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Sample records for biogenic opal content

  1. Stable silicon isotope signatures of marine pore waters - Biogenic opal dissolution versus authigenic clay mineral formation

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    Ehlert, Claudia; Doering, Kristin; Wallmann, Klaus; Scholz, Florian; Sommer, Stefan; Grasse, Patricia; Geilert, Sonja; Frank, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Dissolved silicon isotope compositions have been analysed for the first time in pore waters (δ30SiPW) of three short sediment cores from the Peruvian margin upwelling region with distinctly different biogenic opal content in order to investigate silicon isotope fractionation behaviour during early diagenetic turnover of biogenic opal in marine sediments. The δ30SiPW varies between +1.1‰ and +1.9‰ with the highest values occurring in the uppermost part close to the sediment-water interface. These values are of the same order or higher than the δ30Si of the biogenic opal extracted from the same sediments (+0.3‰ to +1.2‰) and of the overlying bottom waters (+1.1‰ to +1.5‰). Together with dissolved silicic acid concentrations well below biogenic opal saturation, our collective observations are consistent with the formation of authigenic alumino-silicates from the dissolving biogenic opal. Using a numerical transport-reaction model we find that approximately 24% of the dissolving biogenic opal is re-precipitated in the sediments in the form of these authigenic phases at a relatively low precipitation rate of 56 μmol Si cm-2 yr-1. The fractionation factor between the precipitates and the pore waters is estimated at -2.0‰. Dissolved and solid cation concentrations further indicate that off Peru, where biogenic opal concentrations in the sediments are high, the availability of reactive terrigenous material is the limiting factor for the formation of authigenic alumino-silicate phases.

  2. Biogenic CaCO3 and Opal Depositions and Their Latitudinal Comparison During the Past 600 ka in the Central Equatorial Pacific

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    Boo-Keun Khim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The orbital-scale variations in biogenic CaCO3 and opal abundance in two piston cores collected in the central equatorial Pacific (core PC5101 from a southern site at _ and core PC5103 from a northern site at _ were compared to assess latitudinal differences. The correlation between the oxygen isotope stratigraphy of planktonic foraminifera (Globigerinoides sacculifer of PC5103 with the LR04 stacks provides the age of PC5103 to be approximately 950 ka. The age of PC5103 was further refined by correlating the CaCO3 content with the well-dated core RC11-210. The age of PC5101 was also constrained by the same CaCO3 chronostratigraphic correlation with RC11-210, resulting in an age of approximately 650 ka. Distinct orbital-scale series of CaCO3 and opal variations appear to be parallel between the two cores during the past 600 ka, which are controlled mainly by eccentricity with an approximate periodicity of 100 ka. It is worth noting that the biogenic CaCO3 and opal deposition patterns in the two cores differ between interglacial and glacial periods. During interglacial periods the biogenic opal content is higher in the southern core than in the northern core, which corresponds with the present-day condition. In contrast the CaCO3 content is higher in the northern core, which is contradictory to the present-day northward decreasing CaCO3 deposition pattern from the Equator. The collection site of PC5101 is approximately 350 m deeper than that of PC5103, which significantly promotes CaCO3 dissolution and causes unexpectedly high CaCO3 content at the northern site in contrast to the biogenic opal content.

  3. Silicon Isotopes of Marine Pore Water: Tracking the Destiny of Marine Biogenic Opal

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    Cassarino, L.; Hendry, K. R.

    2017-12-01

    Silicon isotopes (δ30Si) are a powerful tool for the studying of the past and present silicon cycles, which is closely linked to the carbon cycle. Siliceous phytoplankton, such as diatoms, as one of the major conveyors of carbon to marine sediments. δ30Si from fossil diatoms has been shown to represent past silicic acid (DSi) utilization in the photic zone, since the lighter isotope is preferentially incorporated in their skeleton, the frustule. This assumes that species in the sediments depict past blooms and that frustules are preserved in their initial state during burial. Here we present new silicon isotopes data of sea water and pore water of deep marine sediments from two contrasted environments, the Equatorial Atlantic and West Antarctic Peninsula. δ30Si and DSi concentration, of both sea water and pore water, are negatively correlated. Marine biogenic opal dissolution can be tracked using δ30Si signature of pore water as lighter signals and high DSi concentrations are associated with the biogenic silica. Our data enhances post depositional and diagenesis processes during burial with a clear highlight on the sediment water interface exchanges.

  4. OPAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, David

    1991-01-01

    The kernel of the OPAL (Omni Purpose Apparatus for LEP) collaboration at CERN's LEP electron-positron collider came from the JADE (JApan, Deutschland, England) experiment at the lower energy PETRA electron positron collider at DESY, Hamburg. The name of a semi-precious stone is a reminder of the JADE tradition, while the spelled-out version conveys versatility

  5. OPAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David

    1991-06-15

    The kernel of the OPAL (Omni Purpose Apparatus for LEP) collaboration at CERN's LEP electron-positron collider came from the JADE (JApan, Deutschland, England) experiment at the lower energy PETRA electron positron collider at DESY, Hamburg. The name of a semi-precious stone is a reminder of the JADE tradition, while the spelled-out version conveys versatility.

  6. BIOGENIC AMINES CONTENT IN DIFFERENT WINE SAMPLES

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    Attila Kántor

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-five samples of different Slovak wines before and after filtration were analysed in order to determine the content of eight biogenic amines (tryptamine, phenylalanine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, spermidine and spermine. The method involves extraction of biogenic amines from wine samples with used dansyl chloride. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC was used for determination of biogenic amines equipped with a Rapid Resolution High Definition (RRHD, DAD detectors and Extend-C18 LC column (50 mm x 3.0 mm ID, 1.8 μm particle size. In this study the highest level of biogenic amine in all wine samples represent tryptamine (TRM with the highest content 170.9±5.3 mg/L in Pinot Blanc wine. Phenylalanine (PHE cadaverine (CAD, histamine (HIS and spermidine (SPD were not detected in all wines; mainly SPD was not detected in 16 wines, HIS not detected in 14 wines, PHE and CAD not detected in 2 wines. Tyramine (TYR, spermine (SPN and putrescine (PUT were detected in all wines, but PUT and SPN in very low concentration. The worst wine samples with high biogenic amine content were Saint Laurent (BF, Pinot Blanc (S and Pinot Noir (AF.

  7. BIOGENIC AMINES CONTENT IN SELECTED WINES DURING WINEMAKING

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    Radka Flasarová

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the development of selected biogenic amines (histamine; tyramine; phenylethylamine; putrescine; agmatine; and cadaverine during the winemaking in 10 selected species grown in Central Europe in 2008. The analysis was performed using ion-exchange chromatography by the sodium-citrate buffers with the post-column ninhydrin derivatization and photometric detection. A comparison of the content of biogenic amines in red and wine varieties showed that red wines have higher concentrations of biogenic amines.

  8. Regional variations in the fluxes of foraminifera carbonate, coccolithophorid carbonate and biogenic opal in the northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Gaye, B.

    Mass fluxes of diatom opal, planktonic foraminifera carbonate and coccolithophorid carbonate were measured with time-series sediment traps at six sites in the Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal and Equatorial Indian Ocean (EIOT). The above fluxes were...

  9. Technological factors affecting biogenic amine content in foods: a review

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    Fausto Gardini

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic amines (BAs are molecules which can be present in foods and, due to their toxicity, can cause adverse effects on the consumers. BAs are generally produced by microbial decarboxylation of amino acids in food products. The most significant BAs occurring in foods are histamine, tyramine, putrescine, cadaverine, tryptamine, 2-phenylethylamine, spermine, spermidine and agmatine. The importance of preventing the excessive accumulation of BAs in food is related to their impact on human health and food quality. Quality criteria in connection with the presence of BAs in food and food products are necessary from a toxicological point of view. This is particularly important in fermented foods in which the massive microbial proliferation required for obtaining specific products is often relater with BA accumulation. In this review, up-to-date information and recent discoveries about technological factors affecting biogenic amine content in foods are reviewed. Specifically, BA forming-microorganism and decarboxylation activity, genetic and metabolic organization of decarboxylases, risk associated to BAs (histamine, tyramine toxicity and other BAs, environmental factors influencing BA formation (temperature, salt concentration, pH. In addition, the technological factors for controlling BA production (use of starter culture, technological additives, effects of packaging, other non-thermal treatments, metabolising BA by microorganisms, effects of pressure treatments on BA formation and antimicrobial substances are addressed.

  10. Inverse Opal Scaffolds with Gradations in Mineral Content for Spatial Control of Osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunlei; Qiu, Jichuan; Pongkitwitoon, Suphannee; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Xia, Younan

    2018-05-30

    The design and fabrication of inverse opal scaffolds with gradations in mineral content to achieve spatial control of osteogenesis are described. The gradient in mineral content is established via the diffusion-limited transport of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in a closely packed lattice of gelatin microbeads. The mineral-graded scaffold has an array of uniform pores and interconnected windows to facilitate efficient transport of nutrients and metabolic wastes, ensuring high cell viability. The graded distribution of mineral content can provide biochemical and mechanical cues for spatially regulating the osteogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stromal cells. This new class of scaffolds holds promise for engineering the interfaces between mineralized and unmineralized tissues. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Biogenic amine content, histamine-forming bacteria, and adulteration of pork in tuna sausage products.

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    Kung, Hsien-Feng; Tsai, Yung-Hsiang; Chang, Shih-Chih; Hong, Tang-Yao

    2012-10-01

    Twenty-five tuna sausage products were purchased from retail markets in Taiwan. The rates of occurrence of biogenic amines, histamine-forming bacteria, and adulteration by pork and poultry were determined. The average content of various biogenic amines in all tested samples was less than 2.0 mg/100 g (Makaira nigricans (blue marlin).

  12. A review of the Si cycle in the modern ocean: recent progress and missing gaps in the application of biogenic opal as a paleoproductivity proxy

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    Ragueneau, O.; Tréguer, P.; Leynaert, A.; Anderson, R. F.; Brzezinski, M. A.; DeMaster, D. J.; Dugdale, R. C.; Dymond, J.; Fischer, G.; François, R.; Heinze, C.; Maier-Reimer, E.; Martin-Jézéquel, V.; Nelson, D. M.; Quéguiner, B.

    2000-12-01

    Due to the major role played by diatoms in the biological pump of CO 2, and to the presence of silica-rich sediments in areas that play a major role in air-sea CO 2 exchange (e.g. the Southern Ocean and the Equatorial Pacific), opal has a strong potential as a proxy for paleoproductivity reconstructions. However, because of spatial variations in the biogenic silica preservation, and in the degree of coupling between the marine Si and C biogeochemical cycles, paleoreconstructions are not straitghtforward. A better calibration of this proxy in the modern ocean is required, which needs a good understanding of the mechanisms that control the Si cycle, in close relation to the carbon cycle. This review of the Si cycle in the modern ocean starts with the mechanisms that control the uptake of silicic acid (Si(OH) 4) by diatoms and the subsequent silicification processes, the regulatory mechanisms of which are uncoupled. This has strong implications for the direct measurement in the field of the kinetics of Si(OH) 4 uptake and diatom growth. It also strongly influences the Si:C ratio within diatoms, clearly linked to environmental conditions. Diatoms tend to dominate new production at marine ergoclines. At depth, they also succeed to form mats, which sedimentation is at the origin of laminated sediments and marine sapropels. The concentration of Si(OH) 4 with respect to other macronutrients exerts a major influence on diatom dominance and on the rain ratio between siliceous and calcareous material, which severely impacts surface waters pCO 2. A compilation of biogenic fluxes collected at about 40 sites by means of sediment traps also shows a remarkable pattern of increasing BSi:C org ratio along the path of the "conveyor belt", accompanying the relative enrichment of waters in Si compared to N and P. This observation suggests an extension of the Si pump model described by Dugdale and Wilkerson (Dugdale, R.C., Wilkerson, F.P., 1998. Understanding the eastern equatorial

  13. Rapid precipitation of silica (opal-A) disguises evidence of biogenicity in high-temperature geothermal deposits: Case study from Dagunguo hot spring, China

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    Peng, Xiaotong; Jones, Brian

    2012-06-01

    Dagunguo Spring, located in the Tengchong geothermal area in the western part of Yunnan Province, China, is a very active spring with water temperatures of 78 to 97 °C and pH of 7.7 to 8.8. The vent pool, 5.6 m in diameter and up to 1.5 m deep, is lined with opal-A that was precipitated from the near-boiling spring waters. A glass suspended in the pool was coated with opal-A in two months and two PVC pipes that drained water from the pool in late 2010 became lined with opal-A precipitates in less than three months. The opal-A accumulated at rates of 0.5 to 0.75 mm/month in the spring pool and 2.5 to 3.5 mm/month in the PVC pipes. The opal-A precipitates, irrespective of where they developed, are formed primarily of silicified microbes and opal-A spheres along with minor amounts of native sulfur, detrital quartz, and clay (mainly kaolinite). The fabrics in these opal-A deposits were dictated largely by the growth patterns of the filamentous and rod-shaped microbes that dominate this low-diversity biota and the amount of opal-A that was precipitated around them. Many of the microbes were preserved as rapid opal-A was precipitated on and around them before the cells decayed. With continued precipitation, however, the microbes became quickly engulfed in the opal-A precipitates and morphological evidence of their presence was lost. In essence, the process that controls their preservation ultimately disguised them to the point where cannot be seen. Critically, this loss of morphological identity takes places even before opal-A starts its diagenetic transformation towards quartz.

  14. Bioproductivity in the Southern Ocean since the last Interglacial - new high-resolution biogenic opal flux records from the Scotia Sea

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    Sprenk, D.; Weber, M. E.; Kuhn, G.; Rosén, P.; Röhling, H.-G.

    2012-04-01

    The Southern Ocean plays an important role in transferring CO2 via wind-induced upwelling from the deep sea to the atmosphere. It is therefore one of the key areas to study climate change. Bioproductivity in the Southern Ocean is mostly influenced by the extent of sea ice, upwelling of cold nutrient- and silica-rich water, and the availability of light. Biogenic opal (BSi) is a significant nutrient in the Southern Ocean, and according to recent investigations only marginally affected by preservation changes. It can therefore be used as bioproductivity proxy. Here we present several methods to determine BSi, discuss them and put the results into context with respect to regional bioproductivity changes in Southern Ocean during the last glacial cycle. We studied deep-sea sediment core sites MD07-3133 and MD07-3134 from the central Scotia Sea with extraordinary high sedimentation rates of up to 2.1 to 1.2 m/kyr, respectively covering the last 92.5 kyr. BSi leaching according to Müller & Schneider (1993) is very time-consuming and expensive, so we measured only 253 samples from large-amplitude variation core sections. In addition, we determined BSi using non-destructive measurements of sediment colour b*, wet-bulk density, and Ti/Si count ratios. Furthermore, we provide the first attempts to estimate BSi in marine sediment using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS), a cost-efficient method, which requires only 11 mg of sediment. All estimation methods capture the main BSi trends, however FTIRS seems to be the most promising one. In the central Scotia Sea, south of the modern Antarctic Polar Front, the BSi flux reflects a relatively complicated glacial-to-interglacial pattern with large-amplitude, millennial-scale fluctuations in bioproductivity. During Antarctic Isotopic Maxima, BSi fluxes were generally increased. Lowest bioproductivity occur at the Last Glacial Maximum, while upwelling of mid-depth water was reduced, atmospheric CO2 low, and sea-ice cover

  15. The isotopic composition of valves and organic tissue of diatoms grown in steady state cultures under varying conditions of temperature, light and nutrients. Implications for the interpretation of oxygen isotopes from sedimentary biogenic opal as proxies of environmental variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczyk, K

    2006-05-15

    The oxygen isotopes of diatomaceous silica from marine and freshwater sediments are frequently used as indicators of the palaeotemperature development, particularly in cases where calcareous microfossils are rare or absent. With regard to terrestrial waters it is unknown whether or not palaeotemperature scale can be used in a limnic ecosystem. Due to the fact that the seasonal variations in lakes are larger than in oceans, specific problems arise when working with freshwater sediments. Thus, an understanding of the contribution of the various factors (e.g. temperature, light nutrients, competition) influencing the formation of isotope signals in biogenic opal is a prerequisite for the accurate interpretation of environmental processes. Since it is impossible to examine the influence of a single parameter under natural ecosystem conditions due to permanent changes of the environment, laboratory experiments with single diatom species are needed. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between the oxygen isotope variations in biogenic opal and different environmental parameters using steady state cultures with diatoms. It should be examined whether or not the different diatom species grown under identical conditions show equal oxygen isotope ratios (species relationship), if variations of the water temperature induce variations of the oxygen isotope ratio (relationship with temperature), variable parameters such as light intensity and nitrate concentration influence the isotope ratio, and if vital effects (e.g. growth rate) lead to variations of the oxygen isotope ratio. (orig.)

  16. The isotopic composition of valves and organic tissue of diatoms grown in steady state cultures under varying conditions of temperature, light and nutrients. Implications for the interpretation of oxygen isotopes from sedimentary biogenic opal as proxies of environmental variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalczyk, K.

    2006-05-01

    The oxygen isotopes of diatomaceous silica from marine and freshwater sediments are frequently used as indicators of the palaeotemperature development, particularly in cases where calcareous microfossils are rare or absent. With regard to terrestrial waters it is unknown whether or not palaeotemperature scale can be used in a limnic ecosystem. Due to the fact that the seasonal variations in lakes are larger than in oceans, specific problems arise when working with freshwater sediments. Thus, an understanding of the contribution of the various factors (e.g. temperature, light nutrients, competition) influencing the formation of isotope signals in biogenic opal is a prerequisite for the accurate interpretation of environmental processes. Since it is impossible to examine the influence of a single parameter under natural ecosystem conditions due to permanent changes of the environment, laboratory experiments with single diatom species are needed. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between the oxygen isotope variations in biogenic opal and different environmental parameters using steady state cultures with diatoms. It should be examined whether or not the different diatom species grown under identical conditions show equal oxygen isotope ratios (species relationship), if variations of the water temperature induce variations of the oxygen isotope ratio (relationship with temperature), variable parameters such as light intensity and nitrate concentration influence the isotope ratio, and if vital effects (e.g. growth rate) lead to variations of the oxygen isotope ratio. (orig.)

  17. Effect of storage conditions on the biogenic amine content in wild boar meat

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    Zdeňka Hutařová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hygienic quality of game meat depends on many factors during and after hunting. Freshness of meat is connected with the concentration of biogenic amines which is related to meat spoilage. The aim of this study was to assess changes in concentration of biogenic amines in raw meat of wild boar (n = 20, mean age 1–2 years during storage at different temperatures. Carcases of wild boars hunted in winter 2012 in hunting districts of south Moravia were stored unskinned during 21 days at various temperatures (0, 7 and 15 °C. Concentrations of biogenic amines (putrescine, cadaverine, tyramine, tryptamine, phenylethylamine, histamine, spermine and spermidine were determined in the shoulder and leg muscles by high-performance liquid chromatography in combination with triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry. Good hygienic quality was maintained when wild boar carcasses were stored for a maximum of 14 days at 0 °C (content of biogenic amines in 3 meat samples exceed the limit of 5 mg/kg on day 21 of storage or a maximum of 7 days at 7 °C (content of biogenic amines in 4 meat samples exceed the limit of 5 mg/kg on day 14 of storage. The temperature of 15 °C should be considered as unsuitable storage temperature if good hygienic quality of game meat during storage is to be guaranteed (content of biogenic amines in 2 meat samples exceed the limit of 5 mg/kg already on day 7 of storage. The study brings new information about the biogenic amine content and its changes in wild boar meat during the storage period of 21 days.

  18. Content of biogenic amines in Lemna minor (common duckweed) growing in medium contaminated with tetracycline.

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    Baciak, Michał; Sikorski, Łukasz; Piotrowicz-Cieślak, Agnieszka I; Adomas, Barbara

    2016-11-01

    Aquatic plants are continuously exposed to a variety of stress factors. No data on the impact of antibiotics on the biogenic amines in duckweed (Lemna minor) have been available so far, and such data could be significant, considering the ecological role of this plant in animal food chains. In the tissues of control (non-stressed) nine-day-old duckweed, the following biogenic amines were identified: tyramine, putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine and spermine. Based on the tetracycline contents and the computed EC values, the predicted toxicity units have been calculated. The obtained results demonstrated phytoxicity caused by tetracycline in relation to duckweed growth rate, yield and the contents of chlorophylls a and b. The carotenoid content was not modified by tetracycline. It was found that tetracycline as a water pollutant was a stress factor triggering an increase in the synthesis of amines. Tetracycline at 19, 39 and 78μM concentrations increased biogenic amine synthesis by 3.5 times. Although the content of tyramine increased fourteen times with the highest concentration of the drug (and of spermidine - only three-fold) the increase of spermidine was numerically the highest. Among the biogenic amines the most responsive to tetracycline were spermine and tyramine, while the least affected were putrescine and spermidine. Despite putrescine and spermidine being the least sensitive, their sum of contents increased five-fold compared to the control. These studies suggest that tetracycline in water reservoirs is taken up by L. minor as the antibiotic clearly modifies the metabolism of this plant and it may likely pose a risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The impact of drawing on the biogenic amines content in meat of pithed pheasant

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    Zdeňka Hutařová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing popularity of game meat, greater emphasis is being placed on ensuring high hygienic quality of this food. Biogenic amines are among possible indicators of the hygienic quality of meat. The aim of this study was to monitor biogenic amine concentrations in the muscle tissues of pheasants (n = 20 killed by pithing and treated by drawing (guts are removed from the body cavity through the cloaca using a specially fashioned hook. The pheasants’ bodies were stored hanged by the neck for 21 days at ±7 °C. Breast and thigh muscle samples were collected at weekly intervals (day 1, 7, 14 and 21 of storage. Biogenic amines (putrescine, cadaverine, tyramine, histamine, tryptamine and phenylethylamine were analysed by reverse phase liquid chromatography and detected by tandem mass spectrometry. In breast muscle, the most evident change was noted in the concentration of cadaverine (0.026 and 1.070 mg/kg for storage day 1 and 21, respectively and tyramine (0.001 and 0.958 mg/kg for storage day 1 and 21, respectively. Throughout the storage period, the concentration of 5 mg/kg (indicating a loss of high hygienic quality of meat was not exceeded by any of the assessed biogenic amines. In thigh muscle, the concentration indicating high hygienic quality of meat was exceed after 14 days of storage in the case of cadaverine, tyramine and putrescine (at the end of storage their concentrations were 9.058, 10.708 and 3.345 mg/kg, respectively. Hygienic quality of thigh muscle decreased faster compared to breast muscle. This study brings new information about the content of biogenic amines in the meat of pithed pheasants treated by drawing.

  20. Heavy metal contamination, microbiological spoilage and biogenic amine content in sushi available on the Polish market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulawik, Piotr; Dordevic, Dani; Gambuś, Florian; Szczurowska, Katarzyna; Zając, Marzena

    2018-05-01

    The present study determined the heavy metal contamination (mercury, cadmium, lead, arsenic and nickel) of nori, restaurant-served sushi and ready-to-eat sushi meals available via retail chains. Moreover, both microbiological load and biogenic amine content in ready-to-eat sushi meals were analysed. All of the nori samples contained high levels of Cd (2.122 mg kg -1 ), Ni (0.715 mg kg -1 ), As (34.56 mg kg -1 ) and Pb (0.659 mg kg -1 ). The studied sushi samples contained high levels of Ni and Pb, reaching 0.194 and 0.142 mg kg -1 wet weight, respectively, being potentially hazardous to women during pregnancy and lactation and small children. None of the studied samples contained high levels of Hg. Overall, 37% of ready-to-eat sushi meals exceeded a microbiological load of 10 6  cfu g -1 . However, biogenic amine content in all of the samples was low, with a highest histamine content of 2.05 mg kg -1 . Sushi is not the source of high levels of biogenic amines even with high microbiological loads. Nevertheless, the high microbiological loads at the end of the shelf-life indicate that some processors might have problems with the distribution chain or implement a poor hygienic regime. Moreover as a result of possible risk associated with heavy metal contamination, the present study highlights the need to establish new regulations regarding the contamination of nori and sushi. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Effect of irradiation and storage on biogenic amine contents in ripened Egyptian smoked cooked sausage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabie, Mohamed A.; Toliba, Abbas O.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of γ-irradiation upon the biogenic amine inventory in Egyptian smoked cooked sausages were investigated for the first time during storage for up to 90 days at 4 ° C. Typical contents of biogenic amines in non-irradiated sausages ranged between 125.50 and 596.18 mg/kgDW; irradiation with 4 and 6 kGy decreased said total contents to 105.20-94.82 and 104.98-26.44 mg/kgDW respectively, by the end of storage. Putrescine and cadaverine were the major amines in non-irradiated samples - where it accounted for 33% and 29% respectively, of the total by 90 days; however, tyramine dominated in irradiated samples with 2, 4 and 6 kGy, where it accounted for 44, 52 and 42%. On the other hand, the histamine content in non-irradiated sausage by 90 days of storage (i.e. 109.12 mg/kgDW) clearly exceeded the maximum allowable of 50 mg/kg, unlike happened in their irradiated counterparts. Therefore, the dramatic reduction observed in the histamine levels suggests use of this preservation technique for that traditional meat food. (author)

  2. Influence of Gamma Irradiation on Biogenic Amine Contents and Pathogenic Bacteria in Spinach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, H.A.S.

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation at doses 1, 2, 4 and 6 kGy as compared with blanching at 95°C/3 min on biogenic amine contents and pathogenic bacteria in spinach leaves (Spinacia oleracea L.). The results indicated that tryptamine and β- phenylethylamine were not detected while histamine was the major amine detected at concentration of 12.55 mg/100g of wet weight. Blanching at 95°C/3 min significantly reduced the content of histamine, putrescine and tyramine in spinach while significantly increased the content of cadaverine. Gamma irradiation at different doses significantly reduced the contents of histamine and tyramine while significantly increased the content of cadaverine. However, putrescine content was increased significantly after subjected to doses 1 and 2 kGy while the doses 4 and 6 kGy significantly reduced it. Regarding to microbiological analysis in spinach, it could be noticed that total bacterial count, Enterobacteriaceae, coliform group, yeast, mould, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella spp. in fresh spinach were 5.97, 4.40, 2.53, 2.11, 1.40, 1.48 and 1.18 log cfu/g, respectively. Changes in microbiological characters (cfu/g) in spinach by different gamma irradiation doses and blanching were also followed. It could be noticed that the total bacterial count, Enterobacteriaceae, coliform group, yeast, mould, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella spp. were significantly decreased after treatment with blanching and gamma irradiation and these microorganisms were not detected after being subjected to 4 and 6 kGy. It could be concluded that blanching at 95°C/3 min or gamma irradiation at dose 2 kGy can be used to control the pathogenic bacteria and reduce biogenic amine (histamine, putrescine and tyramine) in spinach

  3. Quantitative X-ray methods of amorphous content and crystallinity determination of SiO2, in Quartz and Opal mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketabdari, M.R.; Ahmadi, K.; Esmaeilnia Shirvani, A.; Tofigh, A.

    2001-01-01

    X-ray diffraction technique is commonly used for qualitative analysis of minerals, and has also been successfully used for quantitative measurements. In this research, the matrix flushing and a new X-ray diffraction method have been used for the determination of crystallinity and amorphous content of Opal and Quartz mixture. The PCAPD is used to determine the quantitative analysis of these two minerals

  4. The impacts of temperature, alcoholic degree and amino acids content on biogenic amines and their precursor amino acids content in red wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, C; Bordiga, M; Pérez-Álvarez, E P; Travaglia, F; Arlorio, M; Salinas, M R; Coïsson, J D; Garde-Cerdán, T

    2017-09-01

    The aim was to study how factors such as temperature, alcoholic degree, and amino acids supplementation are able to influence the content of tyramine, histamine, 2-phenylethylamine, tryptamine and their precursor amino acids in winemaking process. Biogenic amines and amino acids were quantified at the beginning, middle and end of alcoholic fermentation, and at the end of malolactic fermentation. In general, samples produced with amino acid supplementation did not show the highest concentrations of biogenic amines, except for histamine, which content increased with the addition of the four amino acids. The synthesis of tyramine was mainly affected by the temperature and alcoholic degree, the formation of phenylethylamine was largely influenced by alcoholic degree, and tryptamine synthesis principally depended on temperature. Interestingly, there was interaction between these three factors for the biogenic amines studied. In conclusion, winemaking conditions should be established depending on the biogenic amine which synthesis is required to be controlled. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Secondary biogenic coal seam gas reservoirs in New Zealand: A preliminary assessment of gas contents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butland, Carol I. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Moore, Tim A. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Solid Energy NZ Ltd., P.O. Box 1303, Christchurch (New Zealand)

    2008-10-02

    Four coal cores, one from the Huntly (Eocene), two from the Ohai (Cretaceous) and one from the Greymouth (Cretaceous) coalfields, were sampled and analysed in terms of gas content and coal properties. The coals vary in rank from subbituminous B-A (Huntly) to subbituminous C-A (Ohai), and high volatile A bituminous (Greymouth). Average gas contents were 1.60 m{sup 3}/t (s 0.2) in the Huntly core, 4.80 m{sup 3}/t (s = 0.8) in the Ohai cores, and 2.39 m{sup 3}/t (s = 0.8) in the Greymouth core. The Ohai core not only contained more gas but also had the highest saturation (75%) compared with the Huntly (33%) and Greymouth (45%) cores. Carbon isotopes indicate that the Ohai gas is more mature, containing higher {delta}{sup 13}C isotopes values than either the Huntly or Greymouth gas samples. This may indicate that the gas was derived from a mixed biogenic and thermogenic source. The Huntly and Greymouth gases appear to be derived solely from a secondary biogenic (by CO{sub 2} reduction) source. Although the data set is limited, preliminary analysis indicates that ash yield is the dominant control on gas volume in all samples where the ash yield was above 10%. Below 10%, the amount of gas variation is unrelated to ash yield. Although organic content has some influence on gas volume, associations are basin and/or rank dependent. In the Huntly core total gas content and structured vitrinite increase together. Although this relationship does not appear for the other core data for the Ohai SC3 core, lost gas and fusinite are associated whereas gelovitrinite (unstructured vitrinite) correlates positively with residual gas for the Greymouth data. (author)

  6. [Age-related changes in biogenic amine content and oxidative stress profile in the rat hypothalamus in hyperhomocysteinemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milyutina, Yu P; Pustygina, A V; Zaloznyaya, I V; Arutjunyan, A V

    2016-01-01

    The article presents a detailed analysis of correlations between the content of a variety of biogenic amines in the hypothalamic structures responsible for the luteinizing hormone releasing hormone synthesis and secretion (the medial preoptic area and median eminence) and such independent factors as total L-homocysteine plasma level elevation induced by L-methionine loading and aging. Both a nature and a pattern of changes in oxidative stress profile were evaluated. It was shown that ageing, when compared to hyperhomocysteinemia, is a determining factor influencing biogenic amine content in the studied hypothalamic structures. Unlike antioxidant defense system profile, considerable changes in macromolecule oxidative modification were not found, which evidences a balanced activity of pro- and antioxidant systems in the hypothalamus.

  7. Effect of Steaming and Boiling on the Antioxidant Properties and Biogenic Amines Content in Green Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris Varieties of Different Colours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Preti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of boiling and steaming cooking methods were studied on total polyphenols, antioxidant capacity, and biogenic amines of three green bean varieties, purple, yellow, and green. The vegetables gave good values both for antioxidant capacity and for phenolics content, with the purple variety being the richest in healthful components. Both the heat treatments affected the antioxidant properties of these vegetables, with boiling that reduced the initial antioxidant capacity till 30% in the yellow variety, having the same trend for total polyphenols, with the major decrement of 43% in the green variety. On the contrary, biogenic amines significantly increased only after boiling in green and yellow variety, while purple variety did not show any changes in biogenic amines after cooking. The steaming method showed being better cooking approach in order to preserve the antioxidant properties of green beans varieties and to maintain the biogenic amines content at the lowest level.

  8. Study of the effect of vintage, maturity degree, and irrigation on the amino acid and biogenic amine content of a white wine from the Verdejo variety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Heras, Miriam; Pérez-Magariño, Silvia; Del-Villar-Garrachón, Vanesa; González-Huerta, Carlos; Moro Gonzalez, Luis Carlos; Guadarrama Rodríguez, Alberto; Villanueva Sanchez, Sonia; Gallo González, Rubén; Martín de la Helguera, Sara

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of three factors directly related to the amino acid content of grapes and their interaction. These three factors were vintage, maturity degree and irrigation. The evolution of amino acid was also assessed during the winemaking along with the effect of maturity and irrigation on the biogenic amine formation. The grapes used for this study were of the Verdejo variety. The results indicated that there was a strong vintage effect on amino acid content in grapes, which seemed to be clearly related to climatic conditions. The effect of maturity on amino acid content depended on vintage, irrigation and the amino acid itself although it was observed that irrigation caused the increase of most amino acids present in the berry. Irrigation did not affect the evolution of nitrogen compounds during the alcoholic fermentation process but the maturity degree in some of the amino acids tested did so. No direct relationship could be established between irrigation or maturity degree and biogenic amines. However, it should be noted that the biogenic amine content was very low. Vintage has a strong effect on the amino acid content in grapes which appears to be related to weather conditions. No direct relationship has been found between irrigation or maturity degree and biogenic amines content. Furthermore, it is noted that biogenic amine content found in final wines was very low. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Virgin Valley opal district, Humboldt County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staatz, Mortimer Hay; Bauer, Herman L.

    1951-01-01

    The Virgin Valley opal district, Humboldt County, Nevada, is near the Oregon-Nevada border in the Sheldon Game Refuge. Nineteen claims owned by Jack and Toni Crane were examined, sampled, and tested radiometrically for uranium. Numerous discontinuous layers of opal are interbedded with a gently-dipping series of vitric tuff and ash which is at least 300 ft thick. The tuff and ash are capped by a dark, vesicular basalt in the eastern part of the area and by a thin layer of terrace qravels in the area along the west side of Virgin Valley. Silicification of the ash and tuff has produced a rock that ranges from partly opalized rock that resembles silicified shale to completely altered rock that is entirely translucent, and consists of massive, brown and pale-green opal. Carnotite, the only identified uranium mineral, occurs as fracture coatings or fine layers in the opal; in places, no uranium minerals are visible in the radioactive opal. The opal layers are irregular in extent and thickness. The exposed length of the layers ranges from 8 to 1, 200 ft or more, and the thickness of the layers ranges from 0. 1 to 3. 9 ft. The uranium content of each opal layer, and of different parts of the same layer, differs widely. On the east side of Virgin Valley four of the seven observed opal layers, nos. 3, 4, 5, and 7, are more radioactive than the average; and the uranium content ranges from 0. 002 to 0. 12 percent. Two samples, taken 5 ft apart across opal layer no. 7, contained 0. 003 and 0. -049 percent uranium. On the west side of the valley only four of the fifteen observed opal layers, nos; 9, , 10, 14, and 15, are more radioactive than the average; and the uranium content ranges from 0. 004 to 0. 047 percent. Material of the highest grade was found in a small discontinuous layer of pale-green opal (no. 4) on the east side of Virgin Valley. The grade of this layer ranged from 0. 027 to 0. 12 percent uranium.

  10. Trace elements in coloured opals using neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McOrist, G.D.; Smallwood, A.

    1995-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis was used to determine the concentration of trace elements in 50 samples of orange, yellow, honey, green, blue and pink opals as well as 18 samples of colourless opals taken from a number of recognised fields in Australia, Peru, Mexico and USA. The results were evaluated to determine the relationship between trace elements content and opal colour. (author). 10 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  11. OPAL Silicon Tungsten Luminometer

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. The Silicon Tungsten Luminometer was part of OPAL's calorimeter which was used to measure the energy of particles. Most particles end their journey in calorimeters. These detectors measure the energy deposited when particles are slowed down and stopped.

  12. DiSC-OPAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemal, Mohammed Seifu; Pedersen, Rasmus; Iov, Florin

    2017-01-01

    of such systems. The simulation tool should be able to model Electrical Grid and flexible assets with different time scales and resolution levels fulfilling specific functionalities. In this paper DiSC-OPAL, an OPAL-RT compatible toolbox library for modelling of assets is presented. The library is suitable...

  13. OPAL Muon Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the 4 experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 to 2000. This is a slice of the outermost layer of OPAL : the muon chambers. This outside layer detects particles which are not stopped by the previous layers. These are mostly muons.

  14. Raman study of opal at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfan, G.; Wang, S.; Mao, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    More commonly known for their beauty and lore as gemstones, opals are also intriguing geological materials which may have potential for materials science applications. Opal lacks a definite crystalline structure, and is composed of an amorphous packing of hydrated silica (SiO2) spheroids, which provides us with a unique nano-scaled mineraloid with properties unlike those of other amorphous materials like glass. Opals from different localities were studied at high pressure using a diamond anvil cell to apply pressure and Raman spectroscopy to look at changes in bonding as pressure was increased. We first tested different samples from Virgin Valley, NV, Spencer, ID, Juniper Ridge, OR, and Australia, which contain varying amounts of water at ambient conditions, using Raman spectroscopy to determine if they were opal-CT (semicrystalline cristobalite-trydimite volcanic origin) or opal-A (amorphous sedimentary origin). We then used x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a diamond anvil cell to see how their bonding and structure changed under compression and to determine what effect water content had on their high pressure behavior. Comparison of our results on opal to other high pressure studies of amorphous materials like glass has implications from a geological and materials science standpoint.

  15. Trace elements in Australian opals using neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McOrist, G.D.; Fardy, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis was used to determine the concentration of trace elements in 42 samples of black, grey and white opals taken from a number of recognised Australian field. The results were evaluated to determine if a relationship exited between trace element content and opal colour. (author) 12 refs.; 12 figs.; 3 tabs

  16. OPAL detector electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    Half of the electromagnetic calorimeter of the OPAL detector is seen in this photo. This calorimeter consists of 4720 blocks of lead glass. It was used to detect and measure the energy of photons, electrons and positrons by absorbing them.

  17. Indium oxide inverse opal films synthesized by structure replication method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrehn, Sabrina; Berghoff, Daniel; Nikitin, Andreas; Reichelt, Matthias; Wu, Xia; Meier, Torsten; Wagner, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    We present the synthesis of indium oxide (In2O3) inverse opal films with photonic stop bands in the visible range by a structure replication method. Artificial opal films made of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) spheres are utilized as template. The opal films are deposited via sedimentation facilitated by ultrasonication, and then impregnated by indium nitrate solution, which is thermally converted to In2O3 after drying. The quality of the resulting inverse opal film depends on many parameters; in this study the water content of the indium nitrate/PMMA composite after drying is investigated. Comparison of the reflectance spectra recorded by vis-spectroscopy with simulated data shows a good agreement between the peak position and calculated stop band positions for the inverse opals. This synthesis is less complex and highly efficient compared to most other techniques and is suitable for use in many applications.

  18. Contribution of changes in opal productivity and nutrient distribution in the coastal upwelling systems to Late Pliocene/Early Pleistocene climate cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Etourneau

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The global Late Pliocene/Early Pleistocene cooling (~3.0–2.0 million years ago – Ma concurred with extremely high diatom and biogenic opal production in most of the major coastal upwelling regions. This phenomenon was particularly pronounced in the Benguela upwelling system (BUS, off Namibia, where it is known as the Matuyama Diatom Maximum (MDM. Our study focuses on a new diatom silicon isotope (δ30Si record covering the MDM in the BUS. Unexpectedly, the variations in δ30Si signal follow biogenic opal content, whereby the highest δ30Si values correspond to the highest biogenic opal content. We interpret the higher δ30Si values during the MDM as a result of a stronger degree of silicate utilisation in the surface waters caused by high productivity of mat-forming diatom species. This was most likely promoted by weak upwelling intensity dominating the BUS during the Late Pliocene/Early Pleistocene cooling combined with a large silicate supply derived from a strong Southern Ocean nutrient leakage responding to the expansion of Antarctic ice cover and the resulting stratification of the polar ocean 3.0–2.7 Ma ago. A similar scenario is hypothesized for other major coastal upwelling systems (e.g. off California during this time interval, suggesting that the efficiency of the biological carbon pump was probably sufficiently enhanced in these regions during the MDM to have significantly increased the transport of atmospheric CO2 to the deep ocean. In addition, the coeval extension of the area of surface water stratification in both the Southern Ocean and the North Pacific, which decreased CO2 release to the atmosphere, led to further enhanced atmospheric CO2 drawn-down and thus contributed significantly to Late Pliocene/Early Pleistocene cooling.

  19. Trace elements in coloured opals using neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McOrist, G.D.; Smallwood, A. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a technique particularly suited to analysing opals since it is non-destructive and the silica matrix of opals is not prone to significant activation. It was used to determine the concentration of trace elements in 50 samples of orange, yellow, green, blue and pink opals as well as 18 samples of colourless opals taken from a number of recognised fields in Australia, Peru, Mexico and USA. The results were then evaluated to determine if a relationship existed between trace element content and opal colour. The mean concentration of most of the elements found in orange, yellow and colourless opals were similar with few exceptions. This indicated that, for these samples, colour is not related to the trace elements present. However, the trace element profile of the green, pink and blue opals was found to be significantly different with each colour having a much higher concentration of certain trace elements when compared with all other opals analysed. 7 refs.

  20. Trace elements in coloured opals using neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McOrist, G.D.; Smallwood, A.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a technique particularly suited to analysing opals since it is non-destructive and the silica matrix of opals is not prone to significant activation. It was used to determine the concentration of trace elements in 50 samples of orange, yellow, green, blue and pink opals as well as 18 samples of colourless opals taken from a number of recognised fields in Australia, Peru, Mexico and USA. The results were then evaluated to determine if a relationship existed between trace element content and opal colour. The mean concentration of most of the elements found in orange, yellow and colourless opals were similar with few exceptions. This indicated that, for these samples, colour is not related to the trace elements present. However, the trace element profile of the green, pink and blue opals was found to be significantly different with each colour having a much higher concentration of certain trace elements when compared with all other opals analysed. 7 refs

  1. Trace elements in coloured opals using neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McOrist, G D; Smallwood, A [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a technique particularly suited to analysing opals since it is non-destructive and the silica matrix of opals is not prone to significant activation. It was used to determine the concentration of trace elements in 50 samples of orange, yellow, green, blue and pink opals as well as 18 samples of colourless opals taken from a number of recognised fields in Australia, Peru, Mexico and USA. The results were then evaluated to determine if a relationship existed between trace element content and opal colour. The mean concentration of most of the elements found in orange, yellow and colourless opals were similar with few exceptions. This indicated that, for these samples, colour is not related to the trace elements present. However, the trace element profile of the green, pink and blue opals was found to be significantly different with each colour having a much higher concentration of certain trace elements when compared with all other opals analysed. 7 refs.

  2. OPAL Netlogo Land Condition Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-15

    ER D C/ CE RL T R- 14 -1 2 Optimal Allocation of Land for Training and Non-training Uses ( OPAL ) OPAL Netlogo Land Condition Model...Fulton, Natalie Myers, Scott Tweddale, Dick Gebhart, Ryan Busby, Anne Dain-Owens, and Heidi Howard August 2014 OPAL team measuring above and...online library at http://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/client/default. Optimal Allocation of Land for Training and Non-training Uses ( OPAL ) ERDC/CERL TR-14-12

  3. OPAL Jet Chamber Prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. OPAL's central tracking system consists of (in order of increasing radius) a silicon microvertex detector, a vertex detector, a jet chamber, and z-chambers. All the tracking detectors work by observing the ionization of atoms by charged particles passing by: when the atoms are ionized, electrons are knocked out of their atomic orbitals, and are then able to move freely in the detector. These ionization electrons are detected in the dirfferent parts of the tracking system. This piece is a prototype of the jet chambers

  4. OPAL and More

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomelli, G

    2009-01-01

    We shall summarize some of the research activities performed in collaboration with Ben Shen in the OPAL experiment at LEP and in the CMS experiment at the LHC. And we shall recall the LEP legacy to particle physics in general and to the Standard Model in particular. Short recollections are made in other fields in which Ben was interested, in particular in Astroparticle Physics.

  5. Inverted opal luminescent Ce-doped silica glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Scotti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Inverted opal Ce-doped silica glasses (Ce : Si molar ratio 1 ⋅ 10−3 were prepared by a sol-gel method using opals of latex microspheres as templates. The rare earth is homogeneously dispersed in silica host matrix, as evidenced by the absence of segregated CeO2, instead present in monolithic Ce-doped SG with the same cerium content. This suggests that the nanometric dimensions of bridges and junctions of the host matrix in the inverted opal structures favor the RE distribution avoiding the possible segregation of CeO2.

  6. Determination of the Content of Biogenic Amines in Food by HPLC%液相色谱法测定食品中的生物胺

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    玉澜; 蓝峻峰; 谢济运

    2011-01-01

    [ Objective ] The aim was to look for a quick, easy way to determine biogenic amines in food. [ Method ] Using the dansyl chloride as a derivative agent,room temperature ionic liquids as extraction,enrichment and derivative media,as reaction conditions to ultrasonic liquid chromatography of biogenic amines in food. [ Result]The result showed that determination of biogenic amines derived ideal conditions was that derived dose of 1.5 ml,borate buffer of pH 9. 10,borate buffer volume of 2 ml,1 ml [OMIM] PF6 ionic liquid,ultrasonic time of 20 min. [Conclusion] Determination of liquid chromatography was the content of biogenic amines in a rapid and simple method.%[目的]为测定食品中的生物胺寻求一种快速、简单的方法.[方法]采用以丹磺酰氯作为衍生剂,室温离子液体作为萃取、富集和衍生介质,以超声作为反应条件的液相色谱法测定食品中的生物胺.[结果]测定食品中的生物胺较理想的衍生条件是:衍生剂量1.5ml,硼砂缓冲液的pH9.10,硼砂缓冲液量为2 ml,1 ml[OMIM]PF离子液,超声时间为20 min.[结论]液相色谱法是测定食品中生物胺含量的一种快速、简单的方法.

  7. OPAL Land Condition Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    ccl.northwestern.edu/netlogo/download.shtml ) for installation for Windows, Linux, and Apple OSX ( Macintosh Operating System ) computers. Make sure you choose the...training Uses OSX (Apple Macintosh ) Operating System X PDF Portable Document Format PET Potential Evapotranspiration RFMSS Range Facility...uses some of those extensions. For example, OPAL requires the NetLogo Geographic Information System (GIS) extension, which accom- modates the use of

  8. Model Mineralisasi Pembentukan Opal Banten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chusni Ansori

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v5i3.100Opal is a beautiful precious gemstone that is equal or more valuable than diamond. In Indonesia, precious opal is found at the Lebak Regency, Province of Banten. Banten’s opal widely has been recognized due to its beautiful opalescence. This paper is a review of the last research; preliminary study of Banten’s opal, characteristics of opal-CT and determining of opal type from geochemical data, added by new data to compile concept and to make mineralization model. In order to fulfill these targets, field geology research and analysis of mineralog/gemology, petrography, X-RD, and major and trace element geochemistry have been done. The Banten’s opal is opal-CT showing opalescence (play of colour, weathering, and leaching silica from volcanic glass by dark grey claystone hosted. Mineralization model is divided into three periods; at Early Pliocene volcanic clastic sediments rich in volcanic glass occured as fluvial sediments. Afterwards, at Late Pliocene - Pleistocene folding, weathering and leaching of silica took place. Intensive jointing, faulting, and folding quickened weathering and leaching processes to formed opal at limb of anticline through Holocene. The prospecting area of Banten’s opal is in tuff unit with intercalation of conglomerate or pumiceous breccia, at limb of anticline. The host rock of opal is dark grey claystone which underlies polimict conglomerate/pebbly sandstone sequence with cross stratification, imbricated, and erossional stucture; more than 8 m deep.

  9. OPAL Various Lead Glass Blocks

    CERN Multimedia

    These lead glass blocks were part of a CERN detector called OPAL (one of the four experiments at the LEP particle detector). OPAL uses some 12 000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies in the electromagnetic calorimeter. This detector measured the energy deposited when electrons and photons were slowed down and stopped.

  10. Dismantling OPAL's cylindrical magnet core

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2001-01-01

    Lifting a handling device for dismounting the pressure bells, which are inside the cylindrical magnet coil on the central section of OPAL, on the right part of the photo. OPAL was a detector on the LEP accelerator, which ran from 1989 to 2000.

  11. Biocompatibility of crystalline opal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ortiz, Marlen; Acosta-Torres, Laura S; Hernández-Padrón, Genoveva; Mendieta, Alicia I; Bernal, Rodolfo; Cruz-Vázquez, Catalina; Castaño, Victor M

    2012-10-22

    Silica nanoparticles are being developed as a host of biomedical and biotechnological applications. For this reason, there are more studies about biocompatibility of silica with amorphous and crystalline structure. Except hydrated silica (opal), despite is presents directly and indirectly in humans. Two sizes of crystalline opal nanoparticles were investigated in this work under criteria of toxicology. In particular, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects caused by opal nanoparticles (80 and 120 nm) were evaluated in cultured mouse cells via a set of bioassays, methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT) and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). 3T3-NIH cells were incubated for 24 and 72 h in contact with nanocrystalline opal particles, not presented significant statistically difference in the results of cytotoxicity. Genotoxicity tests of crystalline opal nanoparticles were performed by the BrdU assay on the same cultured cells for 24 h incubation. The reduction of BrdU-incorporated cells indicates that nanocrystalline opal exposure did not caused unrepairable damage DNA. There is no relationship between that particles size and MTT reduction, as well as BrdU incorporation, such that the opal particles did not induce cytotoxic effect and genotoxicity in cultured mouse cells.

  12. Optoacoustic characterization of synthetic opals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechri, C; Ruello, P; Mounier, D; Breteau, J M; Povey, I; Pemble, M; Romanov, S G; Gusev, V

    2007-01-01

    The development of laser-based ultrafast acoustic techniques allowed the investigation of the vibrations of nanostructures. In this communication, we report the results of the characterization of crystals composed of silica nanospheres (opals) by pump-probe setup. In our study, the excitation and detection of the vibrations of nanospheres by femtosecond laser pulses was facilitated by filling the pores in the opals by GaAs semiconducting material

  13. The OPAL vertex drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, J.R.; Elcombe, P.A.; Hill, J.C.; Roach, C.M.; Armitage, J.C.; Carnegie, R.K.; Estabrooks, P.; Hemingway, R.; Karlen, D.; McPherson, A.; Pinfold, J.; Roney, J.M.; Routenburg, P.; Waterhouse, J.; Hargrove, C.K.; Klem, D.; Oakham, F.G.; Carter, A.A.; Jones, R.W.L.; Lasota, M.M.B.; Lloyd, S.L.; Pritchard, T.W.; Wyatt, T.R.

    1990-01-01

    A high precision vertex drift chamber has been installed in the OPAL experiment at LEP. The design of the chamber and the associated readout electronics is described. The performance of the system has been studied using cosmic ray muons and the results of these studies are presented. A space resolution of 50 μm in the drift direction is obtained using the OPAL central detector gas mixture at 4 bar. (orig.)

  14. Water-dependent photonic bandgap in silica artificial opals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Gómez, Francisco; Blanco, Alvaro; Canalejas-Tejero, Victor; López, Cefe

    2011-07-04

    Some characteristics of silica--based structures-like the photonic properties of artificial opals formed by silica spheres--can be greatly affected by the presence of adsorbed water. The reversible modification of the water content of an opal is investigated here by moderate heating (below 300 °C) and measuring in situ the changes in the photonic bandgap. Due to reversible removal of interstitial water, large blueshifts of 30 nm and a bandgap narrowing of 7% are observed. The latter is particularly surprising, because water desorption increases the refractive index contrast, which should lead instead to bandgap broadening. A quantitative explanation of this experiment is provided using a simple model for water distribution in the opal that assumes a nonclose-packed fcc structure. This model further predicts that, at room temperature, about 50% of the interstitial water forms necks between nearest-neighbor spheres, which are separated by 5% of their diameter. Upon heating, dehydration predominantly occurs at the sphere surfaces (in the opal voids), so that above 65 °C the remaining water resides exclusively in the necks. A near-close-packed fcc arrangement is only achieved above 200 °C. The high sensitivity to water changes exhibited by silica opals, even under gentle heating of few degrees, must be taken into account for practical applications. Remarkably, accurate control of the distance between spheres--from 16 to 1 nm--is obtained with temperature. In this study, novel use of the optical properties of the opal is made to infer quantitative information about water distribution within silica beads and dehydration phenomena from simple reflection spectra. Taking advantage of the well-defined opal morphology, this approach offers a simple tool for the straightforward investigation of generic adsorption-desorption phenomena, which might be extrapolated to many other fields involving capillary condensation. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGa

  15. Susceptibility of dry-cured tuna to oxidative deterioration and biogenic amines generation: I. Effect of NaCl content, antioxidant type and ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseiro, L C; Santos, C; Gonçalves, H; Serrano, C; Aleixo, C; Partidário, A; Lourenço, A R; Dias, M Abreu; da Ponte, D J B

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to assess lipid oxidation and biogenic amine (BA) development in "muxama", a dry-cured tuna muscle product, as affected by salt content, antioxidant type and ageing time. Overall, BA contents decreased with NaCl level (2785.1mgkg -1 , 1148.1mgkg -1 and 307.7mgkg -1 ) and increased with ageing time (366.2mgkg -1 , 1711.8mgkg -1 and 2959.2mgkg -1 in the final product (T0), and after 1 (T1) and 3 (T3) months of ageing, respectively). Regardless of the test conditions, the most concentrated BA was always tyramine. For the ageing periods considered in the present study, malondialdehyde formation was affected by the NaCl level, with the saltiest samples exhibiting lower content. Rosemary and sage extracts represented promising technological options for preserving muxama from oxidation and to minimize the presence of a fishy flavour and odour, but this treatment may cause the colour to lose some of its redness and become less appealing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Water-Dependent Photonic Bandgap in Silica Artificial Opals

    OpenAIRE

    Gallego-Gomez, Francisco; Blanco, Alvaro; Canalejas-Tejero, Victor; Lopez, Cefe

    2011-01-01

    Some characteristics of silica-based structuresa-like the photonic properties of artificial opals formed by silica spheresa-can be greatly affected by the presence of adsorbed water. The reversible modification of the water content of an opal is investigated here by moderate heating (below 300 °C) and measuring in situ the changes in the photonic bandgap. Due to reversible removal of interstitial water, large blueshifts of 30 nm and a bandgap narrowing of 7% are observed. The latter is partic...

  17. Shock compression of synthetic opal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, A; Okuno, M; Okudera, H; Mashimo, T; Omurzak, E; Katayama, S; Koyano, M

    2010-01-01

    Structural change of synthetic opal by shock-wave compression up to 38.1 GPa has been investigated by using SEM, X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies. Obtained information may indicate that the dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole due to high shock and residual temperature are very important factors in the structural evolution of synthetic opal by shock compression. Synthetic opal loses opalescence by 10.9 and 18.4 GPa of shock pressures. At 18.4 GPa, dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole and transformation of network structure may occur simultaneously. The 4-membered ring of TO 4 tetrahedrons in as synthetic opal may be relaxed to larger ring such as 6-membered ring by high residual temperature. Therefore, the residual temperature may be significantly high at even 18.4 GPa of shock compression. At 23.9 GPa, opal sample recovered the opalescence. Origin of this opalescence may be its layer structure by shock compression. Finally, sample fuse by very high residual temperature at 38.1 GPa and the structure closes to that of fused SiO 2 glass. However, internal silanole groups still remain even at 38.1 GPa.

  18. Superconductivity in Pb inverse opal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, Ali E.; Lee, Sergey B.; Zakhidov, Anvar A.; Baughman, Ray H.

    2007-01-01

    Type-II superconducting behavior was observed in highly periodic three-dimensional lead inverse opal prepared by infiltration of melted Pb in blue (D = 160 nm), green (D = 220 nm) and red (D = 300 nm) opals and followed by the extraction of the SiO 2 spheres by chemical etching. The onset of a broad phase transition (ΔT = 0.3 K) was shifted from T c = 7.196 K for bulk Pb to T c = 7.325 K. The upper critical field H c2 (3150 Oe) measured from high-field hysteresis loops exceeds the critical field for bulk lead (803 Oe) fourfold. Two well resolved peaks observed in the hysteresis loops were ascribed to flux penetration into the cylindrical void space that can be found in inverse opal structure and into the periodic structure of Pb nanoparticles. The red inverse opal shows pronounced oscillations of magnetic moment in the mixed state at low temperatures, T 0.9T c has been observed for all of the samples studied. The magnetic field periodicity of resistivity modulation is in good agreement with the lattice parameter of the inverse opal structure. We attribute the failure to observe pronounced modulation in magneto-resistive measurement to difficulties in the precision orientation of the sample along the magnetic field

  19. Shock compression of synthetic opal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, A.; Okuno, M.; Okudera, H.; Mashimo, T.; Omurzak, E.; Katayama, S.; Koyano, M.

    2010-03-01

    Structural change of synthetic opal by shock-wave compression up to 38.1 GPa has been investigated by using SEM, X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies. Obtained information may indicate that the dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole due to high shock and residual temperature are very important factors in the structural evolution of synthetic opal by shock compression. Synthetic opal loses opalescence by 10.9 and 18.4 GPa of shock pressures. At 18.4 GPa, dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole and transformation of network structure may occur simultaneously. The 4-membered ring of TO4 tetrahedrons in as synthetic opal may be relaxed to larger ring such as 6-membered ring by high residual temperature. Therefore, the residual temperature may be significantly high at even 18.4 GPa of shock compression. At 23.9 GPa, opal sample recovered the opalescence. Origin of this opalescence may be its layer structure by shock compression. Finally, sample fuse by very high residual temperature at 38.1 GPa and the structure closes to that of fused SiO2 glass. However, internal silanole groups still remain even at 38.1 GPa.

  20. Shock compression of synthetic opal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, A; Okuno, M; Okudera, H [Department of Earth Sciences, Kanazawa University Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1192 (Japan); Mashimo, T; Omurzak, E [Shock Wave and Condensed Matter Research Center, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, 860-8555 (Japan); Katayama, S; Koyano, M, E-mail: okuno@kenroku.kanazawa-u.ac.j [JAIST, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1297 (Japan)

    2010-03-01

    Structural change of synthetic opal by shock-wave compression up to 38.1 GPa has been investigated by using SEM, X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies. Obtained information may indicate that the dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole due to high shock and residual temperature are very important factors in the structural evolution of synthetic opal by shock compression. Synthetic opal loses opalescence by 10.9 and 18.4 GPa of shock pressures. At 18.4 GPa, dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole and transformation of network structure may occur simultaneously. The 4-membered ring of TO{sub 4} tetrahedrons in as synthetic opal may be relaxed to larger ring such as 6-membered ring by high residual temperature. Therefore, the residual temperature may be significantly high at even 18.4 GPa of shock compression. At 23.9 GPa, opal sample recovered the opalescence. Origin of this opalescence may be its layer structure by shock compression. Finally, sample fuse by very high residual temperature at 38.1 GPa and the structure closes to that of fused SiO{sub 2} glass. However, internal silanole groups still remain even at 38.1 GPa.

  1. Diagenetic Microcrystalline Opal Varieties from the Monterey Formation, CA: HRTEM Study of Structures and Phase Transformation Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Sherry L.; Wenk, H.-R.; DeVincenzi, Don (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Microcrystalline opal varieties form as intermediary precipitates during the diagenetic transformation of biogenically precipitated non-crystalline opal (opal-A) to microquartz. With regard to the Monterey Formation of California, X-ray powder diffraction studies have shown that a decrease in the primary d-spacing of opal-CT toward that of cristobalite occurs with increasing diagenesis. The initial timing of opal-CT/quartz formation and the value of the primary opal-CT d-spacing, are influenced by the sediment. lithology. Transmission electron microscopy methods (CTEM/HRTEM) were used to investigate the structure of the diagenetic phases and establish transformation mechanisms between the varieties of microcrystalline opals in charts and porcelanites from the Monterey Formation. HRTEM images revealed that the most common fibrous varieties of microcrystalline opals contain varying amounts of structural disorder. Finite lamellar units of cristobalite-and tridymite-type. layer sequences were found to be randomly stacked in a direction perpendicular to the fiber axis. Disordered and ordered fibers were found to have coprecipitated within the same radial fiber bundles that formed within the matrix of the Most siliceous samples. HRTEM images, which reveal that the fibers within radial and lepispheric fiber bundles branch non-crystallographically, support an earlier proposal that microspheres in chert grow via a spherulitic growth mechanism. A less common variety of opal-CT was found to be characterized by non-parallel (low-angle) stacking sequences that often contain twinned lamellae. Tabular-shaped crystals of orthorhombic tridymite (PO-2) were also identified in the porcelanite samples. A shift in the primary d-spacing of opal-CT has been interpreted as an indication of solid-state ordering g toward a predominantly cristobalite structure, (opal-C). Domains of opal-C were identified as topotactically-oriented overgrowths on discrete Sections of opal-CT fibers and as

  2. The OPAL phase III microvertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jong, S.

    1997-01-01

    A description of the OPAL Phase III microvertex detector is given. Special emphasis is put on problems that have been encountered in the installation and operation of the different phases of the OPAL microvertex detector leading to the present Phase III detector and their cures. A short description of the new OPAL radiation monitoring and beam dump system is also given. (orig.)

  3. Comparison of γ-aminobutyric acid and biogenic amine content of different types of ewe’s milk cheese produced in Sardinia, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavina Manca

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The bioactive compounds γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA and biogenic amines (BA, together with protein-free amino acids, were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography in ewe’s milk cheeses produced in Sardinia with different technological traits. The study included three types of cheese: Pecorino Sardo PDO, Pecorino and Casu Marzu. Farmhouse Casu Marzu and Pecorino showed GABA content (maximum levels: 1001.3 and 378.1 mg 100 g–1 respectively that had never been found so high in cheese before, suggesting that these types of cheese present ideal conditions to produce GABA. These two types of cheese also showed high levels of BA (their total maximum levels were 1035.7 and 288.0 mg 100 g–1 respectively. Pearson correlation analysis detected significant correlation between GABA and the main BA present in the cheeses (tyramine, cadaverine and putrescine, suggesting that the factors affecting the production of GABA are the same as those influencing BA formation.

