WorldWideScience

Sample records for biogenic methane production

  1. Enhancement of Biogenic Coalbed Methane Production and Back Injection of Coalbed Methane Co-Produced Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Jin

    2007-05-31

    Biogenic methane is a common constituent in deep subsurface environments such as coalbeds and oil shale beds. Coalbed methane (CBM) makes significant contributions to world natural gas industry and CBM production continues to increase. With increasing CBM production, the production of CBM co-produced water increases, which is an environmental concern. This study investigated the feasibility in re-using CBM co-produced water and other high sodic/saline water to enhance biogenic methane production from coal and other unconventional sources, such as oil shale. Microcosms were established with the selected carbon sources which included coal, oil shale, lignite, peat, and diesel-contaminated soil. Each microcosm contained either CBM coproduced water or groundwater with various enhancement and inhibitor combinations. Results indicated that the addition of nutrients and nutrients with additional carbon can enhance biogenic methane production from coal and oil shale. Methane production from oil shale was much greater than that from coal, which is possibly due to the greater amount of available Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) from oil shale. Inconclusive results were observed from the other sources since the incubation period was too low. WRI is continuing studies with biogenic methane production from oil shale.

  2. Physiology and Genetics of Biogenic Methane-Production from Acetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowers, Kevin R

    2013-04-04

    Biomass conversion catalyzed by methanogenic consortia is a widely available, renewable resource for both energy production and waste treatment. The efficiency of this process is directly dependent upon the interaction of three metabolically distinct groups of microorganisms; the fermentative and acetogenic Bacteria and the methanogenic Archaea. One of the rate limiting steps in the degradation of soluble organic matter is the dismutation of acetate, a predominant intermediate in the process, which accounts for 70 % or more of the methane produced by the methanogens. Acetate utilization is controlled by regulation of expression of carbon monoxide dehydrogensase (COdh), which catalyzes the dismutation of acetate. However, physiological and molecular factors that control differential substrate utilization have not been identified in these Archaea. Our laboratory has identified sequence elements near the promoter of the gene (cdh) encoding for COdh and we have confirmed that these sequences have a role in the in vivo expression of cdh. The current proposal focuses on identifying the regulatory components that interact with DNA and RNA elements, and identifying the mechanisms used to control cdh expression. We will determine whether expression is controlled at the level of transcription or if it is mediated by coordinate interaction of transcription initiation with other processes such as transcription elongation rate and differential mRNA stability. Utilizing recently sequenced methanosarcinal genomes and a DNA microarray currently under development genes that encode regulatory proteins and transcription factors will be identified and function confirmed by gene disruption and subsequent screening on different substrates. Functional interactions will be determined in vivo by assaying the effects of gene dosage and site-directed mutagenesis of the regulatory gene on the expression of a cdhA™::lacZ operon fusion. Results of this study will reveal whether this critical

  3. Physiology and Genetics of Biogenic Methane-Production from Acetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowers, Kevin R

    2013-04-04

    Biomass conversion catalyzed by methanogenic consortia is a widely available, renewable resource for both energy production and waste treatment. The efficiency of this process is directly dependent upon the interaction of three metabolically distinct groups of microorganisms; the fermentative and acetogenic Bacteria and the methanogenic Archaea. One of the rate limiting steps in the degradation of soluble organic matter is the dismutation of acetate, a predominant intermediate in the process, which accounts for 70 % or more of the methane produced by the methanogens. Acetate utilization is controlled by regulation of expression of carbon monoxide dehydrogensase (COdh), which catalyzes the dismutation of acetate. However, physiological and molecular factors that control differential substrate utilization have not been identified in these Archaea. Our laboratory has identified sequence elements near the promoter of the gene (cdh) encoding for COdh and we have confirmed that these sequences have a role in the in vivo expression of cdh. The current proposal focuses on identifying the regulatory components that interact with DNA and RNA elements, and identifying the mechanisms used to control cdh expression. We will determine whether expression is controlled at the level of transcription or if it is mediated by coordinate interaction of transcription initiation with other processes such as transcription elongation rate and differential mRNA stability. Utilizing recently sequenced methanosarcinal genomes and a DNA microarray currently under development genes that encode regulatory proteins and transcription factors will be identified and function confirmed by gene disruption and subsequent screening on different substrates. Functional interactions will be determined in vivo by assaying the effects of gene dosage and site-directed mutagenesis of the regulatory gene on the expression of a cdh::lacZ operon fusion. Results of this study will reveal whether this critical

  4. Formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane

    OpenAIRE

    Stolper, D. A.; Lawson, M.; Davis, C. L.; Ferreira, A. A.; Santos Neto, E. V.; Ellis, G.S.; Lewan, M.D.; Martini, A. M.; Tang, Y.; Schoell, M.; Sessions, A.L.; Eiler, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and energy resource generated dominantly by methanogens at low temperatures and through the breakdown of organic molecules at high temperatures. However, methane-formation temperatures in nature are often poorly constrained. We measured formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane using a “clumped isotope” technique. Thermogenic gases yield formation temperatures between 157° and 221°C, within the nominal gas window, and biogenic gases yiel...

  5. Formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, D.A.; Lawson, M.; Davis, C.L.; Ferreira, A.A.; Santos Neto, E. V.; Ellis, G.S.; Lewan, M.D.; Martini, A.M.; Tang, Y.; Schoell, M.; Sessions, A.L.; Eiler, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and energy resource generated dominantly by methanogens at low temperatures and through the breakdown of organic molecules at high temperatures. However, methane-formation temperatures in nature are often poorly constrained. We measured formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane using a “clumped isotope” technique. Thermogenic gases yield formation temperatures between 157° and 221°C, within the nominal gas window, and biogenic gases yield formation temperatures consistent with their comparatively lower-temperature formational environments (<50°C). In systems where gases have migrated and other proxies for gas-generation temperature yield ambiguous results, methane clumped-isotope temperatures distinguish among and allow for independent tests of possible gas-formation models.

  6. Biogenic methane potential of marine sediments. Application of chemical thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arning, E.T.; Schulz, H.M. [Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ, Potsdam (Germany); Berk, W. van [Technical Univ. of Clausthal (Germany). Dept. of Hydrogeology

    2013-08-01

    Accumulations of biogenic methane-dominated gas are widespread and occur in a variety of depositional settings and rock types. However, the potential of biogenic methane remains underexplored. This is mainly due to the fact that quantitative assessments applying numerical modeling techniques for exploration purposes are generally lacking to date. Biogenic methane formation starts in relatively shallow marine sediments below the sulfate reduction zone. When sulfate is exhausted, methanogenesis via the CO{sub 2} reduction pathway is often the dominant biogenic methane formation process in marine sediments (Claypool and Kaplan, 1974). The process can be simplified by the reaction: 2CH{sub 2}O + Ca{sup 2+} + H{sub 2}O {yields} CH{sub 4} + CaCO{sub 3} + 2H{sup +}. The products of early diagenetic reactions initiate coupled equilibrium reactions that induce a new state of chemical equilibrium among minerals, pore water and gas. The driving force of the complex biogeochemical reactions in sedimentary environments during early diagenesis is the irreversible redox-conversion of organic matter. Early diagenetic formation of biogenic methane shortly after deposition ('early diagenesis') was retraced using PHREEQC computer code that is applied to calculate homogenous and heterogeneous mass-action equations in combination with one-dimensional diffusion driven transport (Parkhurst and Appelo, 1999). Our modeling approach incorporates interdependent diagenetic reactions evolving into a diffusive multi-component and multiphase system by means of thermodynamic equilibrium calculations of species distribution (Arning et al., 2011, 2012, 2013). Reaction kinetics of organic carbon conversion is integrated into the set of equilibrium reactions by defining type and amount of converted organic matter in a certain time step. It is the aim (1) to calculate quantitatively thermodynamic equilibrium conditions (composition of pore water, mineral phase and gas phase assemblage) in

  7. Insights into Methane Formation Temperatures, Biogenic Methanogenesis, and Natural Methane Emissions from Clumped Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, P. M.; Stolper, D. A.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Dallimore, S.; Paull, C. K.; Wik, M.; Crill, P. M.; Winterdahl, M.; Smith, D. A.; Luhmann, A. J.; Ding, K.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.; Eiler, J. M.; Ponton, C.; Sessions, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    Multiply substituted isotopologues of methane are a valuable new tool for characterizing and understanding the source of methane in different Earth environments. Here we present methane clumped isotope results from natural gas wells, hydrothermal vents, marine and lacustrine methane seeps, and culture experiments. We observe a wide range of formation temperatures for thermogenic methane. Methane samples from low-maturity reservoirs indicate formation temperatures between 102-144° C, high-maturity conventional and shale gasses indicate temperatures between 158-246 °C, and thermogenic coal gases indicate temperatures between 174-267 °C. Methane formation temperatures generally correlate positively with δ13C, and negatively with gas wetness indices. Methane samples from a set of marine hydrothermal vents indicate a formation temperature of 290-350 °C. Methane sampled from subsurface and marine biogenic sources typically indicate temperatures consistent with the formation environment (0-64° C). In contrast, freshwater biogenic methane samples, and cultures of hydrogenotrophic and methylotrophic methanogens, express low levels of isotopic clumping inconsistent with their formation temperature. These data and complementary models suggest that kinetic isotope effects, likely modulated by rates and pathways of methanogenesis, affect biogenic methane in cultures and freshwater environments. Alternatively, non-equilibrium signatures may result from mixing of methane with widely differing δD and δ13C values. Analyses of biogenic methane emissions from lakes indicate a correlation between methane flux and non-equilibrium clumped isotope fractionations in a given lake. Results from large methane seeps in Alaskan lakes confirm that some seeps emit thermogenic methane, but also indicate that other seeps emit subsurface biogenic methane or variable mixtures of biogenic and thermogenic methane. These results point to diverse sources for large Arctic methane seeps.

  8. Microbial Methane Formation from Coal and Wood in Abandoned Coal Mines - Analogues for biogenic methane formation in Black Shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, M.; Beckmann, S.; Engelen, B.; Cypionka, H.

    2009-04-01

    About seven percent of the global annual methane emissions originate from coal mining. Also, mine gas has come into focus of the power industry and is being used increasingly for heat and power production. In many coal deposits worldwide, stable carbon and hydrogen isotopic signatures of methane indicate a mixed thermogenic and biogenic origin. In this study, we have measured in an abandoned coal mine methane fluxes and isotopic signatures of methane and carbon dioxide, and collected samples for microbiological and phylogenetic investigations. Mine timber and hard coal showed an in-situ production of methane with isotopic signatures similar to those of the methane in the mine atmosphere. Enrichment cultures amended with mine timber or hard coal as sole carbon sources formed methane over a period of nine months. Predominantly, acetoclastic methanogenesis was stimulated in enrichments containing acetate or hydrogen/carbon dioxide. Molecular techniques revealed that the archaeal community in enrichment cultures and unamended samples was dominated by members of the Methanosarcinales. The combined geochemical and microbiological investigations identify microbial methanogenesis as a recent source of methane in abandoned coal mines. Overall, our new results support the assumption that abandoned coal reservoirs have a potential to supply methane gas for energy production over extended time scales. The worldwide increased mining activity will go along with an increased coal weathering and the formation of biogenic methane. Currently, our research is focussing on the question to which extent and for how long recent biogenic methane production is contributing to shale gas formation as another important future energy resource.

  9. Gas formation. Formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, D A; Lawson, M; Davis, C L; Ferreira, A A; Santos Neto, E V; Ellis, G S; Lewan, M D; Martini, A M; Tang, Y; Schoell, M; Sessions, A L; Eiler, J M

    2014-06-27

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and energy resource generated dominantly by methanogens at low temperatures and through the breakdown of organic molecules at high temperatures. However, methane-formation temperatures in nature are often poorly constrained. We measured formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane using a "clumped isotope" technique. Thermogenic gases yield formation temperatures between 157° and 221°C, within the nominal gas window, and biogenic gases yield formation temperatures consistent with their comparatively lower-temperature formational environments (<50°C). In systems where gases have migrated and other proxies for gas-generation temperature yield ambiguous results, methane clumped-isotope temperatures distinguish among and allow for independent tests of possible gas-formation models. PMID:24970083

  10. 褐煤生物产气微生物的富集驯化及产气初步研究%The Primary Investigation on Microbial Enrichment of Biogenic Methane with Lignite and Methane Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何环; 韩娅新; 王珊珊; 冷云伟; 陶秀祥

    2013-01-01

    褐煤生物产气是当前研究热点。从山东某煤矿地底973处取回煤层水样品,通过富集培养从中得到稳定产气菌群。产气试验表明,该菌群能够利用白音华褐煤进行产气,驯化培养后,产气量明显增多,产气周期缩短。褐煤经微生物菌群处理后,灰分由原来46.11%下降至42.98%,C元素明显减少,由78.02%降至67.14%,同时O和H元素的含量增加,表面电位分析表明残煤等电点低于原煤等电点。%Biogenic production of coal bed methane with lignite is a research hotspot. In present work, a coal bed water sample at a depth of 936m below land surface has been collected from Zhaolou coal mine, Shan-dong Province, eastern China. The stable microbial consortium with the biotransformation ability of lignite was obtained by the enrichment experiments. The methane production results showed that that the microbial consortium has the bioconversion ability from Baiyinhua native lignite to methane. After acclimation, the gas amount significantly increased whereas the production periods shorten. The ash content of lignite decreased from 46.11% to 42.98%, and the carbon element concentration decreased while oxygen and hydrogen ele-ment increased after processed with microbial consortium. The Zeta potential analysis showed that the iso-electric point of residual coal was lower than that of raw coal.

  11. Effects of composition of labile organic matter on biogenic production of methane in the coastal sediments of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gonsalves, M.J.B.D.; Fernandes, C.E.G.; Fernandes, S.O.; Kirchman, D.L.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Fernandes 1. David Kirchman 2. P.A. Loka Bharathi 1 1 Microbiology Laboratory, National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa, 403 004, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, India 2 School of Marine Science and Policy, University...% from hydrates (IPCC 2001). Most of the methane from natural sources in Earth’s atmosphere is thought to originate from biological processes in anoxic environments (Houghton et al. 2001). As much as 50% of the world’s natural gas resources including...

  12. Biogenic amines in dairy products

    OpenAIRE

    Linares, Daniel M.; Martín, M. Cruz; Ladero Losada, Víctor Manuel; Álvarez González, Miguel Ángel; Fernández García, María

    2011-01-01

    Biogenic amines (BA) are organic, basic, nitrogenous compounds with biological activity, mainly formed by the decarboxylation of amino acids. BA are present in a wide range of foods, including dairy products, and can accumulate in high concentrations. In some cheeses more than 1000 mg of BA have been detected per kilogram of cheese. The consumption of food containing large amounts of these amines can have toxicological consequences. Although there is no specific legislation regarding the BA c...

  13. Rn-222 tracing and stable isotope measurements of biogenic gas fluxes from methane saturated sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Christopher S.; Green, C. D.; Blair, Neal; Chanton, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    Transport of reduced biogenic gases from anoxic sediments and soils to the atmosphere can be quantitatively studied through measurement of radon-222/radium-226 disequilibrium. In previous work, seasonal variations in biogenic gas transport mechanisms, net fluxes and overall composition were documented. Now presented are direct field measurements of radon-222 activity in gases exiting organic rich sediments which show their usefulness for tracing of the stripping of dissolved biogenic gases from within the sediment column and transport via bubble ebullition. Methane is depleted in deuterium during the summer as compared with winter months and is in general lighter than in most marine sediments signaling the probable importance of acetate as an important precursor molecule. The significant seasonal isotopic variations observed illustrate the importance of understanding mechanisms and rates of biogenic gas production in order to interpret observed tropospheric isotopic data.

  14. The effects of fire on biogenic emissions of methane and nitric oxide from wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joel S.; Cofer, Wesley R., III; Sebacher, Daniel I.; Rhinehart, Robert P.; Winstead, Edward L.; Sebacher, Shirley; Hinkle, C. Ross; Schmalzer, Paul A.; Koller, Albert M., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Enhanced emissions of methane (CH4) and nitric oxide (NO) were measured following three controlled burns in a Florida wetlands in 1987 and 1988. Wetlands are the major global source of methane resulting from metabolic activity of methanogenic bacteria. Methanogens require carbon dioxide, acetate, or formate for their growth and the metabolic production of methane. All three water-soluble compounds are produced in large concentrations during biomass burning. Postfire methane emissions exceeded 0.15 g CH 4/sq m per day. Preburn and postburn measurements of soil nutrients indicate significant postburn increases in soil ammonium, from 8.35 to 13.49 parts per million (ppm) in the upper 5 cm of the Juncus marsh and from 8.83 to 23.75 ppm in the upper 5 cm of the Spartina marsh. Soil nitrate concentrations were found to decrease in both marshes after the fire. These measurements indicate that the combustion products of biomass burning exert an important 'fertilizing' effect on the biosphere and on the biogenic production of environmentally significant atmospheric gases.

  15. Deposition of Biogenic Iron Minerals in a Methane Oxidizing Microbial Mat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Wrede

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The syntrophic community between anaerobic methanotrophic archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria forms thick, black layers within multi-layered microbial mats in chimney-like carbonate concretions of methane seeps located in the Black Sea Crimean shelf. The microbial consortium conducts anaerobic oxidation of methane, which leads to the formation of mainly two biomineral by-products, calcium carbonates and iron sulfides, building up these chimneys. Iron sulfides are generated by the microbial reduction of oxidized sulfur compounds in the microbial mats. Here we show that sulfate reducing bacteria deposit biogenic iron sulfides extra- and intracellularly, the latter in magnetosome-like chains. These chains appear to be stable after cell lysis and tend to attach to cell debris within the microbial mat. The particles may be important nuclei for larger iron sulfide mineral aggregates.

  16. Enhanced Microbial Pathways for Methane Production from Oil Shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Fallgren

    2009-02-15

    Methane from oil shale can potentially provide a significant contribution to natural gas industry, and it may be possible to increase and continue methane production by artificially enhancing methanogenic activity through the addition of various substrate and nutrient treatments. Western Research Institute in conjunction with Pick & Shovel Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted microcosm and scaled-up reactor studies to investigate the feasibility and optimization of biogenic methane production from oil shale. The microcosm study involving crushed oil shale showed the highest yield of methane was produced from oil shale pretreated with a basic solution and treated with nutrients. Incubation at 30 C, which is the estimated temperature in the subsurface where the oil shale originated, caused and increase in methane production. The methane production eventually decreased when pH of the system was above 9.00. In the scaled-up reactor study, pretreatment of the oil shale with a basic solution, nutrient enhancements, incubation at 30 C, and maintaining pH at circumneutral levels yielded the highest rate of biogenic methane production. From this study, the annual biogenic methane production rate was determined to be as high as 6042 cu. ft/ton oil shale.

  17. Methylotrophic methanogenesis governs the biogenic coal bed methane formation in Eastern Ordos Basin, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Hongguang; Yu, Zhisheng; Liu, Ruyin [Graduate Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). College of Resources and Environment; Zhang, Hongxun [Graduate Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). College of Resources and Environment; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences; Zhong, Qiding; Xiong, Zhenghe [China National Research Institute of Food and Fermentation Industries, Beijing (China). Food Analysis using Isotope Technology Lab

    2012-12-15

    To identify the methanogenic pathways present in a deep coal bed methane (CBM) reservoir associated with Eastern Ordos Basin in China, a series of geochemical and microbiological studies was performed using gas and water samples produced from the Liulin CBM reservoir. The composition and stable isotopic ratios of CBM implied a mixed biogenic and thermogenic origin of the methane. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed the dominance of the methylotrophic methanogen Methanolobus in the water produced. The high potential of methane production by methylotrophic methanogens was found in the enrichments using the water samples amended with methanol and incubated at 25 and 35 C. Methylotrophic methanogens were the dominant archaea in both enrichments as shown by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that fermentative, sulfate-reducing, and nitrate-reducing bacteria inhabiting the water produced were a factor in coal biodegradation to fuel methanogens. These results suggested that past and ongoing biodegradation of coal by methylotrophic methanogens and syntrophic bacteria, as well as thermogenic CBM production, contributed to the Liulin CBM reserves associated with the Eastern Ordos Basin. (orig.)

  18. Factors influencing biogenic amines accumulation in dairy products

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel M. eLinares; Beatriz edel Río; Victor eLadero; Noelia eMartínez; María eFernández; María Cruz eMartín; Miguel A. eAlvarez

    2012-01-01

    Fermented foods are within the food products more often complained of having caused biogenic amines poisoning. Concerning milk-based fermented foods, cheese is the main product likely to contain significant levels of biogenic amines, specially tyramine, histamine and putrescine. Prompted by the increasing awareness of the risks related to dietary uptake of high biogenic amine loads, in this review we report about cheese elaboration and processing technological aspects affecting biogenic amine...

  19. Biochemically enhanced methane production from coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opara, Aleksandra

    For many years, biogas was connected mostly with the organic matter decomposition in shallow sediments (e.g., wetlands, landfill gas, etc.). Recently, it has been realized that biogenic methane production is ongoing in many hydrocarbon reservoirs. This research examined microbial methane and carbon dioxide generation from coal. As original contributions methane production from various coal materials was examined in classical and electro-biochemical bench-scale reactors using unique, developed facultative microbial consortia that generate methane under anaerobic conditions. Facultative methanogenic populations are important as all known methanogens are strict anaerobes and their application outside laboratory would be problematic. Additional testing examined the influence of environmental conditions, such as pH, salinity, and nutrient amendments on methane and carbon dioxide generation. In 44-day ex-situ bench-scale batch bioreactor tests, up to 300,000 and 250,000 ppm methane was generated from bituminous coal and bituminous coal waste respectively, a significant improvement over 20-40 ppm methane generated from control samples. Chemical degradation of complex hydrocarbons using environmentally benign reagents, prior to microbial biodegradation and methanogenesis, resulted in dissolution of up to 5% bituminous coal and bituminous coal waste and up to 25% lignite in samples tested. Research results confirm that coal waste may be a significant underutilized resource that could be converted to useful fuel. Rapid acidification of lignite samples resulted in low pH (below 4.0), regardless of chemical pretreatment applied, and did not generate significant methane amounts. These results confirmed the importance of monitoring and adjusting in situ and ex situ environmental conditions during methane production. A patented Electro-Biochemical Reactor technology was used to supply electrons and electron acceptor environments, but appeared to influence methane generation in a

  20. Terrestrial plant methane production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Bruhn, Dan; Møller, Ian M.;

    We evaluate all experimental work published on the phenomenon of aerobic methane (CH4) generation in terrestrial plants. We conclude that the phenomenon is true. Four stimulating factors have been observed to induce aerobic plant CH4 production, i.e. cutting injuries, increasing temperature...... into consideration other potential sources than pectin. Due to the large uncertainties related to effects of stimulating factors, genotypic responses and type of precursors, we conclude that current attempts for upscaling aerobic CH4 into a global budget is insufficient. Thus it is too early to draw the line under...

  1. Factors influencing biogenic amines accumulation in dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M. eLinares

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Fermented foods are within the food products more often complained of having caused biogenic amines poisoning. Concerning milk-based fermented foods, cheese is the main product likely to contain significant levels of biogenic amines, specially tyramine, histamine and putrescine. Prompted by the increasing awareness of the risks related to dietary uptake of high biogenic amine loads, in this review we report about cheese elaboration and processing technological aspects affecting biogenic amines levels. Synthesis of biogenic amines is possible only when three conditions converge: i availability of the substrate amino acids; ii presence of microorganisms with the appropriate catabolic pathway activated; and iii environmental conditions favorable to the decarboxilation activity. These conditions depend on several factors such as milk treatment (pasteurization, use of starter cultures, NaCl concentration, time and temperature of ripening and preservation, pH… which will be discussed in this chapter.

  2. Investigations of Methane Production in Hypersaline Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebout, Brad M.

    2015-01-01

    The recent reports of methane in the atmosphere of Mars, as well as the findings of hypersaline paleo-environments on that planet, have underscored the need to evaluate the importance of biological (as opposed to geological) trace gas production and consumption. Methane in the atmosphere of Mars may be an indication of life but might also be a consequence of geologic activity and/or the thermal alteration of ancient organic matter. Hypersaline environments have now been reported to be extremely likely in several locations in our solar system, including: Mars, Europa, and Enceladus. Modern hypersaline microbial mat communities, (thought to be analogous to those present on the early Earth at a period of time when Mars was experiencing very similar environmental conditions), have been shown to produce methane. However, very little is known about the physical and/or biological controls imposed upon the rates at which methane, and other important trace gases, are produced and consumed in these environments. We describe here the results of our investigations of methane production in hypersaline environments, including field sites in Chile, Baja California Mexico, California, USA and the United Arab Emirates. We have measured high concentrations of methane in bubbles of gas produced both in the sediments underlying microbial mats, as well as in areas not colonized by microbial mats in the Guerrero Negro hypersaline ecosystem, Baja California Mexico, in Chile, and in salt ponds on the San Francisco Bay. The carbon isotopic (d13C) composition of the methane in the bubbles exhibited an extremely wide range of values, (ca. -75 per mille ca. -25 per mille). The hydrogen isotopic composition of the methane (d2H) ranged from -60 to -30per mille and -450 to -350per mille. These isotopic values are outside of the range of values normally considered to be biogenic, however incubations of the sediments in contact with these gas bubbles reveals that the methane is indeed being

  3. Factors Influencing Biogenic Amines Accumulation in Dairy Products

    OpenAIRE

    Linares, Daniel M.; del Río, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Martínez, Noelia; Fernández, María; Martín, María Cruz; Álvarez, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Fermented foods are among the food products more often complained of having caused episodes of biogenic amines (BA) poisoning. Concerning milk-based fermented foods, cheese is the main product likely to contain potentially harmful levels of BA, specially tyramine, histamine, and putrescine. Prompted by the increasing awareness of the risks related to dietary uptake of high biogenic amine loads, in this review we report all those elaboration and processing technological aspects affecting BA bi...

  4. Factors influencing biogenic amines accumulation in dairy products

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Fermented foods are among the food products more often complained of having caused episodes of biogenic amines (BA) poisoning. Concerning milk-based fermented foods, cheese is the main product likely to contain potentially harmful levels of BA, specially tyramine, histamine, and putrescine. Prompted by the increasing awareness of the risks related to dietary uptake of high biogenic amine loads, in this review we report all those elaboration and processing technological aspects affecting BA bi...

  5. Radon as a tracer of biogenic gas equilibration and transport from methane-saturated sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Christopher S.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.

    1989-01-01

    Data on Rn-222 activity in methane-rich gas bubbles from anoxic coastal sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina, were used to determine gas equilibration with pore waters and the rates of ebullitive stripping and transport of gases to overlying waters and the atmosphere. Results showed that, during summer months, the bubble ebullition process strips and transports 1.9-4.8 percent/day of the standing crop of radon (and, by inference, other gases equilibrated with gas bubbles) in surface sediments of Cape Lookout Bight to the troposphere. Thus, the ebullitive mode of gas transport represents an effective mechanism for delivering reduced biogenic gases directly to the atmosphere.

  6. Biogenic amines in meat and fermented meat products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Stadnik

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent trends in food quality and safety promote an increasing search for trace compounds that can affect human health. Biogenic amines belong to this group of substances. They can cause distinctive pharmacological, physiological and toxic effects in organisms. Their amounts are usually increasing as a consequence of the use of poor quality raw materials, during controlled or spontaneous microbial fermentation or in the course of food spoilage. The origin of biogenic amines makes them suitable as chemical indicators of the hygienic quality and freshness of some foods being associated to the degree of food fermentation or degradation. The development of appropriate manufacturing technologies to obtain products free or nearly free from biogenic amines is a challenge for the meat industry. This review briefly summarises current knowledge on the biological implications of biogenic amines on human health and collects data on the factors affecting their formation in meat and fermented meat products.

  7. A 21st-century shift from fossil-fuel to biogenic methane emissions indicated by 13CH4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Hinrich; Fletcher, Sara E. Mikaloff; Veidt, Cordelia; Lassey, Keith R.; Brailsford, Gordon W.; Bromley, Tony M.; Dlugokencky, Edward J.; Michel, Sylvia E.; Miller, John B.; Levin, Ingeborg; Lowe, Dave C.; Martin, Ross J.; Vaughn, Bruce H.; White, James W. C.

    2016-04-01

    Between 1999 and 2006, a plateau interrupted the otherwise continuous increase of atmospheric methane concentration [CH4] since preindustrial times. Causes could be sink variability or a temporary reduction in industrial or climate-sensitive sources. We reconstructed the global history of [CH4] and its stable carbon isotopes from ice cores, archived air, and a global network of monitoring stations. A box-model analysis suggests that diminishing thermogenic emissions, probably from the fossil-fuel industry, and/or variations in the hydroxyl CH4 sink caused the [CH4] plateau. Thermogenic emissions did not resume to cause the renewed [CH4] rise after 2006, which contradicts emission inventories. Post-2006 source increases are predominantly biogenic, outside the Arctic, and arguably more consistent with agriculture than wetlands. If so, mitigating CH4 emissions must be balanced with the need for food production.

  8. Re-assessing H and C Isotope Signatures of Biogenic Methane in Coalbeds and Shales: Metabolic Pathways and Alternative Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, D. S.; McIntosh, J. C.; Blair, N. E.; Martini, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogen and carbon isotopes of microbial methane have long been applied to distinguish metabolic pathways of methanogenesis (utilization of acetate vs. H2+CO2 by methanogens). However, application of isotopic tools in hydrocarbon and biodegradation systems requires improved understanding of what is actually recorded by C and H isotopes of biogenic methane. Unlike culture studies where the fractionation factors of methanogenic pathways have been defined, field-collected gas or water samples represent net apparent isotope signatures influenced by a variety of overlapping water-rock-microbial interaction processes. Understanding these processes is important for modeling subsurface carbon cycling and biostimulation efforts for enhanced microbial gas production. Briefly, trends are apparent from a re-analysis of recently published water and gas isotope data from biogenic coalbed methane and shale gas systems: (1) δ13C-CH4 and the relationship between δ13C-CH4 and δ13C-CO2 (α13CCO2-CH4=(δ13C-CO2 + 1000)/(δ13C-CH4 +1000)), can also record the competition between methanogenesis and non-methanogenic processes (e.g. sulfate reduction), rather than simply recording the pathways of methanogenesis itself; and (2) Interpretation of δ2H-CH4 and δ2H-H2O can be inconsistent with δ13C-based fingerprinting techniques and indeed could be highly influenced by isotope exchange between water and methane precursors. This study provides an alternative approach for interpreting δ13C in shallow biogenic gas which considers that Corg may be consumed by competing, highly-fractionating and less-fractionating processes (e.g. methanogenesis and sulfate reduction, respectively). Whereas variation in apparent α13CCO2-CH4 could be inferred to indicate variation of metabolic pathways (that is, acetate fermentation vs. CO2 reduction) in some coalbed methane systems such as the Powder River Basin, the influx of sulfate relative to the overall Corg biodegradation rate could also be an

  9. Methane production from steam-exploded bamboo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Fumihisa; Take, Harumi; Asada, Chikako; Nakamura, Yoshitoshi

    2004-01-01

    To convert unutilized plant biomass into a useful energy source, methane production from bamboo was investigated using a steam explosion pretreatment. Methane could not be produced from raw bamboo but methane production was enhanced by steam explosion. The maximum amount of methane produced, i.e., about 215 ml, was obtained from 1 g of exploded bamboo at a steam pressure of 3.53 MPa and a steaming time of 5 min. A negative correlation between the amount of methane produced and the amount of Klason lignin was observed in the methane fermentation of steam-exploded bamboo.

  10. Are methane production and cattle performance related?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methane is a product of fermentation of feed in ruminant animals. Approximately 2 -12% of the gross energy consumed by cattle is released through enteric methane production. There are three primary components that contribute to the enteric methane footprint of an animal. Those components are dry ...

  11. Biogenic non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC). Nature`s contribution to regional and global atmospheric chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klockow, D.; Hoffman, T. [Inst. of Spectrochemistry and Applied Spectroscopy, Dortmund (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    Terrestrial vegetation provides an important source of volatile hydrocarbons, especially isoprene, monoterpenes and in addition possibly sesquiterpenes as well as oxygenated compounds. Although there exist considerable uncertainties in the estimation of the magnitude of these biogenic NMHC emissions, it is generally accepted that the majority of global NMHC release is from natural and not from anthropogenic sources. Taking into consideration the high reactivity of the mostly unsaturated biogenic emissions, their impact on tropospheric processes can be assumed to be of great importance. Together with anthropogenic NO{sub x} emissions, the highly reactive natural alkenes can act as precursors in photochemical oxidant formation and contribute to regional-scale air pollution. Their oxidation in the atmosphere and the subsequent gas-to-particle conversion of the products lead to the formation of organic aerosols. Because of the formation of phytotoxic compounds, the interaction of the biogenic hydrocarbons with ozone inside or outside the leaves and needles of plants has been suggested to play a role in forest decline. (author)

  12. Factors influencing biogenic amines accumulation in dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Daniel M; Del Río, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Martínez, Noelia; Fernández, María; Martín, María Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2012-01-01

    Fermented foods are among the food products more often complained of having caused episodes of biogenic amines (BA) poisoning. Concerning milk-based fermented foods, cheese is the main product likely to contain potentially harmful levels of BA, specially tyramine, histamine, and putrescine. Prompted by the increasing awareness of the risks related to dietary uptake of high biogenic amine loads, in this review we report all those elaboration and processing technological aspects affecting BA biosynthesis and accumulation in dairy foods. Improved knowledge of the factors involved in the synthesis and accumulation of BA should lead to a reduction in their incidence in milk products. Synthesis of BA is possible only when three conditions converge: (i) availability of the substrate amino acids; (ii) presence of microorganisms with the appropriate catabolic pathway activated; and (iii) environmental conditions favorable to the decarboxylation activity. These conditions depend on several factors such as milk treatment (pasteurization), use of starter cultures, NaCl concentration, time, and temperature of ripening and preservation, pH, temperature, or post-ripening technological processes, which will be discussed in this chapter. PMID:22783233

  13. Methane production and methane consumption: a review of processes underlying wetland methane fluxes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, R.

    1998-01-01

    Potential rates of both methane production and methane consumption vary over three orders of magnitude and their distribution is skew. These rates are weakly correlated with ecosystem type, incubation temperature, in situ aeration, latitude, depth and distance to oxic/anoxic interface. Anaerobic car

  14. Enhancement of methane production from barley waste

    OpenAIRE

    L. Neves; Ribeiro, R.; Oliveira, Rosário; Alves, M. M.

    2006-01-01

    Two different approaches were attempted to try and enhance methane production from an industrial waste composed of 100% barley, which results from production of instant coffee substitutes. In previous work, this waste was co-digested with an excess of activated sludge produced in the wastewater treatment plant located in same industrial unit, resulting in a very poor methane yield (25LCH4(STP)/ kgVSinitial), and low reductions in total solids (31%) and in volatile solids (40%). Wh...

  15. Quantifying Low Temperature Production of Methane on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenzer, S. P.

    2011-03-01

    Potential anorganic production of methane from a range of martian rock compositions is quantified and compared to the concentration of methane observed on Mars. Impact-craters are suggested as potential sites of methane formation and storage.

  16. Non-methane biogenic volatile organic compound emissions from boreal peatland microcosms under warming and water table drawdown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faubert, P; Tiiva, P; Nakam, TA;

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Boreal peatlands have significant emissions of non-methane biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Climate warming is expected to affect these ecosystems both directly, with increasing temperature, and indirectly, through water table drawdown following increased evapotranspiration. We...... of anaerobic microbial community. Our results suggest that boreal peatlands could have concomitant negative and positive radiative forcing effects on climate warming following the effect of water table drawdown. The observed decrease in CH4 emission causes a negative radiative forcing while the increase in CO2...... assessed the combined effect of warming and water table drawdown on the BVOC emissions from boreal peatland microcosms. We also assessed the treatment effects on the BVOC emissions from the peat soil after the 7-week long experiment. Emissions of isoprene, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, other reactive VOCs...

  17. Estimating methane gas production in peat soils of the Florida Everglades using hydrogeophysical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, William; Comas, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The spatial and temporal variability in production and release of greenhouse gases (such as methane) in peat soils remains uncertain, particularly for low-latitude peatlands like the Everglades. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a hydrogeophysical tool that has been successfully used in the last decade to noninvasively investigate carbon dynamics in peat soils; however, application in subtropical systems is almost non-existent. This study is based on four field sites in the Florida Everglades, where changes in gas content within the soil are monitored using time-lapse GPR measurements and gas releases are monitored using gas traps. A weekly methane gas production rate is estimated using a mass balance approach, considering gas content estimated from GPR, gas release from gas traps and incorporating rates of diffusion, and methanotrophic consumption from previous studies. Resulting production rates range between 0.02 and 0.47 g CH4 m-2 d-1, falling within the range reported in literature. This study shows the potential of combining GPR with gas traps to monitor gas dynamics in peat soils of the Everglades and estimate methane gas production. We also show the enhanced ability of certain peat soils to store gas when compared to others, suggesting that physical properties control biogenic gas storage in the Everglades peat soils. Better understanding biogenic methane gas dynamics in peat soils has implications regarding the role of wetlands in the global carbon cycle, particularly under a climate change scenario.

  18. Biogenic amines in meat and fermented meat products

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Stadnik; Zbigniew J. Dolatowski

    2010-01-01

    Recent trends in food quality and safety promote an increasing search for trace compounds that can affect human health. Biogenic amines belong to this group of substances. They can cause distinctive pharmacological, physiological and toxic effects in organisms. Their amounts are usually increasing as a consequence of the use of poor quality raw materials, during controlled or spontaneous microbial fermentation or in the course of food spoilage. The origin of biogenic amines makes them suitabl...

  19. Sulfide and methane production in sewer sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiwen; Ni, Bing-Jie; Ganigué, Ramon; Werner, Ursula; Sharma, Keshab R; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated significant sulfide and methane production by sewer biofilms, particularly in rising mains. Sewer sediments in gravity sewers are also biologically active; however, their contribution to biological transformations in sewers is poorly understood at present. In this study, sediments collected from a gravity sewer were cultivated in a laboratory reactor fed with real wastewater for more than one year to obtain intact sediments. Batch test results show significant sulfide production with an average rate of 9.20 ± 0.39 g S/m(2)·d from the sediments, which is significantly higher than the areal rate of sewer biofilms. In contrast, the average methane production rate is 1.56 ± 0.14 g CH4/m(2)·d at 20 °C, which is comparable to the areal rate of sewer biofilms. These results clearly show that the contributions of sewer sediments to sulfide and methane production cannot be ignored when evaluating sewer emissions. Microsensor and pore water measurements of sulfide, sulfate and methane in the sediments, microbial profiling along the depth of the sediments and mathematical modelling reveal that sulfide production takes place near the sediment surface due to the limited penetration of sulfate. In comparison, methane production occurs in a much deeper zone below the surface likely due to the better penetration of soluble organic carbon. Modelling results illustrate the dependency of sulfide and methane productions on the bulk sulfate and soluble organic carbon concentrations can be well described with half-order kinetics.

  20. Biogenic carbon fluxes from global agricultural production and consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Julie; West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Kyle, G. Page; Zhang, Xuesong; Collatz, George; Imhoff, Marc L.

    2015-10-01

    Quantification of biogenic carbon fluxes from agricultural lands is needed to generate comprehensive bottom-up estimates of net carbon exchange for global and regional carbon monitoring. We estimated global agricultural carbon fluxes associated with annual crop net primary production (NPP), harvested biomass, and consumption of biomass by humans and livestock. These estimates were combined for a single estimate of net carbon exchange (NCE) and spatially distributed to 0.05 degree resolution using MODIS satellite land cover data. Global crop NPP in 2011 was estimated at 5.25 ± 0.46 Pg C yr-1, of which 2.05 ± 0.05 Pg C yr-1 was harvested and 0.54 Pg C yr-1 was collected from crop residues for livestock fodder. Total livestock feed intake in 2011 was 2.42 ± 0.21 Pg C yr-1, of which 2.31 ± 0.21 Pg C yr-1 was emitted as CO2, 0.07 ± 0.01 Pg C yr-1 was emitted as CH4, and 0.04 Pg C yr-1 was contained within milk and egg production. Livestock grazed an estimated 1.27 Pg C yr-1 in 2011, which constituted 52.4% of total feed intake. Global human food intake was 0.57 ± 0.03 Pg C yr-1 in 2011, the majority of which is respired as CO2. Completed global cropland carbon budgets accounted for the ultimate use of ca. 80% of harvested biomass. The spatial distribution of these fluxes may be used for global carbon monitoring, estimation of regional uncertainty, and for use as input to Earth system models.

  1. Aerobic methane production from organic matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vigano, I.

    2010-01-01

    Methane, together with H2O, CO2 and N2O, is an important greenhouse gas in the Earth’s atmosphere playing a key role in the radiative budget. It has been known for decades that the production of the reduced compound CH4 is possible almost exclusively in anoxic environments per opera of one of the mo

  2. Validation of an HPLC Analytical Method for Determination of Biogenic Amines in Agricultural Products and Monitoring of Biogenic Amines in Korean Fermented Agricultural Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyeock; Park, Jung Hyuck; Choi, Ari; Hwang, Han-Joon; Mah, Jae-Hyung

    2015-09-01

    An HPLC analytical method was validated for the quantitative determination of biogenic amines in agricultural products. Four agricultural foods, including apple juice, Juk, corn oil and peanut butter, were selected as food matrices based on their water and fat contents (i.e., non-fatty liquid, non-fatty solid, fatty liquid and fatty solid, respectively). The precision, accuracy, recovery, limit of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were determined to test the validity of an HPLC procedure for the determination of biogenic amines, including tryptamine, β-phenylethylamine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, spermidine and spermine, in each matrix. The LODs and LOQs for the biogenic amines were within the range of 0.01~0.10 mg/kg and 0.02~0.31 mg/kg, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of intraday for biogenic amine concentrations ranged from 1.86 to 5.95%, whereas the RSD of interday ranged from 2.08 to 5.96%. Of the matrices spiked with biogenic amines, corn oil with tyramine and Juk with putrescine exhibited the least accuracy of 84.85% and recovery rate of 89.63%, respectively, at the lowest concentration (10 mg/kg). Therefore, the validation results fulfilled AOAC criteria and recommendations. Subsequently, the method was applied to the analysis of biogenic amines in fermented agricultural products for a total dietary survey in Korea. Although the results revealed that Korean traditional soy sauce and Doenjang contained relatively high levels of histamine, the amounts are of no concern if these fermented agricultural products serve as condiments. PMID:26483889

  3. Methane production from marine microalgae Isochrysis galbana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Nathalia O; Oliveira, Suzana M; Alves, Larissa C; Cammarota, Magali C

    2014-04-01

    Methane production from marine microalgae Isochrysis galbana was assessed before and after mechanical and chemical pretreatments. Mechanical pretreatment resulted in a 61.7% increase in soluble Chemical Oxygen Demand. Different hydrolysis conditions were evaluated by varying temperature - T, sulfuric acid concentration - AC and biomass suspension concentration (measured as particulate COD - CODp) using an experimental design. The most significant interaction occurred between AC and T and the hydrolysis condition that showed the best result in the anaerobic digestion step was the condition at 40°C with addition of 0.2% (v/v) acid for 16h (9.27LCH4/kgVS). The low methane yields were attributed to inhibitory sodium concentrations for anaerobic digestion. Eliminating inhibitory sodium in the anaerobic digestion by biomass prewashing, there was a 71.5% increase in methane yield for biomass after acid hydrolysis, demonstrating the need for pretreatment and reduction in sodium concentration in the anaerobic digestion.

  4. Methane production in simulated hybrid bioreactor landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiyong; Jin, Xiao; Ma, Zeyu; Tao, Huchun; Ko, Jae Hac

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this work was to study a hybrid bioreactor landfill technology for landfill methane production from municipal solid waste. Two laboratory-scale columns were operated for about ten months to simulate an anaerobic and a hybrid landfill bioreactor, respectively. Leachate was recirculated into each column but aeration was conducted in the hybrid bioreactor during the first stage. Results showed that leachate pH in the anaerobic bioreactor maintained below 6.5, while in the hybrid bioreactor quickly increased from 5.6 to 7.0 due to the aeration. The temporary aeration resulted in lowering COD and BOD5 in the leachate. The volume of methane collected from the hybrid bioreactor was 400 times greater than that of the anaerobic bioreactor. Also, the methane production rate of the hybrid bioreactor was improved within a short period of time. After about 10 months' operation, the total methane production in the hybrid bioreactor was 212 L (16 L/kgwaste).

  5. Methane production and simultaneous sulphate reduction in anoxic, salt marsh sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R.S.; Marsh, L.M.; Polcin, S.

    1982-01-01

    It has been generally believed that sulphate reduction precludes methane generation during diagenesis of anoxic sediments1,2. Because most biogenic methane formed in nature is thought to derive either from acetate cleavage or by hydrogen reduction of carbon dioxide3-6, the removal of these compounds by the energetically more efficient sulphate-reducing bacteria can impose a substrate limitation on methanogenic bacteria 7-9. However, two known species of methanogens, Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanococcus mazei, can grow on and produce methane from methanol and methylated amines10-13. In addition, these compounds stimulate methane production by bacterial enrichments from the rumen11,14 and aquatic muds13,14. Methanol can enter anaerobic food webs through bacterial degradation of lignins15 or pectin16, and methylated amines can be produced either from decomposition of substances like choline, creatine and betaine13,14 or by bacterial reduction of trimethylamine oxide17, a common metabolite and excretory product of marine animals. However, the relative importance of methanol and methylated amines as precursors of methane in sediments has not been previously examined. We now report that methanol and trimethylamine are important substrates for methanogenic bacteria in salt marsh sediments and that these compounds may account for the bulk of methane produced therein. Furthermore, because these compounds do not stimulate sulphate reduction, methanogenesis and sulphate reduction can operate concurrently in sulphate-containing anoxic sediments. ?? 1982 Nature Publishing Group.

  6. [Effect of temperature on methane production and oxidation in soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Weixin; Cai, Zucong

    2003-04-01

    The influence of temperature and its mechanism on methane production and oxidation in soils were reviewed in this paper. Temperature can alter the soil ability to produce methane through changing types of dominant methanogens in archaeal community. Dominant methanogen is Methanosarcinaceae at higher temperature which can utilize both H2/CO2 and acetate as the precursor to produce methane, while Methanosaetaceae at lower temperature which only use acetate as the precursor and produce far less methane than do Methanosarcinaceae. Increasing soil temperature apparently raises soil ability to produce methane, which is called temperature effectiveness and expressed as Q10 with a range from 1.5 to 28 and an average of 4.1. There is an obviously positive correlation between temperature effectiveness (Q10) on methane production and substrate content. As compared to methane production, effect of temperature on methane oxidation is lower, which may be related to the strong affinity of methanotrophs for methane.

  7. BIOGENIC AMINES CONTENT IN SELECTED COMMERCIAL FERMENTED PRODUCTS OF ANIMAL ORIGIN

    OpenAIRE

    Vendula Pachlová; Radka Flasarová; Ludmila Zálešáková; František Buňka; Pavel Budinský; Leona Buňková

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor of biogenic amines contents in commercial fermented products, especially various type of ripening cheeses and fermented meat products (15 cheese samples and nine dry fermented meat products obtained from Czech Republic, Slovak Republic, Poland, and Germany). Furthermore, the changes in samples during storage were also observed. The samples were stored at 6±1°C. The samples were taken the first day of storage and the last day of shelf-life. The biogenic ami...

  8. Methane productivity of manure, straw and solid fractions of manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, H.B.; Sommer, S.G.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2004-01-01

    The methane productivity of manure in terms of volatile solids (VS), volume and livestock production was determined. The theoretical methane productivity is higher in pig (516 1 kg(-1) VS) and sow (530 1 kg(-1) VS) manure than in dairy cattle manure (469 1 kg(-1) VS), while the ultimate methane...... yield in terms of VS is considerably higher in pig (356 1 kg(-1) VS) and sow manure (275 1 kg(-1) VS) than in dairy cattle manure (148 1 kg(-1) VS). Methane productivity based on livestock units (LU) shows the lowest methane productivity for sows (165 m(3) CH4 LU-1), while the other animal categories...... methane yield of straw was found to be higher than the yield from total manure and the solid fractions of manure, due to the higher VS content, and hence the use of straw as bedding material will increase the volumetric as well as the livestock-based methane productivity....

  9. Identification of Methanogens and Controls on Methane Production in Incubations of Natural Methane Seep Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevorkian, R.; Lloyd, K. G.

    2014-12-01

    Methane, the most abundant hydrocarbon in Earth's atmosphere, is produced in large quantities in sediments underlying the world's oceans. Very little of this methane makes it to surface sediments as it is consumed by Anaerobic Methanotrophs (ANME's) in consortia with Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB). Less is known about which organisms are responsible for methane production in marine sediments, and whether that production is under thermodynamic control based on hydrogen concentrations. Although ANMEs have been found to be active in methanogenic sediments and incubations, it is currently unknown whether they are able to grow in methanogenic conditions. We demonstrated with bottle incubations of methane seep sediment taken from Cape Lookout Bight, NC, that hydrogen controls methane production. While sulfate was present the hydrogen concentration was maintained at below 2 nM. Only after the depletion of sulfate allowed hydrogen concentrations to rise above 5 nM did we see production of methane. The same sediments when spiked with methane gas demonstrated its complete removal while sulfate reduction occurred. Quantitative PCR shows that ANME-2 and ANME-1 increase in 16S copy number as methane increases. Total direct cell counts demonstrate a decline in cells with the decrease of sulfate until a recovery corresponding with production of methane. Our results strongly suggest that hydrogen concentrations influence what metabolic processes can occur in marine sediments, and that ANME-1 and ANME-2 are able to grow on the energy provided from methane production.

  10. Validation of an HPLC Analytical Method for Determination of Biogenic Amines in Agricultural Products and Monitoring of Biogenic Amines in Korean Fermented Agricultural Products

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Hyeock; Park, Jung Hyuck; Choi, Ari; Hwang, Han-Joon; Mah, Jae-Hyung

    2015-01-01

    An HPLC analytical method was validated for the quantitative determination of biogenic amines in agricultural products. Four agricultural foods, including apple juice, Juk, corn oil and peanut butter, were selected as food matrices based on their water and fat contents (i.e., non-fatty liquid, non-fatty solid, fatty liquid and fatty solid, respectively). The precision, accuracy, recovery, limit of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were determined to test the validity of an HPLC procedu...

  11. Potential for biohydrogen and methane production from olive pulp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Skiadas, Ioannis V.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær;

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigates the potential for thermophilic biohydrogen and methane production from olive pulp, which is the semi-solid residue coming from the two-phase processing of olives. It focussed on: a) production of methane from the raw olive pulp, b) anaerobic bio-production of hydrogen...... and hydrogen-effluent was as high as 19 mmole CH4 per g TS. This suggests that olive pulp is an ideal substrate for methane production and it shows that biohydrogen production can be very efficiently coupled with a subsequent step for methane production....

  12. Aerobic methane production from organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigano, I.

    2010-01-01

    Methane, together with H2O, CO2 and N2O, is an important greenhouse gas in th e Earth’s atmosphere playing a key role in the radiative budget. It has be en known for decades that the production of the reduced compound CH4 is possible almost exclusively in anoxic environments per opera of one of the most importan t class of microorganisms which form the Archaea reign. Methane can be produced also from incomplete combustion of organic material. The generation of CH4 in an oxygenated environment under near-ambient conditions is a new discovery made in 2006 by Keppler et. al where surprisingly they measured emissions of this green house gas from plants incubated in chambers with air containing 20% of oxygen. A lthough the estimates on a global scale are still object of an intensive debate, the results presented in this thesis clearly show the existence of methane prod uction under oxic conditions for non living plant material. Temperature and UV l ight are key factors that drive the generation of CH4 from plant matter in a wel l oxygenated environment.

  13. Responses of non-methane biogenic volatile organic compound emissions to climate change in boreal and subarctic ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faubert, P.

    2010-07-01

    Non-methane biogenic volatile organic compound emissions (BVOCs) have important roles in the global atmospheric chemistry but their feedbacks to climate change are still unknown. This thesis reports one of the first estimates of BVOC emissions from boreal and subarctic ecosystems. Most importantly, this thesis assesses the BVOC emission responses to four effects of climate change in these ecosystems: (1) the direct effect of warming, and its indirect effects via (2) water table drawdown, (3) change in the vegetation composition, and (4) enhanced UV-B radiation. BVOC emissions were measured using a conventional chamber method in which the compounds were collected on adsorbent and later analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. On a subarctic heath, warming by only 1.9-2.5 degC doubled the monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions. Such a high increase of BVOC emissions under a conservative warming cannot be predicted by the current models, which underlines the importance of a focus on BVOC emissions from the Subarctic under climate change. On a subarctic peatland, enhanced UV-B did not affect the BVOC emissions but the water table level exerted the major effect. The water table drawdown experimentally applied on boreal peatland microcosms decreased the emissions of monoterpenes and other VOCs (BVOCs with a lifetime>1 d) for the hollows (wet microsites) and that of all BVOC groups for the lawns (moderately wet microsites). The warming treatment applied on the lawn microcosms decreased the isoprene emission. The removal of vascular plants in the hummock (dry microsites) microcosms decreased the emissions of monoterpenes while the emissions between the microcosms covered with Sphagnum moss and bare peat were not different. In conclusion, the results presented in this thesis indicate that climate change has complex effects on the BVOC emissions. These results make a significant contribution to improving the modeling of BVOC emissions for a better understanding of

  14. Development and application of an analytical method for the determination of total atmospheric biogenic non-methane organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnery, J.; Dindorf, T.; Hacker, L.; Andres, S.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2012-04-01

    Most of the organic carbon which is present in the atmosphere is found as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) dominantly emitted by the biosphere. This biogenic emission has a major impact on the chemical and physical properties of the atmosphere by contributing to the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). One major limitation in advancing the understanding of this ozone and aerosol generation is the technical ability to accurately measure the sum of these volatile organics. Frequently used methods focus on the detection of a defined set of non-methane organic compounds (NMOC). However, adding these single compound concentrations might only represent a lower limit of atmospheric carbon concentrations, since no available method is able to analyze all organic compounds present in the atmosphere. A few studies are known that report on total NMOC concentration measurements in ambient air but measurements of the total NMOC exchange between vegetation and the atmosphere are missing. Therefore, we investigated the analysis of the total NMOC concentration by collecting these compounds on a solid adsorbent material for subsequent total carbon analysis. This first step is necessary to separate the stable gases CO, CO2 and CH4 from the volatile NMOC fraction. NMOC was desorbed and converted to CO2 by passing an oxidation unit. The CO2 is collected on a second preconcentration unit followed by thermal desorption and detection by an infrared gas analyzer. As major difficulties we identified the separation of CO2 from the NMOC compounds on the solid adsorbent unit and the choice of the catalytic material. The measurements were accompanied by GC analysis of single calibrated VOC species from permeation devices and measurements by a PTR-MS. Plant chamber measurements with Quercus ilex showed an expected diurnal course which was confirmed by the NMOC analyzer though with a discrepancy during the day of up to 40 %.

  15. Evaluation of N-nitrosopiperidine formation from biogenic amines during the production of dry fermented sausages

    OpenAIRE

    De Mey, Eveline; De Maere, Hannelore; Goemaere, Olivier; Steen, Liselot; Peeters, Christine; Derdelinckx, Guy; Paelinck, Hubert; Fraeye, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of the precursors cadaverine and piperidine in the N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP) formation during the production of dry fermented sausages. The influences of pH (4.9 and 5.3), sodium nitrite (0 and 150 mg/kg) and ascorbate (0 and 500 mg/kg) were investigated by the use of a dry fermented sausage model. The biogenic amines and volatile N-nitrosamines were analyzed by HPLC-UV and GC-TEA. The major biogenic amines were tyramine (TYR), putrescine (PUT)...

  16. Biogenic amine content, histamine-forming bacteria, and adulteration of pork in tuna sausage products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Hsien-Feng; Tsai, Yung-Hsiang; Chang, Shih-Chih; Hong, Tang-Yao

    2012-10-01

    Twenty-five tuna sausage products were purchased from retail markets in Taiwan. The rates of occurrence of biogenic amines, histamine-forming bacteria, and adulteration by pork and poultry were determined. The average content of various biogenic amines in all tested samples was less than 2.0 mg/100 g (sausage. The fish species in the tuna sausage samples were identified as Thunnus albacares for 22 samples (88%), Thunnus alalunga for 1 sample (4%), and Thunnus thynnus for 1 sample (4%), whereas the remaining sample was identified as Makaira nigricans (blue marlin).

  17. A model for methane production in sewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaosakul, Thitirat; Koottatep, Thammarat; Polprasert, Chongrak

    2014-09-19

    Most sewers in developing countries are combined sewers which receive stormwater and effluent from septic tanks or cesspools of households and buildings. Although the wastewater strength in these sewers is usually lower than those in developed countries, due to improper construction and maintenance, the hydraulic retention time (HRT) could be relatively long and resulting considerable greenhouse gas (GHG) production. This study proposed an empirical model to predict the quantity of methane production in gravity-flow sewers based on relevant parameters such as surface area to volume ratio (A/V) of sewer, hydraulic retention time (HRT) and wastewater temperature. The model was developed from field survey data of gravity-flow sewers located in a peri-urban area, central Thailand and validated with field data of a sewer system of the Gold Coast area, Queensland, Australia. Application of this model to improve construction and maintenance of gravity-flow sewers to minimize GHG production and reduce global warming is presented.

  18. Potential of biogenic hydrogen production for hydrogen driven remediation strategies in marine environments

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseinkhani, Baharak; Hennebel, Tom; Boon, Nico

    2014-01-01

    Fermentative production of bio-hydrogen (bio-H2) from organic residues has emerged as a promising alternative for providing the required electron source for hydrogen driven remediation strategies. Unlike the widely used production of H2 by bacteria in fresh water systems, few reports are available regarding the generation of biogenic H2 and optimisation processes in marine systems. The present research aims to optimise the capability of an indigenous marine bacterium for the production of bio...

  19. Influence of headspace pressure on methane production in Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, David; Montes, Jesús A; Rico, José Luis; Rico, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    The biochemical methane potential test is the most commonly applied method to determine methane production from organic wastes. One of the parameters measured is the volume of biogas produced which can be determined manometrically by keeping the volume constant and measuring increases in pressure. In the present study, the effect of pressure accumulation in the headspace of the reactors has been studied. Triplicate batch trials employing cocoa shell, waste coffee grounds and dairy manure as substrates have been performed under two headspace pressure conditions. The results obtained in the study showed that headspace overpressures higher than 600mbar affected methane production for waste coffee grounds. On the contrary, headspace overpressures within a range of 600-1000mbar did not affect methane production for cocoa shell and dairy manure. With the analyses performed in the present work it has not been possible to determine the reasons for the lower methane yield value obtained for the waste coffee grounds under high headspace pressures.

  20. Terrestrial plant methane production and emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, Dan; Møller, Ian M; Mikkelsen, Teis N; Ambus, Per

    2012-03-01

    In this minireview, we evaluate all experimental work published on the phenomenon of aerobic methane (CH(4) ) generation in terrestrial plants and plant. Clearly, despite much uncertainty and skepticism, we conclude that the phenomenon is true. Four stimulating factors have been observed to induce aerobic plant CH(4) production, i.e. cutting injuries, increasing temperature, ultraviolet radiation and reactive oxygen species. Further, we analyze rates of measured emission of aerobically produced CH(4) in pectin and in plant tissues from different studies and argue that pectin is very far from the sole contributing precursor. In consequence, scaling up of aerobic CH(4) emission needs to take into consideration other potential sources than pectin. Due to the large uncertainties related to effects of stimulating factors, genotypic responses and type of precursors, we conclude that current attempts for upscaling aerobic CH(4) into a global budget is inadequate. Thus it is too early to draw the line under the aerobic methane emission in plants. Future work is needed for establishing the relative contribution of several proven potential CH(4) precursors in plant material.

  1. Contribution by the methanogenic endosymbionts of anaerobic ciliates to methane production in Dutch freshwater sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Alen, T.A.; Vogels, G.D.; Hackstein, J.H.P.

    2006-01-01

    Biogenic methane contributes substantially to the atmospheric methane concentration and thus to global warming. This trace gas is predominantly produced by strictly anaerobic methanogenic archaea, which thrive in the most divergent ecological niches, e. g. paddy fields, sediments, landfills, and the

  2. Toxic Effects of Pollutants on Methane Production of River Sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vlaardingen PLA; van Beelen P

    1992-01-01

    The effects of five compounds on the endogenous methane production of sediment samples of the river Rhine were examined. The concentrations of a toxicant that inhibited the methane production for 10% and 50% are called EC10 and EC50. Benzene, 1,2- dichloroethane, pentachlorophenol and chloroform h

  3. Biogenic gas production from major Amazon reservoirs, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinguelli Rosa, Luiz; Aurelio Dos Santos, Marco; Matvienko, Bohdan; Sikar, Elisabeth; Lourenço, Ronaldo Sérgio M.; Frederico Menezes, Carlos

    2003-05-01

    Methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from Brazilian reservoirs were assessed. Point measurements were made during 1998 and 1999 (using inverted funnels for bubbles and air and water concentration gradients for diffusion) in the 559 km2 Samuel reservoir, which was initially flooded in 1988, and the 2430 km2 Tucuruí reservoir, which was flooded in 1984, and the data were evaluated with respect to historical measurements in other Brazilian reservoirs. Bubble emissions of CH4 were higher in Samuel (ranging from 2 to 70 mgCH4 m-2 day-1) than in Tucuruí (ranging from 0·5 to 30 mgCH4 m-2 day-1), with the highest values occurring the shallowest regions in each reservoir. CH4 from diffusion for the Tucuruí reservoir ranged from 5 to 30 mgCH4 m-2 daymgCO

  4. Hydrogen production from methane reforming: thermodynamic assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assis, A.J.; Hori, Carla E.; Avila Neto, Cicero; Franco, Tatiana [Federal University of Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil). School of Chemical Engineering]. E-mail: adilsonjassis@gmail.com

    2008-07-01

    The main contributions of this study are to conduct a comparative thermodynamic analysis of methane reforming reactions and to asses the influence of key operational variables on chemical equilibrium using an in-house code, developed in the open-source software Scilab{sup c} INRIA-ENPC (www.scilab.org). Equilibrium compositions are calculated by two distinct methods: evaluation of equilibrium constants and Lagrange multipliers. Both methods result in systems of non-linear algebraic equations, solved numerically using the Scilab function 'fsolve'. Comparison between experimental and simulated equilibrium data, published in the literature, was used to validate the simulated results. Effects of temperature, pressure, initial H{sub 2}O/CH{sub 4} ratio (steam reforming), initial CH{sub 4}:CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} ratio (dry reforming) and initial O{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} ratio (partial oxidation) on the reaction products were evaluated. (author)

  5. Methyl chavicol: characterization of its biogenic emission rate, abundance, and oxidation products in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvier-Brown, N. C.; Goldstein, A. H.; Worton, D. R.; Matross, D. M.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; Welsh-Bon, D.; Warneke, C.; de Gouw, J. A.; Cahill, T. M.; Holzinger, R.

    2009-03-01

    We report measurements of ambient atmospheric mixing ratios for methyl chavicol and determine its biogenic emission rate. Methyl chavicol, a biogenic oxygenated aromatic compound, is abundant within and above Blodgett Forest, a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. Methyl chavicol was detected simultaneously by three in-situ instruments - a gas chromatograph with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS), a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), and a thermal desorption aerosol GC-MS (TAG) - and found to be abundant within and above Blodgett Forest. Methyl chavicol atmospheric mixing ratios are strongly correlated with 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO), a light- and temperature-dependent biogenic emission from the ponderosa pine trees at Blodgett Forest. Scaling from this correlation, methyl chavicol emissions account for 4-68% of the carbon mass emitted as MBO in the daytime, depending on the season. From this relationship, we estimate a daytime basal emission rate of 0.72-10.2 μgCg-1 h-1, depending on needle age and seasonality. We also present the first observations of its oxidation products (4-methoxybenzaldehyde and 4-methyoxy benzene acetaldehyde) in the ambient atmosphere. Methyl chavicol is a major essential oil component of many plant species. This work suggests that methyl chavicol plays a significant role in the atmospheric chemistry of Blodgett Forest, and potentially other sites, and should be included explicitly in both biogenic volatile organic carbon emission and atmospheric chemistry models.

  6. Reducing Methane Emissions from Cattle Production in Central Queensland

    OpenAIRE

    Rolfe, John

    2002-01-01

    Beef cattle contribute about 7% of national greenhouse gas emissions through the release of methane into the atmosphere. Cattle in northern Australia produce more methane per unit of beef produced because of tropical (C4) grasses and slower average growth rates. In this paper the level of emissions from different herds and some strategies to reduce emissions are modelled. The results indicate that few options exist to reduce methane emissions without reducing beef production. The opportunity ...

  7. Potential for biohydrogen and methane production from olive pulp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavala, H.N.; Skiadas, I.V. [Patras Univ., Patras (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering and Environmental Technology]|[Denmark Technical Univ., Lyngby (Denmark). Environmental Microbiology and Biotechnology Group; Ahring, B.K. [Denmark Technical Univ., Lyngby (Denmark). Environmental Microbiology and Biotechnology Group; Lyberatos, G. [Patras Univ., Patras (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering and Environmental Technology

    2004-07-01

    Biomass rich in carbohydrates is a potential source of hydrogen. Fermentative hydrogen production includes the transformation of sugars into volatile fatty acids (VFA) without a major effect on the organic content. This study examined the potential for thermophilic biohydrogen and methane production from olive pulp, the semi-solid residue resulting from the two-phase processing of olives. Formation of VFA during acidogenesis of organic matter precedes methanogenesis. Therefore, anaerobic digestion can potentially be coupled with a preliminary step for hydrogen production. This study focused on production of methane from the raw olive pulp; anaerobic bio-production of hydrogen from the olive pulp; and, subsequent anaerobic treatment of the hydrogen-effluent with production of methane. Continuous and batch experiments were performed. The methane potential of the raw olive pulp and hydrogen effluent was up to 19 mmole of methane per gram of total solids. It was concluded that olive pulp is a suitable substrate for methane production and that biohydrogen can be coupled with a subsequent step for methane production. 12 refs., 7 tabs., 2 figs.

  8. Production of extremely low volatile organic compounds from biogenic emissions: Measured yields and atmospheric implications

    OpenAIRE

    Jokinen, T; Berndt, T; Makkonen, R.; Kerminen, V-M; Junninen, H.; Paasonen, P.; Stratmann, F.; Herrmann, H.; Guenther, AB; Worsnop, DR; M. Kulmala; M. Ehn; Sipilä, M.

