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Sample records for biogenic opal content

  1. The occurrence and significance of biogenic opal in the regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Jonathan

    2003-02-01

    Biogenic opal produced by vascular plants, diatoms, and siliceous sponges have been found in soils and terrestrial sediments of all continents except Antarctica since the middle of the 19th century. The opal particles range in size from fine silt to fine sand. Almost all soils contain detectable opal up to levels of 2-3%, and a significant number contain values in excess of 5%. Even higher values have been found from soils and sediments of all continents in a wide range of soil types. The most important factor is poor soil drainage and seasonal to permanent water logging. This encourages the proliferation of silica producing organisms. Such conditions have been found in the soils and aquatic sediments of the monsoonal tropics, tropical rain forests, temperate forests, tropical savanna, tropical islands, semi-arid grasslands and savanna, and temperate woodland and grassland. The presence of a volcanic substrate also appears favourable in some cases, but is not necessary. Biogenic opal preferentially collects in the A horizon of soils and, to a lesser extent, in the B horizon. This preferential distribution facilitates identification of palaeosols in stacked soil sequences. Biogenic opal is also a component of windblown dust, even in arid environments. Biogenic opal is significant to regolith processes in a number of ways. Firstly, as in the case in marine environments, it is likely to be important in silica cycling and storage because of its greater lability compared to quartz. Secondly, dissolution and reprecipitation of opal A as opal CT or micro-quartz may play a role in cementation and silicification of regolith to form silica hardpans and silcrete. Thirdly, the organisms that form biogenic opal can have considerable palaeoenvironmental significance and be valuable in reconstructing regolith evolution. Finally, some forms of biogenic silica, in particular sponge spicules, can present a health hazard. Their high abundance in some soils and sediments needs to be

  2. Stable silicon isotope signatures of marine pore waters - Biogenic opal dissolution versus authigenic clay mineral formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Claudia; Doering, Kristin; Wallmann, Klaus; Scholz, Florian; Sommer, Stefan; Grasse, Patricia; Geilert, Sonja; Frank, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Dissolved silicon isotope compositions have been analysed for the first time in pore waters (δ30SiPW) of three short sediment cores from the Peruvian margin upwelling region with distinctly different biogenic opal content in order to investigate silicon isotope fractionation behaviour during early diagenetic turnover of biogenic opal in marine sediments. The δ30SiPW varies between +1.1‰ and +1.9‰ with the highest values occurring in the uppermost part close to the sediment-water interface. These values are of the same order or higher than the δ30Si of the biogenic opal extracted from the same sediments (+0.3‰ to +1.2‰) and of the overlying bottom waters (+1.1‰ to +1.5‰). Together with dissolved silicic acid concentrations well below biogenic opal saturation, our collective observations are consistent with the formation of authigenic alumino-silicates from the dissolving biogenic opal. Using a numerical transport-reaction model we find that approximately 24% of the dissolving biogenic opal is re-precipitated in the sediments in the form of these authigenic phases at a relatively low precipitation rate of 56 μmol Si cm-2 yr-1. The fractionation factor between the precipitates and the pore waters is estimated at -2.0‰. Dissolved and solid cation concentrations further indicate that off Peru, where biogenic opal concentrations in the sediments are high, the availability of reactive terrigenous material is the limiting factor for the formation of authigenic alumino-silicate phases.

  3. Biogenic opal production changes in the Gulf of Alaska (IODP Expedition 341 Site U1417) during the Pliocene to Miocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khim, B. K.; Kim, S.; Asahi, H.

    2016-12-01

    IODP Expedition 341 Site U1417 (56o57.59'N, 147o6.59'W, 4200 m) is located in the distal Surveyor Fan in the Gulf of Alaska, Northeast Pacific. In this study, we documented biogenic opal content and its mass accumulation rate using a total of 445 sediments from Hole U1417D (below core 43X, 275 CSF-A m) and from Hole U1417E (below core 14R, 465 CSF-A m) which were assigned to Pliocene-Miocene epoch on the basis of shipboard age model. Biogenic opal content and MAR were generally low (<10% and 0.5 g/cm2/kyr, respectively) throughout the core. A significant offset of biogenic opal contents between Site U1417 and Site 887 (54o21.9'N, 148o26.8'W, 3633 m) is observed; much lower at Site U1417. However, biogenic opal content was distinctively high (20 to 40%) at 23 Ma, 15 Ma, 12 Ma, and 8 Ma, which correspond to the lithologic unit changes. These intervals are also characterized by low NGR, MS, and linear sedimentation rate (LSR), indicating the sediment deposition under warm climate/less glacier influence. Thus, the intervals seem to correspond to climatic optimums during the Miocene. Based on terrigenous MAR at Site 887, terrigenous materials supplied by glacial denudation increased greatly since the Northern Hemisphere Glaciation (NHG; 3.5-2.5 Ma). However, Site U1417 shows that high MS representing the terrestrial input occurred far earlier since 8 Ma. It may imply that the formation of glacier in the Gulf of Alaska began earlier or that terrestrial material input was enhanced by sea-ice or turbidite. Intermittent peaks of biogenic opal content and MAR after 8 Ma coincided with the occurrence of cold water/littoral and neritic diatoms and deep cold water radiolarian species, which is likely related to gradual glaciation. Biogenic opal productivity was high during the early Pliocene (5-3.5 Ma), and then it decreased during the NHG.

  4. The Effects of Mg and Al on Diagenetically Induced Phase Changes in Biogenic Opal-A: Implications for Biogenic Silica as Paleoenvironmental Proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryer, A. D.; Dodd, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Oxygen variations in biogenic opal (e.g. diatom frustules, sponge spicules) have been shown to be reliable proxies of paleoenvironmental conditions such as water temperature and salinity; however, diagenetic processes may alter these values by several permil. In marine sediments, a primary concern is the effect of opal phase changes on the chemical and structural composition of the diatom silica. For example, oxygen isotope values of opal in the Monterey Formation, California, are well correlated with the phase change from opal-A to opal-CT and microcrystal quartz as a result of increasing geothermal temperatures with depth (Murata et al., 1997). Additionally, a number of studies have suggested that the presence of metallic cations (e.g. Mg, Al, Fe) in host sediments may affect the rate of phase transitions from opal-A to opal-CT during diagenesis. However, the timing and oxygen isotope fractionation associated with opal phase changes is not well constrained. Opal-A from cultured marine diatoms (Thalassiosira weissflogii) was subjected to elevated temperatures (150°C) in acid digestion vessels for 4 - 6 weeks to initiate opal-CT phase changes. During the experiments, magnesium carbonate (MgCO3) and aluminum chloride (AlCl3) were added to pure diatom silica to constrain the effects of Mg and Al on the timing of opal-CT formation and quantify the structural and isotopic (δ18O) changes that occur during these transitions.

  5. Regional variations in the fluxes of foraminifera carbonate, coccolithophorid carbonate and biogenic opal in the northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Gaye

    species. r 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Northern Indian Ocean; Particle flux; Calcium carbonate; Biogenic opal; Sediment traps; Temporal and spatial variability 1. Introduction northern Indian Ocean V. Ramaswamy a,C3 , B. Gaye b a... coccolithophorid carbonate and biogenic opal in the 271–293 www.elsevier.com/locate/dsr ARTICLE IN PRESS V. Ramaswamy, B. Gaye / Deep-Sea Research I 53 (2006) 271–293272 lesser extent pteropods. Diatom frustules are made up of opal while coccolithophorids...

  6. OPAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, David

    1991-01-01

    The kernel of the OPAL (Omni Purpose Apparatus for LEP) collaboration at CERN's LEP electron-positron collider came from the JADE (JApan, Deutschland, England) experiment at the lower energy PETRA electron positron collider at DESY, Hamburg. The name of a semi-precious stone is a reminder of the JADE tradition, while the spelled-out version conveys versatility

  7. Silicon Isotopes of Marine Pore Water: Tracking the Destiny of Marine Biogenic Opal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassarino, L.; Hendry, K. R.

    2017-12-01

    Silicon isotopes (δ30Si) are a powerful tool for the studying of the past and present silicon cycles, which is closely linked to the carbon cycle. Siliceous phytoplankton, such as diatoms, as one of the major conveyors of carbon to marine sediments. δ30Si from fossil diatoms has been shown to represent past silicic acid (DSi) utilization in the photic zone, since the lighter isotope is preferentially incorporated in their skeleton, the frustule. This assumes that species in the sediments depict past blooms and that frustules are preserved in their initial state during burial. Here we present new silicon isotopes data of sea water and pore water of deep marine sediments from two contrasted environments, the Equatorial Atlantic and West Antarctic Peninsula. δ30Si and DSi concentration, of both sea water and pore water, are negatively correlated. Marine biogenic opal dissolution can be tracked using δ30Si signature of pore water as lighter signals and high DSi concentrations are associated with the biogenic silica. Our data enhances post depositional and diagenesis processes during burial with a clear highlight on the sediment water interface exchanges.

  8. BIOGENIC AMINES CONTENT IN DIFFERENT WINE SAMPLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Kántor

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-five samples of different Slovak wines before and after filtration were analysed in order to determine the content of eight biogenic amines (tryptamine, phenylalanine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, spermidine and spermine. The method involves extraction of biogenic amines from wine samples with used dansyl chloride. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC was used for determination of biogenic amines equipped with a Rapid Resolution High Definition (RRHD, DAD detectors and Extend-C18 LC column (50 mm x 3.0 mm ID, 1.8 μm particle size. In this study the highest level of biogenic amine in all wine samples represent tryptamine (TRM with the highest content 170.9±5.3 mg/L in Pinot Blanc wine. Phenylalanine (PHE cadaverine (CAD, histamine (HIS and spermidine (SPD were not detected in all wines; mainly SPD was not detected in 16 wines, HIS not detected in 14 wines, PHE and CAD not detected in 2 wines. Tyramine (TYR, spermine (SPN and putrescine (PUT were detected in all wines, but PUT and SPN in very low concentration. The worst wine samples with high biogenic amine content were Saint Laurent (BF, Pinot Blanc (S and Pinot Noir (AF.

  9. A review of the Si cycle in the modern ocean: recent progress and missing gaps in the application of biogenic opal as a paleoproductivity proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragueneau, O.; Tréguer, P.; Leynaert, A.; Anderson, R. F.; Brzezinski, M. A.; DeMaster, D. J.; Dugdale, R. C.; Dymond, J.; Fischer, G.; François, R.; Heinze, C.; Maier-Reimer, E.; Martin-Jézéquel, V.; Nelson, D. M.; Quéguiner, B.

    2000-12-01

    Due to the major role played by diatoms in the biological pump of CO 2, and to the presence of silica-rich sediments in areas that play a major role in air-sea CO 2 exchange (e.g. the Southern Ocean and the Equatorial Pacific), opal has a strong potential as a proxy for paleoproductivity reconstructions. However, because of spatial variations in the biogenic silica preservation, and in the degree of coupling between the marine Si and C biogeochemical cycles, paleoreconstructions are not straitghtforward. A better calibration of this proxy in the modern ocean is required, which needs a good understanding of the mechanisms that control the Si cycle, in close relation to the carbon cycle. This review of the Si cycle in the modern ocean starts with the mechanisms that control the uptake of silicic acid (Si(OH) 4) by diatoms and the subsequent silicification processes, the regulatory mechanisms of which are uncoupled. This has strong implications for the direct measurement in the field of the kinetics of Si(OH) 4 uptake and diatom growth. It also strongly influences the Si:C ratio within diatoms, clearly linked to environmental conditions. Diatoms tend to dominate new production at marine ergoclines. At depth, they also succeed to form mats, which sedimentation is at the origin of laminated sediments and marine sapropels. The concentration of Si(OH) 4 with respect to other macronutrients exerts a major influence on diatom dominance and on the rain ratio between siliceous and calcareous material, which severely impacts surface waters pCO 2. A compilation of biogenic fluxes collected at about 40 sites by means of sediment traps also shows a remarkable pattern of increasing BSi:C org ratio along the path of the "conveyor belt", accompanying the relative enrichment of waters in Si compared to N and P. This observation suggests an extension of the Si pump model described by Dugdale and Wilkerson (Dugdale, R.C., Wilkerson, F.P., 1998. Understanding the eastern equatorial

  10. Technological factors affecting biogenic amine content in foods: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Gardini

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic amines (BAs are molecules which can be present in foods and, due to their toxicity, can cause adverse effects on the consumers. BAs are generally produced by microbial decarboxylation of amino acids in food products. The most significant BAs occurring in foods are histamine, tyramine, putrescine, cadaverine, tryptamine, 2-phenylethylamine, spermine, spermidine and agmatine. The importance of preventing the excessive accumulation of BAs in food is related to their impact on human health and food quality. Quality criteria in connection with the presence of BAs in food and food products are necessary from a toxicological point of view. This is particularly important in fermented foods in which the massive microbial proliferation required for obtaining specific products is often relater with BA accumulation. In this review, up-to-date information and recent discoveries about technological factors affecting biogenic amine content in foods are reviewed. Specifically, BA forming-microorganism and decarboxylation activity, genetic and metabolic organization of decarboxylases, risk associated to BAs (histamine, tyramine toxicity and other BAs, environmental factors influencing BA formation (temperature, salt concentration, pH. In addition, the technological factors for controlling BA production (use of starter culture, technological additives, effects of packaging, other non-thermal treatments, metabolising BA by microorganisms, effects of pressure treatments on BA formation and antimicrobial substances are addressed.

  11. The isotopic composition of valves and organic tissue of diatoms grown in steady state cultures under varying conditions of temperature, light and nutrients. Implications for the interpretation of oxygen isotopes from sedimentary biogenic opal as proxies of environmental variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalczyk, K.

    2006-05-01

    The oxygen isotopes of diatomaceous silica from marine and freshwater sediments are frequently used as indicators of the palaeotemperature development, particularly in cases where calcareous microfossils are rare or absent. With regard to terrestrial waters it is unknown whether or not palaeotemperature scale can be used in a limnic ecosystem. Due to the fact that the seasonal variations in lakes are larger than in oceans, specific problems arise when working with freshwater sediments. Thus, an understanding of the contribution of the various factors (e.g. temperature, light nutrients, competition) influencing the formation of isotope signals in biogenic opal is a prerequisite for the accurate interpretation of environmental processes. Since it is impossible to examine the influence of a single parameter under natural ecosystem conditions due to permanent changes of the environment, laboratory experiments with single diatom species are needed. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between the oxygen isotope variations in biogenic opal and different environmental parameters using steady state cultures with diatoms. It should be examined whether or not the different diatom species grown under identical conditions show equal oxygen isotope ratios (species relationship), if variations of the water temperature induce variations of the oxygen isotope ratio (relationship with temperature), variable parameters such as light intensity and nitrate concentration influence the isotope ratio, and if vital effects (e.g. growth rate) lead to variations of the oxygen isotope ratio. (orig.)

  12. The isotopic composition of valves and organic tissue of diatoms grown in steady state cultures under varying conditions of temperature, light and nutrients. Implications for the interpretation of oxygen isotopes from sedimentary biogenic opal as proxies of environmental variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczyk, K.

    2006-05-15

    The oxygen isotopes of diatomaceous silica from marine and freshwater sediments are frequently used as indicators of the palaeotemperature development, particularly in cases where calcareous microfossils are rare or absent. With regard to terrestrial waters it is unknown whether or not palaeotemperature scale can be used in a limnic ecosystem. Due to the fact that the seasonal variations in lakes are larger than in oceans, specific problems arise when working with freshwater sediments. Thus, an understanding of the contribution of the various factors (e.g. temperature, light nutrients, competition) influencing the formation of isotope signals in biogenic opal is a prerequisite for the accurate interpretation of environmental processes. Since it is impossible to examine the influence of a single parameter under natural ecosystem conditions due to permanent changes of the environment, laboratory experiments with single diatom species are needed. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between the oxygen isotope variations in biogenic opal and different environmental parameters using steady state cultures with diatoms. It should be examined whether or not the different diatom species grown under identical conditions show equal oxygen isotope ratios (species relationship), if variations of the water temperature induce variations of the oxygen isotope ratio (relationship with temperature), variable parameters such as light intensity and nitrate concentration influence the isotope ratio, and if vital effects (e.g. growth rate) lead to variations of the oxygen isotope ratio. (orig.)

  13. Measurement of carbon storage in landfills from the biogenic carbon content of excavated waste samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Cruz, Florentino B; Chanton, Jeffrey P; Barlaz, Morton A

    2013-10-01

    Landfills are an anaerobic ecosystem and represent the major disposal alternative for municipal solid waste (MSW) in the U.S. While some fraction of the biogenic carbon, primarily cellulose (Cel) and hemicellulose (H), is converted to carbon dioxide and methane, lignin (L) is essentially recalcitrant. The biogenic carbon that is not mineralized is stored within the landfill. This carbon storage represents a significant component of a landfill carbon balance. The fraction of biogenic carbon that is not reactive in the landfill environment and therefore stored was derived for samples of excavated waste by measurement of the total organic carbon, its biogenic fraction, and the remaining methane potential. The average biogenic carbon content of the excavated samples was 64.6±18.0% (average±standard deviation), while the average carbon storage factor was 0.09±0.06g biogenic-C stored per g dry sample or 0.66±0.16g biogenic-C stored per g biogenic C. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Quantitative X-ray methods of amorphous content and crystallinity determination of SiO2, in Quartz and Opal mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketabdari, M.R.; Ahmadi, K.; Esmaeilnia Shirvani, A.; Tofigh, A.

    2001-01-01

    X-ray diffraction technique is commonly used for qualitative analysis of minerals, and has also been successfully used for quantitative measurements. In this research, the matrix flushing and a new X-ray diffraction method have been used for the determination of crystallinity and amorphous content of Opal and Quartz mixture. The PCAPD is used to determine the quantitative analysis of these two minerals

  15. Assessing Biogenic Methane Content in Various Peatland Landforms Using GPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsekian, A.; Comas, X.; Nolan, J.; Glaser, P.; Chanton, J.; Slater, L.

    2008-12-01

    Northern peatlands are known to be a source of biogenic methane, although efforts to accurately quantify their impact on the global carbon budget are ongoing. An important step towards a better understanding of the dynamics of methane releases to the atmosphere is to identify peatland landforms (i.e. raised bog, fen water track, open pools) where gas is accumulating in the subsurface compared to places where there is little subsurface methane. Additionally, it is important to identify areas of the vertical peat profile where high volumes of free-phase methane are present. In this study, we use ground penetrating radar (GPR) to acquire data on where free-phase gas (FPG) methane may be accumulating within the peat strata, and then make comparisons between various peatland landforms. 1-dimensional GPR common mid-point velocity analysis has been coupled with innovative subsurface gas sampling to identify the areas within northern peatlands that have significant gas trapped below confining layers in the subsurface. Gas samples are evaluated for total recovered volume and total methane concentration in order to support the GPR findings. Traditional 2-dimensional radar profiles were used to identify and estimate the depth at which laterally continuous woody confining layers are present, and therefore zones where gas can be expected to be found. By using 1-D, 2-D and direct sampling methods, it is now possible to identify potential areas of gas accumulation with a higher level of confidence.

  16. Studies of levels of biogenic amines in meat samples in relation to the content of additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzębska, Aneta; Kowalska, Sylwia; Szłyk, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The impact of meat additives on the concentration of biogenic amines and the quality of meat was studied. Fresh white and red meat samples were fortified with the following food additives: citric and lactic acids, disodium diphosphate, sodium nitrite, sodium metabisulphite, potassium sorbate, sodium chloride, ascorbic acid, α-tocopherol, propyl 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoate (propyl gallate) and butylated hydroxyanisole. The content of spermine, spermidine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, tryptamine and 2-phenylethylamine was determined by capillary isotachophoretic methods in meat samples (fresh and fortified) during four days of storage at 4°C. The results were applied to estimate the impact of the tested additives on the formation of biogenic amines in white and red meat. For all tested meats, sodium nitrite, sodium chloride and disodium diphosphate showed the best inhibition. However, cadaverine and putrescine were characterised by the biggest changes in concentration during the storage time of all the additives. Based on the presented data for the content of biogenic amines in meat samples analysed as a function of storage time and additives, we suggest that cadaverine and putrescine have a significant impact on meat quality.

  17. BIOGENIC AMINE CONTENT IN “PECORINO DEL PARCO DI MIGLIARINO - SAN ROSSORE”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Forzale

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic amines (BAs can be naturally present in several foods. They are mainly produced in large amounts by amino acid decarboxylases activity of bacteria. The BAs content has been associated to the quality of raw material and to fermentation or spoilage processes. The aim of the present study was to asses the content of BAs (single and total value in the core and in the external part of a Tuscan traditional pecorino cheese. Sixteen “Pecorino del Parco di Migliarino-San Rossore” cheeses belonging to same batch were tested during ripening time, up to 5 months. BAs content was analyzed by an HPLC-UV method. The BAs content was significantly higher in the core than in the external part. Tyramine was the amine most frequently detected and largely quantized, followed by putrescine, histamine and cadaverine.

  18. Influence of Gamma Irradiation on Biogenic Amine Contents and Pathogenic Bacteria in Spinach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, H.A.S.

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation at doses 1, 2, 4 and 6 kGy as compared with blanching at 95°C/3 min on biogenic amine contents and pathogenic bacteria in spinach leaves (Spinacia oleracea L.). The results indicated that tryptamine and β- phenylethylamine were not detected while histamine was the major amine detected at concentration of 12.55 mg/100g of wet weight. Blanching at 95°C/3 min significantly reduced the content of histamine, putrescine and tyramine in spinach while significantly increased the content of cadaverine. Gamma irradiation at different doses significantly reduced the contents of histamine and tyramine while significantly increased the content of cadaverine. However, putrescine content was increased significantly after subjected to doses 1 and 2 kGy while the doses 4 and 6 kGy significantly reduced it. Regarding to microbiological analysis in spinach, it could be noticed that total bacterial count, Enterobacteriaceae, coliform group, yeast, mould, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella spp. in fresh spinach were 5.97, 4.40, 2.53, 2.11, 1.40, 1.48 and 1.18 log cfu/g, respectively. Changes in microbiological characters (cfu/g) in spinach by different gamma irradiation doses and blanching were also followed. It could be noticed that the total bacterial count, Enterobacteriaceae, coliform group, yeast, mould, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella spp. were significantly decreased after treatment with blanching and gamma irradiation and these microorganisms were not detected after being subjected to 4 and 6 kGy. It could be concluded that blanching at 95°C/3 min or gamma irradiation at dose 2 kGy can be used to control the pathogenic bacteria and reduce biogenic amine (histamine, putrescine and tyramine) in spinach

  19. The impacts of temperature, alcoholic degree and amino acids content on biogenic amines and their precursor amino acids content in red wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, C; Bordiga, M; Pérez-Álvarez, E P; Travaglia, F; Arlorio, M; Salinas, M R; Coïsson, J D; Garde-Cerdán, T

    2017-09-01

    The aim was to study how factors such as temperature, alcoholic degree, and amino acids supplementation are able to influence the content of tyramine, histamine, 2-phenylethylamine, tryptamine and their precursor amino acids in winemaking process. Biogenic amines and amino acids were quantified at the beginning, middle and end of alcoholic fermentation, and at the end of malolactic fermentation. In general, samples produced with amino acid supplementation did not show the highest concentrations of biogenic amines, except for histamine, which content increased with the addition of the four amino acids. The synthesis of tyramine was mainly affected by the temperature and alcoholic degree, the formation of phenylethylamine was largely influenced by alcoholic degree, and tryptamine synthesis principally depended on temperature. Interestingly, there was interaction between these three factors for the biogenic amines studied. In conclusion, winemaking conditions should be established depending on the biogenic amine which synthesis is required to be controlled. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. DiSC-OPAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemal, Mohammed Seifu; Pedersen, Rasmus; Iov, Florin

    2017-01-01

    of such systems. The simulation tool should be able to model Electrical Grid and flexible assets with different time scales and resolution levels fulfilling specific functionalities. In this paper DiSC-OPAL, an OPAL-RT compatible toolbox library for modelling of assets is presented. The library is suitable...

  1. Raman study of opal at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfan, G.; Wang, S.; Mao, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    More commonly known for their beauty and lore as gemstones, opals are also intriguing geological materials which may have potential for materials science applications. Opal lacks a definite crystalline structure, and is composed of an amorphous packing of hydrated silica (SiO2) spheroids, which provides us with a unique nano-scaled mineraloid with properties unlike those of other amorphous materials like glass. Opals from different localities were studied at high pressure using a diamond anvil cell to apply pressure and Raman spectroscopy to look at changes in bonding as pressure was increased. We first tested different samples from Virgin Valley, NV, Spencer, ID, Juniper Ridge, OR, and Australia, which contain varying amounts of water at ambient conditions, using Raman spectroscopy to determine if they were opal-CT (semicrystalline cristobalite-trydimite volcanic origin) or opal-A (amorphous sedimentary origin). We then used x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a diamond anvil cell to see how their bonding and structure changed under compression and to determine what effect water content had on their high pressure behavior. Comparison of our results on opal to other high pressure studies of amorphous materials like glass has implications from a geological and materials science standpoint.

  2. Biogenic amines content as a measure of the quality of wines of Abruzzo (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martuscelli, M; Arfelli, G; Manetta, A C; Suzzi, G

    2013-10-01

    Aim of this research was to study the effect of some agronomic and oenological factors on the content of biogenic amines as quality index of sixty-five Abruzzo wines. Sum of amines was found to be decreasing in the order: red (19.3±12.8mgL(-1)), rosé (9.20±6.34mgL(-1)), white (7.67±3.84mgL(-1)) wine. Significant differences in relationship among amines levels and chemical and chemico-physical characteristics of red, white and rosé wine are due to their different biotechnological process and winemaking. Besides the aging treatment, influential seems to be the effect of the winery, regardless of the area in which it is situated. The single amines significantly correlated with their sum were putrescine, histamine and tyramine, even if reached levels were below toxicity threshold, demonstrating a good quality of the wines of Abruzzo whose consumption is no risk to the health of the consumer following the rules of proper nutrition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Age-related changes in biogenic amine content and oxidative stress profile in the rat hypothalamus in hyperhomocysteinemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milyutina, Yu P; Pustygina, A V; Zaloznyaya, I V; Arutjunyan, A V

    2016-01-01

    The article presents a detailed analysis of correlations between the content of a variety of biogenic amines in the hypothalamic structures responsible for the luteinizing hormone releasing hormone synthesis and secretion (the medial preoptic area and median eminence) and such independent factors as total L-homocysteine plasma level elevation induced by L-methionine loading and aging. Both a nature and a pattern of changes in oxidative stress profile were evaluated. It was shown that ageing, when compared to hyperhomocysteinemia, is a determining factor influencing biogenic amine content in the studied hypothalamic structures. Unlike antioxidant defense system profile, considerable changes in macromolecule oxidative modification were not found, which evidences a balanced activity of pro- and antioxidant systems in the hypothalamus.

  4. OPAL Jet Chamber Prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. OPAL's central tracking system consists of (in order of increasing radius) a silicon microvertex detector, a vertex detector, a jet chamber, and z-chambers. All the tracking detectors work by observing the ionization of atoms by charged particles passing by: when the atoms are ionized, electrons are knocked out of their atomic orbitals, and are then able to move freely in the detector. These ionization electrons are detected in the dirfferent parts of the tracking system. This piece is a prototype of the jet chambers

  5. Trace elements in coloured opals using neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McOrist, G.D.; Smallwood, A. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a technique particularly suited to analysing opals since it is non-destructive and the silica matrix of opals is not prone to significant activation. It was used to determine the concentration of trace elements in 50 samples of orange, yellow, green, blue and pink opals as well as 18 samples of colourless opals taken from a number of recognised fields in Australia, Peru, Mexico and USA. The results were then evaluated to determine if a relationship existed between trace element content and opal colour. The mean concentration of most of the elements found in orange, yellow and colourless opals were similar with few exceptions. This indicated that, for these samples, colour is not related to the trace elements present. However, the trace element profile of the green, pink and blue opals was found to be significantly different with each colour having a much higher concentration of certain trace elements when compared with all other opals analysed. 7 refs.

  6. Trace elements in coloured opals using neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McOrist, G.D.; Smallwood, A.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a technique particularly suited to analysing opals since it is non-destructive and the silica matrix of opals is not prone to significant activation. It was used to determine the concentration of trace elements in 50 samples of orange, yellow, green, blue and pink opals as well as 18 samples of colourless opals taken from a number of recognised fields in Australia, Peru, Mexico and USA. The results were then evaluated to determine if a relationship existed between trace element content and opal colour. The mean concentration of most of the elements found in orange, yellow and colourless opals were similar with few exceptions. This indicated that, for these samples, colour is not related to the trace elements present. However, the trace element profile of the green, pink and blue opals was found to be significantly different with each colour having a much higher concentration of certain trace elements when compared with all other opals analysed. 7 refs

  7. Synthetic magnetic opals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tailor many technologically interesting nanostructured electronic materials [3]. In the present work we show that BiNi infiltrated into the opals is ferromagnetic with a ..... made possible this collaborative work at the Royal Institute of Technology. References. [1] Richard De La Rue, David McComb and Belinda Treble, AIP Conf.

  8. Effect of Steaming and Boiling on the Antioxidant Properties and Biogenic Amines Content in Green Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris Varieties of Different Colours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Preti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of boiling and steaming cooking methods were studied on total polyphenols, antioxidant capacity, and biogenic amines of three green bean varieties, purple, yellow, and green. The vegetables gave good values both for antioxidant capacity and for phenolics content, with the purple variety being the richest in healthful components. Both the heat treatments affected the antioxidant properties of these vegetables, with boiling that reduced the initial antioxidant capacity till 30% in the yellow variety, having the same trend for total polyphenols, with the major decrement of 43% in the green variety. On the contrary, biogenic amines significantly increased only after boiling in green and yellow variety, while purple variety did not show any changes in biogenic amines after cooking. The steaming method showed being better cooking approach in order to preserve the antioxidant properties of green beans varieties and to maintain the biogenic amines content at the lowest level.

  9. Inverted opal luminescent Ce-doped silica glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Scotti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Inverted opal Ce-doped silica glasses (Ce : Si molar ratio 1 ⋅ 10−3 were prepared by a sol-gel method using opals of latex microspheres as templates. The rare earth is homogeneously dispersed in silica host matrix, as evidenced by the absence of segregated CeO2, instead present in monolithic Ce-doped SG with the same cerium content. This suggests that the nanometric dimensions of bridges and junctions of the host matrix in the inverted opal structures favor the RE distribution avoiding the possible segregation of CeO2.

  10. BIOGENIC AMINE CONTENT AND CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL FEATURES OF ITALIAN FORMAGGIO DI FOSSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rea

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Formaggio di Fossa is an Italian traditional cheese of the Montefeltro area (Emilia Romagna and Marche regions characterized by a particular step of ripening that is carried out into pits (infossamento borne in the sandstone. Since the XIV century, the inhabitants were used to set food, especially cereals and cheese, into pits to preserve them during winter and to protect them from invaders. The aim of the present work is to study physical and chemical features of this product with particular reference to the presence of the most important biogenic amines ( -Phenylethylamine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, spermine and spermidine, compared with a control cheese fully ripened in factory. Formaggio di Fossa showed higher values of Aw, pH, humidity, proteins, pH 4,6-soluble nitrogen (NCN and water soluble nitrogen (NPN and much lower amounts of fat. Much higher amounts of total biogenic amines were detected in Formaggio di Fossa than in control cheese, where their concentration was very low. Cadaverine, putrescine and tyramine were the most concentrated biogenic amines. Nevertheless, thyramine was present at levels suggested as compatible with GMPs. Histamine was detected at low amounts, far from potentially toxic levels.

  11. Contribution of changes in opal productivity and nutrient distribution in the coastal upwelling systems to Late Pliocene/Early Pleistocene climate cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Etourneau

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The global Late Pliocene/Early Pleistocene cooling (~3.0–2.0 million years ago – Ma concurred with extremely high diatom and biogenic opal production in most of the major coastal upwelling regions. This phenomenon was particularly pronounced in the Benguela upwelling system (BUS, off Namibia, where it is known as the Matuyama Diatom Maximum (MDM. Our study focuses on a new diatom silicon isotope (δ30Si record covering the MDM in the BUS. Unexpectedly, the variations in δ30Si signal follow biogenic opal content, whereby the highest δ30Si values correspond to the highest biogenic opal content. We interpret the higher δ30Si values during the MDM as a result of a stronger degree of silicate utilisation in the surface waters caused by high productivity of mat-forming diatom species. This was most likely promoted by weak upwelling intensity dominating the BUS during the Late Pliocene/Early Pleistocene cooling combined with a large silicate supply derived from a strong Southern Ocean nutrient leakage responding to the expansion of Antarctic ice cover and the resulting stratification of the polar ocean 3.0–2.7 Ma ago. A similar scenario is hypothesized for other major coastal upwelling systems (e.g. off California during this time interval, suggesting that the efficiency of the biological carbon pump was probably sufficiently enhanced in these regions during the MDM to have significantly increased the transport of atmospheric CO2 to the deep ocean. In addition, the coeval extension of the area of surface water stratification in both the Southern Ocean and the North Pacific, which decreased CO2 release to the atmosphere, led to further enhanced atmospheric CO2 drawn-down and thus contributed significantly to Late Pliocene/Early Pleistocene cooling.

  12. Model Mineralisasi Pembentukan Opal Banten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chusni Ansori

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v5i3.100Opal is a beautiful precious gemstone that is equal or more valuable than diamond. In Indonesia, precious opal is found at the Lebak Regency, Province of Banten. Banten’s opal widely has been recognized due to its beautiful opalescence. This paper is a review of the last research; preliminary study of Banten’s opal, characteristics of opal-CT and determining of opal type from geochemical data, added by new data to compile concept and to make mineralization model. In order to fulfill these targets, field geology research and analysis of mineralog/gemology, petrography, X-RD, and major and trace element geochemistry have been done. The Banten’s opal is opal-CT showing opalescence (play of colour, weathering, and leaching silica from volcanic glass by dark grey claystone hosted. Mineralization model is divided into three periods; at Early Pliocene volcanic clastic sediments rich in volcanic glass occured as fluvial sediments. Afterwards, at Late Pliocene - Pleistocene folding, weathering and leaching of silica took place. Intensive jointing, faulting, and folding quickened weathering and leaching processes to formed opal at limb of anticline through Holocene. The prospecting area of Banten’s opal is in tuff unit with intercalation of conglomerate or pumiceous breccia, at limb of anticline. The host rock of opal is dark grey claystone which underlies polimict conglomerate/pebbly sandstone sequence with cross stratification, imbricated, and erossional stucture; more than 8 m deep.

  13. OPAL Netlogo Land Condition Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-15

    ER D C/ CE RL T R- 14 -1 2 Optimal Allocation of Land for Training and Non-training Uses (OPAL) OPAL Netlogo Land Condition Model...characteristics in tallgrass prairie. Journal of Vegetation Science 8:541–546. Biondini, M. E., B. D. Patton , and P. E. Nyren. 1998. Grazing intensity and

  14. OPAL Various Lead Glass Blocks

    CERN Document Server

    These lead glass blocks were part of a CERN detector called OPAL (one of the four experiments at the LEP particle detector). OPAL uses some 12 000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies in the electromagnetic calorimeter. This detector measured the energy deposited when electrons and photons were slowed down and stopped.

  15. Dismantling OPAL's cylindrical magnet core

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2001-01-01

    Lifting a handling device for dismounting the pressure bells, which are inside the cylindrical magnet coil on the central section of OPAL, on the right part of the photo. OPAL was a detector on the LEP accelerator, which ran from 1989 to 2000.

  16. Biocompatibility of crystalline opal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Silica nanoparticles are being developed as a host of biomedical and biotechnological applications. For this reason, there are more studies about biocompatibility of silica with amorphous and crystalline structure. Except hydrated silica (opal), despite is presents directly and indirectly in humans. Two sizes of crystalline opal nanoparticles were investigated in this work under criteria of toxicology. Methods In particular, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects caused by opal nanoparticles (80 and 120 nm) were evaluated in cultured mouse cells via a set of bioassays, methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT) and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Results 3T3-NIH cells were incubated for 24 and 72 h in contact with nanocrystalline opal particles, not presented significant statistically difference in the results of cytotoxicity. Genotoxicity tests of crystalline opal nanoparticles were performed by the BrdU assay on the same cultured cells for 24 h incubation. The reduction of BrdU-incorporated cells indicates that nanocrystalline opal exposure did not caused unrepairable damage DNA. Conclusions There is no relationship between that particles size and MTT reduction, as well as BrdU incorporation, such that the opal particles did not induce cytotoxic effect and genotoxicity in cultured mouse cells. PMID:23088559

  17. Biocompatibility of crystalline opal nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Ortiz Marlen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Silica nanoparticles are being developed as a host of biomedical and biotechnological applications. For this reason, there are more studies about biocompatibility of silica with amorphous and crystalline structure. Except hydrated silica (opal, despite is presents directly and indirectly in humans. Two sizes of crystalline opal nanoparticles were investigated in this work under criteria of toxicology. Methods In particular, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects caused by opal nanoparticles (80 and 120 nm were evaluated in cultured mouse cells via a set of bioassays, methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU. Results 3T3-NIH cells were incubated for 24 and 72 h in contact with nanocrystalline opal particles, not presented significant statistically difference in the results of cytotoxicity. Genotoxicity tests of crystalline opal nanoparticles were performed by the BrdU assay on the same cultured cells for 24 h incubation. The reduction of BrdU-incorporated cells indicates that nanocrystalline opal exposure did not caused unrepairable damage DNA. Conclusions There is no relationship between that particles size and MTT reduction, as well as BrdU incorporation, such that the opal particles did not induce cytotoxic effect and genotoxicity in cultured mouse cells.

  18. Trans- and cis-urocanic acid, biogenic amine and amino acid contents in ikan pekasam (fermented fish) produced from Javanese carp (Puntius gonionotus) and black tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzat, M A; Zare, D; Karim, R; Ghazali, H M

    2015-04-01

    Ikan pekasam is a fermented fish product produced in Malaysia and is usually made from freshwater fish with ground roasted uncooked rice as the main source of carbohydrate. In this study, the amino acid, biogenic amine, and trans- and cis-urocanic acid (UCA) contents of fifteen commercial samples of Ikan pekasam made from Javanese carp and black tilapia, that had undergone either natural or acid-assisted fermentation, were quantified. The latter includes either tamarind (Tamarindus indica) pulp or dried slices of Garcinia atroviridis fruit in the fermentation process. Results showed that there are no significant differences in most of the biogenic amines including histamine, while there are significant differences in total UCA content, and trans- and cis-UCA contents between the two samples. Differences in the amino acid contents were largely fish-dependent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of mesoscale eddies on the variability of biogenic flux in the northern and central Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vidya, P.J.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    -square analysis of SSHA confirmed the role of eddies in the observed higher biogenic fluxes. During the eddy events, enhanced opal flux suggested eddy-driven new production, while lower carbonate to opal ratio along with high organic carbon indicated large export...

  20. Superconductivity in Pb inverse opal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, Ali E.; Lee, Sergey B.; Zakhidov, Anvar A.; Baughman, Ray H.

    2007-01-01

    Type-II superconducting behavior was observed in highly periodic three-dimensional lead inverse opal prepared by infiltration of melted Pb in blue (D = 160 nm), green (D = 220 nm) and red (D = 300 nm) opals and followed by the extraction of the SiO 2 spheres by chemical etching. The onset of a broad phase transition (ΔT = 0.3 K) was shifted from T c = 7.196 K for bulk Pb to T c = 7.325 K. The upper critical field H c2 (3150 Oe) measured from high-field hysteresis loops exceeds the critical field for bulk lead (803 Oe) fourfold. Two well resolved peaks observed in the hysteresis loops were ascribed to flux penetration into the cylindrical void space that can be found in inverse opal structure and into the periodic structure of Pb nanoparticles. The red inverse opal shows pronounced oscillations of magnetic moment in the mixed state at low temperatures, T 0.9T c has been observed for all of the samples studied. The magnetic field periodicity of resistivity modulation is in good agreement with the lattice parameter of the inverse opal structure. We attribute the failure to observe pronounced modulation in magneto-resistive measurement to difficulties in the precision orientation of the sample along the magnetic field

  1. Dating fossil opal phytoliths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentfer, C.; Boyd, B.; Torrence, R.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Opal phytoliths are microscopic silica bodies formed by the precipitation of hydrated silica dioxide (SiO 2 nH 2 0) in, around and between cell walls. They are relatively resistant to degradation in most environments and thus, can occur in large quantities in palaeosediments. Consequently, they are valuable tools for environmental reconstruction. Furthermore, phytoliths are often the only recoverable organic material in well oxidised sediments, the occluded carbon provides the opportunity for dating sediment whose ages have previously been difficult to determine, and thus, increase the potential for fine resolution determination of environmental change. This poster describes the results of an investigation assessing the viability of AMS radiocarbon dating of fossil phytolith inclusions using samples from Garua Island, West New Britain, PNG. Thirteen phytolith samples, isolated from sediments previously dated using tephrastratigraphy and C14 dating of macroremains of nutshells and wood charcoal, were used in the analysis. As a control measure, thirteen parallel samples of microscopic charcoal were also dated using AMS. The results show that the AMS dates for the microscopic charcoal samples are consistent with ages anticipated from the other dating methods, for all but one sample. However, the dates for eight of the thirteen phytolith samples are considerably younger than expected. This bias could be explained by several factors, including downwashing of phytolith through soils, bioturbation, carbon exchange through the siliceous matrix of the phytolith bodies, and contamination from extraneous sources of modern carbon retained in the samples. Research is currently focusing on the investigation of these issues and selected samples are in the process of being retreated with strong oxidising agents to clear contaminants prior to re-dating. Further to this, a full investigation of one profile with a long sequence is underway. High concentrations of

  2. Drosophila ABC transporter mutants white, brown and scarlet have altered contents and distribution of biogenic amines in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borycz, J; Borycz, J A; Kubów, A; Lloyd, V; Meinertzhagen, I A

    2008-11-01

    Monoamines such as dopamine, histamine and serotonin (5-HT) are widely distributed throughout the brain of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, where many of their actions have been investigated. For example, histamine is released from photoreceptor synapses in the lamina neuropile of the visual system. Mutations of the genes white, an important eye pigmentation marker in fly genetics that encodes an ABC transporter, and its binding partner brown, cause neural phenotypes not readily reconciled solely with actions in eye pigmentation. We find that flies mutant for these genes, and another binding partner, scarlet, have about half the wild-type amount of histamine in the head, as well as reduced 5-HT and dopamine. These differences parallel reductions in immunoreactivity to the corresponding biogenic amines. They also correlate with the amine content of fractions after differential centrifugation of head homogenates. Thus, most of the amine is found in the vesicle-rich fraction of wild-type head homogenates, whereas it is found in the supernatant fractions from white, brown and scarlet flies. White co-expresses in lamina epithelial glia with Ebony, which conjugates histamine to beta-alanine. Histamine is then released when the conjugate is hydrolyzed in photoreceptors, by Tan. Mutant white ameliorates the effects of tan on head histamine whereas it exacerbates the effects of ebony. Our results are consistent with the proposal that histamine uptake by the epithelial glia may be white dependent. Behavioral abnormalities in white, brown and scarlet mutants could arise because aminergic neurons in the Drosophila brain have reduced amine for release.

  3. Use of Staphylococcus xylosus as a starter culture in dried sausages: effect on the biogenic amine content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardini, Fausto; Martuscelli, Maria; Crudele, Maria Antonietta; Paparella, Antonello; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2002-07-01

    The main objective of this work was to investigate if the use of Staphylococcus xylosus S81 as a starter culture in sausage production can influence the amount of histamine during ripening, and the concentration of the other most important biogenic amines, by influencing the activity of the microbial amino oxidases as well as the aminoacid decarboxylases. The results confirm that the biogenic amines presence in foods is the consequence of a complex equilibrium between the composition of the medium and the enzymatic activities of the microbial population. In addition, the results suggest that the presence and relative activity of amino oxidases should be considered as an important characteristic in the selection of starter cultures used in the production of fermented foods.

  4. Effects of heating on fire opal and diaspore from Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatipoǧlu, M.; Can, N.; Karali, T.

    2010-04-01

    Fire opal (SiO 2· nH 2O) and diaspore [Al(OH)O] are two different precious and rare mineral species with high water content. While these species are being cut and polished to make gems, defect-induced weaknesses such as fragility, splintering, and cracking become apparent since the temperature of the mineral species may be increased to high temperatures during the process. These deformations may be broadly related to water loss (molecular (H 2O) and hydroxyl (OH) group) and transformation of the base building components and/or inclusion minerals. In this study, thermal properties and thermal stability as dehydratial behaviors of both gem quality fire opal (SiO 2· nH 2O) from the Şaphane region (Kütahya, Turkey) and gem quality diaspore (AlOHO) from the Milas region (Mug˘la, Turkey), including some associated mineral inclusions, were studied by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), Fourier transform-Infrared absorption (FTIR) spectroscopy and thermal analysis (DTA/TGA). During heating to 1400 °C, DTA/TGA patterns indicated that the weight losses of the fire opal and diaspore were due to the water loss only, and that these losses occur in the temperature ranges between about 342 and 722 °C in fire opal, and between about 592 and 718 °C in diaspore. In addition, after making some corrections concerning the mass gain observed, being due to the drift with buoyancy effect of the atmosphere, in their TGA curves, the fire opal shows a mass loss of 7.942%, and one distinctive sharp endotherm at 1089.99 °C and seven weaker endotherms, whereas the diaspore shows a mass loss of about 13.826%, and one distinctive sharpest endotherm at 650.47 °C and four weaker endotherms.

  5. The OPAL muon barrel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akers, R.J.; Allison, J.; Ashton, P.; Bahan, G.A.; Baines, J.T.M.; Banks, J.N.; Barlow, R.J.; Barnett, S.; Beeston, C.; Chrin, J.T.M.; Clowes, S.G.; Davies, O.W.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Hinde, P.S.; Hughes-Jones, R.E.; Lafferty, G.D.; Loebinger, F.K.; Macbeth, A.A.; McGowan, R.F.; Moss, M.W.; Murphy, P.G.; Nijjhar, B.; O'Dowd, A.J.P.; Pawley, S.J.; Phillips, P.D.; Richards, G.E.; Skillman, A.; Stephens, K.; Tresillian, N.J.; Wood, N.C.; Wyatt, T.R.

    1995-01-01

    The barrel part of the OPAL muon detector consists of 110 drift chambers forming four layers outside the hadron absorber. Each chamber covers an area of 1.2 m by up to 10.4 m and has two cells with wires parallel to the beam and a drift distance of 297 mm. A detailed description of the design, construction, operation and performance of the sub-detector is given. The system has been operating successfully since the start of LEP in 1989. ((orig.))

  6. The effect of Tetraneura ulmi L. galling process on the activity of amino acid decarboxylases and the content of biogenic amines in Siberian elm tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kmieć, K; Sempruch, C; Chrzanowski, G; Czerniewicz, P

    2018-02-01

    Tetraneura ulmi (L.), a member of Eriosomatinae subfamily, is one of the gall-forming aphids occurring on elms. Sap-sucking behaviour of founding mothers results in the formation of new plant organs. This study documents the changes in the content of plant biogenic amines (putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine, tryptamine, spermine and histamine) and key enzymes of their biosynthesis: lysine decarboxylase (LDC), tyrosine decarboxylase and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in galls and other parts of Siberian elm (Ulmus pumila L.) leaves during the galling process. The direction and intensity of these changes for particular amines and enzymes were dependent on the stage of gall development and part of the galling leaf. Generally, the amine content tended to increase in gall tissues during the 1st and 2nd period of the galling process and decreased in later phases. LDC and ODC activities were markedly enhanced, especially in gall tissues at the initial stage of the galling process.

  7. Opal instability: a relationship between water and microstructure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauviré, Boris; Thomas, Paul; Rondeau, Benjamin; Fritsch, Emmanuel

    2017-04-01

    Unlike other gem minerals, opals can suffer a change in their quality with time, resulting in a lack of confidence and hence marketability of this gemstone. The instability has been described and categorized into 2 main types (Aguilar et al., 2004; Aguilar-Reyes et al., 2005; Rondeau et al., 2011): cracking (development of a network of micro-fractures) and whitening (decrease of transparency). Available literature about opal instability, however, is restricted to its description. Although the process involved in the destabilization remains poorly understood, it has been proved, in at least one instance, to be associated with the release of water and a change of its speciation (Pearson, 1985; Paris et al, 2007). We propose 3 models to explain the cracking and/or whitening: (i) drying shrinkage of microstructural units, (ii) differential partial pressure between water enclosed in the opal and atmosphere and (iii) release of water yielding empty pores resulting in a strong light-scattering and hence opacity. In order to ascertain the model, a comprehensive set of opals from various origin and structure have been selected for investigation base on previous heating experiments which identified samples with a high susceptibility to crack or whiten. These samples will be investigated to identify the origins of the destabilization phenomena using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermal analysis (gravimetric (TG) and calorimetric (DSC)) and gas adsorption measurements. FTIR will allow the main species of water present in opals (molecular water and hydroxyl groups) and their proportion to be determined while TG will be used to accurately determine the total water content. Gas adsorption and thermoporosity (DSC) will be used to characterize the porosity (surface area, pore size and crystallizable water content). The characterization of water and microstructure for each opal may provide the potential link between the mobility of water in the microstructure and the observed

  8. The tile endcap at OPAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    A scintillating tile endcap subdetector (TE) has been developed for the OPAL endcap region in order to improve the OPAL trigger and provide valuable trigger redundancy for LEP II operation. The improved trigger is important because of significantly higher luminosities and consequently, higher background rates for measurements away from the Z0 resonance. The subdetector consists of a layer of scintillating tiles with embedded wavelength shifting fibres and optical signal transmission to remote phototubes. TE provides on-line determination of collision times to better than 10 ns thus permitting the tagging of a specific bunch in the bunch train operation mode which LEP II employs. This new capability provides a means of correcting the signal in the electromagnetic endcap (EE), which is sensitive to gate timing, and may provide the only means of determining the bunch crossing if the products are forward-going neutrals. Some of the unusual features of the TE detector that are of particular interest to detector designers are described in this paper. A more detailed description of the design, construction, and testing of TE will appear in a future publication. (orig.)

  9. Susceptibility of dry-cured tuna to oxidative deterioration and biogenic amines generation: I. Effect of NaCl content, antioxidant type and ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseiro, L C; Santos, C; Gonçalves, H; Serrano, C; Aleixo, C; Partidário, A; Lourenço, A R; Dias, M Abreu; da Ponte, D J B

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to assess lipid oxidation and biogenic amine (BA) development in "muxama", a dry-cured tuna muscle product, as affected by salt content, antioxidant type and ageing time. Overall, BA contents decreased with NaCl level (2785.1mgkg -1 , 1148.1mgkg -1 and 307.7mgkg -1 ) and increased with ageing time (366.2mgkg -1 , 1711.8mgkg -1 and 2959.2mgkg -1 in the final product (T0), and after 1 (T1) and 3 (T3) months of ageing, respectively). Regardless of the test conditions, the most concentrated BA was always tyramine. For the ageing periods considered in the present study, malondialdehyde formation was affected by the NaCl level, with the saltiest samples exhibiting lower content. Rosemary and sage extracts represented promising technological options for preserving muxama from oxidation and to minimize the presence of a fishy flavour and odour, but this treatment may cause the colour to lose some of its redness and become less appealing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Discrimination of some European vinegars with protected denomination of origin as a function of their amino acid and biogenic amine content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnici, Fabio; Durán-Guerrero, Enrique; Riponi, Claudio

    2016-08-01

    Twenty-three amino acids and 11 amines were quantified in 37 premium quality European vinegars (traditional balsamic vinegar of Modena, balsamic vinegars of Modena and vinegars of Jerez) by an HPLC-DAD method after derivatisation with diethyl ethoxymethylenmalonate. Data were assessed in the light of the differences in technology and raw materials. The total amount of amino acids ranged from 136 mg kg(-1) to 1450 mg kg(-1) in traditional balsamic vinegar of Modena and balsamic vinegar of Modena, respectively. Jerez vinegars had a mean content from 351 mg kg(-1) to 921 mg kg(-1) . Proline, glycine and γ-aminobutyric acid were the main amino acids while isoleucine was only found in balsamic vinegar of Modena at a concentration of <1 mg kg(-1) . Traditional balsamic vinegar of Modena had the lowest amount of biogenic amines. However, for all the vinegars, their concentration did not raise health issues. Based on the entire dataset, samples were successfully segregated and classified by means of principal component and cluster analysis. The amino acid and amine content in vinegars is influenced by the production process and raw materials. They may potentially contribute in characterising the European premium quality vinegars also for authentication or anti-fraud purposes. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Vibrational spectra of opal-based photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dovbeshko, G; Fesenko, O; Boyko, V; Romanyuk, V; Moiseyenko, V; Gorelik, V; Dolgov, L; Kiisk, V; Sildos, I

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic silica opals were investigated by infrared and Raman spectroscopies. Vibrational modes associated with molecular groups of opal globules and admixtures were detected. Similarities in Raman and infrared spectra of synthetic opal with reference fused and α-quartz indicate the presence of amorphous phase in opal globules. Also some spectral bands designate on modified optical stretching vibrations at 1000-1200 cm −1 and bigger amount of Si-H defects in photonic crystal.

  12. Photonic crystal waveguides in artificial opals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Kiyan, Roman; Neumeister, Andrei

    2008-01-01

    3D photonic crystals based on Si inverted-opals are numerically explored as hosts for effective air-channel waveguides, which can serve as parts of photonic circuits. Two basic shapes of straight waveguides are considered: cylindrical and a chain of spheres. Modelling shows that transmission is h...

  13. Opal web services for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jingyuan; Williams, Nadya; Clementi, Luca; Krishnan, Sriram; Li, Wilfred W

    2010-07-01

    Biomedical applications have become increasingly complex, and they often require large-scale high-performance computing resources with a large number of processors and memory. The complexity of application deployment and the advances in cluster, grid and cloud computing require new modes of support for biomedical research. Scientific Software as a Service (sSaaS) enables scalable and transparent access to biomedical applications through simple standards-based Web interfaces. Towards this end, we built a production web server (http://ws.nbcr.net) in August 2007 to support the bioinformatics application called MEME. The server has grown since to include docking analysis with AutoDock and AutoDock Vina, electrostatic calculations using PDB2PQR and APBS, and off-target analysis using SMAP. All the applications on the servers are powered by Opal, a toolkit that allows users to wrap scientific applications easily as web services without any modification to the scientific codes, by writing simple XML configuration files. Opal allows both web forms-based access and programmatic access of all our applications. The Opal toolkit currently supports SOAP-based Web service access to a number of popular applications from the National Biomedical Computation Resource (NBCR) and affiliated collaborative and service projects. In addition, Opal's programmatic access capability allows our applications to be accessed through many workflow tools, including Vision, Kepler, Nimrod/K and VisTrails. From mid-August 2007 to the end of 2009, we have successfully executed 239,814 jobs. The number of successfully executed jobs more than doubled from 205 to 411 per day between 2008 and 2009. The Opal-enabled service model is useful for a wide range of applications. It provides for interoperation with other applications with Web Service interfaces, and allows application developers to focus on the scientific tool and workflow development. Web server availability: http://ws.nbcr.net.

  14. Recent LEP 2 Results from OPAL

    CERN Document Server

    Glenzinski, D A

    1997-01-01

    In 1996, after another set of upgrades, LEP began running for the first time at center-of-mass energies above the W-pair production threshold. This new energy regime is rich in physics and offers new tests of the Standard Model, increased sensitivity for search physics, and precision W physics. We summarize the recent results from OPAL using 9.9 pb^-1 of data collected at \\sqrt s = 161.3 GeV from June to August 1996.

  15. Microstructural study of CdS/OPAL composites

    CERN Document Server

    Torrecillas, R; Brito, M E; López, C; Miguez, M; Meseguer, F; Moya, J S

    2000-01-01

    CdS/opal photonic materials have been characterised by transmission electron microscopy. The photonic properties of opals formed by CdS- SiO/sub 2/ nanospheres 380 nm in diameter, face-centred cubic ordered and with different CdS filling factors were studied by means of specular reflectance or transmission spectroscopy. It is shown that CdS semiconductor grows homogeneously in the opal interstices, in a cubic phase, with 24 nm being the microcrystal particle size. We show here that chemical bath deposition (CBD) is a useful method to fill the opal interstices, a crucial step for producing photonic band gap materials. (22 refs).

  16. Measurement of parton shower observables with OPAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of QCD coherence is presented based on a sample of about 397,000 e+e- hadronic annihilation events collected at √s = 91 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. The study is based on four recently proposed observables that are sensitive to coherence effects in the perturbative regime. The measurement of these observables is presented, along with a comparison with the predictions of different parton shower models. The models include both conventional parton shower models and dipole antenna models. Different ordering variables are used to investigate their influence on the predictions.

  17. Synthesis and photonic bandgap characterization of polymer inverse opals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miguez, H.; Meseguer, F.; Lopez, C. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Ciencia de Materiales; Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain). Centro Tecnologico de Ondas; Lopez-Tejeira, F.; Sanchez-Dehesa, J. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica de la Materia Condensada

    2001-03-16

    Polymer inverse opals with long-range order have been fabricated and their photonic crystal behavior examined. Good agreement between band structure calculations and experiment is found. It is envisaged that these inverse opals could be used for the modification of the electronic properties of incorporated luminescent materials and as matrices for the synthesis of spherical colloidal particles. (orig.)

  18. Biogenic Emission Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biogenic emissions sources come from natural sources and need to accounted for in photochemical grid models. They are computed using a model which utilizes spatial information on vegetation and land use.

  19. The nature of water in chalcedony and opal-C from brazilian agate geodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graetsch, H.; Flörke, O. W.; Miehe, G.

    1985-10-01

    The water species (H2O(SiOH) and H2O(mol)) of length-fast chalcedony and opal-C in Brazilian agates were studied with thermoanalytical, chemical and infrared absorption methods. Specific surfaces were measured with the BET nitrogen adsorption method and the specific densities were determined. Chalcedony and opal-C have fully hydrated crystal surfaces at the open porosity. They contain additional water at inner surfaces, which are closed micropores in the case of opal-C and regions of accumulated defects (e.g. twinlamellae boundaries) in chalcedony. All surfaces are covered with silanole groups, hydrogen-bonded to molecular water. Additional hydroxyl groups, weakly hydrogen bonded to the structural framework within the crystallites, are located at structural point defects. Wall-lining chalcedony ranges from translucent gray to milky white bands corresponding with decreasing total water content, the H2O(SiOH)/H2O(mol)-ratio, BET-surfaces and increasing density. The H2O(SiOH)/H2O(mol)-ratio is sensitive to subsequent hydrothermal treatment and indicates a low temperature formation of chalcedony.

  20. Influence of persistent exchangeable oxygen on biogenic silica δ18O in deep sea cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menicucci, A. J.; Spero, H. J.

    2016-12-01

    The removal of exchangeable oxygen from biogenic opal prior to IRMS analysis is critical during sample preparation. Exchangeable oxygen is found in the form of hydroxyl and between defects within the amorphous silicate lattice structure. Typical analytical procedures utilize a variety of dehydroxylation methods to eliminate this exchangeable oxygen, including vacuum dehydroxylation and prefluorination. Such methods are generally considered sufficient for elimination of non-lattice bound oxygen that would obfuscate environmental oxygen isotopic signals contained within the silicate tetrahedra. δ18O data that are then empirically calibrated against modern hydrographic data, and applied down core in paleoceanographic applications. We have conducted a suite of experiments on purified marine opal samples using the new microfluorination method (Menicucci et al., 2013). Our data demonstrate that the amount of exchangeable oxygen in biogenic opal decreases as sample age/depth in core increases. These changes are not accounted for by current researchers. Further, our experimental data indicate that vacuum dehydroxylation does not eliminate all exchangeable oxygen, even after hydroxyl is undetectable. We have conducted experiments to quantify the amount of time necessary to ensure vacuum dehydroxylation has eliminated exchangeable oxygen so that opal samples are stable prior to δ18Odiatom analysis. Our experiments suggest that previously generated opal δ18O data may contain a variable down-core offset due to the presence of exchangeable, non-lattice bound oxygen sources. Our experiments indicate that diatom silica requires dehydroxylation for ≥ 44 hours at 1060oC to quantitatively remove all non-lattice bound oxygen. Further, this variable amount of exchangeable oxygen may be responsible for some of the disagreement between existing empirical calibrations based on core-top diatom frustule remains. Analysis of δ18Odiatom values after this long vacuum dehydroxylation

  1. Calibration of the HAO standard opal filter set. Technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streete, J.L.

    1989-10-01

    Solar radiation attenuators called opal filters have been used for several decades to calibrate photographic film in instruments used to measure the brightness of the solar corona. The primary component used in fabricating these filters is opal glass. New measurements of the transmittance of the HAO fundamental standard set of opal filters were begun in September, 1988. Since nearly two decades had passed from the time of the last calibration measurements, there was concern that the transmittance of the filters might have changed. Another motivation for recalibrating the opal filters was the desire to know the transmittance values in spectral regions above and below those used in 1970. The spectral regions chosen were 450 nm, 550 nm, 650 nm and 800 nm. Comparisons of transmittance are made with the previous values, and new transmittance values are given

  2. Opportunities for neutron beam research at the OPAL reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Shane

    2015-01-01

    The OPAL nuclear research reactor, at Lucas Heights, is a modern 20 MW pool type reactor. OPAL is used for scientific research using neutron beams, radioisotope production (particularly for radiopharmaceuticals) and industrial irradiation services. The neutron beam facility has been designed to compete with the best beam facilities in the world. After seven years in construction, the reactor and neutron beam facilities were commissioned in 2007. OPAL now has ten first rate neutron spectrometers in operation, including one radiography/tomography instrument, with three more in commissioning. The presentation will include an introduction to the OPAL neutron beam facility, including some discussion of our strategic objectives. It will also provide scientific highlights from our research selected to illustrate the potential for applications in materials science

  3. Hydrothermally opalized serpentinites in tethyan ophiolite sequence in central Serbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kureshevicj, Lidija; Vushovicj, Olivera

    2012-01-01

    Intensely fractured serpentinite protrusions in Vardar tectonic zone of central Serbia are a part of accreted Jurassic Tethys ophiolite sequence. Primary ultramafic rocks presenting remnants of oceanic crust were regionally metamorphosed into serpentinites after middle Jurassic. Tertiary magmatic activity of calc-alkaline character occurred along deep faults marking the zone of closure of Tethys ocean trench. Hydrothermal activity driven by magmatic heat, through fracture and fault zones, has caused opalization of ultramafic host and vein deposition. Results of various examinations of these opalized serpentinite are presented: field examinations, chemical, microscopic, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (X RF) analyses. Opalized serpentinite has been identified as predominating tridimite-cristobalite type opal-CT. Practical significance of these opal-CT occurrences lies in possibility for its use as a gemstone and in prospection of genetically and spatially related hydrothermal deposits (cryptocrystalline magnesite veins and other siliceous gemstone types). Occurrences of opalized serpentinite of this type have been discovered on many locations along Tethys suture zone. (Author)

  4. Microbiological, physicochemical properties and biogenic amine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty three strained yoghurt samples were collected from local open markets in different provinces of Turkey (Afyon [AF], Aydın [AY], Burdur [B], Isparta [I] and Muğla [M]). Physicochemical and microbiological properties, as well as biogenic amine content, were examined in each of the samples. The dry matter (17.90 to ...

  5. Mineralogy and fluid content of sediments entering the Costa Rica subduction zone - Results from Site U1414, IODP Expedition 344

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpentier, D.; Buatier, M.; Kutterolf, S.; Straub, S. M.; Nascimento, D.; Millan, C.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction zones are characterized by the largest thrust earthquakes, as quantified by both rupture area and seismic moment release. Offshore Costa Rica, the oceanic Cocos Plate subducts under the Caribbean plate forming the southern end of the Middle America trench. A high convergence rate and almost complete subduction of incoming sediments make the Costa Rica convergent margin an extremely dynamic environment. The Costa Rica Seismogenesis Project (CRISP) is designed to understand the processes that control nucleation and seismic rupture of large earthquakes at erosional subduction zones. Site U1414 of IODP Exp.344 was drilled to investigate the material from the incoming Cocos Plate. A key parameter of incoming plate is fluid content and release because it impacts deformation within the subduction complex. The deposition, compaction and diagenesis of sedimentary rocks control the distribution of fluids, fluid pressures and fluid flow patterns within subduction zones. We therefore decided to characterize sediment composition and quantify the different types of water at Site U1414. Mineralogical investigations were performed using optical and electronic microscope observations, X Ray Diffraction (on bulk and clay fractions), Cation Exchange Capacity measurements, carbon analyses (to determine carbonate contents), and sequenced extractions in NaOH (to quantify the biogenic opal content). Fluid characteristics were approached by thermal gravimetric analyses. The entire sedimentary sequence was recovered at Site U1414 and can be divided into three major sedimentary units. The first one is a hemipelagic silty clay to clay with a gradual increase of calcareous nannofossils. The dominant mineral is smectite associated in the clay fractions with kaolinite and zeolites. Small amounts of biogenic opal have been analyzed. Other minerals like quartz, feldspar and calcite are also present. The second unit is composed of nannofossil-rich calcareous ooze. The proportion of

  6. Zircaloy welding in OPAL reactor reflector vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, L.; Martinez, R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: This paper describes the development of the Zircaloy 4 welding processes applied in the fabrication of the Reflector Vessel for the OPAL reactor. As an introduction, a brief description is made of the geometric design of the Reflector Vessel, which is very complex, as it has many irradiation positions, beams tubes, channels, outer connections, and reinforcements. The complexity of this component demanded different welded joints and a careful manufacturing sequence, which comprised welding, machining, heat treatments, and quality control operations. Design and fabrication of different ad-hoc devices was also required, some of which are described in the present paper. For the purposes of issuing reliable welding procedures, the joints were previously set up through tests using samples and mock-ups. Procedures and welders were qualified in accordance with the ASME Code, Section IX. The welding methods used in the fabrication were GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) and PAW (Plasma Arc Welding), processes deemed adequate to weld these alloys, as they do not contaminate the material, for they are carried out within an inert gas atmosphere. Contrary to other welding methods commonly used for other materials, no welding fluxes or chemically-active gases are applied in these two processes. The advantages of both methods used are discussed. The welds were carried out in manual, orbital, or mechanized mode depending on the type of joint

  7. Recent Results on Particle Production from OPAL

    CERN Document Server

    Vossebeld, Joost Herman

    2001-01-01

    Three recent OPAL studies are presented in which the fragmentation process in quark and gluon jets and in identified up, down and strange flavour jets is studied. The first is a measurement is of charged particle, pi0, eta and K0 multiplicities in quark and gluon jets. No evidence is found for a particle species dependent multiplicity enhancement in gluon jets. In another study leading pion, kaon, K0, proton and lambda rates have been measured in up, down and strange flavour jets. The results confirm the leading particle effect in the fragmentation of light flavour jets. In addition a direct determination of the strangeness suppression factor has been performed, yielding gamma_s=0.422 +/- 0.049(stat.) +/- 0.059(syst.). In a third study mean charged particle multiplicities were measured for up, down and strange flavoured Z0 decays and found to be identical within the uncertainties of the measurement, as expected from the flavour independence of the strong interaction.

  8. Solving geological and historical puzzles with advanced gemologic techniques: The Franco Dávila (1772) precious opal case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Guinea, J.; Gonzalez-Alcalde, J.; Furio, M.; Jorge, A.; Garrido, F.