  4. Low-fat frankfurters formulated with a healthier lipid combination as functional ingredient: microstructure, lipid oxidation, nitrite content, microbiological changes and biogenic amine formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Pando, Gonzalo; Cofrades, Susana; Ruiz-Capillas, Claudia; Solas, Maria Teresa; Triki, Mehdi; Jiménez-Colmenero, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Oil (healthier lipid combination of olive, linseed and fish oils)-in-water emulsions stabilized with different protein systems (prepared with sodium caseinate (SC), soy protein isolate (SPI), and microbial transglutaminase (MTG)) were used as pork backfat replacers in low-fat frankfurters. Microstructure, lipid oxidation, nitrite content, microbiological changes and biogenic amine formation of frankfurters were analyzed and found to be affected by the type of oil-in-water emulsion and by chilling storage (2° C, 41 days). Although the lipid oxidation levels attained were low, replacement of animal fat by healthier oil combinations in frankfurter formulation did promote a slight increase in lipid oxidation. Residual nitrite was affected (P nitrite was detectable in the product after processing and 17-46% at the end of storage. The microbial population was low in all formulations during chilling storage. Spermine was the most abundant amine (19-20 mg/kg), but similar in level to all samples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Dating fossil opal phytoliths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentfer, C.; Boyd, B.; Torrence, R.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Opal phytoliths are microscopic silica bodies formed by the precipitation of hydrated silica dioxide (SiO 2 nH 2 0) in, around and between cell walls. They are relatively resistant to degradation in most environments and thus, can occur in large quantities in palaeosediments. Consequently, they are valuable tools for environmental reconstruction. Furthermore, phytoliths are often the only recoverable organic material in well oxidised sediments, the occluded carbon provides the opportunity for dating sediment whose ages have previously been difficult to determine, and thus, increase the potential for fine resolution determination of environmental change. This poster describes the results of an investigation assessing the viability of AMS radiocarbon dating of fossil phytolith inclusions using samples from Garua Island, West New Britain, PNG. Thirteen phytolith samples, isolated from sediments previously dated using tephrastratigraphy and C14 dating of macroremains of nutshells and wood charcoal, were used in the analysis. As a control measure, thirteen parallel samples of microscopic charcoal were also dated using AMS. The results show that the AMS dates for the microscopic charcoal samples are consistent with ages anticipated from the other dating methods, for all but one sample. However, the dates for eight of the thirteen phytolith samples are considerably younger than expected. This bias could be explained by several factors, including downwashing of phytolith through soils, bioturbation, carbon exchange through the siliceous matrix of the phytolith bodies, and contamination from extraneous sources of modern carbon retained in the samples. Research is currently focusing on the investigation of these issues and selected samples are in the process of being retreated with strong oxidising agents to clear contaminants prior to re-dating. Further to this, a full investigation of one profile with a long sequence is underway. High concentrations of

  6. Detector for magnetic monopoles at OPAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinfold, J.L.; Kinoshita, K.; Lorazo, B.; Regimbald, M.

    1991-01-01

    We describe two indepent methods, employed in the OPAL experiment at LEP, for detection of magnetic monopoles and other highly ionizing particles. The first employs passive track-recording plastic detectors incorporated into the apparatus. The second utilizes thed dE/dX measurement capability of the OPAL JET chamber in association with a dedicated trigger. In addition, energetic particles carrying magnetic charge can be identified by the trajectory in the OPAL magnetic field. (orig.)

  7. Tin dioxide opals and inverted opals: near-ideal microstructures for gas sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, R.W.J.; Yang, S.M.; Coombs, N.; Ozin, G.A. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Materials Chemistry Research Group; Chabanis, G.; Williams, D.E. [University Coll., London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    2001-10-02

    Periodic macroporous forms of nc-SnO{sub 2} have been synthesized by two methods, giving opals and inverse opals that can be used as structurally well-defined gas sensors, as demonstrated for CO gas, as well as for toluene and ethanol vapors. The inverse opals, in particular, seem to approximate ''ideal'' behavior. (orig.)

  8. Hierarchical opal grating films prepared by slide coating of colloidal dispersions in binary liquid media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonmok; Kim, Seulgi; Kim, Seulki; Kim, Jin-Ho; Lee, Hyunjung

    2015-02-15

    There are active researches on well ordered opal films due to their possible applications to various photonic devices. A recently developed slide coating method is capable of rapid fabrication of large area opal films from aqueous colloidal dispersion. In the current study, the slide coating of polystyrene colloidal dispersions in water/i-propanol (IPA) binary media is investigated. Under high IPA content in a dispersing medium, resulting opal film showed a deterioration of long range order, as well as a decreased film thickness due to dilution effect. From the binary liquid, the dried opal films exhibited the unprecedented topological groove patterns with varying periodic distances as a function of alcohol contents in the media. The groove patterns were consisted of the hierarchical structures of the terraced opal layers with periodic thickness variations. The origin of the groove patterns was attributed to a shear-induced periodic instability of colloidal concentration within a thin channel during the coating process which was directly converted to a groove patterns in a resulting opal film due to rapid evaporation of liquid. The groove periods of opal films were in the range of 50-500 μm, and the thickness differences between peak and valley of the groove were significantly large enough to be optically distinguishable, such that the coated films can be utilized as the optical grating film to disperse infra-red light. Utilizing a lowered hydrophilicity of water/IPA dispersant, an opal film could be successfully coated on a flexible Mylar film without significant dewetting problem. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Opal instability: a relationship between water and microstructure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauviré, Boris; Thomas, Paul; Rondeau, Benjamin; Fritsch, Emmanuel

    2017-04-01

    Unlike other gem minerals, opals can suffer a change in their quality with time, resulting in a lack of confidence and hence marketability of this gemstone. The instability has been described and categorized into 2 main types (Aguilar et al., 2004; Aguilar-Reyes et al., 2005; Rondeau et al., 2011): cracking (development of a network of micro-fractures) and whitening (decrease of transparency). Available literature about opal instability, however, is restricted to its description. Although the process involved in the destabilization remains poorly understood, it has been proved, in at least one instance, to be associated with the release of water and a change of its speciation (Pearson, 1985; Paris et al, 2007). We propose 3 models to explain the cracking and/or whitening: (i) drying shrinkage of microstructural units, (ii) differential partial pressure between water enclosed in the opal and atmosphere and (iii) release of water yielding empty pores resulting in a strong light-scattering and hence opacity. In order to ascertain the model, a comprehensive set of opals from various origin and structure have been selected for investigation base on previous heating experiments which identified samples with a high susceptibility to crack or whiten. These samples will be investigated to identify the origins of the destabilization phenomena using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermal analysis (gravimetric (TG) and calorimetric (DSC)) and gas adsorption measurements. FTIR will allow the main species of water present in opals (molecular water and hydroxyl groups) and their proportion to be determined while TG will be used to accurately determine the total water content. Gas adsorption and thermoporosity (DSC) will be used to characterize the porosity (surface area, pore size and crystallizable water content). The characterization of water and microstructure for each opal may provide the potential link between the mobility of water in the microstructure and the observed

  10. OPAL Example Segment of Silicon Tungsten Luminometer

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. The Silicon Tungsten Luminometer was part of OPAL's calorimeter which was used to measure the energy of particles. Most particles end their journey in calorimeters. These detectors measure the energy deposited when particles are slowed down and stopped.

  11. The OPAL muon barrel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akers, R.J.; Allison, J.; Ashton, P.; Bahan, G.A.; Baines, J.T.M.; Banks, J.N.; Barlow, R.J.; Barnett, S.; Beeston, C.; Chrin, J.T.M.; Clowes, S.G.; Davies, O.W.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Hinde, P.S.; Hughes-Jones, R.E.; Lafferty, G.D.; Loebinger, F.K.; Macbeth, A.A.; McGowan, R.F.; Moss, M.W.; Murphy, P.G.; Nijjhar, B.; O'Dowd, A.J.P.; Pawley, S.J.; Phillips, P.D.; Richards, G.E.; Skillman, A.; Stephens, K.; Tresillian, N.J.; Wood, N.C.; Wyatt, T.R.

    1995-01-01

    The barrel part of the OPAL muon detector consists of 110 drift chambers forming four layers outside the hadron absorber. Each chamber covers an area of 1.2 m by up to 10.4 m and has two cells with wires parallel to the beam and a drift distance of 297 mm. A detailed description of the design, construction, operation and performance of the sub-detector is given. The system has been operating successfully since the start of LEP in 1989. ((orig.))

  12. The OPAL vertex detector prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roney, J.M.; Armitage, J.C.; Carnegie, R.K.; Giles, G.L.; Hemingway, R.J.; McPherson, A.C.; Pinfold, J.L.; Waterhouse, J.; Godfrey, L.; Hargrove, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    The prototype test results of a high resolution charged particle tracking detector are reported. The detector is designed to measure vertex topologies of particles produced in the e + e - collisions of the OPAL experiment at LEP. The OPAL vertex detector is a 1 m long, 0.46 m diameter cylindrical drift chamber consisting of an axial and stereo layer each of which is divided into 36 jet cells. A prototype chamber containing four axial and two stereo cells was studied using a pion test beam at CERN. The studies examined the prototype under a variety of operating conditions. An r-Φ resolution of 60 μm was obtained when the chamber was operated with argon (50%)-ethane (50%) at 3.75 bar, and when CO 2 (80%)-isobutane (20%) at 2.5 bar was used a 25 μm resolution was achieved. A z measurement using end-to-end time difference has a resolution of 3.5 cm. The details of these prototype studies are discussed in this paper. (orig.)

  13. Elemental Characteristics of Australian Sedimentary Opals and their Implications for Opal Formation and Gemstone Fingerprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, A.; Landgrebe, T. C.; Rey, P. F.

    2011-12-01

    Opal consists of amorphous SiO2.nH2O comprising a network of silica spheres, which in precious opal are of similar size and form an ordered network allowing light to diffract into an array of colors. Common opal, which is often associated with precious opal, lacks this play of color as it is composed of silica spheres of variable sizes. Australia supplies over 95% of the world's precious opal. The opal is almost exclusively located within Cretaceous sedimentary rocks of the Great Artesian Basin, which experienced a major phase of uplift in the Late Cretaceous with subsequent erosion removing a package of sedimentary rock up to 3 km in thickness. Intense weathering resulted in extensive silicification at relatively shallow levels within the Tertiary regolith. However, despite a billion dollar industry and a well-constrained geological history of the basin, the formation of sedimentary opal and its uniqueness to the Australian continent are still very poorly understood. In this study we have used laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) on precious and common opal from key opal mining areas in order to constrain the possible sources of silica fluids involved in opal genesis and to assess whether any major or trace elements could be used to determine the provenance of opal with respect to a particular mining area. A total of 123 spots, each comprising 59 elements, including rare earth elements were analyzed. Globally, volcanic and sedimentary opals can be distinguished on the basis of Ba and Ca concentrations. Although the opals from the Great Artesian Basin are all sedimentary, some show Ba concentrations consistent with volcanic opals suggesting that silica fluids from which they formed were derived from a volcanic province. The most likely source is the Cretaceous volcanic-plutonic province of central Queensland, which supplied vast amounts of volcanogenic material into the Great Artesian Basin. The weathering of feldspars from the

  14. Silica artificial opal incorporated with silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Wenjiang, E-mail: wjli@zju.edu.cn [Center for Optical and Electromagnetic Research, State Key Laboratory for Modern Optical Instrumentation, Zhejiang University, Joint Research Center of Photonics of the Royal Institute of Technology and Zhejiang University, Zijingang Campus, Room 210, East Building 5, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Sun Tan [Center for Optical and Electromagnetic Research, State Key Laboratory for Modern Optical Instrumentation, Zhejiang University, Joint Research Center of Photonics of the Royal Institute of Technology and Zhejiang University, Zijingang Campus, Room 210, East Building 5, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2009-07-15

    The silica artificial opal with a three-dimensional (3D) periodic structure was prepared using highly monodispersed silica microspheres by a force packing method in ITO glass cell. The silica artificial opal incorporated with silver nanoparticles was fabricated by the electroplating technique. The optical microscope images of the synthetic sample and the corresponding optical properties were measured after each treatment of electroplating-washing-drying circle. The transmission and reflection spectra presented a red shift, showing that the effective refractive index of the complex silver/silica opal increased after each electroplating. Combining the SEM images, it was seen that the silver nanoparticles could be directly deposited on the surface of silica spheres in the opaline structure. The silver/silica complex opal film could provide a simple way to tune the opal properties by controlling silver nanoparticles in the silica opal. The silver/silica opal crystal structures could be used for nano-photonic circuits, white-light LEDs or as photocatalysts.

  15. Silica artificial opal incorporated with silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenjiang; Sun Tan

    2009-01-01

    The silica artificial opal with a three-dimensional (3D) periodic structure was prepared using highly monodispersed silica microspheres by a force packing method in ITO glass cell. The silica artificial opal incorporated with silver nanoparticles was fabricated by the electroplating technique. The optical microscope images of the synthetic sample and the corresponding optical properties were measured after each treatment of electroplating-washing-drying circle. The transmission and reflection spectra presented a red shift, showing that the effective refractive index of the complex silver/silica opal increased after each electroplating. Combining the SEM images, it was seen that the silver nanoparticles could be directly deposited on the surface of silica spheres in the opaline structure. The silver/silica complex opal film could provide a simple way to tune the opal properties by controlling silver nanoparticles in the silica opal. The silver/silica opal crystal structures could be used for nano-photonic circuits, white-light LEDs or as photocatalysts.

  16. Investigation and Analysis of the Content of Biogenic Amines in Fermented Alcoholic Beverage%发酵型饮料酒中生物胺含量的调查与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敬; 赵树欣; 薛洁; 张凤杰; 赵彩云

    2012-01-01

    利用反相高效液相色谱技术,以丹磺酰氯柱前衍生,分析了我国市场中32个啤酒样品、32个葡萄酒样品和12个黄酒样品中生物胺的含量。结果表明,我国啤酒、葡萄酒样品中含有较低的生物胺物质,平均含量分别为4.787 mg/L和11.240 mg/L,黄酒中生物胺含量较高,达到了78.304 mg/L。3种饮料酒含量较多的单体生物胺均为腐胺和酪胺,我国葡萄酒中的组胺含量低于国际现有组胺标准的最低限量要求。不同企业生产的啤酒样品和不同原产地的葡萄酒样品中组胺含量存在显著差异,黄酒样品中生物胺含量为18.603~140.010 mg/L,样品间差异很大。%Biogentic amines were analyzed in thirty two samples of beer,twenty seven samples of wine and twelve samples of Chinese rice wine from the Chinese market,using HPLC detection after pre-column derivatization with dansyl chloride.The results showed that the content of biogentic amines in Chinese beer and wine samples was in a relatively low level,with the average being 4.787 mg/L and 11.240 mg/L respectively.While the samples of rice wine contained a high level of biogenic amines,reaching 78.304 mg/L.The monomer biogenic amines that had a relatively high level of content in the three alcoholic beverage mentioned above were all putrescine and tyramine.The content of histamine in wine from Chinese market is below the minimum requirements of existing international histamine standard.Significant differences in the content of histamine were found both among the samples of beer from different enterprises and the samples of wine with different origins.The content of biogenic amines varied widely among the samples of the rice wine,which ranged from 18.603 mg/L to 140.010 mg/L.

  17. Transgenerational hormonal imprinting caused by vitamin A and vitamin D treatment of newborn rats. Alterations in the biogenic amine contents of the adult brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekes, Kornélia; Gyenge, Melinda; Hantos, Mónika; Csaba, György

    2009-10-01

    Biogenic amines (norepinephrine, dopamine, homovanillic acid, serotonin and 5-hyroxyindole acetic acid) were measured by HPLC method in adult F1 generation rats' brain regions (brainstem, hypothalamus, hippocampus, striatum and frontal cortex), whose mothers (P generation) were treated with vitamin A or vitamin D neonatally (hormonal imprinting). Many significant differences were found, related to the maternally untreated controls. In the earlier studied P generation females, vitamin A consistently influenced the serotonerg system (5HIAA), while vitamin D the dopaminerg system (DA or HVA). Vitamin A imprinting always resulted in reduced, while that by vitamin D always in increased tissue levels. In the present case (directly untreated F1 generation) the transgenerational effect was not unidirectional, however biogenic amine tissue levels were strongly disturbed and brain-area dependent. The results call attention to the transgenerational effect of hormonal imprinting in the case of receptor level acting vitamins which are frequently used in the most imprinting-sensitive period (perinatally) of human life and suggests that caution is warranted.

  18. Photonic crystal waveguides in artificial opals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Kiyan, Roman; Neumeister, Andrei

    2008-01-01

    3D photonic crystals based on Si inverted-opals are numerically explored as hosts for effective air-channel waveguides, which can serve as parts of photonic circuits. Two basic shapes of straight waveguides are considered: cylindrical and a chain of spheres. Modelling shows that transmission...... is heavily dependent on the lattice position of the waveguide and its direction. Our experiments of defect inscription by 2-photon polymerization for the production of straight and bent waveguides in opal templates are reported....

  19. Uraniferous opal, Virgin Valley, Nevada: conditions of formation and implications for uranium exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Uraniferous, fluorescent opal, which occurs in tuffaceous sedimentary rocks at Virgin Valley, Nevada, records the temperature and composition of uranium-rich solutions as well as the time of uranium-silica coprecipitation. Results are integrated with previous geologic and geochronologic data for the area to produce a model for uranium mobility that may be used to explore for uranium deposits in similar geologic settings. Uraniferous opal occurs as replacements of diatomite, or silicic air-fall ash layers in tuffaceous lakebeds of the Virgin Valley Formation (Miocene) of Merriam (1907). Fission-track radiography shows uranium to be homogeneously dispersed throughout the opal structure, suggesting coprecipitation of dissolved uranium and silica gel. Fluid inclusions preserved within opal replacements of diatomite have homogenization temperatures in the epithermal range and are of low salinity. Four samples of opal from one locality all have U-Pb apparent ages which suggest uraniferous opal precipitation in late Pliocene time. These ages correspond to a period of local, normal faulting, and highangle faults may have served as vertical conduits for transport of deep, thermalized ground water to shallower levels. Lateral migration of rising solutions occurred at intersections of faults with permeable strata. Silica and some uranium were dissolved from silica-rich host strata of 5-20 ppm original uranium content and reprecipitated as the solutions cooled. The model predicts that in similar geologic settings, ore-grade concentrations of uranium will occur in permeable strata that intersect high-angle faults and that contain uranium source rocks as well as efficient reductant traps for uranium. In the absence of sufficient quantities of reductant materials, uranium will be flushed from the system or will accumulate in low-grade disseminated hosts such as uraniferous opal. ?? 1982.

  20. Biogenic Emission Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biogenic emissions sources come from natural sources and need to accounted for in photochemical grid models. They are computed using a model which utilizes spatial information on vegetation and land use.

  1. The Contribution of Opal-Associated Phosphorus to Bioavailable Phosphorus in Surface and Core Sediments in the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huanxin; He, Huijun; Yang, Shifeng; Liu, Yanli; Che, Hong; Li, Mujian; Zhang, Jing

    2018-06-01

    To improve the burial flux calculations of bioavailable phosphorus (P) and study opal-associated P (Opal-P) in the East China Sea (ECS), surface and core sediments were collected in the Changjiang Estuary (CE) and the south of the Cheju Island. In this study, sedimentary P was operationally divided into seven different forms using modified sedimentary extraction (SEDEX) technique: LSor-P (exchangeable or loosely sorbed P), Fe-P (easily reducible or reactive ferric Fe-bound P), CFA-P (authigenic carbonate fluorapatite and biogenic apatite and CaCO3-bound P), Detr-P (detrital apatite), Org-P (organic P), Opal-P and Ref-P (refractory P). The data revealed that the concentrations of the seven different P forms rank as Detr-P > CFA-P > Org-P > Ref-P > Opal-P > Fe-P > LSor-P in surface sediments and CFA-P > Detr-P > Org-P > Ref-P > Fe-P > Opal-P > LSor-P in core sediments. The distributions of the total phosphorus (TP), TIP, CFA-P, Detr-P are similar and decrease from the CE to the south of the Cheju Island. Meanwhile, Org-P and Opal-P exhibit different distribution trends; this may be affected by the grain size and TOM. The concentrations of potentially bioavailable P are 9.6-13.0 μmol g-1 and 10.0-13.6 μmol g-1, representing 61%-70% and 41%-64% of the TP in surface and core sediments, respectively. The concentrations of Opal-P are 0.6-2.3 μmol g-1 and 0.6-1.4 μmol g-1 in surface and core sediments, accounting for 5.3%-19.8% and 4.2%-10.6% of bioavailable P, respectively. The total burial fluxes of Opal-P and bioavailable P are 1.4×109 mol yr-1 and 1.1×1010 mol yr-1 in the ECS, respectively. Opal-P represents about 12.7% of potentially bioavailable P, which should be recognized when studying P cycling in marine ecosystems.

  2. Micromolding in inverted polymer opals (MIPO): synthesis of hexagonal mesoporous silica opals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Sanming; Coombs, N.; Ozin, G.A. [Toronto Univ., Ont. (Canada). Materials Chemistry Research Group

    2000-12-15

    Regular arrays of hexagonal mesoporous silica spheres are crucial for a number of applications, but until now control of the diameter, dispersity, and packing of the spheres has not proved possible. These authors report a new method-micromolding in inverted polymer opals-that allows the synthesis of such hexagonal mesoporous silica opals for the first time. (orig.)

  3. Uraniferous opal, Virgin Valley, Nevada: conditions of formation and implications for uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Fission-track radiography shows uranium to be homogeneously dispersed throughout the opal structure, suggesting coprecipitation of dissolved uranium and silica gel. Fluid inclusions preserved within opal replacements of diatomite have homogenization temperatures in the epithermal range and are of low salinity. Four samples of opal from one locality all have U-Pb apparent ages which suggest uraniferous opal precipitation in late Pliocene time. These ages correspond to a period of local, normal faulting, and high-angle faults may have served as vertical conduits for transport of deep, thermalized ground water to shallower levels. Lateral migration of rising solutions occurred at intersections of faults with permeable strata. Silica and some uranium were dissolved from silica-rich host strata of 5-20 ppm original uranium content and reprecipitated as the solutions cooled. The model predicts that in similar geologic settings, ore-grade concentrations of uranium will occur in permeable strata that intersect high-angle faults and that contain uranium source rocks as well as efficient reductant traps for uranium. In the absence of sufficient quantities of reductant materials, uranium will be flushed from the system or will accumulate in low-grade disseminated hosts such as uraniferous opal. (Auth.)

  4. Uraniferous opal, Virgin Valley, Nevada: conditions of formation and implications for uranium exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielinski, R A [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA)

    1981-01-01

    Fission-track radiography shows uranium to be homogeneously dispersed throughout the opal structure, suggesting coprecipitation of dissolved uranium and silica gel. Fluid inclusions preserved within opal replacements of diatomite have homogenization temperatures in the epithermal range and are of low salinity. Four samples of opal from one locality all have U-Pb apparent ages which suggest uraniferous opal precipitation in late Pliocene time. These ages correspond to a period of local, normal faulting, and high-angle faults may have served as vertical conduits for transport of deep, thermalized ground water to shallower levels. Lateral migration of rising solutions occurred at intersections of faults with permeable strata. Silica and some uranium were dissolved from silica-rich host strata of 5-20 ppm original uranium content and reprecipitated as the solutions cooled. The model predicts that in similar geologic settings, ore-grade concentrations of uranium will occur in permeable strata that intersect high-angle faults and that contain uranium source rocks as well as efficient reductant traps for uranium. In the absence of sufficient quantities of reductant materials, uranium will be flushed from the system or will accumulate in low-grade disseminated hosts such as uraniferous opal.

  5. Microbiological, physicochemical properties and biogenic amine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty three strained yoghurt samples were collected from local open markets in different provinces of Turkey (Afyon [AF], Aydın [AY], Burdur [B], Isparta [I] and Muğla [M]). Physicochemical and microbiological properties, as well as biogenic amine content, were examined in each of the samples. The dry matter (17.90 to ...

  6. Quantum Effects in Inverse Opal Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiweiss, Michael; Datta, Timir; Lungu, Anca; Yin, Ming; Iqbal, Zafar; Palm, Eric; Brandt, Bruce

    2002-03-01

    Properties of bismuth inverse opals and carbon opal replicas were studied. The bismuth nanostructures were fabricated by pressure infiltration into porous artificial opal, while the carbon opal replicas were created via CVD. These structures form a regular three-dimensional network in which the bismuth and carbon regions percolate in all directions between the close packed spheres of SiO_2. The sizes of the conducting regions are of the order of tens of nanometers. Static susceptibility of the bismuth inverse opal showed clear deHaas-vanAlphen oscillations. Transport measurements, including Hall, were done using standard ac four and six probe techniques in fields up to 17 T* and temperatures between 4.2 and 200 K. Observations of Shubnikov-deHaas oscillations in magnetoresistance, one-dimensional weak localization, quantum Hall and other effects will be discussed. *Performed at the National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) FSU, Tallahassee, FL. This work was partially supported by grants from DARPA-nanothermoelectrics, NASA-EPSCOR and the USC nanocenter.

  7. Superconductivity in Mesocrystalline Inverse Opal Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungu, Anca; Bleiweiss, Michael; Saygi, Salih; Amirzadeh, Jafar; Datta, Timir

    2000-03-01

    Mesocrystalline inverse opal structures were fabricated by the electrodeposition of metallic lead in synthetic opals. In these structures, the superconducting regions percolate in all directions through the voids in the artificial opals and their size is comparable to the coherence length for bulk lead. The inverse lead opals were proven superconducting, with a transition temperature close to that of bulk lead (between 7.2 K and 7.36 K) and broad transition regions. The magnetic behavior of the inverse opals was very different from that of bulk lead. Due to the reduced dimensonality of the superconducting regions, not surprisingly, the magnetic properties of our samples were found to be similar to those of type II superconductors. The critical magnetic field (or the field at which T_copals was proven at least two times larger than that for bulk lead and (dT_c/dH) was observed 2.7 times smaller. We found a reversible ZFC-FC magnetic behavior in the temperature range between T* and T_c. We also performed magnetic relaxation measurements and studied the fluctuation diamagnetism above T_c.

  8. Inverse opal photonic crystal of chalcogenide glass by solution processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohoutek, Tomas; Orava, Jiri; Sawada, Tsutomu; Fudouzi, Hiroshi

    2011-01-15

    Chalcogenide opal and inverse opal photonic crystals were successfully fabricated by low-cost and low-temperature solution-based process, which is well developed in polymer films processing. Highly ordered silica colloidal crystal films were successfully infilled with nano-colloidal solution of the high refractive index As(30)S(70) chalcogenide glass by using spin-coating method. The silica/As-S opal film was etched in HF acid to dissolve the silica opal template and fabricate the inverse opal As-S photonic crystal. Both, the infilled silica/As-S opal film (Δn ~ 0.84 near λ=770 nm) and the inverse opal As-S photonic structure (Δn ~ 1.26 near λ=660 nm) had significantly enhanced reflectivity values and wider photonic bandgaps in comparison with the silica opal film template (Δn ~ 0.434 near λ=600 nm). The key aspects of opal film preparation by spin-coating of nano-colloidal chalcogenide glass solution are discussed. The solution fabricated "inorganic polymer" opal and the inverse opal structures exceed photonic properties of silica or any organic polymer opal film. The fabricated photonic structures are proposed for designing novel flexible colloidal crystal laser devices, photonic waveguides and chemical sensors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Enzymatic Inverse Opal Hydrogel Particles for Biocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Gu, Hongcheng; Chen, Zhuoyue; Shang, Luoran; Zhao, Ze; Gu, Zhongze; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2017-04-19

    Enzymatic carriers have a demonstrated value for chemical reactions and industrial applications. Here, we present a novel kind of inverse opal hydrogel particles as the enzymatic carriers. The particles were negatively replicated from spherical colloidal crystal templates by using magnetic nanoparticles tagged acrylamide hydrogel. Thus, they were endowed with the features of monodispersity, small volume, complete penetrating structure, and controllable motion, which are all beneficial for improving the efficiency of biocatalysis. In addition, due to the ordered porous nanostructure, the inverse opal hydrogel particles were imparted with unique photonic band gaps (PBGs) and vivid structural colors for encoding varieties of immobilized enzymes and for constructing a multienzymes biocatalysis system. These features of the inverse opal hydrogel particles indicate that they are ideal enzymatic carriers for biocatalysis.

  10. Update on the opal opacity code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, F.J.; Iglesias, C.A.; Wilson, B.G.

    1990-01-01

    Persisting discrepancies between theory and observation in a number of astrophysical properties has led to the conjecture that opacity databases may be inaccurate. The OPAL opacity code has been developed to address this question. The physical basis of OPAL removes several of the approximations present in past calculations. For example, it utilizes a much larger and more detailed set of atomic data than was used to construct the los Alamos Astrophysical Library. This data is generated online, in LS or intermediate coupling, from prefitted analytic effective potentials and is of similar quality as single configuration, relativistic, self-consistent-field calculations. The OPAL code has been used to calculate opacities for the solar core and for Cepheid variable stars. In both cases, significant increases in the opacity compared to the Los Alamos Astrophysical Library were found

  11. Diffusion and transport coefficients in synthetic opals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofo, J. O.; Mahan, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    Opals are structures composed of close-packed spheres in the size range of nano to micrometers. They are sintered to create small necks at the points of contact. We have solved the diffusion problem in such structures. The relation between the diffusion coefficient and the thermal and electrical conductivity is used to estimate the transport coefficients of opal structures as a function of the neck size and the mean free path of the carriers. The theory presented is also applicable to the diffusion problem in other periodic structures. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  12. Opal shell structures: direct assembly versus inversion approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tian-Song; Sharifi, Parvin; Marlow, Frank

    2013-09-16

    Opal shell structures can be fabricated in two ways: By direct assembly from hollow spheres (hs-opal) or by infiltration of precursors into opal templates and inversion. The resulting lattice disturbances were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy, and transmission spectra. The hs-opal system shows much lower disturbances, for example, a lower number of cracks and lattice deformations. The strong suppression of crack formation in one of these inverse opal structures can be considered as promising candidates for the fabrication of more perfect photonic crystals. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Synthetic opal as a template for nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Paul A.; Heales, Lindsey; Barber, Richard L.; Turney, Terence W.

    2001-04-01

    Synthetic opal has been used as a template for making 3D inverse opals of silica, titania and silicone rubber. The materials are mesoporous with connected pores and channels and have better opalescence than the opal templates they replace. Thin films of synthetic opal have been grown onto glass substrates by spin coating and these have also been used as templates for making thin films of inverse opal and as masks for depositing metal nanodots. This method produced hexagonally patterned 50 nm gold dots on a flat graphite substrate.

  14. Photonic crystals based on opals and inverse opals: synthesis and structural features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimonsky, S O; Abramova, Vera V; Sinitskii, Alexander S; Tretyakov, Yuri D

    2011-01-01

    Methods of synthesis of photonic crystals based on opals and inverse opals are considered. Their structural features are discussed. Data on different types of structural defects and their influence on the optical properties of opaline materials are systematized. The possibilities of investigation of structural defects by optical spectroscopy, electron microscopy, microradian X-ray diffraction, laser diffraction and using an analysis of Kossel ring patterns are described. The bibliography includes 253 references.

  15. Photonic slab heterostructures based on opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Lidon, Elisa; Galisteo-Lopez, Juan F.; Juarez, Beatriz H.; Lopez, Cefe

    2004-09-01

    In this paper the fabrication of photonic slab heterostructures based on artificial opals is presented. The innovated method combines high-quality thin-films growing of opals and silica infiltration by Chemical Vapor Deposition through a multi-step process. By varying structure parameters, such as lattice constant, sample thickness or refractive index, different heterostructures have been obtained. The optical study of these systems, carried out by reflectance and transmittance measurements, shows that the prepared samples are of high quality further confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscopy micrographs. The proposed novel method for sample preparation allows a high control of the involved structure parameters, giving the possibility of tunning their photonic behavior. Special attention in the optical response of these materials has been addressed to the study of planar defects embedded in opals, due to their importance in different photonic fields and future technological applications. Reflectance and transmission measurements show a sharp resonance due to localized states associated with the presence of planar defects. A detailed study of the defect mode position and its dependance on defect thickness and on the surrounding photonic crystal is presented as well as evidence showing the scalability of the problem. Finally, it is also concluded that the proposed method is cheap and versatile allowing the preparation of opal-based complex structures.

  16. OPAL jet chamber full-scale prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, H M; Hauschild, M; Hartmann, H; Hegerath, A; Boerner, H; Burckhart, H J; Dittmar, M; Hammarstroem, R; Heuer, R D; Mazzone, L

    1986-12-01

    The concept of a jet chamber for the central detector of OPAL was tested with a full scale prototype. The design of this prototype, its mechanical and electrical structure and its support system for high voltage, gas, laser calibration, and readout are described. Operating experience was gathered since summer 1984. The chamber performance in terms of spatial resolution and particle identification capability is given.

  17. OPAL: selection and acquisition of LEP data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Du, P.

    1985-01-01

    The OPAL project (Omni Purpose aparatus for LEP) is presented. It will be a frame and an example to explain the main problems and limitations concerning the mode of event selection, acquisition and information transfer to the final registering system. A quick review of the different problems related to data selection and acquisition is made [fr

  18. Opal web services for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jingyuan; Williams, Nadya; Clementi, Luca; Krishnan, Sriram; Li, Wilfred W

    2010-07-01

    Biomedical applications have become increasingly complex, and they often require large-scale high-performance computing resources with a large number of processors and memory. The complexity of application deployment and the advances in cluster, grid and cloud computing require new modes of support for biomedical research. Scientific Software as a Service (sSaaS) enables scalable and transparent access to biomedical applications through simple standards-based Web interfaces. Towards this end, we built a production web server (http://ws.nbcr.net) in August 2007 to support the bioinformatics application called MEME. The server has grown since to include docking analysis with AutoDock and AutoDock Vina, electrostatic calculations using PDB2PQR and APBS, and off-target analysis using SMAP. All the applications on the servers are powered by Opal, a toolkit that allows users to wrap scientific applications easily as web services without any modification to the scientific codes, by writing simple XML configuration files. Opal allows both web forms-based access and programmatic access of all our applications. The Opal toolkit currently supports SOAP-based Web service access to a number of popular applications from the National Biomedical Computation Resource (NBCR) and affiliated collaborative and service projects. In addition, Opal's programmatic access capability allows our applications to be accessed through many workflow tools, including Vision, Kepler, Nimrod/K and VisTrails. From mid-August 2007 to the end of 2009, we have successfully executed 239,814 jobs. The number of successfully executed jobs more than doubled from 205 to 411 per day between 2008 and 2009. The Opal-enabled service model is useful for a wide range of applications. It provides for interoperation with other applications with Web Service interfaces, and allows application developers to focus on the scientific tool and workflow development. Web server availability: http://ws.nbcr.net.

  19. Electrochemical properties of opal-V6O13 composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernardou, D.; Apostolopoulou, M.; Louloudakis, D.; Spanakis, E.; Katsarakis, N.; Koudoumas, E.; McGrath, J.; Pemble, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Opal-V 6 O 13 composites grown at 95 °C for 50 h. • The deposition period affects the void filling of the opals. • The electrochemical performance is correlated with the oxide’s characteristics. -- Abstract: Vanadium oxides were hydrothermally grown on opal glass substrates at 95 °C. The deposition period was observed to affect the structure of the oxides and the voids filling of the opal surfaces. V 6 O 13 grown on opal for 50 h presented satisfactory electrochemical performance and electrochromic response with a contrast ratio of 2. The specific capacitance of this composite reached a value of 192 F g −1 , which was stable up to 500 continuous charge intercalation/deintercalation scans. The importance of achieving crystalline V 6 O 13 and high opal surface coverage towards the enhancement of the electrochemical properties is presented

  20. Fabrication and optical characterization of gold-infiltrated silica opals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenjiang; Sun Gang; Tang Fangqiong; Tam, W.Y.; Li Jensen; Chan, C T; Sheng Ping

    2005-01-01

    We report the fabrication of metal-infiltrated silica opals for optical studies. Highly mono-dispersed silica microspheres are fabricated and assembled by a force packing method to form opals with large domain sizes. The opals are then infiltrated with gold by an electroplating technique. The optical properties of the infiltrated opals in the visible range are studied and model calculations based on a multiple-scattering formalism are used to interpret the experimental results. The calculated position of the directional gap of the silica opal agrees very well with experimental observation. We found that the optical properties of the infiltrated sample can be explained using a model system in which the voids in the silica opal are partially filled with Au and the surface of the slab is covered with a thin layer of Au

  1. High energy physics studies with the OPAL detector at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienes, B.; Horvath, D.; Palinkas, J.; Trocsanyi, Z.

    1998-01-01

    The OPAL calorimeter is operated by a collaboration of 34 institutes of 7 countries. The participation of the Hungarian team in the analysis work of two OPAL working groups is presented. So far the result of the group was exclusion of mass ranges for Higgs bosons and thus limiting the parameter space available for the various models. Multijet OPAL events are also analyzed in order to measure the strong coupling and test the symmetry structure of the underlying theory simultaneously. (K.A.)

  2. Three-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals based on artificial opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshev, A. V.; Kodama, T.; Nishimura, K.; Uchida, H.; Inoue, M.

    2004-06-01

    We fabricated and experimentally investigated three-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals (3D MPCs) based on artificial opals. Opal samples with three-dimensional dielectric lattices were impregnated with different types of magnetic material. Magnetic and structural properties of 3D MPCs were studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis, and vibrating sample magnetometer. We have shown that magnetic materials synthesized in voids of opal lattices and the composites obtained have typical magnetic properties.

  3. Three-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals based on artificial opals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryshev, A.V.; Kodama, T.; Nishimura, K.; Uchida, H.; Inoue, M.

    2004-01-01

    We fabricated and experimentally investigated three-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals (3D MPCs) based on artificial opals. Opal samples with three-dimensional dielectric lattices were impregnated with different types of magnetic material. Magnetic and structural properties of 3D MPCs were studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis, and vibrating sample magnetometer. We have shown that magnetic materials synthesized in voids of opal lattices and the composites obtained have typical magnetic properties

  4. OPAL jet chamber full scale prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, H M; Hauschild, M; Hartmann, H; Hegerath, A; Boerner, H; Burckhart, H J; Dittmar, M; Hammarstroem, R; Heuer, R D; Mazzone, L

    1986-12-01

    The concept of a jet chamber for the central detector of OPAL has been tested with a full scale prototype. The design of this prototype, its mechanical and electrical structure and its support system for high voltage, gas, laser calibration and readout are described. Operating experience has been gathered since summer 1984. The chamber performance in terms of spatial resolution and particle identification capability is given.

  5. OPAL jet chamber full scale prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, H M; Hauschild, M; Hartmann, H; Hegerath, A; Boerner, H; Burckhart, H J; Dittmar, M; Hammarstreom, R; Heuer, R D; Mazzone, L

    1986-05-22

    The concept of a jet chamber for the central detector of OPAL has been tested with a full scale prototype. The design of this prototype, its mechanical and electrical structure and its support system for high voltage, gas, laser calibration and readout are described. The operating experience gathered since the summer of 1984 and the chamber performance as measured by its spatial resolution and ability to identify particles are also given.

  6. Inverse Opal Scaffolds and Their Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Zhu, Chunlei; Xia, Younan

    2017-09-01

    Three-dimensional porous scaffolds play a pivotal role in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine by functioning as biomimetic substrates to manipulate cellular behaviors. While many techniques have been developed to fabricate porous scaffolds, most of them rely on stochastic processes that typically result in scaffolds with pores uncontrolled in terms of size, structure, and interconnectivity, greatly limiting their use in tissue regeneration. Inverse opal scaffolds, in contrast, possess uniform pores inheriting from the template comprised of a closely packed lattice of monodispersed microspheres. The key parameters of such scaffolds, including architecture, pore structure, porosity, and interconnectivity, can all be made uniform across the same sample and among different samples. In conjunction with a tight control over pore sizes, inverse opal scaffolds have found widespread use in biomedical applications. In this review, we provide a detailed discussion on this new class of advanced materials. After a brief introduction to their history and fabrication, we highlight the unique advantages of inverse opal scaffolds over their non-uniform counterparts. We then showcase their broad applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, followed by a summary and perspective on future directions. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Biogenic amines degradation by microorganisms isolated from cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Butor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the isolation and characterization of microorganisms able to degrade biogenic amines and their identification. Individual microorganisms were obtained by isolation from commercially available foodstuffs and food produced in the technological laboratories of Faculty of Technology, Tomas Bata University in Zlín and subsequently identified by MALDI-TOF MS. The results of MALDI-TOF MS identification were verified by 16S rRNA sequenation. In this work was studied the ability of 5 bacterial strains positive to biogenic amines degradation isolated from dairy products to decrease biogenic amines content in vitro and quantified reduction in the concentration of biogenic amines tryptamine, β-phenylethylamine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine and tyramine. The level of degradation (decrease of biogenic amines was determined on the base of the ability to grow in media with biogenic amines as the sole source carbon and nitrogen. The isolated strains with the ability of degradation of one or more biogenic amines were cultured in medium supplemented with relevant biogenic amines, the media derivatized with dansyl chloride and these amines separated by HPLC at a wavelength of 254 nm. From five tested strains identified as Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumilus, Enterobacter cloacae, Rhizobium radiobacter and Acinetobacter pitii, isolated from gouda type cheese, the greatest ability of degradation was observed in Bacillus subtilis, which was capable to degrade almost all amount of histamine, cadaverine and putrescine. Other four strains showed a lower rate of degradation than Bacillus subtilis, but the ability to degrade biogenic amines with these microorganisms was still significant.

  8. Software engineering experience from the LEP experiment OPAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaile, O.

    1990-01-01

    This contribution describes some of the activities within the OPAL collaboration at LEP to apply Software Engineering Techniques for program development and data documentation. It concentrates on two aspects: Structured Analysis Techniques and a data documentation system developed within OPAL. As far as evaluations are given they are the authors view and opinion

  9. Artificial Opals as Nanophotonic Materials for Optical Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Leyrer, R J; Wohlleben, W

    2007-01-01

    We report on advances in the fabrication of thick and homogeneous polymer opals films with bead sizes up to 600 nm; photo-ablation and point and line defect inscription with femtosecond laser pulses; analysis of the influence of imperfections on opal transmission-reflection properties and numerical...

  10. Barium titanate inverted opals-synthesis, characterization, and optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soten, I.; Miguez, H.; Yang, S.M.; Petrov, S.; Coombs, N.; Tetreault, N.; Ozin, G.A. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry; Matsuura, N.; Ruda, H.E. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science

    2002-01-01

    The engineering of cubic or tetragonal polymorphs of nanocrystalline barium titanate inverted opals has been achieved by thermally induced transformations. Optical characterization demonstrated photonic crystal behavior of the opals. The tuning of the ferroelectric-paraelectric transition around the Curie temperature is shown in this paper. (orig.)

  11. Stability of liquid fuels with biogenic content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Winfried; Hoffmann, Hajo; Pohland vom Schloss, Heide [OWI - Oel-Waerme-Institut GmbH, Herzogenrath (Germany)

    2013-06-01

    Mineral-based fuels for diesel- and spark-ignition engines are always mixtures of many components with a wide distillation range. These insure, for example, a low viscosity and good cold starting properties. Therefore, the fuel system components are designed for mineral-based diesel and gasoline fuels. Biofuels like biodiesel and bioethanol, which only partially show these physical properties, are introduced into the fuel market because of political and ecological aspects. Currently common biofuels, such as ethanol and biodiesel, are investigated in uncommon high blend levels of 10 vol.-% and 30 vol.-% as well as future biofuels. Biodiesel (fatty acid methyl ester, FAME) has poor cold-flow properties concerning to the CP and CFPP. Therefore, biodiesel has the tendency to form crystalline deposits at sub-zero temperatures. For bioethanol applications, an adjustment of the materials used, for example for sealing, is necessary. It is well known that the negative implications of biofuels require an additive treatment for an optimal performance. In contrast to previous examinations, in which technical components were analyzed by their own, in the presented investigations (''GObio''-project), the complete system of sensitive fuel tank and feed system with auxiliary units like independent vehicle heaters is used to determine the influences of the biofuels. The investigations are based on hardware in the loop testing. A target of the project was to modify the application technology like the independent vehicle heater and the in-tank pumps to use the biofuels in the conventional systems. Furthermore, it was an objective to upgrade the performance of the fuels through the development and the treatment with additives. During operation with low blend levels no problems were detected so that safe operation using diesel with up to 7 vol.-% FAME according to EN 590 is ensured. At the temperature levels present in the fuel leading parts during operation, biodiesel tends to polymerize and thus forms deposits at an exponentially higher level. This increased deposit formation near the fuel supply, which does not occur during operation with mineral fuels, leads to failure of the heater. Operation of the heaters with high blend levels of ethanol led to lean combustion due to the amount of oxygen available in ethanol. As a result, the combustion takes place closer to the lean flame limit. In the framework of other projects, long-term-storage stability tests of different domestic heating oil/FAME-blends in a climate chamber at 40 C and defined air moisture were carried out. (orig.)

  12. Modified spontaneous emission of silicon nanocrystals embedded in artificial opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janda, Petr; Valenta, Jan; Rehspringer, Jean-Luc; Mafouana, Rodrigue R.; Linnros, Jan; Elliman, Robert G.

    2007-10-01

    Si nanocrystals (NCs) were embedded in synthetic silica opals by means of Si-ion implantation or opal impregnation with porous-Si suspensions. In both types of sample photoluminescence (PL) is strongly Bragg-reflection attenuated (up to 75%) at the frequency of the opal stop-band in a direction perpendicular to the (1 1 1) face of the perfect hcp opal structure. Time-resolved PL shows a rich distribution of decay rates, which contains both shorter and longer decay components compared with the ordinary stretched exponential decay of Si NCs. This effect reflects changes in the spontaneous emission rate of Si NCs due to variations in the local density of states of real opal containing defects.

  13. Three-dimensional Bragg diffraction in growth-disordered opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshev, A. V.; Kaplyanskii, Alexander A.; Kosobukin, Vladimir A.; Limonov, M. F.; Samusev, K. B.; Usvyat, D. E.

    2003-06-01

    After artificial opals as well as opal-based infilled and inverted composites are considered to be promising representatives of photonic crystal materials. Earlier, photonic stop gaps in opals were studied mainly in transmission or specular reflection geometries corresponding to "one-dimensional" Bragg diffraction. On the contrary, this work was aimed at observing the typical patterns of optical Bragg diffraction in which phenomenon opal crystal structure acts as a three-dimensional diffraction grating. Although our experiments were performed for artificial opals possessing unavoidable imperfections a well-pronounced diffraction peaks were observed characteristic of a crystal structure. Each of the diffraction maxima reveals a photonic stop gap in the specified direction, while the spectral width of the peak is a measure of the photonic stop gap width.

  14. Modified spontaneous emission of silicon nanocrystals embedded in artificial opals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janda, Petr; Valenta, Jan; Rehspringer, Jean-Luc; Mafouana, Rodrigue R; Linnros, Jan; Elliman, Robert G

    2007-01-01

    Si nanocrystals (NCs) were embedded in synthetic silica opals by means of Si-ion implantation or opal impregnation with porous-Si suspensions. In both types of sample photoluminescence (PL) is strongly Bragg-reflection attenuated (up to 75%) at the frequency of the opal stop-band in a direction perpendicular to the (1 1 1) face of the perfect hcp opal structure. Time-resolved PL shows a rich distribution of decay rates, which contains both shorter and longer decay components compared with the ordinary stretched exponential decay of Si NCs. This effect reflects changes in the spontaneous emission rate of Si NCs due to variations in the local density of states of real opal containing defects

  15. Modified spontaneous emission of silicon nanocrystals embedded in artificial opals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janda, Petr [Department of Chemical Physics and Optics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Valenta, Jan [Department of Chemical Physics and Optics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Rehspringer, Jean-Luc [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Materiaux de Strasbourg, GMI et GONLO, UMR46 CNRS-ULP-ECPM, 23, rue du Loess, F-67037 Strasbourg (France); Mafouana, Rodrigue R [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Materiaux de Strasbourg, GMI et GONLO, UMR46 CNRS-ULP-ECPM, 23, rue du Loess, F-67037 Strasbourg (France); Linnros, Jan [Laboratory of Material and Semiconductor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 164 21 Kista-Stockholm (Sweden); Elliman, Robert G [Electronic Materials Engineering Department, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2007-10-07

    Si nanocrystals (NCs) were embedded in synthetic silica opals by means of Si-ion implantation or opal impregnation with porous-Si suspensions. In both types of sample photoluminescence (PL) is strongly Bragg-reflection attenuated (up to 75%) at the frequency of the opal stop-band in a direction perpendicular to the (1 1 1) face of the perfect hcp opal structure. Time-resolved PL shows a rich distribution of decay rates, which contains both shorter and longer decay components compared with the ordinary stretched exponential decay of Si NCs. This effect reflects changes in the spontaneous emission rate of Si NCs due to variations in the local density of states of real opal containing defects.

  16. Three-dimensional metallic opals fabricated by double templating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Qingfeng; Nukala, Pavan; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Wong, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    We report a simple and cost-effective double templating method for fabricating large-area three-dimensional metallic photonic crystals of controlled thickness. A self-assembled polystyrene opal was used as the first template to fabricate a silica inverse opal on a gold-coated glass substrate via sol-gel processing. Gold was subsequently infiltrated to the pores of the silica inverse opal using electrochemical deposition. A high-quality three-dimensional gold photonic crystal was obtained after removal of the secondary template (silica inverse opal). The effects of template sphere size and deposition current density on the gold growth rate, and the resulting morphology and growth mechanism of the gold opal, were investigated.

  17. Tubular inverse opal scaffolds for biomimetic vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ze; Wang, Jie; Lu, Jie; Yu, Yunru; Fu, Fanfan; Wang, Huan; Liu, Yuxiao; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2016-07-01

    There is a clinical need for tissue-engineered blood vessels that can be used to replace or bypass damaged arteries. The success of such grafts depends strongly on their ability to mimic native arteries; however, currently available artificial vessels are restricted by their complex processing, controversial integrity, or uncontrollable cell location and orientation. Here, we present new tubular scaffolds with specific surface microstructures for structural vessel mimicry. The tubular scaffolds are fabricated by rotationally expanding three-dimensional tubular inverse opals that are replicated from colloidal crystal templates in capillaries. Because of the ordered porous structure of the inverse opals, the expanded tubular scaffolds are imparted with circumferentially oriented elliptical pattern microstructures on their surfaces. It is demonstrated that these tailored tubular scaffolds can effectively make endothelial cells to form an integrated hollow tubular structure on their inner surface and induce smooth muscle cells to form a circumferential orientation on their outer surface. These features of our tubular scaffolds make them highly promising for the construction of biomimetic blood vessels.There is a clinical need for tissue-engineered blood vessels that can be used to replace or bypass damaged arteries. The success of such grafts depends strongly on their ability to mimic native arteries; however, currently available artificial vessels are restricted by their complex processing, controversial integrity, or uncontrollable cell location and orientation. Here, we present new tubular scaffolds with specific surface microstructures for structural vessel mimicry. The tubular scaffolds are fabricated by rotationally expanding three-dimensional tubular inverse opals that are replicated from colloidal crystal templates in capillaries. Because of the ordered porous structure of the inverse opals, the expanded tubular scaffolds are imparted with circumferentially

  18. OPAL - portrait of another LEP experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-11-01

    OPAL's design features a central detector consisting of a slim vertex detector wrapped around the beam pipe and the main jet chamber for recording particle tracks and measuring particle momenta. This will pin down the position, angle and momentum of charged particles using true three-dimensional space coordinates, together with the energy loss (for particle identification). The central detector will be surrounded by a solenoid, of conventional type for initial operations, but the plan is to replace this by a stronger superconducting coil after several years of operation. Outside the magnet will be the calorimetry for measuring the deposition of electromagnetic and hadronic energy, and finally the outer muon chambers.

  19. Measurement of parton shower observables with OPAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of QCD coherence is presented based on a sample of about 397,000 e+e- hadronic annihilation events collected at √s = 91 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. The study is based on four recently proposed observables that are sensitive to coherence effects in the perturbative regime. The measurement of these observables is presented, along with a comparison with the predictions of different parton shower models. The models include both conventional parton shower models and dipole antenna models. Different ordering variables are used to investigate their influence on the predictions.

  20. Determination of biogenic component in waste and liquid fuels by the 14C method

    OpenAIRE

    Krajcar Bronić, Ines; Barešić, Jadranka; Horvatinčić, Nada

    2015-01-01

    Intensive use of fossil fuels for energy production and transport during 20th century caused an increase of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. The increase of CO2 concentration can be slowed down by the use of biogenic materials for energy production and/or transport. One of the method for determination of the fraction of the biogenic component in any type of fuel or waste is the 14C method, which is based on different content of 14C in biogenic and in fossil component: while the biogenic c...

  1. Biogenic silica in space and time in sediments of Central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Gupta, S.M.; Mudholkar, A.V.; Parthiban, G.

    rate averages 2.25 x 10/5 g.cm/2.y/1 and it is contributed from 33 to 50% of the total silica. Higher biogenic silica content of the surface sediment is well correlated with Mn, Cu and Ni concentration of the overlying manganese nodules. Higher biogenic...

  2. Optical properties of opal photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eradat-Oskouei, Nayer

    2001-10-01

    Photonic crystals (PC) are a class of artificial structures with a periodic dielectric function in one, two, or three dimensions, in which the propagation of electromagnetic waves within a certain frequency band is forbidden. This forbidden frequency band has been dubbed photonic band gap (PBG). The position, width, depth, and shape of the PBG strongly depend on the periodicity, symmetry properties, dielectric constant contrast, and internal lattice structure of the unit cell. There is a common belief that PCs will perform many functions with light that ordinary crystals do with electrons. At the same time, PCs are of great promise to become a laboratory for testing fundamental processes involving interactions of radiation with matter in novel conditions. We have studied the optical properties of opal PCs that are infiltrated with metals, laser dyes, π-conjugated polymers, and J-aggregates. Opals are self-assembled structures of silica (SiO2) spheres mostly packed in a face centered cubic (fcc) lattice. Our research is summarized in the following six chapters. Chapter 1 is a review on the concepts related to PBG and PC, eigenvalue problem of electromagnetism, material systems that exhibit PBG. Chapter 2 covers all the fabrication and measurement techniques including angle resolved reflectivity, transmission, photoluminescence, photo-induced absorption, and coherent backscattering. Chapter 3 focuses on the relationship between a polaritonic gap and a photonic stop-band when they resonantly coexist in the same structure. Infiltration of opal with polarizable molecules combines the polaritonic and Bragg diffractive effects. The experimental results on reflectivity and its dependence on the impinging angle and concentration of the polarizable medium are in agreement with the theoretical calculations. In Chapter 4, the optical studies of three-dimensional metallic mesh composites are reported. Photonic and electronic properties of these PCs strongly depend on their

  3. Biogenic Emission Inventory System (BEIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biogenic Emission Inventory System (BEIS) estimates volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from vegetation and nitric oxide (NO) emission from soils. Recent BEIS development has been restricted to the SMOKE system

  4. Fabrication and structural studies of opal-III nitride nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, V. Yu; Golubev, V. G.; Kartenko, N. F.; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Pevtsov, A. B.; Sharenkova, N. V.; Brogueira, P.; Schwarz, R.

    2000-12-01

    In this paper, regular three-dimensional systems of GaN, InN and InGaN nanoclusters have been fabricated for the first time in a void sublattice of artificial opal. The opal consisted of 220 nm diameter close packed amorphous silica spheres and had a regular sublattice of voids accessible to filling by other substances. GaN, InN and InGaN were synthesized directly in the opal voids from precursors such as metal salts and nitrogen hydrides. The composites' structures have been characterized using x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and optical measurements.

  5. Fast track trigger processor for the OPAL detector at LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Ward, D R; Heuer, R D; Jaroslawski, S; Wagner, A

    1986-09-20

    A fast hardware track trigger processor being built for the OPAL experiment is described. The processor will analyse data from the central drift chambers of OPAL to determine whether any tracks come from the interaction region, and thereby eliminate background events. The processor will find tracks over a large angular range, vertical strokecos thetavertical stroke < or approx. 0.95. The design of the processor is described, together with a brief account of its hardware implementation for OPAL. The results of feasibility studies are also presented.

  6. Hydropower's Biogenic Carbon Footprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Laura; Pfister, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is accelerating and the world urgently needs a shift to clean and renewable energy. Hydropower is currently the largest renewable source of electricity, but its contribution to climate change mitigation is not yet fully understood. Hydroelectric reservoirs are a source of biogenic greenhouse gases and in individual cases can reach the same emission rates as thermal power plants. Little is known about the severity of their emissions at the global scale. Here we show that the carbon footprint of hydropower is far higher than previously assumed, with a global average of 173 kg CO2 and 2.95 kg CH4 emitted per MWh of electricity produced. This results in a combined average carbon footprint of 273 kg CO2e/MWh when using the global warming potential over a time horizon of 100 years (GWP100). Nonetheless, this is still below that of fossil energy sources without the use of carbon capture and sequestration technologies. We identified the dams most promising for capturing methane for use as alternative energy source. The spread among the ~1500 hydropower plants analysed in this study is large and highlights the importance of case-by-case examinations.

  7. Hydropower's Biogenic Carbon Footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is accelerating and the world urgently needs a shift to clean and renewable energy. Hydropower is currently the largest renewable source of electricity, but its contribution to climate change mitigation is not yet fully understood. Hydroelectric reservoirs are a source of biogenic greenhouse gases and in individual cases can reach the same emission rates as thermal power plants. Little is known about the severity of their emissions at the global scale. Here we show that the carbon footprint of hydropower is far higher than previously assumed, with a global average of 173 kg CO2 and 2.95 kg CH4 emitted per MWh of electricity produced. This results in a combined average carbon footprint of 273 kg CO2e/MWh when using the global warming potential over a time horizon of 100 years (GWP100). Nonetheless, this is still below that of fossil energy sources without the use of carbon capture and sequestration technologies. We identified the dams most promising for capturing methane for use as alternative energy source. The spread among the ~1500 hydropower plants analysed in this study is large and highlights the importance of case-by-case examinations. PMID:27626943

  8. Synthesis of Poly pyrrole Inverse Opal in [bmim] Containing Acetonitrile and the Application of the Inverse Opal in Cell Prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, W.; Dong, Q.Q.; Sun, L.N.; Deng, W.; Wu, Sh.

    2013-01-01

    Most primary cells use Zn or Li as the anode, a metallic oxide as the cathode, and an acidic or alkaline solution or moist past as the electrolytic solution. In this paper, highly ordered poly pyrrole (PPy) inverse opals have been successfully synthesized in the acetonitrile solution containing [bmim]PF 6 . PPy films were prepared under the same experimental conditions. Cyclic voltammograms of the PPy film and the PPy inverse opal in neutral phosphate buffer solution (PBS) were recorded. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique was used to investigate the structural surface of the PPy films and the PPy inverse opals. It is found that the PF 6 - anions kept de doping from the PPy films during the potential scanning process, resulting in the electrochemical inactivity. Although PF 6 - anions also kept de doping from the PPy inverse opals, the PO 4 3- anions from PBS could dope into the inverse opal, explaining why the PPy inverse opals kept their electrochemical activity. An environmental friendly cell prototype was constructed, using the PPy inverse opal as the anode. The electrolytes in both the cathodic and anodic half-cells were neutral PBSs. The open-circuit potential of the cell prototype reached 0.487 V and showed a stable output over several hundred hours

  9. The behavior of biogenic silica-rich rocks and volcanic tuffs as pozzolanic additives in cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragoulis, Dimitris; Stamatakis, Michael; Anastasatou, Marianthi

    2015-04-01

    late compressive strength, the worst performing cement was the one with the lowest reactive silica content with biogenic opal-A as the only reactive pozzolana constituent. Cements produced with perlites, raw materials consisting mainly of a glassy phase, were characterized by higher strength and a rather ordinary specific surface area. Cements produced with Turkish zeolite tuff and Milos glassy tuff exhibited higher late compressive strength than those mentioned above. The highest strength was achieved by the implementation of Australian diatomite for cement production. Its 28 day strength exceeded that of the control mixture consisting of 95% clinker and 5% gypsum. That could be attributed to both, high specific surface of cement and reactive SiO2 of diatomite. Therefore, a preliminary assessment regarding late strength of pozzolanic cements could be obtained by the consideration of two main parameters, namely: specific surface area of cement and reactive silica content of pozzolana.

  10. Nanoindentation hardness of banded Australian sedimentary opal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, P S; Smallwood, A S; Ray, A S [Department of Chemistry, Material and Forensic Science, University of Technology Sydney, PO Box 123, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia); Briscoe, B J; Parsonage, D [Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemical Technology, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: paul.thomas@uts.edu.au

    2008-04-07

    Nanoindentation hardness data in continuous stiffness mode are reported for banded potch and play of colour opals sourced from Lightning Ridge in New South Wales and Andamooka in South Australia. Despite the significant visible heterogeneities observed and the significant differences in origin and microstructures, as observed by SEM, and subtle differences in the elemental distributions between bands within specimens, little difference was observed in the mechanical properties. Specimens were found to be mechanically homogeneous and values of the hardness and moduli were found to be similar between samples. The creep behaviour of the specimens was also observed to be similar. It was concluded that the similarities in mechanical properties were due to the similarities in the silica morphology of the specimens, formed in similar geological environments, as differences in microstructure and trace element distribution were found not to significantly influence the observed bulk mechanical properties.

  11. Changes in biogenic and detrital fluxes across the last two glacial terminations at the Shatsky Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradtmiller, L. I.; Kinsley, C. W.; McGee, D.; Ford, H. L.; Perala-Dewey, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The Shatsky Rise is located within strong gradients in SST and biological productivity between the subtropical and subarctic Pacific gyres. The region is highly sensitive to changes in atmospheric and oceanic circulation on glacial-interglacial timescales, which affect the delivery of Fe-bearing dust and other major nutrients, respectively. Here we use a range of proxies in an attempt to determine the effects of changes in westerly winds and gyre boundaries on dust delivery and biological productivity. We present 230Th-normalized fluxes of opal, Corg, CaCO3, and detrital material at ODP Site 1208 over the last two glacial terminations, extending to 145ka. Opal, Corg, and carbonate are products of surface biological productivity, while most detrital material at this site arrives in the form of windborne East Asian dust. In addition, we calculate the concentration of authigenic U as an indicator of relative oxygenation of the sediment water interface. We observe elevated opal and dust fluxes during the last two glacial maxima, and a decrease in both components during deglaciations. Authigenic U shows distinct peaks at the onset of both terminations. The peak at the penultimate deglaciation is also associated with a large peak in opal flux, while the peak in authigenic U during the last termination does not appear to be associated with any large changes in biogenic fluxes. We compare our records with other data from the subtropical-subarctic transition zone, and suggest that our data are consistent with northward shift of the mean position of the westerly jet and subarctic front during deglaciations.

  12. Polymer sol-gel composite inverse opal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoran; Blanchard, G J

    2015-03-25

    We report on the formation of composite inverse opal structures where the matrix used to form the inverse opal contains both silica, formed using sol-gel chemistry, and poly(ethylene glycol), PEG. We find that the morphology of the inverse opal structure depends on both the amount of PEG incorporated into the matrix and its molecular weight. The extent of organization in the inverse opal structure, which is characterized by scanning electron microscopy and optical reflectance data, is mediated by the chemical bonding interactions between the silica and PEG constituents in the hybrid matrix. Both polymer chain terminus Si-O-C bonding and hydrogen bonding between the polymer backbone oxygens and silanol functionalities can contribute, with the polymer mediating the extent to which Si-O-Si bonds can form within the silica regions of the matrix due to hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  13. Determination of Biogenic Amines in Different Shrimp Species for Export

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myat Myat Thaw; Oo Aung; Aung Myint; Bisswanger, Hans

    2004-06-01

    This study is part of the project on the ''Quality Assurance of Different Shrimp Species for Export''. Local shrimp samples were collected from Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries and various private enterprises. Contents of biogenic amines were determined by using benzoyl chloride derivatization method with HPLC (reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography). Based on the biogenic amines, quality index of shrimps were correlated with freshness index so that the grade of shrimp samples can be classified as excellent, good, and acceptable. All sizes of shrimps such as extra large, large, medium were found to excceptable respectively

  14. Photonic crystal microprisms obtained by carving artificial opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenollosa, R.; Ibisate, M.; Rubio, S.; López, C.; Meseguer, F.; Sánchez-Dehesa, J.