    2015-01-01

    Extremely low volatility organic compounds (ELVOC) are suggested to promote aerosol particle formation and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) production in the atmosphere. We show that the capability of biogenic VOC (BVOC) to produce ELVOC depends strongly on their chemical structure and relative oxidant levels. BVOC with an endocyclic double bond, representative emissions from, e.g., boreal forests, efficiently produce ELVOC from ozonolysis. Compounds with exocyclic double bonds or acyclic comp...

  9. Thermophilic methane production and oxidation in compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäckel, Udo; Thummes, Kathrin; Kämpfer, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Methane cycling within compost heaps has not yet been investigated in detail. We show that thermophilic methane oxidation occurred after a lag phase of up to one day in 4-week old, 8-week old and mature (>10-week old) compost material. The potential rate of methane oxidation was between 2.6 and 4.1 micromol CH4(gdw)(-1)h(-1). Profiles of methane concentrations within heaps of different ages indicated that 46-98% of the methane produced was oxidised by methanotrophic bacteria. The population size of thermophilic methanotrophs was estimated at 10(9) cells (gdw)(-1), based on methane oxidation rates. A methanotroph (strain KTM-1) was isolated from the highest positive step of a serial dilution series. This strain belonged to the genus Methylocaldum, which contains thermotolerant and thermophilic methanotrophs. The closest relative organism on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence identity was M. szegediense (>99%), a species originally isolated from hot springs. The temperature optimum (45-55 degrees C) for methane oxidation within the compost material was identical to that of strain KTM-1, suggesting that this strain was well adapted to the conditions in the compost material. The temperatures measured in the upper layer (0-40 cm) of the compost heaps were also in this range, so we assume that these organisms are capable of effectively reducing the potential methane emissions from compost.

  10. Relationship between selection for feed efficiency and methane production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enteric methane is a product of fermentation in the gastro-intestinal tract of ruminants. A group of archaea bacteria collectively called “methanogens” are responsible for the synthesis of methane. In ruminants, the methanogens grow in the reticulum-rumen complex and in the cecum. Most of the met...

  11. Forest cockchafer larvae as methane production hotspots in soils and their importance for net soil methane fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Kammann, Claudia; Murphy, Paul; Müller, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Certain groups of soil invertebrates, namely scarab beetles and millipedes, are capable of emitting considerable amounts of methane due to methanogens inhabiting their gut system. It was already pointed out in the early 1990's, that these groups of invertebrates may represent a globally important source of methane. However, apart from termites, the importance of invertebrates for the soil methane budget is still unknown. Here, we present preliminary results of a laboratory soil incubation experiment elucidating the influence of forest cockchafer larvae (Melolontha hippocastani FABRICIUS) on soil methane cycling. In January/February 2016, two soils from two different management systems - one from a pine forest (extensive use) and one from a vegetable field (intensive use) - were incubated for 56 days either with or without beetle larvae. Net soil methane fluxes and larvae methane emissions together with their stable carbon isotope signatures were quantified at regular intervals to estimate gross methane production and gross methane oxidation in the soils. The results of this experiment will contribute to testing the hypothesis of whether methane production hotspots can significantly enhance the methane oxidation capacity of soils. Forest cockchafer larvae are only found in well-aerated sandy soils where one would usually not suspect relevant gross methane production. Thus, besides quantifying their contribution to net soil methane fluxes, they are also ideal organisms to study the effect of methane production hotspots on overall soil methane cycling. Funding support: Reintegration grant of the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) (#57185798).

  12. Redox controls on methane formation, migration and fate in shallow aquifers

    OpenAIRE

    Humez, Pauline; Mayer, Bernhard; Nightingale, Michael; Becker, Veith; Kingston, Andrew; Taylor, Stephen; Bayegnak, Guy; Millot, Romain; Kloppmann, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Development of unconventional energy resources such as shale gas and coalbed methane has generated some public concern with regard to the protection of groundwater and surface water resources from leakage of stray gas from the deep subsurface. In terms of environmental impact to and risk assessment of shallow groundwater resources, the ultimate challenge is to distinguish: (a) natural in-situ production of biogenic methane, (b) biogenic or thermogenic methane migration into shallow aquifers d...

  13. Comparing Siliceous Productivity Proxies Along the California Margin During Pliocene Warmth: Smear Slides vs. Biogenic Silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, V.; Dekens, P. S.; Addison, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The early Pliocene (5.3-2.6 Ma) is the most recent time in Earth history when CO2 levels were similar to today, yet model outputs show average global atmospheric temperatures were 3-4˚C warmer. Given the similar climate boundary conditions in the Pliocene and today (CO2, continental positions, ocean circulation), the Pliocene is the best analogue for future climate in the paleo-record. Proxy studies reveal Pliocene sea surface temperatures (SST) along the California margin were 3-9˚C warmer than today. The modern California margin is highly productive, driven by strong seasonal upwelling of cold, nutrient-rich water. If the thermocline and nutricline were coupled during the Pliocene as they are today, warmer SSTs would imply lower nutrient concentrations and reduced productivity. Yet previously published oceanic records do not show a clear relationship between SST and productivity. Alkenone mass accumulation rates (MAR), organic carbon, and biogenic silica show sustained levels of productivity in the Pliocene even as SST was cooling at ODP Site 1022 (40.0˚N, 125.5˚W, depth 1925 m). However, smear slide analysis suggests that diatom MAR decreased during the Pliocene. Because diatoms are the dominant silica-based primary producer, diatom MAR and biogenic silica analyses should display similar variations. The apparent difference between the two proxy records may be due to preservational effects, such as silica dissolution in the sedimentary pore waters and fragmentation of diatom frustules, resulting in reduced diatom MARs, whereas the fragments and non-diatom siliceous producers all contribute to the biogenic silica values. We present smear slide and biogenic silica analyses as records of diatom productivity at the more southerly ODP Site 1016 (34.0˚N, 122.0˚W, depth 3835 m), and compare it to existing data from ODP Site 1022. In the modern ocean, diatoms dominate California margin phytoplankton under high nutrient upwelling conditions; thus changes in the

  14. Evaluating biochemical methane production from brewer's spent yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Hernández, Ornella; Parameswaran, Prathap; Alemán-Nava, Gibrán Sidney; Torres, César I; Parra-Saldívar, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion treatment of brewer's spent yeast (SY) is a viable option for bioenergy capture. The biochemical methane potential (BMP) assay was performed with three different samples (SY1, SY2, and SY3) and SY1 dilutions (75, 50, and 25 % on a v/v basis). Gompertz-equation parameters denoted slow degradability of SY1 with methane production rates of 14.59-4.63 mL/day and lag phases of 10.72-19.7 days. Performance and kinetic parameters were obtained with the Gompertz equation and the first-order hydrolysis model with SY2 and SY3 diluted 25 % and SY1 50 %. A SY2 25 % gave a 17 % of TCOD conversion to methane as well as shorter lag phase (methane production. Methane capture and biogas composition were dependent upon the SY source, and co-digestion (or dilution) can be advantageous.

  15. Evaluating biochemical methane production from brewer's spent yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Hernández, Ornella; Parameswaran, Prathap; Alemán-Nava, Gibrán Sidney; Torres, César I; Parra-Saldívar, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion treatment of brewer's spent yeast (SY) is a viable option for bioenergy capture. The biochemical methane potential (BMP) assay was performed with three different samples (SY1, SY2, and SY3) and SY1 dilutions (75, 50, and 25 % on a v/v basis). Gompertz-equation parameters denoted slow degradability of SY1 with methane production rates of 14.59-4.63 mL/day and lag phases of 10.72-19.7 days. Performance and kinetic parameters were obtained with the Gompertz equation and the first-order hydrolysis model with SY2 and SY3 diluted 25 % and SY1 50 %. A SY2 25 % gave a 17 % of TCOD conversion to methane as well as shorter lag phase (methane production. Methane capture and biogas composition were dependent upon the SY source, and co-digestion (or dilution) can be advantageous. PMID:27276935

  16. PEaCH4 v.2.0: A modelling platform to predict early diagenetic processes in marine sediments with a focus on biogenic methane - Case study: Offshore Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arning, Esther T.; Häußler, Steffen; van Berk, Wolfgang; Schulz, Hans-Martin

    2016-07-01

    The modelling of early diagenetic processes in marine sediments is of interest in marine science, and in the oil and gas industry, here, especially with respect to methane occurrence and gas hydrate formation as resources. Early diagenesis in marine sediments evolves from a complex web of intertwining (bio)geochemical reactions. It comprises microbially catalysed reactions and inorganic mineral-water-gas interactions. A model that will describe and consider all of these reactions has to be complex. However, it should be user-friendly, as well as to be applicable for a broad community and not only for experts in the field of marine chemistry. The presented modelling platform PeaCH4 v.2.0 combines both aspects, and is Microsoft Excel©-based. The modelling tool is PHREEQC (version 2), a computer programme for speciation, batch-reaction, one-dimensional transport, and inverse geochemical calculations. The conceptual PEaCH4 model is based on the conversion of sediment-bound degradable organic matter. PEaCH4 v.2.0 was developed to quantify and predict early diagenetic processes in marine sediments with the focus on biogenic methane formation and its phase behaviour, and allows carbon mass balancing. In regard to the irreversible degradation of organic matter, it comprises a "reaction model" and a "kinetic model" to predict methane formation. Both approaches differ in their calculations and outputs as the "kinetic model" considers the modelling time to integrate temperature dependent biogenic methane formation in its calculations, whereas the "reaction model" simply relies on default organic matter degradation. With regard to the inorganic mineral-water-gas interactions, which are triggered by irreversible degradation of organic matter, PEaCH4 v.2.0 is based on chemical equilibrium thermodynamics, appropriate mass-action laws, and their temperature dependent equilibrium constants. The programme is exemplarily presented with the example of upwelling sediments off Namibia

  17. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-07-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  18. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-06-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  19. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated

  20. Methyl chavicol: characterization of its biogenic emission rate, abundance, and oxidation products in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Bouvier-Brown

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We report measurements of ambient atmospheric mixing ratios for methyl chavicol and determine its biogenic emission rate. Methyl chavicol, a biogenic oxygenated aromatic compound, is abundant within and above Blodgett Forest, a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. Methyl chavicol was detected simultaneously by three in-situ instruments – a gas chromatograph with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS, a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS, and a thermal desorption aerosol GC-MS (TAG – and found to be abundant within and above Blodgett Forest, a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. Methyl chavicol atmospheric mixing ratios are strongly correlated with 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO, a light- and temperature-dependent biogenic emission from the ponderosa pine trees at Blodgett Forest. Scaling from this correlation, methyl chavicol emissions account for 4–68% of the carbon mass emitted as MBO in the daytime, depending on the season. From this relationship, we estimate a daytime basal emission rate of 0.72–10.2 μgCg−1h−1, depending on needle age and seasonality. We also present the first observations of its oxidation products (4-methoxybenzaldehyde and 4-methyoxy benzene acetaldehyde in the ambient atmosphere. Methyl chavicol is a major essential oil component of many plant species. This work suggests that methyl chavicol plays a significant role in the atmospheric chemistry of Blodgett Forest, and potentially other sites, and should be included explicitly in both biogenic volatile organic carbon emission and atmospheric chemistry models.

  1. Contribution of First- versus Second-Generation Products to Secondary Organic Aerosols Formed in the Oxidation of Biogenic Hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Nga L.; Kroll, Jesse H.; Keywood, Melita D.; Bahreini, Roya; Varutbangkul, Varuntida; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.; Lee, Anita; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2006-01-01

    Biogenic hydrocarbons emitted by vegetation are important contributors to secondary organic aerosol (SOA), but the aerosol formation mechanisms are incompletely understood. In this study, the formation of aerosols and gas-phase products from the ozonolysis and photooxidation of a series of biogenic hydrocarbons (isoprene, 8 monoterpenes, 4 sesquiterpenes, and 3 oxygenated terpenes) are examined. By comparing aerosol growth (measured by Differential Mobility Analyzers, DMAs) and gas-phase conc...

  2. The methane production of poultry slaughtering residues and effects of pre-treatments on the methane production of poultry feather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, E; Einola, J; Rintala, J

    2003-09-01

    The biological methane production rate and yield of different poultry slaughtering residues were studied. Poultry offal, blood, and bonemeal were rich in proteins and lipids and showed high methane yields, 0.7-0.9, 0.5, and 0.6-0.7 m3 kg(-1) volatile solids(added), respectively (270-340, 100, and 150-170 m3 ton(-1) wet weight). Blood and bonemeal produced methane rapidly, whereas the methane production of offal was more delayed probably due to long-chain fatty acid inhibition. The length of delay depended on the source and concentration of inoculum and incubation temperature, sewage sludge at 35 degrees C having the shortest delay of a few days, while granular sludge did not produce methane within 94 days of incubation. Feather showed a somewhat lower methane yield, 0.21 m3 kg(-1) volatile solids(added) (50 m3 ton(-1) wet weight). Combined thermal (120 degrees C, 5 min) and enzymatic (commercial alkaline endopeptidase, 2-10 g l(-1)) pre-treatments increased its methane yield by 37 to 51%. Thermal (70-120 degrees C, 5-60 min), chemical (NaOH 2-10 g l(-1), 2-24 h), and enzymatic pre-treatments were less effective, with methane yield increasing by 5 to 32%. Based on the present results, anaerobic digestion of the studied poultry slaughtering residues appears a promising possibility because of the high methane yield and nitrogen content of these residues (8 to 14% N of total solids), whereas pre-treatments were shown to improve the methane production of feather.

  3. Methane and carbon dioxide ratio in excreted air for quantification of the methane production from ruminants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jørgen; Bjerg, Bjarne Schmidt; Hvelplund, Torben;

    2010-01-01

    This technical note presents a simple, fast, reliable and cheap method to estimate the methane (CH4) production from animals by using the CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in air near the animals combined with an estimation of the total CO2 production from information on intake of metab...

  4. Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Hirasaki; Walter Chapman; Gerald Dickens; Colin Zelt; Brandon Dugan; Kishore Mohanty; Priyank Jaiswal

    2011-12-31

    This project seeks to understand regional differences in gas hydrate systems from the perspective of as an energy resource, geohazard, and long-term climate influence. Specifically, the effort will: (1) collect data and conceptual models that targets causes of gas hydrate variance, (2) construct numerical models that explain and predict regional-scale gas hydrate differences in 2-dimensions with minimal 'free parameters', (3) simulate hydrocarbon production from various gas hydrate systems to establish promising resource characteristics, (4) perturb different gas hydrate systems to assess potential impacts of hot fluids on seafloor stability and well stability, and (5) develop geophysical approaches that enable remote quantification of gas hydrate heterogeneities so that they can be characterized with minimal costly drilling. Our integrated program takes advantage of the fact that we have a close working team comprised of experts in distinct disciplines. The expected outcomes of this project are improved exploration and production technology for production of natural gas from methane hydrates and improved safety through understanding of seafloor and well bore stability in the presence of hydrates. The scope of this project was to more fully characterize, understand, and appreciate fundamental differences in the amount and distribution of gas hydrate and how this would affect the production potential of a hydrate accumulation in the marine environment. The effort combines existing information from locations in the ocean that are dominated by low permeability sediments with small amounts of high permeability sediments, one permafrost location where extensive hydrates exist in reservoir quality rocks and other locations deemed by mutual agreement of DOE and Rice to be appropriate. The initial ocean locations were Blake Ridge, Hydrate Ridge, Peru Margin and GOM. The permafrost location was Mallik. Although the ultimate goal of the project was to understand

  5. Method for the production of methanation catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, H.; Hakim, I.

    1976-11-18

    A methanation catalyst is claimed which is produced by precipitation of nickel salts from alcoholic solutions. At the same time, these solutions contain aluminium or magnesium compounds and, in some cases, also a carrier medium. The precipitation agents are alkali boron hydride solutions and alkali carbonate solutions. The precipitate, which is preferably obtained at temperatures between -5 and +5/sup 0/C, consists of a fine mixture of nickel boride, oxide hydrates, and hydroxides of nickel, magnesium, or aluminium. In contrast to the known nickel catalyst masses, it may be processed in air without inert gas. Four examples of preparations with suitable methanation tests are given.

  6. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom

  7. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali Kadaster; Bill Liddell; Tommy Thompson; Thomas Williams; Michael Niedermayr

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and implemented for determining physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and

  8. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2004-11-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained

  9. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained

  10. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Runyon; Mike Globe; Kent Newsham; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling

  11. Methane production from acid hydrolysates of Agave tequilana bagasse: evaluation of hydrolysis conditions and methane yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreola-Vargas, Jorge; Ojeda-Castillo, Valeria; Snell-Castro, Raúl; Corona-González, Rosa Isela; Alatriste-Mondragón, Felipe; Méndez-Acosta, Hugo O

    2015-04-01

    Evaluation of diluted acid hydrolysis for sugar extraction from cooked and uncooked Agave tequilana bagasse and feasibility of using the hydrolysates as substrate for methane production, with and without nutrient addition, in anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (AnSBR) were studied. Results showed that the hydrolysis over the cooked bagasse was more effective for sugar extraction at the studied conditions. Total sugars concentration in the cooked and uncooked bagasse hydrolysates were 27.9 g/L and 18.7 g/L, respectively. However, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural was detected in the cooked bagasse hydrolysate, and therefore, the uncooked bagasse hydrolysate was selected as substrate for methane production. Interestingly, results showed that the AnSBR operated without nutrient addition obtained a constant methane production (0.26 L CH4/g COD), whereas the AnSBR operated with nutrient addition presented a gradual methane suppression. Molecular analyses suggested that methane suppression in the experiment with nutrient addition was due to a negative effect over the archaeal/bacterial ratio.

  12. Methane production from acid hydrolysates of Agave tequilana bagasse: evaluation of hydrolysis conditions and methane yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreola-Vargas, Jorge; Ojeda-Castillo, Valeria; Snell-Castro, Raúl; Corona-González, Rosa Isela; Alatriste-Mondragón, Felipe; Méndez-Acosta, Hugo O

    2015-04-01

    Evaluation of diluted acid hydrolysis for sugar extraction from cooked and uncooked Agave tequilana bagasse and feasibility of using the hydrolysates as substrate for methane production, with and without nutrient addition, in anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (AnSBR) were studied. Results showed that the hydrolysis over the cooked bagasse was more effective for sugar extraction at the studied conditions. Total sugars concentration in the cooked and uncooked bagasse hydrolysates were 27.9 g/L and 18.7 g/L, respectively. However, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural was detected in the cooked bagasse hydrolysate, and therefore, the uncooked bagasse hydrolysate was selected as substrate for methane production. Interestingly, results showed that the AnSBR operated without nutrient addition obtained a constant methane production (0.26 L CH4/g COD), whereas the AnSBR operated with nutrient addition presented a gradual methane suppression. Molecular analyses suggested that methane suppression in the experiment with nutrient addition was due to a negative effect over the archaeal/bacterial ratio. PMID:25647030

  13. Kinetics of Methane Production from Swine Manure and Buffalo Manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chen; Cao, Weixing; Liu, Ronghou

    2015-10-01

    The degradation kinetics of swine and buffalo manure for methane production was investigated. Six kinetic models were employed to describe the corresponding experimental data. These models were evaluated by two statistical measurements, which were root mean square prediction error (RMSPE) and Akaike's information criterion (AIC). The results showed that the logistic and Fitzhugh models could predict the experimental data very well for the digestion of swine and buffalo manure, respectively. The predicted methane yield potential for swine and buffalo manure was 487.9 and 340.4 mL CH4/g volatile solid (VS), respectively, which was close to experimental values, when the digestion temperature was 36 ± 1 °C in the biochemical methane potential assays. Besides, the rate constant revealed that swine manure had a much faster methane production rate than buffalo manure.

  14. Terrestrial plant methane production and emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dan; Møller, Ian M.; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard;

    2012-01-01

    In this minireview, we evaluate all experimental work published on the phenomenon of aerobic methane (CH4) generation in terrestrial plants and plant. Clearly, despite much uncertainty and skepticism, we conclude that the phenomenon is true. Four stimulating factors have been observed to induce a...

  15. Biomass gasification for the production of methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanou, P.

    2013-01-01

    Biomass is very promising as a sustainable alternative to fossil resources because it is a renewable source that contains carbon, an essential building block for gaseous and liquid fuels. Methane is the main component of natural gas, which is a fuel used for heating, power generation and transportat

  16. Structural control of coalbed methane production in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashin, J.C.; Groshong, R.H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Thin-skinned structures are distributed throughout the Alabama coalbed methane fields, and these structures affect the production of gas and water from coal-bearing strata. Extensional structures in Deerlick Creek and Cedar Cove fields include normal faults and hanging-wall rollovers, and area balancing indicates that these structures are detached in the Pottsville Formation. Compressional folds in Gurnee and Oak Grove fields, by comparison, are interpreted to be detachment folds formed above decollements at different stratigraphic levels. Patterns of gas and water production reflect the structural style of each field and further indicate that folding and faulting have affected the distribution of permeability and the overall success of coalbed methane operations. Area balancing can be an effective way to characterize coalbed methane reservoirs in structurally complex regions because it constrains structural geometry and can be used to determine the distribution of layer-parallel strain. Comparison of calculated requisite strain and borehole expansion data from calliper logs suggests that strain in coalbed methane reservoirs is predictable and can be expressed as fracturing and small-scale faulting. However, refined methodology is needed to analyze heterogeneous strain distributions in discrete bed segments. Understanding temporal variation of production patterns in areas where gas and water production are influenced by map-scale structure will further facilitate effective management of coalbed methane fields.Thin-skinned structures are distributed throughout the Alabama coalbed methane fields, and these structures affect the production of gas and water from coal-bearing strata. Extensional structures in Deerlick Creek and Cedar Cove fields include normal faults and hanging-wall rollovers, and area balancing indicates that these structures are detached in the Pottsville Formation. Compressional folds in Gurnee and Oak Grove fields, by comparison, are interpreted to

  17. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the

  18. Large scale production of bio methane from wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Meijden, C.M.; Rabou, L.P.L.M.; Van der Drift, A.; Vreugdenhil, B.J.; Smit, R. [ECN Biomass and Energy Efficiency, Petten (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    An increasing number of countries is setting objectives and obligations to replace part of their fossil natural gas consumptions by bio-methane to reduce CO2 emissions. The production of bio-methane via digestion has been developed and is implemented on a small scale. The limited amount of suitable digestible feedstock demands for development of a technology which can convert a wider range of biomass fuels, such as wood into bio-methane. Gasification is such a route. Gasification technology offers the possibility to convert lignocellulosic biomass (e.g. residual wood) into a combustible gas. This gas can be converted into natural gas quality gas (bio-methane) by catalytic processes. Bio-fuels such as bio-methane produced from biomass have the potential to become a CO2 negative fuel, because part of the biomass carbon is separated as CO2 during the production process. If this pure CO2 stream is sequestrated, these bio-fuels become even CO2 negative. This might be an attractive option for reducing the level of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Several bio-methane demonstration projects are underway based on thermal gasification of woody biomass. The most well known is the 20 MWth GoBiGas project in Gothenburg by Goeteborg Energi and E.ON. ECN (Energy research Centre of the Netherlands) has developed an alternative gasification process (MILENA), optimized for the production of bio-methane. This system has an overall efficiency of 70% from wood to bio-methane. The technology is demonstrated at lab scale (30 kWth) and pilot scale (800 kWth). A 12 MWth demonstration plant is under preparation in close cooperation with the HVC Group who plan to act as launching customer.

  19. Anaerobic digestion of biomass for methane production: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunaseelan, V.N. [PSG College of Arts and Science, Coimbatore (India). Dept. of Zoology

    1997-12-31

    Biological conversion of biomass to methane has received increasing attention in recent years. Hand- and mechanically-sorted municipal solid waste and nearly 100 genera of fruit and vegetable solid wastes, leaves, grasses, woods, weeds, marine and freshwater biomass have been explored for their anaerobic digestion potential to methane. In this review, the extensive literature data have been tabulated and ranked under various categories and the influence of several parameters on the methane potential of the feedstocks are presented. Almost all the land- and water-based species examined to date either have good digestion characteristics or can be pre-treated to promote digestion. This review emphasizes the urgent need for evaluating the inumerable unexplored genera of plants as potential sources for methane production. (author)

  20. Biomass gasification for the production of methane

    OpenAIRE

    Nanou, P.

    2013-01-01

    Biomass is very promising as a sustainable alternative to fossil resources because it is a renewable source that contains carbon, an essential building block for gaseous and liquid fuels. Methane is the main component of natural gas, which is a fuel used for heating, power generation and transportation. In The Netherlands, the contribution of natural gas to the primary energy consumption is almost 50% (Source: Energy Research Centre of The Netherlands [ECN]) and it is a fuel with a well-devel...

  1. Improving productivity and reducing methane production and n and phosphorous excretion in lambs through nutritional strategies. II. Methane production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three trials were conducted to investigate the effect of tea saponins (TS) on production methane production and productive performance in growing goats. In trial 1, TS was added at 0, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 mg/ml to study the effects on the ruminal fermentation in vitro. Methane production was significantly decreased when 0.4 and 0.8 mg/ml of TS was added. The TS had little effect on ruminal pH and total volatile fatty acids However, the fermentation patterns were changed, with lower proportion of acetate and higher proportions of propionate when TS was added. Ammonia-N concentration and protozoal counts were significantly lower with TS addition, while microbial protein yield increased suggesting that the TS could modify ruminal fermentation. Twenty-seven growing Boer goats were used in trail two to evaluate the effects of TS addition on growth performance. The animals received the same basal diet (300g concentrate mixture, 200g alfalfa and corn stover silage ad libitum) and TS was added at 0, 3 and 6 g per day. Dry matter intake, average daily gain and feed efficiency in the 3 g TS group were higher than in the other two groups. Trial three was conducted to investigate the effects of TS (5 g/kg DM), TS plus disodium fumarate (DF) (20 g/kg DM) and coconut oil (7% on DM basis) on methane production in sheep using a simple box chamber. Eight Huzhou sheep were assigned to 4 treatments in a 4 x 4 Latin square design. Addition of TS and TSDF decreased (P < 0.0001) methane production by 8.5 and 9.6%, respectively. Addition of TSDF increased (P < 0.01) the proportion of propionate and decreased (P < 0.01) the proportion of acetate. These results suggest that addition of TS and TSDF, though not as effectively as coconut oil, can inhibit methane production, which is beneficial for economy and environment. (author)

  2. Anaerobic digestion of giant reed for methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liangcheng; Li, Yebo

    2014-11-01

    As a fast growing plant, giant reed has good potential to be used as a feedstock for methane production via anaerobic digestion (AD). The effect of total solids (TS) content, an AD operating parameter, was studied. Results showed that increasing TS from 8% to 38% decreased methane yield, due to the inhibition of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and total ammonia nitrogen (TAN); while the maximum volumetric methane production was obtained at 20-23% TS. Comparison of solid-state AD (SS-AD) at 20% TS and liquid AD (L-AD) at 8% TS was conducted at feedstock to effluent (F/E) ratios of 2.0, 3.5, and 5.0. The best performance was achieved at an F/E of 2.0, with methane yields of 129.7 and 150.8L-CH4/kg-VS for SS-AD and L-AD, respectively. Overall organic components were degraded by 17.7-28.5% and 24.0-26.6% in SS-AD and L-AD, respectively; among which cellulose showed the highest degradation rate and the highest contribution to methane production.

  3. Production of Methane and Water from Crew Plastic Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Captain, Janine; Santiago, Eddie; Parrish, Clyde; Strayer, Richard F.; Garland, Jay L.

    2008-01-01

    Recycling is a technology that will be key to creating a self sustaining lunar outpost. The plastics used for food packaging provide a source of material that could be recycled to produce water and methane. The recycling of these plastics will require some additional resources that will affect the initial estimate of starting materials that will have to be transported from earth, mainly oxygen, energy and mass. These requirements will vary depending on the recycling conditions. The degredation products of these plastics will vary under different atmospheric conditions. An estimate of the the production rate of methane and water using typical ISRU processes along with the plastic recycling will be presented.

  4. Water Management Strategies for Improved Coalbed Methane Production in the Black Warrior Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashin, Jack; McIntyre-Redden, Marcella; Mann, Steven; Merkel, David

    2013-10-31

    The modern coalbed methane industry was born in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama and has to date produced more than 2.6 trillion cubic feet of gas and 1.6 billion barrels of water. The coalbed gas industry in this area is dependent on instream disposal of co-produced water, which ranges from nearly potable sodium-bicarbonate water to hypersaline sodium-chloride water. This study employed diverse analytical methods to characterize water chemistry in light of the regional geologic framework and to evaluate the full range of water management options for the Black Warrior coalbed methane industry. Results reveal strong interrelationships among regional geology, water chemistry, and gas chemistry. Coalbed methane is produced from multiple coal seams in Pennsylvanian-age strata of the Pottsville Coal Interval, in which water chemistry is influenced by a structurally controlled meteoric recharge area along the southeastern margin of the basin. The most important constituents of concern in the produced water include chlorides, ammonia compounds, and organic substances. Regional mapping and statistical analysis indicate that the concentrations of most ionic compounds, metallic substances, and nonmetallic substances correlate with total dissolved solids and chlorides. Gas is effectively produced at pipeline quality, and the only significant impurity is N{sub 2}. Geochemical analysis indicates that the gas is of mixed thermogenic-biogenic origin. Stable isotopic analysis of produced gas and calcite vein fills indicates that widespread late-stage microbial methanogenesis occurred primarily along a CO{sub 2} reduction metabolic pathway. Organic compounds in the produced water appear to have helped sustain microbial communities. Ammonia and ammonium levels increase with total dissolved solids content and appear to have played a role in late-stage microbial methanogenesis and the generation of N{sub 2}. Gas production tends to decline exponentially, whereas water production

  5. Optimization of microwave pretreatment conditions to maximize methane production and methane yield in mesophilic anaerobic sludge digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, W J; Ahn, J H

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to find optimum microwave pretreatment conditions for methane production and methane yield in anaerobic sludge digestion. The sludge was pretreated using a laboratory-scale industrial microwave unit (2450 MHz frequency). Microwave temperature increase rate (TIR) (2.9-17.1 degrees C/min) and final temperature (FT) (52-108 degrees C) significantly affected solubilization, methane production, and methane yield. Solubilization degree (soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD)/total COD) in the pretreated sludge (3.3-14.7%) was clearly higher than that in the raw sludge (2.6%). Within the design boundaries, the optimum conditions for maximum methane production (2.02 L/L) were TIR = 9.1 degrees C/min and FT = 90 degrees C, and the optimum conditions for maximum methane yield (809 mL/g VS(removed)) were TIR 7.1 degrees C/min and FT = 92 degrees C.

  6. Calculation of methane production from enteric fermentation in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smink, M.C.J.; Hoek, van der K.W.; Bannink, A.; Dijkstra, J.

    2005-01-01

    Doel van deze studie is om een inschatting te maken van de methaanproductie door melkkoeien vanaf 1990 tot nu. Tevens zijn de effecten van voer onderzochtThe aim of this study is to calculate methane production by dairy cows during the period 1990 till present. A dynamic mechanistic model of rumen f

  7. Methane and hydrogen production by human intestinal anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, L F; Holbrook, W P; Eastwood, M A

    1982-06-01

    The gas above liquid cultures of a variety of human intestinal anaerobic bacteria was sampled and analysed by headspace gas chromatography. Hydrogen production was greatest with strains of the genus Clostridium, intermediate with anaerobic cocci and least with Bacteroides sp. Very few strains produced methane although small amounts were detected with one strain of B. thetaiotaomicron, C. perfringens and C. histolyticum. There may be a relationship between these anaerobic bacteria and several gastrointestinal disorders in which there is a build up of hydrogen or methane in the intestines.

  8. Zero valent iron significantly enhances methane production from waste activated sludge by improving biochemical methane potential rather than hydrolysis rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiwen; Wang, Qilin; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-02-05

    Anaerobic digestion has been widely applied for waste activated sludge (WAS) treatment. However, methane production from anaerobic digestion of WAS is usually limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and/or poor biochemical methane potential of WAS. This work systematically studied the effects of three different types of zero valent iron (i.e., iron powder, clean scrap and rusty scrap) on methane production from WAS in anaerobic digestion, by using both experimental and mathematical approaches. The results demonstrated that both the clean and the rusty iron scrap were more effective than the iron powder for improving methane production from WAS. Model-based analysis showed that ZVI addition significantly enhanced methane production from WAS through improving the biochemical methane potential of WAS rather than its hydrolysis rate. Economic analysis indicated that the ZVI-based technology for enhancing methane production from WAS is economically attractive, particularly considering that iron scrap can be freely acquired from industrial waste. Based on these results, the ZVI-based anaerobic digestion process of this work could be easily integrated with the conventional chemical phosphorus removal process in wastewater treatment plant to form a cost-effective and environment-friendly approach, enabling maximum resource recovery/reuse while achieving enhanced methane production in wastewater treatment system.

  9. Zero Valent Iron Significantly Enhances Methane Production from Waste Activated Sludge by Improving Biochemical Methane Potential Rather Than Hydrolysis Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiwen; Wang, Qilin; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion has been widely applied for waste activated sludge (WAS) treatment. However, methane production from anaerobic digestion of WAS is usually limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and/or poor biochemical methane potential of WAS. This work systematically studied the effects of three different types of zero valent iron (i.e., iron powder, clean scrap and rusty scrap) on methane production from WAS in anaerobic digestion, by using both experimental and mathematical approaches. The results demonstrated that both the clean and the rusty iron scrap were more effective than the iron powder for improving methane production from WAS. Model-based analysis showed that ZVI addition significantly enhanced methane production from WAS through improving the biochemical methane potential of WAS rather than its hydrolysis rate. Economic analysis indicated that the ZVI-based technology for enhancing methane production from WAS is economically attractive, particularly considering that iron scrap can be freely acquired from industrial waste. Based on these results, the ZVI-based anaerobic digestion process of this work could be easily integrated with the conventional chemical phosphorus removal process in wastewater treatment plant to form a cost-effective and environment-friendly approach, enabling maximum resource recovery/reuse while achieving enhanced methane production in wastewater treatment system.

  10. Climate forcing, primary production and the distribution of Holocene biogenic sediments in the Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Robert; Gonzalez-Yajimovich, Oscar; Ledesma-Vazquez, Jorge; Staines-Urias, Francisca

    2007-01-01

    The Gulf of California is a marginal seaway under the influence of a monsoon climate that produces cool, dry winters and warm, humid summers. Winds, tidal mixing and coastal-trapped waves forced by climate and the Pacific Ocean control nutrient advection and primary productivity (PP). Strong northwest winds from the subtropical East Pacific High Pressure system begin in November and last until April and drive coastal upwelling along the mainland margin, especially in the central and southern Gulf. In the northern Gulf, particularly around the midrift island, tidal mixing and turbulence occurs year round, advecting nutrients into the mixed layer and high productivity. During summer and early fall months, winds are variable, of less intensity and mainly blow cross-basin except in the most northern Gulf. Summer PP is generally low in the central and southern Gulf except along the mainland where coastal-trapped waves associated with tropical surges and hurricanes generate mixing over the continental shelf. Mesoscale eddies or gyres often associated with jets and filaments extend to depths of 1000 m and transport nutrient-enriched upwelled waters and plankton detritus across the Gulf. The largest and most persistent gyres rotate in an anti-cyclonic direction (east to west) and are a principal source of the plankton export to the peninsula margin. Two major biogenic sediment patterns are present in core-top sediments. Hemipelagic biosiliceous-rich muds are accumulating beneath upwelling areas of high productivity in the central Gulf and along the mainland margin. Calcium carbonate- and organic carbon-rich (OC) sediments are concentrated along the peninsula margin, generally beneath lower productivity waters with the highest OC content in areas with the lowest productivity. The high, uniform biosiliceous content in Guaymas basin, extending southward into Carmen basin reflects the redistribution by mesoscale gyres of phytoplankon debris produced in mainland coastal

  11. Polyhydroxyalkanoates in waste activated sludge enhances anaerobic methane production through improving biochemical methane potential instead of hydrolysis rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qilin; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Chang; Xie, Guo-Jun; Zhou, Xu; Qian, Jin; Yang, Guojing; Zeng, Guangming; Liu, Yiqi; Wang, Dongbo

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic sludge digestion is the main technology for sludge reduction and stabilization prior to sludge disposal. Nevertheless, methane production from anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) is often restricted by the poor biochemical methane potential and slow hydrolysis rate of WAS. This work systematically investigated the effect of PHA levels of WAS on anaerobic methane production, using both experimental and mathematical modeling approaches. Biochemical methane potential tests showed that methane production increased with increased PHA levels in WAS. Model-based analysis suggested that the PHA-based method enhanced methane production by improving biochemical methane potential of WAS, with the highest enhancement being around 40% (from 192 to 274 L CH4/kg VS added; VS: volatile solid) when the PHA levels increased from 21 to 143 mg/g VS. In contrast, the hydrolysis rate (approximately 0.10 d-1) was not significantly affected by the PHA levels. Economic analysis suggested that the PHA-based method could save $1.2/PE/y (PE: population equivalent) in a typical wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The PHA-based method can be easily integrated into the current WWTP to enhance methane production, thereby providing a strong support to the on-going paradigm shift in wastewater management from pollutant removal to resource recovery.

  12. Polyhydroxyalkanoates in waste activated sludge enhances anaerobic methane production through improving biochemical methane potential instead of hydrolysis rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qilin; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Chang; Xie, Guo-Jun; Zhou, Xu; Qian, Jin; Yang, Guojing; Zeng, Guangming; Liu, Yiqi; Wang, Dongbo

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic sludge digestion is the main technology for sludge reduction and stabilization prior to sludge disposal. Nevertheless, methane production from anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) is often restricted by the poor biochemical methane potential and slow hydrolysis rate of WAS. This work systematically investigated the effect of PHA levels of WAS on anaerobic methane production, using both experimental and mathematical modeling approaches. Biochemical methane potential tests showed that methane production increased with increased PHA levels in WAS. Model-based analysis suggested that the PHA-based method enhanced methane production by improving biochemical methane potential of WAS, with the highest enhancement being around 40% (from 192 to 274 L CH4/kg VS added; VS: volatile solid) when the PHA levels increased from 21 to 143 mg/g VS. In contrast, the hydrolysis rate (approximately 0.10 d‑1) was not significantly affected by the PHA levels. Economic analysis suggested that the PHA-based method could save $1.2/PE/y (PE: population equivalent) in a typical wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The PHA-based method can be easily integrated into the current WWTP to enhance methane production, thereby providing a strong support to the on-going paradigm shift in wastewater management from pollutant removal to resource recovery.

  13. The Influence of Pyrogenic, Biogenic and Anthropogenic Emissions on Ozone Production Downwind from Boreal Forest Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Douglas; Palmer, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forest fires emit pollutants that can have a strong influence on downwind surface ozone concentrations, with potential implications for exceeding air quality regulations. The influence of the mixing of pyrogenic, biogenic and anthropogenic emissions on ozone is not well understood. Using the nested 0.5° latitude x 0.667° longitude GEOS-Chem chemical transport model we track biomass burning plumes in North America. We identify the changes in key chemical reactions within these plumes as well as the sensitivity of ozone to the different emission sources. We illustrate the importance of this method using a case study of a multi-day forest fire during the BORTAS aircraft campaign over eastern Canada during summer 2011. We focus on emissions from the fire on the 17th of July and follow the plume for eight days. After the initial 24 hours of pyrogenic emissions the main source of VOCs is biogenic with increasing emissions from anthropogenic sources including outflow from Quebec City and Newfoundland. Using a Lagrangian framework, we show that the ozone production efficiency (OPE) of this plume decreases steadily as it moves away from the fire but increases rapidly as the plume reaches the east coast of Canada. Using a Eulerian framework we show that ozone mixing ratios of a east coast receptor region increase by approximately 15% even though the ozone tendency of the regional air mass is negative, which we find is due to the arrival of ozone precursors in the plume. We also consider the contribution of anthropogenic outflow over Nova Scotia that originates from the eastern seaboard of the United States to the local chemistry. Using these sensitivity model runs we generate a chemical reaction narrative for the plume trajectory that helps to understand the attribution of observed ozone variations.

  14. Solar enriched methane production: Assessment of plant potentialities and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Piemonte

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The crucial environmental issue due to fossil fuel use in our society and industries and more and more perceived by the communities is stimulating the development of innovative technologies with the scope of reducing GHGs and pollutants emissions, improving plants efficiency and exploiting renewable energy sources. The idea proposed in the present work links this context: a novel hybrid plant for the production of a mixture of methane and hydrogen (20%vol, called enriched-methane, from a steam reforming reactor whose heat duty is supplied by a concentrating solar power (CSP plant by means of a molten salt stream is here conceived, modelled and assessed. The enriched-methane mixture can be applied in methane internal combustion engines (ICE reducing CO, CO2, unburned emissions and improving engine efficiency. Moreover, the residual sensible heat of solar-heated molten salt stream can be used to generate medium-pressure steam and to produce electricity by a steam-turbine. Therefore, the plant proposed is co-generative, producing both hydrogen and electricity from a solar source. The behaviour of methane steam reforming reactor is simulated by means of a 2D mathematical model and the design of a cogenerative solar plant is proposed, evaluating its potentialities in terms of MWh of electricity produced and number of vehicles fed by enriched-methane. A single CSP module (surface requirement = 1.5 hectares coupled with a 4-tubes-and-shell shaped reactor is able to produce 686 tons/year of hydrogen, equivalent to 3.430 tons/year of 20%vol H2-CH4 mixture and 3.097 MWh/year of clean electricity.

  15. Can aquatic worms enhance methane production from waste activated sludge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Antonio; Hendrickx, Tim L G; Elissen, Hellen H J; Laarhoven, Bob; Buisman, Cees J N; Temmink, Hardy

    2016-07-01

    Although literature suggests that aquatic worms can help to enhance the methane production from excess activated sludge, clear evidence for this is missing. Therefore, anaerobic digestion tests were performed at 20 and at 30°C with sludge from a high-loaded membrane bioreactor, the aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus, feces from these worms and with mixtures of these substrates. A significant synergistic effect of the worms or their feces on methane production from the high-loaded sludge or on its digestion rate was not observed. However, a positive effect on low-loaded activated sludge, which generally has a lower anaerobic biodegradability, cannot be excluded. The results furthermore showed that the high-loaded sludge provides an excellent feed for L. variegatus, which is promising for concepts where worm biomass is considered a resource for technical grade products such as coatings and glues.

  16. Multiple sulfur and carbon isotope composition of sediments from the Belingwe Greenstone Belt (Zimbabwe): A biogenic methane regulation on mass independent fractionation of sulfur during the Neoarchean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomazo, Christophe; Nisbet, Euan G.; Grassineau, Nathalie V.; Peters, Marc; Strauss, Harald

    2013-11-01

    To explore the linkage between mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionation (MIF-S) and δ13Corg excursions during the Neoarchean, as well as the contemporary redox state and biogeochemical cycling of carbon and sulfur, we report the results of a detailed carbon and multiple sulfur (δ34S, δ33S, δ36S) isotopic study of the ∼2.7 Ga Manjeri and ∼2.65 Ga Cheshire formations of the Ngezi Group (Belingwe Greenstone Belt, Zimbabwe). Multiple sulfur isotope data show non-zero Δ33S and Δ36S values for sediments older than 2.4 Ga (i.e. prior to the Great Oxidation Event, GOE), indicating MIF-S thought to be associated with low atmospheric oxygen concentration. However, in several 2.7-2.5 Ga Neoarchean localities, small-scale variations in MIF-S signal (magnitude) seem to correlate with negative excursion in δ13Corg, possibly reflecting a global connection between the relative reaction rate of different MIF-S source reaction and sulfur exit channels and the biogenic flux of methane into the atmosphere during periods of localized, microbiologically mediated, shallow surface-water oxygenation. The Manjeri Formation black shales studied here display a wide range of δ13Corg between -35.4‰ and -16.2‰ (average of -30.3 ± 6.0‰, 1σ), while the Cheshire Formation shales have δ13Corg between -47.7‰ and -35.1‰ (average -41.3 ± 3‰, 1σ). The δ34S values of sedimentary sulfides from Manjeri Formation vary between -15.15‰ and +2.37‰ (average -1.71 ± 4.76‰, 1σ), showing very small and mostly negative Δ33S values varying from -0.58‰ to 0.87‰ (average 0.02 ± 0.43‰, 1σ). Cheshire Formation black shale sulfide samples measured in this study have δ34S values ranging from -2.11‰ to 2.39‰ (average 0.25 ± 1.08‰, 1σ) and near zero and solely positive Δ33S anomalies between 0.14‰ and 1.17‰ (average 0.56 ± 0.29‰, 1σ). Moreover, Δ36S/Δ33S in the two formations are comparable with a slope of -1.38 (Manjeri Formation) and -1.67 (Cheshire

  17. Bacteria isolated from Korean black raspberry vinegar with low biogenic amine production in wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nho-Eul Song

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A high concentration of histamine, one of the biogenic amines (BAs usually found in fermented foods, can cause undesirable physiological side effects in sensitive humans. The objective of this study is to isolate indigenous Acetobacter strains from naturally fermented Bokbunja vinegar in Korea with reduced histamine production during starter fermentation. Further, we examined its physiological and biochemical properties, including BA synthesis. The obtained strain MBA-77, identified as Acetobacter aceti by 16S rDNA homology and biochemical analysis and named A. aceti MBA-77. A. aceti MBA-77 showed optimal acidity % production at pH 5; the optimal temperature was 25 °C. When we prepared and examined the BAs synthesis spectrum during the fermentation process, Bokbunja wine fermented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that the histamine concentration increased from 2.72 of Bokbunja extract to 5.29 mg/L and cadaverine and dopamine was decreased to 2.6 and 10.12 mg/L, respectively. Bokbunja vinegar prepared by A. aceti MBA-77 as the starter, the histamine concentration of the vinegar preparation step was decreased up to 3.66 mg/L from 5.29 mg/L in the wine preparation step. To our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate acetic acid bacteria isolated from Bokbunja seed vinegar with low spectrum BA and would be useful for wellbeing vinegar preparation.

  18. Determination of biogenic amine profiles in conventional and organic cocoa-based products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restuccia, Donatella; Spizzirri, U Gianfranco; Puoci, Francesco; Picci, Nevio

    2015-01-01

    Cocoa contains many compounds such as biogenic amines (BAs), known to influence consumer health. Spermidine, spermidine, putrescine, histamine, tyramine, β-phenylethylamine, cadaverine and serotonine have been found in several cocoa-based products using HPLC with UV detection after derivatisation with dansyl-chloride. Once optimised in terms of linearity, percentage recovery, LOD, LOQ and repeatability, this method was applied to real samples. Total concentrations of BAs ranged from 5.7 to 79.0 µg g(-)(1) with wide variations depending on the type of sample. BAs present in all samples were in decreasing order: histamine (1.9-38.1 µg g(-)(1)) and tyramine (1.7-31.7 µg g(-)(1)), while putrescine (0.9-32.7 µg g(-)(1)), spermidine (1.0-9.7 µg g(-)(1)) and spermidine (0.6-9.3 µg g(-)(1)) were present in most of the samples. Cadaverine, serotonine and β-phenylethylamine were present in a few samples at much lower concentrations. Organic samples always contained much lower levels of BAs than their conventional counterparts and, generally speaking, the highest amounts of BAs were found in the most processed products. PMID:25833003

  19. Bacteria isolated from Korean black raspberry vinegar with low biogenic amine production in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Nho-Eul; Cho, Hyoun-Suk; Baik, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    A high concentration of histamine, one of the biogenic amines (BAs) usually found in fermented foods, can cause undesirable physiological side effects in sensitive humans. The objective of this study is to isolate indigenous Acetobacter strains from naturally fermented Bokbunja vinegar in Korea with reduced histamine production during starter fermentation. Further, we examined its physiological and biochemical properties, including BA synthesis. The obtained strain MBA-77, identified as Acetobacter aceti by 16S rDNA homology and biochemical analysis and named A. aceti MBA-77. A. aceti MBA-77 showed optimal acidity % production at pH 5; the optimal temperature was 25°C. When we prepared and examined the BAs synthesis spectrum during the fermentation process, Bokbunja wine fermented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that the histamine concentration increased from 2.72 of Bokbunja extract to 5.29mg/L and cadaverine and dopamine was decreased to 2.6 and 10.12mg/L, respectively. Bokbunja vinegar prepared by A. aceti MBA-77 as the starter, the histamine concentration of the vinegar preparation step was decreased up to 3.66mg/L from 5.29mg/L in the wine preparation step. To our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate acetic acid bacteria isolated from Bokbunja seed vinegar with low spectrum BA and would be useful for wellbeing vinegar preparation. PMID:26991285

  20. Biogenic amine production by Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains in the model system of Dutch-type cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasarová, Radka; Pachlová, Vendula; Buňková, Leona; Menšíková, Anna; Georgová, Nikola; Dráb, Vladimír; Buňka, František

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the biogenic amine production of two starter strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris (strains from the Culture Collection of Dairy Microorganisms - CCDM 824 and CCDM 946) with decarboxylase positive activity in a model system of Dutch-type cheese during a 90-day ripening period at 10°C. During ripening, biogenic amine and free amino acid content, microbiological characteristics and proximate chemical properties were observed. By the end of the ripening period, the putrescine content in both samples with the addition of the biogenic amine producing strain almost evened out and the concentration of putrescine was >800mg/kg. The amount of tyramine in the cheeses with the addition of the strain of CCDM 824 approached the limit of 400mg/kg by the end of ripening. In the cheeses with the addition of the strain of CCDM 946 it even exceeded 500mg/kg. In the control samples, the amount of biogenic amines was insignificant. PMID:26471528

  1. Biogenic amine production by Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains in the model system of Dutch-type cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasarová, Radka; Pachlová, Vendula; Buňková, Leona; Menšíková, Anna; Georgová, Nikola; Dráb, Vladimír; Buňka, František

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the biogenic amine production of two starter strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris (strains from the Culture Collection of Dairy Microorganisms - CCDM 824 and CCDM 946) with decarboxylase positive activity in a model system of Dutch-type cheese during a 90-day ripening period at 10°C. During ripening, biogenic amine and free amino acid content, microbiological characteristics and proximate chemical properties were observed. By the end of the ripening period, the putrescine content in both samples with the addition of the biogenic amine producing strain almost evened out and the concentration of putrescine was >800mg/kg. The amount of tyramine in the cheeses with the addition of the strain of CCDM 824 approached the limit of 400mg/kg by the end of ripening. In the cheeses with the addition of the strain of CCDM 946 it even exceeded 500mg/kg. In the control samples, the amount of biogenic amines was insignificant.

  2. Steam Methane Reforming System for Hydrogen Production: Advanced Exergetic Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Morosuk, Tatiana; Boyano, Alicia; Blanco-Marigorta, Ana-Maria; Tsatsaronis, George

    2012-01-01

    Steam methane reforming (SMR) is one of the most promising processes for the production of hydrogen. Therefore, the overall thermodynamic efficiency of this process is of particular importance. The thermodynamic inefficiencies in a thermal system are related to exergy destruction and exergy loss. However, a conventional exergetic analysis cannot evaluate the mutual interdependencies among the system components nor the real potential for improving the energy conversion system being considered....

  3. Screening of biogenic amine production by lactic acid bacteria isolated from grape musts and wine

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno-Arribas, M. Victoria; Polo, María Carmen; Jorganes, Felisa; Muñoz, Rosario

    2003-01-01

    The potential to produce the biogenic amines tyramine, histamine and putrescine, was investigated for lactic acid bacteria (LAB) of various origin, including commercial malolactic starter cultures, type strains and 78 strains isolated from Spanish grape must and wine. The presence of biogenic amines in a decarboxylase synthetic broth was determined by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Tyramine was the main amine formed by the LAB strains investigated. ...

  4. Estimation of future methane production from Hellenic landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsatsarelis, T.; Karagiannidis, A. [Aristotle Univ., Thessaloniki (Greece). Lab. of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering

    2009-07-15

    Organic waste decomposition leads to the production of Landfill Gas (LFG). LFG mainly consists of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). It is common understanding now that LFG should be considered either as a significant source of pollution and risk (if migrating uncontrollably to the air and ground), or as a significant source of renewable energy (if extracted and processed accordingly). There are two possible solutions for dealing with LFG emissions. In the case of low methane ratios, LFG should be extracted and flared or oxidized in biofilters. On the other hand, in the case of high methane content, LFG becomes an evidently valuable energy resource, as it is then able to sustain the fuelling of engines producing electricity and thermal energy. More specifically, it can be used as a supplementary or primary fuel to increase the production of electric power, as a pipeline quality gas and vehicle fuel, or even as a supply of heat and carbon dioxide for greenhouses and various industrial processes. Technologies that utilize LFG include internal combustion engines, gas turbines, fuel cells and boiler systems. The main objective of this research was to predict expected methane generation in Hellenic sanitary landfills, in order to evaluate its potential for energy production and to ensure health and safety in and around these sites on the long term. The study was performed for the period 2008--2028 with the use of a multi-phase model and included a sensitivity analysis in order to determine the impact of certain waste parameters. In this context, two 'extreme' reference scenarios were formulated and assessed, one anticipating fulfillment of the EU landfill directive (which sets limits to the amount of biodegradable and packaging materials to be deposited in sanitary landfills) whereas a second (do-nothing scenario) assuming no such timely compliance. The model used here for methane estimation is a multi-phase model developed by the Norwegian

  5. Effect of azithromycin on enhancement of methane production from waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh Tuan; Maeda, Toshinari; Mohd Yusoff, Mohd Zulkhairi; Ogawa, Hiroaki I

    2014-07-01

    In the methane production from waste activated sludge (WAS), complex bacterial interactions in WAS have been known as a major contribution to methane production. Therefore, the influence of bacterial community changes toward methane production from WAS was investigated by an application of antibiotics as a simple means for it. In this study, azithromycin (Azm) as an antibiotic was mainly used to observe the effect on microbial changes that influence methane production from WAS. The results showed that at the end of fermentation, Azm enhanced methane production about twofold compared to control. Azm fostered the growth of acid-producing bacterial communities, which synthesized more precursors for methane formation. DGGE result showed that the hydrolysis as well as acetogenesis stage was improved by the dominant of B1, B2 and B3 strains, which are Clostridium species. In the presence of Azm, the total population of archaeal group was increased, resulting in higher methane productivity achievement.

  6. Ruminal Methane Production on Simple Phenolic Acids Addition in in Vitro Gas Production Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jayanegara

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Methane production from ruminants contributes to total global methane production, which is an important contributor to global warming. In this experiment, six sources of simple phenolic acids (benzoic, cinnamic, phenylacetic, caffeic, p-coumaric and ferulic acids at two different levels (2 and 5 mM added to hay diet were evaluated for their potential to reduce enteric methane production using in vitro Hohenheim gas production method. The measured variables were gas production, methane, organic matter digestibility (OMD, and short chain fatty acids (SCFA. The results showed that addition of cinnamic, caffeic, p-coumaric and ferulic acids at 5 mM significantly (P p-coumaric > ferulic > cinnamic. The addition of simple phenols did not significantly decrease OMD. Addition of simple phenols tends to decrease total SCFA production. It was concluded that methane decrease by addition of phenolic acids was relatively small, and the effect of phenolic acids on methane decrease depended on the source and concentration applied.

  7. Effects of condensation products of biogenic amines on human platelet function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condensation products (CP) are formed by the reaction of biogenic amines with aldehydes and alpha-keto acids. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of CP on platelet function in vitro. The effect of CP on platelet aggregation was examined. Epinephrine-induced aggregation was inhibited, suggesting CP antagonistic activity on the platelet alpha2-adrenergic receptors. Adenosine-diphosphate (ADP), collagen and arachidonic acid induced aggregation was inhibited only at high concentrations. Inhibition of epinephrine and ADP aggregation was reversible, suggesting CP are competitive inhibitors of these agonists. Binding affinities for the platelet alpha2-adrenergic receptor were determined using [3H]-yohimbine, a specific alpha2-receptor antagonist. The order of potency for CP inhibition of [3H]-yohimbine binding paralleled that determined for inhibition of epinephrine-induced aggregation. Platelet uptake of serotonin (5-HT) was competitively inhibited by CP, with the exception of salsolinol, which appears to be stimulatory. Release of 5-HT from platelets was induced by CP, with betacarbolines being more potent than tetrahydroisoquinolines. Evidence suggests that CP cause release by displacement of 5-HT from intraplatelet storage sites since this effect can be inhibited by imipramine, thus preventing accumulation of CP by platelets

  8. Biofilm-Forming Capacity in Biogenic Amine-Producing Bacteria Isolated from Dairy Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Maria; Ladero, Victor; del Rio, Beatriz; Redruello, Begoña; Fernández, María; Martin, M. Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms on the surface of food industry equipment are reservoirs of potentially food-contaminating bacteria—both spoilage and pathogenic. However, the capacity of biogenic amine (BA)-producers to form biofilms has remained largely unexamined. BAs are low molecular weight, biologically active compounds that in food can reach concentrations high enough to be a toxicological hazard. Fermented foods, especially some types of cheese, accumulate the highest BA concentrations of all. The present work examines the biofilm-forming capacity of 56 BA-producing strains belonging to three genera and 10 species (12 Enterococcus faecalis, 6 Enterococcus faecium, 6 Enterococcus durans, 1 Enterococcus hirae, 12 Lactococcus lactis, 7 Lactobacillus vaginalis, 2 Lactobacillus curvatus, 2 Lactobacillus brevis, 1 Lactobacillus reuteri, and 7 Lactobacillus parabuchneri), all isolated from dairy products. Strains of all the tested species - except for L. vaginalis—were able to produce biofilms on polystyrene and adhered to stainless steel. However, the biomass produced in biofilms was strain-dependent. These results suggest that biofilms may provide a route via which fermented foods can become contaminated by BA-producing microorganisms. PMID:27242675

  9. Biofilm-forming capacity in biogenic amine-producing bacteria isolated from dairy products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eDiaz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms on the surface of food industry equipment are reservoirs of potentially food-contaminating bacteria - both spoilage and pathogenic. However, the capacity of biogenic amine (BA-producers to form biofilms has remained largely unexamined. BAs are low molecular weight, biologically active compounds that in food can reach concentrations high enough to be a toxicological hazard. Fermented foods, especially some types of cheese, accumulate the highest BA concentrations of all. The present work examines the biofilm-forming capacity of 56 BA-producing strains belonging to three genera and 10 species (12 Enterococcus faecalis, 6 Enterococcus faecium, 6 Enterococcus durans, 1 Enterococcus hirae, 12 Lactococcus lactis, 7 Lactobacillus vaginalis, 2 Lactobacillus curvatus, 2 Lactobacillus brevis, 1 Lactobacillus reuteri and 7 Lactobacillus parabuchneri, all isolated from dairy products. Strains of all the tested species - except for L. vaginalis - were able to produce biofilms on polystyrene and adhered to stainless steel. However, the biomass produced in biofilms was strain-dependent. These results suggest that biofilms may provide a route via which fermented foods can become contaminated by BA-producing microorganisms.

  10. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the second year of a three-year endeavor being sponsored by Maurer Technology, Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the DOE. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. We plan to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. We also plan to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope is to drill and core a well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 and 2004. We are also using an on-site core analysis laboratory to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well is being drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that will have minimal footprint and environmental impact. We hope to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data to allow reservoir models to be calibrated. Ultimately, our goal is to form an objective technical and economic evaluation of reservoir potential in Alaska.

  11. CHANGES IN COUNTS OF MICROORGANISMS AND BIOGENIC AMINES PRODUCTION DURING THE MANUFACTURE OF FERMENTED SAUSAGES POLIČAN

    OpenAIRE

    Libor Kalhotka; Olga Cwiková; Veronika Čírtková(Kovářová); Zuzana Matoušová; Jitka Přichystalová

    2012-01-01

    Poličan is classic raw fermented sausage with low acidity. Dry fermented sausages Poličan were used for the analysis and drawn once a week during production from ripening chambers of meat-packing plants. Those sausages ripened for 35 days under controlled temperature and humidity conditions. The aim of this article is to evaluate microorganisms accompanying ripening of fermented sausages Poličan and characterize relationships between activity of microorganisms and content of biogenic amines. ...

  12. British Gas HICOM methanation process for SNG production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ensell, R.L.; Stroud, H.J.F.

    1983-01-01

    The British Gas HICOM methanation process (formerly the HCM process) is an efficient, cost-effective way to make SNG from coal-derived gases. Using it with the British Gas/Lurgi slagging gasifier, for example, can yield coal-to-SNG thermal efficiencies of about 70%. In the HICOM process, a methane-rich gas is made directly from the purified gasifier product gas by reaction with steam over a catalyst; the temperature rise is controlled by hot-gas recycling and split-stream operation. The main attributes of this route are that it eliminates the CO-shift stage, has a high thermal efficiency, requires no selective sulfur removal system, minimizes waste liquor treatment, and has a low capital cost.

  13. Hydrogen and chemicals production by plasma reforming methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low temperature plasmas have excellent potential as on board transportation reformers for fuel cells. Because of their low temperature operation, they start up and shut down rapidly, and little energy is lost in waste heat that cannot easily be recovered from high temperature processes. Their use of electricity to drive reactions certainly requires good efficiency, but may simplify on-board systems. Partial oxidation has been shown to operate effectively as has steam reforming under these conditions. Hydrogen, COx, and C2s are the primary products of plasma reforming of methane. In this paper, the major reaction pathways and the results of the partial oxidation and steam reforming of methane will be discussed. (author)

  14. Biogas crops grown in energy crop rotations: Linking chemical composition and methane production characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Christiane; Idler, Christine; Heiermann, Monika

    2016-04-01

    Methane production characteristics and chemical composition of 405 silages from 43 different crop species were examined using uniform laboratory methods, with the aim to characterise a wide range of crop feedstocks from energy crop rotations and to identify main parameters that influence biomass quality for biogas production. Methane formation was analysed from chopped and over 90 days ensiled crop biomass in batch anaerobic digestion tests without further pre-treatment. Lignin content of crop biomass was found to be the most significant explanatory variable for specific methane yields while the methane content and methane production rates were mainly affected by the content of nitrogen-free extracts and neutral detergent fibre, respectively. The accumulation of butyric acid and alcohols during the ensiling process had significant impact on specific methane yields and methane contents of crop silages. It is proposed that products of silage fermentation should be considered when evaluating crop silages for biogas production. PMID:26836846

  15. Extraction of soluble substances from organic solid municipal waste to increase methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano, Rosalinda; González-Martínez, Simón

    2015-02-01

    This work deals with the analysis of the methane production from Mexico City's urban organic wastes after separating soluble from suspended substances. Water was used to extract soluble substances under three different water to waste ratios and after three extraction procedures. Methane production was measured at 35 °C during 21 days using a commercial methane potential testing device. Results indicate that volatile solids extraction increases with dilution rate to a maximum of 40% at 20 °C and to 43% at 93 °C. The extracts methane production increases with the dilution rate as a result of enhanced dissolved solids extraction. The combined (extract and bagasse) methane production reached, in 6 days, 66% of the total methane produced in 21 days. The highest methane production rates were measured during the first six days.

  16. The influence of petroleum products on the methane fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choromański, Paweł; Karwowska, Ewa; Łebkowska, Maria

    2016-01-15

    In this study the influence of the petroleum products: diesel fuel and spent engine oil on the sewage sludge digestion process and biogas production efficiency was investigated. Microbiological, chemical and enzymatic analyses were applied in the survey. It was revealed that the influence of the petroleum derivatives on the effectiveness of the methane fermentation of sewage sludge depends on the type of the petroleum product. Diesel fuel did not limit the biogas production and the methane concentration in the biogas, while spent engine oil significantly reduced the process efficacy. The changes in physical-chemical parameters, excluding COD, did not reflect the effect of the tested substances. The negative influence of petroleum products on individual bacterial groups was observed after 7 days of the process, while after 14 days probably some adaptive mechanisms appeared. The dehydrogenase activity assessment was the most relevant parameter to evaluate the effect of petroleum products contamination. Diesel fuel was probably used as a source of carbon and energy in the process, while the toxic influence was observed in case of spent engine oil. PMID:26378365

  17. Methane production and methanogen levels in steers that differ in residual gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methane gas released by cattle is a product of fermentation in the digestive tract. The two primary sites of methane fermentation in ruminants are the reticulum-rumen complex, and the cecum. Methane release from cattle represents a 2 to 12% loss of the energy intake. Reducing the proportion of fe...

  18. Microbial electrolysis cells for production of methane from CO2: long-term performance and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Eerten-Jansen, van, M.C.A.A.; Heijne, ter, A.; C J N Buisman; Hamelers, H.V.M.

    2012-01-01

    A methane-producing microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) is a technology to convert CO2 into methane, using electricity as an energy source and microorganisms as the catalyst. A methane-producing MEC provides the possibility to increase the fuel yield per hectare of land area, when the CO2 produced in biofuel production processes is converted to additional fuel methane. Besides increasing fuel yield per hectare of land area, this also results in more efficient use of land area, water, and nutrie...

  19. Methane impurity production in the fusion reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion requires temperatures of the order of 108 degrees C. In order to attain the required temperature it will be essential to minimise the energy losses from the plasma. Impurities are a major cause of plasma cooling. Ionization of impurity species in the plasma leads to a subsequent decay and emission of radiation. The most common low Z contaminants to be consideed are water and methane produced by reaction of hydrogen isotopes with oxygen and carbon. This review focuses on the methane production problem. We will be concerned with the sources of carbon in the reactor and also with the reactivity of carbon with hydrogen molecules, atoms and ions and the synergistic effects which can arise from coincident fluxes of electrons and photons and the effects of radiation-induced damage of the materials involved. While the reactor first wall will provide the most hostile environment for methane producton, most of the reactions discussed can occur in breeder blankets and also in other tritium facilities such as fuel handling, purification and storage facilities

  20. Biogenic methane production in formation waters from a large gas field in the North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Neil D; Sherry, Angela; Larter, Stephen R; Erdmann, Michael; Leyris, Juliette; Liengen, Turid; Beeder, Janiche; Head, Ian M

    2009-05-01

    Methanogenesis was investigated in formation waters from a North Sea oil rimmed gas accumulation containing biodegraded oil, which has not been subject to seawater injection. Activity and growth of hydrogenotrophic methanogens was measured but acetoclastic methanogenesis was not detected. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens showed activity between 40 and 80 degrees C with a temperature optimum (ca. 70 degrees C) consistent with in situ reservoir temperatures. They were also active over a broad salinity range, up to and consistent with the high salinity of the waters (90 g l(-1)). These findings suggest the methanogens are indigenous to the reservoir. The conversion of H(2) and CO(2) to CH(4) in methanogenic enrichments was enhanced by the addition of inorganic nutrients and was correlated with cell growth. Addition of yeast extract also stimulated methanogenesis. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered from enrichment cultures were closely related to Methanothermobacter spp. which have been identified in other high-temperature petroleum reservoirs. It has recently been suggested that methanogenic oil degradation may be a major factor in the development of the world's heavy oils and represent a significant and ongoing process in conventional deposits. Although an oil-degrading methanogenic consortium was not enriched from these samples the presence and activity of communities of fermentative bacteria and methanogenic archaea was demonstrated. Stimulation of methanogenesis by addition of nutrients suggests that in situ methanogenic biodegradation of oil could be harnessed to enhance recovery of stranded energy assets from such petroleum systems.

