed concentrations were above 70-80 ppb and to overpredict O3 when observed values were below this level. On average, the model underpredicted daily maximum O3 by 14 ppb. Spatial patterns of O3, however, were reproduced favorably by the model. Several simulations were performed to analyze the effects of uncertainties in biogenic emissions on predicted O3 and to study the effectiveness of two strategies of controlling anthropogenic emissions for reducing high O3 concentrations. Biogenic hydrocarbon emissions were adjusted by a factor of 3 to account for the existing range of uncertainty in these emissions. The impact of biogenic emission uncertainties on O3 predictions depended upon the availability of NOx. In some extremely NOx-limited areas, increasing the amount of biogenic emissions decreased O3 concentrations. Two control strategies were compared in the simulations: (1) reduced anthropogenic hydrocarbon emissions, and (2) reduced anthropogenic hydrocarbon and NOx emissions. The simulations showed that hydrocarbon emission controls were more beneficial to the New York City area, but that combined NOx and hydrocarbon controls were more beneficial to other areas of the Northeast. Hydrocarbon controls were more effective as biogenic hydrocarbon emissions were reduced, whereas combined NOx and hydrocarbon controls were more effective as biogenic hydrocarbon emissions were increased

  17. Leaching of strontium sulfide from produced clinker in conversion furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghorbanian, S. A.; Salehpour, A. R.; Radpour, S. R.

    2009-01-01

    Iran is rich in mineral resources one of which is mineral Celestine. Basing on current estimations, the capacity of mineral Celestine is over two million tons, 75-95% of which is strontium sulfate. However; in industries such as Color cathode Ray Tubes, pyrochemical processes, ceramics, paint production, zinc purification processes; strontium sulfate is not a direct feed, rather it is largely consumed in the form of strontium carbonate. Two conventional methods are used to produce strontium carbonate from the sulfate; that is direct reaction and black ash methods. Strontium sulfide, as an intermediate component has a key role in black ash process including strontium sulfate reduction by coke, hence producing and leaching the strontium sulfide by hot water. Finally the reaction of strontium sulfate with sodium carbonate lead to strontium carbonate. In this paper, a system was designed to analyze and optimize the process parameters of strontium sulfide production which is less expensive and available solvent in water. Fundamentally, when strontium sulfide becomes in contact with strontium sulfate; Sr(SH) 2 , and Sr(OH) 2 , are produced. The solubility of strontium sulfide depends on water temperature and the maximum solubility achieved at 90 d egree C . The results showed that in the experimental scale, at water to SrS ratio of 6; they sediment for 45 minutes at 95 d egree C in five operational stages; the separation of 95 and 97.1 percent of imported SrS is possible in effluent of fourth and fifth stages, respectively. Thus; four leaching stages could be recommended for pilot scale plants. Also, the results show that at water to SrS ratio of 8, 40 minutes sedimentation at 85-95 d egree C in one operational stage, the separation of 95 percent separation of inputted SrS, is possible. Solvent leaching process is continued till no smell of sulfur components is felt. It could be used as a key role to determine the number of leaching stages in experiments. Finally, the

  18. 'Low-acid' sulfide oxidation using nitrate-enriched groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donn, Michael; Boxall, Naomi; Reid, Nathan; Meakin, Rebecca; Gray, David; Kaksonen, Anna; Robson, Thomas; Shiers, Denis

    2016-04-01

    Acid drainage (AMD/ARD) is undoubtedly one of the largest environmental, legislative and economic challenges facing the mining industry. In Australia alone, at least 60m is spent on AMD related issues annually, and the global cost is estimated to be in the order of tens of billions US. Furthermore, the challenge of safely and economically storing or treating sulfidic wastes will likely intensify because of the trend towards larger mines that process increasingly higher volumes of lower grade ores and the associated sulfidic wastes and lower profit margins. While the challenge of managing potentially acid forming (PAF) wastes will likely intensify, the industrial approaches to preventing acid production or ameliorating the effects has stagnated for decades. Conventionally, PAF waste is segregated and encapsulated in non-PAF tips to limit access to atmospheric oxygen. Two key limitations of the 'cap and cover' approach are: 1) the hazard (PAF) is not actually removed; only the pollutant linkage is severed; and, 2) these engineered structures are susceptible to physical failure in short-to-medium term, potentially re-establishing that pollutant linkage. In an effort to address these concerns, CSIRO is investigating a passive, 'low-acid' oxidation mechanism for sulfide treatment, which can potentially produce one quarter as much acidity compared with pyrite oxidation under atmospheric oxygen. This 'low-acid' mechanism relies on nitrate, rather than oxygen, as the primary electron accepter and the activity of specifically cultured chemolithoautotrophic bacteria and archaea communities. This research was prompted by the observation that, in deeply weathered terrains of Australia, shallow (oxic to sub-oxic) groundwater contacting weathering sulfides are commonly inconsistent with the geochemical conditions produced by ARD. One key characteristic of these aquifers is the natural abundance of nitrate on a regional scale, which becomes depleted around the sulfide bodies, and

  19. Seasonal trends of biogenic terpene emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmig, Detlev; Daly, Ryan Woodfin; Milford, Jana; Guenther, Alex

    2013-09-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from six coniferous tree species, i.e. Pinus ponderosa (Ponderosa Pine), Picea pungens (Blue Spruce), Pseudotsuga menziesii (Rocky Mountain Douglas Fir) and Pinus longaeva (Bristlecone Pine), as well as from two deciduous species, Quercus gambelii (Gamble Oak) and Betula occidentalis (Western River Birch) were studied over a full annual growing cycle. Monoterpene (MT) and sesquiterpene (SQT) emissions rates were quantified in a total of 1236 individual branch enclosure samples. MT dominated coniferous emissions, producing greater than 95% of BVOC emissions. MT and SQT demonstrated short-term emission dependence with temperature. Two oxygenated MT, 1,8-cineol and piperitone, were both light and temperature dependent. Basal emission rates (BER, normalized to 1000μmolm(-2)s(-1) and 30°C) were generally higher in spring and summer than in winter; MT seasonal BER from the coniferous trees maximized between 1.5 and 6.0μgg(-1)h(-1), while seasonal lows were near 0.1μgg(-1)h(-1). The fractional contribution of individual MT to total emissions was found to fluctuate with season. SQT BER measured from the coniferous trees ranged from emissions modeling, was not found to exhibit discernible growth season trends. A seasonal correction factor proposed by others in previous work to account for a sinusoidal shaped emission pattern was applied to the data. Varying levels of agreement were found between the data and model results for the different plant species seasonal data sets using this correction. Consequently, the analyses on this extensive data set suggest that it is not feasible to apply a universal seasonal correction factor across different vegetation species. A modeling exercise comparing two case scenarios, (1) without and (2) with consideration of the seasonal changes in emission factors illustrated large deviations when emission factors are applied for other seasons than those in which they were experimentally

  20. Hydrogen sulfide can inhibit and enhance oxygenic photosynthesis in a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klatt, Judith M.; Haas, Sebastian; Yilmaz, Pelin; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    We used microsensors to investigate the combinatory effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and light on oxygenic photosynthesis in biofilms formed by a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs. We found that photosynthesis was both positively and negatively affected by H2S: (i) H2S accelerated the recovery of

  1. Sulfide response analysis for sulfide control using a pS electrode in sulfate reducing bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villa Gomez, D.K.; Cassidy, J.; Keesman, K.J.; Sampaio, R.M.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2014-01-01

    Step changes in the organic loading rate (OLR) through variations in the influent chemical oxygen demand (CODin) concentration or in the hydraulic retention time (HRT) at constant COD/SO4 2- ratio (0.67) were applied to create sulfide responses for the design of a sulfide control in sulfate reducing

  2. Biogenic, anthropogenic and sea salt sulfate size-segregated aerosols in the Arctic summer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ghahremaninezhad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Size-segregated aerosol sulfate concentrations were measured on board the Canadian Coast Guard Ship (CCGS Amundsen in the Arctic during July 2014. The objective of this study was to utilize the isotopic composition of sulfate to address the contribution of anthropogenic and biogenic sources of aerosols to the growth of the different aerosol size fractions in the Arctic atmosphere. Non-sea-salt sulfate is divided into biogenic and anthropogenic sulfate using stable isotope apportionment techniques. A considerable amount of the average sulfate concentration in the fine aerosols with a diameter  <  0.49 µm was from biogenic sources (>  63 %, which is higher than in previous Arctic studies measuring above the ocean during fall (<  15 % (Rempillo et al., 2011 and total aerosol sulfate at higher latitudes at Alert in summer (>  30 % (Norman et al., 1999. The anthropogenic sulfate concentration was less than that of biogenic sulfate, with potential sources being long-range transport and, more locally, the Amundsen's emissions. Despite attempts to minimize the influence of ship stack emissions, evidence from larger-sized particles demonstrates a contribution from local pollution. A comparison of δ34S values for SO2 and fine aerosols was used to show that gas-to-particle conversion likely occurred during most sampling periods. δ34S values for SO2 and fine aerosols were similar, suggesting the same source for SO2 and aerosol sulfate, except for two samples with a relatively high anthropogenic fraction in particles  <  0.49 µm in diameter (15–17 and 17–19 July. The high biogenic fraction of sulfate fine aerosol and similar isotope ratio values of these particles and SO2 emphasize the role of marine organisms (e.g., phytoplankton, algae, bacteria in the formation of fine particles above the Arctic Ocean during the productive summer months.

  3. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) cycling across contrasting biological hotspots of the New Zealand subtropical front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizotte, Martine; Levasseur, Maurice; Law, Cliff S.; Walker, Carolyn F.; Safi, Karl A.; Marriner, Andrew; Kiene, Ronald P.

    2017-11-01

    The oceanic frontal region above the Chatham Rise east of New Zealand was investigated during the late austral summer season in February and March 2012. Despite its potential importance as a source of marine-originating and climate-relevant compounds, such as dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and its algal precursor dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), little is known of the processes fuelling the reservoirs of these sulfur (S) compounds in the water masses bordering the subtropical front (STF). This study focused on two opposing short-term fates of DMSP-S following its uptake by microbial organisms (either its conversion into DMS or its assimilation into bacterial biomass) and has not considered dissolved non-volatile degradation products. Sampling took place in three phytoplankton blooms (B1, B2, and B3) with B1 and B3 occurring in relatively nitrate-rich, dinoflagellate-dominated subantarctic waters, and B2 occurring in nitrate-poor subtropical waters dominated by coccolithophores. Concentrations of total DMSP (DMSPt) and DMS were high across the region, up to 160 and 14.5 nmol L-1, respectively. Pools of DMSPt showed a strong association with overall phytoplankton biomass proxied by chlorophyll a (rs = 0.83) likely because of the persistent dominance of dinoflagellates and coccolithophores, both DMSP-rich taxa. Heterotrophic microbes displayed low S assimilation from DMSP (less than 5 %) likely because their S requirements were fulfilled by high DMSP availability. Rates of bacterial protein synthesis were significantly correlated with concentrations of dissolved DMSP (DMSPd, rs = 0.86) as well as with the microbial conversion efficiency of DMSPd into DMS (DMS yield, rs = 0.84). Estimates of the potential contribution of microbially mediated rates of DMS production (0.1-27 nmol L-1 day-1) to the near-surface concentrations of DMS suggest that bacteria alone could not have sustained DMS pools at most stations, indicating an important role for phytoplankton-mediated DMS

  4. Particle size dependence of biogenic secondary organic aerosol molecular composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Peijun; Johnston, Murray V.

    2017-06-01

    Formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is initiated by the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the gas phase whose products subsequently partition to the particle phase. Non-volatile molecules have a negligible evaporation rate and grow particles at their condensation rate. Semi-volatile molecules have a significant evaporation rate and grow particles at a much slower rate than their condensation rate. Particle phase chemistry may enhance particle growth if it transforms partitioned semi-volatile molecules into non-volatile products. In principle, changes in molecular composition as a function of particle size allow non-volatile molecules that have condensed from the gas phase (a surface-limited process) to be distinguished from those produced by particle phase reaction (a volume-limited process). In this work, SOA was produced by β-pinene ozonolysis in a flow tube reactor. Aerosol exiting the reactor was size-selected with a differential mobility analyzer, and individual particle sizes between 35 and 110 nm in diameter were characterized by on- and offline mass spectrometry. Both the average oxygen-to-carbon (O / C) ratio and carbon oxidation state (OSc) were found to decrease with increasing particle size, while the relative signal intensity of oligomers increased with increasing particle size. These results are consistent with oligomer formation primarily in the particle phase (accretion reactions, which become more favored as the volume-to-surface-area ratio of the particle increases). Analysis of a series of polydisperse SOA samples showed similar dependencies: as the mass loading increased (and average volume-to-surface-area ratio increased), the average O / C ratio and OSc decreased, while the relative intensity of oligomer ions increased. The results illustrate the potential impact that particle phase chemistry can have on biogenic SOA formation and the particle size range where this chemistry becomes important.

  5. Particle size dependence of biogenic secondary organic aerosol molecular composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA is initiated by the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs in the gas phase whose products subsequently partition to the particle phase. Non-volatile molecules have a negligible evaporation rate and grow particles at their condensation rate. Semi-volatile molecules have a significant evaporation rate and grow particles at a much slower rate than their condensation rate. Particle phase chemistry may enhance particle growth if it transforms partitioned semi-volatile molecules into non-volatile products. In principle, changes in molecular composition as a function of particle size allow non-volatile molecules that have condensed from the gas phase (a surface-limited process to be distinguished from those produced by particle phase reaction (a volume-limited process. In this work, SOA was produced by β-pinene ozonolysis in a flow tube reactor. Aerosol exiting the reactor was size-selected with a differential mobility analyzer, and individual particle sizes between 35 and 110 nm in diameter were characterized by on- and offline mass spectrometry. Both the average oxygen-to-carbon (O ∕ C ratio and carbon oxidation state (OSc were found to decrease with increasing particle size, while the relative signal intensity of oligomers increased with increasing particle size. These results are consistent with oligomer formation primarily in the particle phase (accretion reactions, which become more favored as the volume-to-surface-area ratio of the particle increases. Analysis of a series of polydisperse SOA samples showed similar dependencies: as the mass loading increased (and average volume-to-surface-area ratio increased, the average O ∕ C ratio and OSc decreased, while the relative intensity of oligomer ions increased. The results illustrate the potential impact that particle phase chemistry can have on biogenic SOA formation and the particle size range where this chemistry becomes

  6. Transition-Metal-Free Highly Efficient Aerobic Oxidation of Sulfides to Sulfoxides under Mild Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zhang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A highly efficient transition-metal-free catalytic system Br2/NaNO2/H2O has been developed for a robust and economic acid-free aerobic oxidation of sulfides. It is noteworthy that the sulfide function reacts under mild conditions without over-oxidation to sulfone. The role of NaNO2as an efficient NO equivalent for the activation of molecular oxygen was identified. Under the optimal conditions, a broad range of sulfide substrates were converted into their corresponding sulfoxides in high yields by molecular oxygen. The present catalytic system utilizes cheap and readily available agents as the catalysts, exhibits high selectivity for sulfoxide products and releases only innocuous water as the by-products.

  7. Experimental simulations of sulfide formation in the solar nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauretta, D S; Lodders, K; Fegley, B

    1997-07-18

    Sulfurization of meteoritic metal in H2S-H2 gas produced three different sulfides: monosulfide solid solution [(Fe,Ni)1-xS], pentlandite [(Fe,Ni)9-xS8], and a phosphorus-rich sulfide. The composition of the remnant metal was unchanged. These results are contrary to theoretical predictions that sulfide formation in the solar nebula produced troilite (FeS) and enriched the remaining metal in nickel. The experimental sulfides are chemically and morphologically similar to sulfide grains in the matrix of the Alais (class CI) carbonaceous chondrite, suggesting that these meteoritic sulfides may be condensates from the solar nebula.

  8. Hydrocarbon delineation in Muskeg : distinguishing biogenic from petrogenic sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, C. [UMA Engineering Ltd., Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    The quantification of biogenic versus petrogenic hydrocarbons from an emulsion pipeline in a Muskeg setting in northeastern British Columbia was examined. This presentation provided an introduction and discussion of the challenges in Muskeg environments. It introduced the objectives of the study and the analytical approach. Some supporting literature involving studies on the distribution and origin of hydrocarbons in estuary sediments was also cited. Box plots of the physical and chemical characteristics of soil and chromatograms of gas chromatography flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were presented. Last, the approach to establish a true biogenic source and the recommended analytical program and corrections for biogenic input were discussed. The definition of contaminated peat was introduced. tabs., figs.

  9. Dechlorination of chloropicrin and 1,3-dichloropropene by hydrogen sulfide species: redox and nucleophilic substitution reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Yates, Scott R; Papiernik, Sharon K; Guo, Mingxin; Gan, Jianying

    2006-03-22

    The chlorinated fumigants chloropicrin (trichloronitromethane) and 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) are extensively used in agricultural production for the control of soilborne pests. The reaction of these two fumigants with hydrogen sulfide species (H2S and HS-) was examined in well-defined anoxic aqueous solutions. Chloropicrin underwent an extremely rapid redox reaction in the hydrogen sulfide solution. Transformation products indicated reductive dechlorination of chloropicrin by hydrogen sulfide species to produce dichloro- and chloronitromethane. The transformation of chloropicrin in hydrogen sulfide solution significantly increased with increasing pH, indicating that H2S is less reactive toward chloropicrin than HS- is. For both 1,3-D isomers, kinetics and transformation products analysis revealed that the reaction between 1,3-D and hydrogen sulfide species is an S(N)2 nucleophilic substitution process, in which the chlorine at C3 of 1,3-D is substituted by the sulfur nucleophile to form corresponding mercaptans. The 50% disappearance time (DT50) of 1,3-D decreased with increasing hydrogen sulfide species concentration at a constant pH. Transformation of 1,3-D was more rapid at high pH, suggesting that the reactivity of hydrogen sulfide species in the experimental system stems primarily from HS-. Because of the relatively low smell threshold values and potential environmental persistence of organic sulfur products yielded by the reaction of 1,3-D and HS-, the effects of reduced sulfide species should be considered in the development of alternative fumigation practices, especially in the integrated application of sulfur-containing fertilizers.

  10. Mechanism analysis of improved DLC films friction behaviors with liquid sulfidation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Qunfeng; Yu Fei; Dong Guangneng; Mao Junhong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Liquid sulfidation is applied to treat DLC films. ► Sulfur atoms are chemically bonded and the graphitization presented in the treated films. ► The treated films exhibited much lower coefficient of friction than the untreated films under dry friction condition. ► The sulfidation mechanisms are supposed as surface chemical reaction and surface diffusion. ► The presence of sulfur-containing materials and graphitization are beneficial to improve anti-friction behaviors of the treated films. - Abstract: Diamond like carbon (DLC) films were treated by liquid sulfidation to improve their friction behaviors. Friction behaviors of DLC films were experimentally evaluated in ambient air under dry friction using GCr15 steel ball sliding over DLC-coated steel flat in a ball-on-disk tribometer system. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy were applied to identify the chemical composition and structure of DLC films. It was found that the content of sp 2 carbon bond increased and G peak shifted to high wave number after sulfidation treatment. The measurement results showed that sulfur atoms were chemically bonded and the graphitization occurred in the treated DLC films. It was indicated that the treated DLC films exhibited much better friction behaviors than the untreated films, especially for DLC films deposited with high nitrogen ratio. In this paper, we proposed the possible sulfidation mechanism of sulfurized DLC films. Sulfidation mechanism is postulated that thiourea reacted with oxygen to form sulfur-containing organic compounds which included CSSC, CSOH and (NH 2 )NH=CSO 2 H and surface diffusion during sulfidation treatment. The anti-friction behaviors of the treated DLC films can be attributed to the production of the compounds containing sulfur on the DLC film surface, the reduce of oxygen content and the presence of graphitization of DLC films.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide in plants: from dissipation of excess sulfur to signaling molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderwood, Alexander; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2014-09-15

    Sulfur is essential in all organisms for the synthesis of amino acids cysteine and methionine and as an active component of numerous co-factors and prosthetic groups. However, only plants, algae, fungi, and some prokaryotes are capable of using the abundant inorganic source of sulfur, sulfate. Plants take sulfate up, reduce it, and assimilate into organic compounds with cysteine being the first product of the pathway and a donor of reduced sulfur for synthesis of other S-containing compounds. Cysteine is formed in a reaction between sulfide, derived from reduction of sulfite and an activated amino acid acceptor, O-acetylserine. Sulfide is thus an important intermediate in sulfur metabolism, but numerous other functions in plants has been revealed. Hydrogen sulfide can serve as an alternative source of sulfur for plants, which may be significant in anaerobic conditions of waterlogged soils. On the other hand, emissions of hydrogen sulfide have been detected from many plant species. Since the amount of H2S discharged correlated with sulfate supply to the plants, the emissions were considered a mechanism for dissipation of excess sulfur. Significant hydrogen sulfide emissions were also observed in plants infected with pathogens, particularly with fungi. H2S thus seems to be part of the widely discussed sulfur-induced-resistance/sulfur-enhanced-defense. Recently, however, more evidence has emerged for a role for H2S in regulation and signaling. Sulfide stabilizes the cysteine synthase complex, increasing so the synthesis of its acceptor O-acetylserine. H2S has been implicating in regulation of plant stress response, particularly draught stress. There are more and more examples of processes regulated by H2S in plants being discovered, and hydrogen sulfide is emerging as an important signaling molecule, similar to its role in the animal and human world. How similar the functions, and homeostasis of H2S are in these diverse organisms, however, remains to be elucidated

  12. Sulfide Precipitation in Wastewater at Short Timescales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich, Bruno; van de Ven, Wilbert; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning

    2017-01-01

    Abatement of sulfides in sewer systems using iron salts is a widely used strategy. When dosing at the end of a pumping main, the reaction kinetics of sulfide precipitation becomes important. Traditionally the reaction has been assumed to be rapid or even instantaneous. This work shows that this i......Abatement of sulfides in sewer systems using iron salts is a widely used strategy. When dosing at the end of a pumping main, the reaction kinetics of sulfide precipitation becomes important. Traditionally the reaction has been assumed to be rapid or even instantaneous. This work shows...... that this is not the case for sulfide precipitation by ferric iron. Instead, the reaction time was found to be on a timescale where it must be considered when performing end-of-pipe treatment. For real wastewaters at pH 7, a stoichiometric ratio around 14 mol Fe(II) (mol S(−II))−1 was obtained after 1.5 s, while the ratio...