    2003-01-01

    A method for fabrication of photonic crystal prisms is demonstrated. The procedure is based on micromanipulation techniques, here applied to artificial opals. By means of a microgrinder an opal prism comprising a single crystal (several tens of microns in size) has been carved with three different faces: (111), (110), and (100). The faces were morphologically characterized by scanning electron microscopy and their optical reflectance spectra measured and compared with the theoretical band structure.

  15. Measurement and modelization of silica opal optical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Avoine , Amaury; Ngoc Hong , Phan; Frederich , Hugo; Aregahegn , Kifle; Bénalloul , Paul; Coolen , Laurent; Schwob , Catherine; Thu Nga , Pham; Gallas , Bruno; Maître , Agnès

    2014-01-01

    International audience; We present the synthesis process and optical characterization of artificial silica opals. The specular reflection spectra are analyzed and compared to band structure calculations and finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. The silica optical index is a key parameter to correctly describe an opal and is usually not known and treated as a free parameter. Here we propose a method to infer the silica index, as well as the silica spheres diameter, from the reflect...

  16. Effect of annealing on parameters of synthetic opal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajiev, G M; Kurdyukov, D A; Travnikov, V V

    2006-01-01

    We report on the effect of high temperature annealing on the reflection spectra of synthetic opals. The analysis of conditions for simultaneous diffraction on the (111) planes parallel and inclined to the sample surface has shown that both annealed and unannealed opals are compressed along the growth [111] axis and the shape of the SiO 2 balls forming the opals' close packed structure can be described as spheroidal. The structure parameters were evaluated from the analysis of the angular dependences of the peak positions in the Bragg reflection spectra of unfilled and glycerol-filled samples. The major effect of annealing is due to the sintering (interpenetration) of the structural elements of opals. The maximum temperature of 1050 deg. C leads to a 10-fold increase in the degree of spheroid sintering. As a result, the interspheroid spacing decreases by over 10%, while the filling factor increases from 0.75 to 0.96 together with the effective dielectric constant of the opal as a whole (from 1.74 to 2.08). Sintering takes place not only between spheroids, but also inside spheroids between the α-SiO 2 nanoparticles constituting them. This results in a noticeable (by ∼7%) increase in the dielectric constant of opal spheroids

  17. Biogenic silica in tidal freshwater marsh sediments and vegetation (Schelde estuary, Belgium)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struyf, E.; van Damme, S.; Gribsholt, B.; Middelburg, J.J.; Meire, P.

    2005-01-01

    To date, estuarine ecosystem research has mostly neglected silica cycling in freshwater intertidal marshes. However, tidal marshes can store large amounts of biogenic silica (BSi) in vegetation and sediment. BSi content of the typical freshwater marsh plants Phragmites australis, Impatiens

  18. Biogenic amine formation and bacterial contribution in Natto products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bitna; Byun, Bo Young; Mah, Jae-Hyung

    2012-12-01

    Twenty-one Natto products currently distributed in Korea were analysed for biogenic amine contents and tested to determine physicochemical and bacterial contributions to biogenic amine formation. Among them, nine products (about 43%) had β-phenylethylamine or tyramine contents greater than the toxic dose (30mg/kg and 100mg/kg, respectively) of each amine, although no products showed total amounts of biogenic amines above the harmful level (1000mg/kg), which indicates that the amounts of biogenic amines in some Natto products are not within the safe level for human health. From four different Natto products, that contained noticeable levels of β-phenylethylamine and tyramine, 80 bacterial strains were isolated. All the strains were identified to be Bacillus subtilis and highly capable of producing β-phenylethylamine and tyramine. Therefore, it seems likely that the remarkable contents of β-phenylethylamine and tyramine in Natto predominantly resulted from the strains highly capable of producing those amines present in the food. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Biogenic nanomaterials from photosynthetic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffryes, Clayton; Agathos, Spiros N; Rorrer, Gregory

    2015-06-01

    The use of algal cell cultures represents a sustainable and environmentally friendly platform for the biogenic production of nanobiomaterials and biocatalysts. For example, advances in the production of biogeneic nanomaterials from algal cell cultures, such as crystalline β-chitin nanofibrils and gold and silver nanoparticles, could enable the 'green' production of biomaterials such as tissue-engineering scaffolds or drug carriers, supercapacitors and optoelectric materials. The in vivo functionalization, as well as newly demonstrated methods of production and modification, of biogenic diatom biosilica have led to the development of organic-inorganic hybrid catalytic systems as well as new biomaterials for drug delivery, biosensors and heavy-metal adsorbents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Solving geological and historical puzzles with advanced gemologic techniques: The Franco Dávila (1772 precious opal case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. García-Guinea

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The large precious opal weighting 33 grams fitted in a silver jewel and exposed to visitors at the Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN is well documented in: (i its own mounting (1772, (ii at the 775 document of the Archive of the MNCN and (iii the 395 specimen described in the of Pedro Franco Dávila catalogue. The X-ray diffractogram (XRD performed onto the opal block is very similar to other opals of volcanic origin containing varied amounts of cristobalite, tridymite and amorphous silica. The Raman spectrum shows a band peaked at 242, 343 and 416 cm-1 associated with O-Si-O stretching groups; other spectral band peaked at 780 and 819 cm-1 corresponding to vibration of symmetrical O-Si-O rings of 3 and 4 link members, plus other minor bands. The Raman spectrum is also very similar to those observed in Mexican opals of volcanic origin containing an spectral band of stretching nodes v1 (OH at 3233, 3393, 3511, 3628 cm-1 related to OH groups with hydrogen bonds of isolated silanol groups. The interferometric confocal dual microscope 3D (MCI3D, which is a nondestructive facility of high resolution and LED technology reveals the geometry of graver tools on the silver jewel and the computed tomography X-ray highlights the opal cutting as a squared princess type and silver chloride infillings of a crack probably caused by a shock on a corner. Under the scanning electron microscope we observed barite, sealed veins of silica rich in Mn and opal with high contents of Al and K which, along with the historical data, the piece can be attributed to the historical site of opals hosted in Slovakia andesite rocks, this data explains the optical light behavior in the cabochon. The silver jewel has large amounts of Hg and AgCl indicating amalgam method. In addition the natural AgS2 phases probably come from Nueva España (year 1772 in full production of silver in such time. The association of new analytical non-destructive techniques combines the

  1. Solving geological and historical puzzles with advanced gemologic techniques: The Franco Dávila (1772) precious opal case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Guinea, J.; Gonzalez-Alcalde, J.; Furio, M.; Jorge, A.; Garrido, F.

    2016-07-01

    The large precious opal weighting 33 grams fitted in a silver jewel and exposed to visitors at the Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN) is well documented in: (i) its own mounting (1772), (ii) at the 775 document of the Archive of the MNCN and (iii) the 395 specimen described in the of Pedro Franco Dávila catalogue. The X-ray diffractogram (XRD) performed onto the opal block is very similar to other opals of volcanic origin containing varied amounts of cristobalite, tridymite and amorphous silica. The Raman spectrum shows a band peaked at 242, 343 and 416 cm−1 associated with O-Si-O stretching groups; other spectral band peaked at 780 and 819 cm−1 corresponding to vibration of symmetrical O-Si-O rings of 3 and 4 link members, plus other minor bands. The Raman spectrum is also very similar to those observed in Mexican opals of volcanic origin containing an spectral band of stretching nodes ν1 (OH) at 3233, 3393, 3511, 3628 cm−1 related to OH groups with hydrogen bonds of isolated silanol groups. The interferometric confocal dual microscope 3D (MCI3D), which is a nondestructive facility of high resolution and LED technology reveals the geometry of graver tools on the silver jewel and the computed tomography X-ray highlights the opal cutting as a squared princess type and silver chloride infillings of a crack probably caused by a shock on a corner. Under the scanning electron microscope we observed barite, sealed veins of silica rich in Mn and opal with high contents of Al and K which, along with the historical data, the piece can be attributed to the historical site of opals hosted in Slovakia andesite rocks, this data explains the optical light behavior in the cabochon. The silver jewel has large amounts of Hg and AgCl indicating amalgam method. In addition the natural AgS2 phases probably come from Nueva España (year 1772) in full production of silver in such time. The association of new analytical non-destructive techniques combines the

  2. Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    secondary levels. In subject matter didactics, the question of content is more developed, but it is still mostly confined to teaching on lower levels. As for higher education didactics, discussions on selection of content are almost non-existent on the programmatic level. Nevertheless, teachers are forced...... curriculum, in higher education, and to generate analytical categories and criteria for selection of content, which can be used for systematic didactical reflection. The larger project also concerns reflection on and clarification of the concept of content, including the relation between content at the level......Aim, content and methods are fundamental categories of both theoretical and practical general didactics. A quick glance in recent pedagogical literature on higher education, however, reveals a strong preoccupation with methods, i.e. how teaching should be organized socially (Biggs & Tang, 2007...

  3. Biogenic amines in dry fermented sausages: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzzi, Giovanna; Gardini, Fausto

    2003-11-15

    Biogenic amines are compounds commonly present in living organisms in which they are responsible for many essential functions. They can be naturally present in many foods such as fruits and vegetables, meat, fish, chocolate and milk, but they can also be produced in high amounts by microorganisms through the activity of amino acid decarboxylases. Excessive consumption of these amines can be of health concern because their not equilibrate assumption in human organism can generate different degrees of diseases determined by their action on nervous, gastric and intestinal systems and blood pressure. High microbial counts, which characterise fermented foods, often unavoidably lead to considerable accumulation of biogenic amines, especially tyramine, 2-phenylethylamine, tryptamine, cadaverine, putrescine and histamine. However, great fluctuations of amine content are reported in the same type of product. These differences depend on many variables: the quali-quantitative composition of microbial microflora, the chemico-physical variables, the hygienic procedure adopted during production, and the availability of precursors. Dry fermented sausages are worldwide diffused fermented meat products that can be a source of biogenic amines. Even in the absence of specific rules and regulations regarding the presence of these compounds in sausages and other fermented products, an increasing attention is given to biogenic amines, especially in relation to the higher number of consumers with enhanced sensitivity to biogenic amines determined by the inhibition of the action of amino oxidases, the enzymes involved in the detoxification of these substances. The aim of this paper is to give an overview on the presence of these compounds in dry fermented sausages and to discuss the most important factors influencing their accumulation. These include process and implicit factors as well as the role of starter and nonstarter microflora growing in the different steps of sausage production

  4. Commissioning of NAA at the new OPAL reactor in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    In April 2007 the new nuclear research reactor, OPAL, was opened at Lucas Heights in Sydney. OPAL is a 20 MW open pool light water reactor with a heavy water reflector vessel and contains a cold neutron source. It is a multi-purpose facility for radioisotope production, irradiation services and neutron beam research. The OPAL design includes purpose-built facilities for instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and delayed neutron activation analysis (DNAA). For INAA there is a short residence time facility in a neutron flux of around 2 x 10 13 cm -2 x s -1 and a number of long residence time facilities providing fluxes from 3 x 10 12 to 1 x 10 14 cm -2 x s -1 . The flux at the short residence time DNAA facility is around 6 x 10 12 cm -2 x s -1 . The main focus for INAA at OPAL is the research community, meeting the needs of a wide range of disciplines, including mineral processing, geology, the environment, health and archaeology. Both the relative (comparator) method and the k 0 -method of standardization for INAA are being established in OPAL. A description of progress, plans and capabilities are presented. (author)

  5. Particulate inverse opal carbon electrodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Da-Young; Kim, Sang-Ok; Chae, Yu Jin; Lee, Joong Kee; Moon, Jun Hyuk

    2013-01-29

    Inverse opal carbon materials were used as anodes for lithium ion batteries. We applied particulate inverse opal structures and their dispersion in the formation of anode electrodes via solution casting. We prepared aminophenyl-grafted inverse opal carbons (a-IOC), inverse opal carbons with mesopores (mIOC), and bare inverse opal carbons (IOC) and investigated the electrochemical behavior of these samples as anode materials. Surface modification by aminophenyl groups was confirmed by XPS measurements. TEM images showed mesopores, and the specific area of mIOC was compared with that of IOC using BET analysis. A half-cell test was performed to compare a-IOC with IOC and mIOC with IOC. In the case of the a-IOC structure, the cell test revealed no improvement in the reversible specific capacity or the cycle performance. The mIOC cell showed a reversible specific capacity of 432 mAh/g, and the capacity was maintained at 88%-approximately 380 mAh/g-over 20 cycles.

  6. Fishmeal with different levels of biogenic amines in Aquafeed: Comparison of feed protein quality, fish growth performance, and metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasour, Mohammad Sedigh; Wagner, Liane; Sundekilde, Ulrik Kræmer

    2018-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of fishmeal quality (low (LB) and high (HB) levels of endogenous biogenic amines) and feed extrusion temperatures (100 and 130 °C) on protein oxidation indicators and amino acids racemization (AAR) in extruded fish feed. Furthermore, the study investigated......, secondary oxidation products, and racemized methionine correlated positively with a low content of biogenic amines, whereas the primary oxidation product, protein hydroperoxides, and in vivo AAs digestibility correlated positively with high content of biogenic amines. At an extrusion temperature of 100 °C......, the growth performance of the fish decreased when the content of biogenic amines increased. In contrast, at an extrusion temperature of 130 °C, the growth performance was unaffected by the level of biogenic amines. The latter could be a consequence of the higher level of protein oxidation of LB fishmeal...

  7. Opal-based photonic crystal with double photonic bandgap structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, S. G.; Yates, H. M.; Pemble, M. E.; DeLa Rue, R. M.

    2000-09-01

    The interior surfaces of one part of a piece of artificial opal have been coated with GaP so that the remaining part of the opal crystal remains empty, thus forming a photonic heterostructure. Two Bragg resonances have been observed in the optical transmission and reflectance spectra. These two resonances were found to behave differently with changes in the polarization of the incident light and the angle of propagation of the light with respect to the (111) planes of opal. Depolarization of the light was observed to occur most effectively at frequencies within the stop-bands, apparently due to the re-coupling of the propagating electromagnetic wave to a different system of eigenmodes when it crosses the interface separating two parts of the double photonic crystal.

  8. Morphology-Controlled Synthesis of Organometal Halide Perovskite Inverse Opals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kun; Tüysüz, Harun

    2015-11-09

    The booming development of organometal halide perovskites in recent years has prompted the exploration of morphology-control strategies to improve their performance in photovoltaic, photonic, and optoelectronic applications. However, the preparation of organometal halide perovskites with high hierarchical architecture is still highly challenging and a general morphology-control method for various organometal halide perovskites has not been achieved. A mild and scalable method to prepare organometal halide perovskites in inverse opal morphology is presented that uses a polystyrene-based artificial opal as hard template. Our method is flexible and compatible with different halides and organic ammonium compositions. Thus, the perovskite inverse opal maintains the advantage of straightforward structure and band gap engineering. Furthermore, optoelectronic investigations reveal that morphology exerted influence on the conducting nature of organometal halide perovskites. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Ferroelectric inverse opals with electrically tunable photonic band gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Bo; Zhou Ji; Li Longtu; Wang Xingjun; Liu Xiaohan; Zi Jian

    2003-01-01

    We present a scheme for tuning the photonic band gap (PBG) by an external electric field in a ferroelectric inverse opal structure. The inverse opals, consisting of ferroelectric (Pb,La)(Zr,Ti)O 3 (PLZT) ceramics, were synthesized by a sol-gel process. Optical reflection spectra show that the PBG of the PLZT inverse opals shifts continuously with the change in the applied electric field. As the photonic crystals (PCs) consist of the high-refractive-index constituent and possess an 'all-solid' structure, it should supply a more reliable mode to tune the PBG by the electric field for the superprism effect in PCs. It should be of high interest in device applications

  10. Array of lead-glass blocks from OPAL

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the 4 experiments at CERN's Large Electron Positron collider (LEP) which ran from 1989 - 2000. This array of 96 lead glass bricks formed part of the OPAL electromagnetic calorimeter. In total, there were 9440 lead glass counters in the OPAL electromagnetic calorimeter, made of Schott type SF57 glass and each block weighs about 25 kg and consists of 76% PbO by weight. Each block has a Hamamatsu R2238 photomultiplier glued on to it. The complete detector was in the form of a cylinder 7m long and 6m in diameter. It was used to measure the energy of electrons and photons produced in LEP electron positron collisions.

  11. Luminescence response of synthetic opal under femtosecond laser pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasnetsov, M.V.; Bazhenov, V.Yu.; Dmitruk, I.N.; Kudryavtseva, A.D.; Tcherniega, N.V.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic opal is an artificial photonic metamaterial composed from spherical globules of amorphous silica (SiO 2 ) about 300 nm in diameter. We report, for the first time to our knowledge, the origin of a narrow luminescence spectral peak (4 nm HWHM) and optical second and third harmonic generation in synthetic opal samples under femtosecond laser excitation (800 nm) at liquid-nitrogen temperature. Stimulated-emission effects are discussed related to the possibility of nanocavity lasing at the condition of the first Mie resonance in a dielectric sphere. - Highlights: • Second harmonic generation in a synthetic opal (amorphous material composed from spherical SiO 2 globules) was observed. • Narrow luminescence peak which we assign to a Mie resonance in a globule was detected at liquid-nitrogen temperature

  12. Biogenic amines in the meat of hunted pheasant and hare during the course of storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeňka Hutařová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Venison is becoming more and more interesting for consumers. Although treatment procedures of hunted game differ from slaughtered livestock, the hygienic quality of game meat must still be ensured. Potential indicators of meat hygienic quality include the content of biogenic amines. The aim of the present study was to assess the content and changes of biogenic amines in the muscles of selected kinds of small game (common pheasant and brown hare during storage, and based on the obtained results, to assess the hygienic quality of the meat. Biogenic amines (putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, phenylethylamine, and tryptamine in the breast and thigh muscles separated by reverse phase liquid chromatography and consequently were detected using tandem mass spectrometry. Based on the determined content of biogenic amines, both pheasant and hare meats complied with values of high quality meat. The sum of biogenic amines did not exceed the value of 5 mg/kg after 7 days at 0 °C or 7 °C in pheasant meat, and after 21 days at 0 °C or after 14 days at 7 °C in brown hare meat. The biogenic amine content and the speed of their formation in venison can be very helpful for the evaluation of both meat hygienic quality and safety of these foods during storage.

  13. Are artificial opals non-close-packed fcc structures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Santamaría, F.; Braun, P. V.

    2007-06-01

    The authors report a simple experimental method to accurately measure the volume fraction of artificial opals. The results are modeled using several methods, and they find that some of the most common yield very inaccurate results. Both finite size and substrate effects play an important role in calculations of the volume fraction. The experimental results show that the interstitial pore volume is 4%-15% larger than expected for close-packed structures. Consequently, calculations performed in previous work relating the amount of material synthesized in the opal interstices with the optical properties may need revision, especially in the case of high refractive index materials.

  14. Measurement and modelization of silica opal optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avoine, Amaury; Hong, Phan Ngoc; Frederich, Hugo; Aregahegn, Kifle; Bénalloul, Paul; Coolen, Laurent; Schwob, Catherine; Thu Nga, Pham; Gallas, Bruno; Maître, Agnès

    2014-03-01

    We present the synthesis process and optical characterization of artificial silica opals. The specular reflection spectra are analyzed and compared to band structure calculations and finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. The silica optical index is a key parameter to correctly describe an opal and is usually not known and treated as a free parameter. Here we propose a method to infer the silica index, as well as the silica spheres diameter, from the reflection spectra and we validate it by comparison with two independent infrared methods for the index and, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements for the spheres diameter.

  15. Measurement and modelization of silica opal optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avoine, Amaury; Ngoc Hong, Phan; Frederich, Hugo; Aregahegn, Kifle; Bénalloul, Paul; Coolen, Laurent; Schwob, Catherine; Gallas, Bruno; Maître, Agnès; Thu Nga, Pham

    2014-01-01

    We present the synthesis process and optical characterization of artificial silica opals. The specular reflection spectra are analyzed and compared to band structure calculations and finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. The silica optical index is a key parameter to correctly describe an opal and is usually not known and treated as a free parameter. Here we propose a method to infer the silica index, as well as the silica spheres diameter, from the reflection spectra and we validate it by comparison with two independent infrared methods for the index and, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements for the spheres diameter. (paper)

  16. Biogenic Amines in Insect Antennae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna I. Zhukovskaya

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Insect antenna is a multisensory organ, each modality of which can be modulated by biogenic amines. Octopamine (OA and its metabolic precursor tyramine (TA affect activity of antennal olfactory receptor neurons. There is some evidence that dopamine (DA modulates gustatory neurons. Serotonin can serve as a neurotransmitter in some afferent mechanosensory neurons and both as a neurotransmitter and neurohormone in efferent fibers targeted at the antennal vessel and mechanosensory organs. As a neurohormone, serotonin affects the generation of the transepithelial potential by sensillar accessory cells. Other possible targets of biogenic amines in insect antennae are hygro- and thermosensory neurons and epithelial cells. We suggest that the insect antenna is partially autonomous in the sense that biologically active substances entering its hemolymph may exert their effects and be cleared from this compartment without affecting other body parts.

  17. The optical interface of a photonic crystal: Modeling an opal with a stratified effective index

    OpenAIRE

    Maurin, Isabelle; Moufarej, Elias; Laliotis, Athanasios; Bloch, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    An artificial opal is a compact arrangement of transparent spheres, and is an archetype of a three-dimensional photonic crystal. Here, we describe the optics of an opal using a flexible model based upon a stratified medium whose (effective) index is governed by the opal density in a small planar slice of the opal. We take into account the effect of the substrate and assume a well- controlled number of layers, as it occurs for an opal fabricated by Langmuir-Blodgett deposition. The calculation...

  18. Cíge¾ - new field of chloropal and common opal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barok Maroš

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In the open pits in surroudings of village Cígeľ in Prievidza district a new occurance of chloropal and common opal was found. The opal postvulkanic mineralization is related to the vulkanic komplex of the mountain range Vtáčnik. The locality is composed of vulcanic rock and their pyroklastic, represented by particularly by andesite and rhyolit brekcia. The quality of the opals is variable. The resouces of the opals were calculated on the order of hundrens ( XOO kg of available materials. Local opals have also another utilization mostly for the individual jewel.

  19. The OPALS Plan for Operations: Use of ISS Trajectory and Attitude Models in the OPALS Pointing Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Matthew J.; Oaida, Bogdan; Erkmen, Baris

    2013-01-01

    This paper will discuss the OPALS pointing strategy, focusing on incorporation of ISS trajectory and attitude models to build pointing predictions. Methods to extrapolate an ISS prediction based on past data will be discussed and will be compared to periodically published ISS predictions and Two-Line Element (TLE) predictions. The prediction performance will also be measured against GPS states available in telemetry. The performance of the pointing products will be compared to the allocated values in the OPALS pointing budget to assess compliance with requirements.

  20. Method of determining dispersion dependence of refractive index of nanospheres building opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kępińska, Mirosława; Starczewska, Anna; Duka, Piotr

    2017-11-01

    The method of determining dispersion dependence of refractive index of nanospheres building opals is presented. In this method basing on angular dependences of the spectral positions of Bragg diffraction minima on transmission spectra for opal series of known spheres diameter, the spectrum of effective refractive index for opals and then refractive index for material building opal's spheres is determined. The described procedure is used for determination of neff(λ) for opals and nsph(λ) for material which spheres building investigated opals are made of. The obtained results are compared with literature data of nSiO2(λ) considered in the analysis and interpretation of extremes related to the light diffraction at (hkl) SiO2 opal planes.

  1. Optical effects in artificial opals infiltrated with gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comoretto, Davide; Morandi, Valentina; Marabelli, Franco; Amendola, Vincenzo; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2006-04-01

    Polystyrene artificial opals are directly grown with embedded gold nanoparticles (NpAu) in their interstices. Reflectance spectra of samples having different sphere diameters and nanoparticles load clearly show a red shift of the photonic band gap as well as a reduction of its width without showing direct evidence of NpAu absorption. The case of transmission spectra is instead more complicated: here, overlapped to a broad NpAu absorption, a structure having unusual lineshape is detected. The infiltration of opal with NpAu removes the polarization dependence of the photonic band structure observed in bare opals. The lineshape of the absorption spectra suggest a spatial localization of the electromagnetic field in the volume where NpAu are confined thus enhancing its local intensity. This effect seems to be effective to stimulate optical nonlinearities of NpAu. Nanosecond transient absorption measurements on NpAu infiltrated opals indicate that a variation of transmission of about 10% is observed. Since this effect takes place within the pump pulse and since NpAu photoluminescence has been subtracted to the signal, we attribute it to an optical switching process.

  2. Excitations in opal photonic crystals infiltrated with polarizable media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eradat, Nayer; Sivachenko, A. Y.; Raikh, Mikhail E.; Vardeny, Z. Valy; Zakhidov, Anvar A.; Li, S.; Baughman, Ray H.

    2002-12-01

    Photonic crystals (PC) are a class of artificial structures with a periodic dielectric function. PCs can be a laboratory for testing fundamental processes involving interactions of radiation with matter in novel conditions. We have studied the optical properties of opal PCs that are infiltrated with highly polarizable media such as j-aggregates of cyanine dyes. Opals are self-assembled structures of silica spheres. We report our studies on clarifying the relationship between a polaritonic gap and a photonic stop band (Bragg gap) when they resonantly coexist in the same structure. Infiltration of opal with polarizable molecules combines the polaritonic and Bragg diffractive effects. Both effects exist independently when the Bragg (at ω = ωB) and polaritonic (ω = ωT) resonances are well separated in frequency. A completely different situation occurs when ωT ~ωB. Such a condition was achieved in opals that were infiltrated with J-aggregates of cyanine dyes that have large Rabi frequency. Our measurements show some dramatic changes in the shape of the reflectivity plateaus, which are due to the interplay between the photonic band gap and the polaritonic gap. The experimental results on reflectivity and its dependence on the light propagation angle and concentration of the cyanie dyes are in agreement with the theoretical calculations.

  3. Picture Books about Blacks: An Interview with Opal Moore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCann, Donnarae; Richard, Olga

    1991-01-01

    Presents an interview with Opal Moore, who discusses Black imagery in picture books published in the last four years and the institutions that circulate that imagery. Topics discussed include the issue of race pride; interracial themes; appropriate illustrations; African versus African-American books; and the roles of publishers, books reviewers,…

  4. Fast Formation of Opal-like Columnar Colloidal Crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Beek, D.; Radstake, P.B.; Petukhov, A.V.; Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate that highly polydisperse colloidal gibbsite platelets easily form an opal-like columnar crystal with striking iridescent Bragg reflections. The formation process can be accelerated by orders of magnitude under a centrifugation force of 900g without arresting the system in a disordered

  5. Licensing of ANSTO'S OPAL reactor during construction and commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summerfield, M.W.; Ordonez, J.P.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: This paper presents a general description of the ongoing licensing activities associated with the construction and commissioning of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation's (ANSTO) Open Pool Australian Light-water (OPAL) Reactor at their Lucas Heights site. It addresses the following aspects: The Construction Licence - what it is and what impact it had on the construction of the OPAL Reactor, specifically the various Construction Licence Conditions; The interface between ANSTO, INVAP and ARPANSA during the construction of the OPAL Reactor, particularly in relation to ARPANS Regulation 54; Specific licensing issues that have arisen during the construction and commissioning process and how they have been resolved; The Operating Licence Application - what it is and how it interfaces with the construction and commissioning of the OPAL Reactor. These aspects are all addressed from the point of view of the licensee ANSTO and the RRR Project. Particular emphasis will be given to the way in which the licensing process is integrated into the overall project program and the lessons learnt that may be of benefit to other licensees and regulators. Note that this paper is an update of a presentation given at IGORR10 and follows on from a paper previously presented at PNBC12 in October 2002

  6. Hadronic final state interactions at ALEPH and OPAL

    CERN Document Server

    Ghete, V.M.

    2000-01-01

    The studies of Fermi-Dirac correlations of $\\Lambda\\Lambda$ and Bose-Einstein correlations and colour reconnection in $\\mathrm{W}$-pairs decays performed by the ALEPH collaboration in $\\mathrm{e^+e^-}$ annihilation at LEP are presented. The OPAL analysis of Bose-Einstein correlations in

  7. Colorimetric Humidity Sensor Using Inverse Opal Photonic Gel in Hydrophilic Ionic Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seulki; Han, Sung Gu; Koh, Young Gook; Lee, Hyunjung; Lee, Wonmok

    2018-04-27

    We demonstrate a fast response colorimetric humidity sensor using a crosslinked poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) in the form of inverse opal photonic gel (IOPG) soaked in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM⁺][BF₄ − ]), a non-volatile hydrophilic room temperature ionic liquid (IL). An evaporative colloidal assembly enabled the fabrication of highly crystalline opal template, and a subsequent photopolymerization of PHEMA followed by solvent-etching and final soaking in IL produced a humidity-responsive IOPG showing highly reflective structural color by Bragg diffraction. Three IOPG sensors with different crosslinking density were fabricated on a single chip, where a lightly crosslinked IOPG exhibited the color change response over entire visible spectrum with respect to the humidity changes from 0 to 80% RH. As the water content increased in IL, thermodynamic interactions between PHEMA and [BMIM⁺][BF₄ − ] became more favorable, to show a red-shifted structural color owing to a longitudinal swelling of IOPG. Highly porous IO structure enabled fast humidity-sensing kinetics with the response times of ~1 min for both swelling and deswelling. Temperature-dependent swelling of PHEMA in [BMIM⁺][BF₄ − ] revealed that the current system follows an upper critical solution temperature (UCST) behavior with the diffraction wavelength change as small as 1% at the temperature changes from 10 °C to 30 °C.

  8. Framework for Assessing Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    This revision of the 2011 report, Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources, evaluates biogenic CO2 emissions from stationary sources, including a detailed study of the scientific and technical issues associated with assessing biogenic carbon dioxide...

  9. Effect of salt-tolerant yeast of Candida versatilis and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii on the production of biogenic amines during soy sauce fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wei; Hou, Li-Hua; Guo, Hong-Lian; Wang, Chun-Ling; Fan, Zhen-Chuan; Liu, Jin-Fu; Cao, Xiao-Hong

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to enhance and improve the quality and safety of soy sauce. In the present work, the change of biogenic amines, such as histamine, tyramine, cadaverine, spermidine, was examined by the treatment of Candida versatilis and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, and the influence of salt-tolerant yeast on biogenic amines was analysed during the whole fermentation process. The results showed that the content of biogenic amines was elevated after yeast treatment and the content of biogenic amines was influenced by using yeast. The dominating biogenic amine in soy sauce was tyramine. At the end of fermentation, the concentrations of biogenic amines produced by Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Candida versatilis in the soy mash were 122.71 mg kg(-1) and 69.96 mg kg(-1) . The changes of biogenic amines in high-salt liquid soy mash during fermentation process indicated that a variety of biogenic amines were increased in the fermentation ageing period, which may be due to amino acid decarboxylation to form biogenic amines by yeast decarboxylase. The fermentation period of soy sauce should be longer than 5 months because biogenic amines began to decline after this time period. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Investigation of optical properties of PMMA opals and inverse opals with YVO4-Eu nano-phosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Shashi; Gathania, Arvind K.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, opals and inverse opals have attracted the attention of researchers because of their potential applications in photonic devices. The idea of the periodic photonic crystal was proposed by Yablonovitch and John. The photonic crystals are in analogy with crystalline solid: electromagnetic waves propagating in the photonic crystal experienced periodic spatial variation of dielectric constant, as the de Broglie wave propagation in crystalline solids experienced periodic variation of the atomic potential. In the present work we synthesized the PMMA spheres using colloidal crystallization method and PMMA colloidal multilayer crystal were developed on the quartz substrate by self-assembly vertical deposition method. Afterward PMMA microspheres were infiltrated with YVO 4 -Eu nano-phosphors followed by heating at 500 °C and above to form the inverse opals. Transmission spectra for pure PMMA, infiltrated PMMA and inverse opal of PMMA are obtained. The colloidal crystal multilayer shows a stop band at 596nm, which arises from the Bragg reflection of the (111) planes. The central position of this band gap is shifted to 608nm because of the change in the refractive index of the structure after infiltration. As the calcination was carried out at 500 °C and 600 °C, the central position of the band shifted to 483nm and 500nm respectively, because of the change in the effective refractive index of the structure and shrinkage in the direction perpendicular to the film. The resulting structure still exhibits a band gap, as the crystalline ordering is kept after the crystal is inverted. The intensity of inverse opals of PMMA is very small as compared to the bulk powder briefing the application of microstructures for the low voltage light emitting diodes (LEDs). The results show band gap and luminescent characteristics strongly depend upon infiltration. (author)

  11. Intolerance to dietary biogenic amines: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, S.C.; Dusseldorp, M. van; Bottema, K.C.; Dubois, A.E.J.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the scientific evidence for purported intolerance to dietary biogenic amines. Data Sources: MEDLINE was searched for articles in the English language published between January 1966 and August 2001. The keyword biogenic amin* was combined with hypersens*, allerg*, intoler*, and

  12. Intolerance to dietary biogenic amines : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, SC; van Dusseldorp, M; Bottema, KC; Dubois, AEJ

    Objective: To evaluate the scientific evidence for purported intolerance to dietary biogenic amines. Data Sources: MEDLINE was searched for articles in the English language published between January 1966 and August 2001. The keyword biogenic amin* was combined with hypersens*, allergen intoler*, and

  13. OPAL extension for permanent-magnet motors; OPAL-Erweiterung fuer Permanentmagnet-Motoren - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, R

    2008-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at an extension to the OPAL software that is concerned with the energy-efficient design of pump and fan systems that use induction motors. This software has been extended by a module for permanent magnet motors which directly addresses the question of how much energy and cost can be saved through the use of this type of motors compared to ASM standard motors. However, it is noted that certain parameters of permanent magnet motors necessary to make use of this new design feature must be available, which is currently not the case. In order to make this design application available to a wider group of users, a web-based user interface has been developed. New Web-2.0 features that have been included to provide improved usability are discussed. In addition, it is noted that the software has now been adapted to support German, English and French versions. Also, the EuroDEEM database has been integrated, thus giving access to the performance data of more than 10,000 motors.

  14. Safety assessment of the biogenic amines in fermented soya beans and fermented bean curd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; Ding, Xiaowen; Qin, Yingrui; Zeng, Yitao

    2014-08-06

    To evaluate the safety of biogenic amines, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to evaluate the levels of biogenic amines in fermented soya beans and fermented bean curd. In fermented soya beans, the total biogenic amines content was in a relatively safe range in many samples, although the concentration of histamine, tyramine, and β-phenethylamine was high enough in some samples to cause a possible safety threat, and 8 of the 30 samples were deemed unsafe. In fermented bean curd, the total biogenic amines content was more than 900 mg/kg in 19 white sufu amples, a level that has been determined to pose a safety hazard; putrescine was the only one detected in all samples and also had the highest concentration, which made samples a safety hazard; the content of tryptamine, β-phenethylamine, tyramine, and histamine had reached the level of threat to human health in some white and green sufu samples, and that may imply another potential safety risk; and 25 of the 33 samples were unsafe. In conclusion, the content of biogenic amines in all fermented soya bean products should be studied and appropriate limits determined to ensure the safety of eating these foods.

  15. Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editor IJRED

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available International Journal of Renewable Energy Development www.ijred.com Volume 1             Number 3            October 2012                ISSN 2252- 4940   CONTENTS OF ARTICLES page Design and Economic Analysis of a Photovoltaic System: A Case Study 65-73 C.O.C. Oko , E.O. Diemuodeke, N.F. Omunakwe, and E. Nnamdi     Development of Formaldehyde Adsorption using Modified Activated Carbon – A Review 75-80 W.D.P Rengga , M. Sudibandriyo and M. Nasikin     Process Optimization for Ethyl Ester Production in Fixed Bed Reactor Using Calcium Oxide Impregnated Palm Shell Activated Carbon (CaO/PSAC 81-86 A. Buasri , B. Ksapabutr, M. Panapoy and N. Chaiyut     Wind Resource Assessment in Abadan Airport in Iran 87-97 Mojtaba Nedaei       The Energy Processing by Power Electronics and its Impact on Power Quality 99-105 J. E. Rocha and B. W. D. C. Sanchez       First Aspect of Conventional Power System Assessment for High Wind Power Plants Penetration 107-113 A. Merzic , M. Music, and M. Rascic   Experimental Study on the Production of Karanja Oil Methyl Ester and Its Effect on Diesel Engine 115-122 N. Shrivastava,  , S.N. Varma and M. Pandey  

  16. Investigation of luminescence properties in SiO2: Tb, Yb upconversion inverse opal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhengwen; Yan Dong; Song Zhiguo; Zhou Dacheng; Yu Xue; Yang Yong; Yin Zhaoyi; Yan Lei; Wang Rongfei; Wu Hangjun; Qiu Jianbei

    2012-01-01

    The SiO 2 : Tb, Yb inverse opals with photonic band gap at 465 or 543 nm were prepared, and an effect of photonic band gap on upconversion spontaneous emission from Tb 3+ was investigated. The results show that the photonic band gap has a significant influence on the upconversion emission of the SiO 2 : Tb, Yb inverse opals. The upconversion luminescence of the Tb 3+ ions is suppressed in the inverse opal compared with the luminescence of that of the reference sample. - Highlights: ► Upconversion emission from Tb 3+ was observed in the SiO 2 : Tb, Yb inverse opal. ► UC emission of Tb 3+ was modulated by controlling the structure of inverse opal. ► UC emission of Tb 3+ was depressed in the inverse opal.

  17. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between conjugated molecules infiltrated in three-dimensional opal photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Lu; Sui, Ning; Wang, Ying-Hui; Qian, Cheng; Ma, Yu-Guang; Zhang, Han-Zhuang

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from Coumarin 6 (C-6) to Sulforhodamine B (S-B) infiltrated into opal PMMA (poly-methyl-methacrylate) photonic crystals (PCs) has been studied in detail. The intrinsic mesh micro-porous structure of opal PCs could increase the luminescent efficiency through inhibiting the intermolecular interaction. Meanwhile, its structure of periodically varying refractive indices could also modify the FRET through affecting the luminescence characteristics of energy donor or energy acceptor. The results demonstrate that the FRET efficiency between conjugated dyes was easily modified by opal PCs. - Highlights: • We investigate the fluorescence resonance energy transfer between two kinds of dyes. • These two kinds of dyes are infiltrated in PMMA opal photonic crystals. • The structure of opal PCs could improve the luminescent characteristics. • The structure of opal PCs could improve the energy transfer characteristics

  18. Scaling exponents for fracture surfaces in opal glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez-Guerrero, L.; Garza, F.J.; Hinojosa, M.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the scaling properties of fracture surfaces in opal glass. Specimens with two different opacifying particle sizes (1 μm and 0.4 μm) were broken by three-point bending test and the resulting fracture surfaces were analyzed using Atomic Force Microscopy. The analysis of the self-affine behavior was performed using the Variable Bandwidth and Height-Height Correlation Methods, and both the roughness exponent, ζ, and the correlation length, ξ, were determined. It was found that the roughness exponent obtained in both samples is ζ ∼ 0.8; whereas the correlation length in both fractures is of the order of the particle size, demonstrating the dependence of this self-affine parameter on the microstructure of opal glass.

  19. Scaling exponents for fracture surfaces in opal glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez-Guerrero, L., E-mail: guerreroleo@hotmail.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica. Cd. Universitaria s/n, C.P. 66450, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Center of Innovation, Research and Development on Engineering and Technology, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon Monterrey, C.P. 66600, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Garza, F.J., E-mail: fjgarza@gama.fime.uanl.mx [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Cd. Universitaria s/n, C.P. 66450, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Hinojosa, M., E-mail: hinojosa@gama.fime.uanl.mx [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica. Cd. Universitaria s/n, C.P. 66450, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Center of Innovation, Research and Development on Engineering and Technology, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon Monterrey, C.P. 66600, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2010-09-25

    We have investigated the scaling properties of fracture surfaces in opal glass. Specimens with two different opacifying particle sizes (1 {mu}m and 0.4 {mu}m) were broken by three-point bending test and the resulting fracture surfaces were analyzed using Atomic Force Microscopy. The analysis of the self-affine behavior was performed using the Variable Bandwidth and Height-Height Correlation Methods, and both the roughness exponent, {zeta}, and the correlation length, {xi}, were determined. It was found that the roughness exponent obtained in both samples is {zeta} {approx} 0.8; whereas the correlation length in both fractures is of the order of the particle size, demonstrating the dependence of this self-affine parameter on the microstructure of opal glass.

  20. Polarization Change in Face-Centered Cubic Opal Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Christian; Romanov, Sergei; Küchenmeister, Jens; Peschel, Ulf; Busch, Kurt

    2011-10-01

    Artificial opals are a popular platform for investigating fundamental properties of Photonic Crystals (PhC). In this work, we provide a theoretical analysis of polarization-resolved transmission experiments through thin opal films. Despite the full cubic symmetry of the PhC, this system provides a very efficient mechanism for manipulating the polarization state of light. Based on band structure calculations and Bloch mode analysis, we find that this effect closely resembles classical birefringence. Due to the cubic symmetry, however, a description using tensorial quantities is not possible. This indicates fundamental limitations of effective material models for Photonic Crystals and demonstrates the importance of accurately modelling the microscopic geometry of such systems.

  1. Band structure and optical properties of opal photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavarini, E.; Andreani, L. C.; Soci, C.; Galli, M.; Marabelli, F.; Comoretto, D.

    2005-07-01

    A theoretical approach for the interpretation of reflectance spectra of opal photonic crystals with fcc structure and (111) surface orientation is presented. It is based on the calculation of photonic bands and density of states corresponding to a specified angle of incidence in air. The results yield a clear distinction between diffraction in the direction of light propagation by (111) family planes (leading to the formation of a stop band) and diffraction in other directions by higher-order planes (corresponding to the excitation of photonic modes in the crystal). Reflectance measurements on artificial opals made of self-assembled polystyrene spheres are analyzed according to the theoretical scheme and give evidence of diffraction by higher-order crystalline planes in the photonic structure.

  2. Fabrication of photonic crystal microprisms based on artificial opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenollosa, Roberto; Ibisate, Marta; Rubio, Silvia; Lopez, Ceferino; Meseguer, Francisco; Sanchez-Dehesa, Jose

    2002-04-01

    This paper reports a new method for faceting artificial opals based on micromanipulation techniques. By this means it was possible to fabricate an opal prism in a single domain with different faces: (111), (110) and (100), which were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Optical Reflectance Spectroscopy. Their spectra exhibit different characteristics depending on the orientation of the facet. While (111)-oriented face gives rise to a high Bragg reflection peak at about a/(lambda) equals 0.66 (where a is the lattice parameter), (110) and (100) faces show much less intense peaks corresponding to features in the band structure at a/(lambda) equals 1.12 and a/(lambda) equals 1.07 respectively. Peaks at higher energies have less obvious explanation.

  3. Licensing of the OPAL reactor during construction and commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summerfield, M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a description of the licensing activities associated with the construction and commissioning of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation's (ANSTO) OPAL reactor. It addresses the Construction Licence, the interface between ANSTO, INVAP (the contractor with responsibility for design and construction of the facility) and the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA, the Australian nuclear regulator) during the construction of OPAL, specific licensing issues that have arisen during the construction and commissioning process, and the Operating Licence Application. Particular emphasis will be given to the way in which the licensing process is integrated into the overall project program and the lessons learnt that may be of benefit to other licensees and regulators

  4. Cell orientation gradients on an inverse opal substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jie; Zou, Xin; Zhao, Ze; Mu, Zhongde; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-05-20

    The generation of cell gradients is critical for understanding many biological systems and realizing the unique functionality of many implanted biomaterials. However, most previous work can only control the gradient of cell density and this has no effect on the gradient of cell orientation, which has an important role in regulating the functions of many connecting tissues. Here, we report on a simple stretched inverse opal substrate for establishing desired cell orientation gradients. It was demonstrated that tendon fibroblasts on the stretched inverse opal gradient showed a corresponding alignment along with the elongation gradient of the substrate. This "random-to-aligned" cell gradient reproduces the insertion part of many connecting tissues, and thus, will have important applications in tissue engineering.

  5. OPAL Forward Calorimeter (half cylinder with lead scintillator)

    CERN Multimedia

    1 half cylinder piece is available for loan. The OPAL forward Detector Calorimeter was made in 4 half cylindrical pieces. Two full cylinders were placed round the LEP beam pipe about 3m downstream of the interaction point. The detector was used primarily to measure the luminosity of LEP (rate of interactions) and also to trigger on 2-photon events. In addition it formed an essential part of the detector coverage which OPAL needed to carry out searches for new particles such as the Higgs boson. The detector is made of scintillators sandwiched between lead sheets. The light from the scintillators passes via bars of wavelength shifter and light guides on its way to be measured by photomultipliers. There is a layer of gas filled tube chambers within the calorimeter. These provide a measure of the position of the particles interacting in the calorimeter.

  6. OPAL Central Detector (Including vertex, jet and Z chambers)

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. OPAL's central tracking system consists of (in order of increasing radius) a silicon microvertex detector, a vertex detector, a jet chamber, and z-chambers. All the tracking detectors work by observing the ionization of atoms by charged particles passing by: when the atoms are ionized, electrons are knocked out of their atomic orbitals, and are then able to move freely in the detector. These ionization electrons are detected in the different parts of the tracking system. (This piece includes the vertex, jet and Z chambers) In the picture above, the central detector is the piece being removed to the right.

  7. Comparative pulsation calculations with OP and OPAL opacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanbur, Shashi M.; Simon, Norman R.

    1994-01-01

    Comparative linear nonadiabatic pulsation calculations are presented using the OPAL and Opacity Project opacities. The two sets of opacities include effects due to intermediate coupling and fine structure as well as new abundances. We used two mass luminosity (M-L) relations, one standard (BIT), and one employing substantial convective core overshoot (COV). The two sets of opacities cannot be differentiated on the basis of the stellar pulsation calculations presented here. The BIT relation can model the beat and bump Cepheids with masses between 4 and 7 solar mass, while if the overshoot relation is used, masses between 2 and 6 solar mass are required. In the RR Lyrae regime, we find the inferred masses of globular cluster RRd stars to be little influenced by the choice of OPAL or OP. Finally, the limited modeling we have done is not able to constrain the Cepheid M-L relation based upon period ratios observed in the beat and bump stars.

  8. Changes in biogenic amine concentrations in meat of eviscerated pheasants (Phasianus colchicus during storage at 7 °C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeňka Hutařová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In our study, we tested biogenic amine concentrations in 20 eviscerated pheasants killed by pithing (the slaughtering technique in which the spinal cord of the animals is severed and their brain is destroyed and stored at 7 °C for 21 days. Biogenic amine concentrations in breast and thigh muscles were analysed by reverse phase liquid chromatography. In the thigh muscle, the highest increases during the storage time were found in cadaverine (20.17 ± 18.66 mg/kg, putrescine (4.39 ± 4.17 mg/kg and tyramine (15.20 ± 16.88 mg/kg concentrations. Changes of biogenic amine concentrations in the breast muscle were minimal during the whole storage time. The concentration of biogenic amines in meat is associated with the presence of contaminating microorganisms. For that reason, biogenic amines are often used as markers of meat spoilage in various livestock species. Based on our results, the biogenic amines cadaverine, putrescine and tyramine may be considered the main indicators of hygienic quality of pheasant meat. We can recommend storing pithed pheasants treated by evisceration no longer than for seven days at 7 °C. After that period, biogenic amine concentrations in meat begin to change. The main significance of this study lies in the extension of the lack information about the content of biogenic amines in the meat of eviscerated pithed pheasant and also about changes of their concentrations during the course of storage.

  9. Optical analysis of the fine crystalline structure of artificial opal films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, G; Dorado, L A; Schinca, D; Depine, R A; Míguez, H

    2009-11-17

    Herein, we present a detailed analysis of the structure of artificial opal films. We demonstrate that, rather than the generally assumed face centered cubic lattice of spheres, opal films are better approximated by rhombohedral assemblies of distorted colloids. Detailed analysis of the optical response in a very wide spectral range (0.4 opal films is provided, as well as of the photonic band structure of the proposed arrangement. The implications of this distortion in the optical response of the lattice are discussed.

  10. Magnetic topology of Co-based inverse opal-like structures

    OpenAIRE

    Grigoryeva, N.A.; Mistonov, A.A.; Napolskii, K.S.; Sapoletova, N.A.; Eliseev, A.A.; Bouwman, W.; Byelov, D.; Petukhov, A.V.; Chernyshov, D.Y.; Eckerlebe, H.; Vasilieva, A.V.; Grigoriev, S.V.

    2011-01-01

    The magnetic and structural properties of a cobalt inverse opal-like crystal have been studied by a combination of complementary techniques ranging from polarized neutron scattering and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry to x-ray diffraction. Microradian small-angle x-ray diffraction shows that the inverse opal-like structure (OLS) synthesized by the electrochemical method fully duplicates the three-dimensional net of voids of the template artificial opal. The in...

  11. Formation and characterisation of ordered porous vanadium oxide inverse opal materials for Li-ion batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    This thesis presents several routes towards achieving artificial opal templates by colloidal self-assembly of polystyrene (PS) or poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) spheres and the use of these template for the fabrication of V2O5 inverse opals as cathode materials for lithium ion battery applications. First, through the manipulation of different experimental factors, several methods of affecting or directing opal growth towards realizing different structures, improving order and/or achieving f...

  12. Physical studies of porphyrin-infiltrated opal crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabataityte, J. [Semiconductor Physics Institute, Gostauto 11, LT 01108 Vilnius (Lithuania)], E-mail: julija@pfi.lt; Simkiene, I.; Babonas, G.-J.; Reza, A. [Semiconductor Physics Institute, Gostauto 11, LT 01108 Vilnius (Lithuania); Baran, M.; Szymczak, R. [Institute of Physics, PAN, PL 02668, Warsaw (Poland); Vaisnoras, R.; Rasteniene, L. [Vilnius Pedagogical University, LT 08106, Vilnius (Lithuania); Golubev, V.; Kurdyukov, D. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute RAS, 194021, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2007-09-15

    Artificial opals made of silica spheres and infiltrated with aqueous solution of iron porphyrin (FeTPPS) possessing the absorption band in a visible spectral range were studied. The structural, optical and magnetic properties of composite structures were investigated. Bulk samples of opal structure were obtained by sedimentation technique from colloidal solution of SiO{sub 2} spheres of diameter 240 and 245 nm. The structure of the samples was examined by atomic force microscopy. The properties of photonic crystals were demonstrated by optical measurements in transmission and reflection modes. The stop band was observed in the region 510-550 nm. In samples annealed at 900 deg. C the width of the stop band increased to {approx} 70 nm. Aqueous solutions of FeTPPS of concentration {approx} 1.0 mM and various pH-values were used for infiltration. The infiltration has led to a change of photonic characteristics, position of the stop band and dependence on light incidence angle. The absorption bands typical of FeTPPS were observed in the vicinity of the stop band. The photonic properties of infiltrated opal structures were determined to depend on the acidity of aqueous solution, which was used in technological procedure. Magnetic properties of FeTPPS-infiltrated opal samples, which have been studied at 5-300 K in magnetic fields up to 5 T, were discussed. From magnetic measurements it followed that magnetic Fe-Fe interactions have practically vanished in hybrid samples and Fe centers should be treated as isolated ones.

  13. Physical studies of porphyrin-infiltrated opal crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabataityte, J.; Simkiene, I.; Babonas, G.-J.; Reza, A.; Baran, M.; Szymczak, R.; Vaisnoras, R.; Rasteniene, L.; Golubev, V.; Kurdyukov, D.

    2007-01-01

    Artificial opals made of silica spheres and infiltrated with aqueous solution of iron porphyrin (FeTPPS) possessing the absorption band in a visible spectral range were studied. The structural, optical and magnetic properties of composite structures were investigated. Bulk samples of opal structure were obtained by sedimentation technique from colloidal solution of SiO 2 spheres of diameter 240 and 245 nm. The structure of the samples was examined by atomic force microscopy. The properties of photonic crystals were demonstrated by optical measurements in transmission and reflection modes. The stop band was observed in the region 510-550 nm. In samples annealed at 900 deg. C the width of the stop band increased to ∼ 70 nm. Aqueous solutions of FeTPPS of concentration ∼ 1.0 mM and various pH-values were used for infiltration. The infiltration has led to a change of photonic characteristics, position of the stop band and dependence on light incidence angle. The absorption bands typical of FeTPPS were observed in the vicinity of the stop band. The photonic properties of infiltrated opal structures were determined to depend on the acidity of aqueous solution, which was used in technological procedure. Magnetic properties of FeTPPS-infiltrated opal samples, which have been studied at 5-300 K in magnetic fields up to 5 T, were discussed. From magnetic measurements it followed that magnetic Fe-Fe interactions have practically vanished in hybrid samples and Fe centers should be treated as isolated ones

  14. Band structure and optical properties of opal photonic crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Pavarini, E.; Andreani, L. C.; Soci, C.; Galli, M.; Marabelli, F.; Comoretto, D.

    2005-01-01

    A theoretical approach for the interpretation of reflectance spectra of opal photonic crystals with fcc structure and (111) surface orientation is presented. It is based on the calculation of photonic bands and density of states corresponding to a specified angle of incidence in air. The results yield a clear distinction between diffraction in the direction of light propagation by (111) family planes (leading to the formation of a stop band) and diffraction in other directions by higher-order...

  15. Track fitting in the opal vertex detector with stereo wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shally, R; Hemingway, R J; McPherson, A C

    1987-10-01

    The geometry of the vertex chamber for the OPAL detector at LEP is reviewed and expressions for the coordinates of the hits are given in terms of the measured drift distance and z-coordinate. The tracks are fitted by a procedure based on the Lagrange multipliers method. The increase in the accuracy of the fit due to the use of the stereo wires is discussed.

  16. OPAL: Decay of Z0 to two jets

    CERN Multimedia

    1990-01-01

    This track is an example of real data collected from the OPAL detector on the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran between 1989 and 2000. Here a Z0 particle is produced in the collision between an electron and positron that then decays into a quark-antiquark pair. The quark pair is seen as a pair of hadron jets in the detector.

  17. OPAL: Decay of Z0 to three jets

    CERN Multimedia

    1990-01-01

    This track is an example of real data collected from the OPAL detector on the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran between 1989 and 2000. A Z0 particle is produced in the electron-positron collision which decays into a quark and an antiquark, one of which emits a gluon. Both quarks and gluons appear in the detector as jets of hadrons.

  18. Results from γγ collisions in OPAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patt, Jochen

    1998-01-01

    The production of charged hadrons and jets is measured in collisions of quasi-real photons. The data were taken with the OPAL detector at LEP at e + e - centre-of-mass energies √(s ee )=161 and 172 GeV. The measured cross-sections are compared to perturbative next-to-leading order QCD calculations. The separation of the direct and the resolved component of the photon is demonstrated

  19. Track fitting in the opal vertex detector with stereo wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shally, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; McPherson, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    The geometry of the vertex chamber for the OPAL detector at LEP is reviewed and expressions for the coordinates of the hits are given in terms of the measured drift distance and z-coordinate. The tracks are fitted by a procedure based on the Lagrange multipliers method. The increase in the accuracy of the fit due to the use of the stereo wires is discussed. (orig.)

  20. OPAL experiment at LEP: P. Rapp progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.Y.; Glasser, R.G.; Kellogg, R.; Sechi-Zorn, B.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G.; Steinberg, P.; Zorn, G.T.

    1984-01-01

    Excellent progress has been made on all major fronts in this complex collaboration. The magnet construction has begun. The central detector prototypes have been tested and give excellent results. All CERN Review Committee Conditions and milestones are being met in a timely fashion. Financial approval for all major parts of the detector have been obtained from the respective governments and institutions involved, although some financial problems remain when compared to the total requirements of the experiment. Commitments for the physical layout and assembly areas for the various parts of the detector have been obtained and a detailed timetable for construction and assembly have been provided. Some difficulties still remain with respect to the installation time scale. The software problems have been defined and are beginning to yield to the large and steady efforts being made on them. A third US Group, UC Riverside, lead by Prof. Ben Shen has been given conditional acceptance in the OPAL collaboration. In the following is presented (1) a hardware development progress report by Pat Rapp, (2) a detailed overview of the schedule for production and assembly of the OPAL hadron calorimeter, prepared by Gus Zorn, and (3) a status report by C.Y.Chang on Monte Carlo simulation of the BNL test beam hadron calorimeter results (reported last year) for insertion in the overall Hadron Milestone Report being prepared by the OPAL Hadron Calorimeter Group

  1. Thermal properties of carbon inverse opal photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, Ali E.; Lee, Sergey B.; Baughman, Ray H.; Zakhidov, Anvar A.

    2007-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of thin-wall glassy carbon and graphitic carbon inverse opals, fabricated by templating of silica opal has been measured in the temperature range 10-400 K using transient pulse method. The heat flow through 100 A-thick layers of graphite sheets tiled on spherical surfaces of empty overlapping spheres arrayed in face-centered-cubic lattices has been analyzed in term of anisotropy factor. Taking into account high anisotropy factor in graphite, γ=342, we found that the thermal conductivity of inverse opal prepared by chemical vapor deposition infiltration is limited by heat flow across the graphitic layers in bottleneck, κ-perpendicular =3.95 W/m K. The electronic contribution to the thermal conductivity, κ e(300K) =3.7x10 -3 W/m K is negligible comparing to the measured value, κ (300K) =0.33 W/m K. The obtained phonon mean free path, l=90 nm is comparable with the graphite segments between hexagonal array of interconnections

  2. OPALE una alternativa para el desarrollo de objetos de aprendizajes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunior Portilla-Rodríguez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un análisis de la herramienta OPALE (Open Academic Learning que permite adentrarse en sus potencialidades y ventajas para la producción de contenidos digitales educativos, específicamente de objetos de aprendizajes, tanto por equipos multidisciplinarios como por docentes de cualquier nivel educativo. Desde esta perspectiva, se aborda como OPALE da respuesta al desarrollo de objetos de aprendizaje desde sus dimensiones semántica, sintáctica y práctica como medio de enseñanza aprendizaje. Para ello, se emplearon métodos de investigación del nivel teórico y práctico a través de los cuales se condujo el proceso de obtención de los resultados que se presentan. OPALE se utiliza para la creación de contenidos digitales educativos del portal CubaEduca del Ministerio de Educación y en el desarrollo de objetos de aprendizaje en la Universidad de Ciencias Pedagógicas “José de la Luz y Caballero” de Holguín como parte de las acciones del proyecto de investigación “Desarrollo de Aplicaciones Educativas”.

  3. Influence on wine biogenic amine composition of modifications to soil N availability and grapevine N by cover crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Álvarez, Eva P; Garde-Cerdán, Teresa; Cabrita, Maria João; García-Escudero, Enrique; Peregrina, Fernando

    2017-11-01

    Vineyard soil management can modify the nitrogen soil availability and, therefore, grape amino acid content. These compounds are precursors of biogenic amines, which have negative effects on wine quality and human health. The objective was to study whether the effect of conventional tillage and two cover crops (barley and clover) on grapevine nitrogen status could be related to wine biogenic amines. Over 4 years, soil NO 3 - -N, nitrogen content in leaf and wine biogenic amine concentration were determined. Barley reduced soil NO 3 - -N availability and clover increased it. In 2011, at bloom, nitrogen content decreased with barley treatment in both blade and petiole. In 2012, nitrogen content in both leaf tissues at bloom was greater with clover than with tillage and barley treatments. Also, total biogenic amines decreased in barley with respect to tillage and clover treatments. There were correlations between some individual and total biogenic amine concentrations with respect to nitrogen content in leaf tissues. Wine biogenic amine concentration can be affected by the grapevine nitrogen status, provoked by changes in the soil NO 3 - -N availability with both cover crop treatments. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Trace elements in precious and common opals using neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McOrist, G.D.; Smallwood, A.

    1997-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) was used to determine the concentration of trace elements in 44 precious and 52 common opals sampled from a number of recognised fields within Australia. The purpose of this study was to determine if precious and common opals of the same colour and location have the same or a different trace element profile. Similar numbers of black, white and grey samples were studied in each case. In most cases, common opals had a significantly higher concentration of certain trace elements when compared with precious opals. (author)

  5. Biogenic amines in Italian Pecorino cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eSchirone

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The quality of distinctive artisanal cheeses is closely associated with the territory of production and its traditions. Pedoclimatic characteristics, genetic autochthonous variations and anthropic components create an environment so specific that it would be extremely difficult to reproduce elsewhere. Pecorino cheese is included in this sector of the market and is widely diffused in Italy (approximately 53.727t of production. Pecorino is a common name given to indicate Italian cheeses made exclusively from pure ewes' milk characterized by a high content of fat matter and it is mainly produced in the middle and south of Italy by traditional procedures from raw or thermized milk. The microbiota plays a major role in the development of the organoleptic characteristics of the cheese but it can also be responsible for the accumulation of undesirable substances, such as biogenic amines (BA. Several factors can contribute to the qualitative and quantitative profiles of BA’s in Pecorino cheese such as environmental hygienic conditions, pH, salt concentration, aw, fat content, pasteurization of milk, decarboxylase microorganisms, starter cultures, temperature and time of ripening, storage, part of the cheese (core, edge and the presence of cofactor. Generally, the total content of BA’s can range from about 100-2400 mg/kg, with a prevalence of toxicologically important BA’s, tyramine and histamine. The presence of BA in Pecorino cheeses is becoming increasingly important to consumers and cheese-maker alike, due to the potential threats of toxicity to humans and consequent trade implications.

  6. On Mineral Retrosynthesis of a Complex Biogenic Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashit Rao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Synergistic relations between organic molecules and mineral precursors regulate biogenic mineralization. Given the remarkable material properties of the egg shell as a biogenic ceramic, it serves as an important model to elucidate biomineral growth. With established roles of complex anionic biopolymers and a heterogeneous organic scaffold in egg shell mineralization, the present study explores the regulation over mineralization attained by applying synthetic polymeric counterparts (polyethylene glycol, poly(acrylic acid, poly(aspartic acid and poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid as additives during remineralization of decalcified eggshell membranes. By applying Mg2+ ions as a co-additive species, mineral retrosynthesis is achieved in a manner that modulates the polymorph and structure of mineral products. Notable features of the mineralization process include distinct local wettability of the biogenic organic scaffold by mineral precursors and mineralization-induced membrane actuation. Overall, the form, structure and polymorph of the mineralization products are synergistically affected by the additive and the content of Mg2+ ions. We also revisit the physicochemical nature of the biomineral scaffold and demonstrate the distinct spatial distribution of anionic biomolecules associated with the scaffold-mineral interface, as well as highlight the hydrogel-like properties of mammillae-associated macromolecules.

  7. Occurrence and significance of biogenic opal in Plio-Pleistocene sediments of the stream Tegua, Cordoba. Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala, R.; Karlsson, A.; Daziano, C.; Dogliani, J.; Paredes, R.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work is to understand the history of the vegetation from the analysis of phytoliths present in Plio-Pleistocene and interpret the possible climatic changes since the Quaternary sediments to the present

  8. Biogenic sedimentation beneath the California Current system for the past 30 kyr and its paleoceanographic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, J.V.; Dean, W.E.; Dartnell, P.