    2016-07-01

    The large precious opal weighting 33 grams fitted in a silver jewel and exposed to visitors at the Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN) is well documented in: (i) its own mounting (1772), (ii) at the 775 document of the Archive of the MNCN and (iii) the 395 specimen described in the of Pedro Franco Dávila catalogue. The X-ray diffractogram (XRD) performed onto the opal block is very similar to other opals of volcanic origin containing varied amounts of cristobalite, tridymite and amorphous silica. The Raman spectrum shows a band peaked at 242, 343 and 416 cm−1 associated with O-Si-O stretching groups; other spectral band peaked at 780 and 819 cm−1 corresponding to vibration of symmetrical O-Si-O rings of 3 and 4 link members, plus other minor bands. The Raman spectrum is also very similar to those observed in Mexican opals of volcanic origin containing an spectral band of stretching nodes ν1 (OH) at 3233, 3393, 3511, 3628 cm−1 related to OH groups with hydrogen bonds of isolated silanol groups. The interferometric confocal dual microscope 3D (MCI3D), which is a nondestructive facility of high resolution and LED technology reveals the geometry of graver tools on the silver jewel and the computed tomography X-ray highlights the opal cutting as a squared princess type and silver chloride infillings of a crack probably caused by a shock on a corner. Under the scanning electron microscope we observed barite, sealed veins of silica rich in Mn and opal with high contents of Al and K which, along with the historical data, the piece can be attributed to the historical site of opals hosted in Slovakia andesite rocks, this data explains the optical light behavior in the cabochon. The silver jewel has large amounts of Hg and AgCl indicating amalgam method. In addition the natural AgS2 phases probably come from Nueva España (year 1772) in full production of silver in such time. The association of new analytical non-destructive techniques combines the

  9. Oxygen-isotope fractionation between marine biogenic silica and seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheney, Ronald K.; Knauth, L. Paul

    1989-12-01

    A stepwise fluorination technique has been used to selectively react away the water component of hydrous silica in order to better investigate the oxygen-isotope fractionation between biogenic opal and seawater, and to determine whether all taxa produce opal which is suitable for oxygen isotope paleothermometry. δ 18O of the tetrahedrally coordinated silicate oxygen of siliceous sponge spicules grown at a wide variety of temperatures varies independently of temperature. δ 18O from an Eocene radiolarian ooze sample is much more enriched than would be expected from any reasonable isotopic temperature curve, given the probable growing temperature of the sample. δ 18O of diatom samples seems to vary systematically with temperature and to conform approximately to the isotopic temperature curve for diatom frustules obtained by Labeyrie and coworkers using an entirely different analytical technique. Sponges appear to precipitate silica in isotopic disequilibrium with seawater oxygen, and old radiolarian silica may exchange readily with cold oceanic bottom water. Neither will apparently be useful for paleo-climate reconstructions. Diatoms may be useful in deducing ancient surface-water temperatures, but the systematic variation of α with temperature for diatoms may not be related to the quartz-H 2O equilibrium isotope fractionation.

  10. Luminescence response of synthetic opal under femtosecond laser pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasnetsov, M.V.; Bazhenov, V.Yu.; Dmitruk, I.N.; Kudryavtseva, A.D.; Tcherniega, N.V.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic opal is an artificial photonic metamaterial composed from spherical globules of amorphous silica (SiO 2 ) about 300 nm in diameter. We report, for the first time to our knowledge, the origin of a narrow luminescence spectral peak (4 nm HWHM) and optical second and third harmonic generation in synthetic opal samples under femtosecond laser excitation (800 nm) at liquid-nitrogen temperature. Stimulated-emission effects are discussed related to the possibility of nanocavity lasing at the condition of the first Mie resonance in a dielectric sphere. - Highlights: • Second harmonic generation in a synthetic opal (amorphous material composed from spherical SiO 2 globules) was observed. • Narrow luminescence peak which we assign to a Mie resonance in a globule was detected at liquid-nitrogen temperature

  11. Array of lead-glass blocks from OPAL

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the 4 experiments at CERN's Large Electron Positron collider (LEP) which ran from 1989 - 2000. This array of 96 lead glass bricks formed part of the OPAL electromagnetic calorimeter. In total, there were 9440 lead glass counters in the OPAL electromagnetic calorimeter, made of Schott type SF57 glass and each block weighs about 25 kg and consists of 76% PbO by weight. Each block has a Hamamatsu R2238 photomultiplier glued on to it. The complete detector was in the form of a cylinder 7m long and 6m in diameter. It was used to measure the energy of electrons and photons produced in LEP electron positron collisions.

  12. Artificial black opal fabricated from nanoporous carbon spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuri; Ishii, Masahiko; Nakamura, Tadashi; Yano, Kazuhisa

    2010-06-15

    A nanocasting method via chemical vapor deposition of acetonitrile was successfully employed to fabricate porous carbon colloidal crystal using colloidal crystal from monodispersed mesoporous silica spheres (MMSS) as a sacrificial scaffold. The mesostructure as well as periodic arrays within (111) plane of MMSS were replicated for the carbon colloidal crystal (black opal) with the length scale in the centimeter range. Brilliant iridescent colors were clearly observed for the first time on the black carbon colloidal crystal fabricated from porous carbon spheres, and they changed dramatically in accordance with the observation angle, like natural black opals. Reflection spectra measurements based on 2D surface diffraction and Bragg diffraction in the mirror mode were conducted for the fabricated carbon periodic arrays. The periodicity in the (111) plane as well as in the direction perpendicular to the (111) plane of the colloidal crystal was evaluated by comparing the results obtained from these two measurements. It was found that the periodicity in the direction perpendicular to the (111) surface is not high for the obtained black carbon opal. On the other hand, the relationship between the incident angles and the peak wavelengths of the reflection spectra, collected in the condition where the incident light and the reflected light pass through in the same direction, is governed by an approximation based on 2D surface diffraction. The results imply that the origin of the iridescent colors on the fabricated black carbon opal is derived from the periodicity not in the direction perpendicular to the (111) plane but within the (111) plane.

  13. Wood opals from Yakuplu, Turkey: their properties and genesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurman, P.

    1975-01-01

    Fossil driftwood from Sarmatian (Late Miocene) gravel deposits near Yakuplu, Turkey, ranges between lignitic and opaline. Opalization occurred in various stages of decay. The stage of decay of the wood and the eventual admixture of detritic clay influenced the crystallinity and the dehydration

  14. Thermal properties of Australian sedimentary opals and Czech moldavites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Thomas, P.S.; Šesták, Jaroslav; Heide, K.; Fueglein, E.; Šimon, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 3 (2010), s. 861-867 ISSN 1388-6150. [Mediterranean Conference on Calorimetry and Thermal Analysis /9./. Marseille, 15.06.2009-18.06.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : amorphous silica * DEGAS * moldavite * opal * TG-DSC * TMA Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.752, year: 2010

  15. Progress with OPAL, the new Australian research reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Progress with OPAL, the new Australian research reactor. R A ROBINSON. The Bragg Institite, ANSTO, Sydney, Australia. E-mail: rro@ansto.gov.au ... 'sister' facilities, with a common open user ethos, and a vision to play a major role in international science. Fuel was loaded into the reactor in August 2006, and full power.

  16. Licensing of ANSTO'S OPAL reactor during construction and commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summerfield, M.W.; Ordonez, J.P.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: This paper presents a general description of the ongoing licensing activities associated with the construction and commissioning of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation's (ANSTO) Open Pool Australian Light-water (OPAL) Reactor at their Lucas Heights site. It addresses the following aspects: The Construction Licence - what it is and what impact it had on the construction of the OPAL Reactor, specifically the various Construction Licence Conditions; The interface between ANSTO, INVAP and ARPANSA during the construction of the OPAL Reactor, particularly in relation to ARPANS Regulation 54; Specific licensing issues that have arisen during the construction and commissioning process and how they have been resolved; The Operating Licence Application - what it is and how it interfaces with the construction and commissioning of the OPAL Reactor. These aspects are all addressed from the point of view of the licensee ANSTO and the RRR Project. Particular emphasis will be given to the way in which the licensing process is integrated into the overall project program and the lessons learnt that may be of benefit to other licensees and regulators. Note that this paper is an update of a presentation given at IGORR10 and follows on from a paper previously presented at PNBC12 in October 2002

  17. Fabrication and characterization of cerium-doped barium titanate inverse opal by sol-gel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Yi; Zhu Yihua; Yang Xiaoling; Li Chunzhong; Zhou Jinghong

    2007-01-01

    Cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opal was synthesized from barium acetate contained cerous acetate and tetrabutyl titanate in the interstitial spaces of a polystyrene (PS) opal. This procedure involves infiltration of precursors into the interstices of the PS opal template followed by hydrolytic polycondensation of the precursors to amorphous barium titanate and removal of the PS opal by calcination. The morphologies of opal and inverse opal were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The pores were characterized by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation showed the doping structure of cerium, barium and titanium. And powder X-ray diffraction allows one to observe the influence of doping degree on the grain size. The lattice parameters, crystal size and lattice strain were calculated by the Rietveld refinement method. The synthesis of cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opals provides an opportunity to electrically and optically engineer the photonic band structure and the possibility of developing tunable three-dimensional photonic crystal devices. - Graphical abstract: Cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opal was synthesized from barium acetate acid contained cerous acetate and tetrabutyl titanate in the interstitial spaces of a PS opal, which involves infiltration of precursors into the interstices of the PS opal template and removal of the PS opal by calcination

  18. Biogenic amines degradation by microorganisms isolated from cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Butor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the isolation and characterization of microorganisms able to degrade biogenic amines and their identification. Individual microorganisms were obtained by isolation from commercially available foodstuffs and food produced in the technological laboratories of Faculty of Technology, Tomas Bata University in Zlín and subsequently identified by MALDI-TOF MS. The results of MALDI-TOF MS identification were verified by 16S rRNA sequenation. In this work was studied the ability of 5 bacterial strains positive to biogenic amines degradation isolated from dairy products to decrease biogenic amines content in vitro and quantified reduction in the concentration of biogenic amines tryptamine, β-phenylethylamine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine and tyramine. The level of degradation (decrease of biogenic amines was determined on the base of the ability to grow in media with biogenic amines as the sole source carbon and nitrogen. The isolated strains with the ability of degradation of one or more biogenic amines were cultured in medium supplemented with relevant biogenic amines, the media derivatized with dansyl chloride and these amines separated by HPLC at a wavelength of 254 nm. From five tested strains identified as Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumilus, Enterobacter cloacae, Rhizobium radiobacter and Acinetobacter pitii, isolated from gouda type cheese, the greatest ability of degradation was observed in Bacillus subtilis, which was capable to degrade almost all amount of histamine, cadaverine and putrescine. Other four strains showed a lower rate of degradation than Bacillus subtilis, but the ability to degrade biogenic amines with these microorganisms was still significant.

  19. Stability of liquid fuels with biogenic content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Winfried; Hoffmann, Hajo; Pohland vom Schloss, Heide [OWI - Oel-Waerme-Institut GmbH, Herzogenrath (Germany)

    2013-06-01

    Mineral-based fuels for diesel- and spark-ignition engines are always mixtures of many components with a wide distillation range. These insure, for example, a low viscosity and good cold starting properties. Therefore, the fuel system components are designed for mineral-based diesel and gasoline fuels. Biofuels like biodiesel and bioethanol, which only partially show these physical properties, are introduced into the fuel market because of political and ecological aspects. Currently common biofuels, such as ethanol and biodiesel, are investigated in uncommon high blend levels of 10 vol.-% and 30 vol.-% as well as future biofuels. Biodiesel (fatty acid methyl ester, FAME) has poor cold-flow properties concerning to the CP and CFPP. Therefore, biodiesel has the tendency to form crystalline deposits at sub-zero temperatures. For bioethanol applications, an adjustment of the materials used, for example for sealing, is necessary. It is well known that the negative implications of biofuels require an additive treatment for an optimal performance. In contrast to previous examinations, in which technical components were analyzed by their own, in the presented investigations (''GObio''-project), the complete system of sensitive fuel tank and feed system with auxiliary units like independent vehicle heaters is used to determine the influences of the biofuels. The investigations are based on hardware in the loop testing. A target of the project was to modify the application technology like the independent vehicle heater and the in-tank pumps to use the biofuels in the conventional systems. Furthermore, it was an objective to upgrade the performance of the fuels through the development and the treatment with additives. During operation with low blend levels no problems were detected so that safe operation using diesel with up to 7 vol.-% FAME according to EN 590 is ensured. At the temperature levels present in the fuel leading parts during operation, biodiesel tends to polymerize and thus forms deposits at an exponentially higher level. This increased deposit formation near the fuel supply, which does not occur during operation with mineral fuels, leads to failure of the heater. Operation of the heaters with high blend levels of ethanol led to lean combustion due to the amount of oxygen available in ethanol. As a result, the combustion takes place closer to the lean flame limit. In the framework of other projects, long-term-storage stability tests of different domestic heating oil/FAME-blends in a climate chamber at 40 C and defined air moisture were carried out. (orig.)

  20. Scaling exponents for fracture surfaces in opal glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez-Guerrero, L., E-mail: guerreroleo@hotmail.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica. Cd. Universitaria s/n, C.P. 66450, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Center of Innovation, Research and Development on Engineering and Technology, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon Monterrey, C.P. 66600, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Garza, F.J., E-mail: fjgarza@gama.fime.uanl.mx [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Cd. Universitaria s/n, C.P. 66450, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Hinojosa, M., E-mail: hinojosa@gama.fime.uanl.mx [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica. Cd. Universitaria s/n, C.P. 66450, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Center of Innovation, Research and Development on Engineering and Technology, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon Monterrey, C.P. 66600, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2010-09-25

    We have investigated the scaling properties of fracture surfaces in opal glass. Specimens with two different opacifying particle sizes (1 {mu}m and 0.4 {mu}m) were broken by three-point bending test and the resulting fracture surfaces were analyzed using Atomic Force Microscopy. The analysis of the self-affine behavior was performed using the Variable Bandwidth and Height-Height Correlation Methods, and both the roughness exponent, {zeta}, and the correlation length, {xi}, were determined. It was found that the roughness exponent obtained in both samples is {zeta} {approx} 0.8; whereas the correlation length in both fractures is of the order of the particle size, demonstrating the dependence of this self-affine parameter on the microstructure of opal glass.

  1. Opal-like photonic crystal with diamond lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia Santamaria, F; López, C; Meseguer, F; Miyazaki, H T; Sánchez-Dehesa, J

    2002-01-01

    In this contribution, a method to fabricate a diamond structure with a complete PBG in the near infrared is proposed. The procedure starts by building an opal composed of two types of microspheres (organic and inorganic) in a body-centered-cubic symmetry by means of a micro- robotic technique. Then, the organic particles may be selectively removed to obtain a diamond structure of inorganic particles. Once this structure is assembled its filling fraction may be controlled by sintering. Subsequently this template can be infiltrated with an adequate high refractive index material. In this way, the method can be extended to make diamond inverse opals of, for instance, silicon with gap to mid gap ratios as large as 13% for moderate filling fractions. An overview of micromanipulation as well as previous experimental results will be offered to show the feasibility of this method. (24 refs).

  2. OPAL Forward Calorimeter (half cylinder with lead scintillator)

    CERN Multimedia

    1 half cylinder piece is available for loan. The OPAL forward Detector Calorimeter was made in 4 half cylindrical pieces. Two full cylinders were placed round the LEP beam pipe about 3m downstream of the interaction point. The detector was used primarily to measure the luminosity of LEP (rate of interactions) and also to trigger on 2-photon events. In addition it formed an essential part of the detector coverage which OPAL needed to carry out searches for new particles such as the Higgs boson. The detector is made of scintillators sandwiched between lead sheets. The light from the scintillators passes via bars of wavelength shifter and light guides on its way to be measured by photomultipliers. There is a layer of gas filled tube chambers within the calorimeter. These provide a measure of the position of the particles interacting in the calorimeter.

  3. A modular electronic readout system for the OPAL electromagnetic presampler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, J.D.; Anderson, K.J.; Gensler, S.W.; Kroll, J.; Merritt, F.S.; Nguyen, H.H.; Oreglia, M.J.; Pilcher, J.E.; Roney, J.M.; Redmond, M.W.; Sanders, H.; Schappert, W.S.; Strom, D.

    1993-01-01

    The readout system used to sample and digitize the 21 504 channels of the OPAL electromagnetic barrel presampler is described. The system consists of semi-custom analog electronics mounted directly on the detector to provide integrate-and-hold capability and custom VME boards to implement the digitization functions. The data from one event is digitized completely in under 7 ms. This meets the OPAL requirement of a sustained 10 Hz trigger rate with less than 10% dead time. A minimum ionizing particle deposits 2.7 pC in a single layer of the presampler, and the largest signal commonly seen in 200 pC. The dynamic range of the readout system is 0.032 to 1000 pC. The noise on a single channel is typically 0.2 pC. A linear analog calibration is automatically applied on a channel-by-channel basis. Programmable logic is used extensively. (orig.)

  4. OPAL: Decay of Z0 to two jets

    CERN Multimedia

    1990-01-01

    This track is an example of real data collected from the OPAL detector on the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran between 1989 and 2000. Here a Z0 particle is produced in the collision between an electron and positron that then decays into a quark-antiquark pair. The quark pair is seen as a pair of hadron jets in the detector.

  5. OPAL: Decay of Z0 to three jets

    CERN Multimedia

    1990-01-01

    This track is an example of real data collected from the OPAL detector on the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran between 1989 and 2000. A Z0 particle is produced in the electron-positron collision which decays into a quark and an antiquark, one of which emits a gluon. Both quarks and gluons appear in the detector as jets of hadrons.

  6. Symmetry characterization of eigenstates in opal-based photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    López-Torres, E; Sakoda, K; Sánchez-Dehesa, J

    2002-01-01

    The complete symmetry characterization of eigenstates in bare opal systems is obtained by means of group theory. This symmetry assignment has allowed us to identify several bands that cannot couple with an incident external plane wave. Our prediction is supported by layer-KKR calculations, which are also performed: the coupling coefficients between bulk modes and externally excited field tend to zero when symmetry properties mismatch.

  7. The behavior of biogenic silica-rich rocks and volcanic tuffs as pozzolanic additives in cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragoulis, Dimitris; Stamatakis, Michael; Anastasatou, Marianthi

    2015-04-01

    late compressive strength, the worst performing cement was the one with the lowest reactive silica content with biogenic opal-A as the only reactive pozzolana constituent. Cements produced with perlites, raw materials consisting mainly of a glassy phase, were characterized by higher strength and a rather ordinary specific surface area. Cements produced with Turkish zeolite tuff and Milos glassy tuff exhibited higher late compressive strength than those mentioned above. The highest strength was achieved by the implementation of Australian diatomite for cement production. Its 28 day strength exceeded that of the control mixture consisting of 95% clinker and 5% gypsum. That could be attributed to both, high specific surface of cement and reactive SiO2 of diatomite. Therefore, a preliminary assessment regarding late strength of pozzolanic cements could be obtained by the consideration of two main parameters, namely: specific surface area of cement and reactive silica content of pozzolana.

  8. OPAL experiment at LEP: P. Rapp progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.Y.; Glasser, R.G.; Kellogg, R.; Sechi-Zorn, B.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G.; Steinberg, P.; Zorn, G.T.

    1984-01-01

    Excellent progress has been made on all major fronts in this complex collaboration. The magnet construction has begun. The central detector prototypes have been tested and give excellent results. All CERN Review Committee Conditions and milestones are being met in a timely fashion. Financial approval for all major parts of the detector have been obtained from the respective governments and institutions involved, although some financial problems remain when compared to the total requirements of the experiment. Commitments for the physical layout and assembly areas for the various parts of the detector have been obtained and a detailed timetable for construction and assembly have been provided. Some difficulties still remain with respect to the installation time scale. The software problems have been defined and are beginning to yield to the large and steady efforts being made on them. A third US Group, UC Riverside, lead by Prof. Ben Shen has been given conditional acceptance in the OPAL collaboration. In the following is presented (1) a hardware development progress report by Pat Rapp, (2) a detailed overview of the schedule for production and assembly of the OPAL hadron calorimeter, prepared by Gus Zorn, and (3) a status report by C.Y.Chang on Monte Carlo simulation of the BNL test beam hadron calorimeter results (reported last year) for insertion in the overall Hadron Milestone Report being prepared by the OPAL Hadron Calorimeter Group

  9. Determination of biogenic component in waste and liquid fuels by the 14C method

    OpenAIRE

    Krajcar Bronić, Ines; Barešić, Jadranka; Horvatinčić, Nada

    2015-01-01

    Intensive use of fossil fuels for energy production and transport during 20th century caused an increase of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. The increase of CO2 concentration can be slowed down by the use of biogenic materials for energy production and/or transport. One of the method for determination of the fraction of the biogenic component in any type of fuel or waste is the 14C method, which is based on different content of 14C in biogenic and in fossil component: while the biogenic c...

  10. Biogenic silica in space and time in sediments of Central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Gupta, S.M.; Mudholkar, A.V.; Parthiban, G.

    rate averages 2.25 x 10/5 g.cm/2.y/1 and it is contributed from 33 to 50% of the total silica. Higher biogenic silica content of the surface sediment is well correlated with Mn, Cu and Ni concentration of the overlying manganese nodules. Higher biogenic...

  11. Synthesis of Polypyrrole Inverse Opal in [bmim]PF6- Containing Acetonitrile and the Application of the Inverse Opal in Cell Prototype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Most primary cells use Zn or Li as the anode, a metallic oxide as the cathode, and an acidic or alkaline solution or moist past as the electrolytic solution. In this paper, highly ordered polypyrrole (PPy inverse opals have been successfully synthesized in the acetonitrile solution containing [bmim]PF6. PPy films were prepared under the same experimental conditions. Cyclic voltammograms of the PPy film and the PPy inverse opal in neutral phosphate buffer solution (PBS were recorded. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique was used to investigate the structural surface of the PPy films and the PPy inverse opals. It is found that the PF6- anions kept dedoping from the PPy films during the potential scanning process, resulting in the electrochemical inactivity. Although PF6- anions also kept dedoping from the PPy inverse opals, the PO43- anions from PBS could dope into the inverse opal, explaining why the PPy inverse opals kept their electrochemical activity. An environmental friendly cell prototype was constructed, using the PPy inverse opal as the anode. The electrolytes in both the cathodic and anodic half-cells were neutral PBSs. The open-circuit potential of the cell prototype reached 0.487 V and showed a stable output over several hundred hours.

  12. Biogenic Emission Inventory System (BEIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biogenic Emission Inventory System (BEIS) estimates volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from vegetation and nitric oxide (NO) emission from soils. Recent BEIS development has been restricted to the SMOKE system

  13. Hydropower's Biogenic Carbon Footprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Laura; Pfister, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is accelerating and the world urgently needs a shift to clean and renewable energy. Hydropower is currently the largest renewable source of electricity, but its contribution to climate change mitigation is not yet fully understood. Hydroelectric reservoirs are a source of biogenic greenhouse gases and in individual cases can reach the same emission rates as thermal power plants. Little is known about the severity of their emissions at the global scale. Here we show that the carbon footprint of hydropower is far higher than previously assumed, with a global average of 173 kg CO2 and 2.95 kg CH4 emitted per MWh of electricity produced. This results in a combined average carbon footprint of 273 kg CO2e/MWh when using the global warming potential over a time horizon of 100 years (GWP100). Nonetheless, this is still below that of fossil energy sources without the use of carbon capture and sequestration technologies. We identified the dams most promising for capturing methane for use as alternative energy source. The spread among the ~1500 hydropower plants analysed in this study is large and highlights the importance of case-by-case examinations.

  14. Hydropower's Biogenic Carbon Footprint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Scherer

    Full Text Available Global warming is accelerating and the world urgently needs a shift to clean and renewable energy. Hydropower is currently the largest renewable source of electricity, but its contribution to climate change mitigation is not yet fully understood. Hydroelectric reservoirs are a source of biogenic greenhouse gases and in individual cases can reach the same emission rates as thermal power plants. Little is known about the severity of their emissions at the global scale. Here we show that the carbon footprint of hydropower is far higher than previously assumed, with a global average of 173 kg CO2 and 2.95 kg CH4 emitted per MWh of electricity produced. This results in a combined average carbon footprint of 273 kg CO2e/MWh when using the global warming potential over a time horizon of 100 years (GWP100. Nonetheless, this is still below that of fossil energy sources without the use of carbon capture and sequestration technologies. We identified the dams most promising for capturing methane for use as alternative energy source. The spread among the ~1500 hydropower plants analysed in this study is large and highlights the importance of case-by-case examinations.

  15. Filtering of elastic waves by opal-based hypersonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salasyuk, Alexey S; Scherbakov, Alexey V; Yakovlev, Dmitri R; Akimov, Andrey V; Kaplyanskii, Alexander A; Kaplan, Saveliy F; Grudinkin, Sergey A; Nashchekin, Alexey V; Pevtsov, Alexander B; Golubev, Valery G; Berstermann, Thorsten; Brüggemann, Christian; Bombeck, Michael; Bayer, Manfred

    2010-04-14

    We report experiments in which high quality silica opal films are used as three-dimensional hypersonic crystals in the 10 GHz range. Controlled sintering of these structures leads to well-defined elastic bonding between the submicrometer-sized silica spheres, due to which a band structure for elastic waves is formed. The sonic crystal properties are studied by injection of a broadband elastic wave packet with a femtosecond laser. Depending on the elastic bonding strength, the band structure separates long-living surface acoustic waves with frequencies in the complete band gap from bulk waves with band frequencies that propagate into the crystal leading to a fast decay.

  16. Quokka: The Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Instrument at OPAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, Elliot; Noakes, Terry; Schulz, Jamie; Baxter, Peter; Darmann, Frank; Hauser, Nick; Abbeywick, Peter; Brule, Alain; Imamovic, Eno; Christoforidis, Jason

    2005-01-01

    Full text: A small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument is being designed as part of the initial instrument suite for the 20-MW OPAL Reactor. The new instrument, receiving neutrons from a large liquid-D2 cold source, will be in the spirit of the worlds best facilities and will greatly build upon the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisations existing expertise and facilities. Scheduled for completion in July 2006, it will provide Australian and international researchers with opportunities to access state-of-the-art SANS instrumentation. The details of the new SANS will be presented. (author)

  17. Experience with OPAL – a web-based platform for academic learning and teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Luderer, В.; Stöcker, М.

    2010-01-01

    The most essential features of the web-based platform OPAL for academic learning and teaching are described. Two-year experience with this system in the education process for more than 400 students of economics, business administration, and business information systems is reported. It turns out that OPAL is a powerful means for managing academic education.

  18. Revealing stacking sequences in inverse opals by microradian X-ray diffraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinitskii, A.; Abramova, V.; Grigorieva, N.; Grigoriev, S.; Snigirev, A.; Byelov, D.; Petukhov, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of the structural analysis of inverse opal photonic crystals by microradian X-ray diffraction. Inverse opals based on different oxide materials (TiO2, SiO2 and Fe2O3) were fabricated by templating polystyrene colloidal crystal films grown by the vertical deposition technique.

  19. A thermally tunable inverse opal photonic crystal for monitoring glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liguo; Xie, Zhuoying; Xu, Hua; Xu, Ming; Han, Guozhi; Wang, Cheng; Bai, Xuduo; Gu, ZhongZe

    2012-03-01

    An optical method was developed to monitor the glass transition of the polymer by taking advantage of reflection spectrum change of the thermally tunable inverse opal photonic crystal. The thermally tunable photonic bands of the polymer inverse opal photonic crystal were traceable to the segmental motion of macromolecules, and the segmental motion was temperature dependent. By observing the reflection spectrum change of the polystyrene inverse opal photonic crystal during thermal treatment, the glass transition temperature of polystyrene was gotten. Both changes of the position and intensity of the reflection peak were observed during the glass transition process of the polystyrene inverse opal photonic crystal. The optical change of inverse opal photonic crystal was so large that the glass transition temperature could even be estimated by naked eyes. The glass transition temperature derived from this method was consistent with the values measured by differential scanning calorimeter.

  20. Photoluminescence from ZnO-SiO2 opals with different sphere diameters and thicknesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yingling; Yan Hongwei; Fu Zhengping; Yang Beifang; Xia Linsheng; Wang Zhen; Zuo Jian; Yu Shijun; Fu Shengquan; Li Fanqing

    2007-01-01

    We systematically investigated the photoluminescence (PL) and transmittance characteristics of ZnO-SiO 2 opals with varied positions of the stop-band and film thicknesses. An improved ultraviolet (UV) luminescence was observed from ZnO-SiO 2 composites over pure ZnO nanocrystals under 325 nm He-Cd laser excitation at room temperature. The UV PL of ZnO nanocrystals in SiO 2 opals with stop-bands center of 410 nm is sensitive to the thickness of opal films, and the UV PL intensity increases with the film thickness increasing. The PL spectra of ZnO nanocrystals in SiO 2 opals with stop-bands center of 570 nm show a suppression of the weak visible band. The experimental results are discussed based on the scattering and/or absorbance in opal crystals

  1. Determination of Biogenic Amines in Different Shrimp Species for Export

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myat Myat Thaw; Oo Aung; Aung Myint; Bisswanger, Hans

    2004-06-01

    This study is part of the project on the ''Quality Assurance of Different Shrimp Species for Export''. Local shrimp samples were collected from Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries and various private enterprises. Contents of biogenic amines were determined by using benzoyl chloride derivatization method with HPLC (reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography). Based on the biogenic amines, quality index of shrimps were correlated with freshness index so that the grade of shrimp samples can be classified as excellent, good, and acceptable. All sizes of shrimps such as extra large, large, medium were found to excceptable respectively

  2. Biogenic silica in tidal freshwater marsh sediments and vegetation (Schelde estuary, Belgium)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struyf, E.; van Damme, S.; Gribsholt, B.; Middelburg, J.J.; Meire, P.

    2005-01-01

    To date, estuarine ecosystem research has mostly neglected silica cycling in freshwater intertidal marshes. However, tidal marshes can store large amounts of biogenic silica (BSi) in vegetation and sediment. BSi content of the typical freshwater marsh plants Phragmites australis, Impatiens

  3. The OPAL Detector (an~Omni~Purpose~Apparatus~for~Lep)

    CERN Multimedia

    Schaile, D A; Watson, N; Craciun, M; Hanson, G; Mcmahon, T J; Stokes, W; Wilson, G W; Carter, J; Plane, D; Scharff-hansen, P; Sahr, O M; Rembser, C; Saeki, T; Nisius, R; Campana, S; Kormos, L L; Marchant, T E; Takeda, H; Kupper, M; Hill, J C; Hajdu, C; Hauschild, M; Charlton, D; Kellogg, R; Kluth, S; Asai, S; Nellen, B; Bright-thomas, P; Polok, J; Guenther, P O; Keeler, R; Schwick, C; Stephens, K; Zankel, K; Watkins, P; Chang, C Y; Roney, M; Fischer, H; Dubbert, J

    2002-01-01

    The OPAL Detector (an Omni Purpose Apparatus for Lep) \\\\ \\\\OPAL, a general purpose detector, was designed to study a wide range of unexplored physics at LEP. \\\\ \\\\At LEP1, one of the central issues is the precise determination of the mass, width and couplings to quarks and leptons of the Z$^{0}$ boson. At LEP2 the mass and couplings of the W$^\\pm$ bosons are determined. Accurate measurements of these quantities might reveal the mechanisms by which symmetries are broken. Many topics relating to heavy flavours are studied, including the properties of tau leptons, and the spectroscopy, lifetimes and mixing of hadrons containing b-quarks. \\\\ \\\\There are very active QCD and Two-Photon groups. Among the topics being studied are the determination of the strong coupling constant, $ \\alpha _{S} $, tests of the group structure of QCD, differences between quark- and gluon-induced jets, many aspects of the fragmentation process measurements of many different final states in photon-photon collision, and measurement of str...

  4. General structure and functions of the OPAL optimization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikolas, P.; Sustek, J.; Svarny, J.

    2005-01-01

    Presented version of OPAL - the in core fuel management system is under development also for core loading optimization of NPP Temelin (WWER-1000 type reactor). Description of the algorithm of separate modules was presented in several AER papers. The optimization process of NPP Temelin loading patterns comprises problems like preparation input data for NPP SW, loading searching, fixing and splitting of fuel enrichments, BP-assignment, FA rotation and fuel cycle economics. In application for NPP Temelin has been used NPP Temelin code system (spectral code with macrocode). The objective of fuel management is to design a fuel-loading scheme that is capable of producing the required energy at the minimum cost while satisfying the safety constraints. Usually the objectives are: a) To meet the energy production requirements (loaded fuel should have sufficient reactivity that covers reactivity defects associated with startup as well as reactivity loss due to the fuel depletion); b) To satisfy all safety-related limits (loaded fuel should preserve adequate power peaking limits (given namely LOCA), shutdown margins and no positive Moderator Temperature Coefficient (MTC); c) To minimize the power generation cost ($/kWh(e)). Flow of optimization process OPAL management system is in detail described and application for NPP Temelin cores optimization presented (Authors)

  5. Liquid-liquid separation in high porosity inverse opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Soeren; Aizenberg, Joanna

    Oil-water mixtures pose significant industrial and environmental challenges in wastewater treatment. Submicron porosity membranes could provide the foundation of new low-cost separation techniques as local nucleation surfaces. However, membrane separation faces major roadblocks: aging of the membrane through surface fouling and pore blockage limits long-term applicability, and there is a general lack of understanding of the mechanism of separation. Inverse opals provide a structured, porous material with a reproducible, highly interconnected, bimodal pore structure that exhibits unique wetting behavior, based on which we can study the separation of oil-water mixtures in a thin, porous film using fluorescence microscopy. To understand the mechanism of liquid-liquid separation in inverse opals, we have devised an integrated microfluidic system to observe Darcy flow along the principal directions of the porous lattice. We find the pressure drop associated with surface drag to be small, and demonstrate control over the capillary pressure associated with infiltration of the porous matrix by changing the local surface chemistry. Additionally, we are able to achieve de-emulsification at low flow velocities regardless of surface chemistry. NSF - DMREF: 1533985.

  6. First results from the Hubble OPAL Program: Jupiter in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Amy A.; Wong, Michael H.; Orton, Glenn S.

    2015-11-01

    The Hubble 2020: Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program is a Director's Discretionary program designed to generate two yearly global maps for each of the outer planets to enable long term studies of atmospheric color, structure and two-dimensional wind fields. This presentation focuses on Jupiter results from the first year of the campaign. Data were acqured January 19, 2015 with the WFC3/UVIS camera and the F275W, F343N, F395N, F467M, F502N, F547M, F631N, F658N, and F889N filters. Global maps were generated and are publicly available through the High Level Science Products archive: https://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/opal/Using cross-correlation on the global maps, the zonal wind profile was measured between +/- 50 degrees latitude and is in family with Voyager and Cassini era profiles. There are some variations in mid to high latitude wind jet magnitudes, particularly at +40°and -35° planetographic latitude. The Great Red Spot continues to maintain an intense orange coloration, as it did in 2014. However, the interior shows changed structure, including a reduced core and new filamentary features. Finally, a wave not previously seen in Hubble images was also observed and is interpreted as a baroclinic instability with associated cyclone formation near 16° N latitude. A similar feature was observed faintly in Voyager 2 images, and is consistent with the Hubble feature in location and scale.

  7. Patterning hierarchy in direct and inverse opal crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Lidiya; Hatton, Benjamin; Kolle, Mathias; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2012-06-25

    Biological strategies for bottom-up synthesis of inorganic crystalline and amorphous materials within topographic templates have recently become an attractive approach for fabricating complex synthetic structures. Inspired by these strategies, herein the synthesis of multi-layered, hierarchical inverse colloidal crystal films formed directly on topographically patterned substrates via evaporative deposition, or "co-assembly", of polymeric spheres with a silicate sol-gel precursor solution and subsequent removal of the colloidal template, is described. The response of this growing composite colloid-silica system to artificially imposed 3D spatial constraints of various geometries is systematically studied, and compared with that of direct colloidal crystal assembly on the same template. Substrates designed with arrays of rectangular, triangular, and hexagonal prisms and cylinders are shown to control crystallographic domain nucleation and orientation of the direct and inverse opals. With this bottom-up topographical approach, it is demonstrated that the system can be manipulated to either form large patterned single crystals, or crystals with a fine-tuned extent of disorder, and to nucleate distinct colloidal domains of a defined size, location, and orientation in a wide range of length-scales. The resulting ordered, quasi-ordered, and disordered colloidal crystal films show distinct optical properties. Therefore, this method provides a means of controlling bottom-up synthesis of complex, hierarchical direct and inverse opal structures designed for altering optical properties and increased functionality. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Controlled cobalt doping in biogenic magnetite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J. M.; Coker, V. S.; Moise, S.; Wincott, P. L.; Vaughan, D. J.; Tuna, F.; Arenholz, E.; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Lloyd, J. R.; Telling, N. D.

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt-doped magnetite (CoxFe3 −xO4) nanoparticles have been produced through the microbial reduction of cobalt–iron oxyhydroxide by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. The materials produced, as measured by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, Mössbauer spectroscopy, etc., show dramatic increases in coercivity with increasing cobalt content without a major decrease in overall saturation magnetization. Structural and magnetization analyses reveal a reduction in particle size to less than 4 nm at the highest Co content, combined with an increase in the effective anisotropy of the magnetic nanoparticles. The potential use of these biogenic nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions for magnetic hyperthermia applications is demonstrated. Further analysis of the distribution of cations within the ferrite spinel indicates that the cobalt is predominantly incorporated in octahedral coordination, achieved by the substitution of Fe2+ site with Co2+, with up to 17 per cent Co substituted into tetrahedral sites. PMID:23594814

  9. Controlled cobalt doping in biogenic magnetite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J M; Coker, V S; Moise, S; Wincott, P L; Vaughan, D J; Tuna, F; Arenholz, E; van der Laan, G; Pattrick, R A D; Lloyd, J R; Telling, N D

    2013-06-06

    Cobalt-doped magnetite (CoxFe3 -xO4) nanoparticles have been produced through the microbial reduction of cobalt-iron oxyhydroxide by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. The materials produced, as measured by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, Mössbauer spectroscopy, etc., show dramatic increases in coercivity with increasing cobalt content without a major decrease in overall saturation magnetization. Structural and magnetization analyses reveal a reduction in particle size to less than 4 nm at the highest Co content, combined with an increase in the effective anisotropy of the magnetic nanoparticles. The potential use of these biogenic nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions for magnetic hyperthermia applications is demonstrated. Further analysis of the distribution of cations within the ferrite spinel indicates that the cobalt is predominantly incorporated in octahedral coordination, achieved by the substitution of Fe(2+) site with Co(2+), with up to 17 per cent Co substituted into tetrahedral sites.

  10. The Role of the Absorption in the Stop Band Tuning of Opals and Inverse Opals Through Coating of Semiconductor Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzanares-Martinez, Jesus

    2005-03-01

    In this work we report on the modeling of the optical properties of semiconductor in-filled opals and inverse opals for the visible and near infrared spectral region. The crucial influence of the absorption is theoretically investigated by using the three dimensional Transfer Matrix Method (TMM). Fine-tuning of the stop band positioning is achieved with increasing semiconductor infiltration. The red shift of the stop band can be explained by Bragg's law. However, the optical properties depend strongly on the value of the absorption that is directly related to the imaginary part of the Dielectric Constant (DC). We use a realistic model of the DC for a specific semiconductor (InSb) that takes into account the phononic contributions, intrinsic electron and hole densities. By positioning the stop band in the region of the smaller value of the imaginary part of the DC we optimize the value of the lattice constant in order to optimize tuning of the stop band with fewer losses. We also study the influence of absorption in the Fabry-Perot oscillations and in the higher energy stop bands. This work is motivated by new experimental results that show that absorption in 3D structures can be the limiting factor to obtain a useful structure for tuning.

  11. Potential Benefits of Manmade Opals Demonstrated for First Time (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-06-01

    NREL experiments show that disordered inverse opals significantly scatter and trap near-infrared light, with possible impact on optoelectronic materials. Inverse opals, familiar in the form of brilliantly colored opal gemstones, are a class of materials that has astounding optical properties. Scientists have been exploring the ability of inverse opals to manipulate light in the hopes of harnessing this capacity for advanced technologies such as displays, detectors, lasers, and photovoltaics. A research group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) discovered that man-made inverse opal films containing significant morphological disorder exhibit substantial light scattering, consequently trapping wavelengths in the near-infrared (NIR), which is important to a number of technologies. This discovery is the first experimental evidence to validate a 2005 theoretical model predicting the confinement of light in such structures, and it holds great promise for improving the performance of technologies that rely on careful light control. This breakthrough also makes possible optoelectronic technologies that use a range of low-cost molecular and semiconductor species that otherwise absorb light too weakly to be useful. The disordered inverse opal architecture validates the theoretical model that predicts the diffusion and confinement of light in such structures. Electrochemically deposited CdSe inverse opal films containing significant morphological disorder exhibit substantial light scattering and consequent NIR light trapping. This discovery holds promise for NIR light management in optoelectronic technologies, particularly those involving weakly absorbing molecular and semiconductor photomaterials.

  12. Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    Aim, content and methods are fundamental categories of both theoretical and practical general didactics. A quick glance in recent pedagogical literature on higher education, however, reveals a strong preoccupation with methods, i.e. how teaching should be organized socially (Biggs & Tang, 2007......, is subordinating content to methods as seen in modern didactics, hereby transforming content to a medium for achievement of learning-to-learn skills rather than something valuable in its own right. At the level of general didactics quite few attempts have been made to formulate criteria and categories...... secondary levels. In subject matter didactics, the question of content is more developed, but it is still mostly confined to teaching on lower levels. As for higher education didactics, discussions on selection of content are almost non-existent on the programmatic level. Nevertheless, teachers are forced...

  13. Occurrence and significance of biogenic opal in Plio-Pleistocene sediments of the stream Tegua, Cordoba. Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala, R.; Karlsson, A.; Daziano, C.; Dogliani, J.; Paredes, R.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work is to understand the history of the vegetation from the analysis of phytoliths present in Plio-Pleistocene and interpret the possible climatic changes since the Quaternary sediments to the present

  14. A fast track trigger processor for the OPAL detector at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, A.A.; Jaroslawski, S.; Wagner, A.

    1986-01-01

    A fast hardware track trigger processor being built for the OPAL experiment is described. The processor will analyse data from the central drift chambers of OPAL to determine whether any tracks come from the interaction region, and thereby eliminate background events. The processor will find tracks over a large angular range, vertical strokecos thetavertical stroke < or approx. 0.95. The design of the processor is described, together with a brief account of its hardware implementation for OPAL. The results of feasibility studies are also presented. (orig.)

  15. Open Air Laboratories (OPAL): a community-driven research programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, L; Bell, J N B; Bone, J; Head, M; Hill, L; Howard, C; Hobbs, S J; Jones, D T; Power, S A; Rose, N; Ryder, C; Seed, L; Stevens, G; Toumi, R; Voulvoulis, N; White, P C L

    2011-01-01

    OPAL is an English national programme that takes scientists into the community to investigate environmental issues. Biological monitoring plays a pivotal role covering topics of: i) soil and earthworms; ii) air, lichens and tar spot on sycamore; iii) water and aquatic invertebrates; iv) biodiversity and hedgerows; v) climate, clouds and thermal comfort. Each survey has been developed by an inter-disciplinary team and tested by voluntary, statutory and community sectors. Data are submitted via the web and instantly mapped. Preliminary results are presented, together with a discussion on data quality and uncertainty. Communities also investigate local pollution issues, ranging from nitrogen deposition on heathlands to traffic emissions on roadside vegetation. Over 200,000 people have participated so far, including over 1000 schools and 1000 voluntary groups. Benefits include a substantial, growing database on biodiversity and habitat condition, much from previously unsampled sites particularly in urban areas, and a more engaged public. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The W Boson Spin Density Matrix at OPAL

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, I R

    2007-01-01

    The spin states of W bosons in e+e− → W+W− → qq¯′ℓν ℓ events recorded by the OPAL detector at LEP are determined by an analysis of the angular distributions of their decay products. This information is used to calculate polarised differential cross-sections and to search for CP-violating effects. Results are presented for W bosons produced in e +e− collisions with centre- of-mass energies between 183 GeV and 209 GeV. The average percentage of longitudinally polarised W bosons measured from the data is found to be (23.9 ± 2.1 ± 1.1)% compared to a Standard Model prediction of (23.9 ± 0.1)%. All results are consistent with CP conservation.

  17. Nanoparticle-tuned structural color from polymer opals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursiainen, Otto L; Baumberg, Jeremy J; Winkler, Holger; Viel, Benjamin; Spahn, Peter; Ruhl, Tilmann

    2007-07-23

    The production of high-quality low-defect single-domain flexible polymer opals which possess fundamental photonic bandgaps tuneable across the visible and near-infrared regions is demonstrated in an industrially-scalable process. Incorporating sub-50nm nanoparticles into the interstices of the fcc lattice dramatically changes the perceived color without affecting the lattice quality. Contrary to iridescence based on Bragg diffraction, color generation arises through spectrally-resonant scattering inside the 3D photonic crystal. Viewing angles widen beyond 40 masculine removing the strong dependence of the perceived color on the position of light sources, greatly enhancing the color appearance. This opens up a range of decorative, sensing, security and photonic applications, and suggests an origin for structural colors in Nature.

  18. Biogenic sedimentation beneath the California Current system for the past 30 kyr and its paleoceanographic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, J.V.; Dean, W.E.; Dartnell, P.

    1997-01-01

    A north-south transect of 17 cores was constructed along the eastern boundary of the California Current system from 33?? to 42?? N to investigate the changes in biogenic sedimentation over the past 30 kyr. Percentages and mass accumulation rates of CaCO3, Corg, and biogenic opal were assembled at 500 to 1000 years/sample to provide relatively high resolution. Time-space maps reveal a complex pattern of changes that do not follow a simple glacial-interglacial two-mode model. Biogenic sedimentation shows responses that are sometimes time-transgressive and sometimes coeval, and most of the responses show more consistency within a limited geographic area than any temporal consistency. Reconstructed conditions during late oxygen isotope stage 3 were more like early Holocene conditions than any other time during the last 30 kyr. Coastal upwelling and productivity during oxygen isotope stage 3 were relatively strong along the central California margin but were weak along the northern California margin. Precipitation increased during the last glacial interval in the central California region, and the waters of the southern California margin had relatively low productivity. Productivity on the southern Oregon margin was relatively low at the beginning of the last glacial interval, but by about 20 ka, productivity in this area significantly increased. This change suggests that the center of the divergence of the West Wind Drift shifted south at this time. The end of the last glacial interval was characterized by increased productivity in the southern California margin and increased upwelling along the central California margin but upwelling remained weak along the northern California margin. A sudden (<300 years) decrease in CaCO3, Corg, and biogenic opal occurred at 13 ka. The changes suggest a major reorientation of the atmospheric circulation in the North Pacific and western North America and the establishment of a strong seasonality in the central California region. A

  19. Identifying and Analyzing Federal Government Market Opportunities for OpalSoft

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MacGregor, Lee

    2004-01-01

    .... A general review of OpalSoft's current operations and strategy will be conducted. The core of the project will concentrate on the review and analysis of the federal government information technology services sector...

  20. Enhanced yellow-green photoluminescence from ZnO-SiO2 composite opal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yingling; Yang Beifang; Fu Zhengping; Yan Hongwei; Zhen Wang; Dong Weiwei; Xia Linsheng; Liu Wenqi; Jian Zuo; Li Fanqing

    2004-01-01

    A remarkably enhanced yellow-green photoluminescence (PL) was observed from ZnO nanocrystals infiltrated into SiO 2 opal photonic crystals. It was clearly visible to the naked eye under the excitation of an Xe lamp and had substantially improved thermal stability over pure ZnO nanocrystals. The PL spectrum shape of a ZnO-SiO 2 composite opal can be modified by annealing an SiO 2 opal or choosing an SiO 2 opal with different lattice parameters. The enhancement of PL intensity is interpreted based on the dependence of the PL intensity on the size of SiO 2 microspheres as well as the anisotropy of the photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra. Our results may be interesting for further application

  1. Biogenic amines in smear and mould-ripened cheeses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Pleva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was the monitoring of six biogenic amines (histamine, tyramine, phenylethylamine, tryptamine, putrescine, and cadaverine and two polyamines (spermidine and spermine in 30 samples of dairy products purchased in the Czech Republic, namely in 15 samples of mould-ripened cheeses and in 15 samples of smear-ripened cheeses. A further goal was the microbiological analysis of the individual samples of cheeses (total count of microorganisms, number of enterobacteria, enterococci, lactic acid bacteria, yeasts and moulds. The monitored biogenic amines were analyzed by a high performance liquid chromatography equipped with a UV/VIS DAD detector. The amount of enterobacteria in fresh cheese exceeded 105 CFU.g‑1. In smear-ripened cheese flavourless (Romadur type, the amount was >103 CFU.g-1 and 104-105 CFU.g-1 in smear-ripened cheese with flavour. Biogenic amines were observed in two groups of blue cheeses (white veined cheese and blue veined cheese and smear-ripened cheeses. In both groups, there is a possibility of the presence of biogenic amines because the number of microorganisms and concentration of free amino acids increase during ripening. In ten samples of soft smear-ripening acid cheese and in smear-ripened cheese, the total content of biogenic amines were 22-1000 mg.kg-1 and in 5 samples of these cheeses, it was in range 1000-6000 mg.kg-1. The total amount of biogenic amines in the blue cheeses were in range 40-600 mg.kg-1. The presense of the tyramine was observed in the all analysed cheeses. The tyramine producing strains generated more than 900 mg.kg-1 of this biogenic amine. The production of tryptamine in the analysed cheeses was not proved by this study. The results of this study show that biogenic amines and polyamines are common in cheese. However, in some cases, they can pose a significant health danger for consumers. Any legislative control authority does not monitor them, as they are secondary metabolites even

  2. Biogenic amines in the meat of hunted pheasant and hare during the course of storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeňka Hutařová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Venison is becoming more and more interesting for consumers. Although treatment procedures of hunted game differ from slaughtered livestock, the hygienic quality of game meat must still be ensured. Potential indicators of meat hygienic quality include the content of biogenic amines. The aim of the present study was to assess the content and changes of biogenic amines in the muscles of selected kinds of small game (common pheasant and brown hare during storage, and based on the obtained results, to assess the hygienic quality of the meat. Biogenic amines (putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, phenylethylamine, and tryptamine in the breast and thigh muscles separated by reverse phase liquid chromatography and consequently were detected using tandem mass spectrometry. Based on the determined content of biogenic amines, both pheasant and hare meats complied with values of high quality meat. The sum of biogenic amines did not exceed the value of 5 mg/kg after 7 days at 0 °C or 7 °C in pheasant meat, and after 21 days at 0 °C or after 14 days at 7 °C in brown hare meat. The biogenic amine content and the speed of their formation in venison can be very helpful for the evaluation of both meat hygienic quality and safety of these foods during storage.

  3. Capabilities of laser ablation mass spectrometry in the differentiation of natural and artificial opal gemstones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erel, Eric; Aubriet, Frédéric; Finqueneisel, Gisèle; Muller, Jean-François

    2003-12-01

    The potentialities of laser ablation coupled to ion cyclotron resonance Fourier transform mass spectrometry are evaluated to distinguish natural and artificial opals. The detection of specific species in both ion detection modes leads us to obtain relevant criteria of differentiation. In positive ions, species including hafnium and large amounts of zirconium atoms are found to be specific for artificial opal. In contrast, aluminum, titanium, iron, and rubidium are systematically detected in the study of natural opals. Moreover, some ions allow us to distinguish between natural opal from Australia and from Mexico. Australian gemstone includes specifically strontium, cesium, and barium. Moreover, it is also found that the yield of (H2O)0-1(SiO2)nX- (X- = O-, OH-, KO-, NaO-, SiO2-, AlO1-2-, FeO2-, ZrO2-, and ZrO3-) and (Al2O3)(SiO2)nAlO2- ions depends on the composition of the sample when opals are laser ablated. Ions, which include zirconium oxide species, are characteristics of artificial gem. In contrast, natural opals lead us, after laser ablation, to the production of ions including H2O, Al2O3 motifs and AlO-, KO-, NaO-, and FeO2- species.

  4. Biogenic Amines in Insect Antennae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna I. Zhukovskaya

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Insect antenna is a multisensory organ, each modality of which can be modulated by biogenic amines. Octopamine (OA and its metabolic precursor tyramine (TA affect activity of antennal olfactory receptor neurons. There is some evidence that dopamine (DA modulates gustatory neurons. Serotonin can serve as a neurotransmitter in some afferent mechanosensory neurons and both as a neurotransmitter and neurohormone in efferent fibers targeted at the antennal vessel and mechanosensory organs. As a neurohormone, serotonin affects the generation of the transepithelial potential by sensillar accessory cells. Other possible targets of biogenic amines in insect antennae are hygro- and thermosensory neurons and epithelial cells. We suggest that the insect antenna is partially autonomous in the sense that biologically active substances entering its hemolymph may exert their effects and be cleared from this compartment without affecting other body parts.

  5. Polychromatic light-emitting diodes with a fluorescent nanosphere opal coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui, K N; Fu, W Y; Ng, W N; Leung, C H; Lai, P T; Wong, K K Y; Choi, H W

    2008-01-01

    A hexagonally close-packed array consisting of fluorescent nanospheres was coated onto short-wavelength GaN light-emitting diodes to demonstrate polychromatic white light emission. The spherical particles self-assemble into ordered three-dimensional opal structures, performing the role of color conversion to generate a polychromatic spectrum with smooth and uniform emission patterns. Different ratios of green and orange-red fluorescent nanospheres were mixed and coated onto high-extraction-efficiency micro-LEDs. Four devices with different shades of white emission were demonstrated. Device A, with a high content of orange-red nanospheres, offers the highest CRI value of 80, whereas device C with a well-balanced ratio of green and orange-red nanospheres exhibits color characteristics closest to ideal white with CIE coordinate at (0.34, 0.34). At 20 mA driving current, the luminous efficacy of the devices A, B, C, and D are 40.5 lm W -1 , 57.7 lm W -1 , 63.1 lm W -1 , and 67.2 lm W -1 respectively, while the correlated color temperatures (CCTs) of the corresponding devices are 3587, 4778, 5271, and 13 000 K

  6. Unconventional shallow biogenic gas systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurr, G.W.; Ridgley, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Unconventional shallow biogenic gas falls into two distinct systems that have different attributes. Early-generation systems have blanketlike geometries, and gas generation begins soon after deposition of reservoir and source rocks. Late-generation systems have ringlike geometries, and long time intervals separate deposition of reservoir and source rocks from gas generation. For both types of systems, the gas is dominantly methane and is associated with source rocks that are not thermally mature. Early-generation biogenic gas systems are typified by production from low-permeability Cretaceous rocks in the northern Great Plains of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Montana. The main area of production is on the southeastern margin of the Alberta basin and the northwestern margin of the Williston basin. The huge volume of Cretaceous rocks has a generalized regional pattern of thick, non-marine, coarse clastics to the west and thinner, finer grained marine lithologies to the east. Reservoir rocks in the lower part tend to be finer grained and have lower porosity and permeability than those in the upper part. Similarly, source beds in the units have higher values of total organic carbon. Patterns of erosion, deposition, deformation, and production in both the upper and lower units are related to the geometry of lineament-bounded basement blocks. Geochemical studies show that gas and coproduced water are in equilibrium and that the fluids are relatively old, namely, as much as 66 Ma. Other examples of early-generation systems include Cretaceous clastic reservoirs on the southwestern margin of Williston basin and chalks on the eastern margin of the Denver basin. Late-generation biogenic gas systems have as an archetype the Devonian Antrim Shale on the northern margin of the Michigan basin. Reservoir rocks are fractured, organic-rich black shales that also serve as source rocks. Although fractures are important for production, the relationships to specific geologic structures are

  7. Three-dimensional opal-like silica foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carn, Florent; Saadaoui, Hassan; Massé, Pascal; Ravaine, Serge; Julian-Lopez, Beatriz; Sanchez, Clément; Deleuze, Hervé; Talham, Daniel R; Backov, Rénal

    2006-06-06

    The synthesis of novel meso-/macroporous SiO2 monoliths by combining a nano-building-blocks-based approach with the confined geometry of a tailored air-liquid foam structure is described. The resulting macrostructure in which ordered close-packed colloidal silica nanoparticles constitute the monolith's scaffolds very closely resembles the tailored periodic air-liquid foam template. The void spaces between adjacent particles create textural mesoporosity; therefore, the as-prepared silica networks are characterized by hierarchical porosity at the macroscopic and mesoscopic length scales. The fine-tuning of both the liquid foam's fraction and the bubble size allows a rational design over the macroscopic cell morphologies (shape, Plateau border's length, and width). Striking results of this approach are the weak shrinkage of the as-synthesized opal-like scaffolds during the thermally induced sintering process and, in contrast with previous studies, the formation of closed-cell structures. Particle organization and the foam film surface roughness are investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), showing the influence of the liquid flow, within the foams' Plateau borders and films, on the final assemblies.

  8. Open Air Laboratories (OPAL): A community-driven research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, L.; Bell, J.N.B.; Bone, J.; Head, M.; Hill, L.; Howard, C.; Hobbs, S.J.; Jones, D.T.; Power, S.A.; Rose, N.; Ryder, C.; Seed, L.; Stevens, G.; Toumi, R.; Voulvoulis, N.; White, P.C.L.

    2011-01-01

    OPAL is an English national programme that takes scientists into the community to investigate environmental issues. Biological monitoring plays a pivotal role covering topics of: i) soil and earthworms; ii) air, lichens and tar spot on sycamore; iii) water and aquatic invertebrates; iv) biodiversity and hedgerows; v) climate, clouds and thermal comfort. Each survey has been developed by an inter-disciplinary team and tested by voluntary, statutory and community sectors. Data are submitted via the web and instantly mapped. Preliminary results are presented, together with a discussion on data quality and uncertainty. Communities also investigate local pollution issues, ranging from nitrogen deposition on heathlands to traffic emissions on roadside vegetation. Over 200,000 people have participated so far, including over 1000 schools and 1000 voluntary groups. Benefits include a substantial, growing database on biodiversity and habitat condition, much from previously unsampled sites particularly in urban areas, and a more engaged public. - Highlights: → Environmental research conducted jointly by the public and scientists. → Over 200,000 people involved, 8000 sites surveyed, uncertainty minimised. → New insights into urban pollution. → A more engaged and informed society. - Research is enriched where the public and scientists work together.

  9. Open Air Laboratories (OPAL): A community-driven research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, L., E-mail: l.davies@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Bell, J.N.B.; Bone, J.; Head, M.; Hill, L. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Howard, C. [Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Hobbs, S.J. [Environment Department, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Jones, D.T. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Power, S.A. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rose, N. [Department of Geography, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Ryder, C.; Seed, L. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Stevens, G. [Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Toumi, R.; Voulvoulis, N. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); White, P.C.L. [Environment Department, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-15

    OPAL is an English national programme that takes scientists into the community to investigate environmental issues. Biological monitoring plays a pivotal role covering topics of: i) soil and earthworms; ii) air, lichens and tar spot on sycamore; iii) water and aquatic invertebrates; iv) biodiversity and hedgerows; v) climate, clouds and thermal comfort. Each survey has been developed by an inter-disciplinary team and tested by voluntary, statutory and community sectors. Data are submitted via the web and instantly mapped. Preliminary results are presented, together with a discussion on data quality and uncertainty. Communities also investigate local pollution issues, ranging from nitrogen deposition on heathlands to traffic emissions on roadside vegetation. Over 200,000 people have participated so far, including over 1000 schools and 1000 voluntary groups. Benefits include a substantial, growing database on biodiversity and habitat condition, much from previously unsampled sites particularly in urban areas, and a more engaged public. - Highlights: > Environmental research conducted jointly by the public and scientists. > Over 200,000 people involved, 8000 sites surveyed, uncertainty minimised. > New insights into urban pollution. > A more engaged and informed society. - Research is enriched where the public and scientists work together.

  10. Selectively Patterning Polymer Opal Films via Microimprint Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Tao; Zhao, Qibin; Smoukov, Stoyan K; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2014-11-01

    Large-scale structural color flexible coatings have been hard to create, and patterning color on them is key to many applications, including large-area strain sensors, wall-size displays, security devices, and smart fabrics. To achieve controlled tuning, a micro-imprinting technique is applied here to pattern both the surface morphology and the structural color of the polymer opal films (POFs). These POFs are made of 3D ordered arrays of hard spherical particles embedded inside soft shells. The soft outer shells cause the POFs to deform upon imprinting with a pre-patterned stamp, driving a flow of the soft polymer and a rearrangement of the hard spheres within the films. As a result, a patterned surface morphology is generated within the POFs and the structural colors are selectively modified within different regions. These changes are dependent on the pressure, temperature, and duration of imprinting, as well as the feature sizes in the stamps. Moreover, the pattern geometry and structural colors can then be further tuned by stretching. Micropattern color generation upon imprinting depends on control of colloidal transport in a polymer matrix under shear flow and brings many potential properties including stretchability and tunability, as well as being of fundamental interest.

  11. Microscale Liquid Transport in Polycrystalline Inverse Opals across Grain Boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Q N; Barako, M T; Tice, J; Won, Y

    2017-09-05

    Delivering liquid through the void spaces in porous metals is a daunting challenge for a variety of emerging interface technologies ranging from battery electrodes to evaporation surfaces. Hydraulic transport characteristics of well-ordered porous media are governed by the pore distribution, porosity, and morphology. Much like energy transport in polycrystalline solids, hydraulic transport in semi-ordered porous media is predominantly limited by defects and grain boundaries. Here, we report the wicking performances for porous copper inverse opals having pore diameters from 300 to 1000 nm by measuring the capillary-driven liquid rise. The capillary performance parameter within single crystal domain (K ij /R eff  = 10 -3 to 10 -2  µm) is an order of magnitude greater than the collective polycrystal (K eff /R eff  = ~10 -5 to 10 -3  µm) due to the hydraulic resistances (i.e. grain boundaries between individual grains). Inspired by the heterogeneity found in biological systems, we report that the capillary performance parameter of gradient porous copper (K eff /R eff  = ~10 -3  µm), comparable to that of single crystals, overcomes hydraulic resistances through providing additional hydraulic routes in three dimensions. The understanding of microscopic liquid transport physics through porous crystals and across grain boundaries will help to pave the way for the spatial design of next-generation heterogeneous porous media.

  12. [Advances in researches of biogenic molluscicides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Li; Jian-Rong, Dai; Yun-Tian, Xing

    2017-01-05

    Biogenic molluscicides refer to the use of plants, animals and micro-organisms or their metabolites, and synthesis biomimetic molluscicides to kill Oncomelania hupensis snails. With the rapid development of science and technology, new biogenic molluscicides are continuously emerging and the category also continues to expand. According to the molluscicidal active ingredient and sources, at present, the biogenic molluscicides with in-depth studies include plant-derived molluscicides, micro-organism molluscicides, microbial metabolite molluscicides and animal molluscicides. This paper reviews the advances in the researches of biogenic molluscicides in recent years.

  13. Optical chracterization and lasing in three-dimensional opal-structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki eNishijima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The lasing properties of dye-permeated opal pyramidal structures are compared with the lasing properties of opal films. The opal-structures studied were made by sedimentation of micro-spheres and by sol-gel inversion of the direct-opals. Forced-sedimentation by centrifugation inside wet-etched pyramidal pits on silicon surfaces was used to improve the structural quality of the direct-opal structures. Single crystalline pyramids with the base length of ∼ 100 µm were formed by centrifuged sedimentation. The lasing of dyes in the well-ordered crystalline and poly-crystalline structures showed a distinct multi-modal spectrum. Gain via a distributed feedback was responsible for the lasing since the photonic band gap was negligible in a low refractive index contrast medium; the indices of silica and ethylene glycol are 1.46 and 1.42, respectively. A disordered lasing spectrum was observed from opal films with structural defects and multi-domain regions. The three dimensional structural quality of the structures was assessed by in situ optical diffraction and confocal fluorescence. A correlation between the lasing spectrum and the three-dimensional structural quality was established. Lasing threshold of a sulforhodamine dye in a silica opal was controlled via Förster mechanism by addition of a donor rhodamine 6G dye. The lasing spectrum had a well-ordered modal structure which was spectrally stable at different excitation powers. The sharp lasing threshold characterized by a spontaneous emission coupling ratio β ' 10−2 was obtained.

  14. Framework for Assessing Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    This revision of the 2011 report, Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources, evaluates biogenic CO2 emissions from stationary sources, including a detailed study of the scientific and technical issues associated with assessing biogenic carbon dioxide...

  15. Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editor IJRED

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available International Journal of Renewable Energy Development www.ijred.com Volume 1             Number 3            October 2012                ISSN 2252- 4940   CONTENTS OF ARTICLES page Design and Economic Analysis of a Photovoltaic System: A Case Study 65-73 C.O.C. Oko , E.O. Diemuodeke, N.F. Omunakwe, and E. Nnamdi     Development of Formaldehyde Adsorption using Modified Activated Carbon – A Review 75-80 W.D.P Rengga , M. Sudibandriyo and M. Nasikin     Process Optimization for Ethyl Ester Production in Fixed Bed Reactor Using Calcium Oxide Impregnated Palm Shell Activated Carbon (CaO/PSAC 81-86 A. Buasri , B. Ksapabutr, M. Panapoy and N. Chaiyut     Wind Resource Assessment in Abadan Airport in Iran 87-97 Mojtaba Nedaei       The Energy Processing by Power Electronics and its Impact on Power Quality 99-105 J. E. Rocha and B. W. D. C. Sanchez       First Aspect of Conventional Power System Assessment for High Wind Power Plants Penetration 107-113 A. Merzic , M. Music, and M. Rascic   Experimental Study on the Production of Karanja Oil Methyl Ester and Its Effect on Diesel Engine 115-122 N. Shrivastava,  , S.N. Varma and M. Pandey  

  16. Practitioner insights on obesity prevention: the voice of South Australian OPAL workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge based on science has been central to implementing community-based childhood obesity prevention interventions. The art of practitioner wisdom is equally critical to ensure locally relevant responses. In South Australia (SA), the OPAL (Obesity Prevention and Lifestyle) program has been implemented to reduce childhood obesity across 20 communities reaching nearly one quarter of the state's population. Staff from across the State come together at regular intervals to share practice challenges and insights and refine the model of practice. Over a 3-year period 12 reflective practice workshops were held with OPAL staff (n = 46). OPAL staff were guided by an external facilitator using inquiring questions to reflect on their health promotion practice within local government. Three themes were identified as central within the reflections. The first theme is shared clarity through the OPAL obesity prevention model highlighting the importance of working to a clearly articulated, holistic obesity prevention model. The second theme is practitioner skill and sensitivity required to implement the model and deal with the 'politics' of obesity prevention. The final theme is the power of relationships as intrinsic to effective community based health promotion. Insights into the daily practices and reflections from obesity prevention practitioners are shared to shed light on the skills required to contribute to individual and social change. OPAL staff co-authored this paper. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Intolerance to dietary biogenic amines : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, SC; van Dusseldorp, M; Bottema, KC; Dubois, AEJ

    Objective: To evaluate the scientific evidence for purported intolerance to dietary biogenic amines. Data Sources: MEDLINE was searched for articles in the English language published between January 1966 and August 2001. The keyword biogenic amin* was combined with hypersens*, allergen intoler*, and

  18. Intolerance to dietary biogenic amines: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, S.C.; Dusseldorp, M. van; Bottema, K.C.; Dubois, A.E.J.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the scientific evidence for purported intolerance to dietary biogenic amines. Data Sources: MEDLINE was searched for articles in the English language published between January 1966 and August 2001. The keyword biogenic amin* was combined with hypersens*, allerg*, intoler*, and

  19. Safety assessment of the biogenic amines in fermented soya beans and fermented bean curd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; Ding, Xiaowen; Qin, Yingrui; Zeng, Yitao

    2014-08-06

    To evaluate the safety of biogenic amines, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to evaluate the levels of biogenic amines in fermented soya beans and fermented bean curd. In fermented soya beans, the total biogenic amines content was in a relatively safe range in many samples, although the concentration of histamine, tyramine, and β-phenethylamine was high enough in some samples to cause a possible safety threat, and 8 of the 30 samples were deemed unsafe. In fermented bean curd, the total biogenic amines content was more than 900 mg/kg in 19 white sufu amples, a level that has been determined to pose a safety hazard; putrescine was the only one detected in all samples and also had the highest concentration, which made samples a safety hazard; the content of tryptamine, β-phenethylamine, tyramine, and histamine had reached the level of threat to human health in some white and green sufu samples, and that may imply another potential safety risk; and 25 of the 33 samples were unsafe. In conclusion, the content of biogenic amines in all fermented soya bean products should be studied and appropriate limits determined to ensure the safety of eating these foods.

  20. Angle dependence in slow photon photocatalysis using TiO2 inverse opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curti, Mariano; Zvitco, Gonzalo; Grela, María Alejandra; Mendive, Cecilia B.