  13. Nature and origin of the resistant carbonaceous polymorphs involved the fossilization of biogenic soil-aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courty, M.-A.

    2012-04-01

    which are all finely imbricated with phosphides, phosphates, sulphides, sulphates and native metals (Fe-Cr-Ni and Fe-Cr alloys, Ni, Al, Cu, Zn, Pb, As, Sn, Ag, Au, Bi). The 3D observations show that the carbonaceous filaments play a major role in the cohesion of the fine fraction. The carbonaceous components only start to decompose under HF attack and from 400°C heating. They do not display evidence of microbial degradation. The biogenic aggregates with high amount of carbonaceous polymorphs appear to have resisted to cryoturbation and to hard setting under water saturation. Biogenic micro-aggregates from present-day top soils only contain rare exotic components. In contrast to the ones of the soil archives, they display highly variable structural stability depending upon local edaphic conditions. The exotic assemblage of the stable biogenic micro-aggregates from the soil archives is shown to be similar to the range of terrestrial aerosols that are associated to meteor explosion (Courty et al., this volume). This suggests that the fossilized organic-rich surface horizons in soil archives would trace singular situations possibly marked by recurrent meteor explosion with high stratospheric aerosol production. Mechanisms explaining how the dual stratospheric/cosmic processes formed resistant carbon species from fossil combustible precursors yet remain to be investigated. Courty, Benoît and Vaillant (2012). Possible interaction of meteor explosion with stratospheric aerosols on cloud nucleation based on 2011 observations. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 14, EGU2012.

  14. Determination of Biogenic Amines in Different Shrimp Species for Export

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myat Myat Thaw; Oo Aung; Aung Myint; Bisswanger, Hans

    2004-06-01

    This study is part of the project on the ''Quality Assurance of Different Shrimp Species for Export''. Local shrimp samples were collected from Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries and various private enterprises. Contents of biogenic amines were determined by using benzoyl chloride derivatization method with HPLC (reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography). Based on the biogenic amines, quality index of shrimps were correlated with freshness index so that the grade of shrimp samples can be classified as excellent, good, and acceptable. All sizes of shrimps such as extra large, large, medium were found to excceptable respectively

  15. Biogenic, urban, and wildfire influences on the molecular composition of dissolved organic compounds in cloud water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ryan D.; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Peng, Zhuoyu; Boone, Eric; Chu, Rosalie K.; Dukett, James E.; Gunsch, Matthew J.; Zhang, Wuliang; Tolic, Nikola; Laskin, Alexander; Pratt, Kerri A.

    2017-12-01

    Organic aerosol formation and transformation occurs within aqueous aerosol and cloud droplets, yet little is known about the composition of high molecular weight organic compounds in cloud water. Cloud water samples collected at Whiteface Mountain, New York, during August-September 2014 were analyzed by ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry to investigate the molecular composition of dissolved organic carbon, with a focus on sulfur- and nitrogen-containing compounds. Organic molecular composition was evaluated in the context of cloud water inorganic ion concentrations, pH, and total organic carbon concentrations to gain insights into the sources and aqueous-phase processes of the observed high molecular weight organic compounds. Cloud water acidity was positively correlated with the average oxygen : carbon ratio of the organic constituents, suggesting the possibility for aqueous acid-catalyzed (prior to cloud droplet activation or during/after cloud droplet evaporation) and/or radical (within cloud droplets) oxidation processes. Many tracer compounds recently identified in laboratory studies of bulk aqueous-phase reactions were identified in the cloud water. Organosulfate compounds, with both biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compound precursors, were detected for cloud water samples influenced by air masses that had traveled over forested and populated areas. Oxidation products of long-chain (C10-12) alkane precursors were detected during urban influence. Influence of Canadian wildfires resulted in increased numbers of identified sulfur-containing compounds and oligomeric species, including those formed through aqueous-phase reactions involving methylglyoxal. Light-absorbing aqueous-phase products of syringol and guaiacol oxidation were observed in the wildfire-influenced samples, and dinitroaromatic compounds were observed in all cloud water samples (wildfire, biogenic, and urban-influenced). Overall, the cloud water molecular composition depended on

  16. Biogenic Carbon on Mars: A Subsurface Chauvinistic Viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onstott, T. C.; Lau, C. Y. M.; Magnabosco, C.; Harris, R.; Chen, Y.; Slater, G.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Kieft, T. L.; van Heerden, E.; Borgonie, G.; Dong, H.

    2015-12-01

    A review of 150 publications on the subsurface microbiology of the continental subsurface provides ~1,400 measurements of cellular abundances down to 4,800 meter depth. These data suggest that the continental subsurface biomass is comprised of ~1016-17 grams of carbon, which is higher than the most recent estimates of ~1015 grams of carbon (1 Gt) for the marine deep biosphere. If life developed early in Martian history and Mars sustained an active hydrological cycle during its first 500 million years, then is it possible that Mars could have developed a subsurface biomass of comparable size to that of Earth? Such a biomass would comprise a much larger fraction of the total known Martian carbon budget than does the subsurface biomass on Earth. More importantly could a remnant of this subsurface biosphere survive to the present day? To determine how sustainable subsurface life could be in isolation from the surface we have been studying subsurface fracture fluids from the Precambrian Shields in South Africa and Canada. In these environments the energetically efficient and deeply rooted acetyl-CoA pathway for carbon fixation plays a central role for chemolithoautotrophic primary producers that form the base of the biomass pyramid. These primary producers appear to be sustained indefinitely by H2 generated through serpentinization and radiolytic reactions. Carbon isotope data suggest that in some subsurface locations a much larger population of secondary consumers are sustained by the primary production of biogenic CH4 from a much smaller population of methanogens. These inverted biomass and energy pyramids sustained by the cycling of CH4 could have been and could still be active on Mars. The C and H isotopic signatures of Martian CH4 remain key tools in identifying potential signatures of an extant Martian biosphere. Based upon our results to date cavity ring-down spectroscopic technologies provide an option for making these measurements on future rover missions.

  17. Hyperspectral observation of anthropogenic and biogenic pollution in coastal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrova, Olga; Loupian, Evgeny; Mityagina, Marina; Uvarov, Ivan

    The work presents results of anthropogenic and biogenic pollution detection in coastal zones of the Black and Caspian Seas based on satellite hyperspetral data provided by the Hyperion and HICO instruments. Techniques developed on the basis of the analysis of spectral characteristics calculated in special points were employed to address the following problems: (a) assessment of the blooming intensity of cyanobacteria and their distribution in bays of western Crimea and discrimination between anthropogenic pollutant discharge events and algae bloom; (b) detection of anthropogenic pollution in Crimean lakes utilized as industrial liquid discharge reservoirs; (c) detection of oil pollution in areas of shelf oil production in the Caspian Sea. Information values of different spectral bands and their composites were estimated in connection with the retrieval of the main sea water components: phytoplankton, suspended matter and colored organic matter, and also various anthropogenic pollutants, including oil. Software tools for thematic hyperspectral data processing in application to the investigation of sea coastal zones and internal water bodies were developed on the basis of the See the Sea geoportal created by the Space Research Institute RAS. The geoportal is focused on the study of processes in the world ocean with the emphasis on the advantages of satellite systems of observation. The tools that were introduced into the portal allow joint analysis of quasi-simultaneous satellite data, in particular data from the Hyperion, HICO, OLI Landsat-8, ETM Landsat-7 and TM Landsat-5 instruments. Results of analysis attempts combining data from different sensors are discussed. Their strong and weak points are highlighted. The study was completed with partial financial support from The Russian Foundation for Basic Research grants # 14-05-00520-a and 13-07-12017.

  18. A plant chamber system with downstream reaction chamber to study the effects of pollution on biogenic emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timkovsky, J; Gankema, P; Pierik, R; Holzinger, R

    2014-01-01

    A system of two plant chambers and a downstream reaction chamber has been set up to investigate the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and possible effects of pollutants such as ozone. The system can be used to compare BVOC emissions from two sets of differently treated plants, or to study the photochemistry of real plant emissions under polluted conditions without exposing the plants to pollutants. The main analytical tool is a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) which allows online monitoring of biogenic emissions and chemical degradation products. The identification of BVOCs and their oxidation products is aided by cryogenic trapping and subsequent in situ gas chromatographic analysis.

  19. Oxidative dissolution potential of biogenic and abiogenic TcO2 in subsurface sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredrickson, J.K.; Zachara, J.M.; Plymale, A.E.; Heald, S.M.; McKinley, J.P.; Kennedy, D.W.; Liu, C.; Nachimuthu, P.

    2009-01-01

    Technetium-99 (Tc) is an important fission product contaminant associated with sites of nuclear fuels reprocessing and geologic nuclear waste disposal. Tc is highly mobile in its most oxidized state (Tc(VII)O 4 - ) and less mobile in the reduced form (Tc(IV)O 2 · nH 2 O). Here we investigate the potential for oxidation of Tc(IV) that was heterogeneously reduced by reaction with biogenic Fe(II) in two sediments differing in mineralogy and aggregation state; unconsolidated Pliocene-age fluvial sediment from the upper Ringold (RG) Formation at the Hanford Site and a clay-rich saprolite from the Field Research Center (FRC) background site on the Oak Ridge Site. Both sediments contained Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV) as redox active phases, but FRC also contained mass-dominant Fe-phyllosilicates of different types. Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 reduced Mn(III/IV) oxides and generated Fe(II) that was reactive with Tc(VII) in heat-killed, bioreduced sediment. After bioreduction and heat-killing, biogenic Fe(II) in the FRC exceeded that in RG by a factor of two. More rapid reduction rates were observed in the RG that had lower biogenic Fe(II), and less particle aggregation. EXAFS measurements indicated that the primary reduction product was a TcO 2 -like phase in both sediments. The biogenic redox product Tc(IV) oxidized rapidly and completely in RG when contacted with air. Oxidation, in contrast, was slow and incomplete in the FRC, in spite of similar molecular scale speciation of Tc compared to RG. X-ray microprobe, electron microprobe, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and micro X-ray diffraction were applied to the whole sediment and isolated Tc-containing particles. These analyses revealed that non-oxidizable Tc(IV) in the FRC existed as complexes with octahedral Fe(III) within intra-grain domains of 50-100 (micro)m-sized, Fe-containing micas presumptively identified as celadonite. The markedly slower oxidation rates in FRC as compared to RG were attributed to mass

  20. Oxidative dissolution potential of biogenic and abiogenic TcO 2 in subsurface sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Heald, Steve M.; McKinley, James P.; Kennedy, David W.; Liu, Chongxuan; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy

    2009-04-01

    Technetium-99 (Tc) is an important fission product contaminant associated with sites of nuclear fuels reprocessing and geologic nuclear waste disposal. Tc is highly mobile in its most oxidized state [Tc(VII)O4-] and less mobile in the reduced form [Tc(IV)O 2· nH 2O]. Here we investigate the potential for oxidation of Tc(IV) that was heterogeneously reduced by reaction with biogenic Fe(II) in two sediments differing in mineralogy and aggregation state; unconsolidated Pliocene-age fluvial sediment from the upper Ringold (RG) Formation at the Hanford Site and a clay-rich saprolite from the Field Research Center (FRC) background site on the Oak Ridge Site. Both sediments contained Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV) as redox active phases, but FRC also contained mass-dominant Fe-phyllosilicates of different types. Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 reduced Mn(III/IV) oxides and generated Fe(II) that was reactive with Tc(VII) in heat-killed, bioreduced sediment. After bioreduction and heat-killing, biogenic Fe(II) in the FRC exceeded that in RG by a factor of two. More rapid reduction rates were observed in the RG that had lower biogenic Fe(II), and less particle aggregation. EXAFS measurements indicated that the primary reduction product was a TcO 2-like phase in both sediments. The biogenic redox product Tc(IV) oxidized rapidly and completely in RG when contacted with air. Oxidation, in contrast, was slow and incomplete in the FRC, in spite of similar molecular scale speciation of Tc compared to RG. X-ray microprobe, electron microprobe, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and micro X-ray diffraction were applied to the whole sediment and isolated Tc-containing particles. These analyses revealed that non-oxidizable Tc(IV) in the FRC existed as complexes with octahedral Fe(III) within intra-grain domains of 50-100 μm-sized, Fe-containing micas presumptively identified as celadonite. The markedly slower oxidation rates in FRC as compared to RG were attributed to mass

  1. Functional consortium for denitrifying sulfide removal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuan; Ren, Nanqi; Wang, Aijie; Liu, Lihong; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2010-03-01

    Denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process simultaneously converts sulfide, nitrate, and chemical oxygen demand from industrial wastewaters to elemental sulfur, nitrogen gas, and carbon dioxide, respectively. This investigation utilizes a dilution-to-extinction approach at 10(-2) to 10(-6) dilutions to elucidate the correlation between the composition of the microbial community and the DSR performance. In the original suspension and in 10(-2) dilution, the strains Stenotrophomonas sp., Thauera sp., and Azoarcus sp. are the heterotrophic denitrifiers and the strains Paracoccus sp. and Pseudomonas sp. are the sulfide-oxidizing denitrifers. The 10(-4) dilution is identified as the functional consortium for the present DSR system, which comprises two functional strains, Stenotrophomonas sp. strain Paracoccus sp. At 10(-6) dilution, all DSR performance was lost. The functions of the constituent cells in the DSR granules were discussed based on data obtained using the dilution-to-extinction approach.

  2. Risk assessment related to biogenic amines occurrence in ready-to-eat baby foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajkowska-Mysłek, Anna; Leszczyńska, Joanna

    2017-07-01

    Potential adverse reactions among infants and young children could appear after consumption of food containing small amounts of bioactive amines. This study presents the first assessment of biogenic amines occurrence in ready-to-eat vegetable without/with fish, meat and fruit baby products intended for the youngest consumers. The biogenic amine profiles and quantities of 6 amines were evaluated in 68 commercial baby foods produced by 10 leading manufacturers available in Poland, using HPLC-APCI-MS method. The total amine contents in analyzed products were obtained in the range of 1283-101421 ng/g. The maximum level of histamine (2375 ng/g) was found in the sample with spinach, tyramine (1667 ng/g) in fruit sample with banana, and of di- and polyamines (1263-53416 ng/g) in samples containing green peas. The results of amine analysis in baby foods indicated the presence of food ingredients which may be necessary to remove (tuna, possibly spinach) or reduce the amount added (spinach, green peas), either reduce their use by infants under 12 months of age (beef). Special attention should also be given to control the consumption of fruit baby products containing banana (higher tyramine and putrescine level). On the basis of obtained results a potential %ARfD, and the BAI were also evaluated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Life Cycle Assessment of age-related environmental impact of biogenic hydraulic fluids; Life Cycle Assessment der alterungsbedingten Umweltvertraeglichkeit biogener Hydraulik-Schmierstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bressling, Jana

    2012-07-01

    fluids after tribological application. The quantification of the metal content in used oils as well as the determination of the water soluble metal content allows a better interpretation and differentiation of age-related aquatic ecotoxicity. The additional characterisation of conditional-use changes in the ecological characteristics allows a comprehensive assessment and is still widely unknown, but an important aspect regard of LCA for biogenic hydraulic fluids. Such a methodical approach allows therefore the feedback of the desired product properties on the production method during chemical modification. The results of this study demonstrate that optimisation of the lubricant synthesis on the base of herbal reactants (high oleic sunflower oil) leads to successful reproducibility of synthetic esters and therefore also to an invariable environmental compatibility. The storage of basic synthetic esters and complicated ester mixtures leads to increasing toxicity with increasing temperature and storage time conditioned by oxidation. Besides, the age-related toxicity correlates with decreasing DOC-content of the WSF. The typical kinematic viscosity of 32 mm2/s for hydraulic fluids represents positive effects if stored at room temperature, since it causes a slower degredation by oxygen diffusion. The ageing behaviour of synthetic esters during tribological application is independent of their previous synthesis process or their storage, so that biogenic hydraulic fluids can still be used after previous storage in environmentally friendly hydraulic systems. The long term investigation in an environmentally friendly tribosystem leads in spite of metal entry to a decrease of eco- and genotoxic potential which was already available by storage at room temperature. In contrast, in a short period of use the metal content is correlated with the ecotoxicity, since the tribological load is in the foreground. Therefore the influence and change of the toxicity is dependent not exclusively

  4. 76 FR 80368 - Notification of Teleconferences of the Science Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... Office announces two teleconferences of the SAB Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel to review EPA's draft... policy, notice is hereby given that the SAB Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel will hold two public...

  5. Pertechnetate immobilization in aqueous media with hydrogen sulfide under anaerobic and aerobic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.; Jurisson, S.; Terry, J.

    2007-01-01

    The basic chemistry for the immobilization of pertechnetate (TcO 4 - ) by hydrogen sulfide was investigated in aqueous solution under both aerobic and anaerobic environments. Pertechnetate immobilization was acid dependent, with accelerated rates and increased immobilization yields as the acid concentration increased. Oxygen had no effect under acidic conditions. Under anaerobic alkaline conditions, the pH, and therefore the speciation of sulfide, was the determining factor on the immobilization of pertechnetate. Only 53% of the TcO 4 - was immobilized at pH 8, while the yield increased to 83% at pH 9 as HS - became the dominant sulfide species. The immobilization yield then decreased to 73% at pH 13. No reaction was observed between TcO 4 - and sulfide under aerobic alkaline conditions, indicating that oxygen suppressed this reaction. Pertechnetate immobilization was found to be first order with respect to both sulfide and pertechnetate in acidic solutions, and in alkaline solution under anaerobic conditions. The results of stoichiometry studies and product analysis under alkaline anaerobic environments indicated that Tc 2 S 7 was obtained at pH 9. EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) and XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) studies suggested that the samples obtained from acidic, aerobic solution and alkaline anaerobic solution were both Tc 2 S 7 . The stability of Tc 2 S 7 is affected by O 2 with accelerated dissolution at high pH. (orig.)

  6. Biogenic volatile organic compounds - small is beautiful

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, S. M.; Asensio, D.; Li, Q.; Penuelas, J.