    1997-01-01

    A north-south transect of 17 cores was constructed along the eastern boundary of the California Current system from 33?? to 42?? N to investigate the changes in biogenic sedimentation over the past 30 kyr. Percentages and mass accumulation rates of CaCO3, Corg, and biogenic opal were assembled at 500 to 1000 years/sample to provide relatively high resolution. Time-space maps reveal a complex pattern of changes that do not follow a simple glacial-interglacial two-mode model. Biogenic sedimentation shows responses that are sometimes time-transgressive and sometimes coeval, and most of the responses show more consistency within a limited geographic area than any temporal consistency. Reconstructed conditions during late oxygen isotope stage 3 were more like early Holocene conditions than any other time during the last 30 kyr. Coastal upwelling and productivity during oxygen isotope stage 3 were relatively strong along the central California margin but were weak along the northern California margin. Precipitation increased during the last glacial interval in the central California region, and the waters of the southern California margin had relatively low productivity. Productivity on the southern Oregon margin was relatively low at the beginning of the last glacial interval, but by about 20 ka, productivity in this area significantly increased. This change suggests that the center of the divergence of the West Wind Drift shifted south at this time. The end of the last glacial interval was characterized by increased productivity in the southern California margin and increased upwelling along the central California margin but upwelling remained weak along the northern California margin. A sudden (biosphere as the northern latitudes were reforested following retreat of the glaciers. The Holocene has been a period of relatively high productivity in the southern California margin, relatively strong coastal upwelling along the central California margin, relatively weak

  9. Synthesis of Polypyrrole Inverse Opal in [bmim]PF6- Containing Acetonitrile and the Application of the Inverse Opal in Cell Prototype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Most primary cells use Zn or Li as the anode, a metallic oxide as the cathode, and an acidic or alkaline solution or moist past as the electrolytic solution. In this paper, highly ordered polypyrrole (PPy inverse opals have been successfully synthesized in the acetonitrile solution containing [bmim]PF6. PPy films were prepared under the same experimental conditions. Cyclic voltammograms of the PPy film and the PPy inverse opal in neutral phosphate buffer solution (PBS were recorded. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique was used to investigate the structural surface of the PPy films and the PPy inverse opals. It is found that the PF6- anions kept dedoping from the PPy films during the potential scanning process, resulting in the electrochemical inactivity. Although PF6- anions also kept dedoping from the PPy inverse opals, the PO43- anions from PBS could dope into the inverse opal, explaining why the PPy inverse opals kept their electrochemical activity. An environmental friendly cell prototype was constructed, using the PPy inverse opal as the anode. The electrolytes in both the cathodic and anodic half-cells were neutral PBSs. The open-circuit potential of the cell prototype reached 0.487 V and showed a stable output over several hundred hours.

  10. Geological and geochemical characteristics of the secondary biogenic gas in coalbed gases, Huainan coalfield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaojun, Zhang; Zhenglin, Cao; Mingxin, Tao; Wanchun, Wang; Jinlong, Ma

    2010-09-15

    The research results show that the compositions of coalbed gases in Huainan coalfield have high content methane, low content heavy hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide, and special dry gas. The evolution coal is at the stage of generation of thermogenic gases, but the d13C1 values within the range of biogenic gas (d13C1 values from -56.7{per_thousand} to -67.9{per_thousand}). The d13C2 value of coalbed gases in Huainan coalfield shows not only the features of the thermogenic ethane, but also the mixed features of the biogenic methane and thermogenic ethane. In geological characteristics, Huainan coalfield has favorable conditions of generation of secondary biogenic gas.

  11. Isolation and characterization of biogenic calcium carbonate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biogenic calcium carbonate/phosphate were isolated and characterized from oral bacteria (CPOB). The crystalline nature ... XRD analysis revealed the cubic phase of ... subjected to identify upto genus level according to Bergey's. Manual of ...

  12. Small angle X ray diffraction investigation of twinned opal_like structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samusev, A.K.; Sinev, I.S.; Samusev, K.B.; Rybin, M.V.; Mistonov, A.A.; Grigoryeva, N.A.; Grigoriev, S.V.; Petukhov, A.V.; Byelov, D.; Trofimova, E.Y.; Kurdyukov, D.A.; Golubev, V.G.; Limonov, M.F.

    2012-01-01

    Small angle X ray diffraction from synthetic opal films has been investigated as a function of the orientation of the sample. All the observed (hkl) diffraction reflections have been interpreted. The reconstruct tion of the reciprocal lattice of the studied opal films has been carried out. The

  13. Fluorescence lifetime of emitters with broad homogeneous linewidths modified in opal photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolaev, Ivan S.; Lodahl, Peter; Vos, Willem L.

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of spontaneous emission from dye molecules embedded in opal photonic crystals. Fluorescence lifetimes of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye were measured as a function of both optical frequency and crystal lattice parameter of the polystyrene opals. Due to the broad...

  14. Results using the OPAL strategy in Mandarin speaking cochlear implant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandali, Andrew E; Dawson, Pam W; Arora, Komal

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an experimental pitch-coding strategy for improving recognition of Mandarin lexical tone in cochlear implant (CI) recipients. Adult CI recipients were tested on recognition of Mandarin tones in quiet and speech-shaped noise at a signal-to-noise ratio of +10 dB; Mandarin sentence speech-reception threshold (SRT) in speech-shaped noise; and pitch discrimination of synthetic complex-harmonic tones in quiet. Two versions of the experimental strategy were examined: (OPAL) linear (1:1) mapping of fundamental frequency (F0) to the coded modulation rate; and (OPAL+) transposed mapping of high F0s to a lower coded rate. Outcomes were compared to results using the clinical ACE™ strategy. Five Mandarin speaking users of Nucleus® cochlear implants. A small but significant benefit in recognition of lexical tones was observed using OPAL compared to ACE in noise, but not in quiet, and not for OPAL+ compared to ACE or OPAL in quiet or noise. Sentence SRTs were significantly better using OPAL+ and comparable using OPAL to those using ACE. No differences in pitch discrimination thresholds were observed across strategies. OPAL can provide benefits to Mandarin lexical tone recognition in moderately noisy conditions and preserve perception of Mandarin sentences in challenging noise conditions.

  15. Revealing stacking sequences in inverse opals by microradian X-ray diffraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinitskii, A.; Abramova, V.; Grigorieva, N.; Grigoriev, S.; Snigirev, A.; Byelov, D.; Petukhov, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of the structural analysis of inverse opal photonic crystals by microradian X-ray diffraction. Inverse opals based on different oxide materials (TiO2, SiO2 and Fe2O3) were fabricated by templating polystyrene colloidal crystal films grown by the vertical deposition technique.

  16. Changes in the biogenic amine content of the prefrontal cortex, amygdala, dorsal hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens of rats submitted to single and repeated sessions of the elevated plus-maze test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho M.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that exposure to a variety of stressful experiences enhances fearful reactions when behavior is tested in current animal models of anxiety. Until now, no study has examined the neurochemical changes during the test and retest sessions of rats submitted to the elevated plus maze (EPM. The present study uses a new approach (HPLC by looking at the changes in dopamine and serotonin levels in the prefrontal cortex, amygdala, dorsal hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens in animals upon single or double exposure to the EPM (one-trial tolerance. The study involved two experiments: i saline or midazolam (0.5 mg/kg before the first trial, and ii saline or midazolam before the second trial. For the biochemical analysis a control group injected with saline and not tested in the EPM was included. Stressful stimuli in the EPM were able to elicit one-trial tolerance to midazolam on re-exposure (61.01%. Significant decreases in serotonin contents occurred in the prefrontal cortex (38.74%, amygdala (78.96%, dorsal hippocampus (70.33%, and nucleus accumbens (73.58% of the animals tested in the EPM (P < 0.05 in all cases in relation to controls not exposed to the EPM. A significant decrease in dopamine content was also observed in the amygdala (54.74%, P < 0.05. These changes were maintained across trials. There was no change in the turnover rates of these monoamines. We suggest that exposure to the EPM causes reduced monoaminergic neurotransmission activity in limbic structures, which appears to underlie the "one-trial tolerance" phenomenon.

  17. Development of highly-ordered, ferroelectric inverse opal films using sol gel infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, N.; Yang, S.; Sun, P.; Ruda, H. E.

    2005-07-01

    Highly-ordered, ferroelectric, Pb-doped Ba0.7Sr0.3TiO3, inverse opal films were fabricated by spin-coating a sol gel precursor into a polystyrene artificial opal template followed by heat treatment. Thin films of the ferroelectric were independently studied and were shown to exhibit good dielectric properties and high refractive indices. The excellent quality of the final inverse opal film using this spin-coating infiltration method was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy images and the good correspondence between optical reflection data and theoretical simulations. Using this method, the structural and material parameters of the final ferroelectric inverse opal film were easily adjusted by template heating and through repeated infiltrations, without changes in the initial template or precursor. Also, crack-free inverse opal thin films were fabricated over areas comparable to that of the initial crack-free polystyrene template (˜100 by 100 μm2).

  18. Measurement and modelization of silica opal reflection properties: Optical determination of the silica index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avoine, Amaury; Hong, Phan Ngoc; Frederich, Hugo; Frigerio, Jean-Marc; Coolen, Laurent; Schwob, Catherine; Nga, Pham Thu; Gallas, Bruno; Maître, Agnès

    2012-10-01

    Self-assembled artificial opals (in particular silica opals) constitute a model system to study the optical properties of three-dimensional photonic crystals. The silica optical index is a key parameter to correctly describe an opal but is difficult to measure at the submicrometer scale and usually treated as a free parameter. Here, we propose a method to extract the silica index from the opal reflection spectra and we validate it by comparison with two independent methods based on infrared measurements. We show that this index gives a correct description of the opal reflection spectra, either by a band structure or by a Bragg approximation. In particular, we are able to provide explanations in quantitative agreement with the measurements for two features : the observation of a second reflection peak in specular direction, and the quasicollapse of the p-polarized main reflection peak at a typical angle of 54∘.

  19. Effect of templates on inverse opals fabricated through annular self-assembly/sol-gel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Dengteng; Yang Lili; Fan Zeng; Zhao Jiupeng; Li Yao

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Flexible inverse opals could be facilely prepared through annular growth method. → The infiltrated materials are highly densified due to the existence of templates. → The crystalline grains are refined due to the the existence of templates. - Abstract: There is a strong interest in simple preparation of flexible inverse opals for applications. In this article, indium tin oxides (ITO) flexible inverse opals were prepared through annular growth of templates and sol-gel process. It is shown that this method provides a facile route for large scale flexible inverse opals with excellent ordered structures. ITO materials are found much denser in inverse opals, which is due to the increased capillary force during drying process and enhanced shrinkage during annealing process. It is also found that the crystalline grains are refined and the photoluminescence performance is strengthened in low frequency.

  20. Photoluminescence from ZnO-SiO2 opals with different sphere diameters and thicknesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yingling; Yan Hongwei; Fu Zhengping; Yang Beifang; Xia Linsheng; Wang Zhen; Zuo Jian; Yu Shijun; Fu Shengquan; Li Fanqing

    2007-01-01

    We systematically investigated the photoluminescence (PL) and transmittance characteristics of ZnO-SiO 2 opals with varied positions of the stop-band and film thicknesses. An improved ultraviolet (UV) luminescence was observed from ZnO-SiO 2 composites over pure ZnO nanocrystals under 325 nm He-Cd laser excitation at room temperature. The UV PL of ZnO nanocrystals in SiO 2 opals with stop-bands center of 410 nm is sensitive to the thickness of opal films, and the UV PL intensity increases with the film thickness increasing. The PL spectra of ZnO nanocrystals in SiO 2 opals with stop-bands center of 570 nm show a suppression of the weak visible band. The experimental results are discussed based on the scattering and/or absorbance in opal crystals

  1. A thermally tunable inverse opal photonic crystal for monitoring glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liguo; Xie, Zhuoying; Xu, Hua; Xu, Ming; Han, Guozhi; Wang, Cheng; Bai, Xuduo; Gu, ZhongZe

    2012-03-01

    An optical method was developed to monitor the glass transition of the polymer by taking advantage of reflection spectrum change of the thermally tunable inverse opal photonic crystal. The thermally tunable photonic bands of the polymer inverse opal photonic crystal were traceable to the segmental motion of macromolecules, and the segmental motion was temperature dependent. By observing the reflection spectrum change of the polystyrene inverse opal photonic crystal during thermal treatment, the glass transition temperature of polystyrene was gotten. Both changes of the position and intensity of the reflection peak were observed during the glass transition process of the polystyrene inverse opal photonic crystal. The optical change of inverse opal photonic crystal was so large that the glass transition temperature could even be estimated by naked eyes. The glass transition temperature derived from this method was consistent with the values measured by differential scanning calorimeter.

  2. Sulfur cathodes with hydrogen reduced titanium dioxide inverse opal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zheng; Zheng, Guangyuan; Li, Weiyang; Seh, Zhi Wei; Yao, Hongbin; Yan, Kai; Kong, Desheng; Cui, Yi

    2014-05-27

    Sulfur is a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries with a high specific capacity of 1675 mAh/g. The rapid capacity fading, however, presents a significant challenge for the practical application of sulfur cathodes. Two major approaches that have been developed to improve the sulfur cathode performance include (a) fabricating nanostructured conductive matrix to physically encapsulate sulfur and (b) engineering chemical modification to enhance binding with polysulfides and, thus, to reduce their dissolution. Here, we report a three-dimensional (3D) electrode structure to achieve both sulfur physical encapsulation and polysulfides binding simultaneously. The electrode is based on hydrogen reduced TiO2 with an inverse opal structure that is highly conductive and robust toward electrochemical cycling. The relatively enclosed 3D structure provides an ideal architecture for sulfur and polysulfides confinement. The openings at the top surface allow sulfur infusion into the inverse opal structure. In addition, chemical tuning of the TiO2 composition through hydrogen reduction was shown to enhance the specific capacity and cyclability of the cathode. With such TiO2 encapsulated sulfur structure, the sulfur cathode could deliver a high specific capacity of ∼1100 mAh/g in the beginning, with a reversible capacity of ∼890 mAh/g after 200 cycles of charge/discharge at a C/5 rate. The Coulombic efficiency was also maintained at around 99.5% during cycling. The results showed that inverse opal structure of hydrogen reduced TiO2 represents an effective strategy in improving lithium sulfur batteries performance.

  3. In-depth study of the pseudogap in artificial opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galisteo-Lopez, Juan F.; Lopez, Cefe

    2004-09-01

    In this work we present optical and structural characterisation of high-quality opal based photonic crystals consisting of polystyrene spheres ordered into a FCC lattice. By means of optical diffraction we orient our samples so that the evolution of its spectral features in reflectivity experiments may be probed along desired directions in reciprocal space. Prior to a comparison with calculated bands, finite size effects in the optical properties of the samples are taken into account. Further, attention is paid to the appearance of spectral features for energies above those where the characteristic Bragg peak is found.

  4. Filtering of elastic waves by opal-based hypersonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salasyuk, Alexey S; Scherbakov, Alexey V; Yakovlev, Dmitri R; Akimov, Andrey V; Kaplyanskii, Alexander A; Kaplan, Saveliy F; Grudinkin, Sergey A; Nashchekin, Alexey V; Pevtsov, Alexander B; Golubev, Valery G; Berstermann, Thorsten; Brüggemann, Christian; Bombeck, Michael; Bayer, Manfred

    2010-04-14

    We report experiments in which high quality silica opal films are used as three-dimensional hypersonic crystals in the 10 GHz range. Controlled sintering of these structures leads to well-defined elastic bonding between the submicrometer-sized silica spheres, due to which a band structure for elastic waves is formed. The sonic crystal properties are studied by injection of a broadband elastic wave packet with a femtosecond laser. Depending on the elastic bonding strength, the band structure separates long-living surface acoustic waves with frequencies in the complete band gap from bulk waves with band frequencies that propagate into the crystal leading to a fast decay.

  5. Spin alignment in heavy and light flavour systems at OPAL

    CERN Document Server

    Robins, Simon

    1999-01-01

    Spin alignment of inclusive vector mesons and longitudinal polarization of Lambda hyperons have been measured in a sample of 4.3 million hadronic Z/sup 0/ decays from the OPAL detector at LEP. Leading, light vector mesons have been $9 found to populate preferentially the helicity-zero state, a result which has no firm theoretical explanation. The values of off-diagonal elements of the helicity density matrix are in agreement with a theory based on the Standard $9 Model with coherent fragmentation. The longitudinal polarization of the Lambda is well described by a model in which the constituent strange quark carries all of the hyperon spin.

  6. Disruption of the Opal Stop Codon Attenuates Chikungunya Virus-Induced Arthritis and Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jennifer E; Long, Kristin M; Whitmore, Alan C; Sanders, Wes; Thurlow, Lance R; Brown, Julia A; Morrison, Clayton R; Vincent, Heather; Peck, Kayla M; Browning, Christian; Moorman, Nathaniel; Lim, Jean K; Heise, Mark T

    2017-11-14

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus responsible for several significant outbreaks of debilitating acute and chronic arthritis and arthralgia over the past decade. These include a recent outbreak in the Caribbean islands and the Americas that caused more than 1 million cases of viral arthralgia. Despite the major impact of CHIKV on global health, viral determinants that promote CHIKV-induced disease are incompletely understood. Most CHIKV strains contain a conserved opal stop codon at the end of the viral nsP3 gene. However, CHIKV strains that encode an arginine codon in place of the opal stop codon have been described, and deep-sequencing analysis of a CHIKV isolate from the Caribbean identified both arginine and opal variants within this strain. Therefore, we hypothesized that the introduction of the arginine mutation in place of the opal termination codon may influence CHIKV virulence. We tested this by introducing the arginine mutation into a well-characterized infectious clone of a CHIKV strain from Sri Lanka and designated this virus Opal524R. This mutation did not impair viral replication kinetics in vitro or in vivo Despite this, the Opal524R virus induced significantly less swelling, inflammation, and damage within the feet and ankles of infected mice. Further, we observed delayed induction of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as reduced CD4 + T cell and NK cell recruitment compared to those in the parental strain. Therefore, the opal termination codon plays an important role in CHIKV pathogenesis, independently of effects on viral replication. IMPORTANCE Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes significant outbreaks of viral arthralgia. Studies with CHIKV and other alphaviruses demonstrated that the opal termination codon within nsP3 is highly conserved. However, some strains of CHIKV and other alphaviruses contain mutations in the opal termination codon. These mutations alter the virulence

  7. First results from the Hubble OPAL Program: Jupiter in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Amy A.; Wong, Michael H.; Orton, Glenn S.

    2015-11-01

    The Hubble 2020: Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program is a Director's Discretionary program designed to generate two yearly global maps for each of the outer planets to enable long term studies of atmospheric color, structure and two-dimensional wind fields. This presentation focuses on Jupiter results from the first year of the campaign. Data were acqured January 19, 2015 with the WFC3/UVIS camera and the F275W, F343N, F395N, F467M, F502N, F547M, F631N, F658N, and F889N filters. Global maps were generated and are publicly available through the High Level Science Products archive: https://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/opal/Using cross-correlation on the global maps, the zonal wind profile was measured between +/- 50 degrees latitude and is in family with Voyager and Cassini era profiles. There are some variations in mid to high latitude wind jet magnitudes, particularly at +40°and -35° planetographic latitude. The Great Red Spot continues to maintain an intense orange coloration, as it did in 2014. However, the interior shows changed structure, including a reduced core and new filamentary features. Finally, a wave not previously seen in Hubble images was also observed and is interpreted as a baroclinic instability with associated cyclone formation near 16° N latitude. A similar feature was observed faintly in Voyager 2 images, and is consistent with the Hubble feature in location and scale.

  8. General structure and functions of the OPAL optimization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikolas, P.; Sustek, J.; Svarny, J.

    2005-01-01

    Presented version of OPAL - the in core fuel management system is under development also for core loading optimization of NPP Temelin (WWER-1000 type reactor). Description of the algorithm of separate modules was presented in several AER papers. The optimization process of NPP Temelin loading patterns comprises problems like preparation input data for NPP SW, loading searching, fixing and splitting of fuel enrichments, BP-assignment, FA rotation and fuel cycle economics. In application for NPP Temelin has been used NPP Temelin code system (spectral code with macrocode). The objective of fuel management is to design a fuel-loading scheme that is capable of producing the required energy at the minimum cost while satisfying the safety constraints. Usually the objectives are: a) To meet the energy production requirements (loaded fuel should have sufficient reactivity that covers reactivity defects associated with startup as well as reactivity loss due to the fuel depletion); b) To satisfy all safety-related limits (loaded fuel should preserve adequate power peaking limits (given namely LOCA), shutdown margins and no positive Moderator Temperature Coefficient (MTC); c) To minimize the power generation cost ($/kWh(e)). Flow of optimization process OPAL management system is in detail described and application for NPP Temelin cores optimization presented (Authors)

  9. The OPAL Detector (an~Omni~Purpose~Apparatus~for~Lep)

    CERN Multimedia

    Schaile, D A; Watson, N; Craciun, M; Hanson, G; Mcmahon, T J; Stokes, W; Wilson, G W; Carter, J; Plane, D; Scharff-hansen, P; Sahr, O M; Rembser, C; Saeki, T; Nisius, R; Campana, S; Kormos, L L; Marchant, T E; Takeda, H; Kupper, M; Hill, J C; Hajdu, C; Hauschild, M; Charlton, D; Kellogg, R; Kluth, S; Asai, S; Nellen, B; Bright-thomas, P; Polok, J; Guenther, P O; Keeler, R; Schwick, C; Stephens, K; Zankel, K; Watkins, P; Chang, C Y; Roney, M; Fischer, H; Dubbert, J

    2002-01-01

    The OPAL Detector (an Omni Purpose Apparatus for Lep) \\\\ \\\\OPAL, a general purpose detector, was designed to study a wide range of unexplored physics at LEP. \\\\ \\\\At LEP1, one of the central issues is the precise determination of the mass, width and couplings to quarks and leptons of the Z$^{0}$ boson. At LEP2 the mass and couplings of the W$^\\pm$ bosons are determined. Accurate measurements of these quantities might reveal the mechanisms by which symmetries are broken. Many topics relating to heavy flavours are studied, including the properties of tau leptons, and the spectroscopy, lifetimes and mixing of hadrons containing b-quarks. \\\\ \\\\There are very active QCD and Two-Photon groups. Among the topics being studied are the determination of the strong coupling constant, $ \\alpha _{S} $, tests of the group structure of QCD, differences between quark- and gluon-induced jets, many aspects of the fragmentation process measurements of many different final states in photon-photon collision, and measurement of str...

  10. Effect of gamma irradiation on the activity of some microorganisms producing biogenic amines in some foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AL-Bassiony, K.R.A

    2009-01-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on the proximate chemical composition ( moisture content , protein , fat, ash) chemical freshness tests (TBA, TVB-N, TMA, FAN, ph) and microbiological changes (total bacterial count, proteolytic bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, moulds and yeasts counts) occurred in sardine fish and pastirma during cold storage at (4 ± 1 degree C) were fully investigated. Furthermore, the bacterial activity causing the formation of biogenic amines were also studied. In addition, the determination of biogenic amines in sardine fish and pastirma produced by these bacteria were explored. The effects of irradiation doses (1, 3 and 5 kGy) which were applied as a trial to reduce biogenic amines formation in sardine fish and pastirma were also investigated. In addition, the effect of the tested irradiation doses (1, 3 and 5 kGy) on organoleptic properties of the treated sardine fish and pastirma were determined.

  11. The ABAG biogenic emissions inventory project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson-Henry, C. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The ability to identify the role of biogenic hydrocarbon emissions in contributing to overall ozone production in the Bay Area, and to identify the significance of that role, were investigated in a joint project of the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) and NASA/Ames Research Center. Ozone, which is produced when nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons combine in the presence of sunlight, is a primary factor in air quality planning. In investigating the role of biogenic emissions, this project employed a pre-existing land cover classification to define areal extent of land cover types. Emission factors were then derived for those cover types. The land cover data and emission factors were integrated into an existing geographic information system, where they were combined to form a Biogenic Hydrocarbon Emissions Inventory. The emissions inventory information was then integrated into an existing photochemical dispersion model.

  12. High-quality substrate for fluorescence enhancement using agarose-coated silica opal film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming; Li, Juan; Sun, Liguo; Zhao, Yuanjin; Xie, Zhuoying; Lv, Linli; Zhao, Xiangwei; Xiao, Pengfeng; Hu, Jing; Lv, Mei; Gu, Zhongze

    2010-08-01

    To improve the sensitivity of fluorescence detection in biochip, a new kind of substrates was developed by agarose coating on silica opal film. In this study, silica opal film was fabricated on glass substrate using the vertical deposition technique. It can provide stronger fluorescence signals and thus improve the detection sensitivity. After coating with agarose, the hybrid film could provide a 3D support for immobilizing sample. Comparing with agarose-coated glass substrate, the agarose-coated opal substrates could selectively enhance particular fluorescence signals with high sensitivity when the stop band of the silica opal film in the agarose-coated opal substrate overlapped the fluorescence emission wavelength. A DNA hybridization experiment demonstrated that fluorescence intensity of special type of agarose-coated opal substrates was about four times that of agarose-coated glass substrate. These results indicate that the optimized agarose-coated opal substrate can be used for improving the sensitivity of fluorescence detection with high quality and selectivity.

  13. Inverse opal carbons for counter electrode of dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Da-Young; Lee, Youngshin; Cho, Chang-Yeol; Moon, Jun Hyuk

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the fabrication of inverse opal carbon counter electrodes using a colloidal templating method for DSSCs. Specifically, bare inverse opal carbon, mesopore-incoporated inverse opal carbon, and graphitized inverse opal carbon were synthesized and stably dispersed in ethanol solution for spray coating on a FTO substrate. The thickness of the electrode was controlled by the number of coatings, and the average relative thickness was evaluated by measuring the transmittance spectrum. The effect of the counter electrode thickness on the photovoltaic performance of the DSSCs was investigated and analyzed by interfacial charge transfer resistance (R(CT)) under EIS measurement. The effect of the surface area and conductivity of the inverse opal was also investigated by considering the increase in surface area due to the mesopore in the inverse opal carbon and conductivity by graphitization of the carbon matrix. The results showed that the FF and thereby the efficiency of DSSCs were increased as the electrode thickness increased. Consequently, the larger FF and thereby the greater efficiency of the DSSCs were achieved for mIOC and gIOC compared to IOC, which was attributed to the lower R(CT). Finally, compared to a conventional Pt counter electrode, the inverse opal-based carbon showed a comparable efficiency upon application to DSSCs.

  14. Inverse opal photonic crystals with photonic band gaps in the visible and near-infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Brandon C.; Gilleland, Cody L.; Renfro, Tim; Gutierrez, Jose; Parikh, Kunjal; Glosser, R.; Landon, Preston B.

    2005-08-01

    Colloidal silica spheres with 200nm, 250nm, and 290nm diameters were self-assembled with single crystal crystallites 4-5mm wide and 10-15mm long. Larger spheres with diameters between 1000-2300nm were self-assembled with single crystal crystallites up to 1.5mm wide and 2mm long. The silica opals self-assembled vertically along the [100] direction of the face centered cubic lattice resulting in self-templated opals. Inverse opal photonic crystals with a partial band gap possessing a maximum in the near infrared at 3.8μm were constructed from opal templates composed of 2300nm diameter spheres with chalcogenide Ge33As12Se55 (AMTIR-1), a transparent glass in the near infrared with high refractive index. Inverse gold and gold/ polypropylene composite photonic crystals were fabricated from synthetic opal templates composed of 200-290nm silica spheres. The reflectance spectra and electrical conductance of the resulting structures is presented. Gold was infiltrated into opal templates as gold chloride and heat converted to metallic gold. Opals partially infiltrated with gold were co-infiltrated with polypropylene plastic for mechanical support prior to removal of the silica template with hydrofluoric acid.

  15. Potential Benefits of Manmade Opals Demonstrated for First Time (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-06-01

    NREL experiments show that disordered inverse opals significantly scatter and trap near-infrared light, with possible impact on optoelectronic materials. Inverse opals, familiar in the form of brilliantly colored opal gemstones, are a class of materials that has astounding optical properties. Scientists have been exploring the ability of inverse opals to manipulate light in the hopes of harnessing this capacity for advanced technologies such as displays, detectors, lasers, and photovoltaics. A research group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) discovered that man-made inverse opal films containing significant morphological disorder exhibit substantial light scattering, consequently trapping wavelengths in the near-infrared (NIR), which is important to a number of technologies. This discovery is the first experimental evidence to validate a 2005 theoretical model predicting the confinement of light in such structures, and it holds great promise for improving the performance of technologies that rely on careful light control. This breakthrough also makes possible optoelectronic technologies that use a range of low-cost molecular and semiconductor species that otherwise absorb light too weakly to be useful. The disordered inverse opal architecture validates the theoretical model that predicts the diffusion and confinement of light in such structures. Electrochemically deposited CdSe inverse opal films containing significant morphological disorder exhibit substantial light scattering and consequent NIR light trapping. This discovery holds promise for NIR light management in optoelectronic technologies, particularly those involving weakly absorbing molecular and semiconductor photomaterials.

  16. Comparison of the Reactor Core Characteristics of the AHR and the OPAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Chul Gyo; Lee, Byung Chul; Park, C.; Chae, Hee Taek

    2008-09-15

    The AHR (Advanced HANARO research Reactor) was designed using the experiences from the design, operation and utilization of HANARO. Its neutronic performance was compared to that of the OPAL with a 20 MW power which started its operation recently in Australia. As the OPAL does not have any in-core irradiation hole, a modified core model of the AHR, in which an in-core irradiation hole was changed into a fuel channel, was used for the comparison. For a clean, unperturbed core condition with all fresh fuels in the core and no irradiation holes in the reflector region, the maximum thermal neutron flux (E{sub n}<0.625 eV) in the AHR reaches 4.41x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2} s and that in the OPAL reaches 3.96x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}s in the reflector region. The maximum flux in the AHR is 10.3% higher than that in the OPAL. The thermal flux region above 4.0x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}s is widely distributed in the reflector of the AHR, but is not observed at all in the reflector of the OPAL. The uranium loading of the AHR core is 45.7 kgU, which is 16.3% higher than the 39.3 kgU of OPAL. For a clean core state, the excess reactivity of the AHR is higher than that of the OPAL. The assembly-average discharge burnup in the OPAL is estimated to be 49.1%U-235 whereas that in the AHR is 62.4%U-235. The difference for the discharge burnup is significant. For the conditions with the same cycle length of 30 days, the number of fuel assemblies consumed in the AHR is only 3/4 that of the OPAL.

  17. Comparison of the Reactor Core Characteristics of the AHR and the OPAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Chul Gyo; Lee, Byung Chul; Park, C.; Chae, Hee Taek

    2008-09-01

    The AHR (Advanced HANARO research Reactor) was designed using the experiences from the design, operation and utilization of HANARO. Its neutronic performance was compared to that of the OPAL with a 20 MW power which started its operation recently in Australia. As the OPAL does not have any in-core irradiation hole, a modified core model of the AHR, in which an in-core irradiation hole was changed into a fuel channel, was used for the comparison. For a clean, unperturbed core condition with all fresh fuels in the core and no irradiation holes in the reflector region, the maximum thermal neutron flux (E n 14 n/cm 2 s and that in the OPAL reaches 3.96x10 14 n/cm 2 s in the reflector region. The maximum flux in the AHR is 10.3% higher than that in the OPAL. The thermal flux region above 4.0x10 14 n/cm 2 s is widely distributed in the reflector of the AHR, but is not observed at all in the reflector of the OPAL. The uranium loading of the AHR core is 45.7 kgU, which is 16.3% higher than the 39.3 kgU of OPAL. For a clean core state, the excess reactivity of the AHR is higher than that of the OPAL. The assembly-average discharge burnup in the OPAL is estimated to be 49.1%U-235 whereas that in the AHR is 62.4%U-235. The difference for the discharge burnup is significant. For the conditions with the same cycle length of 30 days, the number of fuel assemblies consumed in the AHR is only 3/4 that of the OPAL

  18. Synthesis of hydroxyapatite from biogenic wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teerawat Laonapakul

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite (HAp is a major component of human bone, teeth and hard tissue. It is one of only a few bioactive materials. Since HAp is the most widely used ceramic biomaterial, various techniques have been developed to synthesize HAp. In recent years, the use of natural biogenic structures and materials for medical proposes has been motivated by limitations in producing synthetic materials. This article mainly focuses on the use of biogenic wastes to prepare HAp. These include bio-wastes, marine corals, eggshells, seashells and bio-membranes. In the present review, useful information about HAp preparation methodologies has been summarized for further research and development.

  19. Biogenic amines and radiosensitivity of solitary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharenko, E.N.

    1978-01-01

    Different stability of cells to ionizing radiation is considered from a position of the ''elevated biochemical radioresistance background'' concept. Experimental evidence presented indicates an important role of endogenic amines (serotonin and histamine) possessing radioprotector properties in the cell radioresistance formation. The concept about their effect as being solely a result of circulatory hypoxia is critically discussed. The experimental results favor the existence of a ''cellular'' component, along with the ''hypoxic'' one, in the mechanism of action of biogenic amines. These compounds can affect the initial stages of peroxide oxidation of lipids, thereby favoring a less intensive oxidation induced by radiation. Biogenic amines can also exert influence on the cyclic nucleotide system

  20. Laser generation in opal-like single-crystal and heterostructure photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchyanov, A. S.; Plekhanov, A. I.

    2016-11-01

    This study describes the laser generation of a 6Zh rhodamine in artificial opals representing single-crystal and heterostructure films. The spectral and angular properties of emission and the threshold characteristics of generation are investigated. In the case where the 6Zh rhodamine was in a bulk opal, the so-called random laser generation was observed. In contrast to this, the laser generation caused by a distributed feedback inside the structure of the photonic bandgap was observed in photonic-crystal opal films.

  1. Facile route to magnetophotonic crystals by infiltration of 3D inverse opals with magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caicedo, J.M.; Taboada, E.; Hrabovsky, D.; Lopez-Garcia, M.; Herranz, G.; Roig, A.; Blanco, A.; Lopez, C.; Fontcuberta, J.

    2010-01-01

    We report here on the fabrication and characterization of magnetophotonic crystals obtained by infiltrating magnetic nanoparticles (maghemite) into silica-based inverse opals. Good quality opals, with adjustable photonic and magnetic characteristics have been obtained by this method. Magnetic and magneto-optic measurements, performed by using SQUID magnetometry and Kerr and Faraday effects, have been used to monitor the magnetic filling of the opals. It is observed that the Kerr rotation is not proportional to the overall magnetization of the magnetophotonic crystal. Possible scenarios for this unexpected result are discussed.

  2. A fast track trigger processor for the OPAL detector at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, A.A.; Jaroslawski, S.; Wagner, A.

    1986-01-01

    A fast hardware track trigger processor being built for the OPAL experiment is described. The processor will analyse data from the central drift chambers of OPAL to determine whether any tracks come from the interaction region, and thereby eliminate background events. The processor will find tracks over a large angular range, vertical strokecos thetavertical stroke < or approx. 0.95. The design of the processor is described, together with a brief account of its hardware implementation for OPAL. The results of feasibility studies are also presented. (orig.)

  3. Minerals from Macedonia. XII. The dependence of quartz and opal color on trace element composition - AAS, FT IR and micro-Raman spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makreski, Petre; Jovanovski, Gligor; Stafilov, Trajce; Boev, Blazho

    2004-01-01

    The dependence of the color of quartz and opal natural minerals, collected from different localities in the Republic of Macedonia (Alinci, Belutche, Budinarci, Mariovo, Sasa, Sazhdevo, Chanishte, Cheshinovo, Zletovo) on their element composition is studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT IR), micro-Raman spectroscopy and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). In order to determine the content of different trace elements (Al, Cd, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb and Zn), 15 quartz and 2 opal mineral samples, using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and Zeeman electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) are studied. To avoid matrix interferences, the method for elimination of silicium is proposed. Optimal instrumental parameters for ETAAS determination (temperature and time for drying, pyrolysis and atomizing) are established by extensive testing for each investigated element. It is found that the milky white color of quartz minerals is due to the presence of traces of Ca, the appearance of black color is the result of the existence of Pb, Mn and Al impurities, and the occurrence of Fe and Cr introduce appearance of red and green color, respectively. Preliminary identification of the minerals is based on the comparison of our results, obtained by using the infrared and Raman vibrational spectroscopy, with the corresponding literature data for the analogous mineral species originating all over the world. An overview of the basic morphological and physico-chemical characteristics of the quartz and opal minerals and the geology of the localities is given. The colored pictures of the studied quartz and opal minerals are presented as well. (Author)

  4. Heavy and Excited Leptons in the OPAL Detector?

    CERN Document Server

    Elfgren, Erik

    2002-01-01

    This M.Sc. thesis describes a search for exotic leptons. The search has been performed using data from the OPAL detector at the Large Electron Positron collider at CERN. The total integrated luminosity was 663 pb$^{-1}$ with center of mass energies in the range of 183-209 GeV. The work has been concentrated on the study of production of heavy leptons via the charged current channel and disintegration of the $W$ into two quarks. In particular, single production of heavy leptons in the mass region 100-170 GeV has been extensively studied. No evidence for any new particles has been found. The results translate into upper limits on the mixing between the heavy and the ordinary lepton for different heavy lepton masses. The limits on the mixing angles are generally improved in comparison with the nominal value $\\zeta^2\\sim 0.005$.

  5. Analysis of artificial opals by scanning near field optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, J.; Lozano, G.; Lamela, J.; Lifante, G.; Dorado, L. A.; Depine, R. A.; Jaque, F.; Míguez, H.

    2011-04-01

    Herein we present a detailed analysis of the optical response of artificial opal films realized employing a near-field scanning optical microscope in collection and transmission modes. Near-field patterns measured at the rear surface when a plane wave impinges on the front face are presented with the finding that optical intensity maps present a clear correlation with the periodic arrangement of the outer surface. Calculations based on the vector Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method reproduce the different profiles experimentally observed as well as the response to the polarization of the incident field. These observations constitute the first experimental confirmation of the collective lattice resonances that give rise to the optical response of these three dimensional periodic structures in the high-energy range.

  6. Magneto Transport of CVD Carbon in Artificial Opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yin, Ming; Arammash, Fauzi; Datta, Timir

    2014-03-01

    Magneto-transport of carbon inverse opal structures were investigated in the 2.5 to 300 K temperatures and magnetic fields in the 0-10T regime. Qualitatively, our observations lie between those reported by previous researchers. Over this temperature range, transport (in zero magnetic field) is non-metallic; the resistance decreased with rising temperature however the temperature dependent behavior is not activated, as observed with variable range hopping. In three-dimensions, such behavior can also be the result of weak localization and electron-electron interactions; in particular the change in conductivity is a polynomial in fractional powers of absolute temperature. At sub-helium temperature regimes the relative magneto resistance is measured to be ~ 0.1 percent per Tesla. Results of data analysis for several different scenarios will be reported. DOD award #60177-RT-H from the ARO.

  7. Microwave properties of Ni-based ferromagnetic inverse opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostylev, M.; Stashkevich, A. A.; Roussigné, Y.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Menzel, D.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Eliseev, A. A.; Lukashin, A. V.; Grigoriev, S. V.; Samarin, S. N.

    2012-11-01

    Investigations of microwave properties of Ni-based inverse ferromagnetic opal-like film with the [111] axis of the fcc structure along the normal direction to the film have been carried out in the 2-18 GHz frequency band. We observed multiple spin wave resonances for the magnetic field applied perpendicular to the film, i.e., along the [111] axis of this artificial crystal. For the field applied in the film plane, a broad band of microwave absorption is observed, which does not contain a fine structure. The field ranges of the responses observed are quite different for these two magnetization directions. This suggests a collective magnetic ground state or shape anisotropy and collective microwave dynamics for this foam-like material. This result is in agreement with SQUID measurements of hysteresis loops for the material. Two different models for this collective behavior are suggested that satisfactorily explain the major experimental results.

  8. Hardware Testing for the Optical PAyload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagle, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    Hardware for several subsystems of the proposed Optical PAyload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS), including the gimbal and avionics, was tested. Microswitches installed on the gimbal were evaluated to verify that their point of actuation would remain within the acceptable range even if the switches themselves move slightly during launch. An inspection of the power board was conducted to ensure that all power and ground signals were isolated, that polarized components were correctly oriented, and that all components were intact and securely soldered. Initial testing on the power board revealed several minor problems, but once they were fixed the power board was shown to function correctly. All tests and inspections were documented for future use in verifying launch requirements.

  9. Analysis of trace elements in opal using PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinrichs, Ruth, E-mail: ruth.hinrichs@ufrgs.br [Instituto de Geociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-graduação em Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Bertol, A.P.L. [Programa de Pós-graduação em Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vasconcellos, M.A.Z. [Programa de Pós-graduação em Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis is particularly important for the analysis of trace elements of precious samples, being one of the few methods to determine elements with ppm concentration that does not affect sample integrity. A PIXE methodology for trace element analysis in opal was developed. To avoid detector count saturation due to the high number of Si-Kα X-rays generated in the sample, several filters were employed to optimize the reduction of the Si-Kα signal, while maintaining acceptable intensities of the other relevant X-ray lines. Two proton beam energies were tested, to establish the signal to noise ratio in different X-ray energies. Spectra were fitted with the software GUPIX, using a matrix composition determined with electron beam excited energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Above the energy of the silicon X-ray, several trace elements were quantified.

  10. Biogenic carbon in combustible waste: waste composition, variability and measurement uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Anna W; Fuglsang, Karsten; Pedersen, Niels H; Fellner, Johann; Rechberger, Helmut; Astrup, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Obtaining accurate data for the contents of biogenic and fossil carbon in thermally-treated waste is essential for determination of the environmental profile of waste technologies. Relations between the variability of waste chemistry and the biogenic and fossil carbon emissions are not well described in the literature. This study addressed the variability of biogenic and fossil carbon in combustible waste received at a municipal solid waste incinerator. Two approaches were compared: (1) radiocarbon dating ((14)C analysis) of carbon dioxide sampled from the flue gas, and (2) mass and energy balance calculations using the balance method. The ability of the two approaches to accurately describe short-term day-to-day variations in carbon emissions, and to which extent these short-term variations could be explained by controlled changes in waste input composition, was evaluated. Finally, the measurement uncertainties related to the two approaches were determined. Two flue gas sampling campaigns at a full-scale waste incinerator were included: one during normal operation and one with controlled waste input. Estimation of carbon contents in the main waste types received was included. Both the (14)C method and the balance method represented promising methods able to provide good quality data for the ratio between biogenic and fossil carbon in waste. The relative uncertainty in the individual experiments was 7-10% (95% confidence interval) for the (14)C method and slightly lower for the balance method.

  11. Commissioning of the Opal reactor cold neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiering, R.; Lu, W.; Ullah, R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: At OPAL, Australia's first cold neutron facility will form an essential part of the reactor's research programs. Fast neutrons, born in the core of a reactor, interact with a cryogenic material, in this case liquid deuterium, to give them very low energies ( 1 0 m eV). A cold neutron flux of 1.4 1 0 E 1 4 n /cm 2/ s is expected, with a peak in the energy spectrum at 4.2m eV. The cold neutron source reached cryogenic conditions for the first time in late 2005. The cold neutron source operates with a sub-cooled liquid Deuterium moderator at 24 K. The moderator chamber, which contains the deuterium, has been constructed from AlMg 5. The thermosiphon and moderator chamber are cooled by helium gas, in a natural convection thermosiphon loop. The helium refrigeration system utilises the Brayton cycle, and is fully insulated within a high vacuum environment. Despite the proximity of the cold neutron source to the reactor core, it has been considered as effectively separate to the reactor system, due to the design of its special vacuum containment vessel. As OPAL is a multipurpose research reactor, used for beam research as well as radiopharmaceutical production and industrial irradiations, the cold neutron source has been designed with a stand-by mode, to maximise production. The stand-by mode is a warm operating mode using only gaseous deuterium at ambient temperatures (∼ 3 00 K ), allowing for continued reactor operations whilst parts of the cold source are unavailable or in maintenance. This is the first time such a stand-by feature has been incorporated into a cold source facility

  12. Effects of storage temperature on biogenic amine concentrations in meat of uneviscerated pheasants (Phasianus colchicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeňka Hutařová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the hygienic quality of the pheasants reared for high-quality meat production by the biogenic amine concentrations in their meat. The content of biogenic amines was measured in the meat of sixty male pheasants killed by pithing and stored uneviscerated for 21 days under different storage temperatures (0 °C, 7 °C and 15 °C. The samples of breast and thigh muscles of pheasant were tested at weekly intervals. Biogenic amines were analysed by reverse phase liquid chromatography and detected by tandem mass spectrometry. Concentrations of biogenic amines (except spermin and spermidin in thigh muscle were higher than in breast muscle. Highly significant difference (P < 0.01 was found in tyramine (5.80 mg/kg and 1.38 mg/kg for thigh and breast muscle, respectively, cadaverine (40.80 mg/kg and 14.43 mg/kg for thigh and breast muscle, respectively, putrescine (13.42 mg/kg and 3.16 mg/kg for thigh and breast muscle, respectively and histamine (5.51 mg/kg and 1.70 mg/kg for thigh and breast muscle, respectively concentrations after 21 days of storage at 15 °C. This study provides information on the dynamics of biogenic amine formation in pheasant meat during 21 days of storage at different temperatures. Based on our results, we can recommend storing pithed uneviscerated pheasants at 0–7°C for up to 21 days, or at 15 °C for up to 7 days. Concentrations of biogenic amines gained in our study can be helpful in evaluating freshness and hygienic quality of the pheasant game meat.

  13. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Fabrication and structure of an opal-gallium nitride nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, V. Yu; Dunin-Borkovski, R. E.; Golubev, V. G.; Hutchison, J. L.; Kartenko, N. F.; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Pevtsov, A. B.; Sharenkova, N. V.; Sloan, J.; Sorokin, L. M.

    2001-02-01

    A three-dimensional gallium nitride lattice has been synthesized within the void sublattice of an artificial opal. The composite structure has been characterized using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

  14. Modulating light propagation in ZnO-Cu₂O-inverse opal solar cells for enhanced photocurrents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yantara, Natalia; Pham, Thi Thu Trang; Boix, Pablo P; Mathews, Nripan

    2015-09-07

    The advantages of employing an interconnected periodic ZnO morphology, i.e. an inverse opal structure, in electrodeposited ZnO/Cu2O devices are presented. The solar cells are fabricated using low cost solution based methods such as spin coating and electrodeposition. The impact of inverse opal geometry, mainly the diameter and thickness, is scrutinized. By employing 3 layers of an inverse opal structure with a 300 nm pore diameter, higher short circuit photocurrents (∼84% improvement) are observed; however the open circuit voltages decrease with increasing interfacial area. Optical simulation using a finite difference time domain method shows that the inverse opal structure modulates light propagation within the devices such that more photons are absorbed close to the ZnO/Cu2O junction. This increases the collection probability resulting in improved short circuit currents.

  15. The effects of lithium hydroxide solution on alkali silica reaction gels created with opal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, Lyndon D.; Beaudoin, James J.; Grattan-Bellew, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    The reaction of Nevada opal with calcium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide and lithium hydroxide solutions was investigated. In addition, opal was exposed to a combined solution of these three hydroxides. The progress of the three reactions was followed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), 29 Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD results indicated the presence of a low-angle peak exclusive to the lithium-based reactions. The NMR results suggested a change in the silicate structure in the presence of lithium. These techniques indicated that the reaction of the alkali with the opal starting material is inhibited and perhaps stopped in the presence of lithium hydroxide. SEM revealed that the morphology of the reaction products on the surface of the reacted opal grains is markedly different invariably. It was concluded that evidence to support the theory of a protective layer exists and that the nature of the layer varies with ion type

  16. Ordered macroporous platinum electrode and enhanced mass transfer in fuel cells using inverse opal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ok-Hee; Cho, Yong-Hun; Kang, Soon Hyung; Park, Hee-Young; Kim, Minhyoung; Lim, Ju Wan; Chung, Dong Young; Lee, Myeong Jae; Choe, Heeman; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional, ordered macroporous materials such as inverse opal structures are attractive materials for various applications in electrochemical devices because of the benefits derived from their periodic structures: relatively large surface areas, large voidage, low tortuosity and interconnected macropores. However, a direct application of an inverse opal structure in membrane electrode assemblies has been considered impractical because of the limitations in fabrication routes including an unsuitable substrate. Here we report the demonstration of a single cell that maintains an inverse opal structure entirely within a membrane electrode assembly. Compared with the conventional catalyst slurry, an ink-based assembly, this modified assembly has a robust and integrated configuration of catalyst layers; therefore, the loss of catalyst particles can be minimized. Furthermore, the inverse-opal-structure electrode maintains an effective porosity, an enhanced performance, as well as an improved mass transfer and more effective water management, owing to its morphological advantages.

  17. EPR spectra of synthetic, and natural Australian opals - A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, D.R.; Troup, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The EPR spectra of some synthetic opals, and of some Australian natural opals of various provenance, have been obtained, with the use of a Varian E-12 EPR spectrometer operating at ∼9.2 Ghz. The synthetic opals, from Swiss Gilson showed here a broad ESR signal in the g =2 region, with little identifiable structure . The natural Australian opals from Coober Pedy, Lightning Ridge, and Mintabie all showed the clear presence of Fe 3+ , Mn 2+ and a free radical like signal, suspected to be localised on an Al atom. Examples of the various spectra will be presented. It is not yet certain how the spectra correlate with provenance, but the synthetic spectra are quite different from the natural ones

  18. Luminescence of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots infiltrated into an opal matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruzintsev, A. N.; Emelchenko, G. A.; Masalov, V. M.; Yakimov, E. E.; Barthou, C.; Maitre, A.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the photonic band gap in the photonic crystal, the synthesized SiO 2 opal with embedded CdSe/ZnS quantum dots, on its luminescence in the visible spectral region is studied. It is shown that the position of the photonic band gap in the luminescence and reflectance spectra for the infiltrated opal depends on the diameter of the constituent nanospheres and on the angle of recording the signal. The optimal conditions for embedding the CdSe/ZnS quantum dots from the solution into the opal matrix are determined. It is found that, for the opal-CdSe/ZnS nanocomposites, the emission intensity decreases and the luminescence decay time increases in the spatial directions, in which the spectral positions of the photonic band gap and the luminescence peak of the quantum dots coincide.

  19. Organic Light Emitting Diodes with Opal Photonic Crystal Layer and Carbon Nanotube Anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovalle Robles, Raquel; Del Rocio Nava, Maria; Williams, Christopher; Zhang, Mei; Fang, Shaoli; Lee, Sergey; Baughman, Ray; Zakhidov, Anvar

    2007-03-01

    We report electroluminescence intensity and spectral changes in light emission from organic light emitting diode (OLEDs) structures, which have thin transparent films of opal photonic crystal (PC). The anode in such PC-OLED is laminated on opal layer from free standing optically transparent multiwall carbon nanotubes (T-CNT) sheets made by dry spinning from CVD grown forests. Silica and polystyrene opal films were grown on glass substrates by vertical sedimentation in colloids in thermal baths and the particle size of opal spheres ranges from 300 nm to 450 nm. The use of T-CNTs, (coated by PEDOT-PSS to avoid shorting) as hole injector, allows to eliminate the use of vacuum deposition of metals and permits to achieve tunneling hole injection regime from CNT tips into Alq^3 emission layer

  20. Intolerance to dietary biogenic amines: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Sophia C; van Dusseldorp, Marijke; Bottema, Kathelijne C; Dubois, Anthony E J

    2003-09-01

    To evaluate the scientific evidence for purported intolerance to dietary biogenic amines. MEDLINE was searched for articles in the English language published between January 1966 and August 2001. The keyword biogenic amin* was combined with hypersens*, allerg*, intoler*, and adverse. Additionally, the keywords histamine, tyramine, and phenylethylamine were combined with headache, migraine, urticaria, oral challenge, and oral provocation. Articles were also selected from references in relevant literature. Only oral challenge studies in susceptible patients were considered. Studies with positive results (ie, studies in which an effect was reported) were only eligible when a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design was used. Eligible positive result studies were further evaluated according to a number of scientific criteria. Studies with negative results (ie, studies in which no effect was reported) were examined for factors in their design or methods that could be responsible for a false-negative outcome. Results of methodologically weak or flawed studies were considered inconclusive. A total of 13 oral challenge studies (5 with positive results and 8 with negative results) were found. Three of them (all with positive results) were considered ineligible. By further evaluation of the 10 eligible studies, 6 were considered inconclusive. The 4 conclusive studies all reported negative results. One conclusive study showed no relation between biogenic amines in red wine and wine intolerance. Two conclusive studies found no effect of tyramine on migraine. One conclusive study demonstrated no relation between the amount of phenylethylamine in chocolate and headache attacks in individuals with headache. The current scientific literature shows no relation between the oral ingestion of biogenic amines and food intolerance reactions. There is therefore no scientific basis for dietary recommendations concerning biogenic amines in such patients.

  1. Relationships between palaeogeography and opal occurrence in Australia: A data-mining approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgrebe, T. C. W.; Merdith, A.; Dutkiewicz, A.; Müller, R. D.

    2013-07-01

    Age-coded multi-layered geological datasets are becoming increasingly prevalent with the surge in open-access geodata, yet there are few methodologies for extracting geological information and knowledge from these data. We present a novel methodology, based on the open-source GPlates software in which age-coded digital palaeogeographic maps are used to “data-mine” spatio-temporal patterns related to the occurrence of Australian opal. Our aim is to test the concept that only a particular sequence of depositional/erosional environments may lead to conditions suitable for the formation of gem quality sedimentary opal. Time-varying geographic environment properties are extracted from a digital palaeogeographic dataset of the eastern Australian Great Artesian Basin (GAB) at 1036 opal localities. We obtain a total of 52 independent ordinal sequences sampling 19 time slices from the Early Cretaceous to the present-day. We find that 95% of the known opal deposits are tied to only 27 sequences all comprising fluvial and shallow marine depositional sequences followed by a prolonged phase of erosion. We then map the total area of the GAB that matches these 27 opal-specific sequences, resulting in an opal-prospective region of only about 10% of the total area of the basin. The key patterns underlying this association involve only a small number of key environmental transitions. We demonstrate that these key associations are generally absent at arbitrary locations in the basin. This new methodology allows for the simplification of a complex time-varying geological dataset into a single map view, enabling straightforward application for opal exploration and for future co-assessment with other datasets/geological criteria. This approach may help unravel the poorly understood opal formation process using an empirical spatio-temporal data-mining methodology and readily available datasets to aid hypothesis testing.

  2. Manipulation of inverted and direct opals by a focused ion beam scanning electron microscope (FIB SEM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magni, S; Milani, M; Tatti, F; Savoia, C

    2008-01-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) milling techniques are presented aiming at the manipulation of both tin dioxide (SnO 2 ) inverted opals and polystyrene (PS) direct opals. Different SnO 2 opals are considered in order to estimate the regularity of their bulk after the production. A SnO 2 mesoporous monolith is FIB micromachined to make it suitable for optical applications. PS direct opals are structured by FIB milling at different scales. Ordered arrays of PS opals are modified by selectively removing a single sphere. In performing this task, we discuss the effects on the FIB milling due to the gas-assisted enhanced etching and to the binding of the nearest neighbours. Techniques to achieve imaging of PS opals in absence of a conductive coating are also brought up. Furthermore, isolated PS spheres are drilled with or without enhanced etching in order to produce controlled defects on them. The FIB-assisted manipulations we show may find potential applications in the field of photonic crystals, (bio)sensors and lithography assisted by colloidal masks.

  3. Egg Component-Composited Inverse Opal Particles for Synergistic Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuxiao; Shao, Changmin; Bian, Feika; Yu, Yunru; Wang, Huan; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2018-05-23

    Microparticles have a demonstrated value in drug delivery systems. The attempts to develop this technology focus on the generation of functional microparticles by using innovative but accessible materials. Here, we present egg component-composited microparticles with a hybrid inverse opal structure for synergistic drug delivery. The egg component inverse opal particles were produced by using egg yolk to negatively replicate colloid crystal bead templates. Because of their huge specific surface areas, abundant nanopores, and complex nanochannels of the inverse opal structure, the resultant egg yolk particles could be loaded with different kinds of drugs, such as hydrophobic camptothecin (CPT), by simply immersing them into the corresponding drug solutions. Attractively, additional drugs, such as the hydrophilic doxorubicin (DOX), could also be encapsulated into the particles through the secondary filling of the drug-doped egg white hydrogel into the egg yolk inverse opal scaffolds, which realized the synergistic drug delivery for the particles. It was demonstrated that the egg-derived inverse opal particles were with large quantity and lasting releasing for the CPT and DOX codelivery, and thus could significantly reduce cell viability, and enhance therapeutic efficacy in treating cancer cells. These features of the egg component-composited inverse opal microparticles indicated that they are ideal microcarriers for drug delivery.

  4. Capabilities of laser ablation mass spectrometry in the differentiation of natural and artificial opal gemstones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erel, Eric; Aubriet, Frédéric; Finqueneisel, Gisèle; Muller, Jean-François

    2003-12-01

    The potentialities of laser ablation coupled to ion cyclotron resonance Fourier transform mass spectrometry are evaluated to distinguish natural and artificial opals. The detection of specific species in both ion detection modes leads us to obtain relevant criteria of differentiation. In positive ions, species including hafnium and large amounts of zirconium atoms are found to be specific for artificial opal. In contrast, aluminum, titanium, iron, and rubidium are systematically detected in the study of natural opals. Moreover, some ions allow us to distinguish between natural opal from Australia and from Mexico. Australian gemstone includes specifically strontium, cesium, and barium. Moreover, it is also found that the yield of (H2O)0-1(SiO2)nX- (X- = O-, OH-, KO-, NaO-, SiO2-, AlO1-2-, FeO2-, ZrO2-, and ZrO3-) and (Al2O3)(SiO2)nAlO2- ions depends on the composition of the sample when opals are laser ablated. Ions, which include zirconium oxide species, are characteristics of artificial gem. In contrast, natural opals lead us, after laser ablation, to the production of ions including H2O, Al2O3 motifs and AlO-, KO-, NaO-, and FeO2- species.

  5. Changes in opal flux and the rain ratio during the last 50,000 years in the equatorial Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richaud, Mathieu; Loubere, Paul; Pichat, Sylvain; Francois, Roger

    2007-03-01

    Changes in the orgC/CaCO 3 ratio in particles sinking from the surface to the deep ocean have the potential to alter the atmospheric pCO 2 over the span of a glacial/interglacial cycle. Recent paleoceanographic and modern observational studies suggest that silica is a key factor in the global carbon biogeochemical cycle that can influence the flux ratio, especially at low latitudes, through "silicic acid leakage" [Brzezinski, M., Pride, C., Franck, M., Sigman, D., Sarmiento, J., Matsumoto, K., Gruber, N., Rau, R., Coale, K., 2002. A switch from Si(OH) 4 to NO3- depletion in the glacial Southern Ocean. Geophysical Research Letters 29, 5]. To test this hypothesis, we reconstruct biogenic fluxes of CaCO 3, orgC and Si for three equatorial Pacific cores. We find evidence that a floral shift from a SiO 2-based community to a CaCO 3-based occurred, starting in mid-marine isotope stage (MIS) 3 (24-59 cal. ka) and declining toward MIS 2 (19-24 cal. ka). This could reflect the connection of the Peru upwelling system to the subantarctic region, and we postulate that excess silica was transported from the subantarctic via the deep Equatorial Undercurrent to the eastern equatorial Pacific. In the eastern equatorial Pacific only, we document a significant decrease in rain ratio starting mid-MIS 3 toward MIS 2. This decrease is concomitant with a significant decrease in silica accumulation rates at the seabed. This pattern is not observed in the Pacific influenced by equatorial divergence and shallow upwelling, where all reconstructed fluxes (CaCO 3, orgC, and opal) increase during MIS 2. We conclude that the overall calcium carbonate pump weakened in the EEP under Peru upwelling influence.

  6. Formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, D.A.; Lawson, M.; Davis, C.L.; Ferreira, A.A.; Santos Neto, E. V.; Ellis, G.S.; Lewan, M.D.; Martini, Anna M.; Tang, Y.; Schoell, M.; Sessions, A.L.; Eiler, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and energy resource generated dominantly by methanogens at low temperatures and through the breakdown of organic molecules at high temperatures. However, methane-formation temperatures in nature are often poorly constrained. We measured formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane using a “clumped isotope” technique. Thermogenic gases yield formation temperatures between 157° and 221°C, within the nominal gas window, and biogenic gases yield formation temperatures consistent with their comparatively lower-temperature formational environments (<50°C). In systems where gases have migrated and other proxies for gas-generation temperature yield ambiguous results, methane clumped-isotope temperatures distinguish among and allow for independent tests of possible gas-formation models.

  7. Structural investigation of biogenic ferrihydrite nanoparticles dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasoiu, M.; Ishchenko, L.A.; Stolyar, S.V.; Iskhakov, R.S.; Rajkher, Yu.L.; Kuklin, A.I.; Solov'ev, D.V.; Arzumanyan, G.M.; Kurkin, T.S.; Aranghel, D.

    2010-01-01

    Structural properties of biogenic ferrihydrite nanoparticles produced by bacteria Klebsiella oxytoca are investigated. Investigations of morphology and size of particles dispersed in water by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering measurements were performed. By model calculations followed by fitting procedure the structural parameters of a cylinder of radius R = (4.87 ± 0.02) nm and height L = (2.12 ± 0.04) nm are obtained

  8. Inhibitory Effects of Spices on Biogenic Amine Accumulation during Fish Sauce Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xuxia; Qiu, Mengting; Zhao, Dandan; Lu, Fei; Ding, Yuting

    2016-04-01

    The presence of high levels of biogenic amines is detrimental to the quality and safety of fish sauce. This study investigated the effects of ethanol extracts of spices, including garlic, ginger, cinnamon, and star anise extracts, in reducing the accumulation of biogenic amines during fish sauce fermentation. The concentrations of biogenic amines, which include histamine, putrescine, tyramine, and spermidine, all increased during fish sauce fermentation. When compared with the samples without spices, the garlic and star anise extracts significantly reduced these increases. The greatest inhibitory effect was observed for the garlic ethanolic extracts. When compared with controls, the histamine, putrescine, tyramine, and spermidine contents and the overall biogenic amine levels of the garlic extract-treated samples were reduced by 30.49%, 17.65%, 26.03%, 37.20%, and 27.17%, respectively. The garlic, cinnamon, and star anise extracts showed significant inhibitory effects on aerobic bacteria counts. Furthermore, the garlic and star anise extracts showed antimicrobial activity against amine producers. These findings may be helpful for enhancing the safety of fish sauce. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF BIOGENIC, INTERMEDIATE AND PHYSICOGENIC SOIL AGGREGATES OF AREAS IN THE BRAZILIAN ATLANTIC FOREST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JÚLIO CÉSAR FEITOSA FERNANDES

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggregate formation and stability are related to soil quality, contributing significantly to the carbon storage and nutrient maintenance capacities of the soil. Soil aggregates are formed by two different process: physicogenic, related to moistening and drying cycles and input of organic matter; and biogenic, related to the action of macrofauna organisms and roots. The objective this work was to classify aggregates according to their formation process, quantify and compare organic carbon contents in humic substances and assess the stability of aggregates formed by different processes, in areas with different coverage in the Mid Paraiba Valley, Pinheiral, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Aggregated soil samples were collected at a depth of 0-10 cm, in a Cambisol (Cambissolo Háplico Tb Distrófico under four plant covers: secondary forest in advanced (SFAS, medium (SFMS and initial (SFIS successional stages and managed mixed pasture (MMP. Aggregates were classified and identified into three morphological classes (physicogenic, biogenic and intermediate. The variables evaluated were mean weight diameter (MWD and geometric mean diameter (GMD of aggregates, chemical fractions of organic matter, total organic carbon (TOC and humic substances: humin (C-HUM humic acid (C-FAH and fulvic acid (C-FAF. Biogenic aggregates were found in smaller quantities and showed higher TOC, C-HUM and C-FAH, compared to intermediate and physicogenic aggregates. Thus, biogenic aggregates have potential to be used as soil quality indicators for structured environments, which are able to maintain its intrinsic formation processes.