  1. 基于本源菌的褐煤生物气生成过程与可能途径%Processes and Possible Pathways of Biogenic Coalbed Methane Generation From Lignites Based on Parent Methanogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王爱宽; 秦勇; 兰凤娟

    2012-01-01

    Using the parent anaerobic methanogen flora enriched from lignites in the Zhaotong basin, Yunnan, a simulation experiment was carried out in order to analyze the process and possible approach of the biogenic coalbed gas (CBG) generation. Results showed that the process of the biogenic CBG generation in a period of 130 days underwent at least two gas generation peaks with the higher gas generation rate at the first peak than that at the secondary peak. Gas produced during the first peak came mainly from the huminite group and the biodegradation of the inertinite and liptinite groups was strengthened relatively during the secondary peak. Plots of the carbon isotopic composition to the hydrogen isotopic composition of the simulated methane indicated a major approach of the acetate fermentation by which the biogenic methane was generated. During the stimulation process, the methane concentration raised with the drop of the carbon dioxide concentration. Carbon isotopic composition of the methane tended to become lighter and the hydrogen isotope composition to become heavier in the late period of the simulation process. These data indicate the carbon dioxide-reduction of the partial methane generated in the late period of the stimulation.%利用富集培养得到的本源产甲烷菌群对云南昭通褐煤样品进行生物气模拟实验,分析了褐煤生物气生成过程与可能途径.结果显示,为期130 d的褐煤生物气生成过程至少经历了两个产气高峰,第一高峰产气率高于第二高峰.本文认为第一高峰期间生气母质主要为褐煤中的腐殖组分,第二高峰期间类脂组和惰质组的微生物降解程度相对增强.甲烷碳氢同位素组成显示,模拟生物气主要通过乙酸发酵途径生成.模拟过程中,甲烷浓度和二氧化碳浓度具有相互消长的变化趋势,甲烷碳同位素组成在模拟后期有变轻趋势,氢同位素则趋于变重,表明模拟过程后期生成的部分甲烷具有二氧化碳还原成因.

  2. Enhanced methane productivity from lignocellulosic biomasses using aqueous ammonia soaking pretreatment

    OpenAIRE

    Jurado, Esperanza; Skiadas, Ioannis; Gavala, Hariklia N.

    2012-01-01

    The continuously increasing demand for renewable energy sources, such as methane, renders anaerobic digestion to one of the most promising technologies for renewable energy production. In fact, anaerobic digestion for methane production has become a major part of the rapidly growing renewable energy sector. Biogas is part of a rapidly growing renewable energy sector, which expands at a rate of 20-30 % globally [1]. However, the increasing demand for methane production cannot be satisfied by t...

  3. Effect of inclusion of Myristica fragrans on methane production, rumen fermentation parameters and methanogens population

    OpenAIRE

    Sirohi, S. K.; P P Chaudhary; Navneet Goel

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The present study was done to evaluate the effect of Myristica fragrans fruit active compounds addition on methane production in vitro. Materials and Methods: Methanolic extract of Myristica fragrans fruit powder was prepared and checked for its inhibitory action on methane production in diet containing roughage 50 percent and concentrate 50 percent respectively. Methane production was estimated by Gas Chromatography. Results: It has been shown that supplementation of Myristica fragrans ...

  4. Potential for methane production from typical Mediterranean agro-industrial by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fountoulakis, M.S.; Drakopoulou, S.; Terzakis, S.; Georgaki, E.; Manios, T. [Laboratory of Solid Waste and Wastewater Management, School of Agricultural Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, GR-71004 Iraklio, Crete (Greece)

    2008-02-15

    This work examines the potential for methane production from anaerobic co-digestion of olive mill wastewater and wine-grape residues with slaughterhouse wastewater. Continuous (mesophilic) and batch (mesophilic and thermophilic) experiments were studied, both with the separate types of by-products and with mixtures. Methane yields from olive oil wastewater, winery residues and slaughterhouse wastewater were 108, 147 and 297 L CH{sub 4} kg{sup -1} COD fed respectively. Co-digestion with 50% olive oil wastewater and 50% slaughterhouse wastewater or 50% winery residues gave a methane yield of 184 and 214 L CH{sub 4} kg{sup -1} COD, respectively. Furthermore, the methane yield was 188 L CH{sub 4} kg{sup -1} COD added, co-digesting a mixture of 50% winery residues and slaughterhouse wastewater. Finally, the same mixtures under thermophilic conditions gave methane yields of 282, 301 and 219 L CH{sub 4} kg{sup -1} COD, respectively. These results suggest that methane can be produced very efficiently by co-digesting olive oil wastewater, wine-grape residues and slaughterhouse wastewater. (author)

  5. Progresses in the stable isotope studies of microbial processes associated with wetland methane production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methane emissions from wetlands play a key role in regulating global atmospheric methane concentration, so better understanding of microbial processes for the methane emission in wetlands is critical for developing process models and reducing uncertainty in global methane emission inventory. In this review, we describe basic microbial processes for wetland methane production and then demonstrate how stable isotope fractionation and stable isotope probing can be used to investigate the mechanisms underlying different methanogenic pathways and to quantify microbial species involved in wetland methane production. When applying stable isotope technique to calculate contributions of different pathways to the total methane production in various wetlands, the technical challenge is how to determine isotopic fractionation factors for the acetate derived methane production and carbon dioxide derived methane production. Although the application of stable isotope probing techniques to study the actual functions of different microbial organisms to methane production process is significantly superior to the traditional molecular biology method, the combination of these two technologies will be crucial for direct linking of the microbial community and functional structure with the corresponding metabolic functions, and provide new ideas for future studies. (authors)

  6. Enhanced methane production via repeated batch bioaugmentation pattern of enriched microbial consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiman; Guo, Rongbo; Xu, Xiaohui; Wang, Lin; Dai, Meng

    2016-09-01

    Using batch and repeated batch cultivations, this study investigated the effects of bioaugmentation with enriched microbial consortia (named as EMC) on methane production from effluents of hydrogen-producing stage of potato slurry, as well as on the indigenous bacterial community. The results demonstrated that the improved methane production and shift of the indigenous bacterial community structure were dependent on the EMC/sludge ratio and bioaugmentation patterns. The methane yield and production rate in repeated batch bioaugmentation pattern of EMC were, respectively, average 15% and 10% higher than in one-time bioaugmentation pattern of EMC. DNA-sequencing approach showed that the enhanced methane production in the repeated batch bioaugmentation pattern of EMC mainly resulted from the enriched iron-reducing bacteria and the persistence of the introduced Syntrophomonas, which led to a rapid degradation of individual VFAs to methane. The findings contributed to understanding the correlation between the bioaugmentation of microbial consortia, community shift, and methane production.

  7. Enhanced methane production via repeated batch bioaugmentation pattern of enriched microbial consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiman; Guo, Rongbo; Xu, Xiaohui; Wang, Lin; Dai, Meng

    2016-09-01

    Using batch and repeated batch cultivations, this study investigated the effects of bioaugmentation with enriched microbial consortia (named as EMC) on methane production from effluents of hydrogen-producing stage of potato slurry, as well as on the indigenous bacterial community. The results demonstrated that the improved methane production and shift of the indigenous bacterial community structure were dependent on the EMC/sludge ratio and bioaugmentation patterns. The methane yield and production rate in repeated batch bioaugmentation pattern of EMC were, respectively, average 15% and 10% higher than in one-time bioaugmentation pattern of EMC. DNA-sequencing approach showed that the enhanced methane production in the repeated batch bioaugmentation pattern of EMC mainly resulted from the enriched iron-reducing bacteria and the persistence of the introduced Syntrophomonas, which led to a rapid degradation of individual VFAs to methane. The findings contributed to understanding the correlation between the bioaugmentation of microbial consortia, community shift, and methane production. PMID:27262722

  8. A data-driven model for maximization of methane production in a wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusiak, Andrew; Wei, Xiupeng

    2012-01-01

    A data-driven approach for maximization of methane production in a wastewater treatment plant is presented. Industrial data collected on a daily basis was used to build the model. Temperature, total solids, volatile solids, detention time and pH value were selected as parameters for the model construction. First, a prediction model of methane production was built by a multi-layer perceptron neural network. Then a particle swarm optimization algorithm was used to maximize methane production based on the model developed in this research. The model resulted in a 5.5% increase in methane production.

  9. Modeling methane emissions by cattle production systems in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelan-Ortega, O. A.; Ku Vera, J.; Molina, L. T.

    2013-12-01

    Methane emissions from livestock is one of the largest sources of methane in Mexico. The purpose of the present paper is to provide a realistic estimate of the national inventory of methane produced by the enteric fermentation of cattle, based on an integrated simulation model, and to provide estimates of CH4 produced by cattle fed typical diets from the tropical and temperate climates of Mexico. The Mexican cattle population of 23.3 million heads was divided in two groups. The first group (7.8 million heads), represents cattle of the tropical climate regions. The second group (15.5 million heads), are the cattle in the temperate climate regions. This approach allows incorporating the effect of diet on CH4 production into the analysis because the quality of forages is lower in the tropics than in temperate regions. Cattle population in every group was subdivided into two categories: cows (COW) and other type of cattle (OTHE), which included calves, heifers, steers and bulls. The daily CH4 production by each category of animal along an average production cycle of 365 days was simulated, instead of using a default emission factor as in Tier 1 approach. Daily milk yield, live weight changes associated with the lactation, and dry matter intake, were simulated for the entire production cycle. The Moe and Tyrrell (1979) model was used to simulate CH4 production for the COW category, the linear model of Mills et al. (2003) for the OTHE category in temperate regions and the Kurihara et al. (1999) model for the OTHE category in the tropical regions as it has been developed for cattle fed tropical diets. All models were integrated with a cow submodel to form an Integrated Simulation Model (ISM). The AFRC (1993) equations and the lactation curve model of Morant and Gnanasakthy (1989) were used to construct the cow submodel. The ISM simulates on a daily basis the CH4 production, milk yield, live weight changes associated with lactation and dry matter intake. The total daily CH

  10. Development of methane conversion improvement method by recycling of residual methane for steam reforming as a part of R and D of HTGR-hydrogen production system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the present study is to improve methane conversion for an HTGR-steam reforming system by recycling of residual methane. The residual methane in a product gas after steam reforming was recycled with a gas separator of polyimide membrane. Gas separation characteristics of the separator were investigated experimentally and numerically, and an experimental study on recycling system was carried out. The results showed that the recycling system improves apparent methane conversion, ratio of methane conversion to methane supply from a cylinder, from 20 to 32% compared with those without recycling. (author)

  11. Economic evaluation of coalbed methane production in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roaring natural gas demand, energy security and environment protection concerns coupled with stringent emission reduction requirement have made China's abundant coalbed methane (CBM) resource an increasingly valuable energy source. However, not all of China's CBM resource is economic to develop under current technological condition and economic situation. In order to locate the CBM resource with economic viability to develop in China, economic evaluation of CBM production is conducted by applying net present value (NPV) method. The results indicate that more than half of CBM resource in China is economic to develop. It shows that CBM price, production rate and operating costs are the three major factors with most impact on the economic viability of the CBM development in target areas in China. The result also demonstrates that the economic limit production is roughly 1200 cubic meters per day. These economic evaluation results provide important information for both CBM companies and China government.

  12. Biogenic gas in the Cambrian-Ordovcian Alum Shale (Denmark and Sweden)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, H.M.; Wirth, R.; Biermann, S.; Arning, E.T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Potsdam - Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum GFZ, Potsdam (Germany); Krueger, M.; Straaten, N. [BGR Hannover (Germany); Bechtel, A. [Montanuniv. Leoben (Austria); Berk, W. van [Technical Univ. of Clausthal (Germany); Schovsbo, N.H. [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland - GEUS, Copenhagen (Denmark); Crabtree, Stephen [Gripen Gas (Sweden)

    2013-08-01

    Shale gas is mainly produced from thermally mature black shales. However, biogenic methane also represents a resource which is often underestimated. Today biogenic methane is being produced from the Upper Devonian Antrim Shale in the Michigan Basin which was the most successfully exploited shale gas system during the 1990-2000 decade in the U.S.A. before significant gas production from the Barnett Shale started (Curtis et al., 2008). The Cambro-Ordovician Alum Shale in northern Europe has thermal maturities ranging from overmature in southern areas (Denmark and southern Sweden) to immature conditions (central Sweden). Biogenic methane is recorded during drilling in central Sweden. The immature Alum Shale in central Sweden has total organic carbon (TOC) contents up to 20 wt%. The hydrogen index HI ranges from 380 to 560 mgHC/gTOC at very low oxygen index (OI) values of around 4 mg CO{sub 2}/gTOC, Tmax ranges between 420 - 430 C. The organic matter is highly porous. In general, the Alum Shale is a dense shale with intercalated sandy beds which may be dense due to carbonate cementation. Secondary porosity is created in some sandy beds due to feldspar dissolution and these beds serve as gas conduits. Methane production rates with shale as substrate in the laboratory are dependent on the kind of hydrocarbon-degrading microbial enrichment cultures used in the incubation experiments, ranging from 10-620 nmol/(g*d). In these experiments, the CO{sub 2} production rate was always higher than for methane. Like the northern part of North America, also Northern European has been covered by glaciers during the Pleistocene and similar geological processes may have developed leading to biogenic shale gas formation. For the Antrim Shale one hypothesis suggests that fresh waters, recharged from Pleistocene glaciation and modern precipitation, suppressed basinal brine salinity along the northern margins of the Michigan Basin to greater depths and thereby enhancing methanogenesis

  13. Hydrogen and methane production from household solid waste in the two-stage fermentation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lui, D.; Liu, D.; Zeng, Raymond Jianxiong;

    2006-01-01

    A two-stage process combined hydrogen and methane production from household solid waste was demonstrated working successfully. The yield of 43 mL H-2/g volatile solid (VS) added was generated in the first hydrogen production stage and the methane production in the second stage was 500 mL CH4/g VS...

  14. Equations of state of detonation products: ammonia and methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, John; Dattelbaum, Dana; Goodwin, Peter; Garcia, Daniel; Coe, Joshua; Leiding, Jeffery; Gibson, Lloyd; Bartram, Brian

    2015-06-01

    Ammonia (NH3) and methane (CH4) are two principal product gases resulting from explosives detonation, and the decomposition of other organic materials under shockwave loading (such as foams). Accurate thermodynamic descriptions of these gases are important for understanding the detonation performance of high explosives. However, shock compression data often do not exist for molecular species in the dense gas phase, and are limited in the fluid phase. Here, we present equation of state measurements of elevated initial density ammonia and methane gases dynamically compressed in gas-gun driven plate impact experiments. Pressure and density of the shocked gases on the principal Hugoniot were determined from direct particle velocity and shock wave velocity measurements recorded using optical velocimetry (Photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) and VISAR (velocity interferometer system for any reflector)). Streak spectroscopy and 5-color pyrometry were further used to measure the emission from the shocked gases, from which the temperatures of the shocked gases were estimated. Up to 0.07 GPa, ammonia was not observed to ionize, with temperature remaining below 7000 K. These results provide quantitative measurements of the Hugoniot locus for improving equations of state models of detonation products.

  15. Effects of Rumen Protozoa of Brahman Heifers and Nitrate on Fermentation and In vitro Methane Production

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, S.H.; Li, L.; Hegarty, R S

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted assessing the effects of presence or absence of rumen protozoa and dietary nitrate addition on rumen fermentation characteristics and in vitro methane production in Brahman heifers. The first experiment assessed changes in rumen fermentation pattern and in vitro methane production post-refaunation and the second experiment investigated whether addition of nitrate to the incubation would give rise to methane mitigation additional to that contributed by defaunatio...

  16. Effect of Dietary Monensin or Chlortetracycline on Methane Production from Cattle Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Varel, V. H.; Hashimoto, A. G.

    1981-01-01

    Wastes from feedlot cattle fed finishing diets containing either monensin, chlortetracycline, or no antibiotic were investigated as substrates for methane production. We used continuously mixed anaerobic fermentors with 3-liter working volumes at 35 and 55°C; these fermentors were fed once per day. Within a few days after waste from animals fed monensin was added, the volume of methane produced began to decrease in the 55°C fermentors. After 9 days of daily feeding, methane production was sev...

  17. Biogenic oxidized organic functional groups in aerosol particles from a mountain forest site and their similarities to laboratory chamber products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Schwartz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Submicron particles collected at Whistler, British Columbia, at 1020 m a.s.l. during May and June 2008 on Teflon filters were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR and X-ray fluorescence (XRF techniques for organic functional groups (OFG and elemental composition. Organic mass (OM concentrations ranged from less than 0.5 to 3.1 μg m−3, with a project mean and standard deviation of 1.3±1.0 μg m−3 and 0.21±0.16 μg m−3 for OM and sulfate, respectively. On average, organic hydroxyl, alkane, and carboxylic acid groups represented 34%, 33%, and 23% of OM, respectively. Ketone, amine and organosulfate groups constituted 6%, 5%, and <1% of the average organic aerosol composition, respectively. Measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC, including isoprene and monoterpenes from biogenic VOC (BVOC emissions and their oxidation products (methyl-vinylketone / methacrolein, MVK/MACR, were made using co-located proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS. We present chemically-specific evidence of OFG associated with BVOC emissions. Positive matrix factorization (PMF analysis attributed 65% of the campaign OM to biogenic sources, based on the correlations of one factor to monoterpenes and MVK/MACR. The remaining fraction was attributed to anthropogenic sources based on a correlation to sulfate. The functional group composition of the biogenic factor (consisting of 32% alkane, 25% carboxylic acid, 21% organic hydroxyl, 16% ketone, and 6% amine groups was similar to that of secondary organic aerosol (SOA reported from the oxidation of BVOCs in laboratory chamber studies, providing evidence that the magnitude and chemical composition of biogenic SOA simulated in the laboratory is similar to that found in actual atmospheric conditions. The biogenic factor OM is also correlated to dust elements, indicating that dust may act as a non-acidic SOA sink. This role is supported by the organic functional

  18. Biogenic oxidized organic functional groups in aerosol particles from a mountain forest site and their similarities to laboratory chamber products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Schwartz

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Submicron particles collected at Whistler, British Columbia, at 1020 masl during May and June 2008 on Teflon filters were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR and X-ray fluorescence (XRF techniques for organic functional groups (OFG and elemental composition. Organic mass (OM ranged from less than 0.5 to 3.1μg m−3, with a project mean and standard deviation of 1.3±1.0 μg m−3 and 0.21±0.16 μg m−3 for OM and sulfate, respectively. On average, organic hydroxyl, alkane, and carboxylic acid groups represented 34%, 33%, and 23% of OM, respectively. Ketone, amine and organosulfate groups constituted 6%, 5%, and <1% of the average organic aerosol composition, respectively. Measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC, including isoprene and monoterpenes from biogenic VOC (BVOC emissions and their oxidation products (methyl-vinylketone/methacrolein, MVK/MACR, were made using co-located proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS. We present chemically-specific evidence of OFG associated with BVOC emissions. Positive matrix factorization (PMF analysis attributed 65% of the campaign OM to biogenic sources, based on the correlations of one factor to monoterpenes and MVK/MACR. The remaining fraction was attributed to anthropogenic sources based on a correlation to sulfate. The functional group composition of the biogenic factor (consisting of 32% alkane, 25% carboxylic acid, 2% organic hydroxyl, 16% ketone, and 6% amine groups was similar to that of secondary organic aerosol (SOA reported from the oxidation of BVOCs in laboratory chamber studies, providing evidence that the magnitude and chemical composition of biogenic SOA simulated in the laboratory is similar to that found in actual atmospheric conditions. The biogenic factor OM is also correlated to dust elements, indicating that dust may act as a non-acidic SOA sink. This role is supported by the organic functional group composition and

  19. Hydrogen production from methane using oxygen-permeable ceramic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Sedigheh

    Non-porous ceramic membranes with mixed ionic and electronic conductivity have received significant interest in membrane reactor systems for the conversion of methane and higher hydrocarbons to higher value products like hydrogen. However, hydrogen generation by this method has not yet been commercialized and suffers from low membrane stability, low membrane oxygen flux, high membrane fabrication costs, and high reaction temperature requirements. In this dissertation, hydrogen production from methane on two different types of ceramic membranes (dense SFC and BSCF) has been investigated. The focus of this research was on the effects of different parameters to improve hydrogen production in a membrane reactor. These parameters included operating temperature, type of catalyst, membrane material, membrane thickness, membrane preparation pH, and feed ratio. The role of the membrane in the conversion of methane and the interaction with a Pt/CeZrO2 catalyst has been studied. Pulse studies of reactants and products over physical mixtures of crushed membrane material and catalyst have clearly demonstrated that a synergy exists between the membrane and the catalyst under reaction conditions. The degree of catalyst/membrane interaction strongly impacts the conversion of methane and the catalyst performance. During thermogravimetric analysis, the onset temperature of oxygen release for BSCF was observed to be lower than that for SFC while the amount of oxygen release was significantly greater. Pulse injections of CO2 over crushed membranes at 800°C have shown more CO2 dissociation on the BSCF membrane than the SFC membrane, resulting in higher CO formation on the BSCF membrane. Similar to the CO2 pulses, when CO was injected on the samples at 800°C, CO2 production was higher on BSCF than SFC. It was found that hydrogen consumption on BSCF particles is 24 times higher than that on SFC particles. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption studies of

  20. Microbial methane production in oxygenated water column of an oligotrophic lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Frindte, Katharina; Dziallas, Claudia; Eckert, Werner; Tang, Kam W

    2011-12-01

    The prevailing paradigm in aquatic science is that microbial methanogenesis happens primarily in anoxic environments. Here, we used multiple complementary approaches to show that microbial methane production could and did occur in the well-oxygenated water column of an oligotrophic lake (Lake Stechlin, Germany). Oversaturation of methane was repeatedly recorded in the well-oxygenated upper 10 m of the water column, and the methane maxima coincided with oxygen oversaturation at 6 m. Laboratory incubations of unamended epilimnetic lake water and inoculations of photoautotrophs with a lake-enrichment culture both led to methane production even in the presence of oxygen, and the production was not affected by the addition of inorganic phosphate or methylated compounds. Methane production was also detected by in-lake incubations of lake water, and the highest production rate was 1.8-2.4 nM⋅h(-1) at 6 m, which could explain 33-44% of the observed ambient methane accumulation in the same month. Temporal and spatial uncoupling between methanogenesis and methanotrophy was supported by field and laboratory measurements, which also helped explain the oversaturation of methane in the upper water column. Potentially methanogenic Archaea were detected in situ in the oxygenated, methane-rich epilimnion, and their attachment to photoautotrophs might allow for anaerobic growth and direct transfer of substrates for methane production. Specific PCR on mRNA of the methyl coenzyme M reductase A gene revealed active methanogenesis. Microbial methane production in oxygenated water represents a hitherto overlooked source of methane and can be important for carbon cycling in the aquatic environments and water to air methane flux.

  1. Stimulation of commercial coal seam methane production aimed at improving mining technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubina, E. A.; Lukyanov, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    The relevance of the current research is due to the urgent need to revise the existing normative bases and procedures involved in intensive development of coal-methane deposits and commercial production of coal seam methane. The article presents the analysis of data on coal production volume and amount of methane emitted into the atmosphere in Kuzbass. There is a need to develop the exploration techniques that would allow implementing pre-mining gas drainage of coal seams and provide the companies with the guidance on coal seam methane drainage in very gassy coal mines. Commercial production of methane should become an integral part of economy and energy balance of the Russian Federation, which, in its turn, would enhance environmental protection due to reducing methane emissions, the largest source of greenhouse effect.

  2. A process-based mathematical model on methane production with emission indices for control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, A; Bhattacharaya, D K

    2006-08-01

    In this paper, a process-based mathematical model is developed for the production of methane through biodegradation. It is a three-dimensional model given by ordinary differential equations. The results of the analysis of the model are interpreted through three emission indices, which are introduced for the first time. The estimation of either one or all of them can interpret the feasibility of the equilibrium and the long-term emission tendency of methane. The vulnerability of the methane production process with respect to soil temperature effects in methanogenic phase has been discussed and a feasible condition within a specified temperature range has defined for the nonvulnerability of the methane production process and also it has shown that under the same condition, zero-emission process of methane will be nonvulnerable with respect to the soil temperature effects in methanogenic phase. Lastly, condition for zero emission of methane is also obtained and it is interpreted through the emission indices.

  3. Measurement methods to assess methane production of individual dairy cows in a barn

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mitigation of methane production from dairy cows is critical to reduce the dairy industry’s contribution to the production of greenhouse gases. None of current used methane measurement methods are flawless and application of the methods is limited to assess the effect

  4. Effects of mixing on methane production during thermophilic anaerobic digestion of manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaparaju, Prasad Laxmi-Narasimha; Buendia, Inmaculada M.; Ellegaard, Lars;

    2008-01-01

    /feeding) on methane production was investigated in three lab-scale continuously stirred tank reactors. On comparison to continuous mixing, intermittent and minimal mixing strategies improved methane productions by 1.3% and 12.5%, respectively. Pilot-scale studies also supported the lab-scale results with an average 7...

  5. Comparison between ensilage and fungal pretreatment for storage of giant reed and subsequent methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan; Xu, Fuqing; Ge, Xumeng; Li, Yebo

    2016-06-01

    Ensilage and fungal pretreatment of giant reed harvested from August through December were compared based on their effects on feedstock preservation, glucose yield, and subsequent methane production via anaerobic digestion (AD). Compared to fungal pretreatment, ensilage obtained lower total solids (methane production via AD.

  6. Potential for CO2 sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane production in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamelinck, C.N.; Schreurs, H.; Faaij, A.P.C.; Ruijg, G.J.; Jansen, Daan; Pagnier, H.; Bergen, F. van; Wolf, K.-H.; Barzandji, O.; Bruining, H.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the technical and economic feasibility of using CO2 for the enhanced production of coal bed methane (ECBM) in the Netherlands. This concept could lead to both CO2 storage by adsorbing CO2 in deep coal layers that are not suitable for mining, as well as production of methane.

  7. Methane production during storage of anaerobically digested municipal organic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Trine Lund; Sommer, Svend G; Gabriel, Søren; Christensen, Thomas H

    2006-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of source-separated municipal organic waste is considered feasible in Denmark. The limited hydraulic retention in the biogas reactor (typically 15 d) does not allow full degradation of the organic waste. Storage of anaerobically digested municipal organic waste can therefore be a source of methane (CH4) emission that may contribute significantly to the potential global warming impact from the waste treatment system. This study provides a model for quantifying the CH4 production from stored co-digested municipal organic waste and estimates the production under typical Danish climatic conditions, thus quantifying the potential global warming impact from storage of the digested municipal organic waste before its use on agricultural land. Laboratory batch tests on CH4 production as well as temperature measurements in eight full-scale storage tanks provided data for developing a model estimating the CH4 production in storage tanks containing digested municipal organic waste. The temperatures measured in separate storage tanks on farms receiving digested slurry were linearly correlated with air temperature. In storage tanks receiving slurry directly from biogas reactors, significantly higher temperatures were measured due to the high temperatures of the effluent from the reactor. Storage tanks on Danish farms are typically emptied in April and have a constant inflow of digested material. During the warmest months the content of digested material is therefore low, which limits the yearly CH4 production from storage.

  8. Temperature regulates methane production through the function centralization of microbial community in anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiang; De Vrieze, Jo; He, Guihua; Li, Xiangzhen; Li, Jiabao

    2016-09-01

    Temperature is crucial for the performance of anaerobic digestion process. In this study of anaerobic digestion of swine manure, the relationship between the microbial gene expression and methane production at different temperatures (25-55°C) was revealed through metatranscriptomic analysis. Daily methane production and total biogas production increased with temperature up to 50°C, but decreased at 55°C. The functional gene expression showed great variation at different temperatures. The function centralization (opposite to alpha-diversity), assessed by the least proportions of functional pathways contributing for at least 50% of total reads positively correlated to methane production. Temperature regulated methane production probably through reducing the diversity of functional pathways, but enhancing central functional pathways, so that most of cellular activities and resource were invested in methanogenesis and related pathways, enhancing the efficiency of conversion of substrates to methane. This research demonstrated the importance of function centralization for efficient system functioning.

  9. The prediction of the methane production in landfill affected by the temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Lianying

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The functional relationship between the generation rate coefficient and temperature was developed for quantitative prediction of the temperature effect in this paper. The methane production of the landfill was predicted under the condition of the seasonal variation. The results showed that considering the temperature effect, the methane production is higher than the methane production without temperature effect of the 0.14×106 m3~0.28×106m3.With the depth increasing, the effect of the atmospheric temperature fluctuation on the temperature change of the landfill was weakened. The temperature has a significant effect on the methane production in the landfill. The temperature effect should be considered when simulate the long time effect of the landfill methane production.

  10. Temperature regulates methane production through the function centralization of microbial community in anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiang; De Vrieze, Jo; He, Guihua; Li, Xiangzhen; Li, Jiabao

    2016-09-01

    Temperature is crucial for the performance of anaerobic digestion process. In this study of anaerobic digestion of swine manure, the relationship between the microbial gene expression and methane production at different temperatures (25-55°C) was revealed through metatranscriptomic analysis. Daily methane production and total biogas production increased with temperature up to 50°C, but decreased at 55°C. The functional gene expression showed great variation at different temperatures. The function centralization (opposite to alpha-diversity), assessed by the least proportions of functional pathways contributing for at least 50% of total reads positively correlated to methane production. Temperature regulated methane production probably through reducing the diversity of functional pathways, but enhancing central functional pathways, so that most of cellular activities and resource were invested in methanogenesis and related pathways, enhancing the efficiency of conversion of substrates to methane. This research demonstrated the importance of function centralization for efficient system functioning. PMID:27236402

  11. Haloalkaline Bioconversions for Methane Production from Microalgae Grown on Sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daelman, Matthijs R J; Sorokin, Dimitry; Kruse, Olaf; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Strous, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Microalgal biomass can be converted to biofuels to replace nonsustainable fossil fuels, but the widespread use of microalgal biofuels remains hampered by the high energetic and monetary costs related to carbon dioxide supply and downstream processing. Growing microalgae in mixed culture biofilms reduces energy demands for mixing, maintaining axenic conditions, and biomass concentration. Furthermore, maintaining a high pH improves carbon dioxide absorption rates and inorganic carbon solubility, thus overcoming the carbon limitation and increasing the volumetric productivity of the microalgal biomass. Digesting the microalgal biomass anaerobically at high pH results in biogas that is enriched in methane, while the dissolved carbon dioxide is recycled to the phototrophic reactor. All of the required haloalkaline conversions are known in nature. PMID:26968613

  12. Methods for Detecting Microbial Methane Production and Consumption by Gas Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Jared T.; Catlett, Jennie L.; Smith, Megan L.; Buan, Nicole R.

    2016-01-01

    Methane is an energy-dense fuel but is also a greenhouse gas 25 times more detrimental to the environment than CO2. Methane can be produced abiotically by serpentinization, chemically by Sabatier or Fisher-Tropsh chemistry, or biotically by microbes (Berndt et al., 1996; Horita and Berndt, 1999; Dry, 2002; Wolfe, 1982; Thauer, 1998; Metcalf et al., 2002). Methanogens are anaerobic archaea that grow by producing methane gas as a metabolic byproduct (Wolfe, 1982; Thauer, 1998). Our lab has developed and optimized three different gas chromatograph-utilizing assays to characterize methanogen metabolism (Catlett et al., 2015). Here we describe the end point and kinetic assays that can be used to measure methane production by methanogens or methane consumption by methanotrophic microbes. The protocols can be used for measuring methane production or consumption by microbial pure cultures or by enrichment cultures.

  13. Evidence for methane production by the marine algae Emiliania huxleyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, Katharina; Klintzsch, Thomas; Langer, Gerald; Nehrke, Gernot; Bunge, Michael; Schnell, Sylvia; Keppler, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Methane (CH4), an important greenhouse gas that affects radiation balance and consequently the earth's climate, still has uncertainties in its sinks and sources. The world's oceans are considered to be a source of CH4 to the atmosphere, although the biogeochemical processes involved in its formation are not fully understood. Several recent studies provided strong evidence of CH4 production in oxic marine and freshwaters, but its source is still a topic of debate. Studies of CH4 dynamics in surface waters of oceans and large lakes have concluded that pelagic CH4 supersaturation cannot be sustained either by lateral inputs from littoral or benthic inputs alone. However, regional and temporal oversaturation of surface waters occurs frequently. This comprises the observation of a CH4 oversaturating state within the surface mixed layer, sometimes also termed the "oceanic methane paradox". In this study we considered marine algae as a possible direct source of CH4. Therefore, the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi was grown under controlled laboratory conditions and supplemented with two 13C-labeled carbon substrates, namely bicarbonate and a position-specific 13C-labeled methionine (R-S-13CH3). The CH4 production was 0.7 µg particular organic carbon (POC) g-1 d-1, or 30 ng g-1 POC h-1. After supplementation of the cultures with the 13C-labeled substrate, the isotope label was observed in headspace CH4. Moreover, the absence of methanogenic archaea within the algal culture and the oxic conditions during CH4 formation suggest that the widespread marine algae Emiliania huxleyi might contribute to the observed spatially and temporally restricted CH4 oversaturation in ocean surface waters.

  14. Steam Methane Reforming System for Hydrogen Production: Advanced Exergetic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Morosuk

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Steam methane reforming (SMR is one of the most promising processes for the production of hydrogen. Therefore, the overall thermodynamic efficiency of this process is of particular importance. The thermodynamic inefficiencies in a thermal system are related to exergy destruction and exergy loss. However, a conventional exergetic analysis cannot evaluate the mutual interdependencies among the system components nor the real potential for improving the energy conversion system being considered. One of the tools under development for the improvement of energy conversion systems from the thermodynamic viewpoint is the advanced exergetic analysis. In this paper, the avoidable part of the exergy destruction is estimated and the interactions among components of the overall system are evaluated in terms of endogenous and exogenous exergy destruction. The assumptions required for these calculations are discussed in detail, especially for those components that are typically used in chemical processes. Results of this paper suggest options for increasing the thermodynamic efficiency of hydrogen production by steam-methane reforming.

  15. Methane production from oleate : assessing the bioaugmentation potential of Syntrophomonas zehnderi

    OpenAIRE

    Cavaleiro, A. J.; Sousa, D.Z.; Alves, M. M.

    2010-01-01

    The potential for improving long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) conversion to methane was evaluated by bioaugmenting a non-acclimated anaerobic granular sludge with Syntrophomonas zehnderi. Batch bioaugmentation assays were performed with and without the solid microcarrier sepiolite, using 1 mM oleate as sole carbon and energy source. When S. zehnderi was added to the anaerobic sludge methane production from oleate was faster. High methane yields, i.e. 89 ± 5% and 72 ± 1%, were obser...

  16. Rerouting Cellular Electron Flux To Increase the Rate of Biological Methane Production

    OpenAIRE

    Catlett, Jennie L.; Ortiz, Alicia M.; Buan, Nicole R.

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens are anaerobic archaea that grow by producing methane, a gas that is both an efficient renewable fuel and a potent greenhouse gas. We observed that overexpression of the cytoplasmic heterodisulfide reductase enzyme HdrABC increased the rate of methane production from methanol by 30% without affecting the growth rate relative to the parent strain. Hdr enzymes are essential in all known methane-producing archaea. They function as the terminal oxidases in the methanogen electron trans...

  17. Anaerobic digestion of maize hybrids for methane production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vindis

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This research project was aimed at optimising anaerobic digestion of maize and find out which maturity class of corn and which hybrid of a particular maturity class produces the highest rate of biogas and biomethane. Also the chemical composition of gases was studied.Design/methodology/approach: Biogas and biomethane production and composition in mesophilic (35 degrees C conditions were measured and compared. The corn hybrids of FAO 300 - FAO 600 maturity class were tested. Experiments took place in the lab, for 35 days within four series of experiments with four repetitions according to the method DIN 38 414.Findings: Results show that the highest maturity classes of corn (FAO 500 increases the amount of biogas and biomethane. The greatest gain of biogas, biomethane according to maturity class is found with hybrids of FAO 400 and FAO 500 maturity class. Among the corn hybrids of maturity class FAO 300 - FAO 400, the hybrid PR38F70 gives the greatest production of biogas and biomethane. Among the hybrids of maturity class FAO 400 - FAO 500, the greatest amount of biogas and biomethane was produced by the hybrid PIXXIA (FAO 420. Among the hybrids of maturity class FAO 500 - FAO 600 the hybrid CODISTAR (FAO 500 the highest production of biomethane. Production of biomethane, which has the main role in the production of biogas varied with corn hybrids from 50-60 % of the whole amount of produced gas.Research limitations/implications: Economic efficiency of anaerobic digestion depends on the optimum methane production and optimum anaerobic digestion process.Practical implications: The results reached serve to plan the electricity production in the biogas production plant and to achieve the highest biomethane yield per hectare of maize hybrid.Originality/value: Late ripening varieties (FAO ca. 600 make better use of their potential to produce biomass than medium or early ripening varieties.

  18. Coal-bed methane in Alberta : ownership and incidental production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, A.

    2006-04-05

    Some of the challenges facing the emerging coal-bed methane (CBM) industry in Alberta include concerns regarding water protection, compression noise, well spacing and fracturing issues. One of the most fundamental questions regarding CBM is who in fact owns the resource and what rules oversee its production. The characteristics, development potential and origins of split title ownership of CBM in North America were examined in this paper. The history of freehold and Crown-owned land and the law regarding ownership and incidental production of petroleum, natural gas and bitumen in split-title situations were reviewed. The legal status of CBM in other jurisdictions was also examined. The issues of ownership and incidental production in Alberta were also discussed. The basic common law ownership principles regarding mineral ownership were applied to the characteristics of CBM in situ to conclude its possible owner in Alberta. The extension of established incidental mineral production principles to CBM were examined in the context of its characteristics. The official governmental position on CBM issues and the prospect of future legislative intervention were identified and the implications for industry and resource companies were also presented. The paper presented several recommendations including that Alberta should legislate to eliminate any right of recovery for historical or current venting of CBM during coal mining in order to remove a cloud of uncertainty over the industry. refs.

  19. Relationships linking primary production, sea ice melting, and biogenic aerosol in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becagli, S.; Lazzara, L.; Marchese, C.; Dayan, U.; Ascanius, S. E.; Cacciani, M.; Caiazzo, L.; Di Biagio, C.; Di Iorio, T.; di Sarra, A.; Eriksen, P.; Fani, F.; Giardi, F.; Meloni, D.; Muscari, G.; Pace, G.; Severi, M.; Traversi, R.; Udisti, R.

    2016-07-01

    This study examines the relationships linking methanesulfonic acid (MSA, arising from the atmospheric oxidation of the biogenic dimethylsulfide, DMS) in atmospheric aerosol, satellite-derived chlorophyll a (Chl-a), and oceanic primary production (PP), also as a function of sea ice melting (SIM) and extension of the ice free area in the marginal ice zone (IF-MIZ) in the Arctic. MSA was determined in PM10 samples collected over the period 2010-2012 at two Arctic sites, Ny Ålesund (78.9°N, 11.9°E), Svalbard islands, and Thule Air Base (76.5°N, 68.8°W), Greenland. PP is calculated by means of a bio-optical, physiologically based, semi-analytical model in the potential source areas located in the surrounding oceanic regions (Barents and Greenland Seas for Ny Ålesund, and Baffin Bay for Thule). Chl-a peaks in May in the Barents sea and in the Baffin Bay, and has maxima in June in the Greenland sea; PP follows the same seasonal pattern of Chl-a, although the differences in absolute values of PP in the three seas during the blooms are less marked than for Chl-a. MSA shows a better correlation with PP than with Chl-a, besides, the source intensity (expressed by PP) is able to explain more than 30% of the MSA variability at the two sites; the other factors explaining the MSA variability are taxonomic differences in the phytoplanktonic assemblages, and transport processes from the DMS source areas to the sampling sites. The taxonomic differences are also evident from the slopes of the correlation plots between MSA and PP: similar slopes (in the range 34.2-36.2 ng m-3of MSA/(gC m-2 d-1)) are found for the correlation between MSA at Ny Ålesund and PP in Barents Sea, and between MSA at Thule and PP in the Baffin Bay; conversely, the slope of the correlation between MSA at Ny Ålesund and PP in the Greenland Sea in summer is smaller (16.7 ng m-3of MSA/(gC m-2 d-1)). This is due to the fact that DMS emission from the Barents Sea and Baffin Bay is mainly related to the MIZ

  20. Optimization of a regional production of bioalcohol from biogenic residues; Optimierung der regionalen Bioalkoholherstellung aus biogenen Reststoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Michael; Fleischer, Sven; Senn, Thomas [Hohenheim Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Lebensmittelwissenschaft und Biotechnologie

    2011-07-01

    For some time, one increasingly discusses on the production of ethanol from cellulosic materials. The techniques developed so far are based on concepts resulting from the thirties of the twentieth century. Under this aspect, the author of the contribution under consideration reports on an optimization of the regional production of bioethanol from biogenic raw materials. It has succeeded to design an ethanol process in combination with the biogas production. In this ethanol process, raw materials containing starch and cellulose are processed simultaneously. Still 10-11 percent by volume of ethanol can be achieved in mashing. The released pentoses and non-digested cellulose can be converted in the biogas plant to biogas and used for energy.

  1. Methane production through anaerobic digestion of dedicated energy crops

    OpenAIRE

    Di Girolamo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Methane yield of ligno-cellulosic substrates (i.e. dedicated energy crops and agricultural residues) may be limited by their composition and structural features. Hence, biomass pre-treatments are envisaged to overcome this constraint. This thesis aimed at: i) assessing biomass and methane yield of dedicated energy crops; ii) evaluating the effects of hydrothermal pre-treatments on methane yield of Arundo; iii) investigating the effects of NaOH pre-treatments and iv) acid pre-treatments on che...

  2. Optimizing anaerobic digestion by selection of the immobilizing surface for enhanced methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu-Gyamfi, Nicholas; Ravella, Sreenivas Rao; Hobbs, Phil J

    2012-09-01

    Maximizing methane production while maintaining an appreciable level of process stability is a crucial challenge in the anaerobic digestion industry. In this study, the role of six parameters: the type of immobilizing supports, loading rate, inoculum levels, C:N ratio, trace nutrients concentrations and mixing rate, on methane production were investigated under thermophilic conditions (55 ± 1°C) with synthetic substrate medium. The immobilizing supports were Silica gel, Sand, Molecular Sieve and Dowex Marathon beads. A Taguchi Design of Experiment (DOE) methodology was employed to determine the effects of different parameters using an L(16) orthogonal array. Overall, immobilizing supports influenced methane production substantially (contributing 61.3% of the observed variation in methane yield) followed by loading rate and inoculum which had comparable influence (17.9% and 17.7% respectively). Optimization improved methane production by 153% (from 183 to 463 ml CH(4)l(-1)d(-1)).

  3. Improved methane production from brown algae under high salinity by fed-batch acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Toyokazu; Kita, Akihisa; Okamura, Yoshiko; Aki, Tsunehiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Here, a methanogenic microbial community was developed from marine sediments to have improved methane productivity from brown algae under high salinity. Fed-batch cultivation was conducted by adding dry seaweed at 1wt% total solid (TS) based on the liquid weight of the NaCl-containing sediment per round of cultivation. The methane production rate and level of salinity increased 8-fold and 1.6-fold, respectively, at the 10th round of cultivation. Moreover, the rate of methane production remained high, even at the 10th round of cultivation, with accumulation of salts derived from 10wt% TS of seaweed. The salinity of the 10th-round culture was equivalent to 5% NaCl. The improved methane production was attributed to enhanced acetoclastic methanogenesis because acetate became rapidly converted to methane during cultivation. The family Fusobacteriaceae and the genus Methanosaeta, the acetoclastic methanogen, predominated in bacteria and archaea, respectively, after the cultivation.

  4. Marine biomass system: anaerobic digestion and production of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haven, K.F.; Henriquez, M.; Ritschard, R.L.

    1979-04-01

    Two approaches to kelp conversion to methane are described. First, a large (10.56 mi/sup 2/) oceanic farm using an artificial substrate and an upwelling system to deliver nutrient-rich deep ocean water to the kelp bed is described. This system can yield as much as 50 tons of kelp (dry ash free - DAF) per acre-year. Kelp are harvested by a specially designed 30,000 DWT ship and delivered to an onshore processing plant as a ground kelp slurry. The second system involves the use of a natrual coastal kelp bed. Growth rates in this bed are stimulated by a nutrient rich sewer outfall. A conceptual model is presented for calculation of the growth rate of kelp in this natural bed which can reach 15 tons (DAF) per acre-year. The harvest activity and processing plant are similar to those for oceanic farm system. In the next section of this report, the overall concept of kelp production and conversion to methane is discussed. In Section III the general design of the ocean farm system is presented and discussed while Section IV contains a similar description for the natural bed system. Section V presents the capital requirements and operational labor, resources and material requirements. Section VI describes the environmental residuals created by the operation of either system and, to the extent possible, quantifies the rate at which these residuals are generated. In addition to the technical data reported herein, cost data have been generated for the various processes and components utilized in each solar technology. The requirements for costing information basically arise from the need to compute parameters such as investment demands, employment patterns, material demands and residual levels associated with each technology for each of several national and regional scenarios.

  5. A Critical Review of Methane Trapping Mechanism to Optimize CBM Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleem Qadir Tunio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Optimizing Coal Bed Methane (CBM production depends on the trapping mechanism of methane in the micro pores of coal bed. Methane is trapped in coal beds by adsorption on the free surface. The free surface is mainly available as the micro pores and partly as different cleats. The average percentage of micro pores (1.2x10-7 cm diameter in a coal increases with rank and ranges from 19.3% in lignites to 75% in anthracites. The effective molecular diameter of adsorbed methane is 4.1x10-8 cm suggesting a maximum of three molecules can be accommodated in a unit micro pore. The commitment of optimized production of methane depends on the amount adsorbed on the coal surface. Methane in the micro pore can be accommodated either by solution in pore water or adsorption or as free gas under pressure. If it is dissolved in water, then for CBM production it is not useful because the dissolved gas will be expelled during dewatering phase of the well completion. It is only the free gas and the adsorbed gas that need to be evaluated for optimized production. Langmuir assumed a mono-layer of adsorption in selective locales on the adsorbent whereas many of the present day models assumed multi-layers of adsorbates (BET: Stephen Brunauer, Paul Emmett and Edward Teller. Problem arises with the concept of layering during adsorption process whereby it is difficult to think of adsorption of methane over a methane layer. With higher pressure methane can be accommodated as free gas but will not be adsorbed on any methane surface. It is therefore necessary to understand how methane molecule is trapped in the micro pores of the coal bed in order to optimize the CBM production.

  6. Enhancing methane production in a farm-scale biogas production system

    OpenAIRE

    Kaparaju, Prasad

    2003-01-01

    This work highlights the application of biogas technology in a farm biogas system to generate renewable energy and to reduce environmental impacts and GHG emissions from high strength organic wastes ranging from agricultural, animal wastes and agro-industrial organic wastes. In addition, the thesis also emphasizes various measures to enhance methane production especially in a farm-scale biogas production system through co-digestion of manure and industrial organic waste/energy crops and recov...

  7. Bovine Host Genetic Variation Influences Rumen Microbial Methane Production with Best Selection Criterion for Low Methane Emitting and Efficiently Feed Converting Hosts Based on Metagenomic Gene Abundance

    OpenAIRE

    Rainer Roehe; Dewhurst, Richard J.; Carol-Anne Duthie; Rooke, John A.; Nest McKain; Dave W Ross; Hyslop, Jimmy J; Anthony Waterhouse; Freeman, Tom C.; Mick Watson; John Wallace, R.

    2016-01-01

    Methane produced by methanogenic archaea in ruminants contributes significantly to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The host genetic link controlling microbial methane production is unknown and appropriate genetic selection strategies are not developed. We used sire progeny group differences to estimate the host genetic influence on rumen microbial methane production in a factorial experiment consisting of crossbred breed types and diets. Rumen metagenomic profiling was undertaken to i...

  8. Hydrogen production by radio frequency plasma stimulation in methane hydrate at atmospheric pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Putra, Andi Erwin Eka

    2013-01-01

    Methane hydrate, formed by injecting methane into 100 g of shaved ice at a pressure of 7 MPa and reactor temperature of 0 ??C, was decomposed by applying 27.12 MHz radio frequency plasma in order to produce hydrogen. The process involved the stimulation of plasma in the methane hydrate with a variable input power at atmospheric pressure. It was observed that production of CH4 is optimal at a slow rate of CH4 release from the methane hydrate, as analyzed by in light of the steam...

  9. A Critical Review of Methane Trapping Mechanism to Optimize CBM Production

    OpenAIRE

    Saleem Qadir Tunio; Swapan Kumar Bhattacharya; Sonny Irawan

    2012-01-01

    Optimizing Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production depends on the trapping mechanism of methane in the micro pores of coal bed. Methane is trapped in coal beds by adsorption on the free surface. The free surface is mainly available as the micro pores and partly as different cleats. The average percentage of micro pores (1.2x10-7 cm diameter) in a coal increases with rank and ranges from 19.3% in lignites to 75% in anthracites. The effective molecular diameter of adsorbed methane is 4.1x10-8 cm sugg...

  10. Migration of methane into groundwater from leaking production wells near Lloydminster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of migration of methane from leaking oil and gas wells into aquifers in the Lloydminster area in Saskatchewan, was discussed. A study was conducted to determine if the methane in shallow aquifers near the leaking wells, came from the wells or occurred naturally. Migration rate in aquifers, concentration gradients and approximate flux rates of methane from leaking wells to shallow aquifers, were studied. The methods of investigation included drilling of test holes at selected sites, installation of monitoring wells, purging of wells, pumping tests and water level monitoring, sampling and analyses for dissolved methane. The relatively high methane concentrations in many of the monitoring wells indicated the presence of a methane plume that has migrated from the production well. It was suggested that other leaky well sites in the area should be investigated to determine if similar plumes were present. 18 refs., 5 tabs., 13 figs

  11. Prospects for biogenic natural gas. Pt. I. Production from wet and dry biomass; Perspektiven fuer Bio-Erdgas. T. I.. Bereitstellung aus nasser und trockener Biomasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leible, Ludwig; Kaelber, Stefan; Kappler, Gunnar [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Karlsruhe (DE). Inst. fuer Technikfolgenabschaetzung und Systemanalyse (ITAS); Eltrop, Ludger; Stenull, Maria [Stuttgart Univ. (DE). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER); Lansche, Jens [Hohenheim Univ., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Agrartechnik; Poboss, Norman [Stuttgart Univ. (DE). Inst. fuer Feuerungs- und Kraftwerkstechnik (IFK); Stuermer, Bernd; Kelm, Tobias [Zentrum fuer Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung Baden-Wuerttemberg (ZSW), Stuttgart (Germany); Koeppel, Wolfgang [Deutsche Vereinigung des Gas- und Wasserfaches e.V. (DVGW), Forschungsstelle am Engler-Bunte-Institut (EBI), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Biogenic natural gas offers as substitute for natural gas (SNG) various opportunities for different types of biomass for a more efficient handling and energy use in the power, heat and fuel sector. Part I of this publication deals with techno-economic aspects of SNG production based on biogas and thermo-chemically produced gas. Associated GHG emissions are discussed as well. Part II focuses on the utilization of biogenic natural gas for heat, power and fuel production. A comparison with fossil natural gas and the direct use of biogas or thermo-chemically produced gas is included. (orig.)

  12. Enhanced methane productivity from swine manure fibers by aqueous ammonia soaking pretreatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurado, Esperanza; Skiadas, Ioannis; Gavala, Hariklia N.

    2011-01-01

    The necessity of increasing the methane productivity of manure based biogas plants has triggered the development of new separation technologies for being applied before anaerobic digestion of the manure. Thus, manure solid and liquid fractions could be used to centralized biogas plants for methane...... and hemicelluloses almost intact. Subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis with 15 FPU per g of TS for four days released almost 94% of glucose and 91% of xylose found in manure fibers. AAS pretreatment exhibited a significant effect on methane production rate and potential. It was found that AAS for 3 days at room...... temperature were the optimal conditions among the ones tested, resulting at a 78% increase in methane yield from manure fibers. AAS at 55°C did not exhibit any extra benefit for methane production compared to room temperature....

  13. Key factors influencing the potential of catch crops for methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinuevo-Salces, Beatriz; Fernández-Varela, Raquel; Uellendahl, Hinrich

    2014-08-01

    Catch crops are grown in crop rotation primarily for soil stabilization. The excess biomass of catch crops was investigated for its potential as feedstock for biogas production. Ten variables affecting catch crop growth and methane potential were evaluated. Field trials and methane potential were studied for 14 different catch crops species, with 19 samples harvested in 2010 and 36 harvested in 2011. Principal component analysis was applied to the data to identify the variables characterizing the potential for the different catch crops species for methane production. Two principal components explained up to 84.6% and 71.6% of the total variation for 2010 and 2011 samples, respectively. Specific methane yield, climate conditions (rainfall and temperature) and total nitrogen in the biomass were the variables classifying the different catch crops. Catch crops in the Brassicaceae and Graminaceae botanical families showed the highest methane yield. This study demonstrates the importance of the crop species when choosing a suitable catch crop for biogas production.

  14. Free nitrous acid (FNA)-based pretreatment enhances methane production from waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qilin; Ye, Liu; Jiang, Guangming; Jensen, Paul D; Batstone, Damien J; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2013-10-15

    Anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) is currently enjoying renewed interest due to the potential for methane production. However, methane production is often limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and/or poor methane potential of WAS. This study presents a novel pretreatment strategy based on free nitrous acid (FNA or HNO2) to enhance methane production from WAS. Pretreatment of WAS for 24 h at FNA concentrations up to 2.13 mg N/L substantially enhanced WAS solubilization, with the highest solubilization (0.16 mg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/mg volatile solids (VS), at 2.13 mg HNO2-N/L) being six times that without FNA pretreatment (0.025 mg COD/mg VS, at 0 mg HNO2-N/L). Biochemical methane potential tests demonstrated methane production increased with increased FNA concentration used in the pretreatment step. Model-based analysis indicated FNA pretreatment improved both hydrolysis rate and methane potential, with the highest improvement being approximately 50% (from 0.16 to 0.25 d(-1)) and 27% (from 201 to 255 L CH4/kg VS added), respectively, achieved at 1.78-2.13 mg HNO2-N/L. Further analysis indicated that increased hydrolysis rate and methane potential were related to an increase in rapidly biodegradable substrates, which increased with increased FNA dose, while the slowly biodegradable substrates remained relatively static.

  15. Bioelectrochemical enhancement of methane production in low temperature anaerobic digestion at 10 °C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Dandan; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Si; Buisman, Cees; Heijne, ter Annemiek

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion at low temperature is an attractive technology especially in moderate climates, however, low temperature results in low microbial activity and low rates of methane formation. This study investigated if bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) can enhance methane production from organ

  16. Semi-industrial production of methane from textile wastewaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opwis, Klaus; Mayer-Gall, Thomas; Gutmann, Jochen S. [Deutsches Textilforschungszentrum Nord-West e.V., Krefeld (DE)] (and others)

    2012-12-15

    The enzymatic desizing of starch-sized cotton fabrics leads to wastewaters with an extremely high chemical oxygen demand due to its high sugar content. Nowadays, these liquors are still disposed without use, resulting in a questionable ecological pollution and high emission charges for cotton finishing manufacturers. In this paper, an innovative technology for the production of energy from textile wastewaters from cotton desizing was developed. Such desizing liquors were fermented by methane-producing microbes to biogas. For this purpose, a semi-industrial plant with a total volume of more than 500 L was developed and employed over a period of several weeks. The robust and trouble-free system produces high amounts of biogas accompanied by a significant reduction of the COD of more than 85%. With regard to growing standards and costs for wastewater treatment and disposal, the new process can be an attractive alternative for textile finishing enterprises in wastewater management, combining economic and ecological benefits. Moreover, the production of biogas from textile wastewaters can help to overcome the global energy gap within the next decades, especially with respect to the huge dimension of cotton pretreatment and, therefore, huge desizing activities worldwide.

  17. Effects of exogenous aerobic bacteria on methane production and biodegradation of municipal solid waste in bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Sai; Liu, Lei; Xue, Qiang; Yuan, Zhiming

    2016-09-01

    Landfill is the most common and efficient ways of municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal and the landfill biogas, mostly methane, is currently utilized to generate electricity and heat. The aim of this work is to study the effects and the role of exogenous aerobic bacteria mixture (EABM) on methane production and biodegradation of MSW in bioreactors. The results showed that the addition of EABM could effectively enhance hydrolysis and acidogenesis processes of MSW degradation, resulting in 63.95% reduction of volatile solid (VS), the highest methane production rate (89.83Lkg(-1) organic matter) ever recorded and a threefold increase in accumulative methane production (362.9L) than the control (127.1L). In addition, it is demonstrated that white-rot fungi (WRF) might further promote the methane production through highly decomposing lignin, but the lower pH value in leachate and longer acidogenesis duration may cause methane production reduced. The data demonstrated that methane production and biodegradation of MSW in bioreactors could be significantly enhanced by EABM via enhanced hydrolysis and acidogenesis processes, and the results are of great economic importance for the future design and management of landfill.

  18. Effects of exogenous aerobic bacteria on methane production and biodegradation of municipal solid waste in bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Sai; Liu, Lei; Xue, Qiang; Yuan, Zhiming

    2016-09-01

    Landfill is the most common and efficient ways of municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal and the landfill biogas, mostly methane, is currently utilized to generate electricity and heat. The aim of this work is to study the effects and the role of exogenous aerobic bacteria mixture (EABM) on methane production and biodegradation of MSW in bioreactors. The results showed that the addition of EABM could effectively enhance hydrolysis and acidogenesis processes of MSW degradation, resulting in 63.95% reduction of volatile solid (VS), the highest methane production rate (89.83Lkg(-1) organic matter) ever recorded and a threefold increase in accumulative methane production (362.9L) than the control (127.1L). In addition, it is demonstrated that white-rot fungi (WRF) might further promote the methane production through highly decomposing lignin, but the lower pH value in leachate and longer acidogenesis duration may cause methane production reduced. The data demonstrated that methane production and biodegradation of MSW in bioreactors could be significantly enhanced by EABM via enhanced hydrolysis and acidogenesis processes, and the results are of great economic importance for the future design and management of landfill. PMID:26601890

  19. Comparison of methods for estimating production of methane from whole plant maize silage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Podkówka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory methods to measure the amount of methane gas evolved in the fermentation process require specialized equipment and are long-lasting and expensive. Therefore a number of methods are developed to estimate the efficiency of biogas and methane from the chemical composition of the substrate. The aim of this study was to compare different methods to estimate the efficiency of methane from the silages made from whole plant corn. The study was based on test results of silage from whole plant corn included in various publications, which deal with the production of methane (determined by fermentation “Bacht System” and complete chemical composition. On the basis of chemical composition methane production was determined due to different methods. Methods allow, with high accuracy, to calculate the yield of methane from silage from whole maize plant used as a mono-substrate for biogas. Estimation of methane production from the gross energy gives inflated results. For practice the most useful is to estimate the yield of methane from the dry weight content, due to the ease of determination.

  20. Low temperature production and exhalation of methane from serpentinized rocks on Earth: a potential analog for methane production on Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Etiope, G.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia; Ehlmann, B.; Schoell, M.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate, based on terrestrial analogs, the potential flux, origin and isotopic signature of methane (CH4) from serpentinized or serpentinizing rocks on Mars. The Tekirova ophiolites, in Turkey, have been shown to release, either via focused vents or through diffuse microseepage, substantial amounts of CH4 which could be produced via catalyzed abiotic methanation (Sabatier reaction) at low temperatures (

  1. NREL Advancements in Methane Conversion Lead to Cleaner Air, Useful Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-06-01

    Researchers at NREL leveraged the recent on-site development of gas fermentation capabilities and novel genetic tools to directly convert methane to lactic acid using an engineered methanotrophic bacterium. The results provide proof-of-concept data for a gas-to-liquids bioprocess that concurrently produces fuels and chemicals from methane. NREL researchers developed genetic tools to express heterologous genes in methanotrophic organisms, which have historically been difficult to genetically engineer. Using these tools, researchers demonstrated microbial conversion of methane to lactate, a high-volume biochemical precursor predominantly utilized for the production of bioplastics. Methane biocatalysis offers a means to concurrently liquefy and upgrade natural gas and renewable biogas, enabling their utilization in conventional transportation and industrial manufacturing infrastructure. Producing chemicals and fuels from methane expands the suite of products currently generated from biorefineries, municipalities, and agricultural operations, with the potential to increase revenue and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  2. Formation of methane hazard in longwall coal mines with increasingly higher production capacity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Krause Eugeniusz; Skiba Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly higher hard coal production capacity in Upper Silesian Coal Basin (Poland) in the last two decades led to significant increase of methane hazard occurrence in the workings of exploitation areas. An increase of methane content in the exploited seams and in the surrounding strata, associated with increasing depth of mining, results in higher methane emission into the longwall areas from exploited seams and degassing seams in the mining-induced de-stressed zone. Operational experience gained by the collieries confirms that reducing methane release during longwall operations often requires decreas-ing operating speed of a shearer in a shift. The paper presents an analysis of the parameters and factors, which have critical influence on the formation of methane hazard in longwall areas with high production capacity.

  3. Enhanced methane productivity from lignocellulosic biomasses using aqueous ammonia soaking pretreatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurado, Esperanza; Skiadas, Ioannis; Gavala, Hariklia N.

    2012-01-01

    The continuously increasing demand for renewable energy sources, such as methane, renders anaerobic digestion to one of the most promising technologies for renewable energy production. In fact, anaerobic digestion for methane production has become a major part of the rapidly growing renewable...... energy sector. Biogas is part of a rapidly growing renewable energy sector, which expands at a rate of 20-30 % globally [1]. However, the increasing demand for methane production cannot be satisfied by the use of anaerobic digestion only from waste/wastewater treatment. Energy crops as well...... as agricultural residues, such as wheat straw, can be considered as one of the best options for increasing the methane production through biomass digestion. The production of perennial crops like miscanthus, sweetgrass, and willow consumes far less resources (energy for cultivation, herbicides and fertilizers...

  4. Effects of Rumen Protozoa of Brahman Heifers and Nitrate on Fermentation and In vitro Methane Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, S. H.; Li, L.; Hegarty, R. S.

    2016-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted assessing the effects of presence or absence of rumen protozoa and dietary nitrate addition on rumen fermentation characteristics and in vitro methane production in Brahman heifers. The first experiment assessed changes in rumen fermentation pattern and in vitro methane production post-refaunation and the second experiment investigated whether addition of nitrate to the incubation would give rise to methane mitigation additional to that contributed by defaunation. Ten Brahman heifers were progressively adapted to a diet containing 4.5% coconut oil distillate for 18 d and then all heifers were defaunated using sodium 1-(2-sulfonatooxyethoxy) dodecane (Empicol). After 15 d, the heifers were given a second dose of Empicol. Fifteen days after the second dosing, all heifers were allocated to defaunated or refaunated groups by stratified randomisation, and the experiment commenced (d 0). On d 0, an oral dose of rumen fluid collected from unrelated faunated cattle was used to inoculate 5 heifers and form a refaunated group so that the effects of re-establishment of protozoa on fermentation characteristics could be investigated. Samples of rumen fluid collected from each animal using oesophageal intubation before feeding on d 0, 7, 14, and 21 were incubated for in vitro methane production. On d 35, 2% nitrate (as NaNO3) was included in in vitro incubations to test for additivity of nitrate and absence of protozoa effects on fermentation and methane production. It was concluded that increasing protozoal numbers were associated with increased methane production in refaunated heifers 7, 14, and 21 d after refaunation. Methane production rate was significantly higher from refaunated heifers than from defaunated heifers 35 d after refaunation. Concentration and proportions of major volatile fatty acids, however, were not affected by protozoal treatments. There is scope for further reducing methane output through combining defaunation and dietary

  5. Effects of Rumen Protozoa of Brahman Heifers and Nitrate on Fermentation and In vitro Methane Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, S H; Li, L; Hegarty, R S

    2016-06-01

    Two experiments were conducted assessing the effects of presence or absence of rumen protozoa and dietary nitrate addition on rumen fermentation characteristics and in vitro methane production in Brahman heifers. The first experiment assessed changes in rumen fermentation pattern and in vitro methane production post-refaunation and the second experiment investigated whether addition of nitrate to the incubation would give rise to methane mitigation additional to that contributed by defaunation. Ten Brahman heifers were progressively adapted to a diet containing 4.5% coconut oil distillate for 18 d and then all heifers were defaunated using sodium 1-(2-sulfonatooxyethoxy) dodecane (Empicol). After 15 d, the heifers were given a second dose of Empicol. Fifteen days after the second dosing, all heifers were allocated to defaunated or refaunated groups by stratified randomisation, and the experiment commenced (d 0). On d 0, an oral dose of rumen fluid collected from unrelated faunated cattle was used to inoculate 5 heifers and form a refaunated group so that the effects of re-establishment of protozoa on fermentation characteristics could be investigated. Samples of rumen fluid collected from each animal using oesophageal intubation before feeding on d 0, 7, 14, and 21 were incubated for in vitro methane production. On d 35, 2% nitrate (as NaNO3) was included in in vitro incubations to test for additivity of nitrate and absence of protozoa effects on fermentation and methane production. It was concluded that increasing protozoal numbers were associated with increased methane production in refaunated heifers 7, 14, and 21 d after refaunation. Methane production rate was significantly higher from refaunated heifers than from defaunated heifers 35 d after refaunation. Concentration and proportions of major volatile fatty acids, however, were not affected by protozoal treatments. There is scope for further reducing methane output through combining defaunation and dietary

  6. Effects of Rumen Protozoa of Brahman Heifers and Nitrate on Fermentation and In vitro Methane Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, S H; Li, L; Hegarty, R S

    2016-06-01

    Two experiments were conducted assessing the effects of presence or absence of rumen protozoa and dietary nitrate addition on rumen fermentation characteristics and in vitro methane production in Brahman heifers. The first experiment assessed changes in rumen fermentation pattern and in vitro methane production post-refaunation and the second experiment investigated whether addition of nitrate to the incubation would give rise to methane mitigation additional to that contributed by defaunation. Ten Brahman heifers were progressively adapted to a diet containing 4.5% coconut oil distillate for 18 d and then all heifers were defaunated using sodium 1-(2-sulfonatooxyethoxy) dodecane (Empicol). After 15 d, the heifers were given a second dose of Empicol. Fifteen days after the second dosing, all heifers were allocated to defaunated or refaunated groups by stratified randomisation, and the experiment commenced (d 0). On d 0, an oral dose of rumen fluid collected from unrelated faunated cattle was used to inoculate 5 heifers and form a refaunated group so that the effects of re-establishment of protozoa on fermentation characteristics could be investigated. Samples of rumen fluid collected from each animal using oesophageal intubation before feeding on d 0, 7, 14, and 21 were incubated for in vitro methane production. On d 35, 2% nitrate (as NaNO3) was included in in vitro incubations to test for additivity of nitrate and absence of protozoa effects on fermentation and methane production. It was concluded that increasing protozoal numbers were associated with increased methane production in refaunated heifers 7, 14, and 21 d after refaunation. Methane production rate was significantly higher from refaunated heifers than from defaunated heifers 35 d after refaunation. Concentration and proportions of major volatile fatty acids, however, were not affected by protozoal treatments. There is scope for further reducing methane output through combining defaunation and dietary

  7. 水产品生物胺检测技术的研究进展%Development of research on biogenic amine determination method in aquatic products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳; 张建友; 刘书来; 丁玉庭

    2009-01-01

    生物胺是低分子量含氮有机化合物,广泛存在于蛋白质丰富的食品中.摄入过量的生物胺会对人体产生危害,且生物胺含量与水产品质量具有一定的正相关性.该文对近年来水产品生物胺的检测技术进行了综述,重点介绍了高效液相色谱、毛细管电泳、薄层色谱和电化学生物传感器等在水产品生物胺检测中的应用.%Biogenic amines are organic bases with low molecular weight, occurred in the foods that have abundant proteins.Taking excessive biogenic amines could cause toxicity to human.And the amount of biogenic amines shows positive correlation to the quality of aquatic food.The determination methods of biogenic amines and their applications in foods in recent years were reviewed in this paper.And the application of HPLC, EC, TLC and electrochemical biosensor in detection of biogenic amine in aquatic products was the key point.