    2018-03-01

    The slow photon effect was studied by means of the photocatalytic degradation of stearic acid over TiO2 inverse opals. The comparison of the degradation rates over inverse opals with those obtained over disordered structures at different irradiation angles showed that the irradiation at the blue edge of the stopband leads to the activation of the effect, evidenced by an improvement factor of 1.8 ± 0.6 in the reaction rate for irradiation at 40°. The rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) method was employed to confirm the source of the enhancement; simulated spectra showed an enhancement in the absorption of the TiO2 matrix that composes the inverse opal at a 40° irradiation angle, owing to an appropriate position of the stopband in relation to the absorption onset of TiO2.

  1. Solvothermal synthesis of 3D photonic crystals based on ZnS/opal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Xin; Cao Jieming; Ji Hongmei; Fang Baoqing; Feng Jie; Pan Lijia; Zhang Fang; Wang, Haiyan

    2005-01-01

    We made photonic crystals composed of artificial opals infiltrated with ZnS semiconductor nanocrystals by using self-assembly and solvothermal methods. SEM images show that the silica spheres exhibit a well-ordered arrangement and the ZnS nanocrystals infiltrate within the opal templates by heterogeneous nucleation and growth processing, and the as-synthesized ZnS nanocrystals reveal a cubic phase from X-ray diffraction pattern. Furthermore, the optical properties of the infiltrated opals with different ZnS filling ratio are also studied by transmission spectroscopy, respectively. It is proposed that the position of the stop band can be easily designed by controlling the infiltration ratio of ZnS. These results demonstrate an easy-to-handle and efficient route to obtain high performance photonic crystal structures

  2. Mesozooplankton biomass and grazing responses to Cyclone Opal, a subtropical mesoscale eddy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Michael R.; Decima, Moira; Simmons, Melinda P.; Hannides, Cecelia C. S.; Daniels, Emy

    2008-05-01

    As part of E-Flux III cruise studies in March 2005, plankton net collections were made to assess the effects of a cyclonic cold-core eddy (Cyclone Opal) on the biomass and grazing of mesozooplankton. Mesozooplankton biomass in the central region of Cyclone Opal, an area of uplifted nutricline and a subsurface diatom bloom, averaged 0.80±0.24 and 1.51±0.59 g DW m -2, for day and night tows, respectively. These biomass estimates were about 80% higher than control (OUT) stations, with increases more or less proportionately distributed among size classes from 0.2 to >5 mm. Though elevated relative to surrounding waters south of the Hawaiian Islands (Hawai'i lee), total biomass and size distribution in Cyclone Opal were almost exactly the same as contemporary measurements made at Stn. ALOHA, 100 km north of the islands, by the HOT (Hawaii Ocean Time-series) Program. Mesozooplankton biomass and community composition at the OUT stations were also similar to ALOHA values from 1994 to 1996, preceding a recent decadal increase. These comparisons may therefore provide insight into production characteristics or biomass gradients associated with decadal changes at Stn. ALOHA. Gut fluorescence estimates were higher in Opal than in ambient waters, translating to grazing impacts of 0.11±0.02 d -1 (IN) versus 0.03±0.01 d -1 (OUT). Over the depth-integrated euphotic zone, mesozooplankton accounted for 30% of the combined grazing losses of phytoplankton to micro- and meso-herbivores in Opal, as compared to 13% at control stations. Estimates of active export flux by migrating zooplankton averaged 0.81 mmol C m -2 d -1 in Cyclone Opal and 0.37 mmol C m -2 d -1 at OUT stations, 53% and 24%, respectively, of the carbon export measured by passive sediment traps. Migrants also exported 0.18 mmol N m -2 d -1 (117% of trap N flux) in Cyclone Opal compared to 0.08 mmol N m -2 d -1 (51% of trap flux) at control stations. Overall, the food-web importance of mesozooplankton increased in

  3. Influence on wine biogenic amine composition of modifications to soil N availability and grapevine N by cover crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Álvarez, Eva P; Garde-Cerdán, Teresa; Cabrita, Maria João; García-Escudero, Enrique; Peregrina, Fernando

    2017-11-01

    Vineyard soil management can modify the nitrogen soil availability and, therefore, grape amino acid content. These compounds are precursors of biogenic amines, which have negative effects on wine quality and human health. The objective was to study whether the effect of conventional tillage and two cover crops (barley and clover) on grapevine nitrogen status could be related to wine biogenic amines. Over 4 years, soil NO 3 - -N, nitrogen content in leaf and wine biogenic amine concentration were determined. Barley reduced soil NO 3 - -N availability and clover increased it. In 2011, at bloom, nitrogen content decreased with barley treatment in both blade and petiole. In 2012, nitrogen content in both leaf tissues at bloom was greater with clover than with tillage and barley treatments. Also, total biogenic amines decreased in barley with respect to tillage and clover treatments. There were correlations between some individual and total biogenic amine concentrations with respect to nitrogen content in leaf tissues. Wine biogenic amine concentration can be affected by the grapevine nitrogen status, provoked by changes in the soil NO 3 - -N availability with both cover crop treatments. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Biogenic amines in Italian Pecorino cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eSchirone

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The quality of distinctive artisanal cheeses is closely associated with the territory of production and its traditions. Pedoclimatic characteristics, genetic autochthonous variations and anthropic components create an environment so specific that it would be extremely difficult to reproduce elsewhere. Pecorino cheese is included in this sector of the market and is widely diffused in Italy (approximately 53.727t of production. Pecorino is a common name given to indicate Italian cheeses made exclusively from pure ewes' milk characterized by a high content of fat matter and it is mainly produced in the middle and south of Italy by traditional procedures from raw or thermized milk. The microbiota plays a major role in the development of the organoleptic characteristics of the cheese but it can also be responsible for the accumulation of undesirable substances, such as biogenic amines (BA. Several factors can contribute to the qualitative and quantitative profiles of BA’s in Pecorino cheese such as environmental hygienic conditions, pH, salt concentration, aw, fat content, pasteurization of milk, decarboxylase microorganisms, starter cultures, temperature and time of ripening, storage, part of the cheese (core, edge and the presence of cofactor. Generally, the total content of BA’s can range from about 100-2400 mg/kg, with a prevalence of toxicologically important BA’s, tyramine and histamine. The presence of BA in Pecorino cheeses is becoming increasingly important to consumers and cheese-maker alike, due to the potential threats of toxicity to humans and consequent trade implications.

  5. The design of the cold neutron source of the OPAL reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechiman, L.M.; Bonetto, Fabian J.; Buscaglia, Gustavo C.

    2007-01-01

    The present work describes the conceptual design process of the first cold neutron source developed by INVAP for the nuclear research reactor OPAL. The analysis begins from the requirements given by the client and continues with the chosen solutions. Furthermore, we studied how impact in the design the fully illuminated constraint with the finite remote source model. (author) [es

  6. Achieving Operational Two-Way Laser Acquisition for OPALS Payload on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Matthew J.; Oaida, Bogdan V.; Sindiy, Oleg; Biswas, Abhijit

    2015-01-01

    The Optical PAyload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) experiment was installed on the International Space Station (ISS) in April 2014. Developed as a technology demonstration, its objective was to experiment with space-to-ground optical communications transmissions from Low Earth Orbit. More than a dozen successful optical links were established between a Wrightwood, California-based ground telescope and the OPALS flight terminal from June 2014 to September 2014. Each transmission required precise bi-directional pointing to be maintained between the space-based transmitter and ground-based receiver. This was accomplished by acquiring and tracking a laser beacon signal transmitted from the ground telescope to the OPALS flight terminal on the ISS. OPALS demonstrated the ability to nominally acquire the beacon within three seconds at 25deg elevation and maintain lock within 140 µrad (3(sigma)) for the full 150-second transmission duration while slewing at rates up to 1deg/sec. Additional acquisition attempts in low elevation and weather-challenged conditions provided valuable insight on the optical link robustness under off-nominal operational conditions.

  7. Ornamental Stones and Gemstones: The limits of heritage stone designation: The case for and against Australian Precious Opal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Barry

    2015-04-01

    When the international designation of natural stone types was first mooted in 2007, stones that were utilised in building and construction were the primary focus of attention. However following public discussion it soon became apparent that sculptural stones, stone used for utilitarian purposes such as millstones, as well as archaeological materials including stones used by early man could all be positively assessed as a potential Global Heritage Stone Resource (GHSR). Over the past 2 years it has been realised there is also a range of ornamental and semi-precious stones that may also be considered in the same international context. Examples in this respect include Imperial Porphyry sourced from Egypt that was much prized in the ancient world and "Derbyshire Blue John" a variety of fluorspar from central England that was used for vases, chalices, urns, candle sticks, jars, bowls door, jewellery and fire-place surrounds, especially in the 18th and 19th centuries. It is at this point that rock materials, sometimes used as gemstones, impinge on the domain of typical heritage stones. In Australia, the gemstone most identifiable with the country is precious opal formed by sedimentary processes in the Great Artesian Basin. In this paper the question is asked whether "Australian Precious Opal" could be or should be considered as a heritage stone of international significance. Immediately Australian Precious Opal satisfies several GHSR criteria including historic use for more than 50 years and wide-ranging utilisation for prestige jewellery around the world. It is also recognised as a cultural icon including association with national identity in Australia as it is legally defined as Australia's "National Gemstone" as well as being the "Gemstone Emblem" for the State of South Australia. Opal continues to be mined. Designation of Australian Precious Opal as a Global Heritage Stone Resource would likely involve formal international recognition of Australian opal in the

  8. Biogenic emissions modeling for Southeastern Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, M.; Jacob, D.; Jarvie, J. [Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC) modeling staff performed biogenic hydrocarbon emissions modeling in support of gridded photochemical modeling for ozone episodes in 1992 and 1993 for the Coastal Oxidant Assessment for Southeast Texas (COAST) modeling domain. This paper summarizes the results of the biogenic emissions modeling and compares preliminary photochemical modeling results to ambient air monitoring data collected during the 1993 COAST study. Biogenic emissions were estimated using BIOME, a gridded biogenic emissions model that uses region-specific land use and biomass density data, and plant species-specific emission factor data. Ambient air monitoring data were obtained by continuous automated gas chromatography at two sites, one-hour canister samples at 5 sites, and 24-hour canister samples at 13 other sites. The concentrations of Carbon Bond-IV species (as determined from urban airshed modeling) were compared to measured hydrocarbon concentrations. In this paper, we examined diurnal and seasonal variations, as well as spatial variations.

  9. EFFICIENCY OF REMOVING BIOGENIC COMPOUNDS IN WATER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Jachimowski

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the effectiveness of removal of biogenic compounds from water during the treatment process in water treatment plants of Municipal Water Supply and Sewerage Company in Cracow. The selected water quality indicators were analyzed before and after the treatment process in 2007 - 2014. The research was carried out in waters taken from plants that differed in treatment and production. In the analyzed technological systems it was stated that the biggest objections raised the concentration of nitrates, the average content of which is higher in treated water in three plants: Rudawa, Dłubnia and Bielany.

  10. The Optical Profiling of the Atmospheric Limb (OPAL) CubeSat Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppesen, M.; Miller, J.; Cox, W.; Taylor, M. J.; Swenson, C.; Neilsen, T. L.; Fish, C. S.; Scherliess, L.; Christensen, A. B.; Cleave, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's lower thermosphere is an important interface region between the neutral atmosphere and the "space weather" environment. While the high-latitude region of the thermosphere responds promptly to energy inputs, relatively little is known about the global/regional response to these energy inputs. Global temperatures are predicted to respond within 3-6 hours, but the details of the thermal response of the atmosphere as energy transports away from high-latitude source regions is not well understood. The Optical Profiling of the Atmospheric Limb (OPAL) mission aims to characterize this thermal response through observation of the temperature structure of the lower thermosphere at mid- and low-latitudes. The OPAL instrument is designed to map global thermospheric temperature variability over the critical "thermospheric gap" region (~100-140 km altitude) by spectroscopic analysis of molecular oxygen A-band emission (758 - 768 nm). The OPAL instrument is a grating-based imaging spectrometer with refractive optics and a high-efficiency volume holographic grating (VHG). The scene is sampled by 7 parallel slits that form non-overlapping spectral profiles at the focal plane with resolution of 0.5 nm (spectral), 1.5 km (limb profiling), and 60 km (horizontal sampling). A CCD camera at the instrument focal plane delivers low noise and high sensitivity. The instrument is designed to strongly reject stray light from daylight regions of the earth. The OPAL mission is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) CubeSat-based Science Missions for Geospace and Atmospheric Research program. The OPAL instrument, CubeSat bus and mission are being designed, built and executed by a team comprised of students and professors from Utah State University, Dixie State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, with support from professional scientists and engineers from the Space Dynamics Laboratory and Hawk Institute for Space Science.

  11. Changes in the biogenic amine content of the prefrontal cortex, amygdala, dorsal hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens of rats submitted to single and repeated sessions of the elevated plus-maze test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho M.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that exposure to a variety of stressful experiences enhances fearful reactions when behavior is tested in current animal models of anxiety. Until now, no study has examined the neurochemical changes during the test and retest sessions of rats submitted to the elevated plus maze (EPM. The present study uses a new approach (HPLC by looking at the changes in dopamine and serotonin levels in the prefrontal cortex, amygdala, dorsal hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens in animals upon single or double exposure to the EPM (one-trial tolerance. The study involved two experiments: i saline or midazolam (0.5 mg/kg before the first trial, and ii saline or midazolam before the second trial. For the biochemical analysis a control group injected with saline and not tested in the EPM was included. Stressful stimuli in the EPM were able to elicit one-trial tolerance to midazolam on re-exposure (61.01%. Significant decreases in serotonin contents occurred in the prefrontal cortex (38.74%, amygdala (78.96%, dorsal hippocampus (70.33%, and nucleus accumbens (73.58% of the animals tested in the EPM (P < 0.05 in all cases in relation to controls not exposed to the EPM. A significant decrease in dopamine content was also observed in the amygdala (54.74%, P < 0.05. These changes were maintained across trials. There was no change in the turnover rates of these monoamines. We suggest that exposure to the EPM causes reduced monoaminergic neurotransmission activity in limbic structures, which appears to underlie the "one-trial tolerance" phenomenon.

  12. Transformation of Strontium during formation of biogenic calcium carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, T.; Kozai, N.; Sakamoto, F.; Yamashita, M.; Horiieke, T.; Utsunomiya, S.

    2016-12-01

    Some amounts of radionuclides contaminated water containing 90Sr generated in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant were leaked to sea water in the port. One of the possible method to eliminate 90Sr is co-precipitated with biogenic carbonates minerals (CCM). Specific bacteria are known to form biogenic CCM in groundwater. In the present study, we have screened specific bacterium to form CCM in saline water, and studied transformation of Sr during biogenic CCM. A marine microbe of strain TK2d, which is screened from Tokyo bay to form CCM in saline solution, was grown in the medium solution contained urea and Sr. The concentratuion of Sr2+ in the solution was monitored by ICP-OES (ICP-OES; 720 Agilent Technologies, Inc., USA) during the formation of biogenic CCM. The precipitates were analyzed by SEM, TEM, and XAFS. When 1.0 mM Sr was dissolved in the medium solution, the concentration of Sr decreased up to 0.02 mM within 10 days, indicating that most of Sr in the solution was eliminated within 10 days. SEM and TEM analyses showed that needle shaped CCM containing Ca and Sr were formed. The CCM was not single crystalline, but poly-crystalline of calcite and aragonite. The elemental mapping showed that Sr was present at the same position of Ca, indicating that Sr was coprecipitated with Ca. The XANES analysis of Sr in the precipitates showed that the XANES spectrum was not the same as that of Sr coprecipitated with an abiotic Ca carbonates. Linear combination fitting of XANES spectra by those of SrCl2 and SrCO3 showed that both Sr2+ and SrCO3 were present in CCM. Longer contact time resulted in higher content of SrCO3, indicating that Sr was incorporated gradually with time into CCM structure. Thus, Sr was changed its chemical species from adsorbed one to the incorporated one in biogenic CCM in saline solution. This work was partially supported by a research grant from the Japan Science and Technology Agency, Japan (research grant No. 260502).

  13. Validation of an HPLC Analytical Method for Determination of Biogenic Amines in Agricultural Products and Monitoring of Biogenic Amines in Korean Fermented Agricultural Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyeock; Park, Jung Hyuck; Choi, Ari; Hwang, Han-Joon; Mah, Jae-Hyung

    2015-09-01

    An HPLC analytical method was validated for the quantitative determination of biogenic amines in agricultural products. Four agricultural foods, including apple juice, Juk, corn oil and peanut butter, were selected as food matrices based on their water and fat contents (i.e., non-fatty liquid, non-fatty solid, fatty liquid and fatty solid, respectively). The precision, accuracy, recovery, limit of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were determined to test the validity of an HPLC procedure for the determination of biogenic amines, including tryptamine, β-phenylethylamine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, spermidine and spermine, in each matrix. The LODs and LOQs for the biogenic amines were within the range of 0.01~0.10 mg/kg and 0.02~0.31 mg/kg, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of intraday for biogenic amine concentrations ranged from 1.86 to 5.95%, whereas the RSD of interday ranged from 2.08 to 5.96%. Of the matrices spiked with biogenic amines, corn oil with tyramine and Juk with putrescine exhibited the least accuracy of 84.85% and recovery rate of 89.63%, respectively, at the lowest concentration (10 mg/kg). Therefore, the validation results fulfilled AOAC criteria and recommendations. Subsequently, the method was applied to the analysis of biogenic amines in fermented agricultural products for a total dietary survey in Korea. Although the results revealed that Korean traditional soy sauce and Doenjang contained relatively high levels of histamine, the amounts are of no concern if these fermented agricultural products serve as condiments.

  14. Biogenic carbon in combustible waste: Waste composition, variability and measurement uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anna Warberg; Fuglsang, Karsten; Pedersen, Niels H.

    2013-01-01

    Obtaining accurate data for the contents of biogenic and fossil carbon in thermally-treated waste is essential for determination of the environmental profile of waste technologies. Relations between the variability of waste chemistry and the biogenic and fossil carbon emissions are not well...... described in the literature. This study addressed the variability of biogenic and fossil carbon in combustible waste received at a municipal solid waste incinerator. Two approaches were compared: (1) radiocarbon dating (14C analysis) of carbon dioxide sampled from the flue gas, and (2) mass and energy...... balance calculations using the balance method. The ability of the two approaches to accurately describe short-term day-to-day variations in carbon emissions, and to which extent these short-term variations could be explained by controlled changes in waste input composition, was evaluated. Finally...

  15. Fluorescence lifetime of emitters with broad homogeneous linewidths modified in opal photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolaev, Ivan S.; Lodahl, Peter; Vos, Willem L.

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of spontaneous emission from dye molecules embedded in opal photonic crystals. Fluorescence lifetimes of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye were measured as a function of both optical frequency and crystal lattice parameter of the polystyrene opals. Due to the broad...... homogeneous line width of the dye, the observed fluorescence lifetime varies only slightly with the frequency within the dye emission spectrum. The lifetime however does change as a function of the crystal lattice parameter. Our observations agree with theoretical calculations of the local density of optical...... states (LDOS) in the three-dimensional photonic crystals. The experiments and theory taken together reveal that the emission lifetime is modified over frequency ranges that are broader than the homogeneous emission line width of R6G dye....

  16. Studies of event shape observables with the OPAL detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Ford, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    In quark-antiquark pair production at LEP, many features of the hadronic final state can be predicted by QCD. Using data collected by the OPAL experiment, we present the statistical distributions of fourteen "event shape observables," which describe the inclusive kinematic properties of events producing three or more jets. For six of these observables, we compare the measured distributions with those calculated in perturbative QCD. By optimising the agreement between theory and data, we measure the strong coupling $\\alpha_s$ at a range of energy scales. We also test the predictions of three Monte Carlo event generators, for all fourteen observables. Over the years since the LEP experiments began operating, many similar analyses have been published, and have contributed to the world average measurements of $\\alpha_s$. However, several improvements have now been made, both in the theoretical calculations and in the experimental analysis techniques. We therefore present a complete reanalysis of the OPAL data, ov...

  17. Protein-based inverse opals: A novel support for enzyme immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanjun; Sun, Wenya; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Lihui; Zhou, Liya; Gao, Jing; He, Ying; Ma, Li; Zhang, Xu

    2017-01-01

    In this study, protein-based inverse opals were prepared for the first time by using the colloidal crystal templating method. The preparation process involved three steps including filling the templates with protein molecules, crosslinking, and template removal. The obtained inverse opals were used to immobilize Penicillin G acylase (PGA) because of its intrinsic biocompatible property. The immobilization process was optimized and the properties of the immobilized PGA (PGA@IO) were investigated. PGA@IO exhibited improved thermal and pH stability compared with its free counterpart. After reusing nine times, it retained 70% of the initial activity. Besides, the PGA@IO retained high activity during the hydrolysis reactions in continuous catalysis in packed-bed reactor (PBR) after 15 days. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Residual stress diffractometer KOWARI at the Australian research reactor OPAL: Status of the project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brule, Alain; Kirstein, Oliver

    2006-11-01

    Neutron scattering using diffraction techniques is now recognized as the most precise and reliable method of mapping sub-surface residual stresses in materials or even components, which are not only of academic but also of industrial-economic relevance. The great potential of neutrons in the field of residual stresses was recognized by ANSTO and its external Beam Instrument Advisory Group for the new research reactor OPAL. The recommendation was to build the dedicated strain scanner KOWARI among the first suite of instruments available to users. We give an update on the overall project and present the current status of the diffractometer. It is anticipated that the instrument will be commissioned in mid 2006 and available to users at the end of the OPAL project.

  19. Residual stress diffractometer KOWARI at the Australian research reactor OPAL: Status of the project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brule, Alain; Kirstein, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Neutron scattering using diffraction techniques is now recognized as the most precise and reliable method of mapping sub-surface residual stresses in materials or even components, which are not only of academic but also of industrial-economic relevance. The great potential of neutrons in the field of residual stresses was recognized by ANSTO and its external Beam Instrument Advisory Group for the new research reactor OPAL. The recommendation was to build the dedicated strain scanner KOWARI among the first suite of instruments available to users. We give an update on the overall project and present the current status of the diffractometer. It is anticipated that the instrument will be commissioned in mid 2006 and available to users at the end of the OPAL project

  20. Nanowires of silicon carbide and 3D SiC/C nanocomposites with inverse opal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emelchenko, G.A.; Zhokhov, A.A.; Masalov, V.M.; Kudrenko, E.A.; Tereshenko, A.N.; Steinman, E.A.; Khodos, I.I.; Zinenko, V.I.; Agafonov, Yu.A.

    2011-01-01

    Synthesis, morphology, structural and optical characteristics of SiC NWs and SiC/C nanocomposites with an inverse opal lattice have been investigated. The samples were prepared by carbothermal reduction of silica (SiC NWs) and by thermo-chemical treatment of opal matrices (SiC/C) filled with carbon compounds which was followed by silicon dioxide dissolution. It was shown that the nucleation of SiC NWs occurs at the surface of carbon fibers felt. It was observed three preferred growth direction of the NWs: [111], [110] and [112]. HRTEM studies revealed the mechanism of the wires growth direction change. SiC/C- HRTEM revealed in the structure of the composites, except for silicon carbide, graphite and amorphous carbon, spherical carbon particles containing concentric graphite shells (onion-like particles).

  1. The ABAG biogenic emissions inventory project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson-Henry, C. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The ability to identify the role of biogenic hydrocarbon emissions in contributing to overall ozone production in the Bay Area, and to identify the significance of that role, were investigated in a joint project of the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) and NASA/Ames Research Center. Ozone, which is produced when nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons combine in the presence of sunlight, is a primary factor in air quality planning. In investigating the role of biogenic emissions, this project employed a pre-existing land cover classification to define areal extent of land cover types. Emission factors were then derived for those cover types. The land cover data and emission factors were integrated into an existing geographic information system, where they were combined to form a Biogenic Hydrocarbon Emissions Inventory. The emissions inventory information was then integrated into an existing photochemical dispersion model.

  2. The rheology and processing of “edge sheared” colloidal polymer opals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Hon Sum; Mackley, Malcolm; Butler, Simon; Baumberg, Jeremy; Snoswell, David; Finlayson, Chris; Zhao, Qibin

    2014-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the rheology and processing of solvent-free core shell “polymer opals” that consist of a soft outer shell grafted to hard colloidal polymer core particles. Strong iridescent colors can be produced by shearing the material in a certain way that causes the initially disordered spheres to rearrange into ordered crystalline structures and produce colors by diffraction and interference of multiple light scattering, similar to gemstone opals. The basic linear viscoelastic rheology of a polymer opal sample was determined as a function of temperature, and the material was found to be highly viscoelastic at all tested temperatures. A Cambridge multipass rheometer was specifically modified in order to make controlled mechanical measurements of initially disordered polymer opal tapes that were sandwiched between protective polyethylene terephthalate sheets. Axial extension, simple shear, and a novel “edge shearing” geometry were all evaluated, and multiple successive experiments of the edge shearing test were carried out at different temperatures. The optical development of colloidal ordering, measured as optical opalescence, was quantified by spectroscopy using visible backscattered light. The development of opalescence was found to be sensitive to the geometry of deformation and a number of process variables suggesting a complex interaction of parameters that caused the opalescence. In order to identify aspects of the deformation mechanism of the edge shearing experiment, a separate series of in situ optical experiments were carried out and this helped indicate the extent of simple shear generated with each edge shear deformation. The results show that strong ordering can be induced by successive edge shearing deformation. The results are relevant to polymer opal rheology, processing, and mechanisms relating to ordering within complex viscoelastic fluids

  3. A study of charm production in beauty decays with the OPAL detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2004-01-01

    Using an inclusive method, BR(b -> D\\bar{D}X) has been measured in hadronic Z^0 decays with the OPAL detector at LEP. The impact parameter significance of tracks opposite tagged b-jets is used to differentiate b -> D\\bar{D}X decays from other decays. Using this result, the average number of charm and anti-charm quarks produced per beauty quark decay, n_c, is determined.

  4. Stretched inverse opal colloid crystal substrates-induced orientation of fibroblast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y C; Tang, Z M; Feng, Z Q; Xie, Z Y; Gu, Z Z

    2010-01-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in studying the interaction between mammalian cells and nanometer-sized structures. However, the effect of nanostructures on cell behavior, such as cell morphology and alignment, is still largely unknown. Inverse opal colloid crystal substrates, which can be stretched to produce nano-scale pore structures of different degrees of orientation, serve as a convenient model system to study the effect of nanotopography on cell morphology and cell alignment. In this work, we fabricated inverse opal colloidal crystal films that were either unstretched or stretched to three, four or six times their original length, producing pore structures of increasing degree of orientation. Human dermal fibroblast-fetal (HDF-f) cells were seeded and cultured on these four types of substrates. The results from fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated that cells showed the highest degree of alignment when cultured on inverse opal colloid crystal films that were stretched the most (six times original length). The results also demonstrated that the orientation of nanostructures could affect both the morphology and growth direction of fibroblasts. The ability to control the direction of cell growth through the engineering of nanostructures could have important applications in tissue engineering, especially for tissues with anisotropic structures, such as cardiac muscle, blood vessel, tendon and ligament.

  5. Conversion of the luminescence of laser dyes in opal matrices to stimulated emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alimov, O K; Basiev, T T; Orlovskii, Yu V; Osiko, V V; Samoilovich, M I

    2008-01-01

    The luminescence and laser characteristics of a synthetic opal matrix filled with organic dyes are studied upon excitation by nanosecond laser pulses. The appearance of stimulated emission in a partially ordered scattering medium is investigated. It is shown that if the luminescence spectrum of a dye (oxazine-17) is located far outside the photonic bandgap of the opal matrix, stimulated emission along a preferential direction in the (111) plane is observed when pumping exceeds a threshold even without an external optical cavity. The stimulated emission spectrum is considerably narrower than the luminescence spectrum and consists of several narrow lines located within the dye luminescence band. If the luminescence spectrum of a dye (rhodamine 6G) overlaps with the photonic bandgap of the opal matrix, a different picture is observed. The loss of radiation in the matrix leads to the red shift of the luminescence spectrum, while the stimulated emission as in the case of oxazine-17 lies is observed within the luminescence band. (active media, lasers, and amplifiers)

  6. Biogenic amines in meat and meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Capillas, Claudia; Jiménez-Colmenero, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    It has been recognized for some time that biogenic amines occur in a wide range of foods, among them meat and meat products. Meat is an important component of the diet in developed countries. The presence of these amines in food is of interest for two reasons: firstly, for toxicological reasons, in the sense that high levels of dietary biogenic amines can be toxic for certain consumers, and secondly, for their role as possible quality indicators. Based on these two premises, the present article offers a new analysis on aspects of toxicology and on the use of biogenic amines as a quality control method, as well as on their presence in meat and meat products. The article focuses particularly on factors affecting the production of biogenic amines, with reference to various parameters relating to microorganisms, meat raw materials, and processing conditions. A better understanding of the factors determining their formation (i.e., microorganisms, raw materials used, and technological processes applied) and their effects could lead to ways of controlling their production, limiting their presence in the end product, and hence, rendering them less toxic.

  7. Effects of storage temperature on biogenic amine concentrations in meat of uneviscerated pheasants (Phasianus colchicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeňka Hutařová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the hygienic quality of the pheasants reared for high-quality meat production by the biogenic amine concentrations in their meat. The content of biogenic amines was measured in the meat of sixty male pheasants killed by pithing and stored uneviscerated for 21 days under different storage temperatures (0 °C, 7 °C and 15 °C. The samples of breast and thigh muscles of pheasant were tested at weekly intervals. Biogenic amines were analysed by reverse phase liquid chromatography and detected by tandem mass spectrometry. Concentrations of biogenic amines (except spermin and spermidin in thigh muscle were higher than in breast muscle. Highly significant difference (P < 0.01 was found in tyramine (5.80 mg/kg and 1.38 mg/kg for thigh and breast muscle, respectively, cadaverine (40.80 mg/kg and 14.43 mg/kg for thigh and breast muscle, respectively, putrescine (13.42 mg/kg and 3.16 mg/kg for thigh and breast muscle, respectively and histamine (5.51 mg/kg and 1.70 mg/kg for thigh and breast muscle, respectively concentrations after 21 days of storage at 15 °C. This study provides information on the dynamics of biogenic amine formation in pheasant meat during 21 days of storage at different temperatures. Based on our results, we can recommend storing pithed uneviscerated pheasants at 0–7°C for up to 21 days, or at 15 °C for up to 7 days. Concentrations of biogenic amines gained in our study can be helpful in evaluating freshness and hygienic quality of the pheasant game meat.

  8. Opal-A in glassy pumice, acid alteration, and the 1817 phreatomagmatic eruption at Kawah Ijen (Java), Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; van Hinsberg, Vincent; Berlo, Kim; Liesegang, Moritz; Iacovino, Kayla D.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Wright, Heather M.

    2018-01-01

    At Kawah Ijen (Indonesia), vigorous SO2 and HCl degassing sustains a hyperacid lake (pH ~0) and intensely alters the subsurface, producing widespread residual silica and advanced argillic alteration products. In 1817, a VEI 2 phreatomagmatic eruption evacuated the lake, depositing a widespread layer of muddy ash fall, and sending lahars down river drainages. We discovered multiple types of opaline silica in juvenile low-silica dacite pumice and in particles within co-erupted laharic sediments. Most spectacular are opal-replaced phenocrysts of plagioclase and pyroxene adjacent to pristine matrix glass and melt inclusions. Opal-bearing pumice has been found at numerous sites, including where post-eruption infiltration of acid water is unlikely. Through detailed analyses of an initial sampling of 1817 eruption products, we find evidence for multiple origins of opaline materials in pumice and laharic sediments. Evidently, magma encountered acid-altered materials in the subsurface and triggered phreatomagmatic eruptions. Syn-eruptive incorporation of opal-alunite clasts, layered opal, and fragment-filled vesicles of opal and glass, all suggest magma-rock interactions in concert with vesiculation, followed by cooling within minutes. Our experiments at magmatic temperature confirm that the opaline materials would show noticeable degradation in time periods longer than a few tens of minutes. Some glassy laharic sedimentary grains are more andesitic than the main pumice type and may represent older volcanic materials that were altered beneath the lake bottom and were forcefully ejected during the 1817 eruption. A post-eruptive origin remains likely for most of the opal-replaced phenocrysts in pumice. Experiments at 25°C and 100°C reveal that when fresh pumice is bathed in Kawah Ijen hyperacid fluid for 6 weeks, plagioclase is replaced without altering either matrix glass or melt inclusions. Moreover, lack of evidence for high-temperature annealing of the opal suggests

  9. Opal-A in Glassy Pumice, Acid Alteration, and the 1817 Phreatomagmatic Eruption at Kawah Ijen (Java, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob B. Lowenstern

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available At Kawah Ijen (Indonesia, vigorous SO2 and HCl degassing sustains a hyperacid lake (pH ~0 and intensely alters the subsurface, producing widespread residual silica and advanced argillic alteration products. In 1817, a VEI 2 phreatomagmatic eruption evacuated the lake, depositing a widespread layer of muddy ash fall, and sending lahars down river drainages. We discovered multiple types of opaline silica in juvenile low-silica dacite pumice and in particles within co-erupted laharic sediments. Most spectacular are opal-replaced phenocrysts of plagioclase and pyroxene adjacent to pristine matrix glass and melt inclusions. Opal-bearing pumice has been found at numerous sites, including where post-eruption infiltration of acid water is unlikely. Through detailed analyses of an initial sampling of 1817 eruption products, we find evidence for multiple origins of opaline materials in pumice and laharic sediments. Evidently, magma encountered acid-altered materials in the subsurface and triggered phreatomagmatic eruptions. Syn-eruptive incorporation of opal-alunite clasts, layered opal, and fragment-filled vesicles of opal and glass, all suggest magma-rock interactions in concert with vesiculation, followed by cooling within minutes. Our experiments at magmatic temperature confirm that the opaline materials would show noticeable degradation in time periods longer than a few tens of minutes. Some glassy laharic sedimentary grains are more andesitic than the main pumice type and may represent older volcanic materials that were altered beneath the lake bottom and were forcefully ejected during the 1817 eruption. A post-eruptive origin remains likely for most of the opal-replaced phenocrysts in pumice. Experiments at 25°C and 100°C reveal that when fresh pumice is bathed in Kawah Ijen hyperacid fluid for 6 weeks, plagioclase is replaced without altering either matrix glass or melt inclusions. Moreover, lack of evidence for high-temperature annealing of the

  10. Software Application Profile: Opal and Mica: open-source software solutions for epidemiological data management, harmonization and dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Dany; Marcon, Yannick; Fortier, Isabel; Burton, Paul; Ferretti, Vincent

    2017-10-01

    Improving the dissemination of information on existing epidemiological studies and facilitating the interoperability of study databases are essential to maximizing the use of resources and accelerating improvements in health. To address this, Maelstrom Research proposes Opal and Mica, two inter-operable open-source software packages providing out-of-the-box solutions for epidemiological data management, harmonization and dissemination. Opal and Mica are two standalone but inter-operable web applications written in Java, JavaScript and PHP. They provide web services and modern user interfaces to access them. Opal allows users to import, manage, annotate and harmonize study data. Mica is used to build searchable web portals disseminating study and variable metadata. When used conjointly, Mica users can securely query and retrieve summary statistics on geographically dispersed Opal servers in real-time. Integration with the DataSHIELD approach allows conducting more complex federated analyses involving statistical models. Opal and Mica are open-source and freely available at [www.obiba.org] under a General Public License (GPL) version 3, and the metadata models and taxonomies that accompany them are available under a Creative Commons licence. © The Author 2017; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association

  11. Uranium speciation in the environment: study of opals from Nopal I (Mexico) and mill tailings from Gunnar (Canada)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othmane, G.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the processes of uranium migration and sequestration is an important issue for the prediction of radionuclide retardation in the vicinity of uranium mine tailings sites or for the safety assessment of potential high-level nuclear waste repositories. Uranium speciation, controlled by biotic and abiotic factors, represents a key parameter for the control of uranium transfer in the environment. This study firstly deals with uranium speciation in opals from the Nopal I uranium deposit (Mexico). Microscopic observations of opals at the nano-scale revealed the occurrence of vorlanite, cubic CaUO 4 . This was the first time this rare calcium uranate has been found displaying a cubic morphology, in agreement with its crystal structure. Nopal I opals have been further investigated through time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy. The opals spectra and their comparison with those of experimentally produced standards indicate occurrence of mono- or polymeric uranyl complexes (associated or not with calcium or phosphate) sorbed onto internal surface of opal around pH 7-8. Finally, the speciation of uranium was studied in mill tailings from Gunnar (Canada). In the first tailings site, uranium primarily occurs as monomeric, inner-sphere uranyl complexes sharing edges with Fe(O,OH) 6 octahedral sites of iron-oxy-hydroxides and chlorite. Our results suggested that U(VI) co-precipitates with iron (oxy-hydr)oxides predominate in the second tailings sites. Therefore uranium mobility in Gunnar is governed by sorption/desorption and dissolution/(co)precipitation processes. (author)

  12. Ages and Origins of Calcite and Opal in the Exploratory Studies Facility Tunnel, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paces, James B.; Neymark, Leonid A.; Marshall, Brian D.; Whelan, Joseph F.; Peterman, Zell E.

    2001-01-01

    Deposits of calcite and opal are present as coatings on open fractures and lithophysal cavities in unsaturated-zone tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site of a potential high-level radioactive waste repository. Outermost layers of calcite and opal have radiocarbon ages of 16,000 to 44,000 years before present and thorium-230/uranium ages of 28,000 to more than 500,000 years before present. These ages are young relative to the 13-million-year age of the host rocks. Multiple subsamples from the same outer layer typically show a range of ages with youngest ages from the thinnest subsamples. Initial uranium-234/uranium-238 activity ratios between 1 and 9.5 show a distinct negative correlation with thorium-230/uranium age and are greater than 4 for all but one sample younger than 100,000 years before present. These data, along with micrometer-scale layering and distinctive crystal morphologies, are interpreted to indicate that deposits formed very slowly from water films migrating through open cavities. Exchanges of carbon dioxide and water vapor probably took place between downward-migrating liquids and upward-migrating gases at low rates, resulting in oversaturation of mineral constituents at crystal extremities and more or less continuous deposition of very thin layers. Therefore, subsamples represent mixtures of older and younger layers on a scale finer than sampling techniques can resolve. Slow, long-term rates of deposition (less than about 5 millimeters of mineral per million years) are inferred from subsamples of outermost calcite and opal. These growth rates are similar to those calculated assuming that total coating thicknesses of 10 to 40 millimeters accumulated over 12 million years. Calcite has a wide range of delta carbon-13 values from about -8.2 to 8.5 per mil and delta oxygen-18 values from about 10 to 21 per mil. Systematic microsampling across individual mineral coatings indicates basal (older) calcite tends to have the largest delta carbon-13 values

  13. Calcite/opal deposits at Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Pedogenic or hypogene?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, C.A.; Schluter, C.M.; Harmon, R.S.

    1994-01-01

    This study is part of the research program of the Yucca Mountain Project intended to provide the State of Nevada with a detailed assessment of the geology and geochemistry of Yucca Mountain and adjacent regions. The purpose of this paper is to consider all of the geological and geochemical data available for the calcite/opal deposits at Yucca Mountain and to ascertain whether this data favors a pedogenic or hyogene origin for these deposits. Far from being of esoteric concern, this subject is of paramount importance to the debate which rages around the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a high-level radioactive waste repository site. It is also the purpose of this paper to serve as a foundation for a lengthy feature article to be submitted for publication in 1994. In addition, a stand has been taken by the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences against the upwelling-water model (a vote of 17 to 0 against), and this same panel report has concluded that open-quotes there is no compelling evidence for the repetitive flooding of the environment by expulsion of groundwaterclose quotes and that open-quotes instead, the evidence strongly supports the idea that the near-surface mineral deposits resulted from percolating rainwater, which carried soil minerals down into rock fracturesclose quotes. Based on such information the Department of Energy has stated that it open-quotes finds no basis to continue to study the origin of these specific depositsclose quotes. This study, based upon many different independent lines of evidence, reaches the opposite conclusion and instead favors a hypogene spring-travertine origin for the controversial calcite/opal deposits at Yucca Mountain. This study recognizes a pedogenic carbonate component at Yucca Mountain, but argues that this component is distinct from, and sometimes intermixed with, the calcite/opal deposits

  14. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson with the OPAL Detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Elfgren, E.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hauschildt, J.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Horvath, D.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kramer, T.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Krop, D.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vachon, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarises the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies up to 209 GeV performed by the OPAL Collaboration at LEP. The consistency of the data with the background hypothesis and various Higgs boson mass hypotheses is examined. No indication of a signal is found in the data and a lower bound of 112.7GeV/C^2 is obtained on the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson at the 95% CL.

  15. An archaic crested plesiosaur in opal from the Lower Cretaceous high-latitude deposits of Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Kear, Benjamin P; Schroeder, Natalie I; Lee, Michael S.Y

    2006-01-01

    Umoonasaurus demoscyllus gen. et sp. nov. is a new small-bodied (approx. 2.5 m) pliosauroid plesiosaur from the Lower Cretaceous (Aptian–Albian) of southern Australia. It is represented by several partial skeletons (one with a near complete skull is the most complete opalized vertebrate fossil yet known), and is unique in having large crests on the skull midline and above the orbits. Umoonasaurus is surprisingly archaic despite its relatively late age (approx. 115 Myr ago)—being simultaneousl...

  16. The laser system for calibration and monotoring of the Opal jet chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biebel, O.; Boden, B.; Bug, S.; Eyring, A.; Fischer, H.M.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Gross, S.; Knop, G.; Levegruen, S.; Maringer, G.; Mauer, E.; Maur, U.; Nellen, B.; Neumann, H.; Rollnik, A.; Schreiber, S.; Simon, A.; Thiebes, J.; Wolf, B.; Wuensch, B.; Boerner, H.; Breuker, H.; Hagemann, J.; Hauschild, M.; Heuer, R.D.; Karner, K.; Linser, G.; Runolfsson, O.; Seidl, W.; Voillat, D.; Wicht, P.; Schmitt, H. von der; Wagner, A.

    1992-01-01

    In this report we describe the construction and performance of the laser system which was used in Summer 1989 for the initial calibration of the OPAL jet chamber after installation on the LEP beam axis and which has served as a monitoring tool since then. Two Nd:YAG lasers are used to generate 48 high precision double beams which enter the chamber at fixed positions. The main features of the roughly 450 optical components are described and the beam alignment procedures are explained. Results are given for jet chamber calibration constants such as drift velocity, Lorentz angle, and residual sagittas. (orig.)

  17. Untersuchung der Produktion charmhaltiger Mesonen in der Photon-Photon-Streuung mit dem OPAL-Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Patt, Jochen

    2001-01-01

    Die Produktion von Charm-Quarks in der Photon-Photon-Streuung wird ueber den Nachweis charmhaltiger Mesonen untersucht. Die Arbeit basiert auf den Daten, die mit dem OPAL-Detektor am Elektron-Positron-Speicherring LEP am CERN in Genf in den Jahren von 1989 bis 1998 aufgenommen worden sind. Anhand des Charmonium-Zustandes Chi(c2) wird die Resonanzproduktion von Charm-Quarks untersucht und die Zwei-Photon-Breite des Chi(c2)-Mesons wird gemessen. Geladene D*-Mesonen werden zur Untersuchung der o...

  18. Fabrication and Photo-Detecting Performance of 2D ZnO Inverse Opal Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Lin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional (2D ZnO inverse opal (IO films were fabricated by co-assembly of sacrificed polystyrene (PS microspheres and citric acid/zinc acetate (CA/ZA aqueous solution at an oil–water interface followed by calcination. Their morphologies could be controlled by the surface property of polymer templates and CA/ZA molar ratio. Moreover, photo-detecting devices based on such films were constructed, which showed high photocurrent (up to 4.6 μA, excellent spectral selectivity, and reversible response to optical switch.

  19. SnO2Inverse Opal Composite Film with Low Angle-dependent Structural Color and Enhanced Mechanical Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fangfang; Shan, Bin; Zhang, Shufen; Tang, Bingtao

    2018-03-13

    Structural colors are attracting considerable attention for their advantages of environmental friendliness and resistance to fading. However, the weak mechanical strength and intrinsic iridescent color restrict their widespread application. This article describes a SnO 2 inverse opal composite film with low angle-dependent structural color and enhanced mechanical strength. In the present study, a direct template method was used to prepare SnO 2 inverse opals, which were then embedded in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The structural colors of obtained composite films were low angle-dependent due to light scattering and high effective refractive index. Meanwhile, owing to the good physical strength of PDMS, structures of SnO 2 inverse opals were provided with effective protection. No specific wavelength shift occurred during stretching, and exhibited excellent cycling stability. All these advantages indicated potential applications in packing and decorating materials.

  20. Formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, D.A.; Lawson, M.; Davis, C.L.; Ferreira, A.A.; Santos Neto, E. V.; Ellis, G.S.; Lewan, M.D.; Martini, Anna M.; Tang, Y.; Schoell, M.; Sessions, A.L.; Eiler, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and energy resource generated dominantly by methanogens at low temperatures and through the breakdown of organic molecules at high temperatures. However, methane-formation temperatures in nature are often poorly constrained. We measured formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane using a “clumped isotope” technique. Thermogenic gases yield formation temperatures between 157° and 221°C, within the nominal gas window, and biogenic gases yield formation temperatures consistent with their comparatively lower-temperature formational environments (<50°C). In systems where gases have migrated and other proxies for gas-generation temperature yield ambiguous results, methane clumped-isotope temperatures distinguish among and allow for independent tests of possible gas-formation models.

  1. Biogenic Mn-Oxides in Subseafloor Basalts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivarsson, Magnus; Broman, Curt; Gustafsson, Håkan; Holm, Nils G

    2015-01-01

    The deep biosphere of the subseafloor basalts is recognized as a major scientific frontier in disciplines like biology, geology, and oceanography. Recently, the presence of fungi in these environments has involved a change of view regarding diversity and ecology. Here, we describe fossilized fungal communities in vugs in subseafloor basalts from a depth of 936.65 metres below seafloor at the Detroit Seamount, Pacific Ocean. These fungal communities are closely associated with botryoidal Mn oxides composed of todorokite. Analyses of the Mn oxides by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy (EPR) indicate a biogenic signature. We suggest, based on mineralogical, morphological and EPR data, a biological origin of the botryoidal Mn oxides. Our results show that fungi are involved in Mn cycling at great depths in the seafloor and we introduce EPR as a means to easily identify biogenic Mn oxides in these environments.

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF BIOGENIC, INTERMEDIATE AND PHYSICOGENIC SOIL AGGREGATES OF AREAS IN THE BRAZILIAN ATLANTIC FOREST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JÚLIO CÉSAR FEITOSA FERNANDES

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggregate formation and stability are related to soil quality, contributing significantly to the carbon storage and nutrient maintenance capacities of the soil. Soil aggregates are formed by two different process: physicogenic, related to moistening and drying cycles and input of organic matter; and biogenic, related to the action of macrofauna organisms and roots. The objective this work was to classify aggregates according to their formation process, quantify and compare organic carbon contents in humic substances and assess the stability of aggregates formed by different processes, in areas with different coverage in the Mid Paraiba Valley, Pinheiral, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Aggregated soil samples were collected at a depth of 0-10 cm, in a Cambisol (Cambissolo Háplico Tb Distrófico under four plant covers: secondary forest in advanced (SFAS, medium (SFMS and initial (SFIS successional stages and managed mixed pasture (MMP. Aggregates were classified and identified into three morphological classes (physicogenic, biogenic and intermediate. The variables evaluated were mean weight diameter (MWD and geometric mean diameter (GMD of aggregates, chemical fractions of organic matter, total organic carbon (TOC and humic substances: humin (C-HUM humic acid (C-FAH and fulvic acid (C-FAF. Biogenic aggregates were found in smaller quantities and showed higher TOC, C-HUM and C-FAH, compared to intermediate and physicogenic aggregates. Thus, biogenic aggregates have potential to be used as soil quality indicators for structured environments, which are able to maintain its intrinsic formation processes.

  3. Framework for Assessing Biogenic CO2 Emissions from ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This revision of the 2011 report, Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources, evaluates biogenic CO2 emissions from stationary sources, including a detailed study of the scientific and technical issues associated with assessing biogenic carbon dioxide emissions from stationary sources. EPA developed the revised report, Framework for Assessing Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources, to present a methodological framework for assessing the extent to which the production, processing, and use of biogenic material at stationary sources for energy production results in a net atmospheric contribution of biogenic CO2 emissions. Biogenic carbon dioxide emissions are defined as CO2 emissions related to the natural carbon cycle, as well as those resulting from the production, harvest, combustion, digestion, decomposition, and processing of biologically-based materials. The EPA is continuing to refine its technical assessment of biogenic CO2 emissions through another round of targeted peer review of the revised study with the EPA Science Advisory Board (SAB). This study was submitted to the SAB's Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel in February 2015. http://yosemite.epa.gov/sab/sabproduct.nsf/0/3235dac747c16fe985257da90053f252!OpenDocument&TableRow=2.2#2 The revised report will inform efforts by policymakers, academics, and other stakeholders to evaluate the technical aspects related to assessments of biogenic feedstocks used for energy at s

  4. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of biogenic silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, R; Feitosa, L O; Ballottin, D; Tasic, L; Durán, N; Marcato, P D

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic silver nanoparticles with 40.3 ± 3.5 nm size and negative surface charge (− 40 mV) were prepared with Fusarium oxysporum. The cytotoxicity of 3T3 cell and human lymphocyte were studied by a TaliTM image-based cytometer and the genotoxicity through Allium cepa and comet assay. The results of BioAg-w (washed) and BioAg-nw (unwashed) biogenic silver nanoparticles showed cytotoxicity exceeding 50 μg/mL with no significant differences of response in 5 and 10 μg/mL regarding viability. Results of genotoxicity at concentrations 5.0 and 10.0 ug/mL show some response, but at concentrations 0.5 and 1.0 μg/mL the washed and unwashed silver nanoparticles did not present any effect. This in an important result since in tests with different bacteria species and strains, including resistant, MIC (minimal inhibitory concentration) had good answers at concentrations less than 1.9 μg/mL. This work concludes that biogenic silver nanoparticles may be a promising option for antimicrobial use in the range where no cyto or genotoxic effect were observed. Furthermore, human cells were found to have a greater resistance to the toxic effects of silver nanoparticles in comparison with other cells.

  5. Rett syndrome - Stimulation of endogenous biogenic amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelligra, R.; Norton, R. D.; Wilkinson, R.; Leon, H. A.; Matson, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    Transient hypercapnic hyperoxemia was induced in two Rett syndrome children by the administration of a gaseous mixture of 80 percent O2 and 20 percent CO2. Time course studies of neurotransmitters and their metabolites showed an immediate and marked increase in central biogenic amine turnover following inhalation of the gas mixture. The increased turnover of biogenic amines was associated with improved clinical changes. This suggests a coupled relationship and provides further support for an etiological role of neurotransmitter dysfunction in Rett syndrome. In a complementary study, elevation of pulmonary CO2 by application of a simple rebreathing device resulted in improvement of abnormal blood gases and elimination of the Cheyne-Stokes-like respiratory pattern of the Rett syndrome. Near normalization of the EEG occurred when a normal respiratory pattern was imposed by means of a respirator. Taken together, these results lead to the preliminary conclusion that cerebral hypoxemia secondary to abnormal respiratory function may contribute to diminished production of biogenic amines in Rett syndrome.

  6. Dip-in Indicators for Visual Differentiation of Fuel Mixtures Based on Wettability of Fluoroalkylchlorosilane-Coated Inverse Opal Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, Abootaleb; Qiu, Shuang; Wong, Michael C K; Li, Paul C H

    2015-12-30

    We have developed the dip-in indicator based on the inverse opal film (IOF) for visual differentiation of organic liquid mixtures, such as oil/gasoline or ethanol/gasoline fuel mixtures. The IOF consists of a three-dimensional porous structure with a highly ordered periodic arrangement of nanopores. The specularly reflected light at the interface of the nanopores and silica walls contributes to the structural color of the IOF film. This color disappears when the nanopores are infiltrated by a liquid with a similar refractive index to silica. The disappearance of the structural color provides a means to differentiate various liquid fuel mixtures based on their wettability of the nanopores in the IOF-based indicators. For differentiation of various liquid mixtures, we tune the wettability threshold of the indicator in such a way that it is wetted (color disappears) by one liquid but is not wetted by the other (color remains). Although colorimetric differentiation of liquids based on IOF wettability has been reported, differentiation of highly similar liquid mixtures require complicated readout approaches. It is known that the IOF wettability is controlled by multiple surface properties (e.g., oleophobicity) and structural properties (e.g., neck angle and film thickness) of the nanostructure. Therefore, we aim to exploit the combined tuning of these properties for differentiation of fuel mixtures with close compositions. In this study, we have demonstrated that, for the first time, the IOF-based dip-in indicator is able to detect a slight difference in the fuel mixture composition (i.e., 0.4% of oil content). Moreover, the color/no-color differentiation platform is simple, powerful, and easy-to-read. This platform makes the dip-in indicator a promising tool for authentication and determination of fuel composition at the point-of-purchase or point-of-use.

  7. Angle-resolved reflection spectroscopy of high-quality PMMA opal crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtsev, Ivan V.; Tambasov, Igor A.; Ivanenko, Alexander A.; Zyryanov, Victor Ya.

    2018-02-01

    PMMA opal crystal was prepared by a simple hybrid method, which includes sedimentation, meniscus formation and evaporation. We investigated three surfaces of this crystal by angle-resolved reflective light spectroscopy and SEM study. The angle-resolved reflective measurements were carried out in the 400-1100 nm range. We have determined the high-quality ordered surface of the crystal region. Narrow particle size distribution of the surface has been revealed. The average particle diameter obtained with SEM was nearly 361 nm. The most interesting result was that reflectivity of the surface turned out up to 98% at normal light incidence. Using a fit of dependences of the maximum reflectivity wavelength from an angle based on the Bragg-Snell law, the wavelength of maximum 0° reflectivity, the particle diameter and the fill factor have been determined. For the best surface maximum reflectivity wavelength of a 0° angle was estimated to be 869 nm. The particle diameter and fill factor were calculated as 372 nm and 0.8715, respectively. The diameter obtained by fitting is in excellent agreement with the particle diameter obtained with SEM. The reflectivity maximum is assumed to increase significantly when increasing the fill factor. We believe that using our simple approach to manufacture PMMA opal crystals will significantly increase the fabrication of high-quality photonic crystal templates and thin films.

  8. LEO-to-ground optical communications link using adaptive optics correction on the OPALS downlink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Malcolm W.; Kovalik, Joseph; Morris, Jeff; Abrahamson, Matthew; Biswas, Abhijit

    2016-03-01

    The Optical PAyload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) experiment on the International Space Station (ISS) recently demonstrated successful optical downlinks to the NASA/JPL 1-m aperture telescope at the Optical Communication Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) located near Wrightwood, CA. A large area (200 μm diameter) free space coupled avalanche photodiode (APD) detector was used to receive video and a bit patterns at 50 Mb/s. We report on a recent experiment that used an adaptive optics system at OCTL to correct for atmospherically-induced refractive index fluctuations so that the downlink from the ISS could be coupled into a single mode fiber receiver. Stable fiber coupled power was achieved over an entire pass using a self-referencing interferometer based adaptive optics system that was provided and operated by Boeing Co. and integrated to OCTL. End-to-end transmission and reconstruction of an HD video signal verified the communication performance as in the original OPALS demonstration. Coupling the signal into a single mode fiber opens the possibility for higher bandwidth and efficiency modulation schemes and serves as a pilot experiment for future implementations.

  9. Construction of the Neutron Beam Facility at Australia's OPAL Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Australia's new research reactor, OPAL, has been designed for high quality neutron beam science and radioisotope production. It has a capacity for eighteen neutron beam instruments to be located at the reactor face and in a neutron guide hall. The new neutron beam facility features a 20 litre liquid deuterium cold neutron source and supermirror neutron reflecting guides for intense cold and thermal neutron beams. Nine neutron beam instruments are under development, of which seven are scheduled for completion in early 2007. The project is approaching the hot-commissioning stage, where criticality will be demonstrated. Installation of the neutron beam transport system and neutron beam instruments in the neutron guide hall and at the reactor face is underway, and the path to completion of this project is relatively clear. The lecture will outline Australia's aspirations for neutron science at the OPAL reactor, and describe the neutron beam facility under construction. The status of this project and a forecast of the program to completion, including commissioning and commencement of routine operation in 2007 will also be discussed. This project is the culmination of almost a decade of effort. We now eagerly anticipate catapulting Australia's neutron beam science capability to meet the best in the world today. (author)

  10. Radiation protection commissioning of neutron beam instruments at the OPAL research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkes, Alison; Saratsopoulos, John; Deura, Michael; Kenny, Pat

    2008-01-01

    The neutron beam facilities at the 20 MW OPAL Research Reactor were commissioned in 2007 and 2008. The initial suite of eight neutron beam instruments on two thermal neutron guides, two cold neutron guides and one thermal beam port located at the reactor face, together with their associated shielding were progressively installed and commissioned according to their individual project plans. Radiation surveys were systematically conducted as reactor power was raised in a step-wise manner to 20 MW in order to validate instrument shielding design and performance. The performance of each neutron guide was assessed by neutron energy spectrum and flux measurements. The activation of beam line components, decay times assessments and access procedures for Bragg Institute beam instrument scientists were established. The multiple configurations for each instrument and the influence of operating more than one instrument or beamline simultaneously were also tested. Areas of interest were the shielding around the secondary shutters, guide shield and bunker shield interfaces and monochromator doors. The shielding performance, safety interlock checks, improvements, radiation exposures and related radiation protection challenges are discussed. This paper discusses the health physics experience of commissioning the OPAL Research Reactor neutron beam facilities and describes health physics results, actions taken and lessons learned during commissioning. (author)

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Analysis Of Optical Payload For Lasercomm Science (OPALS) sealed enclosure module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kevin R.; Zayas, Daniel; Turner, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) using the commercial CFD package CFDesign has been performed at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in support of the Phaeton Early Career Hire Program's Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) mission. The OPALS project is one which involves an International Space Station payload that will be using forced convection cooling in a hermetically sealed enclosure at 1 atm of air to cool "off-the-shelf" vendor electronics. The CFD analysis was used to characterize the thermal and fluid flow environment within a complicated labyrinth of electronics boards, fans, instrumentation, harnessing, ductwork and heat exchanger fins. The paradigm of iteratively using CAD/CAE tools and CFD was followed in order to determine the optimum flow geometry and heat sink configuration to yield operational convective film coefficients and temperature survivability limits for the electronics payload. Results from this current CFD analysis and correlation of the CFD model against thermal test data will be presented. Lessons learned and coupled thermal / flow modeling strategies will be shared in this paper.

  12. Leu based Mo-99 production facility using the Open Pool Australian Light-Water (OPAL) reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druce, M.; Turner, I.; Kenny, D.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: ARI currently manufactures Mo-99 in the HIFAR reactor by irradiating uranium dioxide pellets. Whilst this process is old and inefficient, it has enabled ARI to successfully supply Tc 99 m generators to meet the needs of the Australian nuclear medicine community. Along with the new OPAL reactor, ARI is introducing a new Mo-99 production process. Due to global threat reduction and non-proliferation concerns, this new process will be a low enriched uranium (LEU) process. The facility will provide improved efficiencies for Mo-99 production and greatly increase production capacity. A small-scale production plant will be established and the objective of the plant is twofold: to increase production capacity for both the Australian and Asian-Pacific markets and, to serve as a test platform for a much larger scale commercial Mo-99 production which could take advantage of the total OPAL irradiation capacity. Initially, the plant will have a capacity 4 times greater than the current HIFAR based production. Currently the USA and European radiopharmaceutical manufacturers rely on a supply of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to produce targets for the production of Mo-99 and other radionuclides. The new Australian LEU-based Mo-99 production process will be unique in the global marketplace

  13. Inverse opal hydrogel-collagen composite scaffolds as a supportive microenvironment for immune cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Agnieszka N; Irvine, Darrell J

    2008-06-01

    Immunotherapies harness the inherent potential of the body to destroy foreign or infected cells, and are currently being investigated as treatments for cancer. One way to boost native immune responses might be to engineer ectopic lymphoid tissue, providing a supportive microenvironment for immune cell priming, and/or bringing together immune cells at a desired location (e.g., solid tumor sites). Here we describe the development and in vitro testing of composite macroporous poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel scaffolds infused with collagen as a tissue engineering platform for immunotherapy. The PEG hydrogel with ordered, interconnected pores provided mechanical stability and the potential to depot supporting cytokines/chemokines, while an infused collagen matrix supported intra-scaffold migration of loaded T cells and dendritic cells. Rapid, nearly unconstrained T cell migration through scaffolds was achieved by using inverse opal supporting structures with 80 microm macropores. In addition, we demonstrated that the lymphoid tissue chemokine CCL21 could be bound to the inverse opal gel walls of these scaffolds, to provide motility-inducing cues for T cells within these structures. This hybrid scaffold approach combines the strengths of the synthetic and biopolymer hydrogels used in a highly synergistic fashion, allowing each material to compensate for limiting properties of its partner. Copyright 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Real-Time-Simulation of IEEE-5-Bus Network on OPAL-RT-OP4510 Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atul Bhandakkar, Anjali; Mathew, Lini, Dr.

    2018-03-01

    The Real-Time Simulator tools have high computing technologies, improved performance. They are widely used for design and improvement of electrical systems. The advancement of the software tools like MATLAB/SIMULINK with its Real-Time Workshop (RTW) and Real-Time Windows Target (RTWT), real-time simulators are used extensively in many engineering fields, such as industry, education, and research institutions. OPAL-RT-OP4510 is a Real-Time Simulator which is used in both industry and academia. In this paper, the real-time simulation of IEEE-5-Bus network is carried out by means of OPAL-RT-OP4510 with CRO and other hardware. The performance of the network is observed with the introduction of fault at various locations. The waveforms of voltage, current, active and reactive power are observed in the MATLAB simulation environment and on the CRO. Also, Load Flow Analysis (LFA) of IEEE-5-Bus network is computed using MATLAB/Simulink power-gui load flow tool.

  15. XENOBIOTICS AND BIOGENIC ELEMENTS IN RAW COW'S MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Greń

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false SK X-NONE X-NONE This paper presents the concentration some toxic and biogenic elements in milk from Nitra region. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate 30 samples of raw milk with fat contents 3.8% obtained from milk machine in the Nitra region. Samples were analyzed for metal contents using atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS. In comparison with maximum acceptable concentration for milk in the food codex of the Slovak republic, the level of contamination with cadmium was exceeded and reached the value 0.221 µg.ml-1. The copper content ranged from 1.201 µg.ml-1 to 5.810 µg.ml-1 and the average concentration reached 3.793 µg.ml-1.  Iron had an average of 1.824 µg.ml-1. Overall in all milk samples high correlations were found. Between positive correlation (0.7019 and negative correlation between of nickel and potassium concentration in raw milk (-0.72 was found. doi:10.5219/246

  16. To what extent can biogenic SOA be controlled?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Annmarie G; Pinder, Robert W; Bhave, Prakash V; Pouliot, George A

    2010-05-01

    The implicit assumption that biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is natural and can not be controlled hinders effective air quality management. Anthropogenic pollution facilitates transformation of naturally emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the particle phase, enhancing the ambient concentrations of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA). It is therefore conceivable that some portion of ambient biogenic SOA can be removed by controlling emissions of anthropogenic pollutants. Direct measurement of the controllable fraction of biogenic SOA is not possible, but can be estimated through 3-dimensional photochemical air quality modeling. To examine this in detail, 22 CMAQ model simulations were conducted over the continental U.S. (August 15 to September 4, 2003). The relative contributions of five emitted pollution classes (i.e., NO(x), NH(3), SO(x), reactive non methane carbon (RNMC) and primary carbonaceous particulate matter (PCM)) on biogenic SOA were estimated by removing anthropogenic emissions of these pollutants, one at a time and all together. Model results demonstrate a strong influence of anthropogenic emissions on predicted biogenic SOA concentrations, suggesting more than 50% of biogenic SOA in the eastern U.S. can be controlled. Because biogenic SOA is substantially enhanced by controllable emissions, classification of SOA as biogenic or anthropogenic based solely on VOC origin is not sufficient to describe the controllable fraction.

  17. Fishmeal with different levels of biogenic amines in Aquafeed: Comparison of feed protein quality, fish growth performance, and metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasour, Mohammad Sedigh; Wagner, Liane; Sundekilde, Ulrik Kræmer

    2018-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of fishmeal quality (low (LB) and high (HB) levels of endogenous biogenic amines) and feed extrusion temperatures (100 and 130 °C) on protein oxidation indicators and amino acids racemization (AAR) in extruded fish feed. Furthermore, the study investigated......, the growth performance of the fish decreased when the content of biogenic amines increased. In contrast, at an extrusion temperature of 130 °C, the growth performance was unaffected by the level of biogenic amines. The latter could be a consequence of the higher level of protein oxidation of LB fishmeal...... compared to HB fishmeal at this temperature. Higher levels of liver pyruvate and plasma lactate together with high level of betaine and AAs in both liver and plasma were associated with the LB fishmeal diets. The lower concentration of AAs especially in liver of fish fed with HB fishmeal demonstrated...

  18. Optical, magnetic, and dielectric properties of opal matrices with intersphere nanocavities filled with crystalline multiferroic, piezoelectric, and segnetoelectric materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Samoilovich, M.I.; Rinkevich, A.B.; Bovtun, Viktor; Belyanin, A.F.; Kempa, Martin; Nuzhnyy, Dmitry; Tsvetkov, M.Yu.; Klescheva, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 11 (2013), s. 2132-2147 ISSN 1070-3632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/12/0232 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : composites * opal matrices * optical, magnetic, and dielectric properties Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 0.418, year: 2013

  19. Opal phytolith and isotopic studies of "Restinga" communities of Maricá, Brazil, as a modern reference for paleobiogeoclimatic reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cátia Pereira dos Santos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe Maricá restinga, located in the eastern part of the Rio de Janeiro State (Brazil, corresponds to one of the few remaining preserved areas of the state's coastal plain. This paper reports on a study of the Maricá restinga plant communities and also presents an identification of the main plant species present in each community, with the objective of establishing reference collections, by the methods of the proxies opal phytoliths and stable carbon isotopes, for paleoenvironmental reconstructions of this coastal area during the Quaternary. Six plant communities, distributed perpendicularly to the coast line over sandy barriers, lagoonal plain, lagoon margin and weathered basement were identified: halophile-psamophile, scrub, herbaceous swamp, slack, shrubby vegetation and dry forest. In general, the plant species analyzed in each community presented low productivity of opal phytoliths, as only the Poaceae, Cyperaceae and Arecaceae families produce a great amount and diversity of morphotypes of opal phytoliths. The results of the analysis of stable carbon isotopes in sediments indicated a predominance of C3 or a mixture of C3 and C4 plants, presenting a close correlation with the results found in plants collected in each community. In conclusion, it was verified that the carbon isotope analysis associated with that of the opal phytoliths are good proxies for the reconstruction of vegetation in the study area.

  20. Secondary biogeneous radiation of human organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzin, A.M.; Surkenova, G.N.

    1999-01-01

    When studying samples of three types of tissues of alive healthy human organism (hands, surface of breast, hair) it is shown that hair permanently emit secondary biogeneous radiation (SBR) which may registered with biological detectors. The hypothesis is suggested that natural background radiation permanently exciting biopolymers (proteins, nuclei acids) being present in alive organism in condensed state induces permanently present electromagnetic field of SBR which is vitally important for human organism. The field partly extends beyond the organism, where it is registered with sensitive biological detectors [ru

  1. Enhanced photochemical catalysis of TiO2 inverse opals by modification with ZnO or Fe2O3 using ALD and the hydrothermal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiatong; Sun, Cuifeng; Fu, Ming; Long, Jie; He, Dawei; Wang, Yongsheng

    2018-02-01

    The development of porous materials exhibiting photon regulation abilities for improved photoelectrochemical catalysis performance is always one of the important goals of solar energy harvesting. In this study, methods to improve the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 inverse opals were discussed. TiO2 inverse opals were prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using colloidal crystal templates. In addition, TiO2 inverse opal heterostructures were fabricated using colloidal heterocrystals by repeated vertical deposition using different colloidal spheres. The hydrothermal method and ALD were used to prepare ZnO- or Fe2O3-modified TiO2 inverse opals on the internal surfaces of the TiO2 porous structures. Although the photonic reflection band was not significantly varied by oxide modification, the presence of Fe2O3 in the TiO2 inverse opals enhanced their visible absorption. The conformally modified oxides on the TiO2 inverse opals could also form energy barriers and avoid the recombination of electrons and holes. The fabrication of the TiO2 photonic crystal heterostructures and modification with ZnO or Fe2O3 can enhance the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 inverse opals.