    2012-12-01

    While canopy and regional scale flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs) are essential to obtain an integrated picture of total compound reaching the atmosphere, many fascinating and important emission details are waiting to be discovered at smaller scales, in different ecological and functional compartments. We concentrate on bVOCs below ground to plant species, and can be extracted from decaying litter. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the rhizosphere provide a specialised carbon source for micro-organisms, helping to define the micro-organism community structure, and impacting on nutrient cycles which are partly controlled by microorganisms. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the soil system could also affect the aboveground structure of ecosystems because of their role in plant defence strategies and as mediating chemicals in allelopathy. A gradient of monoterpene concentration was found in soil around Pinus sylvestris and Pinus halepensis, decreasing with distance from the tree. Some compounds (α-pinene, sabinene, humulene and caryophyllene) in mineral soil were linearly correlated with the total amount of each compound in the overlying litter, indicating that litter might be the dominant source of these compounds. However, α-pinene did not fall within the correlation, indicating a source other than litter, probably root exudates. We also show that rhizosphere bVOCs can be a carbon source for soil microbes. In a horizontal gradient from Populus tremula trees, microbes closest to the tree trunk were better enzymatically equipped to metabolise labeled monoterpene substrate. Monoterpenes can also increase the degradation rate in soil of the persistant organic pollutants, likely acting as analogues for the cometabo-lism of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) Flowers of a ginger species (Alpinia kwangsiensis) and a fig species (Ficus hispida) showed different bVOC signals pre- and post pollination. For Ficus hispida, there are three

  7. Neutron activation determination of gold and palladium using extraction by organic sulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil'berg, Eh.N.; Torgov, V.G.; Verevkin, G.V.; AN SSSR, Novosibirsk. Inst. Neorganicheskoj Khimii)

    1978-01-01

    Compared are methods of gold determination in standard rock samples of the USA National Geological Service: a) extraction by solutions of dioctylsulfide and oil sulfides from irradiated samples; b) preliminary extraction by the above solfides with the following extract radiation; c) the method of isotope dilution with substoichiometry extraction. A possibility is studied to determine palladium in the sulfide extract with gold using the NaI(Tl) thin crystal scintillators. It is established that joint palladium and gold extraction permits to determine them in many natural products simultaneously

  8. Regulation of bacterial sulfate reduction and hydrogen sulfide fluxes in the central Namibian coastal upwelling zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruchert, V.; Jørgensen, BB; Neumann, K.

    2003-01-01

    The coastal upwelling system off central Namibia is one of the most productive regions of the oceans and is characterized by frequently occurring shelf anoxia with severe effects for the benthic life and fisheries. We present data on water column dissolved oxygen, sulfide, nitrate and nitrite, pore......-depleted bottom waters, the oxygen minimum zone on the continental slope, and the lower continental slope below the oxygen minimum zone. High concentrations of dissolved sulfide, up to 22 mM, in the near-surface sediments of the inner shelf result from extremely high rates of bacterial sulfate reduction...

  9. Characterization of biogenic secondary organic aerosols using statistical methods; Charakterisierung Biogener Sekundaerer Organischer Aerosole mit Statistischen Methoden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spindler, Christian

    2010-07-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have important influence on the radiation balance of the Earth, on visibility and human health. Secondary organic aerosol is formed from gas-to-particle conversion of oxidized volatile organic compounds. A dominant fraction of the gases originates from plant emissions, making biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) an especially important constituent of the atmosphere. Knowing the chemical composition of BSOA particles is crucial for a thorough understanding of aerosol processes in the environment. In this work, the chemical composition of BSOA particles was measured with aerosol mass spectrometry and analyzed with statistical methods. The experimental part of the work comprises process studies of the formation and aging of biogenic aerosols in simulation chambers. Using a plant chamber, real tree emissions were used to produce particles in a way close to conditions in forest environments. In the outdoor chamber SAPHIR, OH-radicals were produced from the photooxidation of ozone under illumination with natural sunlight. Here, BSOA was produced from defined mixtures of mono- and sesquiterpenes that represent boreal forest emissions. A third kind of experiments was performed in the indoor chamber AIDA. Here, particles were produced from ozonolysis of single monoterpenes and aged by condensing OH-oxidation products. Two aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) were used to measure the chemical composition of the particles. One of the instruments is equipped with a quadrupole mass spectrometer providing unit mass resolution. The second instrument contains a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and provides mass resolution sufficient to distinguish different fragments with the same nominal mass. Aerosol mass spectra obtained with these instruments are strongly fragmented due to electron impact ionization of the evaporated molecules. In addition, typical BSOA mass spectra are very similar to each other. In order to get a more detailed knowledge about the mass

  10. Impact of Sulfide on Nitrate Conversion in Eutrophic Nitrate-Rich Marine Sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwermer, Carsten U.; Krieger, Bärbel; Lavik, Gaute

    2006-01-01

    IMPACT OF SULFIDE ON NITRATE CONVERSION IN EUTROPHIC NITRATE-RICH MARINE SLUDGE C.U. Schwermer 1, B.U. Krieger 2, G. Lavik 1, A. Schramm 3, J. van Rijn 4, D. de Beer 1, D. Minz 5, E. Cytryn 4, M. Kuypers 1, A. Gieseke 1 1 Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany; 2 Dept...... nitrate conversion from denitrification to dissimilatory nitrate-reduction to ammonium (DNRA). In situ microsensor profiling in stagnant sludge revealed the typical stratification of nitrate reduction on top of sulfate reduction. Increasing the bulk nitrate concentration lead to a downward shift....... Our results show that the presence of sulfide generally decreased growth rates but increased N2O production. We conclude that sulfide plays a key role in causing incomplete denitrification, presumably by inhibiting the N2O reductase, and enhancing DNRA compared to denitrification.  ...

  11. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yanfei; Cherney, Maia M.; Solomonson, Matthew; Liu, Jianshe; James, Michael N. G.; Weiner, Joel H.

    2009-01-01

    The sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase from A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 was overexpressed in E. coli and purified. Crystallization and preliminarily X-ray crystallographic analysis were performed for the recombinant enzyme. The gene product of open reading frame AFE-1293 from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 is annotated as encoding a sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase, an enzyme that catalyses electron transfer from sulfide to quinone. Following overexpression in Escherichia coli, the enzyme was purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The native crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4 2 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 131.7, c = 208.8 Å, and diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution. Preliminary crystallographic analysis indicated the presence of a dimer in the asymmetric unit, with an extreme value of the Matthews coefficient (V M ) of 4.53 Å 3 Da −1 and a solvent content of 72.9%

  12. Atypical Cyclic Sulfides, Garlicnins G, I, and J, Extracted from Allium sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Masateru; Fujiwara, Yukio; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Pan, Cheng; El-Aasr, Mona; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Nakano, Daisuke; Kinjo, Junei; Nohara, Toshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Newly characterized, atypical sulfides, garlicnins G (1), I (2), and J (3), were isolated from the acetone extracts of garlic bulbs, Allium sativum. Their production pathways are regarded as different from those of cyclic sulfoxides, 3,4-dimethyltetrahydrothiophene-S-oxide derivatives such as onionins A 1 -A 3 , garlicnins B 1 -B 4 and C 1 -C 3 .

  13. Conditions allowing the formation of biogenic amines in cheese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, H.M.L.J.

    1988-01-01

    A study was undertaken to reveal the conditions that allow the formation of biogenic amines in cheese.

    The starters most commonly used in the Dutch cheese industry do not have decarboxylative properties. Only if the milk or curd is contaminated with non-starter bacteria, amine

  14. Biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from forests in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindfors, V.; Laurila, T.

    2000-01-01

    We present model estimates of biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from the forests in Finland. The emissions were calculated for the years 1995-1997 using the measured isoprene and monoterpene emission factors of boreal tree species together with detailed satellite land cover information and meteorological data. The three-year average emission is 319 kilotonnes per annum, which is significantly higher than the estimated annual anthropogenic VOC emissions of 193 kilotonnes. The biogenic emissions of the Finnish forests are dominated by monoterpenes, which contribute approximately 45% of the annual total. The main isoprene emitter is the Norway spruce (Picea abies) due to its high foliar biomass density. Compared to the monoterpenes, however, the total isoprene emissions are very low, contributing only about 7% of the annual forest VOC emissions. The isoprene emissions are more sensitive to the meteorological conditions than the monoterpene emissions, but the progress of the thermal growing season is clearly reflected in all biogenic emission fluxes. The biogenic emission densities in northern Finland are approximately half of the emissions in the southern parts of the country. (orig.)

  15. The secondary biogenic radiation of gamma-irradiated human blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzin, A.M.; Surkenova, G.N.; Budagovskij, A.V.; Gudi, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    The sample of blood freshly taken from healthy men were gamma-irradiated with a dose of 10 Gy. It was shown that after the treatment the blood gained the capacity to emit secondary biogenic radiation. Emission lasted for some hours, passed through quartz-glass curette and was revealed by stimulating influence on biological detector (sprouting seeds)

  16. Control of microbially generated hydrogen sulfide in produced waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, E.D.; Vance, I.; Gammack, G.F.; Duncan, S.E.

    1995-12-31

    Production of hydrogen sulfide in produced waters due to the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is a potentially serious problem. The hydrogen sulfide is not only a safety and environmental concern, it also contributes to corrosion, solids formation, a reduction in produced oil and gas values, and limitations on water discharge. Waters produced from seawater-flooded reservoirs typically contain all of the nutrients required to support SRB metabolism. Surface processing facilities provide a favorable environment in which SRB flourish, converting water-borne nutrients into biomass and H{sub 2}S. This paper will present results from a field trial in which a new technology for the biochemical control of SRB metabolism was successfully applied. A slip stream of water downstream of separators on a produced water handling facility was routed through a bioreactor in a side-steam device where microbial growth was allowed to develop fully. This slip stream was then treated with slug doses of two forms of a proprietary, nonbiocidal metabolic modifier. Results indicated that H{sub 2}S production was halted almost immediately and that the residual effect of the treatment lasted for well over one week.

  17. Corrosion Behavior of Cu40Zn in Sulfide-Polluted 3.5% NaCl Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Q. N.; Xu, N.; Bao, Y. F.; Jiang, Y. F.; Gu, W.; Yang, Z.; Zheng, Y. G.; Qiao, Y. X.

    2017-10-01

    The corrosion behavior of a duplex-phase brass Cu40Zn in clean and sulfide-polluted 3.5% NaCl solutions was investigated by conducting electrochemical and gravimetric measurements. The corrosion product films were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. The presence of sulfide shifted the corrosion potential of Cu40Zn toward a more negative value by 100 mV and increased the mass loss rate by a factor of 1.257 compared with the result in the clean solution. The corrosion product film in the clean solution was thin and compact; it mainly consisted of oxides, such as ZnO and Cu2O. By contrast, the film in the sulfide-polluted solution was thick and porous. It mainly contained sulfides and zinc hydroxide chloride (i.e., Zn5(OH)8Cl2·H2O). The presence of sulfide ions accelerated the corrosion damage of Cu40Zn by hindering the formation of protective oxides and promoting the formation of a defective film which consisted of sulfides and hydroxide chlorides.

  18. Inactivation of MXR1 Abolishes Formation of Dimethyl Sulfide from Dimethyl Sulfoxide in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is a sulfur compound of importance for the organoleptic properties of beer, especially some lager beers. Synthesis of DMS during beer production occurs partly during wort production and partly during fermentation. Methionine sulfoxide reductases are the enzymes responsible for reduction of oxidized cellular methionines. These enzymes have been suggested to be able to reduce dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as well, with DMS as the product. A gene for an enzymatic activity lead...

  19. Formation of Nano-crystalline Todorokite from Biogenic Mn Oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, X.; Zhu, M; Ginder-Vogel, M; Ni, C; Parikh, S; Sparks, D

    2010-01-01

    Todorokite, as one of three main Mn oxide phases present in oceanic Mn nodules and an active MnO{sub 6} octahedral molecular sieve (OMS), has garnered much interest; however, its formation pathway in natural systems is not fully understood. Todorokite is widely considered to form from layer structured Mn oxides with hexagonal symmetry, such as vernadite ({delta}-MnO{sub 2}), which are generally of biogenic origin. However, this geochemical process has not been documented in the environment or demonstrated in the laboratory, except for precursor phases with triclinic symmetry. Here we report on the formation of a nanoscale, todorokite-like phase from biogenic Mn oxides produced by the freshwater bacterium Pseudomonas putida strain GB-1. At long- and short-range structural scales biogenic Mn oxides were transformed to a todorokite-like phase at atmospheric pressure through refluxing. Topotactic transformation was observed during the transformation. Furthermore, the todorokite-like phases formed via refluxing had thin layers along the c* axis and a lack of c* periodicity, making the basal plane undetectable with X-ray diffraction reflection. The proposed pathway of the todorokite-like phase formation is proposed as: hexagonal biogenic Mn oxide {yields} 10-{angstrom} triclinic phyllomanganate {yields} todorokite. These observations provide evidence supporting the possible bio-related origin of natural todorokites and provide important clues for understanding the transformation of biogenic Mn oxides to other Mn oxides in the environment. Additionally this method may be a viable biosynthesis route for porous, nano-crystalline OMS materials for use in practical applications.

  20. Modeling Sulfides, pH and Hydrogen Sulfide Gas in the Sewers of San Francisco

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollertsen, Jes; Revilla, Nohemy; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild

    2015-01-01

    An extensive measuring campaign targeted on sewer odor problems was undertaken in San Francisco. It was assessed whether a conceptual sewer process model could reproduce the measured concentrations of total sulfide in the wastewater and H2S gas in the sewer atmosphere, and to which degree...... such simulations have potential for further improving odor and sulfide management. The campaign covered measurement of wastewater sulfide by grab sampling and diurnal sampling, and H2S gas in the sewer atmosphere was logged. The tested model was based on the Wastewater Aerobic/Anaerobic Transformations in Sewers...... (WATS) sewer process concept, which never had been calibrated to such an extensive dataset. The study showed that the model was capable of reproducing the general levels of wastewater sulfide, wastewater pH, and sewer H2S gas. It could also reproduce the general variability of these parameters, albeit...

  1. Reduction of Biogenic Amines during Miso Fermentation by Lactobacillus plantarum as a Starter Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Chen; Kung, Hsien-Feng; Huang, Ya-Ling; Wu, Chien-Hui; Huang, Yu-Ru; Tsai, Yung-Hsiang

    2016-09-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum D-103 isolated from a miso product that possesses amine-degrading activity was used as a starter culture in miso fermentation (25°C for 120 days) in this study. The salt content in control samples (without starter culture) and inoculated samples (inoculated with L. plantarum D-103) remained constant at 10.4% of the original salt concentration throughout fermentation, whereas the pH value decreased from 6.2 to 4.6 during fermentation. The inoculated samples had significantly lower (P < 0.05) levels of total volatile basic nitrogen than control samples after 40 days of fermentation. After 120 days of fermentation, the histamine and overall biogenic amine contents in inoculated samples were reduced by 58 and 27%, respectively, compared with control samples. To our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that application of a starter culture with amine-degrading activity in miso products was effective in reducing the accumulation of biogenic amines.

  2. Enzyme sensor array for the determination of biogenic amines in food samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, Jana [University of Greifswald, Institute for Chemistry and Biochemistry (Germany); Wittmann, Christine [Fachhochschule Neubrandenburg, Department of Technology (Germany)

    2002-01-01

    An enzyme sensor array for the simultaneous determination of the three biogenic amines (histamine, tyramine and putrescine) by pattern recognition using an artificial neural network and its application to different food samples is described. A combination of a monoamine oxidase, a tyramine oxidase and a diamine oxidase (with specific activities sufficient for rapid detection) are immobilised each on a separate screen-printed thick-film electrode via transglutaminase and glutaraldehyde to compare these cross-linking reagents with regard to their suitability. To calculate the amount of a specific biogenic amine, the raw data from multichannel software were transferred to a neural network. The sensor array takes 20 min to complete (excluding statistical data analysis) with only one extraction and subsequent neutralisation step required prior to sensor measurement. The lower detection limits with the enzyme sensor were 10 mg/kg for histamine and tyramine, and 5 mg/kg for putrescine with a linear range up to 200 mg/kg for histamine and tyramine and 100 mg/kg for putrescine. The application area of the enzyme sensor array was tested from fish to meat products, sauerkraut, beer, dairy products, wine and further fermented foods and compared with the data of conventional LC analyses (mean correlation coefficient: 0.854). (orig.)

  3. Tethered balloon measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds at a Boreal forest site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Spirig

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs were performed at Hyytiälä, a Boreal forest site in Southern Finland as part of the OSOA (origin and formation of secondary organic aerosol project in August 2001. At this site, frequent formation of new particles has been observed and the role of biogenic VOCs in this process is still unclear. Tethered balloons served as platforms to collect VOC samples within the planetary boundary layer at heights up to 1.2 km above ground during daytime. Mean mixed layer concentrations of total monoterpenes varied between 10 and 170 pptv, with a-pinene, limonene and D3-carene as major compounds, isoprene was detected at levels of 2-35 pptv. A mixed layer gradient technique and a budget approach are applied to derive surface fluxes representative for areas of tens to hundreds of square kilometres. Effects of spatial heterogeneity in surface emissions are examined with a footprint analysis. Depending on the source area considered, mean afternoon emissions of the sum of terpenes range between 180 and 300 mg m-2 h-1 for the period of 2-12 August 2001. Surface fluxes close to Hyytiälä were higher than the regional average, and agree well with mean emissions predicted by a biogenic VOC emission model. Total rates of monoterpene oxidation were calculated with a photochemical model. The rates did not correlate with the occurrence of new particle formation, but the ozone pathway was of more importance on days with particle formation. Condensable vapour production from the oxidation of monoterpenes throughout the mixed layer can only account for a fraction of the increase in aerosol mass observed at the surface.

  4. Reaction between Hydrogen Sulfide and Limestone Calcines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartman, Miloslav; Svoboda, Karel; Trnka, Otakar; Čermák, Jiří

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 10 (2002), s. 2392-2398 ISSN 0888-5885 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072711; GA AV ČR IAA4072801 Keywords : hydrogen sulfide * limestone calcines * desulfurization Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.247, year: 2002

  5. Microaeration reduces hydrogen sulfide in biogas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although there are a variety of biological and chemical treatments for removal of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from biogas, all require some level of chemical or water inputs and maintenance. In practice, managing biogas H2S remains a significant challenge for agricultural digesters where labor and opera...

  6. Support Effect in Hydrodesulfurization over Ruthenium Sulfide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gulková, Daniela; Kaluža, Luděk; Vít, Zdeněk; Zdražil, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2009), s. 146-149 ISSN 1337-7027 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/06/0705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : ruthenium sulfide * hydrodesulfurization * support effect Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  7. Monitoring sulfide and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Simple yet precise and accurate methods for monitoring sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide remain useful for the study of bacterial souring and corrosion. Test kits are available to measure sulfide in field samples. A more precise methylene blue sulfide assay for both field and laboratory studies is described here. Improved media, compared to that in API RP-38, for enumeration of SRB have been formulated. One of these, API-RST, contained cysteine (1.1 mM) as a reducing agent, which may be a confounding source of sulfide. While cysteine was required for rapid enumeration of SRB from environmental samples, the concentration of cysteine in medium could be reduced to 0.4 mM. It was also determined that elevated levels of yeast extract (>1 g/liter) could interfere with enumeration of SRB from environmental samples. The API-RST medium was modified to a RST-11 medium. Other changes in medium composition, in addition to reduction of cysteine, included reduction of the concentration of phosphate from 3.4 mM to 2.2 mM, reduction of the concentration of ferrous iron from 0.8 mM to 0.5 mM and preparation of a stock mineral solution to ease medium preparation. SRB from environmental samples could be enumerated in a week in this medium.

  8. Acid volatile sulfide (AVS)- a comment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meysman, F.J.R.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    The review by Rickard and Morse (this volume) adequately summarizes our current understanding with respect to acid-volatile sulfides (AVS). At the same time, this review addresses some of the misunderstandings with regard to measurements and dynamics of this important sedimentary sulfur pool. In

  9. Carbon a support for sulfide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, J.P.R.; Lensing, T.J.; Mercx, F.P.M.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Prins, R.

    1983-01-01

    Two types of carbon materials, carbon black composite and carbon covered alumina, were studied for-their use as support for sulfide catalysts. The following parameters were varied: type of carbon black, carbon coverage of the alumina and carbon pretreatment. Pore size distributions were determined

  10. Reactive Precipitation of Anhydrous Alkali Sulfide Nanocrystals with Concomitant Abatement of Hydrogen Sulfide and Cogeneration of Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuemin; Zhao, Yangzhi; Brennan, Alice; McCeig, Miranda; Wolden, Colin A; Yang, Yongan

    2017-07-21

    Anhydrous alkali sulfide (M 2 S, M=Li or Na) nanocrystals (NCs) are important materials central to the development of next generation cathodes and solid-state electrolytes for advanced batteries, but not commercially available at present. This work reports an innovative method to directly synthesize M 2 S NCs through alcohol-mediated reactions between alkali metals and hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S). In the first step, the alkali metal is complexed with alcohol in solution, forming metal alkoxide (ROM) and releasing hydrogen (H 2 ). Next, H 2 S is bubbled through the ROM solution, where both chemicals are completely consumed to produce phase-pure M 2 S NC precipitates and regenerate alcohol that can be recycled. The M 2 S NCs morphology may be tuned through the choice of the alcohol and solvent. Both synthetic steps are thermodynamically favorable (ΔG m o <-100 kJ mol -1 ), proceeding rapidly to completion at ambient temperature with almost 100 % atom efficiency. The net result, H 2 S+2 m→M 2 S+H 2 , makes good use of a hazardous chemical (H 2 S) and delivers two value-added products that naturally phase separate for easy recovery. This scalable approach provides an energy-efficient and environmentally benign solution to the production of nanostructured materials required in emerging battery technologies. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Ecological, energetic and economical comparison of fermentation, composting and incineration of solid biogenic waste materials; Oekologischer, energetischer und oekonomischer Vergleich von Vergaerung, Kompostierung und Verbrennung fester biogener Abfallstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelmann, W. [Arbeitsgemeinschaft Bioenergie GmbH, Arbi, Baar (Switzerland); Schleiss, K. [Umwelt- und Kompostberatung Schleiss, Baar (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    This study compares different technologies for the treatment of biogenic wastes, including open windrow and enclosed tunnel composting, anaerobic digestion, the combination of both these methods and burning in waste incineration plants. The methods are compared from the points of view of environmental impact, energy use and production, and economics. The environmental impact, calculated for normalised quantities of waste using the 'Ecoindicator 95+' tool, are discussed and the methane and carbon dioxide emissions of the different methods of treatment are compared. Also, the considerable differences to be found in the energy balances of the different systems are discussed in the light of efforts to substitute nuclear and fossil-fuel generated power. Cost and energetic comparisons are also made between compost and artificial fertilisers. The report is concluded with recommendations for adapting bio-technological methods for the treatment of wastes with an emphasis on anaerobic processes.