  8. Biogeochemistry of Microbial Coal-Bed Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strąpoć, Dariusz; Mastalerz, Maria; Dawson, Katherine; Macalady, Jennifer; Callaghan, Amy V.; Wawrik, Boris; Turich, Courtney; Ashby, Matthew

    2011-05-01

    Microbial methane accumulations have been discovered in multiple coal-bearing basins over the past two decades. Such discoveries were originally based on unique biogenic signatures in the stable isotopic composition of methane and carbon dioxide. Basins with microbial methane contain either low-maturity coals with predominantly microbial methane gas or uplifted coals containing older, thermogenic gas mixed with more recently produced microbial methane. Recent advances in genomics have allowed further evaluation of the source of microbial methane, through the use of high-throughput phylogenetic sequencing and fluorescent in situ hybridization, to describe the diversity and abundance of bacteria and methanogenic archaea in these subsurface formations. However, the anaerobic metabolism of the bacteria breaking coal down to methanogenic substrates, the likely rate-limiting step in biogenic gas production, is not fully understood. Coal molecules are more recalcitrant to biodegradation with increasing thermal maturity, and progress has been made in identifying some of the enzymes involved in the anaerobic degradation of these recalcitrant organic molecules using metagenomic studies and culture enrichments. In recent years, researchers have attempted lab and subsurface stimulation of the naturally slow process of methanogenic degradation of coal.

  9. Evaluation of Phytoremediation of Coal Bed Methane Product Water and Waters of Quality Similar to that Associated with Coal Bed Methane Reserves of the Powder River Basin, Montana and Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Bauder

    2008-09-30

    U.S. emphasis on domestic energy independence, along with advances in knowledge of vast biogenically sourced coalbed methane reserves at relatively shallow sub-surface depths with the Powder River Basin, has resulted in rapid expansion of the coalbed methane industry in Wyoming and Montana. Techniques have recently been developed which constitute relatively efficient drilling and methane gas recovery and extraction techniques. However, this relatively efficient recovery requires aggressive reduction of hydrostatic pressure within water-saturated coal formations where the methane is trapped. Water removed from the coal formation during pumping is typically moderately saline and sodium-bicarbonate rich, and managed as an industrial waste product. Current approaches to coalbed methane product water management include: surface spreading on rangeland landscapes, managed irrigation of agricultural crop lands, direct discharge to ephermeral channels, permitted discharge of treated and untreated water to perennial streams, evaporation, subsurface injection at either shallow or deep depths. A Department of Energy-National Energy Technology Laboratory funded research award involved the investigation and assessment of: (1) phytoremediation as a water management technique for waste water produced in association with coalbed methane gas extraction; (2) feasibility of commercial-scale, low-impact industrial water treatment technologies for the reduction of salinity and sodicity in coalbed methane gas extraction by-product water; and (3) interactions of coalbed methane extraction by-product water with landscapes, vegetation, and water resources of the Powder River Basin. Prospective, greenhouse studies of salt tolerance and water use potential of indigenous, riparian vegetation species in saline-sodic environments confirmed the hypothesis that species such as Prairie cordgrass, Baltic rush, American bulrush, and Nuttall's alkaligrass will thrive in saline-sodic environments

  10. Potential and existing mechanisms of enteric methane production in ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyi Qiao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Enteric methane (CH4 emissions in ruminants have attracted considerable attention due to their impact on greenhouse gases and the contribution of agricultural practices to global warming. Over the last two decades, a number of approaches have been adopted to mitigate CH4 emissions. However, the mechanisms of methanogenesis have still not been fully defined. According to the genome sequences of M. ruminantium in the rumen and of M. AbM4 in the abomasum, the pathways of carbon dioxide (CO2 reduction and formate oxidation to CH4 have now been authenticated in ruminants. Furthermore, in the light of species or genera description of methanogens, the precursors of methanogenesis discovered in the rumen and research advances in related subjects, pathways of acetate dissimilation via Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta as well as metabolism of methanol to CH4 might be present in the rumen, although neither process has yet been experimentally demonstrated in the rumen. Herein the research advances in methanogenesic mechanisms including existing and potential mechanisms are reviewed in detail. In addition, further research efforts to understand the methanogenesis mechanism should focus on isolation and identification of more specific methanogens, and their genome sequences. Such increased knowledge will provide benefits in terms of improved dietary energy utilization and a reduced contribution of enteric CH4 emissions to total global greenhouse gas emissions from the ruminant production system.

  11. Methane production from coal by a single methanogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayumi, Daisuke; Mochimaru, Hanako; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Yoshioka, Hideyoshi; Suzuki, Yuichiro; Kamagata, Yoichi; Sakata, Susumu

    2016-10-01

    Coal-bed methane is one of the largest unconventional natural gas resources. Although microbial activity may greatly contribute to coal-bed methane formation, it is unclear whether the complex aromatic organic compounds present in coal can be used for methanogenesis. We show that deep subsurface–derived Methermicoccus methanogens can produce methane from more than 30 types of methoxylated aromatic compounds (MACs) as well as from coals containing MACs. In contrast to known methanogenesis pathways involving one- and two-carbon compounds, this “methoxydotrophic” mode of methanogenesis couples O-demethylation, CO2 reduction, and possibly acetyl–coenzyme A metabolism. Because MACs derived from lignin may occur widely in subsurface sediments, methoxydotrophic methanogenesis would play an important role in the formation of natural gas not limited to coal-bed methane and in the global carbon cycle.

  12. EMG System for Production of Methane From Carbon Dioxide Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sustainable Innovations, LLC, is developing an Electrochemical Methane Generator (EMG), which comprises a novel method of converting CO2 and H2O to hydrocarbon...

  13. The effects of acid deposition on sulfate reduction and methane production in peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Georgia L.; Hines, Mark E.; Bayley, Suzanne E.

    1992-01-01

    Peatlands, as fens and bods, make up a large percentage of northern latitude terrestrial environments. They are organic rich and support an active community of anaerobic bacteria, such as methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria. The end products of these microbial activities, methane and hydrogen sulfide, are important components in the global biogeochemical cycles of carbon and sulfur. Since these two bacterial groups compete for nutritional substrates, increases in sulfate deposition due to acid rain potentially can disrupt the balance between these processes leading to a decrease in methane production and emission. This is significant because methane is a potent greenhouse gas that effects the global heat balance. A section of Mire 239 in the Experimental Lakes Area, in Northwestern Ontario, was artificially acidified and rates of sulfate reduction and methane production were measured with depth. Preliminary results suggested that methane production was not affected immediately after acidification. However, concentrations of dissolved methane decreased and dissolved sulfide increased greatly after acidification and both took several days to recover. The exact mechanism for the decrease in methane was not determined. Analyses are under way which will be used to determine rates of sulfate reduction. These results will be available by Spring and will be discussed.

  14. Characteristics of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste and methane production: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano, Rosalinda; González-Martínez, Simón

    2016-08-01

    Anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is a viable alternative for waste stabilization and energy recovery. Biogas production mainly depends on the type and amount of organic macromolecules. Based on results from different authors analysing OFMSW from different cities, this paper presents the importance of knowing the OFMSW composition to understand how anaerobic digestion can be used to produce methane. This analysis describes and discusses physical, chemical and bromatological characteristics of OFMSW reported by several authors from different countries and cities and their relationship to methane production. The main conclusion is that the differences are country and not city dependant. Cultural habits and OFMSW management systems do not allow a generalisation but the individual analysis for specific cities allow understanding the general characteristics for a better methane production. Not only are the OFMSW characteristics important but also the conditions under which the methane production tests were performed.

  15. Characteristics of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste and methane production: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano, Rosalinda; González-Martínez, Simón

    2016-08-01

    Anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is a viable alternative for waste stabilization and energy recovery. Biogas production mainly depends on the type and amount of organic macromolecules. Based on results from different authors analysing OFMSW from different cities, this paper presents the importance of knowing the OFMSW composition to understand how anaerobic digestion can be used to produce methane. This analysis describes and discusses physical, chemical and bromatological characteristics of OFMSW reported by several authors from different countries and cities and their relationship to methane production. The main conclusion is that the differences are country and not city dependant. Cultural habits and OFMSW management systems do not allow a generalisation but the individual analysis for specific cities allow understanding the general characteristics for a better methane production. Not only are the OFMSW characteristics important but also the conditions under which the methane production tests were performed. PMID:27236403

  16. ADM1-based modeling of methane production from acidified sweet sorghum extractin a two stage process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonopoulou, Georgia; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Skiadas, Ioannis;

    2012-01-01

    The present study focused on the application of the Anaerobic Digestion Model 1 οn the methane production from acidified sorghum extract generated from a hydrogen producing bioreactor in a two-stage anaerobic process. The kinetic parameters for hydrogen and volatile fatty acids consumption were...... was 12% for the methane production rate at the HRT of 20d while the deviation values for the 15 and 10 d HRT were 1.9% and 1.1%, respectively. The model predictions regarding pH, methane percentage in the gas phase and COD removal were in very good agreement with the experimental data with a deviation...

  17. Economic tools for realization of methane production project on Kuzbass coal deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharf, I.; Sokolova, M.; Kochetkova, O.; Dmitrieva, N.

    2016-09-01

    Environmental issues and, above all, issues related to the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, such as coal bed methane, actualize the challenge of searching a variety of options for its disposal. The difference in the macroeconomic, industrial, geological and infrastructural features determine the need to choose the most cost-effective option for using of methane emitted from the coal deposits. Various economic ways to improve the profitability of production are viewed on the basis of the analysis of methane production project from Kuzbass coal deposits, Kemerovo region, Russia.

  18. Study on Production of Hydrogen from Methane for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋正昶; 李传统

    2001-01-01

    The hydrogen production from methane for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was studied experimentally. The conversion rate of methane under different steam-carbon ratios, the effect of the different excess air ratios on the constituents of the gas produced, the permeability of hydrogen under different pressure differences, and the effect of different system pressure on the reaction enthalpy of hydrogen were obtained. The results lay the basis for the production of hydrogen applicable to PEMFC, moreover, provide a new way for the comprehensive utilization of the coal bed methane.

  19. Effect of inclusion of Myristica fragrans on methane production, rumen fermentation parameters and methanogens population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Sirohi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was done to evaluate the effect of Myristica fragrans fruit active compounds addition on methane production in vitro. Materials and Methods: Methanolic extract of Myristica fragrans fruit powder was prepared and checked for its inhibitory action on methane production in diet containing roughage 50 percent and concentrate 50 percent respectively. Methane production was estimated by Gas Chromatography. Results: It has been shown that supplementation of Myristica fragrans reduces the methane production up to 48 percent as compared to control diet without supplementation of Myristica fragrans. Similarly real time quantification of mcr-A gene also shown the significant (P<0.05 reduction in the number of methanogens. Myristica fragrans appeared to reduce methane production by inhibiting methanogens directly. However, digestibility of dry matter also decreased due to myristica fragrans supplementation in total mixed diet, which may affect the production of volatile acid production. Conclusion: The active compounds extracted in methanol of Myristica fragrans emerged out to be a useful natural plant source for the inhibition of methanogenesis and its supplementation in animal feed may proves to be an effective measure to control methane emission from ruminants. [Vet. World 2012; 5(6.000: 335-340

  20. The kinetics of methane production from co-digestion of cattle manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhov, Zh K; Korazbekova, K U; Lakhanova, K M

    2014-08-01

    In this article, the kinetics of methane production from co-digestion of liquid manure from cattle with the addition of winemaking waste, food waste and biowaste was investigated in order to describe and evaluate methanogenesis in terms of growth curve of methanogenic bacteria. Experiments were carried out in "Hohenheim"n biogas yield testing system at the temperature of 37 degrees C. The cumulative methane yield was 0.330 ± 0.038, 0.277 ± 0.041, 0.1480 ± 013 and 0.250 ± 0.025 m3 CH4 per kg oDM in normal condition, respectively in mono-digestion and co-digestion of liquid manure from cattle with winemaking, food and biowaste. The kinetic Gompertz parameters of methane production (P-potential yield of methane, R(m)-maximum methane production rate and λ-duration of lag phase) were analyzed. The highest potential methane yield (P) showed co-fermentation of liquid manure from cattle with biowaste 0.387 Nm3 (kg oDM)(-1), the highest methane production rate (R(m)) was 0.022 ± 0.003 Nm3 (kg oDM)(-1) day(-1) for mono-digestion of cattle slurry, the lowest 0.006 Nm3 (kg oDM)(-1) day(-1) was obtained during co-digestion with food waste. Duration of lag phase (λ) was within 10.17-14.60 days for all samples. Additional, the duration of digestion to produce 95% of the potential methane yield and efficient methane production was determined.

  1. Implementation and verification of an analytical method for the quantification of biogenic amines in seafood products

    OpenAIRE

    Olajos, Ildikó, 1976-

    2015-01-01

    Rotamín (e. biogenic amines, BA) eru hitaþolin, lífræn basísk efni með hátt suðumark sem myndast í matvælum af völdum örvera vegna ensímatískra efnabreytinga á náttúrulegum amínósýrum. BA eru áhættuþáttur varðandi matvælaöryggi þar sem þau geta valdið ofnæmisviðbrögðum hjá mönnum. BA má finna í ýmsum matvælum, sérstaklega fisk af scombroid tegund (t.d. makríl, túnfisk, síld) sem ekki hefur verið rétt meðhöndlaður eða geymdur við réttar aðstæður. BA brotna ekki niður við eldun og greinast ekki...

  2. New strategies for optimal methane production from long chain fatty acids

    OpenAIRE

    Cavaleiro, A. J.; Salvador, A. F.; Silva, Sérgio; Pereira, M.A.; Sousa, D.Z.; Alves, M. M.

    2012-01-01

    High methane production can be expected from biodegradation of long chain fatty acids (LCFA) in anaerobic bioreactors; however, in practice, this process is limited by LCFA accumulation onto the sludge. To optimize methane production from LCFA-rich wastewater, two novel strategies were tested: (i) bioreactor start-up based on the alternation of continuous-feeding phases with batch-degradation phases, and (ii) bioreactor bioaugmentation with the LCFAdegrading bacterium Syntrophomonas zehnderi....

  3. Microbial diversity and dynamics during methane production from municipal solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bareither, Christopher A., E-mail: christopher.bareither@colostate.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering, Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, CO 80532 (United States); Geological Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Wolfe, Georgia L., E-mail: gwolfe@wisc.edu [Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); McMahon, Katherine D., E-mail: tmcmahon@engr.wisc.edu [Bacteriology, Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Benson, Craig H., E-mail: chbenson@wisc.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering, Geological Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Similar bacterial communities developed following different start-up operation. ► Total methanogens in leachate during the decelerated methane phase reflected overall methane yield. ► Created correlations between methanogens, methane yield, and available substrate. ► Predominant bacteria identified with syntrophic polysaccharide degraders. ► Hydrogenotrophic methanogens were dominant in the methane generation process. - Abstract: The objectives of this study were to characterize development of bacterial and archaeal populations during biodegradation of municipal solid waste (MSW) and to link specific methanogens to methane generation. Experiments were conducted in three 0.61-m-diameter by 0.90-m-tall laboratory reactors to simulate MSW bioreactor landfills. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes was used to characterize microbial communities in both leachate and solid waste. Microbial assemblages in effluent leachate were similar between reactors during peak methane generation. Specific groups within the Bacteroidetes and Thermatogae phyla were present in all samples and were particularly abundant during peak methane generation. Microbial communities were not similar in leachate and solid fractions assayed at the end of reactor operation; solid waste contained a more abundant bacterial community of cellulose-degrading organisms (e.g., Firmicutes). Specific methanogen populations were assessed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinaceae, and Methanobacteriales were the predominant methanogens in all reactors, with Methanomicrobiales consistently the most abundant. Methanogen growth phases coincided with accelerated methane production, and cumulative methane yield increased with increasing total methanogen abundance. The difference in methanogen populations and corresponding methane yield is attributed to different initial cellulose and hemicellulose contents of the MSW. Higher initial cellulose and

  4. Comparison of Nonprecious Metal Cathode Materials for Methane Production by Electromethanogenesis.

    KAUST Repository

    Siegert, Michael

    2014-02-18

    In methanogenic microbial electrolysis cells (MMCs), CO2 is reduced to methane using a methanogenic biofilm on the cathode by either direct electron transfer or evolved hydrogen. To optimize methane generation, we examined several cathode materials: plain graphite blocks, graphite blocks coated with carbon black or carbon black containing metals (platinum, stainless steel or nickel) or insoluble minerals (ferrihydrite, magnetite, iron sulfide, or molybdenum disulfide), and carbon fiber brushes. Assuming a stoichiometric ratio of hydrogen (abiotic):methane (biotic) of 4:1, methane production with platinum could be explained solely by hydrogen production. For most other materials, however, abiotic hydrogen production rates were insufficient to explain methane production. At -600 mV, platinum on carbon black had the highest abiotic hydrogen gas formation rate (1600 ± 200 nmol cm(-3) d(-1)) and the highest biotic methane production rate (250 ± 90 nmol cm(-3) d(-1)). At -550 mV, plain graphite (76 nmol cm(-3) d(-1)) performed similarly to platinum (73 nmol cm(-3) d(-1)). Coulombic recoveries, based on the measured current and evolved gas, were initially greater than 100% for all materials except platinum, suggesting that cathodic corrosion also contributed to electromethanogenic gas production.

  5. Sulfide and methane production in sewer sediments: Field survey and model evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiwen; Tugtas, A Evren; Sharma, Keshab R; Ni, Bing-Jie; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-02-01

    Sewer sediment processes have been reported to significantly contribute to overall sulfide and methane production in sewers, at a scale comparable to that of sewer biofilms. The physiochemical and biological characteristics of sewer sediments are heterogeneous; however, the variability of in-sediments sulfide and methane production rates among sewers has not been assessed to date. In this study, five sewer sediment samples were collected from two cities in Australia with different climatic conditions. Batch assays were conducted to determine the rates of sulfate reduction and methane production under different flow velocity (shear stress) conditions as well as under completely mixed conditions. The tests showed substantial and variable sulfate reduction and methane production activities among different sediments. Sulfate reduction and methane production from sewer sediments were confirmed to be areal processes, and were dependent on flow velocity/shear stress. Despite of the varying characteristics and reactions kinetics, the sulfate reduction and methane production processes in all sediments could be well described by a one-dimensional sewer sediment model recently developed based on results obtained from a laboratory sewer sediment reactor. Model simulations indicated that the in-situ contribution of sewer sediment emissions could be estimated without the requirement of measuring the specific sediment characteristics or the sediment depths.

  6. Comparison of Nonprecious Metal Cathode Materials for Methane Production by Electromethanogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, Michael; Yates, Matthew D; Call, Douglas F; Zhu, Xiuping; Spormann, Alfred; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-04-01

    In methanogenic microbial electrolysis cells (MMCs), CO2 is reduced to methane using a methanogenic biofilm on the cathode by either direct electron transfer or evolved hydrogen. To optimize methane generation, we examined several cathode materials: plain graphite blocks, graphite blocks coated with carbon black or carbon black containing metals (platinum, stainless steel or nickel) or insoluble minerals (ferrihydrite, magnetite, iron sulfide, or molybdenum disulfide), and carbon fiber brushes. Assuming a stoichiometric ratio of hydrogen (abiotic):methane (biotic) of 4:1, methane production with platinum could be explained solely by hydrogen production. For most other materials, however, abiotic hydrogen production rates were insufficient to explain methane production. At -600 mV, platinum on carbon black had the highest abiotic hydrogen gas formation rate (1600 ± 200 nmol cm(-3) d(-1)) and the highest biotic methane production rate (250 ± 90 nmol cm(-3) d(-1)). At -550 mV, plain graphite (76 nmol cm(-3) d(-1)) performed similarly to platinum (73 nmol cm(-3) d(-1)). Coulombic recoveries, based on the measured current and evolved gas, were initially greater than 100% for all materials except platinum, suggesting that cathodic corrosion also contributed to electromethanogenic gas production.

  7. Methyl-coenzyme M reductase A as an indicator to estimate methane production from dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguinaga Casañas, M A; Rangkasenee, N; Krattenmacher, N; Thaller, G; Metges, C C; Kuhla, B

    2015-06-01

    The evaluation of greenhouse gas mitigation strategies requires the quantitative assessment of individual methane production. Because methane measurement in respiration chambers is highly accurate, but also comprises various disadvantages such as limited capacity and high costs, the establishment of an indicator for estimating methane production of individual ruminants would provide an alternative to direct methane measurement. Methyl-coenzyme M reductase is involved in methanogenesis and the subunit α of methyl-coenzyme M reductase is encoded by the mcrA gene of rumen archaea. We therefore examined the relationship between methane emissions of Holstein dairy cows measured in respiration chambers with 2 different diets (high- and medium-concentrate diet) and the mcrA DNA and mcrA cDNA abundance determined from corresponding rumen fluid samples. Whole-body methane production per kilogram of dry matter intake and mcrA DNA normalized to the abundance of the rrs gene coding for 16S rRNA correlated significantly when using qmcrA primers. Use of qmcrA primers also revealed linear correlation between mcrA DNA copy number and methane yield. Regression analyses based on normalized mcrA cDNA abundances revealed no significant linear correlation with methane production per kilogram of dry matter intake. Furthermore, the correlations between normalized mcrA DNA abundance and the rumen fluid concentration of acetic and isobutyric acid were positive, whereas the correlations with propionic and lactic acid were negative. These data suggest that the mcrA DNA approach based on qmcrA primers could potentially be a molecular proxy for methane yield after further refinement.

  8. Experimental workflow for developing a feed forward strategy to control biomass growth and exploit maximum specific methane productivity of Methanothermobacter marburgensis in a biological methane production process (BMPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Krajete

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, interests for new biofuel generations allowing conversion of gaseous substrate(s to gaseous product(s arose for power to gas and waste to value applications. An example is biological methane production process (BMPP with Methanothermobacter marburgensis. The latter, can convert carbon dioxide (CO2 and hydrogen (H2, having different origins and purities, to methane (CH4, water and biomass. However, these gas converting bioprocesses are tendentiously gas limited processes and the specific methane productivity per biomass amount (qCH4 tends to be low. Therefore, this contribution proposes a workflow for the development of a feed forward strategy to control biomass, growth (rx and qCH4 in a continuous gas limited BMPP. The proposed workflow starts with a design of experiment (DoE to optimize media composition and search for a liquid based limitation to control selectively growth. From the DoE it came out that controlling biomass growth was possible independently of the dilution and gassing rate applied while not affecting methane evolution rates (MERs. This was done by shifting the process from a natural gas limited state to a controlled liquid limited growth. The latter allowed exploiting the maximum biocatalytic activity for methane formation of Methanothermobacter marburgensis. An increase of qCH4 from 42 to 129 mmolCH4 g−1 h−1 was achieved by applying a liquid limitation compare with the reference state. Finally, a verification experiment was done to verify the feeding strategy transferability to a different process configuration. This evidenced the ratio of the fed KH2PO4 to rx (R(FKH2PO4/rx has an appropriate parameter for scaling feeds in a continuous gas limited BMPP. In the verification experiment CH4 was produced in a single bioreactor step at a methane evolution rate (MER of   132 mmolCH4*L−1*h−1 at a CH4 purity of 93 [Vol.%].

  9. Methane from CO₂: Influence of different CO₂ concentrations in the flush gas on the methane production in BMP tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Konrad; Huber, Bettina; Fernández, Yadira Bajón; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-03-01

    The influence of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the headspace gas on the specific methane (CH4) production of blank samples with just inoculum during Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) tests was studied. The headspace of the bottles had been flushed with 15 different ratios of CO2 and N2 prior to incubation, while they were treated otherwise identically. The results revealed that the CH4 yield increased linearly with higher ratio of CO2 in the flush gas reaching a 30% higher yield at pure CO2 relative to pure N2 headspace conditions. However, a slightly distinct lag is noticeable during the initial phase of the degradation process at high ratios of CO2, hypothesizing a reversible disturbance of the biocenosis. Further experiments and analyses need to be performed to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. PMID:26818184

  10. Biochemical methane production potential from different components of fraction of municipal solid waste

    OpenAIRE

    de Andrés Pérez de Rada, Mª Magdalena

    2009-01-01

    - Issues of management of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (biogas production in landfills, leachates with high concentrations of organics, odour problems). - Porribility of energy production from this fraction by mean of Anaerobic digestion. - Evaluation of the biogas and methane potential productions from single components of the organic fraction of MSW by mean of lab test. - Modelling of cumulative production.

  11. The distribution of methane in groundwater in Alberta (Canada) and associated aqueous geochemistry conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humez, Pauline; Mayer, Bernhard; Nightingale, Michael; Becker, Veith; Kingston, Andrew; Taylor, Stephen; Millot, Romain; Kloppmann, Wolfram

    2016-04-01

    Development of unconventional energy resources such as shale gas and coalbed methane has generated some public concern with regard to the protection of groundwater and surface water resources from leakage of stray gas from the deep subsurface. In terms of environmental impact to and risk assessment of shallow groundwater resources, the ultimate challenge is to distinguish: (a) natural in-situ production of biogenic methane, (b) biogenic or thermogenic methane migration into shallow aquifers due to natural causes, and (c) thermogenic methane migration from deep sources due to human activities associated with the exploitation of conventional or unconventional oil and gas resources. We have conducted a NSERC-ANR co-funded baseline study investigating the occurrence of methane in shallow groundwater of Alberta (Canada), a province with a long record of conventional and unconventional hydrocarbon exploration. Our objective was to assess the occurrence and sources of methane in shallow groundwaters and to also characterize the hydrochemical environment in which the methane was formed or transformed through redox processes. Ultimately our aim was to determine whether methane was formed in-situ or whether it migrated from deeper formations into shallow aquifers. Combining hydrochemical and dissolved and free geochemical gas data from 372 groundwater samples obtained from 186 monitoring wells of the provincial groundwater observation well network (GOWN) in Alberta, it was found that methane is ubiquitous in groundwater in Alberta and is predominantly of biogenic origin. The highest concentrations of dissolved biogenic methane (> 0.01 mM or > 0.2 mg/L), characterized by δ13CCH4 values definition in the context of current and future unconventional hydrocarbon exploration and exploitation.

  12. Steam cracking and methane to olefins: Energy use, CO2 emissions and production costs

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, T.; Patel, M K; de Blok, K

    2008-01-01

    While most olefins (e.g., ethylene and propylene) are currently produced through steam cracking routes, they can also possibly be produced from natural gas (i.e., methane) via methanol and oxidative coupling routes. We reviewed recent data in the literature and then compared the energy use, CO2 emissions and production costs of methane-based routes with those of steam cracking routes. We found that methane-based routes use more than twice as much process energy than state-of-the-art steam cra...

  13. Production of hydrogen and methane from wastewater sludge using anaerobic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, C H; Lin, K R; Lee, D J; Tay, J H

    2004-01-01

    The hydrogen and methane were produced from wastewater sludge using a Clostridium strain. The original sludge and the pre-treated (acidified, sterilized, freeze/thawed, and sonicated) sludges were tested. Some pre-treatment could enhance hydrogen yield, and the other tests could enhance methane yield. Hydrogen yield followed freeze/thawed>acidified>sterilized>original sludge>sonicated; while methane yield followed sonicated>freeze/thawed>sterilized>acidified>original sludge. The production and consumption of acetate correlated closely with the trends in both yields.

  14. The production of methane, hydrogen, and organic compounds in ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal vents of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konn, C; Charlou, J L; Holm, N G; Mousis, O

    2015-05-01

    Both hydrogen and methane are consistently discharged in large quantities in hydrothermal fluids issued from ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal fields discovered along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Considering the vast number of these fields discovered or inferred, hydrothermal fluxes represent a significant input of H2 and CH4 to the ocean. Although there are lines of evidence of their abiogenic formation from stable C and H isotope results, laboratory experiments, and thermodynamic data, neither their origin nor the reaction pathways generating these gases have been fully constrained yet. Organic compounds detected in the fluids may also be derived from abiotic reactions. Although thermodynamics are favorable and extensive experimental work has been done on Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions, for instance, nothing is clear yet about their origin and formation mechanism from actual data. Since chemolithotrophic microbial communities commonly colonize hydrothermal vents, biogenic and thermogenic processes are likely to contribute to the production of H2, CH4, and other organic compounds. There seems to be a consensus toward a mixed origin (both sources and processes) that is consistent with the ambiguous nature of the isotopic data. But the question that remains is, to what proportions? More systematic experiments as well as integrated geochemical approaches are needed to disentangle hydrothermal geochemistry. This understanding is of prime importance considering the implications of hydrothermal H2, CH4, and organic compounds for the ocean global budget, global cycles, and the origin of life.

  15. Semi-continuous methane production from undiluted brown algae using a halophilic marine microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Toyokazu; Kita, Akihisa; Okamura, Yoshiko; Aki, Tsunehiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Acclimated marine sediment-derived culture was used for semi-continuous methane production from materials equivalent to raw brown algae, without dilution of salinity and without nutrient supply, under 3 consecutive conditions of varying organic loading rates (OLRs) and hydraulic retention time (HRT). Methane production was stable at 2.0gVS/kg/day (39-day HRT); however, it became unstable at 2.9gVS/kg/day (28-day HRT) due to acetate and propionate accumulation. OLR subsequently decreased to 1.7gVS/kg/day (46-day HRT), stabilizing methane production beyond steady state. Methane yield was above 300mL/g VS at all OLRs. These results indicated that the acclimated marine sediment culture was able to produce methane semi-continuously from raw brown algae without dilution and nutrient supply under steady state. Microbial community analysis suggested that hydrogenotrophic methanogens predominated among archaea during unstable methane production, implying a partial shift of the methanogenic pathway from acetoclastic methanogenesis to acetate oxidation.

  16. Estimating methane releases from natural gas production and transmission in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedikov, J. V.; Akopova (Vniigaz), G. S.; Gladkaja (Vniigaz), N. G.; Piotrovskij (Tyumentransgaz), A. S.; Markellov (Volgotransgaz), V. A.; Salichov (Yamburggazdabuicha), S. S.; Kaesler, H.; Ramm, A.; Müller von Blumencron, A.; Lelieveld, J.

    Methane releases from the RAO Gazprom gas production and transmission facilities in Russia were determined in an extensive measurement program carried out in 1996 and 1997. Subsequently, the measurements were extrapolated to the Russian scale. The results show that methane releases from gas transmission are less than 1% of throughput. Methane loss from gas production in northwestern Siberia appears to be relatively small, generally less than 0.1%. The largest methane emissions result from venting during maintenance and repairs, leaks from valves on transmission lines, and from compressor stations. The measurements show that, in the case of leaks, a limited number of major ones accounts for most of the methane releases. Methane emissions expressed as a percentage of the gas volume produced or transported are (rounded figures): production and processing 0.1%, pipelines 0.2%, compressor stations 0.7%, so that the total release by production and transmission in Russia amounts to about 1.0%, i.e. ˜5.4×10 9 m 3/a (˜4 Tg/a). This is consistent with our previous preliminary estimates, indicating that maximum emissions are 1.5-1.8%/a. However, this is generally lower than most other estimates and speculations.

  17. Evaluation of marine sediments as microbial sources for methane production from brown algae under high salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Toyokazu; Kita, Akihisa; Okamura, Yoshiko; Aki, Tsunehiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2014-10-01

    Various marine sediments were evaluated as promising microbial sources for methane fermentation of Saccharina japonica, a brown alga, at seawater salinity. All marine sediments tested produced mainly acetate among volatile fatty acids. One marine sediment completely converted the produced volatile fatty acids to methane in a short period. Archaeal community analysis revealed that acetoclastic methanogens belonging to the Methanosarcina genus dominated after cultivation. Measurement of the specific conversion rate at each step of methane production under saline conditions demonstrated that the marine sediments had higher conversion rates of butyrate and acetate than mesophilic methanogenic granules. These results clearly show that marine sediments can be used as microbial sources for methane production from algae under high-salt conditions without dilution.

  18. Selective production of methane from aqueous biocarbohydrate streams over a mixture of platinum and ruthenium catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira D'Angelo, Maria Fernanda; Ordomsky, Vitaly; van der Schaaf, John; Schouten, Jaap C; Nijhuis, Tjeerd Alexander

    2014-02-01

    A one-step process for the selective production of methane from low-value aqueous carbohydrate streams is proposed. Sorbitol, used herein as a model compound, is fully converted to methane, CO2 , and a minor amount of H2 by using a physical mixture of Pt and Ru (1:5 in mass basis) at 220 °C and 35 bar. This conversion is the result of hydrogenolysis of part of the sorbitol over Ru and the in situ production of H2 through the aqueous-phase reforming of the remaining carbohydrate over Pt. A synergistic effect of the combination of these two catalysts results in the rapid and highly selective conversion of the carbohydrate to methane. This process offers the possibility of upgrading a low-value carbohydrate stream into a valuable fuel with no addition of H2. Exergy analysis reveals that nearly 80 % of the exergy of the reactant is recovered as methane.

  19. Comparison between ensilage and fungal pretreatment for storage of giant reed and subsequent methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan; Xu, Fuqing; Ge, Xumeng; Li, Yebo

    2016-06-01

    Ensilage and fungal pretreatment of giant reed harvested from August through December were compared based on their effects on feedstock preservation, glucose yield, and subsequent methane production via anaerobic digestion (AD). Compared to fungal pretreatment, ensilage obtained lower total solids (hemicellulose degradation, except for giant reed harvested in August. Ensilage increased glucose and methane yields by 7-15% and 4-14%, respectively, for giant reed harvested from August through December. Fungal pretreatment failed for giant reed harvested in August and October with reduced glucose yields, and was effective for that harvested in November and December, with about 20% increases in glucose yield. However, hydrocarbon losses during fungal pretreatment offset the increased glucose yield, resulting in decreased methane yields by AD. In summary, ensilage was found to be more suitable than fungal pretreatment for giant reed storage and its methane production via AD. PMID:26974356

  20. The Potential Role of Seaweeds in the Natural Manipulation of Rumen Fermentation and Methane Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Margarida R. G.; Fonseca, António J. M.; Oliveira, Hugo M.; Mendonça, Carla; Cabrita, Ana R. J.

    2016-01-01

    This study is the first to evaluate the effects of five seaweeds (Ulva sp., Laminaria ochroleuca, Saccharina latissima, Gigartina sp., and Gracilaria vermiculophylla) on gas and methane production and ruminal fermentation parameters when incubated in vitro with two substrates (meadow hay and corn silage) for 24 h. Seaweeds led to lower gas production, with Gigartina sp. presenting the lowest value. When incubated with meadow hay, Ulva sp., Gigartina sp. and G. vermiculophylla decreased methane production, but with corn silage, methane production was only decreased by G. vermiculophylla. With meadow hay, L. ochroleuca and S. latissima promoted similar methane production as the control, but with corn silage, L. ochroleuca increased it. With the exception of S. latissima, all seaweeds promoted similar levels of total volatile fatty acid production. The highest proportion of acetic acid was produced with Ulva sp., G. vermiculophylla, and S. latissima; the highest proportion of butyric acid with the control and L. ochroleuca; and the highest proportion of iso-valeric acid with Gigartina sp. These results reveal the potential of seaweeds to mitigate ruminal methane production and the importance of the basal diet. To efficiently use seaweeds as feed ingredients with nutritional and environmental benefits, more research is required to determine the mechanisms underlying seaweed and substrate interactions. PMID:27572486

  1. The Potential Role of Seaweeds in the Natural Manipulation of Rumen Fermentation and Methane Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Margarida R G; Fonseca, António J M; Oliveira, Hugo M; Mendonça, Carla; Cabrita, Ana R J

    2016-08-30

    This study is the first to evaluate the effects of five seaweeds (Ulva sp., Laminaria ochroleuca, Saccharina latissima, Gigartina sp., and Gracilaria vermiculophylla) on gas and methane production and ruminal fermentation parameters when incubated in vitro with two substrates (meadow hay and corn silage) for 24 h. Seaweeds led to lower gas production, with Gigartina sp. presenting the lowest value. When incubated with meadow hay, Ulva sp., Gigartina sp. and G. vermiculophylla decreased methane production, but with corn silage, methane production was only decreased by G. vermiculophylla. With meadow hay, L. ochroleuca and S. latissima promoted similar methane production as the control, but with corn silage, L. ochroleuca increased it. With the exception of S. latissima, all seaweeds promoted similar levels of total volatile fatty acid production. The highest proportion of acetic acid was produced with Ulva sp., G. vermiculophylla, and S. latissima; the highest proportion of butyric acid with the control and L. ochroleuca; and the highest proportion of iso-valeric acid with Gigartina sp. These results reveal the potential of seaweeds to mitigate ruminal methane production and the importance of the basal diet. To efficiently use seaweeds as feed ingredients with nutritional and environmental benefits, more research is required to determine the mechanisms underlying seaweed and substrate interactions.

  2. The Potential Role of Seaweeds in the Natural Manipulation of Rumen Fermentation and Methane Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Margarida R G; Fonseca, António J M; Oliveira, Hugo M; Mendonça, Carla; Cabrita, Ana R J

    2016-01-01

    This study is the first to evaluate the effects of five seaweeds (Ulva sp., Laminaria ochroleuca, Saccharina latissima, Gigartina sp., and Gracilaria vermiculophylla) on gas and methane production and ruminal fermentation parameters when incubated in vitro with two substrates (meadow hay and corn silage) for 24 h. Seaweeds led to lower gas production, with Gigartina sp. presenting the lowest value. When incubated with meadow hay, Ulva sp., Gigartina sp. and G. vermiculophylla decreased methane production, but with corn silage, methane production was only decreased by G. vermiculophylla. With meadow hay, L. ochroleuca and S. latissima promoted similar methane production as the control, but with corn silage, L. ochroleuca increased it. With the exception of S. latissima, all seaweeds promoted similar levels of total volatile fatty acid production. The highest proportion of acetic acid was produced with Ulva sp., G. vermiculophylla, and S. latissima; the highest proportion of butyric acid with the control and L. ochroleuca; and the highest proportion of iso-valeric acid with Gigartina sp. These results reveal the potential of seaweeds to mitigate ruminal methane production and the importance of the basal diet. To efficiently use seaweeds as feed ingredients with nutritional and environmental benefits, more research is required to determine the mechanisms underlying seaweed and substrate interactions. PMID:27572486

  3. Global warming and carbon dynamics in permafrost soils: methane production and oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Dirk Wagner; Susanne Liebner;  ,

    2009-01-01

    The Arctic plays a key role in the Earths climate system, because global warming is predicted to be most pronounced at high latitudes, and one third of the global carbon pool is stored in ecosystems of the northern latitudes. The degradation of permafrost and the associated intensified release of methane, a climate-relevant trace gas, represent potential environmental hazards. The microorganisms driving methane production and oxidation in Arctic permafrost soils have remained poorly investiga...

  4. Role of Methane Capture for Sustainable Biodiesel Production from Palm Oil: A Life Cycle Assessment Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Hermawan Prasetya; Yandra Arkeman; Erliza Hambali

    2013-01-01

    Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME) is one of the major wastes generated by palm oil milling which is a part of palm oil diesel production chain. POME contain of methane (about 60-70 %), which contribute to Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emission. Due to reduction GHG emission is one of indicator bioenergy sustainability, some alternatives have been implementing to reduction it. One of the alternatives is implementing of methane capture technology which able to capture and/or utilize it for energy source. In...

  5. Methane and ethane from global oil and gas production: bottom-up simulations over three decades

    OpenAIRE

    L. Höglund-Isaksson

    2016-01-01

    Existing bottom-up emission inventories of historical methane and ethane emissions from global oil and gas systems do not well explain year-on-year variations estimated by top-down models from atmospheric measurements. This paper develops a bottom-up methodology which allows for country- and year specific source attribution of methane and ethane emissions from global oil and natural gas production for the period 1980 to 2012. The analysis rests on country-specific simulations of associated ga...

  6. Effect of Catalytic Cylinders on Autothermal Reforming of Methane for Hydrogen Production in a Microchamber Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Yunfei Yan; Hongliang Guo; Li Zhang; Junchen Zhu; Zhongqing Yang; Qiang Tang; Xin Ji

    2014-01-01

    A new multicylinder microchamber reactor is designed on autothermal reforming of methane for hydrogen production, and its performance and thermal behavior, that is, based on the reaction mechanism, is numerically investigated by varying the cylinder radius, cylinder spacing, and cylinder layout. The results show that larger cylinder radius can promote reforming reaction; the mass fraction of methane decreased from 26% to 21% with cylinder radius from 0.25 mm to 0.75 mm; compact cylinder spaci...

  7. Effect of temperature on methane production from field-scale anaerobic digesters treating dairy manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Osman A; Mulbry, Walter; Lansing, Stephanie

    2015-09-01

    Temperature is a critical factor affecting anaerobic digestion because it influences both system heating requirements and methane production. Temperatures of 35-37°C are typically suggested for manure digestion. In temperate climates, digesters require a considerable amount of additional heat energy to maintain temperatures at these levels. In this study, the effects of lower digestion temperatures (22 and 28°C), on the methane production from dairy digesters were evaluated and compared with 35°C using duplicate replicates of field-scale (FS) digesters with a 17-day hydraulic retention time. After acclimation, the FS digesters were operated for 12weeks using solids-separated manure at an organic loading rate (OLR) of 1.4kgVSm(-3)d(-1) and then for 8weeks using separated manure amended with manure solids at an OLR of 2.6kgVSm(-3)d(-1). Methane production values of the FS digesters at 22 and 28°C were about 70% and 87%, respectively, of the values from FS digesters at 35°C. The results suggest that anaerobic digesters treating dairy manure at 28°C were nearly as efficient as digesters operated at 35°C, with 70% of total methane achievable at 22°C. These results are relevant to small farms interested in anaerobic digestion for methane reduction without heat recovery from generators or for methane recovery from covered lagoon digesters.

  8. Addressing biogenic greenhouse gas emissions from hydropower in LCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertwich, Edgar G

    2013-09-01

    The ability of hydropower to contribute to climate change mitigation is sometimes questioned, citing emissions of methane and carbon dioxide resulting from the degradation of biogenic carbon in hydropower reservoirs. These emissions are, however, not always addressed in life cycle assessment, leading to a bias in technology comparisons, and often misunderstood. The objective of this paper is to review and analyze the generation of greenhouse gas emissions from reservoirs for the purpose of technology assessment, relating established emission measurements to power generation. A literature review, data collection, and statistical analysis of methane and CO2 emissions are conducted. In a sample of 82 measurements, methane emissions per kWh hydropower generated are log-normally distributed, ranging from micrograms to 10s of kg. A multivariate regression analysis shows that the reservoir area per kWh electricity is the most important explanatory variable. Methane emissions flux per reservoir area are correlated with the natural net primary production of the area, the age of the power plant, and the inclusion of bubbling emissions in the measurement. Even together, these factors fail to explain most of the variation in the methane flux. The global average emissions from hydropower are estimated to be 85 gCO2/kWh and 3 gCH4/kWh, with a multiplicative uncertainty factor of 2. GHG emissions from hydropower can be largely avoided by ceasing to build hydropower plants with high land use per unit of electricity generated. PMID:23909506

  9. High-time resolved measurements of biogenic and anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol precursors and products in urban air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Rosa M.; Doskey, Paul V.

    2016-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are present in the atmosphere entirely in the gas phase are directly emitted by biogenic (~1089 Tg yr-1) and anthropogenic sources (~185 Tg yr-1). However, the sources and molecular speciation of intermediate VOCs (IVOCs), which are for the most part also present almost entirely in the gas phase, are not well characterized. The VOCs and IVOCs participate in reactions that form ozone and semivolatile OC (SVOC) that partition into the aerosol phase. Formation and evolution of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are part of a complex dynamic process that depends on the molecular speciation and concentration of VOCs, IVOCs, primary organic aerosol (POA), and the level of oxidants (NO3, OH, O3). The current lack of understanding of OA properties and their impact on radiative forcing, ecosystems, and human health is partly due to limitations of models to predict SOA production on local, regional, and global scales. More accurate forecasting of SOA production requires high-temporal resolution measurement and molecular characterization of SOA precursors and products. For the subject study, the IVOCs and aerosol-phase organic matter were collected using the high-volume sampling technique and were analyzed by multidimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-ToFMS). The IVOCs included terpenes, terpenoids, n-alkanes, branched alkanes, isoprenoids, alkylbenzenes, cycloalkylbenzenes, PAH, alkyl PAH, and an unresolved complex mixture (UCM). Diurnal variations of OA species containing multiple oxygenated functionalities and selected SOA tracers of isorprene, α-pinene, toluene, cyclohexene, and n-dodecane oxidation were also quantified. The data for SOA precursor and oxidation products presented here will be useful for evaluating the ability of molecular-specific SOA models to forecast SOA production in and downwind of urban areas.

  10. Enhancement of bioenergy production from organic wastes by two-stage anaerobic hydrogen and methane production process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Gang; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi;

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated a two-stage anaerobic hydrogen and methane process for increasing bioenergy production from organic wastes. A two-stage process with hydraulic retention time (HRT) 3d for hydrogen reactor and 12d for methane reactor, obtained 11% higher energy compared to a single......:12 to 1:14, 6.7%, more energy could be obtained. Microbial community analysis indicated that the dominant bacterial species were different in the hydrogen reactors (Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum-like species) and methane reactors (Clostridium thermocellum-like species). The changes...

  11. Enhancement of anaerobic biohydrogen/methane production from cellulose using heat-treated activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, C H; Chang, F Y; Chu, C Y; Chen, C C; Chi, Y C; Hsieh, T T; Huang, H H; Lin, C Y

    2011-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is an effective technology to convert cellulosic wastes to methane and hydrogen. Heat-treatment is a well known method to inhibit hydrogen-consuming bacteria in using anaerobic mixed cultures for seeding. This study aims to investigate the effects of heat-treatment temperature and time on activated sludge for fermentative hydrogen production from alpha-cellulose by response surface methodology. Hydrogen and methane production was evaluated based on the production rate and yield (the ability of converting cellulose into hydrogen and methane) with heat-treated sludge as the seed at various temperatures (60-97 degrees C) and times (20-60 min). Batch experiments were conducted at 55 degrees C and initial pH of 8.0. The results indicate that hydrogen and methane production yields peaked at 4.3 mmol H2/g cellulose and 11.6 mmol CH4/g cellulose using the seed activated sludge that was thermally treated at 60 degrees C for 40 min. These parameter values are higher than those of no-treatment seed (HY 3.6 mmol H2/g cellulose and MY 10.4 mmol CH4/g cellulose). The maximum hydrogen production rate of 26.0 mmol H2/L/d and methane production rate of 23.2 mmol CH4/L/d were obtained for the seed activated sludge that was thermally treated at 70 degrees C for 50 min and 60 degrees C for 40 min, respectively.

  12. Methane sources and production in the northern Cascadia margin gas hydrate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, J.W.; Kaneko, M.; Heuer, V.B.; Coffin, R.B.; Whiticar, M.

    2009-01-01

    -enrichment. The magnitude of the 13C-enrichment of CO2 correlates with decreasing sedimentation rates and a diminishing occurrence of stratigraphic gas hydrate. We suggest the decreasing sedimentation rates increase the exposure time of sedimentary organic matter to aerobic and anaerobic degradation, during burial, thereby reducing the availability of metabolizable organic matter available for methane production. This process is reflected in the occurrence and distribution of gas hydrate within the northern Cascadia margin accretionary prism. Our observations are relevant for evaluating methane production and the occurrence of stratigraphic gas hydrate within other convergent margins.

  13. Screening of biogenic amine production by coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated during industrial Spanish dry-cured ham proceses

    OpenAIRE

    Landeta, Gerardo; Rivas, Blanca de las; Alfonso V Carrascosa; Muñoz, Rosario

    2007-01-01

    The potential to produce biogenic amines was investigated for 56 coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated during industrial Spanish dry-cured ham processes. The presence of biogenic amines from bacterial cultures was determined by thin-layer chromatography. The percentage of strains that decarboxylated amino acids was very low (3.6%). The only staphylococci with aminogenic capacity were an histamine-producing Staphylococcus capitis strain, and a Staphylococcus lugdunensis strain tha...

  14. Analysis of methane potentials of steam-exploded wheat straw and estimation of energy yields of combined ethanol and methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Alexander; Bösch, Peter; Friedl, Anton; Amon, Thomas

    2009-06-01

    Agrarian biomass as a renewable energy source can contribute to a considerable CO(2) reduction. The overriding goal of the European Union is to cut energy consumption related greenhouse gas emission in the EU by 20% until the year 2020. This publication aims at optimising the methane production from steam-exploded wheat straw and presents a theoretical estimation of the ethanol and methane potential of straw. For this purpose, wheat straw was pretreated by steam explosion using different time/temperature combinations. Specific methane yields were analyzed according to VDI 4630. Pretreatment of wheat straw by steam explosion significantly increased the methane yield from anaerobic digestion by up to 20% or a maximum of 331 l(N)kg(-1) VS compared to untreated wheat straw. Furthermore, the residual anaerobic digestion potential of methane after ethanol fermentation was determined by enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated wheat straw using cellulase. Based on the resulting glucose concentration the ethanol yield and the residual sugar available for methane production were calculated. The theoretical maximum ethanol yield of wheat straw was estimated to be 0.249 kg kg(-1) dry matter. The achievable maximum ethanol yield per kg wheat straw dry matter pretreated by steam explosion and enzymatic hydrolysis was estimated to be 0.200 kg under pretreatment conditions of 200 degrees C and 10 min corresponding to 80% of the theoretical maximum. The residual methane yield from straw stillage was estimated to be 183 l(N)kg(-1) wheat straw dry matter. Based on the presented experimental data, a concept is proposed that processes wheat straw for ethanol and methane production. The concept of an energy supply system that provides more than two forms of energy is met by (1) upgrading obtained ethanol to fuel-grade quality and providing methane to CHP plants for the production of (2) electric energy and (3) utility steam that in turn can be used to operate distillation columns in the

  15. Attributing Atmospheric Methane to Anthropogenic Emission Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David

    2016-07-19

    Methane is a greenhouse gas, and increases in atmospheric methane concentration over the past 250 years have driven increased radiative forcing of the atmosphere. Increases in atmospheric methane concentration since 1750 account for approximately 17% of increases in radiative forcing of the atmosphere, and that percentage increases by approximately a factor of 2 if the effects of the greenhouse gases produced by the atmospheric reactions of methane are included in the assessment. Because of the role of methane emissions in radiative forcing of the atmosphere, the identification and quantification of sources of methane emissions is receiving increased scientific attention. Methane emission sources include biogenic, geogenic, and anthropogenic sources; the largest anthropogenic sources are natural gas and petroleum systems, enteric fermentation (livestock), landfills, coal mining, and manure management. While these source categories are well-known, there is significant uncertainty in the relative magnitudes of methane emissions from the various source categories. Further, the overall magnitude of methane emissions from all anthropogenic sources is actively debated, with estimates based on source sampling extrapolated to regional or national scale ("bottom-up analyses") differing from estimates that infer emissions based on ambient data ("top-down analyses") by 50% or more. To address the important problem of attribution of methane to specific sources, a variety of new analytical methods are being employed, including high time resolution and highly sensitive measurements of methane, methane isotopes, and other chemical species frequently associated with methane emissions, such as ethane. This Account describes the use of some of these emerging measurements, in both top-down and bottom-up methane emission studies. In addition, this Account describes how data from these new analytical methods can be used in conjunction with chemical mass balance (CMB) methods for source

  16. Attributing Atmospheric Methane to Anthropogenic Emission Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David

    2016-07-19

    Methane is a greenhouse gas, and increases in atmospheric methane concentration over the past 250 years have driven increased radiative forcing of the atmosphere. Increases in atmospheric methane concentration since 1750 account for approximately 17% of increases in radiative forcing of the atmosphere, and that percentage increases by approximately a factor of 2 if the effects of the greenhouse gases produced by the atmospheric reactions of methane are included in the assessment. Because of the role of methane emissions in radiative forcing of the atmosphere, the identification and quantification of sources of methane emissions is receiving increased scientific attention. Methane emission sources include biogenic, geogenic, and anthropogenic sources; the largest anthropogenic sources are natural gas and petroleum systems, enteric fermentation (livestock), landfills, coal mining, and manure management. While these source categories are well-known, there is significant uncertainty in the relative magnitudes of methane emissions from the various source categories. Further, the overall magnitude of methane emissions from all anthropogenic sources is actively debated, with estimates based on source sampling extrapolated to regional or national scale ("bottom-up analyses") differing from estimates that infer emissions based on ambient data ("top-down analyses") by 50% or more. To address the important problem of attribution of methane to specific sources, a variety of new analytical methods are being employed, including high time resolution and highly sensitive measurements of methane, methane isotopes, and other chemical species frequently associated with methane emissions, such as ethane. This Account describes the use of some of these emerging measurements, in both top-down and bottom-up methane emission studies. In addition, this Account describes how data from these new analytical methods can be used in conjunction with chemical mass balance (CMB) methods for source

  17. Microbial and chemical factors influencing methane production in laboratory incubations of low-rank subsurface coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Stephen H.; Smith, Richard L.; Barker, Charles E.

    2008-01-01

    Lignite and subbituminous coals were investigated for their ability to support microbial methane production in laboratory incubations. Results show that naturally-occurring microorganisms associated with the coals produced substantial quantities of methane, although the factors influencing this process were variable among different samples tested. Methanogenic microbes in two coals from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA, produced 140.5-374.6 mL CH4/kg ((4.5-12.0 standard cubic feet (scf)/ton) in response to an amendment of H2/CO2. The addition of high concentrations (5-10 mM) of acetate did not support substantive methane production under the laboratory conditions. However, acetate accumulated in control incubations where methanogenesis was inhibited, indicating that acetate was produced and consumed during the course of methane production. Acetogenesis from H2/CO2 was evident in these incubations and may serve as a competing metabolic mode influencing the cumulative amount of methane produced in coal. Two low-rank (lignite A) coals from Fort Yukon, Alaska, USA, demonstrated a comparable level of methane production (131.1-284.0 mL CH4/kg (4.2-9.1 scf/ton)) in the presence of an inorganic nutrient amendment, indicating that the source of energy and organic carbon was derived from the coal. The concentration of chloroform-extractable organic matter varied by almost three orders of magnitude among all the coals tested, and appeared to be related to methane production potential. These results indicate that substrate availability within the coal matrix and competition between different groups of microorganisms are two factors that may exert a profound influence on methanogenesis in subsurface coal beds.

  18. Hydrothermal carbonisation of sewage sludge: effect of process conditions on product characteristics and methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danso-Boateng, E; Shama, G; Wheatley, A D; Martin, S J; Holdich, R G

    2015-02-01

    Hydrothermal carbonisation of primary sewage sludge was carried out using a batch reactor. The effect of temperature and reaction time on the characteristics of solid (hydrochar), liquid and gas products, and the conditions leading to optimal hydrochar characteristics were investigated. The amount of carbon retained in hydrochars decreased as temperature and time increased with carbon retentions of 64-77% at 140 and 160°C, and 50-62% at 180 and 200°C. Increasing temperature and treatment time increased the energy content of the hydrochar from 17 to 19 MJ/kg but reduced its energy yield from 88% to 68%. Maillard reaction products were identified in the liquid fractions following carbonisations at 180 and 200°C. Theoretical estimates of the methane yields resulting from the anaerobic digestion of the liquid by-products are also presented and optimal reaction conditions to maximise these identified.

  19. Methane production potential (B0) of swine and cattle manures--a Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbout, S; Verma, M; Larouche, J P; Potvin, L; Chapman, A M; Lemay, S P; Pelletier, F; Brar, S K

    2010-11-01

    Canada's agricultural emissions accounted for 60 Mt or 8% of national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in 2007. The estimation of CH4 emission factor (B0) from manure management systems in Canada is prone to uncertainty owing to lack of B0 values for Canadian conditions. Therefore, in this study, manure samples from six Canadian animal farms, two each of swine, beef and dairy cattle, were investigated in order to estimate their methane production potential (B0). The ultimate anaerobic biodegradability was measured with ISO standard batch fermentation. The extent of biodegradation of the manure samples with or without sodium benzoate was always greater than 60% and hence showed no inhibitory effect on methane production by the manure. The impact of use of antibiotics in the animal feed on methane production was also considered; however, no inhibitory effect on methane production could be observed. The plateau of methane production in all cases was achieved by 63 d of anaerobic digestion process and the final pH was within 6-8. The calculated B0 were in the range of 0.47-0.42, 0.21-0.19 and 0.35-0.30 for swine, beef cattle and dairy cattle, respectively. The uncertainties associated with B0 values were +/- 9% for swine, +/- 3% for beef cattle and, +/- 6 and +/- 2% for dairy cows.

  20. Methane and fertilizer production from seaweed biomass. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betzer, P.R.; Humm, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    It was demonstrated that several varieties of abundant benthic algae indigenous to Tampa Bay (Gracilaria, Hypnea, and Ulva) were readily degradable via anaerobic digestion to methane. The energy yield per unit weight biomass degraded was higher than any previously reported. Given the large masses of readily degradable plants which are annually produced in and around Tampa Bay, the resource is estimated to be at least equivalent to several million gallons of gasoline.

  1. Thermophilic anaerobic fermentation of olive pulp for hydrogen and methane production: modelling of the anaerobic digestion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Skiadas, Ioannis V.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær;

    2006-01-01

    The present study investigates the thermophilic biohydrogen and methane production from olive pulp, which is the semi-solid. residue coming from the two-phase processing of olives. It focussed on: a) production of methane from the raw olive pulp; b) anaerobic bio-production of hydrogen from...... were performed. The hydrogen potential of the olive pulp amounted to 1.6 mmole H-2 per g TS. The methane potential of the raw olive pulp and hydrogen-effluent was as high as 19 mmole CH4 per g TS suggesting that: a) olive pulp is a suitable substrate for methane production; and b) biohydrogen...

  2. Coalbed methane production base established in Southeast Kansas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that revenue from coalbed methane gas sales is growing and currently far exceeds that of what little conventional gas is produced in southeastern Kansas. And this only 2-1/2 years after Stroud Oil Properties, Wichita, brought in the first coalbed methane well in the Sycamore Valley in Montgomery County 6 miles north of Independence. Another operator contributing to the success is Conquest Oil, Greeley, Colo. Conquest acquired a lease with 20 old wells near Sycamore, recompleted five of them in Weir coal, and has installed a compressor. It hopes to being selling a combined 300 Mcfd soon. Great Eastern Energy, Denver, reportedly can move 2 MMcfd from its Sycamore Valley holdings. The fever is spreading into Northeast Kansas, where a venture headed by Duncan Energy Co. and Farleigh Oil Properties, also of Denver, plan 12 coalbed methane wildcats. The two companies received in October 1991 from the Kansas Corporation Commission (KCC) a 40 acre well spacing for seven counties and an exclusion from burdensome gas testing procedures. The test procedures are on the books but not applicable to coal gas wells

  3. Monitoring of biogenic amines in cheeses manufactured at small-scale farms and in fermented dairy products in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buňková, Leona; Adamcová, Gabriela; Hudcová, Kateřina; Velichová, Helena; Pachlová, Vendula; Lorencová, Eva; Buňka, František

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was the monitoring of six biogenic amines (histamine, tyramine, phenylethylamine, tryptamine, putrescine, and cadaverine) and two polyamines (spermidine and spermine) in 112 samples of dairy products purchased in the Czech Republic, namely in 55 cheeses made in small-scale farms and in 57 fermented dairy products. The products were tested at the end of their shelf-life period. Neither tryptamine nor phenylethylamine was detected in the monitored samples; histamine was found only in four cheese samples containing up to 25mg/kg. The contents of spermine and spermidine were low and did not exceed the values of 35 mg/kg. Significant amounts of tyramine, putrescine, and cadaverine occurred especially in cheeses produced from ewe's milk or in long-term ripened cheeses. In about 10% of the tested cheeses, the total concentration of all the monitored biogenic amines and polyamines exceeded the level of 200mg/kg, which can be considered toxicologically significant. In fermented dairy products, the tested biogenic amines occurred in relatively low amounts (generally up to 30 mg/kg) that are regarded safe for the consumer's health. PMID:23768392

  4. Assessment of animal productivity and methane production using an associative feeding strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methane production from ruminants is a loss of digestible energy thereby reducing animal productivity and is contributing to environmental pollution. In order to develop a beneficial strategy for improving animal productivity while conserving the environment the present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of a concentrate feeding strategy on the animal productivity and rumen methane production. In this experiment two feeding regimes, Diet-1 and Diet-2, were either fodder alone and with a 10% inclusion of concentrates in the forage diet feed as a phased sequence of 45 days of fodder alone and then 45 days of fodder plus concentrate. The diets were fed to four animal groups comprising of 5 animals in each. Throughout the experimental period, a fresh, chopped fodder of similar age (50-65 days age) was offered to the animals. Average dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP), crude fibre (CF), ash and ether extract contents of the fodder were 21, 9.3, 31.7, 10.1 and 3.1%, respectively. Diet2 included a concentrate containing 88.0, 16.0, 8.1, 10.0, and 12.1% DM, CP, CF, Ash and EE, respectively. A decrease of 8.2 and 39.5% in group A and B with only minor a minor change in group C and D for feed intake was observed when the animals where feed Diet2. Weight gain for the four groups were 133, 422, 111 and 600 g per animal per day on Diet1 and 244, 688, 177 and 888 g per animal per day on Diet2 for groups A, B, C and D, respectively. With supplementation feeding strategy, there was an increase of 45.4, 38.7, 3.7 and 32.4% in weigh gain over fodder alone diet for groups A, B, C and D, respectively. This was associated with an improvement of 49.7, 62.9, 38.5 and 32% in feed to gain ratio for groups A, B, C and D, respectively. The DM digestibility was 22.9, 4.6, 4.7 and 8.4% higher in groups A, B, C and D, respectively when the groups were feed the fodder diets supplemented with concentrates. On fodder alone, the molar concentration of acetate, propionate, butyrate and

  5. Potential of biogas and methane production from anaerobic digestion of poultry slaughterhouse effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália da Silva Sunada

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of anaerobic digestion on the treatment of effluent from poultry slaughterhouse. The experiment was conducted at the Laboratory of Waste Recycling from Animal Production/FCA/UFGD. During four weeks, eight experimental digesters, semi-continuous models, were loaded and set according to the hydraulic retention time (HRT of 7, 14, 21 and 28 days, and according to the solid fraction treatment, separated with 1 mm sieve or without separation. The average weekly production of biogas and methane as well as the methane concentrations, the potential production per amount of chemical oxygen demand (COD added and reduced, the concentrations of N, P and K at the beginning and end of process, and the most likely numbers of total and thermotolerant coliforms were evaluated. For data analysis, a completely randomized design was performed in a 4 × 2 factorial arrangement (4 HRT: 7, 14, 21 and 28 days and separation with 1 mm sieve or without separation, with repetition over time. The highest production of biogas and methane was statistically significant for the HRT of 7 and 14 days (5.29 and 2.38 L of biogas and 4.28 and 1.73 L of methane, respectively. There was an interaction between HRT and the separation of the solid with sieve and the highest production was obtained in the treatment without separation. Similar behavior was observed for the potential production with a maximum of 0.41 m³ methane.kg-1 COD added with an HRT of 7 days without separation of the solid fraction. The separation of the solid fraction is not recommended in the pretreatment of liquid effluent from poultry slaughterhouse, once the potential for production and production of methane and biogas were reduced with this treatment.

  6. Association between the Levels of Biogenic Amines and Superoxide Anion Production in Brain Regions of Rats after Subchronic Exposure to TCDD

    OpenAIRE

    Byers, James P.; Masters, Karilane; Sarver, Jeffrey G.; Hassoun, Ezdihar A.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of TCDD on the distribution of biogenic amines and production of superoxide anion (SA) in different brain regions of rats have been studied after subchronic exposure. Groups of females Sprague-Dawley rats were administered daily dose of 46 ng TCDD/kg/day (treated groups), or the vehicle used to dissolve TCDD (control group), for 90 days. The rats were sacrificed at the end of the exposure period and their brains were dissected into different regions including, hippocampus (H), cer...

  7. Microbial methane production associated with carbon steel corrosion in a Nigerian oil field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaspreet eMand

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC in oil field pipeline systems can be attributed to many different types of hydrogenotrophic microorganisms including sulfate reducers, methanogens and acetogens. Samples from a low temperature oil reservoir in Nigeria were analyzed using DNA pyrotag sequencing. The microbial community compositions of these samples revealed an abundance of anaerobic methanogenic archaea. Activity of methanogens was demonstrated by incubating samples anaerobically in a basal salts medium, in the presence of carbon steel and carbon dioxide. Methane formation was measured in all enrichments and correlated with metal weight loss. Methanogens were prominently represented in pipeline solids samples, scraped from the inside of a pipeline, comprising over 85% of all pyrosequencing reads. Methane production was only witnessed when carbon steel beads were added to these pipeline solids samples, indicating that no methane was formed as a result of degradation of the oil organics present in these samples. These results were compared to those obtained for samples taken from a low temperature oil field in Canada, which had been incubated with oil, either in the presence or in the absence of carbon steel. Again, methanogens present in these samples catalyzed methane production only when carbon steel was present. Moreover, acetate production was also found in these enrichments only in the presence of carbon steel. From these studies it appears that carbon steel, not oil organics, was the predominant electron donor for acetate production and methane formation in these low temperature oil fields, indicating that the methanogens and acetogens found may contribute significantly to MIC.