  2. Biogenic precipitation of manganese oxides and enrichment of heavy metals at acidic soil pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayanna, Sathish; Peacock, Caroline L.; Schäffner, Franziska; Grawunder, Anja; Merten, Dirk; Kothe, Erika; Büchel, Georg

    2014-05-01

    The precipitation of biogenic Mn oxides at acidic pH is rarely reported and poorly understood, compared to biogenic Mn oxide precipitation at near neutral conditions. Here we identified and investigated the precipitation of biogenic Mn oxides in acidic soil, and studied their role in the retention of heavy metals, at the former uranium mining site of Ronneburg, Germany. The site is characterized by acidic pH, low carbon content and high heavy metal loads including rare earth elements. Specifically, the Mn oxides were present in layers identified by detailed soil profiling and within these layers pH varied from 4.7 to 5.1, Eh varied from 640 to 660 mV and there were enriched total metal contents for Ba, Ni, Co, Cd and Zn in addition to high Mn levels. Using electron microprobe analysis, synchrotron X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we identified poorly crystalline birnessite (δ-MnO2) as the dominant Mn oxide in the Mn layers, present as coatings covering and cementing quartz grains. With geochemical modelling we found that the environmental conditions at the site were not favourable for chemical oxidation of Mn(II), and thus we performed 16S rDNA sequencing to isolate the bacterial strains present in the Mn layers. Bacterial phyla present in the Mn layers belonged to Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, and from these phyla we isolated six strains of Mn(II) oxidizing bacteria and confirmed their ability to oxidise Mn(II) in the laboratory. The biogenic Mn oxide layers act as a sink for metals and the bioavailability of these metals was much lower in the Mn layers than in adjacent layers, reflecting their preferential sorption to the biogenic Mn oxide. In this presentation we will report our findings, concluding that the formation of natural biogenic poorly crystalline birnessite can occur at acidic pH, resulting in the formation of a biogeochemical barrier which, in turn, can control the mobility and bioavailability of heavy metals in

  3. Assessing the quality of sardine based on biogenic amines using a fuzzy logic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Davood; Ghazali, H M

    2017-04-15

    There is an increasing concern about the quality and quality assessment procedures of seafood. In the present study, a model to assess fish quality based on biogenic amine contents using fuzzy logic model (FLM) is proposed. The fish used was sardine (Sardinella sp.) where the production of eight biogenic amines was monitored over fifteen days of storage at 0, 3 and 10°C. Based on the results, histamine, putrescine and cadaverine were selected as input variables and twelve quality grades were considered for quality of fish as output variables for the FLM. Input data were processed by rules established in the model and were then defuzzified according to defined output variables. Finally, the quality of fish was evaluated using the designed model and Pearson correlation between storage times with quality of fish showed r=0.97, 0.95 and 1 for fish stored at 0, 3 and 10°C, respectively. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Biogenic amines and hygienic quality of lucerne silage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mlejnkova Veronika

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This experiment examined the influence of two different silage additives of biological (Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Enterococcus faecium, enzyme xylanase and chemical (43% formic acid, 30% ammonium formate, 10% propionic acid, 2% benzoic acid types on biogenic amines concentration, nutrient content, fermentation process, and microbiologic indicators in lucerne (Medicago sativa silage after 90 days of fermentation. The biological additive significantly (P < 0.05 increased putrescine (+51%, lactic acid (+11% and protein content (+11% in comparison with control silage. It significantly decreased cadaverine (−29%, histamine (−57%, spermidine (−15%, spermine (−55%, acetic acid (−40%, ethanol (−55%, ammonium (−25% and ash (−9%. After the chemical-additive treatment, greater amounts of histamine and tyramine were recorded. Significant decrease was observed in the concentrations of putrescine (−18%, cadaverine (−55%, spermidine (−47%, spermine (−45%, lactic acid (−16%, acetic acid (−46%, ammonium (−59%, ash (−13% and fat (−24%. Populations of bacteria associated with lactic acid fermentation, moulds, yeasts, enterobacteria and total microorganisms count were also influenced. Both biological and chemical additives can be highly recommended for producing high-quality silages meeting hygienic requirements. In lucerne silage, the chemical preservative showed a stronger effect in achieving the health safety of silage compared to the biological inoculant.

  5. Removal of colloidal biogenic selenium from wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staicu, Lucian C; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Oturan, Mehmet A; Ackerson, Christopher J; Lens, Piet N L

    2015-04-01

    Biogenic selenium, Se(0), has colloidal properties and thus poses solid-liquid separation problems, such as poor settling and membrane fouling. The separation of Se(0) from the bulk liquid was assessed by centrifugation, filtration, and coagulation-flocculation. Se(0) particles produced by an anaerobic granular sludge are normally distributed, ranging from 50 nm to 250 nm, with an average size of 166±29 nm and a polydispersity index of 0.18. Due to its nanosize range and protein coating-associated negative zeta potential (-15 mV to -23 mV) between pH 2 and 12, biogenic Se(0) exhibits colloidal properties, hampering its removal from suspension. Centrifugation at different centrifugal speeds achieved 22±3% (1500 rpm), 73±2% (3000 rpm) and 91±2% (4500 rpm) removal. Separation by filtration through 0.45 μm filters resulted in 87±1% Se(0) removal. Ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate were used as coagulants in coagulation-flocculation experiments. Aluminum sulfate achieved the highest turbidity removal (92±2%) at a dose of 10(-3) M, whereas ferric chloride achieved a maximum turbidity removal efficiency of only 43±4% at 2.7×10(-4) M. Charge repression plays a minor role in particle neutralization. The sediment volume resulting from Al2(SO3)4 treatment is three times larger than that produced by FeCl3. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Incidence of biogenic amines in foods implications for the Gambia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amines are found in food. Biogenic amines are a class of amines, which result from decarboxylation. They are food quality indicators. Health-wise biogenic amines play positive roles and have adverse effects as well; they are a public health concern. Certain conditions make it possible for them to be produced. These could ...

  7. Methyl chavicol: characterization of its biogenic emission rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouvier-Brown, N.C.; Goldstein, A.H.; Worton, D.R.; Matross, D.M.; Gilman, J.B.; Kuster, W.C.; Welsh-Bon, D.; Warneke, C.; de Gouw, J.A.; Cahill, M.J.; Holzinger, R.

    2009-01-01

    We report measurements of ambient atmospheric mixing ratios for methyl chavicol and determine its biogenic emission rate. Methyl chavicol, a biogenic oxygenated aromatic compound, is abundant within and above Blodgett Forest, a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California.

  8. Neutron scattering for industrial and engineering research at the OPAL reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The OPAL research reactor at ANSTO has a number of neutron instruments available for science and engineering applications. The instruments have a unique non-destructive ability to determine critical aspects of a wide variety of material systems. This includes surfaces, defects, fine scale dispersions, texture and residual stresses. This information can provide a direct impact into optimization of modern manufacturing processes, improved product reliability, enhanced design performance, reduced production cost, and extended life prediction on significant engineering assets (e.g. power-station utilities, gas pipelines, aircrafts, trains, etc.). This presentation will focus on two instruments in particular: Kowari, the strain and crystallographic texture measurement system and Dingo the radiography/tomography instrument. (author)

  9. Kookaburra - the ultra-small-angle neutron scattering instrument at OPAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehm, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Full text: An ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) instrument is to be built at ANSTO's new research reactor OPAL. This instrument will extend the range of experimentally measurable length scales currently accessible through the already existing SANS instrument Quokka by two orders of magnitude into the micrometre regime. Therefore, the combined USANS/SANS utilisation at ANSTO will allow the characterisation of microstructure over 4 orders of magnitude in size (1 nm to 10μm). Kookaburra is to be installed at the cold-neutron guide CG 3 , and will use the classical Bonse-Hart method. The instrument shall individually operate at two different wavelengths to optimally accommodate weakly and strongly scattering samples at one sample position. This contribution will discuss the layout and conceptual design of Kookaburra, and its expected performance is compared to that of the reactor-based USANS instrument BT-5 at NIST.

  10. Radiological Shielding Design for the Neutron High-Resolution Backscattering Spectrometer EMU at the OPAL Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersez, Tunay; Esposto, Fernando; Souza, Nicolas R. de

    2017-09-01

    The shielding for the neutron high-resolution backscattering spectrometer (EMU) located at the OPAL reactor (ANSTO) was designed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 5-1.60. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies, such as the neutron pre-monochromator bunker with sliding cylindrical block shields to accommodate a range of neutron take-off angles, and in the experimental area - shielding of neutron focusing guides, choppers, flight tube, backscattering monochromator, and additional shielding elements inside the Scattering Tank. These shielding assemblies meet safety and engineering requirements and cost constraints. The neutron dose rates around the EMU instrument were reduced to < 0.5 µSv/h and the gamma dose rates to a safe working level of ≤ 3 µSv/h.

  11. Studies on the beam system for the calibration of the OPAL jet chamber with laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maringer, G.

    1988-07-01

    UV laser beams are an important tool for the calibration of the OPAL jet chamber. A beam transport system containing about 350 mirrors in total guides the beams from the laser outside the detector into the chamber. Four of the mirrors are moveable under remote control allowing to guide the beams into each of the 24 sectors and to correct the beam path in case of deviations. A program to control these moveable mirrors has been developed. Drift velocity measurements will be performed by means of double beams which are generated by appropriate beamsplitters. Accurate knowledge of the double beam distances is essential to obtain the desired accuracy of better than 0.1% or 10 μm. Using a CCD device with a pixel size of 23x23 μm 2 the beam distance could be measured with errors below the required limit. (orig.)

  12. Coherence effects and perturbative QCD tests with the OPAL detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Boutemeur, M

    2002-01-01

    I report on results and methods from a set of analyses performed within the OPAL collaboration at CERN. The full available data sample collected at and near the Z/sup 0/ resonance is used. Results concern colour-field interference and coherence phenomena, quark and gluon jet properties, identified particles in quark and gluon jets, measurements of the QCD colour factors and relevant tests of recently improved perturbative QCD calculations. The challenge is that QCD is a quantum field theory that requires all orders in perturbation theory and non-perturbative analysis to confront data at available energies. Thus, precise measurements can be thought as explorations of quantum field theory itself. Nonetheless, these tests and measurements have important practical applications, in the calculation of backgrounds to new physics and, for hadron collider particularly, in predictions for new particle cross-sections. (184 refs).

  13. LEP1 measurement of heavy quark forward-backward asymmetries with Opal detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafoux, H.

    1996-01-01

    Using all data collected by OPAL during the first phase of LEP operation, called LEP1, we have measured the b and c quark forward-backward asymmetries on and around the Z 0 peak. The measurement, which is based on prompt leptons produced in semileptonic decays of heavy quarks, has been optimized using artificial neural networks whenever necessary, that is whenever the problem to solve implied taking into account simultaneously a large number of parameters. Our results are compatible with other LEP measurements and with the Standard Model predictions for a top quark of 174±31 GeV/c□ and a Higgs boson mass between 60 and 1000 GeV/c□. (author). 159 refs., 88 figs., 37 tabs

  14. Wombat: The high-intensity powder diffractometer at the OPAL reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, Andrew J [Bragg Institute, ANSTO, PMB 1 Menai 2234 (Australia)]. E-mail: ajs@ansto.gov.au; Hagen, Mark E. [Bragg Institute, ANSTO, PMB 1 Menai 2234 (Australia); Noakes, Terrence J. [Bragg Institute, ANSTO, PMB 1 Menai 2234 (Australia)

    2006-11-15

    The Wombat powder diffractometer will be located on the TG1 thermal guide at the OPAL reactor. A variable vertically focusing monochromator will provide a flux of up to {approx}10{sup 8} ns{sup -1} cm{sup -2} at the sample position. A compact curved 2D position sensitive detector will allow simultaneous acquisition of 120 deg. in 2{theta}, with {approx}10{sup 6} s{sup -1} count rate capability and time resolution down to the microsecond level. Wombat is designed for experiments requiring rapid real time acquisition (time-resolved environmental or kinetics experiments) or very good signal to noise (experiments with difficult sample environments or small sample volumes)

  15. The multipurpose time-of-flight neutron reflectometer “Platypus” at Australia's OPAL reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, M.; Nelson, A.; Holt, S. A.; Saerbeck, T.; Hamilton, W. A.; Klose, F.

    2011-03-01

    In this manuscript we describe the major components of the Platypus time-of-flight neutron reflectometer at the 20 MW OPAL reactor in Sydney, Australia. Platypus is a multipurpose spectrometer for the characterisation of solid thin films, materials adsorbed at the solid-liquid interface and free-liquid surfaces. It also has the capacity to study magnetic thin films using spin-polarised neutrons. Platypus utilises a white neutron beam ( λ=2-20 Å) that is pulsed using boron-coated disc chopper pairs; thus providing the capacity to tailor the wavelength resolution of the pulses to suit the system under investigation. Supermirror optical components are used to focus, deflect or spin-polarise the broad bandwidth neutron beams, and typical incident spectra are presented for each configuration. A series of neutron reflectivity datasets are presented, indicating the quality and flexibility of this spectrometer. Minimum reflectivity values of Platypus time-of-flight neutron reflectometer are presented.

  16. Semileptonic B decays to narrow orbitally-excited charm mesons using the OPAL detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2072991

    2003-01-01

    The decay chain b → B¯ → D**0 ℓ − n&d1; X, D**0 → D*+π −, D*+ → D0π+, D0 → (Kπ or K 3π) was identified in a sample of 3.9 million hadronic Z decays collected with the OPAL detector at LEP. The branching ratio BR (b → B¯) × BR (B¯ → D01 ℓ− n&d1; X) × BR( D01 → D*+π−) was measured to be (2.64 ± 0.79 (stat) ± 0.39 (syst)) × 10−3 for the JP = 1+ ( D01 ) state. For decays into the JP = 2 + ( D*02 ) state, an upper limit of 1.4 × 10−3 was placed on the branching ratio at the 95% confidence level.

  17. Focused ion beam milling of nanocavities in single colloidal particles and self-assembled opals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woldering, Leon A; Otter, A M; Husken, Bart H; Vos, Willem L

    2006-01-01

    We present a new method of realizing single nanocavities in individual colloidal particles on the surface of silicon dioxide artificial opals using a focused ion beam milling technique. We show that both the radius and the position of the nanocavity can be controlled with nanometre precision, to radii as small as 40 nm. The relation between the defect size and the milling time has been established. We confirmed that milling not only occurs on the surface of the spheres, but into and through them as well. We also show that an array of nanocavities can be fashioned. Structurally modified colloids have interesting potential applications in nanolithography, as well as in chemical sensing and solar cells, and as photonic crystal cavities

  18. Carbon quantum dots coated BiVO{sub 4} inverse opals for enhanced photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nan, Feng; Shen, Mingrong; Fang, Liang, E-mail: zhkang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: lfang@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Thin Films, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Kang, Zhenhui, E-mail: zhkang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: lfang@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-based Functional Materials and Devices, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Wang, Junling [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2015-04-13

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) coated BiVO{sub 4} inverse opal (io-BiVO{sub 4}) structure that shows dramatic improvement of photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation has been fabricated using electrodeposition with a template. The io-BiVO{sub 4} maximizes photon trapping through slow light effect, while maintaining adequate surface area for effective redox reactions. CQDs are then incorporated to the io-BiVO{sub 4} to further improve the photoconversion efficiency. Due to the strong visible light absorption property of CQDs and enhanced separation of the photoexcited electrons, the CQDs coated io-BiVO{sub 4} exhibit a maximum photo-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 0.35%, which is 6 times higher than that of the pure BiVO{sub 4} thin films. This work is a good example of designing composite photoelectrode by combining quantum dots and photonic crystal.

  19. PLATYPUS - A Time-of-Flight Neutron Reflectometer at the OPAL Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, Michael; Brule, Alain

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Neutron reflectometry is used to probe the structure of surfaces, thin-films or buried interfaces as well as processes occurring at surfaces and interfaces. Applications cover adsorbed surfactant layers, self-assembled monolayers, biological membranes, electrochemical and catalytic interfaces, polymer coatings and photosensitive films. The PLATYPUS neutron reflectometer has been recognised as one of the highest priority instruments to be constructed at the new 20MW OPAL research reactor at Lucas Heights. The instrument will be capable of collecting data from solid, liquid and magnetic samples using a broad wavelength band of polarised or non-polarised neutrons. Details of the design and construction of the PLATYPUS reflectometer will be given. (authors)

  20. Upgrade of the neutron guide system at the OPAL Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, D Martin; Kennedy, S J; Klose, F

    2010-01-01

    The new research reactor at ANSTO (OPAL) is operating with seven neutron beam instruments in the user programme and three more under construction. The reactor design provides for expansion of the facility to eighteen instruments, and much of the basic infrastructure is already in place. However, an expansion of the neutron guide system is needed for further beam instruments. For this purpose, several possibilities are under consideration, such as insertion of multi-channel neutron benders in the existing cold guides or the construction of a new elliptic cold guide. In this work Monte Carlo (MC) simulations have been used to evaluate performance of these guide configurations. Results show that these configurations can be competitive with the best instruments in the world.

  1. Comparison of Biogenic Amines and Mycotoxins in Alfalfa and Red Clover Fodder Depending on Additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skladanka, Jiri; Adam, Vojtech; Zitka, Ondrej; Mlejnkova, Veronika; Kalhotka, Libor; Horky, Pavel; Konecna, Klara; Hodulikova, Lucia; Knotova, Daniela; Balabanova, Marie; Slama, Petr; Skarpa, Petr

    2017-04-14

    In the production of fermented feed, each crop can be contaminated with a variety of microorganisms that may produce natural pollutants. Biogenic amines, mycotoxins, and undesirable organic acids can decrease health feed safety. The aim of this study was to compare the counts of microorganisms, levels of biogenic amines, and the mycotoxins in forage legumes, and also to compare the occurrence of microorganisms and levels of mycotoxins in green fodder and subsequently produced silage and the influence of additives on the content of natural harmful substances in silage. The experimental plot was located in Troubsko and Vatín, in the Czech Republic. Two varieties of Medicago sativa and one variety of Trifolium pratense were compared. Green fodder and subsequently produced silage reaching up to 23% of dry matter were evaluated and prepared using a bio-enzymatic additive and a chemical additive. Green fodder of Medicago sativa was more contaminated by Enterococci than Trifolium pratense fodder. The obvious difference was determined by the quality of silage leachate. The silage prepared from Medicago sativa fodder was more contaminated with butyric acid. Fungi were present in higher counts in the anaerobic environment of green fodder and contaminated it with zearalenone and deoxynivalenol. Lower counts of fungi were found in silage, although the zearalenone content did not change. Lower content of deoxynivalenol was detected in silage, compared with green fodder. Silages treated with a chemical additive were found not to contain butyric acid. Lower ethanol content was determined, and the tendency to reduce the risk of biogenic amines occurrence was evident. The additives proved to have no influence on the content of mycotoxins.

  2. Spatial and Temporal Variability in Biogenic Gas Accumulation and Release in The Greater Everglades at Multiple Scales of Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, M. D.; Cornett, C.; Schaffer, L.; Comas, X.

    2017-12-01

    Wetlands play a critical role in the carbon (C) cycle by producing and releasing significant amounts of greenhouse biogenic gasses (CO2, CH4) into the atmosphere. Wetlands in tropical and subtropical climates (such as the Florida Everglades) have become of great interest in the past two decades as they account for more than 20% of the global peatland C stock and are located in climates that favor year-round C emissions. Despite the increase in research involving C emission from these types of wetlands, the spatial and temporal variability involving C production, accumulation and release is still highly uncertain, and is the focus of this research at multiple scales of measurement (i.e. lab, field and landscape). Spatial variability in biogenic gas content, build up and release, at both the lab and field scales, was estimated using a series of ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys constrained with gas traps fitted with time-lapse cameras. Variability in gas content was estimated at the sub-meter scale (lab scale) within two extracted monoliths from different wetland ecosystems at the Disney wilderness Preserve (DWP) and the Blue Cypress Preserve (BCP) using high frequency GPR (1.2 GHz) transects across the monoliths. At the field scale (> 10m) changes in biogenic gas content were estimated using 160 MHz GPR surveys collected within 4 different emergent wetlands at the DWP. Additionally, biogenic gas content from the extracted monoliths was used to developed a landscape comparison of C accumulation and emissions for each different wetland ecosystem. Changes in gas content over time were estimated at the lab scale at high temporal resolution (i.e. sub-hourly) in monoliths from the BCP and Water Conservation Area 1-A. An autonomous rail system was constructed to estimate biogenic gas content variability within the wetland soil matrix using a series of continuous, uninterrupted 1.2 GHz GPR transects along the samples. Measurements were again constrained with an array

  3. Total balance of biogenic fuels for thermal uses; Ganzheitliche Bilanzierung verschiedener biogener Festbrennstoffe zur thermischen Nutzung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher, S.; Kaltschmitt, M. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER)

    1996-12-31

    In this situation of unfavourable energy price levels, the use of biogenic fuels for power supply can be recommended only if it serves to reduce environmental pollution. Against this background and on the basis of a primary energy balance, the authors attempted a total balance of selected enfironmental effects (global heating and acidification potential) of biomass use as compared to fossil fuel combustion. (orig) [Deutsch] ie Nutzung biogener Festbrennstoffe zur Energienachfragedeckung ist bei dem gegenwaertigen unguenstigen Energiepreisniveau nur dann zu rechtfertigen, wenn es durch die Biomassenutzung zu einer Reduzierung der energiebedingten Umwelteffekte kommt. Vor disem Hintergrund werden ausgehend von der Primaerenergiebilanz ausgewaehlte Umwelteffekte (d.h. das Treibhaus- und das Versauerungspotential) einer Biomassenutzung im Vergleich zu einer Nutzung fossiler Energietraeger ganzheitlich bilanziert. Die wesentlichen Ergebnisse werden zusammengefasst und interpretiert. (orig)

  4. 206Pb-230Th-234U-238U and 207Pb-235U geochronology of Quaternary opal, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neymark, Leonid A.; Amelin, Yuri V.; Paces, James B.

    2000-01-01

    U–Th–Pb isotopic systems have been studied in submillimeter-thick outermost layers of Quaternary opal occurring in calcite–silica fracture and cavity coatings within Tertiary tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. These coatings preserve a record of paleohydrologic conditions at this site, which is being evaluated as a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. The opal precipitated from groundwater is variably enriched in 234U (measured 234U/238U activity ratio 1.124–6.179) and has high U (30–313 ppm), low Th (0.008–3.7 ppm), and low common Pb concentrations (measured 206Pb/204Pb up to 11,370). It has been demonstrated that the laboratory acid treatment used in this study to clean sample surfaces and to remove adherent calcite, did not disturb U–Th–Pb isotopic systems in opal. The opal ages calculated from 206Pb∗/238U and 207Pb∗/235U ratios display strong reverse discordance because of excess radiogenic 206Pb∗ derived from the elevated initial 234U. The data are best interpreted using projections of a new four-dimensional concordia diagram defined by 206Pb∗/238U, 207Pb∗/235U, 234U/238Uactivity, and 230Th/238Uactivity. Ages and initial 234U/238U activity ratios have been calculated using different projections of this diagram and tested for concordance. The data are discordant, that is observed 207Pb∗/235U ages of 170 ± 32 (2σ) to 1772 ± 40 ka are systematically older than 230Th/U ages of 34.1 ± 0.6 to 452 ± 32 ka. The age discordance is not a result of migration of uranium and its decay products under the open system conditions, but a consequence of noninstantaneous growth of opal. Combined U–Pb and 230Th/U ages support the model of slow mineral deposition at the rates of millimeters per million years resulting in layering on a scale too fine for mechanical sampling. In this case, U–Pb ages provide more accurate estimates of the average age for mixed multiage samples than 230Th/U ages, because ages based on shorter

  5. Climate/chemistry feedbacks and biogenic emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, John A; Warwick, Nicola; Yang, Xin; Young, Paul J; Zeng, Guang

    2007-07-15

    The oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere is affected by anthropogenic emissions and is projected to change in the future. Model calculations indicate that the change in surface ozone at some locations could be large and have significant implications for human health. The calculations depend on the precise scenarios used for the anthropogenic emissions and on the details of the feedback processes included in the model. One important factor is how natural biogenic emissions will change in the future. We carry out a sensitivity calculation to address the possible increase in isoprene emissions consequent on increased surface temperature in a future climate. The changes in ozone are significant but depend crucially on the background chemical regime. In these calculations, we find that increased isoprene will increase ozone in the Northern Hemisphere but decrease ozone in the tropics. We also consider the role of bromine compounds in tropospheric chemistry and consider cases where, in a future climate, the impact of bromine could change.

  6. Determination of biogenic component in liquid fuels by the 14C direct LSC method by using quenching properties of modern liquids for calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronić, Ines Krajcar; Barešić, Jadranka; Horvatinčić, Nada; Sironić, Andreja

    2017-08-01

    The fraction of biogenic component within various types of materials that can be used as fuels for energy production and transport can be determined by measuring their 14C activity. The method is based on different 14C signatures of the biogenic and the fossil components: while the biogenic component reflects the modern atmospheric 14C activity, no 14C is present in fossil fuels. A direct measurement of the 14C content in liquid fuel by liquid scintillation counter is a simple and fast technique but has a main disadvantage: different liquid colors cause different quenching properties and affect the measurement efficiency. We propose a new evaluation technique that uses liquids of different colors to construct modern and background calibration curves. Various binary mixtures of biogenic liquids have been used to verify the relation between the count rate and the quenching parameter. Mixtures of a biogenic and a 14C-free liquid demonstrated the potential of the proposed technique for determining the biogenic fraction of a mixture.

  7. U-Pb ages of uraniferous opals and implications for the history of beryllium, fluorine, and uranium mineralization at Spor Mountain, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, K. R.; Lindsey, D.A.; Zielinski, R.A.; Simmons, K.R.

    1980-01-01

    The U-Pb isotope systematics of uraniferous opals from Spor Mountain, Utah, were investigated to determine the suitability of such material for geochronologic purposes, and to estimate the timing of uranium and associated beryllium and fluorine mineralization. The results indicate that uraniferous opals can approximate a closed system for uranium and uranium daughters, so that dating samples as young as ???1 m.y. should be possible. In addition, the expected lack of initial 230Th and 231Pa in opals permits valuable information on the initial 234U/238U to be obtained on suitable samples of ???10 m.y. age. The oldest 207Pb/235U apparent age observed, 20.8 ?? 1 m.y., was that of the opal-fluorite core of a nodule from a beryllium deposit in the Spor Mountain Formation. This age is indistinguishable from that of fission-track and K-Ar ages from the host rhyolite, and links the mineralization to the first episode of alkali rhyolite magmatism and related hydrothermal activity at Spor Mountain. Successively younger ages of 13 m.y. and 8-9 m.y. on concentric outer zones of the same nodule indicate that opal formed either episodically or continuously for over 10 m.y. Several samples of both fracture-filling and massive-nodule opal associated with beryllium deposits gave 207Pb/235U apparent ages of 13-16 m.y., which may reflect a restricted period of mineralization or perhaps an averaging of 21- and <13-m.y. periods of opal growth. Several samples of fracture-filling opal in volcanic rocks as young as 6 m.y. gave 207Pb/235U ages of 3.4-4.8 m.y. These ages may reflect hot-spring activity after the last major eruption of alkali rhyolite. ?? 1980.

  8. Biogenic amines in Portuguese traditional foods and wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Isabel M P L V O; Pinho, Olívia

    2006-09-01

    The presence of biogenic amines in foodstuffs is an important food safety problem because of the implication of these compounds in food intolerance and intoxication. The separation and quantification of biogenic amines in foods is normally performed by chromatographic techniques. This review contains descriptions of the quantification of biogenic amines in Portuguese traditional fermented and/or ripened foods and wines, including Protected Denomination of Origin cheeses, dry-cured sausages, and Portuguese wines (including Port wines), using different analytical methods based on high-pressure liquid chromatography (UV or diode array and/or fluorometric detectors) and gas chromatography (with a mass spectrometry detector). The evolution of biogenic amines during fermentation, ripening, aging, or storage of those products was also evaluated. Biogenic amine concentrations ranged widely within individual food items, and storage, transport, and handling conditions can influence to some extent the biogenic amines present and their concentrations. Traditional foods are an important part of the Portuguese diet, and a high intake of harmful amounts of biogenic amines from traditional Portuguese fermented foods is possible. However, extensive research is needed to extend the current limited database.

  9. Validation of a method for the analysis of biogenic amines: histamine instability during wine sample storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Benoit; Le Quere, Stephanie; Vuchot, Patrick; Grinbaum, Magali; Barnavon, Laurent

    2012-06-30

    This paper reports on the development of an optimized method for the simultaneous analysis of eight biogenic amines (histamine, methylamine, ethylamine, tyramine, putrescine, cadaverine, phenethylamine, and isoamylamine). The analytical method thus proposed has the following advantages: the easy derivatization of wine, the quantification of biogenic amines and a complete degradation of excess derivatization reagent during sample preparation in order to preserve the column. It consists in reversed phase separation by HPLC and UV-vis detection of the aminoenones formed by the reaction of amino compounds with the derivatization reagent diethyl ethoxymethylenemalonate (DEEMM). The usefulness of this technique was confirmed by an alternative oenological analytical method for the validation, quality control and uncertainty assessment (OIV Oeno 10/2005). The method was validated and proposed as a reference method to the International Organization of Vine and Wine (OIV). As a specific application of the proposed method, the biogenic amine content of Rhône valley wines was investigated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Absorption of Visible and Long-wave Radiation by Primary and Secondary Biogenic Aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.

    2008-12-01

    Field results for the 14C content of carbonaceous aerosols are presented that indicate significant biogenic sources of both primary and secondary aerosols in urban and regional environments. Samples collected in Mexico City and downwind of the urban area during the MILAGRO field study are compared with results reported previously in the literature indicating a significant amount of biogenic aerosols from both biomass burning and secondary photochemical production (e.g. terpene oxidations) are contributing to the overall carbonaceous aerosols in the optically active region of 0.1 to 1.0 micron. Samples in this size range collected on quartz fiber filters were also examined using an integrating sphere and FTIR diffuse reflectance techniques to obtain absorption spectra from 280 to the mid-IR. These data clearly indicate that the biogenic derived primary aerosols from agricultural and trash-burning, as well as secondary organic aerosols from isoprene and terpene oxidations will produce both UV-Visible (short-wave) absorbing substances as well as IR (long-wave) absorbing compounds including humic-like-substances (HULIS). With the anticipated increases in growing seasons (i.e. earlier springs and longer summers) the likely hood of increased fires (forest and grassland) as well as the continuing growth in agricultural burning activities, these primary sources are expected to increase and may play a role in heating of the atmosphere. The compound effects of these primary and secondary biogenic sources of absorbing aerosols to the total aerosol loading and regional climate will be discussed. This work was supported by the Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64328 as part of the Atmospheric Science Program.

  11. Can citizen science produce good science? Testing the OPAL Air Survey methodology, using lichens as indicators of nitrogenous pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregidgo, Daniel J; West, Sarah E; Ashmore, Mike R

    2013-11-01

    Citizen science is having increasing influence on environmental monitoring as its advantages are becoming recognised. However methodologies are often simplified to make them accessible to citizen scientists. We tested whether a recent citizen science survey (the OPAL Air Survey) could detect trends in lichen community composition over transects away from roads. We hypothesised that the abundance of nitrophilic lichens would decrease with distance from the road, while that of nitrophobic lichens would increase. The hypothesised changes were detected along strong pollution gradients, but not where the road source was relatively weak, or background pollution relatively high. We conclude that the simplified OPAL methodology can detect large contrasts in nitrogenous pollution, but it may not be able to detect more subtle changes in pollution exposure. Similar studies are needed in conjunction with the ever-growing body of citizen science work to ensure that the limitations of these methods are fully understood. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Oxygen persufflation as adjunct in liver preservation (OPAL: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scherag Andre

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early graft dysfunction due to preservation/reperfusion injury represents a dramatic event after liver transplantation. Enhancement of donor organ criteria, in order to cope with the ever increasing donor shortage, further increases graft susceptibility to ischemic alterations. Major parts of post-preservation injury, however, occur at the time of warm reperfusion but not during ischemic storage; successful reperfusion of ischemic tissue in turn depends on an adequate redox and intracellular signal homeostasis. The latter has been shown experimentally to be favorably influenced by oxygen persufflation within short time spans. Thus viability of marginally preserved liver grafts could still be augmented by transient hypothermic reconditioning even after normal procurement and static cold storage. The present study is aimed to confirm the conceptual expectations, that hypothermic reconditioning by gaseous oxygen persufflation is a useful method to suppress injurious cellular activation cascades and to improve post-ischemic recovery of marginally preserved liver grafts. Methods/Design OPAL is a prospective single center randomized proof of concept study, including two parallel groups in a total of 116 liver transplant patients. The effect of an in hospital treatment of the isolated liver graft by 2 hours of oxygen persufflation immediately prior to transplantation will be assesses as compared to standard procedure (cold storage without further intervention. The primary endpoint is the peak transaminase serum level (AST during the first three days after transplantation as a surrogate readout for parenchymal liver injury. Other outcomes comprise patient and graft survival, time of intensive care requirement, hepatic tissue perfusion 1h after revascularisation, early onset of graft dysfunction based on coagulation parameters, as well as the use of a refined scoring-system for initial graft function based on a multi-parameter (AST

  13. Biogenic Sulfur in the Siple Dome Ice Core, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set is a continuous, high-resolution record of biogenic sulfur (methanesulfonate, known as MSA and CH3SO3-) in the 1000 m deep Siple Dome A (SDMA) core,...

  14. Biogenic hydrocarbon emission estimates for North Central Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedinmyer, C.; Wade Strange, I.; Allen, D.T. [University of Texas at Austin (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Estes, M. [Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission, Austin, TX (United States); Yarwood, G. [ENVIRON International Corporation, Novato, CA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Biogenic hydrocarbon emissions were estimated for a 37 county region in North Central Texas. The estimates were based on several sources of land use/land cover data that were combined using geographical information systems. Field studies were performed to collect species and tree diameter distribution data. These data were used to estimate biomass densities and species distributions for each of the land use and cover classifications. VOC emissions estimates for the domain were produced using the new land use/land cover data and a biogenic emissions model. These emissions were more spatially resolved and a factor of 2 greater in magnitude than those calculated based on the biogenic emissions landuse database (BELD) commonly used in biogenic emissions models. (author)

  15. Biogenic sulfur compounds and the global sulfur cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aneja, V.P.; Aneja, A.P.; Adams, D.F.

    1982-01-01

    Field measurements of biogenic sulfur compounds shows a great variation in concentrations and emission rates for H 2 S, DMS, CS 2 and COS. Measurements by the chamber method and estimates from micrometeorological sampling are employed to determine the earth-atmosphere flux of these gases. Much of the variation can be attributed to differences of climate and surface conditions, with marshes being a large source of biogenic sulfur (mean contribution 4 x 10 to the 6th ton/year maximum contribution 142 x 10 to the 6th ton/year). Considering that the estimated biogenic contribution needed to balance the global sulfur cycle ranges from 40- 230 x 10 to the 6th tons/year, the mean values are not sufficient to balance this cycle. Further experimental investigations are suggested in order to characterize the biogenic processes adequately

  16. Quantifying the Global Marine Biogenic Nitrogen Oxides Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, H.; Wang, S.; Lin, J.; Hao, N.; Poeschl, U.; Cheng, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are among the most important molecules in atmospheric chemistry and nitrogen cycle. The NOx over the ocean areas are traditionally believed to originate from the continental outflows or the inter-continental shipping emissions. By comparing the satellite observations (OMI) and global chemical transport model simulation (GEOS-Chem), we suggest that the underestimated modeled atmospheric NO2 columns over biogenic active ocean areas can be possibly attributed to the biogenic source. Nitrification and denitrification in the ocean water produces nitrites which can be further reduced to NO through microbiological processes. We further report global distributions of marine biogenic NO emissions. The new added emissions improve the agreement between satellite observations and model simulations over large areas. Our model simulations manifest that the marine biogenic NO emissions increase the atmospheric oxidative capacity and aerosol formation rate, providing a closer link between atmospheric chemistry and ocean microbiology.

  17. Platinum 'opal eyes' - an upgraded high resolution imaging standard for performance monitoring of FEG SEM and FEG VPSEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, B.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The new generation of field emission variable pressure and conventional scanning electron microscopes [FEG (VP)SEM] are capable of extremely high resolution (e.g. 1nm 15kV) and, in parallel, imaging at very low accelerating voltages (e.g. 4 nm 0.1 kV). Most of this level of performance is in conventional high vacuum modes of operation, the variable pressure performances are lower but under rapid development. A synthetic opal sample with fine gold decoration on the 400nm silica spheres was described previously as a suitable standard for the routine monitoring of SEM performance. The sample was named 'OPAL EYES'. Whilst ideal for tungsten and LaBo filament sourced SEMs the level of detail was marginal for field emission SEM performance measurement for two reasons. Firstly, the fine gold decoration was highly variable in grain size and inconsistent between samples making comparable image collection difficult. Secondly the sample was prone to self-contamination and damage during imaging at high accelerating voltages or high magnifications. Overall the 'OPAL EYES' sample has been successful in its adoption by a number of service engineers and laboratories world-wide. A new processing step has been added to the previously described preparation process for the OPAL-EYES standard; a light sputter coating with platinum. The effect is dramatic and results in growth of (presumably -to be checked and reported on) Au-Pt features of remarkably consistent size within the central EYE regions of the sample. These outgrowths are proud of the substrate and often equi-dimensional at a size of ∼ 10 nm. The substrate detail is at a scale of ∼2-3 nm. The new Pt OPAL EYES have been used as a resolution test specimen on a recently installed FEG VPSEM with excellent results. An important feature of this new sample is the high contrast sharp-edged nature of the detail as this not only allows resolution measurement but also definition of interference (vibration, electric fields

  18. Search for the production of single top quarks using the OPAL detector

    CERN Document Server

    Leins, Axel; Dunnweber, W.

    2002-01-01

    Innerhalb des sogenannten Standardmodells (SM) der Teilchenphysik ist der Prozess der Flavour-andernden neutralen Str ¨ ome (FCNC) auf Born-Niveau verboten, und nur ¨ uber Prozesse h ¨ oherer Ordnung m ¨ oglich. FCNC-Prozesse sind daher extrem unter- ¨ druckt und sehr selten. Experimentell konnte dies f ¨ ur die ersten beiden Generationen ¨ von Quarks bestatigt werden. F ¨ ur die dritte Generation, speziell f ¨ ur das Top-Quark, ¨ existieren bisher nur wenige experimentelle Erkenntnisse uber FCNC-Prozesse. Durch ¨ theoretische Erweiterungen des SM konnen, aufgrund der extrem großen Masse des ¨ Top-Quarks und der damit verbundenen Sonderstellung, FCNC-Prozesse fur Top- ¨ Quarks vorhergesagt werden, die um mehrere Großenordnungen gegen ¨ uber dem SM ¨ erhoht sind. ¨ In dieser Arbeit wird nach der Produktion einzelner Top-Quarks uber ¨ Flavourandernde neutrale Str ¨ ome mit den Daten des OPAL-Detektors am e ¨ e -Speicherring LEP gesucht. Hierzu wird im hadronischen Zerfallskanal des W-Bosons...

  19. Determination of $\\alpha_{s}$ using Jet Rates at LEP with the OPAL detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, Niels T.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2006-01-01

    Hadronic events produced in e+e- collisions by the LEP collider and recorded by the OPAL detector were used to form distributions based on the number of reconstructed jets. The data were collected between 1995 and 2000 and correspond to energies of 91 GeV, 130-136 GeV and 161-209 GeV. The jet rates were determined using four different jet-finding algorithms (Cone, JADE, Durham and Cambridge). The differential two-jet rate and the average jet rate with the Durham and Cambridge algorithms were used to measure alpha(s) in the LEP energy range by fitting an expression in which order alpah_2s calculations were matched to a NLLA prediction and fitted to the data. Combining the measurements at different centre-of-mass energies, the value of alpha_s (Mz) was determined to be alpha(s)(Mz)=0.1177+-0.0006(stat.)+-0.0012$(expt.)+-0.0010(had.)+-0.0032

  20. Search for Invisibly Decaying Higgs Bosons with Large Decay Width Using the OPAL Detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostu, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Bailari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batly, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krasznahorkay, A., Jr.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, N.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D.E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, M.; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; shen, B.C.; sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a topological search for an invisibly decaying Higgs boson,H, produced via the Bjorken process (e+e- -> HZ). The analysis is based on data recorded using the OPAL detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies from 183 to 209 GeV corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 629pb-1. In the analysis only hadronic decays of the Z boson are considered. A scan over Higgs boson masses from 1 to 120 GeV and decay widths from 1 to 3000 GeV revealed no indication for a signal in the data. From a likelihood ratio of expected signal and Standard Model background we determine upper limits on cross-section times branching ratio to an invisible final state. For moderate Higgs boson decay widths, these range from about 0.07pb Mh = 60GeV) to 0.57pb (Mh = 114GeV). For decay widths above 200GeV the upper limits are of the order of 0.15pb. The results can be interpreted in general scenarios predicting a large invisible decay width of the Higgs boson. As an example we interpret the results in the so-called...

  1. Progress on ANSTO'S OPAL reactor project and its future importance as the centrepiece of ANSTO'S facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, I.O.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: After an intensive process of analysis, the Australian government approved the construction of a multi-purpose research reactor in 1997. Following the conduct of a comprehensive tender evaluation process in 1998-2000, INVAP was contracted to construct a 20 MW open pool research reactor and associated neutron beam facilities. The construction of the reactor is now almost complete, and we have commenced cold commissioning. ANSTO has applied for an operating licence, and we hope for a decision on that application in June, following the consideration by the regulator of the results of cold commissioning. The OPAL reactor will provide neutrons to a world-class neutron beam facility, in which a number of the instruments will have the best performance available in the world to date. We intend to establish the Bragg Institute as a regional centre of excellence on neutron beam science, with a significant number of international scientists using the facility to produce cutting edge science in the fields of biology, materials science, food science and other area. The reactor also has extensive irradiation facilities within the reflector vessel. These facilities will be used to produce medical isotopes - ANSTO supplies the bulk of the Australian market and also exports into this region - and for the transmutation doping of silicon ingots for semiconductor manufacture. There are also a number of pneumatically loaded radiation facilities allowing for short term irradiation of samples for such activities as neutron activation analysis

  2. An Antibody-Immobilized Silica Inverse Opal Nanostructure for Label-Free Optical Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Sik Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional SiO2-based inverse opal (SiO2-IO nanostructures were prepared for use as biosensors. SiO2-IO was fabricated by vertical deposition and calcination processes. Antibodies were immobilized on the surface of SiO2-IO using 3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APTMS, a succinimidyl-[(N-maleimidopropionamido-tetraethyleneglycol] ester (NHS-PEG4-maleimide cross-linker, and protein G. The highly accessible surface and porous structure of SiO2-IO were beneficial for capturing influenza viruses on the antibody-immobilized surfaces. Moreover, as the binding leads to the redshift of the reflectance peak, the influenza virus could be detected by simply monitoring the change in the reflectance spectrum without labeling. SiO2-IO showed high sensitivity in the range of 103–105 plaque forming unit (PFU and high specificity to the influenza A (H1N1 virus. Due to its structural and optical properties, SiO2-IO is a promising material for the detection of the influenza virus. Our study provides a generalized sensing platform for biohazards as various sensing strategies can be employed through the surface functionalization of three-dimensional nanostructures.

  3. The multipurpose time-of-flight neutron reflectometer 'Platypus' at Australia's OPAL reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.; Nelson, A.; Holt, S.A.; Saerbeck, T.; Hamilton, W.A.; Klose, F.

    2011-01-01

    In this manuscript we describe the major components of the Platypus time-of-flight neutron reflectometer at the 20 MW OPAL reactor in Sydney, Australia. Platypus is a multipurpose spectrometer for the characterisation of solid thin films, materials adsorbed at the solid-liquid interface and free-liquid surfaces. It also has the capacity to study magnetic thin films using spin-polarised neutrons. Platypus utilises a white neutron beam (λ=2-20 A) that is pulsed using boron-coated disc chopper pairs; thus providing the capacity to tailor the wavelength resolution of the pulses to suit the system under investigation. Supermirror optical components are used to focus, deflect or spin-polarise the broad bandwidth neutron beams, and typical incident spectra are presented for each configuration. A series of neutron reflectivity datasets are presented, indicating the quality and flexibility of this spectrometer. Minimum reflectivity values of -7 are observed; while maximum thickness values of 325 nm have been measured for single-component films and 483 nm for a multilayer system. Off-specular measurements have also been made to investigate in-plane features as opposed to those normal to the sample surface. Finally, the first published studies conducted using the Platypus time-of-flight neutron reflectometer are presented.

  4. The study of Z boson pair production with the OPAL detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, D H

    2001-01-01

    This thesis describes the study of the process e+e − → ZZ performed using data collected with the OPAL detector at the LEP storage ring. Events where one Z decays to a pair of neutrinos, which is detected as missing energy, and the other Z to hadrons or charged leptons are analyzed. The data were collected between 1998 and the end of the LEP running in 2000. The center-of-mass energy range started near ZZ threshold, 183 GeV, and continued up to 209 GeV. The production efficiencies, the number of selected events and the expected number of backgrounds events for ZZ→qq&d1;nn &d1; and ZZ→ℓ+ℓ- n n&d1; are calculated at each energy. The results of other ZZ final states are also summarized. This information is combined to calculate the production cross section of ZZ and set limits on anomalous gauge boson couplings and low scale quantum gravity. The result of this analysis is the consistent with the predictions of the Standard Model.

  5. Study of the ionoluminescence behavior of the gemstones: Beryl (aquamarine variety), opal, and topaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikbakht, T., E-mail: tnikbakht@aeoi.org.ir; Kakuee, O.; Lamehi-Rachti, M.

    2016-03-15

    Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) is introduced as a powerful luminescence technique for analyzing the gemstones. Although IBIL is basically comparable to cathodoluminescence (CL), as a well-known luminescence method for studying the gemstones, its high energy density, superior flexibility in depth resolving and fast ionization rate, qualify it for studying weakly luminescent, multi-layer, and precious samples. In order to examine the potential of IBIL in analyzing the gemstones, three samples of beryl (aquamarine variety), opal, and topaz, with different luminosities, were studied through simulations and experiments. The results of the Monte Carlo simulations of the proton beam in interaction with the mentioned gemstones, displayed the capabilities of IBIL, especially in comparison to the well-known technique of CL. The in-air ion beam induced luminescence experiments of the natural samples were performed at room temperature. Also, the complementary technique of microPIXE was applied for elemental analyses of the samples. The promising results of the IBIL experiments exhibit the ability of the technique for analyzing weakly luminescent gemstones, such as aquamarine. The IBIL spectra also exhibit some unknown luminescence bands, which are mostly located in the UV part of the spectra. These new bands disclose the existence of the unknown luminescence activators in the samples. Possible ideas on the origins of these new bands are proposed.

  6. Study of the ionoluminescence behavior of the gemstones: Beryl (aquamarine variety), opal, and topaz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikbakht, T.; Kakuee, O.; Lamehi-Rachti, M.

    2016-01-01

    Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) is introduced as a powerful luminescence technique for analyzing the gemstones. Although IBIL is basically comparable to cathodoluminescence (CL), as a well-known luminescence method for studying the gemstones, its high energy density, superior flexibility in depth resolving and fast ionization rate, qualify it for studying weakly luminescent, multi-layer, and precious samples. In order to examine the potential of IBIL in analyzing the gemstones, three samples of beryl (aquamarine variety), opal, and topaz, with different luminosities, were studied through simulations and experiments. The results of the Monte Carlo simulations of the proton beam in interaction with the mentioned gemstones, displayed the capabilities of IBIL, especially in comparison to the well-known technique of CL. The in-air ion beam induced luminescence experiments of the natural samples were performed at room temperature. Also, the complementary technique of microPIXE was applied for elemental analyses of the samples. The promising results of the IBIL experiments exhibit the ability of the technique for analyzing weakly luminescent gemstones, such as aquamarine. The IBIL spectra also exhibit some unknown luminescence bands, which are mostly located in the UV part of the spectra. These new bands disclose the existence of the unknown luminescence activators in the samples. Possible ideas on the origins of these new bands are proposed.

  7. Up-conversion nanoparticles sensitized inverse opal photonic crystals enable efficient water purification under NIR irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Lili; Ma, Xiumei; Ren, Junfeng; Sun, Qinxing; Shi, Yongsheng; Li, Lin; Shi, Jinsheng

    2018-03-01

    A novel porous monolayer inverse opal (IO) structure was prepared by a simple sol-gel method combined with a self-assembly PS photonic crystal (PC) as template. By prolonging deposition time of PS spheres, three-dimensional multilayer TiO2 IOPC was also fabricated. Up-conversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) were selected to sensitize TiO2 IOPCs. Photocatalytic activity of as-prepared materials was investigated by disinfection of bacteria and organic pollutant degradation. Under NIR light irradiation, a large improvement in bacterial inactivation and photodegradation efficiency could be seen for NYF/TiO2 composites in comparison with other samples. As for monolayer NYF/TiO2, water disinfection of 100% inactivation of bacteria is realized within 11 h and kinetic constant of RhB degradation is 0.133 h-1, which is about 10 times higher than that of pure TiO2 IOPCs. Reasons of enhanced photocatalytic activity were systematically investigated and a possible mechanism for NIR-driven photocatalysis was reasonably proposed.

  8. A Study of charm quark production in beauty quark decays with the OPAL detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Waller, David

    2003-01-01

    The production of charm quarks in beauty quark decays has been studied with the OPAL detector at the Large Electron Positron collider near Geneva, Switzerland. The branching ratio Br(b -1 DDX) has been measured using hadronic zo decays collected between 1993 and 1995. Here b refers to the admixture of weakly decaying hadrons containing ab quark that are produced in electron-positron annihilations at a centre of mass energy equal to the mass of the zo boson. The impact parameter significance of tracks in tagged b-jets is used to differentiate b -1 DDX decays from other decays. The result is Br(b -1 DDX) = (10.0 ± 3.2(stat.)~~:~(syst. det.)~~~04 (syst. phys.))%. where syst. det. is the systematic uncertainty due to the modelling of the detector, and syst. phys. is the systematic uncertainty due to the modelling of the underlying particle physics. Using this result, the average number of charm and anti-charm quarks produced in a beauty quark decay, nc, is found to be l.12~8:i6- Ill

  9. Untersuchung perturbativer und nichtperturbativer Struktur der Momente hadronischer Ereignisformvariablen mit den Experimenten JADE und OPAL

    CERN Document Server

    Pahl, Christoph Johannes

    2007-01-01

    In Hadronproduktionsdaten der e+e− - Vernichtungsexperimente JADE und OPAL messen wir die ersten f¨unf Momente von zw¨olf hadronischen Ereignisformvariablen bei Schwerpunktsenergien von 14 bis 207GeV. Aus dem Vergleich der QCD NLO-Vorhersage mit den mittels MC-Modellen um Hadronisierung korrigierten Daten erhalten wir den Referenzwert der starken Kopplung αs(MZ0) = 0.1254 ± 0.0007(stat.) ± 0.0010(exp.)+0.0009 −0.0023(had.)+0.0069 −0.0053(theo.) . F¨ur einige, insbesondere h¨ohere, Momente sind systematische Unzul¨anglichkeiten in der QCD NLO-Vorhersage erkenntlich. Simultane Fits an zwei Momente unter Annahme identischer Renormierungsskalen ergeben Skalenwerte von xμ=0.057 bis xμ=0.196 . Wir pr¨ufen Vorhersagen verschiedener nichtperturbativer Modelle. Aus der Single Dressed Gluon - N¨aherung ergibt sich eine perturbative Vorhersage in O(α5 s ) mit zu vernachl¨assigender Energiepotenzkorrektur, die den Mittelwert von Thrust auf Hadronniveau gut beschreibt mit αs(MZ0) = 0.1186 ± 0.0007(st...

  10. Biogenic antimicrobial silver nanoparticles produced by fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Alexandre G; Ping, Liu Yu; Marcato, Priscyla D; Alves, Oswaldo L; Silva, Maria C P; Ruiz, Rita C; Melo, Itamar S; Tasic, Ljubica; De Souza, Ana O

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus tubingensis and Bionectria ochroleuca showed excellent extracellular ability to synthesize silver nanoparticles (Ag NP), spherical in shape and 35 ± 10 nm in size. Ag NP were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and photon correlation spectroscopy for particle size and zeta potential. Proteins present in the fungal filtrate and in Ag NP dispersion were analyzed by electrophoresis (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis). Ag NP showed pronounced antifungal activity against Candida sp, frequently occurring in hospital infections, with minimal inhibitory concentration in the range of 0.11-1.75 μg/mL. Regarding antibacterial activity, nanoparticles produced by A. tubingensis were more effective compared to the other fungus, inhibiting 98.0 % of Pseudomonas. aeruginosa growth at 0.28 μg/mL. A. tubingensis synthesized Ag NP with surprisingly high and positive surface potential, differing greatly from all known fungi. These data open the possibility of obtaining biogenic Ag NP with positive surface potential and new applications.

  11. Biogenic volatile emissions from the soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñuelas, J; Asensio, D; Tholl, D; Wenke, K; Rosenkranz, M; Piechulla, B; Schnitzler, J P

    2014-08-01

    Volatile compounds are usually associated with an appearance/presence in the atmosphere. Recent advances, however, indicated that the soil is a huge reservoir and source of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs), which are formed from decomposing litter and dead organic material or are synthesized by underground living organism or organs and tissues of plants. This review summarizes the scarce available data on the exchange of VOCs between soil and atmosphere and the features of the soil and particle structure allowing diffusion of volatiles in the soil, which is the prerequisite for biological VOC-based interactions. In fact, soil may function either as a sink or as a source of bVOCs. Soil VOC emissions to the atmosphere are often 1-2 (0-3) orders of magnitude lower than those from aboveground vegetation. Microorganisms and the plant root system are the major sources for bVOCs. The current methodology to detect belowground volatiles is described as well as the metabolic capabilities resulting in the wealth of microbial and root VOC emissions. Furthermore, VOC profiles are discussed as non-destructive fingerprints for the detection of organisms. In the last chapter, belowground volatile-based bi- and multi-trophic interactions between microorganisms, plants and invertebrates in the soil are discussed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Evaluation of biogenic amines and microbial counts throughout the ripening of goat cheeses from pasteurized and raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novella-Rodríguez, Sonia; Veciana-Nogués, M Teresa; Roig-Sagués, Artur X; Trujillo-Mesa, Antonio J; Vidal-Carou, M Carmen

    2004-05-01

    The effect of the hygienic quality of milk on changes in microbial counts and biogenic amine content was evaluated during ripening of goat cheeses manufactured from pasteurized and raw milks at 1, 14, 30, 60 and 90 d. The original milk, rennet, curd and whey were also included in the study. The pH, salt content and extent of proteolysis in the cheese were also evaluated. Spermidine and spermine were the main amines in raw milk, while they were minor amines in cheeses. Other amines increased markedly during ripening, tyramine being the main amine in cheese made from raw milk and cadaverine and putrescine in those produced from pasteurized milk. Enterobacteriaceae counts decreased during ripening whereas those of lactic acid bacteria increased, especially lactobacilli and enterococci. Cheese made from raw milk showed higher microbial counts during ripening than those made from pasteurized milk, especially for Enterobacteriaceae and enterococci, counts being 2 or 3 log units higher. Raw milk cheese showed remarkably higher biogenic amines compared with pasteurized milk cheeses. Therefore, pasteurization of milk causes a decrease in final biogenic amine content of cheese as a result of the reduction of its microbial counts.

  13. Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus saerimneri 30a (Formerly Lactobacillus sp. Strain 30a), a Reference Lactic Acid Bacterium Strain Producing Biogenic Amines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romano, Andrea; Trip, Hein; Campbell-Sills, Hugo; Bouchez, Olivier; Sherman, David; Lolkema, Juke S.; Lucas, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus sp. strain 30a (Lactobacillus saerimneri) produces the biogenic amines histamine, putrescine, and cadaverine by decarboxylating their amino acid precursors. We report its draft genome sequence (1,634,278 bases, 42.6% G+C content) and the principal findings from its annotation, which

  14. Effectiveness of a Lactobacillus sakei starter culture in the reduction of biogenic amine accumulation as a function of the raw material quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bover-Cid, S; Izquierdo-Pulido, M; Vidal-Carou, M C

    2001-03-01

    The effectiveness of an amine-negative starter culture (Lactobacillus sakei CTC494) in the reduction of biogenic amine production during the ripening of fermented sausages was examined. Four batches were manufactured in parallel: spontaneously fermented and starter-mediated sausages were manufactured from two lots of raw materials of different hygienic quality. Besides the biogenic amine contents, changes in the microbial counts, nitrogenous fractions, pH, and water content were measured at several sampling points during the ripening process. In sausages manufactured from good quality meat, the starter strain of L. sakei reduced and even inhibited biogenic amine accumulation during sausage fermentation, the end products showing extremely low biogenic amine contents (tyramine levels less than 15 mg/kg of dry matter and putrescine and cadaverine levels less than 5 mg/kg of dry matter). Nevertheless, starter-mediated sausages made from poorer-quality raw materials showed much higher amine contents (308, 223, and 36 mg/kg of dry matter of cadaverine, tyramine, and putrescine, respectively), which were only slightly lower than those of the spontaneously fermented sausages made from the same raw materials. The relatively high bacterial numbers of raw materials of poorer-hygienic quality diminished the beneficial effect of the starter strain. Therefore, the effectiveness of the starter was strongly dependent on the hygienic quality of the raw materials used.

  15. Biogenic and non-biogenic Si pools in terrestrial ecosystems: results from a novel analysis method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barao, Lucia; Vandevenne, Floor; Clymans, Wim; Meire, Patrick; Frings, Patrick; Conley, Daniel; Struyf, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Silicon (Si) is a chemical element frequently associated with highly abundant silicate minerals in the Earth crust. Over millions of years, the interaction of such minerals with the atmosphere and hydrosphere produces a myriad of processed compounds, and the mineral weathering consumes CO2 during the process. The weathering of minerals also triggers the export of dissolved Si (DSi) to coastal waters and the ocean. Here, DSi is deposited in diatom frustules, in an amorphous biogenic form (BSi). Diatoms account for 50% of the primary production and are crucial for the export of carbon into the deep sea. In recent years, it was acknowledged that terrestrial systems filter the Si transition from the terrestrial mineral to the marine and coastal biological pool, by the incorporation of DSi into plants. In this process, DSi is taken up by roots together with other nutrients and precipitates in plant cells in amorphous structures named phytoliths. After dead, plant tissues become mixed in the top soil, where BSi is available for dissolution and will control the DSi availability in short time scales. Additionally, Si originated from soil forming processes can also significantly interfere with the global cycle. The Si cycle in terrestrial ecosystems is a key factor to coastal ecology, plant ecology, biogeochemistry and agro-sciences, but the high variability of different biogenic and non-biogenic Si pools remains as an obstacle to obtain accurate measurements. The traditional methods, developed to isolate diatoms in ocean sediments, only account for simple mineral corrections. In this dissertation we have adapted a novel continuous analysis method (during alkaline extraction) that uses Si-Al ratios and reactivity to differ biogenic from non-biogenic fractions. The method was originally used in marine sediments, but we have developed it to be applicable in a wide range of terrestrial, aquatic and coastal ecosystems. We first focused on soils under strong human impact in

  16. Sensitivity of modeled ozone concentrations to uncertainties in biogenic emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roselle, S.J.

    1992-06-01

    The study examines the sensitivity of regional ozone (O3) modeling to uncertainties in biogenic emissions estimates. The United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Regional Oxidant Model (ROM) was used to simulate the photochemistry of the northeastern United States for the period July 2-17, 1988. An operational model evaluation showed that ROM had a tendency to underpredict O3 when observed concentrations were above 70-80 ppb and to overpredict O3 when observed values were below this level. On average, the model underpredicted daily maximum O3 by 14 ppb. Spatial patterns of O3, however, were reproduced favorably by the model. Several simulations were performed to analyze the effects of uncertainties in biogenic emissions on predicted O3 and to study the effectiveness of two strategies of controlling anthropogenic emissions for reducing high O3 concentrations. Biogenic hydrocarbon emissions were adjusted by a factor of 3 to account for the existing range of uncertainty in these emissions. The impact of biogenic emission uncertainties on O3 predictions depended upon the availability of NOx. In some extremely NOx-limited areas, increasing the amount of biogenic emissions decreased O3 concentrations. Two control strategies were compared in the simulations: (1) reduced anthropogenic hydrocarbon emissions, and (2) reduced anthropogenic hydrocarbon and NOx emissions. The simulations showed that hydrocarbon emission controls were more beneficial to the New York City area, but that combined NOx and hydrocarbon controls were more beneficial to other areas of the Northeast. Hydrocarbon controls were more effective as biogenic hydrocarbon emissions were reduced, whereas combined NOx and hydrocarbon controls were more effective as biogenic hydrocarbon emissions were increased

  17. Geophysical monitoring of biogenic gas dynamics in a northern peatland: seasonal variability and implications for production rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comas, X.; Slater, L.; Reeve, A.; Nolan, J.

    2007-12-01

    In-situ biogenic gas dynamics and seasonal variability within a northern peatland in Maine (Caribou Bog) were investigated using a set of high resolution surface ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys. Measurements were combined with elevation rod (to monitor surface deformation) and gas flux measurements. Spatial variability in gas production was also investigated by comparing two sites with different geological and ecological attributes, and showed a striking dependence on seasonal variability. One site characterized by thick highly humified peat deposits (5-6 m), wooded heath vegetation and open pools showed large ebullition events during the summer season, emitting up to 156 g CH4 m-2 during a single event. The other site characterized by thinner less humified peat deposits (2-3 m) and shrub vegetation showed much smaller ebullition events during the same season (accounting for up to 21 g CH4 m-2). A period of biogenic gas accumulation during the fall and winter (as enhanced by the frozen surficial peat acting as a confining layer) was followed by a large FPG release after the snow/ice melt that released approximately 180 g CH4 m-2 from both sites. Gas production rates were directly estimated from the time series of GPR measurements (ranging between 0.35-1.80 g CH4 m-3 d-1 during periods of biogenic gas accumulation) and reflected strong seasonal and spatial variability. Periods of decreased atmospheric pressure showed certain correspondence with short-period increases in biogenic gas flux (including a very rapid decrease in FPG content associated with an ebullition event that released an estimated 61 g CH4 m-2 in less than 3.5 hours). These results provide insights into the spatial and seasonal variability in production and emission of biogenic gases from northern peatlands

  18. Seasonal trends of biogenic terpene emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmig, Detlev; Daly, Ryan Woodfin; Milford, Jana; Guenther, Alex

    2013-09-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from six coniferous tree species, i.e. Pinus ponderosa (Ponderosa Pine), Picea pungens (Blue Spruce), Pseudotsuga menziesii (Rocky Mountain Douglas Fir) and Pinus longaeva (Bristlecone Pine), as well as from two deciduous species, Quercus gambelii (Gamble Oak) and Betula occidentalis (Western River Birch) were studied over a full annual growing cycle. Monoterpene (MT) and sesquiterpene (SQT) emissions rates were quantified in a total of 1236 individual branch enclosure samples. MT dominated coniferous emissions, producing greater than 95% of BVOC emissions. MT and SQT demonstrated short-term emission dependence with temperature. Two oxygenated MT, 1,8-cineol and piperitone, were both light and temperature dependent. Basal emission rates (BER, normalized to 1000μmolm(-2)s(-1) and 30°C) were generally higher in spring and summer than in winter; MT seasonal BER from the coniferous trees maximized between 1.5 and 6.0μgg(-1)h(-1), while seasonal lows were near 0.1μgg(-1)h(-1). The fractional contribution of individual MT to total emissions was found to fluctuate with season. SQT BER measured from the coniferous trees ranged from emissions modeling, was not found to exhibit discernible growth season trends. A seasonal correction factor proposed by others in previous work to account for a sinusoidal shaped emission pattern was applied to the data. Varying levels of agreement were found between the data and model results for the different plant species seasonal data sets using this correction. Consequently, the analyses on this extensive data set suggest that it is not feasible to apply a universal seasonal correction factor across different vegetation species. A modeling exercise comparing two case scenarios, (1) without and (2) with consideration of the seasonal changes in emission factors illustrated large deviations when emission factors are applied for other seasons than those in which they were experimentally

  19. Comportamento do algodoeiro cultivar delta opal sob estresse hídrico com e sem aplicação de bioestimulante Cotton plant cultivar delta opal behavior under water stress with or without biostimulant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Baldo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se, com esse trabalho, avaliar o efeito do bioestimulante Stimulate®, aplicado ou não em diferentes fases do desenvolvimento do algodoeiro cv. Delta Opal, (Gossypium hirsutum L. cultivado em casa de vegetação e submetido ou não ao estresse hídrico. Foram aplicados 25, 60 e 100% do volume total de poros (VTP preenchidos com água e o Stimulate® aplicado na semente, na semente e na fase de botão floral e sem a aplicação do bioestimulante, aos 69 dias após a semeadura. A duração do estresse hídrico foi de 15, 30 e 45 dias após a aplicação do estresse hídrico. O algodoeiro cv Delta Opal não tolerou deficiência hídrica de 25% VTP iniciado na fase de botão floral, sendo observadas as menores alturas, diâmetros de colo, número de folhas, e comprometendo também a formação de estruturas reprodutivas. O bioestimulante na dose e na forma aplicada não proporcionou melhoras no desenvolvimento das plantas quando submetidas à falta de água, já em plantas submetidas ao excesso de água, houve aumento do diâmetro do colo das plantas.This work was aimed at evaluating the effect of biostimulant Stimulate® applied or not at different development stages of cotton plant cv Delta Opal, (Gossypium hirsutum L. cultivated in greenhouse, subjected or not to water stress. Applications of 25, 60 and 100% of total volume of pores (VTP filled up with water were conducted, and then Stimulate® was sprinkled over the seed and on the flower bud stage, without biostimulant application 69 days after sowing. The water stress time period was that of 15, 30 and 45 days after water stress application. The cotton plant cv Delta Opal did not tolerate hydric deficit of 25% VTP on the flower bud set off, where smaller heights as well as smaller colon diameters and flower number were observed, all of which also endanger reproductive structure formation. The use of biostimulant on the dosage and the type of application did not render any

  20. Quality properties, fatty acids, and biogenic amines profile of fresh tilapia stored in ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulawik, Piotr; Özoğul, Fatih; Glew, Robert H

    2013-07-01

    This work determines quality properties and fatty acids content of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) stored in ice for 21 d. The quality properties consist of thiobarbituic acid (TBA), total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), trimethylamine (TMA), and microbiological analysis (total viable count (TVC), total coliform, Salmonella and Staphylococcus aureus) and determination of biogenic amines content (histamine, cadaverine, putrescine, spermine, spermidine, 2-phenylethylamine, agmatine, tyramine, and ammonia). Moreover, the fat, moisture, and ash composition as well as fatty acids profile have also been analyzed. The TBA, TVB-N, and biogenic amines analysis showed rather low levels of spoilage even after 21 d of storage. The microbiological analysis, however, showed that tilapia was unsuitable for consumption after just 10 d. The fat, ash, moisture, and fatty acids profile analysis showed that tilapia is not a good source of n-3 fatty acids. The research indicated that the microbiological analysis was the best method to establish spoilage of tilapia stored in ice, of all analytical methods performed in this study. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  1. Monolithic multiscale bilayer inverse opal electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Woo; Moon, Jun Hyuk

    2015-03-12

    Multilayer structures in which the layers are both electrically and physically connected are critical to be used as high-performance electrodes for photovoltaic devices. We present the first multiscale bilayer inverse opal (IO) structures for application as electrodes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). A bilayer of a mesoscopic IO layer (70 nm pore diameter) and a top macroporous IO layer (215 nm and 250 nm pore diameters) was fabricated as the high-specific-area electrode and the light-harvesting enhancing layer, respectively. The mesoscopic IO layer exhibits a dye-adsorption density, which is approximately 4 times greater than that of the macroporous IO structure because of its small pore size. The macroporous IO layer exhibits a photonic bandgap reflection in the visible-light wavelength range. We incorporated the bilayer IO electrodes into DSCs and compared the effects of the pore sizes of the macroporous layers on the photocurrent densities of the DSCs. We observed that the bilayer IO electrode DSCs that contained a 250 nm IO layer exhibited photocurrent densities greater than those of 215 nm IO DSCs. This enhanced photocurrent density was achieved because the photonic bandgap (PBG) reflection wavelength matches the wavelength range in which the N719 dye has a small light-absorption coefficient. The fabrication of this structurally homogeneous IO bilayer allows a strong contact between the layers, and the resulting bilayer, therefore, exhibits a high photovoltaic performance. We believe that this bilayer structure provides an alternative approach to the development of optimized electrode structures for various devices.