  12. Study on the sulfidation behavior of smithsonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Dandan; Wen, Shuming; Deng, Jiushuai; Liu, Jian; Mao, Yingbo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Zeta potential showed that the pH IEP of smithsonite decreased from 7.7 to 6. • ICP test showed the gradual reduction of C S in the solution. • SEM showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film. • XPS indicated that the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions. - Abstract: Zinc extraction from low-grade mineral resources of oxidized zinc has recently become a focus of study. Sulfidation is an important process in oxidized ore flotation. In this study, the influence of sulfur ion adsorption on smithsonite surface was investigated with the use of zeta potential, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. Zeta potential measurements of sodium sulfide showed that sulfur ions were adsorbed onto the surface of pure smithsonite, as evidenced by the increased negative charge and the decrease in the pH IEP of smithsonite from 7.7 to 6 after sodium sulfide treatment. The ICP test revealed the gradual reduction in sulfur ion adsorption onto the surface of smithsonite in pulp sulfur. After 30 min of absorption, C S in the solution declined from 1000 × 10 −6 mol/L to 1.4 × 10 −6 mol/L. SEM results showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film after sodium sulfide treatment, whereas EDS analysis results showed that 2% S is contained on the smithsonite surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions after sulfidation. Sulfur concentration increased to 11.89%, whereas oxygen concentration decreased from 42.31% to 13.74%. Sulfur ions were not only present during chemical adsorption, but were also incorporated into the crystal lattices of minerals by the exchange reaction between S 2− and CO 3 2− ions

  13. Evaluation of Biogenic and Fire Emissions in a Global Chemistry Model with NOMADSS, DC3 and SEAC4RS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, L. K.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Park, M.; Kaser, L.; Apel, E. C.; Guenther, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Numerous measurements of compounds produced by biogenic and fire emissions were made during several recent field campaigns in the southeast United States, providing a unique data set for emissions and chemical model evaluation. The NCAR Community Atmosphere Model with Chemistry (CAM-chem) is coupled to the Community Land Model (CLM), which includes the biogenic emissions model MEGAN-v2.1, allowing for online calculation of emissions from vegetation for 150 compounds. Simulations of CAM-chem for summers 2012 and 2013 are evaluated with the aircraft and ground-based observations from DC3, NOMADSS and SEAC4RS. Comparison of directly emitted biogenic species, such as isoprene, terpenes, methanol and acetone, are used to evaluate the MEGAN emissions. Evaluation of oxidation products, including methyl vinyl ketone (MVK), methacrolein, formaldehyde, and other oxygenated VOCs are used to test the model chemistry mechanism. In addition, several biomass burning inventories are used in the model, including FINN, QFED, and FLAMBE, and are compared for their impact on atmospheric composition and ozone production, and evaluated with the aircraft observations.

  14. Magnetic Dinner Salads: The Role of Biogenic Magnetite in Cryopreservation for Common Food Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, T. M.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Kobayashi, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Biogenically-precipitated magnetite has been found in organisms ranging from Bacteria, single-celled protists, and many of the animal phyla, where its major function is navigation and magnetoreception. To date there is but a single report of biogenic magnetite in plants (essentially, magnetoferritin), and that is in common grass (Festuca species, from Gajdardziska-Josifovska et. al. doi:10.1127/0935-1221/2001/0013/0863). Recent developments in cryopreservation suggest that ~ 1 mT, ~ 10 Hz oscillating magnetic fields can drastically reduce ice nucleation during freezing, promote supercooling, and minimize cellular damage in living tissues (e.g., Kaku et al., doi: 10.1016/j.cryobiol.2012.02.001). Kobayashi & Kirschvink (2014, doi:10.1016/j.cryobiol.2013.12.002) suggest that biogenic magnetite crystals could be the nucleating site for damaging ice crystals, and that they would be driven magneto-mechanically to rotate in those oscillating fields which could inhibit the ice crystal nucleation process. This prompted our investigation into the magnetite content of ordinary fruit and vegetable food products, as knowledge of the natural levels of biogenic magnetite in the human food supply could guide the selection of which foods might work for this type of cryopreservation. Our study involved a range of common foods including avocados, bananas, garlic, and apples. Samples were prepared in a clean lab environment kept free of contaminant particles, and subjected to a variety of standard rock-magnetic tests including IRM and ARM acquisition, and the corresponding Af demagnetization, on a standard 2G™ SRM. Results are consistent with moderately interacting single-domain magnetite (see figure), with moderate inter-particle interaction effects. Typical magnetite concentrations in these samples are in the range of .1 to 1 ng/g for room temperature samples, increasing to the range of 1-10 ng/g when measured frozen (to inhibit thermal rotation of small particles and clumps). If

  15. Association between catastrophic paleovegetation changes during Devonian-Carboniferous boundary and the formation of giant massive sulfide deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menor-Salván, Cesar; Tornos, Fernando; Fernández-Remolar, David; Amils, Ricardo

    2010-11-01

    The Iberian Pyrite Belt (SW Iberia) is one of the largest sulfur anomalies in the Earth's crust. In the southern Iberian Pyrite Belt, more than 820 Mt of exhalative massive sulfides were deposited in less than one million years at the Devonian-Carboniferous boundary. The shale of the ore-bearing horizon contains biomarkers indicating major biogenic activity in a methanogenic setting, including a five-fold increase in typical vascular plant biomarkers and a significant anomaly in those probably indicating the presence of thermophilic Archaea. This contrasts with signatures in the average sedimentary rocks of the basin that indicate the sediments settled in oxic to sub-oxic environments, and that they have only minor biomarkers derived from continental paleoflora. These data show that the formation of the mineralization was not only related to major hydrothermal activity synchronous with volcanism but may also have been controlled by the input of large amounts of organic matter, mostly derived from the degradation of woodland detritus sourced in the nearby continent. This massive influx of organic matter could have accelerated extremophilic microbial activity that used short-chain hydrocarbons as electron donors for seawater sulfate reduction, resulting in concomitant massive sulfide precipitation. We propose that the giant massive sulfide deposits resulted from overlapping of geological and biological processes that occurred at the Devonian to Carboniferous transition, including: (1) continent collision during the onset of the Variscan orogeny leading to major paleogeographic changes and volcanism; (2) dramatic stress of continental ecosystems due to the combination of climatic change, volcanism, variations in the sea level and erosion on a regional scale; (3) major biomass destruction and increase of organic supply to marine environments; and, (4) generation of anoxic conditions and the thriving of sulfate reducing microorganisms. Under these conditions, massive

  16. Measure of O(6)-Alkylguanine-DNA Alkyltransferase Activity in Normal Human Epidermal Keratinocytes in Culture and Effects of Bis-(2-chloroethyl)sulfide in the Activity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kurt, Ellen

    1999-01-01

    ...)-alkylguanine in DNA. AGT may be important in DNA repair following injury induced by bis-(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (sulfur mustard, HD), since O(sup 6)-alkylguanine is one of the HD alkylation products...

  17. Giant hydrogen sulfide plume in the oxygen minimum zone off Peru supports chemolithoautotrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Schunck

    Full Text Available In Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems nutrient-rich waters are transported to the ocean surface, fuelling high photoautotrophic primary production. Subsequent heterotrophic decomposition of the produced biomass increases the oxygen-depletion at intermediate water depths, which can result in the formation of oxygen minimum zones (OMZ. OMZs can sporadically accumulate hydrogen sulfide (H2S, which is toxic to most multicellular organisms and has been implicated in massive fish kills. During a cruise to the OMZ off Peru in January 2009 we found a sulfidic plume in continental shelf waters, covering an area >5500 km(2, which contained ∼2.2×10(4 tons of H2S. This was the first time that H2S was measured in the Peruvian OMZ and with ∼440 km(3 the largest plume ever reported for oceanic waters. We assessed the phylogenetic and functional diversity of the inhabiting microbial community by high-throughput sequencing of DNA and RNA, while its metabolic activity was determined with rate measurements of carbon fixation and nitrogen transformation processes. The waters were dominated by several distinct γ-, δ- and ε-proteobacterial taxa associated with either sulfur oxidation or sulfate reduction. Our results suggest that these chemolithoautotrophic bacteria utilized several oxidants (oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, nitric oxide and nitrous oxide to detoxify the sulfidic waters well below the oxic surface. The chemolithoautotrophic activity at our sampling site led to high rates of dark carbon fixation. Assuming that these chemolithoautotrophic rates were maintained throughout the sulfidic waters, they could be representing as much as ∼30% of the photoautotrophic carbon fixation. Postulated changes such as eutrophication and global warming, which lead to an expansion and intensification of OMZs, might also increase the frequency of sulfidic waters. We suggest that the chemolithoautotrophically fixed carbon may be involved in a negative feedback loop that

  18. Effect of particle-particle shearing on the bioleaching of sulfide minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, N; Karamanev, D G; Margaritis, A

    2002-11-05

    The biological leaching of sulfide minerals, used for the production of gold, copper, zinc, cobalt, and other metals, is very often carried out in slurry bioreactors, where the shearing between sulfide particles is intensive. In order to be able to improve the efficiency of the bioleaching, it is of significant importance to know the effect of particle shearing on the rate of leaching. The recently proposed concept of ore immobilization allowed us to study the effect of particle shearing on the rate of sulfide (pyrite) leaching by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. Using this concept, we designed two very similar bioreactors, the main difference between which was the presence and absence of particle-particle shearing. It was shown that when the oxygen mass transfer was not the rate-limiting step, the rate of bioleaching in the frictionless bioreactor was 2.5 times higher than that in a bioreactor with particle friction (shearing). The concentration of free suspended cells in the frictionless bioreactor was by orders of magnitude lower than that in the frictional bioreactor, which showed that particle friction strongly reduces the microbial attachment to sulfide surface, which, in turn, reduces the rate of bioleaching. Surprisingly, it was found that formation of a layer of insoluble iron salts on the surface of sulfide particles is much slower under shearless conditions than in the presence of particle-particle shearing. This was explained by the effect of particle friction on liquid-solid mass transfer rate. The results of this study show that reduction of the particle friction during bioleaching of sulfide minerals can bring important advantages not only by increasing significantly the bioleaching rate, but also by increasing the rate of gas-liquid oxygen mass transfer, reducing the formation of iron precipitates and reducing the energy consumption. One of the efficient methods for reduction of particle friction is ore immobilization in a porous matrix. Copyright 2002

  19. Spatial and Temporal Variability in Biogenic Gas Accumulation and Release in The Greater Everglades at Multiple Scales of Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, M. D.; Cornett, C.; Schaffer, L.; Comas, X.

    2017-12-01

    Wetlands play a critical role in the carbon (C) cycle by producing and releasing significant amounts of greenhouse biogenic gasses (CO2, CH4) into the atmosphere. Wetlands in tropical and subtropical climates (such as the Florida Everglades) have become of great interest in the past two decades as they account for more than 20% of the global peatland C stock and are located in climates that favor year-round C emissions. Despite the increase in research involving C emission from these types of wetlands, the spatial and temporal variability involving C production, accumulation and release is still highly uncertain, and is the focus of this research at multiple scales of measurement (i.e. lab, field and landscape). Spatial variability in biogenic gas content, build up and release, at both the lab and field scales, was estimated using a series of ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys constrained with gas traps fitted with time-lapse cameras. Variability in gas content was estimated at the sub-meter scale (lab scale) within two extracted monoliths from different wetland ecosystems at the Disney wilderness Preserve (DWP) and the Blue Cypress Preserve (BCP) using high frequency GPR (1.2 GHz) transects across the monoliths. At the field scale (> 10m) changes in biogenic gas content were estimated using 160 MHz GPR surveys collected within 4 different emergent wetlands at the DWP. Additionally, biogenic gas content from the extracted monoliths was used to developed a landscape comparison of C accumulation and emissions for each different wetland ecosystem. Changes in gas content over time were estimated at the lab scale at high temporal resolution (i.e. sub-hourly) in monoliths from the BCP and Water Conservation Area 1-A. An autonomous rail system was constructed to estimate biogenic gas content variability within the wetland soil matrix using a series of continuous, uninterrupted 1.2 GHz GPR transects along the samples. Measurements were again constrained with an array

  20. Solvothermal synthesis of copper sulfide semiconductor micro/nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jun; Xue, Dongfeng

    2010-01-01

    Covellite copper sulfide (CuS) micro/nanometer crystals in the shape of hierarchical doughnut-shaped, superstructured spheric-shaped and flowerlike architectures congregated from those nanoplates with the thickness of 20-100 nm have been prepared by a solvothermal method. The as-obtained CuS products were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). A systematic investigation has been carried out to understand the factors influencing the evolution of CuS particle morphology which found to be predominant by solvent, surfactant, sulfur resource and copper salt. The possible formation mechanism for the nanostructure formation was also discussed. These CuS products show potential applications in solar cell, photothermal conversion and chemical sensor.

  1. Modeling of Syngas Reactions and Hydrogen Generation Over Sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamil Klier; Jeffery A. Spirko; Michael L. Neiman

    2002-09-17

    The objective of the research is to analyze pathways of reactions of hydrogen with oxides of carbon over sulfides, and to predict which characteristics of the sulfide catalyst (nature of metal, defect structure) give rise to the lowest barriers toward oxygenated hydrocarbon product. Reversal of these pathways entails the generation of hydrogen, which is also proposed for study. In this first year of study, adsorption reactions of H atoms and H{sub 2} molecules with MoS{sub 2}, both in molecular and solid form, have been modeled using high-level density functional theory. The geometries and strengths of the adsorption sites are described and the methods used in the study are described. An exposed MO{sup IV} species modeled as a bent MoS{sub 2} molecule is capable of homopolar dissociative chemisorption of H{sub 2} into a dihydride S{sub 2}MoH{sub 2}. Among the periodic edge structures of hexagonal MoS{sub 2}, the (1{bar 2}11) edge is most stable but still capable of dissociating H{sub 2}, while the basal plane (0001) is not. A challenging task of theoretically accounting for weak bonding of MoS{sub 2} sheets across the Van der Waals gap has been addressed, resulting in a weak attraction of 0.028 eV/MoS{sub 2} unit, compared to the experimental value of 0.013 eV/MoS{sub 2} unit.

  2. Differential responses of the freshwater wetland species Juncus effusus L. and Caltha palustris L. to iron supply in sulfidic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welle, Marlies E.W. van der; Niggebrugge, Karla; Lamers, Leon P.M.; Roelofs, Jan G.M.

    2007-01-01

    Sulfur pollution can lead to serious problems in freshwater wetlands, including phosphorus eutrophication and sulfide toxicity. We tested the effects of anaerobic iron-rich groundwater discharge in fens, simulated by iron injection, on two characteristic species (Juncus effusus and Caltha palustris) in a sulfidic environment. Biomass production of C. palustris roots showed an optimum response to the combined addition of iron and sulfide, with highest values at intermediate concentrations of both substances. Iron deficiency apparently occurred at low iron concentrations, while at high iron concentrations, growth was decreased. For J. effusus, in contrast, no toxic effects were found of both iron and sulfide. This could be explained by larger radial oxygen loss (ROL) of J. effusus and could not be explained by differences in phosphorous concentrations. The results of our experiments confirm that iron-rich groundwater discharge has the potential to affect vegetation composition through toxicity modification in sulfidic environments. - Toxicity of iron and sulfide are interacting with each other and have the potential to affect vegetation composition

  3. In situ recovery of copper from sulfide ore bodies following nuclear fracturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, Joe B.; McKinney, W.A.

    1970-01-01

    Leaching now yields about 12 percent of the Nation's annual new copper production. About 200,000 tons of copper a year is being won by heap and vat leaching of ore, dump leaching of waste, and in-place leaching of caved underground workings. Although in-place leaching was practiced as long ago as the 15th century, it is little used and contributes only a few percent of the total leach copper production. Current technology in this area is exemplified by practice at the Miami, Ariz., mine of the Miami Copper Co. Despite its limited use, the concept of extracting copper by in-place leaching without physically mining and transporting the ore continues to present intriguing cost saving possibilities. Project SLOOP has been proposed as an experiment to test the feasibility of nuclear fracturing and acid leaching the oxidized portion of a deep ore body near Safford, Ariz. However, the bulk of the copper in deep ore deposits occurs as sulfide minerals that are not easily soluble in acid solutions. This paper explores the concept of in-place leaching of nuclear fractured, deeply buried copper sulfide deposits. On the assumption that fracturing of rock and solution injection and collection would be feasible, an assessment is made of solution systems that might be employed for the different copper sulfide minerals in porphyry ore bodies. These include the conventional ferric sulfate-sulfuric acid systems and combinations of sulfide mineral oxidants and different acids. (author)

  4. In situ recovery of copper from sulfide ore bodies following nuclear fracturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbaum, Joe B; McKinney, W A [Salt Lake City Metallurgy Research Center, Bureau of Mines, US Department of the Interior, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1970-05-15

    Leaching now yields about 12 percent of the Nation's annual new copper production. About 200,000 tons of copper a year is being won by heap and vat leaching of ore, dump leaching of waste, and in-place leaching of caved underground workings. Although in-place leaching was practiced as long ago as the 15th century, it is little used and contributes only a few percent of the total leach copper production. Current technology in this area is exemplified by practice at the Miami, Ariz., mine of the Miami Copper Co. Despite its limited use, the concept of extracting copper by in-place leaching without physically mining and transporting the ore continues to present intriguing cost saving possibilities. Project SLOOP has been proposed as an experiment to test the feasibility of nuclear fracturing and acid leaching the oxidized portion of a deep ore body near Safford, Ariz. However, the bulk of the copper in deep ore deposits occurs as sulfide minerals that are not easily soluble in acid solutions. This paper explores the concept of in-place leaching of nuclear fractured, deeply buried copper sulfide deposits. On the assumption that fracturing of rock and solution injection and collection would be feasible, an assessment is made of solution systems that might be employed for the different copper sulfide minerals in porphyry ore bodies. These include the conventional ferric sulfate-sulfuric acid systems and combinations of sulfide mineral oxidants and different acids. (author)

  5. Reaction of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen in the presence of sulfite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weres, O.; Tsao, L.

    1983-01-14

    Commonly, abatement of hydrogen sulfide emission from a geothermal powerplant requires that hydrogen sulfide dissolved in the cooling water be eliminated by chemical reaction. Oxidation by atmospheric oxygen is the preferred reaction, but requires a suitable catalyst. Nickel is the most potent and thereby cheapest catalyst for this purpose. One mg/L nickel in the cooling water would allow 99% removal of hydrogen sulfide to be attained. A major drawback of catalytic air oxidation is that colloidal sulfur is a major reaction product; this causes rapid sludge accumulation and deposition of sulfur scale. We studied the kinetics and product distribution of the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen, catalyzed by nickel. Adding sodium sulfite to the solution completely suppresses formation of colloidal sulfur by converting it to thiosulfate. The oxidation reaction is an autocatalytic, free radical chain reaction. A rate expression for this reaction and a detailed reaction mechanism were developed. Nickel catalyzes the chain initiation step, and polysulfidoradical ions propagate the chains. Several complexes of iron and cobalt were also studied. Iron citrate and iron N-hydroxyEDTA are the most effective iron based catalysts. Uncomplexed cobalt is as effective as nickel, but forms a precipitate of cobalt oxysulfide and is too expensive for practical use. 33 figures, 9 tables.