  8. Microbial Methane Production Associated with Carbon Steel Corrosion in a Nigerian Oil Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mand, Jaspreet; Park, Hyung S; Okoro, Chuma; Lomans, Bart P; Smith, Seun; Chiejina, Leo; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in oil field pipeline systems can be attributed to many different types of hydrogenotrophic microorganisms including sulfate reducers, methanogens and acetogens. Samples from a low temperature oil reservoir in Nigeria were analyzed using DNA pyrotag sequencing. The microbial community compositions of these samples revealed an abundance of anaerobic methanogenic archaea. Activity of methanogens was demonstrated by incubating samples anaerobically in a basal salts medium, in the presence of carbon steel and carbon dioxide. Methane formation was measured in all enrichments and correlated with metal weight loss. Methanogens were prominently represented in pipeline solids samples, scraped from the inside of a pipeline, comprising over 85% of all pyrosequencing reads. Methane production was only witnessed when carbon steel beads were added to these pipeline solids samples, indicating that no methane was formed as a result of degradation of the oil organics present in these samples. These results were compared to those obtained for samples taken from a low temperature oil field in Canada, which had been incubated with oil, either in the presence or in the absence of carbon steel. Again, methanogens present in these samples catalyzed methane production only when carbon steel was present. Moreover, acetate production was also found in these enrichments only in the presence of carbon steel. From these studies it appears that carbon steel, not oil organics, was the predominant electron donor for acetate production and methane formation in these low temperature oil fields, indicating that the methanogens and acetogens found may contribute significantly to MIC.

  9. Microbial Methane Production Associated with Carbon Steel Corrosion in a Nigerian Oil Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mand, Jaspreet; Park, Hyung S; Okoro, Chuma; Lomans, Bart P; Smith, Seun; Chiejina, Leo; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in oil field pipeline systems can be attributed to many different types of hydrogenotrophic microorganisms including sulfate reducers, methanogens and acetogens. Samples from a low temperature oil reservoir in Nigeria were analyzed using DNA pyrotag sequencing. The microbial community compositions of these samples revealed an abundance of anaerobic methanogenic archaea. Activity of methanogens was demonstrated by incubating samples anaerobically in a basal salts medium, in the presence of carbon steel and carbon dioxide. Methane formation was measured in all enrichments and correlated with metal weight loss. Methanogens were prominently represented in pipeline solids samples, scraped from the inside of a pipeline, comprising over 85% of all pyrosequencing reads. Methane production was only witnessed when carbon steel beads were added to these pipeline solids samples, indicating that no methane was formed as a result of degradation of the oil organics present in these samples. These results were compared to those obtained for samples taken from a low temperature oil field in Canada, which had been incubated with oil, either in the presence or in the absence of carbon steel. Again, methanogens present in these samples catalyzed methane production only when carbon steel was present. Moreover, acetate production was also found in these enrichments only in the presence of carbon steel. From these studies it appears that carbon steel, not oil organics, was the predominant electron donor for acetate production and methane formation in these low temperature oil fields, indicating that the methanogens and acetogens found may contribute significantly to MIC. PMID:26793176

  10. Temperature response of methane production in liquid manures and co-digestates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsgaard, Lars; Olsen, Anna Berg; Petersen, Søren O.

    2016-01-01

    gradient incubator and CH4 production was measured by gas chromatographic analysis of headspace gas after a 17-h incubation period. Methane production potentials at 5–37 °C were described by the Arrhenius equation (modelling efficiencies, 79.2–98.1%), and the four materials showed a consistent activation...

  11. Natural carbon isotopes used to study methane consumption and production in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambus, Per; Andersen, Bertel Lohmann; Kemner, Marianne;

    2002-01-01

    Changes in the isotopic composition of carbon can be used to reveal simultaneous occurrence of methane production and oxidation in soil. The method is conducted in laboratory jar experiments as well as in the field by using flux chambers. Simultaneous occurrence of production and oxidation...

  12. Hydrogen and methane production from desugared molasses using a two‐stage thermophilic anaerobic process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongjan, Prawit; O-Thong, Sompong; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-01-01

    of 3380 mL CH4/day/L, corresponding to a yield of 239 mL CH4/g VS. Aceticlastic Methanosarcina mazei was the dominant methanogen in the methanogenesis stage. This work demonstrates that biohydrogen production can be very efficiently coupled with a subsequent step of methane production using desugared...

  13. Enhancement of sludge reduction and methane production by removing extracellular polymeric substances from waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh Tuan; Mohd Yasin, Nazlina Haiza; Miyazaki, Toshiki; Maeda, Toshinari

    2014-12-01

    The management of waste activated sludge (WAS) recycling is a concern that affects the development of the future low-carbon society, particularly sludge reduction and biomass utilization. In this study, we investigated the effect of removing extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which play important roles in the adhesion and flocculation of WAS, on increased sludge disintegration, thereby enhancing sludge reduction and methane production by anaerobic digestion. EPS removal from WAS by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) significantly enhanced sludge reduction, i.e., 49 ± 5% compared with 27 ± 1% of the control at the end the digestion process. Methane production was also improved in WAS without EPS by 8881 ± 109 CH4 μmol g(-1) dry-weight of sludge. Microbial activity was determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and real-time polymerase chain reaction, which showed that the hydrolysis and acetogenesis stages were enhanced by pretreatment with 2% EDTA, with a larger methanogenic community and better methane production.

  14. Improving methane production from digested manure biofibers by mechanical and thermal alkaline pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsapekos, P; Kougias, Panagiotis G; Frison, A; Raga, R; Angelidaki, I

    2016-09-01

    Animal manure digestion is associated with limited methane production, due to the high content in fibers, which are hardly degradable lignocellulosic compounds. In this study, different mechanical and thermal alkaline pretreatment methods were applied to partially degradable fibers, separated from the effluent stream of biogas reactors. Batch and continuous experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficiency of these pretreatments. In batch experiments, the mechanical pretreatment improved the degradability up to 45%. Even higher efficiency was shown by applying thermal alkaline pretreatments, enhancing fibers degradability by more than 4-fold. In continuous experiments, the thermal alkaline pretreatment, using 6% NaOH at 55°C was proven to be the most efficient pretreatment method as the methane production was increased by 26%. The findings demonstrated that the methane production of the biogas plants can be increased by further exploiting the fraction of the digested manure fibers which are discarded in the post-storage tank.

  15. Protease cell wall degradation of Chlorella vulgaris: effect on methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdy, Ahmed; Mendez, Lara; Blanco, Saul; Ballesteros, Mercedes; González-Fernández, Cristina

    2014-11-01

    In order to optimize the enzymatic dosage and microalgae biomass loads subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis prior anaerobic digestion of Chlorella vulgaris, organic matter solubilisation and methane production were investigated. Experimental data using protease dosage of 0.585 AU g DW(-1) showed that increasing biomass loads up to 65 g L(-1) did not affect markedly the hydrolysis efficiency (51%). Enzymatically pretreated biomasses subjected to anaerobic digestion enhanced methane production by 50-70%. The attempt of decreasing the enzymatic dosages revealed diminished hydrolysis efficiency concomitantly with a decreased methane production enhancement. In agreement with the good results observed for organic matter conversion into biogas, total nitrogen mineralization was attained for enzymatically pretreated biomass. Despite the high protein content of the biomass and the biocatalyst used in the present study no ammonia inhibition was detected.

  16. Methane production in an UASB reactor operated under periodic mesophilic-thermophilic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourque, J-S; Guiot, S R; Tartakovsky, B

    2008-08-15

    Methane production was studied in a laboratory-scale 10 L anaerobic upflow sludge bed (UASB) reactor with periodic variations of the reactor temperature. On a daily basis the temperature was varied between 35 and 45 degrees C or 35 and 55 degrees C with a heating period of 6 h. Each temperature increase was accompanied by an increase in methane production and a decrease in the concentration of soluble organic matter in the effluent. In comparison to a reactor operated at 35 degrees C, a net increase in methane production of up to 22% was observed. Batch activity tests demonstrated a tolerance of mesophilic methanogenic populations to short-term, 2-6 h, temperature increases, although activity of acetoclastic methanogens decreased after 6 h exposure to a temperature of 55 degrees C. 16S sequencing of DGGE bands revealed proliferation of temperature-tolerant Methanospirillum hungatii sp. in the reactor.

  17. Improving methane production from digested manure biofibers by mechanical and thermal alkaline pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsapekos, P; Kougias, Panagiotis G; Frison, A; Raga, R; Angelidaki, I

    2016-09-01

    Animal manure digestion is associated with limited methane production, due to the high content in fibers, which are hardly degradable lignocellulosic compounds. In this study, different mechanical and thermal alkaline pretreatment methods were applied to partially degradable fibers, separated from the effluent stream of biogas reactors. Batch and continuous experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficiency of these pretreatments. In batch experiments, the mechanical pretreatment improved the degradability up to 45%. Even higher efficiency was shown by applying thermal alkaline pretreatments, enhancing fibers degradability by more than 4-fold. In continuous experiments, the thermal alkaline pretreatment, using 6% NaOH at 55°C was proven to be the most efficient pretreatment method as the methane production was increased by 26%. The findings demonstrated that the methane production of the biogas plants can be increased by further exploiting the fraction of the digested manure fibers which are discarded in the post-storage tank. PMID:27268439

  18. Status of research on biogenic coalbed gas generation mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Biogenic coalbed gas,how it is generated and the geochemical characteristics of the gas are gaining global attention.The ways coalbed gas is generated,the status of research on the generation mechanism and the methods of differentiating between biogenic gasses are discussed.The generation of biogenic coalbed methane is consistent with anaerobic fermentation theory.Commercial biogenic coalbed gas reservoirs are mainly generated by the process of CO2 reduction.The substrates used by the microbes living in the...

  19. Comparison of Methane Data Products from the TES and AIRS Infrared Sounders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, T. J.; Pagano, T. S.; Worden, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is the second most powerful greenhouse gas with a highly positive radiative forcing of 0.48 W/m2 (IPCC 2013). Global concentrations of methane have been steadily increasing since 2007 (Bruhwiler 2014), raising concerns about methane's impact on the future global climate. For about the last decade, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura spacecraft has been detecting several trace gas species in the troposphere including methane. The goal of this study is to compare TES methane retrievals to that of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua spacecraft so that scientific investigations may be transferred from TES to AIRS. The two instruments fly in the afternoon constellation (A-Train), providing numerous coincident measurements for comparison. In addition, they also have a similar spectral range, (3.3 to 15.4 µm) for TES (Beer, 2006) and (3.7 to 15.4 µm) for AIRS (Chahine, 2006), making both instruments sensitive to the mid and upper troposphere. This makes them ideal candidates to compare methane data products. However, because AIRS spectral resolution is lower than that of the TES, there may be a difference in vertical sensitivity. In addition, the retrieval techniques and error characteristics are different for the two data sets. The current state of validation for these data products will be presented. To identify conditions in which the data sets agree and dis agree, we present global maps of methane concentrations from monthly level 3 (L3) data products. We also investigate the temporal stability between the two datasets by comparing global zonal averages derived from L3 over the last decade. Finally, we compare L2 retrieval profiles from representative granules in the tropical, mid-latitude and northern latitudes.

  20. A model for methane production in anaerobic digestion of swine wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongnan; Deng, Liangwei; Liu, Gangjin; Yang, Di; Liu, Yi; Chen, Ziai

    2016-10-01

    A study was conducted using a laboratory-scale anaerobic sequencing batch digester to investigate the quantitative influence of organic loading rates (OLRs) on the methane production rate during digestion of swine wastewater at temperatures between 15 °C and 35 °C. The volumetric production rate of methane (Rp) at different OLRs and temperatures was obtained. The maximum volumetric methane production rates (Rpmax) were 0.136, 0.796, 1.294, 1.527 and 1.952 LCH4 L(-1) d(-1) at corresponding organic loading rates of 1.2, 3.6, 5.6, 5.6 and 7.2 g volatile solids L(-1) d(-1), respectively, which occurred at 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 °C, respectively. A new model was developed to describe the quantitative relationship between Rp and OLR. In addition to the maximum volumetric methane production rate (Rpmax) and the half-saturation constant (KLR) commonly used in previous models such as the modified Stover-Kincannon model and Deng model, the new model introduced a new index (KD) that denoted the speed of volumetric methane production rate approaching the maximum as a function of temperature. The new model more satisfactorily described the influence of OLR on the rate of methane production than other models as confirmed by higher determination coefficients (R(2)) (0.9717-0.9900) and lower bias between the experimental and predicted data in terms of the root mean square error and the Akaike Information Criterion. Data from other published research also validated the applicability and generality of the new kinetic model to different types of wastewater.

  1. A model for methane production in anaerobic digestion of swine wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongnan; Deng, Liangwei; Liu, Gangjin; Yang, Di; Liu, Yi; Chen, Ziai

    2016-10-01

    A study was conducted using a laboratory-scale anaerobic sequencing batch digester to investigate the quantitative influence of organic loading rates (OLRs) on the methane production rate during digestion of swine wastewater at temperatures between 15 °C and 35 °C. The volumetric production rate of methane (Rp) at different OLRs and temperatures was obtained. The maximum volumetric methane production rates (Rpmax) were 0.136, 0.796, 1.294, 1.527 and 1.952 LCH4 L(-1) d(-1) at corresponding organic loading rates of 1.2, 3.6, 5.6, 5.6 and 7.2 g volatile solids L(-1) d(-1), respectively, which occurred at 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 °C, respectively. A new model was developed to describe the quantitative relationship between Rp and OLR. In addition to the maximum volumetric methane production rate (Rpmax) and the half-saturation constant (KLR) commonly used in previous models such as the modified Stover-Kincannon model and Deng model, the new model introduced a new index (KD) that denoted the speed of volumetric methane production rate approaching the maximum as a function of temperature. The new model more satisfactorily described the influence of OLR on the rate of methane production than other models as confirmed by higher determination coefficients (R(2)) (0.9717-0.9900) and lower bias between the experimental and predicted data in terms of the root mean square error and the Akaike Information Criterion. Data from other published research also validated the applicability and generality of the new kinetic model to different types of wastewater. PMID:27395030

  2. Isotopic evidence for biogenic molecular hydrogen production in the Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, S.; Kock, A.; Steinhoff, T.; Fiedler, B.; Fietzek, P.; Kaiser, J.; Krol, M.; Popa, M. E.; Chen, Q.; Tanhua, T.; Röckmann, T.

    2016-01-01

    Oceans are a net source of molecular hydrogen (H2) to the atmosphere. The production of marine H2 is assumed to be mainly biological by N2 fixation, but photochemical pathways are also discussed. We present measurements of mole fraction and isotopic composition of dissolved and atmospheric H2 from the southern and northern Atlantic between 2008 and 2010. In total almost 400 samples were taken during 5 cruises along a transect between Punta Arenas (Chile) and Bremerhaven (Germany), as well as at the coast of Mauritania.The isotopic source signatures of dissolved H2 extracted from surface water are highly deuterium-depleted and correlate negatively with temperature, showing δD values of (-629 ± 54) ‰ for water temperatures at (27 ± 3) °C and (-249 ± 88) ‰ below (19 ± 1) °C. The results for warmer water masses are consistent with the biological production of H2. This is the first time that marine H2 excess has been directly attributed to biological production by isotope measurements. However, the isotope values obtained in the colder water masses indicate that beside possible biological production, a significant different source should be considered.The atmospheric measurements show distinct differences between both hemispheres as well as between seasons. Results from the global chemistry transport model TM5 reproduce the measured H2 mole fractions and isotopic composition well. The climatological global oceanic emissions from the GEMS database are in line with our data and previously published flux calculations. The good agreement between measurements and model results demonstrates that both the magnitude and the isotopic signature of the main components of the marine H2 cycle are in general adequately represented in current atmospheric models despite a proposed source different from biological production or a substantial underestimation of nitrogen fixation by several authors.

  3. Improving methane production from digested manure biofibers by mechanical and thermal alkaline pretreatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsapekos, Panagiotis; Kougias, Panagiotis; Frison, A.;

    2016-01-01

    the effluent stream of biogas reactors. Batch and continuous experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficiency of these pretreatments. In batch experiments, the mechanical pretreatment improved the degradability up to 45%. Even higher efficiency was shown by applying thermal alkaline pretreatments......, enhancing fibers degradability by more than 4-fold. In continuous experiments, the thermal alkaline pretreatment, using 6% NaOH at 55 °C was proven to be the most efficient pretreatment method as the methane production was increased by 26%. The findings demonstrated that the methane production of the biogas...

  4. Isotopic evidence for biogenic molecular hydrogen production in the Atlantic Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Walter, S.; Kock, A.; Steinhoff, T.; B. Fiedler; P. Fietzek; J. Kaiser; Krol, M.; POPA M. E.; Chen, Q.; Tanhua, T.; Röckmann, T.

    2016-01-01

    Oceans are a net source of molecular hydrogen (H2) to the atmosphere. The production of marine H2 is assumed to be mainly biological by N2 fixation, but photochemical pathways are also discussed. We present measurements of mole fraction and isotopic composition of dissolved and atmospheric H2 from the southern and northern Atlantic between 2008 and 2010. In total almost 400 samples were taken during five cruises along a transect between Punta Arenas (Chile) and Bremerhaven (...

  5. Chamber-Based Estimates of Methane Production in Coastal Estuarine Systems in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, B.; Lipson, D.; Lai, C.

    2008-12-01

    Wetland systems are believed to produce between 100 - 231 Tg CH4 yr-1 which is roughly 20% of global methane emissions. The uncertainty in methane emissions models stem from the lack of detailed information about methane gas production within regional wetland systems. The aim of this study is to report the range of methane fluxes observed along salinity gradients at two San Diego coastal wetland systems, the Tijuana Estuary (Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve) and the Peñasquitos Lagoon (Torrey Pines State Park Reserve). Soil water samples are used to elucidate factors responsible for the observed variation in methane fluxes. Air samples were subsequently collected from the headspace of a static soil chamber and stored in pre- evacuated vials. Methane concentrations were analyzed within hours after collection by gas chromatography in the laboratory. The chemical and physical properties of the soil, including salinity, pH, redox potential and temperature are measured with a hand-held probe nearby soil collars. The biological properties of the soil, including dissolved organic carbon, nitrate, and ammonia levels are measured from soil water samples in the laboratory. We find that saline sites under direct tidal influence produced methane fluxes ranging from -3.10 to 9.10 (mean 2.18) mg CH4 m-2 day-1. We also find that brackish sites (0.6 to 3.2 ppt in salinity) with fresh water input from residential runoff at the Peñasquitos Lagoon produced methane fluxes ranging from 0.53 to 192.10 (mean 33.34) mg CH4 m-2 day-1. Sampling was done over the course of 5 weeks during August-September of 2008. We hypothesize that the contrasting methane fluxes found between the saline and the brackish sites is due primarily to the different salinity, and in turn sulfate levels found at the two sites. The reduction of sulfate to produce energy is more energetically favorable than the reduction of carbon dioxide to produce methane. Thus the presence of sulfate may act as

  6. Bovine Host Genetic Variation Influences Rumen Microbial Methane Production with Best Selection Criterion for Low Methane Emitting and Efficiently Feed Converting Hosts Based on Metagenomic Gene Abundance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Roehe

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Methane produced by methanogenic archaea in ruminants contributes significantly to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The host genetic link controlling microbial methane production is unknown and appropriate genetic selection strategies are not developed. We used sire progeny group differences to estimate the host genetic influence on rumen microbial methane production in a factorial experiment consisting of crossbred breed types and diets. Rumen metagenomic profiling was undertaken to investigate links between microbial genes and methane emissions or feed conversion efficiency. Sire progeny groups differed significantly in their methane emissions measured in respiration chambers. Ranking of the sire progeny groups based on methane emissions or relative archaeal abundance was consistent overall and within diet, suggesting that archaeal abundance in ruminal digesta is under host genetic control and can be used to genetically select animals without measuring methane directly. In the metagenomic analysis of rumen contents, we identified 3970 microbial genes of which 20 and 49 genes were significantly associated with methane emissions and feed conversion efficiency respectively. These explained 81% and 86% of the respective variation and were clustered in distinct functional gene networks. Methanogenesis genes (e.g. mcrA and fmdB were associated with methane emissions, whilst host-microbiome cross talk genes (e.g. TSTA3 and FucI were associated with feed conversion efficiency. These results strengthen the idea that the host animal controls its own microbiota to a significant extent and open up the implementation of effective breeding strategies using rumen microbial gene abundance as a predictor for difficult-to-measure traits on a large number of hosts. Generally, the results provide a proof of principle to use the relative abundance of microbial genes in the gastrointestinal tract of different species to predict their influence on traits e

  7. Bovine Host Genetic Variation Influences Rumen Microbial Methane Production with Best Selection Criterion for Low Methane Emitting and Efficiently Feed Converting Hosts Based on Metagenomic Gene Abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehe, Rainer; Dewhurst, Richard J; Duthie, Carol-Anne; Rooke, John A; McKain, Nest; Ross, Dave W; Hyslop, Jimmy J; Waterhouse, Anthony; Freeman, Tom C; Watson, Mick; Wallace, R John

    2016-02-01

    Methane produced by methanogenic archaea in ruminants contributes significantly to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The host genetic link controlling microbial methane production is unknown and appropriate genetic selection strategies are not developed. We used sire progeny group differences to estimate the host genetic influence on rumen microbial methane production in a factorial experiment consisting of crossbred breed types and diets. Rumen metagenomic profiling was undertaken to investigate links between microbial genes and methane emissions or feed conversion efficiency. Sire progeny groups differed significantly in their methane emissions measured in respiration chambers. Ranking of the sire progeny groups based on methane emissions or relative archaeal abundance was consistent overall and within diet, suggesting that archaeal abundance in ruminal digesta is under host genetic control and can be used to genetically select animals without measuring methane directly. In the metagenomic analysis of rumen contents, we identified 3970 microbial genes of which 20 and 49 genes were significantly associated with methane emissions and feed conversion efficiency respectively. These explained 81% and 86% of the respective variation and were clustered in distinct functional gene networks. Methanogenesis genes (e.g. mcrA and fmdB) were associated with methane emissions, whilst host-microbiome cross talk genes (e.g. TSTA3 and FucI) were associated with feed conversion efficiency. These results strengthen the idea that the host animal controls its own microbiota to a significant extent and open up the implementation of effective breeding strategies using rumen microbial gene abundance as a predictor for difficult-to-measure traits on a large number of hosts. Generally, the results provide a proof of principle to use the relative abundance of microbial genes in the gastrointestinal tract of different species to predict their influence on traits e.g. human metabolism

  8. Production of Excess CO2 relative to methane in peatlands: a new H2 sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R.; Woodcroft, B. J.; Varner, R. K.; Tyson, G. W.; Tfaily, M. M.; Sebestyen, S.; Saleska, S. R.; Rogers, K.; Rich, V. I.; McFarlane, K. J.; Kostka, J. E.; Kolka, R. K.; Keller, J.; Iversen, C. M.; Hodgkins, S. B.; Hanson, P. J.; Guilderson, T. P.; Griffiths, N.; de La Cruz, F.; Crill, P. M.; Chanton, J.; Bridgham, S. D.; Barlaz, M.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is generated as the end product of anaerobic organic matter degradation following a series of reaction pathways including fermentation and syntrophy. Along with acetate and CO2, syntrophic reactions generate H2 and are only thermodynamically feasible when coupled to an exothermic reaction that consumes H2. The usual model of organic matter degradation in peatlands has assumed that methanogenesis is that exothermic H2-consuming reaction. If correct, this paradigm should ultimately result in equimolar production of CO2 and methane from the degradation of the model organic compound cellulose: i.e. C6H12O6 à 3CO2 + 3CH4. However, dissolved gas measurement and modeling results from field and incubation experiments spanning peatlands across the northern hemisphere have failed to demonstrate equimolar production of CO2 and methane. Instead, in a flagrant violation of thermodynamics, these studies show a large bias favoring CO2 production over methane generation. In this talk, we will use an array of complementary analytical techniques including FT-IR, cellulose and lignin measurements, 13C-NMR, fluorescence spectroscopy, and ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry to describe organic matter degradation within a peat column and identify the important degradation mechanisms. Hydrogenation was the most common transformation observed in the ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry data. From these results we propose a new mechanism for consuming H2 generated during CO2 production, without concomitant methane formation, consistent with observed high CO2/CH4 ratios. While homoacetogenesis is a known sink for H2 in these systems, this process also consumes CO2 and therefore does not explain the excess CO2 measured in field and incubation samples. Not only does the newly proposed mechanism consume H2 without generating methane, but it also yields enough energy to balance the coupled syntrophic reactions, thereby restoring thermodynamic order. Schematic of organic matter

  9. Fungal degradation of coal as a pretreatment for methane production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Rizwan; Ghauri, Muhammad A.; SanFilipo, John R.; Jones, Elizabeth J.; Orem, William H.; Tatu, Calin A.; Akhtar, Kalsoom; Akhtar, Nasrin

    2013-01-01

    Coal conversion technologies can help in taking advantage of huge low rank coal reserves by converting those into alternative fuels like methane. In this regard, fungal degradation of coal can serve as a pretreatment step in order to make coal a suitable substrate for biological beneficiation. A fungal isolate MW1, identified as Penicillium chrysogenum on the basis of fungal ITS sequences, was isolated from a core sample of coal, taken from a well drilled by the US. Geological Survey in Montana, USA. The low rank coal samples, from major coal fields of Pakistan, were treated with MW1 for 7 days in the presence of 0.1% ammonium sulfate as nitrogen source and 0.1% glucose as a supplemental carbon source. Liquid extracts were analyzed through Excitation–Emission Matrix Spectroscopy (EEMS) to obtain qualitative estimates of solubilized coal; these analyses indicated the release of complex organic functionalities. In addition, GC–MS analysis of these extracts confirmed the presence of single ring aromatics, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), aromatic nitrogen compounds and aliphatics. Subsequently, the released organics were subjected to a bioassay for the generation of methane which conferred the potential application of fungal degradation as pretreatment. Additionally, fungal-mediated degradation was also prospected for extracting some other chemical entities like humic acids from brown coals with high huminite content especially from Thar, the largest lignite reserve of Pakistan.

  10. A novel method to determine simultaneously methane production during in vitro gas production using fully automated equipment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellikaan, W.F.; Hendriks, W.H.; Uwimanaa, G.; Bongers, L.J.G.M.; Becker, P.M.; Cone, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    An adaptation of fully automated gas production equipment was tested for its ability to simultaneously measure methane and total gas. The simultaneous measurement of gas production and gas composition was not possible using fully automated equipment, as the bottles should be kept closed during the i

  11. Effect of the chlortetracycline addition method on methane production from the anaerobic digestion of swine wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lu; Wen, Xin; Wang, Yan; Zou, Yongde; Ma, Baohua; Liao, Xindi; Liang, Juanboo; Wu, Yinbao

    2014-10-01

    Effects of antibiotic residues on methane production in anaerobic digestion are commonly studied using the following two antibiotic addition methods: (1) adding manure from animals that consume a diet containing antibiotics, and (2) adding antibiotic-free animal manure spiked with antibiotics. This study used chlortetracycline (CTC) as a model antibiotic to examine the effects of the antibiotic addition method on methane production in anaerobic digestion under two different swine wastewater concentrations (0.55 and 0.22mg CTC/g dry manure). The results showed that CTC degradation rate in which manure was directly added at 0.55mg CTC/g (HSPIKE treatment) was lower than the control values and the rest of the treatment groups. Methane production from the HSPIKE treatment was reduced (pmethane production under different antibiotic addition methods might be explained by the microbial activity and the concentrations of antibiotic intermediate products and metabolites. Because the primary entry route of veterinary antibiotics into an anaerobic digester is by contaminated animal manure, the most appropriate method for studying antibiotic residue effects on methane production may be using manure from animals that are given a particular antibiotic, rather than adding the antibiotic directly to the anaerobic digester.

  12. Effects of lactone, ketone, and phenolic compounds on methane production and metabolic intermediates during anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikandari, Rachma; Sari, Noor Kartika; A'yun, Qurrotul; Millati, Ria; Cahyanto, Muhammad Nur; Niklasson, Claes; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2015-02-01

    Fruit waste is a potential feedstock for biogas production. However, the presence of fruit flavors that have antimicrobial activity is a challenge for biogas production. Lactones, ketones, and phenolic compounds are among the several groups of fruit flavors that are present in many fruits. This work aimed to investigate the effects of two lactones, i.e., γ-hexalactone and γ-decalactone; two ketones, i.e., furaneol and mesifurane; and two phenolic compounds, i.e., quercetin and epicatechin on anaerobic digestion with a focus on methane production, biogas composition, and metabolic intermediates. Anaerobic digestion was performed in a batch glass digester incubated at 55 °C for 30 days. The flavor compounds were added at concentrations of 0.05, 0.5, and 5 g/L. The results show that the addition of γ-decalactone, quercetin, and epicathechin in the range of 0.5-5 g/L reduced the methane production by 50 % (MIC50). Methane content was reduced by 90 % with the addition of 5 g/L of γ-decalactone, quercetin, and epicathechin. Accumulation of acetic acid, together with an increase in carbon dioxide production, was observed. On the contrary, γ-hexalactone, furaneol, and mesifurane increased the methane production by 83-132 % at a concentration of 5 g/L.

  13. Sequential parametric optimization of methane production from different sources of forest raw material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonidas eMatsakas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The increase in environmental problems and the shortage of fossil fuels have led to the need for action in the development of sustainable and renewable fuels. Methane is produced through anaerobic digestion of organic materials and is a biofuel with very promising characteristics. The success in using methane as a biofuel has resulted in the operation of several commercial-scale plants and the need to exploit novel materials to be used. Forest biomass can serve as an excellent candidate for use as raw material for anaerobic digestion. During this work, both hardwood and softwood species―which are representative of the forests of Sweden―were used for the production of methane. Initially, when untreated forest materials were used for the anaerobic digestion, the yields obtained were very low, even with the addition of enzymes, reaching a maximum of only 40 mL CH4/g VS when birch was used. When hydrothermal pretreatment was applied, the enzymatic digestibility improved up to 6.7 times relative to that without pretreatment, and the yield of methane reached up to 254 mL CH4/g VS. Then the effect of chemical/enzymatic detoxification was examined, where laccase treatment improved the methane yield from the more harshly pretreated materials while it had no effect on the more mildly pretreated material. Finally, addition of cellulolytic enzymes during the digestion improved the methane yields from spruce and pine, whereas for birch separate saccharification was more beneficial. To achieve high yields in spruce 30 FPU/g was necessary, whereas 15 FPU/g was enough when pine and birch were used. During this work, the highest methane yields obtained from pine and birch were 179.9 mL CH4/g VS and 304.8 mL CH4/g VS, respectively. For mildly and severely pretreated spruce, the methane yields reached 259.4 mL CH4/g VS and 276.3 mL CH4/g VS, respectively. We have shown that forest material can serve as raw material for efficient production of methane. The

  14. Methane production from hydrothermal transformation of siderite to magnetite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratbayev, T.; Schroeder, C.; Kappler, A.; Haderlein, S.

    2012-12-01

    Mumma et al. (2009) observed a methane (CH4) plume above the Nili Fossae region on Mars, a region rich in carbonate minerals. Morris et al. (2010) suggest this to be (Mg,Fe)-carbonate. McCollom (2003) demonstrated that the hydrothermal transformation of siderite (FeCO3), to magnetite (Fe3O4) produces CH4. This reaction may thus contribute to the formation of methane on Mars, but is also relevant in the context of such diverse topics as diagenesis of Precambrian banded iron formations, sources of prebiotic organic compounds on early Earth, oil and gas accumulations in Earth's crust, or geological sequestration and storage of CO2. However, neither the thermodynamics of this reaction nor the conditions of maximum CH4 yield have been investigated to date. In order to estimate how pressure and temperature influence CH4 yield we derived a thermodynamic model with a numerical solution implemented in MATLAB. We used the equation 12FeCO3 + 2H2O → 4Fe3O4 + 11CO2 + CH4 (Frost et al. 2007) and thermodynamic calculations of the stability field of FeCO3 by Thoms-Keprta et al. (2009) as a template. At 1 bar pressure, the Gibbs energy turns negative (favorable reaction conditions) at a temperature of 200°C. Increasing pressure to 1000 bar changes that temperature to 250°C. An increase in temperature has a larger effect on shifting the Gibbs energy to more negative values. We therefore chose ambient pressure and temperatures of 300°C, 400°C, and 500°C as experimental conditions. We added 100 mg of either natural or synthetic FeCO3 and 25 μL of MilliQ water into long tip Pasteur pipettes inside an anoxic glove box to avoid contamination by free oxygen. The Pasteur pipettes were sealed with butyl stoppers and then melted shut outside of the glove box. The glass capsules were heated for 48 hours in a muffle furnace at 300°C, 400 0C or 5000C. The composition of the gas phase and the formation of methane in particular were analyzed using gas chromatography with a flame

  15. High-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of biogenic amines in pharmaceutical products containing Citrus aurantium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Carine; Zemolin, Gabriela M; Lima, Fernanda O; de Carvalho, Leandro M; Bottoli, Carla B G; Limberger, Renata Pereira

    2013-01-01

    A reverse-phase (RP)-HPLC method is reported for determining L-tyrosine, p-octopamine, synephrine, tyramine and hordenine as chemical markers of the species Citrus aurantium in raw material, dry extracts and phytotherapeutic herbal formulations. Using RP-HPLC with diode array detection (DAD) and gradient elution, the amines were determined in 12 different products from different Brazilian states labelled as containing C. aurantium. The presence of the amines was confirmed by mass spectrometry using electrospray ionisation (ESI-MS/MS). This RP-HPLC method allowed the separation of the amines from complex mixtures containing caffeine, ephedrine, salicin and other raw materials (e.g. Garcinia camboja, Phaseolus vulgaris, Caralluma fimbriata, Cassia nomane, Ephedra sp. and Cordia ecalyculata). The method proved useful and selective for inspecting herbal medicines containing p-synephrine and structural analogues. The herbal products analysed had a p-synephrine content ranging from 0.005 to 4.0% (w/w). PMID:23574611

  16. Methane production potentials, pathways, and communities of methanogens in vertical sediment profiles of river Sitka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Václav; Blaser, Martin B; Claus, Peter; Chaudhary, Prem P; Rulík, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Biological methanogenesis is linked to permanent water logged systems, e.g., rice field soils or lake sediments. In these systems the methanogenic community as well as the pathway of methane formation are well-described. By contrast, the methanogenic potential of river sediments is so far not well-investigated. Therefore, we analyzed (a) the methanogenic potential (incubation experiments), (b) the pathway of methane production (stable carbon isotopes and inhibitor studies), and (c) the methanogenic community composition (terminal restriction length polymorphism of mcrA) in depth profiles of sediment cores of River Sitka, Czech Republic. We found two depth-related distinct maxima for the methanogenic potentials (a) The pathway of methane production was dominated by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis (b) The methanogenic community composition was similar in all depth layers (c) The main TRFs were representative for Methanosarcina, Methanosaeta, Methanobacterium, and Methanomicrobium species. The isotopic signals of acetate indicated a relative high contribution of chemolithotrophic acetogenesis to the acetate pool.

  17. Hydrogen and methane production from condensed molasses fermentation soluble by a two-stage anaerobic process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chiu-Yue; Liang, You-Chyuan; Lay, Chyi-How [Feng Chia Univ., Taichung, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Environmental Engineering and Science; Chen, Chin-Chao [Chungchou Institute of Technology, Taiwan (China). Environmental Resources Lab.; Chang, Feng-Yuan [Feng Chia Univ., Taichung, Taiwan (China). Research Center for Energy and Resources

    2010-07-01

    The treatment of condensed molasses fermentation soluble (CMS) is a troublesome problem for glutamate manufacturing factory. However, CMS contains high carbohydrate and nutrient contents and is an attractive and commercially potential feedstock for bioenergy production. The aim of this paper is to produce hydrogen and methane by two-stage anaerobic fermentation process. The fermentative hydrogen production from CMS was conducted in a continuously-stirred tank bioreactor (working volume 4 L) which was operated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 8 h, organic loading rate (OLR) of 120 kg COD/m{sup 3}-d, temperature of 35 C, pH 5.5 and sewage sludge as seed. The anaerobic methane production was conducted in an up-flow bioreactor (working volume 11 L) which was operated at a HRT of 24 -60 hrs, OLR of 4.0-10 kg COD/m{sup 3}-d, temperature of 35 C, pH 7.0 with using anaerobic granule sludge from fructose manufacturing factory as the seed and the effluent from hydrogen production process as the substrate. These two reactors have been operated successfully for more than 400 days. The steady-state hydrogen content, hydrogen production rate and hydrogen production yield in the hydrogen fermentation system were 37%, 169 mmol-H{sub 2}/L-d and 93 mmol-H{sub 2}/g carbohydrate{sub removed}, respectively. In the methane fermentation system, the peak methane content and methane production rate were 66.5 and 86.8 mmol-CH{sub 4}/L-d with methane production yield of 189.3 mmol-CH{sub 4}/g COD{sub removed} at an OLR 10 kg/m{sup 3}-d. The energy production rate was used to elucidate the energy efficiency for this two-stage process. The total energy production rate of 133.3 kJ/L/d was obtained with 5.5 kJ/L/d from hydrogen fermentation and 127.8 kJ/L/d from methane fermentation. (orig.)

  18. The prediction of methane production of Holstein cows by several equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, V A; Casper, D P; Mertens, D R

    1995-11-01

    Ruminants are one of many sources contributing to atmospheric methane. The accuracy of seven published equations for methane prediction was evaluated using a data file consisting of 16 experiments (602 observations). Methane energy emissions ranged from .89 to 7.21 Mcal/d for Holstein cows. The DMI ranged from 9.7 to 28.7 kg/d for lactating cows and 4.0 to 12.9 kg/d for nonlactating cows. Mean dietary concentrations of ADF, CP, and ether extract were similar for lactating and nonlactating cows (20.9, 16.5, and 3.0% for lactating cows versus 21.2, 15.7, and 2.9% for nonlactating cows, respectively). Milk production ranged from 2.7 to 55.9 kg/d. Prediction equations were ranked by correlation coefficients and error of prediction. Prediction of methane energy loss from lactating and nonlactating Holstein cows with equations based on the daily total intake or intake of digested cellulose, hemicellulose, and nonfiber carbohydrates (OM - NDF - CP - ether extract) provided the highest correlation coefficients for reproducibility and the lowest errors of prediction. Predictions were poor for lactating cows when a quadratic function of DMI was used. In general, equations estimated methane production more accurately and precisely for nonlactating than for lactating cows. PMID:8747332

  19. Effects of Plant Secondary Metabolites on Methane Production and Fermentation Parameters in In vitro Ruminal Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Giuburunca

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Enteric fermentation process is of concern worldwide for its contribution to global warming. It is known that ruminant animals, due to natural fermentation process contribute substantially to the increase in methane production. Methanogenesis process represents besides its contribution to greenhouse gases emissions an energy loss to the animal. To reduce ruminal methane productions in an ecologically and sustainable way, many attempts have been initiated, such as: uses of chemicals additives or ionophore antibiotics, defaunation process or immunization against ruminal methanogenesis. In the last years, a new strategy has been evaluated whether plant secondary metabolites can be used as natural additives to reduce ruminal methane emissions. The present study has been conducted to investigate the effects of trans-cinnamic, caffeic, p-coumaric acids and catechin hydrate, four plant secondary metabolites (PSMs on methane production and fermentation in in vitro ruminal cultures. The four PSMs were added anaerobically in a 6 mM concentration to 100 ml serum bottles containing 500 mg grass hay as a substrate, 10 ml rumen fluid collected from a fistulated sheep before morning feeding and 40 ml 141 DSM culture medium. The bottles were incubated at 39 ̊C. After 24 h, the following variables were measured: total gas volume, pH, methane and volatile fatty acids (VFAs production. The results showed that caffeic (p = 0.058 and p-coumaric (p = 0.052 acids tended to decrease methane production in comparison to control but the decrease was not statistic significantly at α= 0.05. The other two PSMs had no significant effect on methane production. Addition of PSMs did not affected the total gas volume, the pH and VFAs profile (P>0.05 in relation to the control (no PSM added. In conclusion, caffeic and p-coumaric acids in 6 mM concentration showed some promising effects for decreasing ruminal methane emissions without affecting ruminal fermentation parameters but

  20. Methane production by treating vinasses from hydrous ethanol using a modified UASB reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    España-Gamboa Elda I

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A modified laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB reactor was used to obtain methane by treating hydrous ethanol vinasse. Vinasses or stillage are waste materials with high organic loads, and a complex composition resulting from the process of alcohol distillation. They must initially be treated with anaerobic processes due to their high organic loads. Vinasses can be considered multipurpose waste for energy recovery and once treated they can be used in agriculture without the risk of polluting soil, underground water or crops. In this sense, treatment of vinasse combines the elimination of organic waste with the formation of methane. Biogas is considered as a promising renewable energy source. The aim of this study was to determine the optimum organic loading rate for operating a modified UASB reactor to treat vinasse generated in the production of hydrous ethanol from sugar cane molasses. Results The study showed that chemical oxygen demand (COD removal efficiency was 69% at an optimum organic loading rate (OLR of 17.05 kg COD/m3-day, achieving a methane yield of 0.263 m3/kg CODadded and a biogas methane content of 84%. During this stage, effluent characterization presented lower values than the vinasse, except for potassium, sulfide and ammonia nitrogen. On the other hand, primers used to amplify the 16S-rDNA genes for the domains Archaea and Bacteria showed the presence of microorganisms which favor methane production at the optimum organic loading rate. Conclusions The modified UASB reactor proposed in this study provided a successful treatment of the vinasse obtained from hydrous ethanol production. Methanogen groups (Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales detected by PCR during operational optimum OLR of the modified UASB reactor, favored methane production.

  1. Quantifying Contribution of Synthrophic Acetate Oxidation to Methane Production in Thermophilic Anaerobic Reactors by Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulat, Daniel Girma; Ward, Alastair James; Adamsen, Anders Peter S.;

    2014-01-01

    a new approach for online quantification of the relative contribution of methanogenesis pathways to methane production with a time resolution shorter than one minute. The observed contribution of SAO-HM to methane production under the tested conditions challenges the current widely accepted anaerobic...

  2. Assessment of metabolic properties and kinetic parameters of methanogenic sludge by on-line methane production rate measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Gil, G.; Kleerebezem, R.; Lettinga, G.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents a new approach to studying the metabolic and kinetic properties of anaerobic sludge from single batch experiments. The two main features of the method are that the methane production is measured on-line with a relatively cheap system, and that the methane production data can be

  3. Optimization of process parameters for production of volatile fatty acid, biohydrogen and methane from anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M A; Ngo, H H; Guo, W S; Liu, Y; Nghiem, L D; Hai, F I; Deng, L J; Wang, J; Wu, Y

    2016-11-01

    The anaerobic digestion process has been primarily utilized for methane containing biogas production over the past few years. However, the digestion process could also be optimized for producing volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and biohydrogen. This is the first review article that combines the optimization approaches for all three possible products from the anaerobic digestion. In this review study, the types and configurations of the bioreactor are discussed for each type of product. This is followed by a review on optimization of common process parameters (e.g. temperature, pH, retention time and organic loading rate) separately for the production of VFA, biohydrogen and methane. This review also includes additional parameters, treatment methods or special additives that wield a significant and positive effect on production rate and these products' yield.

  4. Methane cracking over commercial carbons for hydrogen production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sarada Prasad, Vivek Dhand, V. Himabindu Y. Anjaneyulu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A bench scale unit has been designed and developed indigenously for producing hydrogen from methane in the presence of a catalyst. Five number carbon samples (two carbon blacks and three activated carbons of different origin procured from Indian market have been investigated in the bench scale unit with stainless steel continuous fixed bed reactor at a constant temperature of 850 0C and space velocity (VHSV of 1.62 Lit/hr.g. Among all the five samples, activated carbon produced from coconut shells with BET surface area of 1185 m2/g showed promising activity with a sustainability factor (R1/R0 of 0.33 and initial activity (R0 of 0.623 mmol/min.g of catalyst. Accumulated carbon yield (over a period of four hours of the above catalyst is 564 mg/g of catalyst.

  5. Monitoring the Methane Hydrate Dissociation by the Offshore Methane Hydrate Production Tests using Multi-component Seismic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Eiichi; Hayashi, Tsutomu; Tsukahara, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Hiroo; Saeki, Tatsuo

    2013-04-01

    We developed a new OBC (Ocean Bottom Cable), named as 'DSS' (Deep-sea Seismic System). The sensor has 3-component accelerometer and a hydrophone applicable for four-component (4C) seismic survey. Using the DSS, the methane hydrate dissociation zone will be tried to be monitored at the water depth of around 1000m during JOGMEC offshore methane hydrate production test in early 2013. Before the DSS, we had developed the RSCS (Real-time Seismic Cable System) with 3-component gimbaled geophones, and carried out a reflection seismic survey in the Nankai Trough in 2006. Referring this successful survey, we improved the RSCS to the DSS. The receiver size is reduced to 2/3 and the receiver case has a protective metallic exterior and the cable is protected with steel-screened armouring, allowing burial usage using ROV for sub-seabed deployment at the water depth up to 2000m. It will realize a unique survey style that leaves the system on the seabed between pre-test baseline survey and post-test repeated surveys, which might be up to 6 months. The fixed location of the receiver is very important for time-lapse monitoring survey. The DSS has totally 36 sensors and the sensor spacing is 26.5m. The total length is about 1km. We carried out the pre-test baseline survey between off Atsumi and Shima-peninsula in August, 2012.We located the DSS close to the production test well. The nearest sensor is 63m apart from the well. A newly developed real-time 3-D laying simulation system consisting of ADCP (Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler), transponders attached to the DSS, and real-time 3-D plotting system for transponder locations have been adopted. After we laid the cable, we buried the DSS using ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle). The baseline survey included 2D/3D seismic surveys with shooting vessel and cable laying/observation ship. The resultant 2D section and 3D volume shows the good quality to delineate the methane hydrate concentrated zone. After the baseline survey, we have left

  6. The indirect global warming potential and global temperature change potential due to methane oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methane is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas in the atmosphere next to carbon dioxide. Its global warming potential (GWP) for a time horizon of 100 years is 25, which makes it an attractive target for climate mitigation policies. Although the methane GWP traditionally includes the methane indirect effects on the concentrations of ozone and stratospheric water vapour, it does not take into account the production of carbon dioxide from methane oxidation. We argue here that this CO2-induced effect should be included for fossil sources of methane, which results in slightly larger GWP values for all time horizons. If the global temperature change potential is used as an alternative climate metric, then the impact of the CO2-induced effect is proportionally much larger. We also discuss what the correction term should be for methane from anthropogenic biogenic sources.

  7. Quantification of Methane and VOC Emissions from Natural Gas Production in Two Basins with High Ozone Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edie, R.; Robertson, A.; Snare, D.; Soltis, J.; Field, R. A.; Murphy, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2005, the Uintah Basin of Utah and the Upper Green River Basin of Wyoming frequently exceeded the EPA 8-hour allowable ozone level of 75 ppb, spurring interest in volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted during oil and gas production. Debate continues over which stage of production (drilling, flowback, normal production, transmission, etc.) is the most prevalent VOC source. In this study, we quantify emissions from normal production on well pads by using the EPA-developed Other Test Method 33a. This methodology combines ground-based measurements of fugitive emissions with 3-D wind data to calculate the methane and VOC emission fluxes from a point source. VOC fluxes are traditionally estimated by gathering a canister of air during a methane flux measurement. The methane:VOC ratio of this canister is determined at a later time in the laboratory, and applied to the known methane flux. The University of Wyoming Mobile Laboratory platform is equipped with a Picarro methane analyzer and an Ionicon Proton Transfer Reaction-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometer, which provide real-time methane and VOC data for each well pad. This independent measurement of methane and VOCs in situ reveals multiple emission sources on one well pad, with varying methane:VOC ratios. Well pad emission estimates of methane, benzene, toluene and xylene for the two basins will be presented. The different emission source VOC profiles and the limitations of real-time and traditional VOC measurement methods will also be discussed.

  8. Effects of Fe and Mn in Paddy Soils Derived from Different Parent Materials on Methane Production and Emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ke-Xing; LIAO Zong-Wen; WANG Sheng-Chun; YOU Zhi-Lin

    2003-01-01

    Three types of paddy soils, derived from granite, Quaternary red clay and basalt, respectively, were selected to study the effects of Fe and Mn in paddy soils on methane production and emission through pot and incubation experiments. The results indicated that the difference of Fe and Mn in paddy soils was one of the important factors causing obvious differences in methane emission from different soil types. Soil Fe and Mn affecting methane emission from the paddy soils was likely through affecting soil Eh and forming Fe and Mn plaques on rice roots. Different rates and valences of added Fe and Mn significantly affected methane production from paddy soils. Therefore, this study enhanced understanding of processes controlling methane emission from paddy soils and may help to improve modeling and estimating regional and global methane emission from paddy soils.

  9. Evidence for methane production by marine algae (Emiliana huxleyi) and its implication for the methane paradox in oxic waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, K.; Klintzsch, T.; Langer, G.; Nehrke, G.; Bunge, M.; Schnell, S.; Keppler, F.

    2015-12-01

    Methane (CH4), an important greenhouse gas that affects radiation balance and consequently the earth's climate, still has uncertainties in its sinks and sources. The world's oceans are considered to be a source of CH4 to the atmosphere, although the biogeochemical processes involved in its formation are not fully understood. Several recent studies provided strong evidence of CH4 production in oxic marine and freshwaters but its source is still a topic of debate. Studies of CH4 dynamics in surface waters of oceans and large lakes have concluded that pelagic CH4 supersaturation cannot be sustained either by lateral inputs from littoral or benthic inputs alone. However, frequently regional and temporal oversaturation of surface waters occurs. This comprises the observation of a CH4 oversaturating state within the surface mixed layer, sometimes also termed the "oceanic methane paradox". In this study we considered marine algae as a possible direct source of CH4. Therefore, the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi was grown under controlled laboratory conditions and supplemented with two 13C-labelled carbon substrates, namely bicarbonate and a position-specific 13C-labelled methionine (R-S-13CH3). The CH4 production was 0.7 μg POC g-1 d-1, or 30 ng g-1 POC h-1. After supplementation of the cultures with the 13C labelled substrate, the isotope label was observed in headspace-CH4. Moreover, the absence of methanogenic archaea within the algal culture and the oxic conditions during CH4 formation suggest that marine algae such as Emiliania huxleyi contribute to the observed spatial and temporal restricted CH4 oversaturation in ocean surface waters.

  10. Effects of dietary starch content and rate of fermentation on methane production in lactating dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatew, B.; Podesta, S.C.; Laar, van H.; Pellikaan, W.F.; St-Pierre, J.L.; Dijkstra, J.; Bannink, A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of starch varying in rate of fermentation and level of inclusion in the diet in exchange for fiber on methane (CH4) production of dairy cows. Forty Holstein-Friesian lactating dairy cows of which 16 were rumen cannulated were grouped in 10 b

  11. Anaerobic digestion of poplar processing residues for methane production after alkaline treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yiqing; He, Mulan; Ren, Yubing; Ma, Liying; Luo, Yang; Sheng, Hongmei; Xiang, Yun; Zhang, Hua; Li, Qien; An, Lizhe

    2013-04-01

    Poplar processing residues were used for methane production by anaerobic digestion after alkaline treatment and methane production was measured. The highest methane production of 271.9 L/kg volatile solid (VS) was obtained at conditions of 35 g/L and 5.0% NaOH, which was 113.8% higher than non-alkaline treated samples, and 28.9% higher than that of corn straw, which is the conventional anaerobic digestion material in China. The maximal enhancement of 275.5% obtained at conditions of 50 g/L and 7.0% NaOH. Degradation of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin after treatment increased by 4.0-9.0%, 3.3-6.2%, and 11.1-20.5%, respectively, with NaOH dose ranged from 3.0% to 7.0%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), FTIR spectra and Crystallinity measurements showed that the lignocellulosic structures were disrupted by NaOH. The results indicate poplar processing residues might be an efficient substrate for methane production after alkaline treatment.

  12. Environmental evidence for net methane production and oxidation in putative ANaerobic MEthanotrophic (ANME) archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lloyd, Karen; Teske, Andreas; Alperin, Marc J.

    2011-01-01

    versus methane production in sediments from the White Oak River estuary, North Carolina. ANME-1 consistently transcribe 16S rRNA and mRNA of methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA), the key gene for methanogenesis, up to 45 cm into methanogenic sediments. CARD-FISH shows that ANME-1 exist as single rod...

  13. Zero valent iron simultaneously enhances methane production and sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiwen; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-05-15

    Zero valent iron (ZVI) packed anaerobic granular sludge reactors have been developed for improved anaerobic wastewater treatment. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to describe the enhanced methane production and sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge reactors with the addition of ZVI. The model is successfully calibrated and validated using long-term experimental data sets from two independent ZVI-enhanced anaerobic granular sludge reactors with different operational conditions. The model satisfactorily describes the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, sulfate reduction and methane production data from both systems. Results show ZVI directly promotes propionate degradation and methanogenesis to enhance methane production. Simultaneously, ZVI alleviates the inhibition of un-dissociated H2S on acetogens, methanogens and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) through buffering pH (Fe(0) + 2H(+) = Fe(2+) + H2) and iron sulfide precipitation, which improve the sulfate reduction capacity, especially under deterioration conditions. In addition, the enhancement of ZVI on methane production and sulfate reduction occurs mainly at relatively low COD/ [Formula: see text] ratio (e.g., 2-4.5) rather than high COD/ [Formula: see text] ratio (e.g., 16.7) compared to the reactor without ZVI addition. The model proposed in this work is expected to provide support for further development of a more efficient ZVI-based anaerobic granular system.

  14. Bioaugmentation as a solution to increase methane production from an ammonia-rich substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Wang, Han; Fiedel, Nicolai Russell;

    2014-01-01

    this study clearly demonstrated a 31.3% increase in methane production yield in the CSTR reactor, at steady-state, after bioaugmentation. Additionally, high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis showed a fivefold increase in relative abundance of Methanoculleus spp. after bioaugmentation. On contrary...

  15. Enhancement of methane production from co-digestion of chicken manure with agricultural wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouelenien, Fatma; Namba, Yuzaburo; Kosseva, Maria R; Nishio, Naomichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2014-05-01

    The potential for methane production from semi-solid chicken manure (CM) and mixture of agricultural wastes (AWS) in a co-digestion process has been experimentally evaluated at thermophilic and mesophilic temperatures. To the best of author(')s knowledge, it is the first time that CM is co-digested with mixture of AWS consisting of coconut waste, cassava waste, and coffee grounds. Two types of anaerobic digestion processes (AD process) were used, process 1 (P1) using fresh CM (FCM) and process 2 (P2) using treated CM (TCM), ammonia stripped CM, were conducted. Methane production in P1 was increased by 93% and 50% compared to control (no AWS added) with maximum methane production of 502 and 506 mL g(-1)VS obtained at 55°C and 35°C, respectively. Additionally, 42% increase in methane production was observed with maximum volume of 695 mL g(-1)VS comparing P2 test with P2 control under 55°C. Ammonia accumulation was reduced by 39% and 32% in P1 and P2 tests.

  16. Effects of probiotics on the faecal production of hydrogen and methane in patients with meteorism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Julie Bernstorf; Jespersen, Lene; Westermann, Peter;

    Meteorism is a dominating problem in the western world, especially in women. The condition is very difficult to quantify, and effective and documented therapies are not avaiable. We wanted to develop a method for measuring anaerobic production of hydrogen and methane in faeces, and to correlate t...

  17. The presence of hydrogenotrophic methanogens in the inoculum improves methane gas production in microbial electrolysis cells.

    KAUST Repository

    Siegert, Michael

    2014-01-01

    High current densities in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) result from the predominance of various Geobacter species on the anode, but it is not known if archaeal communities similarly converge to one specific genus. MECs were examined here on the basis of maximum methane production and current density relative to the inoculum community structure. We used anaerobic digester (AD) sludge dominated by acetoclastic Methanosaeta, and an anaerobic bog sediment where hydrogenotrophic methanogens were detected. Inoculation using solids to medium ratio of 25% (w/v) resulted in the highest methane production rates (0.27 mL mL(-1) cm(-2), gas volume normalized by liquid volume and cathode projected area) and highest peak current densities (0.5 mA cm(-2)) for the bog sample. Methane production was independent of solid to medium ratio when AD sludge was used as the inoculum. 16S rRNA gene community analysis using pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR confirmed the convergence of Archaea to Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter, and of Bacteria to Geobacter, despite their absence in AD sludge. Combined with other studies, these findings suggest that Archaea of the hydrogenotrophic genera Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter are the most important microorganisms for methane production in MECs and that their presence in the inoculum improves the performance.

  18. Enhanced methane production of Chlorella vulgaris and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by hydrolytic enzymes addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Methane production of microalgae biomass is hampered by their cell wall. • Pretreatment should be designed in accordance to the microalgae specie. • Fresh Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exhibited high anaerobic biodegradability. • Chlorella vulgaris anaerobic biodegradability was enhanced by 50% using protease pretreatment. - Abstract: The effect of enzymatic hydrolysis on microalgae organic matter solubilisation and methane production was investigated in this study. Even though both biomasses, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella vulgaris, exhibited similar macromolecular distribution, their cell wall composition provided different behaviors. The addition of carbohydrolase (Viscozyme) and protease (Alcalase) resulted in high carbohydrates and protein solubilisation on both biomasses (86–96%). Despite the high carbohydrate solubilisation with the carbohydrolase, methane production was enhanced by 14% for C. vulgaris, while hydrolyzed C. reinhardtii did not show any improvement. The addition of protease to C. reinhardtii increased methane production by 1.17-fold. The low enhancement achieved together with the inherent high biodegradability of this biomass would not justify the cost associated to the enzyme addition. On the other hand, C. vulgaris hydrolyzed with the protease resulted in 86% anaerobic biodegradability compared to 54% of the raw biomass. Therefore, the application of protease prior anaerobic digestion of C. vulgaris could be a promising approach to decrease the energetic input required for cell wall disruption

  19. Nanostructural control of methane release in kerogen and its implications to wellbore production decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Tuan Anh; Criscenti, Louise J.; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-06-01

    Despite massive success of shale gas production in the US in the last few decades there are still major concerns with the steep decline in wellbore production and the large uncertainty in a long-term projection of decline curves. A reliable projection must rely on a mechanistic understanding of methane release in shale matrix–a limiting step in shale gas extraction. Using molecular simulations, we here show that methane release in nanoporous kerogen matrix is characterized by fast release of pressurized free gas (accounting for ~30–47% recovery) followed by slow release of adsorbed gas as the gas pressure decreases. The first stage is driven by the gas pressure gradient while the second stage is controlled by gas desorption and diffusion. We further show that diffusion of all methane in nanoporous kerogen behaves differently from the bulk phase, with much smaller diffusion coefficients. The MD simulations also indicate that a significant fraction (3–35%) of methane deposited in kerogen can potentially become trapped in isolated nanopores and thus not recoverable. Our results shed a new light on mechanistic understanding gas release and production decline in unconventional reservoirs. The long-term production decline appears controlled by the second stage of gas release.

  20. Modelling Methane Production and Sulfate Reduction in Anaerobic Granular Sludge Reactor with Ethanol as Electron Donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Dai, Xiaohu; Wang, Qilin; Pan, Yuting; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a mathematical model based on growth kinetics of microorganisms and substrates transportation through biofilms was developed to describe methane production and sulfate reduction with ethanol being a key electron donor. The model was calibrated and validated using experimental data from two case studies conducted in granule-based Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket reactors. The results suggest that the developed model could satisfactorily describe methane and sulfide productions as well as ethanol and sulfate removals in both systems. The modeling results reveal a stratified distribution of methanogenic archaea, sulfate-reducing bacteria and fermentative bacteria in the anaerobic granular sludge and the relative abundances of these microorganisms vary with substrate concentrations. It also indicates sulfate-reducing bacteria can successfully outcompete fermentative bacteria for ethanol utilization when COD/SO42‑ ratio reaches 0.5. Model simulation suggests that an optimal granule diameter for the maximum methane production efficiency can be achieved while the sulfate reduction efficiency is not significantly affected by variation in granule size. It also indicates that the methane production and sulfate reduction can be affected by ethanol and sulfate loading rates, and the microbial community development stage in the reactor, which provided comprehensive insights into the system for its practical operation.

  1. Methane Production and Consumption in Loess Soil at Different Slope Position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Brzezińska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Methane (CH4 production and consumption and soil respiration in loess soils collected from summit (Top, back slope (Middle, and slope bottom (Bottom positions were assessed in laboratory incubations. The CH4 production potential was determined under conditions which can occur in the field (relatively short-term flooding periods with initially ambient O2 concentrations, and the CH4 oxidation potential was estimated in wet soils enriched with CH4. None of the soils tested in this study emitted a significant amount of CH4. In fact, the Middle and Bottom soils, especially at the depth of 20–40 cm, were a consistent sink of methane. Soils collected at different slope positions significantly differed in their methanogenic, methanotrophic, and respiration activities. In comparison with the Top position (as reference soil, methane production and both CO2 production and O2 consumption under flooding were significantly stimulated in the soil from the Middle slope position (P<0.001, while they were reduced in the Bottom soil (not significantly, by 6 to 57%. All upper soils (0–20 cm completely oxidized the added methane (5 kPa during 9–11 days of incubation. Soils collected from the 20–40 cm at the Middle and Bottom slope positions, however, consumed significantly more CH4 than the Top soil (P<0.001.

  2. Gas Production Potential in the Landfill of Tehran by Landfill Methane Outreach Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pazoki

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Landfilling is the most common way of municipal solid waste (MSW disposal in Iran. Many countries have targeted landfill methane recovery among greenhouse gas mitigation strategies, since methane is the second most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide. Major questions remain with respect to actual methane production rates in field settings as well as the relative mass of methane that is recovered, emitted, oxidized by methanotrophic bacteria, laterally migrated, or temporarily stored within the landfill volume. Landfill gas (LFG consists of 50% - 60 vol% methane and 30% - 40 vol% carbon dioxide as well as trace amounts of numerous chemical compounds such as aromatics, chlorinated organic compounds and sulfur compounds. Landfill methane outreach program (LMOP is a voluntary assistance program which helps reduce methane emissions from landfills by encouraging the recovery and the beneficial use of LFG as an energy resource. Objectives In this study, the volume of LFG of Tehran by landfill methane outreach program (LMOP software was calculated. In addition, the relationship between the time of gas collection system operation and the volume of LFG production was evaluated. Materials and Methods The LMOP software was used. The available information and some presumptions were used to operate the software. The composition of the solid waste collected from the landfill of Tehran had specific details. A large amount of it was organic materials, which was about 67.8%. These materials have a good potential to produce gas. In addition, LMOP Colombia model uses the first-order equations in all the analytical equations. Furthermore, it is assumed that the landfill operation time is 30 years and the process is considered in two conditions; first, the gas was recovered in 2000, and second, the process started in 2015. Results The modeling results showed that for the gas recovery starting in 2000 and 2015, the power generation would be 2

  3. The presence of hydrogenotrophic methanogens in the inoculum improves methane gas production in microbial electrolysis cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eSiegert

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High current densities in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs result from the predominance of various Geobacter species on the anode. MECs inoculated from different sources often converge in terms of current production and predominance of Geobacter species despite variability in the inoculum community. Relatively less is known about the effects of inoculum source on methane gas production in MECs, and specifically whether archaeal communities similarly converge to one specific genus. MECs were examined here on the basis of maximum methane production and current density relative to the inoculum community structure. We used anaerobic digester (AD sludge dominated by acetoclastic Methanosaeta species, and an anaerobic bog sediment where hydrogenotrophic methanogens were detected. Inoculation using solids to medium ratio of 25% w/v resulted in the highest methane production rates (0.27 mL mL–1 cm–2, gas volume normalized by liquid volume and cathode projected area and highest peak current densities (0.5 mA cm–2 for the bog sample. Methane production was independent of solid to medium ratio when AD sludge was used as the inoculum. 16S rRNA gene community analysis using pyrosequencing and qPCR confirmed the convergence of Archaea to Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter, and of Bacteria to Geobacter, despite their absence in AD sludge. Combined with other studies, these findings suggest that Archaea of the hydrogenotrophic genera Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter are the most important microorganisms for methane production in MECs and that their presence in the inoculum improves the performance.

  4. Effect of Buffalo Dung to the Water Ratio on Production of Methane through Anaerobic Digestion

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Razaque Sahito; Rasool Bux Mahar; Farooq Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Generation of methane from animal dung through AD (Anaerobic Digestion) is the most feasible way to get energy from it. Pakistan has about 70 million heads of cattle and buffalos, and about 90 million heads of sheep and goats. The dung from these animals can overcome the energy crisis and can fulfill the future energy demands of Pakistan. In present study, buffalo dung is used as the substrate for anaerobic digestion process, whereas the production of methane was analyzed as the function of b...

  5. Enhanced hydrogen production from methane steam reforming using a new thin layered structural coating on a metal substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Lugo, Michael; Tiliakos, Nickolas; Wilde, Juray De; Gill, Rajinder; W. Davis, Andrew; Soltani, Elaine C.; Modroukas, Dean; Castaldi, Marco J.; AICHE 2015 Annual Meeting

    2015-01-01

    The recent increase in the availability of hydrocarbons, especially methane, from shale gas exploration has led to renewed interest in converting or upgrading methane to higher value chemicals. Steam reforming is still the most developed and widely practiced industrial process for converting methane to hydrogen/syngas and its derivatives. It has no oxygen requirement and the most favorable H2/CO ratio for methanol and ammonia production of all available technologies. However, opportunities st...

  6. Analyzing the Dynamics of the Bio-methane Production Chain and the Effectiveness of Subsidization Schemes under Uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Eker, S.; Van Daalen, C.

    2014-01-01

    Bio-methane is a renewable gas option that can be injected to the natural gas grids to increase the sustainability of the energy system and to deal with natural gas supply problems. However, being based on several factors such as resource availability, competition between bio-methane and electricity sectors for biogas and biomass supply, demand, capacity installation and profitability, the future dynamics of bio-methane production is uncertain. In this study, we investigated the dynamics of b...

  7. Bioenergy potential of Ulva lactuca: Biomass yield, methane production and combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Annette; Dahl, Jonas; Bangsø Nielsen, Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    a production potential of 45 T (TS) ha−1 y−1. Biogas production from fresh and macerated U. lactuca yielded up to 271 ml CH4 g−1 VS, which is in the range of the methane production from cattle manure and land based energy crops, such as grass-clover. Drying of the biomass resulted in a 5–9-fold increase...... in weight specific methane production compared to wet biomass. Ash and alkali contents are the main challenges in the use of U. lactuca for direct combustion. Application of a bio-refinery concept could increase the economical value of the U. lactuca biomass as well as improve its suitability for production...