  10. Framework for Assessing Biogenic CO2 Emissions from ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This revision of the 2011 report, Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources, evaluates biogenic CO2 emissions from stationary sources, including a detailed study of the scientific and technical issues associated with assessing biogenic carbon dioxide emissions from stationary sources. EPA developed the revised report, Framework for Assessing Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources, to present a methodological framework for assessing the extent to which the production, processing, and use of biogenic material at stationary sources for energy production results in a net atmospheric contribution of biogenic CO2 emissions. Biogenic carbon dioxide emissions are defined as CO2 emissions related to the natural carbon cycle, as well as those resulting from the production, harvest, combustion, digestion, decomposition, and processing of biologically-based materials. The EPA is continuing to refine its technical assessment of biogenic CO2 emissions through another round of targeted peer review of the revised study with the EPA Science Advisory Board (SAB). This study was submitted to the SAB's Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel in February 2015. http://yosemite.epa.gov/sab/sabproduct.nsf/0/3235dac747c16fe985257da90053f252!OpenDocument&TableRow=2.2#2 The revised report will inform efforts by policymakers, academics, and other stakeholders to evaluate the technical aspects related to assessments of biogenic feedstocks used for energy at s

  11. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of biogenic silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, R; Feitosa, L O; Ballottin, D; Tasic, L; Durán, N; Marcato, P D

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic silver nanoparticles with 40.3 ± 3.5 nm size and negative surface charge (− 40 mV) were prepared with Fusarium oxysporum. The cytotoxicity of 3T3 cell and human lymphocyte were studied by a TaliTM image-based cytometer and the genotoxicity through Allium cepa and comet assay. The results of BioAg-w (washed) and BioAg-nw (unwashed) biogenic silver nanoparticles showed cytotoxicity exceeding 50 μg/mL with no significant differences of response in 5 and 10 μg/mL regarding viability. Results of genotoxicity at concentrations 5.0 and 10.0 ug/mL show some response, but at concentrations 0.5 and 1.0 μg/mL the washed and unwashed silver nanoparticles did not present any effect. This in an important result since in tests with different bacteria species and strains, including resistant, MIC (minimal inhibitory concentration) had good answers at concentrations less than 1.9 μg/mL. This work concludes that biogenic silver nanoparticles may be a promising option for antimicrobial use in the range where no cyto or genotoxic effect were observed. Furthermore, human cells were found to have a greater resistance to the toxic effects of silver nanoparticles in comparison with other cells.

  12. TL and OSL dosimetric properties of Opal gemstone for gamma radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonio, Patrícia L.; Gronchi, Claudia C.; Oliveira, Raquel A.P.; Khoury, Helen J.; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the response of the natural material Opal was studied in relation to its thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), after exposure to the gamma radiation of a "6"0Co source. The structure of the powdered Opal was verified using the X-ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy techniques. The material, in its stone form, was turned into powder and mixed to Teflon (also in powder) in three different concentrations, and then pellets were manufactured. The aim of this work was to evaluate the response of these pellets in high-doses of gamma radiation beams, and to observe their possible application as dosimeters, using the TL and OSL techniques. The dosimetric properties of the samples were analyzed by means of different tests, as: TL emission curves and OSL signal decay curves, reproducibility of TL and OSL response, minimum detectable dose, TL and OSL dose–response curves (5 Gy–10 kGy), and fading. The results obtained in this work, for the TL and OSL phenomena, demonstrated that the pellets of Opal + Teflon present an adequate performance e possibility of use as dosimeters in beams of high-dose gamma radiation. - Highlights: • The XRD, SEM and EDX techniques were used to investigate powdered Opal. • Pellets of three different concentrations of Opal and Teflon were studied. • The dosimetric properties of the Opal + Teflon pellets were verified. • TL and OSL techniques were used to analyze the characteristics of the pellets. • Pellets of concentration of 2:1 (Opal:Teflon) presented the most adequate results.

  13. Optical chracterization and lasing in three-dimensional opal-structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki eNishijima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The lasing properties of dye-permeated opal pyramidal structures are compared with the lasing properties of opal films. The opal-structures studied were made by sedimentation of micro-spheres and by sol-gel inversion of the direct-opals. Forced-sedimentation by centrifugation inside wet-etched pyramidal pits on silicon surfaces was used to improve the structural quality of the direct-opal structures. Single crystalline pyramids with the base length of ∼ 100 µm were formed by centrifuged sedimentation. The lasing of dyes in the well-ordered crystalline and poly-crystalline structures showed a distinct multi-modal spectrum. Gain via a distributed feedback was responsible for the lasing since the photonic band gap was negligible in a low refractive index contrast medium; the indices of silica and ethylene glycol are 1.46 and 1.42, respectively. A disordered lasing spectrum was observed from opal films with structural defects and multi-domain regions. The three dimensional structural quality of the structures was assessed by in situ optical diffraction and confocal fluorescence. A correlation between the lasing spectrum and the three-dimensional structural quality was established. Lasing threshold of a sulforhodamine dye in a silica opal was controlled via Förster mechanism by addition of a donor rhodamine 6G dye. The lasing spectrum had a well-ordered modal structure which was spectrally stable at different excitation powers. The sharp lasing threshold characterized by a spontaneous emission coupling ratio β ' 10−2 was obtained.

  14. OPAL reactor calculations using the Monte Carlo code serpent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraro, Diego; Villarino, Eduardo [Nuclear Engineering Dept., INVAP S.E., Rio Negro (Argentina)

    2012-03-15

    In the present work the Monte Carlo cell code developed by VTT Serpent v1.1.14 is used to model the MTR fuel assemblies (FA) and control rods (CR) from OPAL (Open Pool Australian Light-water) reactor in order to obtain few-group constants with burnup dependence to be used in the already developed reactor core models. These core calculations are performed using CITVAP 3-D diffusion code, which is well-known reactor code based on CITATION. Subsequently the results are compared with those obtained by the deterministic calculation line used by INVAP, which uses the Collision Probability Condor cell-code to obtain few-group constants. Finally the results are compared with the experimental data obtained from the reactor information for several operation cycles. As a result several evaluations are performed, including a code to code cell comparison at cell and core level and calculation-experiment comparison at core level in order to evaluate the Serpent code actual capabilities. (author)

  15. Selectively Patterning Polymer Opal Films via Microimprint Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Tao; Zhao, Qibin; Smoukov, Stoyan K; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2014-11-01

    Large-scale structural color flexible coatings have been hard to create, and patterning color on them is key to many applications, including large-area strain sensors, wall-size displays, security devices, and smart fabrics. To achieve controlled tuning, a micro-imprinting technique is applied here to pattern both the surface morphology and the structural color of the polymer opal films (POFs). These POFs are made of 3D ordered arrays of hard spherical particles embedded inside soft shells. The soft outer shells cause the POFs to deform upon imprinting with a pre-patterned stamp, driving a flow of the soft polymer and a rearrangement of the hard spheres within the films. As a result, a patterned surface morphology is generated within the POFs and the structural colors are selectively modified within different regions. These changes are dependent on the pressure, temperature, and duration of imprinting, as well as the feature sizes in the stamps. Moreover, the pattern geometry and structural colors can then be further tuned by stretching. Micropattern color generation upon imprinting depends on control of colloidal transport in a polymer matrix under shear flow and brings many potential properties including stretchability and tunability, as well as being of fundamental interest.

  16. Open Air Laboratories (OPAL): A community-driven research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, L., E-mail: l.davies@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Bell, J.N.B.; Bone, J.; Head, M.; Hill, L. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Howard, C. [Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Hobbs, S.J. [Environment Department, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Jones, D.T. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Power, S.A. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rose, N. [Department of Geography, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Ryder, C.; Seed, L. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Stevens, G. [Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Toumi, R.; Voulvoulis, N. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); White, P.C.L. [Environment Department, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-15

    OPAL is an English national programme that takes scientists into the community to investigate environmental issues. Biological monitoring plays a pivotal role covering topics of: i) soil and earthworms; ii) air, lichens and tar spot on sycamore; iii) water and aquatic invertebrates; iv) biodiversity and hedgerows; v) climate, clouds and thermal comfort. Each survey has been developed by an inter-disciplinary team and tested by voluntary, statutory and community sectors. Data are submitted via the web and instantly mapped. Preliminary results are presented, together with a discussion on data quality and uncertainty. Communities also investigate local pollution issues, ranging from nitrogen deposition on heathlands to traffic emissions on roadside vegetation. Over 200,000 people have participated so far, including over 1000 schools and 1000 voluntary groups. Benefits include a substantial, growing database on biodiversity and habitat condition, much from previously unsampled sites particularly in urban areas, and a more engaged public. - Highlights: > Environmental research conducted jointly by the public and scientists. > Over 200,000 people involved, 8000 sites surveyed, uncertainty minimised. > New insights into urban pollution. > A more engaged and informed society. - Research is enriched where the public and scientists work together.

  17. Open Air Laboratories (OPAL): A community-driven research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, L.; Bell, J.N.B.; Bone, J.; Head, M.; Hill, L.; Howard, C.; Hobbs, S.J.; Jones, D.T.; Power, S.A.; Rose, N.; Ryder, C.; Seed, L.; Stevens, G.; Toumi, R.; Voulvoulis, N.; White, P.C.L.

    2011-01-01

    OPAL is an English national programme that takes scientists into the community to investigate environmental issues. Biological monitoring plays a pivotal role covering topics of: i) soil and earthworms; ii) air, lichens and tar spot on sycamore; iii) water and aquatic invertebrates; iv) biodiversity and hedgerows; v) climate, clouds and thermal comfort. Each survey has been developed by an inter-disciplinary team and tested by voluntary, statutory and community sectors. Data are submitted via the web and instantly mapped. Preliminary results are presented, together with a discussion on data quality and uncertainty. Communities also investigate local pollution issues, ranging from nitrogen deposition on heathlands to traffic emissions on roadside vegetation. Over 200,000 people have participated so far, including over 1000 schools and 1000 voluntary groups. Benefits include a substantial, growing database on biodiversity and habitat condition, much from previously unsampled sites particularly in urban areas, and a more engaged public. - Highlights: → Environmental research conducted jointly by the public and scientists. → Over 200,000 people involved, 8000 sites surveyed, uncertainty minimised. → New insights into urban pollution. → A more engaged and informed society. - Research is enriched where the public and scientists work together.

  18. Rapid Software Development for Experiment Control at OPAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hathaway, P.V.; Lam, Tony; Franceschini, Ferdi; Hauser, Nick; Rayner, Hugh

    2005-01-01

    Full text: ANSTO is undertaking the parallel development of instrument control and graphical experiment interface software for seven neutron beam instruments at OPAL. Each instrument poses several challenges for a common system solution, including custom detector interfaces, a range of motion and beamline optics schema, and a spectrum of online data reduction requirements. To provide a superior system with the least development effort, the computing team have adopted proven, configurable, server-based control software (SICS)1., a highly Integrated Scientific Experimental Environment (GumTree)2. and industry-standard database management systems. The resulting graphical interfaces allow operation in a familiar experiment domain, with monitoring of data and parameters independent of control system specifics. GumTree presents the experimenter with a consistent interface for experiment management, instrument control and data reduction tasks. The facility instrument scientists can easily reconfigure instruments and add ancillaries. The user community can expect a reduced learning curve for performing each experiment. GumTree can be installed anywhere for pre-experiment familiarisation, postprocessing of acquired data sets, and integration with third party analysis tools. Instrument scientists are seeing faster software development iterations and have a solid basis to prepare for the next suite of instruments. 1. SICS from PSI (lns00.psi.ch). 2. GumTree (gumtree.sourceforge.net), new site: http://gumtree.sourceforge.net/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

  19. Functional Polymer Opals and Porous Materials by Shear-Induced Assembly of Tailor-Made Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallei, Markus

    2018-02-01

    Photonic band-gap materials attract enormous attention as potential candidates for a steadily increasing variety of applications. Based on the preparation of easily scalable monodisperse colloids, such optically attractive photonic materials can be prepared by an inexpensive and convenient bottom-up process. Artificial polymer opals can be prepared by shear-induced assembly of core/shell particles, yielding reversibly stretch-tunable materials with intriguing structural colors. This feature article highlights recent developments of core/shell particle design and shear-induced opal formation with focus on the combination of hard and soft materials as well as crosslinking strategies. Structure formation of opal materials relies on both the tailored core/shell architecture and the parameters for polymer processing. The emphasis of this feature article is on elucidating the particle design and incorporation of addressable moieties, i.e., stimuli-responsive polymers as well as elaborated crosslinking strategies for the preparation of smart (inverse) opal films, inorganic/organic opals, and ceramic precursors by shear-induced ordering. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Thermally Driven Photonic Actuator Based on Silica Opal Photonic Crystal with Liquid Crystal Elastomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Huihui; Li, Jun; Shi, Yang; Guo, Jinbao; Wei, Jie

    2016-04-13

    We have developed a novel thermoresponsive photonic actuator based on three-dimensional SiO2 opal photonic crystals (PCs) together with liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs). In the process of fabrication of such a photonic actuator, the LCE precursor is infiltrated into the SiO2 opal PC followed by UV light-induced photopolymerization, thereby forming the SiO2 opal PC/LCE composite film with a bilayer structure. We find that this bilayer composite film simultaneously exhibits actuation behavior as well as the photonic band gap (PBG) response to external temperature variation. When the SiO2 opal PC/LCE composite film is heated, it exhibits a considerable bending deformation, and its PBG shifts to a shorter wavelength at the same time. In addition, this actuation is quite fast, reversible, and highly repeatable. The thermoresponsive behavior of the SiO2 opal PC/LCE composite films mainly derives from the thermal-driven change of nematic order of the LCE layer which leads to the asymmetric shrinkage/expansion of the bilayer structure. These results will be of interest in designing optical actuator systems for environment-temperature detection.

  1. Practitioner insights on obesity prevention: the voice of South Australian OPAL workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge based on science has been central to implementing community-based childhood obesity prevention interventions. The art of practitioner wisdom is equally critical to ensure locally relevant responses. In South Australia (SA), the OPAL (Obesity Prevention and Lifestyle) program has been implemented to reduce childhood obesity across 20 communities reaching nearly one quarter of the state's population. Staff from across the State come together at regular intervals to share practice challenges and insights and refine the model of practice. Over a 3-year period 12 reflective practice workshops were held with OPAL staff (n = 46). OPAL staff were guided by an external facilitator using inquiring questions to reflect on their health promotion practice within local government. Three themes were identified as central within the reflections. The first theme is shared clarity through the OPAL obesity prevention model highlighting the importance of working to a clearly articulated, holistic obesity prevention model. The second theme is practitioner skill and sensitivity required to implement the model and deal with the 'politics' of obesity prevention. The final theme is the power of relationships as intrinsic to effective community based health promotion. Insights into the daily practices and reflections from obesity prevention practitioners are shared to shed light on the skills required to contribute to individual and social change. OPAL staff co-authored this paper. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. XENOBIOTICS AND BIOGENIC ELEMENTS IN RAW COW'S MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Greń

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false SK X-NONE X-NONE This paper presents the concentration some toxic and biogenic elements in milk from Nitra region. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate 30 samples of raw milk with fat contents 3.8% obtained from milk machine in the Nitra region. Samples were analyzed for metal contents using atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS. In comparison with maximum acceptable concentration for milk in the food codex of the Slovak republic, the level of contamination with cadmium was exceeded and reached the value 0.221 µg.ml-1. The copper content ranged from 1.201 µg.ml-1 to 5.810 µg.ml-1 and the average concentration reached 3.793 µg.ml-1.  Iron had an average of 1.824 µg.ml-1. Overall in all milk samples high correlations were found. Between positive correlation (0.7019 and negative correlation between of nickel and potassium concentration in raw milk (-0.72 was found. doi:10.5219/246

  3. New Technique Of Determination Of Biogenic Fraction In Liquid Fuels By The 14C Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajcar Bronic, I.; Baresic, J.; Horvatincic, N.; Kristof, R.; Kozar Logar, J.

    2015-01-01

    According to the EU Directive 2009/28/EC all (liquid) fuels have to contain at least 10 percent of bio-fuel, i.e., blend of biogenic origin, by 2020. 14C method is the most reliable method of determination of the biogenic fraction in fuels and various measurement techniques can be applied. A technique of direct measurement of the 14C content in liquid fuel is simple and fast but has main disadvantage: different liquid colours cause different quenching and changes in the measurement efficiency. Here we have described a new technique that uses liquids of different colours to construct modern and background calibration curves, MCC and BCC, respectively, by measuring count rates and SQP values of various modern and fossil liquids. Several types of fossil fuel, pure benzine and benzene (used as 14C-free background for 14C dating) were used for BCC, and various brands of domestic oil (vegetable, sunflower, olive, pumpkin), bioethanol and benzene prepared from modern samples were used MCC construction. The procedure for the unknown sample consists of: 1) measurement of the count rate and the SQP value, 2) calculation of background and modern count rates corresponding to the measured SQP value based on the BCC and MCC curves, respectively, and 3) the ratio of net count rates of the unknown sample and the modern net count rate at the same SQP represents the fraction of the biogenic component in the liquid. All samples should be measured under the same conditions. In our case these are: UltimaGold F scintillator, the ratio sample:scintillator (10 mL:10 mL), low-potassium glass vials of 20 mL volume, spectra recorded by LSC Quantulus and evaluated in the window 124 - 570. Lowest detectable biogenic fraction is 0.5 %. The technique depends neither on the fossil matrix or the biogenic additive types. The results are in good agreement with those obtained by different evaluation technique. (author).

  4. Infiltrating a thin or single-layer opal with an atomic vapour: Sub-Doppler signals and crystal optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moufarej, Elias; Maurin, Isabelle; Zabkov, Ilya; Laliotis, Athanasios; Ballin, Philippe; Klimov, Vasily; Bloch, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Artificial thin glass opals can be infiltrated with a resonant alkali-metal vapour, providing novel types of hybrid systems. The reflection at the interface between the substrate and the opal yields a resonant signal, which exhibits sub-Doppler structures in linear spectroscopy for a range of oblique incidences. This result is suspected to originate in an effect of the three-dimensional confinement of the vapour in the opal interstices. It is here extended to a situation where the opal is limited to a few- or even a single-layer opal film, which is a kind of bidimensional grating. We have developed a flexible one-dimensional layered optical model, well suited for a Langmuir-Blodgett opal. Once extended to the case of a resonant infiltration, the model reproduces quick variations of the lineshape with incidence angle or polarization. Alternately, for an opal limited to a single layer of identical spheres, a three-dimensional numerical calculation was developed. It predicts crystalline anisotropy, which is demonstrated through diffraction on an empty opal made of a single layer of polystyrene spheres.

  5. Biogenic VOC Emissions from Tropical Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, A.; Greenberg, J.; Harley, P.; Otter, L.; Vanni Gatti, L.; Baker, B.

    2003-04-01

    Biogenic VOC have an important role in determining the chemical composition of atmosphere. As a result, these compounds are important for visibility, biogeochemical cycling, climate and radiative forcing, and the health of the biosphere. Tropical landscapes are estimated to release about 80% of total global biogenic VOC emissions but have been investigated to lesser extent than temperate regions. Tropical VOC emissions are particularly important due to the strong vertical transport and the rapid landuse change that is occurring there. This presentation will provide an overview of field measurements of biogenic VOC emissions from tropical landscapes in Amazonia (Large-scale Biosphere-atmosphere experiment in Amazonia, LBA) Central (EXPRESSO) and Southern (SAFARI 2000) Africa, Asia and Central America. Flux measurement methods include leaf-scale (enclosure measurements), canopy-scale (above canopy tower measurements), landscape-scale (tethered balloon), and regional-scale (aircraft measurements) observations. Typical midday isoprene emission rates for different landscapes vary by more than a factor of 20 with the lowest emissions observed from degraded forests. Emissions of alpha-pinene vary by a similar amount with the highest emissions associated with landscapes dominated by light dependent monoterpene emitting plants. Isoprene emissions tend to be higher for neotropical forests (Amazon and Costa Rica) in comparison to Africa and Asian tropical forests but considerable differences are observed within regions. Strong seasonal variations were observed in both the Congo and the Amazon rainforests with peak emissions during the dry seasons. Substantial emissions of light dependent monoterpenes, methanol and acetone are characteristic of at least some tropical landscapes.

  6. Solvothermal synthesis of 3D photonic crystals based on ZnS/opal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Xin [Nanomaterials Research Institute, College of Material Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Cao Jieming [Nanomaterials Research Institute, College of Material Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)]. E-mail: jmcao@nuaa.edu.cn; Ji Hongmei [Nanomaterials Research Institute, College of Material Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Fang Baoqing [Nanomaterials Research Institute, College of Material Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Feng Jie [Nanomaterials Research Institute, College of Material Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Pan Lijia [Nanomaterials Research Institute, College of Material Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Zhang Fang [Nanomaterials Research Institute, College of Material Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Wang, Haiyan [Nanomaterials Research Institute, College of Material Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2005-01-15

    We made photonic crystals composed of artificial opals infiltrated with ZnS semiconductor nanocrystals by using self-assembly and solvothermal methods. SEM images show that the silica spheres exhibit a well-ordered arrangement and the ZnS nanocrystals infiltrate within the opal templates by heterogeneous nucleation and growth processing, and the as-synthesized ZnS nanocrystals reveal a cubic phase from X-ray diffraction pattern. Furthermore, the optical properties of the infiltrated opals with different ZnS filling ratio are also studied by transmission spectroscopy, respectively. It is proposed that the position of the stop band can be easily designed by controlling the infiltration ratio of ZnS. These results demonstrate an easy-to-handle and efficient route to obtain high performance photonic crystal structures.

  7. Solvothermal synthesis of 3D photonic crystals based on ZnS/opal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Xin; Cao Jieming; Ji Hongmei; Fang Baoqing; Feng Jie; Pan Lijia; Zhang Fang; Wang, Haiyan

    2005-01-01

    We made photonic crystals composed of artificial opals infiltrated with ZnS semiconductor nanocrystals by using self-assembly and solvothermal methods. SEM images show that the silica spheres exhibit a well-ordered arrangement and the ZnS nanocrystals infiltrate within the opal templates by heterogeneous nucleation and growth processing, and the as-synthesized ZnS nanocrystals reveal a cubic phase from X-ray diffraction pattern. Furthermore, the optical properties of the infiltrated opals with different ZnS filling ratio are also studied by transmission spectroscopy, respectively. It is proposed that the position of the stop band can be easily designed by controlling the infiltration ratio of ZnS. These results demonstrate an easy-to-handle and efficient route to obtain high performance photonic crystal structures

  8. Three-dimensional artificial spin ice in nanostructured Co on an inverse opal-like lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistonov, A. A.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Chumakova, A. V.; Eckerlebe, H.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Eliseev, A. A.; Menzel, D.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2013-06-01

    The evolution of the magnetic structure for an inverse opal-like structure under an applied magnetic field is studied by small-angle neutron scattering. The samples were produced by filling the voids of an artificial opal film with Co. It is shown that the local configuration of magnetization is inhomogeneous over the basic element of the inverse opal-like lattice structure (IOLS) but follows its periodicity. Applying the “ice-rule” concept to the structure, we describe the local magnetization of this ferromagnetic three-dimensional lattice. We have developed a model of the remagnetization process predicting the occurrence of an unusual perpendicular component of the magnetization in the IOLS which is defined only by the direction and strength of the applied magnetic field.

  9. Transmission spectra changes produced by decreasing compactness of opal-like structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andueza, A.; Echeverría, R.; Morales, P.; Sevilla, J.

    2009-01-01

    Artificial opal-like structures based on spheres and colloidal particles have been fabricated in a controlled way, presenting optical band-gap properties in the optical frequency range. Nonclose packed artificial opals have also been fabricated and studied recently. In order to gain a better understanding of these phenomena, we have studied macroscopic models of nonclose packed fcc lattices using glass spheres (ɛ =7) of 8 mm diameter, and measuring in the microwave region (from 10 to 30 GHz). The results have shown a Bragg resonance tunable with filling factor of the opal, and a strong rejected band similar, also present in close packed samples, much less affected by compactness. The relation of this high order band with spheres single layer behavior is also discussed.

  10. Secondary Emission From Synthetic Opal Infiltrated by Colloidal Gold and Glycine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dovbeshko, G.I.; Fesenko, O.M.; Boyko, V.V.; Romanyuk, V.R.; Gorelik, V.S.; Moiseyenko, V.N.; Sobolev, V.B.; Shvalagin, V.V.

    2012-01-01

    A comparison of the secondary emission (photoluminescence) and Bragg reflection spectra of photonic crystals (PC), namely, synthetic opals, opals infiltrated by colloidal gold, glycine, and a complex of colloidal gold with glycine is performed. The infiltration of colloidal gold and a complex of colloidal gold with glycine into the pores of PC causes a short-wavelength shift (about 5-15 nm) of the Bragg reflection and increases the intensity of this band by 1.5-3 times. In photoluminescence, the infiltration of PC by colloidal gold and colloidal gold with glycine suppresses the PC emission band near 375-450 nm and enhances the shoulder of the stop-zone band of PC in the region of 470-510 nm. The shape of the observed PC emission band connected with defects in synthetic opal is determined by the type of infiltrates and the excitation wavelength. Possible mechanisms of the effects are discussed.

  11. Resonant infiltration of an opal: Reflection line shape and contribution from in-depth regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurin, Isabelle; Bloch, Daniel

    2015-06-21

    We analyze the resonant variation of the optical reflection on an infiltrated artificial opal made of transparent nanospheres. The resonant infiltration is considered as a perturbation in the frame of a previously described one-dimensional model based upon a stratified effective index. We show that for a thin slice of resonant medium, the resonant response oscillates with the position of this slice. We derive that for adequate conditions of incidence angle, this spatially oscillating behavior matches the geometrical periodicity of the opal and hence the related density of resonant infiltration. Close to these matching conditions, the resonant response of the global infiltration varies sharply in amplitude and shape with the incidence angle and polarization. The corresponding resonant reflection originates from a rather deep infiltration, up to several wavelengths or layers of spheres. Finally, we discuss the relationship between the present predictions and our previous observations on an opal infiltrated with a resonant vapor.

  12. Angle dependence in slow photon photocatalysis using TiO2 inverse opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curti, Mariano; Zvitco, Gonzalo; Grela, María Alejandra; Mendive, Cecilia B.

    2018-03-01

    The slow photon effect was studied by means of the photocatalytic degradation of stearic acid over TiO2 inverse opals. The comparison of the degradation rates over inverse opals with those obtained over disordered structures at different irradiation angles showed that the irradiation at the blue edge of the stopband leads to the activation of the effect, evidenced by an improvement factor of 1.8 ± 0.6 in the reaction rate for irradiation at 40°. The rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) method was employed to confirm the source of the enhancement; simulated spectra showed an enhancement in the absorption of the TiO2 matrix that composes the inverse opal at a 40° irradiation angle, owing to an appropriate position of the stopband in relation to the absorption onset of TiO2.

  13. Opals: Mission System Operations Architecture for an Optical Communications Demonstration on the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Matthew J.; Sindiy, Oleg V.; Oaida, Bogdan V.; Fregoso, Santos; Bowles-Martinez, Jessica N.; Kokorowski, Michael; Wilkerson, Marcus W.; Konyha, Alexander L.

    2014-01-01

    In April of 2014, the Optical PAyload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) Flight System (FS) launched to the International Space Station (ISS) to demonstrate space-to-ground optical communications. During a planned 90-day baseline mission, the OPALS FS will downlink high quality, short duration videos to the Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) ground station in Wrightwood, California. Interfaces to the ISS payload operations infrastructure have been established to facilitate activity planning, hazardous laser operations, commanding, and telemetry transmission. In addition, internal processes, such as pointing prediction and data processing, satisfy the technical requirements of the mission. The OPALS operations team participates in Operational Readiness Tests (ORTs) with external partners to exercise coordination processes and train for the overall mission. The ORTs have provided valuable insight into operational considerations for the instrument on the ISS.

  14. Effects of heat treatment temperature on morphology and properties of opal crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Tao; China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang; Peng Tongjiang; Chen Jiming; Tang Yongjian

    2008-01-01

    The monodispersed SiO 2 microspheres were synthesized by reactant mixed equally. The colloid crystal templates were assemblied by vertical sedimentation method in ethanol at certain temperatures, and the effects of the heat treatment temperature on the morphology and the properties of opal colloid crystals were investigated. SEM, TCr-DSC results indicate SiO 2 colloid templates should be heat treated at 700-800 degree C, enhancing the conglutination and mechanistic intensity of opal templates. UV-Vis analysis result indicates that the heat treatment process can remove the photonic band gap location of the opal colloid crystals, and with the heat treatment temperature increasing gradually, blue shift occurs and the gap narrows. (authors)

  15. Secondary biogeneous radiation of human organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzin, A.M.; Surkenova, G.N.

    1999-01-01

    When studying samples of three types of tissues of alive healthy human organism (hands, surface of breast, hair) it is shown that hair permanently emit secondary biogeneous radiation (SBR) which may registered with biological detectors. The hypothesis is suggested that natural background radiation permanently exciting biopolymers (proteins, nuclei acids) being present in alive organism in condensed state induces permanently present electromagnetic field of SBR which is vitally important for human organism. The field partly extends beyond the organism, where it is registered with sensitive biological detectors [ru

  16. Color Tunable and Upconversion Luminescence in Yb-Tm Co-Doped Yttrium Phosphate Inverse Opal Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siqin; Qiu, Jianbei; Wang, Qi; Zhou, Dacheng; Yang, Zhengwen

    2016-04-01

    For this paper, YPO4: Tm, Yb inverse opals with the photonic band gaps at 475 nm and 655 nm were prepared by polystyrene colloidal crystal templates. We investigated the influence of photonic band gaps on the Tm-Yb upconversion emission which was in the YPO4: Tm Yb inverse opal photonic crystals. Comparing with the reference sample, significant suppression of both the blue and red upconversion luminescence of Tm3+ ions were observed in the inverse opals. The color purity of the blue emission was improved in the inverse opal by the suppression of red upconversion emission. Additionally, mechanism of upconversion emission in the inverse opal was discussed. We believe that the present work will be valuable for not only the foundational study of upconversion emission modification but also the development of new optical devices in upconversion lighting and display.

  17. Optimizing sol-gel infiltration for the fabrication of high-quality titania inverse opal and its photocatalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Weijie; Zou Bo; Zhao Jing; Cui Haining

    2010-01-01

    This article reports an optimized sol-gel opal infiltration technique for the fabrication of high-quality titania inverse opal. Different from previous reports, the presently proposed method is facile, efficient and suitable for other inorganic oxide. We have compared two different infiltration strategies and their influences on the structure, photonic properties and photocatalytic activity. The obtained titania inverse opal displays excellent photonic properties with photonic band gap at 320 nm and better photocatalytic effect, which is attributed to its high-quality inverse opal nanostructure. Reproducibility tests prove that the photocatalytic activity of the resultant titania inverse opal remains intact even after five repeated photocatalytic reactions under the same procedure and experimental conditions.

  18. Red photoluminescent property and modification of WO3:Eu3+ inverse opal for blue light converted LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Jiufeng; Yang, Zhengwen; Huang, Anjun; Chai, Zhuangzhuang; Qiu, Jianbei; Song, Zhiguo

    2018-01-01

    Blue light converted light-emitting diodes is of great significance as a candidate for next generation lighting. In this work, the WO3:Eu3+ inverse opal photonic crystals were prepared and their luminescence properties were studied. The results demonstrated that the main excitation peak of WO3:Eu3+ inverse opals were located at 465 nm. The red luminescence peak at the 613 nm was observed in the WO3:Eu3+ inverse opal upon 465 nm excitation, exhibiting better red color purity. The influence of photonic band gap on the photoluminescence of WO3:Eu3+ inverse opal was obtained. When the red luminescence peak is in the regions of the photonic band gap and the edge of the band-gap, the red luminescence suppression and enhancement was observed respectively. The WO3:Eu3+ inverse opals may be a promising candidate for the blue light converted LEDs.

  19. Utilizing stretch-tunable thermochromic elastomeric opal films as novel reversible switchable photonic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Christian G; Lederle, Christina; Zentel, Kristina; Stühn, Bernd; Gallei, Markus

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the preparation of highly thermoresponsive and fully reversible stretch-tunable elastomeric opal films featuring switchable structural colors is reported. Novel particle architectures based on poly(diethylene glycol methylether methacrylate-co-ethyl acrylate) (PDEGMEMA-co-PEA) as shell polymer are synthesized via seeded and stepwise emulsion polymerization protocols. The use of DEGMEMA as comonomer and herein established synthetic strategies leads to monodisperse soft shell particles, which can be directly processed to opal films by using the feasible melt-shear organization technique. Subsequent UV crosslinking strategies open access to mechanically stable and homogeneous elastomeric opal films. The structural colors of the opal films feature mechano- and thermoresponsiveness, which is found to be fully reversible. Optical characterization shows that the combination of both stimuli provokes a photonic bandgap shift of more than 50 nm from 560 nm in the stretched state to 611 nm in the fully swollen state. In addition, versatile colorful patterns onto the colloidal crystal structure are produced by spatial UV-induced crosslinking by using a photomask. This facile approach enables the generation of spatially cross-linked switchable opal films with fascinating optical properties. Herein described strategies for the preparation of PDEGMEMA-containing colloidal architectures, application of the melt-shear ordering technique, and patterned crosslinking of the final opal films open access to novel stimuli-responsive colloidal crystal films, which are expected to be promising materials in the field of security and sensing applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Biogenic precipitation of manganese oxides and enrichment of heavy metals at acidic soil pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayanna, Sathish; Peacock, Caroline L.; Schäffner, Franziska; Grawunder, Anja; Merten, Dirk; Kothe, Erika; Büchel, Georg

    2014-05-01

    The precipitation of biogenic Mn oxides at acidic pH is rarely reported and poorly understood, compared to biogenic Mn oxide precipitation at near neutral conditions. Here we identified and investigated the precipitation of biogenic Mn oxides in acidic soil, and studied their role in the retention of heavy metals, at the former uranium mining site of Ronneburg, Germany. The site is characterized by acidic pH, low carbon content and high heavy metal loads including rare earth elements. Specifically, the Mn oxides were present in layers identified by detailed soil profiling and within these layers pH varied from 4.7 to 5.1, Eh varied from 640 to 660 mV and there were enriched total metal contents for Ba, Ni, Co, Cd and Zn in addition to high Mn levels. Using electron microprobe analysis, synchrotron X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we identified poorly crystalline birnessite (δ-MnO2) as the dominant Mn oxide in the Mn layers, present as coatings covering and cementing quartz grains. With geochemical modelling we found that the environmental conditions at the site were not favourable for chemical oxidation of Mn(II), and thus we performed 16S rDNA sequencing to isolate the bacterial strains present in the Mn layers. Bacterial phyla present in the Mn layers belonged to Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, and from these phyla we isolated six strains of Mn(II) oxidizing bacteria and confirmed their ability to oxidise Mn(II) in the laboratory. The biogenic Mn oxide layers act as a sink for metals and the bioavailability of these metals was much lower in the Mn layers than in adjacent layers, reflecting their preferential sorption to the biogenic Mn oxide. In this presentation we will report our findings, concluding that the formation of natural biogenic poorly crystalline birnessite can occur at acidic pH, resulting in the formation of a biogeochemical barrier which, in turn, can control the mobility and bioavailability of heavy metals in

  1. Biogenic gas in the Cambrian-Ordovcian Alum Shale (Denmark and Sweden)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, H.M.; Wirth, R.; Biermann, S.; Arning, E.T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Potsdam - Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum GFZ, Potsdam (Germany); Krueger, M.; Straaten, N. [BGR Hannover (Germany); Bechtel, A. [Montanuniv. Leoben (Austria); Berk, W. van [Technical Univ. of Clausthal (Germany); Schovsbo, N.H. [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland - GEUS, Copenhagen (Denmark); Crabtree, Stephen [Gripen Gas (Sweden)

    2013-08-01

    Shale gas is mainly produced from thermally mature black shales. However, biogenic methane also represents a resource which is often underestimated. Today biogenic methane is being produced from the Upper Devonian Antrim Shale in the Michigan Basin which was the most successfully exploited shale gas system during the 1990-2000 decade in the U.S.A. before significant gas production from the Barnett Shale started (Curtis et al., 2008). The Cambro-Ordovician Alum Shale in northern Europe has thermal maturities ranging from overmature in southern areas (Denmark and southern Sweden) to immature conditions (central Sweden). Biogenic methane is recorded during drilling in central Sweden. The immature Alum Shale in central Sweden has total organic carbon (TOC) contents up to 20 wt%. The hydrogen index HI ranges from 380 to 560 mgHC/gTOC at very low oxygen index (OI) values of around 4 mg CO{sub 2}/gTOC, Tmax ranges between 420 - 430 C. The organic matter is highly porous. In general, the Alum Shale is a dense shale with intercalated sandy beds which may be dense due to carbonate cementation. Secondary porosity is created in some sandy beds due to feldspar dissolution and these beds serve as gas conduits. Methane production rates with shale as substrate in the laboratory are dependent on the kind of hydrocarbon-degrading microbial enrichment cultures used in the incubation experiments, ranging from 10-620 nmol/(g*d). In these experiments, the CO{sub 2} production rate was always higher than for methane. Like the northern part of North America, also Northern European has been covered by glaciers during the Pleistocene and similar geological processes may have developed leading to biogenic shale gas formation. For the Antrim Shale one hypothesis suggests that fresh waters, recharged from Pleistocene glaciation and modern precipitation, suppressed basinal brine salinity along the northern margins of the Michigan Basin to greater depths and thereby enhancing methanogenesis

  2. Neogene biogenic sediments of onshore Peru: part I, sedimentology and stratigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marty, R.C.; Dunbar, R.B.; Baker, P.

    1985-01-01

    The Sechura (approx.6/sup 0/S) and Pisco (approx.14/sup 0/S) Basins of onshore Peru contain Miocene diatom and phosphate rich sediments which sharply contrast with underlying clastics. In the Sechura Basin the Miocene clastic Mancora, Heath and Montera Formations are overlain by the Zapallal Formation which grades upwards from a weakly biogenic base into fairly pure diatomites (biogenic silica >20%) and ore grade phosphorite (P/sub 2/O/sub 5/>20%). Biogeneic content decreases in the eastern basin as clastic content increases. The base of the Zapallal Formation has been dated at between 12.2 and 14.0 mybp using radiolaria correlated to magnetic stratigraphy by Theyer, et al (1978), and the phosphatic section yields dates of between 8.0 and 11.2 my. In the Pisco Basin the Eocene clastic Paracas Formation is overlain unconformably by the Miocene Pisco Formation which contains a basal sequence of cross-bedded clastics, tuffs, and partially recrystallized diatomites; a phosphorite bearing middle sequence; and a diatom rich top. Current direction from the cross beds of the basal Pisco Formation indicate a generally southerly transport direction but with considerable directional variability. This may be related to the Peru under-current which shows highly variable strength and direction near 15/sup 0/S.

  3. Growth and optical studies of opal films as three-dimensional photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comoretto, D.; Grassi, R.; Marabelli, F.; Andreani, L.C

    2003-01-15

    Three-dimensional artificial opals showing photonic crystals properties are grown by self-assembly of polystyrene nanospheres. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of opal surfaces show domains with regular triangular and squared packing of the spheres separated by cracks whose relative fraction depends on the sample quality. The energy position of an optical pseudo gap in transmittance spectra is observed by varying the angle of incidence and is accounted for by theoretical calculations of the photonic band structure based on a plane-wave expansion method.

  4. Chemically Patterned Inverse Opal Created by a Selective Photolysis Modification Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Gao, Ning; Gu, Chen; Li, Jian; Wang, Hui; Lan, Yue; Yin, Xianpeng; Li, Guangtao

    2015-09-02

    Anisotropic photonic crystal materials have long been pursued for their broad applications. A novel method for creating chemically patterned inverse opals is proposed here. The patterning technique is based on selective photolysis of a photolabile polymer together with postmodification on released amine groups. The patterning method allows regioselective modification within an inverse opal structure, taking advantage of selective chemical reaction. Moreover, combined with the unique signal self-reporting feature of the photonic crystal, the fabricated structure is capable of various applications, including gradient photonic bandgap and dynamic chemical patterns. The proposed method provides the ability to extend the structural and chemical complexity of the photonic crystal, as well as its potential applications.

  5. New high-gain thin-gap detector for the OPAL hadron calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dado, S; Goldberg, J; Lupu, N; Mincer, A I; Alexander, G; Bella, G; Gnat, Y; Grunhaus, J; Levy, A; Cohen, J

    1986-12-01

    A new type of thin-gap multiwire gas detector operating in a high-gain mode was developed for use in the OPAL pole-tip calorimeter. The detector thickness is only 6.6 mm and its area is 0.61 m/sup 2/. The induced pad readout provides high output pulses that require no amplification. The setup for the detector mass production and quality-control test is described. Results from a test beam setup that simulates the OPAL pole-tip calorimeter are presented and compared with computer simulations.

  6. New high gain thin gap detector for the OPAL hadron calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dado, S; Goldberg, J; Lupu, N; Mincer, A I; Alexander, G; Bella, G; Gnat, Y; Grunhaus, J; Levy, A; Cohen, J

    1986-12-01

    A new type of thin gap multiwire gas detector operating in a high gain mode has been developed for use in the OPAL pole tip calorimeter. The detector thickness is only 6.6 mm and its area is 0.61 m/sup 2/. The induced pad readout provides high output pulses which require no amplification. The set-up for the detector mass production and quality control test is described. Results from a test beam set-up that simulates the OPAL pole tip calorimeter are presented and compared with computer simulations.

  7. Growth and optical studies of opal films as three-dimensional photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comoretto, D.; Grassi, R.; Marabelli, F.; Andreani, L.C.

    2003-01-01

    Three-dimensional artificial opals showing photonic crystals properties are grown by self-assembly of polystyrene nanospheres. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of opal surfaces show domains with regular triangular and squared packing of the spheres separated by cracks whose relative fraction depends on the sample quality. The energy position of an optical pseudo gap in transmittance spectra is observed by varying the angle of incidence and is accounted for by theoretical calculations of the photonic band structure based on a plane-wave expansion method

  8. Optical Properties of Metal-Dielectric Structures Based on Photon-Crystal Opal Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanin, A. I.; Lukin, A. E.; Romanov, S. G.; Solovyev, V. G.; Khanin, S. D.; Yanikov, M. V.

    2018-04-01

    Optical properties of novel metal-dielectric nanocomposite materials based on opal matrices have been investigated. The position of optical resonances of nanocomposites, obtained by embedding of silver into the opal matrix by the electrothermodiffusion method, is explained by the Bragg diffraction, and an asymmetric form of resonance curves is attributed to the Fano resonance. An anomalous transmission and absorption of light by hybrid plasmon-photonic layered heterostructures, which is apparently associated with excitation of surface plasmon-polaritons, propagating along "metal-dielectric" interfaces, was revealed.

  9. Biogenic carbon in combustible waste: Waste composition, variability and measurement uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anna Warberg; Fuglsang, Karsten; Pedersen, Niels H.

    2013-01-01

    described in the literature. This study addressed the variability of biogenic and fossil carbon in combustible waste received at a municipal solid waste incinerator. Two approaches were compared: (1) radiocarbon dating (14C analysis) of carbon dioxide sampled from the flue gas, and (2) mass and energy......, the measurement uncertainties related to the two approaches were determined. Two flue gas sampling campaigns at a full-scale waste incinerator were included: one during normal operation and one with controlled waste input. Estimation of carbon contents in the main waste types received was included. Both the 14C...... method and the balance method represented promising methods able to provide good quality data for the ratio between biogenic and fossil carbon in waste. The relative uncertainty in the individual experiments was 7–10% (95% confidence interval) for the 14C method and slightly lower for the balance method....

  10. Methyl chavicol: characterization of its biogenic emission rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouvier-Brown, N.C.; Goldstein, A.H.; Worton, D.R.; Matross, D.M.; Gilman, J.B.; Kuster, W.C.; Welsh-Bon, D.; Warneke, C.; de Gouw, J.A.; Cahill, M.J.; Holzinger, R.

    2009-01-01

    We report measurements of ambient atmospheric mixing ratios for methyl chavicol and determine its biogenic emission rate. Methyl chavicol, a biogenic oxygenated aromatic compound, is abundant within and above Blodgett Forest, a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California.

  11. Ice nuclei in marine air: biogenic particles or dust?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Burrows

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ice nuclei impact clouds, but their sources and distribution in the atmosphere are still not well known. Particularly little attention has been paid to IN sources in marine environments, although evidence from field studies suggests that IN populations in remote marine regions may be dominated by primary biogenic particles associated with sea spray. In this exploratory model study, we aim to bring attention to this long-neglected topic and identify promising target regions for future field campaigns. We assess the likely global distribution of marine biogenic ice nuclei using a combination of historical observations, satellite data and model output. By comparing simulated marine biogenic immersion IN distributions and dust immersion IN distributions, we predict strong regional differences in the importance of marine biogenic IN relative to dust IN. Our analysis suggests that marine biogenic IN are most likely to play a dominant role in determining IN concentrations in near-surface-air over the Southern Ocean, so future field campaigns aimed at investigating marine biogenic IN should target that region. Climate-related changes in the abundance and emission of biogenic marine IN could affect marine cloud properties, thereby introducing previously unconsidered feedbacks that influence the hydrological cycle and the Earth's energy balance. Furthermore, marine biogenic IN may be an important aspect to consider in proposals for marine cloud brightening by artificial sea spray production.

  12. Interaction of biogenic amines with ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A A

    1975-01-01

    Ethanol through its primary catabolite, acetaldehyde, competitively inhibits oxidation of aldehyde dehydrogenase substrates. As a consequence biogenic amines form increased quantities of alcohols rather than the corresponding acids. During this biotransformation, condensation reactions between deaminated and intact amines may occur which can yield tetrahydropapaverolines. These compounds are closely related to precursors of opioids which is cause to link ethanol abuse to morphine addiction. There is, however, no pharmacological or clinical evidence suggesting similarities between ethanol dependence or opiod addiction. Acetaldehyde plays an additional role in alkaloidal formation in vitro. Biogenic amines may react with acetaldehyde to form isoquinoline or carboline compounds. Some of these substances have significant pharmacological activity. Furthermore, they may enter neural stores and displace the natural neurotransmitter. Thus, they can act as false neurotransmitters. Some investigators believe that chronic ethanol ingestion leads to significant formation of such aberrant compounds which may then upset autonomic nervous system balance. This disturbance may explain the abnormal sympathetic activity seen in withdrawal. While these ideas about the etiology of alcohol abuse have a definite appeal, they are naturally based on in vitro preliminary work. Much study of the quantitative pharmacology of these compounds in animals is required before judgement can be made as to the merits of the proposed hypotheses. In the meantime, pharmacological studies on the ability of ethanol to depress respiration in the mouse has revealed that unlike opioids or barbituates, respiratory depression induced by ethanol requires the presence in brain of serotonin. This neurotransmitter also mediates the respiratory effects of several other alcohols but curiously, not chloral hydrate, yet this compound is purported to alter biogenic amine metabolism much like ethanol. Thus, the response

  13. Ornamental Stones and Gemstones: The limits of heritage stone designation: The case for and against Australian Precious Opal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Barry

    2015-04-01

    When the international designation of natural stone types was first mooted in 2007, stones that were utilised in building and construction were the primary focus of attention. However following public discussion it soon became apparent that sculptural stones, stone used for utilitarian purposes such as millstones, as well as archaeological materials including stones used by early man could all be positively assessed as a potential Global Heritage Stone Resource (GHSR). Over the past 2 years it has been realised there is also a range of ornamental and semi-precious stones that may also be considered in the same international context. Examples in this respect include Imperial Porphyry sourced from Egypt that was much prized in the ancient world and "Derbyshire Blue John" a variety of fluorspar from central England that was used for vases, chalices, urns, candle sticks, jars, bowls door, jewellery and fire-place surrounds, especially in the 18th and 19th centuries. It is at this point that rock materials, sometimes used as gemstones, impinge on the domain of typical heritage stones. In Australia, the gemstone most identifiable with the country is precious opal formed by sedimentary processes in the Great Artesian Basin. In this paper the question is asked whether "Australian Precious Opal" could be or should be considered as a heritage stone of international significance. Immediately Australian Precious Opal satisfies several GHSR criteria including historic use for more than 50 years and wide-ranging utilisation for prestige jewellery around the world. It is also recognised as a cultural icon including association with national identity in Australia as it is legally defined as Australia's "National Gemstone" as well as being the "Gemstone Emblem" for the State of South Australia. Opal continues to be mined. Designation of Australian Precious Opal as a Global Heritage Stone Resource would likely involve formal international recognition of Australian opal in the

  14. Spatial and Temporal Variability in Biogenic Gas Accumulation and Release in The Greater Everglades at Multiple Scales of Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, M. D.; Cornett, C.; Schaffer, L.; Comas, X.

    2017-12-01

    Wetlands play a critical role in the carbon (C) cycle by producing and releasing significant amounts of greenhouse biogenic gasses (CO2, CH4) into the atmosphere. Wetlands in tropical and subtropical climates (such as the Florida Everglades) have become of great interest in the past two decades as they account for more than 20% of the global peatland C stock and are located in climates that favor year-round C emissions. Despite the increase in research involving C emission from these types of wetlands, the spatial and temporal variability involving C production, accumulation and release is still highly uncertain, and is the focus of this research at multiple scales of measurement (i.e. lab, field and landscape). Spatial variability in biogenic gas content, build up and release, at both the lab and field scales, was estimated using a series of ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys constrained with gas traps fitted with time-lapse cameras. Variability in gas content was estimated at the sub-meter scale (lab scale) within two extracted monoliths from different wetland ecosystems at the Disney wilderness Preserve (DWP) and the Blue Cypress Preserve (BCP) using high frequency GPR (1.2 GHz) transects across the monoliths. At the field scale (> 10m) changes in biogenic gas content were estimated using 160 MHz GPR surveys collected within 4 different emergent wetlands at the DWP. Additionally, biogenic gas content from the extracted monoliths was used to developed a landscape comparison of C accumulation and emissions for each different wetland ecosystem. Changes in gas content over time were estimated at the lab scale at high temporal resolution (i.e. sub-hourly) in monoliths from the BCP and Water Conservation Area 1-A. An autonomous rail system was constructed to estimate biogenic gas content variability within the wetland soil matrix using a series of continuous, uninterrupted 1.2 GHz GPR transects along the samples. Measurements were again constrained with an array

  15. Total balance of biogenic fuels for thermal uses; Ganzheitliche Bilanzierung verschiedener biogener Festbrennstoffe zur thermischen Nutzung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher, S.; Kaltschmitt, M. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER)

    1996-12-31

    In this situation of unfavourable energy price levels, the use of biogenic fuels for power supply can be recommended only if it serves to reduce environmental pollution. Against this background and on the basis of a primary energy balance, the authors attempted a total balance of selected enfironmental effects (global heating and acidification potential) of biomass use as compared to fossil fuel combustion. (orig) [Deutsch] ie Nutzung biogener Festbrennstoffe zur Energienachfragedeckung ist bei dem gegenwaertigen unguenstigen Energiepreisniveau nur dann zu rechtfertigen, wenn es durch die Biomassenutzung zu einer Reduzierung der energiebedingten Umwelteffekte kommt. Vor disem Hintergrund werden ausgehend von der Primaerenergiebilanz ausgewaehlte Umwelteffekte (d.h. das Treibhaus- und das Versauerungspotential) einer Biomassenutzung im Vergleich zu einer Nutzung fossiler Energietraeger ganzheitlich bilanziert. Die wesentlichen Ergebnisse werden zusammengefasst und interpretiert. (orig)

  16. Total balance of biogenic fuels for thermal uses; Ganzheitliche Bilanzierung verschiedener biogener Festbrennstoffe zur thermischen Nutzung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher, S; Kaltschmitt, M [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER)

    1997-12-31

    In this situation of unfavourable energy price levels, the use of biogenic fuels for power supply can be recommended only if it serves to reduce environmental pollution. Against this background and on the basis of a primary energy balance, the authors attempted a total balance of selected enfironmental effects (global heating and acidification potential) of biomass use as compared to fossil fuel combustion. (orig) [Deutsch] ie Nutzung biogener Festbrennstoffe zur Energienachfragedeckung ist bei dem gegenwaertigen unguenstigen Energiepreisniveau nur dann zu rechtfertigen, wenn es durch die Biomassenutzung zu einer Reduzierung der energiebedingten Umwelteffekte kommt. Vor disem Hintergrund werden ausgehend von der Primaerenergiebilanz ausgewaehlte Umwelteffekte (d.h. das Treibhaus- und das Versauerungspotential) einer Biomassenutzung im Vergleich zu einer Nutzung fossiler Energietraeger ganzheitlich bilanziert. Die wesentlichen Ergebnisse werden zusammengefasst und interpretiert. (orig)

  17. Ni-NiO core-shell inverse opal electrodes for supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hun; Kang, Soon Hyung; Zhu, Kai; Kim, Jin Young; Neale, Nathan R; Frank, Arthur J

    2011-05-14

    A general template-assisted electrochemical approach was used to synthesize three-dimensional ordered Ni core-NiO shell inverse opals (IOs) as electrodes for supercapacitors. The Ni-NiO IO electrodes displayed pseudo-capacitor behavior, good rate capability and cycling performance. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  18. The design of the cold neutron source of the OPAL reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechiman, L.M.; Bonetto, Fabian J.; Buscaglia, Gustavo C.

    2007-01-01

    The present work describes the conceptual design process of the first cold neutron source developed by INVAP for the nuclear research reactor OPAL. The analysis begins from the requirements given by the client and continues with the chosen solutions. Furthermore, we studied how impact in the design the fully illuminated constraint with the finite remote source model. (author) [es

  19. Magnetic topology of Co-based inverse opal-like structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigoryeva, N.A.; Mistonov, A.A.; Napolskii, K.S.; Sapoletova, N.A.; Eliseev, A.A.; Bouwman, W.; Byelov, D.; Petukhov, A.V.; Chernyshov, D.Y.; Eckerlebe, H.; Vasilieva, A.V.; Grigoriev, S.V.

    2011-01-01

    Themagnetic and structural properties of a cobalt inverse opal-like crystal have been studied by a combination of complementary techniques ranging from polarized neutron scattering and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry to x-ray diffraction. Microradian small-angle

  20. Magnetic topology of Co-based inverse opal-like structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigoryeva, N.A.; Mistonov, A.A.; Napolskii, K.S.; Sapoletova, N.A.; Eliseev, A.A.; Bouwman, W.G.; Byelov, D.V.; Petukhov, A.V.; Chernyshov, D.Y.; Eckerlebe, H.; Vasilieva, A.V.; Grigoriev, S.V.

    2011-01-01

    The magnetic and structural properties of a cobalt inverse opal-like crystal have been studied by a combination of complementary techniques ranging from polarized neutron scattering and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry to x-ray diffraction. Microradian small-angle

  1. Interaction of the Bragg gap with polaritonic gap in opal photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayer, Eradat; Sivachenko, Andrey Yu; Li, Sergey; Raikh, Mikhail E.; Valy Vardeny, Z.

    2001-03-01

    Photonic crystals (PC) are a class of artificial structures with a periodic dielectric function. PCs can be a laboratory for testing fundamental processes involving interactions of radiation with matter in novel conditions. We have studied the optical properties of opal PCs that are infiltrated with highly polarizable media such as j-aggregates of cyanine dyes. Opals are self- assembled structures of silica (SiO_2) spheres. We report our studies on clarifying the relationship between a polaritonic gap and a photonic stop band (Bragg gap) when they resonantly coexist in the same structure. Infiltration of opal with polarizable molecules combines the polaritonic and Bragg diffractive effects. Both effects exist independently when the Bragg (at ω=ω_B) and polaritonic (at ω=ω_T) resonances are well separated in frequency. A completely different situation occurs when ωT =ω_B. Such a condition was achieved in opals that were infiltrated with J-aggregates of cyanine dyes that have large Rabi frequency. Our measurements show some dramatic changes in the shape of the reflectivity plateaus, which are due to the interplay between the photonic band gap and the polaritonic gap. The experimental results on reflectivity and its dependence on the light propagation angle and concentration of the cyanie dyes are in agreement with the theoretical calculations. (The work was supported in part by Army Research office DAAD19-00-1-0406.)

  2. Synthesis and characterization of magnetic opal/Fe3O4 colloidal crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Carmona, A. J.; Palomino-Ovando, M. A.; Hernández-Cristobal, Orlando; Sánchez-Mora, E.; Toledo-Solano, M.

    2017-03-01

    We report an experimental study of colloidal crystals based on SiO2 artificial opals, infiltrated with 1.34(M1), 2.03(M2) and 24.4(M3) wt% Fe3O4 nanoparticles, using the co-assembly method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and Vibration sample magnetometer (VSM) were used to study the structural, magnetic and optical properties of the samples. At 300 K all the samples exhibit superparamagnetic behavior due to the magnetic coupling of Fe3O4 nanoparticles infiltrated into opal. However, for higher concentration of nanoparticles this strong coupling distorts the opal network. The UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and Kubelka-Munk theory were applied to determine that the energy band gap of the opal-magnetite composites can be adjusted by varying the concentration of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. This values are between the energy band gap of SiO2 and Fe3O4.

  3. Radiation monitoring and beam dump system of the OPAL silicon microvertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Braibant, S

    1997-01-01

    The OPAL microvertex silicon detector radiation monitoring and beam dump system is described. This system was designed and implemented in order to measure the radiation dose received at every beam crossing and to induce a fast beam dump if the radiation dose exceeds a given threshold.

  4. Vegetation response to large scale disturbance in a southern Appalachian forest: Hurricane Opal and salvage logging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine J. Elliott; Stephanie L. Hitchcock; Lisa Krueger

    2002-01-01

    Disturbance such as catastrophic windthrow can play a major role in the structure and composition of southern Appalachian forests. We report effects of Hurricane Opal followed by salvage logging on vegetation dynamics (regeneration, composition, and diversity) the first three years after disturbance at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory in western North Carolina. The...

  5. Preparation and Optical Properties of Spherical Inverse Opals by Liquid Phase Deposition Using Spherical Colloidal Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoi, Y; Tominaga, T

    2013-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) inverse opals in spherical shape were prepared by liquid phase deposition (LPD) using spherical colloidal crystals as templates. Spherical colloidal crystals were produced by ink-jet drying technique. Aqueous emulsion droplets that contain polystyrene latex particles were ejected into air and dried. Closely packed colloidal crystals with spherical shape were obtained. The obtained spherical colloidal crystals were used as templates for the LPD. The templates were dispersed in the deposition solution of the LPD, i.e. a mixed solution of ammonium hexafluorotitanate and boric acid and reacted for 4 h at 30 °C. After the LPD process, the interstitial spaces of the spherical colloidal crystals were completely filled with titanium oxide. Subsequent heat treatment resulted in removal of templates and spherical titanium dioxide inverse opals. The spherical shape of the template was retained. SEM observations indicated that the periodic ordered voids were surrounded by titanium dioxide. The optical reflectance spectra indicated that the optical properties of the spherical titanium dioxide inverse opals were due to Bragg diffractions from the ordered structure. Filling in the voids of the inverse opals with different solvents caused remarkable changes in the reflectance peak.

  6. Green Color Purification in Tb(3+) Ions through Silica Inverse Opal Heterostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Vishnu Prasad; Sivakumar, Sri; Kumar, Jitendra

    2015-06-10

    The ordered SiO2:Tb(3+) inverse opal heterostructure films are fabricated through polystyrene spheres hetero-opal template using the convective self-assembly method to examine their potential for color purification. Their optical properties and photoluminescence have been investigated and compared with individual single inverse opals and reference (SiO2:Tb(3+) powder). The heterostructures are shown to possess two broad photonic stop bands separated by an effective pass band, causing suppression of blue, orange, and red emission bands corresponding to (5)D4 → (7)F(j); j = 6, 4, 3 transitions, respectively and an enhancement of green emission (i.e., (5)D4 → (7)F5). Although the suppression of various emission occurs because of its overlap with the photonic band gaps (PSBs), the enhancement of green radiation is observed because of its location matching with the pass band region. The Commission International de l'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates of the emission spectrum of the heterostructure based on polystyrene sphere of 390 and 500 nm diameter are x = 0.2936, y = 0.6512 and lie closest to those of standard green color (wavelength 545 nm). In addition, a significant increase observed in luminescence lifetime for (5)D4 level of terbium in inverse opal heterostructures vis-à-vis reference (SiO2:Tb(3+) powder) is attributed to the change in the effective refractive index.

  7. Dominant ultraviolet-blue photoluminescence of ZnO embedded into synthetic opal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrarov, S.M.; Yuldashev, Sh.U.; Kim, T.W.; Lee, S.B.; Kwon, H.Y.; Kang, T.W.

    2005-01-01

    The temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of zinc oxide (ZnO) embedded into the voids of synthetic opal were studied. ZnO was infiltrated into opal from aqueous solution with zinc nitrate precursor followed by thermal annealing. The PL spectra of the ZnO powder exhibit very high and broad emission peaks in the green region due to crystal defects, such as oxygen vacancies and zinc ion interstitials. In contrast to the PL spectra of ZnO powder, nanocrystals of ZnO embedded into the voids of FCC packed opal matrix exhibit dominant ultraviolet (UV)-blue and rapidly decreasing green PL emissions with decreasing temperature. The temperature-dependent PL characteristics show that the green band suppression in the ZnO nanocrystals is due to the influence of photonic crystal. The infiltration of nanoparticles into synthetic opal may be used for the fabrication of polycrystalline ZnO with dominant UV-blue PL. These results indicate that the luminescent materials embedded into photonic crystal may be promising for the fabrication of the RGB pixels in full-color displays

  8. Two-dimensional inverse opal hydrogel for pH sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Fei; Meng, Zihui; Qi, Fenglian; Xue, Min; Wang, Fengyan; Chen, Wei; Yan, Zequn

    2014-12-07

    A novel hydrogel film with a highly ordered macropore monolayer on its surface was prepared by templated photo-polymerization of hydrogel monomers on a two-dimensional (2D) polystyrene colloidal array. The 2D inverse opal hydrogel has prominent advantages over traditional three-dimensional (3D) inverse opal hydrogels. First, the formation of the 2D array template through a self-assembly method is considerably faster and simpler. Second, the stable ordering structure of the 2D array template makes it easier to introduce the polymerization solution into the template. Third, a simple measurement, a Debye diffraction ring, is utilized to characterize the neighboring pore spacing of the 2D inverse opal hydrogel. Acrylic acid was copolymerized into the hydrogel; thus, the hydrogel responded to pH through volume change, which resulted from the formation of the Donnan potential. The 2D inverse opal hydrogel showed that the neighboring pore spacing increased by about 150 nm and diffracted color red-shifted from blue to red as the pH increased from pH 2 to 7. In addition, the pH response kinetics and ionic strength effect of this 2D mesoporous polymer film were also investigated.