  6. Reaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Oxygen in the Presence ofSulfite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weres, Oleh; Tsao, Leon

    1983-01-01

    Commonly, abatement of hydrogen sulfide emissions from a geothermal powerplant requires that hydrogen sulfide dissolved in the cooling water be eliminated by chemical reaction. Oxidation by atmospheric oxygen is the preferred reaction, but requires a suitable catalyst. Nickel is the most potent and thereby cheapest catalyst for this purpose. One Mg/L nickel in the cooling water would allow 99% removal of hydrogen sulfide to be attained. A major drawback of catalytic air oxidation is that colloidal sulfur is a major reaction product; this causes rapid sludge accumulation and deposition of sulfur scale. The authors studied the kinetics and product distribution of the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen, catalyzed by nickel. Adding sodium sulfite to the solution completely suppresses formation of colloidal sulfur by converting it to thiosulfate. The oxidation reaction is an autocatalytic, free radical chain reaction. A rate expression for this reaction and a detailed reaction mechanism were developed. Nickel catalyzes the chain initiation step, and polysulfidoradical ions propagate the chains. Several complexes of iron and cobalt were also studied. Iron citrate and iron N-hydroxyEDT are the most effective iron based catalysts. Uncomplexed cobalt is as effective as nickel, but forms a precipitate of cobalt oxysulfide and is too expensive for practical use.

  7. Optimum injection dose rate of hydrogen sulfide scavenger for treatment of petroleum crude oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M. Elshiekh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide H2S scavengers are chemicals that favorably react with hydrogen sulfide gas to eliminate it and produce environmental friendly products. These products depend on the type and composition of the scavenger and the conditions at which the reaction takes place. The scavenger should be widely available and economical for industry acceptance by having a low unit cost. The optimum values of H2S scavenger injection dose rate of scavenging hydrogen sulfide from the multiphase fluid produced at different wells conditions in one of the Petroleum Companies in Egypt were studied. The optimum values of H2S scavenger injection dose rate depend on pipe diameter, pipe length, gas molar mass velocity, inlet H2S concentration and pressure. The optimization results are obtained for different values of these parameters using the software program Lingo. In general, the optimum values of H2S scavenger injection dose rate of the scavenging of hydrogen sulfide are increased by increasing of the pipe diameter and increasing the inlet H2S concentration, and decreased by increasing the pipe length, gas molar mass velocity and pressure.

  8. Effect of Additional Sulfide and Thiosulfate on Corrosion of Q235 Carbon Steel in Alkaline Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bian Li Quan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the effect of additional sulfide and thiosulfate on Q235 carbon steel corrosion in alkaline solutions. Weight loss method, scanning electron microscopy (SEM equipped with EDS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and electrochemical measurements were used in this study to show the corrosion behavior and electrochemistry of Q235 carbon steel. Results indicate that the synergistic corrosion rate of Q235 carbon steel in alkaline solution containing sulfide and thiosulfate is larger than that of sulfide and thiosulfate alone, which could be due to redox reaction of sulfide and thiosulfate. The surface cracks and pitting characteristics of the specimens after corrosion were carefully examined and the corrosion products film is flake grains and defective. The main corrosion products of specimen induced by S2− and S2O32- are FeS, FeS2, Fe3O4, and FeOOH. The present study shows that the corrosion mechanism of S2− and S2O32- is different for the corrosion of Q235 carbon steel.

  9. Spatio-temporal variation of biogenic volatile organic compounds emissions in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L Y; Chen, Y; Xie, S D

    2013-11-01

    Aiming to reduce the large uncertainties of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emissions estimation, the emission inventory of BVOCs in China at a high spatial and temporal resolution of 36 km × 36 km and 1 h was established using MEGANv2.1 with MM5 providing high-resolution meteorological data, based on the most detailed and latest vegetation investigations. BVOC emissions from 82 plant functional types in China were computed firstly. More local species-specific emission rates were developed combining statistical analysis and category classification, and the leaf biomass was estimated based on vegetation volume and production with biomass-apportion models. The total annual BVOC emissions in 2003 were 42.5 Tg, including isoprene 23.4 Tg, monoterpene 5.6 Tg, sesquiterpene 1.0 Tg, and other VOCs (OVOCs) 12.5 Tg. Subtropical and tropical evergreen and deciduous broadleaf shrubs, Quercus, and bamboo contributed more than 45% to the total BVOC emissions. The highest biogenic emissions were found over northeastern, southeastern, and southwestern China. Strong seasonal pattern was observed with the highest BVOC emissions in July and the lowest in January and December, with daily emission peaked at approximately 13:00 or 14:00 local time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sulfur isotope studies of biogenic sulfur emissions at Wallops Island, Virginia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitchcock, D.R.; Black, M.S.; Herbst, R.P.

    1978-03-01

    This research attempted to determine whether it is possible to measure the stable sulfur isotope distributions of atmospheric particulate and gaseous sulphur, and to use this information together with measurements of the ambient levels of sulfur gases and particulate sulfate and sodium in testing certain hypotheses. Sulfur dioxide and particulate sulfur samples were collected at a coastal marine location and their delta (34)S values were determined. These data were used together with sodium concentrations to determine the presence of biogenic sulfur and the identity of the biological processes producing it. Excess (non-seasalt) sulfate levels ranged from 2 to 26 micrograms/cu m and SO2 from 1 to 9 ppb. Analyses of air mass origins and lead concentrations indicated that some anthropogenic contaminants were present on all days, but the isotope data revealed that most of the atmospheric sulfur originated locally from the metabolism of bacterial sulfate reducers on all days, and that the atmospheric reactions leading to the production of sulfate from this biogenic sulfur source are extremely rapid. Delta 34 S values of atmospheric sulfur dioxide correlated well with those of excess sulfate, and implied little or no sulfur isotope fractionation during the oxidation of sulfur gases to sulfate

  11. Exploring sources of biogenic secondary organic aerosol compounds using chemical analysis and the FLEXPART model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Martinsson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Molecular tracers in secondary organic aerosols (SOAs can provide information on origin of SOA, as well as regional scale processes involved in their formation. In this study 9 carboxylic acids, 11 organosulfates (OSs and 2 nitrooxy organosulfates (NOSs were determined in daily aerosol particle filter samples from Vavihill measurement station in southern Sweden during June and July 2012. Several of the observed compounds are photo-oxidation products from biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs. Highest average mass concentrations were observed for carboxylic acids derived from fatty acids and monoterpenes (12. 3 ± 15. 6 and 13. 8 ± 11. 6 ng m−3, respectively. The FLEXPART model was used to link nine specific surface types to single measured compounds. It was found that the surface category sea and ocean was dominating the air mass exposure (56 % but contributed to low mass concentration of observed chemical compounds. A principal component (PC analysis identified four components, where the one with highest explanatory power (49 % displayed clear impact of coniferous forest on measured mass concentration of a majority of the compounds. The three remaining PCs were more difficult to interpret, although azelaic, suberic, and pimelic acid were closely related to each other but not to any clear surface category. Hence, future studies should aim to deduce the biogenic sources and surface category of these compounds. This study bridges micro-level chemical speciation to air mass surface exposure at the macro level.

  12. Biogenic volatile organic compounds in the Earth system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laothawornkitkul, Jullada; Taylor, Jane E; Paul, Nigel D; Hewitt, C Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds produced by plants are involved in plant growth, development, reproduction and defence. They also function as communication media within plant communities, between plants and between plants and insects. Because of the high chemical reactivity of many of these compounds, coupled with their large mass emission rates from vegetation into the atmosphere, they have significant effects on the chemical composition and physical characteristics of the atmosphere. Hence, biogenic volatile organic compounds mediate the relationship between the biosphere and the atmosphere. Alteration of this relationship by anthropogenically driven changes to the environment, including global climate change, may perturb these interactions and may lead to adverse and hard-to-predict consequences for the Earth system.

  13. Er2S[SiO4]: An erbium sulfide ortho-oxosilicate with unusual sulfide anion coordination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartenbach, Ingo; Lauxmann, Petra; Schleid, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    During the reaction of cadmium sulfide with erbium and sulfur in evacuated silica ampoules pink lath-shaped crystals of Er 2 S[SiO 4 ] occur as by-product which were characterized by X-ray single crystal structure analysis. The title compound crystallizes orthorhombically in the space group Cmce (a = 1070.02(8), b = 1235.48(9), c = 683.64(6) pm) with eight formula units per unit cell. Besides isolated ortho-oxosilicate units [SiO 4 ] 4- , the crystal structure contains two crystallographically independent Er 3+ cations which are both eightfold coordinated by six oxygen and two sulfur atoms. The sulfide anions are surrounded by four erbium cations each in the shape of very distorted tetrahedra. These excentric [SEr 4 ] 10+ tetrahedra build up layers according to 2 ∞ [SEr 4/2 ] 4+ by vertex- and edge-connection. They are piled parallel to (010) and separated by the isolated ortho-oxosilicate tetrahedra. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [de

  14. The effect of preparation of biogenic sorbent on zinc sorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Jenčárová

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to prepare biogenic sulphides by using bacteria for the removal of zinc cations from their solutions. Theproduction was realized in a bioreactor under anaerobic conditions at 30 °C. Sorbents were prepared by sulphate-reducing bacteria indifferent nutrient medium modifications, under two modes of bacteria cultivation. Created precipitates of iron sulphides were removedfrom the liquid phase of the cultivation medium by filtration, dried and used for the sorption experiments.

  15. Biogas as a fuel for solid oxide fuel cells and synthesis gas production: effects of ceria-doping and hydrogen sulfide on the performance of nickel-based anode materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laycock, Christian J; Staniforth, John Z; Ormerod, R Mark

    2011-05-28

    Numerous investigations have been carried out into the conversion of biogas into synthesis gas (a mixture of H(2) + CO) over Ni/YSZ anode cermet catalysts. Biogas is a variable mixture of gases consisting predominantly of methane and carbon dioxide (usually in a 2 : 1 ratio, but variable with source), with other constituents including sulfur-containing gases such as hydrogen sulfide, which can cause sulfur poisoning of nickel catalysts. The effect of temperature on carbon deposition and sulfur poisoning of 90 : 10 mol% Ni/YSZ under biogas conversion conditions has been investigated by carrying out a series of catalytic reactions of methane-rich (2 : 1) CH(4)/CO(2) mixtures in the absence and presence of H(2)S over the temperature range 750-1000 °C. The effect of ceria-doping on carbon dioxide reforming, carbon deposition and sulfur tolerance has also been investigated by carrying out a similar series of reactions over ceria-doped Ni/YSZ. Ceria was doped at 5 mol% of the nickel content to give an anode catalyst composition of 85.5 : 4.5 : 10 mol% Ni/CeO(2)/YSZ. Reactions were followed using quadrupolar mass spectrometry (QMS) and the amount of carbon deposition was analysed by subjecting the reacted catalyst samples to a post-reaction temperature programmed oxidation (TPO). On undoped Ni/YSZ, carbon deposition occurred predominantly through thermal decomposition of methane. Ceria-doping significantly suppressed methane decomposition and at high temperatures simultaneously promoted the reverse Boudouard reaction, significantly lowering carbon deposition. Sulfur poisoning of Ni/YSZ occurred in two phases, the first of which caused the most activity loss and was accelerated on increasing the reaction temperature, while the second phase had greater stability and became more favourable with increasing reaction temperature. Adding H(2)S significantly inhibited methane decomposition, resulting in much less carbon deposition. Ceria-doping significantly increased the sulfur

  16. BAECC Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petäjä, Tuukka [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Moisseev, Dmitri [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Sinclair, Victoria [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); O' Connor, Ewan J. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland); Manninen, Antti J. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Levula, Janne [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Väänänen, Riikka [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Heikkinen, Liine [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Äijälä, Mikko [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Aalto, Juho [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Bäck, Jaana [University of Helsinki, Finland

    2015-11-01

    Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC)”, featured the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s 2nd Mobile Facility (AMF2) in Hyytiälä, Finland. It operated for an 8-month intensive measurement campaign from February to September 2014. The main research goal was to understand the role of biogenic aerosols in cloud formation. One of the reasons to perform BAECC study in Hyytiälä was the fact that it hosts SMEAR-II (Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations), which is one of the world’s most comprehensive surface in-situ observation sites in a boreal forest environment. The station has been measuring atmospheric aerosols, biogenic emissions and an extensive suite of parameters relevant to atmosphere-biosphere interactions continuously since 1996. The BAECC enables combining vertical profiles from AMF2 with surface-based in-situ SMEAR-II observations and allows the processes at the surface to be directly related to processes occurring throughout the entire tropospheric column. With the inclusion of extensive surface precipitation measurements, and intensive observation periods involving aircraft flights and novel radiosonde launches, the complementary observations of AMF2 and SMEAR-II provide a unique opportunity for investigating aerosol-cloud interactions, and cloud-to-precipitation processes. The BAECC dataset will initiate new opportunities for evaluating and improving models of aerosol sources and transport, cloud microphysical processes, and boundary-layer structures.

  17. Hydrogen sulfide concentration in Beaver Dam Creek

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiser, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    Concentration-time profiles calculated with LODIPS for various hypothetical releases of hydrogen sulfide from the heavy water extraction facility predict lethal conditions for swamp fish from releases as small as 568 kg discharged over a period of 30 minutes or from releases of 1818 kg discharged over a period of 6 hours or less. The necessary volatilization and oxidation coefficients for LODIPS were derived from field measurements following planned releases of H 2 S. Upsets in the operation of the wastewater strippers in the Girdler-Sulfide (GS) heavy water extraction facility in D Area have released significant amounts of dissolved H 2 S to Beaver Dam Creek. Because H 2 S is toxic to fish in concentrations as low as 1 mg/liter, the downstream environmental impact of H 2 S releases from D Area was evaluated

  18. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Guan-Guang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2013-12-17

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  19. Interfacial photochemistry of biogenic surfactants: a major source of abiotic volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, Martin; Hayeck, Nathalie; Bonnineau, Chloé; Pesce, Stéphane; Alpert, Peter A; Perrier, Sébastien; Zuth, Christoph; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Chen, Jianmin; George, Christian

    2017-08-24

    Films of biogenic compounds exposed to the atmosphere are ubiquitously found on the surfaces of cloud droplets, aerosol particles, buildings, plants, soils and the ocean. These air/water interfaces host countless amphiphilic compounds concentrated there with respect to in bulk water, leading to a unique chemical environment. Here, photochemical processes at the air/water interface of biofilm-containing solutions were studied, demonstrating abiotic VOC production from authentic biogenic surfactants under ambient conditions. Using a combination of online-APCI-HRMS and PTR-ToF-MS, unsaturated and functionalized VOCs were identified and quantified, giving emission fluxes comparable to previous field and laboratory observations. Interestingly, VOC fluxes increased with the decay of microbial cells in the samples, indicating that cell lysis due to cell death was the main source for surfactants and VOC production. In particular, irradiation of samples containing solely biofilm cells without matrix components exhibited the strongest VOC production upon irradiation. In agreement with previous studies, LC-MS measurements of the liquid phase suggested the presence of fatty acids and known photosensitizers, possibly inducing the observed VOC production via peroxy radical chemistry. Up to now, such VOC emissions were directly accounted to high biological activity in surface waters. However, the results obtained suggest that abiotic photochemistry can lead to similar emissions into the atmosphere, especially in less biologically-active regions. Furthermore, chamber experiments suggest that oxidation (O 3 /OH radicals) of the photochemically-produced VOCs leads to aerosol formation and growth, possibly affecting atmospheric chemistry and climate-related processes, such as cloud formation or the Earth's radiation budget.

  20. Hydrogen sulfide prodrugs—a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueqin Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is recognized as one of three gasotransmitters together with nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO. As a signaling molecule, H2S plays an important role in physiology and shows great potential in pharmaceutical applications. Along this line, there is a need for the development of H2S prodrugs for various reasons. In this review, we summarize different H2S prodrugs, their chemical properties, and some of their potential therapeutic applications.

  1. Multi-proxy approach (Thorium-234, excess Barium) of export and remineralisation fluxes of carbon and biogenic elements associated with the oceanic biological pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaitre, Nolwenn

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to improve our understanding of the different controls that affect the oceanic biological carbon pump. Particulate export and remineralisation fluxes were investigated using the thorium-234 ( 234 Th) and biogenic barium (Baxs) proxies. In the North Atlantic, the highest particulate organic carbon (POC) export fluxes were associated to biogenic (biogenic silica or calcium carbonate) and lithogenic minerals, ballasting the particles. Export efficiency was generally low (≤ 10%) and inversely related to primary production, highlighting a phase lag between production and export. The highest transfer efficiencies, i.e. the fraction of POC that reached 400 m, were driven by sinking particles ballasted by calcite or lithogenic minerals. The regional variation of meso-pelagic remineralisation was attributed to changes in bloom intensity, phytoplankton cell size, community structure and physical forcing (down-welling). Carbon remineralisation balanced, or even exceeded, POC export, highlighting the impact of meso-pelagic remineralisation on the biological pump with a near-zero, deep carbon sequestration for spring 2014. Export of trace metals appeared strongly influenced by lithogenic material advected from the margins. However, at open ocean stations not influenced by lithogenic matter, trace metal export rather depended on phytoplankton activity and biomass. A last part of this work focused on export of biogenic silica, particulate nitrogen and iron near the Kerguelen Island. This area is characterized by a natural iron-fertilization that increases export fluxes. Inside the fertilized area, flux variability is related to phytoplankton community composition. (author)

  2. Time Resolved Measurements of Primary Biogenic Aerosol Particles in Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollny, A. G.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-04-01

    Biogenic aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and they influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere, climate, and public health. They play an important role in the spread of biological organisms and reproductive materials, and they can cause or enhance human, animal, and plant diseases. Moreover, they influence the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing radiation, and they can initiate the formation of clouds and precipitation as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. The composition, abundance, and origin of biogenic aerosol particles and components are, however, still not well understood and poorly quantified. Prominent examples of primary biogenic aerosol particles, which are directly emitted from the biosphere to the atmosphere, are pollen, bacteria, fungal spores, viruses, and fragments of animals and plants. During the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08) a large number of aerosol and gas-phase measurements were taken on a remote site close to Manaus, Brazil, during a period of five weeks in February and March 2008. This presented study is focused on data from an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS, TSI inc.) that has been deployed for the first time in Amazonia. In this instrument, particle counting and aerodynamic sizing over the range of 0.5-20 µm are complemented by the measurement of UV fluorescence at 355 nm (excitation) and 420-575 nm (emission), respectively. Fluorescence at these wavelengths is characteristic for reduced pyridine nucleotides (e.g., NAD(P)H) and for riboflavin, which are specific for living cells. Thus particles exhibiting fluorescence signals can be regarded as "viable aerosols" or "fluorescent bioparticles" (FBAP), and their concentration can be considered as lower limit for the actual abundance of primary biogenic aerosol particles. Data from the UVAPS were averaged over 5 minute time intervals. The presence of bioparticles in the observed size range has been

  3. 40K in the Black Sea: a proxy to estimate biogenic sedimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulin, S.B.; Gulina, L.V.; Sidorov, I.G.; Proskurnin, V.Yu.; Duka, M.S.; Moseichenko, I.N.; Rodina, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    An approach to estimate the rate of biogenic sedimentation in the Black Sea using the naturally occurring radionuclide 40 K has been considered. It allows assessment of the contribution of suspended matter of biological origin to the overall sediment accumulation in the Black Sea coastal, shelf and deep-water areas. Based upon this method, a relationship between the biogenic fraction of the seabed sediments and the water depth has been established with a view to differentiating the contributions of allochthonous and autochthonous suspended matter to the sedimentation rate. Overall, 40 K can be considered as an easily applicable proxy to assess sedimentation rate of biogenic fraction of particulate matter in marine environments. - Highlights: • 40 K-based approach was developed to assess biogenic sedimentation in the Black Sea. • 40 K-derived relationship between biogenic sedimentation and water depth was traced. • 40 K is an easily applicable proxy to estimate rate of biogenic sedimentation in sea

  4. Simultaneous removal of sulfide, nitrate and acetate: Kinetic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Aijie; Liu Chunshuang; Ren Nanqi; Han Hongjun; Lee Duujong

    2010-01-01

    Biological removal of sulfide, nitrate and chemical oxygen demand (COD) simultaneously from industrial wastewaters to elementary sulfur (S 0 ), N 2 , and CO 2 , or named the denitrifying sulfide (DSR) process, is a cost effective and environmentally friendly treatment process for high strength sulfide and nitrate laden organic wastewater. Kinetic model for the DSR process was established for the first time on the basis of Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1). The DSR experiments were conducted at influent sulfide concentrations of 200-800 mg/L, whose results calibrate the model parameters. The model correlates well with the DSR process dynamics. By introducing the switch function and the inhibition function, the competition between autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrifiers is quantitatively described and the degree of inhibition of sulfide on heterotrophic denitrifiers is realized. The model output indicates that the DSR reactor can work well at 0.5 1000 mg/L influent sulfide, however, the DSR system will break down.