  8. Experimental characterization of production behavior accompanying the hydrate reformation in methane hydrate bearing sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, T.; Kang, J.M.; Nguyen, H.T. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, C. [Kangwon National Univ., (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. [Korea Inst., of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-01

    This study investigated the production behaviour associated with gas hydrate reformation in methane hydrate-bearing sediment by hot-brine injection. A range of different temperature and brine injection rates were used to analyze the pressure and temperature distribution, the gas production behaviour and the movement of the dissociation front. The study showed that hydrate reformation reduces the production rate considerably at an early time. However, gas production increases during the dissociation, near the outlet because the dissociated methane around the inlet is consumed in reforming the hydrate and increases the hydrate saturation around the outlet. Higher temperature also increases the gas production rate and the speed of the dissociation front. 12 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  9. Effect of thermal, chemical and thermo-chemical pre-treatments to enhance methane production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafique, Rashad; Nizami, Abdul-Sattar; Murphy, Jerry D.; Kiely, Gerard [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University College Cork (Ireland); Poulsen, Tjalfe Gorm [Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University (Denmark); Asam, Zaki-ul-Zaman [Department of Civil Engineering, National University of Ireland Galway (Ireland)

    2010-12-15

    The rise in oil price triggered the exploration and enhancement of various renewable energy sources. Producing biogas from organic waste is not only providing a clean sustainable indigenous fuel to the number of on-farm digesters in Europe, but also reducing the ecological and environmental deterioration. The lignocellulosic substrates are not completely biodegraded in anaerobic digesters operating at commercial scale due to their complex physical and chemical structure, which result in meager energy recovery in terms of methane yield. The focus of this study is to investigate the effect of pre-treatments: thermal, thermo-chemical and chemical pre-treatments on the biogas and methane potential of dewatered pig manure. A laboratory scale batch digester is used for these pre-treatments at different temperature range (25 C-150 C). Results showed that thermo-chemical pretreatment has high effect on biogas and methane potential in the temperature range (25-100 C). Maximum enhancement is observed at 70 C with increase of 78% biogas and 60% methane production. Thermal pretreatment also showed enhancement in the temperature range (50-10 C), with maximum enhancement at 100 C having 28% biogas and 25% methane increase. (author)

  10. Prediction of methane emissions from beef cattle in tropical production systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCrabb, G.J.; Hunter, R.A. [CSIRO, Rockhampton, Qld. (Australia). Division of Tropical Agriculture

    1999-07-01

    The northern beef cattle herd accounts for more than half of Australia's beef cattle population, and is a major source of anthropogenic methane emissions for Australia. National Greenhouse Gas Inventory predictions of methane output from Australian beef cattle are based on a predictive equation developed for British breeds of sheep and cattle offered temperate forage-based diets. However, tropical forage diets offered to cattle in northern Australia differ markedly from temperate forage-based diets used in the United Kingdom to develop the predictive equations. The paper reviews recent respiration chamber measurements of daily methane production for Brahman cattle offered a tropical forage or high grain diet, and compares them with values predicted using methodologies of the Australian National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Committee and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. It is concluded that a reliable inventory of methane emissions for cattle in northern Australia can only be achieved after a wider range of tropical forage species has been investigated. Some opportunities for reducing methane emissions of beef cattle by dietary manipulation are discussed.

  11. Optimization of a Pd-based membrane reactor for hydrogen production from methane steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assis, A.J.; Hori, C.E.; Silva, L.C.; Murata, V.V. [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil). School of Chemical Engineering]. E-mail: adilsonjassis@gmail.com

    2008-07-01

    In this work, it is proposed a phenomenological model in steady state to describe the performance of a membrane reactor for hydrogen production through methane steam reform as well as it is performed an optimization of operating conditions. The model is composed by a set of ordinary differential equations from mass, energy and momentum balances and constitutive relations. They were used two different intrinsic kinetic expressions from literature. The results predicted by the model were validated using experimental data. They were investigated the effect of five important process parameters, inlet reactor pressure (PR0), methane feed flow rate (FCH40), sweep gas flow rate (FI), external reactor temperature (TW) and steam to methane feed flow ratio (M), both on methane conversion (XCH{sub 4} ) and hydrogen recovery (YH{sub 2}). The best operating conditions were obtained through simple parametric optimization and by a method based on gradient, which uses the computer code DIRCOL in FORTRAN. It is shown that high methane conversion (96%) as well as hydrogen recovery (91%) can be obtained, using the optimized conditions. (author)

  12. Innovation in biological production and upgrading of methane and hydrogen for use as gaseous transport biofuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ao; Cheng, Jun; Murphy, Jerry D

    2016-01-01

    Biofuels derived from biomass will play a major role in future renewable energy supplies in transport. Gaseous biofuels have superior energy balances, offer greater greenhouse gas emission reductions and produce lower pollutant emissions than liquid biofuels. Biogas derived through fermentation of wet organic substrates will play a major role in future transport systems. Biogas (which is composed of approximately 60% methane/hydrogen and 40% carbon dioxide) requires an upgrading process to reduce the carbon dioxide content to less than 3% before it is used as compressed gas in transport. This paper reviews recent developments in fermentative biogas production and upgrading as a transport fuel. Third generation gaseous biofuels may be generated using marine-based algae via two-stage fermentation, cogenerating hydrogen and methane. Alternative biological upgrading techniques, such as biological methanation and microalgal biogas upgrading, have the potential to simultaneously upgrade biogas, increase gaseous biofuel yield and reduce carbon dioxide emission. PMID:26724182

  13. Effects of rutin and buckwheat seeds on energy metabolism and methane production in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoldt, Ann-Kathrin; Derno, Michael; Das, Gürbüz; Weitzel, Joachim M; Wolffram, Siegfried; Metges, Cornelia C

    2016-03-01

    Flavonoids are secondary plant metabolites with several health promoting effects. As dairy cows often suffer from metabolic imbalance and health problems, interest is growing in health improvements by plant substances such as flavonoids. Our group has recently shown that the flavonoids quercetin and rutin (a glucorhamnoside of quercetin) are bioavailable in cows when given via a duodenal fistula or orally, respectively, affect glucose metabolism, and have beneficial effects on liver health. Furthermore, flavonoids may reduce rumen methane production in vitro through their antibacterial properties. To test the hypothesis that rutin has effects on energy metabolism, methane production, and production performance in dairy cows, we fed rutin trihydrate at a dose of 100mg/kg of body weight to a group of 7 lactating dairy cows for 2 wk in a crossover design. In a second experiment, 2 cows were fed the same ration but were supplemented with buckwheat seeds (Fagopyrum tartaricum), providing rutin at a dose comparable to the first experiment. Two other cows receiving barley supplements were used as controls in a change-over mode. Blood samples were taken weekly and respiration measurements were performed at the end of each treatment. Supplementation of pure rutin, but not of rutin contained in buckwheat seeds, increased the plasma quercetin content. Methane production and milk yield and composition were not affected by rutin treatment in either form. Plasma glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate, and albumin were increased by pure rutin treatment, indicating a possible metabolic effect of rutin on energy metabolism of dairy cows. In addition, we did not show that in vivo ruminal methane production was reduced by rutin. In conclusion, we could not confirm earlier reports on in vitro methane reduction by rutin supplementation in dairy cows in established lactation.

  14. Effects of rutin and buckwheat seeds on energy metabolism and methane production in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoldt, Ann-Kathrin; Derno, Michael; Das, Gürbüz; Weitzel, Joachim M; Wolffram, Siegfried; Metges, Cornelia C

    2016-03-01

    Flavonoids are secondary plant metabolites with several health promoting effects. As dairy cows often suffer from metabolic imbalance and health problems, interest is growing in health improvements by plant substances such as flavonoids. Our group has recently shown that the flavonoids quercetin and rutin (a glucorhamnoside of quercetin) are bioavailable in cows when given via a duodenal fistula or orally, respectively, affect glucose metabolism, and have beneficial effects on liver health. Furthermore, flavonoids may reduce rumen methane production in vitro through their antibacterial properties. To test the hypothesis that rutin has effects on energy metabolism, methane production, and production performance in dairy cows, we fed rutin trihydrate at a dose of 100mg/kg of body weight to a group of 7 lactating dairy cows for 2 wk in a crossover design. In a second experiment, 2 cows were fed the same ration but were supplemented with buckwheat seeds (Fagopyrum tartaricum), providing rutin at a dose comparable to the first experiment. Two other cows receiving barley supplements were used as controls in a change-over mode. Blood samples were taken weekly and respiration measurements were performed at the end of each treatment. Supplementation of pure rutin, but not of rutin contained in buckwheat seeds, increased the plasma quercetin content. Methane production and milk yield and composition were not affected by rutin treatment in either form. Plasma glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate, and albumin were increased by pure rutin treatment, indicating a possible metabolic effect of rutin on energy metabolism of dairy cows. In addition, we did not show that in vivo ruminal methane production was reduced by rutin. In conclusion, we could not confirm earlier reports on in vitro methane reduction by rutin supplementation in dairy cows in established lactation. PMID:26805964

  15. Novel Earth Observation products to characterise wetland xxtent and methane dynamics: the ESA ALANIS-Methane Project

    OpenAIRE

    Hayman, Garry; Bartsch, Annett; Prigent, Catherine; Aires, Felipe; Buchwitz, Michael; Burrows, John; Schneising, Oliver; Blyth, Eleanor; Clark, Douglas B.; O'Connor, Fiona; Gedney, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    The role of wetlands in the global methane cycle is the subject of much current interest. Wetlands are generally accepted as being the largest, but least well quantified, single source of methane (CH4), with emission estimates ranging from 100-231 Tg yr-1. Since the late 1970s, there have been significant inter-annual variations in the growth rate of atmospheric methane, which has been linked to the variability in wetland CH4 emissions. Although the emissions of methane from the wetland...

  16. Methane Production in Microbial Reverse-Electrodialysis Methanogenesis Cells (MRMCs) Using Thermolytic Solutions

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Xi

    2014-08-05

    The utilization of bioelectrochemical systems for methane production has attracted increasing attention, but producing methane in these systems requires additional voltage to overcome large cathode overpotentials. To eliminate the need for electrical grid energy, we constructed a microbial reverse- electrodialysis methanogenesis cell (MRMC) by placing a reverse electrodialysis (RED) stack between an anode with exoelectrogenic microorganisms and a methanogenic biocathode. In the MRMC, renewable salinity gradient energy was converted to electrical energy, thus providing the added potential needed for methane evolution from the cathode. The feasibility of the MRMC was examined using three different cathode materials (stainless steel mesh coated with platinum, SS/Pt; carbon cloth coated with carbon black, CC/CB; or a plain graphite fiber brush, GFB) and a thermolytic solution (ammonium bicarbonate) in the RED stack. A maximum methane yield of 0.60 ± 0.01 mol-CH 4/mol-acetate was obtained using the SS/Pt biocathode, with a Coulombic recovery of 75 ± 2% and energy efficiency of 7.0 ± 0.3%. The CC/CB biocathode MRMC had a lower methane yield of 0.55 ± 0.02 mol-CH4/mol-acetate, which was twice that of the GFB biocathode MRMC. COD removals (89-91%) and Coulombic efficiencies (74-81%) were similar for all cathode materials. Linear sweep voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests demonstrated that cathodic microorganisms enhanced electron transfer from the cathode compared to abiotic controls. These results show that the MRMC has significant potential for production of nearly pure methane using low-grade waste heat and a source of waste organic matter at the anode. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  17. Methane production in microbial reverse-electrodialysis methanogenesis cells (MRMCs) using thermolytic solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xi; Zhang, Fang; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Huang, Xia; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-01-01

    The utilization of bioelectrochemical systems for methane production has attracted increasing attention, but producing methane in these systems requires additional voltage to overcome large cathode overpotentials. To eliminate the need for electrical grid energy, we constructed a microbial reverse-electrodialysis methanogenesis cell (MRMC) by placing a reverse electrodialysis (RED) stack between an anode with exoelectrogenic microorganisms and a methanogenic biocathode. In the MRMC, renewable salinity gradient energy was converted to electrical energy, thus providing the added potential needed for methane evolution from the cathode. The feasibility of the MRMC was examined using three different cathode materials (stainless steel mesh coated with platinum, SS/Pt; carbon cloth coated with carbon black, CC/CB; or a plain graphite fiber brush, GFB) and a thermolytic solution (ammonium bicarbonate) in the RED stack. A maximum methane yield of 0.60 ± 0.01 mol-CH4/mol-acetate was obtained using the SS/Pt biocathode, with a Coulombic recovery of 75 ± 2% and energy efficiency of 7.0 ± 0.3%. The CC/CB biocathode MRMC had a lower methane yield of 0.55 ± 0.02 mol-CH4/mol-acetate, which was twice that of the GFB biocathode MRMC. COD removals (89-91%) and Coulombic efficiencies (74-81%) were similar for all cathode materials. Linear sweep voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests demonstrated that cathodic microorganisms enhanced electron transfer from the cathode compared to abiotic controls. These results show that the MRMC has significant potential for production of nearly pure methane using low-grade waste heat and a source of waste organic matter at the anode.

  18. Methane production in microbial reverse-electrodialysis methanogenesis cells (MRMCs) using thermolytic solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xi; Zhang, Fang; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Huang, Xia; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-01-01

    The utilization of bioelectrochemical systems for methane production has attracted increasing attention, but producing methane in these systems requires additional voltage to overcome large cathode overpotentials. To eliminate the need for electrical grid energy, we constructed a microbial reverse-electrodialysis methanogenesis cell (MRMC) by placing a reverse electrodialysis (RED) stack between an anode with exoelectrogenic microorganisms and a methanogenic biocathode. In the MRMC, renewable salinity gradient energy was converted to electrical energy, thus providing the added potential needed for methane evolution from the cathode. The feasibility of the MRMC was examined using three different cathode materials (stainless steel mesh coated with platinum, SS/Pt; carbon cloth coated with carbon black, CC/CB; or a plain graphite fiber brush, GFB) and a thermolytic solution (ammonium bicarbonate) in the RED stack. A maximum methane yield of 0.60 ± 0.01 mol-CH4/mol-acetate was obtained using the SS/Pt biocathode, with a Coulombic recovery of 75 ± 2% and energy efficiency of 7.0 ± 0.3%. The CC/CB biocathode MRMC had a lower methane yield of 0.55 ± 0.02 mol-CH4/mol-acetate, which was twice that of the GFB biocathode MRMC. COD removals (89-91%) and Coulombic efficiencies (74-81%) were similar for all cathode materials. Linear sweep voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests demonstrated that cathodic microorganisms enhanced electron transfer from the cathode compared to abiotic controls. These results show that the MRMC has significant potential for production of nearly pure methane using low-grade waste heat and a source of waste organic matter at the anode. PMID:25010133

  19. Low temperature calcium hydroxide treatment enhances anaerobic methane production from (extruded) biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Way Cern; Rabaey, Korneel; Vervaeren, Han

    2015-01-01

    Ca(OH)2 treatment was applied to enhance methane yield. Different alkali concentration, incubation temperature and duration were evaluated for their effect on methane production and COD conversion efficiency from (non-)extruded biomass during mesophilic anaerobic digestion at lab-scale. An optimum Ca(OH)2 pretreatment for grass is found at 7.5% lime loading at 10°C for 20h (37.3% surplus), while mild (50°C) and high temperatures perform sub-optimal. Ca(OH)2 post-treatment after fast extrusion gives an additional surplus compared to extruded material of 15.2% (grass), 11.2% (maize straw) and 8.2% (sprout stem) regarding methane production. COD conversion improves accordingly, with additional improvements of 10.3% (grass), 9.0% (maize straw) and 6.8% (sprout stem) by Ca(OH)2 post-treatment. Therefore, Ca(OH)2 pretreatment and post-treatment at low temperature generate an additional effect regarding methane production and COD conversion efficiency. Fast extrusion gives a higher energy efficiency ratio compared to slow extrusion.

  20. Methane production and methanogenic Archaea in the digestive tracts of millipedes (Diplopoda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír Šustr

    Full Text Available Methane production by intestinal methanogenic Archaea and their community structure were compared among phylogenetic lineages of millipedes. Tropical and temperate millipedes of 35 species and 17 families were investigated. Species that emitted methane were mostly in the juliform orders Julida, Spirobolida, and Spirostreptida. The irregular phylogenetic distribution of methane production correlated with the presence of the methanogen-specific mcrA gene. The study brings the first detailed survey of methanogens' diversity in the digestive tract of millipedes. Sequences related to Methanosarcinales, Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales and some unclassified Archaea were detected using molecular profiling (DGGE. The differences in substrate preferences of the main lineages of methanogenic Archaea found in different millipede orders indicate that the composition of methanogen communities may reflect the differences in available substrates for methanogenesis or the presence of symbiotic protozoa in the digestive tract. We conclude that differences in methane production in the millipede gut reflect differences in the activity and proliferation of intestinal methanogens rather than an absolute inability of some millipede taxa to host methanogens. This inference was supported by the general presence of methanogenic activity in millipede faecal pellets and the presence of the 16S rRNA gene of methanogens in all tested taxa in the two main groups of millipedes, the Helminthophora and the Pentazonia.

  1. Methane production enhancement by an independent cathode in integrated anaerobic reactor with microbial electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weiwei; Han, Tingting; Guo, Zechong; Varrone, Cristiano; Wang, Aijie; Liu, Wenzong

    2016-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) represents a potential way to achieve energy recovery from waste organics. In this study, a novel bioelectrochemically-assisted anaerobic reactor is assembled by two AD systems separated by anion exchange membrane, with the cathode placing in the inside cylinder (cathodic AD) and the anode on the outside cylinder (anodic AD). In cathodic AD, average methane production rate goes up to 0.070 mL CH4/mL reactor/day, which is 2.59 times higher than AD control reactor (0.027 m(3) CH4/m(3)/d). And COD removal is increased ∼15% over AD control. When changing to sludge fermentation liquid, methane production rate has been further increased to 0.247 mL CH4/mL reactor/day (increased by 51.53% comparing with AD control). Energy recovery efficiency presents profitable gains, and economic revenue from increased methane totally self-cover the cost of input electricity. The study indicates that cathodic AD could cost-effectively enhance methane production rate and degradation of glucose and fermentative liquid.

  2. Methane production and methanogenic Archaea in the digestive tracts of millipedes (Diplopoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šustr, Vladimír; Chroňáková, Alica; Semanová, Stanislava; Tajovský, Karel; Šimek, Miloslav

    2014-01-01

    Methane production by intestinal methanogenic Archaea and their community structure were compared among phylogenetic lineages of millipedes. Tropical and temperate millipedes of 35 species and 17 families were investigated. Species that emitted methane were mostly in the juliform orders Julida, Spirobolida, and Spirostreptida. The irregular phylogenetic distribution of methane production correlated with the presence of the methanogen-specific mcrA gene. The study brings the first detailed survey of methanogens' diversity in the digestive tract of millipedes. Sequences related to Methanosarcinales, Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales and some unclassified Archaea were detected using molecular profiling (DGGE). The differences in substrate preferences of the main lineages of methanogenic Archaea found in different millipede orders indicate that the composition of methanogen communities may reflect the differences in available substrates for methanogenesis or the presence of symbiotic protozoa in the digestive tract. We conclude that differences in methane production in the millipede gut reflect differences in the activity and proliferation of intestinal methanogens rather than an absolute inability of some millipede taxa to host methanogens. This inference was supported by the general presence of methanogenic activity in millipede faecal pellets and the presence of the 16S rRNA gene of methanogens in all tested taxa in the two main groups of millipedes, the Helminthophora and the Pentazonia.

  3. Comparison of ultrasound and thermal pretreatment of Scenedesmus biomass on methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, C; Sialve, B; Bernet, N; Steyer, J P

    2012-04-01

    Ultrasound at 20Hz was applied at different energy levels (Es) to treat Scenedesmus biomass, and organic matter solubilization, particle size distribution, cell disruption and biochemical methane potential were evaluated. An Es of 35.5 and 47.2MJ/kg resulted in floc deagglomeration but no improvement in methane production compared to untreated biomass. At an Es of 128.9, cell wall disruption was observed together with a 3.1-fold organic matter solubilization and an approximately 2-fold methane production in comparison with untreated biomass. Thermal pretreatment at 80°C caused cell wall disruption and improved anaerobic biodegradability 1.6-fold compared to untreated biomass. Since sonication caused a temperature increase in samples to as high as 85°C, it is likely that thermal effects accounted for much of the observed changes in the biomass. Given that ultrasound treatment at the highest Es studied only increased methane production by 1.2-fold over thermal treatment at 80°C, the higher energy requirement of sonication might not justify the use of this approach over thermal treatment.

  4. High rate production of hydrogen/methane from various substrates and wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Naomichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2004-01-01

    To treat soluble and solid wastes and recover energy from them, high rate methane fermentation, especially using the UASB (upflow anaerobic sludge blanket) reactor, and hydrogen fermentation using various microorganisms and microbial consortia have been investigated intensively in Japan. In this chapter, recent works on high rate methane fermentation in Japan are reviewed, focusing on: 1) basic studies into the applicability of the UASB reactor for various substrates such as propionate, lactate, ethanol, glucose and phenol; 2) its applications to unfeasible conditions, such as lipid and protein containing wastes, low temperature and high salt-containing wastes; 3) progress made in the field of advanced UASB reactors, and; 4) research into methane fermentation from solid wastes, such as from cellulosic materials, municipal sewage sludge, and mud sediments. Following this, although hydrogen fermentation with photosynthetic microorganisms or anaerobic bacteria was researched, for this review we have focused on fermentative hydrogen production using strictly or facultative anaerobes and microbial consortia in Japan, since high rate production of hydrogen-methane via a two-stage process was judged to be more attractive for biological hydrogen production and wastewater treatments. PMID:15453185

  5. Low temperature calcium hydroxide treatment enhances anaerobic methane production from (extruded) biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Way Cern; Rabaey, Korneel; Vervaeren, Han

    2015-01-01

    Ca(OH)2 treatment was applied to enhance methane yield. Different alkali concentration, incubation temperature and duration were evaluated for their effect on methane production and COD conversion efficiency from (non-)extruded biomass during mesophilic anaerobic digestion at lab-scale. An optimum Ca(OH)2 pretreatment for grass is found at 7.5% lime loading at 10°C for 20h (37.3% surplus), while mild (50°C) and high temperatures perform sub-optimal. Ca(OH)2 post-treatment after fast extrusion gives an additional surplus compared to extruded material of 15.2% (grass), 11.2% (maize straw) and 8.2% (sprout stem) regarding methane production. COD conversion improves accordingly, with additional improvements of 10.3% (grass), 9.0% (maize straw) and 6.8% (sprout stem) by Ca(OH)2 post-treatment. Therefore, Ca(OH)2 pretreatment and post-treatment at low temperature generate an additional effect regarding methane production and COD conversion efficiency. Fast extrusion gives a higher energy efficiency ratio compared to slow extrusion. PMID:25461001

  6. Dynamical Effects and Product Distributions in Simulated CN + Methane Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Thomas J; Hornung, Balázs; Pandit, Shubhrangshu; Harvey, Jeremy N; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2016-07-14

    Dynamics of collisions between structured molecular species quickly become complex as molecules become large. Reactions of methane with halogen and oxygen atoms serve as model systems for polyatomic molecule chemical dynamics, and replacing the atomic reagent with a diatomic radical affords further insights. A new, full-dimensional potential energy surface for collisions between CN + CH4 to form HCN + CH3 is developed and then used to perform quasi-classical simulations of the reaction. Coupled-cluster energies serve as input to an empirical valence bonding (EVB) model, which provides an analytical function for the surface. Efficient sampling permits simulation of velocity-map ion images and exploration of dynamics over a range of collision energies. Reaction populates HCN vibration, and energy partitioning changes with collision energy. The reaction cross-section depends on the orientation of the diatomic CN radical. A two-dimensional extension of the cone of acceptance for an atom in the line-of-centers model appropriately describes its reactivity. The simulation results foster future experiments and diatomic extensions to existing atomic models of chemical collisions and reaction dynamics. PMID:26812395

  7. Sulfidogenesis interference on methane production from carbohydrate-rich wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoi, L A G; Damianovic, M H R Z; Foresti, E

    2015-01-01

    Two anaerobic fixed-structured bed reactors were fed with synthetic wastewater simulating the soluble fraction of sugarcane vinasse to evaluate the interference of sulfidogenesis on methanogenesis. The reactors running in parallel were subjected to the same operating conditions. The influent organic matter concentration (in term of chemical oxygen demand (COD)) remained close to 4,000 mgCOD L(-1) and the hydraulic retention time was 24 hours. One reactor, the methanogenic (control reactor), received sulfate only to provide the sulfur required as a nutrient to the methanogenic biomass. The other one, the sulfidogenic/methanogenic reactor (SMR), received sulfate concentration corresponding to COD/sulfate ratios of 4, 5 and 3. In the last phase, the COD removal efficiencies were higher than 96% in both reactors and the SMR achieved 97% of sulfate removal efficiency (COD/sulfate ratio of 3 and influent sulfate concentration close to 1,300 mgSO4(2-) L(-1)). Both reactors also had similar methane yields in this phase, close to 350 mLCH4 gCODremoved(-1) at standard temperature and pressure. These results indicated no significant inhibition of methanogenic activity under the sulfidogenic conditions assessed.

  8. CYANOBACTERIA FOR MITIGATING METHANE EMISSION FROM SUBMERGED PADDY FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upasana Mishra; Shalini Anand [Department of Environmental Studies, Inderprastha Engineering College, Sahibabad, Ghaziabad (India)

    2008-09-30

    Atmospheric methane, a potent greenhouse gas with high absorption potential for infrared radiation, is responsible for one forth of the total anticipated warming. It is forming a major part of green house gases, next after carbon dioxide. Its concentration has been increasing alarmingly on an average at the rate of one percent per year. Atmospheric methane, originating mainly from biogenic sources such as paddy fields, natural wetlands and landfills, accounts for 15-20% of the world's total anthropogenic methane emission. With intensification of rice cultivation in coming future, methane emissions from paddy fields are anticipated to increase. India's share in world's rice production is next after to China and likewise total methane emission from paddy fields also. Methane oxidation through planktophytes, particularly microalgae which are autotrophic and abundant in rice rhizospheres, hold promise in controlling methane emission from submerged paddy fields. The present study is focused on the role of nitrogen fixing, heterocystous cyanobacteria and Azolla (a water fern harboring a cyanobacterium Anabaena azollae) as biological sink for headspace concentration of methane in flooded soils. In this laboratory study, soil samples containing five potent nitrogen fixer cyanobacterial strains from paddy fields, were examined for their methane reducing potential. Soil sample without cyanobacterial strain was tested and taken as control. Anabaena sp. was found most effective in inhibiting methane concentration by 5-6 folds over the control. Moist soil cores treated with chemical nitrogen, urea, in combination with cyanobacteria mixture, Azolla microphylla or cyanobacteria mixture plus Azolla microphylla exhibited significance reduction in the headspace concentration of methane than the soil cores treated with urea alone. Contrary to other reports, this study also demonstrates that methane oxidation in soil core samples from paddy fields was stimulated by

  9. Methane production and energy evaluation of a farm scaled biogas plant in cold climate area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjørtoft, Kristian; Morken, John; Hanssen, Jon Fredrik; Briseid, Tormod

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the specific methane production and the energy balance at a small farm scaled mesophilic biogas plant in a cold climate area. The main substrate was dairy cow slurry. Fish silage was used as co-substrate for two of the three test periods. Energy production, substrate volumes and thermal and electric energy consumption was monitored. Methane production depended mainly on type and amount of substrates, while energy consumption depended mainly on the ambient temperature. During summer the main thermal energy consumption was caused by heating of new substrates, while covering for thermal energy losses from digester and pipes required most thermal energy during winter. Fish silage gave a total energy production of 1623 k Wh/m(3), while the dairy cow slurry produced 79 k Wh/m(3) slurry. Total energy demand at the plant varied between 26.9% and 88.2% of the energy produced.

  10. Methane production rates from natural organics of glacial lake clay and granitic groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engineered barrier materials are an integral part of the proposed Canadian concept for the disposal of used nuclear fuel or high level waste. Components of these barriers, such as the buffer and backfill clays surrounding the waste containers in a vault, and granitic groundwater, naturally contain small quantities of organic material (up to about 1.2 wt%). Despite high temperatures, space and water limitations and radiation effects, the question remains whether gas could be produced from these organics as a result of biological processes. Degradation of organic carbon by microbes can produce gases such as carbon dioxide (C02) and methane (CH4). This work demonstrates that methane is produced in natural systems containing 2. In deep fracture zone groundwater, the largest methane production rate was 0.19 mole %/day or 5 μg CH4/L groundwater per day, at STP. This can be compared with the methane production rate of 1 μg CH4/(kg clay · day) at STP in an earlier experiment containing added organic material. Using this rate of 5 pg CH4/(L groundwater · day) (3.75 μg C/(L groundwater · day)), all of the organic C in the groundwater, assuming it is equally bioavailable, would have been converted to CH4 during the timeframe of this experiment. Enhanced methane production occurred with an increase in natural organic carbon, an increase in the microbe population and with the addition of Fe. Steady-state methane production rates of 10 to 25 μg CH4/ L groundwater per day have been repeatedly observed in clay-free systems. The effects of microbial metabolism, the requirement for a facilitating consortium, the Eh, the pH, the salinity, the groundwater sulphate concentration, the presence of methanotrophs and the sorption effects of clay interlayers are discussed as possible explanations for the inhibition of methanogenesis and methane production in the presence of clay and crushed granite. (author). 49 refs., 11 tabs., 12 figs

  11. Effect of complete rumen modifier (CRM and Calliandra calothyrus on productivity and enteric methane productions of PE dairy goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Made Suci Sukmawati

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Methanogenesis in the rumen is thought to represent 2-12% loss of energy intake. The energy loss as methane can decrease animal productivity and feed efficiency. In addition, methane is potentially involves in global warming that affects the atmosphere adversely. A research to improve PE dairy goat productivity and reduce enteric methane emission by supplementation of calliandra and complete rumen modifier (CRM was conducted for 6 months. In this experiment 20 PE dairy goats were divided into five blocks according to body weight. The experimental design used was a randomized block design that consisted of four treatments, A. Elephant grass 50% + concentrate 50% (control, B. Elephant grass 40% + concentrate 40% + calliandra 20%, C. Elephant grass 50% + concentrate 48% + CRM 2% and D. Elephant grass 40% + concentrate 38% + calliandra 20% + CRM 2%. Data were analyzed statistically using ANOVA and Duncan test. The result showed that calliandra and CRM did not affect nutrient consumption, except that protein consumption increased (P < 0.05 in calliandra treatments (B and D. Nutrient digestibility increased in CRM (C treatment, while other treatments did not differ from control. CRM also increased total bacteria (36.84%, milk production (67.21%, milk fat (25.0%, and reduced enteric methane production (65.71%. The improvement of milk production in CRM treatment (C was followed by better feed efficiency than other treatments. In conclusion, CRM was more effective than calliandra in improving milk production of PE dairy goats and reduced enteric methane emission, but its effectivity was reduced in combination with calliandra.

  12. Potential methane production and oxidation in soil reclamation covers of an oil sands mining site in Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pum, Lisa; Reichenauer, Thomas; Germida, Jim

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic activities create a number of significant greenhouse gases and thus potentially contribute to global warming. Methane production is significant in some agricultural production systems and from wetlands. In soil, methane can be oxidised by methanotrophic bacteria. However, little is known about methane production and oxidation in oil sand reclamation covers. The purpose of this study was to investigate methane production and oxidation potential of tailing sands and six different reclamation layers of oil sands mining sites in Alberta, Canada. Methane production and oxidation potential were investigated in laboratory scale microcosms through continuous headspace analysis using gas chromatography. Samples from a reclamation layer were collected at the Canadian Natural Resources Limited (CNRL) reclamation site at depths of 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm and 20-40 cm in October 2014. In addition, tailing sands provided by Suncor Energy Inc. and soil from a CNRL wetland were studied for methane production. Samples were dried, crushed and sieved to 4 mm, packed into serum bottle microcosms and monitored for eight weeks. Methane production potential was assessed by providing an anoxic environment and by adjusting the samples to a moisture holding capacity of 100 %. Methane oxidation potential was examined by an initial application of 2 vol % methane to the microcosms and by adjusting the samples to a moisture holding capacity of 50 %. Microcosm headspace gas was analysed for methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide and oxygen. All experiments were carried out in triplicates, including controls. SF6 and Helium were used as internal standards to detect potential leaks. Our results show differences for methane production potential between the soil depths, tailing sands and wetlands. Moreover, there were differences in the methane oxidation potential of substrate from the three depths investigated and between the reclamation layers. In conclusion, the present study shows that

  13. Evaluation of feeds from tropical origin for in vitro methane production potential and rumen fermentation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Pal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Enteric methane arising due to fermentation of feeds in the rumen contributes substantially to the greenhouse gas emissions. Thus, like evaluation of chemical composition and nutritive values of feeds, methane production potential of each feed should be determined. This experiment was conducted to evaluate several feeds for methane production potential and rumen fermentation using in vitro gas production technique so that low methane producing feeds could be utilized to feed ruminants. Protein- and energy-rich concentrates (n=11, cereal and grass forages (n=11, and different straws and shrubs (n=12, which are commonly fed to ruminants in India, were collected from a number of locations. Gas production kinetics, methane production, degradability and rumen fermentation greatly varied (p<0.01 among feeds depending upon the chemical composition. Methane production (mL/g of degraded organic matter was lower (p<0.01 for concentrate than forages, and straws and shrubs. Among shrubs and straws, methane production was lower (p<0.01 for shrubs than straws. Methane production was correlated (p<0.05 with concentrations of crude protein (CP, ether extract and non-fibrous carbohydrate (NFC negatively, and with neutral detergent (NDF and acid detergent fiber (ADF positively. Potential gas production was negatively correlated (p=0.04 with ADF, but positively (p<0.01 with NFC content. Rate of gas production and ammonia concentration were influenced by CP content positively (p<0.05, but by NDF and ADF negatively (p<0.05. Total volatile fatty acid concentration and organic matter degradability were correlated (p<0.05 positively with CP and NFC content, but negatively with NDF and ADF content. The results suggest that incorporation of concentrates and shrubs replacing straws and forages in the diets of ruminants may decrease methane production.

  14. Enhancement of bioenergy production from organic wastes by two-stage anaerobic hydrogen and methane production process

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Gang; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated a two-stage anaerobic hydrogen and methane process for increasing bioenergy production from organic wastes. A two-stage process with hydraulic retention time (HRT) 3d for hydrogen reactor and 12d for methane reactor, obtained 11% higher energy compared to a single-stage methanogenic process (HRT 15d) under organic loading rate (OLR) 3gVS/(Ld). The two-stage process was still stable when the OLR was increased to 4.5gVS/(Ld), while the single-stage process failed....

  15. Conversion of crude oil to methane by a microbial consortium enriched from oil reservoir production waters

    OpenAIRE

    Berdugo-Clavijo, Carolina; Lisa M. Gieg

    2014-01-01

    The methanogenic biodegradation of crude oil is an important process occurring in petroleum reservoirs and other oil-containing environments such as contaminated aquifers. In this process, syntrophic bacteria degrade hydrocarbon substrates to products such as acetate, and/or H2 and CO2 that are then used by methanogens to produce methane in a thermodynamically dependent manner. We enriched a methanogenic crude oil-degrading consortium from production waters sampled from a low temperature heav...

  16. Hydropower's Biogenic Carbon Footprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Laura; Pfister, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is accelerating and the world urgently needs a shift to clean and renewable energy. Hydropower is currently the largest renewable source of electricity, but its contribution to climate change mitigation is not yet fully understood. Hydroelectric reservoirs are a source of biogenic greenhouse gases and in individual cases can reach the same emission rates as thermal power plants. Little is known about the severity of their emissions at the global scale. Here we show that the carbon footprint of hydropower is far higher than previously assumed, with a global average of 173 kg CO2 and 2.95 kg CH4 emitted per MWh of electricity produced. This results in a combined average carbon footprint of 273 kg CO2e/MWh when using the global warming potential over a time horizon of 100 years (GWP100). Nonetheless, this is still below that of fossil energy sources without the use of carbon capture and sequestration technologies. We identified the dams most promising for capturing methane for use as alternative energy source. The spread among the ~1500 hydropower plants analysed in this study is large and highlights the importance of case-by-case examinations. PMID:27626943

  17. Enhancement of bioenergy production from organic wastes by two-stage anaerobic hydrogen and methane production process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gang; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-09-01

    The present study investigated a two-stage anaerobic hydrogen and methane process for increasing bioenergy production from organic wastes. A two-stage process with hydraulic retention time (HRT) 3d for hydrogen reactor and 12d for methane reactor, obtained 11% higher energy compared to a single-stage methanogenic process (HRT 15 d) under organic loading rate (OLR) 3 gVS/(L d). The two-stage process was still stable when the OLR was increased to 4.5 gVS/(Ld), while the single-stage process failed. The study further revealed that by changing the HRT(hydrogen):HRT(methane) ratio of the two-stage process from 3:12 to 1:14, 6.7%, more energy could be obtained. Microbial community analysis indicated that the dominant bacterial species were different in the hydrogen reactors (Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum-like species) and methane reactors (Clostridium thermocellum-like species). The changes of substrates and HRT did not change the dominant species. The archaeal community structures in methane reactors were similar both in single- and two- stage reactors, with acetoclastic methanogens Methanosarcina acetivorans-like organisms as the dominant species.

  18. Assessment of wet explosion as a pretreatment method to enhance methane production from agricultural residues and energy crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Guangtao; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Skiadas, Ioannis;

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, wet explosion has been studied as a pretreatment method for increasing the methane yield from wheat straw, miscantus and willow. Among the three biomasses tested, wheat straw and miscanthus were the most promising in terms of methane production, yielding around 265 m...

  19. Ammonia, a selective agent for methane production by syntrophic acetate oxidation at mesophilic temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnürer, A; Nordberg, A

    2008-01-01

    In biogas processes, methane production from acetate proceeds by either aceticlastic methanogenesis or through syntrophic acetate oxidation (SAO). In the present study, the pathway for methane production from acetate was analysed; i) during a gradual increase of the ammonia concentration (final concentration 7 g NH(4)(+) -N/L) in a semi-continuous lab-scale anaerobic digester (4.3 L), operating at mesophilic temperature (37 degrees C) or ii) in diluted enrichment cultures (100 ml) experiencing a gradual increase in ammonia, sodium, potassium and propionic acid. The pathway for methane formation was determined by calculating the (14)CO(2)/(14)CH(4) ratio after incubating samples with (14)C-2-acetate. In the anaerobic digester, as well as in the enrichment cultures, the (14)CO(2)/(14)CH4 ratio clearly increased with increasing ammonium-nitrogen concentration, i.e. as the ammonia concentration increased, a shift from the aceticlastic mechanism to the syntrophic pathway occurred. The shift was very distinct and occurred as the NH(4)(+) -N concentration rose above 3 g/l. No shift in pathway was seen during increasing concentrations of sodium, potassium or propionic acid. The shift to SAO in the biogas digester resulted in a twofold decrease in the specific gas and methane yield.

  20. Rerouting Cellular Electron Flux To Increase the Rate of Biological Methane Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlett, Jennie L; Ortiz, Alicia M; Buan, Nicole R

    2015-10-01

    Methanogens are anaerobic archaea that grow by producing methane, a gas that is both an efficient renewable fuel and a potent greenhouse gas. We observed that overexpression of the cytoplasmic heterodisulfide reductase enzyme HdrABC increased the rate of methane production from methanol by 30% without affecting the growth rate relative to the parent strain. Hdr enzymes are essential in all known methane-producing archaea. They function as the terminal oxidases in the methanogen electron transport system by reducing the coenzyme M (2-mercaptoethane sulfonate) and coenzyme B (7-mercaptoheptanoylthreonine sulfonate) heterodisulfide, CoM-S-S-CoB, to regenerate the thiol-coenzymes for reuse. In Methanosarcina acetivorans, HdrABC expression caused an increased rate of methanogenesis and a decrease in metabolic efficiency on methylotrophic substrates. When acetate was the sole carbon and energy source, neither deletion nor overexpression of HdrABC had an effect on growth or methane production rates. These results suggest that in cells grown on methylated substrates, the cell compensates for energy losses due to expression of HdrABC with an increased rate of substrate turnover and that HdrABC lacks the appropriate electron donor in acetate-grown cells. PMID:26162885

  1. Effect of biochar addition on hydrogen and methane production in two-phase anaerobic digestion of aqueous carbohydrates food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunyoto, Nimas M S; Zhu, Mingming; Zhang, Zhezi; Zhang, Dongke

    2016-11-01

    Effect of biochar addition on hydrogen and methane production in two-phase anaerobic digestion of aqueous carbohydrates was studied using bench-scale bioreactors. The cultures with biochar additions were placed in 100ml reactors and incubated at 35°C and pH 5 for hydrogen production. The residual cultures were then used for methane production, incubated at 35°C and pH 7. Daily yields of hydrogen and methane and weekly yield of volatile fatty acids (VFA) were measured. The hydrogen and methane production potentials, rate and lag phases of the two phases were analysed using the Gompertz model. The results showed that biochar addition increased the maximum production rates of hydrogen by 32.5% and methane 41.6%, improved hydrogen yield by 31.0% and methane 10.0%, and shortened the lag phases in the two phases by 36.0% and 41.0%, respectively. Biochar addition also enhanced VFA generation during hydrogen production and VFA degradation in methane production.

  2. Effect of biochar addition on hydrogen and methane production in two-phase anaerobic digestion of aqueous carbohydrates food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunyoto, Nimas M S; Zhu, Mingming; Zhang, Zhezi; Zhang, Dongke

    2016-11-01

    Effect of biochar addition on hydrogen and methane production in two-phase anaerobic digestion of aqueous carbohydrates was studied using bench-scale bioreactors. The cultures with biochar additions were placed in 100ml reactors and incubated at 35°C and pH 5 for hydrogen production. The residual cultures were then used for methane production, incubated at 35°C and pH 7. Daily yields of hydrogen and methane and weekly yield of volatile fatty acids (VFA) were measured. The hydrogen and methane production potentials, rate and lag phases of the two phases were analysed using the Gompertz model. The results showed that biochar addition increased the maximum production rates of hydrogen by 32.5% and methane 41.6%, improved hydrogen yield by 31.0% and methane 10.0%, and shortened the lag phases in the two phases by 36.0% and 41.0%, respectively. Biochar addition also enhanced VFA generation during hydrogen production and VFA degradation in methane production. PMID:27474855

  3. Methane production and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in children living in a slum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carolina Santos Mello; Soraia Tahan; Lígia Cristina FL Melli; Mirian Silva do Carmo Rodrigues; Ricardo Martin Pereira de Mello; Isabel Cristina Affonso Scaletsky; Mauro Batista de Morais

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To analyze small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in school-aged children and the relationship between hydrogen and methane production in breath tests.METHODS:This transversal study included 85 children residing in a slum and 43 children from a private school,all aged between 6 and 10 years,in Osasco,Brazil.For characterization of the groups,data regarding the socioeconomic status and basic housing sanitary conditions were collected.Anthropometric data was obtained in children from both groups.All children completed the hydrogen (H2) and methane (CH4) breath test in order to assess small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO).SIBO was diagnosed when there was an increase in H2 ≥ 20 ppm or CH4 ≥ 10 ppm with regard to the fasting value until 60 min after lactulose ingestion.RESULTS:Children from the slum group had worse living conditions and lower nutritional indices than children from the private school.SIBO was found in 30.9% (26/84) of the children from the slum group and in 2.4% (1/41) from the private school group (P =0.0007).Greater hydrogen production in the small intestine was observed in children from the slum group when compared to children from the private school (P =0.007).A higher concentration of hydrogen in the small intestine (P < 0.001) and in the colon (P < 0.001) was observed among the children from the slum group with SIBO when compared to children from the slum group without SIBO.Methane production was observed in 63.1% (53/84) of the children from the slum group and in 19.5% (8/41) of the children from the private school group (P < 0.0001).Methane production was observed in 38/58 (65.5%) of the children without SIBO and in 15/26 (57.7%) of the children with SIBO from the slum.Colonic production of hydrogen was lower in methaneproducing children (P =0.017).CONCLUSION:Children who live in inadequate environmental conditions are at risk of bacterial overgrowth and methane production.Hydrogen is a substrate for methane

  4. Conversion of Crude Oil to Methane by a Microbial Consortium Enriched From Oil Reservoir Production Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina eBerdugo-Clavijo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The methanogenic biodegradation of crude oil is an important process occurring in petroleum reservoirs and other oil-containing environments such as contaminated aquifers. In this process, syntrophic bacteria degrade hydrocarbon substrates to products such as acetate, and/or H2 and CO2 that are then used by methanogens to produce methane in a thermodynamically dependent manner. We enriched a methanogenic crude oil-degrading consortium from production waters sampled from a low temperature heavy oil reservoir. Alkylsuccinates indicative of fumarate addition to C5 and C6 n-alkanes were identified in the culture (above levels found in controls, corresponding to the detection of an alkyl succinate synthase gene (assA in the culture. In addition, the enrichment culture was tested for its ability to produce methane from residual oil in a sandstone-packed column system simulating a mature field. Methane production rates of up 5.8 μmol CH4/g of oil/day were measured in the column system. Amounts of produced methane were in relatively good agreement with hydrocarbon loss showing depletion of more than 50% of saturate and aromatic hydrocarbons. Microbial community analysis revealed that the enrichment culture was dominated by members of the genus Smithella, Methanosaeta, and Methanoculleus. However, a shift in microbial community occurred following incubation of the enrichment in the sandstone columns. Here, Methanobacterium sp. were most abundant, as were bacterial members of the genus Pseudomonas and other known biofilm forming organisms. Our findings show that microorganisms enriched from petroleum reservoir waters can bioconvert crude oil components to methane both planktonically and in sandstone-packed columns as test systems. Further, the results suggest that different organisms may contribute to oil biodegradation within different phases (e.g., planktonic versus sessile within a subsurface crude oil reservoir.

  5. Production of methane by co-digestion of cassava pulp with various concentrations of pig manure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panichnumsin, Pornpan [The Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Thungkru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Excellent Center of Waste Utilization and Management, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand); Nopharatana, Annop [Pilot Plant Development and Training Institute, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand); Ahring, Birgitte [AAU, Copenhagen Institute of Technology, Lautrupvang 15, 2750 Ballerup (Denmark); Chaiprasert, Pawinee [School of Bioresources and Technology, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand)

    2010-08-15

    Cassava pulp is a major by-product produced in a cassava starch factory, containing 50-60% of starch (dry basis). Therefore, in this study we are considering its potential as a raw material substrate for the production of methane. To ensure sufficient amounts of nutrients for the anaerobic digestion process, the potential of co-digestion of cassava pulp (CP) with pig manure (PM) was further examined. The effect of the co-substrate mixture ratio was carried out in a semi-continuously fed stirred tank reactor (CSTR) operated under mesophilic condition (37 C) and at a constant OLR of 3.5 kg VS m{sup -3} d{sup -1} and a HRT of 15 days. The results showed that co-digestion resulted in higher methane production and reduction of volatile solids (VS) but lower buffering capacity. Compared to the digestion of PM alone, the specific methane yield increased 41% higher when co-digested with CP in concentrations up to 60% of the incoming VS. This was probably due to an increase in available easily degradable carbohydrates as the CP ratio in feedstock increased. The highest methane yield and VS removal of 306 mL g{sup -1} VS{sub added} and 61%, respectively, were achieved with good process stability (VFA:Alkalinity ratio < 0.1) when CP accounted for 60% of the feedstock VS. A further increase of CP of the feedstock led to a decrease in methane yield and solid reductions. This appeared to be caused by an extremely high C:N ratio of the feedstock resulting in a deficiency of ammonium nitrogen for microbial growth and buffering capacity. (author)

  6. Production of methane by co-digestion of cassava pulp with various concentrations of pig manure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassava pulp is a major by-product produced in a cassava starch factory, containing 50-60% of starch (dry basis). Therefore, in this study we are considering its potential as a raw material substrate for the production of methane. To ensure sufficient amounts of nutrients for the anaerobic digestion process, the potential of co-digestion of cassava pulp (CP) with pig manure (PM) was further examined. The effect of the co-substrate mixture ratio was carried out in a semi-continuously fed stirred tank reactor (CSTR) operated under mesophilic condition (37 oC) and at a constant OLR of 3.5 kg VS m-3 d-1 and a HRT of 15 days. The results showed that co-digestion resulted in higher methane production and reduction of volatile solids (VS) but lower buffering capacity. Compared to the digestion of PM alone, the specific methane yield increased 41% higher when co-digested with CP in concentrations up to 60% of the incoming VS. This was probably due to an increase in available easily degradable carbohydrates as the CP ratio in feedstock increased. The highest methane yield and VS removal of 306 mL g-1 VSadded and 61%, respectively, were achieved with good process stability (VFA:Alkalinity ratio < 0.1) when CP accounted for 60% of the feedstock VS. A further increase of CP of the feedstock led to a decrease in methane yield and solid reductions. This appeared to be caused by an extremely high C:N ratio of the feedstock resulting in a deficiency of ammonium nitrogen for microbial growth and buffering capacity.

  7. Primary production control of methane emission from wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, G. J.; Chanton, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Based on simultaneous measurements of CO2 and CH4 exchange in wetlands extending from subarctic peatlands to subtropical marshes, a positive correlation between CH4 emission and net ecosystem production is reported. It is suggested that net ecosystem production is a master variable integrating many factors which control CH4 emission in vegetated wetlands. It is found that about 3 percent of the daily net ecosystem production is emitted back to the atmosphere as CH4. With projected stimulation of primary production and soil microbial activity in wetlands associated with elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, the potential for increasing CH4 emission from inundated wetlands, further enhancing the greenhouse effect, is examined.

  8. Effect of nitrogen content on methane production by the marine algae Gracilaria tikvahiae and Ulva sp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habig, C.; DeBusk, T.A.; Ryther, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    The rhodophyte Gracilaria tikvahiae and the chlorophyte Ulva sp. were grown under three different concentrations of tissue nitrogen. Each was then digested in batch-mode fermentation experiments. Both biogas and methane production were initially greater in Ulva but persisted longer in Gracilaria, resulting in similar performances for the two species over the entire time course of the experiment. Low-nitrogen Gracilaria contained more volatile solids and produced more biogas and methane per unit dry weight than did higher nitrogen plants, but about the same gas production per unit volatile solids. However, low nitrogen Ulva consistently out-performed the high nitrogen plants in gas production per unit volatile solids, total volatile solids, total volatile solids reduction, and bioconversion efficiency. These results, in contrast with those found in higher plants, probably reflect the low fiber, high soluble carbohydrate levels of nitrogen-deficient seaweeds in general and of Ulva in particular. 18 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  9. Effect of nitrogen content on methane production by the marine algae gracilaria tikvahiae and ulva species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habig, C.; De Busk, T.A.; Ryther, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    The rhodophyte Gracilaria tikvahiae and the chlorophyte Ulva species were grown under three different nitrogen enrichment regimes producing plants of each species with three different concentrations of tissue nitrogen. Each was then digested in batch-mode fermentation experiments. Both biogas and methane production were initially greater in Ulva but persisted longer in Gracilaria, resulting in similar performances for the two species over the entire time course of the experiment. Low-nitrogen Gracilaria contained more volatile solids and produced more biogas and methane per unit dry weight than did higher nitrogen plants, but about the same gas production per unit volatile solids. However, low nitrogen Ulva consistently out-performed the high nitrogen plants in gas production per unit volatile solids, total volatile solids reduction, and bioconversion efficiency. These results, in contrast with those found in higher plants, probably reflect the low fiber, high soluble carbohydrate levels of nitrogen-deficient seaweeds in general and of Ulva in particular.

  10. Effect of urea addition on giant reed ensilage and subsequent methane production by anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan; Ge, Xumeng; Liew, Lo Niee; Liu, Zhe; Li, Yebo

    2015-09-01

    The effect of urea addition on giant reed ensilage and sequential anaerobic digestion (AD) of the ensiled giant reed was evaluated. The dry matter loss during ensilage (up to 90 days) with or without urea addition was about 1%. Addition of 2% urea enhanced production of lactic acid by about 4 times, and reduced production of propionic acid by 2-8 times. Besides, urea addition reduced degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose, and increased degradation of lignin in giant reed during ensilage. Ensilage with or without urea addition had no significant effects on the enzymatic digestibility of giant reed, but ensilage with urea addition achieved a cumulative methane yield of 173 L/kg VS, which was 18% higher than that of fresh giant reed. The improved methane yield of giant reed could be attributed to the production of organic acids and ethanol during ensilage.

  11. Study on methane fermentation and production of vitamin B12 from alcohol waste slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenya; Quan, Taisheng; Li, Pomin; Zhang, Yansheng; Sugiura, Norio; Maekawa, Takaaki

    2004-01-01

    We studied biogas fermentation from alcohol waste fluid to evaluate the anaerobic digestion process and the production of vitamin B12 as a byproduct. Anaerobic digestion using acclimated methanogens was performed using the continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and fixed-bed reactor packed with rock wool as carrier material at 55 degrees C. We also studied the effects of metal ions added to the culture broth on methane and vitamin B12 formation. Vitamin B12 production was 2.92 mg/L in the broth of the fixed-bed reactor, twice that of the CSTR. The optimum concentrations of trace metal ions added to the culture liquid for methane and vitamin B12 production were 1.0 and 8 mL/L for the CSTR and fixed-bed reactor, respectively. Furthermore, an effective method for extracting and purifying vitamin B12 from digested fluid was developed.

  12. Wet explosion of wheat straw and codigestion with swine manure: effect on the methane productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G; Gavala, H N; Skiadas, I V; Ahring, B K

    2009-11-01

    The continuously increasing demand for renewable energy sources renders anaerobic digestion to one of the most promising technologies for renewable energy production. Twenty-two (22) large-scale biogas plants are currently under operation in Denmark. Most of these plants use manure as the primary feedstock but their economical profitable operation relies on the addition of other biomass products with a high biogas yield. Wheat straw is the major crop residue in Europe and the second largest agricultural residue in the world. So far it has been used in several applications, i.e. pulp and paper making, production of regenerated cellulose fibers as an alternative to wood for cellulose-based materials and ethanol production. The advantage of exploiting wheat straw for various applications is that it is available in considerable quantity and at low-cost. In the present study, the codigestion of swine manure with wheat straw in a continuous operated system was investigated, as a method to increase the efficiency of biogas plants that are based on anaerobic digestion of swine manure. Also, the pretreatment of wheat straw with the wet explosion method was studied and the efficiency of the wet explosion process was evaluated based on (a) the sugars release and (b) the methane potential of the pretreated wheat straw compared to that of the raw biomass. It was found that, although a high release of soluble sugars was observed after wet explosion, the methane obtained from the wet-exploded wheat straw was slightly lower compared to that from the raw biomas s. On the other hand, the results from the codigestion of raw (non-pretreated) wheat straw with swine manure were very promising, suggesting that 4.6 kg of straw added to 1t of manure increase the methane production by 10%. Thus, wheat straw can be considered as a promising, low-cost biomass for increasing the methane productivity of biogas plants that are based mainly on swine manure.

  13. Wet explosion of wheat straw and codigestion with swine manure: effect on the methane productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G; Gavala, H N; Skiadas, I V; Ahring, B K

    2009-11-01

    The continuously increasing demand for renewable energy sources renders anaerobic digestion to one of the most promising technologies for renewable energy production. Twenty-two (22) large-scale biogas plants are currently under operation in Denmark. Most of these plants use manure as the primary feedstock but their economical profitable operation relies on the addition of other biomass products with a high biogas yield. Wheat straw is the major crop residue in Europe and the second largest agricultural residue in the world. So far it has been used in several applications, i.e. pulp and paper making, production of regenerated cellulose fibers as an alternative to wood for cellulose-based materials and ethanol production. The advantage of exploiting wheat straw for various applications is that it is available in considerable quantity and at low-cost. In the present study, the codigestion of swine manure with wheat straw in a continuous operated system was investigated, as a method to increase the efficiency of biogas plants that are based on anaerobic digestion of swine manure. Also, the pretreatment of wheat straw with the wet explosion method was studied and the efficiency of the wet explosion process was evaluated based on (a) the sugars release and (b) the methane potential of the pretreated wheat straw compared to that of the raw biomass. It was found that, although a high release of soluble sugars was observed after wet explosion, the methane obtained from the wet-exploded wheat straw was slightly lower compared to that from the raw biomas s. On the other hand, the results from the codigestion of raw (non-pretreated) wheat straw with swine manure were very promising, suggesting that 4.6 kg of straw added to 1t of manure increase the methane production by 10%. Thus, wheat straw can be considered as a promising, low-cost biomass for increasing the methane productivity of biogas plants that are based mainly on swine manure. PMID:19666217

  14. Laboratory-scale bioaugmentation relieves acetate accumulation and stimulates methane production in stalled anaerobic digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, Jennifer R; Dumonceaux, Tim J

    2016-01-01

    An imbalance between acidogenic and methanogenic organisms during anaerobic digestion can result in increased accumulation of volatile fatty acids, decreased reactor pH, and inhibition of methane-producing Archaea. Most commonly the result of organic input overload or poor inoculum selection, these microbiological and biochemical changes severely hamper reactor performance, and there are a few tools available to facilitate reactor recovery. A small, stable consortium capable of catabolizing acetate and producing methane was propagated in vitro and evaluated as a potential bioaugmentation tool for stimulating methanogenesis in acidified reactors. Replicate laboratory-scale batch digesters were seeded with a combination of bioethanol stillage waste and a dairy manure inoculum previously observed to result in high volatile fatty acid accumulation and reactor failure. Experimental reactors were then amended with the acetoclastic consortium, and control reactors were amended with sterile culture media. Within 7 days, bioaugmented reactors had significantly reduced acetate accumulation and the proportion of methane in the biogas increased from 0.2 ± 0 to 74.4 ± 9.9 % while control reactors showed no significant reduction in acetate accumulation or increase in methane production. Organisms from the consortium were enumerated using specific quantitative PCR assays to evaluate their growth in the experimental reactors. While the abundance of hydrogenotrophic microorganisms remained stable during the recovery period, an acetoclastic methanogen phylogenetically similar to Methanosarcina sp. increased more than 100-fold and is hypothesized to be the primary contributor to reactor recovery. Genomic sequencing of this organism revealed genes related to the production of methane from acetate, hydrogen, and methanol.

  15. Laboratory-scale bioaugmentation relieves acetate accumulation and stimulates methane production in stalled anaerobic digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, Jennifer R; Dumonceaux, Tim J

    2016-01-01

    An imbalance between acidogenic and methanogenic organisms during anaerobic digestion can result in increased accumulation of volatile fatty acids, decreased reactor pH, and inhibition of methane-producing Archaea. Most commonly the result of organic input overload or poor inoculum selection, these microbiological and biochemical changes severely hamper reactor performance, and there are a few tools available to facilitate reactor recovery. A small, stable consortium capable of catabolizing acetate and producing methane was propagated in vitro and evaluated as a potential bioaugmentation tool for stimulating methanogenesis in acidified reactors. Replicate laboratory-scale batch digesters were seeded with a combination of bioethanol stillage waste and a dairy manure inoculum previously observed to result in high volatile fatty acid accumulation and reactor failure. Experimental reactors were then amended with the acetoclastic consortium, and control reactors were amended with sterile culture media. Within 7 days, bioaugmented reactors had significantly reduced acetate accumulation and the proportion of methane in the biogas increased from 0.2 ± 0 to 74.4 ± 9.9 % while control reactors showed no significant reduction in acetate accumulation or increase in methane production. Organisms from the consortium were enumerated using specific quantitative PCR assays to evaluate their growth in the experimental reactors. While the abundance of hydrogenotrophic microorganisms remained stable during the recovery period, an acetoclastic methanogen phylogenetically similar to Methanosarcina sp. increased more than 100-fold and is hypothesized to be the primary contributor to reactor recovery. Genomic sequencing of this organism revealed genes related to the production of methane from acetate, hydrogen, and methanol. PMID:26481626

  16. [Influence of substrate COD on methane production in single-chambered microbial electrolysis cell].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Wen-Kai; Liu, Guang-Li; Luo, Hai-Ping; Zhang, Ren-Duo; Fu, Shi-Yu

    2015-03-01

    The chemical oxygen demand (COD) of substrate can affect the microbial activity of both anode and cathode biofilm in the single-chamber methanogenic microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). In order to investigate the effect of COD on the performance of MEC, a single chamber MEC was constructed with biocathode. With the change of initial concentration of COD (700, 1 000 and 1 350 mg x L(-1)), the methane production rate, COD removal and energy efficiency in the MEC were examined under different applied voltages. The results showed that the methane production rate and COD removal increased with the increasing COD. With the applied voltage changing from 0.3 to 0.7 V, the methane production rate increased at the COD of 700 mg x L(-1), while it increased at first and then decreased at the COD of 1000 mg x L(-1) and 1350 mg x L(-1). A similar trend was observed for the COD removal. The cathode potential reached the minimum (- 0.694 ± 0.001) V as the applied voltage was 0.5 V, which therefore facilitated the growth of methanogenic bacteria and improved the methane production rate and energy efficiency of the MEC. The maximum energy income was 0.44 kJ ± 0.09 kJ (1450 kJ x m(-3)) in the MEC, which was obtained at the initial COD of 1000 mg x L(-1) and the applied voltage of 0.5 V. Methanogenic MECs could be used for the treatment of wastewaters containing low organic concentrations to achieve positive energy production, which might provide a new method to recover energy from low-strength domestic wastewater.

  17. Formation Mechanism, Detection and Control of Biogenic Amines in Traditional Fermented Meat Products%传统发酵肉制品中生物胺形成机理及检测控制技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王永丽; 李锋; 陈肖; 黎良浩; 章建浩

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic amines which are present in a wide of animals,plants and microorganisms,are essential for many physiological functions.However,the excessive accumulation of biogenic amines would lead to some potential health risks.Extensive investigations have been conducted in order to illustrate the formation mechanism of biogenic amines in meat products in the past decades.This paper summarizes the research progress in the production conditions of biogenic amines in traditional fermented meat products,microorganism involved in biogenic amines accumulation and biological control over their formation.These illustrations will contribute to our theoretical understanding of the accumulation mechanism of biogenic amines in foods,and provide more knowledge for biological control over the formation of biogenic amines in traditionally Chinese fermented meat products while effectively reducing food safety risks.%生物胺是动植物和多数微生物体内正常的生理成分,过量生物胺则会对人体健康产生潜在的安全隐患.国内外对于肉制品中生物胺的产生机制进行了大量的研究.本文综述传统发酵肉制品中生物胺产生积累的机理条件、与生物胺积累有关的微生物以及相关生物控制方法等方面的研究进展,以期寻找生物胺形成积累的原因,为研究探索传统中式发酵肉制品中生物胺的控制方法提供参考,有效降低食品安全风险.

  18. Effect of combined herbal feed additives on methane, total gas production and rumen fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Indu; Dutta, Tapas Kumar; Singh, Pawan Kumar; Sharma, Ashwani

    2015-01-01

    The present study was to evaluate effect of herbal feed additives on methane and total gas production during the rumen fermentation for environment and animal health concern. Different parts of the five medicinal plants were selected such as leaf and small stems of Ocimum sanctum (Tulsi), roots of Curcuma longa (Haldi), fruits of Emblica officinalis (Amla), leaves of Azadirachta indica (Neem) and leaves and small stem of Clerodendrum phlomidis (Arni) for our study. Addition of different herbal additive combinations did not influence IVDMD and total gas production however methane production (mg/g of substrate DM) was significantly (P<0.05) reduced in Amla: Neem and Neem: Arni combinations. Total nitrogen significantly (P<0.01) increased in the combinations of Tulsi: Haldi and Amla: Neem. TCA-ppt-N is significantly (P<0.01) increased in Tulsi: Haldi, Haldi: Amla, Amla: Neem and Neem: Arni however NH3-N (mg/dl) significantly decreased in all treatments. We conclude that the screening of plant combinations, Amla: Neem and Neem: Arni have potential to decrease methane production and our herbal feed supplements have no side-effects on the ruminant in small amount. PMID:26124571

  19. Anaerobic digestion of grape pomace: Biochemical characterization of the fractions and methane production in batch and continuous digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Achkar, Jean H; Lendormi, Thomas; Hobaika, Zeina; Salameh, Dominique; Louka, Nicolas; Maroun, Richard G; Lanoisellé, Jean-Louis

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we have estimated the biogas and methane production from grape pomace (variety Cabernet Franc). The physical and chemical characteristics of the raw material were determined, and the structural polysaccharides were identified and analyzed by the Van Soest method. Batch anaerobic digestions were carried out to assess the methane production of the grape pomace, pulp and seeds. The obtained cumulative methane productions are 0.125, 0.165 and 0.052 Nm(3) kg COD(-1) for grape pomace, pulps and seeds, respectively. The effect of grinding on the methane potential of the substrates, as a mechanical pretreatment, was evaluated. We found that it increased the anaerobic biodegradability for grape pomace, pulp and seeds by 13.1%, 4.8% and 22.2%, respectively. On the other hand, the methane potential of the grape pomace was determined in a laboratory pilot plant (12L) continuously mixed with an organic loading rate of 2.5 kg COD m(3) d(-1) and a hydraulic retention time of 30 days. The corresponding biogas production was 6.43 × 10(-3) Nm(3) d(-1), with a methane content of 62.3%. Thus, the pilot plant's efficiency compared to that achieved in the batch process was 81.2%. Finally, a significant correlation was found between the biochemical content and methane production.

  20. H{sub 2} production from methane pyrolysis over commercial carbon catalysts: Kinetic and deactivation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, D.P.; Botas, J.A. [Chemical and Environmental Technology Department, ESCET, Rey Juan Carlos University, C/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles (Spain); IMDEA Energia, C/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles (Spain); Guil-Lopez, R. [Chemical and Environmental Technology Department, ESCET, Rey Juan Carlos University, C/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    Hydrogen production from catalytic methane decomposition (DeCH{sub 4}) is a simple process to produce high purity hydrogen with no formation of carbon oxides (CO or CO{sub 2}). However, to completely avoid those emissions, the catalyst must not be regenerated. Therefore, it is necessary to use inexpensive catalysts, which show low deactivation during the process. Use of carbon materials as catalysts fulfils these requirements. Methane decomposition catalysed by a number of commercial carbons has been studied in this work using both constant and variable temperature experiments. The results obtained showed that the most active catalyst at short reaction times was activated carbon, but it underwent a fast deactivation due to the deposition of the carbon formed from methane cracking. On the contrary, carbon blacks, and especially the CB-bp sample, present high reaction rates for methane decomposition at both short and long reaction times. Carbon nanotubes exhibit a relatively low activity in spite of containing significant amounts of metals. The initial loss of activity observed with the different catalysts is attributed mainly to the blockage of their micropores due to the deposition of the carbon formed during the reaction. (author)

  1. Optimization of thermal-dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment for enhancement of methane production from cassava residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghua; Tang, Lei; Zhang, Jianhua; Mao, Zhonggui; Jiang, Li

    2011-02-01

    In this study, the pretreatment of cassava residues by thermal-dilute sulfuric acid (TDSA) hydrolysis was investigated by means of a statistically designed set of experiments. A three-factor central composite design (CCD) was employed to identify the optimum pretreatment condition of cassava residues for methane production. The individual and interactive effects of temperature, H(2)SO(4) concentration and reaction time on increase of methane yield (IMY) were evaluated by applying response surface methodology (RSM). After optimization, the resulting optimum pretreatment condition was 157.84°C, utilizing 2.99% (w/w TS) H(2)SO(4) for 20.15 min, where the maximum methane yield (248 mL/g VS) was 56.96% higher than the control (158 mL/g VS), which was very close to the predict value 56.53%. These results indicate the model obtained through RSM analysis is suit to predict the optimum pretreatment condition and there is great potential of using TDSA pretreatment of cassava residues to enhance methane yield.