  9. Ultrafast optical switching of three-dimensional Si inverse opal photonic band gap crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Euser, T.G.; Wei, Hong; Kalkman, Jeroen; Jun, Yoonho; Polman, Albert; Norris, David J.; Vos, Willem L.

    2007-01-01

    We present ultrafast optical switching experiments on three-dimensional photonic band gap crystals. Switching the Si inverse opal is achieved by optically exciting free carriers by a two-photon process. We probe reflectivity in the frequency range of second order Bragg diffraction where the photonic

  10. Climate/chemistry feedbacks and biogenic emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, John A; Warwick, Nicola; Yang, Xin; Young, Paul J; Zeng, Guang

    2007-07-15

    The oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere is affected by anthropogenic emissions and is projected to change in the future. Model calculations indicate that the change in surface ozone at some locations could be large and have significant implications for human health. The calculations depend on the precise scenarios used for the anthropogenic emissions and on the details of the feedback processes included in the model. One important factor is how natural biogenic emissions will change in the future. We carry out a sensitivity calculation to address the possible increase in isoprene emissions consequent on increased surface temperature in a future climate. The changes in ozone are significant but depend crucially on the background chemical regime. In these calculations, we find that increased isoprene will increase ozone in the Northern Hemisphere but decrease ozone in the tropics. We also consider the role of bromine compounds in tropospheric chemistry and consider cases where, in a future climate, the impact of bromine could change.

  11. Magnetophotonic crystals based on yttrium-iron-garnet infiltrated opals: Magnetization-induced second-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murzina, T. V.; Kim, E. M.; Kapra, R. V.; Moshnina, I. V.; Aktsipetrov, O. A.; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Kaplan, S. F.; Golubev, V. G.; Bader, M. A.; Marowsky, G.

    2006-01-01

    Three-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals (MPCs) based on artificial opals infiltrated by yttrium iron garnet (YIG) are fabricated and their structural, optical, and nonlinear optical properties are studied. The formation of the crystalline YIG inside the opal matrix is checked by x-ray analysis. Two templates are used for the infiltration by YIG: bare opals and those covered by a thin platinum film. Optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) technique is used to study the magnetization-induced nonlinear-optical properties of the composed MPCs. A high nonlinear magneto-optical Kerr effect in the SHG intensity is observed at the edge of the photonic band gap of the MPCs.

  12. OPAL: prediction of MoRF regions in intrinsically disordered protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ronesh; Raicar, Gaurav; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Patil, Ashwini; Sharma, Alok

    2018-06-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins lack stable 3-dimensional structure and play a crucial role in performing various biological functions. Key to their biological function are the molecular recognition features (MoRFs) located within long disordered regions. Computationally identifying these MoRFs from disordered protein sequences is a challenging task. In this study, we present a new MoRF predictor, OPAL, to identify MoRFs in disordered protein sequences. OPAL utilizes two independent sources of information computed using different component predictors. The scores are processed and combined using common averaging method. The first score is computed using a component MoRF predictor which utilizes composition and sequence similarity of MoRF and non-MoRF regions to detect MoRFs. The second score is calculated using half-sphere exposure (HSE), solvent accessible surface area (ASA) and backbone angle information of the disordered protein sequence, using information from the amino acid properties of flanks surrounding the MoRFs to distinguish MoRF and non-MoRF residues. OPAL is evaluated using test sets that were previously used to evaluate MoRF predictors, MoRFpred, MoRFchibi and MoRFchibi-web. The results demonstrate that OPAL outperforms all the available MoRF predictors and is the most accurate predictor available for MoRF prediction. It is available at http://www.alok-ai-lab.com/tools/opal/. ashwini@hgc.jp or alok.sharma@griffith.edu.au. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  13. Life Cycle Assessment of age-related environmental impact of biogenic hydraulic fluids; Life Cycle Assessment der alterungsbedingten Umweltvertraeglichkeit biogener Hydraulik-Schmierstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bressling, Jana

    2012-07-01

    fluids after tribological application. The quantification of the metal content in used oils as well as the determination of the water soluble metal content allows a better interpretation and differentiation of age-related aquatic ecotoxicity. The additional characterisation of conditional-use changes in the ecological characteristics allows a comprehensive assessment and is still widely unknown, but an important aspect regard of LCA for biogenic hydraulic fluids. Such a methodical approach allows therefore the feedback of the desired product properties on the production method during chemical modification. The results of this study demonstrate that optimisation of the lubricant synthesis on the base of herbal reactants (high oleic sunflower oil) leads to successful reproducibility of synthetic esters and therefore also to an invariable environmental compatibility. The storage of basic synthetic esters and complicated ester mixtures leads to increasing toxicity with increasing temperature and storage time conditioned by oxidation. Besides, the age-related toxicity correlates with decreasing DOC-content of the WSF. The typical kinematic viscosity of 32 mm2/s for hydraulic fluids represents positive effects if stored at room temperature, since it causes a slower degredation by oxygen diffusion. The ageing behaviour of synthetic esters during tribological application is independent of their previous synthesis process or their storage, so that biogenic hydraulic fluids can still be used after previous storage in environmentally friendly hydraulic systems. The long term investigation in an environmentally friendly tribosystem leads in spite of metal entry to a decrease of eco- and genotoxic potential which was already available by storage at room temperature. In contrast, in a short period of use the metal content is correlated with the ecotoxicity, since the tribological load is in the foreground. Therefore the influence and change of the toxicity is dependent not exclusively

  14. Optimal enhancement in conversion efficiency of crystalline Si solar cells using inverse opal photonic crystals as back reflectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaouachi, A; M’nif, A; Hamzaoui, A H; Chtourou, R

    2015-01-01

    The effect of using inverse opal photonic crystals as back reflectors on the power conversion efficiency of c-Si solar cells is investigated. The reflection spectra of inverse opal photonic crystals with different diameters of air spheres are simulated using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The reflection peaks are correlated with photonic band gaps present in the photonic band gap diagram. Significant improvement in the optical absorption of the crystalline silicon layer is recorded when inverse opal photonic crystals are considered. Physical mechanisms which may contribute to the enhancement of the light absorption are underlined. With higher short-circuit current enhancement possible, and with no corresponding degradation in open-circuit voltage V oc or the fill factor, the power conversion efficiency is increased significantly when inverse opal photonic crystals are used as back reflectors with optimized diameter of air spheres. (paper)

  15. Spontaneous emission of semiconductor quantum dots in inverse opal SiO2 photonic crystals at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng; Yang, Yingshu; Wang, Yinghui; Gao, Jiechao; Sui, Ning; Chi, Xiaochun; Zou, Lu; Zhang, Han-Zhuang

    2016-02-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) infiltrated into inverse opal SiO2 photonic crystals (PCs) are systemically studied. The special porous structure of inverse opal PCs enhanced the thermal exchange rate between the CdSe QDs and their surrounding environment. Finally, inverse opal SiO2 PCs suppressed the nonlinear PL enhancement of CdSe QDs in PCs excited by a continuum laser and effectively modulated the PL characteristics of CdSe QDs in PCs at high temperatures in comparison with that of CdSe QDs out of PCs. The final results are of benefit in further understanding the role of inverse opal PCs on the PL characteristics of QDs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Low temperature catalytic combustion of propane over Pt-based catalyst with inverse opal microstructure in microchannel reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guan, G.; Zapf, R.; Kolb, G.A.; Men, Y.; Hessel, V.; Löwe, H.; Ye, J.; Zentel, R.

    2007-01-01

    novel Pt-based catalyst with highly regular, periodic inverse opal microstructure was fabricated in a microchannel reactor, and catalytic testing revealed excellent conversion and stable activity for propane combustion at low temperatures

  17. Biogenic sulfur compounds and the global sulfur cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aneja, V.P.; Aneja, A.P.; Adams, D.F.

    1982-01-01

    Field measurements of biogenic sulfur compounds shows a great variation in concentrations and emission rates for H 2 S, DMS, CS 2 and COS. Measurements by the chamber method and estimates from micrometeorological sampling are employed to determine the earth-atmosphere flux of these gases. Much of the variation can be attributed to differences of climate and surface conditions, with marshes being a large source of biogenic sulfur (mean contribution 4 x 10 to the 6th ton/year maximum contribution 142 x 10 to the 6th ton/year). Considering that the estimated biogenic contribution needed to balance the global sulfur cycle ranges from 40- 230 x 10 to the 6th tons/year, the mean values are not sufficient to balance this cycle. Further experimental investigations are suggested in order to characterize the biogenic processes adequately

  18. Quantifying the Global Marine Biogenic Nitrogen Oxides Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, H.; Wang, S.; Lin, J.; Hao, N.; Poeschl, U.; Cheng, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are among the most important molecules in atmospheric chemistry and nitrogen cycle. The NOx over the ocean areas are traditionally believed to originate from the continental outflows or the inter-continental shipping emissions. By comparing the satellite observations (OMI) and global chemical transport model simulation (GEOS-Chem), we suggest that the underestimated modeled atmospheric NO2 columns over biogenic active ocean areas can be possibly attributed to the biogenic source. Nitrification and denitrification in the ocean water produces nitrites which can be further reduced to NO through microbiological processes. We further report global distributions of marine biogenic NO emissions. The new added emissions improve the agreement between satellite observations and model simulations over large areas. Our model simulations manifest that the marine biogenic NO emissions increase the atmospheric oxidative capacity and aerosol formation rate, providing a closer link between atmospheric chemistry and ocean microbiology.

  19. Production of biogenic amines in "Salamini italiani alla cacciatora PDO".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coı X0308 Sson, Jean Daniel; Cerutti, Caterina; Travaglia, Fabiano; Arlorio, Marco

    2004-06-01

    Various fermented and seasoned foods such as cheese, sauerkraut, wine, beer and meat products may contain biogenic amines. The aim of this paper was to describe the presence of some biogenic amines (histamine, tyramine, tryptamine, 2-phenylethylamine) in "Salamini italiani alla cacciatora PDO", a typical fermented-ripened dry sausage widely consumed in Italy. Total level of biogenic amines in commercial samples ranged from 71 to 586 mg kg(-1). The amine recovered in higher concentrations was tyramine (372 mg kg(-1)) followed by histamine (165 mg kg(-1)). The second aim of this work was the quality control of the production in order to determine the parameters influencing the presence of biogenic amines in ripened salami. Sausages sampled for analysis during production, manipulation and ripening showed the presence of tyramine (64.4 mg kg(-1)) only after 15 days of fermentation. All investigated biogenic amines were detected in "Salamini" after 21 days of fermentation. We suggest the control of biogenic as important tool to establish the better condition of preservation of "Salamini italiani alla cacciatore PDO" during their shelf-life.

  20. Periodic order and defects in Ni-based inverse opal-like crystals on the mesoscopic and atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumakova, A. V.; Valkovskiy, G. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Dyadkin, V. A.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Eliseev, A. A.; Petukhov, A. V.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2014-10-01

    The structure of inverse opal crystals based on nickel was probed on the mesoscopic and atomic levels by a set of complementary techniques such as scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron microradian and wide-angle diffraction. The microradian diffraction revealed the mesoscopic-scale face-centered-cubic (fcc) ordering of spherical voids in the inverse opal-like structure with unit cell dimension of 750±10nm. The diffuse scattering data were used to map defects in the fcc structure as a function of the number of layers in the Ni inverse opal-like structure. The average lateral size of mesoscopic domains is found to be independent of the number of layers. 3D reconstruction of the reciprocal space for the inverse opal crystals with different thickness provided an indirect study of original opal templates in a depth-resolved way. The microstructure and thermal response of the framework of the porous inverse opal crystal was examined using wide-angle powder x-ray diffraction. This artificial porous structure is built from nickel crystallites possessing stacking faults and dislocations peculiar for the nickel thin films.

  1. Biogenic volatile emissions from the soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñuelas, J; Asensio, D; Tholl, D; Wenke, K; Rosenkranz, M; Piechulla, B; Schnitzler, J P

    2014-08-01

    Volatile compounds are usually associated with an appearance/presence in the atmosphere. Recent advances, however, indicated that the soil is a huge reservoir and source of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs), which are formed from decomposing litter and dead organic material or are synthesized by underground living organism or organs and tissues of plants. This review summarizes the scarce available data on the exchange of VOCs between soil and atmosphere and the features of the soil and particle structure allowing diffusion of volatiles in the soil, which is the prerequisite for biological VOC-based interactions. In fact, soil may function either as a sink or as a source of bVOCs. Soil VOC emissions to the atmosphere are often 1-2 (0-3) orders of magnitude lower than those from aboveground vegetation. Microorganisms and the plant root system are the major sources for bVOCs. The current methodology to detect belowground volatiles is described as well as the metabolic capabilities resulting in the wealth of microbial and root VOC emissions. Furthermore, VOC profiles are discussed as non-destructive fingerprints for the detection of organisms. In the last chapter, belowground volatile-based bi- and multi-trophic interactions between microorganisms, plants and invertebrates in the soil are discussed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Biogenic antimicrobial silver nanoparticles produced by fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Alexandre G; Ping, Liu Yu; Marcato, Priscyla D; Alves, Oswaldo L; Silva, Maria C P; Ruiz, Rita C; Melo, Itamar S; Tasic, Ljubica; De Souza, Ana O

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus tubingensis and Bionectria ochroleuca showed excellent extracellular ability to synthesize silver nanoparticles (Ag NP), spherical in shape and 35 ± 10 nm in size. Ag NP were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and photon correlation spectroscopy for particle size and zeta potential. Proteins present in the fungal filtrate and in Ag NP dispersion were analyzed by electrophoresis (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis). Ag NP showed pronounced antifungal activity against Candida sp, frequently occurring in hospital infections, with minimal inhibitory concentration in the range of 0.11-1.75 μg/mL. Regarding antibacterial activity, nanoparticles produced by A. tubingensis were more effective compared to the other fungus, inhibiting 98.0 % of Pseudomonas. aeruginosa growth at 0.28 μg/mL. A. tubingensis synthesized Ag NP with surprisingly high and positive surface potential, differing greatly from all known fungi. These data open the possibility of obtaining biogenic Ag NP with positive surface potential and new applications.

  3. Nitrate radicals and biogenic volatile organic compounds ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) by the nitrate radical (NO3) represents one of the important interactions between anthropogenic emissions related to combustion and natural emissions from the biosphere. This interaction has been recognized for more than 3 decades, during which time a large body of research has emerged from laboratory, field, and modeling studies. NO3-BVOC reactions influence air quality, climate and visibility through regional and global budgets for reactive nitrogen (particularly organic nitrates), ozone, and organic aerosol. Despite its long history of research and the significance of this topic in atmospheric chemistry, a number of important uncertainties remain. These include an incomplete understanding of the rates, mechanisms, and organic aerosol yields for NO3-BVOC reactions, lack of constraints on the role of heterogeneous oxidative processes associated with the NO3 radical, the difficulty of characterizing the spatial distributions of BVOC and NO3 within the poorly mixed nocturnal atmosphere, and the challenge of constructing appropriate boundary layer schemes and non-photochemical mechanisms for use in state-of-the-art chemical transport and chemistry–climate models. This review is the result of a workshop of the same title held at the Georgia Institute of Technology in June 2015. The first half of the review summarizes the current literature on NO3-BVOC chemistry, with a particular focus on recent advances in

  4. Localization and Related Phenomena in Multiply Connected Nanostructured Inverse Opal Bismuth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiweiss, Michael; Saygi, Salih; Amirzadeh, Jafar; Datta, Timir; Lungu, Anca; Yin, Ming; Palm, Eric; Brandt, Bruce; Iqbal, Zafar

    2001-03-01

    The nanostructures were fabricated by pressure infiltration of bismuth into porous artificial opal and were characterized using SEM, EDX and XRD. These structures form a regular three-dimensional network in which the bismuth regions percolate in all directions between the close packed spheres of SiO_2. The sizes of the conducting regions are of the order of tens of nanometers. The static magnetic properties of both bismuth inverse opal and bulk bismuth were studied using a SQUID magnetometer. Transport measurements, including Hall, were done using standard ac four and six probe techniques in fields up to 17 T* and temperatures between 4.2 and 150 K. The results of these measurements, including the observation of localization phenomena, will be discussed. Comparisons will be made with published results on bismuth nanowires. *Performed at the National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) FSU, Tallahassee, FL. Partially supported by a grant from NASA.

  5. Angular shaping of fluorescence from synthetic opal-based photonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiko, Vitalii; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Dolgov, Leonid; Kiisk, Valter; Sildos, Ilmo; Loot, Ardi; Gorelik, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Spectral, angular, and temporal distributions of fluorescence as well as specular reflection were investigated for silica-based artificial opals. Periodic arrangement of nanosized silica globules in the opal causes a specific dip in the defect-related fluorescence spectra and a peak in the reflectance spectrum. The spectral position of the dip coincides with the photonic stop band. The latter is dependent on the size of silica globules and the angle of observation. The spectral shape and intensity of defect-related fluorescence can be controlled by variation of detection angle. Fluorescence intensity increases up to two times at the edges of the spectral dip. Partial photobleaching of fluorescence was observed. Photonic origin of the observed effects is discussed.

  6. Particle identification with the OPAL jet chamber in the region of the relativistic rise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuker, H; Fischer, H M; Hauschild, M; Hartmann, H; Wuensch, B; Boerner, H; Burckhart, H J; Dittmar, M; Hammarstroem, R; Heuer, R D

    1987-10-15

    An important goal of the OPAL jet chamber is particle identification at high momenta by exploiting the relativistic rise of the energy loss. Extensive tests have been performed with the full scale prototype of the OPAL jet chamber to measure the energy loss in an argon-methane-isobutane mixture as function of momentum and particle species. The measurements were done under various operating conditions in order to optimise the operationg point, to investigate sources of systematic errors, to monitor the stability of the energy loss measurement and to develop calibration procedures. The particle separation capability in the region of relativistic rise has been studied at gas pressures of 3 and 4 bar. The adopted operation point represents a reasonable compromise between the requirements for particle identification and tracking accuracy.

  7. Transition of lasing modes in polymeric opal photonic crystal resonating cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lan-Ting; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Jin, Feng; Dong, Xian-Zi; Chen, Wei-Qiang; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng; Duan, Xuan-Ming

    2016-06-10

    We demonstrate the transition of lasing modes in the resonating cavity constructed by polystyrene opal photonic crystals and 7 wt. % tert-butyl Rhodamine B doped polymer film. Both single mode and multiple mode lasing emission are observed from the resonating cavity. The lasing threshold is determined to be 0.81  μJ/pulse for single mode lasing emission and 2.25  μJ/pulse for multiple mode lasing emission. The single mode lasing emission is attributed to photonic lasing resulting from the photonic bandgap effect of the opal photonic crystals, while the multiple mode lasing emission is assigned to random lasing due to the defects in the photonic crystals. The result would benefit the development of low threshold polymeric solid state photonic crystal lasers.

  8. Protein-based inverse opals: A novel support for enzyme immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanjun; Sun, Wenya; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Lihui; Zhou, Liya; Gao, Jing; He, Ying; Ma, Li; Zhang, Xu

    2017-01-01

    In this study, protein-based inverse opals were prepared for the first time by using the colloidal crystal templating method. The preparation process involved three steps including filling the templates with protein molecules, crosslinking, and template removal. The obtained inverse opals were used to immobilize Penicillin G acylase (PGA) because of its intrinsic biocompatible property. The immobilization process was optimized and the properties of the immobilized PGA (PGA@IO) were investigated. PGA@IO exhibited improved thermal and pH stability compared with its free counterpart. After reusing nine times, it retained 70% of the initial activity. Besides, the PGA@IO retained high activity during the hydrolysis reactions in continuous catalysis in packed-bed reactor (PBR) after 15 days. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Nanowires of silicon carbide and 3D SiC/C nanocomposites with inverse opal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emelchenko, G.A.; Zhokhov, A.A.; Masalov, V.M.; Kudrenko, E.A.; Tereshenko, A.N.; Steinman, E.A.; Khodos, I.I.; Zinenko, V.I.; Agafonov, Yu.A.

    2011-01-01

    Synthesis, morphology, structural and optical characteristics of SiC NWs and SiC/C nanocomposites with an inverse opal lattice have been investigated. The samples were prepared by carbothermal reduction of silica (SiC NWs) and by thermo-chemical treatment of opal matrices (SiC/C) filled with carbon compounds which was followed by silicon dioxide dissolution. It was shown that the nucleation of SiC NWs occurs at the surface of carbon fibers felt. It was observed three preferred growth direction of the NWs: [111], [110] and [112]. HRTEM studies revealed the mechanism of the wires growth direction change. SiC/C- HRTEM revealed in the structure of the composites, except for silicon carbide, graphite and amorphous carbon, spherical carbon particles containing concentric graphite shells (onion-like particles).

  10. Development studies for the OPAL end cap electromagnetic calorimeter using vacuum photo triode instrumented leadglass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffreys, P.W.; Arnison, G.T.J.; Akrawy, M.

    1989-07-01

    A description is given of the OPAL end cap electromagnetic calorimeters which consist of leadglass instrumented with vacuum photo triodes. Test results are presented showing linearity, energy and position resolution measured in an electron beam whilst the calorimeter is subject to magnetic fields up to 1.0T. The response to hadrons is also discussed. Finally, radiation damage and recovery of the leadglass is reported. (author)

  11. Magnetic topology of Co-based inverse opal-like structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryeva, N. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Eliseev, A. A.; Bouwman, W.; Byelov, D. V.; Petukhov, A. V.; Chernyshov, D. Yu.; Eckerlebe, H.; Vasilieva, A. V.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2011-08-01

    The magnetic and structural properties of a cobalt inverse opal-like crystal have been studied by a combination of complementary techniques ranging from polarized neutron scattering and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry to x-ray diffraction. Microradian small-angle x-ray diffraction shows that the inverse opal-like structure (OLS) synthesized by the electrochemical method fully duplicates the three-dimensional net of voids of the template artificial opal. The inverse OLS has a face-centered cubic (fcc) structure with a lattice constant of 640±10 nm and with a clear tendency to a random hexagonal close-packed structure along the [111] axes. Wide-angle x-ray powder diffraction shows that the atomic cobalt structure is described by coexistence of 95% hexagonal close-packed and 5% fcc phases. The SQUID measurements demonstrate that the inverse OLS film possesses easy-plane magnetization geometry with a coercive field of 14.0 ± 0.5 mT at room temperature. The detailed picture of the transformation of the magnetic structure under an in-plane applied field was detected with the help of small-angle diffraction of polarized neutrons. In the demagnetized state the magnetic system consists of randomly oriented magnetic domains. A complex magnetic structure appears upon application of the magnetic field, with nonhomogeneous distribution of magnetization density within the unit element of the OLS. This distribution is determined by the combined effect of the easy-plane geometry of the film and the crystallographic geometry of the opal-like structure with respect to the applied field direction.

  12. The rheology and processing of “edge sheared” colloidal polymer opals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Hon Sum; Mackley, Malcolm; Butler, Simon; Baumberg, Jeremy; Snoswell, David; Finlayson, Chris; Zhao, Qibin

    2014-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the rheology and processing of solvent-free core shell “polymer opals” that consist of a soft outer shell grafted to hard colloidal polymer core particles. Strong iridescent colors can be produced by shearing the material in a certain way that causes the initially disordered spheres to rearrange into ordered crystalline structures and produce colors by diffraction and interference of multiple light scattering, similar to gemstone opals. The basic linear viscoelastic rheology of a polymer opal sample was determined as a function of temperature, and the material was found to be highly viscoelastic at all tested temperatures. A Cambridge multipass rheometer was specifically modified in order to make controlled mechanical measurements of initially disordered polymer opal tapes that were sandwiched between protective polyethylene terephthalate sheets. Axial extension, simple shear, and a novel “edge shearing” geometry were all evaluated, and multiple successive experiments of the edge shearing test were carried out at different temperatures. The optical development of colloidal ordering, measured as optical opalescence, was quantified by spectroscopy using visible backscattered light. The development of opalescence was found to be sensitive to the geometry of deformation and a number of process variables suggesting a complex interaction of parameters that caused the opalescence. In order to identify aspects of the deformation mechanism of the edge shearing experiment, a separate series of in situ optical experiments were carried out and this helped indicate the extent of simple shear generated with each edge shear deformation. The results show that strong ordering can be induced by successive edge shearing deformation. The results are relevant to polymer opal rheology, processing, and mechanisms relating to ordering within complex viscoelastic fluids

  13. The rheology and processing of “edge sheared” colloidal polymer opals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Hon Sum; Mackley, Malcolm, E-mail: mrm5@cam.ac.uk; Butler, Simon [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); Baumberg, Jeremy; Snoswell, David; Finlayson, Chris; Zhao, Qibin [Cavendish Laboratory, NanoPhotonics Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 OHE (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    This paper is concerned with the rheology and processing of solvent-free core shell “polymer opals” that consist of a soft outer shell grafted to hard colloidal polymer core particles. Strong iridescent colors can be produced by shearing the material in a certain way that causes the initially disordered spheres to rearrange into ordered crystalline structures and produce colors by diffraction and interference of multiple light scattering, similar to gemstone opals. The basic linear viscoelastic rheology of a polymer opal sample was determined as a function of temperature, and the material was found to be highly viscoelastic at all tested temperatures. A Cambridge multipass rheometer was specifically modified in order to make controlled mechanical measurements of initially disordered polymer opal tapes that were sandwiched between protective polyethylene terephthalate sheets. Axial extension, simple shear, and a novel “edge shearing” geometry were all evaluated, and multiple successive experiments of the edge shearing test were carried out at different temperatures. The optical development of colloidal ordering, measured as optical opalescence, was quantified by spectroscopy using visible backscattered light. The development of opalescence was found to be sensitive to the geometry of deformation and a number of process variables suggesting a complex interaction of parameters that caused the opalescence. In order to identify aspects of the deformation mechanism of the edge shearing experiment, a separate series of in situ optical experiments were carried out and this helped indicate the extent of simple shear generated with each edge shear deformation. The results show that strong ordering can be induced by successive edge shearing deformation. The results are relevant to polymer opal rheology, processing, and mechanisms relating to ordering within complex viscoelastic fluids.

  14. A study of charm production in beauty decays with the OPAL detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2004-01-01

    Using an inclusive method, BR(b -> D\\bar{D}X) has been measured in hadronic Z^0 decays with the OPAL detector at LEP. The impact parameter significance of tracks opposite tagged b-jets is used to differentiate b -> D\\bar{D}X decays from other decays. Using this result, the average number of charm and anti-charm quarks produced per beauty quark decay, n_c, is determined.

  15. Evaluation of biogenic amines and microbial counts throughout the ripening of goat cheeses from pasteurized and raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novella-Rodríguez, Sonia; Veciana-Nogués, M Teresa; Roig-Sagués, Artur X; Trujillo-Mesa, Antonio J; Vidal-Carou, M Carmen

    2004-05-01

    The effect of the hygienic quality of milk on changes in microbial counts and biogenic amine content was evaluated during ripening of goat cheeses manufactured from pasteurized and raw milks at 1, 14, 30, 60 and 90 d. The original milk, rennet, curd and whey were also included in the study. The pH, salt content and extent of proteolysis in the cheese were also evaluated. Spermidine and spermine were the main amines in raw milk, while they were minor amines in cheeses. Other amines increased markedly during ripening, tyramine being the main amine in cheese made from raw milk and cadaverine and putrescine in those produced from pasteurized milk. Enterobacteriaceae counts decreased during ripening whereas those of lactic acid bacteria increased, especially lactobacilli and enterococci. Cheese made from raw milk showed higher microbial counts during ripening than those made from pasteurized milk, especially for Enterobacteriaceae and enterococci, counts being 2 or 3 log units higher. Raw milk cheese showed remarkably higher biogenic amines compared with pasteurized milk cheeses. Therefore, pasteurization of milk causes a decrease in final biogenic amine content of cheese as a result of the reduction of its microbial counts.

  16. Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus saerimneri 30a (Formerly Lactobacillus sp. Strain 30a), a Reference Lactic Acid Bacterium Strain Producing Biogenic Amines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romano, Andrea; Trip, Hein; Campbell-Sills, Hugo; Bouchez, Olivier; Sherman, David; Lolkema, Juke S.; Lucas, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus sp. strain 30a (Lactobacillus saerimneri) produces the biogenic amines histamine, putrescine, and cadaverine by decarboxylating their amino acid precursors. We report its draft genome sequence (1,634,278 bases, 42.6% G+C content) and the principal findings from its annotation, which

  17. Conversion of the luminescence of laser dyes in opal matrices to stimulated emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alimov, O K; Basiev, T T; Orlovskii, Yu V; Osiko, V V; Samoilovich, M I

    2008-01-01

    The luminescence and laser characteristics of a synthetic opal matrix filled with organic dyes are studied upon excitation by nanosecond laser pulses. The appearance of stimulated emission in a partially ordered scattering medium is investigated. It is shown that if the luminescence spectrum of a dye (oxazine-17) is located far outside the photonic bandgap of the opal matrix, stimulated emission along a preferential direction in the (111) plane is observed when pumping exceeds a threshold even without an external optical cavity. The stimulated emission spectrum is considerably narrower than the luminescence spectrum and consists of several narrow lines located within the dye luminescence band. If the luminescence spectrum of a dye (rhodamine 6G) overlaps with the photonic bandgap of the opal matrix, a different picture is observed. The loss of radiation in the matrix leads to the red shift of the luminescence spectrum, while the stimulated emission as in the case of oxazine-17 lies is observed within the luminescence band. (active media, lasers, and amplifiers)

  18. Stretched inverse opal colloid crystal substrates-induced orientation of fibroblast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y C; Tang, Z M; Feng, Z Q; Xie, Z Y; Gu, Z Z, E-mail: gu@seu.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2010-06-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in studying the interaction between mammalian cells and nanometer-sized structures. However, the effect of nanostructures on cell behavior, such as cell morphology and alignment, is still largely unknown. Inverse opal colloid crystal substrates, which can be stretched to produce nano-scale pore structures of different degrees of orientation, serve as a convenient model system to study the effect of nanotopography on cell morphology and cell alignment. In this work, we fabricated inverse opal colloidal crystal films that were either unstretched or stretched to three, four or six times their original length, producing pore structures of increasing degree of orientation. Human dermal fibroblast-fetal (HDF-f) cells were seeded and cultured on these four types of substrates. The results from fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated that cells showed the highest degree of alignment when cultured on inverse opal colloid crystal films that were stretched the most (six times original length). The results also demonstrated that the orientation of nanostructures could affect both the morphology and growth direction of fibroblasts. The ability to control the direction of cell growth through the engineering of nanostructures could have important applications in tissue engineering, especially for tissues with anisotropic structures, such as cardiac muscle, blood vessel, tendon and ligament.

  19. Manipulating emission of CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals embedded in synthetic opals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benalloul, Paul; Vion, Celine; Barthou, Charles; Schwob, Catherine; Frigerio, Jean-Marc; MaItre, Agnes; Gruzintsev, Alex; Emelchenko, Gennadi; Masalov, Wladimir; Nga, Pham Thu

    2009-01-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) are the object of great interest due to the possibility, for appropriate PCs, to modify and control light propagation and even to influence the emission properties of an emitter, such as its emission diagram and its life time. One of the most common approaches to prepare 3D PCs takes advantage of the spontaneous self-organisation of spherical colloidal particles. Various self-assembly techniques such as sedimentation, convective or Langmuir-Blodgett ones have been studied as they provide a low cost and relatively easy protocol to obtain artificial opals. SiO 2 opals exhibit a pseudo-band gap. Nevertheless the coupling of II-VI nanocrystal emitters in such PCs allows one to recognize and study some basic problems. Large opals have been prepared by the sedimentation method and the size of the balls has been adjusted so that the pseudo-band gap of those PCs lies in the same region as the emission band of CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals. Diagrams of radiation and the modification of the spontaneous life time of the embedded nanocrystals will be presented and discussed. Introducing well-defined defects in PCs which are necessary to guide the photons through the crystal remains a hard technological challenge. Several top-down methods have been investigated. We will present different bottom-up routes proposed by different groups to engineer planar defects into colloidal PCs.

  20. Inverse Opal Photonic Crystals as an Optofluidic Platform for Fast Analysis of Hydrocarbon Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiwei; Mahpeykar, Seyed Milad; Burgess, Ian B; Wang, Xihua

    2018-06-13

    Most of the reported optofluidic devices analyze liquid by measuring its refractive index. Recently, the wettability of liquid on various substrates has also been used as a key sensing parameter in optofluidic sensors. However, the above-mentioned techniques face challenges in the analysis of the relative concentration of components in an alkane hydrocarbon mixture, as both refractive indices and wettabilities of alkane hydrocarbons are very close. Here, we propose to apply volatility of liquid as the key sensing parameter, correlate it to the optical property of liquid inside inverse opal photonic crystals, and construct powerful optofluidic sensors for alkane hydrocarbon identification and analysis. We have demonstrated that via evaporation of hydrocarbons inside the periodic structure of inverse opal photonic crystals and observation of their reflection spectra, an inverse opal film could be used as a fast-response optofluidic sensor to accurately differentiate pure hydrocarbon liquids and relative concentrations of their binary and ternary mixtures in tens of seconds. In these 3D photonic crystals, pure chemicals with different volatilities would have different evaporation rates and can be easily identified via the total drying time. For multicomponent mixtures, the same strategy is applied to determine the relative concentration of each component simply by measuring drying time under different temperatures. Using this optofluidic sensing platform, we have determined the relative concentrations of ternary hydrocarbon mixtures with the difference of only one carbon between alkane hydrocarbons, which is a big step toward detailed hydrocarbon analysis for practical use.

  1. Stretched inverse opal colloid crystal substrates-induced orientation of fibroblast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y C; Tang, Z M; Feng, Z Q; Xie, Z Y; Gu, Z Z

    2010-01-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in studying the interaction between mammalian cells and nanometer-sized structures. However, the effect of nanostructures on cell behavior, such as cell morphology and alignment, is still largely unknown. Inverse opal colloid crystal substrates, which can be stretched to produce nano-scale pore structures of different degrees of orientation, serve as a convenient model system to study the effect of nanotopography on cell morphology and cell alignment. In this work, we fabricated inverse opal colloidal crystal films that were either unstretched or stretched to three, four or six times their original length, producing pore structures of increasing degree of orientation. Human dermal fibroblast-fetal (HDF-f) cells were seeded and cultured on these four types of substrates. The results from fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated that cells showed the highest degree of alignment when cultured on inverse opal colloid crystal films that were stretched the most (six times original length). The results also demonstrated that the orientation of nanostructures could affect both the morphology and growth direction of fibroblasts. The ability to control the direction of cell growth through the engineering of nanostructures could have important applications in tissue engineering, especially for tissues with anisotropic structures, such as cardiac muscle, blood vessel, tendon and ligament.

  2. Inverse gold photonic crystals and conjugated polymer coated opals for functional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landon, P.B.; Gutierrez, Jose; Ferraris, John P.; Martinez, I.L.; Giridharagopal, Rajiv; Wu, Y.-C.; Lee, Sergey; Parikh, Kunjal; Gillespie, Jessica; Ussery, Geoffrey; Karimi, Behzad; Baughman, Ray; Zakhidov, Anvar; Glosser, R

    2003-10-01

    Inverse gold photonic crystals templated from synthetic opals with a face centered cubic (FCC) crystal lattice were constructed by heat converting gold chloride to metallic gold. Tetrahedral formations constructed of alternating large and small octahedrons oriented in the zinc sulfide structure were created by controlling the infiltration of gold chloride. Silica spheres were coated with polyanilinesulfonic acid, polypyrrole, poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) and 5 nm colloidal gold. Ordinary yeast cells were coated with polyanilinesulfonic acid, polypyrrole and 5 nm colloidal gold. Spheres coated with MEH-PPV were dispersed in H{sub 2}O and coated with polyelectrolytes which recharged and sterically stabilized the colloidal surfaces. The recharged spheres self-assembled by sedimentation with a FCC crystalline lattice possessing 500 {mu}m wide and 1 mm long crystallites. Silica spheres with diameters as large as 1500 {mu}m were self-assembled along the [1 0 0] direction of the FCC crystal lattice. Opals infiltrated with gold and opals constructed from polymer coated spheres were co-infiltrated with polypropylene yielding inverse polypropylene composite photonic crystals.

  3. Sensitivity of modeled ozone concentrations to uncertainties in biogenic emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roselle, S.J.

    1992-06-01

    The study examines the sensitivity of regional ozone (O3) modeling to uncertainties in biogenic emissions estimates. The United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Regional Oxidant Model (ROM) was used to simulate the photochemistry of the northeastern United States for the period July 2-17, 1988. An operational model evaluation showed that ROM had a tendency to underpredict O3 when observed concentrations were above 70-80 ppb and to overpredict O3 when observed values were below this level. On average, the model underpredicted daily maximum O3 by 14 ppb. Spatial patterns of O3, however, were reproduced favorably by the model. Several simulations were performed to analyze the effects of uncertainties in biogenic emissions on predicted O3 and to study the effectiveness of two strategies of controlling anthropogenic emissions for reducing high O3 concentrations. Biogenic hydrocarbon emissions were adjusted by a factor of 3 to account for the existing range of uncertainty in these emissions. The impact of biogenic emission uncertainties on O3 predictions depended upon the availability of NOx. In some extremely NOx-limited areas, increasing the amount of biogenic emissions decreased O3 concentrations. Two control strategies were compared in the simulations: (1) reduced anthropogenic hydrocarbon emissions, and (2) reduced anthropogenic hydrocarbon and NOx emissions. The simulations showed that hydrocarbon emission controls were more beneficial to the New York City area, but that combined NOx and hydrocarbon controls were more beneficial to other areas of the Northeast. Hydrocarbon controls were more effective as biogenic hydrocarbon emissions were reduced, whereas combined NOx and hydrocarbon controls were more effective as biogenic hydrocarbon emissions were increased

  4. Determination of the real structure of artificial and natural opals on the basis of three-dimensional reconstructions of reciprocal space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliseev, A. A.; Gorozhankin, D. F.; Napolskii, K. S.; Petukhov, A. V.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Vasilieva, A. V.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Byelov, D. V.; Bouwman, W. G.; Kvashnina, K. O.; Chernyshov, D. Yu.; Bosak, A. A.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2009-10-01

    The distribution of the scattering intensity in the reciprocal space for natural and artificial opals has been reconstructed from a set of small-angle X-ray diffraction patterns. The resulting three-dimensional intensity maps are used to analyze the defect structure of opals. The structure of artificial opals can be satisfactorily described in the Wilson probability model with the prevalence of layers in the fcc environment. The diffraction patterns observed for a natural opal confirm the presence of sufficiently long unequally occupied fcc domains.

  5. Preparation and photonic bandgap properties of Na1/2Bi1/2TiO3 inverse opal photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhengwen; Zhou Ji; Huang Xueguang; Xie Qin; Fu Ming; Li Bo; Li Longtu

    2009-01-01

    The Na 1/2 Bi 1/2 TiO 3 (NBT) inverse opal photonic crystals were prepared by the self-assembly technique in combination with a sol-gel method. In the preparation process, NBT precursors were filled into the interstices of the opal template assembled by monodispersive polystyrene microspheres. The polystyrene template was then removed by calcination at 800 deg. C for 5 h, meanwhile, a perovskite NBT inverse opal photonic crystal was formed. An optical micrograph shows that the NBT inverse opals reflect green-yellow light strongly. Moreover, a photonic band gap was observed by reflective spectra of NBT sample

  6. Seasonal trends of biogenic terpene emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmig, Detlev; Daly, Ryan Woodfin; Milford, Jana; Guenther, Alex

    2013-09-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from six coniferous tree species, i.e. Pinus ponderosa (Ponderosa Pine), Picea pungens (Blue Spruce), Pseudotsuga menziesii (Rocky Mountain Douglas Fir) and Pinus longaeva (Bristlecone Pine), as well as from two deciduous species, Quercus gambelii (Gamble Oak) and Betula occidentalis (Western River Birch) were studied over a full annual growing cycle. Monoterpene (MT) and sesquiterpene (SQT) emissions rates were quantified in a total of 1236 individual branch enclosure samples. MT dominated coniferous emissions, producing greater than 95% of BVOC emissions. MT and SQT demonstrated short-term emission dependence with temperature. Two oxygenated MT, 1,8-cineol and piperitone, were both light and temperature dependent. Basal emission rates (BER, normalized to 1000μmolm(-2)s(-1) and 30°C) were generally higher in spring and summer than in winter; MT seasonal BER from the coniferous trees maximized between 1.5 and 6.0μgg(-1)h(-1), while seasonal lows were near 0.1μgg(-1)h(-1). The fractional contribution of individual MT to total emissions was found to fluctuate with season. SQT BER measured from the coniferous trees ranged from emissions modeling, was not found to exhibit discernible growth season trends. A seasonal correction factor proposed by others in previous work to account for a sinusoidal shaped emission pattern was applied to the data. Varying levels of agreement were found between the data and model results for the different plant species seasonal data sets using this correction. Consequently, the analyses on this extensive data set suggest that it is not feasible to apply a universal seasonal correction factor across different vegetation species. A modeling exercise comparing two case scenarios, (1) without and (2) with consideration of the seasonal changes in emission factors illustrated large deviations when emission factors are applied for other seasons than those in which they were experimentally

  7. A multi-physics analysis for the actuation of the SSS in opal reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferraro Diego

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available OPAL is a 20 MWth multi-purpose open-pool type Research Reactor located at Lucas Heights, Australia. It was designed, built and commissioned by INVAP between 2000 and 2006 and it has been operated by the Australia Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO showing a very good overall performance. On November 2016, OPAL reached 10 years of continuous operation, becoming one of the most reliable and available in its kind worldwide, with an unbeaten record of being fully operational 307 days a year. One of the enhanced safety features present in this state-of-art reactor is the availability of an independent, diverse and redundant Second Shutdown System (SSS, which consists in the drainage of the heavy water reflector contained in the Reflector Vessel. As far as high quality experimental data is available from reactor commissioning and operation stages and even from early component design validation stages, several models both regarding neutronic and thermo-hydraulic approaches have been developed during recent years using advanced calculations tools and the novel capabilities to couple them. These advanced models were developed in order to assess the capability of such codes to simulate and predict complex behaviours and develop highly detail analysis. In this framework, INVAP developed a three-dimensional CFD model that represents the detailed hydraulic behaviour of the Second Shutdown System for an actuation scenario, where the heavy water drainage 3D temporal profiles inside the Reflector Vessel can be obtained. This model was validated, comparing the computational results with experimental measurements performed in a real-size physical model built by INVAP during early OPAL design engineering stages. Furthermore, detailed 3D Serpent Monte Carlo models are also available, which have been already validated with experimental data from reactor commissioning and operating cycles. In the present work the neutronic and thermohydraulic

  8. A multi-physics analysis for the actuation of the SSS in opal reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Diego; Alberto, Patricio; Villarino, Eduardo; Doval, Alicia

    2018-05-01

    OPAL is a 20 MWth multi-purpose open-pool type Research Reactor located at Lucas Heights, Australia. It was designed, built and commissioned by INVAP between 2000 and 2006 and it has been operated by the Australia Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) showing a very good overall performance. On November 2016, OPAL reached 10 years of continuous operation, becoming one of the most reliable and available in its kind worldwide, with an unbeaten record of being fully operational 307 days a year. One of the enhanced safety features present in this state-of-art reactor is the availability of an independent, diverse and redundant Second Shutdown System (SSS), which consists in the drainage of the heavy water reflector contained in the Reflector Vessel. As far as high quality experimental data is available from reactor commissioning and operation stages and even from early component design validation stages, several models both regarding neutronic and thermo-hydraulic approaches have been developed during recent years using advanced calculations tools and the novel capabilities to couple them. These advanced models were developed in order to assess the capability of such codes to simulate and predict complex behaviours and develop highly detail analysis. In this framework, INVAP developed a three-dimensional CFD model that represents the detailed hydraulic behaviour of the Second Shutdown System for an actuation scenario, where the heavy water drainage 3D temporal profiles inside the Reflector Vessel can be obtained. This model was validated, comparing the computational results with experimental measurements performed in a real-size physical model built by INVAP during early OPAL design engineering stages. Furthermore, detailed 3D Serpent Monte Carlo models are also available, which have been already validated with experimental data from reactor commissioning and operating cycles. In the present work the neutronic and thermohydraulic models, available for

  9. Accounting for urban biogenic fluxes in regional carbon budgets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Brady S; Wang, Jonathan A; Hutyra, Lucy R; Gately, Conor K; Getson, Jackie M; Friedl, Mark A

    2017-08-15

    Many ecosystem models incorrectly treat urban areas as devoid of vegetation and biogenic carbon (C) fluxes. We sought to improve estimates of urban biomass and biogenic C fluxes using existing, nationally available data products. We characterized biogenic influence on urban C cycling throughout Massachusetts, USA using an ecosystem model that integrates improved representation of urban vegetation, growing conditions associated with urban heat island (UHI), and altered urban phenology. Boston's biomass density is 1/4 that of rural forests, however 87% of Massachusetts' urban landscape is vegetated. Model results suggest that, kilogram-for-kilogram, urban vegetation cycles C twice as fast as rural forests. Urban vegetation releases (R E ) and absorbs (GEE) the equivalent of 11 and 14%, respectively, of anthropogenic emissions in the most urban portions of the state. While urban vegetation in Massachusetts fully sequesters anthropogenic emissions from smaller cities in the region, Boston's UHI reduces annual C storage by >20% such that vegetation offsets only 2% of anthropogenic emissions. Asynchrony between temporal patterns of biogenic and anthropogenic C fluxes further constrains the emissions mitigation potential of urban vegetation. However, neglecting to account for biogenic C fluxes in cities can impair efforts to accurately monitor, report, verify, and reduce anthropogenic emissions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of biogenic gas production on coalbed methane recovery index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Guo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In investigating the effect of biogenic gas production on the recovery of coalbed methane (CBM, coal samples spanning different ranks were applied in the microbial-functioned simulation experiments for biogenic methane production. Based on the biogenic methane yield, testing of pore structures, and the isothermal adsorption data of coals used before and after the simulation experiments, several key parameters related to the recovery of CBM, including recovery rate, gas saturation and ratio of critical desorption pressure to reservoir pressure, etc., were calculated and the corresponding variations were further analyzed. The results show that one of the significant functions of microbial communities on coal is possibly to weaken its affinity for methane gas, especially with the advance of coal ranks; and that by enhancing the pore system of coal, which can be evidenced by the increase of porosity and permeability, the samples collected from Qianqiu (Yima in Henan and Shaqu (Liulin in Shanxi coal mines all see a notable increase in the critical desorption pressure, gas saturation and recovery rate, as compared to the moderate changes of that of Guandi (Xishan in Shanxi coal sample. It is concluded that the significance of enhanced biogenic gas is not only in the increase of CBM resources and the improvement of CBM recoverability, but in serving as an engineering reference for domestic coalbed biogenic gas production.

  11. Reduction of Biogenic Amines during Miso Fermentation by Lactobacillus plantarum as a Starter Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Chen; Kung, Hsien-Feng; Huang, Ya-Ling; Wu, Chien-Hui; Huang, Yu-Ru; Tsai, Yung-Hsiang

    2016-09-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum D-103 isolated from a miso product that possesses amine-degrading activity was used as a starter culture in miso fermentation (25°C for 120 days) in this study. The salt content in control samples (without starter culture) and inoculated samples (inoculated with L. plantarum D-103) remained constant at 10.4% of the original salt concentration throughout fermentation, whereas the pH value decreased from 6.2 to 4.6 during fermentation. The inoculated samples had significantly lower (P < 0.05) levels of total volatile basic nitrogen than control samples after 40 days of fermentation. After 120 days of fermentation, the histamine and overall biogenic amine contents in inoculated samples were reduced by 58 and 27%, respectively, compared with control samples. To our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that application of a starter culture with amine-degrading activity in miso products was effective in reducing the accumulation of biogenic amines.

  12. Quality properties, fatty acids, and biogenic amines profile of fresh tilapia stored in ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulawik, Piotr; Özoğul, Fatih; Glew, Robert H

    2013-07-01

    This work determines quality properties and fatty acids content of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) stored in ice for 21 d. The quality properties consist of thiobarbituic acid (TBA), total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), trimethylamine (TMA), and microbiological analysis (total viable count (TVC), total coliform, Salmonella and Staphylococcus aureus) and determination of biogenic amines content (histamine, cadaverine, putrescine, spermine, spermidine, 2-phenylethylamine, agmatine, tyramine, and ammonia). Moreover, the fat, moisture, and ash composition as well as fatty acids profile have also been analyzed. The TBA, TVB-N, and biogenic amines analysis showed rather low levels of spoilage even after 21 d of storage. The microbiological analysis, however, showed that tilapia was unsuitable for consumption after just 10 d. The fat, ash, moisture, and fatty acids profile analysis showed that tilapia is not a good source of n-3 fatty acids. The research indicated that the microbiological analysis was the best method to establish spoilage of tilapia stored in ice, of all analytical methods performed in this study. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  13. Hydrocarbon delineation in Muskeg : distinguishing biogenic from petrogenic sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, C. [UMA Engineering Ltd., Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    The quantification of biogenic versus petrogenic hydrocarbons from an emulsion pipeline in a Muskeg setting in northeastern British Columbia was examined. This presentation provided an introduction and discussion of the challenges in Muskeg environments. It introduced the objectives of the study and the analytical approach. Some supporting literature involving studies on the distribution and origin of hydrocarbons in estuary sediments was also cited. Box plots of the physical and chemical characteristics of soil and chromatograms of gas chromatography flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were presented. Last, the approach to establish a true biogenic source and the recommended analytical program and corrections for biogenic input were discussed. The definition of contaminated peat was introduced. tabs., figs.

  14. Opal-A in glassy pumice, acid alteration, and the 1817 phreatomagmatic eruption at Kawah Ijen (Java), Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; van Hinsberg, Vincent; Berlo, Kim; Liesegang, Moritz; Iacovino, Kayla D.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Wright, Heather M.

    2018-01-01

    At Kawah Ijen (Indonesia), vigorous SO2 and HCl degassing sustains a hyperacid lake (pH ~0) and intensely alters the subsurface, producing widespread residual silica and advanced argillic alteration products. In 1817, a VEI 2 phreatomagmatic eruption evacuated the lake, depositing a widespread layer of muddy ash fall, and sending lahars down river drainages. We discovered multiple types of opaline silica in juvenile low-silica dacite pumice and in particles within co-erupted laharic sediments. Most spectacular are opal-replaced phenocrysts of plagioclase and pyroxene adjacent to pristine matrix glass and melt inclusions. Opal-bearing pumice has been found at numerous sites, including where post-eruption infiltration of acid water is unlikely. Through detailed analyses of an initial sampling of 1817 eruption products, we find evidence for multiple origins of opaline materials in pumice and laharic sediments. Evidently, magma encountered acid-altered materials in the subsurface and triggered phreatomagmatic eruptions. Syn-eruptive incorporation of opal-alunite clasts, layered opal, and fragment-filled vesicles of opal and glass, all suggest magma-rock interactions in concert with vesiculation, followed by cooling within minutes. Our experiments at magmatic temperature confirm that the opaline materials would show noticeable degradation in time periods longer than a few tens of minutes. Some glassy laharic sedimentary grains are more andesitic than the main pumice type and may represent older volcanic materials that were altered beneath the lake bottom and were forcefully ejected during the 1817 eruption. A post-eruptive origin remains likely for most of the opal-replaced phenocrysts in pumice. Experiments at 25°C and 100°C reveal that when fresh pumice is bathed in Kawah Ijen hyperacid fluid for 6 weeks, plagioclase is replaced without altering either matrix glass or melt inclusions. Moreover, lack of evidence for high-temperature annealing of the opal suggests

  15. Opal-A in Glassy Pumice, Acid Alteration, and the 1817 Phreatomagmatic Eruption at Kawah Ijen (Java), Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; van Hinsberg, Vincent; Berlo, Kim; Liesegang, Moritz; Iacovino, Kayla; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Wright, Heather M.

    2018-02-01

    At Kawah Ijen (Indonesia), vigorous SO2 and HCl degassing sustains a hyperacid lake (pH 0) and intensely alters the subsurface, producing widespread residual silica and advanced argillic alteration products. In 1817, a VEI 2 phreatomagmatic eruption evacuated the lake, depositing a widespread layer of muddy ash fall, and sending lahars down river drainages. We discovered multiple types of opaline silica in juvenile low-silica dacite pumice and in particles within co-erupted laharic sediments. Most spectacular are opal-replaced phenocrysts of plagioclase and pyroxene adjacent to pristine matrix glass and melt inclusions. Opal-bearing pumice has been found at numerous sites, including where post-eruption infiltration of acid water is unlikely. Through detailed analyses of an initial sampling of 1817 eruption products, we find evidence for multiple origins of opaline materials in pumice and laharic sediments. Evidently, magma encountered acid-altered materials in the subsurface and triggered phreatomagmatic eruptions. Syn-eruptive incorporation of opal-alunite clasts, layered opal, and fragment-filled vesicles of opal and glass, all suggest magma-rock interactions in concert with vesiculation, followed by cooling within minutes. Our experiments at magmatic temperature confirm that the opaline materials would show noticeable degradation in time periods longer than a few tens of minutes. Some glassy laharic sedimentary grains are more andesitic than the main pumice type and may represent older volcanic materials that were altered beneath the lake bottom and were forcefully ejected during the 1817 eruption. A post-eruptive origin remains likely for most of the opal-replaced phenocrysts in pumice. Experiments at 25°C and 100°C reveal that when fresh pumice is bathed in Kawah Ijen hyperacid fluid for six weeks, plagioclase is replaced without altering either matrix glass or melt inclusions. Moreover, lack of evidence for high-temperature annealing of the opal suggests

  16. Ion-probe U–Pb dating of authigenic and detrital opal from Neogene-Quaternary alluvium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neymark, Leonid; Paces, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Knowing depositional ages of alluvial fans is essential for many tectonic, paleoclimatic, and geomorphic studies in arid environments. The use of U–Pb dating on secondary silica to establish the age of Neogene-Quaternary clastic sediments was tested on samples of authigenic and detrital opal and chalcedony from depths of ∼25 to 53 m in boreholes at Midway Valley, Nevada. Dating of authigenic opal present as rinds on rock clasts and in calcite/silica cements establishes minimum ages of alluvium deposition; dating of detrital opal or chalcedony derived from the source volcanic rocks gives the maximum age of sediment deposition.Materials analyzed included 12 samples of authigenic opal, one sample of fracture-coating opal from bedrock, one sample of detrital opal, and two samples of detrital chalcedony. Uranium–lead isotope data were obtained by both thermal ionization mass spectrometry and ion-microprobe. Uranium concentrations ranged from tens to hundreds of μg/g. Relatively large U/Pb allowed calculation of 206Pb/238U ages that ranged from 1.64±0.36 (2σ) to 6.16±0.50 Ma for authigenic opal and from 8.34±0.28 to 11.2±1.3 Ma for detrital opal/chalcedony. Three samples with the most radiogenic Pb isotope compositions also allowed calculation of 207Pb/235U ages, which were concordant with 206Pb/238U ages from the same samples.These results indicate that basin development at Midway Valley was initiated between about 8 and 6 Ma, and that the basin was filled at long-term average deposition rates of less than 1 cm/ka. Because alluvium in Midway Valley was derived from adjacent highlands at Yucca Mountain, the low rates of deposition determined in this study may imply a slow rate of erosion of Yucca Mountain. Volcanic strata underlying the basin are offset by a number of buried faults to a greater degree than the relatively smooth-sloping bedrock/alluvium contact. These geologic relations indicate that movement on most faults ceased prior to erosional

  17. Biogenic methane potential of marine sediments. Application of chemical thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arning, E.T.; Schulz, H.M. [Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ, Potsdam (Germany); Berk, W. van [Technical Univ. of Clausthal (Germany). Dept. of Hydrogeology

    2013-08-01

    Accumulations of biogenic methane-dominated gas are widespread and occur in a variety of depositional settings and rock types. However, the potential of biogenic methane remains underexplored. This is mainly due to the fact that quantitative assessments applying numerical modeling techniques for exploration purposes are generally lacking to date. Biogenic methane formation starts in relatively shallow marine sediments below the sulfate reduction zone. When sulfate is exhausted, methanogenesis via the CO{sub 2} reduction pathway is often the dominant biogenic methane formation process in marine sediments (Claypool and Kaplan, 1974). The process can be simplified by the reaction: 2CH{sub 2}O + Ca{sup 2+} + H{sub 2}O {yields} CH{sub 4} + CaCO{sub 3} + 2H{sup +}. The products of early diagenetic reactions initiate coupled equilibrium reactions that induce a new state of chemical equilibrium among minerals, pore water and gas. The driving force of the complex biogeochemical reactions in sedimentary environments during early diagenesis is the irreversible redox-conversion of organic matter. Early diagenetic formation of biogenic methane shortly after deposition ('early diagenesis') was retraced using PHREEQC computer code that is applied to calculate homogenous and heterogeneous mass-action equations in combination with one-dimensional diffusion driven transport (Parkhurst and Appelo, 1999). Our modeling approach incorporates interdependent diagenetic reactions evolving into a diffusive multi-component and multiphase system by means of thermodynamic equilibrium calculations of species distribution (Arning et al., 2011, 2012, 2013). Reaction kinetics of organic carbon conversion is integrated into the set of equilibrium reactions by defining type and amount of converted organic matter in a certain time step. It is the aim (1) to calculate quantitatively thermodynamic equilibrium conditions (composition of pore water, mineral phase and gas phase assemblage) in

  18. Non-enzymatic U(VI) interactions with biogenic mackinawite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeramani, H.; Qafoku, N. P.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Murayama, M.; Hochella, M. F.

    2011-12-01

    Reductive immobilization of hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] by stimulation of dissimilatory metal and/or sulfate reducing bacteria (DMRB or DSRB) has been extensively researched as a remediation strategy for subsurface U(VI) contamination. These bacteria derive energy by reducing oxidized metals as terminal electron acceptors, often utilizing organic substrates as electron donors. Thus, when evaluating the potential for in-situ uranium remediation in heterogeneous subsurface media, it is important to understand how the presence of alternative electron acceptors such as Fe(III) and sulfate affect U(VI) remediation and the long term behavior and reactivity of reduced uranium. Iron, an abundant subsurface element, represents a substantial sink for electrons from DMRB, and the reduction of Fe(III) leads to the formation of dissolved Fe(II) or to reactive biogenic Fe(II)- and mixed Fe(II)/Fe(III)- mineral phases. Consequently, abiotic U(VI) reduction by reactive forms of biogenic Fe(II) minerals could be a potentially important process for uranium immobilization. In our study, the DMRB Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 was used to synthesize a biogenic Fe(II)-bearing sulfide mineral: mackinawite, that has been characterized by XRD, SEM, HRTEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Batch experiments involving treated biogenic mackinawite and uranium (50:1 molar ratio) were carried out at room temperature under strict anoxic conditions. Following complete removal of uranium from solution, the biogenic mackinawite was analyzed by a suite of analytical techniques including XAS, HRTEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy to determine the speciation of uranium and investigate concomitant Fe(II)-phase transformation. Determining the speciation of uranium is critical to success of a remediation strategy. The present work elucidates non-enzymatic/abiotic molecular scale redox interactions between biogenic mackinawite and uranium.

  19. Uranium speciation in the environment: study of opals from Nopal I (Mexico) and mill tailings from Gunnar (Canada)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othmane, G.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the processes of uranium migration and sequestration is an important issue for the prediction of radionuclide retardation in the vicinity of uranium mine tailings sites or for the safety assessment of potential high-level nuclear waste repositories. Uranium speciation, controlled by biotic and abiotic factors, represents a key parameter for the control of uranium transfer in the environment. This study firstly deals with uranium speciation in opals from the Nopal I uranium deposit (Mexico). Microscopic observations of opals at the nano-scale revealed the occurrence of vorlanite, cubic CaUO 4 . This was the first time this rare calcium uranate has been found displaying a cubic morphology, in agreement with its crystal structure. Nopal I opals have been further investigated through time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy. The opals spectra and their comparison with those of experimentally produced standards indicate occurrence of mono- or polymeric uranyl complexes (associated or not with calcium or phosphate) sorbed onto internal surface of opal around pH 7-8. Finally, the speciation of uranium was studied in mill tailings from Gunnar (Canada). In the first tailings site, uranium primarily occurs as monomeric, inner-sphere uranyl complexes sharing edges with Fe(O,OH) 6 octahedral sites of iron-oxy-hydroxides and chlorite. Our results suggested that U(VI) co-precipitates with iron (oxy-hydr)oxides predominate in the second tailings sites. Therefore uranium mobility in Gunnar is governed by sorption/desorption and dissolution/(co)precipitation processes. (author)

  20. Software Application Profile: Opal and Mica: open-source software solutions for epidemiological data management, harmonization and dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Dany; Marcon, Yannick; Fortier, Isabel; Burton, Paul; Ferretti, Vincent

    2017-10-01

    Improving the dissemination of information on existing epidemiological studies and facilitating the interoperability of study databases are essential to maximizing the use of resources and accelerating improvements in health. To address this, Maelstrom Research proposes Opal and Mica, two inter-operable open-source software packages providing out-of-the-box solutions for epidemiological data management, harmonization and dissemination. Opal and Mica are two standalone but inter-operable web applications written in Java, JavaScript and PHP. They provide web services and modern user interfaces to access them. Opal allows users to import, manage, annotate and harmonize study data. Mica is used to build searchable web portals disseminating study and variable metadata. When used conjointly, Mica users can securely query and retrieve summary statistics on geographically dispersed Opal servers in real-time. Integration with the DataSHIELD approach allows conducting more complex federated analyses involving statistical models. Opal and Mica are open-source and freely available at [www.obiba.org] under a General Public License (GPL) version 3, and the metadata models and taxonomies that accompany them are available under a Creative Commons licence. © The Author 2017; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association

  1. Biomass burning - Combustion emissions, satellite imagery, and biogenic emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joel S.; Cofer, Wesley R., III; Winstead, Edward L.; Rhinehart, Robert P.; Cahoon, Donald R., Jr.; Sebacher, Daniel I.; Sebacher, Shirley; Stocks, Brian J.

    1991-01-01

    After detailing a technique for the estimation of the instantaneous emission of trace gases produced by biomass burning, using satellite imagery, attention is given to the recent discovery that burning results in significant enhancement of biogenic emissions of N2O, NO, and CH4. Biomass burning accordingly has an immediate and long-term impact on the production of atmospheric trace gases. It is presently demonstrated that satellite imagery of fires may be used to estimate combustion emissions, and could be used to estimate long-term postburn biogenic emission of trace gases to the atmosphere.