  5. Microaeration for hydrogen sulfide removal in UASB reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krayzelova, Lucie; Bartacek, Jan; Kolesarova, Nina; Jenicek, Pavel

    2014-11-01

    The removal of hydrogen sulfide from biogas by microaeration was studied in Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors treating synthetic brewery wastewater. A fully anaerobic UASB reactor served as a control while air was dosed into a microaerobic UASB reactor (UMSB). After a year of operation, sulfur balance was described in both reactors. In UASB, sulfur was mainly presented in the effluent as sulfide (49%) and in biogas as hydrogen sulfide (34%). In UMSB, 74% of sulfur was detected in the effluent (41% being sulfide and 33% being elemental sulfur), 10% accumulated in headspace as elemental sulfur and 9% escaped in biogas as hydrogen sulfide. The efficiency of hydrogen sulfide removal in UMSB was on average 73%. Microaeration did not cause any decrease in COD removal or methanogenic activity in UMSB and the elemental sulfur produced by microaeration did not accumulate in granular sludge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Reduction of produced elementary sulfur in denitrifying sulfide removal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xu; Liu, Lihong; Chen, Chuan; Ren, Nanqi; Wang, Aijie; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2011-05-01

    Denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) processes simultaneously convert sulfide, nitrate, and chemical oxygen demand from industrial wastewater into elemental sulfur, dinitrogen gas, and carbon dioxide, respectively. The failure of a DSR process is signaled by high concentrations of sulfide in reactor effluent. Conventionally, DSR reactor failure is blamed for overcompetition for heterotroph to autotroph communities. This study indicates that the elementary sulfur produced by oxidizing sulfide that is a recoverable resource from sulfide-laden wastewaters can be reduced back to sulfide by sulfur-reducing Methanobacterium sp. The Methanobacterium sp. was stimulated with excess organic carbon (acetate) when nitrite was completely consumed by heterotrophic denitrifiers. Adjusting hydraulic retention time of a DSR reactor when nitrite is completely consumed provides an additional control variable for maximizing DSR performance.

  7. Study on the sulfidation behavior of smithsonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Dandan; Wen, Shuming, E-mail: shmwen@126.com; Deng, Jiushuai, E-mail: dengshuai689@163.com; Liu, Jian; Mao, Yingbo

    2015-02-28

    Highlights: • Zeta potential showed that the pH{sub IEP} of smithsonite decreased from 7.7 to 6. • ICP test showed the gradual reduction of C{sub S} in the solution. • SEM showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film. • XPS indicated that the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions. - Abstract: Zinc extraction from low-grade mineral resources of oxidized zinc has recently become a focus of study. Sulfidation is an important process in oxidized ore flotation. In this study, the influence of sulfur ion adsorption on smithsonite surface was investigated with the use of zeta potential, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. Zeta potential measurements of sodium sulfide showed that sulfur ions were adsorbed onto the surface of pure smithsonite, as evidenced by the increased negative charge and the decrease in the pH{sub IEP} of smithsonite from 7.7 to 6 after sodium sulfide treatment. The ICP test revealed the gradual reduction in sulfur ion adsorption onto the surface of smithsonite in pulp sulfur. After 30 min of absorption, C{sub S} in the solution declined from 1000 × 10{sup −6} mol/L to 1.4 × 10{sup −6} mol/L. SEM results showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film after sodium sulfide treatment, whereas EDS analysis results showed that 2% S is contained on the smithsonite surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions after sulfidation. Sulfur concentration increased to 11.89%, whereas oxygen concentration decreased from 42.31% to 13.74%. Sulfur ions were not only present during chemical adsorption, but were also incorporated into the crystal lattices of minerals by the exchange reaction between S{sup 2−} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} ions.

  8. Nanostructured silver sulfide: synthesis of various forms and their application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovnikov, S. I.; Rempel, A. A.; Gusev, A. I.

    2018-04-01

    The results of experimental studies on nanostructured silver sulfide are analyzed and generalized. The influence of small particle size on nonstoichiometry of silver sulfide is discussed. Methods for the synthesis of various forms of nanostructured Ag2S including nanopowders, stable colloidal solutions, quantum dots, core–shell nanoparticles and heteronanostructures are described. The advantages and drawbacks of different synthetic procedures are analyzed. Main fields of application of nanostructured silver sulfide are considered. The bibliography includes 184 references.

  9. Biogenic synthesized nanoparticles and their applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Abhijeet, E-mail: abhijeet.singh@jaipur.manipal.edu; Sharma, Madan Mohan [Manipal University Jaipur (India)

    2016-05-06

    In the present scenario, there are growing concerns over the potential impacts of bioengineered nanoparticles in the health sector. However, our understanding of how bioengineered nanoparticles may affect organisms within natural ecosystems, lags far behind our rapidly increasing ability to engineer novel nanoparticles. To date, research on the biological impacts of bioengineered nanoparticles has primarily consisted of controlled lab studies of model organisms with single species in culture media. Here, we described a cost effective and environment friendly technique for green synthesis of silver nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles were successfully synthesized from 1 mM AgNO{sub 3} via a green synthesis process using leaf extract as reducing as well as capping agent. Nanoparticles were characterized with the help of UV–vis absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and TEM analysis which revealed the size of nanoparticles of 30-40 nm size. Further the nanoparticles synthesized by green route are found highly toxic against pathogenic bacteria and plant pathogenic fungi viz. Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas syringae and Sclerotiniasclerotiorum. The most important outcome of this work will be the development of value-added products and protection of human health from pathogens viz., bacteria, virus, fungi etc.

  10. Biogenic synthesized nanoparticles and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Abhijeet; Sharma, Madan Mohan

    2016-01-01

    In the present scenario, there are growing concerns over the potential impacts of bioengineered nanoparticles in the health sector. However, our understanding of how bioengineered nanoparticles may affect organisms within natural ecosystems, lags far behind our rapidly increasing ability to engineer novel nanoparticles. To date, research on the biological impacts of bioengineered nanoparticles has primarily consisted of controlled lab studies of model organisms with single species in culture media. Here, we described a cost effective and environment friendly technique for green synthesis of silver nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles were successfully synthesized from 1 mM AgNO_3 via a green synthesis process using leaf extract as reducing as well as capping agent. Nanoparticles were characterized with the help of UV–vis absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and TEM analysis which revealed the size of nanoparticles of 30-40 nm size. Further the nanoparticles synthesized by green route are found highly toxic against pathogenic bacteria and plant pathogenic fungi viz. Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas syringae and Sclerotiniasclerotiorum. The most important outcome of this work will be the development of value-added products and protection of human health from pathogens viz., bacteria, virus, fungi etc.

  11. Control of Biogenic Amines in Fermented Sausages: Role of Starter Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre-Moratalla, M.L.; Bover-Cid, Sara; Veciana-Nogués, M.T.; Vidal-Carou, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    Biogenic amines show biological activity and exert undesirable physiological effects when absorbed at high concentrations. Biogenic amines are mainly formed by microbial decarboxylation of amino acids and thus are usually present in a wide range of foods, fermented sausages being one of the major biogenic amine sources. The use of selected starter cultures is one of the best technological measures to control aminogenesis during meat fermentation. Although with variable effectiveness, several works show the ability of some starters to render biogenic amine-free sausages. In this paper, the effect of different starter culture is reviewed and the factors determining their performance discussed. PMID:22586423

  12. Control of biogenic amines in fermented sausages: role of starter cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariluz eLatorre-Moratalla

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic amines show biological activity and exert undesirable physiological effects when absorbed at high concentrations. Biogenic amines are mainly formed by microbial decarboxylation of amino acids and thus are usually present in a wide range of foods, fermented sausages being one of the major biogenic amine sources. The use of selected starter cultures is one of the best technological measures to control aminogenesis during meat fermentation. Although with variable effectiveness, several works show the ability of some starters to render biogenic amine-free sausages. In this paper, the effect of different starter culture is reviewed and the factors determining their performance discussed.

  13. LBA-ECO TG-02 Biogenic VOC Emissions from Brazilian Amazon Forest and Pasture Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set reports concentrations of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) collected from tethered balloon-sampling platforms above selected...

  14. LBA-ECO TG-02 Biogenic VOC Emissions from Brazilian Amazon Forest and Pasture Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set reports concentrations of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) collected from tethered balloon-sampling platforms above selected forest and...

  15. Carbon steel protection in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) plants. Iron sulfide scales formation conditions. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruzzoni, P.; Burkart, A.L.; Garavaglia, R.N.

    1981-11-01

    An ASTM A 516 degree 60 carbon steel superficial protection technique submitted to a hydrogen-water sulfide corrosive medium at 2 MPa of pressure and 40-125 deg C forming on itself an iron sulfide layer was tested. Studies on pH influence, temperature, passivating mean characteristics and exposure time as well as the mechanical resistance of sulfide layers to erosion are included. (Author) [es

  16. Concentrations of biogenic amines in fish, squid and octopus and their changes during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue; Huang, Zhiyong; Li, Jian; Yang, Hong

    2012-12-15

    The concentrations of seven biogenic amines (BA) were simultaneously determined in 74 samples of fish, squid and octopus, by the method of HPLC coupled with pre-column derivatisation. The relationship between the formation of BA in aquatic products and the growth of microbial flora during storage was also investigated. Results showed that putrescine, cadaverine, histamine and tyramine were the dominant BA in the studied samples, but the concentrations of histamine and tyramine were mostly less than 50 and 100 mgkg(-1), respectively. Freezing can effectively prevent the formation of BA, but the levels of putrescine, cadaverine, histamine and tyramine significantly increased (poctopus strongly and positively correlated with the formation of amines (such as putrescine, cadaverine, histamine and tyramine) during storage, except for histamine in octopus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Gigantism in unique biogenic magnetite at the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Dirk; Raub, Timothy D; Kopp, Robert E; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Wu, Ting-Di; Rouiller, Isabelle; Smirnov, Aleksey V; Sears, S Kelly; Lücken, Uwe; Tikoo, Sonia M; Hesse, Reinhard; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Vali, Hojatollah

    2008-11-18

    We report the discovery of exceptionally large biogenic magnetite crystals in clay-rich sediments spanning the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) in a borehole at Ancora, NJ. Aside from previously described abundant bacterial magnetofossils, electron microscopy reveals novel spearhead-like and spindle-like magnetite up to 4 microm long and hexaoctahedral prisms up to 1.4 microm long. Similar to magnetite produced by magnetotactic bacteria, these single-crystal particles exhibit chemical composition, lattice perfection, and oxygen isotopes consistent with an aquatic origin. Electron holography indicates single-domain magnetization despite their large crystal size. We suggest that the development of a thick suboxic zone with high iron bioavailability--a product of dramatic changes in weathering and sedimentation patterns driven by severe global warming--drove diversification of magnetite-forming organisms, likely including eukaryotes.

  18. 76 FR 64022 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Lifting of Administrative Stay for Hydrogen Sulfide. SUMMARY: EPA is announcing... (EPCRA) section 313 toxic chemical release reporting requirements for hydrogen sulfide (Chemical...

  19. Enriching distinctive microbial communities from marine sediments via an electrochemical-sulfide-oxidizing process on carbon electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiue-Lin eLi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sulfide is a common product of marine anaerobic respiration, and a potent reactant biologically and geochemically. Here we demonstrate the impact on microbial communities with the removal of sulfide via electrochemical methods. The use of differential pulse voltammetry revealed that the oxidation of soluble sulfide was seen at + mV (vs. SHE at all pH ranges tested (from pH = 4 to 8, while non-ionized sulfide, which dominated at pH = 4 was poorly oxidized via this process. Two mixed cultures (CAT and LA were enriched from two different marine sediments (from Catalina Island, CAT; from the Port of Los Angeles, LA in serum bottles using a seawater medium supplemented with lactate, sulfate, and yeast extract, to obtain abundant biomass. Both CAT and LA cultures were inoculated in electrochemical cells (using yeast-extract-free seawater medium as an electrolyte equipped with carbon-felt electrodes. In both cases, when potentials of +630 or 130 mV (vs. SHE were applied, currents were consistently higher at +630 then at 0 mV, indicating more sulfide being oxidized at the higher potential. In addition, higher organic-acid and sulfate conversion rates were found at +630 mV with CAT, while no significant differences were found with LA at different potentials. The results of microbial-community analyses revealed a decrease in diversity for both CAT and LA after electrochemical incubation. In addition, some bacteria (e.g., Clostridium and Arcobacter not well known to be capable of extracellular electron transfer, were found to be dominant in the electrochemical cells. Thus, even though the different mixed cultures have different tolerances for sulfide, electrochemical-sulfide removal can lead to major population changes.

  20. Determination of sulfur isotopic composition for the study of iron sulfides origin, biotic or abiotic, in anoxic corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grousset, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    The first goal of this project was to develop a methodology based on the study of the sulfur isotopic composition enabling the determination of iron sulfides origin, biotic or abiotic, within the corrosion products layers (CPL). Then, the aim was to apply this methodology to real corrosion systems in order to determine the mechanisms of iron sulfides formation. Sulfur isotopic analyses methodologies, adapted to micrometric iron sulfides layers observed in real corrosion systems, were developed in nanoSIMS and ToF-SIMS. The study of iron sulfides formed in anoxic carbonated medium with or without sulphate-reducing bacteria validated the use of these methods for the determination of iron sulfides origin. The application of these methods coupled with the precise characterization of irons sulfides formed in the real corrosion systems show two kind of corrosion pattern. In pattern 1, the iron sulfides are localized in the external part of the CPL. They result from the Fe 2+ migration from the metal surface to areas rich in biotic S 2- . In this pattern, corrosion rates are lower than 20 μm/year for laboratory systems, and lower than 5 μm/year for archaeological objects. In pattern 2, the large presence of conductive phases in the CPL results in the delocalization of electrons, and so a disequilibrium of the charges at the metal's surface. That leads to the migration of biotic S 2- in the CPL till the metal where they precipitate in iron sulphides. This pattern shows high corrosion rates (∼100 μm/an) that might be resulting from the accumulation of bio-corrosion and chloride corrosion mechanisms. (author) [fr

  1. Spatio-temporal variation of biogenic volatile organic compounds emissions in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, L.Y.; Chen, Y.; Xie, S.D.

    2013-01-01

    Aiming to reduce the large uncertainties of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emissions estimation, the emission inventory of BVOCs in China at a high spatial and temporal resolution of 36 km × 36 km and 1 h was established using MEGANv2.1 with MM5 providing high-resolution meteorological data, based on the most detailed and latest vegetation investigations. BVOC emissions from 82 plant functional types in China were computed firstly. More local species-specific emission rates were developed combining statistical analysis and category classification, and the leaf biomass was estimated based on vegetation volume and production with biomass-apportion models. The total annual BVOC emissions in 2003 were 42.5 Tg, including isoprene 23.4 Tg, monoterpene 5.6 Tg, sesquiterpene 1.0 Tg, and other VOCs (OVOCs) 12.5 Tg. Subtropical and tropical evergreen and deciduous broadleaf shrubs, Quercus, and bamboo contributed more than 45% to the total BVOC emissions. The highest biogenic emissions were found over northeastern, southeastern, and southwestern China. Strong seasonal pattern was observed with the highest BVOC emissions in July and the lowest in January and December, with daily emission peaked at approximately 13:00 or 14:00 local time. -- Highlights: •An emission inventory of BVOCs in China at a high spatial and temporal resolution of 36 km and 1 h is established. •High-resolution meteorological data simulated by MM5 is used. •We update the land cover data used in MEGAN based on the most detailed and latest vegetation investigations. •A new vegetation classification with 82 plant functional types is developed in MEGAN. •The leaf biomass is estimated based on vegetation volume and production with biomass-apportion models. -- An emission inventory of BVOCs in China was established based on the most detailed and latest vegetation investigations, and high-resolution meteorological data

  2. Arsenic removal from acidic solutions with biogenic ferric precipitates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahoranta, Sarita H., E-mail: sarita.ahoranta@tut.fi [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Kokko, Marika E., E-mail: marika.kokko@tut.fi [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Papirio, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.papirio@unicas.it [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Özkaya, Bestamin, E-mail: bozkaya@yildiz.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Department of Environmental Engineering, Yildiz Technical University, Davutpasa Campus 34220, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Puhakka, Jaakko A., E-mail: jaakko.puhakka@tut.fi [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2016-04-05

    Highlights: • Continuous and rapid arsenic removal with biogenic jarosite was achieved at pH 3.0. • Arsenic removal was inefficient below pH 2.4 due to reduced Fe–As co-precipitation. • As(V) had better sorption characteristics than As(III). • Biogenic jarosite adsorbed arsenic more effectively than synthetic jarosite. - Abstract: Treatment of acidic solution containing 5 g/L of Fe(II) and 10 mg/L of As(III) was studied in a system consisting of a biological fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) for iron oxidation, and a gravity settler for iron precipitation and separation of the ferric precipitates. At pH 3.0 and FBR retention time of 5.7 h, 96–98% of the added Fe(II) precipitated (99.1% of which was jarosite). The highest iron oxidation and precipitation rates were 1070 and 28 mg/L/h, respectively, and were achieved at pH 3.0. Subsequently, the effect of pH on arsenic removal through sorption and/or co-precipitation was examined by gradually decreasing solution pH from 3.0 to 1.6 (feed pH). At pH 3.0, 2.4 and 1.6, the highest arsenic removal efficiencies obtained were 99.5%, 80.1% and 7.1%, respectively. As the system had ferric precipitates in excess, decreased arsenic removal was likely due to reduced co-precipitation at pH < 2.4. As(III) was partially oxidized to As(V) in the system. In shake flask experiments, As(V) sorbed onto jarosite better than As(III). Moreover, the sorption capacity of biogenic jarosite was significantly higher than that of synthetic jarosite. The developed bioprocess simultaneously and efficiently removes iron and arsenic from acidic solutions, indicating potential for mining wastewater treatment.

  3. Post-speleogenetic biogenic modification of Gomantong Caves, Sabah, Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Joyce; McFarlane, Donald A.

    2012-07-01

    The Gomantong cave system of eastern Sabah, Malaysia, is well-known as an important site for harvesting edible bird-nests and, more recently, as a tourist attraction. Although the biology of the Gomantong system has been repeatedly studied, very little attention has been given to the geomorphology. Here, we report on the impact of geobiological modification in the development of the modern aspect of the cave, an important but little recognized feature of tropical caves. Basic modeling of the metabolic outputs from bats and birds (CO2, H2O, heat) reveals that post-speleogenetic biogenic corrosion can erode bedrock by between ~ 3.0 mm/ka (1 m/~300 ka) and ~ 4.6 mm/ka (1 m/~200 ka). Modeling at high densities of bats yields rates of corrosion of ~ 34 mm/ka (or 1 m/~30 ka). Sub-aerial corrosion creates a previously undescribed speleological feature, the apse-flute, which is semicircular in cross-section and ~ 80 cm wide. It is vertical regardless of rock properties, developing in parallel but apparently completely independently, and often unbroken from roof to floor. They end at a blind hemi-spherical top with no extraneous water source. Half-dome ceiling conch pockets are remnants of previous apse-fluting. Sub-cutaneous corrosion creates the floor-level guano notch formed by organic acid dissolution of bedrock in contact with guano. Speleogenetic assessment suggests that as much as 70-95% of the total volume of the modern cave may have been opened by direct subaerial biogenic dissolution and biogenically-induced collapse, and by sub-cutaneous removal of limestone, over a timescale of 1-2 Ma.

  4. Long-term effects of sulfidized silver nanoparticles in sewage sludge on soil microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraas, Marco; Schlich, Karsten; Knopf, Burkhard; Wege, Franziska; Kägi, Ralf; Terytze, Konstantin; Hund-Rinke, Kerstin

    2017-12-01

    The use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in consumer products such as textiles leads to their discharge into wastewater and consequently to a transfer of the AgNPs to soil ecosystems via biosolids used as fertilizer. In urban wastewater systems (e.g., sewer, wastewater treatment plant [WWTP], anaerobic digesters) AgNPs are efficiently converted into sparingly soluble silver sulfides (Ag 2 S), mitigating the toxicity of the AgNPs. However, long-term studies on the bioavailability and effects of sulfidized AgNPs on soil microorganisms are lacking. Thus we investigated the bioavailability and long-term effects of AgNPs (spiked in a laboratory WWTP) on soil microorganisms. Before mixing the biosolids into soil, the sludges were either anaerobically digested or directly dewatered. The effects on the ammonium oxidation process were investigated over 140 d. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) suggested an almost complete sulfidation of the AgNPs analyzed in all biosolid samples and in soil, with Ag 2 S predominantly detected in long-term incubation experiments. However, despite the sulfidation of the AgNPs, soil ammonium oxidation was significantly inhibited, and the degree of inhibition was independent of the sludge treatment. The results revealed that AgNPs sulfidized under environmentally relevant conditions were still bioavailable to soil microorganisms. Consequently, Ag 2 S may exhibit toxic effects over the long term rather than the short term. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:3305-3313. © 2017 The Authors. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. © 2017 The Authors. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC.