  2. Effect of Coexistent Hydrogen on the Selective Production of Ethane by Dehydrogenative Methane Coupling through Dielectric-Barrier Discharge under Ordinary Pressure at an Ambient Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Katsuya Konno; Kaoru Onoe; Yasuyuki Takiguchi; Tatsuaki Yamaguchi

    2014-01-01

    The effect of coexistence of hydrogen on the product selectivity to ethane from methane by dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) reactor was examined experimentally under ordinary pressure without use of catalyst and external heating. By the dilution of methane with hydrogen, both the increase of methane conversion and the decrease of alkene production were observed, improving the selectivities to ethane by ca. 70%.

  3. Methane production from the red seaweed gracilaria tikvahiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanisak, M.D.

    1981-01-01

    Stable continuous anaerobic digestion of the title seaweed was maintained in large (120 L) digesters for more than 20 months, with an average gas (60% CH4) production of 0.4 L/g volatile solids. The average bioconversion efficiency was approximately 48%. When the retention time, t, was increased (i.e., loading rate decreased) from 10 to 60 days the total production of biogas and CH4 (as well as the percent CH4 and the reduction of total volatile solids) increased to maximum at t = 30 days and decreased at t = 60 days. Biogas and CH4 production on the basis of volatile solids added increased to less than or equal to 60 days, as did the percent volatile solids reduction. The pH in the digesters increased with increasing t.

  4. Effect of fat supplementation and stage of lactation on methane production in dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Lene; Hellwing, Anne Louise Frydendahl; Lund, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    decreased milk yield, both measured as kg milk and kg energy corrected milk (ECM). Fat supplementation increased milk yield compared to CON, however ECM yield was not affected. Milk protein concentration decreased with fat supplementation. Methane production increased with DIM when measured in L/d, L/kg DMI......The aim was to determine the effect of fat supplementation on methane (CH4) production and to study if the effect persists over time as lactation progresses. Rumen microbial protein synthesis and thereby milk yield may be reduced when fermentable organic matter (OM) is replaced by nonfermentable...... treatments: Control (CON), CON supplemented with whole cracked rapeseed (WCR), CON supplemented with vegetable rumen protected fat (Lipmix 40/60, Lipitec, NLM Vantinge Aps, Ringe, Denmark) (RPF), and RPF supplemented with HMBi (MetaSmart, Adisseo, France) (RPFA). All diets contained maize silage (230 g...

  5. Effects of Oxytetracycline on Methane Production and the Microbial Communities During Anaerobic Digestion of Cow Manure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE Xin; WANG Chun-yong; LI Run-dong; ZHANG Yun

    2014-01-01

    The effects of different concentrations of oxytetracycline (OTC) on the dynamics of bacterial and archaeal communities during the mesophilic anaerobic digestion (37°C) of cow manure were investigated. Before anaerobic digestion, OTC was added to digesters at concentrations of 20, 50, and 80 mg L-1, respectively. Compared with no-antibiotic control, all methane productions underwent different levels of inhibition at different concentrations of OTC. Changes in the bacterial and archaeal communities were discussed by using PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Results showed that OTC affected the richness and diversity of bacterial and archaeal communities. The bacterial genus Flavobacterium and an uncultured bacterium (JN256083.1) were detected throughout the entire process of anaerobic digestion and seemed to be the functional bacteria. Methanobrevibacter boviskoreani and an uncultured archaeon (FJ230982.1) dominated the archaeal communities during anaerobic digestion. These microorganisms may have high resistance to OTC and may play vital roles in methane production.

  6. Microbial electrolysis contribution to anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge, leading to accelerated methane production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wenzong; Cai, Weiwei; Guo, Zechong;

    2016-01-01

    Methane production rate (MPR) in waste activated sludge (WAS) digestion processes is typically limitedby the initial steps of complex organic matter degradation, leading to a limited MPR due to sludgefermentation speed of solid particles. In this study, a novel microbial electrolysis AD reactor (ME......-AD) wasused to accelerate methane production for energy recovery from WAS. Carbon bioconversion wasaccelerated by ME producing H2 at the cathode. MPR was enhanced to 91.8 gCH4/m3 reactor/d in themicrobial electrolysis ME-AD reactor, thus improving the rate by 3 times compared to control conditions (30.6 gCH4......-AD reactor allowed to significantly enhance carbon degradation and methaneproduction from WAS....

  7. Partial Regeneration of Ni-Based Catalysts for Hydrogen Production via Methane Cracking

    OpenAIRE

    KOÇ, Reyyan; ALPER, Erdoğan; CROISET, Eric; Elkamel, Ali

    2008-01-01

    Methane cracking has the potential to produce high purity, carbon monoxide-free hydrogen suitable for application in PEM fuel cells. The 2 products of the reaction are molecular hydrogen and solid carbon. The carbon appears in the form of carbon filaments whose growth is hindered by carbon encapsulation leading to total deactivation of the catalyst. Several attempts have been made to regenerate the catalyst, mainly by gasifying the carbon filament in air or steam. Our work on 5-wt%...

  8. Effect of nickel ions on anaerobic methane production from water hyacinth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xuan; Hong, Zi-Jian; Dai, Rui-Hua; Liu, Yan; Liu, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    The effect of different concentrations of nickel ions (Ni(2+), 0, 10, 40 and 80 mg/L) on the anaerobic methane production of water hyacinth were investigated. Under these four concentrations, the methane production in 40 d was 2,275, 2,703, 3,210 and 2,481 mL, respectively. This situation illustrated that the Ni(2+) promoted the growth of hydrogen-producing acetic acid bacteria and methanogenic bacteria, even at high concentrations (i.e. 40-80 mg/L). The highest methane production per unit weight water hyacinth reached 206 mL/gTS with 40 mg/L Ni(2+). Meanwhile, the modified Gompertz and Logistic equations were applied to describe the effect on anaerobic culture of Ni(2+). According to these models, the values of methane production potential (mL) for four concentrations were in the following order: 40 mg/L (3,123.42 ± 60.08) > 10 mg/L (2,541.16 ± 46.94) > 80 mg/L (2,432.36 ± 40.18) > 0 mg/L (2,238.10 ± 31.90). According to the analysis of the digestate, the residual concentration of Ni(2+) was approximately 1.05-4.9 mg/L, which was relatively low compared with the Ni(2+) concentrations in the raw feedstock. The results would provide academic guidance and technical support for treatment of water hyacinth with an accumulation of heavy metals.

  9. Temperature response of methane oxidation and production potentials in peatland ecosystems across Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welti, Nina; Korrensalo, Aino; Kerttula, Johanna; Maljanen, Marja; Uljas, Salli; Lohila, Annalea; Laine, Anna; Vesala, Timo; Elliott, David; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina

    2016-04-01

    It has been suggested that the ecosystems located in the high latitudes are especially sensitive to warming. Therefore, we compared 14 peatland systems throughout Finland along a latitudinal gradient from 69°N to 61°N to examine the response of methane production and methane oxidation with warming climate. Peat samples were taken at the height of the growing season in 2015 from 0 - 10cm below the water table depth. The plant communities in sampling locations were described by estimating cover of each plant species and pH of water was measured. Upon return to the lab, we made two parallel treatments, under anoxic and oxic conditions in order to calculate the CH4 production and consumption potentials of the peat and used three temperatures, 4°C, 17.5°C, and 30°C to examine the temperature effect on the potentials. We hypothesized that there will be an observable response curve in CH4 production and oxidation relative to temperature with a greater response with increasing latitude. In general, increasing temperature increased the potential for CH4 production and oxidation, at some sites, the potential was highest at 17.5°C, indicating that there is an optimum temperature threshold for the in situ methane producing and oxidizing microbial communities. Above this threshold, the peat microbial communities are not able to cope with increasing temperature. This is especially noticeable for methane oxidation at sites above 62°N. As countries are being expected to adequately account for their greenhouse gas budgets with increasing temperature models, knowing where the temperature threshold exists is of critical importance.

  10. Bioelectrochemical enhancement of methane production in low temperature anaerobic digestion at 10 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dandan; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Si; Buisman, Cees; Ter Heijne, Annemiek

    2016-08-01

    Anaerobic digestion at low temperature is an attractive technology especially in moderate climates, however, low temperature results in low microbial activity and low rates of methane formation. This study investigated if bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) can enhance methane production from organic matter in low-temperature anaerobic digestion (AD). A bioelectrochemical reactor was operated with granular activated carbon as electrodes at 10 °C. Our results showed that bioelectrochemical systems can enhance CH4 yield, accelerate CH4 production rate and increase acetate removal efficiency at 10 °C. The highest CH4 yield of 31 mg CH4-COD/g VSS was achieved in the combined BES-AD system at a cathode potential of -0.90 V (Ag/AgCl), which was 5.3-6.6 times higher than that in the AD reactor at 10 °C. CH4 production rate achieved in the combined BES-AD system at 10 °C was only slightly lower than that in the AD reactor at 30 °C. The presence of an external circuit between the acetate-oxidizing bioanode and methane-producing cathode provided an alternative pathway from acetate via electrons to methane, potentially via hydrogen. This alternative pathway seems to result in higher CH4 production rates at low temperature compared with traditional methanogenesis from acetate. Integration of BES with AD could therefore be an attractive alternative strategy to enhance the performance of anaerobic digestion in cold areas.

  11. Methane production from horse manure and stall waste with softwood bedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartell, Brian A; Krumins, Valdis; Alt, Jeffrey; Kang, Kathleen; Schwab, Bryan J; Fennell, Donna E

    2012-05-01

    Substantial stall waste is generated from horses on softwood bedding. The methane potential (G(pot)) of horse manure and constructed mixtures of stall waste with softwood bedding was determined at 35°C. G(pot) of 68, 191 and 273 mL/g volatile solids (VS) were estimated for three separate batches of horse manure, indicating variability in the material. Cumulative energy production over 20-40 days ranged from 3.11 ± 0.92 to 8.45 ± 5.42 × 10(5)kJ/metric ton wet weight horse manure alone, and from 1.69 ± 0.39 to 3.91 ± 0.47 × 10(5)kJ/metric ton wet weight horse manure plus softwood stall bedding (mixed at a 1:1 ratio on a VS basis). Softwood bedding was barely degradable and diluted the energy production of the stall waste; however, it did not cause inhibition of methane production from manure. Manually separated used softwood bedding contained substantial methane potential.

  12. Magnetite nanoparticles facilitate methane production from ethanol via acting as electron acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiman; Shi, Xiaoshuang; Wang, Chuanshui; Wang, Lin; Guo, Rongbo

    2015-11-12

    Potential for interspecies hydrogen transfer within paddy soil enrichments obtained via addition of magnetite nanoparticles and ethanol (named as PEM) was investigated. To do this, PEM derived from rice field of Hangzhou (named as PEM-HZ) was employed, because it offered the best methane production performance. Methane production and Fe (III) reduction proceeded in parallel in the presence of magnetite. Inhibition experiments with 2-bromoethane sulfonate (BES) or phosphate showed that interspecies hydrogen transfer and Fe (III) reduction also occurred in methane production from ethanol. 16S rRNA-based Illumina sequencing results showed that Dechloromonas, Thauera, Desulfovibrio and Clostridium were the dominant putative Fe (III) -reducers, and that hydrogenotrophic Methanobacterium accounted for about 88% of the total archaeal community. These results indicated that magnetite nanoparticles that acted as electron acceptor could facilitate rapid oxidation of ethanol by members of the Fe (III) -reducers in PEM-HZ and establishment of the syntrophic relationship of Fe (III) -reducers with Methanobacterium via interspecies hydrogen transfer. Our results could offer a model to understand the microbial interaction with magnetite from a novel angle during methanogenesis.

  13. Effect of dietary nitrate level on enteric methane production, hydrogen emission, rumen fermentation, and nutrient digestibility in dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olijhoek, Dana; Hellwing, Anne Louise Frydendahl; Brask, Maike;

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate may lower methane production in ruminants by competing with methanogenesis for available hydrogen in the rumen. This study evaluated the effect of 4 levels of dietary nitrate addition on enteric methane production, hydrogen emission, feed intake, rumen fermentation, nutrient digestibility......, microbial protein synthesis, and blood methemoglobin. In a 4 × 4 Latin square design 4 lactating Danish Holstein dairy cows fitted with rumen, duodenal, and ileal cannulas were assigned to 4 calcium ammonium nitrate addition levels: control, low, medium, and high [0, 5.3, 13.6, and 21.1 g of nitrate...... content from duodenum, ileum, and feces, and rumen liquid were collected, after which methane production and hydrogen emissions were measured in respiration chambers. Methane production [L/kg of dry matter intake (DMI)] linearly decreased with increasing nitrate concentrations compared with the control...

  14. Anaerobic treatment of glycol contaminated wastewater for methane production

    OpenAIRE

    Agbalakwe, Ekene

    2011-01-01

    Glycols are usually used in the offshore gas industry as hydrate inhibitor in gas pipelines laid deep under the sea. Glycols, in its use, are contaminated by dissolved salts from formation water together with scaling and corrosion products from the pipeline. This results to generation of wastewater containing glycols. Anaerobic treatment may represent an alternative to the aerobic treatment of glycol wastewater. Laboratory-scale studies were carried out to investigate the treatability of glyc...

  15. Anaerobic digestion of maize hybrids for methane production

    OpenAIRE

    P. Vindis; B. Mursec; M. Janzekovic; D. Stajnko; F. Cus

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This research project was aimed at optimising anaerobic digestion of maize and find out which maturity class of corn and which hybrid of a particular maturity class produces the highest rate of biogas and biomethane. Also the chemical composition of gases was studied.Design/methodology/approach: Biogas and biomethane production and composition in mesophilic (35 degrees C) conditions were measured and compared. The corn hybrids of FAO 300 - FAO 600 maturity class were tested. Experime...

  16. Discrimination of abiogenic and biogenic alkane gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI JinXing; MI JingKui; LI ZhiSheng; HU AnPing; YANG Chun; ZHOU QingHua; SHUAI YanHua; ZHANG Ying; MA ChengHua; ZOU CaiNeng; ZHANG ShuiChang; LI Jian; NI YunYan; HU GuoYi; LUO Xia; TAO ShiZhen; ZHU GuangYou

    2008-01-01

    We have combined the analytical data of the carbon isotope distribution pattern, R/Ra and cliche values of abiogenic and biogenic (referring to the therrnogenic and bacterial or microbial) alkane gases in China with those of alkane gases from USA, Russia, Germany, Australia and other countries. Four discrimination criteria are derived from this comparative study: 1) Carbon isotopic composition is generally greater than -30‰ for abiogenic methane and less than -30‰ for biogenic methane; 2)Abiogenic alkane gases have a carbon isotopic reversal trend (Δ13c1>Δ13c2>Δ13c3>Δ13c4) with Δ13c1>-30‰ in general; 3) Gases with R/Ra>0.5 and Δ13c1- Δ13c2>0 are of abiogenic origin; 4) Gases (methane) with CH4/3He≤106 are of abiogenic origin, whereas gases with CH4/3He≥1011 are of biogenic origin.

  17. Thermo-Catalytic Methane Decomposition for Hydrogen Production: Effect of Palladium Promoter on Ni-based Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Irene Lock Sow Mei; S.S.M. Lock; Dai-Viet N. Vo; Bawadi Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen production from the direct thermo-catalytic decomposition of methane is a promising alternative for clean fuel production. However, thermal decomposition of methane can hardly be of any practical and empirical interest in the industry unless highly efficient and effective catalysts, in terms of both catalytic activity and operational lifetime have been developed. In this study, the effect of palladium (Pd) as a promoter onto Ni supported on alumina catalyst has been investigated by u...

  18. Methane production from the anaerobic digestion of some marine macrophytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habig, C.; Ryther, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    Recently, considerable interest has developed concerning the use of biomass as an alternative fuel source. Among the possible substrates, marine plant biomass has frequently been mentioned, primarily due to the fact that such plants do not have competing, more valuable uses for food or fiber and their cultivation does not compete for valuable agricultural lands. Also, recent research has demonstrated that at least one potential marine energy crop, the red alga Graciliaria tikvahiae, is capable of extremely high production rates that equal or exceed those of terrestrial plants, and are rivaled by the productivity of another possible aquatic energy crop, the water hyacinth. To date, seaweed energy research has emphasized cultivation, while a marked paucity of information exists regarding the comparative performance of these algae as a methanogenic substrate. Only two species, the giant kelp, Macrocystic pyrifera and Gracilaria tikvahiae, have been tested in fermentation trials. The relative merits of a red, a green, and a brown alga, run vis a vis at four different loading rates, are discussed in this report. In addition, two loading procedures were utilized to assess what if any, effect they might have on digester performance. (Refs. 14).

  19. Methane production from the Anaerobic digestion of some Marine Macrophytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habig, C.; Ryther, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    Recently, considerable interest has developed concerning the use of biomass as an alternative fuel source. Among the possible substrates, marine plant biomass has frequently been mentioned, primarily due to the fact that such plants do not have competing, more valuable uses for food or fiber and their cultivation does not compete for valuable agricultural lands (1,2). Also, recent research has demonstrated that at least one potential marine energy crop, the red alga Gracilaria tikvahiae, is capable of extremely high production rates that equal or exceed those of terrestrial plants, and are rivaled by the productivity of another possible aquatic energy crop, the water hyacinth. To date, seaweed energy research has emphasized cultivation, while a marked paucity of information exists regarding the comparative performance of these algae as a methanogenic substrate. Only two species, the giant kelp, Macrocystic pyrifera and Gracilaria tikvahiae, have been tested in fermentation trials. The relative merits of a red, a green, and a brown alga, run vis a vis at four different loading rates are discussed in this report. In addition, two loading procedures were utilized to assess what if any, effect they might have on digester performance.

  20. Diamond dissolution and the production of methane and other carbon-bearing species in hydrothermal diamond-anvil cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I.-Ming; Anderson, Alan J.

    2009-01-01

    Raman analysis of the vapor phase formed after heating pure water to near critical (355-374 ??C) temperatures in a hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC) reveals the synthesis of abiogenic methane. This unexpected result demonstrates the chemical reactivity of diamond at relatively low temperatures. The rate of methane production from the reaction between water and diamond increases with increasing temperature and is enhanced by the presence of a metal gasket (Re, Ir, or Inconel) which is compressed between the diamond anvils to seal the aqueous sample. The minimum detection limit for methane using Raman spectroscopy was determined to be ca. 0.047 MPa, indicating that more than 1.4 nanograms (or 8.6 ?? 10-11 mol) of methane were produced in the HDAC at 355 ??C and 30 MPa over a period of ten minutes. At temperatures of 650 ??C and greater, hydrogen and carbon dioxide were detected in addition to methane. The production of abiogenic methane, observed in all HDAC experiments where a gasket was used, necessitates a reexamination of the assumed chemical systems and intensive parameters reported in previous hydrothermal investigations employing diamonds. The results also demonstrate the need to minimize or eliminate the production of methane and other carbonic species in experiments by containing the sample within a HDAC without using a metal gasket.

  1. Use of 13C-Labeled Substrates to Determine Relative Methane Production Rates in Hypersaline Microbial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, C. A.; Bebout, B.; Chanton, J.

    2015-12-01

    Rates and pathways of methane production were determined from photosynthetic soft microbial mats and gypsum-encrusted endoevaporites collected in hypersaline environments from California, Mexico and Chile, as well as an organic-rich mud from a pond in the El Tatio volcanic fields, Chile. Samples (mud, homogenized soft mats and endoevaporites) were incubated anaerobically with deoxygenated site water, and the increase in methane concentration through time in the headspaces of the incubation vials was used to determine methane production rates. To ascertain the substrates used by the methanogens, 13C-labeled methylamines, methanol, dimethylsulfide, acetate or bicarbonate were added to the incubations (one substrate per vial) and the stable isotopic composition of the resulting methane was measured. The vials amended with 13C-labeled methylamines produced the most 13C-enriched methane, generally followed by the 13C-labeled methanol-amended vials. The stable isotope data and the methane production rates were used to determine first order rate constants for each of the substrates at each of the sites. Estimates of individual substrate use revealed that the methylamines produced 55 to 92% of the methane generated, while methanol was responsible for another 8 to 40%.

  2. Methane emissions from process equipment at natural gas production sites in the United States: liquid unloadings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David T; Sullivan, David W; Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Pacsi, Adam P; Harrison, Matthew; Keen, Kindal; Fraser, Matthew P; Daniel Hill, A; Lamb, Brian K; Sawyer, Robert F; Seinfeld, John H

    2015-01-01

    Methane emissions from liquid unloadings were measured at 107 wells in natural gas production regions throughout the United States. Liquid unloadings clear wells of accumulated liquids to increase production, employing a variety of liquid lifting mechanisms. In this work, wells with and without plunger lifts were sampled. Most wells without plunger lifts unload less than 10 times per year with emissions averaging 21,000-35,000 scf methane (0.4-0.7 Mg) per event (95% confidence limits of 10,000-50,000 scf/event). For wells with plunger lifts, emissions averaged 1000-10,000 scf methane (0.02-0.2 Mg) per event (95% confidence limits of 500-12,000 scf/event). Some wells with plunger lifts are automatically triggered and unload thousands of times per year and these wells account for the majority of the emissions from all wells with liquid unloadings. If the data collected in this work are assumed to be representative of national populations, the data suggest that the central estimate of emissions from unloadings (270 Gg/yr, 95% confidence range of 190-400 Gg) are within a few percent of the emissions estimated in the EPA 2012 Greenhouse Gas National Emission Inventory (released in 2014), with emissions dominated by wells with high frequencies of unloadings.

  3. Nitrogen recycling and methane production using Gracilaria tikvahiae: a closed system approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habig, C.; Andrews, D.A.; Ryther, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    The macroalga Gracilaria tikvahiae (Rhodophyta) was used in a closed system of materials to study methane production and nitrogen recycling. Twenty liter carboys served as digesters. The performance of these digesters mirrors results obtained with two- and four litre Gracilaria digesters with respect to optimal retention times for biogas production, methane content, and bioconversion efficiency to methane. Three groups of Gracilaria were cultivated in 850-L vaults to compare growth performance under three different enrichment treatments. These treatments consisted of an unfertilized group, a group raised on a typical commercial enrichment regime, and a group raised on the residues removed from the digester when additional substrate was loaded into the digester. The results indicate that growth of Gracilaria on the digester residue enrichment scheme is statistically similar to growth using a commercial enrichment mixture. In addition, the nitrogen content of the digester residue is described, along with nitrogen assimilation by Gracilaria and nitrogen recycling efficiencies. Both nitrogen assimilation and recycling efficiency closely parallel the ammonium content of the residue enrichment media. (Refs. 18).

  4. Methane production and microbial community structure for alkaline pretreated waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui; Xing, Defeng; Jia, Jianna; Zhou, Aijuan; Zhang, Lu; Ren, Nanqi

    2014-10-01

    Alkaline pretreatment was studied to analyze the influence on waste activated sludge (WAS) reduction, methane production and microbial community structure during anaerobic digestion. Methane production from alkaline pretreated sludge (A-WAS) (pH = 12) increased from 251.2 mL/Ld to 362.2 mL/Ld with the methane content of 68.7% compared to raw sludge (R-WAS). Sludge reduction had been improved, and volatile suspended solids (VSS) removal rate and protein reduction had increased by ∼ 10% and ∼ 35%, respectively. The bacterial and methanogenic communities were analyzed using 454 pyrosequencing and clone libraries of 16S rRNA gene. Remarkable shifts were observed in microbial community structures after alkaline pretreatment, especially for Archaea. The dominant methanogenic population changed from Methanosaeta for R-WAS to Methanosarcina for A-WAS. In addition to the enhancement of solubilization and hydrolysis of anaerobic digestion of WAS, alkaline pretreatment showed significant impacts on the enrichment and syntrophic interactions between microbial communities.

  5. Methane production from rice straw with acclimated anaerobic sludge: effect of phosphate supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhongfang; Chen, Jiayi; Zhang, Zhenya; Sugiura, Norio

    2010-06-01

    Rice straw particles were directly used as substrate for anaerobic digestion with acclimated sludge under room temperature and different levels of phosphate. Two obvious biogas production peaks were observed for all reactors, with biogas or methane yields of (0.33-0.35)m(3)/kg-VS loaded or (0.27-0.29)m(3) CH(4)/kg-VS loaded and average methane contents of 75.9-78.2%. A separated two-stage first-order kinetic model was developed in this study and showed a good fit to the experimental data when this complicated process was divided into two stages. The average biogas and methane production rate constants were (0.027-0.031)d(-1) and (0.028-0.033)d(-1), respectively, increased by 2-3 times in the second stages than those in the first. The results indicated that an adequate level of phosphate addition (465 mg-P/L) could accelerate the biogasification process: 7-13 days earlier appearance of the two peaks and shorter time needed for complete biogasification of rice straw.

  6. An integrated system for hydrogen and methane production during landfill leachate treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full text': The patent-pending integrated waste-to-energy system comprises both a novel biohydrogen reactor with a gravity settler (Biohydrogenator, Hafez et al., 2009), followed by a second stage conventional anaerobic digester for the production of methane gas. This chemical-free process has been tested with a synthetic wastewater/leachate solution, and was operated at 37oC for 45 days. The biohydrogenator (system (A), stage 1) steadily produced hydrogen with no methane during the experimental period. The maximum hydrogen yield was 400 ml H2 / g glucose with an average of 345 ml H2 / g glucose, as compared to 141 and 118 ml H2 / g glucose for two consecutive runs done in parallel using a conventional continuously stirrer tank reactor (System (B)). The maximum and average hydrogen production rates in system (A) were 22 and 19 L H2/d, the maximum yield was 2.8 mol H2 /mol glucose higher than 1.6-2.3 mol H2 /mol glucose reported for continuous-flow reactors. The methane yield for the second stage in system (A) approached a maximum value of 426 ml CH4/ gCOD removed. (author)

  7. Biological hydrogen and methane production from bagasse bioethanol fermentation residues using a two-stage bioprocess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hai-Hsuan; Whang, Liang-Ming; Chung, Man-Chien; Chan, Kun-Chi

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the recovery of H2 and CH4 from bagasse bioethanol fermentation residues (bagasse BEFR) using a two-stage bioprocess. In the hydrogen fermentation bioreactor (HFB), carbohydrate removal efficiency was maintained at 82-93% and the highest hydrogen yield was 8.24mL/gCOD at volumetric loading rate (VLR) of 80kgCOD/m(3)/day. The results indicated a positive correlation between hydrogen yield and butyrate-to-acetate ratio, which might be due to the mechanisms of lactate/acetate utilization for hydrogen production and acetogenesis occurring in the HFB. Remaining volatile fatty acids and alcohols in the HFB effluent were further utilized for methane production in methane fermentation bioreactor (MFB), in which the highest methane yield of 345.2mL/gCOD was attained at VLR of 2.5kgCOD/m(3)/day. Overall, the two-stage bioprocess achieved a maximum COD removal of 81% from bagasse BEFR, and converted 0.3% and 72.8% of COD in the forms of H2 and CH4, respectively. PMID:26774443

  8. Oxidative reforming of methane for hydrogen and synthesis gas production: Thermodynamic equilibrium analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonio C.D.Freitas; Reginaldo Guirardello

    2012-01-01

    A thermodynamic analysis of methane oxidative reforming was carried out by Gibbs energy minimization (at constant pressure and temperature) and entropy maximization (at constant pressure and enthalpy) methods,to determine the equilibrium compositions and equilibrium temperatures,respectively.Both cases were treated as optimization problems (non-linear programming formulation).The GAMS(R) 23.1 software and the CONOPT2 solver were used in the resolution of the proposed problems.The hydrogen and syngas production were favored at high temperatures and low pressures,and thus the oxygen to methane molar ratio (O2/CH4) was the dominant factor to control the composition of the product formed.For O2/CH4 molar ratios higher than 0.5,the oxidative reforming of methane presented autothermal behavior in the case of either utilizing O2 or air as oxidant agent,but oxidation reaction with air possessed the advantage of avoiding peak temperatures in the system,due to change in the heat capacity of the system caused by the addition of nitrogen.The calculated results were compared with previously published experimental and simulated data with a good agreement between them.

  9. Methane emissions from process equipment at natural gas production sites in the United States: liquid unloadings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David T; Sullivan, David W; Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Pacsi, Adam P; Harrison, Matthew; Keen, Kindal; Fraser, Matthew P; Daniel Hill, A; Lamb, Brian K; Sawyer, Robert F; Seinfeld, John H

    2015-01-01

    Methane emissions from liquid unloadings were measured at 107 wells in natural gas production regions throughout the United States. Liquid unloadings clear wells of accumulated liquids to increase production, employing a variety of liquid lifting mechanisms. In this work, wells with and without plunger lifts were sampled. Most wells without plunger lifts unload less than 10 times per year with emissions averaging 21,000-35,000 scf methane (0.4-0.7 Mg) per event (95% confidence limits of 10,000-50,000 scf/event). For wells with plunger lifts, emissions averaged 1000-10,000 scf methane (0.02-0.2 Mg) per event (95% confidence limits of 500-12,000 scf/event). Some wells with plunger lifts are automatically triggered and unload thousands of times per year and these wells account for the majority of the emissions from all wells with liquid unloadings. If the data collected in this work are assumed to be representative of national populations, the data suggest that the central estimate of emissions from unloadings (270 Gg/yr, 95% confidence range of 190-400 Gg) are within a few percent of the emissions estimated in the EPA 2012 Greenhouse Gas National Emission Inventory (released in 2014), with emissions dominated by wells with high frequencies of unloadings. PMID:25488307

  10. Combustible gas production (methane) and biodegradation of solid and liquid mixtures of meat industry wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcos, A.; Al-Kassir, A.; Cuadros, F.; Lopez-Rodriguez, F. [School of Engineering, University of Extremadura, Avda. De Elva, s/n, 06071, Badajoz (Spain); Mohamad, A.A. [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Calgary, 2500 University Dr. N.W., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2010-05-15

    This work is devoted to determine the optimal operational conditions on the methane production as well as on the biodegradation obtained from the anaerobic codigestion of solid (fat, intestines, rumen, bowels, whiskers, etc.) and liquid (blood, washing water, manure, etc.) wastes of meat industry, particularly the ones rising from the municipal slaughterhouse of Badajoz (Spain). The experiments were performed using a 2 l capacity discontinuous digester at 38 C. The loading rate were 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4.5 g COD for wastewater (washing water and blood; Mixture 1), and 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4 g COD for the co-digestion of a mixture of 97% liquid effluent and 3% solid wastes v/v (Mixture 2) which represents the annual mean composition of the waste generated by the slaughterhouse. The maximal biodegradation rates obtained were: Mixture 1, 56.9% for a COD load of 1 g; and Mixture 2, 19.1% for a COD load of 2 g. For both mixtures, the greatest methane production was for the maximum COD load (4.5 g for Mixture 1, and 4 g for Mixture 2), at which values the amounts of methane obtained during and at the end of the co-digestion were practically indistinguishable between the two mixtures. The results will be used to design, construct, and establish the optimal operating conditions of a continuous complete-mixture biodigester. (author)

  11. Methane production enhancement by an independent cathode in integrated anaerobic reactor with microbial electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Weiwei; Han, Tingting; Guo, Zechong;

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) represents a potential way to achieve energy recovery from waste organics. In this study, a novel bioelectrochemically-assisted anaerobic reactor is assembled by two AD systems separated by anion exchange membrane, with the cathode placing in the inside cylinder (cathodic...... AD) and the anode on the outside cylinder (anodic AD). In cathodic AD, average methane production rate goes up to 0.070 mL CH4/mL reactor/day, which is 2.59 times higher than AD control reactor (0.027 m3 CH4/m3/d). And COD removal is increased ~15% over AD control. When changing to sludge...... fermentation liquid, methane production rate has been further increased to 0.247 mL CH4/mL reactor/day (increased by 51.53% comparing with AD control). Energy recovery efficiency presents profitable gains, and economic revenue from increased methane totally self-cover the cost of input electricity. The study...

  12. Simultaneous enhancement of methane production and methane content in biogas from waste activated sludge and perennial ryegrass anaerobic co-digestion: The effects of pH and C/N ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaohu; Li, Xiaoshuai; Zhang, Dong; Chen, Yinguang; Dai, Lingling

    2016-09-01

    It is necessary to find an appropriate strategy to simultaneously enhance the methane production and methane content in biogas from waste activated sludge (WAS) and grass co-digestion. In this study an efficient strategy, i.e., adjusting the initial pH 12 and C/N ratio 17/1, for simultaneous enhancement of methane production and methane content in biogas from WAS and perennial ryegrass co-digestion was reported. Experimental results indicated that the maximal methane production was 310mL/gVSadd at the optimum conditions after 30-d anaerobic digestion, which was, respectively, about 1.5- and 3.8-fold of the sole WAS and sole perennial ryegrass anaerobic digestion. Meanwhile, the methane content in biogas was about 74%, which was much higher than that of sole WAS (64%) or sole perennial ryegrass (54%) anaerobic digestion.

  13. Simultaneous enhancement of methane production and methane content in biogas from waste activated sludge and perennial ryegrass anaerobic co-digestion: The effects of pH and C/N ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaohu; Li, Xiaoshuai; Zhang, Dong; Chen, Yinguang; Dai, Lingling

    2016-09-01

    It is necessary to find an appropriate strategy to simultaneously enhance the methane production and methane content in biogas from waste activated sludge (WAS) and grass co-digestion. In this study an efficient strategy, i.e., adjusting the initial pH 12 and C/N ratio 17/1, for simultaneous enhancement of methane production and methane content in biogas from WAS and perennial ryegrass co-digestion was reported. Experimental results indicated that the maximal methane production was 310mL/gVSadd at the optimum conditions after 30-d anaerobic digestion, which was, respectively, about 1.5- and 3.8-fold of the sole WAS and sole perennial ryegrass anaerobic digestion. Meanwhile, the methane content in biogas was about 74%, which was much higher than that of sole WAS (64%) or sole perennial ryegrass (54%) anaerobic digestion. PMID:27259187

  14. Solid-state co-digestion of expired dog food and corn stover for methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fuqing; Li, Yebo

    2012-08-01

    Expired dog food was co-digested with corn stover for biogas production via solid-state anaerobic digestion (SS-AD) at feedstock-to-effluent (F/E) ratios of 2, 4, and 6 using effluent from a sewage sludge digester as inoculum. Degradation of the main components in dog food and corn stover was measured. Higher methane yields were obtained at lower F/E ratios and at higher percentages of dog food in the substrate. The highest methane yield of 304.4 L/kg VS(feed) was obtained for the substrate containing 50% corn stover and 50% dog food, which was an increase of 229% and 109% compared to digesting corn stover and dog food alone, respectively. Co-digestion of corn stover with dog food reduced the start-up time and volatile fatty acid (VFA) accumulation, but decreased the cellulose and xylan degradation of corn stover.

  15. Optimisation of a microwave pretreatment of wheat straw for methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackowiak, D; Bassard, D; Pauss, A; Ribeiro, T

    2011-06-01

    This study aims at the optimisation of a microwave pretreatment for wheat straw solubilisation and anaerobic biodegradability. The maximum yield of methane production was obtained at 150°C with an improvement of 28% compared to an untreated sample. In addition, at this temperature, the time to reach 80% of the methane volume obtained from untreated straw was about 35%. The study of ramp time and holding time at targeted temperature showed that they had no improvement effect. Thus, the best conditions are the highest heating rate for a final temperature 150°C without any holding time. The reading of energy consumed by pretreatment and energy overproduced by pretreated samples showed that increasing tVS amount and heating rate led to a saving of energy consumption. Nevertheless, to obtain a positive energy balance, a microwave device should consume less than 2.65 kJ/g(tVS).

  16. Syngas production via methane steam reforming with oxygen: plasma reactors versus chemical reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steam reforming with oxygen (SRO) is a combination of non-catalytic partial oxidation and steam reforming of methane, industrially used for syngas production. There are several models of the chemical reactors used for this purpose but in the last decade a new direction has developed - plasma devices. The aim of the present paper is to make a comparative analysis between the autothermal reformers, including their improved variants, and the plasma reactors. The study is conceived in terms of advantages and disadvantages coming from the exploitation parameters, methane conversion, selectivity, energy efficiency and investment costs. Although SRO by means of chemical reactors may be the most efficient, plasma reactors represent an incisive approach by their simplicity, compactness and low price. (author)

  17. Effect of Catalytic Cylinders on Autothermal Reforming of Methane for Hydrogen Production in a Microchamber Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfei Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new multicylinder microchamber reactor is designed on autothermal reforming of methane for hydrogen production, and its performance and thermal behavior, that is, based on the reaction mechanism, is numerically investigated by varying the cylinder radius, cylinder spacing, and cylinder layout. The results show that larger cylinder radius can promote reforming reaction; the mass fraction of methane decreased from 26% to 21% with cylinder radius from 0.25 mm to 0.75 mm; compact cylinder spacing corresponds to more catalytic surface and the time to steady state is decreased from 40 s to 20 s; alteration of staggered and aligned cylinder layout at constant inlet flow rates does not result in significant difference in reactor performance and it can be neglected. The results provide an indication and optimize performance of reactor; it achieves higher conversion compared with other reforming reactors.

  18. A trimodal porous carbon as an effective catalyst for hydrogen production by methane decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yi; Lua, Aik Chong

    2016-01-15

    A new type of porous carbon with an interconnected trimodal pore system is synthesized by a nanocasting method using nanoparticulated bimodal micro-mesoporous silica particles as the template. The synthesized template and carbon material are characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission electron scanning microscopy (FESEM) and nitrogen adsorption-desorption test. The synthesized carbon material has an extremely high surface area, a large pore volume and an interconnected pore structure, which could provide abundant active sites and space for chemical reactions and minimize the diffusion resistance of the reactants. The resulting carbon is used as the catalyst for hydrogen production by the thermal decomposition of methane. The catalytic results show that the as-synthesized carbon in this study produces much higher methane conversion and hydrogen yield than the commercial carbon materials. PMID:26433477

  19. Gravimetric analysis of the solubility of methane in high boiling hydrocarbons and petroleum products; Gravimetrische Bestimmung der Loeslichkeit von Methan in hoeher siedenden Kohlenwasserstoffen und Erdoelprodukten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laux, H.; Rahimian, I. [Institut fuer Erdoel- und Erdgasforschung, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2001-05-01

    The solubility of methane has a great influence on the colloid stability of crude oils at the conditions of production. Adequate data are needed for the modelling of the beginning of asphaltene precipitation as the result of the destabilization. Because such data are limited in the literature a magnetic suspension balance was used. By means of the magnetic suspension balance the solubility of gases in high boiling products can be determined by the weight difference resulting from the steped pressure reduction. The solubility of methane was investigated in different n-alkanes and squalane as well as a wax, a slack wax, a extract from the solvent raffination and a atmospheric crude oil residue. The aim was to investigate the influence of the molare weight, the structure and the composition of mixture on the solubility of methane. The pressure was varied in the region to 120 bar, the temperature was predominantly 75 C. The influence of the temperature on the solubility of methane was studied in the slack wax and the atmospheric residue. The results and the advantage as well as the disadvantage of the using of the magnetic suspension balance will be discussed. (orig.)

  20. Optimal scheduling for enhanced coal bed methane production through CO2 injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A novel deterministic optimization model for CO2-ECBM production scheduling. • Maximize the total profit from both sales of natural gas and CO2 credits trading in the carbon market. • A stochastic model incorporating uncertainties and dynamics of NG price and CO2 credit. - Abstract: Enhanced coal bed methane production with CO2 injection (CO2-ECBM) is an effective technology for accessing the natural gas embedded in the traditionally unmineable coal seams. The revenue via this production process is generated not only by the sales of coal bed methane, but also by trading CO2 credits in the carbon market. As the technology of CO2-ECBM becomes mature, its commercialization opportunities are also springing up. This paper proposes applicable mathematical models for CO2-ECBM production and compares the impacts of their production schedules on the total profit. A novel basic deterministic model for CO2-ECBM production including the technical and chemical details is proposed and then a multistage stochastic programming model is formulated in order to address uncertainties of natural gas price and CO2 credit. Both models are nonlinear programming problems, which are solved by commercial nonlinear programming software BARON via GAMS. Numerical experiments show the benefits (e.g., expected profit gain) of using stochastic models versus deterministic models

  1. Straw application in paddy soil enhances methane production also from other carbon sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Q.; Pump, J.; Conrad, R.

    2014-01-01

    Flooded rice fields are an important source of the greenhouse gas methane. Methane is produced from rice straw (RS), soil organic matter (SOM), and rice root organic carbon (ROC). Addition of RS is widely used for ameliorating soil fertility. However, this practice provides additional substrate for CH4 production and results in increased CH4 emission. Here, we found that decomposing RS is not only a substrate of CH4 production, but in addition stimulates CH4 production from SOM and ROC. Apart from accelerating the creation of reduced conditions in the soil environment, RS decomposition resulted in enhancement of SOM-derived CH4 production. In particular, hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis from SOM-derived CO2 was stimulated, presumably by H2 released from RS decomposition. On the other hand, the enhancement of ROC-derived CH4 production after RS application was probably caused by the significant increase of the abundance of methanogenic Archaea in the RS treatment compared with the untreated control. Our results show that traditional management of rice residues exerts a positive feedback on CH4 production from rice fields, thus exacerbating its effect on the global CH4 budget.

  2. Production of methane by co-digestion of cassava pulp with various concentrations of pig manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panichnumsin, Pan; Nopharatana, Annop; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær;

    2010-01-01

    Cassava pulp is a major by-product produced in a cassava starch factory, containing 50-60% of starch (dry basis). Therefore, in this study we are considering its potential as a raw material substrate for the production of methane. To ensure sufficient amounts of nutrients for the anaerobic...... digestion process, the potential of co-digestion of cassava pulp (CP) with pig manure (PM) was further examined. The effect of the co-substrate mixture ratio was carried out in a semi-continuously fed stirred tank reactor (CSTR) operated under mesophilic condition (37 C) and at a constant OLR of 3.5 kg VS m...

  3. Methane production by sheep consuming diets with different levels of eucalyptus essential oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Public concern over use of antibiotics in livestock production has increased in recent years because of possible contribution of antibiotics to emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, and their transmission from livestock to humans. Consequently, ruminant microbiologists and nutritionists have been exploring alternative methods of favourably altering ruminal fermentation thereby enhancing the efficiency of utilization of feed energy while decreasing methane emissions. However, there have only been limited studies conducted to investigate the effects of essential oils on growth performance, digestive functions, rumen microbial activity and methane production in ruminants. The present study was designed to evaluate the potential effect of eucalyptus essential oils (EUEO, Eucalyptus citriodora) on intake, digestion, rumen fermentation and methane production in sheep. The experiment was conducted during November and January (early summer) 2007-2008 at the Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, Laboratory of Animal Nutrition, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Twelve Santa Ines sheep were allocated into 3 groups (59.7 ± 12.16 kg of live weight). The control group (CON) received only the basal diet (Tifton-85 hay-Cynodon sp, concentrate mixture, molasses and mineral mixture), the second group (EUEO I) received the basal diet plus 10 mL of EUEO/head/d while, the third group (EUEO II) received the basal diet plus 20 mL of EUEO/head/d. The EUEO was obtained from the Distillery Tres Barras Company, Sao Paulo, Brazil. All animals were fed the basal diet twice daily at 08:00 and 16:00 h. Four open-circuit respiration chambers were used. Dry gas meters were pitted in the pipe work between the chambers and the air suction pumps (60 l/min) to measure the total volume of gas passing through each chamber. Methane volume was adjusted to standard temperature and pressure. Data were subjected to analysis of variance using the General Linear Model procedure of the SAS. The model

  4. Utilization of coal mine methane for methanol and SCP production. Topical report, May 5, 1995--March 4, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The feasibility of utilizing a biological process to reduce methane emissions from coal mines and to produce valuable single cell protein (SCP) and/or methanol as a product has been demonstrated. The quantities of coal mine methane from vent gas, gob wells, premining wells and abandoned mines have been determined in order to define the potential for utilizing mine gases as a resource. It is estimated that 300 MMCFD of methane is produced in the United States at a typical concentration of 0.2-0.6 percent in ventilation air. Of this total, almost 20 percent is produced from the four Jim Walter Resources (JWR) mines, which are located in very gassy coal seams. Worldwide vent gas production is estimated at 1 BCFD. Gob gas methane production in the U.S. is estimated to be 38 MMCFD. Very little gob gas is produced outside the U.S. In addition, it is estimated that abandoned mines may generate as much as 90 MMCFD of methane. In order to make a significant impact on coal mine methane emissions, technology which is able to utilize dilute vent gases as a resource must be developed. Purification of the methane from the vent gases would be very expensive and impractical. Therefore, the process application must be able to use a dilute methane stream. Biological conversion of this dilute methane (as well as the more concentrated gob gases) to produce single cell protein (SCP) and/or methanol has been demonstrated in the Bioengineering Resources, Inc. (BRI) laboratories. SCP is used as an animal feed supplement, which commands a high price, about $0.11 per pound.

  5. Methane excess production in oxygen-rich polar water and a model of cellular conditions for this paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, E.; Thoms, S.; Beszczynska-Möller, A.; Nöthig, E. M.; Kattner, G.

    2015-09-01

    Summer sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean has undergone a reduction in the last decade exposing the sea surface to unforeseen environmental changes. Melting sea ice increases water stratification and induces nutrient limitation, which is also known to play a crucial role in methane formation in oxygenated surface water. We report on an excess of methane in the marginal ice zone in the western Fram Strait. Our study is based on measurements of oxygen, methane, DMSP, nitrate and phosphate concentrations as well as on phytoplankton composition and light transmission, conducted along the 79°N oceanographic transect, in the western part of the Fram Strait and in Northeast Water Polynya region off Greenland. Between the eastern Fram Strait, where Atlantic water enters from the south and the western Fram Strait, where Polar water enters from the north, different nutrient limitations occurred and consequently different bloom conditions were established. Ongoing sea ice melting enhances the environmental differences between both water masses and initiates regenerated production in the western Fram Strait. We show that in this region methane is in situ produced while DMSP (dimethylsulfoniopropionate) released from sea ice may serve as a precursor for the methane formation. The methane production occured despite high oxygen concentrations in this water masses. As the metabolic activity (respiration) of unicellular organisms explains the presence of anaerobic conditions in the cellular environment we present a theoretical model which explains the maintenance of anaerobic conditions for methane formation inside bacterial cells, despite enhanced oxygen concentrations in the environment.

  6. Development of a combined bio-hydrogen- and methane-production unit using dark fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunstermann, R.; Widmann, R. [Duisburg-Essen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Urban Water and Waste Management

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen is regarded as a source of energy of the future. Currently, hydrogen is produced, predominantly, by electrolysis of water by using electricity or by stream reforming of natural gas. So both methods are based on fossil fuels. If the used electricity is recovered from renewable recourses, hydrogen produced by water electrolysis may be a clean solution. At present, the production of hydrogen by biological processes finds more and more attention world far. The biology provides a wide range of approaches to produce hydrogen, including bio-photolysis as well as photo-fermentation and dark-fermentation. Currently these biological technologies are not suitable for solving every day energy problems [1]. But the dark-fermentation is a promising approach to produce hydrogen in a sustainable way and was already examined in some projects. At mesophilic conditions this process provides a high yield of hydrogen by less energy demand, [2]. Short hydraulic retention times (HRT) and high metabolic rates are advantages of the process. The incomplete transformation of the organic components into various organic acids is a disadvantage. Thus a second process step is required. Therefore the well known biogas-technique is used to degrade the organic acids predominantly acetic and butyric acid from the hydrogen-production unit into CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}. This paper deals with the development of a combined hydrogen and methane production unit using dark fermentation at mesophilic conditions. The continuous operation of the combined hydrogen and methane production out of DOC loaded sewages and carbohydrate rich biowaste is necessary for the examination of the technical and economical implementation. The hydrogen step shows as first results hydrogen concentration in the biogas between 40 % and 60 %.The operating efficiency of the combined production of hydrogen and methane shall be checked as a complete system. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation of gas production from methane hydrates using depressurization, thermal stimulation and combined methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The schematic diagram of hydrate decomposition process and the gas production by using different methods. - Highlights: • Three gas production methods were evaluated with different hydrate saturations. • The roles of temperature, pressure, sensible heat and heat transfer were analyzed. • The driving force of hydrate dissociation at different stages was analyzed. • The combined method effectively improved the gas production and energy efficiency. - Abstract: To investigate the gas production from methane hydrate-bearing sediments, the gas production processes from methane hydrate in porous media using depressurization, two-cycle warm-water injection and a combination of the two methods were characterized in this study. The methane hydrates were formed in porous media with various initial hydrate saturation (Shi) in a pressure vessel. The percentage of gas production, rate of gas production, and energy efficiency were obtained and compared using the three methods. The driving force of the hydrate dissociation at different stages of depressurization was analyzed and ice formation during the gas production was observed. For the two-cycle warm-water-injection method, the percentage of gas production and the energy efficiency increased with increasing of Shi. However, due to the large amount of warm water needed to heat the porous media at the dissociation site, the percentage of gas production was lower than the other two methods under the same experimental conditions. The experimental results proved that the combined method had obvious advantages for hydrate exploitation over the depressurization and warm-water-injection method in terms of the energy efficiency, percentage of gas production and average rate of gas production, and with increasing of Shi, the advantages are enhanced. For the Shi of 51.61%, the percentage of gas production reaches 74.87%, which had increments of 18.63% and 31.19% compared with the depressurization and warm

  8. Methane as a biomarker in the search for extraterrestrial life: Lessons learned from Mars analog hypersaline environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebout, B.; Tazaz, A.; Kelley, C. A.; Poole, J. A.; Davila, A.; Chanton, J.

    2010-12-01

    -60 ‰ to -30 ‰, while the hydrogen isotopic composition (δ2H) ranged from about -350 to -300‰. These isotopic values are outside the range generally considered to be biogenic, however incubations of the sediments and salt crusts revealed that the methane is indeed produced there. The highest rate of methane production was 20 nmol/g/d, in a gypsum crust with endolithic microbial communities. Currently we are studying the mechanisms that control the isotopic signatures of methane in these environments. These studies are of special relevance given the projected analysis of Mars atmospheric methane by the Mars Science Laboratory in 2012, and by the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter in 2017.

  9. Geologically controlling factors on coal bed methane (CBM) productivity in Liulin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Li-jun; TANG Da-zhen; XU Hao; MENG Shang-zhi; ZHANG Wen-zhong; MENG Yan-jun; WANG Jun-jian

    2012-01-01

    It is of great significance to forecast high yield of CBM wells and analyze dynamic production by having an overall study on the characteristics of the produced CBM and determining the main factors influencing the productivity of CBM.With the test report and the related geological parameters of a single well,methods of combining the productivity data and typical production curves were used to analyze different geological factors and how to influence the capacity of a single layer.Then,the paper proposed a new understanding about capacity characteristics of the study area and geological control factors:First,the Shanxi formation production capacity characteristics was divided into two-stages,showing signs of gas and gas breakthrough for 100 days.Second,two parameters,which include potential of gas production and gas production capacity,were better than the single parameter,such as gas content,coal thickness,and penetration to analyze affecting factors of single well production.Finally,comprehensive analysis concluded that the ratio of critical desorption pressure to reservoir pressure has greater influence on the production of vertical CBM wells.Besides,the potential of gas production capacity has greater impact at stage of showing gas signs; the coal reservoir pressure and gas production capacity have greater impact at stage of gas breakthrough for 100 days.Thus,to seek the coal bed methane with high ratio of critical desorption pressure to reservoir pressure and high yield of gas will be important guarantee to the success of the coal bed methane exploration and development.

  10. Butachlor inhibits production and oxidation of methane in tropical rice soils under flooded condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, S R; Nayak, D R; Babu, Y J; Adhya, T K

    2004-01-01

    In laboratory incubation experiments, application of a commercial formulation of the herbicide butachlor (N-butoxymethyl-2-chloro-2',6'-diethyl acetanilide) to three tropical rice soils, widely differing in their physicochemical characteristics, under flooded condition inhibited methane (CH4) production. The inhibitory effect was concentration dependent and most remarkable in the alluvial soil. Thus, following application of butachlor at 5, 10, 50 and 100 microg g(-1) soil, respectively, cumulative CH4 production in the alluvial soil was inhibited by 15%, 31%, 91% and 98% over unamended control. Since CH4 production was less pronounced in the sandy loam and acid sulfate soil, the impact of amendment with butchalor, albeit inhibitory, was less extensive than the alluvial soil. Inhibition of CH4 production in butachlor-amended alluvial soil was related to the prevention in the drop in redox potential as well as low methanogenic bacterial population especially at high concentrations of butachlor. CH4 oxidation was also inhibited in butachlor-amended alluvial soil with the inhibitory effect being more prevalent under flooded condition. Inhibition in CH4 oxidation was related to a reduction in the population of soluble methane monooxygenase producing methanotrophs. Results demonstrate that butachlor, a commonly used herbicide in rice cultivation, even at very low concentrations can affect CH4 production and its oxidation, thereby influencing the biogeochemical cycle of CH4 in flooded rice soils.

  11. Reducing methane production by supplementation of Terminalia chebula RETZ. containing tannins and saponins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantasook, Nirawan; Wanapat, Metha; Gunun, Pongsatorn; Cherdthong, Anusorn

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of Terminalia chebula Retz. meal supplementation on rumen fermentation and methane (CH4 ) production by using an in vitro gas technique. The experimental design was a completely randomized design (CRD) and the dietary treatments were T. chebula supplementation at 0, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 mg with 0.5 g of roughage and concentrate ratio at 60:40. The results revealed that cumulative gas production (96 h of incubation) were higher (P  0.05). The NH3 -N concentrations tended to quadratically increase with increasing levels of T. chebula in the diet. In addition, total volatile fatty acids (VFA) and propionate concentrations were increased (P production and protozoal populations were decreased (P production and protozoa populations, thus improving in vitro gas production and VFA profiles. PMID:27255184

  12. Methane Production from Protozoan Endosymbionts Following Stimulation of Microbial Metabolism within Subsurface Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Elena Holmes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that protozoa prey on Fe(III- and sulfate-reducing bacteria that are enriched when acetate is added to uranium contaminated subsurface sediments to stimulate U(VI reduction. In order to determine whether protozoa continue to impact subsurface biogeochemistry after these acetate amendments have stopped, 18S rRNA and ß-tubulin sequences from this phase of an in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment were analyzed. Sequences most similar to Metopus species predominated, with the majority of sequences most closely related to M. palaeformis, a cilitated protozoan known to harbor methanogenic symbionts. Quantification of mcrA mRNA transcripts in the groundwater suggested that methanogens closely related to Metopus endosymbionts were metabolically active at this time. There was a strong correlation between the number of mcrA transcripts from the putative endosymbiotic methanogen and Metopus ß-tubulin mRNA transcripts during the course of the field experiment, suggesting that the activity of the methanogens was dependent upon the activity of the Metopus species. Addition of the eukaryotic inhibitors cyclohexamide and colchicine to laboratory incubations of acetate-amended subsurface sediments significantly inhibited methane production and there was a direct correlation between methane concentration and Metopus ß-tubulin and putative symbiont mcrA gene copies. These results suggest that, following the stimulation of subsurface microbial growth with acetate, protozoa harboring methanogenic endosymbionts become important members of the microbial community, feeding on moribund biomass and producing methane.

  13. Production of carbon molecular sieves from palm shell through carbon deposition from methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi Maedeh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of production of carbon molecular sieve (CMS from palm shell as a waste lignocellulosic biomass was investigated. CMS samples were prepared through heat treatment processes including carbonization, physiochemical activation and chemical vapor deposition (CVD from methane. Methane was pyrolyzed to deposit fine carbon on the pore mouth of palm shell-based activated carbon to yield CMS. All the deposition experiments were performed at 800 ºC, while the methane flow rate (100, 200, 300 mL min-1 CH4 diluted in 500 mL min-1 N2 and deposition time (30 to 60 min were the investigated parameters. The textural characteristics of the CMSs were assessed by N2 adsorption. The largest BET surface area (752 m2 g-1, micropore surface area (902.2 m2 g-1 and micropore volume (0.3466 cm3 g-1 was obtained at the CH4 flow rate of 200 mL min-1 and deposition time of 30 min. However, prolonging the deposition time to 45 min yielded in a micropouros CMS with a narrow pore size distribution.

  14. Hydrolysis rates, methane production and nitrogen solubilisation of grey waste components during anaerobic degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokela, J P Y; Vavilin, V A; Rintala, J A

    2005-03-01

    Municipal grey waste (i.e. the remaining fraction in municipal waste management systems in which putrescibles (biowaste) and other recyclables (paper, metals, glass) are source-segregated) was manually sorted into six main fractions on the basis of composition and also separated by sieving (100 mm mesh size) into two fractions, oversized and undersized, respectively. In practice, in waste management plant the oversized fraction is (or will be) used to produce refuse-derived fuel and the undersized landfilled after biological stabilisation. The methane yields and nitrogen solubilisation of the grey waste and the different fractions (all studied samples were first milled to 5 mm particle samples) were determined in a 237-day methane production batch assay and in a water elution test, respectively. The grey waste was found to contained remnants of putrescibles and also a high amount of other biodegradable waste, including packaging, cartons and cardboard, newsprint, textiles and diapers. These waste fractions comprised 41%-w/w of the grey waste and produced 40-210 m3 methane (total solids (TS))(-1) and less than 0.01 g NH4-N kg TS(added)(-1) except diapers which produced 9.8 g NH4-N kg TS(added)(-1) in the batch assays. In the case of the two sieved fractions and on mass bases, most of the methane originated from the oversized fraction, whereas most of the NH4-N was solublised from the undersized fraction. The first-order kinetic model described rather well the degradation of each grey waste fraction and component, showing the different components to be in the range 0.021-0.058 d(-1), which was around one-sixth of the values reported for the source-segregated putrescible fraction of MSW. PMID:15491833

  15. Biogenic Impact on Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Ina; Askew, Peter; Gorbushina, Anna; Grinda, Manfred; Hertel, Horst; Krumbein, Wolfgang; Müller, Rolf-Joachim; Pantke, Michael; Plarre, Rüdiger (Rudy); Schmitt, Guenter; Schwibbert, Karin

    Materials as constituents of products or components of technical systems rarely exist in isolation and many must cope with exposure in the natural world. This chapter describes methods that simulate how a material is influenced through contact with living systems such as microorganisms and arthropods. Both unwanted and desirable interactions are considered. This biogenic impact on materials is intimately associated with the environment to which the material is exposed (Materials-Environment Interaction, Chap. 15). Factors such as moisture, temperature and availability of food sources all have a significant influence on biological systems. Corrosion (Chap. 12) and wear (Chap. 13) can also be induced or enhanced in the presence of microorganisms. Section 14.1 introduces the categories between desired (biodegradation) and undesired (biodeterioration) biological effects on materials. It also introduces the role of biocides for the protection of materials. Section 14.2 describes the testing of wood as a building material especially against microorganisms and insects. Section 14.3 characterizes the test methodologies for two other groups of organic materials, namely polymers (Sect. 14.3.1) and paper and textiles (Sect. 14.3.2). Section 14.4 deals with the susceptibility of inorganic materials such as metals (Sect. 14.4.1), concrete (Sect. 14.4.2) and ceramics (Sect. 14.4.3) to biogenic impact. Section 14.5 treats the testing methodology concerned with the performance of coatings and coating materials. In many of these tests specific strains of organisms are employed. It is vital that these strains retain their ability to utilize/attack the substrate from which they were isolated, even when kept for many years in the laboratory. Section 14.6 therefore considers the importance of maintaining robust and representative test organisms that are as capable of utilizing a substrate as their counterparts in nature such that realistic predictions of performance can be made.

  16. The cumulative methane production from dairy cattle slurry can be explained by its volatile solid, temperature and length of storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawamoto, Takuji; Nakamura, Megumi; Nekomoto, Kenji; Hoshiba, Shinji; Minato, Keiko; Nakayama, Motoo; Osada, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    In order to refine the national estimate of methane emission from stored cattle slurry, it is important to comprehend the basic characteristics of methane production. Two dairy cattle slurries were obtained from livestock farms located in Hokkaido (a northern island) and Kyushu (a southern island). The slurries were diluted with water into three levels: undiluted, three times diluted, and 10 times diluted. Three hundred mL of the slurries were put into a bottle with a headspace volume of 2.0 L, which was filled with nitrogen gas and then sealed by butyl rubber. Four levels of temperature were used for incubation: 35, 25, 15 and 5 °C. The time course of the cumulative methane production per volatile solid (VS) was satisfactorily expressed by an asymptotic regression model. The effect of dilution on the methane production per VS was not distinctive, but that of temperature was of primary importance. In particular, higher temperature yields a higher potential production and a shorter time when the cumulative production reaches half of the potential production. The inclusive and simple models obtained in this study indicate that the cumulative methane production from stored cattle slurry can be explained by VS, temperature and length of storage. PMID:26387490

  17. The cumulative methane production from dairy cattle slurry can be explained by its volatile solid, temperature and length of storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawamoto, Takuji; Nakamura, Megumi; Nekomoto, Kenji; Hoshiba, Shinji; Minato, Keiko; Nakayama, Motoo; Osada, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    In order to refine the national estimate of methane emission from stored cattle slurry, it is important to comprehend the basic characteristics of methane production. Two dairy cattle slurries were obtained from livestock farms located in Hokkaido (a northern island) and Kyushu (a southern island). The slurries were diluted with water into three levels: undiluted, three times diluted, and 10 times diluted. Three hundred mL of the slurries were put into a bottle with a headspace volume of 2.0 L, which was filled with nitrogen gas and then sealed by butyl rubber. Four levels of temperature were used for incubation: 35, 25, 15 and 5 °C. The time course of the cumulative methane production per volatile solid (VS) was satisfactorily expressed by an asymptotic regression model. The effect of dilution on the methane production per VS was not distinctive, but that of temperature was of primary importance. In particular, higher temperature yields a higher potential production and a shorter time when the cumulative production reaches half of the potential production. The inclusive and simple models obtained in this study indicate that the cumulative methane production from stored cattle slurry can be explained by VS, temperature and length of storage.

  18. Biogenic amines in raw and processed seafood

    OpenAIRE

    Pierina eVisciano; Maria eSchirone; Rosanna eTofalo; Giovanna eSuzzi

    2012-01-01

    The presence of biogenic amines in raw and processed seafood, associated with either time/temperature conditions or food technologies is discussed in the present paper from a safety and prevention point of view. In particular, storage temperature, handling practices, presence of microbial populations with decarboxylase activity and availability of free amino acids are considered the most important factors affecting the production of biogenic amines in raw seafood. On the other hand, some foo...

  19. Establishment and assessment of an integrated citric acid-methane production process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Chen, Yang-Qiu; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Bao, Jia-Wei; Tang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2015-01-01

    To solve the problem of extraction wastewater in citric acid industrial production, an improved integrated citric acid-methane production process was established in this study. Extraction wastewater was treated by anaerobic digestion and then the anaerobic digestion effluent (ADE) was stripped by air to remove ammonia. Followed by solid-liquid separation to remove metal ion precipitation, the supernatant was recycled for the next batch of citric acid fermentation, thus eliminating wastewater discharge and reducing water consumption. 130U/g glucoamylase was added to medium after inoculation and the recycling process performed for 10 batches. Fermentation time decreased by 20% in recycling and the average citric acid production (2nd-10th) was 145.9±3.4g/L, only 2.5% lower than that with tap water (149.6g/L). The average methane production was 292.3±25.1mL/g CODremoved and stable in operation. Excessive Na(+) concentration in ADE was confirmed to be the major challenge for the proposed process.

  20. Temperature response of methane production in liquid manures and co-digestates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsgaard, Lars; Olsen, Anne B; Petersen, Søren O

    2016-01-01

    Intensification of livestock production makes correct estimation of methanogenesis in liquid manure increasingly important for inventories of CH4 emissions. Such inventories currently rely on fixed methane conversion factors as knowledge gaps remain with respect to detailed temperature responses of CH4 emissions from liquid manure. Here, we describe the temperature response of CH4 production in liquid cattle slurry, pig slurry, and fresh and stored co-digested slurry from a thermophilic biogas plant. Subsamples of slurry were anoxically incubated at 20 temperatures from 5-52°C in a temperature gradient incubator and CH4 production was measured by gas chromatographic analysis of headspace gas after a 17-h incubation period. Methane production potentials at 5-37°C were described by the Arrhenius equation (modelling efficiencies, 79.2-98.1%), and the four materials showed a consistent activation energy (Ea) which averaged 81.0kJmol(-1) (95% confidence interval, 74.9-87.1kJmol(-1)) corresponding to a temperature sensitivity (Q10) of 3.4. In contrast, the frequency factor (A) differed among the slurry materials (30.1temperature sensitivity parameters may be applicable to dynamic modelling of CH4 emissions from livestock manure.