  2. Influence of biogenic gas production on coalbed methane recovery index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Guo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In investigating the effect of biogenic gas production on the recovery of coalbed methane (CBM, coal samples spanning different ranks were applied in the microbial-functioned simulation experiments for biogenic methane production. Based on the biogenic methane yield, testing of pore structures, and the isothermal adsorption data of coals used before and after the simulation experiments, several key parameters related to the recovery of CBM, including recovery rate, gas saturation and ratio of critical desorption pressure to reservoir pressure, etc., were calculated and the corresponding variations were further analyzed. The results show that one of the significant functions of microbial communities on coal is possibly to weaken its affinity for methane gas, especially with the advance of coal ranks; and that by enhancing the pore system of coal, which can be evidenced by the increase of porosity and permeability, the samples collected from Qianqiu (Yima in Henan and Shaqu (Liulin in Shanxi coal mines all see a notable increase in the critical desorption pressure, gas saturation and recovery rate, as compared to the moderate changes of that of Guandi (Xishan in Shanxi coal sample. It is concluded that the significance of enhanced biogenic gas is not only in the increase of CBM resources and the improvement of CBM recoverability, but in serving as an engineering reference for domestic coalbed biogenic gas production.

  3. Accounting for urban biogenic fluxes in regional carbon budgets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Brady S; Wang, Jonathan A; Hutyra, Lucy R; Gately, Conor K; Getson, Jackie M; Friedl, Mark A

    2017-08-15

    Many ecosystem models incorrectly treat urban areas as devoid of vegetation and biogenic carbon (C) fluxes. We sought to improve estimates of urban biomass and biogenic C fluxes using existing, nationally available data products. We characterized biogenic influence on urban C cycling throughout Massachusetts, USA using an ecosystem model that integrates improved representation of urban vegetation, growing conditions associated with urban heat island (UHI), and altered urban phenology. Boston's biomass density is 1/4 that of rural forests, however 87% of Massachusetts' urban landscape is vegetated. Model results suggest that, kilogram-for-kilogram, urban vegetation cycles C twice as fast as rural forests. Urban vegetation releases (R E ) and absorbs (GEE) the equivalent of 11 and 14%, respectively, of anthropogenic emissions in the most urban portions of the state. While urban vegetation in Massachusetts fully sequesters anthropogenic emissions from smaller cities in the region, Boston's UHI reduces annual C storage by >20% such that vegetation offsets only 2% of anthropogenic emissions. Asynchrony between temporal patterns of biogenic and anthropogenic C fluxes further constrains the emissions mitigation potential of urban vegetation. However, neglecting to account for biogenic C fluxes in cities can impair efforts to accurately monitor, report, verify, and reduce anthropogenic emissions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Passivation of ZnO Nanowire Guests and 3D Inverse Opal Host Photoanodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Labouchere, Philippe

    2014-04-23

    A hierarchical host-guest nanostructured photoanode is reported for dye-sensitized solar cells. It is composed of ZnO nanowires grown in situ into the macropores of a 3D ZnO inverse opal structure, which acts both as a seed layer and as a conductive backbone host. Using a combination of self-assembly, hydrothermal or electrodeposition of single crystalline ZnO nanowires and TiO2 passivation, a novel photoanode with scattering capability for optimal light harvesting is fabricated. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Technologies for the utilisation of biogenic waste in the bioeconomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    A brief review has been done of technologies involved in the exploitation of biogenic wastes, in order to provide an introduction to the subject from the technological perspective. Biogenic waste materials and biomass have historically been utilised for thousands of years, but a new conversation is emerging on the role of these materials in modern bioeconomies. Due to the nature of the products and commodities now required, a modern bioeconomy is not simply a rerun of former ones. This new dialogue needs to help us understand how technologies for managing and processing biogenic wastes--both established and novel--should be deployed and integrated (or not) to meet the requirements of the sustainability, closed-loop and resource-security agendas that evidently sit behind the bioeconomy aspirations now being voiced in many countries and regions of the world. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Non-enzymatic U(VI) interactions with biogenic mackinawite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeramani, H.; Qafoku, N. P.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Murayama, M.; Hochella, M. F.

    2011-12-01

    Reductive immobilization of hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] by stimulation of dissimilatory metal and/or sulfate reducing bacteria (DMRB or DSRB) has been extensively researched as a remediation strategy for subsurface U(VI) contamination. These bacteria derive energy by reducing oxidized metals as terminal electron acceptors, often utilizing organic substrates as electron donors. Thus, when evaluating the potential for in-situ uranium remediation in heterogeneous subsurface media, it is important to understand how the presence of alternative electron acceptors such as Fe(III) and sulfate affect U(VI) remediation and the long term behavior and reactivity of reduced uranium. Iron, an abundant subsurface element, represents a substantial sink for electrons from DMRB, and the reduction of Fe(III) leads to the formation of dissolved Fe(II) or to reactive biogenic Fe(II)- and mixed Fe(II)/Fe(III)- mineral phases. Consequently, abiotic U(VI) reduction by reactive forms of biogenic Fe(II) minerals could be a potentially important process for uranium immobilization. In our study, the DMRB Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 was used to synthesize a biogenic Fe(II)-bearing sulfide mineral: mackinawite, that has been characterized by XRD, SEM, HRTEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Batch experiments involving treated biogenic mackinawite and uranium (50:1 molar ratio) were carried out at room temperature under strict anoxic conditions. Following complete removal of uranium from solution, the biogenic mackinawite was analyzed by a suite of analytical techniques including XAS, HRTEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy to determine the speciation of uranium and investigate concomitant Fe(II)-phase transformation. Determining the speciation of uranium is critical to success of a remediation strategy. The present work elucidates non-enzymatic/abiotic molecular scale redox interactions between biogenic mackinawite and uranium.

  7. Biogen to produce diagnostic tests, vaccines and ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-11

    In addition to its work on pharmaceuticals and veterinary products, Europe's largest biotechnology company, Biogen, is reported to be working on the production of ethanol from biomass. The process, based on two strains of clostridia bacteria, can convert both the cellulose and hemicellulose of agricultural wastes to ethanol. Biogen is also studying the production of basic chemicals, such as acetic acid, acetone and butane from cellulosic biomass and is looking at various types of organisms to effect low cost chemical conversions.

  8. Fermented functional foods based on probiotics and their biogenic metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Van Sinderen, Douwe

    2005-04-01

    The claimed health benefits of fermented functional foods are expressed either directly through the interaction of ingested live microorganisms, bacteria or yeast with the host (probiotic effect) or indirectly as a result of ingestion of microbial metabolites produced during the fermentation process (biogenic effect). Although still far from fully understood, several probiotic mechanisms of action have been proposed, including competitive exclusion, competition for nutrients and/or stimulation of an immune response. The biogenic properties of fermented functional foods result from the microbial production of bioactive metabolites such as certain vitamins, bioactive peptides, organic acids or fatty acids during fermentation.

  9. Biomass burning - Combustion emissions, satellite imagery, and biogenic emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joel S.; Cofer, Wesley R., III; Winstead, Edward L.; Rhinehart, Robert P.; Cahoon, Donald R., Jr.; Sebacher, Daniel I.; Sebacher, Shirley; Stocks, Brian J.

    1991-01-01

    After detailing a technique for the estimation of the instantaneous emission of trace gases produced by biomass burning, using satellite imagery, attention is given to the recent discovery that burning results in significant enhancement of biogenic emissions of N2O, NO, and CH4. Biomass burning accordingly has an immediate and long-term impact on the production of atmospheric trace gases. It is presently demonstrated that satellite imagery of fires may be used to estimate combustion emissions, and could be used to estimate long-term postburn biogenic emission of trace gases to the atmosphere.

  10. Can citizen science produce good science? Testing the OPAL Air Survey methodology, using lichens as indicators of nitrogenous pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tregidgo, Daniel J.; West, Sarah E.; Ashmore, Mike R.

    2013-01-01

    Citizen science is having increasing influence on environmental monitoring as its advantages are becoming recognised. However methodologies are often simplified to make them accessible to citizen scientists. We tested whether a recent citizen science survey (the OPAL Air Survey) could detect trends in lichen community composition over transects away from roads. We hypothesised that the abundance of nitrophilic lichens would decrease with distance from the road, while that of nitrophobic lichens would increase. The hypothesised changes were detected along strong pollution gradients, but not where the road source was relatively weak, or background pollution relatively high. We conclude that the simplified OPAL methodology can detect large contrasts in nitrogenous pollution, but it may not be able to detect more subtle changes in pollution exposure. Similar studies are needed in conjunction with the ever-growing body of citizen science work to ensure that the limitations of these methods are fully understood. -- Highlights: •We investigated the validity of a simplified citizen science methodology. •Lichen abundance data were used to indicate nitrogenous air pollution. •Significant changes were detected beside busy roads with low background pollution. •The methodology detected major, but not subtle, contrasts in pollution. •Sensitivity of citizen science methods to environmental change must be evaluated. -- A simplified lichen biomonitoring method used for citizen science can detect the impact of nitrogenous air pollution from local roads

  11. Current-induced suppression of superconductivity in a three-dimensional lattice of weakly linked indium grains in opal

    CERN Document Server

    Romanov, S G

    2000-01-01

    The current-voltage characteristics of the metal-dielectric composite have been investigated in the range of the resistive state near the superconducting transition temperature T/sub c/. The composite structure can be represented as a face-centered cubic lattice, which involves a large number of weakly linked indium nanograins and is stabilized in structural cavities of opal. The response to microwave radiation is used to characterize the resistive state of the composite. The comparative investigation into the current-voltage characteristics and the response of the composite to microwave radiation makes it possible to conclude that the weak links are superconducting in the region of the critical current (I/sub c/) of the composite as a whole. The transition of weak links to the resistive state occurs at currents immediately preceding the transition of the composite from the resistive state to the ohmic state. The model of the resistivity of the indium-opal composite is proposed on the basis of morphological e...

  12. 76 FR 80368 - Notification of Teleconferences of the Science Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... Office announces two teleconferences of the SAB Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel to review EPA's draft Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources (September 2011). DATES: The...

  13. Biogenic volatile organic compounds - small is beautiful

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, S. M.; Asensio, D.; Li, Q.; Penuelas, J.

    2012-12-01

    While canopy and regional scale flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs) are essential to obtain an integrated picture of total compound reaching the atmosphere, many fascinating and important emission details are waiting to be discovered at smaller scales, in different ecological and functional compartments. We concentrate on bVOCs below ground to soil surfaces are small, bVOCs are exuded by roots of some plant species, and can be extracted from decaying litter. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the rhizosphere provide a specialised carbon source for micro-organisms, helping to define the micro-organism community structure, and impacting on nutrient cycles which are partly controlled by microorganisms. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the soil system could also affect the aboveground structure of ecosystems because of their role in plant defence strategies and as mediating chemicals in allelopathy. A gradient of monoterpene concentration was found in soil around Pinus sylvestris and Pinus halepensis, decreasing with distance from the tree. Some compounds (α-pinene, sabinene, humulene and caryophyllene) in mineral soil were linearly correlated with the total amount of each compound in the overlying litter, indicating that litter might be the dominant source of these compounds. However, α-pinene did not fall within the correlation, indicating a source other than litter, probably root exudates. We also show that rhizosphere bVOCs can be a carbon source for soil microbes. In a horizontal gradient from Populus tremula trees, microbes closest to the tree trunk were better enzymatically equipped to metabolise labeled monoterpene substrate. Monoterpenes can also increase the degradation rate in soil of the persistant organic pollutants, likely acting as analogues for the cometabo-lism of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) Flowers of a ginger species (Alpinia kwangsiensis) and a fig species (Ficus hispida) showed different bVOC signals pre- and

  14. Biogenic gases in tropical floodplain river

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Victória Ramos Ballester

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the distribution of biogenic gases in the floodplain of the Mogi-Guaçu River (São Paulo, Brazil enabled the establishment of a "redox hierarchy", in which the main channel was the most oxidizing environment, followed by Diogo Lake, with Infernão Lake having the most reducing conditions of the subsystems evaluated. Diogo Lake exported about 853.4 g C.m-2.year-1, of which, 14.6% was generated from methanogenesis and 36.7% by aerobic respiration. For Infernão Lake, these values were 2016 g C.m-2.year-1, 1.8 % and 41.5 %, respectively. Carbon export by these systems was predominantly in the form of CO2, which was responsible for the release of 728.78 g C.m-2.year-1 at Diogo Lake and 1979.72 g C.m-2. year-1 at Infernão Lake. Such patterns may result from the nature of the hydrological conditions, the action of the hydroperiod, and morphological characteristics of the environment.A análise da distribuição de gases biogênicos na planície de inundação do Rio Mogi Guaçu (São Paulo, Brasil possibilitou o estabelecimento de um gradiente redox para os sistemas aquáticos avaliados, em que o canal principal do rio apresentou-se como o ambiente mais oxidado, seguido da Lagoa do Diogo, e a Lagoa do Infernão apresentando as condições mais redutoras entre os ambientes em questão. A Lagoa do Diogo exporta um total de 853,4 g C.m-2.ano-1, do qual 14,6% é produzido pela metanogênese e 36,7% pela respiração aeróbia. Para a Lagoa do Infernão estes valores foram respectivamente de 2.016 g C.m-2.ano-1, 1,8% e de 41,5%. A exportação de carbono por estes sistemas é realizada, predominantemente na forma de CO2, nos valores de 728,78 g C.m-2.ano-1 para a Lagoa do Diogo e 1.979,72 g C.m-2.ano-1 para a Lagoa do Infernão. Estes padrões parecem estar relacionados com a natureza das condições hidrológicas, com a ação do hidroperíodo e com as características morfológicas do ambiente.

  15. Magnetic Dinner Salads: The Role of Biogenic Magnetite in Cryopreservation for Common Food Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, T. M.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Kobayashi, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Biogenically-precipitated magnetite has been found in organisms ranging from Bacteria, single-celled protists, and many of the animal phyla, where its major function is navigation and magnetoreception. To date there is but a single report of biogenic magnetite in plants (essentially, magnetoferritin), and that is in common grass (Festuca species, from Gajdardziska-Josifovska et. al. doi:10.1127/0935-1221/2001/0013/0863). Recent developments in cryopreservation suggest that ~ 1 mT, ~ 10 Hz oscillating magnetic fields can drastically reduce ice nucleation during freezing, promote supercooling, and minimize cellular damage in living tissues (e.g., Kaku et al., doi: 10.1016/j.cryobiol.2012.02.001). Kobayashi & Kirschvink (2014, doi:10.1016/j.cryobiol.2013.12.002) suggest that biogenic magnetite crystals could be the nucleating site for damaging ice crystals, and that they would be driven magneto-mechanically to rotate in those oscillating fields which could inhibit the ice crystal nucleation process. This prompted our investigation into the magnetite content of ordinary fruit and vegetable food products, as knowledge of the natural levels of biogenic magnetite in the human food supply could guide the selection of which foods might work for this type of cryopreservation. Our study involved a range of common foods including avocados, bananas, garlic, and apples. Samples were prepared in a clean lab environment kept free of contaminant particles, and subjected to a variety of standard rock-magnetic tests including IRM and ARM acquisition, and the corresponding Af demagnetization, on a standard 2G™ SRM. Results are consistent with moderately interacting single-domain magnetite (see figure), with moderate inter-particle interaction effects. Typical magnetite concentrations in these samples are in the range of .1 to 1 ng/g for room temperature samples, increasing to the range of 1-10 ng/g when measured frozen (to inhibit thermal rotation of small particles and clumps). If

  16. Use of biogenic sulfide for ZnS precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, G.; Veeken, A.; Weijma, J.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2006-01-01

    A 600 ml continuously stirred tank reactor was used to assess the performance of a zinc sulfide precipitation process using a biogenic sulfide solution (the effluent of a sulfate-reducing bioreactor) as sulfide source. In all experiments, a proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm was used to

  17. Azo dye decolorization assisted by chemical and biogenic sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prato-Garcia, Dorian [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Cervantes, Francisco J. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Camino a la Presa de San José 2055, San Luis Potosí 78216 (Mexico); Buitrón, Germán, E-mail: gbuitronm@ii.unam.mx [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Azo dyes were reduced efficiently by chemical and biogenic sulfide. ► Biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide. ► There was no competition between dyes and sulfate for reducing equivalents. ► Aromatic amines barely affected the sulfate-reducing process. -- Abstract: The effectiveness of chemical and biogenic sulfide in decolorizing three sulfonated azo dyes and the robustness of a sulfate-reducing process for simultaneous decolorization and sulfate removal were evaluated. The results demonstrated that decolorization of azo dyes assisted by chemical sulfide and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) was effective. In the absence of AQDS, biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide for decolorizing the azo dyes. The performance of sulfate-reducing bacteria in attached-growth sequencing batch reactors suggested the absence of competition between the studied azo dyes and the sulfate-reducing process for the reducing equivalents. Additionally, the presence of chemical reduction by-products had an almost negligible effect on the sulfate removal rate, which was nearly constant (94%) after azo dye injection.

  18. Biogenic ZnO nanoparticles synthesized using L. aculeata leaf

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 1. Biogenic ZnO nanoparticles synthesized using L. aculeata leaf extract and their antifungal activity against plant fungal pathogens. S Narendhran Rajeshwari Sivaraj. Volume 39 Issue 1 February 2016 pp 1- ...

  19. Conditions allowing the formation of biogenic amines in cheese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, H.M.L.J.

    1988-01-01

    A study was undertaken to reveal the conditions that allow the formation of biogenic amines in cheese.

    The starters most commonly used in the Dutch cheese industry do not have decarboxylative properties. Only if the milk or curd is contaminated with non-starter bacteria, amine

  20. incidence of biogenic amines in foods implications for the gambia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temechegn

    Health-wise biogenic amines play positive roles and ... BAs include, fish, fish products, meat products, eggs, cheeses, fermented vegetables, soybean ... The amount of. BAs present in foods, fruits and vegetables provides an index for measuring food quality [3]. In the tropics fish are caught in temperatures more than 200C.

  1. Biogenic volatile compounds of activated sludge and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heavy metals pollution is nowadays one of the most important environmental concerns. This paper illustrates the employment of the biogenic volatile compounds generated during the aerobic growth of activated sludge on raw domestic wastewater for heavy metals removal. Most of the tested metals even as individual or ...

  2. Biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from forests in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindfors, V.; Laurila, T.

    2000-01-01

    We present model estimates of biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from the forests in Finland. The emissions were calculated for the years 1995-1997 using the measured isoprene and monoterpene emission factors of boreal tree species together with detailed satellite land cover information and meteorological data. The three-year average emission is 319 kilotonnes per annum, which is significantly higher than the estimated annual anthropogenic VOC emissions of 193 kilotonnes. The biogenic emissions of the Finnish forests are dominated by monoterpenes, which contribute approximately 45% of the annual total. The main isoprene emitter is the Norway spruce (Picea abies) due to its high foliar biomass density. Compared to the monoterpenes, however, the total isoprene emissions are very low, contributing only about 7% of the annual forest VOC emissions. The isoprene emissions are more sensitive to the meteorological conditions than the monoterpene emissions, but the progress of the thermal growing season is clearly reflected in all biogenic emission fluxes. The biogenic emission densities in northern Finland are approximately half of the emissions in the southern parts of the country. (orig.)

  3. The secondary biogenic radiation of gamma-irradiated human blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzin, A.M.; Surkenova, G.N.; Budagovskij, A.V.; Gudi, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    The sample of blood freshly taken from healthy men were gamma-irradiated with a dose of 10 Gy. It was shown that after the treatment the blood gained the capacity to emit secondary biogenic radiation. Emission lasted for some hours, passed through quartz-glass curette and was revealed by stimulating influence on biological detector (sprouting seeds)

  4. Mineralogical and Biogenic Composition of the Zanzibar Channel Sediments, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaghude, Y. W.; Wannäs, K. O.

    2000-10-01

    Sediments from the Zanzibar Channel have been analysed for mineralogical and biogenic composition. The main objective of the study was to describe the depositional environment of the sediments based on these parameters. The study was also conducted to give an insight into sediment provenance of the sediments. Quartz, feldspar (both microcline and plagioclase) and hornblende are the main mineralogical components, while zircon, muscovite, biotite and augite occur as accessory minerals. The quartz grains are generally angular to sub-angular and highly strained, indicative of immature sediments, probably derived from highly metamorphosed rocks. The presence of hornblende also supports the conclusion that the sediments are immature. A possible source is the metamorphic rocks of the Mozambique belt, located about 25-50 km from the coastline. Benthic foraminifera are the dominant biogenic constituents. Other common biogenic constituents are molluscs (pelecypods and gastropods) and corals. Bryozoans and ostracods are relatively less common, while sea urchins are accessory biogenic components. The composition and abundance of these biogenic components and morphological, sedimentological and mineralogical data permit construction of a simple model which distinguishes between three bio-physiographic settings in the Zanzibar Channel using depth contours: (1) the coastal zone (0-10 m depth); (2) the reef platform/patch reefs zone (10-20 m depth) and (3) the central channel zone (>20 cm depth). In the coastal zone, the sediments are dominated by fine sand, sized with a very prominent fine sand mode. The proportion of benthic foraminifera is lower than in the other two zones (25%). Two lithogenic mineral components (quartz and feldspar) occur in significant proportions. In the reef platform/patch reefs zone, the sediments are coarse to medium sand sized with no distinct mode. the proportion of benthic foraminifera is highest (80-85%) there, and so is the biogenic:quartz ratio

  5. Biogenic amines and mycotoxins concentrations in baled silage from organic and conventional farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jovaišienė

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of the current study was to investigate biogenic amines and mycotoxins concentrations in baled silage (mainly Poaceae family grasses prepared in organic and conventional farms and to relate these parameters to fermentative parameters. The mean dry matter (DM content was 364.10±93.31 and 424.70±95.93g/kg in the silage from organic and conventional farms respectively. The silage samples from organic farms had 17.00% higher (P≤ 0.05 tyramine (TY than the silage from conventional farms. Conventional farm samples were characterized by 46.00% higher histamine (HIS (P≤ 0.05, 9.80% higher putrescine (PUT (P≤ 0.05, 17.30% higher cadaverine (CAD (P≤ 0.05. Aflatoxins (AFL (total and zearalenone (ZEN, T-2/HT-2 concentrations were higher respectively 16.00% (P≤ 0.05 and 13.40% (P≤ 0.05, 1.80% (P≤ 0.05 in the silage prepared in organic farms. Deoxynivalenol (DON concentration was higher 42.40% (P≤ 0.05 in silage from conventional farms. Volatile fatty acids (VFA, lactic acid, ethanol, pH and ammonia nitrogen showed that the silage samples from organic and conventional farms were of good quality. Our study suggests differences in biogenic amine formation or mycotoxins content in silage from organic and conventional farming, but, overall, the measured values are too low to be relevant for animal health. Furthermore, these differences might as well be due to the difference in dry matter content and plant maturity between the organic and conventional silage samples.

  6. Biogenic Calcium Phosphate Transformation in Soils over Millennium Time Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, S.; Neves, E; Solomon, D; Liang, B; Lehmann, J

    2009-01-01

    Changes in bioavailability of phosphorus (P) during pedogenesis and ecosystem development have been shown for geogenic calcium phosphate (Ca-P). However, very little is known about long-term changes of biogenic Ca-P in soil. Long-term transformation characteristics of biogenic Ca-P were examined using anthropogenic soils along a chronosequence from centennial to millennial time scales. Phosphorus fractionation of Anthrosols resulted in overall consistency with the Walker and Syers model of geogenic Ca-P transformation during pedogenesis. The biogenic Ca-P (e.g., animal and fish bones) disappeared to 3% of total P within the first ca. 2,000 years of soil development. This change concurred with increases in P adsorbed on metal-oxides surfaces, organic P, and occluded P at different pedogenic time. Phosphorus K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed that the crystalline and therefore thermodynamically most stable biogenic Ca-P was transformed into more soluble forms of Ca-P over time. While crystalline hydroxyapatite (34% of total P) dominated Ca-P species after about 600-1,000 years, {Beta}-tricalcium phosphate increased to 16% of total P after 900-1,100 years, after which both Ca-P species disappeared. Iron-associated P was observable concurrently with Ca-P disappearance. Soluble P and organic P determined by XANES maintained relatively constant (58-65%) across the time scale studied. Conclusions - Disappearance of crystalline biogenic Ca-P on a time scale of a few thousand years appears to be ten times faster than that of geogenic Ca-P.

  7. Formation of Nano-crystalline Todorokite from Biogenic Mn Oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, X.; Zhu, M; Ginder-Vogel, M; Ni, C; Parikh, S; Sparks, D

    2010-01-01

    Todorokite, as one of three main Mn oxide phases present in oceanic Mn nodules and an active MnO{sub 6} octahedral molecular sieve (OMS), has garnered much interest; however, its formation pathway in natural systems is not fully understood. Todorokite is widely considered to form from layer structured Mn oxides with hexagonal symmetry, such as vernadite ({delta}-MnO{sub 2}), which are generally of biogenic origin. However, this geochemical process has not been documented in the environment or demonstrated in the laboratory, except for precursor phases with triclinic symmetry. Here we report on the formation of a nanoscale, todorokite-like phase from biogenic Mn oxides produced by the freshwater bacterium Pseudomonas putida strain GB-1. At long- and short-range structural scales biogenic Mn oxides were transformed to a todorokite-like phase at atmospheric pressure through refluxing. Topotactic transformation was observed during the transformation. Furthermore, the todorokite-like phases formed via refluxing had thin layers along the c* axis and a lack of c* periodicity, making the basal plane undetectable with X-ray diffraction reflection. The proposed pathway of the todorokite-like phase formation is proposed as: hexagonal biogenic Mn oxide {yields} 10-{angstrom} triclinic phyllomanganate {yields} todorokite. These observations provide evidence supporting the possible bio-related origin of natural todorokites and provide important clues for understanding the transformation of biogenic Mn oxides to other Mn oxides in the environment. Additionally this method may be a viable biosynthesis route for porous, nano-crystalline OMS materials for use in practical applications.

  8. The relationship between Al and Si in biogenic silica as determined by PIXE and XAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, L.; Gehlen, M.; Flank, A.-M.; Bennekom, A.J. van; Beusekom, J.E.E. van

    2002-01-01

    Biogenic silica, one of the major constituents of marine sediments, is a potentially powerful paleoceanographic tool, revealing information on past productivity. Interpreting the sedimentary records of the biogenic silica requires, however, an understanding of its preservation. Dissolution of biogenic silica is controlled by the presence of trace elements such as Al. The work in this paper focuses on the association of Al and Si in biogenic silica. The composition and the atomic structure of cultured and natural diatoms were determined by using PIXE and XAS techniques. This study provides the first evidence for a structural association of Al and Si in biogenic silica

  9. Coupling of Ag Nanoparticle with Inverse Opal Photonic Crystals as a Novel Strategy for Upconversion Emission Enhancement of NaYF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Bo; Yang, Zhengwen; Wang, Yida; Li, Jun; Yang, Jianzhi; Qiu, Jianbei; Song, Zhiguo

    2015-11-18

    Rare-earth-ion-doped upconversion (UC) nanoparticles have generated considerable interest because of their potential application in solar cells, biological labeling, therapeutics, and imaging. However, the applications of UC nanoparticles were still limited because of their low emission efficiency. Photonic crystals and noble metal nanoparticles are applied extensively to enhance the UC emission of rare earth ions. In the present work, a novel substrate consisting of inverse opal photonic crystals and Ag nanoparticles was prepared by the template-assisted method, which was used to enhance the UC emission of NaYF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) nanoparticles. The red or green UC emissions of NaYF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) nanoparticles were selectively enhanced on the inverse opal substrates because of the Bragg reflection of the photonic band gap. Additionally, the UC emission enhancement of NaYF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) nanoparticles induced by the coupling of metal nanoparticle plasmons and photonic crystal effects was realized on the Ag nanoparticles included in the inverse opal substrate. The present results demonstrated that coupling of Ag nanoparticle with inverse opal photonic crystals provides a useful strategy to enhance UC emission of rare-earth-ion-doped nanoparticles.

  10. Structural and magnetic properties of inverse opal photonic crystals studied by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and small-angle neutron scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigoriev, S.V.; Napolskii, K.S.; Grigoryeva, N.A.; Vasilieva, A.V.; Mistonov, A.A.; Chernyshov, D.Y.; Petukhov, A.V.; Belov, D.V.; Eliseev, A.A.; Lukashin, A.V.; Tretyakov, Y.D.; Sinitskii, A.S.; Eckerlebe, H.

    2009-01-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of nickel inverse opal photonic crystal have been studied by complementary experimental techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, wide-angle and small-angle diffraction of synchrotron radiation, and polarized neutrons. The sample was fabricated by

  11. Potential of biogenic methane for pilot-scale fermentation ex situ with lump anthracite and the changes of methanogenic consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiuqing; Chen, Yanmei; Wu, Ruiwei; Nie, Zhiqiang; Han, Zuoying; Tan, Kaili; Chen, Linyong

    2018-04-01

    Pilot-scale fermentation is one of the important processes for achieving industrialization of biogenic coalbed methane (CBM), although the mechanism of biogenic CBM remains unknown. In this study, 16 samples of formation water from CBM production wells were collected and enriched for methane production, and the methane content was between 3.1 and 21.4%. The formation water of maximum methane production was used as inoculum source for pilot-scale fermentation. The maximum methane yield of the pilot-scale fermentation with lump anthracite amendment reached 13.66 μmol CH 4 /mL, suggesting that indigenous microorganisms from formation water degraded coal to produce methane. Illumina high-throughput sequencing analysis revealed that the bacterial and archaeal communities in the formation water sample differed greatly from the methanogic water enrichment culture. The hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanocalculus dominated the formation water. Acetoclastic methanogens, from the order Methanosarcinales, dominated coal bioconversion. Thus, the biogenic methanogenic pathway ex situ cannot be simply identified according to methanogenic archaea in the original inoculum. Importantly, this study was the first time to successfully simulate methanogenesis in large-capacity fermentors (160 L) with lump anthracite amendment, and the result was also a realistic case for methane generation in pilot-scale ex situ.

  12. LEP1 measurement of heavy quark forward-backward asymmetries with Opal detector; Mesure de l`asymetrie avant-arriere des quarks lourds a LEP1 avec le detecteur Opal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafoux, H.

    1996-04-30

    Using all data collected by OPAL during the first phase of LEP operation, called LEP1, we have measured the b and c quark forward-backward asymmetries on and around the Z{sup 0} peak. The measurement, which is based on prompt leptons produced in semileptonic decays of heavy quarks, has been optimized using artificial neural networks whenever necessary, that is whenever the problem to solve implied taking into account simultaneously a large number of parameters. Our results are compatible with other LEP measurements and with the Standard Model predictions for a top quark of 174{+-}31 GeV/c{open_square} and a Higgs boson mass between 60 and 1000 GeV/c{open_square}. (author). 159 refs., 88 figs., 37 tabs.

  13. Comparative analysis of the in vitro cytotoxicity of the dietary biogenic amines tyramine and histamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Daniel M; del Rio, Beatriz; Redruello, Begoña; Ladero, Victor; Martin, M Cruz; Fernandez, Maria; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2016-04-15

    Tyramine and histamine, the most toxic biogenic amines (BA), are often found in high concentrations in certain foods. Prompted by the limited knowledge of BA toxicity, and increasing awareness of the risks associated with high intakes of dietary BA, the in vitro cytotoxicity of tyramine and histamine was investigated. Tyramine and histamine were toxic for HT29 intestinal cell cultures at concentrations commonly found in BA-rich food, as determined by real-time cell analysis. Surprisingly, tyramine had a stronger and more rapid cytotoxic effect than histamine. Their mode of action was also different, while tyramine caused cell necrosis, histamine induced apoptosis. To avoid health risks, the BA content of foods should be reduced and legal limits established for tyramine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Study of prompt photon and neutral pion production in photon-photon scattering with the OPAL experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lillich, Joachim

    2003-01-01

    For the first time at LEP the production of prompt photons is studied in the collisions of quasi-real photons using the OPAL data taken at e+e- centre-of mass energies between 183 GeV and 209 GeV. The total inclusive production cross-section for isolated prompt photons in the kinematic range of transverse momentum > 3.0 GeV and the absolut value of pseudorapidity <1 is determined to be (0.32 +- 0.04 (stat) +- 0.04 (sys)) pb. Differential cross-sections are compared to the predictions of a next-to-leading-order (NLO) calculation. In the second part of this thesis inclusive differential neutral pion cross-sections in photon photon collisons are measured. This measurement is an important test of QCD. In addition this process is the main background for prompt photons.

  15. Search for Dirac Magnetic Monopoles in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions with the OPAL Detector at LEP2

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K.W.; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, R.M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Cozzi, M.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.M.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, M.; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krasznahorkay Jr., A.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, P.; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, N.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D.E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, M.; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, D.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2008-01-01

    This letter describes a direct search for pair produced magnetic monopoles in e+e- collisions. The analysis is based on 62.7 pb^-1 of data collected with the OPAL detector at an average centre-of-mass energy of sqrt(s)= 206.3GeV. The monopole signal was assumed to be characterized by two back-to-back particles with an anomalously high ionization energy loss de/dx in the tracking chambers. No evidence for production of monopoles was observed. Upper limits were obtained on the magnetic monopole pair-production cross-section (sigma) in the mass range 45 GeV/c^2

  16. Silver nanoparticle deposition on inverse opal SiO2 films embedded in protective polypropylene micropits for SERS applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammosova, Lena; Ankudze, Bright; Philip, Anish; Jiang, Yu; Pakkanen, Tuula T.; Pakkanen, Tapani A.

    2018-01-01

    Common methods to fabricate surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates with controlled micro-nanohierarchy are often complex and expensive. In this study, we demonstrate a simple and cost effective method to fabricate SERS substrates with complex geometries. Microworking robot structuration is used to pattern a polypropylene (PP) substrate with micropits, facilitating protective microenvironment for brittle SiO2 inverse opal (IO) structure. Hierarchical SiO2 IO patterns were obtained using polystyrene (PS) spheres as a sacrificial template, and were selectively embedded into the hydrophilized PP micropits. The same microworking robot technique was subsequently used to deposit silver nanoparticle ink into the SiO2 IO cavities. The fabricated multi-level micro-nanohierarchy surface was studied to enhance Raman scattering of the 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) analyte molecule. The results show that the SERS performance of the micro-nanohierarchical substrate increases significantly the Raman scattering intensity compared to substrates with structured 2D surface geometries.

  17. Modeling Global Biogenic Emission of Isoprene: Exploration of Model Drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Susan E.; Potter, Christopher S.; Coughlan, Joseph C.; Klooster, Steven A.; Lerdau, Manuel T.; Chatfield, Robert B.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Vegetation provides the major source of isoprene emission to the atmosphere. We present a modeling approach to estimate global biogenic isoprene emission. The isoprene flux model is linked to a process-based computer simulation model of biogenic trace-gas fluxes that operates on scales that link regional and global data sets and ecosystem nutrient transformations Isoprene emission estimates are determined from estimates of ecosystem specific biomass, emission factors, and algorithms based on light and temperature. Our approach differs from an existing modeling framework by including the process-based global model for terrestrial ecosystem production, satellite derived ecosystem classification, and isoprene emission measurements from a tropical deciduous forest. We explore the sensitivity of model estimates to input parameters. The resulting emission products from the global 1 degree x 1 degree coverage provided by the satellite datasets and the process model allow flux estimations across large spatial scales and enable direct linkage to atmospheric models of trace-gas transport and transformation.

  18. Biomass burning: Combustion emissions, satellite imagery, and biogenic emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, J.S.; Cofer, W.R III; Rhinehart, R.P.; Cahoon, D.R. J.; Winstead, E.L.; Sebacher, S.; Sebacher, D.I.; Stocks, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    This chapter deals with two different, but related, aspects of biomass burning. The first part of the chapter deals with a technique to estimate the instantaneous emissions of trace gases produced by biomass burning using satellite imagery. The second part of the chapter concerns the recent discovery that burning results in significantly enhanced biogenic emissions of N 2 O, NO, and CH 4 . Hence, biomass burning has both an immediate and long-term impact on the production of trace gases to the atmosphere. The objective of this research is to better assess and quantify the role of this research is to better assess and quantify the role and impact of biomass as a driver for global change. It will be demonstrated that satellite imagery of fires may be used to estimate combustion emissions and may in the future be used to estimate the long-term postburn biogenic emissions of trace gases to the atmosphere

  19. BAECC Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petäjä, Tuukka [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Moisseev, Dmitri [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Sinclair, Victoria [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); O' Connor, Ewan J. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland); Manninen, Antti J. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Levula, Janne [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Väänänen, Riikka [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Heikkinen, Liine [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Äijälä, Mikko [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Aalto, Juho [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Bäck, Jaana [University of Helsinki, Finland

    2015-11-01

    Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC)”, featured the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s 2nd Mobile Facility (AMF2) in Hyytiälä, Finland. It operated for an 8-month intensive measurement campaign from February to September 2014. The main research goal was to understand the role of biogenic aerosols in cloud formation. One of the reasons to perform BAECC study in Hyytiälä was the fact that it hosts SMEAR-II (Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations), which is one of the world’s most comprehensive surface in-situ observation sites in a boreal forest environment. The station has been measuring atmospheric aerosols, biogenic emissions and an extensive suite of parameters relevant to atmosphere-biosphere interactions continuously since 1996. The BAECC enables combining vertical profiles from AMF2 with surface-based in-situ SMEAR-II observations and allows the processes at the surface to be directly related to processes occurring throughout the entire tropospheric column. With the inclusion of extensive surface precipitation measurements, and intensive observation periods involving aircraft flights and novel radiosonde launches, the complementary observations of AMF2 and SMEAR-II provide a unique opportunity for investigating aerosol-cloud interactions, and cloud-to-precipitation processes. The BAECC dataset will initiate new opportunities for evaluating and improving models of aerosol sources and transport, cloud microphysical processes, and boundary-layer structures.

  20. Grape yield to soil N-NO3- ratio can explain the different levels of biogenic amines in wine from two vineyards in the AOC Rioja (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Álvarez, Eva Pilar; Garde-Cerdán, Teresa; Santamaría, Pilar; García-Escudero, Enrique; Peregrina, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    Plant N status may affect the grape amino acid concentration, which act as precursors in the formation of biogenic amines in wine. Biogenic amines have negative effects on human health and so they reduce the wine quality. The objective of this study was to analyze, at bloom (when the vine N demand peaks) if both the available soil N and the N concentration in the leaf could explain the amino acid concentration in the must as well as the biogenic amines in wines from AOC Rioja. Two plots with cv. Tempranillo (Vitis vinifera L.) vines grafted on R-110 rootstock were chosen: "La Grajera" (2,998 plants ha-1) and "Nájera" (2,849 plants ha-1), both plots with a traditional soil tillage management system and classified according to the American Soil Taxonomy as Typic Haloxerepts and Oxyaquic Xerorthent, respectively. Both soils had a pH higher than 7, a silty loam texture and organic matter values lower than 2%. The climatic conditions were described as semiarid Mediterranean according to the UNESCO aridity index. In each vineyard, three non-adjacent experimental plots with 3 rows of 30 vines each, were set out. No fertilizer was applied during the project. Each plot was sampled in 2009, 2010 and 2011 seasons at bloom, analyzing the available soil N-NO3- at 0-15 and 15-45 cm depth and expressing the results in kg ha-1 by means of the bulk density of soil and the coarse elements content. Also at bloom, 30 leaves per experimental plot were collected and their N concentration was analyzed. At harvest, 200 berries were taken from each plot and the amino acid content in the musts was determined by HPLC. In addition, 100 kg of grapes from each plot were taken in order to elaborate wine according to the AOC Rioja common winemaking practices. When the winemaking process was finished, the concentration of biogenic amines in the wine (histamine, methylamine, ethylamine, tyramine, putrescine, cadeverine, phenylethylamine and isoamylamine) was determined by HPLC. Our results showed

  1. Time Resolved Measurements of Primary Biogenic Aerosol Particles in Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollny, A. G.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-04-01

    Biogenic aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and they influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere, climate, and public health. They play an important role in the spread of biological organisms and reproductive materials, and they can cause or enhance human, animal, and plant diseases. Moreover, they influence the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing radiation, and they can initiate the formation of clouds and precipitation as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. The composition, abundance, and origin of biogenic aerosol particles and components are, however, still not well understood and poorly quantified. Prominent examples of primary biogenic aerosol particles, which are directly emitted from the biosphere to the atmosphere, are pollen, bacteria, fungal spores, viruses, and fragments of animals and plants. During the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08) a large number of aerosol and gas-phase measurements were taken on a remote site close to Manaus, Brazil, during a period of five weeks in February and March 2008. This presented study is focused on data from an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS, TSI inc.) that has been deployed for the first time in Amazonia. In this instrument, particle counting and aerodynamic sizing over the range of 0.5-20 µm are complemented by the measurement of UV fluorescence at 355 nm (excitation) and 420-575 nm (emission), respectively. Fluorescence at these wavelengths is characteristic for reduced pyridine nucleotides (e.g., NAD(P)H) and for riboflavin, which are specific for living cells. Thus particles exhibiting fluorescence signals can be regarded as "viable aerosols" or "fluorescent bioparticles" (FBAP), and their concentration can be considered as lower limit for the actual abundance of primary biogenic aerosol particles. Data from the UVAPS were averaged over 5 minute time intervals. The presence of bioparticles in the observed size range has been

  2. Crystallization of biogenic hydrous amorphous silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyono, A.; Yokooji, M.; Chiba, T.; Tamura, T.; Tuji, A.

    2017-12-01

    Diatom, Nitzschia cf. frustulum, collected from Lake Yogo, Siga prefecture, Japan was cultured in laboratory. Organic components of the diatom cell were removed by washing with acetone and sodium hypochlorite. The remaining frustules were studied by SEM-EDX, FTIR spectroscopy, and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The results showed that the spindle-shaped morphology of diatom frustule was composed of hydrous amorphous silica. Pressure induced phase transformation of the diatom frustule was investigated by in situ Raman spectroscopic analysis. With exposure to 0.3 GPa at 100 oC, Raman band corresponding to quartz occurred at ν = 465 cm-1. In addition, Raman bands known as a characteristic Raman pattern of moganite was also observed at 501 cm-1. From the integral ratio of Raman bands, the moganite content in the probed area was estimated to be approximately 50 wt%. With the pressure and temperature effect, the initial morphology of diatom frustule was completely lost and totally changed to a characteristic spherical particle with a diameter of about 2 mm. With keeping the compression of 5.7 GPa at 100 oC, a Raman band assignable to coesite appeared at 538 cm-1. That is, with the compression and heating, the hydrous amorphous silica can be readily crystallized into quartz, moganite, and coesite. The first-principles calculations revealed that a disiloxane molecule stabilized in a trans configuration is twisted 60o and changed into the cis configuration with a close approach of water molecule. It is therefore a reasonable assumption that during crystallization of hydrous amorphous silica, the Si-O-Si bridging unit with the cis configuration would survive as a structural defect and then crystallized into moganite by keeping the geometry. This hypothesis is adaptable to the phase transformation from hydrous amorphous silica to coesite as well, because coesite has the four-membered rings and easily formed from the hydrous amorphous silica under high pressure and high

  3. 40K in the Black Sea: a proxy to estimate biogenic sedimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulin, S.B.; Gulina, L.V.; Sidorov, I.G.; Proskurnin, V.Yu.; Duka, M.S.; Moseichenko, I.N.; Rodina, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    An approach to estimate the rate of biogenic sedimentation in the Black Sea using the naturally occurring radionuclide 40 K has been considered. It allows assessment of the contribution of suspended matter of biological origin to the overall sediment accumulation in the Black Sea coastal, shelf and deep-water areas. Based upon this method, a relationship between the biogenic fraction of the seabed sediments and the water depth has been established with a view to differentiating the contributions of allochthonous and autochthonous suspended matter to the sedimentation rate. Overall, 40 K can be considered as an easily applicable proxy to assess sedimentation rate of biogenic fraction of particulate matter in marine environments. - Highlights: • 40 K-based approach was developed to assess biogenic sedimentation in the Black Sea. • 40 K-derived relationship between biogenic sedimentation and water depth was traced. • 40 K is an easily applicable proxy to estimate rate of biogenic sedimentation in sea

  4. Organic compounds in aerosols from selected European sites - Biogenic versus anthropogenic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Célia; Vicente, Ana; Pio, Casimiro; Kiss, Gyula; Hoffer, Andras; Decesari, Stefano; Prevôt, André S. H.; Minguillón, María Cruz; Querol, Xavier; Hillamo, Risto; Spindler, Gerald; Swietlicki, Erik

    2012-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosol samples from a boreal forest (Hyytiälä, April 2007), a rural site in Hungary (K-puszta, summer 2008), a polluted rural area in Italy (San Pietro Capofiume, Po Valley, April 2008), a moderately polluted rural site in Germany located on a meadow (Melpitz, May 2008), a natural park in Spain (Montseny, March 2009) and two urban background locations (Zurich, December 2008, and Barcelona, February/March 2009) were collected. Aliphatics, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, carbonyls, sterols, n-alkanols, acids, phenolic compounds and anhydrosugars in aerosols were chemically characterised by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, along with source attribution based on the carbon preference index (CPI), the ratios between the unresolved and the chromatographically resolved aliphatics, the contribution of wax n-alkanes, n-alkanols and n-alkanoic acids from plants, diagnostic ratios of individual target compounds and source-specific markers to organic carbon ratios. In spite of transboundary pollution episodes, Hyytiälä registered the lowest levels among all locations. CPI values close to 1 for the aliphatic fraction of the Montseny aerosol suggest that the anthropogenic input may be associated with the transport of aged air masses from the surrounding industrial/urban areas, which superimpose the locally originated hydrocarbons with biogenic origin. Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in samples from San Pietro Capofiume reveal that fossil fuel combustion is a major source influencing the diel pattern of concentrations. This source contributed to 25-45% of the ambient organic carbon (OC) at the Po Valley site. Aerosols from the German meadow presented variable contributions from both biogenic and anthropogenic sources. The highest levels of vegetation wax components and biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) products were observed at K-puszta, while anthropogenic SOA compounds predominated in Barcelona. The primary vehicular emissions in the Spanish

  5. Recrystallization of biogenic carbonates in soils: consequences for palaeological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanian, Kazem; Pustovoytov, Konstantin; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    The isotopic signatures of biogenic carbonate (BC) in fossils are commonly used to assess environmental conditions during the life time of organisms, their diets and extinction periods. As a proxy, BC represents in many cases the only alternative to organic matter. However, BC in fossils may dissolve in embedded matrix and recrystallize with CO2 respired by roots and microorganisms. Consequently, isotopic composition of BC can be re-equilibrated and the original paleoenvironmental signal may be lost. The dynamics of these processes still remains poorly understood. Here the results of BC recrystallization under controlled conditions have been presented. We aimed 1) To determine the recrystallization amounts of BC as a function of time, 2) To investigate the effects of geogenic carbonates (GC) availability in embedded matrix on recrystallization rate of BC and 3) To evaluate the effects of organic matter (OM) presence in the BC structure on its recrystallization. Loess and a loamy soil were selected as carbonate containing and carbonate free matrixes, respectively. Shells of 'Pacific little-neck clams (Protothaca staminea)' were selected as BC. To evaluate the role of OM presence in the BC structure, heated (550?C) and not heated shells were used. The shells were washed by means of ultrasonic and crashed to a size of 2-2.5 mm. The 14C labeled CO2 (pCO2= 2%) was injected into the airtight bottles. The samples were incubated at room temperature and water content of 60% of water holding capacity of matrixes for 1, 3, 10, 21 and 56 days. At each time the 14C activity was measured in bottle air, dissolved organic and inorganic carbon, matrixes and the shells. The recrystallization of shells started even after one day of incubation. However, the amounts of recrystallization were increased by the time. The recrystallization of CaCO3 was higher in shells without OM. Elimination of OM probably increases the porosity of shell structure and led to better water penetration into

  6. Search for the Higgs boson at center-of-mass energies between 161 and 184 GeV in the 4-jet channel with OPAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toerne, E. von

    1998-07-01

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson using data from e + e - collisions collected at center-of-mass energies from 161 to 184 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP is presented. The search is applied to events in the four-jet-channel, in which the Higgs boson decays into a bb pair and the associated Z 0 decays into quark and anti-quark. The data analyzed corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 75.0 pb -1 . Five candidate events are observed, in agreement with the Standard Model background expectation of 6.61±0.42 (stat.) ±1.72 (syst.) events. A lower limit of 74.0 GeV is derived for the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson at the 95% confidence level. In combination with OPAL searches in other channels a limit of 86.9 GeV is obtained. (orig.)

  7. Targeting polyamines and biogenic amines by green tea epigallocatechin-3-gallate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgarejo, Esther; Urdiales, José Luis; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Medina, Miguel Angel

    2010-02-01

    Biogenic amines and polyamines are organic polycations derived from aromatic or cationic amino acids. They exert pleiotropic effects, more related to intercellular communication in the case of biogenic amines, and to intracellular signaling in the case of polyamines. The bioactive compound epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major component of green tea, has been shown to target key enzyme of biogenic amine and polyamine metabolic pathways. Herein, we review the specific effects of EGCG on concrete molecular targets of both biogenic amine and polyamine metabolic pathways, and discuss the relevance of these data to support the potential therapeutic interest of this compound.

  8. Control of Biogenic Amines in Fermented Sausages: Role of Starter Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre-Moratalla, M.L.; Bover-Cid, Sara; Veciana-Nogués, M.T.; Vidal-Carou, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    Biogenic amines show biological activity and exert undesirable physiological effects when absorbed at high concentrations. Biogenic amines are mainly formed by microbial decarboxylation of amino acids and thus are usually present in a wide range of foods, fermented sausages being one of the major biogenic amine sources. The use of selected starter cultures is one of the best technological measures to control aminogenesis during meat fermentation. Although with variable effectiveness, several works show the ability of some starters to render biogenic amine-free sausages. In this paper, the effect of different starter culture is reviewed and the factors determining their performance discussed. PMID:22586423

  9. Control of biogenic amines in fermented sausages: role of starter cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariluz eLatorre-Moratalla

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic amines show biological activity and exert undesirable physiological effects when absorbed at high concentrations. Biogenic amines are mainly formed by microbial decarboxylation of amino acids and thus are usually present in a wide range of foods, fermented sausages being one of the major biogenic amine sources. The use of selected starter cultures is one of the best technological measures to control aminogenesis during meat fermentation. Although with variable effectiveness, several works show the ability of some starters to render biogenic amine-free sausages. In this paper, the effect of different starter culture is reviewed and the factors determining their performance discussed.

  10. LBA-ECO TG-02 Biogenic VOC Emissions from Brazilian Amazon Forest and Pasture Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set reports concentrations of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) collected from tethered balloon-sampling platforms above selected...

  11. LBA-ECO TG-02 Biogenic VOC Emissions from Brazilian Amazon Forest and Pasture Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set reports concentrations of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) collected from tethered balloon-sampling platforms above selected forest and...

  12. Factors influencing temporal changes in chemical composition of biogenic deposits in the middle Tążyna River Valley (Kuyavian Lakeland, central Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okupny Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper discusses the influence of geochemical properties on biogenic deposits in the Wilkostowo mire near Toruń, central Poland. The analysed core has allowed the documentation of environmental changes between the older part of the Atlantic Period and the present day (probably interrupted at the turn of the Meso- and Neoholocene. In order to reconstruct the main stages in the sedimentation of biogenic deposits, we have used stratigraphic variability of selected litho-geochemical elements (organic matter, calcium carbonate, biogenic and terrigenous silica, macro- and micro-elements: Na, K, Mg, Ca, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr and Ni. The main litho-geochemical component is CaCO3; its content ranges from 4.1 per cent to 92 per cent. The variability of CaCO3 content reflects mainly changes in hydrological and geomorphological conditions within the catchment area. The effects of prehistoric anthropogenic activities in the catchment of the River Tążyna, e.g., the use of saline water for economic purposes, are recorded in a change from calcareous gyttja into detritus-calcareous gyttja sedimentation and an increased content of lithophilous elements (Na, K, Mg and Ni in the sediments. Principal component analysis (PCA has enabled the distinction the most important factors that affected the chemical composition of sediments at the Wilkostowo site, i.e., mechanical and chemical denudation processes in the catchment, changes in redox conditions, bioaccumulation of selected elements and human activity. Sediments of the Wilkostowo mire are located in the direct vicinity of an archaeological site, where traces of intensive settlement dating back to the Neolithic have been documented. The settlement phase is recorded both in lithology and geochemical properties of biogenic deposits which fill the reservoir formed at the bottom of the Parchania Canal Valley.

  13. Petrographic description of calcite/opal samples collected on field trip of December 5-9, 1992. Special report No. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, C.A.; Schluter, C.M.

    1993-06-01

    This study is part of the research program of the Yucca Mountain Project intended to provide the State of Nevada with a detailed analysis and assessment of the water-deposited minerals of Yucca Mountain and adjacent regions. Forty-three separate stops were made and 203 samples were collected during the five days of the field trip. This report describes petrographic observations made on the calcite/opal samples

  14. Measurements of jet rates with the anti-$k_T$ and SiScone algorithms at LEP with the OPAL detector

    CERN Document Server

    Verbytskyi, A

    2016-01-01

    We study jet production in $e^+e^−$ annihilation to hadrons with data recorded by the OPAL experiment at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 90 GeV and 207 GeV. The jet $e^+e^−$ production rates were measured for the first time with the anti-$k_T$ and SiScone jet clustering algorithms. We compare the data with predictions by modern Monte Carlo event generators.

  15. Effects of ultraviolet light on biogenic amines and other quality indicators of chicken meat during refrigerated storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro, C A; Conte-Júnior, C A; Monteiro, M L G; Canto, A C V S; Costa-Lima, B R C; Mano, S B; Franco, R M

    2014-09-01

    Radiation from UV-C has been demonstrated as a potential surface decontamination method in addition to several advantages over regular sanitation methods. However, UV-C radiation possibly affects the physicochemical properties of meat products. To determine the optimum exposure time for bacterial reduction, 39 chicken breasts, inoculated with a pool of Salmonella spp., were submitted to 3 levels of UV-C intensities (0.62, 1.13, and 1.95 mW/cm²) for up to 120 s. After the optimum exposure time of 90 s was determined, changes in the biogenic amines, total aerobic mesophilic bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, lipid oxidation, pH, and instrumental color were evaluated in 84 chicken breasts that were irradiated (0.62, 1.13, and 1.95 mW/cm²) and stored at 4°C for 9 d. The groups treated with UV-C radiation exhibited an increase in tyramine, cadaverine, and putrescine contents (P light was demonstrated to be an efficient alternative technology to improve the bacteriological quality of chicken meat without negatively affecting the physical and chemical parameters of chicken breast meat. Nonetheless, the increases on the biogenic amines content should be considered as an effect of the UV processing and not as an indicator of bacterial growth. © 2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  16. Energy transfer and visible-infrared quantum cutting photoluminescence modification in Tm-Yb codoped YPO(4) inverse opal photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siqin; Qiu, Jianbei; Wang, Qi; Zhou, Dacheng; Yang, Zhengwen

    2015-08-01

    YPO4:  Tm, Yb inverse opal photonic crystals were successfully synthesized by the colloidal crystal templates method, and the visible-infrared quantum cutting (QC) photoluminescence properties of YPO4:  Tm, Yb inverse opal photonic crystals were investigated. We obtained tetragonal phase YPO4 in all the samples when the samples sintered at 950°C for 5 h. The visible emission intensity of Tm3+ decreased significantly when the photonic bandgap was located at 650 nm under 480 nm excitation. On the contrary, the QC emission intensity of Yb3+ was enhanced as compared with the no photonic bandgap sample. When the photonic bandgap was located at 480 nm, the Yb3+ and Tm3+ light-emitting intensity weakened at the same time. We demonstrated that the energy transfer between Tm3+ and Yb3+ is enhanced by the suppression of the red emission of Tm3+. Additionally, the mechanisms for the influence of the photonic bandgap on the energy transfer process of the Tm3+, Yb3+ codoped YPO4 inverse opal are discussed.

  17. Highly improved upconversion luminescence in NaGd(WO4)2:Yb3+/Tm3+ inverse opal photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunfeng; Xu, Wen; Cui, Shaobo; Xu, Sai; Yin, Ze; Song, Hongwei; Zhou, Pingwei; Liu, Xiaoyan; Xu, Lin; Cui, Haining

    2015-01-01

    The upconversion luminescence (UCL) of rare earth (RE) ions doped nanomaterials has attracted extensive interest because of its wide and great potential applications. However, the lower UCL efficiency is still an obstacle for real applications. Photonic modulation is a novel way to improve the efficiency of UCL. In this work, NaGd(WO4)2:Yb3+/Tm3+ inverse opal photonic crystals (IOPCs) were fabricated through the polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) template and the modification of the IOPC structure on the emission spectra and dynamics of Tm3+ ions was systemically studied. It is interesting to observe that in the IOPCs, the high-order UCL 1D2-3H6/3F4 was relatively enhanced. At the same time, the local thermal effect induced by laser irradiation was suppressed. Furthermore, the overall intensity ratio of visible UCL to near-infrared (NIR) down-conversion luminescence (DCL) was 2.8-8 times improved than that of the grinded reference (REF) and independent of the photonic stop band (PSB). The studies on UCL dynamics indicated that the nonradiative transition rate of Tm3+ was considerably suppressed. The facts above indicated that in the IOPCs the UCL efficiency of Tm3+ was largely improved due to the periodic macroporous structure.The upconversion luminescence (UCL) of rare earth (RE) ions doped nanomaterials has attracted extensive interest because of its wide and great potential applications. However, the lower UCL efficiency is still an obstacle for real applications. Photonic modulation is a novel way to improve the efficiency of UCL. In this work, NaGd(WO4)2:Yb3+/Tm3+ inverse opal photonic crystals (IOPCs) were fabricated through the polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) template and the modification of the IOPC structure on the emission spectra and dynamics of Tm3+ ions was systemically studied. It is interesting to observe that in the IOPCs, the high-order UCL 1D2-3H6/3F4 was relatively enhanced. At the same time, the local thermal effect induced by laser irradiation was

  18. Changes in biogenic amine levels during storage of Mexican-style soft and Spanish-style dry-ripened sausages with different a(w) values under modified atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Tenorio, Roberto; Fonseca, Beatriz; Caro, Irma; Fernández-Diez, Ana; Kuri, Victor; Soto, Sergio; Mateo, Javier

    2013-07-01

    Two raw sausages were prepared: a soft and a dry-ripened one, both by local traditional and industrial manufacturing practices. Sausages were packaged under a CO2/N2 atmosphere at different targeted activity water (aw) values: 0.96 and 0.92 (soft sausages) and 0.88 and 0.82 (dry-ripened sausages). Sausages were then stored at 5 °C for 42 days or at 12 °C for 240 days (soft and a dry-ripened sausages, respectively). The time-related changes in dominant microbiota, pH and biogenic amine contents during storage were determined. Tyramine was the most abundant biogenic amine in all the sausages. Biogenic amine levels were higher in dry-ripened sausages than in soft sausages at packaging. However, during refrigerated storage soft sausages were fermented and the levels of biogenic amines increased (P<0.05). At the end of storage, traditional soft sausages with 0.96 aw presented comparable levels of biogenic amines to traditional dry-ripened sausages. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Extracellular Proteins Limit the Dispersal of BiogenicNanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, John W.; Weber, Peter K.; Martin, Michael C.; Gilbert,Benjamin; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2007-04-27

    High spatial-resolution secondaryion microprobespectrometry, synchrotron radiation Fourier-transform infraredspectroscopy and polyacrylamide gel analysis demonstrate the intimateassociation of proteins with spheroidal aggregates of biogenic zincsulfide nanocrystals, an example of extracellular biomineralization.Experiments involving synthetic ZnS nanoparticles and representativeamino acids indicate a driving role for cysteine in rapid nanoparticleaggregation. These findings suggest that microbially-derivedextracellular proteins can limit dispersal of nanoparticulatemetal-bearing phases, such as the mineral products of bioremediation,that may otherwise be transported away from their source by subsurfacefluid flow.

  20. Carbon nanomaterial based electrochemical sensors for biogenic amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiao; He, Xiulan; Li, Fangping; Fei, Junjie; Feng, Bo; Ding, Yonglan

    2013-01-01

    This review describes recent advances in the use of carbon nanomaterials for electroanalytical detection of biogenic amines (BAs). It starts with a short introduction into carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, nanodiamonds, carbon nanofibers, fullerenes, and their composites. Next, electrochemical sensing schemes are discussed for various BAs including dopamine, serotonin, epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyramine, histamine and putrescine. Examples are then given for methods for simultaneous detection of various BAs. Finally, we discuss the current and future challenges of carbon nanomaterial-based electrochemical sensors for BAs. The review contains 175 references. (author)

  1. Pulmonary extraction of biogenic amines during septic shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerstein, M.D.; Kohler, J.; Gould, S.; Moseley, P.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of live Escherichia coli on the pulmonary extraction of the biogenic amines 14 C 5-hydroxytryptamine, (5-HT) and 3 H-epinephrine was investigated. The labeled isotopes were injected into a central venous catheter and collected from an aortic catheter. One hundred per cent of the labeled epinephrine was recovered in the control and septic state. Only 32.8 +/- 3.6% SEM of the 5-hydroxytryptamine was recovered before sepsis and 42.5 +/- 4.9% SEM after sepsis. During sepsis, mean arterial pressure fell to 58 mm Hg from 121 mm Hg. Pulmonary shunt increased from .7 +/- .05 SEM to .33 +/- .09 SEM

  2. ANALYSIS OF FREE AMINO ACIDS AND BIOGENIC AMINES IN THE BULL MUSCULUS THORACIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juraj Čuboň

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition, changes of pH, free amino acids and biogenic amines during aging of beef Musculus thoracis during maturation were analysed. The parameters were analysed 24 hours, 48 hours, 1 week, 2 weeks and 3 weeks after slaughtering. The value of pH was 24 hours after slaughtering 5.6 and 48 hours similar 5.57, following the first week increased (pH 5.89 and decreased after the second week and in the third week reached 6.20 pH. During the 3 weeks ripening of meat, we found statistically significant (P ≤0.01 differences only in spermidine content. Spermine content was significantly increased (P ≤0.05 from 20.05 mg.kg-1 to 48.27 mg.kg-1. Free amino acids histamine not significant increased from 0.04 to 0.86 mg.kg-1, also content of free amino acids ornithine increased from 0.02 to 0.37 mg.kg-1 at the end of ripening. The putrescine content was 24 hours after slaughter 1.11 mg.kg-1 and at 21th day of the experiment was non significantly higher of 9.28 mg.kg-1. Spermidine content significantly (P ≤0.01 increased from 2.04 to 9.91 mg.kg-1 and spermine significantly increased (P ≤0.05 from 20.05 to 48.27 mg.kg-1 on the 21th day of the experiment.

  3. Biogenic emissions of isoprenoids and NO in China and comparison to anthropogenic emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tie Xuexi; Li Guohui; Ying, Zhuming; Guenther, Alex; Madronich, Sasha

    2006-01-01

    In this study, a regional dynamical model (WRF) is used to drive biogenic emission models to calculate high resolution (10 x 10 km) biogenic emissions of isoprene (C 5 H 8 ), monoterpenes (C 1 H 16 ), and nitric oxide (NO) in China. This high resolution biogenic inventory will be available for the community to study the effect of biogenic emissions on photochemical oxidants in China. The biogenic emissions are compared to anthropogenic emissions to gain insight on the potential impact of the biogenic emissions on tropospheric chemistry, especially ozone production in this region. The results show that the biogenic emissions in China exhibit strongly diurnal, seasonal, and spatial variations. The isoprenoid (including both isoprene and monoterpenes) emissions are closely correlated to tree density and strongly vary with season and local time. During winter (January), the biogenic isoprenoid emissions are the lowest, resulting from lower temperature and solar radiation, and highest in summer (July) due to higher temperature and solar radiation. The biogenic NO emissions are also higher during summer and lower during winter, but the magnitude of the seasonal variation is smaller than the emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes. The biogenic emissions of NO are widely spread out in the northern, eastern, and southern China regions, where high-density agricultural soil lands are located. Both biogenic NO and isoprenoid emissions are very small in western China. The calculated total biogenic emission budget is smaller than the total anthropogenic VOC emission budget in China. The biogenic isoprenoid and anthropogenic VOC emissions are 10.9 and 15.1 Tg year -1 , respectively. The total biogenic and anthropogenic emissions of NO are 5.9 and 11.5 Tg(NO) year -1 , respectively. The study shows that in central eastern China, the estimated biogenic emissions of isoprenoids are very small, and the anthropogenic emissions of VOCs are dominant in this region. However, in

  4. Biogenic emissions of isoprenoids and NO in China and comparison to anthropogenic emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Xuexi; Li, Guohui; Ying, Zhuming; Guenther, Alex; Madronich, Sasha

    2006-12-01

    In this study, a regional dynamical model (WRF) is used to drive biogenic emission models to calculate high resolution (10x10 km) biogenic emissions of isoprene (C(5)H(8)), monoterpenes (C(10)H(16)), and nitric oxide (NO) in China. This high resolution biogenic inventory will be available for the community to study the effect of biogenic emissions on photochemical oxidants in China. The biogenic emissions are compared to anthropogenic emissions to gain insight on the potential impact of the biogenic emissions on tropospheric chemistry, especially ozone production in this region. The results show that the biogenic emissions in China exhibit strongly diurnal, seasonal, and spatial variations. The isoprenoid (including both isoprene and monoterpenes) emissions are closely correlated to tree density and strongly vary with season and local time. During winter (January), the biogenic isoprenoid emissions are the lowest, resulting from lower temperature and solar radiation, and highest in summer (July) due to higher temperature and solar radiation. The biogenic NO emissions are also higher during summer and lower during winter, but the magnitude of the seasonal variation is smaller than the emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes. The biogenic emissions of NO are widely spread out in the northern, eastern, and southern China regions, where high-density agricultural soil lands are located. Both biogenic NO and isoprenoid emissions are very small in western China. The calculated total biogenic emission budget is smaller than the total anthropogenic VOC emission budget in China. The biogenic isoprenoid and anthropogenic VOC emissions are 10.9 and 15.1 Tg year(-1), respectively. The total biogenic and anthropogenic emissions of NO are 5.9 and 11.5 Tg(NO) year(-1), respectively. The study shows that in central eastern China, the estimated biogenic emissions of isoprenoids are very small, and the anthropogenic emissions of VOCs are dominant in this region. However, in

  5. Measurement of the running of the QED coupling in small angle Bhabha scattering with the OPAL detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, P.