  2. Determination of the real structure of artificial and natural opals on the basis of three-dimensional reconstructions of reciprocal space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eliseev, A.A.; Gorozhankin, D.F.; Napolskii, K.S.; Petukhov, A.V.; Sapoletova, N.A.; Vasilieva, A.V.; Grigoryeva, N.A.; Mistonov, A.A.; Belov, D.V.; Bouwman, W.G.; Kvashnina, K.; Chernyshov, D.Y.; Bosak, A.A.; Grigoriev, S.V.

    2009-01-01

    The distribution of the scattering intensity in the reciprocal space for natural and artificial opals has been reconstructed from a set of small-angle X-ray diffraction patterns. The resulting three-dimensional intensity maps are used to analyze the defect structure of opals. The structure of

  3. 76 FR 80368 - Notification of Teleconferences of the Science Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... Office announces two teleconferences of the SAB Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel to review EPA's draft... policy, notice is hereby given that the SAB Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel will hold two public...

  4. Biogenic volatile organic compounds - small is beautiful

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, S. M.; Asensio, D.; Li, Q.; Penuelas, J.

    2012-12-01

    While canopy and regional scale flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs) are essential to obtain an integrated picture of total compound reaching the atmosphere, many fascinating and important emission details are waiting to be discovered at smaller scales, in different ecological and functional compartments. We concentrate on bVOCs below ground to plant species, and can be extracted from decaying litter. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the rhizosphere provide a specialised carbon source for micro-organisms, helping to define the micro-organism community structure, and impacting on nutrient cycles which are partly controlled by microorganisms. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the soil system could also affect the aboveground structure of ecosystems because of their role in plant defence strategies and as mediating chemicals in allelopathy. A gradient of monoterpene concentration was found in soil around Pinus sylvestris and Pinus halepensis, decreasing with distance from the tree. Some compounds (α-pinene, sabinene, humulene and caryophyllene) in mineral soil were linearly correlated with the total amount of each compound in the overlying litter, indicating that litter might be the dominant source of these compounds. However, α-pinene did not fall within the correlation, indicating a source other than litter, probably root exudates. We also show that rhizosphere bVOCs can be a carbon source for soil microbes. In a horizontal gradient from Populus tremula trees, microbes closest to the tree trunk were better enzymatically equipped to metabolise labeled monoterpene substrate. Monoterpenes can also increase the degradation rate in soil of the persistant organic pollutants, likely acting as analogues for the cometabo-lism of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) Flowers of a ginger species (Alpinia kwangsiensis) and a fig species (Ficus hispida) showed different bVOC signals pre- and post pollination. For Ficus hispida, there are three

  5. UPLC柱前衍生法分析小黄鱼中生物胺%Determination of Biogenic Amines in Small Yellow Croakers by UPLC with Precolumn Dansylations and Analysis of the Characteristic Biogenic Amines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭慧; 刘晓琴; 晁鲁平; 蒋益虹

    2017-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the changes of biogenic amines and characteristic BAs in small yellow croakers.Methods:UPLC with UV detection was used to detect the content of 8 biogenic amines (BAs) including tyramine (Tyr),2-phenylethylamine(2-Phe),putrescine (Put),cadaverine (Cad),histamine (His),tryptamine (Try),spermine (Spm) and spermidine (Spd) in the small yellow croaker samples.Through the correlation between freshness index and biogenic amines,we determined the characteristic biogenic amines in small yellow croakers.The results showed that:TVC,TVB-N and biogenic amine contents increased significantly during storage.The contents of Put,Cad,His and Tyr were very high and they were significantly associated with the changes of TVC and TVB-N.Conclusion:Put,Cad and Tyr were determined to be characteristic BAs in small yellow croakers.%目的:研究非鲭科鱼类小黄鱼贮藏过程中生物胺变化规律及其特征生物胺.方法:采用丹酰氯柱前衍生UPLC方法检测鱼肉中的生物胺含量,通过分析菌落总数(TVC)、挥发性盐基氮(TVB-N)与主要生物胺的相关性,确定小黄鱼的特征生物胺.结果:随时间的延长,小黄鱼贮藏过程中TVC、TVB-N、生物胺含量均有所增加,且温度越高变化越剧烈;贮藏过程中小黄鱼的主要生物胺是腐胺、尸胺、酪胺、组胺,其变化与TVC、TVB-N相关性极高.结论:小黄鱼腐败过程中的特征生物胺是腐胺、尸胺、酪胺,建议其作为小黄鱼质量评价的参考指标.

  6. Calcite/opal deposits at Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Pedogenic or hypogene?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, C.A.; Schluter, C.M.; Harmon, R.S.

    1994-01-01

    This study is part of the research program of the Yucca Mountain Project intended to provide the State of Nevada with a detailed assessment of the geology and geochemistry of Yucca Mountain and adjacent regions. The purpose of this paper is to consider all of the geological and geochemical data available for the calcite/opal deposits at Yucca Mountain and to ascertain whether this data favors a pedogenic or hyogene origin for these deposits. Far from being of esoteric concern, this subject is of paramount importance to the debate which rages around the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a high-level radioactive waste repository site. It is also the purpose of this paper to serve as a foundation for a lengthy feature article to be submitted for publication in 1994. In addition, a stand has been taken by the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences against the upwelling-water model (a vote of 17 to 0 against), and this same panel report has concluded that open-quotes there is no compelling evidence for the repetitive flooding of the environment by expulsion of groundwaterclose quotes and that open-quotes instead, the evidence strongly supports the idea that the near-surface mineral deposits resulted from percolating rainwater, which carried soil minerals down into rock fracturesclose quotes. Based on such information the Department of Energy has stated that it open-quotes finds no basis to continue to study the origin of these specific depositsclose quotes. This study, based upon many different independent lines of evidence, reaches the opposite conclusion and instead favors a hypogene spring-travertine origin for the controversial calcite/opal deposits at Yucca Mountain. This study recognizes a pedogenic carbonate component at Yucca Mountain, but argues that this component is distinct from, and sometimes intermixed with, the calcite/opal deposits

  7. Thermoresponsive Polymers and Inverse Opal Hydrogels for the Detection of Diols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, Jean-Philippe; Wischerhoff, Erik; Bernin, Robert; Hettrich, Cornelia; Koetz, Joachim; Sütterlin, Martin; Tiersch, Brigitte; Laschewsky, André

    2016-05-03

    Responsive inverse opal hydrogels functionalized by boroxole moieties were synthesized and explored as sensor platforms for various low molar mass as well as polymeric diols and polyols, including saccharides, glycopolymers and catechols, by exploiting the diol induced modulation of their structural color. The underlying thermoresponsive water-soluble copolymers and hydrogels exhibit a coil-to-globule or volume phase transition, respectively, of the LCST-type. They were prepared from oligoethylene oxide methacrylate (macro)monomers and functionalized via copolymerization to bear benzoboroxole moieties. The resulting copolymers represent weak polyacids, which can bind specifically to diols within an appropriate pH window. Due to the resulting modulation of the overall hydrophilicity of the systems and the consequent shift of their phase transition temperature, the usefulness of such systems for indicating the presence of catechols, saccharides, and glycopolymers was studied, exploiting the diol/polyol induced shifts of the soluble polymers' cloud point, or the induced changes of the hydrogels' swelling. In particular, the increased acidity of benzoboroxoles compared to standard phenylboronic acids allowed performing the studies in PBS buffer (phosphate buffered saline) at the physiologically relevant pH of 7.4. The inverse opals constructed of these thermo- and analyte-responsive hydrogels enabled following the binding of specific diols by the induced shift of the optical stop band. Their highly porous structure enabled the facile and specific optical detection of not only low molar mass but also of high molar mass diol/polyol analytes such as glycopolymers. Accordingly, such thermoresponsive inverse opal systems functionalized with recognition units represent attractive and promising platforms for the facile sensing of even rather big analytes by simple optical means, or even by the bare eye.

  8. Magnetic Dinner Salads: The Role of Biogenic Magnetite in Cryopreservation for Common Food Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, T. M.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Kobayashi, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Biogenically-precipitated magnetite has been found in organisms ranging from Bacteria, single-celled protists, and many of the animal phyla, where its major function is navigation and magnetoreception. To date there is but a single report of biogenic magnetite in plants (essentially, magnetoferritin), and that is in common grass (Festuca species, from Gajdardziska-Josifovska et. al. doi:10.1127/0935-1221/2001/0013/0863). Recent developments in cryopreservation suggest that ~ 1 mT, ~ 10 Hz oscillating magnetic fields can drastically reduce ice nucleation during freezing, promote supercooling, and minimize cellular damage in living tissues (e.g., Kaku et al., doi: 10.1016/j.cryobiol.2012.02.001). Kobayashi & Kirschvink (2014, doi:10.1016/j.cryobiol.2013.12.002) suggest that biogenic magnetite crystals could be the nucleating site for damaging ice crystals, and that they would be driven magneto-mechanically to rotate in those oscillating fields which could inhibit the ice crystal nucleation process. This prompted our investigation into the magnetite content of ordinary fruit and vegetable food products, as knowledge of the natural levels of biogenic magnetite in the human food supply could guide the selection of which foods might work for this type of cryopreservation. Our study involved a range of common foods including avocados, bananas, garlic, and apples. Samples were prepared in a clean lab environment kept free of contaminant particles, and subjected to a variety of standard rock-magnetic tests including IRM and ARM acquisition, and the corresponding Af demagnetization, on a standard 2G™ SRM. Results are consistent with moderately interacting single-domain magnetite (see figure), with moderate inter-particle interaction effects. Typical magnetite concentrations in these samples are in the range of .1 to 1 ng/g for room temperature samples, increasing to the range of 1-10 ng/g when measured frozen (to inhibit thermal rotation of small particles and clumps). If

  9. The laser system for calibration and monotoring of the Opal jet chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biebel, O.; Boden, B.; Bug, S.; Eyring, A.; Fischer, H.M.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Gross, S.; Knop, G.; Levegruen, S.; Maringer, G.; Mauer, E.; Maur, U.; Nellen, B.; Neumann, H.; Rollnik, A.; Schreiber, S.; Simon, A.; Thiebes, J.; Wolf, B.; Wuensch, B.; Boerner, H.; Breuker, H.; Hagemann, J.; Hauschild, M.; Heuer, R.D.; Karner, K.; Linser, G.; Runolfsson, O.; Seidl, W.; Voillat, D.; Wicht, P.; Schmitt, H. von der; Wagner, A.

    1992-01-01

    In this report we describe the construction and performance of the laser system which was used in Summer 1989 for the initial calibration of the OPAL jet chamber after installation on the LEP beam axis and which has served as a monitoring tool since then. Two Nd:YAG lasers are used to generate 48 high precision double beams which enter the chamber at fixed positions. The main features of the roughly 450 optical components are described and the beam alignment procedures are explained. Results are given for jet chamber calibration constants such as drift velocity, Lorentz angle, and residual sagittas. (orig.)

  10. The Knight shift in liquid gallium confined within porous glasses and opals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charnaya, E V; Michel, D; Tien, C; Kumzerov, Yu A; Yaskov, D

    2003-01-01

    71 Ga nuclear magnetic resonance studies were carried out for liquid gallium embedded into porous glasses with different pore sizes and into artificial opals within the temperature range from about 320 K to complete confined gallium freezing. A general decrease in the Knight shift compared to the bulk melt depending on pore sizes was observed in contrast to theoretical predictions. Correlations between alterations in the Knight shift and pore sizes were established for particular pore geometry. It was also observed that confined geometry affects the temperature dependence of the Knight shift in liquid gallium

  11. Tuning optical properties of opal photonic crystals by structural defects engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Stasio, F.; Cucini, M.; Berti, L.; Comoretto, D.; Abbotto, A.; Bellotto, L.; Manfredi, N.; Marinzi, C.

    2009-06-01

    We report on the preparation and optical characterization of three dimensional colloidal photonic crystal (PhC) containing an engineered planar defect embedding photoactive push-pull dyes. Free standing polystyrene films having thickness between 0.6 and 3 mm doped with different dipolar chromophores were prepared. These films were sandwiched between two artificial opals creating a PhC structure with planar defect. The system was characterized by reflectance at normal incidence angle (R), variable angle transmittance (T) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) Evidence of defect states were observed in T and R spectra which allow the light to propagate for selected frequencies within the pseudogap (stop band).

  12. Interpretation of small-angle diffraction experiments on opal-like photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, F.; Muldarisnur, M.; Sharifi, P.; Zabel, H.

    2011-08-01

    Comprehensive structural information on artificial opals involving the deviations from the strongly dominating face-centered cubic structure is still missing. Recent structure investigations with neutrons and synchrotron sources have shown a high degree of order but also a number of unexpected scattering features. Here, we point out that the exclusion of the allowed 002-type diffraction peaks by a small atomic form factor is not obvious and that surface scattering has to be included as a possible source for the diffraction peaks. Our neutron diffraction data indicate that surface scattering is the main reason for the smallest-angle peaks in the diffraction patterns.

  13. Application of the GEANT3 geometry package to the description of the OPAL detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, J; Brun, R; Bruyant, F; Zanarini, P; Bullock, F W; Hobson, P R; Chang, C Y; Dumont, J J; Hemingway, R J; McPherson, A C

    1987-10-01

    We present the general features of the GEANT3 package for coding the geometrical structure of a large and complex detector in the computer programs used for their design and analysis. This package has been developed in the context of Monte Carlo studies of detector performance but should be well matched to the problem of analysis. As a specific example, we illustrate the description of the OPAL detector for the Large Electron Positron collider at CERN and show the results of a sample study using this description.

  14. Fabrication and Photo-Detecting Performance of 2D ZnO Inverse Opal Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Lin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional (2D ZnO inverse opal (IO films were fabricated by co-assembly of sacrificed polystyrene (PS microspheres and citric acid/zinc acetate (CA/ZA aqueous solution at an oil–water interface followed by calcination. Their morphologies could be controlled by the surface property of polymer templates and CA/ZA molar ratio. Moreover, photo-detecting devices based on such films were constructed, which showed high photocurrent (up to 4.6 μA, excellent spectral selectivity, and reversible response to optical switch.

  15. Quality control in public participation assessments of water quality: the OPAL Water Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, N L; Turner, S D; Goldsmith, B; Gosling, L; Davidson, T A

    2016-07-22

    Public participation in scientific data collection is a rapidly expanding field. In water quality surveys, the involvement of the public, usually as trained volunteers, generally includes the identification of aquatic invertebrates to a broad taxonomic level. However, quality assurance is often not addressed and remains a key concern for the acceptance of publicly-generated water quality data. The Open Air Laboratories (OPAL) Water Survey, launched in May 2010, aimed to encourage interest and participation in water science by developing a 'low-barrier-to-entry' water quality survey. During 2010, over 3000 participant-selected lakes and ponds were surveyed making this the largest public participation lake and pond survey undertaken to date in the UK. But the OPAL approach of using untrained volunteers and largely anonymous data submission exacerbates quality control concerns. A number of approaches were used in order to address data quality issues including: sensitivity analysis to determine differences due to operator, sampling effort and duration; direct comparisons of identification between participants and experienced scientists; the use of a self-assessment identification quiz; the use of multiple participant surveys to assess data variability at single sites over short periods of time; comparison of survey techniques with other measurement variables and with other metrics generally considered more accurate. These quality control approaches were then used to screen the OPAL Water Survey data to generate a more robust dataset. The OPAL Water Survey results provide a regional and national assessment of water quality as well as a first national picture of water clarity (as suspended solids concentrations). Less than 10 % of lakes and ponds surveyed were 'poor' quality while 26.8 % were in the highest water quality band. It is likely that there will always be a question mark over untrained volunteer generated data simply because quality assurance is uncertain

  16. Inverse opal pH sensors with various protic monomers copolymerized with polyhydroxyethylmethacrylate hydrogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jinsub; Han, Sung Gu; Lee, Wonmok

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We polymerized four different inverse opal pH sensors by using vinyl monomers containing acidic or basic substituents. ► Stepwise swelling response from polyprotic acid sensor was investigated. ► Opposite color changing responses were obtained for acidic and basic sensors. ► Composite pH sensor with wide pH sensing range was fabricated by mixing different monomers. ► Both acid and base sensors show the response time as fast as ∼10 s. - Abstract: pH sensitive inverse opal sensors were synthesized using various vinyl monomers containing acidic or basic substituents. Acrylic acid (AA), vinylphosphonic acid (VPA), vinylimidazole (VI), and dimethylaminoethylmethacrylic acid (DMAEMA) were respectively copolymerized with hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), the building block monomer of the hydrogel via UV-initiated photopolymerization. Opal templating and subsequent template removal enabled the fabrication of four inverse opal (IO) hydrogel colorimetric sensors, which responded to pH in different fashions. pH-dependent swelling of the IO hydrogel induced the red-shift of the diffracted color. The sensors containing AA or VPA, the proton donating monomers showed the color shifts from green to red with pH increase due to the increased concentration of carboxylate anions bound to the hydrogel. Diprotic VPA sensor exhibited two-step increases of diffracted wavelengths at its pK a1 and pK a2 respectively. The sensors containing proton acceptors, VI and DMAEMA showed the pH-dependent color changes in an opposite way to the AA sensor and the VPA sensor since their ionizations take place by lowering pH due to the protonation at the amino groups. The shapes of pH response curves of VI and DMAEMA sensors were similar but pK b s were different from each other. Optical diffraction responses of four sensors were compared with the calculated concentration ratios of the ionized species to the total monomer with pH variation, and a deswelling effect in the

  17. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson with the OPAL Detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Elfgren, E.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hauschildt, J.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Horvath, D.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kramer, T.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Krop, D.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vachon, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarises the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies up to 209 GeV performed by the OPAL Collaboration at LEP. The consistency of the data with the background hypothesis and various Higgs boson mass hypotheses is examined. No indication of a signal is found in the data and a lower bound of 112.7GeV/C^2 is obtained on the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson at the 95% CL.

  18. An application of the GEANT3 geometry package to the description of the OPAL detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, J.; Bullock, F.W.; Hobson, P.R.; Lorazo, B.; Mallet, J.; Patrick, G.; Possoz, A.; Rossi, A.; Bologna Univ.; Ward, D.R.; Ward, C.P.

    1987-01-01

    We present the general features of the GEANT3 package for coding the geometrical structure of a large and complex detector in the computer programs used for their design and analysis. This package has been developed in the context of Monte Carlo studies of detector performance but should be well matched to the problem of analysis. As a specific example, we illustrate the description of the OPAL detector for the Large Electron Positron collider at CERN and show the results of a sample study using this description. (orig.)

  19. Conditions allowing the formation of biogenic amines in cheese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, H.M.L.J.

    1988-01-01

    A study was undertaken to reveal the conditions that allow the formation of biogenic amines in cheese.

    The starters most commonly used in the Dutch cheese industry do not have decarboxylative properties. Only if the milk or curd is contaminated with non-starter bacteria, amine

  20. Biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from forests in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindfors, V.; Laurila, T.

    2000-01-01

    We present model estimates of biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from the forests in Finland. The emissions were calculated for the years 1995-1997 using the measured isoprene and monoterpene emission factors of boreal tree species together with detailed satellite land cover information and meteorological data. The three-year average emission is 319 kilotonnes per annum, which is significantly higher than the estimated annual anthropogenic VOC emissions of 193 kilotonnes. The biogenic emissions of the Finnish forests are dominated by monoterpenes, which contribute approximately 45% of the annual total. The main isoprene emitter is the Norway spruce (Picea abies) due to its high foliar biomass density. Compared to the monoterpenes, however, the total isoprene emissions are very low, contributing only about 7% of the annual forest VOC emissions. The isoprene emissions are more sensitive to the meteorological conditions than the monoterpene emissions, but the progress of the thermal growing season is clearly reflected in all biogenic emission fluxes. The biogenic emission densities in northern Finland are approximately half of the emissions in the southern parts of the country. (orig.)

  1. Azo dye decolorization assisted by chemical and biogenic sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prato-Garcia, Dorian [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Cervantes, Francisco J. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Camino a la Presa de San José 2055, San Luis Potosí 78216 (Mexico); Buitrón, Germán, E-mail: gbuitronm@ii.unam.mx [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Azo dyes were reduced efficiently by chemical and biogenic sulfide. ► Biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide. ► There was no competition between dyes and sulfate for reducing equivalents. ► Aromatic amines barely affected the sulfate-reducing process. -- Abstract: The effectiveness of chemical and biogenic sulfide in decolorizing three sulfonated azo dyes and the robustness of a sulfate-reducing process for simultaneous decolorization and sulfate removal were evaluated. The results demonstrated that decolorization of azo dyes assisted by chemical sulfide and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) was effective. In the absence of AQDS, biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide for decolorizing the azo dyes. The performance of sulfate-reducing bacteria in attached-growth sequencing batch reactors suggested the absence of competition between the studied azo dyes and the sulfate-reducing process for the reducing equivalents. Additionally, the presence of chemical reduction by-products had an almost negligible effect on the sulfate removal rate, which was nearly constant (94%) after azo dye injection.

  2. The secondary biogenic radiation of gamma-irradiated human blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzin, A.M.; Surkenova, G.N.; Budagovskij, A.V.; Gudi, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    The sample of blood freshly taken from healthy men were gamma-irradiated with a dose of 10 Gy. It was shown that after the treatment the blood gained the capacity to emit secondary biogenic radiation. Emission lasted for some hours, passed through quartz-glass curette and was revealed by stimulating influence on biological detector (sprouting seeds)

  3. Use of biogenic sulfide for ZnS precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, G.; Veeken, A.; Weijma, J.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2006-01-01

    A 600 ml continuously stirred tank reactor was used to assess the performance of a zinc sulfide precipitation process using a biogenic sulfide solution (the effluent of a sulfate-reducing bioreactor) as sulfide source. In all experiments, a proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm was used to

  4. Risk assessment related to biogenic amines occurrence in ready-to-eat baby foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajkowska-Mysłek, Anna; Leszczyńska, Joanna

    2017-07-01

    Potential adverse reactions among infants and young children could appear after consumption of food containing small amounts of bioactive amines. This study presents the first assessment of biogenic amines occurrence in ready-to-eat vegetable without/with fish, meat and fruit baby products intended for the youngest consumers. The biogenic amine profiles and quantities of 6 amines were evaluated in 68 commercial baby foods produced by 10 leading manufacturers available in Poland, using HPLC-APCI-MS method. The total amine contents in analyzed products were obtained in the range of 1283-101421 ng/g. The maximum level of histamine (2375 ng/g) was found in the sample with spinach, tyramine (1667 ng/g) in fruit sample with banana, and of di- and polyamines (1263-53416 ng/g) in samples containing green peas. The results of amine analysis in baby foods indicated the presence of food ingredients which may be necessary to remove (tuna, possibly spinach) or reduce the amount added (spinach, green peas), either reduce their use by infants under 12 months of age (beef). Special attention should also be given to control the consumption of fruit baby products containing banana (higher tyramine and putrescine level). On the basis of obtained results a potential %ARfD, and the BAI were also evaluated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fabrication of Au- and Ag–SiO{sub 2} inverse opals having both localized surface plasmon resonance and Bragg diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erola, Markus O.A.; Philip, Anish; Ahmed, Tanzir; Suvanto, Sari; Pakkanen, Tuula T., E-mail: Tuula.Pakkanen@uef.fi

    2015-10-15

    The inverse opal films of SiO{sub 2} containing metal nanoparticles can have both the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of metal nanoparticles and the Bragg diffraction of inverse opal crystals of SiO{sub 2}, which are very useful properties for applications, such as tunable photonic structures, catalysts and sensors. However, effective processes for fabrication of these films from colloidal particles have rarely been reported. In our study, two methods for preparation of inverse opal films of SiO{sub 2} with three different crystal sizes and containing gold or silver nanoparticles (NPs) via self-assembly using electrostatic interactions and capillary forces are reported. The Bragg diffraction of inverse opal films of SiO{sub 2} in the presence and absence of the template was measured and predicted on the basis of with UV–vis spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The preparation methods used provided good-quality inverse opal SiO{sub 2} films containing highly dispersed, plasmonic AuNPs or AgNPs and having both Bragg diffractions and LSPRs. - Graphical abstract: For syntheses of SiO{sub 2} inverse opals containing Au/Ag nanoparticles two approaches and three template sizes were employed. Self-assembly of template molecules and metal nanoparticles occurred using electrostatic interactions and capillary forces. Both the Bragg diffraction of the photonic crystal and the localized surface plasmon resonance of Au/Ag nanoparticles were detected. - Highlights: • Fabrication methods of silica inverse opals containing metal nanoparticles studied. • Three template sizes used to produce SiO{sub 2} inverse opals with Au/Ag nanoparticles. • PS templates with Au nanoparticles adsorbed used in formation of inverse opals. • Ag particles infiltrated in inverse opals with capillary and electrostatic forces. • Bragg diffractions of IOs and surface plasmon resonances of nanoparticles observed.

  6. Periodic order and defects in Ni-based inverse opal-like crystals on the mesoscopic and atomic scale

    OpenAIRE

    Chumakova, A. V.; Valkovskiy, G. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Dyadkin, V. A.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Eliseev, A. A.; Petukhov, Andrei V.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of inverse opal crystals based on nickel was probed on the mesoscopic and atomic levels by a set of complementary techniques such as scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron microradian and wide-angle diffraction. The microradian diffraction revealed the mesoscopic-scale face-centered-cubic (fcc) ordering of spherical voids in the inverse opal-like structure with unit cell dimension of 750±10nm. The diffuse scattering data were used to map defects in the fcc structure as a f...

  7. Suppression of the green photoluminescence band in ZnO embedded into porous opal by spray pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrarov, S.M.; Yuldashev, Sh.U.; Lee, S.B.; Kang, T.W.

    2004-01-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) and transmittance characteristics of the zinc oxide embedded into voids of FCC sub-micron packed silicon dioxide spheres by using technologically simple and inexpensive spray pyrolysis are reported. The uniform formation of ZnO nanocrystalline particles inside of the porous opal takes place after deposition in aqueous solution with zinc nitrite hexahydride precursor followed by thermal annealing. The decrease of green PL is observed due to the inhibition of spontaneous emission through oxygen vacancies in ZnO. The strong red shift of the transmittance characteristics signifies the essential filling of voids in the opal matrix

  8. Dip-in Indicators for Visual Differentiation of Fuel Mixtures Based on Wettability of Fluoroalkylchlorosilane-Coated Inverse Opal Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, Abootaleb; Qiu, Shuang; Wong, Michael C K; Li, Paul C H

    2015-12-30

    We have developed the dip-in indicator based on the inverse opal film (IOF) for visual differentiation of organic liquid mixtures, such as oil/gasoline or ethanol/gasoline fuel mixtures. The IOF consists of a three-dimensional porous structure with a highly ordered periodic arrangement of nanopores. The specularly reflected light at the interface of the nanopores and silica walls contributes to the structural color of the IOF film. This color disappears when the nanopores are infiltrated by a liquid with a similar refractive index to silica. The disappearance of the structural color provides a means to differentiate various liquid fuel mixtures based on their wettability of the nanopores in the IOF-based indicators. For differentiation of various liquid mixtures, we tune the wettability threshold of the indicator in such a way that it is wetted (color disappears) by one liquid but is not wetted by the other (color remains). Although colorimetric differentiation of liquids based on IOF wettability has been reported, differentiation of highly similar liquid mixtures require complicated readout approaches. It is known that the IOF wettability is controlled by multiple surface properties (e.g., oleophobicity) and structural properties (e.g., neck angle and film thickness) of the nanostructure. Therefore, we aim to exploit the combined tuning of these properties for differentiation of fuel mixtures with close compositions. In this study, we have demonstrated that, for the first time, the IOF-based dip-in indicator is able to detect a slight difference in the fuel mixture composition (i.e., 0.4% of oil content). Moreover, the color/no-color differentiation platform is simple, powerful, and easy-to-read. This platform makes the dip-in indicator a promising tool for authentication and determination of fuel composition at the point-of-purchase or point-of-use.

  9. Formation of Nano-crystalline Todorokite from Biogenic Mn Oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, X.; Zhu, M; Ginder-Vogel, M; Ni, C; Parikh, S; Sparks, D

    2010-01-01

    Todorokite, as one of three main Mn oxide phases present in oceanic Mn nodules and an active MnO{sub 6} octahedral molecular sieve (OMS), has garnered much interest; however, its formation pathway in natural systems is not fully understood. Todorokite is widely considered to form from layer structured Mn oxides with hexagonal symmetry, such as vernadite ({delta}-MnO{sub 2}), which are generally of biogenic origin. However, this geochemical process has not been documented in the environment or demonstrated in the laboratory, except for precursor phases with triclinic symmetry. Here we report on the formation of a nanoscale, todorokite-like phase from biogenic Mn oxides produced by the freshwater bacterium Pseudomonas putida strain GB-1. At long- and short-range structural scales biogenic Mn oxides were transformed to a todorokite-like phase at atmospheric pressure through refluxing. Topotactic transformation was observed during the transformation. Furthermore, the todorokite-like phases formed via refluxing had thin layers along the c* axis and a lack of c* periodicity, making the basal plane undetectable with X-ray diffraction reflection. The proposed pathway of the todorokite-like phase formation is proposed as: hexagonal biogenic Mn oxide {yields} 10-{angstrom} triclinic phyllomanganate {yields} todorokite. These observations provide evidence supporting the possible bio-related origin of natural todorokites and provide important clues for understanding the transformation of biogenic Mn oxides to other Mn oxides in the environment. Additionally this method may be a viable biosynthesis route for porous, nano-crystalline OMS materials for use in practical applications.

  10. The relationship between Al and Si in biogenic silica as determined by PIXE and XAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, L.; Gehlen, M.; Flank, A.-M.; Bennekom, A.J. van; Beusekom, J.E.E. van

    2002-01-01

    Biogenic silica, one of the major constituents of marine sediments, is a potentially powerful paleoceanographic tool, revealing information on past productivity. Interpreting the sedimentary records of the biogenic silica requires, however, an understanding of its preservation. Dissolution of biogenic silica is controlled by the presence of trace elements such as Al. The work in this paper focuses on the association of Al and Si in biogenic silica. The composition and the atomic structure of cultured and natural diatoms were determined by using PIXE and XAS techniques. This study provides the first evidence for a structural association of Al and Si in biogenic silica

  11. Is climate influenced by biogenic atmospheric sulfur compounds. Beeinflussen biogene atmosphaerische Schwefelverbindungen das Klima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgii, H W

    1990-01-01

    About 10 years ago, traces of gaseous sulfur compounds were detected in the atmosphere which are of mainly biogenic origin and are formed in large areas in the oceans by phytoplankton. Continental sources, too, are important. These gases - dimethyl sulfide, carbon bisulfide and carbonyl sulfide - provide an important, if not the main, part to the natural sulfur budget of the atmosphere. While dimethyl sulfide and carbon bisulfide are quickly oxidized in the lower atmosphere forming sulfate particles in the process, carbonyl sulfide is an inert gas which is oxidized only after reaching the stratosphere. Lately, the relevance of these trace components to climate is being discussed. Conceivably, they might influence the radiation budget of the earth via the formation of aerosol particles: While, in the case of dimethyl sulfide, these would change the microphysical parameters of maritime clouds, an increase in the production of carbonyl sulfide would entail a strengthening of the stratospheric sulfate particle layer. Both processes might have a stabilizing effect on the climate as they act in opposite direction to the much discussed greenhouse effect. (orig.).

  12. Radiation protection commissioning of neutron beam instruments at the OPAL research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkes, Alison; Saratsopoulos, John; Deura, Michael; Kenny, Pat

    2008-01-01

    The neutron beam facilities at the 20 MW OPAL Research Reactor were commissioned in 2007 and 2008. The initial suite of eight neutron beam instruments on two thermal neutron guides, two cold neutron guides and one thermal beam port located at the reactor face, together with their associated shielding were progressively installed and commissioned according to their individual project plans. Radiation surveys were systematically conducted as reactor power was raised in a step-wise manner to 20 MW in order to validate instrument shielding design and performance. The performance of each neutron guide was assessed by neutron energy spectrum and flux measurements. The activation of beam line components, decay times assessments and access procedures for Bragg Institute beam instrument scientists were established. The multiple configurations for each instrument and the influence of operating more than one instrument or beamline simultaneously were also tested. Areas of interest were the shielding around the secondary shutters, guide shield and bunker shield interfaces and monochromator doors. The shielding performance, safety interlock checks, improvements, radiation exposures and related radiation protection challenges are discussed. This paper discusses the health physics experience of commissioning the OPAL Research Reactor neutron beam facilities and describes health physics results, actions taken and lessons learned during commissioning. (author)

  13. Angle-resolved reflection spectroscopy of high-quality PMMA opal crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtsev, Ivan V.; Tambasov, Igor A.; Ivanenko, Alexander A.; Zyryanov, Victor Ya.

    2018-02-01

    PMMA opal crystal was prepared by a simple hybrid method, which includes sedimentation, meniscus formation and evaporation. We investigated three surfaces of this crystal by angle-resolved reflective light spectroscopy and SEM study. The angle-resolved reflective measurements were carried out in the 400-1100 nm range. We have determined the high-quality ordered surface of the crystal region. Narrow particle size distribution of the surface has been revealed. The average particle diameter obtained with SEM was nearly 361 nm. The most interesting result was that reflectivity of the surface turned out up to 98% at normal light incidence. Using a fit of dependences of the maximum reflectivity wavelength from an angle based on the Bragg-Snell law, the wavelength of maximum 0° reflectivity, the particle diameter and the fill factor have been determined. For the best surface maximum reflectivity wavelength of a 0° angle was estimated to be 869 nm. The particle diameter and fill factor were calculated as 372 nm and 0.8715, respectively. The diameter obtained by fitting is in excellent agreement with the particle diameter obtained with SEM. The reflectivity maximum is assumed to increase significantly when increasing the fill factor. We believe that using our simple approach to manufacture PMMA opal crystals will significantly increase the fabrication of high-quality photonic crystal templates and thin films.

  14. Conductive framework of inverse opal structure for sulfur cathode in lithium-sulfur batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lu; Huang, Xiaopeng; Zeng, Guobo; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-09-07

    As a promising cathode inheritor for lithium-ion batteries, the sulfur cathode exhibits very high theoretical volumetric capacity and energy density. In its practical applications, one has to solve the insulating properties of sulfur and the shuttle effect that deteriorates cycling stability. The state-of-the-art approaches are to confine sulfur in a conductive matrix. In this work, we utilize monodisperse polystyrene nanoparticles as sacrificial templates to build polypyrrole (PPy) framework of an inverse opal structure to accommodate (encapsulate) sulfur through a combined in situ polymerization and melting infiltration approach. In the design, the interconnected conductive PPy provides open channels for sulfur infiltration, improves electrical and ionic conductivity of the embedded sulfur, and reduces polysulfide dissolution in the electrolyte through physical and chemical adsorption. The flexibility of PPy and partial filling of the inverse opal structure endure possible expansion and deformation during long-term cycling. It is found that the long cycling stability of the cells using the prepared material as the cathode can be substantially improved. The result demonstrates the possibility of constructing a pure conductive polymer framework to accommodate insulate sulfur in ion battery applications.

  15. Opal-like Multicolor Appearance of Self-Assembled Photonic Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnon, Zohar A; Pinotsi, Dorothea; Schmidt, Matthias; Gilead, Sharon; Guterman, Tom; Sadhanala, Aditya; Ahmad, Shahab; Levin, Aviad; Walther, Paul; Kaminski, Clemens F; Fändrich, Marcus; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Shimon, Linda J W; Gazit, Ehud

    2018-06-20

    Molecular self-assembly of short peptide building blocks leads to the formation of various material architectures that may possess unique physical properties. Recent studies had confirmed the key role of biaromaticity in peptide self-assembly, with the diphenylalanine (FF) structural family as an archetypal model. Another significant direction in the molecular engineering of peptide building blocks is the use of fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) modification, which promotes the assembly process and may result in nanostructures with distinctive features and macroscopic hydrogel with supramolecular features and nanoscale order. Here, we explored the self-assembly of the protected, noncoded fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl-β,β-diphenyl-Ala-OH (Fmoc-Dip) amino acid. This process results in the formation of elongated needle-like crystals with notable aromatic continuity. By altering the assembly conditions, arrays of spherical particles were formed that exhibit strong light scattering. These arrays display vivid coloration, strongly resembling the appearance of opal gemstones. However, unlike the Rayleigh scattering effect produced by the arrangement of opal, the described optical phenomenon is attributed to Mie scattering. Moreover, by controlling the solution evaporation rate, i.e., the assembly kinetics, we were able to manipulate the resulting coloration. This work demonstrates a bottom-up approach, utilizing self-assembly of a protected amino acid minimal building block, to create arrays of organic, light-scattering colorful surfaces.

  16. The effect of Livermore OPAL opacities on the evolutionary masses of RR Lyrae stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sukyoung; Lee, Young-Wook; Demarque, Pierre

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of the new Livermore OPAL opacities on the evolution of horizontal-branch (HB) stars. This work was motivated by the recent stellar pulsation calculations using the new Livermore opacities, which suggest that the masses of double-mode RR Lyrae stars are 0.1-0.2 solar mass larger than those based on earlier opacities. Unlike the pulsation calculations, we find that the effect of opacity change on the evolution of HB stars is not significant. In particular, the effect of the mean masses of RR Lyrae stars is very small, showing a decrease of only 0.01-0.02 solar mass compared to the models based on old Cox-Stewart opacities. Consequently, with the new Livermore OPAL opacities, both the stellar pulsation and evolution models now predict approximately the same masses for the RR Lyrae stars. Our evolutionary models suggest that the mean masses of the RR Lyrae stars are about 0.76 and about 0.71 solar mass for M15 (Oosterhoff group II) and M3 (group I), respectively. If (alpha/Fe) = 0.4, these values are decreased by about 0.03 solar mass. Variations of the mean masses of RR Lyrae stars with HB morphology and metallicity are also presented.

  17. Construction of the neutron beam facility at Australia's OPAL research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Shane J.

    2006-01-01

    Australia's new research reactor, OPAL, has been designed principally for neutron beam science and radioisotope production. It has a capacity for 18 neutron beam instruments, located at the reactor face and in a neutron guide hall. The neutron beam facility features a 20 l liquid deuterium cold neutron source and cold and thermal supermirror neutron guides. Nine neutron beam instruments are under development, of which seven are scheduled for completion in early 2007. The project is approaching the hot-commissioning stage, when criticality will be demonstrated. Installation of the neutron beam transport system and neutron beam instruments in the neutron guide hall and at the reactor face is underway, and the path to completion of this project is relatively clear. This paper will outline the key features of the OPAL reactor, and will describe the neutron beam facility in particular. The status of the construction and a forecast of the program to completion, including commissioning and commencement of routine operation in 2007 will also be discussed

  18. Real-Time-Simulation of IEEE-5-Bus Network on OPAL-RT-OP4510 Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atul Bhandakkar, Anjali; Mathew, Lini, Dr.

    2018-03-01

    The Real-Time Simulator tools have high computing technologies, improved performance. They are widely used for design and improvement of electrical systems. The advancement of the software tools like MATLAB/SIMULINK with its Real-Time Workshop (RTW) and Real-Time Windows Target (RTWT), real-time simulators are used extensively in many engineering fields, such as industry, education, and research institutions. OPAL-RT-OP4510 is a Real-Time Simulator which is used in both industry and academia. In this paper, the real-time simulation of IEEE-5-Bus network is carried out by means of OPAL-RT-OP4510 with CRO and other hardware. The performance of the network is observed with the introduction of fault at various locations. The waveforms of voltage, current, active and reactive power are observed in the MATLAB simulation environment and on the CRO. Also, Load Flow Analysis (LFA) of IEEE-5-Bus network is computed using MATLAB/Simulink power-gui load flow tool.

  19. Construction of the Neutron Beam Facility at Australia's OPAL Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Australia's new research reactor, OPAL, has been designed for high quality neutron beam science and radioisotope production. It has a capacity for eighteen neutron beam instruments to be located at the reactor face and in a neutron guide hall. The new neutron beam facility features a 20 litre liquid deuterium cold neutron source and supermirror neutron reflecting guides for intense cold and thermal neutron beams. Nine neutron beam instruments are under development, of which seven are scheduled for completion in early 2007. The project is approaching the hot-commissioning stage, where criticality will be demonstrated. Installation of the neutron beam transport system and neutron beam instruments in the neutron guide hall and at the reactor face is underway, and the path to completion of this project is relatively clear. The lecture will outline Australia's aspirations for neutron science at the OPAL reactor, and describe the neutron beam facility under construction. The status of this project and a forecast of the program to completion, including commissioning and commencement of routine operation in 2007 will also be discussed. This project is the culmination of almost a decade of effort. We now eagerly anticipate catapulting Australia's neutron beam science capability to meet the best in the world today. (author)

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Analysis Of Optical Payload For Lasercomm Science (OPALS) sealed enclosure module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kevin R.; Zayas, Daniel; Turner, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) using the commercial CFD package CFDesign has been performed at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in support of the Phaeton Early Career Hire Program's Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) mission. The OPALS project is one which involves an International Space Station payload that will be using forced convection cooling in a hermetically sealed enclosure at 1 atm of air to cool "off-the-shelf" vendor electronics. The CFD analysis was used to characterize the thermal and fluid flow environment within a complicated labyrinth of electronics boards, fans, instrumentation, harnessing, ductwork and heat exchanger fins. The paradigm of iteratively using CAD/CAE tools and CFD was followed in order to determine the optimum flow geometry and heat sink configuration to yield operational convective film coefficients and temperature survivability limits for the electronics payload. Results from this current CFD analysis and correlation of the CFD model against thermal test data will be presented. Lessons learned and coupled thermal / flow modeling strategies will be shared in this paper.

  1. Establishment of the Neutron Beam Research Facility at the OPAL Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, S.J.; Robinson, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Australia's first research reactor, HIFAR, reached criticality in January 1958. At that time Australia's main agenda was establishment of a nuclear power program. HIFAR operated for nearly 50 years, providing a firm foundation for the establishment of Australia's second generation research Reactor OPAL, which reached criticality in August 006. In HIFAR's early years a neutron beam facility was established for materials characterization, partly in aid of the nuclear energy agenda and partly in response to interest from Australia's scientific community. By the time Australia's nuclear energy program ceased (in the 1970s), radioisotope production and research had also been established at Lucas Heights. Also, by this time the neutron beam facility for scientific research had evolved into a major utilization programme, warranting establishment of an independent body to facilitate scientific access (the Australian Institute for Nuclear Science and Engineering). In HIFAR's lifetime, ANSTO established a radiopharmaceuticals service for the Australian medical community and NDT silicon production was also established and grew to maturity. So when time came to determine the strategy for nuclear research in Australia into the 21st century, it was clear that the replacement for HIFAR should be multipurpose, with major emphases on scientific applications of neutron beams and medical isotope production. With this strategy in mind, ANSTO set about to design and build OPAL with a world-class neutron beam facility, capable of supporting a large and diverse scientific research community. The establishment of the neutron beam facility became the mission of the Bragg Institute management team. This journey began in 1997 with establishment of a working budget, and reached its first major objective when OPAL reached 20 MW thermal power nearly one decade later (in 2006). The first neutron beam instruments began operation soon after (in 2007), and quickly proved themselves to be

  2. Enhanced photochemical catalysis of TiO2 inverse opals by modification with ZnO or Fe2O3 using ALD and the hydrothermal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiatong; Sun, Cuifeng; Fu, Ming; Long, Jie; He, Dawei; Wang, Yongsheng

    2018-02-01

    The development of porous materials exhibiting photon regulation abilities for improved photoelectrochemical catalysis performance is always one of the important goals of solar energy harvesting. In this study, methods to improve the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 inverse opals were discussed. TiO2 inverse opals were prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using colloidal crystal templates. In addition, TiO2 inverse opal heterostructures were fabricated using colloidal heterocrystals by repeated vertical deposition using different colloidal spheres. The hydrothermal method and ALD were used to prepare ZnO- or Fe2O3-modified TiO2 inverse opals on the internal surfaces of the TiO2 porous structures. Although the photonic reflection band was not significantly varied by oxide modification, the presence of Fe2O3 in the TiO2 inverse opals enhanced their visible absorption. The conformally modified oxides on the TiO2 inverse opals could also form energy barriers and avoid the recombination of electrons and holes. The fabrication of the TiO2 photonic crystal heterostructures and modification with ZnO or Fe2O3 can enhance the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 inverse opals.

  3. OPAL shield design performance assessment. Comparison of measured dose rates against the corresponding design calculated values. A designer perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brizuela, Martin; Albornoz, Felipe [INVAP SE, Av. Cmte. Piedrabuena, Bariloche (Argentina)

    2012-03-15

    A comparison of OPAL shielding calculations against measurements carried out during Commissioning, is presented for relevant structures such as the reactor block, primary shutters, neutron guide bunker, etc. All the results obtained agree very well with the measured values and contribute to establish the confidence on the calculation tools (MCNP4, DORT, etc.) and methodology used for shielding design. (author)

  4. Periodic order and defects in Ni-based inverse opal-like crystals on the mesoscopic and atomic scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chumakova, A. V.; Valkovskiy, G. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Dyadkin, V. A.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Eliseev, A. A.; Petukhov, Andrei V.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of inverse opal crystals based on nickel was probed on the mesoscopic and atomic levels by a set of complementary techniques such as scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron microradian and wide-angle diffraction. The microradian diffraction revealed the mesoscopic-scale

  5. Infrared to visible upconversion luminescence in Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped CeO2 inverse opal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhengwen; Wu, Hangjun; Liao, Jiayan; Li, Wucai; Song, Zhiguo; Yang, Yong; Zhou, Dacheng; Wang, Rongfei; Qiu, Jianbei

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • UC emission of Er 3+ was modified by introducing the structure of inverse opal. • Color tuning of CeO 2 :Yb, Er inverse opal was realized by inhibition of UC emission. • Two-photon excitation processes were observed in CeO 2 :Yb, Er inverse opal. -- Abstract: Infrared to visible upconversion luminescence has been investigated in Er 3+ /Yb 3+ co-doped CeO 2 inverse opal. Under the excitation of 980 nm diode lasers, visible emissions centered at 525, 547, 561, 660 and 680 nm are observed, which are assigned to the Er 3+ transitions of 2 H 11/2 → 4 I 15/2 (525 nm), 4 S 3/2 → 4 I 15/2 (547, 561 nm), 4 F 9/2 → 4 I 15/2 (660 and 680 nm), respectively. The effect of photonic band gap on the upconversion luminescence intensity was also obtained. Additionally, the upconversion luminescence mechanism was studied. The dependence of Er 3+ upconversion emission intensity on pump power reveals that it is a two-photon excitation process

  6. Production, oxygen respiration rates, and sinking velocity of copepod fecal pellets: Direct measurements of ballasting by opal and calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, H.; Iversen, M.H.; Koski, Marja

    2008-01-01

    sp., T. weissflogii, and E. huxleyi, respectively. The average carbon-specific respiration rate was 0.15 d(-1) independent on diet (range: 0.08-0.21 d(-1)). Because of ballasting of opal and calcite, sinking velocities were significantly higher for pellets produced on T. weissflogii (322 +/- 169 m d...

  7. 3D WO3 /BiVO4 /Cobalt Phosphate Composites Inverse Opal Photoanode for Efficient Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haifeng; Zhou, Weiwei; Yang, Yaping; Cheng, Chuanwei

    2017-04-01

    A novel 3D WO 3 /BiVO 4 /cobalt phosphate composite inverse opal is designed for photoeletrochemical (PEC) water splitting, yielding a significantly improved PEC performance. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Multifunctional Inverse Opal-Like TiO2 Electron Transport Layer for Efficient Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Yang, Shuang; Zheng, Yi Chu; Chen, Ying; Hou, Yu; Yang, Xiao Hua; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-09-01

    A novel multifunctional inverse opal-like TiO 2 electron transport layer (IOT-ETL) is designed to replace the traditional compact layer and mesoporous scaffold layer in perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Improved light harvesting efficiency and charge transporting performance in IOT-ETL based PSCs yield high power conversion efficiency of 13.11%.

  9. Optical, magnetic, and dielectric properties of opal matrices with intersphere nanocavities filled with crystalline multiferroic, piezoelectric, and segnetoelectric materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Samoilovich, M.I.; Rinkevich, A.B.; Bovtun, Viktor; Belyanin, A.F.; Kempa, Martin; Nuzhnyy, Dmitry; Tsvetkov, M.Yu.; Klescheva, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 11 (2013), s. 2132-2147 ISSN 1070-3632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/12/0232 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : composites * opal matrices * optical, magnetic, and dielectric properties Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 0.418, year: 2013

  10. Passivation of ZnO Nanowire Guests and 3D Inverse Opal Host Photoanodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Labouchere, Philippe; Chandiran, Aravind Kumar; Moehl, Thomas; Harms, Hauke; Chavhan, Sudam; Tena-Zaera, Ramon; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Graetzel, Michael; Tetreault, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    A hierarchical host-guest nanostructured photoanode is reported for dye-sensitized solar cells. It is composed of ZnO nanowires grown in situ into the macropores of a 3D ZnO inverse opal structure, which acts both as a seed layer and as a conductive

  11. Opal phytolith and isotopic studies of "Restinga" communities of Maricá, Brazil, as a modern reference for paleobiogeoclimatic reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cátia Pereira dos Santos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe Maricá restinga, located in the eastern part of the Rio de Janeiro State (Brazil, corresponds to one of the few remaining preserved areas of the state's coastal plain. This paper reports on a study of the Maricá restinga plant communities and also presents an identification of the main plant species present in each community, with the objective of establishing reference collections, by the methods of the proxies opal phytoliths and stable carbon isotopes, for paleoenvironmental reconstructions of this coastal area during the Quaternary. Six plant communities, distributed perpendicularly to the coast line over sandy barriers, lagoonal plain, lagoon margin and weathered basement were identified: halophile-psamophile, scrub, herbaceous swamp, slack, shrubby vegetation and dry forest. In general, the plant species analyzed in each community presented low productivity of opal phytoliths, as only the Poaceae, Cyperaceae and Arecaceae families produce a great amount and diversity of morphotypes of opal phytoliths. The results of the analysis of stable carbon isotopes in sediments indicated a predominance of C3 or a mixture of C3 and C4 plants, presenting a close correlation with the results found in plants collected in each community. In conclusion, it was verified that the carbon isotope analysis associated with that of the opal phytoliths are good proxies for the reconstruction of vegetation in the study area.

  12. Comparative analysis of the in vitro cytotoxicity of the dietary biogenic amines tyramine and histamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Daniel M; del Rio, Beatriz; Redruello, Begoña; Ladero, Victor; Martin, M Cruz; Fernandez, Maria; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2016-04-15

    Tyramine and histamine, the most toxic biogenic amines (BA), are often found in high concentrations in certain foods. Prompted by the limited knowledge of BA toxicity, and increasing awareness of the risks associated with high intakes of dietary BA, the in vitro cytotoxicity of tyramine and histamine was investigated. Tyramine and histamine were toxic for HT29 intestinal cell cultures at concentrations commonly found in BA-rich food, as determined by real-time cell analysis. Surprisingly, tyramine had a stronger and more rapid cytotoxic effect than histamine. Their mode of action was also different, while tyramine caused cell necrosis, histamine induced apoptosis. To avoid health risks, the BA content of foods should be reduced and legal limits established for tyramine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Si cycling in a forest biogeosystem - the importance of transient state biogenic Si pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, M.; Jochheim, H.; Höhn, A.; Breuer, J.; Zagorski, Z.; Busse, J.; Barkusky, D.; Meier, K.; Puppe, D.; Wanner, M.; Kaczorek, D.

    2013-07-01

    The relevance of biological Si cycling for dissolved silica (DSi) export from terrestrial biogeosystems is still in debate. Even in systems showing a high content of weatherable minerals, like Cambisols on volcanic tuff, biogenic Si (BSi) might contribute > 50% to DSi (Gerard et al., 2008). However, the number of biogeosystem studies is rather limited for generalized conclusions. To cover one end of controlling factors on DSi, i.e., weatherable minerals content, we studied a forested site with absolute quartz dominance (> 95%). Here we hypothesise minimal effects of chemical weathering of silicates on DSi. During a four year observation period (05/2007-04/2011), we quantified (i) internal and external Si fluxes of a temperate-humid biogeosystem (beech, 120 yr) by BIOME-BGC (version ZALF), (ii) related Si budgets, and (iii) Si pools in soil and beech, chemically as well as by SEM-EDX. For the first time two compartments of biogenic Si in soils were analysed, i.e., phytogenic and zoogenic Si pool (testate amoebae). We quantified an average Si plant uptake of 35 kg Si ha-1 yr-1 - most of which is recycled to the soil by litterfall - and calculated an annual biosilicification from idiosomic testate amoebae of 17 kg Si ha-1. The comparatively high DSi concentrations (6 mg L-1) and DSi exports (12 kg Si ha-1 yr-1) could not be explained by chemical weathering of feldspars or quartz dissolution. Instead, dissolution of a relictic, phytogenic Si pool seems to be the main process for the DSi observed. We identified canopy closure accompanied by a disappearance of grasses as well as the selective extraction of pine trees 30 yr ago as the most probable control for the phenomena observed. From our results we concluded the biogeosystem to be in a transient state in terms of Si cycling.

  14. Si cycling in a forest biogeosystem – the importance of transient state biogenic Si pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sommer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of biological Si cycling for dissolved silica (DSi export from terrestrial biogeosystems is still in debate. Even in systems showing a high content of weatherable minerals, like Cambisols on volcanic tuff, biogenic Si (BSi might contribute > 50% to DSi (Gerard et al., 2008. However, the number of biogeosystem studies is rather limited for generalized conclusions. To cover one end of controlling factors on DSi, i.e., weatherable minerals content, we studied a forested site with absolute quartz dominance (> 95%. Here we hypothesise minimal effects of chemical weathering of silicates on DSi. During a four year observation period (05/2007–04/2011, we quantified (i internal and external Si fluxes of a temperate-humid biogeosystem (beech, 120 yr by BIOME-BGC (version ZALF, (ii related Si budgets, and (iii Si pools in soil and beech, chemically as well as by SEM-EDX. For the first time two compartments of biogenic Si in soils were analysed, i.e., phytogenic and zoogenic Si pool (testate amoebae. We quantified an average Si plant uptake of 35 kg Si ha−1 yr−1 – most of which is recycled to the soil by litterfall – and calculated an annual biosilicification from idiosomic testate amoebae of 17 kg Si ha−1. The comparatively high DSi concentrations (6 mg L−1 and DSi exports (12 kg Si ha−1 yr−1 could not be explained by chemical weathering of feldspars or quartz dissolution. Instead, dissolution of a relictic, phytogenic Si pool seems to be the main process for the DSi observed. We identified canopy closure accompanied by a disappearance of grasses as well as the selective extraction of pine trees 30 yr ago as the most probable control for the phenomena observed. From our results we concluded the biogeosystem to be in a transient state in terms of Si cycling.

  15. Modeling Global Biogenic Emission of Isoprene: Exploration of Model Drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Susan E.; Potter, Christopher S.; Coughlan, Joseph C.; Klooster, Steven A.; Lerdau, Manuel T.; Chatfield, Robert B.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Vegetation provides the major source of isoprene emission to the atmosphere. We present a modeling approach to estimate global biogenic isoprene emission. The isoprene flux model is linked to a process-based computer simulation model of biogenic trace-gas fluxes that operates on scales that link regional and global data sets and ecosystem nutrient transformations Isoprene emission estimates are determined from estimates of ecosystem specific biomass, emission factors, and algorithms based on light and temperature. Our approach differs from an existing modeling framework by including the process-based global model for terrestrial ecosystem production, satellite derived ecosystem classification, and isoprene emission measurements from a tropical deciduous forest. We explore the sensitivity of model estimates to input parameters. The resulting emission products from the global 1 degree x 1 degree coverage provided by the satellite datasets and the process model allow flux estimations across large spatial scales and enable direct linkage to atmospheric models of trace-gas transport and transformation.

  16. Biomass burning: Combustion emissions, satellite imagery, and biogenic emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, J.S.; Cofer, W.R III; Rhinehart, R.P.; Cahoon, D.R. J.; Winstead, E.L.; Sebacher, S.; Sebacher, D.I.; Stocks, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    This chapter deals with two different, but related, aspects of biomass burning. The first part of the chapter deals with a technique to estimate the instantaneous emissions of trace gases produced by biomass burning using satellite imagery. The second part of the chapter concerns the recent discovery that burning results in significantly enhanced biogenic emissions of N 2 O, NO, and CH 4 . Hence, biomass burning has both an immediate and long-term impact on the production of trace gases to the atmosphere. The objective of this research is to better assess and quantify the role of this research is to better assess and quantify the role and impact of biomass as a driver for global change. It will be demonstrated that satellite imagery of fires may be used to estimate combustion emissions and may in the future be used to estimate the long-term postburn biogenic emissions of trace gases to the atmosphere

  17. Biogenic volatile organic compounds in the Earth system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laothawornkitkul, Jullada; Taylor, Jane E; Paul, Nigel D; Hewitt, C Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds produced by plants are involved in plant growth, development, reproduction and defence. They also function as communication media within plant communities, between plants and between plants and insects. Because of the high chemical reactivity of many of these compounds, coupled with their large mass emission rates from vegetation into the atmosphere, they have significant effects on the chemical composition and physical characteristics of the atmosphere. Hence, biogenic volatile organic compounds mediate the relationship between the biosphere and the atmosphere. Alteration of this relationship by anthropogenically driven changes to the environment, including global climate change, may perturb these interactions and may lead to adverse and hard-to-predict consequences for the Earth system.

  18. Origin of opal-ct in lower eocene tallahatta formation, mississippi, usa and pleistocene barind clay formation in bangladesh: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, S.

    2008-01-01

    Opal-CT mineral in the lower Eocene Tallahatta formation in Mississippi. USA and the Pleistocene Barind clay formation in Bangladesh is of volcanogenic origin. X-ray diffraction patterns of claystones in the former indicated more ordered condition on the older sediments than those of the latter, which may be due to higher burial temperatures and longer time interval for transformation from volcanic ash to opal-CT of the former. Glass shards, present in the latter sediments, were not identified in the former, which may be due to transformation of glass shards of volcanic ash to opal-Cr over the time. (author)

  19. The effect of preparation of biogenic sorbent on zinc sorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Jenčárová

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to prepare biogenic sulphides by using bacteria for the removal of zinc cations from their solutions. Theproduction was realized in a bioreactor under anaerobic conditions at 30 °C. Sorbents were prepared by sulphate-reducing bacteria indifferent nutrient medium modifications, under two modes of bacteria cultivation. Created precipitates of iron sulphides were removedfrom the liquid phase of the cultivation medium by filtration, dried and used for the sorption experiments.

  20. BAECC Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petäjä, Tuukka [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Moisseev, Dmitri [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Sinclair, Victoria [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); O' Connor, Ewan J. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland); Manninen, Antti J. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Levula, Janne [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Väänänen, Riikka [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Heikkinen, Liine [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Äijälä, Mikko [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Aalto, Juho [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Bäck, Jaana [University of Helsinki, Finland

    2015-11-01

    Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC)”, featured the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s 2nd Mobile Facility (AMF2) in Hyytiälä, Finland. It operated for an 8-month intensive measurement campaign from February to September 2014. The main research goal was to understand the role of biogenic aerosols in cloud formation. One of the reasons to perform BAECC study in Hyytiälä was the fact that it hosts SMEAR-II (Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations), which is one of the world’s most comprehensive surface in-situ observation sites in a boreal forest environment. The station has been measuring atmospheric aerosols, biogenic emissions and an extensive suite of parameters relevant to atmosphere-biosphere interactions continuously since 1996. The BAECC enables combining vertical profiles from AMF2 with surface-based in-situ SMEAR-II observations and allows the processes at the surface to be directly related to processes occurring throughout the entire tropospheric column. With the inclusion of extensive surface precipitation measurements, and intensive observation periods involving aircraft flights and novel radiosonde launches, the complementary observations of AMF2 and SMEAR-II provide a unique opportunity for investigating aerosol-cloud interactions, and cloud-to-precipitation processes. The BAECC dataset will initiate new opportunities for evaluating and improving models of aerosol sources and transport, cloud microphysical processes, and boundary-layer structures.

  1. Grape yield to soil N-NO3- ratio can explain the different levels of biogenic amines in wine from two vineyards in the AOC Rioja (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Álvarez, Eva Pilar; Garde-Cerdán, Teresa; Santamaría, Pilar; García-Escudero, Enrique; Peregrina, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    Plant N status may affect the grape amino acid concentration, which act as precursors in the formation of biogenic amines in wine. Biogenic amines have negative effects on human health and so they reduce the wine quality. The objective of this study was to analyze, at bloom (when the vine N demand peaks) if both the available soil N and the N concentration in the leaf could explain the amino acid concentration in the must as well as the biogenic amines in wines from AOC Rioja. Two plots with cv. Tempranillo (Vitis vinifera L.) vines grafted on R-110 rootstock were chosen: "La Grajera" (2,998 plants ha-1) and "Nájera" (2,849 plants ha-1), both plots with a traditional soil tillage management system and classified according to the American Soil Taxonomy as Typic Haloxerepts and Oxyaquic Xerorthent, respectively. Both soils had a pH higher than 7, a silty loam texture and organic matter values lower than 2%. The climatic conditions were described as semiarid Mediterranean according to the UNESCO aridity index. In each vineyard, three non-adjacent experimental plots with 3 rows of 30 vines each, were set out. No fertilizer was applied during the project. Each plot was sampled in 2009, 2010 and 2011 seasons at bloom, analyzing the available soil N-NO3- at 0-15 and 15-45 cm depth and expressing the results in kg ha-1 by means of the bulk density of soil and the coarse elements content. Also at bloom, 30 leaves per experimental plot were collected and their N concentration was analyzed. At harvest, 200 berries were taken from each plot and the amino acid content in the musts was determined by HPLC. In addition, 100 kg of grapes from each plot were taken in order to elaborate wine according to the AOC Rioja common winemaking practices. When the winemaking process was finished, the concentration of biogenic amines in the wine (histamine, methylamine, ethylamine, tyramine, putrescine, cadeverine, phenylethylamine and isoamylamine) was determined by HPLC. Our results showed

  2. Time Resolved Measurements of Primary Biogenic Aerosol Particles in Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollny, A. G.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-04-01

    Biogenic aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and they influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere, climate, and public health. They play an important role in the spread of biological organisms and reproductive materials, and they can cause or enhance human, animal, and plant diseases. Moreover, they influence the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing radiation, and they can initiate the formation of clouds and precipitation as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. The composition, abundance, and origin of biogenic aerosol particles and components are, however, still not well understood and poorly quantified. Prominent examples of primary biogenic aerosol particles, which are directly emitted from the biosphere to the atmosphere, are pollen, bacteria, fungal spores, viruses, and fragments of animals and plants. During the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08) a large number of aerosol and gas-phase measurements were taken on a remote site close to Manaus, Brazil, during a period of five weeks in February and March 2008. This presented study is focused on data from an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS, TSI inc.) that has been deployed for the first time in Amazonia. In this instrument, particle counting and aerodynamic sizing over the range of 0.5-20 µm are complemented by the measurement of UV fluorescence at 355 nm (excitation) and 420-575 nm (emission), respectively. Fluorescence at these wavelengths is characteristic for reduced pyridine nucleotides (e.g., NAD(P)H) and for riboflavin, which are specific for living cells. Thus particles exhibiting fluorescence signals can be regarded as "viable aerosols" or "fluorescent bioparticles" (FBAP), and their concentration can be considered as lower limit for the actual abundance of primary biogenic aerosol particles. Data from the UVAPS were averaged over 5 minute time intervals. The presence of bioparticles in the observed size range has been

  3. Crystallization of biogenic hydrous amorphous silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyono, A.; Yokooji, M.; Chiba, T.; Tamura, T.; Tuji, A.