  5. Elevated corrosion rates and hydrogen sulfide in homes with 'Chinese Drywall'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Joseph G.; MacIntosh, David L. [Environmental Health and Engineering, Inc., 117 Fourth Avenue, Needham, MA (United States); Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA (United States); Saltzman, Lori E. [U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, Bethesda, MD (United States); Baker, Brian J. [Environmental Health and Engineering, Inc., 117 Fourth Avenue, Needham, MA (United States); Matheson, Joanna M.; Recht, Joel R. [U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, Bethesda, MD (United States); Minegishi, Taeko; Fragala, Matt A.; Myatt, Theodore A. [Environmental Health and Engineering, Inc., 117 Fourth Avenue, Needham, MA (United States); Spengler, John D.; Stewart, James H. [Environmental Health and Engineering, Inc., 117 Fourth Avenue, Needham, MA (United States); Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA (United States); McCarthy, John F., E-mail: jmcccarthy@eheinc.com [Environmental Health and Engineering, Inc., 117 Fourth Avenue, Needham, MA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    In December 2008, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) began receiving reports about odors, corrosion, and health concerns related to drywall originating from China. In response, a detailed environmental health and engineering evaluation was conducted of 41 complaint and 10 non-complaint homes in the Southeast U.S. Each home investigation included characterization of: 1) drywall composition; 2) indoor and outdoor air quality; 3) temperature, moisture, and building ventilation; and 4) copper and silver corrosion rates. Complaint homes had significantly higher hydrogen sulfide concentrations (mean 0.82 vs. < LOD {mu}g/m{sup 3}, p < 0.05), and significantly greater rates of copper sulfide and silver sulfide corrosion compared to non-complaint homes (Cu{sub 2}S: 476 vs. < 32 A/30 d, p < 0.01; Ag{sub 2}S: 1472 vs. 389 A/30 d, p < 0.01). The abundance of carbonate and strontium in drywall was also elevated in complaint homes, and appears to be useful objective marker of problematic drywall in homes that meet other screening criteria (e.g., constructed or renovated in 2006-2007, reports of malodor and accelerated corrosion). This research provides empirical evidence of the direct association between homes constructed with 'Chinese Drywall' in 2006-2007 and elevated corrosion rates and hydrogen sulfide concentrations in indoor air. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental measurements in homes with and without 'Chinese Drywall' Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homes with 'Chinese Drywall' had higher hydrogen sulfide concentrations Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homes with 'Chinese Drywall' had elevated corrosion rates Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study provides empirical evidence of reported associations.

  6. Carbon nanomaterial based electrochemical sensors for biogenic amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiao; He, Xiulan; Li, Fangping; Fei, Junjie; Feng, Bo; Ding, Yonglan

    2013-01-01

    This review describes recent advances in the use of carbon nanomaterials for electroanalytical detection of biogenic amines (BAs). It starts with a short introduction into carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, nanodiamonds, carbon nanofibers, fullerenes, and their composites. Next, electrochemical sensing schemes are discussed for various BAs including dopamine, serotonin, epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyramine, histamine and putrescine. Examples are then given for methods for simultaneous detection of various BAs. Finally, we discuss the current and future challenges of carbon nanomaterial-based electrochemical sensors for BAs. The review contains 175 references. (author)

  7. Pulmonary extraction of biogenic amines during septic shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerstein, M.D.; Kohler, J.; Gould, S.; Moseley, P.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of live Escherichia coli on the pulmonary extraction of the biogenic amines 14 C 5-hydroxytryptamine, (5-HT) and 3 H-epinephrine was investigated. The labeled isotopes were injected into a central venous catheter and collected from an aortic catheter. One hundred per cent of the labeled epinephrine was recovered in the control and septic state. Only 32.8 +/- 3.6% SEM of the 5-hydroxytryptamine was recovered before sepsis and 42.5 +/- 4.9% SEM after sepsis. During sepsis, mean arterial pressure fell to 58 mm Hg from 121 mm Hg. Pulmonary shunt increased from .7 +/- .05 SEM to .33 +/- .09 SEM

  8. Modeling organic aerosols during MILAGRO: importance of biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hodzic

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The meso-scale chemistry-transport model CHIMERE is used to assess our understanding of major sources and formation processes leading to a fairly large amount of organic aerosols – OA, including primary OA (POA and secondary OA (SOA – observed in Mexico City during the MILAGRO field project (March 2006. Chemical analyses of submicron aerosols from aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS indicate that organic particles found in the Mexico City basin contain a large fraction of oxygenated organic species (OOA which have strong correspondence with SOA, and that their production actively continues downwind of the city. The SOA formation is modeled here by the one-step oxidation of anthropogenic (i.e. aromatics, alkanes, biogenic (i.e. monoterpenes and isoprene, and biomass-burning SOA precursors and their partitioning into both organic and aqueous phases. Conservative assumptions are made for uncertain parameters to maximize the amount of SOA produced by the model. The near-surface model evaluation shows that predicted OA correlates reasonably well with measurements during the campaign, however it remains a factor of 2 lower than the measured total OA. Fairly good agreement is found between predicted and observed POA within the city suggesting that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions are reasonably captured. Consistent with previous studies in Mexico City, large discrepancies are encountered for SOA, with a factor of 2–10 model underestimate. When only anthropogenic SOA precursors were considered, the model was able to reproduce within a factor of two the sharp increase in OOA concentrations during the late morning at both urban and near-urban locations but the discrepancy increases rapidly later in the day, consistent with previous results, and is especially obvious when the column-integrated SOA mass is considered instead of the surface concentration. The increase in the missing SOA mass in the afternoon coincides with the sharp drop in POA

  9. Iron sulfide crystal growth: a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewar, E.J.

    1977-04-01

    Iron pyrite (FeS 2 ) is often found on trays and in heat exchangers in Girdler-Sulfide (G.S.) plants used to extract D 2 O from fresh water. A critical review of the literature was made to find: (i) what is known about FeS 2 crystal growth; (ii) which techniques could be used to study FeS 2 crystal growth experimentally; (iii) potential chemical additives that could be used in trace amounts to poison FeS 2 crystals and reduce their growth rate in G.S. plants. (author)

  10. Sulfide geochronlogy along the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W.; Tao, C.; Li, H.; Liang, J.; Liao, S.

    2017-12-01

    Dragon Flag and Duanqiao hydrothermal field is located between the Indomed and Gallieni fracture zones in the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). Ten subsamples from active and inactive vents of Dragon Flag hydrothermal field and twenty-eight subsamples from Duanqiao hydrothermal field were dated using the 230Th/238U method. Four main episodes of hydrothermal activity of Duanqiao were determined according to the restricted results: 68.9-84.3, 43.9-48.4, 25.3-34.8, and 0.7-17.3 kyrs. Hydrothermal activity of Duanqiao probably started about 84.3 (±0.5) kyrs ago and ceased about 0.737 (±0.023) kyrs ago. And sulfide samples from the nearby Dragon Flag filed at the same time and the results show that the ages of most sulfides from Dragon Flag field range from 1.496(±0.176) to 5.416 (±0.116) kyrs with the oldest age estimated at 15.997 (±0.155) kyrs Münch et al. (2001) reconstructed the evolution history of Mt. Jourdanne hydrothermal field. The age dating results indicate activity in two episodes, at 70-40 and 27-13 kyrs. The hydrothermal activity in Dragon Flag field is much more recent than that of Duanqiao or Mt. Jourdanne fields. The massive sulfides are younger than the sulfides from other hydrothermal fields such as Rainbow, Sonne and Ashadze-2. All these results suggest that hydrothermal activity of Dragon Flag field is much more recent than that of Duanqiao or Mt. Jourdanne fields. Mt. Jourdanne is situated on an axial volcanic ridge which has both volcanic and tectonic activity. This is necessary to develop the heat source and pathways for the fluid convection, which enables the hydrothermal circulation. Hydrothermal activity in Dragon Flag Field is located next to the detachment fault termination. The detachment fault system provides a pathway for hydrothermal convection. Such style of heat source can contribute to continuous hydrothermal activity for over 1000 years. Duanqiao field is located near the central volcano and there is a hot

  11. Gamma radiolysis of aliphatic sulfur compounds in aqueous solutions. A study to contribute to the analysis of the end products of the OH radical-induced oxidation of aliphatic mercaptanes, sulfides, and disulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, J.

    1982-01-01

    By identifying and determining numerous hitherto unknown end products, the study in hand contributes to a better insight into the radiation chemical processes occurring in OH radical-induced oxidation of aliphatic sulfur compounds. An extraction method has been developed for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of end products in aqueous solution in order to determine these compounds down to the level of trace amounts. Separation of endproducts is achieved by means of gas chromatography and high-pressure liquid chromatography, subsequent identification by GC-MS analysis. Aliphatic mercaptanes are oxidized by OH radicals to thiyl radicals which after combination can be detected as disulfide. At high radiation doses, secondary reactions will lead to polysulfides of which the homologues could first be prepared as the pure substance. The end products of the γ-radiolysis of aliphatic thioethers are determined to be dithia compounds, symmetrical or asymmetrical disulfides, or polysulfides, depending on the thioethers. With some end products, the radiation chemical yield is found to be a function of the absorbed dose so that material balances are impossible. Intermediate thiyl, α-alkyl mercaptoalkyl or alkyl radicals can be captured by tetramethyl ethylene, cyclohexene or p-benzoquinone, and can then be identified as the relevant adducts. (orig./RB) [de

  12. Organic compounds in aerosols from selected European sites - Biogenic versus anthropogenic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Célia; Vicente, Ana; Pio, Casimiro; Kiss, Gyula; Hoffer, Andras; Decesari, Stefano; Prevôt, André S. H.; Minguillón, María Cruz; Querol, Xavier; Hillamo, Risto; Spindler, Gerald; Swietlicki, Erik

    2012-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosol samples from a boreal forest (Hyytiälä, April 2007), a rural site in Hungary (K-puszta, summer 2008), a polluted rural area in Italy (San Pietro Capofiume, Po Valley, April 2008), a moderately polluted rural site in Germany located on a meadow (Melpitz, May 2008), a natural park in Spain (Montseny, March 2009) and two urban background locations (Zurich, December 2008, and Barcelona, February/March 2009) were collected. Aliphatics, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, carbonyls, sterols, n-alkanols, acids, phenolic compounds and anhydrosugars in aerosols were chemically characterised by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, along with source attribution based on the carbon preference index (CPI), the ratios between the unresolved and the chromatographically resolved aliphatics, the contribution of wax n-alkanes, n-alkanols and n-alkanoic acids from plants, diagnostic ratios of individual target compounds and source-specific markers to organic carbon ratios. In spite of transboundary pollution episodes, Hyytiälä registered the lowest levels among all locations. CPI values close to 1 for the aliphatic fraction of the Montseny aerosol suggest that the anthropogenic input may be associated with the transport of aged air masses from the surrounding industrial/urban areas, which superimpose the locally originated hydrocarbons with biogenic origin. Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in samples from San Pietro Capofiume reveal that fossil fuel combustion is a major source influencing the diel pattern of concentrations. This source contributed to 25-45% of the ambient organic carbon (OC) at the Po Valley site. Aerosols from the German meadow presented variable contributions from both biogenic and anthropogenic sources. The highest levels of vegetation wax components and biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) products were observed at K-puszta, while anthropogenic SOA compounds predominated in Barcelona. The primary vehicular emissions in the Spanish

  13. Stability of biogenic metal(loid) nanomaterials related to the colloidal stabilization theory of chemical nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacenza, Elena; Presentato, Alessandro; Turner, Raymond J

    2018-02-25

    In the last 15 years, the exploitation of biological systems (i.e. plants, bacteria, mycelial fungi, yeasts, and algae) to produce metal(loid) (Me)-based nanomaterials has been evaluated as eco-friendly and a cost-effective alternative to the chemical synthesis processes. Although the biological mechanisms of biogenic Me-nanomaterial (Bio-Me-nanomaterials) production are not yet completely elucidated, a key advantage of such bio-nanostructures over those chemically synthesized is related to their natural thermodynamic stability, with several studies ascribed to the presence of an organic layer surrounding these Bio-Me-nanostructures. Different macromolecules (e.g. proteins, peptides, lipids, DNA, and polysaccharides) or secondary metabolites (e.g. flavonoids, terpenoids, glycosides, organic acids, and alkaloids) naturally produced by organisms have been indicated as main contributors to the stabilization of Bio-Me-nanostructures. Nevertheless, the chemical-physical mechanisms behind the ability of these molecules in providing stability to Bio-Me-nanomaterials are unknown. In this context, transposing the stabilization theory of chemically synthesized Me-nanomaterials (Ch-Me-nanomaterials) to biogenic materials can be used towards a better comprehension of macromolecules and secondary metabolites role as stabilizing agents of Bio-Me-nanomaterials. According to this theory, nanomaterials are generally featured by high thermodynamic instability in suspension, due to their high surface area and surface energy. This feature leads to the necessity to stabilize chemical nanostructures, even during or directly after their synthesis, through the development of (i) electrostatic, (ii) steric, or (iii) electrosteric interactions occurring between molecules and nanomaterials in suspension. Based on these three mechanisms, this review is focused on parallels between the stabilization of biogenic or chemical nanomaterials, suggesting which chemical-physical mechanisms may be

  14. Purity and crystallinity of microwave synthesized antimony sulfide microrods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Alonso, Claudia, E-mail: claudiamartinezalonso30@gmail.com [Facultad de Química, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Querétaro, Querétaro, 76010 (Mexico); Olivos-Peralta, Eliot U. [Instituto de Energías Renovables, Universidad NacionalAutónoma de México, Temixco, Morelos, 62580 (Mexico); Sotelo-Lerma, Mérida [Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora, 83000 (Mexico); Sato-Berrú, Roberto Y. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, MéxicoD.F., 04510 (Mexico); Mayén-Hernández, S.A. [Facultad de Química, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Querétaro, Querétaro, 76010 (Mexico); Hu, Hailin, E-mail: hzh@ier.unam.mx [Instituto de Energías Renovables, Universidad NacionalAutónoma de México, Temixco, Morelos, 62580 (Mexico)

    2017-01-15

    Antimony sulfide (Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}) is a promising semiconductor material for solar cell applications. In this work, microrods of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} were synthesized by microwave heating with different sulfur sources, solvents, temperature, heating rate, power, and solution concentration. It was found that 90% of stoichiometric Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} can be obtained with thiourea (TU) or thioacetamide (TA) as sulfur sources and that their optical band gap values were within the range of 1.59–1.60 eV. The most crystalline Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} were obtained by using TU. The morphology of the Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} with TU the individual rods were exhibited, whereas rods bundles appeared in TA-based products. The solvents were ethylene glycol (EG) and dimethylformamide (DMF). EG generates more heat than DMF during the microwave synthesis. As a result, the Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} obtained with EG contained a larger percentage of oxygen and smaller crystal sizes compared to those from DMF. On the other hand, the length and diameter of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} microrods can be increased by applying higher heating power although the crystal size did not change at all. In summary, pure and highly crystalline Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} microrods of 6–10 μm long and 330–850 nm in diameter can be obtained by the microwave method with a careful selection of chemical and thermodynamic parameters of the synthesis. - Highlights: • Purity up to 90% of crystalline Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanorods can be obtained by microwave heating. • The combination of solvent and sulfide type affects crystallinity & purity of Sb2S3. • The high pressure generated in microwave heating helps to form Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanorods.

  15. Purity and crystallinity of microwave synthesized antimony sulfide microrods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez-Alonso, Claudia; Olivos-Peralta, Eliot U.; Sotelo-Lerma, Mérida; Sato-Berrú, Roberto Y.; Mayén-Hernández, S.A.; Hu, Hailin

    2017-01-01

    Antimony sulfide (Sb_2S_3) is a promising semiconductor material for solar cell applications. In this work, microrods of Sb_2S_3 were synthesized by microwave heating with different sulfur sources, solvents, temperature, heating rate, power, and solution concentration. It was found that 90% of stoichiometric Sb_2S_3 can be obtained with thiourea (TU) or thioacetamide (TA) as sulfur sources and that their optical band gap values were within the range of 1.59–1.60 eV. The most crystalline Sb_2S_3 were obtained by using TU. The morphology of the Sb_2S_3 with TU the individual rods were exhibited, whereas rods bundles appeared in TA-based products. The solvents were ethylene glycol (EG) and dimethylformamide (DMF). EG generates more heat than DMF during the microwave synthesis. As a result, the Sb_2S_3 obtained with EG contained a larger percentage of oxygen and smaller crystal sizes compared to those from DMF. On the other hand, the length and diameter of Sb_2S_3 microrods can be increased by applying higher heating power although the crystal size did not change at all. In summary, pure and highly crystalline Sb_2S_3 microrods of 6–10 μm long and 330–850 nm in diameter can be obtained by the microwave method with a careful selection of chemical and thermodynamic parameters of the synthesis. - Highlights: • Purity up to 90% of crystalline Sb_2S_3 nanorods can be obtained by microwave heating. • The combination of solvent and sulfide type affects crystallinity & purity of Sb2S3. • The high pressure generated in microwave heating helps to form Sb_2S_3 nanorods.

  16. Sulfide stress corrosion study of a super martensitic stainless steel in H2S sour environments: Metallic sulfides formation and hydrogen embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnot, Martin; Nogueira, Ricardo P.; Roche, Virginie; Berthomé, Grégory; Chauveau, Eric; Estevez, Rafael; Mantel, Marc

    2017-02-01

    Thanks to their high corrosion resistance, super martensitic stainless steels are commonly used in the oil and gas industry, particularly in sour environments. Some grades are however susceptible to undergo hydrogen and mechanically-assisted corrosion processes in the presence of H2S, depending on the pH. The martensitic stainless steel EN 1.4418 grade exhibits a clear protective passive behavior with no sulfide stress corrosion cracking when exposed to sour environments of pH ≥ 4, but undergoes a steep decrease in its corrosion resistance at lower pH conditions. The present paper investigated this abrupt loss of corrosion resistance with electrochemical measurements as well as different physicochemical characterization techniques. Results indicated that below pH 4.0 the metal surface is covered by a thick (ca 40 μm) porous and defect-full sulfide-rich corrosion products layer shown to be straightforwardly related to the onset of hydrogen and sulfide mechanically-assisted corrosion phenomena.

  17. The effect of sulfide on the aerobic corrosion of carbon steel in near-neutral pH saline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherar, B.W.A.; Keech, P.G.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The corrosion rate is low when steel is exposed to anaerobic conditions (pH = 8.9). ► An anaerobic to aerobic corrosion with sulfide switch increases the corrosion rate. ► Aerobic exposure induces the formation of goethite-covered tubercles. ► Continual sulfide exposure leads to the slow conversion of goethite to mackinawite. - Abstract: Severe corrosion damage may occur when gas transmission pipelines are exposed, at disbonded coating locations, to trapped waters containing sulfide followed by secondary exposure to air. Aerobic corrosion with sulfide was investigated in a long-term corrosion experiment in which corrosion was monitored by measurement of the corrosion potential and polarization resistance obtained from linear polarization resistance measurements. The properties and composition of the corrosion product deposits formed were determined using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. A switch from aerobic to aerobic-with-sulfide corrosion doubles the relative corrosion rate.

  18. Influence of Thawing Methods and Storage Temperatures on Bacterial Diversity, Growth Kinetics, and Biogenic Amine Development in Atlantic Mackerel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onyang, S.; Palmadottir, H.; Tomason, T.

    2016-01-01

    Limited knowledge is currently available on the influence of fish thawing and subsequent storage conditions on bacterial growth kinetics, succession, and diversity alongside the production of biogenic amines. This study aimed to address these factors during the thawing and subsequent storage of m...... amine producing bacteria, with the exception of the genus Proteus, which was 8.6% in fast-thawed mackerel during storage at ambient temperature. This suggests that the decarboxylation potential is dependent on both microbial load and microbial community structure....

  19. Microbial selenium sulfide reduction for selenium recovery from wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, S.P.W.; Weijden, van der R.D.; Stams, A.J.M.; Cappellen, van P.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2017-01-01

    Microbial reduction of selenium sulfide (SeS2) is a key step in a new treatment process to recover selenium from selenate and selenite streams. In this process, selenate is first reduced to selenite, and subsequently selenite is reduced by sulfide and precipitates from the solution as SeS2. The

  20. Recent findings on sinks for sulfide in gravity sewer networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2006-01-01

    summarizes this newly obtained knowledge and emphasizes important implications of the findings. Model simulations of the in-sewer processes important for the sulfur cycle showed that sulfide oxidation in the wetted biofilm is typically the most important sink for dissolved sulfide in gravity sewers. However...