    2005-06-01

    Using the high precision OPAL Silicon-Tungsten luminometer at LEP, the running of the effective QED coupling {alpha}(t) is measured for space-like momentum transfer 1.81 {<=} -t {<=} 6.07 GeV{sup 2} through its effect on the angular spectrum of small angle Bhabha scattering. In an almost ideal QED framework, with very favourable experimental conditions, we obtain a strong direct evidence that the running of {alpha}(t) is consistent with standard model expectations. The null hypothesis that {alpha} remains constant within the above interval of -t is excluded with a significance above 5{sigma}: {delta}{alpha}(-6.07 GeV{sup 2}) - {delta}{alpha}(-1.81 GeV{sup 2}) = 0.00450 {+-} 0.00079 The hadronic contribution to the running of the coupling has been estimated to be: {delta}{alpha}{sub had}(-6.07 GeV{sup 2}) - {delta}{alpha}{sub had}(-1.81 GeV{sup 2}) = 0.00248 {+-} 0.00079. This result is inconsistent at the level of more than 3{sigma} with the hypothesis that only leptonic loops contribute to the running, and therefore provide the first clear space-like experimental evidence that hadronic loops also contribute. (orig.)

  6. Facile control of silica nanoparticles using a novel solvent varying method for the fabrication of artificial opal photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Weihong [The University of Manchester, School of Materials (United Kingdom); Rigout, Muriel [University of Leeds, School of Design (United Kingdom); Owens, Huw, E-mail: Huw.Owens@manchester.ac.uk [The University of Manchester, School of Materials (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    In this work, the Stöber process was applied to produce uniform silica nanoparticles (SNPs) in the meso-scale size range. The novel aspect of this work was to control the produced silica particle size by only varying the volume of the solvent ethanol used, whilst fixing the other reaction conditions. Using this one-step Stöber-based solvent varying (SV) method, seven batches of SNPs with target diameters ranging from 70 to 400 nm were repeatedly reproduced, and the size distribution in terms of the polydispersity index (PDI) was well maintained (within 0.1). An exponential equation was used to fit the relationship between the particle diameter and ethanol volume. This equation allows the prediction of the amount of ethanol required in order to produce particles of any target diameter within this size range. In addition, it was found that the reaction was completed in approximately 2 h for all batches regardless of the volume of ethanol. Structurally coloured artificial opal photonic crystals (PCs) were fabricated from the prepared SNPs by self-assembly under gravity sedimentation.

  7. Anatomy of biologically mediated opal speleothems in the World's largest sandstone cave: Cueva Charles Brewer, Chimantá Plateau, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrecht, R.; Brewer-Carías, Ch.; Šmída, B.; Audy, M.; Kováčik, Ľ.

    2008-01-01

    Siliceous speleothems can be formed in sandstone caves. Recently, opal "biospeleothems" have been found in the World's largest cave in Precambrian sandstones on the Chimantá Tepui in Venezuela. The speleothems, although reminiscent of normal stalactites and stalagmites from limestone caves, are in fact large microbialites. More than a dozen forms were distinguished, but they share a common structure and origin. They consist of two main types: 1. fine-laminated columnar stromatolite formed by silicified filamentous microbes (either heterotrophic filamentous bacteria or cyanobacteria) and 2. a porous peloidal stromatolite formed by Nostoc-type cyanobacteria. The first type usually forms the central part and the second type, the outer part, of speleothems. Fungal hyphae, metazoan and plant remains also subordinately contribute to speleothem construction. The speleothems occur out of the reach of flowing water; the main source of silica is the condensed cave moisture which is the main dissolution-reprecipitation agent. Speleothems which originated by encrustation of spider threads are unique.

  8. Facile control of silica nanoparticles using a novel solvent varying method for the fabrication of artificial opal photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Weihong; Rigout, Muriel; Owens, Huw

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the Stöber process was applied to produce uniform silica nanoparticles (SNPs) in the meso-scale size range. The novel aspect of this work was to control the produced silica particle size by only varying the volume of the solvent ethanol used, whilst fixing the other reaction conditions. Using this one-step Stöber-based solvent varying (SV) method, seven batches of SNPs with target diameters ranging from 70 to 400 nm were repeatedly reproduced, and the size distribution in terms of the polydispersity index (PDI) was well maintained (within 0.1). An exponential equation was used to fit the relationship between the particle diameter and ethanol volume. This equation allows the prediction of the amount of ethanol required in order to produce particles of any target diameter within this size range. In addition, it was found that the reaction was completed in approximately 2 h for all batches regardless of the volume of ethanol. Structurally coloured artificial opal photonic crystals (PCs) were fabricated from the prepared SNPs by self-assembly under gravity sedimentation.

  9. The multipurpose time-of-flight neutron reflectometer 'Platypus' at Australia's OPAL reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, M., E-mail: mja@ansto.gov.a [Bragg Institute, Building 87, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); School of Chemistry, University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW 2052 (Australia); Nelson, A.; Holt, S.A.; Saerbeck, T.; Hamilton, W.A.; Klose, F. [Bragg Institute, Building 87, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2011-03-11

    In this manuscript we describe the major components of the Platypus time-of-flight neutron reflectometer at the 20 MW OPAL reactor in Sydney, Australia. Platypus is a multipurpose spectrometer for the characterisation of solid thin films, materials adsorbed at the solid-liquid interface and free-liquid surfaces. It also has the capacity to study magnetic thin films using spin-polarised neutrons. Platypus utilises a white neutron beam ({lambda}=2-20 A) that is pulsed using boron-coated disc chopper pairs; thus providing the capacity to tailor the wavelength resolution of the pulses to suit the system under investigation. Supermirror optical components are used to focus, deflect or spin-polarise the broad bandwidth neutron beams, and typical incident spectra are presented for each configuration. A series of neutron reflectivity datasets are presented, indicating the quality and flexibility of this spectrometer. Minimum reflectivity values of <10{sup -7} are observed; while maximum thickness values of 325 nm have been measured for single-component films and 483 nm for a multilayer system. Off-specular measurements have also been made to investigate in-plane features as opposed to those normal to the sample surface. Finally, the first published studies conducted using the Platypus time-of-flight neutron reflectometer are presented.

  10. Measurement of the running of the QED coupling in small angle Bhabha scattering with the OPAL detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, P.

    2005-06-01

    Using the high precision OPAL Silicon-Tungsten luminometer at LEP, the running of the effective QED coupling α(t) is measured for space-like momentum transfer 1.81 ≤ -t ≤ 6.07 GeV 2 through its effect on the angular spectrum of small angle Bhabha scattering. In an almost ideal QED framework, with very favourable experimental conditions, we obtain a strong direct evidence that the running of α(t) is consistent with standard model expectations. The null hypothesis that α remains constant within the above interval of -t is excluded with a significance above 5σ: Δα(-6.07 GeV 2 ) - Δα(-1.81 GeV 2 ) = 0.00450 ± 0.00079 The hadronic contribution to the running of the coupling has been estimated to be: Δα had (-6.07 GeV 2 ) - Δα had (-1.81 GeV 2 ) = 0.00248 ± 0.00079. This result is inconsistent at the level of more than 3σ with the hypothesis that only leptonic loops contribute to the running, and therefore provide the first clear space-like experimental evidence that hadronic loops also contribute. (orig.)

  11. Modulation of Multiscale 3D Lattices through Conformational Control: Painting Silk Inverse Opals with Water and Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Aurelio, Daniele; Li, Wenyi; Tseng, Peter; Zheng, Zhaozhu; Li, Meng; Kaplan, David L; Liscidini, Marco; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G

    2017-10-01

    Structural proteins from naturally occurring materials are an inspiring template for material design and synthesis at multiple scales. The ability to control the assembly and conformation of such materials offers the opportunity to define fabrication approaches that recapitulate the dimensional hierarchy and structure-function relationships found in nature. A simple and versatile directed assembly method of silk fibroin, which allows the design of structures across multiple dimensional scales by generating and tuning structural color in large-scale, macro defect-free colloidally assembled 3D nanostructures in the form of silk inverse opals (SIOs) is reported. This approach effectively combines bottom-up and top-down techniques to obtain control on the nanoscale (through silk conformational changes), microscale (through patterning), and macroscale (through colloidal assembly), ultimately resulting in a controllable photonic lattice with predefined spectral behavior, with a resulting palette spanning almost the entire visible range. As a demonstration of the approach, examples of "multispectral" SIOs, paired with theoretical calculations and analysis of their response as a function of changes of lattice constants and refractive index contrast are illustrated. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. CdS quantum dots modified CuO inverse opal electrodes for ultrasensitive electrochemical and photoelectrochemical biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lei; Xu, Lin; Song, Jian; Xu, Ru; Liu, Dali; Dong, Biao; Song, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    The CuO inverse opal photonic crystals (IOPCs) were synthesized by the sol-gel method and modified with CdS quantum dots by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR). CdS QDs modified CuO IOPCs FTO electrodes of different SILAR cycles were fabricated and their electrochemical properties were studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (I–t). Structure and morphology of the samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD). The result indicated that the structure of IOPCs and loading of CdS QDs could greatly improve the electrochemical properties. Three SILAR cycles of CdS QDs sensitization was the optimum condition for preparing electrodes, it exhibited a sensitivity of 4345 μA mM-1 cm-2 to glucose with a 0.15 μM detection limit (S/N= 3) and a linear range from 0.15 μM to 0.5 mM under a working potential of +0.7 V. It also showed strong stability, good reproducibility, excellent selectivity and fast amperometric response. This work provides a promising approach for realizing excellent photoelectrochemical nonenzymatic glucose biosensor of similar composite structure. PMID:26042520

  13. Investigation of hidden periodic structures on SEM images of opal-like materials using FFT and IFFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephant, Nicolas; Rondeau, Benjamin; Gauthier, Jean-Pierre; Cody, Jason A; Fritsch, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a method to use fast Fourier transformation (FFT) and inverse fast Fourier transformation (IFFT) to investigate hidden periodic structures on SEM images. We focused on samples of natural, play-of-color opals that diffract visible light and hence are periodically structured. Conventional sample preparation by hydrofluoric acid etch was not used; untreated, freshly broken surfaces were examined at low magnification relative to the expected period of the structural features, and, the SEM was adjusted to get a very high number of pixels in the images. These SEM images were treated by software to calculate autocorrelation, FFT, and IFFT. We present how we adjusted SEM acquisition parameters for best results. We first applied our procedure on an SEM image on which the structure was obvious. Then, we applied the same procedure on a sample that must contain a periodic structure because it diffracts visible light, but on which no structure was visible on the SEM image. In both cases, we obtained clearly periodic patterns that allowed measurements of structural parameters. We also investigated how the irregularly broken surface interfered with the periodic structure to produce additional periodicity. We tested the limits of our methodology with the help of simulated images. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Effect of nisin on biogenic amines and shelf life of vacuum packaged rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fillets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves López, Clemencia; Serio, Annalisa; Montalvo, Costanza; Ramirez, Cristina; Peréz Álvarez, José Angel; Paparella, Antonello; Mastrocola, Dino; Martuscelli, Maria

    2017-09-01

    Nisin is a lantibiotic exhibiting antimicrobial activity against a wide range of Gram-positive bacteria, or some Gram-negative bacteria when used in combination with other preservative agents. The objective of the present work was to study the effect of nisin treatment on biogenic amines occurrence and shelf life of refrigerated (4 °C) vacuum packaged rainbow trout samples. For this purpose samples were divided in two batches: the experimental batch (CB-N), consisting of samples immersed in sterilized broth formulated with soy milk 1.4% (v/v) and whey powder 11.2% (w/v) dissolved in deionized water with addition of nisin (500 mg L -1 ); the control batch (CB), consisting of samples immersed in the former broth without addition of nisin. A positive effect of nisin resulted on colour stability; in fact, the global colour index ΔE remained constant during the storage of treated rainbow trout samples, while it increased in the control. However, the behaviour of microbiota, texture, odour and biogenic amines were comparable between fillet samples treated with nisin broth and with control medium (without nisin). No inhibitory effects of nisin on biogenic amines accumulation was observed; conversely, the decline of histamine content (about 30%), observed only in fishes of the control batch, may be correlated to the presence of histamine-degradating bacteria ( Pseudomonas species). Further studies are necessary to investigate nisin action mechanism on the colour, an important physical characteristic involved in the product quality and consumer acceptability.

  15. Comparative study of biogenic and abiotic iron-containing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherkezova-Zheleva, Z., E-mail: zzhel@ic.bas.bg; Shopska, M., E-mail: shopska@ic.bas.bg; Paneva, D. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Catalysis (Bulgaria); Kovacheva, D. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry (Bulgaria); Kadinov, G.; Mitov, I. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Catalysis (Bulgaria)

    2016-12-15

    Series of iron-based biogenic materials prepared by cultivation of Leptothrix group of bacteria in different feeding media (Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group of bacteria isolation medium, Adler, Lieske and silicon-iron-glucose-peptone) were studied. Control samples were obtained in the same conditions and procedures but the nutrition media were not infected with bacteria, i.e. they were sterile. Room and low temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared spectroscopy (IRS) were used to reveal the composition and physicochemical properties of biomass and respective control samples. Comparative analysis showed differences in their composition and dispersity of present phases. Sample composition included different ratio of nanodimensional iron oxyhydroxide and oxide phases. Relaxation phenomena such as superparamagnetism or collective magnetic excitation behaviour were registered for some of them. The experimental data showed that the biogenic materials were enriched in oxyhydroxides of high dispersion. Catalytic behaviour of a selected biomass and abiotic material were studied in the reaction of CO oxidation. In situ diffuse-reflectance (DR) IRS was used to monitor the phase transformations in the biomass and CO conversion.

  16. Biogenic magnetite as a primary remanence carrier in limestone deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Bin R.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Stolz, John F.

    1987-06-01

    Studies on the microbial communities and magnetic phases of samples collected from carbonate oozes at Sugarloaf Key, FL, U.S.A. and calcareous laminated sediments from Laguna Figueroa, Baja California, Mexico have revealed the existence of magnetotactic bacteria and ultrafine-grained single domain magnetite in both environments. Magnetotactic bacteria were identified by light and electron microscopy. The single domain magnetite was detected by coercivity spectra analysis with a SQUID magnetometer and examined under the transmission electron microscope. The similarity, in terms of size and shape, between the single domain magnetite found in these sediments and the magnetite observed in the bacterial magnetosome from enriched cultures indicates the ultrafine-grained magnetite in these two marine environments was biologically formed. These results, combined with the common occurrences of ultrafine-grained magnetite in limestone deposits detected rock magnetically, suggest biogenic magnetite may be present and contribute to the magnetic remanence in these rocks. Several Cambrian limestone samples, separately collected from Siberia, China, and Kazakhstan, were examined for the presence of bacterial magnetite. Samples from the Lower Cambrian Sinskian Formation at Siberia Platform were found to contain both a large amount of apparently bacterial magnetite particles and a very stable primary magnetic component. Post-Cambrian diagenesis does not seem to affect the microgranulometry of these apparently bacterial magnetite crystals or the magnetic remanence carried by them. Assessing the potential role of biogenic magnetite as a primary remanence carrier in other Phanerozoic limestone deposits ought to be further pursued.

  17. Estimating the Biogenic Non-Methane Hydrocarbon Emissions over Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermioni Dimitropoulou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic emissions affect the urban air quality as they are ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA precursors and should be taken into account when applying photochemical pollution models. The present study presents an estimation of the magnitude of non-methane volatile organic compounds (BNMVOCs emitted by vegetation over Greece. The methodology is based on computation developed with the aid of a Geographic Information System (GIS and theoretical equations in order to produce an emission inventory on a 6 × 6 km2 spatial resolution, in a temporal resolution of 1 h covering one year (2016. For this purpose, a variety of input data was used: updated satellite land-use data, land-use specific emission potentials, foliar biomass densities, temperature, and solar radiation data. Hourly, daily, and annual isoprene, monoterpenes, and other volatile organic compounds (OVOCs were estimated. In the area under study, the annual biogenic emissions were estimated up to 472 kt, consisting of 46.6% isoprene, 28% monoterpenes, and 25.4% OVOCs. Results delineate an annual cycle with increasing values from March to April, while maximum emissions were observed from May to September, followed by a decrease from October to January.

  18. Antimicrobial textiles: Biogenic silver nanoparticles against Candida and Xanthomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballottin, Daniela; Fulaz, Stephanie; Cabrini, Flávia; Tsukamoto, Junko; Durán, Nelson; Alves, Oswaldo L; Tasic, Ljubica

    2017-06-01

    This paper introduces cotton fibers impregnated with biogenic silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), synthesized from a Fusarium oxysporum fungal filtrate (FF) solution, and open up the possibility for their use in medical environment and agriculture clothing as means to avoid microbial spreading. After thorough AgNPs characterization, regarding their physical, chemical and biochemical properties, Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC) against some human and orange tree pathogens were determined. We report the strong AgNPs activity against Candida parapsilosis and Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) that was morphologically characterized, pointing to strong AgNPs effects on microorganisms' membranes. Cotton fibers were then impregnated with AgNPs suspension and these maintained strong antimicrobial activity even after repeated mechanical washing cycles (up to 10). Reported data might point to an application for biogenic AgNPs as potent agrochemicals, as well as, to their application in textiles for antiseptic clothing for medical and agronomic applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Selection of Nutrient Used in Biogenic Healing Agent for Cementitious Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tziviloglou, E.; Wiktor, V.A.C.; Jonkers, H.M.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.

    2017-01-01

    Biogenic self-healing cementitious materials target on the closure of micro-cracks with precipitated inorganic minerals originating from bacterial metabolic activity. Dormant bacterial spores and organic mineral compounds often constitute a biogenic healing agent. The current paper focuses on the

  20. Biogenic Carbon Fraction of Biogas and Natural Gas Fuel Mixtures Determined with 14C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palstra, Sanne W. L.; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the accuracy of the radiocarbon-based calculation of the biogenic carbon fraction for different biogas and biofossil gas mixtures. The focus is on the uncertainty in the C-14 reference values for 100% biogenic carbon and on the C-13-based isotope fractionation correction of

  1. 77 FR 21772 - Notification of Two Public Teleconferences of the Science Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ... of Air and Radiation requested SAB review of EPA's draft accounting framework. As noticed in 76 FR... review and discuss its advice on EPA's draft Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO2 Emissions from... Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources (September 2011). DATES: The public...

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF SEASONAL AND ANNUAL BIOGENIC EMISSIONS INVENTORIES FOR THE U.S. AND CANADA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report describes the development of a biogenic emissions inventory for the U.S. and Canada, to assess the role of biogenic emissions in ozone formation. Emission inventories were developed at hourly and grid (1/4 x 116 degree) level from input data at the same scales. Emissio...

  3. Estimation of biogenic volatile organic compounds emissions in subtropical island--Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ken-Hui; Chen, Tu-Fu; Huang, Ho-Chun

    2005-06-15

    Elevated tropospheric ozone is harmful to human health and plants. It is formed through the photochemical reactions involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NO(x)). The elevated ozone episodes occur mainly in summer months in the United States, while the high-ozone episodes frequently occur during the fall in Taiwan. The unique landscape of Taiwan produces tremendous amounts of biogenic VOCs in the mountain regions that are adjacent to concentrated urban areas. The urban areas, in turn, generate prodigious amounts of anthropogenic emissions. Biogenic VOC emissions have direct influence on tropospheric ozone formation. To explore the air quality problems in Taiwan, this study attempts to develop a biogenic VOC emission model suitable for air quality applications in Taiwan. The emission model is based on the Biogenic Emissions Inventory System Version 2 and coupled with a detailed Taiwan land use database. The 1999 total Taiwan biogenic VOC emissions were estimated at 214,000 metric tons. The emissions of isoprene, monoterpenes, and other VOCs were about 37.2%, 30.4%, and 32.4% of total biogenic VOC emissions, respectively. The annual total biogenic VOC emission per unit area was more than two times the value of that in any European country, implying that detailed emissions estimates in any size of region will benefit the global biogenic emission inventories.

  4. Constraining biogenic silica dissolution in marine sediments: a comparison between diagenetic models and experimental dissolution rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalil, K.; Rabouille, C.; Gallinari, M.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; DeMaster, D.J.; Ragueneau, O.

    2007-01-01

    The processes controlling preservation and recycling of particulate biogenic silica in sediments must be understood in order to calculate oceanic silica mass balances. The new contribution of this work is the coupled use of advanced models including reprecipitation and different phases of biogenic

  5. BIOGENIC AMINE CONTENT AND CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL FEATURES OF ITALIAN FORMAGGIO DI FOSSA

    OpenAIRE

    N. Mascaro; R. Stocchi; M. Ricciutelli; N. Cammertoni; F Renzi; S Cecchini; A.R Loschi; S Rea

    2010-01-01

    Formaggio di Fossa is an Italian traditional cheese of the Montefeltro area (Emilia Romagna and Marche regions) characterized by a particular step of ripening that is carried out into pits (infossamento) borne in the sandstone. Since the XIV century, the inhabitants were used to set food, especially cereals and cheese, into pits to preserve them during winter and to protect them from invaders. The aim of the present work is to study physical and chemical features of this product with particul...

  6. Picoplankton contribution to biogenic silica stocks and production rates in the Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, J. W.; Brzezinski, M. A.; Baines, S. B.; Collier, J.; Ohnemus, D.; Twining, B. S.

    2016-02-01

    The picoplankton size class (total biogenic silica (>0.4 µm) standing stock and to its rate of production in the Sargasso Sea. These trends were robust after correcting biogenic silica, and the calculated rates which use these data, for interference by lithogenic silica. The 100-m total integrated biogenic silica concentration was low and ranged from 0.7 - 5.0 mmol Si m-2, with the highest value within a mesoscale eddy. Material within the picoplankton size fraction was present at every low-biomass station and provided a relatively consistent contribution to total biogenic silica (10 - 24%, average 14%). The integrated rates of total biogenic silica production were reflective of the low biomass: 0.2 - 1.8 mmol Si m-2 d-1 in non-eddy stations and 6.0 mmol Si m-2 d-1 within the eddy. The average proportion of biogenic silica production in the picoplankton was 16% (range 3 - 38%), with a lower value within the eddy. Outside the eddy, the biomass-normalized rates of silica production were similar for each size class, 0.6 d-1. Using Synechococcus abundance data in the upper 30 m and assuming this group was the only contributor to the picoplankton biogenic silica, we calculate an average Si quota of 229 amol Si cell-1; this is two-fold higher than reported previously by direct measurement on cells using x-ray fluorescence. In the eddy, the estimated Synechococcus Si-quotas were up to 50-fold higher than estimated at other stations, suggesting that most of the pico-sized biogenic silica in this feature may have been diatom fragments. This interpretation is also supported by the eddy having the lowest biomass-normalized production rates for the picoplankton. Our results suggest picoplankton may have a small, but relatively stable, contribution to biogenic silica in this region, which underlies a more dynamic microplankton biogenic silica pool driven by diatoms.

  7. 76 FR 61100 - Notification of a Public Meeting of the Science Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... Office announces a public face-to-face meeting of the SAB Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel to review EPA's draft Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO 2 Emissions from Stationary Sources (September 2011). DATES...

  8. Tests of perturbative and non perturbative structure of moments of hadronic event shapes using experiments JADE and OPAL; Untersuchung perturbativer und nichtperturbativer Struktur der Momente hadronischer Ereignisformvariablen mit den Experimenten JADE und OPAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahl, Christoph Johannes

    2008-01-29

    In hadron production data of the e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation experiments JADE and OPAL we measure the first five moments of twelve hadronic-event-shape variables at c.m. energies from 14 to 207 GeV. From the comparison of the QCD NLO prediction with the data corrected by means of MC models about hadronization we obtain the reference value of the strong coupling {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z{sup 0}})=0.1254{+-}0.0007(stat.){+-}0.0010(exp.){sup +0.0009}{sub -0.0023}(had.){sup +0.0069}{sub -0.0053}(theo.). For some, especially higher moments, systematic unsufficiencies in the QCD NLO prediction are recognizable. Simultaneous fits to two moments under assumption of identical renormalization scales yield scale values from x{sub {mu}}=0.057 to x{sub {mu}}=0.196. We check predictions of different non-perturbative models. From the single-dressed-gluon approximation a perturbative prediction in O({alpha}{sup 5}{sub s}) results with neglegible energy power correction, which describes the thrust average on hadron level well with {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z{sup 0}})=0.1186{+-}0,0017(exp.){sub -0.0028}{sup +0.0033}(theo.). The variance of the event-shape variable is measured and compared with models as well as predictions. [German] In Hadronproduktionsdaten der e{sup +}e{sup -}-Vernichtungsexperimente JADE und OPAL messen wir die ersten fuenf Momente von zwoelf hadronischen Ereignisformvariablen bei Schwerpunktsenergien von 14 bis 207 GeV. Aus dem Vergleich der QCD NLO-Vorhersage mit den mittels MC-Modellen um Hadronisierung korrigierten Daten erhalten wir den Referenzwert der starken Kopplung {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z{sup 0}})=0.1254{+-}0.0007(stat.){+-}0.0010(exp.){sup +0.0009}{sub -0.0023}(had.){sup +0.0069}{sub -0.0053}(theo.). Fuer einige, insbesondere hoehere, Momente sind systematische Unzulaenglichkeiten in der QCD NLO-Vorhersage erkenntlich. Simultane Fits an zwei Momente unter Annahme identischer Renormierungsskalen ergeben Skalenwerte von x{sub {mu}}=0.057 bis x{sub {mu}}=0

  9. Evaluation of biogenic amines levels, and biochemical and microbiological characterization of Italian-type salami sold in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Felipe Lopes dos Santos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the levels of biogenic amines (cadaverine, putrescine, tyramine, histamine, spermidine and spermine by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and the physicochemical (moisture, lipids, proteins, pH, water activity and fixed mineral residue and microbiological (lactic acid bacteria and aerobic heterotrophic mesophilic bacteria count characteristics of six Italian-type salami brands sold in the city of Niteroi (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The salami showed lactic acid bacteria count from 5.7 to 8.6 CFU•mL-1, and heterotrophic mesophilic bacteria count from 5.8 to 8.7 CFU•mL-1. Three brands showed moisture contents above 35% and one brand had protein content below 25%. The mean values obtained for the amines were: 197.43, 143.29, 73.02, 4.52, 90.66 and 36.17 mg•kg-1 for tyramine, putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine, histamine, and spermine respectively. Two brands presented histamine contents above the legal limit established in 100 mg•kg-1. We concluded that the evaluated salami presented a wide variation in the count of the bacterial groups with a predominance of lactic acid bacteria. The moisture contents indicate insufficient drying before commercialization and protein content had values below the minimum limit determined by the Brazilian legislation. Finally, the levels of biogenic amines found could cause adverse reactions in susceptible consumers, depending of the amount and frequency of intake of these products.

  10. Using public participation to sample trace metals in lake surface sediments: the OPAL Metals Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, S D; Rose, N L; Goldsmith, B; Bearcock, J M; Scheib, C; Yang, H

    2017-05-01

    Members of the public in England were invited in 2010 to take part in a national metals survey, by collecting samples of littoral sediment from a standing water body for geochemical analysis. To our knowledge, this is the first national sediment metals survey using public participation and reveals a snapshot of the extent of metals contamination in ponds and lakes across England. Hg, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb concentrations exceeding sediment quality guidelines for the health of aquatic biota are ubiquitous in ponds and lakes, not just in areas with a legacy of industrial activity. To validate the public sampling approach, a calibration exercise was conducted at ten water bodies selected to represent a range of lakes found across England. Sediment concentrations of Hg, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb were measured in samples of soil, stream and littoral and deep water sediment to assess inputs. Significant differences between littoral sediment metal concentrations occur due to local variability, but also organic content, especially in upland, peat soil catchments. Variability of metal concentrations between littoral samples is shown to be low in small (complex inputs and variation in organic content of littoral samples have a greater variability. Collection of littoral sediments in small lakes and ponds, with or without voluntary participation, can provide a reliable sampling technique for the preliminary assessment of metal contamination in standing waters. However, the heterogeneity of geology, soils and history/extent of metal contamination in the English landscape, combined with the random nature of sample collection, shows that systematic sampling for evaluating the full extent of metal contamination in lakes is still required.

  11. Influence of pH, competing ions, and salinity on the sorption of strontium and cobalt onto biogenic hydroxyapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley-Sidhu, Stephanie; Mullan, Thomas K.; Grail, Quentin; Albadarneh, Malek; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Macaskie, Lynne E.

    2016-03-01

    Anthropogenic radionuclides contaminate a range of environments as a result of nuclear activities, for example, leakage from waste storage tanks/ponds (e.g. Hanford, USA or Sellafield sites, UK) or as a result of large scale nuclear accidents (e.g. Chernobyl, Ukraine or Fukushima, Japan). One of the most widely applied remediation techniques for contaminated waters is the use of sorbent materials (e.g. zeolites and apatites). However, a key problem at nuclear contaminated sites is the remediation of radionuclides from complex chemical environments. In this study, biogenic hydroxyapatite (BHAP) produced by Serratia sp. bacteria was investigated for its potential to remediate surrogate radionuclides (Sr2+ and Co2+) from environmentally relevant waters by varying pH, salinity and the type and concentration of cations present. The sorption capacity of the BHAP for both Sr2+ and Co2+ was higher than for a synthetically produced hydroxyapatite (HAP) in the solutions tested. BHAP also compared favorably against a natural zeolite (as used in industrial decontamination) for Sr2+ and Co2+ uptake from saline waters. Results confirm that hydroxyapatite minerals of high surface area and amorphous calcium phosphate content, typical for biogenic sources, are suitable restoration or reactive barrier materials for the remediation of complex contaminated environments or wastewaters.

  12. Non-invasive characterization of biogenic gas dynamics in peatlands using the ground penetrating radar (GPR) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comas, X.; Slater, L. D.; Reeve, A. S.; Glaser, P. H.; Nolan, J. T.; Parsekian, A.

    2009-12-01

    Several applications of ground penetrating radar (GPR) as a non-invasive technology for investigating carbon cycling in northern peatlands are presented here. The GPR method has been proved as an effective approach for investigating biogenic gas dynamics over a wide range of spatial scales. Unlike other commonly applied techniques used in peatland science, GPR can be employed entirely non-invasively from the surface, and therefore can provide information on the vertical distribution of biogenic gases within the peat structure without disruption to the in situ gas regime. Several applications of the GPR method in peatlands research are presented here and include: (1) imaging of laterally continuous woody layers that may act as confining layers for free phase gas (FPG) accumulation as proposed by others; (2) surface and cross-hole measurements to estimate one-dimensional vertical profiles of variable FPG content and confirm accumulation of FPG below confining layers; (3) non-invasive time-lapse monitoring of FPG production and emissions from a peat column and use of reflection amplitudes to show that, in addition to travel times, amplitude analysis can also yield insights into changes in FPG production and emissions (e.g. via ebullition) from peat soils. We conclude with some further recommendations for future applications of GPR in northern peatlands.

  13. Effects of iron availability on pigment signature and biogenic silica production in the coastal diatom Chaetoceros gracilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haimanti Biswas

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of iron availability on pigment signature and biogenic silica production were investigated for the first time in the coastal diatom Chaetoceros gracilis (isolated from the SW coast of the Bay of Bengal, India. Results revealed that increase in iron supply considerably increases chlorophyll a based specific growth rates, whereas, it decreases the values of diatoxanthin index and photoprotective to light harvesting pigment ratios. It is likely that, under iron stress C. gracilis activated a strong photoprotection mechanism by maximising the conversion of diadinoxanthin to diatoxanthin and by increasing overall amount of photoprotective pigments relative to light harvesting pigments. The xanthophyll cycle comprising of diadinoxanthin and diatoxanthin seems to be the principal photoprotective mechanism in C. gracilis and is consistent with some earlier studies. It is suggested that under iron limited conditions the diatoxanthin index and the ratio of photoprotective to light harvesting pigments can be used as physiological markers for iron stress in C. gracilis. The ratios of biogenic silica to chlorophyll a were considerably decreased with increasing iron supply indicating the possibility of reduced cellular silica content under iron enriched conditions; however, supplementary information is required to confirm this observation.

  14. Emission of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindwall, Frida

    , emitted in order to communicate within and between trophic levels and as protection against biotic and abiotic stresses, or as byproducts. Some BVOCs are very reactive, and when entering the atmosphere they rapidly react with for example hydroxyl radicals and ozone, affecting the oxidative capacity......Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from arctic ecosystems are scarcely studied and the effect of climate change on BVOC emissions even less so. BVOCs are emitted from all living organisms and play a role for atmospheric chemistry. The major part of BVOCs derives from plants...... dependent and the emissions will increase in a future warmer climate. The aims of this dissertation were to study BVOC emission rates and blends from arctic ecosystems and to reveal the effect of climate change on BVOC emissions from the Arctic. BVOC emissions were measured in ambient and modified...

  15. Monitoring biogenic volatile compounds emitted by Eucalyptus citriodora using SPME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zini, C A; Augusto, F; Christensen, T E; Smith, B P; Caramão, E B; Pawliszy, J

    2001-10-01

    A procedure to monitor BVOC emitted by living plants using SPME technique is presented. For this purpose, a glass sampling chamber was designed. This device was employed for the characterization of biogenic volatile compounds emitted by leaves of Eucalyptus citriodora. After extraction with SPME fibers coated with PDMS/ DVB, it was possible to identify or detect 33 compounds emitted by this plant. A semiquantitative approach was applied to monitor the behavior of the emitted BVOC during 9 days. Circadian profiles of the variation in the concentration of isoprene were plotted. Using diffusion-based SPME quantitation, a recently introduced analytical approach, with extraction times as short as 15 s, it was possible to quantify subparts-per-billion amounts of isoprene emitted by this plant.

  16. Pharmacological potential of biogenic amine-polyamine interactions beyond neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Jiménez, F; Ruiz-Pérez, M V; Urdiales, J L; Medina, M A

    2013-09-01

    Histamine, serotonin and dopamine are biogenic amines involved in intercellular communication with multiple effects on human pathophysiology. They are products of two highly homologous enzymes, histidine decarboxylase and l-aromatic amino acid decarboxylase, and transmit their signals through different receptors and signal transduction mechanisms. Polyamines derived from ornithine (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) are mainly involved in intracellular effects related to cell proliferation and death mechanisms. This review summarizes structural and functional evidence for interactions between components of all these amine metabolic and signalling networks (decarboxylases, transporters, oxidases, receptors etc.) at cellular and tissue levels, distinct from nervous and neuroendocrine systems, where the crosstalk among these amine-related components can also have important pathophysiological consequences. The discussion highlights aspects that could help to predict and discuss the effects of intervention strategies. © 2013 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Impact of biogenic emissions on feedbacks in the climate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Olaf

    2017-04-01

    Impact of biogenic emissions on feedbacks in the climate system Bio-geophysical feedback between marine or continental ecosystems and the atmosphere potentially can alter climate change. A prominent feedback loop which is under discussion since 1983 bases on the emission of biologically produced gases - molecular oxygen, sulphur containing compounds and possibly isoprene, supersaturated in oceanic waters - into the marine troposphere. These by-products of phytoplankton metabolism lead to aerosol production and procure sustained influence on climate via modulation of cloud optical properties. In this contribution some findings related to the above mentioned climate processes are presented with special emphasis on marine ecosystems. A comparison of marine and continental ecosystems is made and different processes with major impact on feedbacks in the climate system are discussed.

  18. Emissions of biogenic sulfur gases from northern bogs and fens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demello, William Zamboni; Hines, Mark E.; Bayley, Suzanne E.

    1992-01-01

    Sulfur gases are important components of the global cycle of S. They contribute to the acidity of precipitation and they influence global radiation balance and climate. The role of terrestrial sources of biogenic S and their effect on atmospheric chemistry remain as major unanswered questions in our understanding of the natural S cycle. The role of northern wetlands as sources and sinks of gaseous S by measuring rates of S gas exchange as a function of season, hydrologic conditions, and gradients in tropic status was investigated. Experiments were conducted in wetlands in New Hampshire, particularly a poor fen, and in Mire 239, a poor fen at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in Ontario. Emissions were determined using Teflon enclosures, gas cryotrapping methods and gas chromatography (GC) with flame photometric detection. Dynamic (sweep flow) and static enclosures were employed which yielded similar results. Dissolved S gases and methane were determined by gas stripping followed by GC.

  19. Sustainable use of biogenic fuels resources through industrial synergies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuech, Andrea; Nelles, Michael; Nassour, Abdallah

    2017-01-01

    The term industrial symbiosis is used when traditionally separate companies and industries work together in a collective approach to physically exchange materials, energy, water and by-products with a mutual competitive advantage. Aim of the European project ''UBIS - Urban Baltic Industrial Symbiosis'' (INTERREG South-Baltic Programme) is to use biogenic resources as well as waste and residues sustainable in industrial symbiosis and to reduce emissions at the same time. Even if a lot has already been achieved in this area, there are still many unused material flows and there are possibilities to use them even more efficiently. In the project existing collaborations will be investigated as well as new ones identified and evaluated. This article introduces the UBIS project and provides an insight into the subject of industrial symbiosis as well examples described.

  20. Ion-induced nucleation of pure biogenic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkby, Jasper; Sengupta, Kamalika; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K; Wagner, Robert; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill; Dias, antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Onnela, antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Pringle, Kirsty; Rap, Alexandru; Richards, Nigel A D; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E; Seinfeld, John H; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander L; Wagner, Andrea C; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols and their effect on clouds are thought to be important for anthropogenic radiative forcing of the climate, yet remain poorly understood. Globally, around half of cloud condensation nuclei originate from nucleation of atmospheric vapours. It is thought that sulfuric acid is essential to initiate most particle formation in the atmosphere and that ions have a relatively minor role. Some laboratory studies, however, have reported organic particle formation without the intentional addition of sulfuric acid, although contamination could not be excluded. Here we present evidence for the formation of aerosol particles from highly oxidized biogenic vapours in the absence of sulfuric acid in a large chamber under atmospheric conditions. The highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) are produced by ozonolysis of $\\alpha$-pinene. We find that ions from Galactic cosmic rays increase the nucleation rate by one to two orders of magnitude compared with neutral nucleation. Our experimental findings are supported...

  1. Slow photon amplification of gas-phase ethanol photo-oxidation in titania inverse opal photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovic, Vedran, E-mail: vjov001@aucklanduni.ac.nz [School of Chemical Sciences, Science Centre, Building 301, 23 Symonds Street, Auckland 92019 (New Zealand); Idriss, Hicham, E-mail: IdrissH@sabic.com [Corporate Research and Development (CRD), Saudi Basic Industries Corporation (SABIC) at KAUST (Saudi Arabia); Waterhouse, Geoffrey I.N., E-mail: g.waterhouse@auckland.ac.nz [School of Chemical Sciences, Science Centre, Building 301, 23 Symonds Street, Auckland 92019 (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Dodd Walls Centre for Photonic and Quantum Technologies (New Zealand)

    2016-11-10

    Here we describe the successful fabrication of six titania inverse opal (TiO{sub 2} IO) photocatalysts with fcc[1 1 1] pseudo photonic band gaps (PBGs) tuned to span the UV–vis region. Photocatalysts were fabricated by a colloidal crystal templating and sol-gel approach – a robust and highly applicable bottom-up scheme which allowed for precise control over the geometric and optical properties of the TiO{sub 2} IO photocatalysts. Optical properties of the TiO{sub 2} IO thin films were investigated in detail by UV–vis transmittance and reflectance measurements. The PBG along the fcc[1 1 1] direction in the TiO{sub 2} IOs was dependent on the inter-planar spacing in the [1 1 1] direction, the incident angle of light and the refractive index of the medium filling the macropores in the IOs, in agreement with a modified Bragg’s law expression. Calculated photonic band structures for the photocatalysts revealed a PBG along the Γ → L direction at a/λ ∼ 0.74, in agreement with the experimental optical data. By coupling the low frequency edge of the PBG along the [1 1 1] direction with the electronic absorption edge of anatase TiO{sub 2}, a two-fold enhancement in the rate of gas phase ethanol photo-oxidation in air was achieved. This enhancement appears to be associated with a ‘slow photon’ effect that acts to both enhance TiO{sub 2} absorption and inhibit spontaneous emission (i.e. suppress electron-hole pair recombination).

  2. The MUMBA campaign: measurements of urban, marine and biogenic air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Paton-Walsh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Measurements of Urban, Marine and Biogenic Air (MUMBA campaign took place in Wollongong, New South Wales (a small coastal city approximately 80 km south of Sydney, Australia from 21 December 2012 to 15 February 2013. Like many Australian cities, Wollongong is surrounded by dense eucalyptus forest, so the urban airshed is heavily influenced by biogenic emissions. Instruments were deployed during MUMBA to measure the gaseous and aerosol composition of the atmosphere with the aim of providing a detailed characterisation of the complex environment of the ocean–forest–urban interface that could be used to test the skill of atmospheric models. The gases measured included ozone, oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane and many of the most abundant volatile organic compounds. The aerosol characterisation included total particle counts above 3 nm, total cloud condensation nuclei counts, mass concentration, number concentration size distribution, aerosol chemical analyses and elemental analysis.The campaign captured varied meteorological conditions, including two extreme heat events, providing a potentially valuable test for models of future air quality in a warmer climate. There was also an episode when the site sampled clean marine air for many hours, providing a useful additional measure of the background concentrations of these trace gases within this poorly sampled region of the globe. In this paper we describe the campaign, the meteorology and the resulting observations of atmospheric composition in general terms in order to equip the reader with a sufficient understanding of the Wollongong regional influences to use the MUMBA datasets as a case study for testing a chemical transport model. The data are available from PANGAEA (http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.871982.

  3. Emission of the main biogenic volatile organic compounds in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchetta, L.; Simon, V.; Torres, L.

    2000-01-01

    An estimation of biogenic emissions of the main non-methanic Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) due to the forest cover in France has been realized. 32 species representing 98% of French forest have been considered for the estimation. The latter dealt on a net made of 93 irregular spatial grids (Departments) with an average size of 75 km x 75 km. We assigned emission rates and foliar biomass densities specific to each of the 32 species. The environmental variables (temperature, light intensity) have been collected for the whole of French Departments. A special effort was extended so as to use ''Guenther's'' calculation algorithms, and specific emitting factors to species growing in France or in bordering countries. Along the way of the five years (1994-1998) of the study we have calculated the yearly mean of isoprene, mono-terpenes and Other Volatile Organic Compounds (OVOCs) emissions on the scale of the French Departments. At the national level isoprene emission is reckoned at 457 kt yr -1 and represents nearly 49% of the total emission, whereas mono-terpenes with 350 kt yr -1 and OVOCs with 129 kt yr -1 represent respectively 37% and 14% of the total. The yearly biogenic emission of VOCs in France represents virtually half the anthropic source. However in some regions (Mediterranean area) natural emissions can widely exceed anthropic emissions during certain periods. Let's note the whole of our results remains tinged with a great uncertainty because the estimations carried out are presented with correction factors that can reach values comprised between 4 and 7. (author)

  4. The MUMBA campaign: measurements of urban, marine and biogenic air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton-Walsh, Clare; Guérette, Élise-Andrée; Kubistin, Dagmar; Humphries, Ruhi; Wilson, Stephen R.; Dominick, Doreena; Galbally, Ian; Buchholz, Rebecca; Bhujel, Mahendra; Chambers, Scott; Cheng, Min; Cope, Martin; Davy, Perry; Emmerson, Kathryn; Griffith, David W. T.; Griffiths, Alan; Keywood, Melita; Lawson, Sarah; Molloy, Suzie; Rea, Géraldine; Selleck, Paul; Shi, Xue; Simmons, Jack; Velazco, Voltaire

    2017-06-01

    The Measurements of Urban, Marine and Biogenic Air (MUMBA) campaign took place in Wollongong, New South Wales (a small coastal city approximately 80 km south of Sydney, Australia) from 21 December 2012 to 15 February 2013. Like many Australian cities, Wollongong is surrounded by dense eucalyptus forest, so the urban airshed is heavily influenced by biogenic emissions. Instruments were deployed during MUMBA to measure the gaseous and aerosol composition of the atmosphere with the aim of providing a detailed characterisation of the complex environment of the ocean-forest-urban interface that could be used to test the skill of atmospheric models. The gases measured included ozone, oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane and many of the most abundant volatile organic compounds. The aerosol characterisation included total particle counts above 3 nm, total cloud condensation nuclei counts, mass concentration, number concentration size distribution, aerosol chemical analyses and elemental analysis.The campaign captured varied meteorological conditions, including two extreme heat events, providing a potentially valuable test for models of future air quality in a warmer climate. There was also an episode when the site sampled clean marine air for many hours, providing a useful additional measure of the background concentrations of these trace gases within this poorly sampled region of the globe. In this paper we describe the campaign, the meteorology and the resulting observations of atmospheric composition in general terms in order to equip the reader with a sufficient understanding of the Wollongong regional influences to use the MUMBA datasets as a case study for testing a chemical transport model. The data are available from PANGAEA (http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.871982).

  5. Monitoring of biogenic amines in cheeses manufactured at small-scale farms and in fermented dairy products in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buňková, Leona; Adamcová, Gabriela; Hudcová, Kateřina; Velichová, Helena; Pachlová, Vendula; Lorencová, Eva; Buňka, František

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was the monitoring of six biogenic amines (histamine, tyramine, phenylethylamine, tryptamine, putrescine, and cadaverine) and two polyamines (spermidine and spermine) in 112 samples of dairy products purchased in the Czech Republic, namely in 55 cheeses made in small-scale farms and in 57 fermented dairy products. The products were tested at the end of their shelf-life period. Neither tryptamine nor phenylethylamine was detected in the monitored samples; histamine was found only in four cheese samples containing up to 25mg/kg. The contents of spermine and spermidine were low and did not exceed the values of 35 mg/kg. Significant amounts of tyramine, putrescine, and cadaverine occurred especially in cheeses produced from ewe's milk or in long-term ripened cheeses. In about 10% of the tested cheeses, the total concentration of all the monitored biogenic amines and polyamines exceeded the level of 200mg/kg, which can be considered toxicologically significant. In fermented dairy products, the tested biogenic amines occurred in relatively low amounts (generally up to 30 mg/kg) that are regarded safe for the consumer's health. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. INSIGHTS INTO SPELEOTHEMS FROM LAVA TUBES OF THE GALAPAGOS ISLANDS (ECUADOR): MINERALOGY AND BIOGENICITY

    OpenAIRE

    Daza, Raquel; Gázquez, Fernando; Miller, Ana-Zelia; Sáiz-Jiménez, Cesáreo; Calaforra, José-María; Forti, Paolo; Rull, Fernando; Medina, Jesús; Sanz-Arranz, Aurelio; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Toulkeridis, Theofilos

    2016-01-01

    Different types of hard and soft speleothems (stalactites, stalagmites, columns, crusts, flowstones, micro-gours and botryoidal coralloids) have been observed throughout lava tubes in the Galapagos archipelago, Ecuador. Three lava tubes were studied in this work: Gallardo and Royal Palm volcanic caves (Santa Cruz Island) and Sucre Cave (Isabela Island). The studied speleothems were mainly formed by opal, calcite and clay minerals, including plagioclase and pyroxenes...

  7. Impacts of biogenic emissions of VOC and NOx on tropospheric ozone during summertime in eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin'geng; Han, Zhiwei; Wang, Tijian; Zhang, Renjian

    2008-05-20

    This study is intended to understand and quantify the impacts of biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) on the formation of tropospheric ozone during summertime in eastern China. The model system consists of the non-hydrostatic mesoscale meteorological model (MM5) and a tropospheric chemical and transport model (TCTM) with the updated carbon-bond chemical reaction mechanism (CBM-IV). The spatial resolution of the system domain is 30 km x 30 km. The impacts of biogenic emissions are investigated by performing simulations (36 h) with and without biogenic emissions, while anthropogenic emissions are constant. The results indicate that biogenic emissions have remarkable impacts on surface ozone in eastern China. In big cities and their surrounding areas, surface ozone formation tends to be VOC-limited. The increase in ozone concentration by biogenic VOC is generally 5 ppbv or less, but could be more than 10 ppbv or even 30 ppbv in some local places. The impacts of biogenic NO(x) are different or even contrary in different regions, depending on the relative availability of NO(x) and VOC. The surface ozone concentrations reduced or increased by the biogenic NO(x) could be as much as 10 ppbv or 20 ppbv, respectively. The impacts of biogenic emissions on ozone aloft are generally restricted to the boundary layer and generally more obvious during the daytime than during the nighttime. This study is useful for understanding the role of biogenic emissions and for planning strategies for surface ozone abatement in eastern China. Due to limitations of the emission inventories used and the highly non-linear nature of zone formation, however, some uncertainties remain in the results.

  8. Fabrication of transparent-conducting-oxide-coated inverse opals as mesostructured architectures for electrocatalysis applications: a case study with NiO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Vennesa O; DeMarco, Erica J; Katz, Michael J; Libera, Joseph A; Riha, Shannon C; Kim, Dong Wook; Avila, Jason R; Martinson, Alex B F; Elam, Jeffrey W; Pellin, Michael J; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2014-08-13

    Highly ordered, and conductive inverse opal arrays were made with silica and subsequently coated with tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) via atomic layer deposition (ALD). We demonstrate the utility of the resulting mesostructured electrodes by further coating them with nickel oxide via ALD. The NiO-coated arrays are capable of efficiently electrochemically evolving oxygen from water. These modular, crack-free, transparent, high surface area, and conducting structures show promise for many applications including electrocatalysis, photocatalysis, and dye-sensitized solar cells.

  9. Pêche récréative sur la Côte d'Opale : Quelles pratiques pour une meilleure gouvernance des littoraux ?

    OpenAIRE

    Audouit , Christelle; scientifique) , Hervé Flanquart (coordination; Breton , Florian Le; Carrard , Michel; Roche , Catherine; Herbert , Vincent; Voltaire , Louinord; Verlynde , Nicolas; Gibout , Christophe; Deboudt , Philippe; Chagnon , Philippe; Reboul , Serge; Noyer , Jean-Charles; Choquel , Jean-Bernard; Lherbier , Régis

    2017-01-01

    La recherche se focalisera sur les différentes formes de pêche récréative sur le rivage et dans la limite des deux milles nautiques, et ce sur la portion de la Côte d’Opale allant du cap Gris Nez au nord à Equihen au sud. L’objectif final est de contribuer à une meilleure gouvernance des pratiques, qui permettrait de concilier au mieux préservation des ressources et maintien d’activités traditionnelles faisant l’objet d’un fort attachement local. Pour ce faire, l’équipe mobilisera la compéten...

  10. Application of a nanoEA-IRMS system for δ13C measurement of biomineral-bound organics in samples of diatom opal with nanomolar quantities of C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Vicente, Ana; María Mejía-Ramírez, Luz; Stoll, Heather

    2013-04-01

    We describe the isotopic measurement of δ13C in very small samples of diatom opal (nanomolar quantities of C) both from fossil sediments and cultures. We use a nano-EA system composed of a combustion elemental analyzer (EA3000 series, Eurovector), with standard 18 mm diameter quartz oxidation-reduction reactors and an ash removal device that aids in removal of uncombusted opal and ensures a long reactor lifetime. This is coupled to a custom designed trapping and cromatography system (Nano-CF, Nu Instruments Ltd.) which cryogenically removes CO2 generated by sample combustion and introduces the gas into a low-flow helium carrier stream to the mass spectrometer (Nu Perspective IRMS instrument, Nu Instruments Ltd.). This technique allows for an important reduction in the minimum sample requirements for analysis compared to a typical EA, however the need to reduce the contribution of the blank to the measured values becomes all the more critical. Blank from the capsules can be minimized through specific protocols including cleaning with solvents and reducing the size of the capsule by cutting it to a smaller size, attaining blanks as low as 13.75±2.15 nmol C. Under these conditions we can accurately measure both standards and diatom reference materials in the range of 100 to 330 nmol C, with a precision of 2σ 10 ‰ analysed in sequence. Applied to measure biomineral-bound organics in cleaned diatom samples from sediments, the low sample size requirements of this technique allows us to analyse multiple size fractions within one sample, and explore isotopic fractionation patterns between them. We have analysed samples from sediments of both centric and pennate diatoms typically in the range of 200 to 1300 µg of cleaned opal. Analysis of culture samples of Thalassiosira pseudonana of 20 to 150 µg of cleaned opal, allows us to evaluate if there is covariation of the whole cell particulate organic carbon (POC) and diatom-bound δ13C values. Initial results suggest

  11. Operation of Marine Diesel Engines on Biogenic Fuels: Modification of Emissions and Resulting Climate Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Petzold, A.; Lauer, P.; Fritsche, U.; Hasselbach, J.; Lichtenstern, M.; Schlager, H.; Fleischer, F.

    2011-01-01

    The modification of emissions of climate-sensitive exhaust compounds such as CO2, NOx, hydrocarbons, and particulate matter from medium-speed marine diesel engines was studied for a set of fossil and biogenic fuels. Applied fossil fuels were the reference heavy fuel oil (HFO) and the low-sulfur marine gas oil (MGO); biogenic fuels were palm oil, soybean oil, sunflower oil, and animal fat. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to the production of biogenic fuels were treated by means of a fue...

  12. Sustainable use of biogenic fuels resources through industrial synergies; Nachhaltige energetische Nutzung biogener Ressourcen durch industrielle Synergien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuech, Andrea [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Professur Abfall- und Stoffstromwirtschaft; Nelles, Michael [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Agrar- und Umweltwissenschaftliche Fakultaet; Nassour, Abdallah

    2017-08-01

    The term industrial symbiosis is used when traditionally separate companies and industries work together in a collective approach to physically exchange materials, energy, water and by-products with a mutual competitive advantage. Aim of the European project ''UBIS - Urban Baltic Industrial Symbiosis'' (INTERREG South-Baltic Programme) is to use biogenic resources as well as waste and residues sustainable in industrial symbiosis and to reduce emissions at the same time. Even if a lot has already been achieved in this area, there are still many unused material flows and there are possibilities to use them even more efficiently. In the project existing collaborations will be investigated as well as new ones identified and evaluated. This article introduces the UBIS project and provides an insight into the subject of industrial symbiosis as well examples described.

  13. Transglutaminase-catalyzed amination of pea protein peptides using the biogenic amines histamine and tyramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinyao; Hrynets, Yuliya; Betti, Mirko

    2017-06-01

    Biogenic amines (BAs) are produced by the enzymatic decarboxylation of amino acids, and are well-known for their toxicity to humans. This study describes a new method using microbial transglutaminase (MTGase) to covalently link BAs such as histamine (HIS) and tyramine (TYR) to the glutamine residues of alcalase-hydrolyzed pea protein (PPH). The incubation of PPH and HIS and TYR in the presence of MTGase at 37 °C led to the formation of conjugates, as determined by liquid chromatography, after derivatization with dansyl chloride. Seventy-six % of HIS and 65% of TYR were covalently incorporated to PPH by MTGase. The incubation of PPH and TYR in the presence of MTGase exhibited a 52% DPPH radical scavenging activity at 10 mg mL -1 . Conjugation via MTGase improved the antioxidant status by reducing lipid peroxidation. This study emphasizes that the application of MTGase can effectively reduce histamine and tyramine content while simultaneously enhancing antioxidative capacity of PPH. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Quantitative Identification of Biogenic Nonextractable Pesticide Residues in Soil by (14)C-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poßberg, Claudia; Schmidt, Burkhard; Nowak, Karolina; Telscher, Markus; Lagojda, Andreas; Schaeffer, Andreas

    2016-06-21

    Quantification of nonextractable residues (NER) of pesticides in soil is feasible by use of radioactively labeled compounds, but structural information on these long-term stabilized residues is usually lacking. Microorganisms incorporate parts of the radiolabeled ((14)C-) carbon from contaminants into microbial biomass, which after cell death enters soil organic matter, thus forming biogenic nonextractable residues (bioNER). The formation of bioNER is not yet determinable in environmental fate studies due to a lack of methodology. This paper focuses on the development of a feasible analytical method to quantify proteinaceous carbon, since proteins make up the largest mass portion of bacterial cells. The test substance (14)C-bromoxynil after 56 days forms more than 70% of NER in soil. For further characterization of NER the amino acids were extracted, purified, and separated by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Visualization of the (14)C-amino acids was performed by bioimaging, unambiguous identification by GC-MS and LC-MS/MS. Our analysis revealed that after 56 days of incubation about 14.5% of the (14)C-label of bromoxynil was incorporated in amino acids. Extrapolating this content based on the amount of proteins in the biomass (55%), in total about 26% of the NER is accounted for by bioNER and thus is not environmentally relevant.

  15. Biogenic nanosilica blended by nanofibrillated cellulose as support for slow-release of tebuconazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattos, Bruno D.; Magalhães, Washington L. E.

    2016-09-01

    Despite the potential application of nanotechnology in the agricultural sector, it is not as competitive as other industrial sectors because these approaches do not demonstrate a sufficient economic return to counterbalance the high production costs. For biocidal purposes, the reduction of the initial costs can be addressed if biogenic nanosilica and nanofibrillated cellulose were used to prepare nanocomposite for further utilization as support for slow-release of tebuconazole. Infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis revealed that biocide was entrapped in the cellulose/silica nanocomposites network. The scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microtomography evaluation showed the nanocomposite's microstructure based on irregular shape nanosilica blended by nanofibrillated cellulose in a randomly organized network. Elemental mapping images showed the tebuconazole better dispersed in the composite blended with lower content of cellulose. The nanofibrillated cellulose played an important role in the release rate of the biocide mainly at short-term periods. At 15 days of immersion, the pure biocide had 95 % release compared with 30-45 % release of the tebuconazole loaded in the nanocomposites.

  16. Biogenic nanosilica blended by nanofibrillated cellulose as support for slow-release of tebuconazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattos, Bruno D., E-mail: brunodufaumattos@gmail.com [Federal University of Paraná, Integrated Graduate Program in Engineering and Materials Science, Polytechnic Center (Brazil); Magalhães, Washington L. E. [Embrapa Florestas (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    Despite the potential application of nanotechnology in the agricultural sector, it is not as competitive as other industrial sectors because these approaches do not demonstrate a sufficient economic return to counterbalance the high production costs. For biocidal purposes, the reduction of the initial costs can be addressed if biogenic nanosilica and nanofibrillated cellulose were used to prepare nanocomposite for further utilization as support for slow-release of tebuconazole. Infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis revealed that biocide was entrapped in the cellulose/silica nanocomposites network. The scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microtomography evaluation showed the nanocomposite’s microstructure based on irregular shape nanosilica blended by nanofibrillated cellulose in a randomly organized network. Elemental mapping images showed the tebuconazole better dispersed in the composite blended with lower content of cellulose. The nanofibrillated cellulose played an important role in the release rate of the biocide mainly at short-term periods. At 15 days of immersion, the pure biocide had 95 % release compared with 30–45 % release of the tebuconazole loaded in the nanocomposites.Graphical abstract.

  17. Biogenic volatile organic compound emissions along a high arctic soil moisture gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Sarah Hagel; Lindwall, Frida; Michelsen, Anders; Rinnan, Riikka

    2016-12-15

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from terrestrial ecosystems are important for the atmospheric chemistry and the formation of secondary organic aerosols, and may therefore influence the climate. Global warming is predicted to change patterns in precipitation and plant species compositions, especially in arctic regions where the temperature increase will be most pronounced. These changes are potentially highly important for the BVOC emissions but studies investigating the effects are lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the quality and quantity of BVOC emissions from a high arctic soil moisture gradient extending from dry tundra to a wet fen. Ecosystem BVOC emissions were sampled five times in the July-August period using a push-pull enclosure technique, and BVOCs trapped in absorbent cartridges were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Plant species compositions were estimated using the point intercept method. In order to take into account important underlying ecosystem processes, gross ecosystem production, ecosystem respiration and net ecosystem production were measured in connection with chamber-based BVOC measurements. Highest emissions of BVOCs were found from vegetation communities dominated by Salix arctica and Cassiope tetragona, which had emission profiles dominated by isoprene and monoterpenes, respectively. These results show that emissions of BVOCs are highly dependent on the plant cover supported by the varying soil moisture, suggesting that high arctic BVOC emissions may affect the climate differently if soil water content and plant cover change. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Winter climate change and fine root biogenic silica in sugar maple trees (Acer saccharum): Implications for silica in the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Timothy J.; Templer, Pamela H.; Battles, John J.; Fulweiler, Robinson W.

    2017-03-01

    Winter temperatures are projected to increase over the next century, leading to reductions in winter snowpack and increased frequency of soil freezing in many northern forest ecosystems. Here we examine biogenic silica (BSi) concentrations in sugar maple (Acer saccharum) fine roots collected from a snow manipulation experiment at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (New Hampshire, USA). Increased soil freezing significantly lowered the BSi content of sugar maple fine roots potentially decreasing their capacity to take up water and dissolved nutrients. The reduced silica uptake (8 ± 1 kmol silica km-2) by sugar maple fine roots is comparable to silica export from temperate forest watersheds. We estimate that fine roots account for 29% of sugar maple BSi, despite accounting for only 4% of their biomass. These results suggest that increased frequency of soil freezing will reduce silica uptake by temperate tree roots, thereby changing silica availability in downstream receiving waters.

  19. Criteria for the recognition of pedogenic/supergene and nonpedogenic/hypogene deposits and their relationship to the origin of calcite/opal deposits at Yucca Mountain. Special report No. 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, C.A.; Schluter, C.M.; Monger, H.C.

    1993-10-01

    This study is part of the research program of the Yucca Mountain Project intended to provide the State of Nevada with a detailed assessment of the geology and geochemistry of Yucca Mountain and adjacent regions. The purpose of this report is to try and establish criteria for the recognition of pedogenic/supergene deposits of calcite/opal versus non-pedogenic/hypogene deposits of calcite/opal. Far from being of esoteric concern, this subject is of paramount importance to the pedogenic-hypogene debate which rages around the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a high-level radioactive waste repository site

  20. Synthesis of biogenic Ag@Pd Core-shell nanoparticles having anti-cancer/anti-microbial functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Fattah, Wafa I; Eid, M M; Abd El-Moez, Sh I; Mohamed, E; Ali, Ghareib W

    2017-08-15

    Biogenic Ag@Pd core-shell nanoparticles were greenly synthesized within two plant extracts aiming at enhanced anticancer/bactericidal functions. These functions were verified for the two Pd@Ag biogenic core-shell nanoparticles (BCSnp) with constant Pd to several Ag contents. BCSnp were synthesized within two extracts of Almond nuts and Black Berry fruits, four samples each, through simple, low cost and echo friendly microwave route. The BCSnp Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) was detected via UV/visible spectrophotometer. Their morphology was assessed using High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope supplemented with EDAX. Particle size/zeta potential of the achieved nanoparticles was measured. The active reducing groups were depicted by FTIR while XRD assessed nanoparticles crystallinity. The enhanced particle size distribution as proved by UV and band gap energies, imparted better functionality by the Almond extract compared to the berry one due to its protein content. Cytotoxicity against human breast cancer (MCF7) and liver cancer (HEPG2) cell lines were followed and compared to the normal Wish cells. The antimicrobial impact against gram-negative (G - veo) E. coli, gram-positive (G + ve) S. aureus bacteria and mycotic strain C. albicans species were verified and compared to antibiotics. A significant inhibition of cancer cell growth of MCF 7 and HEPG2 compared to Wish normal cells and doxorubicin is assessed. A discriminative effect was recorded for G - ve compared to G + ve, along with Mycotic strain C. albicans is achieved. The obtained BCSnp are proposed for cancer therapy and bactericidal applications with improved efficiency applying the nanomedicine approach. Tailorable properties can be obtained by tuning the individual structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A comparison between acoustic properties and heat effects in biogenic (magnetosomes) and abiotic magnetite nanoparticle suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Józefczak, A., E-mail: aras@amu.edu.pl [Institute of Acoustics, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Leszczyński, B. [Institute of Acoustics, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Skumiel, A.; Hornowski, T. [Institute of Acoustics, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles show unique properties and find many applications because of the possibility to control their properties using magnetic field. Magnetic nanoparticles are usually synthesized chemically and modification of the particle surface is necessary. Another source of magnetic nanoparticles are various magnetotactic bacteria. These biogenic nanoparticles (magnetosomes) represent an attractive alternative to chemically synthesized iron oxide particles because of their unique characteristics and a high potential for biotechnological and biomedical applications. This work presents a comparison between acoustic properties of biogenic and abiotic magnetite nanoparticle suspensions. Experimental studies have shown the influence of a biological membrane on the ultrasound properties of magnetosomes suspension. Finally the heat effect in synthetic and biogenic magnetite nanoparticles is also discussed. The experimental study shows that magnetosomes present good heating efficiency. - Highlights: • A biogenic and abiotic magnetite nanoparticle suspensions are investigated. • A comparison between ultrasonic properties and heat effects is presented. • Magnetosomes and abiotic magnetite nanoparticles exhibit good heating efficiency.

  2. Aging of biogenic secondary organic aerosol via gas-phase OH radical reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donahue, Neil M.; Henry, Kaytlin M.; Mentel, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    The Multiple Chamber Aerosol Chemical Aging Study (MUCHACHAS) tested the hypothesis that hydroxyl radical (OH) aging significantly increases the concentration of first-generation biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA). OH is the dominant atmospheric oxidant, and MUCHACHAS employed environmental...

  3. Biogenic amines degradation by malolactic bacteria: towards a potential application in wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio eCapozzi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic amines in wine represent a toxicological risk for the health of the consumer, with several trade implications. In this study 26 strains of Lactobacillus plantarum were analysed for their ability to degrade biogenic amines commonly found during wine fermentation. Two strains of L. plantarum were selected in reason of their ability to degrade putrescine and tyramine. The degradation was assessed in vitro, both in presence of the biogenic amines and in presence of the specific chemical precursor and of producer bacteria. The two L. plantarum biotypes were found capable to work synergically. In addition, the survival in wine-like medium and the aptitude to degrade malic acid after alcoholic fermentation of the selected L. plantarum strains was analysed. Our results suggest the potential application of wine L. plantarum strains to design malolactic starter cultures able to degrade biogenic amines in wine.

  4. A comparison between acoustic properties and heat effects in biogenic (magnetosomes) and abiotic magnetite nanoparticle suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Józefczak, A.; Leszczyński, B.; Skumiel, A.; Hornowski, T.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles show unique properties and find many applications because of the possibility to control their properties using magnetic field. Magnetic nanoparticles are usually synthesized chemically and modification of the particle surface is necessary. Another source of magnetic nanoparticles are various magnetotactic bacteria. These biogenic nanoparticles (magnetosomes) represent an attractive alternative to chemically synthesized iron oxide particles because of their unique characteristics and a high potential for biotechnological and biomedical applications. This work presents a comparison between acoustic properties of biogenic and abiotic magnetite nanoparticle suspensions. Experimental studies have shown the influence of a biological membrane on the ultrasound properties of magnetosomes suspension. Finally the heat effect in synthetic and biogenic magnetite nanoparticles is also discussed. The experimental study shows that magnetosomes present good heating efficiency. - Highlights: • A biogenic and abiotic magnetite nanoparticle suspensions are investigated. • A comparison between ultrasonic properties and heat effects is presented. • Magnetosomes and abiotic magnetite nanoparticles exhibit good heating efficiency.

  5. Biogenic silver nanoparticles synthesized with rhamnogalacturonan gum: Antibacterial activity, cytotoxicity and its mode of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Jyothi Kora

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanoparticles synthesized from gum kondagogu (5 nm were used to evaluate the antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. To decipher the mode of antibacterial action of nanoparticles, a comprehensive study was carried out employing a variety of susceptibility assays: micro-broth dilution, antibiofilm activity, growth kinetics, cytoplasmic content leakage, membrane permeabilization, etc. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and cell surface damage during bacterial nanoparticle interaction were also demonstrated using dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, N-acetylcysteine; and scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectra. Further, the biocompatibility with HeLa cell line was also evaluated. Compared to earlier reports, the minimum inhibitory concentration values were lower by 3.2- and 16-folds for Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative Escherichia coli strains, respectively. The minimum bactericidal concentration values were lower by 4 and 50-folds. Thus, the biogenic silver nanoparticles were found to be more potent bactericidal agents in terms of concentration. The nanoparticles exhibited significant antibiofilm activity against test strains at 2 μg mL−1, which can have implications in the treatment of drug resistant bacterial infections caused by biofilms. Growth curve in nanoparticle supplemented indicated a faster inhibition in Gram-negative bacteria as compared to Gram-positive. Treatment with nanoparticles caused cytoplasmic content leakage and membrane permeabilization in a dose dependent manner, an evidence for membrane damage. The observations noted in our study substantiated the association of ROS and membrane damage in the antibacterial action of silver nanoparticles. The promising antibacterial activity enables these nanoparticles as potential bactericidal material for various environmental and biomedical applications.