    2017-12-01

    Diatom, Nitzschia cf. frustulum, collected from Lake Yogo, Siga prefecture, Japan was cultured in laboratory. Organic components of the diatom cell were removed by washing with acetone and sodium hypochlorite. The remaining frustules were studied by SEM-EDX, FTIR spectroscopy, and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The results showed that the spindle-shaped morphology of diatom frustule was composed of hydrous amorphous silica. Pressure induced phase transformation of the diatom frustule was investigated by in situ Raman spectroscopic analysis. With exposure to 0.3 GPa at 100 oC, Raman band corresponding to quartz occurred at ν = 465 cm-1. In addition, Raman bands known as a characteristic Raman pattern of moganite was also observed at 501 cm-1. From the integral ratio of Raman bands, the moganite content in the probed area was estimated to be approximately 50 wt%. With the pressure and temperature effect, the initial morphology of diatom frustule was completely lost and totally changed to a characteristic spherical particle with a diameter of about 2 mm. With keeping the compression of 5.7 GPa at 100 oC, a Raman band assignable to coesite appeared at 538 cm-1. That is, with the compression and heating, the hydrous amorphous silica can be readily crystallized into quartz, moganite, and coesite. The first-principles calculations revealed that a disiloxane molecule stabilized in a trans configuration is twisted 60o and changed into the cis configuration with a close approach of water molecule. It is therefore a reasonable assumption that during crystallization of hydrous amorphous silica, the Si-O-Si bridging unit with the cis configuration would survive as a structural defect and then crystallized into moganite by keeping the geometry. This hypothesis is adaptable to the phase transformation from hydrous amorphous silica to coesite as well, because coesite has the four-membered rings and easily formed from the hydrous amorphous silica under high pressure and high

  4. Effects of packaging, mineral oil coating, and storage time on biogenic amine levels and internal quality of eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, T C; Assis, D C S; Menezes, L D M; Oliveira, D D; Lima, A L; Souza, M R; Heneine, L G D; Cançado, S V

    2014-12-01

    This study was carried out with the aim of evaluating the effects of mineral oil application on eggshells and the use of plastic packages with lids on the physical-chemical and microbiological quality and biogenic amine contents of eggs stored under refrigeration for up to 125 d. A total of 1,920 eggs from 46-wk-old Hyline W36 laying hens were randomly distributed into 4 groups soon after classification: (i) 480 eggs were stored in pulp carton tray packages; (ii) 480 eggs were stored in plastic packages with lids; (iii) 480 eggs were stored in carton packages after the application of mineral oil; and (iv) 480 eggs were stored in plastic packages with lids after the application of mineral oil. The internal quality was measured by Haugh units, by the counts of mesophilic and psychrotrophic microorganisms, by the most probable number of total and thermal-tolerant coliforms, by the counts of molds and yeasts, by the analysis of Salmonella spp. and Staphylococcus spp., and by the levels of biogenic amines in the egg yolk and albumen. The application of mineral oil to the eggshell resulted in higher Haugh unit values throughout storage, and the use of plastic packages altered the internal quality. The application of mineral oil and the use of packaging had no effects on the microbiological and biogenic amine results. Microbiological analyses showed the absence of Salmonella spp., Staphylococcus aureus, thermal-tolerant coliforms, and fungi. However, the highest counts of mesophilic (1.1 × 10(7) cfu/g) and psychrotrophic (6.7 × 10(7) cfu/g) microorganisms were recorded. The highest values of biogenic amines detected and quantified were putrescine (2.38 mg/kg) and cadaverine (7.27 mg/kg) in the egg yolk and putrescine (1.95 mg/kg), cadaverine (2.83 mg/kg), and phenylethylamine (2.57 mg/kg) in the albumen. Despite these results, the biogenic amine levels recorded were considered low and would not be harmful to consumer health. ©2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  5. Upgrade of the neutron guide system at the OPAL Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, D Martin; Kennedy, S J; Klose, F

    2010-01-01

    The new research reactor at ANSTO (OPAL) is operating with seven neutron beam instruments in the user programme and three more under construction. The reactor design provides for expansion of the facility to eighteen instruments, and much of the basic infrastructure is already in place. However, an expansion of the neutron guide system is needed for further beam instruments. For this purpose, several possibilities are under consideration, such as insertion of multi-channel neutron benders in the existing cold guides or the construction of a new elliptic cold guide. In this work Monte Carlo (MC) simulations have been used to evaluate performance of these guide configurations. Results show that these configurations can be competitive with the best instruments in the world.

  6. PLATYPUS - A Time-of-Flight Neutron Reflectometer at the OPAL Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, Michael; Brule, Alain

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Neutron reflectometry is used to probe the structure of surfaces, thin-films or buried interfaces as well as processes occurring at surfaces and interfaces. Applications cover adsorbed surfactant layers, self-assembled monolayers, biological membranes, electrochemical and catalytic interfaces, polymer coatings and photosensitive films. The PLATYPUS neutron reflectometer has been recognised as one of the highest priority instruments to be constructed at the new 20MW OPAL research reactor at Lucas Heights. The instrument will be capable of collecting data from solid, liquid and magnetic samples using a broad wavelength band of polarised or non-polarised neutrons. Details of the design and construction of the PLATYPUS reflectometer will be given. (authors)

  7. Studies on the beam system for the calibration of the OPAL jet chamber with laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maringer, G.

    1988-07-01

    UV laser beams are an important tool for the calibration of the OPAL jet chamber. A beam transport system containing about 350 mirrors in total guides the beams from the laser outside the detector into the chamber. Four of the mirrors are moveable under remote control allowing to guide the beams into each of the 24 sectors and to correct the beam path in case of deviations. A program to control these moveable mirrors has been developed. Drift velocity measurements will be performed by means of double beams which are generated by appropriate beamsplitters. Accurate knowledge of the double beam distances is essential to obtain the desired accuracy of better than 0.1% or 10 μm. Using a CCD device with a pixel size of 23x23 μm 2 the beam distance could be measured with errors below the required limit. (orig.)

  8. Focused ion beam milling of nanocavities in single colloidal particles and self-assembled opals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woldering, Leon A; Otter, A M; Husken, Bart H; Vos, Willem L

    2006-01-01

    We present a new method of realizing single nanocavities in individual colloidal particles on the surface of silicon dioxide artificial opals using a focused ion beam milling technique. We show that both the radius and the position of the nanocavity can be controlled with nanometre precision, to radii as small as 40 nm. The relation between the defect size and the milling time has been established. We confirmed that milling not only occurs on the surface of the spheres, but into and through them as well. We also show that an array of nanocavities can be fashioned. Structurally modified colloids have interesting potential applications in nanolithography, as well as in chemical sensing and solar cells, and as photonic crystal cavities

  9. Spin-ice behavior of three-dimensional inverse opal-like magnetic structures: Micromagnetic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubitskiy, I. S.; Syromyatnikov, A. V.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2017-11-01

    We perform micromagnetic simulations of the magnetization distribution in inverse opal-like structures (IOLS) made from ferromagnetic materials (nickel and cobalt). It is shown that the unit cell of these complex structures, whose characteristic length is approximately 700 nm, can be divided into a set of structural elements some of which behave like Ising-like objects. A spin-ice behavior of IOLS is observed in a broad range of external magnetic fields. Numerical results describe successfully the experimental hysteresis curves of the magnetization in Ni- and Co-based IOLS. We conclude that ferromagnetic IOLS can be considered as the first realization of three-dimensional artificial spin ice. The problem is discussed of optimal geometrical properties and material characteristics of IOLS for the spin-ice rule fulfillment.

  10. Radiological Shielding Design for the Neutron High-Resolution Backscattering Spectrometer EMU at the OPAL Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersez Tunay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The shielding for the neutron high-resolution backscattering spectrometer (EMU located at the OPAL reactor (ANSTO was designed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 5-1.60. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies, such as the neutron pre-monochromator bunker with sliding cylindrical block shields to accommodate a range of neutron take-off angles, and in the experimental area - shielding of neutron focusing guides, choppers, flight tube, backscattering monochromator, and additional shielding elements inside the Scattering Tank. These shielding assemblies meet safety and engineering requirements and cost constraints. The neutron dose rates around the EMU instrument were reduced to < 0.5 µSv/h and the gamma dose rates to a safe working level of ≤ 3 µSv/h.

  11. Search for Supersymmetric Particles with the OPAL Detector at LEP2

    CERN Document Server

    Kanaya, N

    A search of Supersymmetric particles was performed using the data collected in 1999 and 2000 by the Opal detector at the LEP2 e+e- collider. The center-of-mass energies ranged from 192 GeV to 209 GeV, and the data analyzed correspond to an integrated luminosity of 432 pb-1. Supersymmetric models permit a large number of different experimental final states which should all be investigated. The search presented here is sensitive to final states with photons plus additional detector activity with missing energy. these topologies are characteristic of events expected in Gauge-Mediated Supersymmetry Breaking (GMSB) models. No significant evidence for their existence is observed. Finally, using various search results at centre-of-mass energy of 189 GeV, constraints on the parameters have been given within the framework of the minimal GMSB model.

  12. Radiological Shielding Design for the Neutron High-Resolution Backscattering Spectrometer EMU at the OPAL Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersez, Tunay; Esposto, Fernando; Souza, Nicolas R. de

    2017-09-01

    The shielding for the neutron high-resolution backscattering spectrometer (EMU) located at the OPAL reactor (ANSTO) was designed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 5-1.60. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies, such as the neutron pre-monochromator bunker with sliding cylindrical block shields to accommodate a range of neutron take-off angles, and in the experimental area - shielding of neutron focusing guides, choppers, flight tube, backscattering monochromator, and additional shielding elements inside the Scattering Tank. These shielding assemblies meet safety and engineering requirements and cost constraints. The neutron dose rates around the EMU instrument were reduced to < 0.5 µSv/h and the gamma dose rates to a safe working level of ≤ 3 µSv/h.

  13. Untersuchung der Produktion charmhaltiger Mesonen in der Photon-Photon-Streuung mit dem OPAL-Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Patt, Jochen

    2001-01-01

    Die Produktion von Charm-Quarks in der Photon-Photon-Streuung wird ueber den Nachweis charmhaltiger Mesonen untersucht. Die Arbeit basiert auf den Daten, die mit dem OPAL-Detektor am Elektron-Positron-Speicherring LEP am CERN in Genf in den Jahren von 1989 bis 1998 aufgenommen worden sind. Anhand des Charmonium-Zustandes Chi(c2) wird die Resonanzproduktion von Charm-Quarks untersucht und die Zwei-Photon-Breite des Chi(c2)-Mesons wird gemessen. Geladene D*-Mesonen werden zur Untersuchung der offenen Produktion von Charm-Quarks benutzt. Der Anteil des direkten und des einfach-aufgeloesten Produktionsmechanismus, differentielle D*-Wirkungsquerschnitte, der totale Charm-Wirkungsquerschnitt sowie die Charm-Strukturfunktion des Photons werden bestimmt.

  14. LEP1 measurement of heavy quark forward-backward asymmetries with Opal detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafoux, H.

    1996-01-01

    Using all data collected by OPAL during the first phase of LEP operation, called LEP1, we have measured the b and c quark forward-backward asymmetries on and around the Z 0 peak. The measurement, which is based on prompt leptons produced in semileptonic decays of heavy quarks, has been optimized using artificial neural networks whenever necessary, that is whenever the problem to solve implied taking into account simultaneously a large number of parameters. Our results are compatible with other LEP measurements and with the Standard Model predictions for a top quark of 174±31 GeV/c□ and a Higgs boson mass between 60 and 1000 GeV/c□. (author). 159 refs., 88 figs., 37 tabs

  15. Impact of opal nanoconfinement on electronic properties of sodium particles: NMR studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charnaya, E.V., E-mail: charnaya@live.com [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 70101 Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, 198504 (Russian Federation); Lee, M.K. [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 70101 Taiwan (China); MoST Instrument Center at NCKU, Tainan, 70101 Taiwan (China); Chang, L.J. [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 70101 Taiwan (China); Kumzerov, Yu.A.; Fokin, A.V. [A.F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute RAS, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Samoylovich, M.I. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Moscow, 141700 (Russian Federation); Bugaev, A.S. [CSR Institute of Technology “Technomash”, Moscow, 121108 (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-20

    The {sup 23}Na Knight shift of NMR line which is highly correlated with the electron spin susceptibility and density of states at the Fermi level was studied for the sodium loaded opal. The measurements were carried out within a temperature range from 100 to 400 K for solid and melted confined sodium nanoparticles. The NMR line below 305 K was a singlet with the Knight shift reduced compared to that in bulk. Above this temperature the NMR line split reproducibly into two components with opposite trends in the Knight shift temperature dependences which evidenced a nanoconfinement-induced transformation and heterogeneity in the electron system. The findings were suggested to be related to changes in the topology of the Fermi surface.

  16. 40K in the Black Sea: a proxy to estimate biogenic sedimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulin, S.B.; Gulina, L.V.; Sidorov, I.G.; Proskurnin, V.Yu.; Duka, M.S.; Moseichenko, I.N.; Rodina, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    An approach to estimate the rate of biogenic sedimentation in the Black Sea using the naturally occurring radionuclide 40 K has been considered. It allows assessment of the contribution of suspended matter of biological origin to the overall sediment accumulation in the Black Sea coastal, shelf and deep-water areas. Based upon this method, a relationship between the biogenic fraction of the seabed sediments and the water depth has been established with a view to differentiating the contributions of allochthonous and autochthonous suspended matter to the sedimentation rate. Overall, 40 K can be considered as an easily applicable proxy to assess sedimentation rate of biogenic fraction of particulate matter in marine environments. - Highlights: • 40 K-based approach was developed to assess biogenic sedimentation in the Black Sea. • 40 K-derived relationship between biogenic sedimentation and water depth was traced. • 40 K is an easily applicable proxy to estimate rate of biogenic sedimentation in sea

  17. Graphene-embedded 3D TiO2 inverse opal electrodes for highly efficient dye-sensitized solar cells: morphological characteristics and photocurrent enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye-Na; Yoo, Haemin; Moon, Jun Hyuk

    2013-05-21

    We demonstrated the preparation of graphene-embedded 3D inverse opal electrodes for use in DSSCs. The graphene was incorporated locally into the top layers of the inverse opal structures and was embedded into the TiO2 matrix via post-treatment of the TiO2 precursors. DSSCs comprising the bare and 1-5 wt% graphene-incorporated TiO2 inverse opal electrodes were compared. We observed that the local arrangement of graphene sheets effectively enhanced electron transport without significantly reducing light harvesting by the dye molecules. A high efficiency of 7.5% was achieved in DSSCs prepared with the 3 wt% graphene-incorporated TiO2 inverse opal electrodes, constituting a 50% increase over the efficiencies of DSSCs prepared without graphene. The increase in efficiency was mainly attributed to an increase in J(SC), as determined by the photovoltaic parameters and the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis.

  18. Organic compounds in aerosols from selected European sites - Biogenic versus anthropogenic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Célia; Vicente, Ana; Pio, Casimiro; Kiss, Gyula; Hoffer, Andras; Decesari, Stefano; Prevôt, André S. H.; Minguillón, María Cruz; Querol, Xavier; Hillamo, Risto; Spindler, Gerald; Swietlicki, Erik

    2012-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosol samples from a boreal forest (Hyytiälä, April 2007), a rural site in Hungary (K-puszta, summer 2008), a polluted rural area in Italy (San Pietro Capofiume, Po Valley, April 2008), a moderately polluted rural site in Germany located on a meadow (Melpitz, May 2008), a natural park in Spain (Montseny, March 2009) and two urban background locations (Zurich, December 2008, and Barcelona, February/March 2009) were collected. Aliphatics, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, carbonyls, sterols, n-alkanols, acids, phenolic compounds and anhydrosugars in aerosols were chemically characterised by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, along with source attribution based on the carbon preference index (CPI), the ratios between the unresolved and the chromatographically resolved aliphatics, the contribution of wax n-alkanes, n-alkanols and n-alkanoic acids from plants, diagnostic ratios of individual target compounds and source-specific markers to organic carbon ratios. In spite of transboundary pollution episodes, Hyytiälä registered the lowest levels among all locations. CPI values close to 1 for the aliphatic fraction of the Montseny aerosol suggest that the anthropogenic input may be associated with the transport of aged air masses from the surrounding industrial/urban areas, which superimpose the locally originated hydrocarbons with biogenic origin. Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in samples from San Pietro Capofiume reveal that fossil fuel combustion is a major source influencing the diel pattern of concentrations. This source contributed to 25-45% of the ambient organic carbon (OC) at the Po Valley site. Aerosols from the German meadow presented variable contributions from both biogenic and anthropogenic sources. The highest levels of vegetation wax components and biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) products were observed at K-puszta, while anthropogenic SOA compounds predominated in Barcelona. The primary vehicular emissions in the Spanish

  19. Seismological comparisons of solar models with element diffusion using the MHD, OPAL, and SIREFF equations of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzik, J.A.; Swenson, F.J.

    1997-01-01

    We compare the thermodynamic and helioseismic properties of solar models evolved using three different equation of state (EOS) treatments: the Mihalas, Daeppen ampersand Hummer EOS tables (MHD); the latest Rogers, Swenson, ampersand Iglesias EOS tables (OPAL), and a new analytical EOS (SIREFF) developed by Swenson et al. All of the models include diffusive settling of helium and heavier elements. The models use updated OPAL opacity tables based on the 1993 Grevesse ampersand Noels solar element mixture, incorporating 21 elements instead of the 14 elements used for earlier tables. The properties of solar models that are evolved with the SIREFF EOS agree closely with those of models evolved using the OPAL or MHD tables. However, unlike the MHD or OPAL EOS tables, the SIREFF in-line EOS can readily account for variations in overall Z abundance and the element mixture resulting from nuclear processing and diffusive element settling. Accounting for Z abundance variations in the EOS has a small, but non-negligible, effect on model properties (e.g., pressure or squared sound speed), as much as 0.2% at the solar center and in the convection zone. The OPAL and SIREFF equations of state include electron exchange, which produces models requiring a slightly higher initial helium abundance, and increases the convection zone depth compared to models using the MHD EOS. However, the updated OPAL opacities are as much as 5% lower near the convection zone base, resulting in a small decrease in convection zone depth. The calculated low-degree nonadiabatic frequencies for all of the models agree with the observed frequencies to within a few microhertz (0.1%). The SIREFF analytical calibrations are intended to work over a wide range of interior conditions found in stellar models of mass greater than 0.25M circle-dot and evolutionary states from pre-main-sequence through the asymptotic giant branch (AGB). It is significant that the SIREFF EOS produces solar models that both measure up

  20. U-Pb ages of uraniferous opals and implications for the history of beryllium, fluorine, and uranium mineralization at Spor Mountain, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, K. R.; Lindsey, D.A.; Zielinski, R.A.; Simmons, K.R.

    1980-01-01

    The U-Pb isotope systematics of uraniferous opals from Spor Mountain, Utah, were investigated to determine the suitability of such material for geochronologic purposes, and to estimate the timing of uranium and associated beryllium and fluorine mineralization. The results indicate that uraniferous opals can approximate a closed system for uranium and uranium daughters, so that dating samples as young as ???1 m.y. should be possible. In addition, the expected lack of initial 230Th and 231Pa in opals permits valuable information on the initial 234U/238U to be obtained on suitable samples of ???10 m.y. age. The oldest 207Pb/235U apparent age observed, 20.8 ?? 1 m.y., was that of the opal-fluorite core of a nodule from a beryllium deposit in the Spor Mountain Formation. This age is indistinguishable from that of fission-track and K-Ar ages from the host rhyolite, and links the mineralization to the first episode of alkali rhyolite magmatism and related hydrothermal activity at Spor Mountain. Successively younger ages of 13 m.y. and 8-9 m.y. on concentric outer zones of the same nodule indicate that opal formed either episodically or continuously for over 10 m.y. Several samples of both fracture-filling and massive-nodule opal associated with beryllium deposits gave 207Pb/235U apparent ages of 13-16 m.y., which may reflect a restricted period of mineralization or perhaps an averaging of 21- and <13-m.y. periods of opal growth. Several samples of fracture-filling opal in volcanic rocks as young as 6 m.y. gave 207Pb/235U ages of 3.4-4.8 m.y. These ages may reflect hot-spring activity after the last major eruption of alkali rhyolite. ?? 1980.

  1. Luminescence of two-dimensional ordered array of the ZnO quantum nanodots, obtained by means of the synthetic opal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruzintsev, A.N.; Volkov, V.T.; Emelchenko, G.A.; Karpov, I.A.; Maslov, W.M.; Michailov, G.M.; Yakimov, E.E.

    2004-01-01

    The luminescence properties of ZnO films of different thickness obtained on a synthetic opal were investigated. Several narrow peaks in the exciton emission region related to the size quantum effect of the electron wave functions were detected. Two-dimensional ordered array of ZnO quantum dots formed inside the opal pores on the second sphere layer were found by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and angle dependence of the luminescence spectra

  2. Control of Biogenic Amines in Fermented Sausages: Role of Starter Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre-Moratalla, M.L.; Bover-Cid, Sara; Veciana-Nogués, M.T.; Vidal-Carou, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    Biogenic amines show biological activity and exert undesirable physiological effects when absorbed at high concentrations. Biogenic amines are mainly formed by microbial decarboxylation of amino acids and thus are usually present in a wide range of foods, fermented sausages being one of the major biogenic amine sources. The use of selected starter cultures is one of the best technological measures to control aminogenesis during meat fermentation. Although with variable effectiveness, several works show the ability of some starters to render biogenic amine-free sausages. In this paper, the effect of different starter culture is reviewed and the factors determining their performance discussed. PMID:22586423

  3. Control of biogenic amines in fermented sausages: role of starter cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariluz eLatorre-Moratalla

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic amines show biological activity and exert undesirable physiological effects when absorbed at high concentrations. Biogenic amines are mainly formed by microbial decarboxylation of amino acids and thus are usually present in a wide range of foods, fermented sausages being one of the major biogenic amine sources. The use of selected starter cultures is one of the best technological measures to control aminogenesis during meat fermentation. Although with variable effectiveness, several works show the ability of some starters to render biogenic amine-free sausages. In this paper, the effect of different starter culture is reviewed and the factors determining their performance discussed.

  4. LBA-ECO TG-02 Biogenic VOC Emissions from Brazilian Amazon Forest and Pasture Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set reports concentrations of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) collected from tethered balloon-sampling platforms above selected...

  5. LBA-ECO TG-02 Biogenic VOC Emissions from Brazilian Amazon Forest and Pasture Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set reports concentrations of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) collected from tethered balloon-sampling platforms above selected forest and...

  6. On the controlled isotropic shrinkage induced fine-tuning of photo-luminescence in terbium ions embedded silica inverse opal films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Vishnu Prasad; Kumar, Jitendra; Sivakumar, Sri

    2017-12-01

    Tb3+ embedded silica inverse opal structures with different photonic stop bands have been fabricated by annealing the SiO2-polystyrene spheres (diameter 390 nm) opal template at 320-650 oC. The PSB tuning realized in the wavelength range 498 - 600 nm is shown to depend on annealing temperature and impending isotropic shrinkage of silica matrix. The impact of wide PSB shift on four Tb3+ ion emission bands (blue, green, yellow, and red at 486, 545, 580, and 620 nm, respectively) corresponding to 5D4→7Fj (j = 6,5,4,3) transitions have been investigated. The effect amounts to significant suppression of emission bands at 586, 545 and 486 nm in inverse opals, obtained by annealing opal template at 350, 400, and 650 oC, respectively. Further, luminescence lifetime of Tb3+ ion 5D4 state increases with shrinkage induced in inverse opal progressively and get enhanced up to 2.3 times vis-à-vis reference silica. The changes in refractive index caused by thermal annealing of opal template is found to be responsible for the observed improvement in 5D4 state lifetime.

  7. Factors influencing temporal changes in chemical composition of biogenic deposits in the middle Tążyna River Valley (Kuyavian Lakeland, central Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okupny, Daniel; Rzepecki, Seweryn; Borówka, Ryszard Krzysztof; Forysiak, Jacek; Twardy, Juliusz; Fortuniak, Anna; Tomkowiak, Julita

    2016-06-01

    The present paper discusses the influence of geochemical properties on biogenic deposits in the Wilkostowo mire near Toruń, central Poland. The analysed core has allowed the documentation of environmental changes between the older part of the Atlantic Period and the present day (probably interrupted at the turn of the Meso- and Neoholocene). In order to reconstruct the main stages in the sedimentation of biogenic deposits, we have used stratigraphic variability of selected litho-geochemical elements (organic matter, calcium carbonate, biogenic and terrigenous silica, macro- and micro-elements: Na, K, Mg, Ca, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr and Ni). The main litho-geochemical component is CaCO3; its content ranges from 4.1 per cent to 92 per cent. The variability of CaCO3 content reflects mainly changes in hydrological and geomorphological conditions within the catchment area. The effects of prehistoric anthropogenic activities in the catchment of the River Tążyna, e.g., the use of saline water for economic purposes, are recorded in a change from calcareous gyttja into detritus-calcareous gyttja sedimentation and an increased content of lithophilous elements (Na, K, Mg and Ni) in the sediments. Principal component analysis (PCA) has enabled the distinction the most important factors that affected the chemical composition of sediments at the Wilkostowo site, i.e., mechanical and chemical denudation processes in the catchment, changes in redox conditions, bioaccumulation of selected elements and human activity. Sediments of the Wilkostowo mire are located in the direct vicinity of an archaeological site, where traces of intensive settlement dating back to the Neolithic have been documented. The settlement phase is recorded both in lithology and geochemical properties of biogenic deposits which fill the reservoir formed at the bottom of the Parchania Canal Valley.

  8. Factors influencing temporal changes in chemical composition of biogenic deposits in the middle Tążyna River Valley (Kuyavian Lakeland, central Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okupny Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper discusses the influence of geochemical properties on biogenic deposits in the Wilkostowo mire near Toruń, central Poland. The analysed core has allowed the documentation of environmental changes between the older part of the Atlantic Period and the present day (probably interrupted at the turn of the Meso- and Neoholocene. In order to reconstruct the main stages in the sedimentation of biogenic deposits, we have used stratigraphic variability of selected litho-geochemical elements (organic matter, calcium carbonate, biogenic and terrigenous silica, macro- and micro-elements: Na, K, Mg, Ca, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr and Ni. The main litho-geochemical component is CaCO3; its content ranges from 4.1 per cent to 92 per cent. The variability of CaCO3 content reflects mainly changes in hydrological and geomorphological conditions within the catchment area. The effects of prehistoric anthropogenic activities in the catchment of the River Tążyna, e.g., the use of saline water for economic purposes, are recorded in a change from calcareous gyttja into detritus-calcareous gyttja sedimentation and an increased content of lithophilous elements (Na, K, Mg and Ni in the sediments. Principal component analysis (PCA has enabled the distinction the most important factors that affected the chemical composition of sediments at the Wilkostowo site, i.e., mechanical and chemical denudation processes in the catchment, changes in redox conditions, bioaccumulation of selected elements and human activity. Sediments of the Wilkostowo mire are located in the direct vicinity of an archaeological site, where traces of intensive settlement dating back to the Neolithic have been documented. The settlement phase is recorded both in lithology and geochemical properties of biogenic deposits which fill the reservoir formed at the bottom of the Parchania Canal Valley.

  9. Enhanced recycling of organic matter and Os-isotopic evidence for multiple magmatic or meteoritic inputs to the Late Permian Panthalassic Ocean, Opal Creek, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Svetoslav V.; Stein, Holly J.; Hannah, Judith L.; Henderson, Charles M.; Algeo, Thomas J.

    2015-02-01

    The geochemical record for the Permian-Triassic boundary in northern latitudes is essential to evaluation of global changes associated with the most profound extinction of life on Earth. We present inorganic and organic geochemical data, and Re-Os isotope systematics in a critical stratigraphic interval of pre- and post-extinction Upper Permian-Lower Triassic sediments from Opal Creek, western Canada (paleolatitude of ∼30°N). We document significant and long-lived changes in Panthalassa seawater chemistry that were initiated during the first of four magmatic or meteoritic inputs to Late Permian seawater, evidenced by notable decreases of Os isotopic ratios upsection. Geochemical signals indicate establishment of anoxic bottom waters shortly after regional transgression reinitiated sedimentation in the Late Permian. Euxinic signals are most prominent in the Upper Permian sediments with low organic carbon and high sulfur contents, and gradually wane in the Lower Triassic. The observed features may have been generated in a strongly euxinic ocean in which high bacterioplankton productivity sustained prolific microbial sulfate reduction in the sediment and/or water column, providing hydrogen sulfide to form pyrite. This scenario requires nearly complete anaerobic decomposition of predominantly labile marine organic matter (OM) without the necessity for a complete collapse of primary marine productivity. Similar geochemical variations could have been achieved by widespread oxidation of methane by sulfate reducers after a methanogenic burst in the Late Permian. Both scenarios could have provided similar kill mechanisms for the latest Permian mass extinction. Despite the moderate thermal maturity of the section, OM in all studied samples is dominantly terrestrial and/or continentally derived, recycled and refractory ancient OM. We argue that, as such, the quantity of the OM in the section mainly reflects changes in terrestrial vegetation and/or weathering, and not in

  10. Arsenic removal from acidic solutions with biogenic ferric precipitates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahoranta, Sarita H., E-mail: sarita.ahoranta@tut.fi [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Kokko, Marika E., E-mail: marika.kokko@tut.fi [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Papirio, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.papirio@unicas.it [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Özkaya, Bestamin, E-mail: bozkaya@yildiz.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Department of Environmental Engineering, Yildiz Technical University, Davutpasa Campus 34220, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Puhakka, Jaakko A., E-mail: jaakko.puhakka@tut.fi [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2016-04-05

    Highlights: • Continuous and rapid arsenic removal with biogenic jarosite was achieved at pH 3.0. • Arsenic removal was inefficient below pH 2.4 due to reduced Fe–As co-precipitation. • As(V) had better sorption characteristics than As(III). • Biogenic jarosite adsorbed arsenic more effectively than synthetic jarosite. - Abstract: Treatment of acidic solution containing 5 g/L of Fe(II) and 10 mg/L of As(III) was studied in a system consisting of a biological fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) for iron oxidation, and a gravity settler for iron precipitation and separation of the ferric precipitates. At pH 3.0 and FBR retention time of 5.7 h, 96–98% of the added Fe(II) precipitated (99.1% of which was jarosite). The highest iron oxidation and precipitation rates were 1070 and 28 mg/L/h, respectively, and were achieved at pH 3.0. Subsequently, the effect of pH on arsenic removal through sorption and/or co-precipitation was examined by gradually decreasing solution pH from 3.0 to 1.6 (feed pH). At pH 3.0, 2.4 and 1.6, the highest arsenic removal efficiencies obtained were 99.5%, 80.1% and 7.1%, respectively. As the system had ferric precipitates in excess, decreased arsenic removal was likely due to reduced co-precipitation at pH < 2.4. As(III) was partially oxidized to As(V) in the system. In shake flask experiments, As(V) sorbed onto jarosite better than As(III). Moreover, the sorption capacity of biogenic jarosite was significantly higher than that of synthetic jarosite. The developed bioprocess simultaneously and efficiently removes iron and arsenic from acidic solutions, indicating potential for mining wastewater treatment.

  11. Post-speleogenetic biogenic modification of Gomantong Caves, Sabah, Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Joyce; McFarlane, Donald A.

    2012-07-01

    The Gomantong cave system of eastern Sabah, Malaysia, is well-known as an important site for harvesting edible bird-nests and, more recently, as a tourist attraction. Although the biology of the Gomantong system has been repeatedly studied, very little attention has been given to the geomorphology. Here, we report on the impact of geobiological modification in the development of the modern aspect of the cave, an important but little recognized feature of tropical caves. Basic modeling of the metabolic outputs from bats and birds (CO2, H2O, heat) reveals that post-speleogenetic biogenic corrosion can erode bedrock by between ~ 3.0 mm/ka (1 m/~300 ka) and ~ 4.6 mm/ka (1 m/~200 ka). Modeling at high densities of bats yields rates of corrosion of ~ 34 mm/ka (or 1 m/~30 ka). Sub-aerial corrosion creates a previously undescribed speleological feature, the apse-flute, which is semicircular in cross-section and ~ 80 cm wide. It is vertical regardless of rock properties, developing in parallel but apparently completely independently, and often unbroken from roof to floor. They end at a blind hemi-spherical top with no extraneous water source. Half-dome ceiling conch pockets are remnants of previous apse-fluting. Sub-cutaneous corrosion creates the floor-level guano notch formed by organic acid dissolution of bedrock in contact with guano. Speleogenetic assessment suggests that as much as 70-95% of the total volume of the modern cave may have been opened by direct subaerial biogenic dissolution and biogenically-induced collapse, and by sub-cutaneous removal of limestone, over a timescale of 1-2 Ma.

  12. PROSPECTS OF MODIFICATION OF BALNEOLOGICAL REMEDIES WITH BIOGENEOUS METALLS NANOPARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Mamuchieva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the issues of mineral waters modification with biogeneous metals nanoparticles, since they have extremely important meaning for human's organism and their production in green and biologically compliant form is hard to overestimate. Russian scientists discovered low toxicity of these nanomaterials. So the use of biogeneuos metals in form of nanoparticles allows lowering of their toxicity compared with its use in forms of ions.

  13. Extracellular Proteins Limit the Dispersal of BiogenicNanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, John W.; Weber, Peter K.; Martin, Michael C.; Gilbert,Benjamin; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2007-04-27

    High spatial-resolution secondaryion microprobespectrometry, synchrotron radiation Fourier-transform infraredspectroscopy and polyacrylamide gel analysis demonstrate the intimateassociation of proteins with spheroidal aggregates of biogenic zincsulfide nanocrystals, an example of extracellular biomineralization.Experiments involving synthetic ZnS nanoparticles and representativeamino acids indicate a driving role for cysteine in rapid nanoparticleaggregation. These findings suggest that microbially-derivedextracellular proteins can limit dispersal of nanoparticulatemetal-bearing phases, such as the mineral products of bioremediation,that may otherwise be transported away from their source by subsurfacefluid flow.

  14. Carbon nanomaterial based electrochemical sensors for biogenic amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiao; He, Xiulan; Li, Fangping; Fei, Junjie; Feng, Bo; Ding, Yonglan

    2013-01-01

    This review describes recent advances in the use of carbon nanomaterials for electroanalytical detection of biogenic amines (BAs). It starts with a short introduction into carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, nanodiamonds, carbon nanofibers, fullerenes, and their composites. Next, electrochemical sensing schemes are discussed for various BAs including dopamine, serotonin, epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyramine, histamine and putrescine. Examples are then given for methods for simultaneous detection of various BAs. Finally, we discuss the current and future challenges of carbon nanomaterial-based electrochemical sensors for BAs. The review contains 175 references. (author)

  15. Pulmonary extraction of biogenic amines during septic shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerstein, M.D.; Kohler, J.; Gould, S.; Moseley, P.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of live Escherichia coli on the pulmonary extraction of the biogenic amines 14 C 5-hydroxytryptamine, (5-HT) and 3 H-epinephrine was investigated. The labeled isotopes were injected into a central venous catheter and collected from an aortic catheter. One hundred per cent of the labeled epinephrine was recovered in the control and septic state. Only 32.8 +/- 3.6% SEM of the 5-hydroxytryptamine was recovered before sepsis and 42.5 +/- 4.9% SEM after sepsis. During sepsis, mean arterial pressure fell to 58 mm Hg from 121 mm Hg. Pulmonary shunt increased from .7 +/- .05 SEM to .33 +/- .09 SEM

  16. Can citizen science produce good science? Testing the OPAL Air Survey methodology, using lichens as indicators of nitrogenous pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregidgo, Daniel J; West, Sarah E; Ashmore, Mike R

    2013-11-01

    Citizen science is having increasing influence on environmental monitoring as its advantages are becoming recognised. However methodologies are often simplified to make them accessible to citizen scientists. We tested whether a recent citizen science survey (the OPAL Air Survey) could detect trends in lichen community composition over transects away from roads. We hypothesised that the abundance of nitrophilic lichens would decrease with distance from the road, while that of nitrophobic lichens would increase. The hypothesised changes were detected along strong pollution gradients, but not where the road source was relatively weak, or background pollution relatively high. We conclude that the simplified OPAL methodology can detect large contrasts in nitrogenous pollution, but it may not be able to detect more subtle changes in pollution exposure. Similar studies are needed in conjunction with the ever-growing body of citizen science work to ensure that the limitations of these methods are fully understood. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhanced photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic activity in visible-light-driven Ag/BiVO_4 inverse opals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Liang; Nan, Feng; Yang, Ying; Cao, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    BiVO_4 photonic crystal inverse opals (io-BiVO_4) with highly dispersed Ag nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by the nanosphere lithography method combining the pulsed current deposition method. The incorporation of the Ag NPs can significantly improve the photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic activity of BiVO_4 inverse opals in the visible light region. The photocurrent density of the Ag/io-BiVO_4 sample is 4.7 times higher than that of the disordered sample without the Ag NPs, while the enhancement factor of the corresponding kinetic constant in photocatalytic experiment is approximately 3. The improved photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic activity is benefited from two reasons: one is the enhanced light harvesting owing to the coupling between the slow light and localized surface plasmon resonance effect; the other is the efficient separation of charge carriers due to the Schottky barriers.

  18. Synthesis of suspended carbon nanotubes on silicon inverse-opal structures by laser-assisted chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, J; Lu, Y F; Wang, H; Yi, K J; Lin, Y S; Zhang, R; Liou, S H

    2006-01-01

    Suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been synthesized on Si inverse-opal structures by laser-assisted chemical vapour deposition (LCVD). A CW CO 2 laser at 10.6 μm was used to directly irradiate the substrates during the LCVD process. At a laser power density of 14.3 MW m -2 , suspended SWNT networks were found predominantly rooted at the sharp edges in the Si inverse-opal structures. Raman spectroscopy indicated that the SWNT networks were composed of high-quality defect-free SWNTs with an average diameter of 1.3 nm. At a lower laser power density (6.4 MW m -2 ), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were grown on the entire surface of the substrates. The preference for the synthesis of SWNTs or MWNTs was attributed to the difference in the catalyst sizes as well as the growth temperature in the LCVD process

  19. The influence of macroscopic texture on biogenically-derived coalbed methane, Huntly coalfield, New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mares, Tennille E. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Moore, Tim A. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Solid Energy NZ Ltd., P.O. Box 1303, Christchurch (New Zealand)

    2008-10-02

    Secondary biogenic gas content can be related to textural characteristics in Eocene age subbituminous coals from the Huntly coalfield, New Zealand. However, the relationships between the two major coal seams in the basin are considerably different despite their close stratigraphic proximity (less than 25 m). In this study, 163 coal samples were collected and desorbed from eight drill holes. Gas adsorption capacity and proximate analyses were conducted as well as macroscopic logging for coal type and vitrain banding characteristics. Vitrain bands were quantitatively point counted and the longest dimension of the shortest axis measured. Three coal types were recognized: bright luster non-banded, bright moderately banded and bright highly banded. Vitrain band thickness, converted to the phi (- log{sub 2}) scale, was found to increase across the coal types with the thickest bands being associated with the most banded coal type. Overall, when normalized by seam and location, the dataset reveals a relationship between coal type and gas content with the non-banded coal type having the highest gas contents and conversely, the coal types with the most vitrain bands having the lowest gas contents. However, when the seams are considered separately, it can be seen that in the stratigraphically higher Renown coal seam, gas has an indirect association with increasing band thickness, in agreement with the overall trend, while the stratigraphically lower Kupakupa coal seam appears to have a direct relationship. Interestingly the Renown seam, which has a greater percentage of non-banded material, generally has a greater methane adsorption capacity as well as a greater gas content compared to the Kupakupa seam. It is believed these differences are related to macroscopic texture and that the differing proportions of the coal types between the two seams has a fundamental effect on microporosity, ultimately controlling the available surface area for gas adsorption. (author)

  20. Biogenic emissions of isoprenoids and NO in China and comparison to anthropogenic emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tie Xuexi; Li Guohui; Ying, Zhuming; Guenther, Alex; Madronich, Sasha

    2006-01-01

    In this study, a regional dynamical model (WRF) is used to drive biogenic emission models to calculate high resolution (10 x 10 km) biogenic emissions of isoprene (C 5 H 8 ), monoterpenes (C 1 H 16 ), and nitric oxide (NO) in China. This high resolution biogenic inventory will be available for the community to study the effect of biogenic emissions on photochemical oxidants in China. The biogenic emissions are compared to anthropogenic emissions to gain insight on the potential impact of the biogenic emissions on tropospheric chemistry, especially ozone production in this region. The results show that the biogenic emissions in China exhibit strongly diurnal, seasonal, and spatial variations. The isoprenoid (including both isoprene and monoterpenes) emissions are closely correlated to tree density and strongly vary with season and local time. During winter (January), the biogenic isoprenoid emissions are the lowest, resulting from lower temperature and solar radiation, and highest in summer (July) due to higher temperature and solar radiation. The biogenic NO emissions are also higher during summer and lower during winter, but the magnitude of the seasonal variation is smaller than the emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes. The biogenic emissions of NO are widely spread out in the northern, eastern, and southern China regions, where high-density agricultural soil lands are located. Both biogenic NO and isoprenoid emissions are very small in western China. The calculated total biogenic emission budget is smaller than the total anthropogenic VOC emission budget in China. The biogenic isoprenoid and anthropogenic VOC emissions are 10.9 and 15.1 Tg year -1 , respectively. The total biogenic and anthropogenic emissions of NO are 5.9 and 11.5 Tg(NO) year -1 , respectively. The study shows that in central eastern China, the estimated biogenic emissions of isoprenoids are very small, and the anthropogenic emissions of VOCs are dominant in this region. However, in

  1. Biogenic emissions of isoprenoids and NO in China and comparison to anthropogenic emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Xuexi; Li, Guohui; Ying, Zhuming; Guenther, Alex; Madronich, Sasha

    2006-12-01

    In this study, a regional dynamical model (WRF) is used to drive biogenic emission models to calculate high resolution (10x10 km) biogenic emissions of isoprene (C(5)H(8)), monoterpenes (C(10)H(16)), and nitric oxide (NO) in China. This high resolution biogenic inventory will be available for the community to study the effect of biogenic emissions on photochemical oxidants in China. The biogenic emissions are compared to anthropogenic emissions to gain insight on the potential impact of the biogenic emissions on tropospheric chemistry, especially ozone production in this region. The results show that the biogenic emissions in China exhibit strongly diurnal, seasonal, and spatial variations. The isoprenoid (including both isoprene and monoterpenes) emissions are closely correlated to tree density and strongly vary with season and local time. During winter (January), the biogenic isoprenoid emissions are the lowest, resulting from lower temperature and solar radiation, and highest in summer (July) due to higher temperature and solar radiation. The biogenic NO emissions are also higher during summer and lower during winter, but the magnitude of the seasonal variation is smaller than the emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes. The biogenic emissions of NO are widely spread out in the northern, eastern, and southern China regions, where high-density agricultural soil lands are located. Both biogenic NO and isoprenoid emissions are very small in western China. The calculated total biogenic emission budget is smaller than the total anthropogenic VOC emission budget in China. The biogenic isoprenoid and anthropogenic VOC emissions are 10.9 and 15.1 Tg year(-1), respectively. The total biogenic and anthropogenic emissions of NO are 5.9 and 11.5 Tg(NO) year(-1), respectively. The study shows that in central eastern China, the estimated biogenic emissions of isoprenoids are very small, and the anthropogenic emissions of VOCs are dominant in this region. However, in

  2. Facile fabrication of highly controllable gating systems based on the combination of inverse opal structure and dynamic covalent chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Yang, Haowei; Tian, Li; Wang, Shiqiang; Gao, Ning; Zhang, Wanlin; Wang, Peng; Yin, Xianpeng; Li, Guangtao

    2017-06-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) inverse opal with periodic and porous structures has shown great potential for applications not only in optics and optoelectronics, but also in functional membranes. In this work, the benzaldehyde group was initially introduced into a 3D nanoporous inverse opal, serving as a platform for fabricating functional membranes. By employing the dynamic covalent approach, a highly controllable gating system was facilely fabricated to achieve modulable and reversible transport features. It was found that the physical/chemical properties and pore size of the gating system could easily be regulated through post-modification with amines. As a demonstration, the gated nanopores were modified with three kinds of amines to control the wettability, surface charge and nanopore size which in turn was exploited to achieve selective mass transport, including hydrophobic molecules, cations and anions, and the transport with respect to the physical steric hindrance. In particular, the gating system showed extraordinary reversibility and could recover to its pristine state by simply changing pH values. Due to the unlimited variety provided by the Schiff base reaction, the inverse opal described here exhibits a significant extendibility and could be easily post-modified with stimuli-responsive molecules for special purposes. Furthermore, this work can be extended to employ other dynamic covalent routes, for example Diels-Alder, ester exchange and disulfide exchange-based routes.

  3. Factors Influencing Biogenic Amines Accumulation in Dairy Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Daniel M.; del Río, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Martínez, Noelia; Fernández, María; Martín, María Cruz; Álvarez, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Fermented foods are among the food products more often complained of having caused episodes of biogenic amines (BA) poisoning. Concerning milk-based fermented foods, cheese is the main product likely to contain potentially harmful levels of BA, specially tyramine, histamine, and putrescine. Prompted by the increasing awareness of the risks related to dietary uptake of high biogenic amine loads, in this review we report all those elaboration and processing technological aspects affecting BA biosynthesis and accumulation in dairy foods. Improved knowledge of the factors involved in the synthesis and accumulation of BA should lead to a reduction in their incidence in milk products. Synthesis of BA is possible only when three conditions converge: (i) availability of the substrate amino acids; (ii) presence of microorganisms with the appropriate catabolic pathway activated; and (iii) environmental conditions favorable to the decarboxylation activity. These conditions depend on several factors such as milk treatment (pasteurization), use of starter cultures, NaCl concentration, time, and temperature of ripening and preservation, pH, temperature, or post-ripening technological processes, which will be discussed in this chapter. PMID:22783233

  4. Comparative study of biogenic and abiotic iron-containing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherkezova-Zheleva, Z., E-mail: zzhel@ic.bas.bg; Shopska, M., E-mail: shopska@ic.bas.bg; Paneva, D. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Catalysis (Bulgaria); Kovacheva, D. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry (Bulgaria); Kadinov, G.; Mitov, I. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Catalysis (Bulgaria)

    2016-12-15

    Series of iron-based biogenic materials prepared by cultivation of Leptothrix group of bacteria in different feeding media (Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group of bacteria isolation medium, Adler, Lieske and silicon-iron-glucose-peptone) were studied. Control samples were obtained in the same conditions and procedures but the nutrition media were not infected with bacteria, i.e. they were sterile. Room and low temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared spectroscopy (IRS) were used to reveal the composition and physicochemical properties of biomass and respective control samples. Comparative analysis showed differences in their composition and dispersity of present phases. Sample composition included different ratio of nanodimensional iron oxyhydroxide and oxide phases. Relaxation phenomena such as superparamagnetism or collective magnetic excitation behaviour were registered for some of them. The experimental data showed that the biogenic materials were enriched in oxyhydroxides of high dispersion. Catalytic behaviour of a selected biomass and abiotic material were studied in the reaction of CO oxidation. In situ diffuse-reflectance (DR) IRS was used to monitor the phase transformations in the biomass and CO conversion.

  5. Biogenic magnetite as a primary remanence carrier in limestone deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Bin R.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Stolz, John F.

    1987-06-01

    Studies on the microbial communities and magnetic phases of samples collected from carbonate oozes at Sugarloaf Key, FL, U.S.A. and calcareous laminated sediments from Laguna Figueroa, Baja California, Mexico have revealed the existence of magnetotactic bacteria and ultrafine-grained single domain magnetite in both environments. Magnetotactic bacteria were identified by light and electron microscopy. The single domain magnetite was detected by coercivity spectra analysis with a SQUID magnetometer and examined under the transmission electron microscope. The similarity, in terms of size and shape, between the single domain magnetite found in these sediments and the magnetite observed in the bacterial magnetosome from enriched cultures indicates the ultrafine-grained magnetite in these two marine environments was biologically formed. These results, combined with the common occurrences of ultrafine-grained magnetite in limestone deposits detected rock magnetically, suggest biogenic magnetite may be present and contribute to the magnetic remanence in these rocks. Several Cambrian limestone samples, separately collected from Siberia, China, and Kazakhstan, were examined for the presence of bacterial magnetite. Samples from the Lower Cambrian Sinskian Formation at Siberia Platform were found to contain both a large amount of apparently bacterial magnetite particles and a very stable primary magnetic component. Post-Cambrian diagenesis does not seem to affect the microgranulometry of these apparently bacterial magnetite crystals or the magnetic remanence carried by them. Assessing the potential role of biogenic magnetite as a primary remanence carrier in other Phanerozoic limestone deposits ought to be further pursued.

  6. Estimating the Biogenic Non-Methane Hydrocarbon Emissions over Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermioni Dimitropoulou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic emissions affect the urban air quality as they are ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA precursors and should be taken into account when applying photochemical pollution models. The present study presents an estimation of the magnitude of non-methane volatile organic compounds (BNMVOCs emitted by vegetation over Greece. The methodology is based on computation developed with the aid of a Geographic Information System (GIS and theoretical equations in order to produce an emission inventory on a 6 × 6 km2 spatial resolution, in a temporal resolution of 1 h covering one year (2016. For this purpose, a variety of input data was used: updated satellite land-use data, land-use specific emission potentials, foliar biomass densities, temperature, and solar radiation data. Hourly, daily, and annual isoprene, monoterpenes, and other volatile organic compounds (OVOCs were estimated. In the area under study, the annual biogenic emissions were estimated up to 472 kt, consisting of 46.6% isoprene, 28% monoterpenes, and 25.4% OVOCs. Results delineate an annual cycle with increasing values from March to April, while maximum emissions were observed from May to September, followed by a decrease from October to January.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF SEASONAL AND ANNUAL BIOGENIC EMISSIONS INVENTORIES FOR THE U.S. AND CANADA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report describes the development of a biogenic emissions inventory for the U.S. and Canada, to assess the role of biogenic emissions in ozone formation. Emission inventories were developed at hourly and grid (1/4 x 116 degree) level from input data at the same scales. Emissio...

  8. Estimation of biogenic volatile organic compounds emissions in subtropical island--Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ken-Hui; Chen, Tu-Fu; Huang, Ho-Chun

    2005-06-15

    Elevated tropospheric ozone is harmful to human health and plants. It is formed through the photochemical reactions involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NO(x)). The elevated ozone episodes occur mainly in summer months in the United States, while the high-ozone episodes frequently occur during the fall in Taiwan. The unique landscape of Taiwan produces tremendous amounts of biogenic VOCs in the mountain regions that are adjacent to concentrated urban areas. The urban areas, in turn, generate prodigious amounts of anthropogenic emissions. Biogenic VOC emissions have direct influence on tropospheric ozone formation. To explore the air quality problems in Taiwan, this study attempts to develop a biogenic VOC emission model suitable for air quality applications in Taiwan. The emission model is based on the Biogenic Emissions Inventory System Version 2 and coupled with a detailed Taiwan land use database. The 1999 total Taiwan biogenic VOC emissions were estimated at 214,000 metric tons. The emissions of isoprene, monoterpenes, and other VOCs were about 37.2%, 30.4%, and 32.4% of total biogenic VOC emissions, respectively. The annual total biogenic VOC emission per unit area was more than two times the value of that in any European country, implying that detailed emissions estimates in any size of region will benefit the global biogenic emission inventories.

  9. 78 FR 50135 - Soil Biogenics Ltd., File No. 500-1; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Soil Biogenics Ltd., File No. 500-1; Order of Suspension of Trading August 14, 2013. It appears to the Securities and Exchange Commission that there is a lack of current and accurate information concerning the securities of Soil Biogenics Ltd. because it has not filed [[Page 50136

  10. Biogenic Carbon Fraction of Biogas and Natural Gas Fuel Mixtures Determined with 14C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palstra, Sanne W. L.; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the accuracy of the radiocarbon-based calculation of the biogenic carbon fraction for different biogas and biofossil gas mixtures. The focus is on the uncertainty in the C-14 reference values for 100% biogenic carbon and on the C-13-based isotope fractionation correction of

  11. Mastocytosis and adverse reactions to biogenic amines and histamine-releasing foods : what is the evidence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viieg-Boerstra, BJ; van der Heide, S; Elberink, JNGO; Kluin-Nelemans, JC; Dubois, AEJ

    2005-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that normal concentrations of biogenic amines and 'histamine-releasing foods' may exacerbate symptoms in mastocytosis. The purpose of this study was to look for scientific evidence in the literature on diets restricted in biogenic amines and histamine-releasing

  12. Constraining biogenic silica dissolution in marine sediments: a comparison between diagenetic models and experimental dissolution rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalil, K.; Rabouille, C.; Gallinari, M.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; DeMaster, D.J.; Ragueneau, O.

    2007-01-01

    The processes controlling preservation and recycling of particulate biogenic silica in sediments must be understood in order to calculate oceanic silica mass balances. The new contribution of this work is the coupled use of advanced models including reprecipitation and different phases of biogenic

  13. 76 FR 61100 - Notification of a Public Meeting of the Science Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... demonstrated expertise in forestry, agriculture, measurement and carbon accounting methodologies, land use... draft Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO 2 Emissions from Stationary Sources (September 2011). DATES... review EPA's draft Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO 2 Emissions from Stationary Sources (September...

  14. Geohydrologic reconnaissance of Lake Mead National Recreation Area; Las Vegas Wash to Opal Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laney, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    The study is a geohydrologic reconnaissance of about 170 square miles in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area from Las Vegas Wash to Opal Mountain, Nevada. The study is one of a series that describes the geohydrology of the recreation area and that indentifies areas where water supplies can be developed. Precipitation in this arid area is about 5 inches per year. Streamflow is seasonal and extremely variable except for that in the Colorado River, which adjoins the area. Pan evaporation is more than 20 times greater than precipitation; therefore, regional ground-water supplies are meager except near the Colorado River, Lake Mead, and Lake Mohave. Large ground-water supplies can be developed near the river and lakes, and much smaller supplies may be obtained in a few favorable locations farther from the river and lakes. Ground water in most of the areas probably contains more than 1,000 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids, but water that contains less than 1,000 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids can be obtained within about 1 mile of the lakes. Crystalline rocks of metamorphic, intrusive and volcanic origin crop out in the area. These rocks are overlain by conglomerate and mudstone of the Muddy Creek Formation, gravel and conglomerate of the older alluvium, and sand and gravel of the Chemehuevi Formation and younger alluvium. The crystalline rocks, where sufficiently fractured, yield water to springs and would yield small amounts of water to favorably located wells. The poorly cemented and more permeable beds of the older alluvium, Chemehuevi Formation, and younger alluvium are the better potential aquifers, particularly along the Colorado River and Lakes Mead and Mohave. Thermal springs in the gorge of the Colorado River south of Hoover Dam discharge at least 2,580 acre-feet per year of water from the volcanic rocks and metamorphic and plutonic rocks. The discharge is much greater than could be infiltrated in the drainage basin above the springs

  15. Platinum 'opal eyes' - an upgraded high resolution imaging standard for performance monitoring of FEG SEM and FEG VPSEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, B.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The new generation of field emission variable pressure and conventional scanning electron microscopes [FEG (VP)SEM] are capable of extremely high resolution (e.g. 1nm 15kV) and, in parallel, imaging at very low accelerating voltages (e.g. 4 nm 0.1 kV). Most of this level of performance is in conventional high vacuum modes of operation, the variable pressure performances are lower but under rapid development. A synthetic opal sample with fine gold decoration on the 400nm silica spheres was described previously as a suitable standard for the routine monitoring of SEM performance. The sample was named 'OPAL EYES'. Whilst ideal for tungsten and LaBo filament sourced SEMs the level of detail was marginal for field emission SEM performance measurement for two reasons. Firstly, the fine gold decoration was highly variable in grain size and inconsistent between samples making comparable image collection difficult. Secondly the sample was prone to self-contamination and damage during imaging at high accelerating voltages or high magnifications. Overall the 'OPAL EYES' sample has been successful in its adoption by a number of service engineers and laboratories world-wide. A new processing step has been added to the previously described preparation process for the OPAL-EYES standard; a light sputter coating with platinum. The effect is dramatic and results in growth of (presumably -to be checked and reported on) Au-Pt features of remarkably consistent size within the central EYE regions of the sample. These outgrowths are proud of the substrate and often equi-dimensional at a size of ∼ 10 nm. The substrate detail is at a scale of ∼2-3 nm. The new Pt OPAL EYES have been used as a resolution test specimen on a recently installed FEG VPSEM with excellent results. An important feature of this new sample is the high contrast sharp-edged nature of the detail as this not only allows resolution measurement but also definition of interference (vibration, electric fields

  16. Zinc oxide inverse opal electrodes modified by glucose oxidase for electrochemical and photoelectrochemical biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lei; Song, Jian; Xu, Ru; Liu, Dali; Dong, Biao; Xu, Lin; Song, Hongwei

    2014-09-15

    The ZnO inverse opal photonic crystals (IOPCs) were synthesized by the sol-gel method using the polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) as a template. For glucose detection, glucose oxidase (GOD) was further immobilized on the inwall and surface of the IOPCs. The biosensing properties toward glucose of the Nafion/GOD/ZnO IOPCs modified FTO electrodes were carefully studied and the results indicated that the sensitivity of ZnO IOPCs modified electrode was 18 times than reference electrode due to the large surface area and uniform porous structure of ZnO IOPCs. Moreover, photoelectrochemical detection for glucose using the electrode was realized and the sensitivity approached to 52.4 µA mM(-1) cm(-2), which was about four times to electrochemical detection (14.1 µA mM(-1) cm(-2)). It indicated that photoelectrochemical detection can highly improve the sensor performance than conventional electrochemical method. It also exhibited an excellent anti-interference property and a good stability at the same time. This work provides a promising approach for realizing excellent photoelectrochemical biosensor of similar semiconductor photoelectric material. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The study of Z boson pair production with the OPAL detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, D H

    2001-01-01

    This thesis describes the study of the process e+e − → ZZ performed using data collected with the OPAL detector at the LEP storage ring. Events where one Z decays to a pair of neutrinos, which is detected as missing energy, and the other Z to hadrons or charged leptons are analyzed. The data were collected between 1998 and the end of the LEP running in 2000. The center-of-mass energy range started near ZZ threshold, 183 GeV, and continued up to 209 GeV. The production efficiencies, the number of selected events and the expected number of backgrounds events for ZZ→qq&d1;nn &d1; and ZZ→ℓ+ℓ- n n&d1; are calculated at each energy. The results of other ZZ final states are also summarized. This information is combined to calculate the production cross section of ZZ and set limits on anomalous gauge boson couplings and low scale quantum gravity. The result of this analysis is the consistent with the predictions of the Standard Model.

  18. Three-Dimensional Inverse Opal Photonic Crystal Substrates toward Efficient Capture of Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hongwei; Dong, Biao; Xiao, Qiaoqin; Sun, Xueke; Zhang, Xinran; Lyu, Jiekai; Yang, Yudan; Xu, Lin; Bai, Xue; Zhang, Shuang; Song, Hongwei

    2017-09-13

    Artificial fractal structures have attracted considerable scientific interest in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) detection and capture, which plays a pivotal role in the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer. Herein, we designed a bionic TiO 2 inverse opal photonic crystal (IOPC) structure for highly efficient immunocapture of CTCs by combination of a magnetic Fe 3 O 4 @C6@silane nanoparticles with anti-EpCAM (antiepithelial cell adhesion molecule) and microchannel structure. Porous structure and dimension of IOPC TiO 2 can be precisely controlled for mimicking cellular components, and anti-EpCAM antibody was further modified on IOPC interface by conjugating with polydopamine (PDA). The improvement of CTCs capture efficiency reaches a surprising factor of 20 for the IOPC interface compared to that on flat glass, suggesting that the IOPCs are responsible for the dramatic enhancement of the capture efficiency of MCF-7 cells. IOPC substrate with pore size of 415 nm leads to the optimal CTCs capture efficiency of 92% with 1 mL/h. Besides the cell affinity, IOPCs also have the advantage of light scattering property which can enhance the excitation and emission light of fluorescence labels, facilitating the real-time monitoring of CTCs capture. The IOPC-based platform demonstrates excellent performance in CTCs capture, which will take an important step toward specific recognition of disease-related rare cells.

  19. An Antibody-Immobilized Silica Inverse Opal Nanostructure for Label-Free Optical Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Sik Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional SiO2-based inverse opal (SiO2-IO nanostructures were prepared for use as biosensors. SiO2-IO was fabricated by vertical deposition and calcination processes. Antibodies were immobilized on the surface of SiO2-IO using 3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APTMS, a succinimidyl-[(N-maleimidopropionamido-tetraethyleneglycol] ester (NHS-PEG4-maleimide cross-linker, and protein G. The highly accessible surface and porous structure of SiO2-IO were beneficial for capturing influenza viruses on the antibody-immobilized surfaces. Moreover, as the binding leads to the redshift of the reflectance peak, the influenza virus could be detected by simply monitoring the change in the reflectance spectrum without labeling. SiO2-IO showed high sensitivity in the range of 103–105 plaque forming unit (PFU and high specificity to the influenza A (H1N1 virus. Due to its structural and optical properties, SiO2-IO is a promising material for the detection of the influenza virus. Our study provides a generalized sensing platform for biohazards as various sensing strategies can be employed through the surface functionalization of three-dimensional nanostructures.

  20. Cell-friendly inverse opal-like hydrogels for a spatially separated co-culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaeyun; Bencherif, Sidi A; Li, Weiwei Aileen; Mooney, David J

    2014-09-01

    Three-dimensional macroporous scaffolds have extensively been studied for cell-based tissue engineering but their use is mostly limited to mechanical support for cell adhesion and growth on the surface of macropores. Here, a templated fabrication method is described to prepare cell-friendly inverse opal-like hydrogels (IOHs) allowing both cell encapsulation within the hydrogel matrix and cell seeding on the surface of macropores. Ionically crosslinked alginate microbeads and photocrosslinkable biocompatible polymers are used as a sacrificial template and as a matrix, respectively. The alginate microbeads are easily removed by a chelating agent, with minimal toxicity for the encapsulated cells during template removal. The outer surface of macropores in IOHs can also provide a space for cell adherence. The cells encapsulated or attached in IOHs are able to remain viable and to proliferate over time. The elastic modulus and cell-adhesion properties of IOHs can be easily controlled and tuned. Finally, it is demonstrated that IOH can be used to co-culture two distinct cell populations in different spatial positions. This cell-friendly IOH system provides a 3D scaffold for organizing different cell types in a controllable microenvironment to investigate biological processes such as stem cell niches or tumor microenvironments. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.