  1. Technetium behavior in sulfide and ferrous iron solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Bondietti, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    Pertechnetate oxyanion ( 99 TcO 4- ), a potentially mobile species in leachate from a breached radioactive waste repository, was removed from a brine solution by precipitation with sulfide, iron, and ferrous sulfide at environmental pH's. Maghemite (ν-Fe 2 O 3 ) and geothite (α-FeOOH) were the dominant minerals in the precipitate obtained from the TcO 4- -ferrous iron reaction. The observation of small particle size and poor crystallinity of the minerals formed in the presence of Tc suggested that the Tc was incorporated into the mineral structure after reduction to a lower valence state. Amorphous ferrous sulfide, an initial phase precipitating in the TcO 4- -ferrous iron-sulfide reaction, was transformed to goethite and hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) on aging. The black precipitate obtained from the TcO 4- -sulfide reaction was poorly crystallized technetium sulfide (Tc 2 S 7 ) which was insoluble in both acid and alkaline solution in the absence of strong oxidents. The results suggested that ferrous- and/or sulfide-bearing groundwaters and minerals in host rocks or backfill barriers could reduce the mobility of Tc through the formation of less-soluble Tc-bearing iron and/or sulfide minerals

  2. Sulfidation of carbon-supported iron oxide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramselaar, W.L.T.M.; Hadders, R.H.; Gerkema, E.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Oers, van E.M.; Kraan, van der A.M.

    1989-01-01

    The sulfidation of carbon-supported iron oxide catalysts was studied by means of in-situ Mössbauer spectroscopy at temperatures down to 4.2 K. The catalysts were dried in two different ways and then sulfided in a flow of 10% H2S in H2 at temperatures between 293 and 773 K. Thiophene

  3. Comparative study of biogenic and abiotic iron-containing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherkezova-Zheleva, Z., E-mail: zzhel@ic.bas.bg; Shopska, M., E-mail: shopska@ic.bas.bg; Paneva, D. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Catalysis (Bulgaria); Kovacheva, D. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry (Bulgaria); Kadinov, G.; Mitov, I. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Catalysis (Bulgaria)

    2016-12-15

    Series of iron-based biogenic materials prepared by cultivation of Leptothrix group of bacteria in different feeding media (Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group of bacteria isolation medium, Adler, Lieske and silicon-iron-glucose-peptone) were studied. Control samples were obtained in the same conditions and procedures but the nutrition media were not infected with bacteria, i.e. they were sterile. Room and low temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared spectroscopy (IRS) were used to reveal the composition and physicochemical properties of biomass and respective control samples. Comparative analysis showed differences in their composition and dispersity of present phases. Sample composition included different ratio of nanodimensional iron oxyhydroxide and oxide phases. Relaxation phenomena such as superparamagnetism or collective magnetic excitation behaviour were registered for some of them. The experimental data showed that the biogenic materials were enriched in oxyhydroxides of high dispersion. Catalytic behaviour of a selected biomass and abiotic material were studied in the reaction of CO oxidation. In situ diffuse-reflectance (DR) IRS was used to monitor the phase transformations in the biomass and CO conversion.

  4. Biogenic magnetite as a primary remanence carrier in limestone deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Bin R.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Stolz, John F.

    1987-06-01

    Studies on the microbial communities and magnetic phases of samples collected from carbonate oozes at Sugarloaf Key, FL, U.S.A. and calcareous laminated sediments from Laguna Figueroa, Baja California, Mexico have revealed the existence of magnetotactic bacteria and ultrafine-grained single domain magnetite in both environments. Magnetotactic bacteria were identified by light and electron microscopy. The single domain magnetite was detected by coercivity spectra analysis with a SQUID magnetometer and examined under the transmission electron microscope. The similarity, in terms of size and shape, between the single domain magnetite found in these sediments and the magnetite observed in the bacterial magnetosome from enriched cultures indicates the ultrafine-grained magnetite in these two marine environments was biologically formed. These results, combined with the common occurrences of ultrafine-grained magnetite in limestone deposits detected rock magnetically, suggest biogenic magnetite may be present and contribute to the magnetic remanence in these rocks. Several Cambrian limestone samples, separately collected from Siberia, China, and Kazakhstan, were examined for the presence of bacterial magnetite. Samples from the Lower Cambrian Sinskian Formation at Siberia Platform were found to contain both a large amount of apparently bacterial magnetite particles and a very stable primary magnetic component. Post-Cambrian diagenesis does not seem to affect the microgranulometry of these apparently bacterial magnetite crystals or the magnetic remanence carried by them. Assessing the potential role of biogenic magnetite as a primary remanence carrier in other Phanerozoic limestone deposits ought to be further pursued.

  5. Estimating the Biogenic Non-Methane Hydrocarbon Emissions over Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermioni Dimitropoulou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic emissions affect the urban air quality as they are ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA precursors and should be taken into account when applying photochemical pollution models. The present study presents an estimation of the magnitude of non-methane volatile organic compounds (BNMVOCs emitted by vegetation over Greece. The methodology is based on computation developed with the aid of a Geographic Information System (GIS and theoretical equations in order to produce an emission inventory on a 6 × 6 km2 spatial resolution, in a temporal resolution of 1 h covering one year (2016. For this purpose, a variety of input data was used: updated satellite land-use data, land-use specific emission potentials, foliar biomass densities, temperature, and solar radiation data. Hourly, daily, and annual isoprene, monoterpenes, and other volatile organic compounds (OVOCs were estimated. In the area under study, the annual biogenic emissions were estimated up to 472 kt, consisting of 46.6% isoprene, 28% monoterpenes, and 25.4% OVOCs. Results delineate an annual cycle with increasing values from March to April, while maximum emissions were observed from May to September, followed by a decrease from October to January.

  6. Biogenic silica in space and time in sediments of Central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Gupta, S.M.; Mudholkar, A.V.; Parthiban, G.

    rate averages 2.25 x 10/5 g.cm/2.y/1 and it is contributed from 33 to 50% of the total silica. Higher biogenic silica content of the surface sediment is well correlated with Mn, Cu and Ni concentration of the overlying manganese nodules. Higher biogenic...

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF SEASONAL AND ANNUAL BIOGENIC EMISSIONS INVENTORIES FOR THE U.S. AND CANADA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report describes the development of a biogenic emissions inventory for the U.S. and Canada, to assess the role of biogenic emissions in ozone formation. Emission inventories were developed at hourly and grid (1/4 x 116 degree) level from input data at the same scales. Emissio...

  8. Estimation of biogenic volatile organic compounds emissions in subtropical island--Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ken-Hui; Chen, Tu-Fu; Huang, Ho-Chun

    2005-06-15

    Elevated tropospheric ozone is harmful to human health and plants. It is formed through the photochemical reactions involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NO(x)). The elevated ozone episodes occur mainly in summer months in the United States, while the high-ozone episodes frequently occur during the fall in Taiwan. The unique landscape of Taiwan produces tremendous amounts of biogenic VOCs in the mountain regions that are adjacent to concentrated urban areas. The urban areas, in turn, generate prodigious amounts of anthropogenic emissions. Biogenic VOC emissions have direct influence on tropospheric ozone formation. To explore the air quality problems in Taiwan, this study attempts to develop a biogenic VOC emission model suitable for air quality applications in Taiwan. The emission model is based on the Biogenic Emissions Inventory System Version 2 and coupled with a detailed Taiwan land use database. The 1999 total Taiwan biogenic VOC emissions were estimated at 214,000 metric tons. The emissions of isoprene, monoterpenes, and other VOCs were about 37.2%, 30.4%, and 32.4% of total biogenic VOC emissions, respectively. The annual total biogenic VOC emission per unit area was more than two times the value of that in any European country, implying that detailed emissions estimates in any size of region will benefit the global biogenic emission inventories.

  9. 78 FR 50135 - Soil Biogenics Ltd., File No. 500-1; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Soil Biogenics Ltd., File No. 500-1; Order of Suspension of Trading August 14, 2013. It appears to the Securities and Exchange Commission that there is a lack of current and accurate information concerning the securities of Soil Biogenics Ltd. because it has not filed [[Page 50136

  10. Biogenic Carbon Fraction of Biogas and Natural Gas Fuel Mixtures Determined with 14C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palstra, Sanne W. L.; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the accuracy of the radiocarbon-based calculation of the biogenic carbon fraction for different biogas and biofossil gas mixtures. The focus is on the uncertainty in the C-14 reference values for 100% biogenic carbon and on the C-13-based isotope fractionation correction of

  11. Mastocytosis and adverse reactions to biogenic amines and histamine-releasing foods : what is the evidence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viieg-Boerstra, BJ; van der Heide, S; Elberink, JNGO; Kluin-Nelemans, JC; Dubois, AEJ

    2005-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that normal concentrations of biogenic amines and 'histamine-releasing foods' may exacerbate symptoms in mastocytosis. The purpose of this study was to look for scientific evidence in the literature on diets restricted in biogenic amines and histamine-releasing

  12. Constraining biogenic silica dissolution in marine sediments: a comparison between diagenetic models and experimental dissolution rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalil, K.; Rabouille, C.; Gallinari, M.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; DeMaster, D.J.; Ragueneau, O.

    2007-01-01

    The processes controlling preservation and recycling of particulate biogenic silica in sediments must be understood in order to calculate oceanic silica mass balances. The new contribution of this work is the coupled use of advanced models including reprecipitation and different phases of biogenic

  13. 76 FR 61100 - Notification of a Public Meeting of the Science Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... demonstrated expertise in forestry, agriculture, measurement and carbon accounting methodologies, land use... draft Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO 2 Emissions from Stationary Sources (September 2011). DATES... review EPA's draft Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO 2 Emissions from Stationary Sources (September...

  14. Lithogenic and biogenic particle deposition in an Antarctic coastal environment (Marian Cove, King George Island): Seasonal patterns from a sediment trap study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khim, B. K.; Shim, J.; Yoon, H. I.; Kang, Y. C.; Jang, Y. H.

    2007-06-01

    Particulate suspended material was recovered over a 23-month period using two sediment traps deployed in shallow water (˜30 m deep) off the King Sejong Station located in Marian Cove of King George Island, West Antarctica. Variability in seasonal flux and geochemical characteristics of the sediment particles highlights seasonal patterns of sedimentation of both lithogenic (terrigenous) and biogenic particles in the coastal glaciomarine environment. All components including total mass flux, lithogenic particle flux and biogenic particle flux show distinct seasonal variation, with high recovery rates during the summer and low rates under winter fast ice. The major contributor to total mass flux is the lithogenic component, comprising from 88% during the summer months (about 21 g m -2 d -1) up to 97% during the winter season (about 2 g m -2 d -1). The lithogenic particle flux depends mainly on the amount of snow-melt (snow accumulation) delivered into the coastal region as well as on the resuspension of sedimentary materials. These fine-grained lithogenic particles are silt-to-clay sized, composed mostly of clay minerals weathered on King George Island. Biogenic particle flux is also seasonal. Winter flux is ˜0.2 g m -2 d -1, whereas the summer contribution increases more than tenfold, up to 2.6 g m -2 d -1. Different biogenic flux between the two summers indicates inter-annual variability to the spring-summer phytoplankton bloom. The maximum of lithogenic particle flux occurs over a short period of time, and follows the peak of biogenic particle flux, which lasts longer. The seasonal warming and sea-ice retreat result in change in seawater nutrient status and subsequent ice-edge phytoplankton production. Meanwhile, the meltwater input to Marian Cove from the coastal drainage in January to February plays a major role in transporting lithogenic particles into the shallow water environment, although the tidal currents may be the main agents of resuspension in this

  15. Influence of Water Salinity on Air Purification from Hydrogen Sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leybovych L.I.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling of «sliding» water drop motion in the air flow was performed in software package FlowVision. The result of mathematical modeling of water motion in a droplet with diameter 100 microns at the «sliding» velocity of 15 m/s is shown. It is established that hydrogen sulfide oxidation occurs at the surface of phases contact. The schematic diagram of the experimental setup for studying air purification from hydrogen sulfide is shown. The results of the experimental research of hydrogen sulfide oxidation by tap and distilled water are presented. The dependence determining the share of hydrogen sulfide oxidized at the surface of phases contact from the dimensionless initial concentration of hydrogen sulfide in the air has been obtained.

  16. Kinetic Spectrophotometric Determination of Trace Amounts of Sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barzegar, Mohsen [Tarbiat Modarres University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jabbari, Ali [K. N. Toosi University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esmaeili, Majid [Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2003-09-15

    A method for the determination of trace amount of sulfide based on the addition reaction of sulfide with methyl green at pH 7.5 and 25 .deg. C is described. The reaction is monitored spectrophotometrically by measuring the decrease in absorbance of the dyestuff at 637 nm by the initial rate and fixed time method. The calibration graph is linear in the range 30-1200 ppb. The theoretical limit of detection was 0.014 ppm. Seven replicate analysis of a sample solution containing 0.70 ppm sulfide gave a relative standard deviation of 1.5%. The interfering effects of various ions on sulfide determination have been reported and procedures for removal of interference have been described. The proposed method was applied successfully to the determination of sulfide in tap and wastewater samples.

  17. Kinetic Spectrophotometric Determination of Trace Amounts of Sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barzegar, Mohsen; Jabbari, Ali; Esmaeili, Majid

    2003-01-01

    A method for the determination of trace amount of sulfide based on the addition reaction of sulfide with methyl green at pH 7.5 and 25 .deg. C is described. The reaction is monitored spectrophotometrically by measuring the decrease in absorbance of the dyestuff at 637 nm by the initial rate and fixed time method. The calibration graph is linear in the range 30-1200 ppb. The theoretical limit of detection was 0.014 ppm. Seven replicate analysis of a sample solution containing 0.70 ppm sulfide gave a relative standard deviation of 1.5%. The interfering effects of various ions on sulfide determination have been reported and procedures for removal of interference have been described. The proposed method was applied successfully to the determination of sulfide in tap and wastewater samples

  18. Characterization of upgraded fast pyrolysis oak oil distillate fractions from sulfided and non-sulfided catalytic hydrotreating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olarte, Mariefel V.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Ferrell, Jack R.; Christensen, Earl D.; Hallen, Richard T.; Lucke, Richard B.; Burton, Sarah D.; Lemmon, Teresa L.; Swita, Marie S.; Fioroni, Gina; Elliott, Douglas C.; Drennan, Corinne

    2017-08-01

    Catalytic hydroprocessing of pyrolysis oils from biomass produces hydrocarbons that can be considered for liquid fuel production. This process requires removal of oxygen and cracking of the heavier molecular weight bio-oil constituents into smaller fragments at high temperatures and pressures under hydrogen. A comprehensive understanding of product oils is useful to optimize cost versus degree of deoxygenation. Additionally, a better understanding of the chemical composition of the distillate fractions can open up other uses of upgraded oils for potentially higher-value chemical streams. We present in this paper the characterization data for five well-defined distillate fractions of two hydroprocessed oils with different oxygen levels: a low oxygen content (LOC, 1.8% O, wet basis) oil and a medium oxygen content (MOC, 6.4% O, wet basis) oil. Elemental analysis and 13C NMR results suggest that the distillate fractions become more aromatic/unsaturated as they become heavier. Our results also show that the use of sulfided catalysts directly affects the S content of the lightest distillate fraction. Carbonyl and carboxylic groups were found in the MOC light fractions, while phenols were present in the heavier fractions for both MOC and LOC. PIONA analysis of the light LOC fraction shows a predominance of paraffins with a minor amount of olefins. These results can be used to direct future research on refinery integration and production of value-added product from specific upgraded oil streams.

  19. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits A2A adenosine receptor agonist induced β-amyloid production in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells via a cAMP dependent pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan Vijay Nagpure

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the leading cause of senile dementia in today's society. Its debilitating symptoms are manifested by disturbances in many important brain functions, which are influenced by adenosine. Hence, adenosinergic system is considered as a potential therapeutic target in AD treatment. In the present study, we found that sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, an H2S donor, 100 µM attenuated HENECA (a selective A2A receptor agonist, 10-200 nM induced β-amyloid (1-42 (Aβ42 production in SH-SY5Y cells. NaHS also interfered with HENECA-stimulated production and post-translational modification of amyloid precursor protein (APP by inhibiting its maturation. Measurement of the C-terminal APP fragments generated from its enzymatic cleavage by β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1 showed that NaHS did not have any significant effect on β-secretase activity. However, the direct measurements of HENECA-elevated γ-secretase activity and mRNA expressions of presenilins suggested that the suppression of Aβ42 production in NaHS pretreated cells was mediated by inhibiting γ-secretase. NaHS induced reductions were accompanied by similar decreases in intracellular cAMP levels and phosphorylation of cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB. NaHS significantly reduced the elevated cAMP and Aβ42 production caused by forskolin (an adenylyl cyclase, AC agonist alone or forskolin in combination with IBMX (a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, but had no effect on those caused by IBMX alone. Moreover, pretreatment with NaHS significantly attenuated HENECA-elevated AC activity and mRNA expressions of various AC isoforms. These data suggest that NaHS may preferentially suppress AC activity when it was stimulated. In conclusion, H2S attenuated HENECA induced Aβ42 production in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells through inhibiting γ-secretase via a cAMP dependent pathway.

  20. Combined borax and tannin treatment of stored dairy manure to reduce bacterial populations and hydrogen sulfide emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Anaerobic digestion of organic residues in stored livestock manure is associated with the production of odors and emissions. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is one such emission that can reach hazardous levels during manure storage and handling, posing a risk to both farmers and livestock. New te...

  1. Renewable biocatalyst for swine manure treatment and mitigation of odorous VOCs, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions: Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comprehensive control of odors, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), ammonia (NH3), and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with swine production is a critical need. The objective of this paper is to review the use of soybean peroxidase (SBP) and peroxides as a manure additive to mitigate emissions of odor...

  2. Phase Stability and Electronic Structure of Prospective Sb-Based Mixed Sulfide and Iodide 3D Perovskite (CH3NH3)SbSI2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianyang; Wang, Xiaoming; Yan, Yanfa; Mitzi, David B

    2018-06-29

    Lead-free antimony-based mixed sulfide and iodide perovskite phases have recently been reported to be synthesized experimentally and to exhibit reasonable photovoltaic performance. Through a combination of experimental validation and computational analysis, we show no evidence of the formation of the mixed sulfide and iodide perovskite phase, MASbSI 2 (MA = CH 3 NH 3 + ), and instead that the main products are a mixture of the binary and ternary compounds (Sb 2 S 3 and MA 3 Sb 2 I 9 ). Density functional theory calculations also indicate that such a mixed sulfide and iodide perovskite phase should be thermodynamically less stable compared with binary/ternary anion-segregated secondary phases and less likely to be synthesized under equilibrium conditions. Additionally, band structure calculations show that this mixed sulfide and iodide phase, if possible to synthesize (e.g., under nonequilibrium conditions), should have a suitable direct band gap for photovoltaic application.

  3. Incorporating GOES Satellite Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) Retrievals to Improve Biogenic Emission Estimates in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; White, Andrew T.; Pour Biazar, Arastoo; McNider, Richard T.; Cohan, Daniel S.

    2018-01-01

    This study examines the influence of insolation and cloud retrieval products from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) system on biogenic emission estimates and ozone simulations in Texas. Compared to surface pyranometer observations, satellite-retrieved insolation and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) values tend to systematically correct the overestimation of downwelling shortwave radiation in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The correlation coefficient increases from 0.93 to 0.97, and the normalized mean error decreases from 36% to 21%. The isoprene and monoterpene emissions estimated by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature are on average 20% and 5% less, respectively, when PAR from the direct satellite retrieval is used rather than the control WRF run. The reduction in biogenic emission rates using satellite PAR reduced the predicted maximum daily 8 h ozone concentration by up to 5.3 ppbV over the Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) region on some days. However, episode average ozone response is less sensitive, with a 0.6 ppbV decrease near DFW and 0.3 ppbV increase over East Texas. The systematic overestimation of isoprene concentrations in a WRF control case is partially corrected by using satellite PAR, which observes more clouds than are simulated by WRF. Further, assimilation of GOES-derived cloud fields in WRF improved CAMx model performance for ground-level ozone over Texas. Additionally, it was found that using satellite PAR improved the model's ability to replicate the spatial pattern of satellite-derived formaldehyde columns and aircraft-observed vertical profiles of isoprene.

  4. Anoxic sulfide biooxidation using nitrite as electron acceptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, Qaisar; Zheng Ping; Cai Jing; Wu Donglei; Hu, Baolan; Li Jinye

    2007-01-01

    Biotechnology can be used to assess the well being of ecosystems, transform pollutants into benign substances, generate biodegradable materials from renewable sources, and develop environmentally safe manufacturing and disposal processes. Simultaneous elimination of sulfide and nitrite from synthetic wastewaters was investigated using a bioreactor. A laboratory scale anoxic sulfide-oxidizing (ASO) reactor was operated for 135 days to evaluate the potential for volumetric loading rates, effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and substrate concentration on the process performance. The maximal sulfide and nitrite removal rate