  6. Biogenic hardparts: Difficult archives of the geological past (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immenhauser, A.; Schone, B. R.; Hoffmann, R.; Niedermayr, A.

    2013-12-01

    Biomineralized exo- or endoskeletons of fossil marine invertebrates are widespread and diverse components of the Phanerozoic rock record of Earth's past and present oceans. Exoskeletons serve as protection against environmental pressure or predators, whilst endoskeletons can act as support or serve as an attachment for muscles and ligaments and hence as a mechanism for transmitting muscular forces. Biogenic hard parts represent sophisticated products resulting from the hierarchical interaction of inorganic minerals (95%) and macromolecular organic matrices, forming commonly less than 5%. The significance of many biogenic carbonate archives lies in the time-resolved growth patterns and their ability to record ambient environmental conditions in the form of multiple geochemical properties (multi-proxy archives) that have been widely used to assess past oceanic seawater properties. Here, we compile and review published work dealing with crystallization pathways of skeletal hard parts secreted by mollusks (i.e., bivalves and cephalopods) as well as brachiopods as widely used archives of ancient neritic epeiric settings. Bivalves and cephalopods (e.g., extinct ammonoids and belemnites and extant Sepia, Nautilus and Spirula) all form accretionary calcitic, aragonitic or vateritic skeletal hard parts. Despite the fact that mollusks and brachiopods form part of very different branches of the animal phylogenetic tree, their biomineralization strategies are surprisingly similar. Our main focus lies in a critical assessment of the complex pathways of ions and aquo-complexes from their source (seawater) to the final product (biomineral). We do this as an attempt to critically test the commonly held hypothesis that many fossil hard parts precipitated (under favorable conditions and pending subsequent diagenetic alteration) in equilibrium with seawater. Two main observations stand out: (1) the present knowledge on pathways and mechanisms (e.g., ion channel trans-membrane or

  7. Sub-Antarctic marine aerosol: dominant contributions from biogenic sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schmale

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic influences on the composition and characteristics of aerosol were investigated on Bird Island (54°00' S, 38°03' W in the South Atlantic during November and December 2010. This remote marine environment is characterised by large seabird and seal colonies. The chemical composition of the submicron particles, measured by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS, was 21% non-sea-salt sulfate, 2% nitrate, 8% ammonium, 22% organics and 47% sea salt including sea salt sulfate. A new method to isolate the sea spray signature from the high-resolution AMS data was applied. Generally, the aerosol was found to be less acidic than in other marine environments due to the high availability of ammonia, from local fauna emissions. By positive matrix factorisation five different organic aerosol (OA profiles could be isolated: an amino acid/amine factor (AA-OA, 18% of OA mass, a methanesulfonic acid OA factor (MSA-OA, 25%, a marine oxygenated OA factor (M-OOA, 41%, a sea spray OA fraction (SS-OA, 7% and locally produced hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, 9%. The AA-OA was dominant during the first two weeks of November and found to be related with the hatching of penguins in a nearby colony. This factor, rich in nitrogen (N : C ratio = 0.13, has implications for the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen in the area as particulate matter is often transported over longer distances than gaseous N-rich compounds. The MSA-OA was mainly transported from more southerly latitudes where phytoplankton bloomed. The bloom was identified as one of three sources for particulate sulfate on Bird Island, next to sea salt sulfate and sulfate transported from South America. M-OOA was the dominant organic factor and found to be similar to marine OA observed at Mace Head, Ireland. An additional OA factor highly correlated with sea spray aerosol was identified (SS-OA. However, based on the available data the type of mixture, internal or external, could not be determined. Potassium was not

  8. Bacterial iron reduction and biogenic mineral formation for the stabilisation of corroded iron objects

    OpenAIRE

    Kooli, Wafa M.; Comensoli, Lucrezia; Maillard, Julien; Albini, Monica; Gelb, Arnaud; Junier, Pilar; Joseph, Edith

    2018-01-01

    Exploiting bacterial metabolism for the stabilisation of corroded iron artefacts is a promising alternative to conventional conservation-restoration methods. Bacterial iron reduction coupled to biogenic mineral formation has been shown to promote the conversion of reactive into stable corrosion products that are integrated into the natural corrosion layer of the object. However, in order to stabilise iron corrosion, the formation of specific biogenic minerals is essential. In this study, we u...

  9. Global comparison reveals biogenic weathering as driven by nutrient limitation at ecosystem scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boy, Jens; Godoy, Roberto; Dechene, Annika; Shibistova, Olga; Amir, Hamid; Iskandar, Issi; Fogliano, Bruno; Boy, Diana; McCulloch, Robert; Andrino, Alberto; Gschwendtner, Silvia; Marin, Cesar; Sauheitl, Leopold; Dultz, Stefan; Mikutta, Robert; Guggenberger, Georg

    2017-04-01

    A substantial contribution of biogenic weathering in ecosystem nutrition, especially by symbiotic microorganisms, has often been proposed, but large-scale in vivo studies are still missing. Here we compare a set of ecosystems spanning from the Antarctic to tropical forests for their potential biogenic weathering and its drivers. To address biogenic weathering rates, we installed mineral mesocosms only accessible for bacteria and fungi for up to 4 years, which contained freshly broken and defined nutrient-baring minerals in soil A horizons of ecosystems along a gradient of soil development differing in climate and plant species communities. Alterations of the buried minerals were analyzed by grid-intersection, confocal lascer scanning microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy on the surface and on thin sections. On selected sites, carbon fluxes were tracked by 13C labeling, and microbial community was identified by DNA sequencing. In young ecosystems (protosoils) biogenic weathering is almost absent and starts after first carbon accumulation by aeolian (later litter) inputs and is mainly performed by bacteria. With ongoing soil development and appearance of symbiotic (mycorrhized) plants, nutrient availability in soil increasingly drove biogenic weathering, and fungi became the far more important players than bacteria. We found a close relation between fungal biogenic weathering and available potassium across all 16 forested sites in the study, regardless of the dominant mycorrhiza type (AM or EM), climate, and plant-species composition. We conclude that nutrient limitations at ecosystem scale are generally counteracted by adapted fungal biogenic weathering. The close relation between fungal weathering and plant-available nutrients over a large range of severely contrasting ecosystems points towards a direct energetic support of these weathering processes by the photoautotrophic community, making biogenic weathering a

  10. Production of protons in the decay of Z0 measured by means of OPAL detector at LEP storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, A.

    1997-09-01

    From the data samples accumulated from 1991 to 1994 by the OPAL detector during the first phase of operation at LEP, the proton production rates are measured with the help of the time-of-flight (TOF) detector. A method is developed for the measurement of the pion and proton production rates with the velocity spectra. The velocity is calculated from the time-of-flight measurement. This method offers the best results in the momentum range from 0.8 to 1.8 GeV/c. This range gives inclusive rates of 4.09 ± 0.01 ± 0.28 pions and 0.227 ± 0.002 ± 0.019 protons per event. This method is then adapted to 3-jet events by using the E0 jet-finder with a y cut of 0.03 to separate the jets. After regrouping the jets by their energy, the proton rates are calculated as a function of track momentum and jet energy. Dividing the rates by the jet charged multiplicity leads to relative rates that have less of an energy dependence than absolute rates. The relative rates in the measured momentum range are converted to R pp -bar, the rates for the total momentum range, by a factor calculated with the Monte Carlo. After fitting R pp -bar gluon and R pp -bar quark , their ratio, R pp -bar gluon /R pp -bar quark , is 0.971 ± 0.019 (stat) -0.090 +0.099 (sys) for the fit between 5 and 45 GeV and 1.054 ± 0.027 (stat) -0.094 +0.102 (sys) for the fit between 5 and 40 GeV. The relatively high value of R pp -bar in the last energy bin decreases the ratio R pp -bar gluon /R pp -bar quark . On the other hand, the ratio obtained by the values from the fit without the last bin is in agreement with the results from other analyses. (author)

  11. Inverse Opal-like Porous MoSex Films for Hydrogen Evolution Catalysis: Overpotential-Pore Size Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Xinyi; Pumera, Martin

    2018-02-07

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are prized as electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Common TMD syntheses entail conditions of high temperatures and reagents that are detrimental to the environment. The electrochemical synthesis of TMDs is advocated as a viable alternative to the conventional synthetic procedures in terms of simplicity, ecological sustainability, and versatility of deposition on various surfaces at room temperature. In this work, we demonstrate the successful fabrication of electrocatalytic inverse opal porous MoSe x films, where 2 ≤ x ≤ 3, via solid template-assisted electrodeposition from the simultaneous electroreduction of molybdic acid and selenium dioxide as the respective metal and chalcogen precursors in an aqueous electrolyte. The electrosynthesized porous MoSe x films contain pores with diameters of 0.1, 0.3, 0.6, or 1.0 μm, depending on the size of the polystyrene bead template used. The investigation reveals that porous MoSe x films with a pore size of 0.1 μm, which prevailed over the other pore sizes, are endowed with the lowest HER overpotential of 0.57 V at -30 mA cm -2 and a Tafel slope of 118 mV dec -1 , alluding to the adsorption step as rate limiting. Across all pore sizes, the Volmer adsorption step limits the HER mechanism. Nevertheless, the pore size dictates the catalytic activity of the porous MoSe x films apropos of HER overpotential such that the HER performance of smaller pore sizes of 0.1 and 0.3 μm surpasses those with wider pore sizes of 0.6 and 1.0 μm. The observed trends in their HER behavior may be rationalized by the tunable surface wettability as pore sizes vary. These fundamental findings offer a glimpse into the efficacy of electrodeposited porous TMDs as electrocatalysts and exemplify the feasibility of the electrosynthesis method in altering the morphological structure of the TMDs.

  12. [Factors associated with eating disorders in students of the University of Littoral Côte d'Opale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhem, E; El Hage, R; Pezé, T; Hurdiel, R; Zunquin, G; Theunynck, D

    2015-08-01

    Our study aimed to observe the rate of eating disorders in first year public health students (allied medical and sports) of the University of the Littoral Opal Coast (ULCO) using the SCOFF-F (Sick, Control, One, stone, Fat, Food; French version) questionnaire and to compare morphological characteristics, level of physical condition, level of physical activity and sleep quality. Overall 642 subjects (459 women and 183 men) aged 22years (20.9±4.9years) participated in this study (Universanté-CEMHaVi). Weight, height, and fat mass were measured, and waist-to-hip ratio and body mass index (BMI) were calculated. The level of physical condition was evaluated using several physical tests: Leger and Boucher (20m) and shuttle run (4×10m), Sargent-test and handgrip strength. The SCOFF-F questionnaire followed by a clinical maintenance conducted by a professional was used to detect eating disorders. Several other questionnaires were used to evaluate the physical activity level; General Practice Assessment Questionnaire (GPAQ) and wellness. Sleep quality index was evaluated using Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). SCOFF-F was positive in 24.2% of women and 10.2% of men. In women, there were no significant differences between those who had a positive SCOFF-F screening and those who had a negative SCOFF-F screening regarding age, height, waist-to-hip ratio, level of physical condition measured and level of physical activity evaluated. However, significant differences were found between women who had a positive SCOFF-F screening and women who had a negative SCOFF-F screening regarding sleep quality, well-being score, BMI and fat mass. In men, significant differences were found between those who had a positive SCOFF-F screening and those who had a negative SCOFF-F screening regarding BMI and fat mass. This study suggests that in both sexes, having a positive SCOFF-F screening is associated with higher BMI. In women, the increase in BMI and the perturbations in sleep

  13. Determination of the mass and width of the W-boson using the semileptonic decay channel with the OPAL detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Vollmer, Cornelius Fritz

    2004-01-01

    Diese Arbeit ist eine Weiterentwicklung der beim OPAL-Experiment verwendeten Faltungsmethode zur Bestimmung der Masse des geladenen Eichbosons der schwachen Wechselwirkung. Die Methode wurde ausgeweitet auf eine gleichzeitige Bestimmung der Masse Mw und der Zerfallsbreite Gw des W-Boson genannten Eichbosons. Analysiert wurden dazu Daten, die mit dem OPAL-Experiment in den Jahren 1997 bis 2000 aufgezeichnet wurden. Von den möglichen Zerfällen der erzeugten W-Bosonpaare werden nur semileptonische betrachtet, bei denen ein W-Boson hadronisch in ein Quark-Antiquark-Paar zerfällt und das andere in ein geladenes Lepton und ein Neutrino. In der Faltungsmethode werden die aus der Detektorauflösung resultierenden Fehler der einzelnen Ereignisse berücksichtigt. Dazu wird eine Funktion P(m) für jedes Ereignis ermittelt, welche die Wahrscheinlichkeit angibt, daß die produzierten W-Bosonen eine mittlere Masse m haben. Diese sogenannte Ereigniswahrscheinlichkeitsdichte wird mit einer Physikfunktion PF(m;Mw,Gw) gefal...

  14. Influence of atmospheric 14CO2 on determination of the ratio of biogenic carbon to fossil one in exhaust gases using accelerator mass spectrometry. Experimental evaluation for industrial flue gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunoki, Shunji; Saito, Masaaki; Nagakawa, Yoshiyasu

    2012-01-01

    The influence of atmospheric 14 CO 2 was evaluated on the determination of biogenic carbon ratios in industrial flue gases using accelerated mass spectrometry(AMS). Bioethanol, n-hexane, and their mixtures were combusted with a four-stroke engine, and 14 CO 2 in exhaust gases was analyzed by AMS. The experimental biogenic carbon ratio determined by ASTM D6866 method was 1.2 times higher than the theoretical value of mixed fuel containing 3.18% biogenic carbons. In general, the influence of atmospheric 14 CO 2 taken in combustion gases is neglected. It seems that the error cannot be neglected under international trading of emission allowances, where a large amount of carbons in the fuel were evaluated. The experimental value became to be the theoretical value by subtracting the amount of atmospheric 14 C from that of the samples. As the contents of biofuel increased, the experimental biogenic carbon ratios reached the theoretical values and the influence of atmospheric 14 CO 2 decreased. We recommend that the influence of atmospheric 14 CO 2 should be corrected when fuel samples contain low amounts of 14 C. (author)

  15. Managing Your Wine Fermentation to Reduce the Risk of Biogenic Amine Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Anita Yolandi; Engelbrecht, Lynn; du Toit, Maret

    2012-01-01

    Biogenic amines are nitrogenous organic compounds produced in wine from amino acid precursors mainly by microbial decarboxylation. The concentration of biogenic amines that can potentially be produced is dependent on the amount of amino acid precursors in the medium, the presence of decarboxylase positive microorganisms and conditions that enable microbial or biochemical activity such as the addition of nutrients to support the inoculated starter cultures for alcoholic and malolactic fermentation (MLF). MLF can be conducted using co-inoculation or an inoculation after the completion of alcoholic fermentation that may also affect the level of biogenic amines in wine. This study focused on the impact of the addition of complex commercial yeast and bacterial nutrients and the use of different MLF inoculation scenarios on the production of biogenic amines in wine. Results showed that the addition of complex nutrients to real grape must could potentially increase histamine concentrations in wine. The same experiment in synthetic grape must showed a similar trend for putrescine and cadaverine. The effect of different MLF inoculation scenarios was examined in two cultivars, Pinotage and Shiraz. Conflicting results was obtained. In the Shiraz, co-inoculation resulted in lower biogenic amine concentrations after MLF compared to before MLF, while the concentration was higher in the Pinotage. However, the production of biogenic amines was affected more by the presence of decarboxylase positive lactic acid bacteria than by the addition of complex nutrients or the inoculation scenario. PMID:22419915

  16. Land use change affects biogenic silica pool distribution in a subtropical soil toposequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Unzué-Belmonte

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Land use change (deforestation has several negative consequences for the soil system. It is known to increase erosion rates, which affect the distribution of elements in soils. In this context, the crucial nutrient Si has received little attention, especially in a tropical context. Therefore, we studied the effect of land conversion and erosion intensity on the biogenic silica pools in a subtropical soil in the south of Brazil. Biogenic silica (BSi was determined using a novel alkaline continuous extraction where Si / Al ratios of the fractions extracted are used to distinguish BSi and other soluble fractions: Si / Al > 5 for the biogenic AlkExSi (alkaline-extractable Si and Si / Al < 5 for the non-biogenic AlkExSi. Our study shows that deforestation can rapidly (< 50 years deplete the biogenic AlkExSi pool in soils depending on the slope of the study site (10–53 %, with faster depletion in steeper sites. We show that higher erosion in steeper sites implies increased accumulation of biogenic Si in deposition zones near the bottom of the slope, where rapid burial can cause removal of BSi from biologically active zones. Our study highlights the interaction of erosion strength and land use for BSi redistribution and depletion in a soil toposequence, with implications for basin-scale Si cycling.

  17. [Development of biogenic VOC emissions inventory with high temporal and spatial resolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Y; Zhang, Y; Xie, S; Zeng, L

    2001-11-01

    A new method was developed to estimate biogenic VOC emissions with high temporal and spatial resolution by use of Mesoscale Meteorology Modeling System Version5 (MM5). In this method, the isoprene and monoterpene standard emission factors for some types of tree in China were given and the standard VOC emission factors and seasonally average densities of leaf biomass for all types of vegetation were determined. A biogenic VOC emissions inventory in South China was established which could meet the requirement of regional air quality modeling. Total biogenic VOC emissions in a typical summer day were estimated to be 1.12 x 10(4) metric tons in an area of 729 km x 729 km of South China. The results showed the temporal and spatial distributions of biogenic VOC emission rates in this area. The results also showed that the geographical distribution of biogenic VOC emission rates depended on vegetation types and their distributions and the diurnal variation mainly depended on the solar radiation and temperature. The uncertainties of estimating biogenic VOC emissions were also discussed.

  18. Operation of marine diesel engines on biogenic fuels: modification of emissions and resulting climate effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Andreas; Lauer, Peter; Fritsche, Uwe; Hasselbach, Jan; Lichtenstern, Michael; Schlager, Hans; Fleischer, Fritz

    2011-12-15

    The modification of emissions of climate-sensitive exhaust compounds such as CO(2), NO(x), hydrocarbons, and particulate matter from medium-speed marine diesel engines was studied for a set of fossil and biogenic fuels. Applied fossil fuels were the reference heavy fuel oil (HFO) and the low-sulfur marine gas oil (MGO); biogenic fuels were palm oil, soybean oil, sunflower oil, and animal fat. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to the production of biogenic fuels were treated by means of a fuel life cycle analysis which included land use changes associated with the growth of energy plants. Emissions of CO(2) and NO(x) per kWh were found to be similar for fossil fuels and biogenic fuels. PM mass emission was reduced to 10-15% of HFO emissions for all low-sulfur fuels including MGO as a fossil fuel. Black carbon emissions were reduced significantly to 13-30% of HFO. Changes in emissions were predominantly related to particulate sulfate, while differences between low-sulfur fossil fuels and low-sulfur biogenic fuels were of minor significance. GHG emissions from the biogenic fuel life cycle (FLC) depend crucially on energy plant production conditions and have the potential of shifting the overall GHG budget from positive to negative compared to fossil fuels.

  19. Fungal spores overwhelm biogenic organic aerosols in a midlatitudinal forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Zhu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Both primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs and oxidation products of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs contribute significantly to organic aerosols (OAs in forested regions. However, little is known about their relative importance in diurnal timescales. Here, we report biomarkers of PBAP and secondary organic aerosols (SOAs for their diurnal variability in a temperate coniferous forest in Wakayama, Japan. Tracers of fungal spores, trehalose, arabitol and mannitol, showed significantly higher levels in nighttime than daytime (p < 0.05, resulting from the nocturnal sporulation under near-saturated relative humidity. On the contrary, BVOC oxidation products showed higher levels in daytime than nighttime, indicating substantial photochemical SOA formation. Using tracer-based methods, we estimated that fungal spores account for 45 % of organic carbon (OC in nighttime and 22 % in daytime, whereas BVOC oxidation products account for 15 and 19 %, respectively. To our knowledge, we present for the first time highly time-resolved results that fungal spores overwhelmed BVOC oxidation products in contributing to OA especially in nighttime. This study emphasizes the importance of both PBAPs and SOAs in forming forest organic aerosols.

  20. Leishmanicidal Activity of Biogenic Fe₃O₄ Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Mehrdad; Alijani, Hajar; Sharifi, Iraj; Sharifi, Fatemeh; Pourseyedi, Shahram; Kharazi, Sam; Lima Nobre, Marcos Augusto; Khatami, Manouchehr

    2017-11-20

    Abstract : Due to the multiplicity of useful applications of metal oxide nanoparticles (ONPs) in medicine are growing exponentially, in this study, Fe₃O₄ (iron oxide) nanoparticles (IONPs) were biosynthesized using Rosemary to evaluate the leishmanicidal efficiency of green synthesized IONPs. This is the first report of the leishmanicidal efficiency of green synthesized IONPs against Leishmania major . The resulting biosynthesized IONPs were characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The leishmanicidal activity of IONPS was studied via 3-4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results showed the fabrication of the spherical shape of monodisperse IONPs with a size 4 ± 2 nm. The UV-visible spectrophotometer absorption peak was at 334 nm. The leishmanicidal activity of biogenic iron oxide nanoparticles against Leishmania major (promastigote) was also studied. The IC 50 of IONPs was 350 µg/mL. In this report, IONPs were synthesized via a green method. IONPs are mainly spherical and homogeneous, with an average size of about 4 nm, and were synthesized here using an eco-friendly, simple, and inexpensive method.

  1. Leishmanicidal Activity of Biogenic Fe3O4 Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Khatami

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Due to the multiplicity of useful applications of metal oxide nanoparticles (ONPs in medicine are growing exponentially, in this study, Fe3O4 (iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs were biosynthesized using Rosemary to evaluate the leishmanicidal efficiency of green synthesized IONPs. This is the first report of the leishmanicidal efficiency of green synthesized IONPs against Leishmania major. The resulting biosynthesized IONPs were characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis, X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The leishmanicidal activity of IONPS was studied via 3-4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. The results showed the fabrication of the spherical shape of monodisperse IONPs with a size 4 ± 2 nm. The UV-visible spectrophotometer absorption peak was at 334 nm. The leishmanicidal activity of biogenic iron oxide nanoparticles against Leishmania major (promastigote was also studied. The IC50 of IONPs was 350 µg/mL. In this report, IONPs were synthesized via a green method. IONPs are mainly spherical and homogeneous, with an average size of about 4 nm, and were synthesized here using an eco-friendly, simple, and inexpensive method.

  2. Analysis of irradiated biogenic amines by computational chemistry and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Jorge L.S.P.; Borges Junior, Itamar; Cardozo, Monique; Souza, Stefania P.; Lima, Antonio L.S.; Lima, Keila S.C.

    2011-01-01

    Biogenic Amines (B A) are nitrogenous compounds able to cause food poisoning. In this work, we studied the tyramine, one of the most common BA present in foods by combining experimental measured IR (Infrared) and GC/MS (Gas Chromatograph / Mass Spectrometry) spectra and computational quantum chemistry. Density Functional Theory (DFT) and the Deformed Atoms in Molecules (DMA) method was used to compute the partition the electronic densities in a chemically-intuitive way and electrostatic potentials of molecule to identify the acid and basic sites. Trading pattern was irradiated using a Cs 137 radiator, and each sample was identified by IR and GC/MS. Calculated and experimental IR spectra were compared. We observed that ionizing gamma irradiation was very effective in decreasing the population of standard amine, resulting in fragments that could be rationalized through the quantum chemistry calculations. In particular, we could locate the acid and basic sites of both molecules and identify possible sites of structural weaknesses, which allowed to propose mechanistic schemes for the breaking of chemical bonds by the irradiation. Moreover, from this work we hope it will be also possible to properly choose the dose of gamma irradiation which should be provided to eliminate each type of contamination. (author)

  3. Ambient Gas-Particle Partitioning of Tracers for Biogenic Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabriel; Yee, Lindsay D.; Kreisberg, Nathan M.; Wernis, Rebecca; Moss, Joshua A.; Hering, Susanne V.; de Sa, Suzanne; Martin, Scot T.; Alexander, Mikaela L.; Palm, Brett B.; Hu, Weiwei; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Day, Douglas; Jimenez, Jose L.; Riva, Matthieu; Surratt, Jason D.; Viegas, Juarez; Manzi, Antonio; Edgerton, Eric S.; Baumann, K.; Souza, Rodrigo A.; Artaxo, Paulo; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2016-08-23

    Exchange of atmospheric organic compounds between gas and particle phases is important in the production and chemistry of particle-phase mass but is poorly understood due to a lack of simultaneous measurements in both phases of individual compounds. Measurements of particle- and gas phase organic compounds are reported here for the southeastern United States and central Amazonia. Polyols formed from isoprene oxidation contribute 8% and 15% on average to particle-phase organic mass at these sites but are also observed to have substantial gas-phase concentrations contrary to many models that treat these compounds as nonvolatile. The results of the present study show that the gas-particle partitioning of approximately 100 known and newly observed oxidation products is not well explained by environmental factors (e.g., temperature). Compounds having high vapor pressures have higher particle fractions than expected from absorptive equilibrium partitioning models. These observations support the conclusion that many commonly measured biogenic oxidation products may be bound in low-volatility mass (e.g., accretion products, inorganic organic adducts) that decomposes to individual compounds on analysis. However, the nature and extent of any such bonding remains uncertain. Similar conclusions are reach for both study locations, and average particle fractions for a given compound are consistent within similar to 25% across measurement sites.

  4. Cryogenic Displacement and Accumulation of Biogenic Methane in Frozen Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleb Kraev

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Evidences of highly localized methane fluxes are reported from the Arctic shelf, hot spots of methane emissions in thermokarst lakes, and are believed to evolve to features like Yamal crater on land. The origin of large methane outbursts is problematic. Here we show, that the biogenic methane (13C ≤ −71‰ which formed before and during soil freezing is presently held in the permafrost. Field and experimental observations show that methane tends to accumulate at the permafrost table or in the coarse-grained lithological pockets surrounded by the sediments less-permeable for gas. Our field observations, radiocarbon dating, laboratory tests and theory all suggest that depending on the soil structure and freezing dynamics, this methane may have been displaced downwards tens of meters during freezing and has accumulated in the lithological pockets. The initial flux of methane from the one pocket disclosed by drilling was at a rate of more than 2.5 kg C(CH4 m−2 h−1. The age of the methane was 8–18 thousand years younger than the age of the sediments, suggesting that it was displaced tens of meters during freezing. The theoretical background provided the insight on the cryogenic displacement of methane in support of the field and experimental data. Upon freezing of sediments, methane follows water migration and either dissipates in the freezing soils or concentrates at certain places controlled by the freezing rate, initial methane distribution and soil structure.

  5. Pharmacological potential of biogenic amine–polyamine interactions beyond neurotransmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Jiménez, F; Ruiz-Pérez, M V; Urdiales, J L; Medina, M A

    2013-01-01

    Histamine, serotonin and dopamine are biogenic amines involved in intercellular communication with multiple effects on human pathophysiology. They are products of two highly homologous enzymes, histidine decarboxylase and l-aromatic amino acid decarboxylase, and transmit their signals through different receptors and signal transduction mechanisms. Polyamines derived from ornithine (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) are mainly involved in intracellular effects related to cell proliferation and death mechanisms. This review summarizes structural and functional evidence for interactions between components of all these amine metabolic and signalling networks (decarboxylases, transporters, oxidases, receptors etc.) at cellular and tissue levels, distinct from nervous and neuroendocrine systems, where the crosstalk among these amine-related components can also have important pathophysiological consequences. The discussion highlights aspects that could help to predict and discuss the effects of intervention strategies. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine Pharmacology Update. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-1 PMID:23347064

  6. Bounce behavior of freshly nucleated biogenic secondary organic aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Virtanen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of the climatic impacts and adverse health effects of atmospheric aerosol particles requires detailed information on particle properties. However, very limited information is available on the morphology and phase state of secondary organic aerosol (SOA particles. The physical state of particles greatly affects particulate-phase chemical reactions, and thus the growth rates of newly formed atmospheric aerosol. Thus verifying the physical phase state of SOA particles gives new and important insight into their formation, subsequent growth, and consequently potential atmospheric impacts. According to our recent study, biogenic SOA particles produced in laboratory chambers from the oxidation of real plant emissions as well as in ambient boreal forest atmospheres can exist in a solid phase in size range >30 nm. In this paper, we extend previously published results to diameters in the range of 17–30 nm. The physical phase of the particles is studied by investigating particle bounce properties utilizing electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI. We also investigate the effect of estimates of particle density on the interpretation of our bounce observations. According to the results presented in this paper, particle bounce clearly decreases with decreasing particle size in sub 30 nm size range. The comparison measurements by ammonium sulphate and investigation of the particle impaction velocities strongly suggest that the decreasing bounce is caused by the differences in composition and phase of large (diameters greater than 30 nm and smaller (diameters between 17 and 30 nm particles.

  7. A marine biogenic source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, T. W.; Ladino, L. A.; Alpert, Peter A.; Breckels, M. N.; Brooks, I. M.; Browse, J.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Carslaw, K. S.; Huffman, J. A.; Judd, C.; Kilthau, W. P.; Mason, R. H.; McFiggans, Gordon; Miller, L. A.; Najera, J.; Polishchuk, E. A.; Rae, S.; Schiller, C. L.; Si, M.; Vergara Temprado, J.; Whale, Thomas; Wong, J P S; Wurl, O.; Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Abbatt, JPD; Aller, Josephine Y.; Bertram, Allan K.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Murray, Benjamin J.

    2015-09-09

    The formation of ice in clouds is facilitated by the presence of airborne ice nucleating particles1,2. Sea spray is one of the major global sources of atmospheric particles, but it is unclear to what extent these particles are capable of nucleating ice3–11. Here we show that material in the sea surface microlayer, which is enriched in surface active organic material representative of that found in sub-micron sea- spray aerosol12–21, nucleates ice under conditions that occur in mixed-phase clouds and high-altitude ice clouds. The ice active material is likely biogenic and is less than ~0.2 ?m in size. We also show that organic material (exudate) released by a common marine diatom nucleates ice when separated from cells and propose that organic material associated with phytoplankton cell exudates are a candidate for the observed ice nucleating ability of the microlayer samples. By combining our measurements with global model simulations of marine organic aerosol, we show that ice nucleating particles of marine origin are dominant in remote marine environments, such as the Southern Ocean, the North Pacific and the North Atlantic.

  8. Emissions of biogenic sulfur gases from Alaskan tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Mark E.; Morrison, Michael C.

    1992-01-01

    Results of sulfur emission measurements made in freshwater and marine wetlands in Alaskan tundra during the Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition 2A (ABLE 3A) in July 1988 are presented. The data indicate that this type of tundra emits very small amounts of gaseous sulfur and, when extrapolated globally, accounts for a very small percentage of the global flux of biogenic sulfur to the atmosphere. Sulfur emissions from marine sites are up to 20-fold greater than fluxes from freshwater habitats and are dominated by dimethyl sulfide (DMS). Highest emissions, with a mean of 6.0 nmol/sq m/h, occurred in water-saturated wet meadow areas. In drier upland tundra sites, highest fluxes occurred in areas inhabited by mixed vegetation and labrador tea at 3.0 nmol/sq m/h and lowest fluxes were from lichen-dominated areas at 0.9 nmol/sq m/h. DMS was the dominant gas emitted from all these sites. Emissions of DMS were highest from intertidal soils inhabited by Carex subspathacea.

  9. PTR-MS in environmental research: biogenic VOCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauchamp, J.; Grabmer, W.; Graus, M.; Wisthaler, A.; Hansel, A.

    2004-01-01

    Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a chemical ionization mass spectrometry technique that allows for on-line measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at pptV levels. This well established analytical tool has been used in a broad variety of research, including the investigation of VOCs in various foods (e.g. for quality control or food degradation studies), as well as being used as a tool for non-invasive medical diagnostics (e.g. human breath analysis). In addition to these fields of study, PTR-MS has been widely used in environmental research, from trace gas analysis in the troposphere to VOC emissions from plants. Participation in two field campaigns (BEWA and ECHO - both part of the German AFO 2000 program) by the Institute of Ion Physics involved a variety of investigations for monitoring biogenic emissions. These included the technique of disjunct eddy covariance for flux measurements above a forest canopy, C-13 carbon labelling experiments to follow carbon use in a plant, and stress-induced VOC emission investigations to gain understanding of how plants react to stress (e.g. ozone exposure). A selection of results from these investigations will be discussed in this presentation. (author)

  10. Emission and role of biogenic volatile organic compounds in biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    Plants are an essential part of the biosphere. Under the influence of climate change, plants respond in multiple ways within the ecosystem. One such way is the release of assimilated carbon back to the atmosphere in form of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), which are produced by plants and are involved in plant growth, reproduction, defense and other . These compounds are emitted from vegetation into the atmosphere under different environmental situations. Plants produce an extensive range of BVOCs, including isoprenoids, sequisterpenes, aldehydes, alcohols and terpenes in different tissues above and below the ground. The emission rates vary with various environmental conditions and the plant growth stage in its life span.BVOCs are released under biotic and abiotic stress changes, like heat, drought, land-use changes, higher atmospheric CO concentrations, increased UV radiation and insect or disease attack. Plants emit BVOCs in atmosphere in order to avoid stress, and adapt to harsh circumstances. These compounds also have a significant role in plant-plant interaction, communication and competition. BVOCs have the ability to alter atmospheric chemistry; they readily react with atmospheric pollutant gases under high temperature and form tropospheric ozone, which is a potent air pollutant for global warming and disease occurrence. BVOCs may be a cause of photochemical smog and increase the stay of other GHGs in the atmosphere. Therefore, further study is required to assess the behavior of BVOCs in the biosphere as well as the atmosphere. (author)

  11. Photochemistry of biogenic emissions over the Amazon forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Daniel J.; Wofsy, Steven C.

    1988-01-01

    The boundary layer chemistry over the Amazon forest during the dry season is simulated with a photochemical model. Results are in good agreement with measurements of isoprene, NO, ozone, and organic acids. Photochemical reactions of biogenic isoprene and NOx can supply most of the ozone observed in the boundary layer. Production of ozone is very sensitive to the availability of NOx, but is insensitive to the isoprene source strength. High concentrations of total odd nitrogen (NOy) are predicted for the planetary boundary layer, about 1 ppb in the mixed layer and 0.75 ppb in the convective cloud layer. Most of the odd nitrogen is present as PAN-type species, which are removed by dry deposition to the forest. The observed daytime variations of isoprene are explained by a strong dependence of the isoprene emission flux on sun angle. Nighttime losses of isoprene exceed rates of reaction with NO3 and O3 and appear to reflect dry-deposition processes. The 24-hour averaged isoprene emission flux is calculated to be 38 mg/sq m per day. Photooxidation of isoprene could account for a large fraction of the CO enrichment observed in the boundary layer under unpolluted conditions and could constitute an important atmospheric source of formic acid, methacrylic acid, and pyruvic acid.

  12. Addressing biogenic greenhouse gas emissions from hydropower in LCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertwich, Edgar G

    2013-09-03

    The ability of hydropower to contribute to climate change mitigation is sometimes questioned, citing emissions of methane and carbon dioxide resulting from the degradation of biogenic carbon in hydropower reservoirs. These emissions are, however, not always addressed in life cycle assessment, leading to a bias in technology comparisons, and often misunderstood. The objective of this paper is to review and analyze the generation of greenhouse gas emissions from reservoirs for the purpose of technology assessment, relating established emission measurements to power generation. A literature review, data collection, and statistical analysis of methane and CO2 emissions are conducted. In a sample of 82 measurements, methane emissions per kWh hydropower generated are log-normally distributed, ranging from micrograms to 10s of kg. A multivariate regression analysis shows that the reservoir area per kWh electricity is the most important explanatory variable. Methane emissions flux per reservoir area are correlated with the natural net primary production of the area, the age of the power plant, and the inclusion of bubbling emissions in the measurement. Even together, these factors fail to explain most of the variation in the methane flux. The global average emissions from hydropower are estimated to be 85 gCO2/kWh and 3 gCH4/kWh, with a multiplicative uncertainty factor of 2. GHG emissions from hydropower can be largely avoided by ceasing to build hydropower plants with high land use per unit of electricity generated.

  13. Biogenic volatile organic compound emissions from vegetation fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccioli, Paolo; Centritto, Mauro; Loreto, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide an overview of the current state of the art on research into the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from vegetation fires. Significant amounts of VOCs are emitted from vegetation fires, including several reactive compounds, the majority belonging to the isoprenoid family, which rapidly disappear in the plume to yield pollutants such as secondary organic aerosol and ozone. This makes determination of fire-induced BVOC emission difficult, particularly in areas where the ratio between VOCs and anthropogenic NOx is favourable to the production of ozone, such as Mediterranean areas and highly anthropic temperate (and fire-prone) regions of the Earth. Fire emissions affecting relatively pristine areas, such as the Amazon and the African savannah, are representative of emissions of undisturbed plant communities. We also examined expected BVOC emissions at different stages of fire development and combustion, from drying to flaming, and from heatwaves coming into contact with unburned vegetation at the edge of fires. We conclude that forest fires may dramatically change emission factors and the profile of emitted BVOCs, thereby influencing the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere, the physiology of plants and the evolution of plant communities within the ecosystem. © 2014 The Authors. Plant, Cell & Environment published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Modeling the dynamical sinking of biogenic particles in oceanic flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Monroy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We study the problem of sinking particles in a realistic oceanic flow, with major energetic structures in the mesoscale, focussing on the range of particle sizes and densities appropriate for marine biogenic particles. Our aim is to evaluate the relevance of theoretical results of finite size particle dynamics in their applications in the oceanographic context. By using a simplified equation of motion of small particles in a mesoscale simulation of the oceanic velocity field, we estimate the influence of physical processes such as the Coriolis force and the inertia of the particles, and we conclude that they represent negligible corrections to the most important terms, which are passive motion with the velocity of the flow, and a constant added vertical velocity due to gravity. Even if within this approximation three-dimensional clustering of particles can not occur, two-dimensional cuts or projections of the evolving three-dimensional density can display inhomogeneities similar to the ones observed in sinking ocean particles.

  15. OPAL Land Condition Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    CENTURY is a computer model of plant-soil ecosystems that simulates the dynamics of grasslands, forest , crops, and savannas with a focus on nutri...Kamnalrut, and J. L. Kinyamario. 1993. Observations and modeling of biomass and soil organic matter dynamics for the grassland biome worldwide. Global

  16. Synthetic magnetic opals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2JDS Uniphase Corporation, 625 Industrial Way, Eatontown, NJ 07724, USA. 3UTD-NanoTech Institute, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75083, USA. Abstract. ..... the Swedish funding agency VINNOVA for financing this project. VA, PS, and AYuG would like to acknowledge the local hospitality and the summer ...

  17. Paleoceanographic history of the Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California, during the past 15,000 years based on diatoms, silicoflagellates, and biogenic sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, J.A.; Bukry, D.; Dean, W.E.

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution records of calcium carbonate, biogenic opal, diatoms, and silicoflagellates from western Guaymas Basin gravity core GGC55 and piston core JPC56 and eastern Guaymas Basin DSDP Site 480 reveal a complex paleoceanographic history of the central Gulf of California during the past 15,000 years. Prior to ??? 6.2 ka, the eastern and western Guaymas Basin proxy records were remarkably similar. After conditions similar to those of today during the B??lling-Allerod, the Younger Dryas (YD) saw a major drop in diatom production, coincident with increased calcium carbonate and tropical microfossils suggestive of El Nin??o-like conditions. Biosiliceous productivity began increasing during the latter part of the YD, but it was only during the earliest Holocene (11.6 to 11.0 ka) that conditions similar to those of the B??lling-Allerod returned to the central Gulf. Between around 11.0 and 6.2 ka, tropical diatoms and silicoflagellates were virtually absent from the central Gulf, as relatively cooler and fresher surface waters resembling those of the modern northern Gulf were present in the central Gulf. Beginning at about 6.2 ka, tropical diatoms and silicoflagellates began increasing in the central Gulf, and coccoliths returned to western Gulf sediments. The onset of modern-day monsoon conditions in the American Southwest required the presence of warm SSTs in the northern Gulf, which probably did not occur until after about 5.4 ka, when tropical diatoms and silicoflagellates became relatively common in the central Gulf. Modern east-west contrasts, which arise from late winter-early spring coastal upwelling on the mainland side and lower diatom productivity on the western side of the Gulf, commenced between 6.2 and 5.4 ka, possibly due to a shift in the direction of late winter-early spring winds more towards the southeast, or down the axis of the Gulf. This proposed wind shift might have ultimately been due to a late Holocene strengthening of ENSO-like conditions

  18. An approach for verifying biogenic greenhouse gas emissions inventories with atmospheric CO2 concentration data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogle, Stephen M; Davis, Kenneth; Lauvaux, Thomas; Miles, Natasha L; Richardson, Scott; Schuh, Andrew; Cooley, Dan; Breidt, F Jay; West, Tristram O; Heath, Linda S; Smith, James E; McCarty, Jessica L; Gurney, Kevin R; Tans, Pieter; Denning, A Scott

    2015-01-01

    Verifying national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventories is a critical step to ensure that reported emissions data to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) are accurate and representative of a country’s contribution to GHG concentrations in the atmosphere. Furthermore, verifying biogenic fluxes provides a check on estimated emissions associated with managing lands for carbon sequestration and other activities, which often have large uncertainties. We report here on the challenges and results associated with a case study using atmospheric measurements of CO 2 concentrations and inverse modeling to verify nationally-reported biogenic CO 2 emissions. The biogenic CO 2 emissions inventory was compiled for the Mid-Continent region of United States based on methods and data used by the US government for reporting to the UNFCCC, along with additional sources and sinks to produce a full carbon balance. The biogenic emissions inventory produced an estimated flux of −408 ± 136 Tg CO 2 for the entire study region, which was not statistically different from the biogenic flux of −478 ± 146 Tg CO 2 that was estimated using the atmospheric CO 2 concentration data. At sub-regional scales, the spatial density of atmospheric observations did not appear sufficient to verify emissions in general. However, a difference between the inventory and inversion results was found in one isolated area of West-central Wisconsin. This part of the region is dominated by forestlands, suggesting that further investigation may be warranted into the forest C stock or harvested wood product data from this portion of the study area. The results suggest that observations of atmospheric CO 2 concentration data and inverse modeling could be used to verify biogenic emissions, and provide more confidence in biogenic GHG emissions reporting to the UNFCCC. (letter)

  19. Impact of biogenic terpene emissions from Brassica napus on tropospheric ozone over Saxony (Germany): numerical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Eberhard; Münzenberg, Annette

    2003-01-01

    The role of biogenic emissions in tropospheric ozone production is currently under discussion and major aspects are not well understood yet. This study aims towards the estimation of the influence of biogenic emissions on tropospheric ozone concentrations over Saxony in general and of biogenic emissions from brassica napus in special. MODELLING TOOLS: The studies are performed by utilizing a coupled numerical modelling system consisting of the meteorological model METRAS and the chemistry transport model MUSCAT. For the chemical part, the Euro-RADM algorithm is used. EMISSIONS: Anthropogenic and biogenic emissions are taken into account. The anthropogenic emissions are introduced by an emission inventory. Biogenic emissions, VOC and NO, are calculated within the chemical transport model MUSCAT at each time step and in each grid cell depending on land use type and on the temperature. The emissions of hydrocarbons from forest areas as well as biogenic NO especially from agricultural grounds are considered. Also terpene emissions from brassica napus fields are estimated. SIMULATION SETUP AND METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS: The simulations were performed over an area with an extension of 160 x 140 km2 which covers the main parts of Saxony and neighboring areas of Brandenburg, Sachsen-Anhalt and Thuringia. Summer smog with high ozone concentrations can be expected during high pressure conditions on hot summer days. Typical meteorological conditions for such cases were introduced in an conceptual way. It is estimated that biogenic emissions change tropospheric ozone concentrations in a noticeable way (up to 15% to 20%) and, therefore, should not be neglected in studies about tropospheric ozone. Emissions from brassica napus do have a moderate potential to enhance tropospheric ozone concentrations, but emissions are still under consideration and, therefore, results vary to a high degree. Summing up, the effect of brassica napus terpene emissions on ozone concentrations is

  20. Mineralization of Bacteria in Terrestrial Basaltic Rocks: Comparison With Possible Biogenic Features in Martian Meteorite Allan Hills 84001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; McKay, D. S.; Wentworth, S. J.; Stevens, T. O.; Taunton, A. E.; Allen, C. C.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Romanek, C. S.

    1998-01-01

    The identification of biogenic features altered by diagenesis or mineralization is important in determining whether specific features in terrestrial rocks and in meteorites may have a biogenic origin. Unfortunately, few studies have addressed the formation of biogenic features in igneous rocks, which may be important to these phenomena, including the controversy over possible biogenic features in basaltic martian meteorite ALH84001. To explore the presence of biogenic features in igneous rocks, we examined microcosms growing in basaltic small-scale experimental growth chambers or microcosms. Microbial communities were harvested from aquifers of the Columbia River Basalt (CRB) group and grown in a microcosm containing unweathered basalt chips and groundwater (technique described in. These microcosms simulated natural growth conditions in the deep subsurface of the CRB, which should be a good terrestrial analog for any putative martian subsurface ecosystem that may have once included ALH84001. Here we present new size measurements and photomicrographs comparing the putative martian fossils to biogenic material in the CRB microcosms. The range of size and shapes of the biogenic features on the CRB microcosm chips overlaps with and is similar to those on ALH84001 chips. Although this present work does not provide evidence for the biogenicity of ALH84001 features, we believe that, based on criteria of size, shape, and general morphology, a biogenic interpretation for the ALH84001 features remains plausible.

  1. Hyperspectral observation of anthropogenic and biogenic pollution in coastal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrova, Olga; Loupian, Evgeny; Mityagina, Marina; Uvarov, Ivan

    The work presents results of anthropogenic and biogenic pollution detection in coastal zones of the Black and Caspian Seas based on satellite hyperspetral data provided by the Hyperion and HICO instruments. Techniques developed on the basis of the analysis of spectral characteristics calculated in special points were employed to address the following problems: (a) assessment of the blooming intensity of cyanobacteria and their distribution in bays of western Crimea and discrimination between anthropogenic pollutant discharge events and algae bloom; (b) detection of anthropogenic pollution in Crimean lakes utilized as industrial liquid discharge reservoirs; (c) detection of oil pollution in areas of shelf oil production in the Caspian Sea. Information values of different spectral bands and their composites were estimated in connection with the retrieval of the main sea water components: phytoplankton, suspended matter and colored organic matter, and also various anthropogenic pollutants, including oil. Software tools for thematic hyperspectral data processing in application to the investigation of sea coastal zones and internal water bodies were developed on the basis of the See the Sea geoportal created by the Space Research Institute RAS. The geoportal is focused on the study of processes in the world ocean with the emphasis on the advantages of satellite systems of observation. The tools that were introduced into the portal allow joint analysis of quasi-simultaneous satellite data, in particular data from the Hyperion, HICO, OLI Landsat-8, ETM Landsat-7 and TM Landsat-5 instruments. Results of analysis attempts combining data from different sensors are discussed. Their strong and weak points are highlighted. The study was completed with partial financial support from The Russian Foundation for Basic Research grants # 14-05-00520-a and 13-07-12017.

  2. Level of biogenic amines in pregnant women with psycho-emotional disorders stipulated by anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Syusyuka

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Object of research – to determine level of biogenic amines in pregnant women with psycho-emotional disorders stipulated by anxiety. Group of examined women and methods of research. 90 Pregnant women were examined in ІІ and ІІІ trimester of pregnancy. The main group includes 58 pregnant women with the medium and high level of state anxiety and 32 pregnant women with anxiety level of 30 points and less that indicates the low level of SA (control group. For estimation of the state anxiety and trait anxiety the scale of Spielberger-Hanin was used. Level of serotonin and melatonin was measured with fluorometric method in blood hemolysate of pregnant women. Results. According to the obtained results of biochemical research of hemolysate of packed red cells of blood of examined women it was stated that increase of state anxiety was accompanied by statistically reliable (p < 0.05 rise of serotonin level and decrease of melatonin level. Thus, special features have direct influence on increase (p < 0.05 of serotonin/melatonin index. Pregnant women of the main group have the index which was 2.5 times higher than the same index in women of the control group. Conclusions. Results of performed research among pregnant women have indicated that increase of state anxiety is accompanied by statistically reliable (p < 0.05 rise of serotonin content in blood and statistically reliable (p < 0.05 decrease of melatonin. Such results have direct influence on increase (p < 0.05 of serotonin/melatonin index in pregnant women with medium and high levels of state anxiety comparing to the certain index in women with the low level of anxiety.

  3. Impact of biogenic emissions on ozone formation in the Mediterranean area - a BEMA modelling study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thunis, P.; Cuvelier, C.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this modelling study is to understand and quantify the influence of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions on the formation of tropospheric ozone in the Burriana area (north of Valencia) on the east coast of Spain. The mesoscale modelling system used consists of the meteorology/transport module TVM and the chemical reaction mechanism RACM. The results of the model simulations are validated and compared with the data collected during the biogenic emissions in the mediterranean area (BEMA) field campaign that took place in June 1997. Anthropogenic and biogenic emission inventories have been constructed with an hourly resolution. Averaged (over the land area and over 24 h) emission fluxes for AVOC, anthropogenic NO x , BVOC and biogenic NO x are given by 16.0, 9.9, 6.2, and 0.7 kg km -2 day -1 , respectively. The impact of biogenic emissions is investigated on peak ozone values by performing simulations with and without biogenic emissions; while keeping anthropogenic emissions constant. The impact on ozone formation is also studied in combination with some anthropogenic emissions reduction strategies, i.e. when anthropogenic VOC emissions and/or NO x emissions are reduced. A factor separation technique is applied to isolate the impact due to biogenic emissions from the overall impact due to biogenic and anthropogenic emissions together. The results indicate that the maximum impact of biogenic emissions on ozone formation represents at the most 10 ppb, while maximum ozone values are of the order of 100 ppb. At different locations the maximum impact is reached at different times of the day depending on the arrival time of the sea breeze. It is also shown that this impact does not coincide in time with the maximum simulated ozone concentrations that are reached over the day. By performing different emission reduction scenarios, BVOC impacts are found to be sensitive mainly to NO x , and not to AVOC. Finally, it is shown that amongst the various

  4. Control of biogenic amines in food--existing and emerging approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naila, Aishath; Flint, Steve; Fletcher, Graham; Bremer, Phil; Meerdink, Gerrit

    2010-09-01

    Biogenic amines have been reported in a variety of foods, such as fish, meat, cheese, vegetables, and wines. They are described as low molecular weight organic bases with aliphatic, aromatic, and heterocyclic structures. The most common biogenic amines found in foods are histamine, tyramine, cadaverine, 2-phenylethylamine, spermine, spermidine, putrescine, tryptamine, and agmatine. In addition octopamine and dopamine have been found in meat and meat products and fish. The formation of biogenic amines in food by the microbial decarboxylation of amino acids can result in consumers suffering allergic reactions, characterized by difficulty in breathing, itching, rash, vomiting, fever, and hypertension. Traditionally, biogenic amine formation in food has been prevented, primarily by limiting microbial growth through chilling and freezing. However, for many fishing based subsistence populations, such measures are not practical. Therefore, secondary control measures to prevent biogenic amine formation in foods or to reduce their levels once formed need to be considered as alternatives. Such approaches to limit microbial growth may include hydrostatic pressures, irradiation, controlled atmosphere packaging, or the use of food additives. Histamine may potentially be degraded by the use of bacterial amine oxidase or amine-negative bacteria. Only some will be cost-effective and practical for use in subsistence populations.

  5. Control of Biogenic Amines in Food—Existing and Emerging Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naila, Aishath; Flint, Steve; Fletcher, Graham; Bremer, Phil; Meerdink, Gerrit

    2010-01-01

    Biogenic amines have been reported in a variety of foods, such as fish, meat, cheese, vegetables, and wines. They are described as low molecular weight organic bases with aliphatic, aromatic, and heterocyclic structures. The most common biogenic amines found in foods are histamine, tyramine, cadaverine, 2-phenylethylamine, spermine, spermidine, putrescine, tryptamine, and agmatine. In addition octopamine and dopamine have been found in meat and meat products and fish. The formation of biogenic amines in food by the microbial decarboxylation of amino acids can result in consumers suffering allergic reactions, characterized by difficulty in breathing, itching, rash, vomiting, fever, and hypertension. Traditionally, biogenic amine formation in food has been prevented, primarily by limiting microbial growth through chilling and freezing. However, for many fishing based subsistence populations, such measures are not practical. Therefore, secondary control measures to prevent biogenic amine formation in foods or to reduce their levels once formed need to be considered as alternatives. Such approaches to limit microbial growth may include hydrostatic pressures, irradiation, controlled atmosphere packaging, or the use of food additives. Histamine may potentially be degraded by the use of bacterial amine oxidase or amine-negative bacteria. Only some will be cost-effective and practical for use in subsistence populations. PMID:21535566

  6. Cocaine affects foraging behaviour and biogenic amine modulated behavioural reflexes in honey bees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eirik Søvik

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In humans and other mammals, drugs of abuse alter the function of biogenic amine pathways in the brain leading to the subjective experience of reward and euphoria. Biogenic amine pathways are involved in reward processing across diverse animal phyla, however whether cocaine acts on these neurochemical pathways to cause similar rewarding behavioural effects in animal phyla other than mammals is unclear. Previously, it has been shown that bees are more likely to dance (a signal of perceived reward when returning from a sucrose feeder after cocaine treatment. Here we examined more broadly whether cocaine altered reward-related behaviour, and biogenic amine modulated behavioural responses in bees. Bees developed a preference for locations at which they received cocaine, and when foraging at low quality sucrose feeders increase their foraging rate in response to cocaine treatment. Cocaine also increased reflexive proboscis extension to sucrose, and sting extension to electric shock. Both of these simple reflexes are modulated by biogenic amines. This shows that systemic cocaine treatment alters behavioural responses that are modulated by biogenic amines in insects. Since insect reward responses involve both octopamine and dopamine signalling, we conclude that cocaine treatment altered diverse reward-related aspects of behaviour in bees. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding the ecology of cocaine as a plant defence compound. Our findings further validate the honey bee as a model system for understanding the behavioural impacts of cocaine, and potentially other drugs of abuse.

  7. Cocaine affects foraging behaviour and biogenic amine modulated behavioural reflexes in honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søvik, Eirik; Even, Naïla; Radford, Catherine W; Barron, Andrew B

    2014-01-01

    In humans and other mammals, drugs of abuse alter the function of biogenic amine pathways in the brain leading to the subjective experience of reward and euphoria. Biogenic amine pathways are involved in reward processing across diverse animal phyla, however whether cocaine acts on these neurochemical pathways to cause similar rewarding behavioural effects in animal phyla other than mammals is unclear. Previously, it has been shown that bees are more likely to dance (a signal of perceived reward) when returning from a sucrose feeder after cocaine treatment. Here we examined more broadly whether cocaine altered reward-related behaviour, and biogenic amine modulated behavioural responses in bees. Bees developed a preference for locations at which they received cocaine, and when foraging at low quality sucrose feeders increase their foraging rate in response to cocaine treatment. Cocaine also increased reflexive proboscis extension to sucrose, and sting extension to electric shock. Both of these simple reflexes are modulated by biogenic amines. This shows that systemic cocaine treatment alters behavioural responses that are modulated by biogenic amines in insects. Since insect reward responses involve both octopamine and dopamine signalling, we conclude that cocaine treatment altered diverse reward-related aspects of behaviour in bees. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding the ecology of cocaine as a plant defence compound. Our findings further validate the honey bee as a model system for understanding the behavioural impacts of cocaine, and potentially other drugs of abuse.

  8. Managing your wine fermentation to reduce the risk of biogenic amine formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Yolandi Smit

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic amines are nitrogenous organic compounds produced in wine from amino acid precursors mainly by microbial decarboxylation. The concentration of biogenic amines that can potentially be produced is dependent on the amount of amino acid precursors in the medium, the presence of decarboxylase positive microorganisms and conditions that enable microbial or biochemical activity such as the addition of nutrients to support the alcoholic and malolactic fermentation (MLF inoculated starter cultures. MLF can be conducted using co-inoculation or inoculated after the completion of alcoholic fermentation (AF that may also affect the level of biogenic amine in the wine. This study focussed on the impact the addition of complex commercial yeast and bacterial nutrients and the use of different MLF inoculation scenarios could have on the production of biogenic amine in the wine. Results obtained with wine showed that in this study the amine that was influenced by nutrient addition was histamine. In the synthetic winemaking using 12 different treatments no clear tendencies were observed. It was shown that in certain conditions co-inoculation could reduce the amount of biogenic amines produced.

  9. Comprehensive, structurally-informed alignment and phylogeny of vertebrate biogenic amine receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J. Spielman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic amine receptors play critical roles in regulating behavior and physiology in both vertebrates and invertebrates, particularly within the central nervous system. Members of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR family, these receptors interact with endogenous bioamine ligands such as dopamine, serotonin, and epinephrine, and are targeted by a wide array of pharmaceuticals. Despite the clear clinical and biological importance of these receptors, their evolutionary history remains poorly characterized. In particular, the relationships among biogenic amine receptors and any specific evolutionary constraints acting within distinct receptor subtypes are largely unknown. To advance and facilitate studies in this receptor family, we have constructed a comprehensive, high-quality sequence alignment of vertebrate biogenic amine receptors. In particular, we have integrated a traditional multiple sequence approach with robust structural domain predictions to ensure that alignment columns accurately capture the highly-conserved GPCR structural domains, and we demonstrate how ignoring structural information produces spurious inferences of homology. Using this alignment, we have constructed a structurally-partitioned maximum-likelihood phylogeny from which we deduce novel biogenic amine receptor relationships and uncover previously unrecognized lineage-specific receptor clades. Moreover, we find that roughly 1% of the 3039 sequences in our final alignment are either misannotated or unclassified, and we propose updated classifications for these receptors. We release our comprehensive alignment and its corresponding phylogeny as a resource for future research into the evolution and diversification of biogenic amine receptors.

  10. Characterization of biogenic secondary organic aerosols using statistical methods; Charakterisierung Biogener Sekundaerer Organischer Aerosole mit Statistischen Methoden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spindler, Christian

    2010-07-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have important influence on the radiation balance of the Earth, on visibility and human health. Secondary organic aerosol is formed from gas-to-particle conversion of oxidized volatile organic compounds. A dominant fraction of the gases originates from plant emissions, making biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) an especially important constituent of the atmosphere. Knowing the chemical composition of BSOA particles is crucial for a thorough understanding of aerosol processes in the environment. In this work, the chemical composition of BSOA particles was measured with aerosol mass spectrometry and analyzed with statistical methods. The experimental part of the work comprises process studies of the formation and aging of biogenic aerosols in simulation chambers. Using a plant chamber, real tree emissions were used to produce particles in a way close to conditions in forest environments. In the outdoor chamber SAPHIR, OH-radicals were produced from the photooxidation of ozone under illumination with natural sunlight. Here, BSOA was produced from defined mixtures of mono- and sesquiterpenes that represent boreal forest emissions. A third kind of experiments was performed in the indoor chamber AIDA. Here, particles were produced from ozonolysis of single monoterpenes and aged by condensing OH-oxidation products. Two aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) were used to measure the chemical composition of the particles. One of the instruments is equipped with a quadrupole mass spectrometer providing unit mass resolution. The second instrument contains a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and provides mass resolution sufficient to distinguish different fragments with the same nominal mass. Aerosol mass spectra obtained with these instruments are strongly fragmented due to electron impact ionization of the evaporated molecules. In addition, typical BSOA mass spectra are very similar to each other. In order to get a more detailed knowledge about the mass

  11. Search for R-parity violating decays of supersymmetric particles in final states with jets and leptons using the OPAL detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Mutter, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Of all the data of the years 1998 to 2000 taken with the OPAL detector at the e+e-- collider LEP at CERN, final states with jets and leptons have been analysed. A search for decays of new particles postulated by supersymmetric extensions of the standard model of particle physics has been performed. Only decays violating the quantum number R-parity (Rp) that is introduced in supersymmetric models have been investigated. The violation of Rp leads to experimental signatures that are in general completely different from those in the Rp conserving case. If Rp is violated, processes that lead to a rapid decay of the proton might be possible. In order to avoid such processes, in most investigations Rp is assumed to be conserved. However, there is no theoretically compelling reason for this assumption. Therefore, the possibility of R-parity violation should also be considered.

  12. Highly active surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on gold nanoparticles infiltrated into SiO{sub 2} inverse opals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ankudze, Bright; Philip, Anish [Department of Chemistry, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 111, F1-80101, Joensuu (Finland); Pakkanen, Tuula T., E-mail: Tuula.Pakkanen@uef.fi [Department of Chemistry, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 111, F1-80101, Joensuu (Finland); Matikainen, Antti; Vahimaa, Pasi [Institute of Photonics, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 111, F1-80101, Joensuu (Finland)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • SERS substrates prepared by infiltration of nanoparticles into SiO{sub 2} inverse opal. • The SERS substrate gives an enhancement factor of 10{sup 7} for 4-aminothiophenol. • The sensitivity of the substrate is mainly attributed to gold nanoparticle clusters. - Abstract: SiO{sub 2} inverse opal (IO) films with embedded gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) application are reported. SiO{sub 2} IO films were loaded with AuNPs by a simple infiltration in a single cycle to form Au-SiO{sub 2} IOs. The optical property and the morphology of the Au-SiO{sub 2} IO substrates were characterized; it was observed that they retained the Bragg diffraction of SiO{sub 2} IO and the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of AuNPs. The SERS property of the Au-SiO{sub 2} IO substrates were studied with methylene blue (MB) and 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP). The SERS enhancement factors were 10{sup 7} and 10{sup 6} for 4-ATP and MB, respectively. A low detection limit of 10{sup −10} M for 4-ATP was also obtained with the Au-SiO{sub 2} IO substrate. A relative standard deviation of 18.5% for the Raman signals intensity at 1077 cm{sup −1} for 4-ATP shows that the Au-SiO{sub 2} IO substrates have good signal reproducibility. The results of this study indicate that the Au-SiO{sub 2} IO substrates can be used in sensing and SERS applications.

  13. Community-based obesity prevention in Australia: Background, methods and recruitment outcomes for the evaluation of the effectiveness of OPAL (Obesity Prevention and Lifestyle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Leslie

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Obesity Prevention and Lifestyle (OPAL intervention program targets families and communities to improve children’s eating and physical activity patterns. We outline the quantitative evaluation design and recruitment results for baseline data collection. Methods: A longitudinal quasi-experimental design, with baseline data collection and five-year follow-up. Participants targeted are children, parents, and school principals/directors from primary, secondary/R-12 schools, pre-schools, childcare and out-of-school-hours-care (OSHC centers in 20 selected communities across South Australia (SA, and one in the Northern Territory (NT. A total of 277 (262 SA, 15 NT schools participated; 4860 9-11 year olds and 1164 12-16 year olds completed a questionnaire. Anthropometric measures were taken from 5531 students; 6552 parents, 276 pre/school/childcare directors, 139 OSHC directors and 237 principals completed questionnaires. Data include measurements of child participants’ weight/height/waist circumference; paper-based/online surveys of informants in early childhood, primary/secondary school and community settings; and secondary growth check data for 4-5 year old children. Serial cross-sectional analyses will compare intervention to matched comparison communities. Results: Overall school response rate was 50%. Student response rates were 20-22% and 11-13% (questionnaires and measurements respectively; 14-21% of parents, 49-55% of directors, and 26-44% of principals completed and returned questionnaires. Changes to child weight status; eating practices; sleep, physical activity/sedentary behaviors; physical environments; community capacity; and economic evaluation (Quality Adjusted Life year gain will examine program effectiveness. Conclusions: As the most significant program of its kind in Australia, OPAL will contribute to obesity prevention efforts on an international scale.

  14. (40)K in the Black Sea: a proxy to estimate biogenic sedimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulin, S B; Gulina, L V; Sidorov, I G; Proskurnin, V Yu; Duka, M S; Moseichenko, I N; Rodina, E A

    2014-08-01

    An approach to estimate the rate of biogenic sedimentation in the Black Sea using the naturally occurring radionuclide (40)K has been considered. It allows assessment of the contribution of suspended matter of biological origin to the overall sediment accumulation in the Black Sea coastal, shelf and deep-water areas. Based upon this method, a relationship between the biogenic fraction of the seabed sediments and the water depth has been established with a view to differentiating the contributions of allochthonous and autochthonous suspended matter to the sedimentation rate. Overall, (40)K can be considered as an easily applicable proxy to assess sedimentation rate of biogenic fraction of particulate matter in marine environments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Measurements of atmospheric hydrocarbons and biogenic emission fluxes in the Amazon boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, P. R.; Greenberg, J. P.; Westberg, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    Tropospheric mixing ratios of methane, C2-C10 hydrocarbons, and carbon monoxide were measured over the Amazon tropical forest near Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil, in July and August 1985. The measurements, consisting mostly of altitude profiles of these gases, were all made within the atmospheric boundary layer up to an altitude of 1000 m above ground level. Data characterize the diurnal hydrocarbon composition of the boundary layer. Biogenic emissions of isoprene control hydroxyl radical concentrations over the forest. Biogenic emission fluxes of isoprene and terpenes are estimated to be 25,000 micrograms/sq m per day and 5600 micrograms/sq m per day, respectively. This isoprene emission is equivalent to 2 percent of the net primary productivity of the tropical forest. Atmospheric oxidation of biogenic isoprene and terpenes emissions from the Amazon forest may account for daily increases of 8-13 ppb for carbon monoxide in the planetary boundary layer.