  1. Experimental study on gas production from methane hydrate in porous media by SAGD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A novel three-dimensional 117.8-L pressure vessel is developed. ► Dual horizontal wells are used as the injection and production wells. ► Evaluation of gas production of SAGD with different Qinj is proposed. ► With the injected hot water flowing sideways, the hot water chamber is expanding. ► The resistance ratio at the point in the near-well region decrease early. - Abstract: A 117.8 L three-dimensional pressure vessel is used to study the methane hydrate dissociation with the steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) method. It is called the Pilot-Scale Hydrate Simulator (PHS). This study proposes the evaluation and the comparisons of the gas production performance by SAGD method from the methane hydrate reservoir with different steam injection rates. It indicates that the experiment could be divided into three main stages: the original gas releasing stage, the original and the hydrate-originating gas releasing stage, and the hydrate-originating gas releasing stage (the SAGD process). Furthermore, the temperature change consists of the four periods: decreasing dramatically, keeping stable, rising gradually, and keeping steady. With the injected steam flowing downwards and sideways, the steam chamber is expanding. The gas production rate increases with the steam injection rate, while the Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER) and gas-to-water ratios are improved by the decrease of the steam injection rate

  2. Effects of Flavonoids on Rumen Fermentation Activity, Methane Production, and Microbial Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Oskoueian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried out to evaluate the effects of flavone, myricetin, naringin, catechin, rutin, quercetin, and kaempferol at the concentration of 4.5% of the substrate (dry matter basis on the rumen microbial activity in vitro. Mixture of guinea grass and concentrate (60 : 40 was used as the substrate. The results showed that all the flavonoids except naringin and quercetin significantly ( decreased the dry matter degradability. The gas production significantly ( decreased by flavone, myricetin, and kaempferol, whereas naringin, rutin, and quercetin significantly ( increased the gas production. The flavonoids suppressed methane production significantly (. The total VFA concentration significantly ( decreased in the presence of flavone, myricetin, and kaempferol. All flavonoids except naringin and quercetin significantly ( reduced the carboxymethyl cellulase, filter paperase, xylanase, and β-glucosidase activities, purine content, and the efficiency of microbial protein synthesis. Flavone, myricetin, catechin, rutin, and kaempferol significantly ( reduced the population of rumen microbes. Total populations of protozoa and methanogens were significantly ( suppressed by naringin and quercetin. The results of this research demonstrated that naringin and quercetin at the concentration of 4.5% of the substrate (dry matter basis were potential metabolites to suppress methane production without any negative effects on rumen microbial fermentation.

  3. 水产品中生物胺检测方法的研究进展%Research Progress of Detecting Methods for Biogenic Amine in Aquatic Product

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程丽林; 聂小宝; 张长峰; 王国利

    2012-01-01

    综述了高效液相色谱、薄层色谱、毛细管电泳、电化学生物传感器等主要检测技术在水产品生物胺检测中的研究进展,介绍了生物胺的形成及抑制机理,探讨了该领域存在的问题,并展望了未来的研究前景.%The recent progress of main techniques for detecting biogenic amine in aquatic products was summarized. These techniques included HPLC, TLC, EC and electrochemical biosensor, etc. Furthermore, the formation and inhibition mechanisms of biological amine were introduced, and the present problems in this domain were analyzed. Finally, its research was prospected.

  4. Enhancing methane production from waste activated sludge using a novel indigenous iron activated peroxidation pre-treatment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xu; Wang, Qilin; Jiang, Guangming

    2015-04-01

    Methane production from anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) is limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and/or poor methane potential of WAS. This study presents a novel pre-treatment strategy based on indigenous iron (in WAS) activated peroxidation to enhance methane production from WAS. Pre-treatment of WAS for 30 min at 50mg H2O2/g total solids (dry weight) and pH 2.0 (iron concentration in WAS was 7 mg/g TS) substantially enhanced WAS solubilization. Biochemical methane potential tests demonstrated that methane production was improved by 10% at a digestion time of 16d after incorporating the indigenous iron activated peroxidation pre-treatment. Model-based analysis indicated that indigenous iron activated peroxidation pre-treatment improved the methane potential by 13%, whereas the hydrolysis rate was not significantly affected. The economic analysis showed that the proposed pre-treatment method can save the cost by $112,000 per year in a treatment plant with a population equivalent of 300,000.

  5. Anthropogenic Sulfur Perturbations on Biogenic Oxidation: Impacts of Sulfur Dioxide Additions on Bulk Gas Phase OH Oxidation Products of Alpha and Beta Pinene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, B.; Brophy, P.; Brune, W. H.; Farmer, D.

    2015-12-01

    The evolution of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) in the atmosphere is impacted by concurrent emissions of anthropogenic pollutants, such as sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx), which can impact air quality and SOA formation in regions of biogenic and anthropogenic influence. We present the impacts of anthropogenic perturbations in the form of sulfur dioxide on the oxidation systems of α- and β-pinene. An oxidative flow reactor simulated atmospheric aging by OH oxidation on the order of days, and high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HR-TOF-CIMS) was utilized to identify gas-phase oxidation products and changes to the ensemble system as a function of the SO2 perturbation. Results show that the SO2 perturbation impacted the oxidation systems of α- and β-pinene, and that these perturbations affected the oxidation systems of α- and β-pinene differently. Bulk analysis comparing the perturbed system to the unperturbed system indicated a change in oxidation pathway or mechanism leading to an ensemble of products with a lesser degree of oxygenation, on the order of a 30% decrease in the bulk oxidation state and a 10% decrease in the bulk O:C ratio for both BVOC systems. Increasing the relative humidity in the oxidative flow reactor was found to dampen the impact of the perturbation. Experiments involving other anthropogenic emissions, such as NOx, as well as other pairs of BVOC structural isomers, were conducted to investigate if changes in the oxidation system were due to the BVOC structure or the specific anthropogenic pollutant.

  6. Anaerobic digestion of corn stovers for methane production in a novel bionic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meixia; Zhang, Guangming; Zhang, Panyue; Fan, Shiyang; Jin, Shuguang; Wu, Dan; Fang, Wei

    2014-08-01

    To improve the biogas production from corn stovers, a new bionic reactor was designed and constructed. The bionic reactor simulated the rumen digestion of ruminants. The liquid was separated from corn stovers and refluxed into corn stovers again, which simulated the undigested particles separated from completely digested materials and fed back again for further degradation in ruminant stomach. Results showed that the bionic reactor was effective for anaerobic digestion of corn stovers. The liquid amount and its reflux showed an obvious positive correlation with biogas production. The highest biogas production rate was 21.6 ml/gVS-addedd, and the total cumulative biogas production was 256.5 ml/gVS-added. The methane content in biogas ranged from 52.2% to 63.3%. The degradation of corn stovers were greatly enhanced through simulating the animal digestion mechanisms in this bionic reactor. PMID:24923659

  7. Gas productivity related to cleat volumes derived from focused resistivity tools in coalbed methane (CBM) fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y.H.; Peeters, M.; Cloud, T.A.; Van Kirk, C.W. [Kerr McGee Rocky Mountain Corporation, Denver, CO (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Cleats are critical for coal-bed methane (CBM) production, but operators usually lack a viable method to determine productivity except for costly well tests. Wireline logs, run over the CBM deposits of the Drunkards Wash Unit located in the Uinta Basin of Utah, were used to develop a new method to relate productivity to the cleat volume. The latter is derived from a focused resistivity log and the wellbore-fluid resistivity. Induction tools are unsuitable for this method, because they are dominated by borehole effects in high resistivity coals and low resistivity mud. Moreover, they read too deep to be significantly affected by the substitution of formation fluid by borehole fluid in the cleats on which the method is based. The method was demonstrated by relating cleat volume to CBM gas productivity in 24 wells, an exercise that clearly separated good from poor producers.

  8. Anaerobic digestion of corn stovers for methane production in a novel bionic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meixia; Zhang, Guangming; Zhang, Panyue; Fan, Shiyang; Jin, Shuguang; Wu, Dan; Fang, Wei

    2014-08-01

    To improve the biogas production from corn stovers, a new bionic reactor was designed and constructed. The bionic reactor simulated the rumen digestion of ruminants. The liquid was separated from corn stovers and refluxed into corn stovers again, which simulated the undigested particles separated from completely digested materials and fed back again for further degradation in ruminant stomach. Results showed that the bionic reactor was effective for anaerobic digestion of corn stovers. The liquid amount and its reflux showed an obvious positive correlation with biogas production. The highest biogas production rate was 21.6 ml/gVS-addedd, and the total cumulative biogas production was 256.5 ml/gVS-added. The methane content in biogas ranged from 52.2% to 63.3%. The degradation of corn stovers were greatly enhanced through simulating the animal digestion mechanisms in this bionic reactor.

  9. Seasonal variation in rates of methane production from peat of various botanical origins: effects of temperature and substrate quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman; Klarqvist; Nilsson

    2000-09-01

    The methane produced in peat soils can vary over the growing season due to variations in the supply of available substrate, the activity of the microbial community or changes in temperature. Our aim was to study how these factors regulate the methane production over the season from five different peat types of different botanical origin. Peat samples were collected on seven occasions between June and September. After each sampling, the peat soils were incubated at five different temperatures (7, 10, 15, 20 and 25 degrees C) without added substrate, or at 20 degrees C with added substrate (glucose, or H(2)/CO(2), or starch). Rates of methane production averaged over the season differed significantly (Pmethane production from each plant community varied significantly (Ptemperature, explains the seasonal variation in methane production. However, addition of saturating amounts of glucose, H(2)/CO(2) or starch at 20 degrees C significantly reduced the seasonal variation (Pmethane production in peat from the minerotrophic lawn, wet carpet and mud-bottom plant communities. This suggests that substrate supply (e.g. root exudates) for the micro-organisms also varied over the season at these sites. Seasonal variation in methane production rates was apparent in peat from the hummock and ombrotrophic lawn plant communities even after addition of substrates, suggesting that the active biomass of the anaerobic microbial populations at these sites was regulated by other factors than the ones studied.

  10. Enhancement of methane production from long chain fatty acid based effluents

    OpenAIRE

    Cavaleiro, A. J.; Pereira, M.A.; Alves, M. M.

    2008-01-01

    Two anaerobic sludges previously loaded with oleate and palmitate accumulated 4570 ± 257 and 5200 ± 9 mgCOD-LCFA gVSS−1, respectively. These sludges were incubated in batch assays and methane production was recorded after addition of 100–900 mg L−1 of oleate and palmitate, respectively. The batch assays were conducted before and after allowing the depletion of the biomass-associated LCFA. The presence of biomass-associated LCFA decreased the capacity of both sludges to convert the added LCFA ...

  11. Understanding the anthropogenic influence on formation of biogenic secondary organic aerosols via analysis of organosulfates and related oxidation products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. T. Nguyen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2 and nitrogen oxides (NOx may affect concentration levels and composition of biogenic secondary organic aerosols (BSOA through photochemical reactions with biogenic organic precursors to form organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates. We investigated this influence in a field study from 19 May–22 June 2011 at two sampling sites in Denmark. Within the study, we identified a substantial number of organic acids, organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates in the ambient urban curbside and semi-rural background air. A high degree of correlation in concentrations was found among a group of specific organic acids, organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates, which may originate from various precursors, suggesting a common mechanism or factor affecting their concentration levels at the sites. It was proposed that the formation of those species most likely occurred on a larger spatial scale with the compounds being long-range transported to the sites on the days with highest concentrations. The origin of the long-range transported aerosols was investigated using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT model in addition to modeled emissions of related precursors including isoprene and monoterpenes using the global Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN and SO2 emissions using the European Monitoring and Evaluation Program (EMEP database. The local impacts were also studied by examining the correlation between selected species which showed significantly enhanced concentrations at the urban curbside site and the local concentrations of various gases including SO2, ozone (O3, carbon monoxide (CO, NOx, aerosol acidity and other meteorological conditions. This investigation showed that an inter-play of the local parameters such as the aerosol acidity, NOx, relative humidity (RH, temperature and global radiation seemed to influence the concentration level of those

  12. Enteric methane production from beef cattle that vary in feed efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freetly, H C; Brown-Brandl, T M

    2013-10-01

    We hypothesized that CH4 production will decrease with increased feed efficiency. Two experiments were conducted to determine CH4 production of cattle that differed in feed efficiency. Cattle in both studies were selected from larger contemporary groups. Animals furthest from the confidence ellipse that resulted from regressing BW gain on DMI were selected. In the first experiment, 113 crossbred steers were evaluated for feed efficiency for 64 d. Steers were 355 ± 1 d of age and weighed 456 ± 10 kg when they began the study. Steers were fed a ration that consisted of (DM basis) 82.8% corn, 12.8% corn silage, and 4.5% supplement [contains 0.065% monensin, 32% CP (28% NPN), 7.5% Ca, 0.8% P, 4.8% NaCl, 1.8% K, and 55,116 IU/kg vitamin A]. Thirty-seven steers were selected to measure CH4 production. In the second experiment, 197 heifers were evaluated for feed efficiency for 64 d. Heifers were 286 ± 1 d of age and weighed 327 ± 2 kg when they began the study. Heifers were fed a ration that consisted of (DM basis) 60% corn silage, 30% alfalfa hay, and 10% wet distillers grains with solubles. Forty-seven heifers were selected to measure CH4 production. Methane production was measured with respiration calorimeters. In both experiments, cattle had ad libitum access to feed, and DMI consumed during the 24 h before CH4 production was measured. Methane production was collected for a 6-h period on untrained cattle. Consequently, methane production is not a quantitative measure of daily methane production; rather, it is an index value to rank cattle. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between either BW gain:DMI ratio or residual feed intake (RFI) on CH4 production after adjusting for the previous 24-h DMI. In the steers, BW gain:DMI ratio and previous 24-h feed intake accounted for little of the variance in CH4 production (R(2) = 0.009), and neither did RFI and previous 24-h feed intake (R(2) = 0.001). In the heifers, the BW gain:DMI ratio

  13. Air-adapted Methanosarcina acetivorans shows high methane production and develops resistance against oxygen stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Jasso-Chávez

    Full Text Available Methanosarcina acetivorans, considered a strict anaerobic archaeon, was cultured in the presence of 0.4-1% O2 (atmospheric for at least 6 months to generate air-adapted cells; further, the biochemical mechanisms developed to deal with O2 were characterized. Methane production and protein content, as indicators of cell growth, did not change in air-adapted cells respect to cells cultured under anoxia (control cells. In contrast, growth and methane production significantly decreased in control cells exposed for the first time to O2. Production of reactive oxygen species was 50 times lower in air-adapted cells versus control cells, suggesting enhanced anti-oxidant mechanisms that attenuated the O2 toxicity. In this regard, (i the transcripts and activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase significantly increased; and (ii the thiol-molecules (cysteine + coenzyme M-SH + sulfide and polyphosphate contents were respectively 2 and 5 times higher in air-adapted cells versus anaerobic-control cells. Long-term cultures (18 days of air-adapted cells exposed to 2% O2 exhibited the ability to form biofilms. These data indicate that M. acetivorans develops multiple mechanisms to contend with O2 and the associated oxidative stress, as also suggested by genome analyses for some methanogens.

  14. Study on the inhibition of methane production from anaerobic digestion of biodegradable solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiantao Zhao; Lijie Zhang; Youcai Zhao

    2010-04-01

    The inhibition effects and mechanisms of chlorinated methane, anthraquinone and acetylene on methanogenesis in the anaerobic digestion process of biodegradable solid wastes were investigated. It was found that both chloroform and acetylene could effectively inhibit methanogens. Acetylene inhibited the activity of methanogens, while chloroform inhibited metabolic process of methanogenesis. A central composite design (CCD) and response surface regression analysis (RSREG) were employed to determine the optimum conditions and interaction effects of chloroform and acetylene in terms of methane and hydrogen production. Acetylene promoted the inhibition efficiency (F = 31.14; P 0.05). In addition, a maximum hydrogen production of 1.6 ml was estimated under the optimum conditions of chloroform concentration of 6.69 mg kg(-1) and acetylene concentration of 3.08 x 10(-3) (v/v). Chloroform had a significant effect on enhancing the production of propionic acid and a minimum molar ratio of acetic acid to propionic acid of 0.707 was reached with the chloroform concentration of 9.24 mg kg(-1) and acetylene concentration of 4.0 x 10(-3) (v/v). Hence, methanogens can be inhibited while the stabilization process of solid wastes can still work well. Moreover, co-inhibition technology practice at landfills was feasible and the environmental damage was negligible, according to the analysis and experimental results.

  15. Enhancement of methane production and bio-stabilisation of municipal solid waste in anaerobic bioreactor landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali Sandip, T; Khare Kanchan, C; Biradar Ashok, H

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the experiment was to enhance biodegradation and methane production of municipal solid waste (MSW). Two groups of simulated anaerobic bioreactor landfill were used; one group of mixed MSW with three bioreactors (R1, R2 and R3) and second group was compostable MSW with two bioreactors (R4 and R5). The different combinations of operational parameters were aeration with addition of aerobic microbial culture, anaerobic sludge, coarse gravel mixing, intermediate soil cover and varied leachate recirculation rate. The results observed at the end of 270days prevail that the process combination of above operational parameters adopted in compostable MSW bioreactor was more efficient approach for stabilization of MSW. It has accelerated the methane production rate (141.28Lkg(-1)dry waste) by 25%. It was also observed that the degradation time of MSW was reduced by 25% compared to maximum values quoted in the literature. The nonlinear regression of the cumulative biogas production and digestion time shows that Gompertz growth equation fits the results well. PMID:22342079

  16. Methane production potential of leachate generated from Korean food waste recycling facilities: a lab-scale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae Hee; Behera, Shishir Kumar; Kim, Ji Won; Park, Hung-Suck

    2009-02-01

    This paper examines the applicability of food waste leachate (FWL) in bioreactor landfills or anaerobic digesters to produce methane as a sustainable solution to the persisting leachate management problem in Korea. Taking into account the climatic conditions in Korea and FWL characteristics, the effect of key parameters, viz., temperature, alkalinity and salinity on methane yield was investigated. The monthly average moisture content and the ratio of volatile solids to total solids of the FWL were found to be 84% and 91%, respectively. The biochemical methane potential experiment under standard digestion conditions showed the methane yield of FWL to be 358 and 478 ml/g VS after 10 and 28 days of digestion, respectively, with an average methane content of 70%. Elemental analysis showed the chemical composition of FWL to be C(13.02)H(23.01)O(5.93)N(1). The highest methane yield of 403 ml/g VS was obtained at 35 degrees C due to the adaptation of seed microorganisms to mesophilic atmosphere, while methane yields at 25, 45 and 55 degrees C were 370, 351 and 275 ml/g VS, respectively, at the end of 20 days. Addition of alkalinity had a favorable effect on the methane yield. Dilution of FWL with salinity of 2g/l NaCl resulted in 561 ml CH(4)/g VS at the end of 30 days. Considering its high biodegradability (82.6%) and methane production potential, anaerobic digestion of FWL in bioreactor landfills or anaerobic digesters with a preferred control of alkalinity and salinity can be considered as a sustainable solution to the present emergent problem.

  17. Discrimination of abiogenic and biogenic alkane gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    We have combined the analytical data of the carbon isotope distribution pattern, R/Ra and CH4/3He values of abiogenic and biogenic (referring to the thermogenic and bacterial or microbial) alkane gases in China with those of alkane gases from USA, Russia, Germany, Australia and other countries. Four discrimination criteria are derived from this comparative study: 1) Carbon isotopic composition is generally greater than -30‰ for abiogenic methane and less than -30‰ for biogenic methane; 2) Abiogenic alkane gases have a carbon isotopic reversal trend (δ 13C1> δ 13C2> δ 13C3> δ 13C4) with δ 13C1>-30‰ in general; 3) Gases with R/Ra >0.5 and δ 13C11 δ 13C2>0 are of abiogenic origin; 4) Gases (meth- ane) with CH4/3He≤106 are of abiogenic origin, whereas gases with CH4/3He≥1011 are of biogenic origin.

  18. Methane production of two roughage and total mixed ration as influenced by cellulase and xylanase enzyme addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belete Shenkute Gemeda

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades supplementation of animal feeds with exogenous fibrolytic enzymes has substantially improved digestibility and animal performance. However, information related to associated methane production is limited and inconsistent. This study evaluated the effect of cellulase and xylanase enzymes on in vitro methane production of Eragrostis curvula hay, maize (Zea mays stover and a total mixed ration (TMR at seven levels of the two enzymes. Feed samples were incubated for 2, 12, 24 and 48 h in an in vitro batch culture with buffer and rumen fluid, and fibrolytic enzymes. Gas production was measured using a pressure transducer connected to a data tracker, while methane gas was analysed using a gas chromatograph which was calibrated with standard CH4 and CO2. Increases in the level of enzyme application resulted in increases in gas volume, total volatile fatty acid (VFA production, dry matter (DM disappearance and associated increases in methane production. The linear increase in percentage and volume of methane production in tandem with increases in level of enzyme application might be due to increased fermentation, and organic matter degradability that resulted in a shift in VFA production towards acetate. Considering the efficiency of DM and neutral detergent fiber degradation and production of associated VFA with levels of enzymes, the use of 1 mg g−1 DM of enzyme can be a good option for the feeds tested. However, they cannot decrease methane production. It will be very important to consider other hydrogen sinks that can capture directly extra H+ produced by the addition of enzyme so that their supplementation could be very efficient and environmentally sound.

  19. Experimental and Mathematical Modelling for Methane Biogas Production from Mixing of Real Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Faiza E. Gharib*; Ahmed Hassoon Ali; , Wisam Ali Hussein

    2014-01-01

    Biogas (methane) production from batch anaerobic digesters containing varying ratio of organic fraction municipal solid waste and sewage sludge, pH, temperature and total solid are studied for a period of 30 days. It was observed that biogas production was optimized when waste and inoculum were mixed in a ratio of 5:1.At temperature, total solid and pH of 35oC, 10 % and of 7.5 respectively. The maximum accumulative methane production is 450 mL/gm V.S. First order model was deve...

  20. Use of short-term breath measures to estimate daily methane production by cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazco, J I; Mayer, D G; Zimmerman, S; Hegarty, R S

    2016-01-01

    Methods to measure enteric methane (CH4) emissions from individual ruminants in their production environment are required to validate emission inventories and verify mitigation claims. Estimates of daily methane production (DMP) based on consolidated short-term emission measurements are developing, but method verification is required. Two cattle experiments were undertaken to test the hypothesis that DMP estimated by averaging multiple short-term breath measures of methane emission rate did not differ from DMP measured in respiration chambers (RC). Short-term emission rates were obtained from a GreenFeed Emissions Monitoring (GEM) unit, which measured emission rate while cattle consumed a dispensed supplement. In experiment 1 (Expt. 1), four non-lactating cattle (LW=518 kg) were adapted for 18 days then measured for six consecutive periods. Each period consisted of 2 days of ad libitum intake and GEM emission measurement followed by 1 day in the RC. A prototype GEM unit releasing water as an attractant (GEM water) was also evaluated in Expt. 1. Experiment 2 (Expt. 2) was a larger study based on similar design with 10 cattle (LW=365 kg), adapted for 21 days and GEM measurement was extended to 3 days in each of the six periods. In Expt. 1, there was no difference in DMP estimated by the GEM unit relative to the RC (209.7 v. 215.1 g CH(4)/day) and no difference between these methods in methane yield (MY, 22.7 v. 23.7 g CH(4)/kg of dry matter intake, DMI). In Expt. 2, the correlation between GEM and RC measures of DMP and MY were assessed using 95% confidence intervals, with no difference in DMP or MY between methods and high correlations between GEM and RC measures for DMP (r=0.85; 215 v. 198 g CH(4)/day SEM=3.0) and for MY (r=0.60; 23.8 v. 22.1 g CH(4)/kg DMI SEM=0.42). When data from both experiments was combined neither DMP nor MY differed between GEM- and RC-based measures (P>0.05). GEM water-based estimates of DMP and MY were lower than RC and GEM (PCattle

  1. Prospects for methane production and nutrient recycling from lipid extracted residues and whole Nannochloropsis salina using anaerobic digestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Semi-continuous AD of untreated and enzymatically pretreated lipid extracted algae. • Coupled biodiesel and methane process yields 40% more energy than biodiesel alone. • Thermal pretreatment (150–170 °C) of whole algae was more effective than enzymatic. • Addition of 5% of AD effluent was optimal to support high growth of Nannochloropsis. • AD effluent can partly replace chemical fertilizer for algal growth. - Abstract: Sustainable mass production of algal biofuels requires a reduction in nutrient demand and efficient conversion into fuels of all biomass including lipid-extracted algal residues (LEA). This study evaluated methane production, nutrient recovery and recycling from untreated and enzymatically pretreated Nannochloropsis LEA using semi-continuous anaerobic digestion (AD). Additionally, this process was compared to methane generation from whole Nannochloropsis alga (WA) and thermally pretreated WA. The methane production from untreated LEA and WA reached up to 0.22 L and 0.24 L per gram of biomass volatile solids (VS), respectively, corresponding to only 36–38% of the theoretical potential. Additionally, observed VS reduction was only 40–50% confirming biomass recalcitrance to biodegradation. While enzymatic treatment hydrolyzed up to 65% of the LEA polysaccharides, the methane production increased by only 15%. Alternatively, WA thermal pretreatment at 150–170 °C enhanced methane production up to 40%. Overall, an integrated process of lipid conversion into biodiesel coupled with LEA conversion into methane generates nearly 40% more energy compared to methane production from WA, and about 100% more energy than from biodiesel alone. Additionally, the AD effluent contained up to 60–70% of the LEA phosphorus content, 30–50% of the nitrogen, sulfur, calcium and boron, 20% of the iron and cobalt, and 10% of manganese, zinc and copper, which can partially replace chemical fertilizers during algal cultivation. Consequently

  2. Redox controls on methane formation, migration and fate in shallow aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humez, Pauline; Mayer, Bernhard; Nightingale, Michael; Becker, Veith; Kingston, Andrew; Taylor, Stephen; Bayegnak, Guy; Millot, Romain; Kloppmann, Wolfram

    2016-07-01

    Development of unconventional energy resources such as shale gas and coalbed methane has generated some public concern with regard to the protection of groundwater and surface water resources from leakage of stray gas from the deep subsurface. In terms of environmental impact to and risk assessment of shallow groundwater resources, the ultimate challenge is to distinguish (a) natural in situ production of biogenic methane, (b) biogenic or thermogenic methane migration into shallow aquifers due to natural causes, and (c) thermogenic methane migration from deep sources due to human activities associated with the exploitation of conventional or unconventional oil and gas resources. This study combines aqueous and gas (dissolved and free) geochemical and isotope data from 372 groundwater samples obtained from 186 monitoring wells of the provincial Groundwater Observation Well Network (GOWN) in Alberta (Canada), a province with a long record of conventional and unconventional hydrocarbon exploration. We investigated whether methane occurring in shallow groundwater formed in situ, or whether it migrated into the shallow aquifers from elsewhere in the stratigraphic column. It was found that methane is ubiquitous in groundwater in Alberta and is predominantly of biogenic origin. The highest concentrations of biogenic methane (> 0.01 mM or > 0.2 mgL-1), characterized by δ13CCH4 values origin found in more oxidizing shallow aquifer portions suggesting limited upward migration from deeper methanogenic aquifers. Of the samples, 14.1 % contained methane with δ13CCH4 values > -54 ‰, potentially suggesting a thermogenic origin, but aqueous and isotope geochemistry data revealed that the elevated δ13CCH4 values were caused by microbial oxidation of biogenic methane or post-sampling degradation of low CH4 content samples rather than migration of deep thermogenic gas. A significant number of samples (39.2 %) contained methane with predominantly biogenic C isotope ratios (δ13

  3. Long-term effect of the antibiotic cefalexin on methane production during waste activated sludge anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xueqin; Zhen, Guangyin; Liu, Yuan; Hojo, Toshimasa; Estrada, Adriana Ledezma; Li, Yu-You

    2014-10-01

    Long-term experiments herein were conducted to investigate the effect of cefalexin (CLX) on methane production during waste activated sludge (WAS) anaerobic digestion. CLX exhibited a considerable inhibition in methane production during the initial 25 days while the negative effect attenuated subsequently and methane production recovered depending on CLX doses used (600 and 1000 mg/L). The highest methane yield reached 450 mL at 1000 mg-CLX/L after 157 days of digestion, 63.8% higher than CLX-free one. Stimulated excretion of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) by CLX served as microbial protecting layers, creating a suitable environment for microbes' growth and fermentation. Further examination via ultraviolet visible (UV-Vis) spectra also verified the elevated slime EPS, LB-EPS and TB-EPS indicated by UV-254 in the presence of CLX. Unlike the commonly accepted adverse effect, this study demonstrated the beneficial role of CLX in methane production, providing new insights into its true environmental impacts.

  4. Optimization of sugarcane bagasse autohydrolysis for methane production from hemicellulose hydrolyzates in a biorefinery concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baêta, Bruno Eduardo Lôbo; Lima, Diego Roberto Sousa; Adarme, Oscar Fernando Herrera; Gurgel, Leandro Vinícius Alves; Aquino, Sérgio Francisco de

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to optimize through design of experiments, the process variables (temperature - T, time - t and solid-to-liquid ratio - SLR) for sugarcane bagasse (SB) autohydrolysis (AH) to obtain hemicellulose hydrolyzates (HH) prone to anaerobic digestion (AD) and biochemical methane production (BMP). The results indicated that severe AH conditions, which lead to maximum hemicelluloses dissolution and sugar content in the HH, were not the best for BMP, probably due to the accumulation of toxic/recalcitrant compounds (furans and lignin). Mild AH conditions (170°C, 35min and SLR=0.33) led to the highest BMP (0.79Nm(3)kg TOC(-1)), which was confirmed by the desirability tool. HH produced by AH carried out at the desired condition DC2 (178.6°C, 43.6min and SLR=0.24) showed the lowest accumulation of inhibitory compounds and volatile fatty acids (VFA) and highest BMP (1.56Nm(3)kg TOC(-1)). The modified Gompertz model best fit the experimental data and led to a maximum methane production rate (R) of 2.6mmol CH4d(-1) in the best condition.

  5. Optimizing ethanol and methane production from steam-pretreated, phosphoric acid-impregnated corn stover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondesson, Pia-Maria; Dupuy, Aurélie; Galbe, Mats; Zacchi, Guido

    2015-02-01

    Pretreatment is of vital importance in the production of ethanol and methane from agricultural residues. In this study, the effects of steam pretreatment with phosphoric acid on enzymatic hydrolysis (EH), simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF), anaerobic digestion (AD) and the total energy output at three different temperatures were investigated. The effect of separating the solids for SSF and the liquid for AD was also studied and compared with using the whole slurry first in SSF and then in AD. Furthermore, the phosphoric acid was compared to previous studies using sulphuric acid or no catalyst. Using phosphoric acid resulted in higher yields than when no catalyst was used. However, compared with sulphuric acid, an improved yield was only seen with phosphoric acid in the case of EH. The higher pretreatment temperatures (200 and 210 °C) resulted in the highest yields after EH and SSF, while the highest methane yield was obtained with the lower pretreatment temperature (190 °C). The highest yield in terms of total energy recovery (78 %) was obtained after pretreatment at 190 °C, but a pretreatment temperature of 200 °C is, however, the best alternative since fewer steps are required (whole slurry in SSF and then in AD) and high product yields were obtained (76 %).

  6. Anaerobic biodegradability of Category 2 animal by-products: methane potential and inoculum source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdniakova, Tatiana A; Costa, José C; Santos, Ricardo J; Alves, M M; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2012-11-01

    Category 2 animal by-products that need to be sterilized with steam pressure according Regulation (EC) 1774/2002 are studied. In this work, 2 sets of experiments were performed in mesophilic conditions: (i) biomethane potential determination testing 0.5%, 2.0% and 5.0% total solids (TS), using sludge from the anaerobic digester of a wastewater treatment plant as inoculum; (ii) biodegradability tests at a constant TS concentration of 2.0% and different inoculum sources (digested sludge from a wastewater treatment plant; granular sludge from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor; leachate from a municipal solid waste landfill; and sludge from the slaughterhouse wastewater treatment anaerobic lagoon) to select the more adapted inoculum to the substrate in study. The higher specific methane production was of 317 mL CH(4)g(-1) VS(substrate) for 2.0% TS. The digested sludge from the wastewater treatment plant led to the lowest lag-phase period and higher methane potential rate. PMID:22989655

  7. Methane production and oxidation patterns along a hydrological gradient in Luther Bog, Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praetzel, Leandra; Berger, Sina; Blodau, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Methane emissions from natural peatlands contribute significantly to the global budget of atmospheric CH4. In the northern hemisphere, where climate models predict rising temperatures and precipitation rates, these emissions are likely to rise. So far, little is known about the change of processes of methane production and oxidation, which influence the total amount of methane emissions, in peatland soils under warmer and wetter climate conditions. Our work focuses on anaerobic CH4 production and aerobic CH4 oxidation processes along a hydrological gradient in an ombotrophic bog in Ontario, Canada that was induced by creation of a reservoir in 1952. Along this transect, four sites were established differing in hydrologic conditions and vegetation patterns. We examined depth profiles of CO2 and CH4 concentrations and delta 13C isotope ratios in the peat using silicon samplers, dialysis chambers and multi-level piezometers. Chamber flux measurements were used to determine carbon fluxes. Isotope mass balances were calculated based on 13C isotope ratios and concentration profiles. By this approach the contribution of anaerobic CH4 and CO2 production to the total ER flux and the amount of oxidised CH4 can be determined. In addition meteorological data, soil temperatures, moisture and water table levels were recorded. By raising data at different sites and dates and with the help of the additionally recorded parameters, we will be able to make predictions about changing CH4 production and oxidation processes due to changing climate conditions. Preliminary results show that CH4 concentrations in the soil profile are higher at the sites which are exposed to stronger water table fluctuations, whereas CO2 concentration levels are lower at these sites. At all sites, CO2 concentrations in the peat are increasing but CH4 profiles are fairly stable. Moreover, isotopic signatures of 13CH4 indicate that the importance of the production pathway changes with depth from acetoclastic

  8. Methane Pyrolysis for Hydrogen & Carbon Nanotube Recovery from Sabatier Products Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a microgravity and hypogravity compatible catalytic methane pyrolysis reactor is proposed to recover hydrogen which is lost as methane in the...

  9. High Time Resolution Measurements of Methane Fluxes From Enteric Fermentation in Cattle Rumen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floerchinger, C. R.; Herndon, S.; Fortner, E.; Roscioli, J. R.; Kolb, C. E.; Knighton, W. B.; Molina, L. T.; Zavala, M.; Castelán, O.; Ku Vera, J.; Castillo, E.

    2013-12-01

    Methane accounts for roughly 20% of the global radiative climate forcing in the last two and a half centuries. Methane emissions arise from a number of anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In some areas enteric fermentation in livestock produces over 90% of agricultural methane. In the spring of 2013, as a part of the Short Lived Climate Forcer-Mexico field campaign, the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory in partnership with the Molina Center for the Environment studied methane production associated with enteric fermentation in the rumen of cattle. A variety of different breeds and stocks being raised in two agricultural and veterinary research facilities located in different areas of Mexico were examined. Methane fluxes were quantified using two methods: 1) an atmospherically stable gaseous tracer release was collocated with small herds in a pasture, allowing tracer ratio flux measurements; 2) respiratory CO2 was measured in tandem with methane in the breath of individual animals allowing methane production to be related to metabolism. The use of an extensive suite of very high time response instruments allows for differentiation of individual methane producing rumination events and respiratory CO2 from possible background interferences. The results of these studies will be presented and compared to data from traditional chamber experiments.

  10. Microbial methane formation from hard coal and timber in an abandoned coal mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, M.; Beckmann, S.; Engelen, B.; Thielemann, T.; Cramer, B.; Schippers, A.; Cypionka, H. [Federal Institute for Geoscience and Natural Resources BGR, Hannover (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    About 7% of the global annual methane emissions originate from coal mining. Also, mine gas has come into focus of the power industry and is being used increasingly for heat and power production. In many coal deposits worldwide, stable carbon and hydrogen isotopic signatures of methane indicate a mixed thermogenic and biogenic origin. In this study, we have measured in an abandoned coal mine methane fluxes and isotopic signatures of methane and carbon dioxide, and collected samples for microbiological and phylogenetic investigations. Mine timber and hard coal showed an in-situ production of methane with isotopic signatures similar to those of the methane in the mine atmosphere. Enrichment cultures amended with mine timber or hard coal as sole carbon sources formed methane over a period of nine months. Predominantly, acetoclastic methanogenesis was stimulated in enrichments containing acetate or hydrogen/carbon dioxide. Molecular techniques revealed that the archaeal community in enrichment cultures and unamended samples was dominated by members of the Methanosarcinales. The combined geochemical and microbiological investigations identify microbial methanogenesis as a recent source of methane in abandoned coal mines.

  11. The rumen microbial metagenome associated with high methane production in cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, R. John; John A Rooke; McKain, Nest; Duthie, Carol-Anne; Hyslop, Jimmy J.; Ross, David W.; Waterhouse, Anthony; Watson, Mick; Roehe, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Background Methane represents 16 % of total anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. It has been estimated that ruminant livestock produce ca. 29 % of this methane. As individual animals produce consistently different quantities of methane, understanding the basis for these differences may lead to new opportunities for mitigating ruminal methane emissions. Metagenomics is a powerful new tool for understanding the composition and function of complex microbial communities. Here we have applied m...

  12. Examining the Role of Aquatic Vegetation in Methane Production: Examples From a Shallow High Latitude Lake in Abisko, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horruitiner, C. D.; Varner, R. K.; Palace, M. W.; Johnson, J. E.; Wik, M.; Lundgren, D. J.; Sinclair, S. N.; Nicastro, A. J. D.; Crawford, M.

    2015-12-01

    High latitude lakes and ponds are a large source of atmospheric methane. Emissions from lakes are thought to be controlled primarily by temperature and secondarily by the availability of labile organic carbon. Aquatic plants provide insitu carbon sources to lake bottoms and therefore can potentially impact rates of methane production. We studied vegetation and lake sediment characteristics across shallow depths in Inre Harrsjön, a lake located within the Stordalen Mire in the discontinuous permafrost zone in subarctic Sweden. Vegetation surveys using a submerged quadrat with camera were performed in transects across IH to characterize bottom vegetation. Carbon and nitrogen elemental analysis was performed on vegetation samples from both the lake and surrounding mire ecosystem. Sediment cores representing each vegetation type were analyzed for CH4, δ13CH4, and elemental CHNS. In all cores but one, total organic carbon (TOC) is greatest near the surface and decreases downcore. Methane concentrations correlated with TOC indicating insitu methane production. C:N ratios in sediment cores are more reflective of aquatic than terrestrial mire vegetation indicating that organic carbon in the lake sediments is dominated by aquatic sources. δ13CH4 is relatively constant downcore, which indicates little to no methane oxidation. The methane produced in sediments is consistently within the range of hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis via CO2 reduction. We suggest the role of aquatic vegetation in the production of methane in high latitude shallow lakes may be important and will likely have a positive feedback in a warming climate with longer ice-free seasons.

  13. Effect of Coexistent Hydrogen on the Selective Production of Ethane by Dehydrogenative Methane Coupling through Dielectric-Barrier Discharge under Ordinary Pressure at an Ambient Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuya Konno

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of coexistence of hydrogen on the product selectivity to ethane from methane by dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD reactor was examined experimentally under ordinary pressure without use of catalyst and external heating. By the dilution of methane with hydrogen, both the increase of methane conversion and the decrease of alkene production were observed, improving the selectivities to ethane by ca. 70%.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Methane Production from Hydrates Induced by Different Depressurizing Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanghui Li

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated that methane production from hydrate-bearing porous media by means of depressurization-induced dissociation can be a promising technique. In this study, a 2D axisymmetric model for simulating the gas production from hydrates by depressurization is developed to investigate the gas production behavior with different depressurizing approaches. The simulation results showed that the depressurization process with depressurizing range has significant influence on the final gas production. On the contrary, the depressurizing rate only affects the production lifetime. More amount of cumulative gas can be produced with a larger depressurization range or lowering the depressurizing rate for a certain depressurizing range. Through the comparison of the combined depressurization modes, the Class 2 (all the hydrate dissociation simulations are performed by reducing the initial system pressure with the same depressurizing range initially, then to continue the depressurization process conducted by different depressurizing rates and complete when the system pressure decreases to the atmospheric pressure is much superior to the Class 1 (different depressurizing ranges are adopted in the initial period of the gas production process, when the pressure is reduced to the corresponding value of depressurization process at the different depressurizing range, the simulations are conducted at a certain depressurizing rate until the pressure reaches the atmospheric pressure for a long and stable gas production process. The parameter analysis indicated that the gas production performance decreases and the period of stable production increases with the initial pressure for the case of depressurizing range. Additionally, for the case of depressurizing range, the better gas production performance is associated with higher ambient temperature for production process, and the effect of thermal conductivity on gas production performance can be

  15. Evaluation of methane-utilising bacteria products as feed ingredients for monogastric animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øverland, Margareth; Tauson, Anne-Helene; Shearer, Karl;

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial proteins represent a potential future nutrient source for monogastric animal production because they can be grown rapidly on substrates with minimum dependence on soil, water, and climate conditions. This review summarises the current knowledge on methane-utilising bacteria as feed...... ingredients for animals. We present results from earlier work and recent findings concerning bacterial protein, including the production process, chemical composition, effects on nutrient digestibility, metabolism, and growth performance in several monogastric species, including pigs, broiler chickens, mink...... (Mustela vison), fox (Alopex lagopus), Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus). It is concluded that bacterial meal (BM) derived from natural gas fermentation, utilising a bacteria culture containing mainly the methanotroph...

  16. Influence of lignin on biochemical methane potential of biomass for biogas production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triolo, J M; Sommer, S G; Møller, H B;

    2011-01-01

    Biochemical methane potential (BMP) of biomass is of great importance in assessing biodegradability as well as predicting biogas yield for biogas production. Since the current BMP determination methods are costly and time-consuming, innovative techniques for predicting BMP are needed. The objective...... of this study was to examine the influence of fibrous fractions of biomass on BMP to develop an economical and easy-to-use predicting model of BMP, and hence the biodegradability of organic materials for biogas production. The model was developed either for energy crops or for animal manures, or as a...... combined model for these two biomass groups. Validation of the combined model was carried out using datasets from the literature. This study showed that lignin was not degraded during anaerobic digestion. Furthermore, lignin concentration in organic materials was the strongest predictor of BMP for all the...

  17. The coalbed methane production potential method for optimization of wells location selection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng-Ke DOU; Yong-Shang KANG; Shao-Feng QIN; De-Lei MAO; Jun HAN

    2013-01-01

    A gas production potential method for optimization of gas wellsite locations selection is proposed in terms of the coalbed gas resources volume and the recoverability.The method uses the actual data about reservoirs in a coalbed gas field in central China to optimize wellsite locations in the studied area in combination with the dynamic data about actual production in the coalbed gas field,selects a favorable subarea for gas wells deployment.The method is established based on the basic properties of coal reservoirs,in combination with the coalbed thickness and the gas content to make an analysis of the gas storage potential of a coal reservoir,as well as resources volume and the permeability of a coal reservoir.This method can be popularized for optimization of wellsite locations in other methane gas development areas or blocks.

  18. Effect of Natural Mineral on Methane Production and Process Stability During Semi-Continuous Mono-Digestion of Maize Straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Suárez, A; Pereda-Reyes, I; Pozzi, E; da Silva, A José; Oliva-Merencio, D; Zaiat, M

    2016-04-01

    The effect of natural mineral on the mono-digestion of maize straw was evaluated in continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) at 38 °C. Different strategies of mineral addition were studied. The organic loading rate (OLR) was varied from 0.5 to 2.5 g volatile solid (VS) L(-1) d(-1). A daily addition of 1 g mineral L(-1) in reactor 2 (R2) diminished the methane production by about 11 % with respect to the initial phase. However, after a gradual addition of mineral, an average methane yield of 257 NmL CH4 g VS(-1) was reached and the methane production was enhanced by 30 % with regard to R1. An increase in the frequency of mineral addition did not enhance the methane production. The archaeal community was more sensitive to the mineral than the bacterial population whose similarity stayed high between R1 and R2. Significant difference in methane yield was found for both reactors throughout the operation.

  19. Effects of Essential Oils on Methane Production and Fermentation by, and Abundance and Diversity of, Rumen Microbial Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Patra, Amlan K.; Yu, Zhongtang

    2012-01-01

    Five essential oils (EOs), namely, clove oil (CLO), eucalyptus oil (EUO), garlic oil (GAO), origanum oil (ORO), and peppermint oil (PEO), were tested in vitro at 3 different doses (0.25, 0.50, and 1.0 g/liter) for their effect on methane production, fermentation, and select groups of ruminal microbes, including total bacteria, cellulolytic bacteria, archaea, and protozoa. All the EOs significantly reduced methane production with increasing doses, with reductions by 34.4%, 17.6%, 42.3%, 87%, a...

  20. Genetic resources for methane production from biomass described with gene ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang ePurwantini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Methane (CH4 is a valuable fuel, constituting 70-95% of natural gas, and a potent greenhouse gas. Release of CH4 into the atmosphere contributes to climate change. Biological CH4 production or methanogenesis is mostly performed by methanogens, a group of strictly anaerobic archaea. The direct substrates for methanogenesis are H2 plus CO2, acetate, formate, methylamines, methanol, methyl sulfides, and ethanol or a secondary alcohol plus CO2. In numerous anaerobic niches in nature, methanogenesis facilitates mineralization of complex biopolymers such as carbohydrates, lipids and proteins generated by primary producers. Thus, methanogens are critical players in the global carbon cycle. The same process is used in anaerobic treatment of municipal, industrial and agricultural wastes, reducing the biological pollutants in the wastes and generating methane. It also holds potential for commercial production of natural gas from renewable resources. This process operates in digestive systems of many animals, including cattle, and humans. In contrast, in deep-sea hydrothermal vents methanogenesis is a primary production process, allowing chemosynthesis of biomaterials from H2 plus CO2. In this report we present Gene Ontology (GO terms that can be used to describe processes, functions and cellular components involved in methanogenic biodegradation and biosynthesis of specialized coenzymes that methanogens use. Some of these GO terms were previously available and the rest were generated in our Microbial Energy Gene Ontology (MENGO project. A recently discovered non-canonical CH4 production process is also described. We have performed manual GO annotation of selected methanogenesis genes, based on experimental evidence, providing gold standards for machine annotation and automated discovery of methanogenesis genes or systems in diverse genomes. Most of the GO-related information presented in this report is available at the MENGO website (http://www.mengo.biochem.vt.edu/.

  1. Biogenic amines in raw and processed seafood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierina eVisciano

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of biogenic amines in raw and processed seafood, associated with either time/temperature conditions or food technologies is discussed in the present paper from a safety and prevention point of view. In particular, storage temperature, handling practices, presence of microbial populations with decarboxylase activity and availability of free amino acids are considered the most important factors affecting the production of biogenic amines in raw seafood. On the other hand, some food technological treatments such as salting, ripening, fermentation or marination can increase the levels of biogenic amines in processed seafood. The consumption of high amount of biogenic amines, above all histamine, can result in food borne poisoning which is a worldwide problem. The European Regulation established as maximum limits for histamine, in fishery products from fish species associated with high histidine amounts, values ranging from 100 to 200 mg/kg, while for products which have undergone enzyme maturation treatment in brine, the aforementioned limits rise to 200 and 400 mg/kg. Preventive measures and emerging methods aiming at controlling the production of biogenic amines are also reported for potential application in seafood industries.

  2. Biomass production and biochemical methane potential of seasonally flooded inter-generic and inter-specific Saccharum hybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deren, C.W.; Snyder, G.H. (Florida Univ., Belle Glade, FL (United States). Agricultural Research and Education Center); Tai, P.Y.P. (Department of Agriculture, Canal Point, FL (US). Sugarcane Field Station); Turick, C.E.; Chynoweth, D.P. (Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Agricultural Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    Production of biomass crops for energy can compete with food crop production for quality, arable land. Certain biomass crops may be well suited to marginal sites which do not favor food crop production. This study was conducted to evaluate biomass production on a wetland site which, without extensive and costly conversion, would be unsuitable for conventional agricultural production. Nine clones of the Saccharum taxonomic complex were evaluated for biomass production and methane conversion after being flooded for six months in each of two crop years. Erianthus arundinaceus clones were intolerant of flood and subsequently were low in biomass production. Inter-specific and inter-generic hybrids of commercial sugarcane with E. arundinaceus and S. spontaneum produced well under flood. All clones were more productive in ratoon (regrowth crop). Rates of methane conversion under mesophilic conditions (35{sup o}C) ranged from 0.060 to 0.095 day{sup -1} and methane yield was from 0.266 to 0.314 liter g{sup -1} volatile solids (VS). Biomass dry matter yield varied widely from 0.47 to 20.28 Mg ha{sup -1} in the plant-crop and 4.57 to 60.1 Mg ha{sup -1} in ratoon. Using the mean sample value observed for methane yield, this corresponds to upper methane yields of 5.89 and 17.4 x 10{sup 6} liter ha{sup -1} for the plant and ratoon crops, respectively. The wide crosses appear to have good potential for biomass production in areas prone to periodic flooding. (author).

  3. Effects of gas composition in headspace and bicarbonate concentrations in media on gas and methane production, degradability, and rumen fermentation using in vitro gas production techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Amlan Kumar; Yu, Zhongtang

    2013-07-01

    Headspace gas composition and bicarbonate concentrations in media can affect methane production and other characteristics of rumen fermentation in in vitro gas production systems, but these 2 important factors have not been evaluated systematically. In this study, these 2 factors were investigated with respect to gas and methane production, in vitro digestibility of feed substrate, and volatile fatty acid (VFA) profile using in vitro gas production techniques. Three headspace gas compositions (N2+ CO2+ H2 in the ratio of 90:5:5, CO2, and N2) with 2 substrate types (alfalfa hay only, and alfalfa hay and a concentrate mixture in a 50:50 ratio) in a 3×2 factorial design (experiment 1) and 3 headspace compositions (N2, N2 + CO2 in a 50:50 ratio, and CO2) with 3 bicarbonate concentrations (80, 100, and 120 mM) in a 3×3 factorial design (experiment 2) were evaluated. In experiment 1, total gas production (TGP) and net gas production (NGP) was the lowest for CO2, followed by N2, and then the gas mixture. Methane concentration in headspace gas after fermentation was greater for CO2 than for N2 and the gas mixture, whereas total methane production (TMP) and net methane production (NMP) were the greatest for CO2, followed by the gas mixture, and then N2. Headspace composition did not affect in vitro digestibility or the VFA profile, except molar percentages of propionate, which were greater for CO2 and N2 than for the gas mixture. Methane concentration in headspace gas, TGP, and NGP were affected by the interaction of headspace gas composition and substrate type. In experiment 2, increasing concentrations of CO2 in the headspace decreased TGP and NGP quadratically, but increased the concentrations of methane, NMP, and in vitro fiber digestibility linearly, and TMP quadratically. Fiber digestibility, TGP, and NGP increased linearly with increasing bicarbonate concentrations in the medium. Concentrations of methane and NMP were unaffected by bicarbonate concentration, but

  4. Low temperature anaerobic digestion of mixtures of llama, cow and sheep manure for improved methane production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Rene [IIDEPROQ, UMSA, Plaza del Obelisco 1175, La Paz (Bolivia)]|[Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Liden, Gunnar [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2009-03-15

    Biogas production in anaerobic digestion in farm-scale units is typically performed under mesophilic conditions when used for producing domestic fuel and stabilizing animal waste for the use of digested manure as a fertilizer. Previous studies on the digestion of llama and cow manure have shown the feasibility of producing biogas under altiplano conditions (low pressure and low temperature) and of llama manure as a promising feedstock. The present study concerns the utilization of various mixtures of feedstocks from the Bolivian altiplano under low temperature conditions (18-25 C). Laboratory scale experiments were performed on the digestion of mixtures of llama, sheep and cow manure in a semi-continuous process using ten 2-L stainless steel digesters to determine the effects of organic loading rate (OLR) and the feed composition. The semi-continuous operation of mixture of llama-cow-sheep manure proved to be a reliable system, which could be operated with good stability. The results suggest that in a system digesting a mixture of llama-cow-sheep manure at low temperature (18-25 C) the maximum OLR value is between 4 and 6 kg VS m{sup 3} d{sup -1}. The methane yields obtained in the mixture experiments were in the range 0.07-0.14 m{sup 3} kg{sup -1} VS added, with a methane concentration in the gas of between 47 and 55%. (author)

  5. Comparison of Chlorella vulgaris and cyanobacterial biomass: cultivation in urban wastewater and methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Lara; Sialve, Bruno; Tomás-Pejó, Elia; Ballesteros, Mercedes; Steyer, Jean Philippe; González-Fernández, Cristina

    2016-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion of microalgae is hampered by its complex cell wall. Against this background, cyanobacteria cell walls render this biomass as an ideal substrate for overcoming this drawback. The aim of the present study was to compare the growth of two cyanobacteria (Aphanizomenon ovalisporum and Anabaena planctonica) and a microalga (Chlorella vulgaris) in urban wastewater when varying the temperature (22, 27 and 32 °C). Cyanobacterial optimal growth for both strains was attained at 22 °C, while C. vulgaris did not show remarkable differences among temperatures. For all the microorganisms, ammonium removal was higher than phosphate. Biomass collected was subjected to anaerobic digestion. Methane yield of C. vulgaris was 184.8 mL CH4 g COD in(-1) while with A. ovalisporum and A. planctonica the methane production was 1.2- and 1.4-fold higher. This study showed that cyanobacteria growth rates could be comparable to microalgae while presenting the additional benefit of an increased anaerobic digestibility.

  6. Measurement of ethylene and methane production in a temperate forest soil using inhibition of acetylene and carbon monoxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU XingKai; INUBUSHI Kazuyuki

    2008-01-01

    We studied in the laboratory the effects of acetylene (C2H2) concentrations on the accumulation and consumption of ethylene and methane in a temperate pine forest soil, and in situ ethylene and methane production and flush effects of nitrogen sources on both productions in the pine forest stand (Pinus sylvestris L.). The addition of C2H2 at concentrations more than 50 Pa C2H2 in the headspace caused a more than 95% reduction in rates of ethylene and methane consumption in forest soil compared to those with no C2H2. Furthermore, addition of acetylene within a range of 50 to 10, 000 Pa C2H2 induced a similar rate of methane accumulation in forest soil. Hence, it can be concluded that presence of more than 50 Pa C2H2 in the headspace is an effective method to measure methane production in forest soil. The addition of C2H2 at concentrations more than 50 Pa C2H2 induced an increasing concentration of ethylene in the headspace (P≤0.05), indicating the reduction of acetylene to ethylene in forest soil. Using inhibition of 0.5 kPa C2H2 in combination with 5 kPa carbon monoxide that inhibits the reduction of acetylene in a short term, it was observed that there was a larger in situ methane production rate (218±26 μg C m-2 h-1 (μg C per square meter per hour, the same below)) than in situethylene produc-tion rate (92 ± 6 μg C m-2 h-1) in the pine forest soil. The addition of nitrogen sources such as urea, urea plus a nitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide, and potassium nitrate, could induce a 5-fold greater in-crease in rates of in situ ethylene and methane production compared to those in the control, particu-larly in the latter (P≤0.05). The results can promote in situ measurement of ethylene and methane production in forest soils at different sites.

  7. Anaerobic membrane bioreactors and the influence of space velocity and biomass concentration on methane production for liquid dairy manure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two pilot-scale anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) and a control completely mixed digester (CMD) were constructed to evaluate the influence of space velocity and biomass concentration on methane production for sand separated dairy manure. A negative impact on methane production resulted with operating the AnMBR system at 972 μHz–2960 μHz but no impact was found when operating at 69 μHz and 312 μHz. Operating at 69 μHz–350 μHz is realistic for a field installation. Despite the higher biomass concentration, the methane production of the AnMBRs was nearly equal to the CMD. An AnMBR with 69 μHz was operated equivalent to a CMD by returning all permeate to the digester tank and removing excess biomass directly from the reactor tank resulting in a hydraulic retention time (HRT) equal to the solids retention time (SRT). When using sand separated dairy manure and an HRT (and equal SRT) of 12 d, both systems produced methane at an equal rate, suggesting that the pump/membrane system did not influence methane production. The most likely reason was mass transfer limitations of hydrolytic enzymes. Based on methane production and volatile fatty acids analysis, it appears the fermentable substrate available for degradation was similar. The AnMBR proved to have benefit as part of an integrated nutrient management system that produced water that is virtually free of particulate nutrients, especially phosphorus. This enables the irrigation of the water to crops that need nitrogen and the efficient movement of phosphorus, as a solid, to needed locations. - Highlights: • Manure AnMBRs with a high space velocity inhibit methane production. • Manure AnMBRs with a low space velocity perform similar to conventional digesters. • Decoupled HRT and SRT in manure AnMBRs do not increase methane production. • Ultrafiltration membranes effectively partitioned manure nutrients from the liquid. • Manure does not foul ultrafiltration membranes and require mild

  8. Enhancing methane production of corn stover through a novel way: sequent pretreatment of potassium hydroxide and steam explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianghao; Zhang, Ruihong; Siddhu, Muhammad Abdul Hanan; He, Yanfeng; Wang, Wen; Li, Yeqing; Chen, Chang; Liu, Guangqing

    2015-04-01

    Getting over recalcitrance of lignocellulose is effective way to fuel production from lignocellulosic biomass. In current work, different pretreatments were applied to enhance the digestibility of corn stover (CS). Results showed that steam explosion (SE)-treated CS produced maximal methane yield (223.2 mL/gvs) at 1.2 MPa for 10 min, which was 55.2% more than untreated (143.8 mL/gvs). Whereas 1.5% KOH-treated CS produced maximum methane yield of 208.6 mL/gvs, and significantly (αMethane production could be well explained by the first-order and modified Gompertz models. Besides, SEM, FTIR, and XRD analyses validated structural changes of CS after SPPE. SPPE might be a promising method to pretreat CS in the future AD industry.

  9. Production of synthesis gas and methane via coal gasification utilizing nuclear heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The steam gasificaton of coal requires a large amount of energy for endothermic gasification, as well as for production and heating of the steam and for electricity generation. In hydrogasification processes, heat is required primarily for the production of hydrogen and for preheating the reactants. Current developments in nuclear energy enable a gas cooled high temperature nuclear reactor (HTR) to be the energy source, the heat produced being withdrawn from the system by means of a helium loop. There is a prospect of converting coal, in optimal yield, into a commercial gas by employing the process heat from a gas-cooled HTR. The advantages of this process are: (1) conservation of coal reserves via more efficient gas production; (2) because of this coal conservation, there are lower emissions, especially of CO2, but also of dust, SO2, NO/sub x/, and other harmful substances; (3) process engineering advantages, such as omission of an oxygen plant and reduction in the number of gas scrubbers; (4) lower gas manufacturing costs compared to conventional processes. The main problems involved in using nuclear energy for the industrial gasification of coal are: (1) development of HTRs with helium outlet temperatures of at least 9500C; (2) heat transfer from the core of the reactor to the gas generator, methane reforming oven, or heater for the hydrogenation gas; (3) development of a suitable allothermal gas generator for the steam gasification; and (4) development of a helium-heated methane reforming oven and adaption of the hydrogasification process for operation in combination with the reactor. In summary, processes for gasifying coal that employ heat from an HTR have good economic and technical prospects of being realized in the future. However, time will be required for research and development before industrial application can take place. 23 figures, 4 tables. (DP)

  10. Source attribution of methane emissions from global oil and gas production: results of bottom-up simulations over three decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglund-Isaksson, Lena

    2016-04-01

    Existing bottom-up emission inventories of historical methane and ethane emissions from global oil and gas systems do not well explain year-on-year variations estimated by top-down models from atmospheric measurements. This paper develops a bottom-up methodology which allows for country- and year specific source attribution of methane and ethane emissions from global oil and natural gas production for the period 1980 to 2012. The analysis rests on country-specific simulations of associated gas flows which are converted into methane and ethane emissions. The associated gas flows are constructed from country-specific information on oil and gas production and associated gas generation and recovery, and coupled with generic assumptions to bridge regional information gaps on the fractions of unrecovered associated gas that is vented instead of flared. Summing up emissions from associated gas flows with global estimates of emissions from unintended leakage and natural gas transmission and distribution, the resulting global emissions of methane and ethane from oil and gas systems are reasonably consistent with corresponding estimates from top-down models. Also revealed is that the fall of the Soviet Union in 1990 had a significant impact on methane and ethane emissions from global oil and gas systems.

  11. Energy production from agricultural residues: High methane yields in pilot-scale two-stage anaerobic digestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a large, unutilised energy potential in agricultural waste fractions. In this pilot-scale study, the efficiency of a simple two-stage anaerobic digestion process was investigated for stabilisation and biomethanation of solid potato waste and sugar beet leaves, both separately and in co-digestion. A good phase separation between hydrolysis/acidification and methanogenesis was achieved, as indicated by the high carbon dioxide production, high volatile fatty acid concentration and low pH in the acidogenic reactors. Digestion of the individual substrates gave gross energy yields of 2.1-3.4 kWh/kg VS in the form of methane. Co-digestion, however, gave up to 60% higher methane yield, indicating that co-digestion resulted in improved methane production due to the positive synergism established in the digestion liquor. The integrity of the methane filters (MFs) was maintained throughout the period of operation, producing biogas with 60-78% methane content. A stable effluent pH showed that the methanogenic reactors had good ability to withstand the variations in load and volatile fatty acid concentrations that occurred in the two-stage process. The results of this pilot-scale study show that the two-stage anaerobic digestion system is suitable for effective conversion of semi-solid agricultural residues as potato waste and sugar beet leaves

  12. Effect of dietary nitrate level on enteric methane production, hydrogen emission, rumen fermentation, and nutrient digestibility in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olijhoek, D W; Hellwing, A L F; Brask, M; Weisbjerg, M R; Højberg, O; Larsen, M K; Dijkstra, J; Erlandsen, E J; Lund, P

    2016-08-01

    Nitrate may lower methane production in ruminants by competing with methanogenesis for available hydrogen in the rumen. This study evaluated the effect of 4 levels of dietary nitrate addition on enteric methane production, hydrogen emission, feed intake, rumen fermentation, nutrient digestibility, microbial protein synthesis, and blood methemoglobin. In a 4×4 Latin square design 4 lactating Danish Holstein dairy cows fitted with rumen, duodenal, and ileal cannulas were assigned to 4 calcium ammonium nitrate addition levels: control, low, medium, and high [0, 5.3, 13.6, and 21.1g of nitrate/kg of dry matter (DM), respectively]. Diets were made isonitrogenous by replacing urea. Cows were fed ad libitum and, after a 6-d period of gradual introduction of nitrate, adapted to the corn-silage-based total mixed ration (forage:concentrate ratio 50:50 on DM basis) for 16d before sampling. Digesta content from duodenum, ileum, and feces, and rumen liquid were collected, after which methane production and hydrogen emissions were measured in respiration chambers. Methane production [L/kg of dry matter intake (DMI)] linearly decreased with increasing nitrate concentrations compared with the control, corresponding to a reduction of 6, 13, and 23% for the low, medium, and high diets, respectively. Methane production was lowered with apparent efficiencies (measured methane reduction relative to potential methane reduction) of 82.3, 71.9, and 79.4% for the low, medium, and high diets, respectively. Addition of nitrate increased hydrogen emissions (L/kg of DMI) quadratically by a factor of 2.5, 3.4, and 3.0 (as L/kg of DMI) for the low, medium, and high diets, respectively, compared with the control. Blood methemoglobin levels and nitrate concentrations in milk and urine increased with increasing nitrate intake, but did not constitute a threat for animal health and human food safety. Microbial crude protein synthesis and efficiency were unaffected. Total volatile fatty acid

  13. The effects of leachate recirculation with supplemental water addition on methane production and waste decomposition in a simulated tropical landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanphoti, N; Towprayoon, S; Chaiprasert, P; Nopharatana, A

    2006-10-01

    In order to increase methane production efficiency, leachate recirculation is applied in landfills to increase moisture content and circulate organic matter back into the landfill cell. In the case of tropical landfills, where high temperature and evaporation occurs, leachate recirculation may not be enough to maintain the moisture content, therefore supplemental water addition into the cell is an option that could help stabilize moisture levels as well as stimulate biological activity. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of leachate recirculation and supplemental water addition on municipal solid waste decomposition and methane production in three anaerobic digestion reactors. Anaerobic digestion with leachate recirculation and supplemental water addition showed the highest performance in terms of cumulative methane production and the stabilization period time required. It produced an accumulated methane production of 54.87 l/kg dry weight of MSW at an average rate of 0.58 l/kg dry weight/d and reached the stabilization phase on day 180. The leachate recirculation reactor provided 17.04 l/kg dry weight at a rate of 0.14l/kg dry weight/d and reached the stabilization phase on day 290. The control reactor provided 9.02 l/kg dry weight at a rate of 0.10 l/kg dry weight/d, and reached the stabilization phase on day 270. Increasing the organic loading rate (OLR) after the waste had reached the stabilization phase made it possible to increase the methane content of the gas, the methane production rate, and the COD removal. Comparison of the reactors' efficiencies at maximum OLR (5 kgCOD/m(3)/d) in terms of the methane production rate showed that the reactor using leachate recirculation with supplemental water addition still gave the highest performance (1.56 l/kg dry weight/d), whereas the leachate recirculation reactor and the control reactor provided 0.69 l/kg dry weight/d and 0.43 l/kg dry weight/d, respectively. However, when considering

  14. Effect of dietary nitrate level on enteric methane production, hydrogen emission, rumen fermentation, and nutrient digestibility in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olijhoek, D W; Hellwing, A L F; Brask, M; Weisbjerg, M R; Højberg, O; Larsen, M K; Dijkstra, J; Erlandsen, E J; Lund, P

    2016-08-01

    Nitrate may lower methane production in ruminants by competing with methanogenesis for available hydrogen in the rumen. This study evaluated the effect of 4 levels of dietary nitrate addition on enteric methane production, hydrogen emission, feed intake, rumen fermentation, nutrient digestibility, microbial protein synthesis, and blood methemoglobin. In a 4×4 Latin square design 4 lactating Danish Holstein dairy cows fitted with rumen, duodenal, and ileal cannulas were assigned to 4 calcium ammonium nitrate addition levels: control, low, medium, and high [0, 5.3, 13.6, and 21.1g of nitrate/kg of dry matter (DM), respectively]. Diets were made isonitrogenous by replacing urea. Cows were fed ad libitum and, after a 6-d period of gradual introduction of nitrate, adapted to the corn-silage-based total mixed ration (forage:concentrate ratio 50:50 on DM basis) for 16d before sampling. Digesta content from duodenum, ileum, and feces, and rumen liquid were collected, after which methane production and hydrogen emissions were measured in respiration chambers. Methane production [L/kg of dry matter intake (DMI)] linearly decreased with increasing nitrate concentrations compared with the control, corresponding to a reduction of 6, 13, and 23% for the low, medium, and high diets, respectively. Methane production was lowered with apparent efficiencies (measured methane reduction relative to potential methane reduction) of 82.3, 71.9, and 79.4% for the low, medium, and high diets, respectively. Addition of nitrate increased hydrogen emissions (L/kg of DMI) quadratically by a factor of 2.5, 3.4, and 3.0 (as L/kg of DMI) for the low, medium, and high diets, respectively, compared with the control. Blood methemoglobin levels and nitrate concentrations in milk and urine increased with increasing nitrate intake, but did not constitute a threat for animal health and human food safety. Microbial crude protein synthesis and efficiency were unaffected. Total volatile fatty acid

  15. THE USE OF PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS IN IDENTIFYING AND INTEGRATING VARIABLES RELATED TO FORAGE QUALITY AND METHANE PRODUCTION