  16. Carbon-14 based determination of the biogenic fraction of industrial CO(2) emissions - application and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palstra, S W L; Meijer, H A J

    2010-05-01

    The (14)C method is a very reliable and sensitive method for industrial plants, emission authorities and emission inventories to verify data estimations of biogenic fractions of CO(2) emissions. The applicability of the method is shown for flue gas CO(2) samples that have been sampled in 1-h intervals at a coal- and wood-fired power plant and a waste incineration plant. Biogenic flue gas CO(2) fractions of 5-10% and 48-50% have been measured at the power plant and the waste incineration plant, respectively. The reliability of the method has been proven by comparison of the power plant results with those based on carbon mass input and output data of the power plant. At industrial plants with relatively low biogenic CO(2) fraction (<10%) the results need to be corrected for sampled (14)CO(2) from atmospheric air. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. BOREAS TGB-5 Biogenic Soil Emissions of NO and N2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, J. S.; Winstead, E. L.; Parsons, D. A. B.; Scholes, M. C.; Cofer, W. R.; Cahoon, D. R.; Sebacher, D. I.; Scholes, R. J.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Trace Gas Biogeochemistry (BOREAS TGB)-5 team made several measurements of trace gas concentrations and fluxes at various NSA sites. This data set contains biogenic soil emissions of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide that were measured over a wide range of spatial and temporal site parameters. Since very little is known about biogenic soil emissions of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide from the boreal forest, the goal of the measurements was to characterize the biogenic soil fluxes of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide from black spruce and jack pine areas in the boreal forest. The diurnal variation and monthly variation of the emissions was examined as well as the impact of wetting through natural or artificial means. Temporally, the data cover mid-August 1993, June to August 1994, and mid-July 1995. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  18. Biogenic origin of coalbed gas in the northern Gulf of Mexico Coastal Plain, U.S.A.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warwick, Peter D.; Hackley, Paul C. [U.S. Geological Survey, 956 National Center, Reston, VA 20192 (United States); Breland, F. Clayton Jr. [Louisiana Department of Natural Resources, 617 North 3rd Street, Baton Rouge, LA 70802 (United States)

    2008-10-02

    New coal-gas exploration and production in northern Louisiana and south-central Mississippi, Gulf of Mexico Basin, is focused on the Wilcox Group (Paleocene-Eocene), where the depth to targeted subbituminous C to high volatile C bituminous coal beds ranges from 300 to 1680 m, and individual coal beds have a maximum thickness of about 6 m. Total gas content (generally excluding residual gas) of the coal beds ranges from less than 0.37 cm{sup 3}/g (as-analyzed or raw basis; 1.2 cm{sup 3}/g, dry, ash free basis, daf) at depths less than 400 m, to greater than 7.3 cm{sup 3}/g (as-analyzed basis; 8.76 cm{sup 3}/g, daf) in deeper (> 1,500 m) parts of the basin. About 20 Wilcox coal-gas wells in northern Louisiana produce from 200 to 6485 m{sup 3} of gas/day and cumulative gas production from these wells is approximately 25 million m{sup 3} (as of December, 2006). U.S. Geological Survey assessment of undiscovered, technically recoverable gas resources in the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Plain, including northern and south-central Mississippi, indicates that coal beds of the Wilcox Group contain an estimated mean total 109.3 million m{sup 3} (3.86 trillion ft{sup 3}) of producible natural gas. To determine the origin of the Wilcox Group coal gases in northern Louisiana, samples of gas, water, and oil were collected from Wilcox coal and sandstone reservoirs and from under- and overlying Late Cretaceous and Eocene carbonate and sandstone reservoirs. Isotopic data from Wilcox coal-gas samples have an average {delta}{sup 13}C{sub CH4} value of - 62.6 permille VPDB (relative to Vienna Peedee Belemnite) and an average {delta}D{sub CH4} value of - 199.9 permille VSMOW (relative to Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water). Values of {delta}{sup 13}C{sub CO2} range from - 25.4 to 3.42 permille VPDB. Produced Wilcox saline water collected from oil, conventional gas, and coalbed gas wells have {delta}D{sub H2O} values that range from - 27.3 to - 18.0 permille VSMOW. These data suggest that the

  19. Effects of Spartina alterniflora invasion on biogenic elements in a subtropical coastal mangrove wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoqing; Yang, Jun; Liu, Lemian; Tian, Yuan; Yu, Zheng

    2015-02-01

    The invasion by exotic cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) has become one of the most serious and challenging environmental and ecological problems in coastal China because it can have adverse effects on local native species, thereby changing ecosystem processes, functions, and services. In this study, 300 surface sediments were collected from 15 stations in the Jiulong River Estuary, southeast China, across four different seasons, in order to reveal the spatiotemporal variability of biogenic elements and their influencing factors in the subtropical coastal mangrove wetland. The biogenic elements including carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur (C, N, and S) were determined by an element analyzer, while the phosphorus (P) was determined by a flow injection analyzer. The concentrations of biogenic elements showed no significant differences among four seasons except total phosphorus (TP); however, our ANOVA analyses revealed a distinct spatial pattern which was closely related with the vegetation type and tidal level. Values of total carbon (TC) and total nitrogen (TN) in the surface sediment of mangrove vegetation zones were higher than those in the cordgrass and mudflat zones. The concentrations of TC, TN, TP, and total sulfur (TS) in the high tidal zones were higher than those in the middle and low tidal zones. Redundancy analysis (RDA) revealed that tidal level, vegetation type, and season had some significant influence on the distribution of biogenic elements in the Jiulong River Estuary, by explaining 18.2, 7.7, and 4.9 % of total variation in the four biogenic elements, respectively. In conclusion, S. alterniflora invasion had substantial effects on the distributions of biogenic elements in the subtropical coastal wetland. If regional changes in the Jiulong River Estuary are to persist and much of the mangrove vegetation was to be replaced by cordgrass, there would be significant decreases on the overall storage of C and N in this coastal zone. Therefore, the native

  20. Antimicrobial activity of biogenic silver nanoparticles, and silver chloride nanoparticles: an overview and comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Nelson; Nakazato, Gerson; Seabra, Amedea B

    2016-08-01

    The antimicrobial impact of biogenic-synthesized silver-based nanoparticles has been the focus of increasing interest. As the antimicrobial activity of nanoparticles is highly dependent on their size and surface, the complete and adequate characterization of the nanoparticle is important. This review discusses the characterization and antimicrobial activity of biogenic synthesized silver nanoparticles and silver chloride nanoparticles. By revising the literature, there is confusion in the characterization of these two silver-based nanoparticles, which consequently affects the conclusion regarding to their antimicrobial activities. This review critically analyzes recent publications on the synthesis of biogenic silver nanoparticles and silver chloride nanoparticles by attempting to correlate the characterization of the nanoparticles with their antimicrobial activity. It was difficult to correlate the size of biogenic nanoparticles with their antimicrobial activity, since different techniques are employed for the characterization. Biogenic synthesized silver-based nanoparticles are not completely characterized, particularly the nature of capped proteins covering the nanomaterials. Moreover, the antimicrobial activity of theses nanoparticles is assayed by using different protocols and strains, which difficult the comparison among the published papers. It is important to select some bacteria as standards, by following international foundations (Pharmaceutical Microbiology Manual) and use the minimal inhibitory concentration by broth microdilution assays from Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, which is the most common assay used in antibiotic ones. Therefore, we conclude that to have relevant results on antimicrobial effects of biogenic silver-based nanoparticles, it is necessary to have a complete and adequate characterization of these nanostructures, followed by standard methodology in microbiology protocols.

  1. Biogenic contribution to PM-2.5 ambient aerosol from radiocarbon measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, C.; Klouda, G.; Ellenson, W.

    2003-04-01

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of biogenic versus anthropogenic sources to ambient aerosol is of great interest in the formulation of strategies to achieve nationally mandated air quality standards. Radiocarbon (14C) measurements provide a means to quantify the biogenic fraction of any carbon-containing sample of ambient aerosol. In the absence of an impact from biomass burning (e.g., during summertime) such measurements can provide an estimate of the contribution of biogenic secondary organic aerosol, from biogenic volatile organic compound precursors. Radiocarbon results for 11.5-h PM-2.5 samples collected near Nashville, Tennessee, USA, during summer 1999 will be presented. On average the measured biogenic fraction was surprisingly large (more than half), with the average biogenic fraction for night samples being only slightly smaller than for day samples. Discussion will include (a) description of the radiocarbon methodology, (b) use of radiocarbon measurements on local vegetation and fuel samples as calibration data, (c) concurrent measurements of organic carbon and elemental carbon ambient concentrations, (d) assessment of organic aerosol sampling artifact through use of organic vapor denuders, variable face velocities, and filter extraction, and (e) comparison with published radiocarbon results obtained in Houston, Texas in a similar study. Disclaimer: This work has been funded wholly or in part by the United States Environmental Protection Agency under Interagency Agreement No. 13937923 to the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and Contract No. 68-D5-0049 to ManTech Environmental Tecnology, Inc. It has been subjected to Agency review and approved for publication.

  2. Uncertainty in biogenic isoprene emissions and its impacts on tropospheric chemistry in East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, K M; Park, R S; Kim, H K; Woo, J H; Kim, J; Song, C H

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the accuracy of biogenic isoprene emission fluxes over East Asia during two summer months (July and August) was examined by comparing two tropospheric HCHO columns (ΩHCHO) obtained from the SCIAMACHY sensor and the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ v4.7.1) model simulations, using three available biogenic isoprene emission inventories over East Asia: i) GEIA, ii) MEGAN and iii) MOHYCAN. From this comparative analysis, the tropospheric HCHO columns from the CMAQ model simulations, using the MEGAN and MOHYCAN emission inventories (Ω(CMAQ, MEGAN) and Ω(CMAQ, MOHYCAN)), were found to agree well with the tropospheric HCHO columns from the SCIAMACHY observations (Ω(SCIA)). Secondly, the propagation of such uncertainties in the biogenic isoprene emission fluxes to the levels of atmospheric oxidants (e.g., OH and HO2) and other atmospheric gaseous/particulate species over East Asia during the two summer months was also investigated. As the biogenic isoprene emission fluxes decreased from the GEIA to the MEGAN emission inventories, the levels of OH radicals increased by factors of 1.39 and 1.75 over Central East China (CEC) and South China, respectively. Such increases in the OH radical mixing ratios subsequently influence the partitioning of HO(y) species. For example, the HO2/OH ratios from the CMAQ model simulations with GEIA isoprene emissions were 2.7 times larger than those from the CMAQ model simulations based on MEGAN isoprene emissions. The large HO2/OH ratios from the CMAQ model simulations with the GEIA biogenic emission were possibly due to the overestimation of GEIA biogenic isoprene emissions over East Asia. It was also shown that such large changes in HO(x) radicals created large differences on other tropospheric compounds (e.g., NO(y) chemistry) over East Asia during the summer months. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Condensed-phase biogenic-anthropogenic interactions with implications for cold cloud formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnawskas, Joseph C; Alpert, Peter A; Lambe, Andrew T; Berkemeier, Thomas; O'Brien, Rachel E; Massoli, Paola; Onasch, Timothy B; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Moffet, Ryan C; Gilles, Mary K; Davidovits, Paul; Worsnop, Douglas R; Knopf, Daniel A

    2017-08-24

    Anthropogenic and biogenic gas emissions contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). When present, soot particles from fossil fuel combustion can acquire a coating of SOA. We investigate SOA-soot biogenic-anthropogenic interactions and their impact on ice nucleation in relation to the particles' organic phase state. SOA particles were generated from the OH oxidation of naphthalene, α-pinene, longifolene, or isoprene, with or without the presence of sulfate or soot particles. Corresponding particle glass transition (T g ) and full deliquescence relative humidity (FDRH) were estimated using a numerical diffusion model. Longifolene SOA particles are solid-like and all biogenic SOA sulfate mixtures exhibit a core-shell configuration (i.e. a sulfate-rich core coated with SOA). Biogenic SOA with or without sulfate formed ice at conditions expected for homogeneous ice nucleation, in agreement with respective T g and FDRH. α-pinene SOA coated soot particles nucleated ice above the homogeneous freezing temperature with soot acting as ice nuclei (IN). At lower temperatures the α-pinene SOA coating can be semisolid, inducing ice nucleation. Naphthalene SOA coated soot particles acted as ice nuclei above and below the homogeneous freezing limit, which can be explained by the presence of a highly viscous SOA phase. Our results suggest that biogenic SOA does not play a significant role in mixed-phase cloud formation and the presence of sulfate renders this even less likely. However, anthropogenic SOA may have an enhancing effect on cloud glaciation under mixed-phase and cirrus cloud conditions compared to biogenic SOA that dominate during pre-industrial times or in pristine areas.

  4. The impact of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions on surface ozone concentrations in Istanbul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Ulas; Poupkou, Anastasia; Incecik, Selahattin; Markakis, Konstantinos; Kindap, Tayfun; Unal, Alper; Melas, Dimitros; Yenigun, Orhan; Topcu, Sema; Odman, M Talat; Tayanc, Mete; Guler, Meltem

    2011-03-01

    Surface ozone concentrations at Istanbul during a summer episode in June 2008 were simulated using a high resolution and urban scale modeling system coupling MM5 and CMAQ models with a recently developed anthropogenic emission inventory for the region. Two sets of base runs were performed in order to investigate for the first time the impact of biogenic emissions on ozone concentrations in the Greater Istanbul Area (GIA). The first simulation was performed using only the anthropogenic emissions whereas the second simulation was performed using both anthropogenic and biogenic emissions. Biogenic NMVOC emissions were comparable with anthropogenic NMVOC emissions in terms of magnitude. The inclusion of biogenic emissions significantly improved the performance of the model, particularly in reproducing the low night time values as well as the temporal variation of ozone concentrations. Terpene emissions contributed significantly to the destruction of the ozone during nighttime. Biogenic NMVOCs emissions enhanced ozone concentrations in the downwind regions of GIA up to 25ppb. The VOC/NO(x) ratio almost doubled due to the addition of biogenic NMVOCs. Anthropogenic NO(x) and NMVOCs were perturbed by ±30% in another set of simulations to quantify the sensitivity of ozone concentrations to the precursor emissions in the region. The sensitivity runs, as along with the model-calculated ozone-to-reactive nitrogen ratios, pointed NO(x)-sensitive chemistry, particularly in the downwind areas. On the other hand, urban parts of the city responded more to changes in NO(x) due to very high anthropogenic emissions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Probing the Origin and Evolution of Interstellar and Protoplanetary Biogenic Ices with SPHEREx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, Gary; SPHEREx Science Team

    2018-01-01

    Many of the most important building blocks of life are locked in interstellar and protoplanetary ices. Examples include H2O, CO, CO2, and CH3OH, among others. There is growing evidence that within the cores of dense molecular clouds and the mid-plane of protoplanetary disks the abundance of these species in ices far exceeds that in the gas phase. As a result, collisions between ice-bearing bodies and newly forming planets are thought to be a major means of delivering these key species to young planets. There currently exist fewer than 250 ice absorption spectra toward Galactic molecular clouds, which is insufficient to reliably trace the ice content of clouds through the various evolutionary stages of collapse to form stars and planets. Likewise, the current number of spectra is inadequate to assess the effects of environment, such as cloud density and temperature, presence or absence of embedded sources, external FUV and X-ray radiation, gas-phase composition, or cosmic-ray ionization rate, on the ice composition of clouds at similar stages of evolution. Ultimately, our goal is to understand how these findings connect to our own Solar System.SPHEREx will be a game changer for the study of interstellar, circumstellar, and protoplanetary disk ices. SPHEREx will obtain spectra over the entire sky in the optical and near-IR, including the 2.5 to 5.0 micron region, which contains the above biogenic ice features. SPHEREx will detect millions of potential background continuum point sources already catalogued by NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) at 3.4 and 4.6 microns for which there is evidence for intervening gas and dust based on the 2MASS+WISE colors with sufficient sensitivity to yield ice absorption spectra with SNR ≥ 100 per spectral resolution element. The resulting > 100-fold increase in the number of high-quality ice absorption spectra toward a wide variety of regions distributed throughout the Galaxy will reveal correlations between ice

  6. Experimental assessment of the liquefaction resistance of calcareous biogenous sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandoval Eimar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    ABSTRACT

    Liquefaction is a phenomenon in which soils, typically sands, suddenly loose a substantial amount of their shear strength and stiffness, this often triggered by large-magnitude earthquakes. Most liquefaction research has focused on silicate-based sands and not on other sand types, such as calcareous biogenous sands Calcareous sands are usually composed of skeletal or non-skeletal remains of marine organisms, with unique characteristics in terms of their mineralogy surface roughness, particle shape, crushability, and intraparticle porosity. The unique characteristics of calcareous sands suggest that their geotechnical engineering behaviour can be substantially different compared to that of terrigenous sands, including their behaviour under seismic loading, which have not been very well studied

    This paper presents the results of an experimental programme aimed at studying the cyclic liquefaction resistance of uncemented calcareous biogenous sands retrieved from south-western Puerto Rico Evaluation of liquefaction potential involved a comprehensive set of isotropically consolidated undrained cyclic triaxial tests on reconstituted samples of this calcareous sand. The programme also included tests on Ottawa terrigenous silica sand samples prepared and tested in similar conditions for comparison purposes.

    In general, the experimental results showed that Cabo Rojo calcareous sands had higher liquefaction resistance compared to Ottawa silica sands tested under similar conditions. Important differences between calcareous and silica sands regarding pore pressure generation characteristics and axial strain accumulation were also observed


  7. Comparison of U and Np uptake on biogenic and abiotic ferrihydrite by XAFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawczyk-Baersch, Evelyn [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biogeochemistry; Schmeide, Katja [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes; Kvashnina, Kristina O.; Rossberg, Andre; Scheinost, Andreas C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Molecular Structures

    2017-06-01

    XAS spectra of U and Np sorption biogenic ferrihydrite samples were compared to abiotic samples. The k{sup 3}-weighted χ-spectrum and its Fourier-transform of the studied biogenic ferrihydrite sample bears close resemblance to the bidentate edge-sharing innersphere sorption {sup 1}E complex, which is the main sorption species on abiotic ferrihydrite. Based on the shell fit analysis, the distances of the coordination shells U-O{sub eq}, U-O{sub ax}, and U-Fe are similar to those determined for abiotic ferrihydrite samples.

  8. Enhanced biogenic emissions of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide following surface biomass burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iris C.; Levine, Joel S.; Poth, Mark A.; Riggan, Philip J.

    1988-01-01

    Recent measurements indicate significantly enhanced biogenic soil emissions of both nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) following surface burning. These enhanced fluxes persisted for at least six months following the burn. Simultaneous measurements indicate enhanced levels of exchangeable ammonium in the soil following the burn. Biomass burning is known to be an instantaneous source of NO and N2O resulting from high-temperature combustion. Now it is found that biomass burning also results in significantly enhanced biogenic emissions of these gases, which persist for months following the burn.

  9. Proportion of biogenic carbon in flue gas by carbon 4 measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehtomaeki, J.; Antson, O.; Jungner, H.

    2006-01-01

    The rules of EU's emissions trading system promote the decrease of fossile emissions. The usefulness of using waste fuels in emissions trading depends on the proportion of biogenic component. Companies need to verify the amount of renewable energy from produced energy or emissions. It can be estimated that the demand on emission measurement devices and services is large and increasing in EU and later also in the whole world. This project aims to clarify the possibilities and restrictions of C-14 isotope method in determining biogenic and fossile part of recycled fuel. (orig.)

  10. PC-BEIS: a personal computer version of the biogenic emissions inventory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, T.E.; Waldruff, P.S.

    1991-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency's Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (BEIS) has been adapted for use on IBM-compatible personal computers (PCs). PC-BEIS estimates hourly emissions of isoprene, α-pinene, other monoterpenes, and unidentified hydrocarbons for any county in the contiguous United States. To run the program, users must provide hourly data on ambient temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, cloud cover, and a code that identifies the particular county. This paper provides an overview of the method used to calculate biogenic emissions, shows an example application, and gives information on how to obtain a copy of the program

  11. Radiocarbon-based determination of biogenic and fossil carbon partitioning in the production of synthetic natural gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palstra, Sanne W. L.; Rabou, Luc P. L. M.; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of the radiocarbon (C-14) method for the quantification of the biogenic carbon fractions at different stages of the Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG) production process is demonstrated in this study. The C-14-based biogenic carbon fractions were determined in process flue gas and raw SNG

  12. USER'S GUIDE TO THE PERSONAL COMPUTER VERSION OF THE BIOGENIC EMISSIONS INVENTORY SYSTEM (PC-BEIS2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The document is a user's guide for an updated Personal Computer version of the Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (PC-BEIS2), allowing users to estimate hourly emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and soil nitrogen oxide emissions for any county in the contig...

  13. Effect of biogenic carbon inventory on the life cycle assessment of bioenergy: challenges to the neutrality assumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiloso, E.I.; Heijungs, R.; Huppes, G.; Fang, K.

    2016-01-01

    Biogenic carbon is defined as carbon contained in biomass that is accumulated during plant growth. In spite of the considerable progress towards the inventory of biogenic carbon in the life cycle assessment (LCA) of bioenergy in policy guidelines, many scientific articles tend to give no

  14. Natural biogenic solid fuels - environmentally relevant characteristics and possible influences. Final report; Naturbelassene biogene Festbrennstoffe - umweltrelevante Eigenschaften und Einflussmoeglichkeiten. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, H.; Boehm, T.; Maier, L. [Bayerische Landesanstalt fuer Landtechnik, Friesing-Weihenstephan (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe Festbrennstoffe

    2000-09-01

    , Weizenstroh und Weizenganzpflanzen. Eine Datenbank fuer naturbelassene biogene Festbrennstoffe wurde errichtet. Hierfuer wurde ein relationales Datenbankmodell gewaehlt. Dessen Struktur wurde so angelegt, dass neben den eigentlichen Messgroessen auch eine Vielzahl weiterer Eigenschaften und Informationen zum Brennstoff sowie seine Herkunftsmerkmale und die verwendeten Analyseverfahren festgehalten werden konnten. Die in den eigenen Versuchsserien zustande gekommenen Analyseergebnisse wurden durch weitere Daten aus einer umfangreichen Recherche (Befragung) sowie aus Literaturangaben ergaenzt, so dass insgesamt ca. 1.238 Datensaetze (Stand April 1999) zusammengetragen werden konnten. (orig.)

  15. Biogenic arsenic volatilisation from an acidic wetland soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgen, Gunter; Huang, Jen-How; Lu, Shipeng; Tian, Liyan; Alewell, Christine

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic arsenic (As) volatilisation was budgeted at 26000 t yr-1as the largest input of the global As release into the atmosphere, thereby playing an important role in the biogeochemical cycle of As in the surface environment. In order to quantify As volatilisation from wetland soils and to elucidate the geochemical and microbiological factors governing As volatilisation, a series of incubations with an acidic wetland soil collected in NE-Bavaria in Germany were performed at 15oC for 4 months with addition of NaN3, arsenite (As(III)), FeCl3, NaSO4 and NaOAc with N2 and air in the headspace. Speciation of gaseous As in the headspace using GC-ICP-MS/ ESI-MS coupling showed the predominance of either arsine (AsH3) or trimethylarsine ((CH3)3As) in all treatments during the time course of incubation. Monomethylarsine ((CH3)AsH2) and dimethylarsine ((CH3)2AsH) could be only detected in trace amounts. Arsenic speciation in porewater with HPLC-ICP-MS revealed the predominance of As(III) and methylated As was never detectable. Arsenic volatilisation summed to 2.3 ng As (88% as AsH3) in the control incubations, which accounted for ~0.25 % of the total As storage in the wetland soil. Treatments with 10 mM NaN3 resulted in emission of only 0.03 ng As. In contrast, addition of 10 mM NaOAc stimulated microbial activities in wetland soils and subsequently rose As volatilisation to 8.5 ng As. It could be therefore concluded that As volatilisation from the wetland soils was mainly biological. Spiking 67 μM As(III) increased 10 times of As volatilisation and the proportion of methylated arsines increased to 66%, which is supposed to be caused by the largely enhanced As availability in porewater for microbes (480 ppb, ~65 times higher than those in the controls). Adding 10 mM FeCl3 stimulated microbial Fe(III) reducing activities but suppressed other microbial activities by lowering soil pH from 5 to 3.6, decreasing consequently As volatilisation to 0.3 ng As. The much lower redox

  16. Content Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Duc

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to introduce the new trend in today’s marketing world: content marketing. It has been employed by many companies and organizations in the world and has been proven success even when it is still a fairly new topic. Five carefully selected theories of content marketing proposed by experts in the field has been collected, compared and displayed as originally and scientifically as possible in this thesis. The chosen theories provide a diversified perspectives of...

  17. Impact of salt reduction on biogenic amines, fatty acids, microbiota, texture and sensory profile in traditional blood dry-cured sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laranjo, Marta; Gomes, Ana; Agulheiro-Santos, Ana Cristina; Potes, Maria Eduarda; Cabrita, Maria João; Garcia, Raquel; Rocha, João Miguel; Roseiro, Luísa Cristina; Fernandes, Maria José; Fraqueza, Maria João; Elias, Miguel

    2017-03-01

    Meat industry needs to reduce salt in their products due to health issues. The present study evaluated the effect of salt reduction from 6% to 3% in two Portuguese traditional blood dry-cured sausages. Physicochemical and microbiological parameters, biogenic amines, fatty acids and texture profiles and sensory panel evaluations were considered. Differences due to salt reduction were perceptible in a faint decline of water activity, which slightly favoured microbial growth. Total biogenic amines content ranged from 88.86 to 796.68mgkg -1 fresh matter, with higher amounts, particularly of cadaverine, histamine and tyramine, in low-salt products. Still, histamine and other vasoactive amines remained at low levels, thus not affecting consumers' health. Regarding fatty acids, no significant differences were observed due to salt. However, texture profile analysis revealed lower resilience and cohesiveness in low-salt products, although no textural changes were observed by the sensory panel. Nevertheless, low-salt sausages were clearly preferred by panellists. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sediment waves with a biogenic twist in Pleistocene cool water carbonates, Great Australian Bight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderskouv, Kresten; Surlyk, Finn; Huuse, Mads

    2010-01-01

    -parallel to contours immediately off the shelf–slope break. They are asymmetrical, showing up-slope migration, and mainly occur in trains. The sediment waves were drilled during ODP leg 182 in 1998, and were interpreted as biogenic reef mounds. New high-quality seismic and multibeam bathymetry data were acquired...

  19. From urban municipalities to polar bioremediation: the characterisation and contribution of biogenic minerals for water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidman, Benjamin L; Northcott, Kathy A; Thiel, Peta; Gras, Sally L; Snape, Ian; Stevens, Geoff W; Mumford, Kathryn A

    2017-06-01

    Minerals of biological origin have shown significant potential for the separation of contaminants from water worldwide. This study details the contribution of biologically derived minerals to water treatment operations, with a focus on filtration media from urban municipalities and remote cold regions. The results support biofilm-embedded iron and manganese to be the building blocks of biogenic mineral development on activated carbon and nutrient-amended zeolites. The presence of similar iron and manganese oxidising bacterial species across all filter media supports the analogous morphologies of biogenic minerals between sites and suggests that biological water treatment processes may be feasible across a range of climates. This is the first time the stages of biogenic mineral formation have been aligned with comprehensive imaging of the biofilm community and bacterial identification; especially with respect to cold regions. Where biogenic mineral formation occurs on filter media, the potential exists for enhanced adsorption for a range of organic and inorganic contaminants and improved longevity of filter media beyond the adsorption or exchange capacities of the raw material.

  20. Land use change affects biogenic silica pool distribution in a subtropical soil toposequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unzué-Belmonte, Dácil; Ameijeiras-Mariño, Yolanda; Opfergelt, Sophie; Cornelis, Jean-Thomas; Barão, Lúcia; Minella, Jean; Meire, Patrick; Struyf, Eric

    2017-07-01

    Land use change (deforestation) has several negative consequences for the soil system. It is known to increase erosion rates, which affect the distribution of elements in soils. In this context, the crucial nutrient Si has received little attention, especially in a tropical context. Therefore, we studied the effect of land conversion and erosion intensity on the biogenic silica pools in a subtropical soil in the south of Brazil. Biogenic silica (BSi) was determined using a novel alkaline continuous extraction where Si / Al ratios of the fractions extracted are used to distinguish BSi and other soluble fractions: Si / Al > 5 for the biogenic AlkExSi (alkaline-extractable Si) and Si / Al soils depending on the slope of the study site (10-53 %), with faster depletion in steeper sites. We show that higher erosion in steeper sites implies increased accumulation of biogenic Si in deposition zones near the bottom of the slope, where rapid burial can cause removal of BSi from biologically active zones. Our study highlights the interaction of erosion strength and land use for BSi redistribution and depletion in a soil toposequence, with implications for basin-scale Si cycling.

  1. Bacterial iron reduction and biogenic mineral formation for the stabilisation of corroded iron objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooli, Wafa M; Comensoli, Lucrezia; Maillard, Julien; Albini, Monica; Gelb, Arnaud; Junier, Pilar; Joseph, Edith

    2018-01-15

    Exploiting bacterial metabolism for the stabilisation of corroded iron artefacts is a promising alternative to conventional conservation-restoration methods. Bacterial iron reduction coupled to biogenic mineral formation has been shown to promote the conversion of reactive into stable corrosion products that are integrated into the natural corrosion layer of the object. However, in order to stabilise iron corrosion, the formation of specific biogenic minerals is essential. In this study, we used the facultative anaerobe Shewanella loihica for the production of stable biogenic iron minerals under controlled chemical conditions. The biogenic formation of crystalline iron phosphates was observed after iron reduction in a solution containing Fe(III) citrate. When the same biological treatment was applied on corroded iron plates, a layer composed of iron phosphates and iron carbonates was formed. Surface and cross-section analyses demonstrated that these two stable corrosion products replaced 81% of the reactive corrosion layer after two weeks of treatment. Such results demonstrate the potential of a biological treatment in the development of a stabilisation method to preserve corroded iron objects.

  2. Effect of garlic, black seed and Biogen as immunostimulants on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three dosage levels of black seed, garlic and commercial Biogen were administered for three months in summer and six months in winter to test their stimulation effect on growth, survival and response to challenge infection in Oreochromis niloticus. At the end of summer, no significant difference was observed in the growth ...

  3. Magnetically-modified natural biogenic iron oxides for organic xenobiotics removal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafařík, Ivo; Filip, J.; Horská, Kateřina; Nowakova, M.; Tuček, J.; Šafaříková, Miroslava; Hashimoto, H.; Takada, J.; Zbořil, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 2 (2015), s. 673-682 ISSN 1735-1472 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11111; GA MŠk LH12190 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Biogenic iron oxides * Leptothrix ochracea * Magnetic fluid * Magnetic adsorbents * Xenobiotics Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 2.344, year: 2015

  4. BIOGENIC VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS FROM A LOWLAND TROPICAL WET FOREST IN COSTA RICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenty common plant species were screened for emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCS) at a lowland tropical wet forest site in Costa Rica. Ten of the species. examined emitted substantial quantities of isoprene. These species accounted for 35-50% of the total bas...

  5. Crystal and fine structural transformation of Heat-treated biogenic manganese oxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kimura, N.; Hashimoto, H.; Miyata, N.; Nishina, Y.; Kusano, Y.; Ikeda, Y.; Nakanishi, Y.; Fujii, T.; Šafařík, Ivo; Šafaříková, Miroslava; Takada, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 3 (2013), s. 92-98 ISSN 0532-8799 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11111 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : microorganisms * biogenic manganese oxides * phase transitions * nano-sheets * microstructures Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  6. The Rate-equation for Biogenic Silica Dissolution in Seawater – New Hypotheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truesdale, V.W.; Greenwood, J.E.; Rendell, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the kinetics of biogenic silica dissolution in seawater, through batch dissolution, where the reaction is observed as the increase in dissolved silicic acid concentration with time. It utilises new data from dissolution of the marine diatom Cyclotella cryptica, and the

  7. Tidal marshes and biogenic silica recycling at the land-sea interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struyf, E.; Dausse, A.; van Damme, S.; Bal, K.; Gribsholt, B.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Meire, P.

    2006-01-01

    We studied the seasonal exchange of biogenic silica (BSi) and dissolved silica (DSi) between a freshwater and a saltwater tidal marsh and the adjacent coastal waters. Export of DSi was observed from both tidal marshes, whereas BSi was imported in association with suspended solids. The export of DSi

  8. Biogenic-amine acetylation: an additional function of the N-acetyltransferase from Fasciola hepatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisien, S O; Walter, R D

    1993-01-01

    The previously described polyamine N-acetyltransferase from Fasciola hepatica has been observed to have an additional function, the acetylation of biogenic amines. The activities for biogenic amines, diamines and polyamines were in a constant ratio throughout the purification process. Biogenic amines found to be substrates for the enzyme included tyramine, tryptamine, beta-phenylethylamine and histamine, with Km values of 0.12 mM, 0.26 mM, 0.30 mM and 0.76 mM respectively. Octopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine and alpha-phenylethylamine were also acceptable as substrates, though to a lesser degree. The optimum pH for biogenic-amine acetylation was 7.5, and CoA was inhibitory to the process, with a Ki of 5.5 microM. N-Acetylation appears to play a major role in the amine metabolism of this trematode. We presume that acetylation represents the process by which the parasite inactivates excess amines. PMID:8489501

  9. Enhancement of Biogenic Coalbed Methane Production and Back Injection of Coalbed Methane Co-Produced Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Jin

    2007-05-31

    Biogenic methane is a common constituent in deep subsurface environments such as coalbeds and oil shale beds. Coalbed methane (CBM) makes significant contributions to world natural gas industry and CBM production continues to increase. With increasing CBM production, the production of CBM co-produced water increases, which is an environmental concern. This study investigated the feasibility in re-using CBM co-produced water and other high sodic/saline water to enhance biogenic methane production from coal and other unconventional sources, such as oil shale. Microcosms were established with the selected carbon sources which included coal, oil shale, lignite, peat, and diesel-contaminated soil. Each microcosm contained either CBM coproduced water or groundwater with various enhancement and inhibitor combinations. Results indicated that the addition of nutrients and nutrients with additional carbon can enhance biogenic methane production from coal and oil shale. Methane production from oil shale was much greater than that from coal, which is possibly due to the greater amount of available Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) from oil shale. Inconclusive results were observed from the other sources since the incubation period was too low. WRI is continuing studies with biogenic methane production from oil shale.

  10. Biocompatibility assessment of rice husk-derived biogenic silica nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshatwi, Ali A; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan

    2015-02-01

    Synthetic forms of silica have low biocompatibility, whereas biogenic forms have myriad beneficial effects in current toxicological applications. Among the various sources of biogenic silica, rice husk is considered a valuable agricultural biomass material and a cost-effective resource that can provide biogenic silica for biomedical applications. In the present study, highly pure biogenic silica nanoparticles (bSNPs) were successfully harvested from rice husks using acid digestion under pressurized conditions at 120°C followed by a calcination process. The obtained bSNPs were subjected to phase identification analysis using X-ray diffraction, which revealed the amorphous nature of the bSNPs. The morphologies of the bSNPs were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which revealed spherical particles 10 to 30 nm in diameter. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of the bSNPs with human lung fibroblast cells (hLFCs) was investigated using a viability assay and assessing cellular morphological changes, intracellular ROS generation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential and oxidative stress-related gene expression. Our results revealed that the bSNPs did not have any significant incompatibility in these in vitro cell-based approaches. These preliminary findings suggest that bSNPs are biocompatible, could be the best alternative to synthetic forms of silica and are applicable to food additive and biomedical applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Biogenic, biomass and biofuel sources of trace gases in southern Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Otter, LB

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic processes in southern African savannas are estimated to produce 1.0 Tg NO yr(-1), 44.2-87.8 Tg C yr(-1) as non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and to consume 0.23 Tg CH4 yr(-1). Floodplains and wetlands in southern Africa are estimated...

  12. Radiocarbon AMS determination of the biogenic component in CO2 emitted from waste incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcagnile, L.; Quarta, G.; D’Elia, M.; Ciceri, G.; Martinotti, V.

    2011-01-01

    The thermal utilization of waste for energy production is gaining importance in European countries. Nevertheless, the combustion of waste leads to significant CO 2 emissions in the atmosphere which, depending on the fraction of biogenic and fossil materials, have to be only partially accounted for the national greenhouse gas inventory. For this reason the development of proper methodologies for the measurement of the biogenic fraction in the combusted waste is an active research field. In fact the determination of the radiocarbon concentration in the carbon dioxide stack emissions allows to have a direct indication of the biogenic component in the burned fuel. We present the results of the AMS radiocarbon analyses carried out on carbon dioxide sampled at the stack of three power plants located in Northern Italy burning natural gas, landfill biogas and SRF (Solid Recovered Fuel) derived from MSW (Municipal Solid Waste). The sampling apparatus and the applied processing protocols are described together with the calculation procedures used to determine, from the measured radiocarbon concentrations, the proportion of biogenic and fossil component in the flue gas and in the combusted fuel. The results confirm the high potentialities of this approach in the analysis of industrial CO 2 emissions.

  13. An approach for verifying biogenic greenhouse gas emissions inventories with atmospheric CO2 concentration data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen M Ogle; Kenneth Davis; Thomas Lauvaux; Andrew Schuh; Dan Cooley; Tristram O West; Linda S Heath; Natasha L Miles; Scott Richardson; F Jay Breidt; James E Smith; Jessica L McCarty; Kevin R Gurney; Pieter Tans; A Scott. Denning

    2015-01-01

    Verifying national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventories is a critical step to ensure that reported emissions data to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) are accurate and representative of a country's contribution to GHG concentrations in the atmosphere. Furthermore, verifying biogenic fluxes provides a check on estimated...

  14. Worldwide biogenic soil NOx emissions inferred from OMI NO2 observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinken, G.C.M.; Boersma, K.F.; Maasakkers, J.D.; Adon, M.; Martin, R.V.

    2014-01-01

    Biogenic NOx emissions from soils are a large natural source with substantial uncertainties in global bottom-up estimates (ranging from 4 to 15 Tg N yr-1). We reduce this range in emission estimates, and present a top-down soil NOx emission inventory for 2005 based on retrieved tropospheric NO2

  15. Foliar leaching, translocation, and biogenic emission of 35S in radiolabeled loblolly pines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garten, C.T. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Foliar leaching, basipetal (downward) translocation, and biogenic emission of sulfur (S), as traced by 35 S, were examined in a field study of loblolly pines. Four trees were radiolabeled by injection with amounts of 35 S in the 6-8 MBq range, and concentrations in needle fall, stemflow, throughfall, and aboveground biomass were measured over a period of 15-20 wk after injection. The contribution of dry deposition to sulfate-sulfur (SO 4 2- -S) concentrations in net throughfall (throughfall SO 4 2- -S concentration minus that in incident precipitation) beneath all four trees was > 90%. Calculations indicated that about half of the summertime SO 2 dry deposition flux to the loblolly pines was fixed in the canopy and not subsequently leached by rainfall. Based on mass balance calculations, 35 S losses through biogenic emissions from girdled trees were inferred to be 25-28% of the amount injected. Estimates based on chamber methods and mass balance calculations indicated a range in daily biogenic S emission of 0.1-10 μg/g dry needles. Translocation of 35 S to roots in nongirdled trees was estimated to be between 14 and 25% of the injection. It is hypothesized that biogenic emission and basipetal translocation of S (and not foliar leaching) are important mechanisms by which forest trees physiologically adapt to excess S in the environment

  16. UNITED STATES LAND USE INVENTORY FOR ESTIMATING BIOGENIC OZONE PRECURSOR EMISSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Earth Resources Observation System (EROS) Data Center's (EDC) 1-km classified land cover data are combined with other land use data using a Geographic Information System (GIS) to create the Biogenic Emissions Landcover Database (BELD). The land...

  17. Impacts of Interannual Variability in Biogenic VOC Emissions near Transitional Ozone Production Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, J.

    2017-12-01

    Due to successful NOx emission controls, summertime ozone production chemistry in urban areas across North America is transitioning from VOC-limited to increasingly NOx-limited. In some regions where ozone production sensitivity is in transition, interannual variability in surrounding biogenic VOC emissions could drive fluctuations in the prevailing chemical regime and modify the impact of anthropogenic emission changes. I use satellite observations of HCHO and NO2 column density, along with a long-term simulation of atmospheric chemistry, to investigate the impact of interannual variability in biogenic isoprene sources near large metro areas. Peak emissions of isoprene in the model can vary by up to 20-60% in any given year compared to the long term mean, and this variability drives the majority of the variability in simulated local HCHO:NO2 ratios (a common proxy for ozone production sensitivity). The satellite observations confirm increasingly NOx-limited chemical regimes with large interannual variability. In several instances, the model and satellite observations suggest that variability in biogenic isoprene emissions could shift summertime ozone production from generally VOC- to generally NOx- sensitive (or vice versa). This would have implications for predicting the air quality impacts of anthropogenic emission changes in any given year, and suggests that drivers of biogenic emissions need to be well understood.

  18. Future changes in biogenic isoprene emissions: how might they affect regional and global atmospheric chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christine Wiedinmyer; Xuexi Tie; Alex Guenther; Ron Neilson; Claire. Granier

    2006-01-01

    Isoprene is emitted from vegetation to the atmosphere in significant quantities, and it plays an important role in the reactions that control tropospheric oxidant concentrations. As future climatic and land-cover changes occur, the spatial and temporal variations, as well as the magnitude of these biogenic isoprene emissions, are expected to change. This paper presents...

  19. Carbon-14 based determination of the biogenic fraction of industrial CO2 emissions : Application and validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palstra, S. W. L.; Meijer, H. A. J.

    The C-14 method is a very reliable and sensitive method for industrial plants, emission authorities and emission inventories to verify data estimations of biogenic fractions of CO2 emissions. The applicability of the method is shown for flue gas CO2 samples that have been sampled in I-h intervals at

  20. Evolution of cyclonic eddies and biogenic fluxes in the northern Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nuncio, M.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    -and-half to two-and-half times the annual mean flux, while the anomaly of peak episodic fluxes was at least equal to or greater than the magnitude of the seasonal flux value. Cyclonic eddies responsible for high biogenic flux during 1994 and 1996 were formed...

  1. Importance of particle formation to reconstructed water column biogenic silica fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moriceau, B.; Gallinari, M.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Ragueneau, O.

    2007-01-01

    The particles sinking out of the ocean's surface layer are made up of a mixture of living and dead algal cells, fecal pellets, and aggregates, while the parameters used to describe the behavior of biogenic silica (bSiO2) in today's models are experimentally determined on freely suspended diatoms

  2. Contribution of biogenic emissions to the formation of ozone and particulate matter in the eastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Betty K; Wu, Shiang-Yuh; Seigneur, Christian

    2002-08-15

    As anthropogenic emissions of ozone (O3) precursors, fine particulate matter (PM2.5), and PM2.5 precursors continue to decrease in the United States, the fraction of O3 and PM2.5 attributable to natural sources may become significant in some locations, reducing the efficacy that can be expected from future controls of anthropogenic sources. Modeling studies were conducted to estimate the contribution of biogenic emissions to the formation of O3 and PM2.5 in Nashville/TN and the northeastern United States. Two approaches were used to bound the estimates. In an anthropogenic simulation, biogenic emissions and their influence at the domain boundaries were eliminated. Contributions of biogenic compounds to the simulated concentrations of O3 and PM2.5 were determined by the deviation of the concentrations in the anthropogenic case from those in the base case. A biogenic simulation was used to assess the amounts of O3 and PM2.5 produced in an environment free from anthropogenic influences in emissions and boundary conditions. In both locations, the contribution of biogenic emissions to O3 was small (biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions (65-89% of total VOC emissions). However, the production of O3 was much more sensitive to biogenic emissions in urban areas (22-34%). Therefore, the effects of biogenic emissions on O3 manifested mostly via their interaction with anthropogenic emissions of NOx. In the anthropogenic simulations, the average contribution of biogenic and natural sources to PM2.5 was estimated at 9% in Nashville/TN and 12% in the northeast domain. Because of the long atmospheric lifetimes of PM2.5, the contribution of biogenic/natural PM2.5 from the boundary conditions was higher than the contribution of biogenic aerosols produced within the domain. The elimination of biogenic emissions also affected the chemistry of other secondary PM2.5 components. Very little PM2.5 was formed in the biogenic simulations.

  3. Evaluation of biogenic emission flux and its impact on oxidants and inorganic aerosols in East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, K. M.; Song, C. H.; Park, R. S.; Woo, J.; Kim, H.

    2010-12-01

    As a major precursor during the summer season, biogenic species are of primary importance in the ozone and SOAs (secondary organic aerosols) formations. Isoprene and mono-terpene also influence the level of inorganic aerosols (i.e. sulfate and nitrate) by controlling OH radicals. However, biogenic emission fluxes are highly uncertain in East Asia. While isoprene emission fluxes from the GEIA (Global Emissions Inventory Activity) and POET (Precursors of Ozone and their Effects in the Troposphere) inventories estimate approximately 20 Tg yr-1 in East Asia, those from the MEGAN (Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature) and MOHYCAN (MOdel for Hydrocarbon emissions by the CANopy) estimate approximately 10 Tg yr-1 and 5 Tg yr-1, respectively. In order to evaluate and/or quantify the magnitude of biogenic emission fluxes over East Asia, the tropospheric HCHO columns obtained from the GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment) observations were compared with the HCHO columns from the CMAQ (Community Multi-scale Air Quality) simulations over East Asia. In this study, US EPA Models-3/CMAQ v4.5.1 model simulation using the ACE-ASIA (Asia Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment) emission inventory for anthropogenic pollutants and GEIA, POET, MEGAN, and MOHYCAN emission inventories for biogenic species was carried out in conjunction with the Meteorological fields generated from the PSU/NCAR MM5 (Pennsylvania state University/National Center for Atmospheric Research Meso-scale Model 5) model for the summer episodes of the year 2002. In addition to an evaluation of the biogenic emission flux, we investigated the impact of the uncertainty in biogenic emission inventory on inorganic aerosol formations and variations of oxidants (OH, O3, and H2O2) in East Asia. In this study, when the GEIA and POET emission inventories are used, the CMAQ-derived HCHO columns are highly overestimated over East Asia, particularly South China compared with GOME-derived HCHO

  4. Enhanced SOA formation from mixed anthropogenic and biogenic emissions during the CARES campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Shilling

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The CARES campaign was conducted during June, 2010 in the vicinity of Sacramento, California to study aerosol formation and aging in a region where anthropogenic and biogenic emissions regularly mix. Here, we describe measurements from an Aerodyne High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS, an Ionicon Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS, and trace gas detectors (CO, NO, NOx deployed on the G-1 research aircraft to investigate ambient gas- and particle-phase chemical composition. AMS measurements showed that the particle phase is dominated by organic aerosol (OA (85% on average with smaller concentrations of sulfate (5%, nitrate (6% and ammonium (3% observed. PTR-MS data showed that isoprene dominated the biogenic volatile organic compound concentrations (BVOCs, with monoterpene concentrations generally below the detection limit. Using two different metrics, median OA concentrations and the slope of plots of OA vs. CO concentrations (i.e., ΔOA/ΔCO, we contrast organic aerosol evolution on flight days with different prevailing meteorological conditions to elucidate the role of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions on OA formation. Airmasses influenced predominantly by biogenic emissions had median OA concentrations of 2.2 μg m−3 and near zero ΔOA/ΔCO. Those influenced predominantly by anthropogenic emissions had median OA concentrations of 4.7 μg m−3 and ΔOA/ΔCO ratios of 35–44 μg m−3 ppmv. But, when biogenic and anthropogenic emissions mixed, OA levels were enhanced, with median OA concentrations of 11.4 μg m−3 and ΔOA/ΔCO ratios of 77–157 μg m−3 ppmv. Taken together, our observations show that production of OA was enhanced when anthropogenic emissions from Sacramento mixed with isoprene-rich air from the foothills. After considering several anthropogenic/biogenic interaction mechanisms, we conclude that NOx concentrations

  5. Performance of the JULES land surface model for UK Biogenic VOC emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, Garry; Comyn-Platt, Edward; Vieno, Massimo; Langford, Ben

    2017-04-01

    Emissions of biogenic non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) are important for air quality and tropospheric composition. Through their contribution to the production of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA), biogenic VOCs indirectly contribute to climate forcing and climate feedbacks [1]. Biogenic VOCs encompass a wide range of compounds and are produced by plants for growth, development, reproduction, defence and communication [2]. There are both biological and physico-chemical controls on emissions [3]. Only a few of the many biogenic VOCs are of wider interest and only two or three (isoprene and the monoterpenes, α- and β-pinene) are represented in chemical transport models. We use the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES), the UK community land surface model, to estimate biogenic VOC emission fluxes. JULES is a process-based model that describes the water, energy and carbon balances and includes temperature, moisture and carbon stores [4, 5]. JULES currently provides emission fluxes of the 4 largest groups of biogenic VOCs: isoprene, terpenes, methanol and acetone. The JULES isoprene scheme uses gross primary productivity (GPP), leaf internal carbon and the leaf temperature as a proxy for the electron requirement for isoprene synthesis [6]. In this study, we compare JULES biogenic VOC emission estimates of isoprene and terepenes with (a) flux measurements made at selected sites in the UK and Europe and (b) gridded estimates for the UK from the EMEP/EMEP4UK atmospheric chemical transport model [7, 8], using site-specific or EMEP4UK driving meteorological data, respectively. We compare the UK-scale emission estimates with literature estimates. We generally find good agreement in the comparisons but the estimates are sensitive to the choice of the base or reference emission potentials. References (1) Unger, 2014: Geophys. Res. Lett., 41, 8563, doi:10.1002/2014GL061616; (2) Laothawornkitkul et al., 2009: New Phytol., 183, 27, doi

  6. Effect of Novel Starter Culture on Reduction of Biogenic Amines, Quality Improvement, and Sensory Properties of Doenjang, a Traditional Korean Soybean Fermented Sauce Variety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Shruti; Lee, Jong Suk; Park, Hae-Kyong; Yoo, Jung-Ah; Hong, Sung-Yong; Kim, Jong-Kyu; Kim, Myunghee

    2015-08-01

    To select appropriate microorganisms as starter cultures for the reliable and reproducible fermentation of soybean fermented products of Korean Doenjang, various ratios of fungi (Aspergillus oryzae J, Mucor racemosus 15, M. racemosus 42) combined with Bacillus subtilis TKSP 24 were selected as either single, double, or multiple Meju strains for commercial mass production of Doenjang, followed by analysis of sensory characteristics. In the sensory evaluation, Doenjang BAM15-1 and BAM42-1, which were fermented with multiple strains (1:1:1), showed the highest sensory scores as compared to control. Based on sensory characteristics, 6 Doenjang samples were subjected to quantitative determination of amino acids, free sugars, and organic acids (volatile and nonvolatile) contents, followed by determination of biogenic amines. Total sweet taste amino acid contents were highest in BAM15-1 and BAM42-1 samples (333.7 and 295.8 mg/100 g, respectively) and similar that of control (391.1 mg/100 g). Samples BAM15-1 and BAM42-1 showed the relatively high volatile and nonvolatile organic acid contents (154.24, 192.26, and 71.31, 82.42 mg/100 g, respectively). In addition, BAM15-1 and BAM42-1 showed negligible biogenic amine formation, ranging from 0.00 to 1.02 and 0.00 to 3.92 mg/100 g, respectively. These findings indicate that determination of food components along with sensory and quality attributes using multiple microbial Meju strains as a starter culture may provide substantial results on improved quality fermented Doenjang products. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  7. Recent trends in the determination of biogenic amines in fermented beverages – A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordóñez, José Luis; Troncoso, Ana Maria; García-Parrilla, Maria Del Carmen; Callejón, Raquel Maria, E-mail: rcallejon@us.es

    2016-10-05

    Biogenic amines (BA) are generally considered as a food hazard, even though there is not a threshold for these biomolecules in the European legislation, except for histamine in fishery products. These compounds are formed during the storage and processing of certain foods through microbiological activity, and when present in high concentrations, could have toxicological effects, causing health problems in consumers, especially to sensitive persons. This fact, in addition to the economical concern involved, makes it necessary to control the amounts of biogenic amines in foods. For all these reasons, literature on biogenic amines in different food products, especially in fermented beverages, is extensive. This review provides an overview of the most recent trends in the determination of biogenic amines in fermented beverages focusing on novelty, improvement and optimization of analytical methods. Hence, the different sample treatment procedures (including derivatization), the most important analytical techniques and the most frequent applications are described and discussed. Although biogenic amines have been determined in wine and other fermented beverages for decades, new advancements and technical possibilities have allowed to increase the accuracy and sensitivity of analytical methods, in order to overcome the challenges posed by the complex matrices and their high intrinsic variability. Thus, the different purposes of BA determination (food safety, production process or food microbiology research) and the most widely employed analytical techniques have been reviewed. - Highlights: • A critical review on analytical methods for BA in fermented beverages is presented. • Recent sample treatments and analytical techniques are described and discussed. • A previous derivatization is needed in most liquid chromatographic methods. • BA determination is related to food safety, production process or microbiology research.

  8. Modeling of microbial gas generation: application to the eastern Mediterranean “Biogenic Play”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M.; Dubille, M.; Montadert, L.

    2016-07-01

    Biogenic gas is becoming increasingly important as an exploration target in the petroleum industry because it occurs in geologically predictable circumstances and in large quantities at shallow depths as free gas or gas hydrates. As accumulations of biogenic gas result in a subtle synchronization between early generation and early trapping, we integrated a macroscopic model of microbial gas generation within a 3D basin and petroleum system forward simulator. The macroscopic model is based on a microscopic model, which consists in a 1D sedimentary column that accounts for sedimentation, compaction, Darcy flow and Diffusion flow. The organic carbon is the only non-soluble element considered in this version of the model. The dissolved elements are O2, SO4 2-, H2, CH3COOH, and CH4. Methane is dissolved in water or present as a free phase if its concentration exceeds its solubility at given pressure and temperature. In this microscopic model, the transformation of substrate into biomass is described through a set of logistic equations coupled with the transport equations (advection and diffusion). Based on the microscopic considerations we developed the macroscopic model of low maturity/biogenic gas generation in which hydrocarbons are generated through first order kinetic reactions at low maturity. This macroscopic model is adapted to petroleum system modeling at basin scale with TemisFlow®, which aims to understand and predict hydrocarbon generation, migration, and accumulation. It is composed of: i) A source rock criteria which allow defining the biogenic gas source rocks potential and ii) A kinetic model of methane generation. The previous model has been successfully applied on different basins such as the Carupano Basin from the offshore Venezuela, the Magdalena Delta (offshore Colombia) and the offshore Vietnam where direct observations of low-maturity gas were available. Furthermore, it has been applied in the offshore Lebanon in order to check the viability of

  9. New procedure of selected biogenic amines determination in wine samples by HPLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piasta, Anna M.; Jastrzębska, Aneta, E-mail: aj@chem.uni.torun.pl; Krzemiński, Marek P.; Muzioł, Tadeusz M.; Szłyk, Edward

    2014-06-27

    Highlights: • We proposed new procedure for derivatization of biogenic amines. • The NMR and XRD analysis confirmed the purity and uniqueness of derivatives. • Concentration of biogenic amines in wine samples were analyzed by RP-HPLC. • Sample contamination and derivatization reactions interferences were minimized. - Abstract: A new procedure for determination of biogenic amines (BA): histamine, phenethylamine, tyramine and tryptamine, based on the derivatization reaction with 2-chloro-1,3-dinitro-5-(trifluoromethyl)-benzene (CNBF), is proposed. The amines derivatives with CNBF were isolated and characterized by X-ray crystallography and {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 19}F NMR spectroscopy in solution. The novelty of the procedure is based on the pure and well-characterized products of the amines derivatization reaction. The method was applied for the simultaneous analysis of the above mentioned biogenic amines in wine samples by the reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography. The procedure revealed correlation coefficients (R{sup 2}) between 0.9997 and 0.9999, and linear range: 0.10–9.00 mg L{sup −1} (histamine); 0.10–9.36 mg L{sup -1} (tyramine); 0.09–8.64 mg L{sup −1} (tryptamine) and 0.10–8.64 mg L{sup −1} (phenethylamine), whereas accuracy was 97%–102% (recovery test). Detection limit of biogenic amines in wine samples was 0.02–0.03 mg L{sup −1}, whereas quantification limit ranged 0.05–0.10 mg L{sup −1}. The variation coefficients for the analyzed amines ranged between 0.49% and 3.92%. Obtained BA derivatives enhanced separation the analytes on chromatograms due to the inhibition of hydrolysis reaction and the reduction of by-products formation.

  10. Biocompatibility assessment of rice husk-derived biogenic silica nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alshatwi, Ali A.; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic forms of silica have low biocompatibility, whereas biogenic forms have myriad beneficial effects in current toxicological applications. Among the various sources of biogenic silica, rice husk is considered a valuable agricultural biomass material and a cost-effective resource that can provide biogenic silica for biomedical applications. In the present study, highly pure biogenic silica nanoparticles (bSNPs) were successfully harvested from rice husks using acid digestion under pressurized conditions at 120 °C followed by a calcination process. The obtained bSNPs were subjected to phase identification analysis using X-ray diffraction, which revealed the amorphous nature of the bSNPs. The morphologies of the bSNPs were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which revealed spherical particles 10 to 30 nm in diameter. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of the bSNPs with human lung fibroblast cells (hLFCs) was investigated using a viability assay and assessing cellular morphological changes, intracellular ROS generation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential and oxidative stress-related gene expression. Our results revealed that the bSNPs did not have any significant incompatibility in these in vitro cell-based approaches. These preliminary findings suggest that bSNPs are biocompatible, could be the best alternative to synthetic forms of silica and are applicable to food additive and biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Simple, rapid and convenient process • Amorphous and spherical with 10–30 nm size SiO 2 nanoparticles were fabricated. • Biogenic silica nanoparticles showed biocompatibility. • bSNPs are an alternative to synthetic forms of silica

  11. Improved MEGAN predictions of biogenic isoprene in the contiguous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Schade, Gunnar; Estes, Mark; Ying, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Isoprene emitted from biogenic sources significantly contributes to ozone and secondary organic aerosol formation in the troposphere. The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) has been widely used to estimate isoprene emissions from local to global scales. However, previous studies have shown that MEGAN significantly over-predicts isoprene emissions in the contiguous United States (US). In this study, ambient isoprene concentrations in the US were simulated by the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model (v5.0.1) using biogenic emissions estimated by MEGAN v2.10 with several different gridded isoprene emission factor (EF) fields. Best isoprene predictions were obtained with the EF field based on the Biogenic Emissions Landcover Database v4 (BELD4) from US EPA for its Biogenic Emission Inventory System (BEIS) model v3.61 (MEGAN-BEIS361). A seven-month simulation (April to October 2011) of isoprene emissions with MEGAN-BEIS361 and ambient concentrations using CMAQ shows that observed spatial and temporal variations (both diurnal and seasonal) of isoprene concentrations can be well predicted at most non-urban monitors using isoprene emission estimation from the MEGAN-BEIS361 without significant biases. The predicted monthly average vertical column density of formaldehyde (HCHO), a reactive volatile organic compound with significant contributions from isoprene oxidation, generally agree with the spatial distribution of HCHO column density derived using satellite data collected by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), although summer month vertical column densities in the southeast US were overestimated, which suggests that isoprene emission might still be overestimated in that region. The agreement between observation and prediction may be further improved if more accurate PAR values, such as those derived from satellite-based observations, were used in modeling the biogenic emissions.

  12. Recent trends in the determination of biogenic amines in fermented beverages – A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordóñez, José Luis; Troncoso, Ana Maria; García-Parrilla, Maria Del Carmen; Callejón, Raquel Maria

    2016-01-01

    Biogenic amines (BA) are generally considered as a food hazard, even though there is not a threshold for these biomolecules in the European legislation, except for histamine in fishery products. These compounds are formed during the storage and processing of certain foods through microbiological activity, and when present in high concentrations, could have toxicological effects, causing health problems in consumers, especially to sensitive persons. This fact, in addition to the economical concern involved, makes it necessary to control the amounts of biogenic amines in foods. For all these reasons, literature on biogenic amines in different food products, especially in fermented beverages, is extensive. This review provides an overview of the most recent trends in the determination of biogenic amines in fermented beverages focusing on novelty, improvement and optimization of analytical methods. Hence, the different sample treatment procedures (including derivatization), the most important analytical techniques and the most frequent applications are described and discussed. Although biogenic amines have been determined in wine and other fermented beverages for decades, new advancements and technical possibilities have allowed to increase the accuracy and sensitivity of analytical methods, in order to overcome the challenges posed by the complex matrices and their high intrinsic variability. Thus, the different purposes of BA determination (food safety, production process or food microbiology research) and the most widely employed analytical techniques have been reviewed. - Highlights: • A critical review on analytical methods for BA in fermented beverages is presented. • Recent sample treatments and analytical techniques are described and discussed. • A previous derivatization is needed in most liquid chromatographic methods. • BA determination is related to food safety, production process or microbiology research.

  13. Downward particle fluxes of biogenic matter and Saharan dust across the equatorial North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korte, Laura F.; Brummer, Geert-Jan A.; van der Does, Michèlle; Guerreiro, Catarina V.; Hennekam, Rick; van Hateren, Johannes A.; Jong, Dirk; Munday, Chris I.; Schouten, Stefan; Stuut, Jan-Berend W.

    2017-05-01

    Massive amounts of Saharan dust are blown from the coast of northern Africa across the Atlantic Ocean towards the Americas each year. This dust has, depending on its chemistry, direct and indirect effects on global climate which include reflection and absorption of solar radiation as well as transport and deposition of nutrients and metals fertilizing both ocean and land. To determine the temporal and spatial variability of Saharan dust transport and deposition and their marine environmental effects across the equatorial North Atlantic Ocean, we have set up a monitoring experiment using deep-ocean sediment traps as well as land-based dust collectors. The sediment traps were deployed at five ocean sites along a transatlantic transect between north-west Africa and the Caribbean along 12° N, in a downwind extension of the land-based dust collectors placed at 19° N on the Mauritanian coast in Iouîk. In this paper, we lay out the setup of the monitoring experiment and present the particle fluxes from sediment trap sampling over 24 continuous and synchronized intervals from October 2012 through to November 2013. We establish the temporal distribution of the particle fluxes deposited in the Atlantic and compare chemical compositions with the land-based dust collectors propagating to the downwind sediment trap sites, and with satellite observations of Saharan dust outbreaks. First-year results show that the total mass fluxes in the ocean are highest at the sampling sites in the east and west, closest to the African continent and the Caribbean, respectively. Element ratios reveal that the lithogenic particles deposited nearest to Africa are most similar in composition to the Saharan dust collected in Iouîk. Downwind increasing Al, Fe and K contents suggest a downwind change in the mineralogical composition of Saharan dust and indicate an increasing contribution of clay minerals towards the west. In the westernmost Atlantic Ocean, admixture of re-suspended clay

  14. Preliminary carbon isotope measurements of fossil fuel and biogenic emissions from the Brazilian Southeastern region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, F. M.; Santos, G.; Macario, K.; Muniz, M.; Queiroz, E.; Park, J.

    2014-12-01

    Researchers have confirmed that the continuing global rising of atmospheric CO2 content is caused by anthropogenic CO2 contributions. Most of those contributions are essentially associated with burning of fossil fuels (coal, petroleum and natural gas). However, deforestation, biomass burning, and land use changes, can also play important roles. Researchers have showed that 14C measurements of annual plants, such as corn leaf (Hsueh et al. 2007), annual grasses (Wang and Pataki 2012), and leaves of deciduous trees (Park et al. 2013) can be used to obtain time-integrated information of the fossil fuel ration in the atmosphere. Those regional-scale fossil fuel maps are essential for monitoring CO2 emissions mitigation efforts and/or growth spikes around the globe. However, no current data from anthropogenic contributions from both biogenic and fossil carbon has been reported from the major urban areas of Brazil. Here we make use of carbon isotopes (13C and 14C) to infer sources of CO2 in the highly populated Brazilian Southeastern region (over 80 million in 2010). This region leads the country in population, urban population, population density, vehicles, industries, and many other utilities and major infrastructures. For a starting point, we focus on collecting Ipê leaves (Tabebuia, a popular deciduous tree) from across Rio de Janeiro city and state as well as Sao Paulo city during May/June of 2014 to obtain the regional distribution of 13C and 14C of those urban domes. So far, Δ14C range from -10 to 32‰, when δ13C values are running from -26 to -35‰. The result of these preliminary investigations will be presented and discussed.Hsueh et al. 2007 Regional patterns of radiocarbon and fossil fuel-derived CO2 in surface air across North America. Geophysical Research Letters. 34: L02816. doi:10.1029/2006GL027032 Wang and Pataki 2012 Drivers of spatial variability in urban plant and soil isotopic composition in the Los Angeles Basin. Plant and Soil 350: 323

  15. [Metabolism of various biogenic amines in diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoilov, L D; Perelygina, A A

    1981-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) and histamine metabolism was studied in 50 patients with diabetes melitus. Simultaneously the blood and urine content of their precursors and metabolites tryptophane, 5-hydroxytryptophane (5-HTP), 5-hydroxyindolylacetic acid (5-HIAA) and histidine was examined. An increase in 5-HT metabolism intensification (the augmented 5-HTP and 5-HT blood levels and enhanced 5-HTP and 5-HIAA excretion with the urine) was determined, whereas the blood and urine contents of histamine and histadine were within normal. Moreover, significantly higher increase in 5-HT blood level and enhanced 5-HIAA excretion with the urine were seen in patients with juvenile diabetes mellitus comparatively to those with insulin-depending type of the disease. Possible significance of changes, being discovered in 5-HT metabolism of patients with diabetes mellitus, in the disease pathogenesis is discussed.

  16. Biogenic Amine Formation and Microbiological Quality of Anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) Treated with Lavender and Lemon Balm Ethanol Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özogul, Fatih; Öztekin, Rana; Kulawik, Piotr

    2017-05-01

    Biogenic amine formation and bacterial growth of vacuum-packed European anchovy treated with 1% lemon balm (LB) or lavender (LD) ethanol extracts was investigated. The treated samples were stored at 2 ± 1 °C for 11 d and analyzed for biogenic amines, total viable count, fecal coliform count, and lactic acid bacterial count. The analyses were done on 0, 4, 7, 9, and 11 d of storage. Both LB and LD extracts proved effective in reducing most biogenic amines, with histamine reduced by 3-fold compared to control. The calculated biogenic amine index showed that LB extract was the most effective in inhibiting the biogenic amine formation. The reduction in total viable count was low and the bacterial contamination reached more than 7 log cfu/g at the end of the storage period for all the samples. Moreover, the reduction in fecal coliform and lactic acid bacterial count by LB and LD extracts was below 1 log cfu/g. Treatment of European anchovy with LB and LD extracts proved to be a very effective preservation technique to reduce the biogenic amine formation and lower the risk of histamine fish poisoning but is not effective in reduction of bacterial load. Consequently, LB and LD extracts could be used to reduce the biogenic amine formation which provides additional safety prior to spoilage for histamine sensitive fish species. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  17. Local Content

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gibberd, Jeremy

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available , 1997; Qiu & Tao, 2001; Corkin, 2012; Warner, 2011; Stephenson, 2013). Local content is also seen a way of improving national sustainability performance and developing greener buildings (Olivier et al, 2016; van Reneen, 2014; Gibberd, 2002). As a result...

  18. Ecological Importance of Insects in Selenium Biogenic Cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhda Golubkina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential trace element for animal and human beings. Despite the importance of insects in most ecosystems and their significant contribution to the biological cycling of trace elements due to high abundance, population productivity, and diverse ecosystem functions, surprisingly little information is available on selenium bioaccumulation by these arthropods. This review considers selenium essentiality and toxicity to insects as well as insects’ contribution to selenium trophic transfer through the food chains. Data on Se accumulation by insects of the Dniester River Valley with no anthropogenic Se loading reveal typically low Se content in necrophagous insects compared to predators and herbivores and seasonal variations in Se accumulation.

  19. Search for a low mass CP-odd Higgs boson in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions with the OPAL detector at LEP2

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Elfgren, E.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hauschildt, J.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Horvath, D.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kramer, T.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Krop, D.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vachon, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2003-01-01

    We have analysed the data collected by OPAL at centre-of-mass energies between 189 and 209 GeV searching for Higgs boson candidates from the process e/sup +/e/sup -/ to h/sup 0/Z/sup 0/ followed by the decay of h/sup 0/ to A/sup 0/A/sup 0/ where A/sup 0/ is the CP-odd Higgs boson. The search is done in the region where the A/sup 0/ mass, m/sub A/, is below the production threshold for bb, and the CP- even Higgs boson mass m/sub h/ is within the range 45-86 GeV/c/sup 2 /. In this kinematic range, the decay of h/sup 0/ to A/sup 0/A/sup 0/ may be dominant and previous Higgs boson searches have very small sensitivities. This search can be interpreted within any model that predicts the existence of at least one scalar and one pseudoscalar Higgs boson. No excess of events is observed above the expected standard model backgrounds. Model-independent limits on the cross- section for the process e/sup +/e/sup -/ to h/sup 0/Z/sup 0/ are derived assuming 100% decays of the h/sup 0/ into A/sup 0/A/sup 0/ and 100% decays o...

  20. Determination of $\\alpha_S$ using OPAL hadronic event shapes at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 91 − 209 GeV and resummed NNLO calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Akesson, P F; Alexander, G; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Asai, S; Axen, D; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, R J; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, S; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brown, R M; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, M; De Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, K; Dienes, B; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, F; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, J; Gruwe, M; Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Horvath, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, D; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krasznahorkay, Jr A; Krieger, P; von Krogh, J; Kuhl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, H; Lanske, D; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lu, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Mashimo, T; Mattig, P; McKenna, J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; O’Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pasztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J; Plane, D E; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan, E K G; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schorner-Sadenius, T; Schroder, M; Schumacher, M; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R; Soldner-Rembold, S; Spano, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Strohmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Trigger, I; Trocsanyi, Z; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvari, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, J; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2011-01-01

    Hadronic event shape distributions from e+e− annihilation measured by the OPAL experiment at centre-of-mass energies between 91 GeV and 209 GeV are used to determine the strong coupling αS. The results are based on QCD predictions complete to the next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO), and on NNLO calculations matched to the resummed next-to-leading-log-approximation terms (NNLO+NLLA). The combined NNLO result from all variables and centre-of-mass energies is αS(mZ0) = 0.1201 ± 0.0008(stat.) ± 0.0013(exp.) ± 0.0010(had.) ± 0.0024(theo.). while the combined NNLO+NLLA result is αS(mZ0) = 0.1189 ± 0.0008(stat.) ± 0.0016(exp.) ± 0.0010(had.) ± 0.0036(theo.). The completeness of the NNLO and NNLO+NLLA results with respect to missing higher order contributions, studied by varying the renormalization scale, is improved compared to previous results based on NLO or NLO+NLLA predictions only. The observed energy dependence of αS agrees with the QCD prediction of asymptotic freedom and excludes the absence o...