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Sample records for biogenesis

  1. crRNA biogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charpentier, E.; Oost, van der J.; White, M.

    2013-01-01

    Mature crRNAs are key elements in CRISPR-Cas defense against genome invaders. These short RNAs are composed of unique repeat/spacer sequences that guide the Cas protein(s) to the cognate invading nucleic acids for their destruction. The biogenesis of mature crRNAs involves highly precise processing

  2. Mitochondrial biogenesis: pharmacological approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Organelle biogenesis is concomitant to organelle inheritance during cell division. It is necessary that organelles double their size and divide to give rise to two identical daughter cells. Mitochondrial biogenesis occurs by growth and division of pre-existing organelles and is temporally coordinated with cell cycle events [1]. However, mitochondrial biogenesis is not only produced in association with cell division. It can be produced in response to an oxidative stimulus, to an increase in the energy requirements of the cells, to exercise training, to electrical stimulation, to hormones, during development, in certain mitochondrial diseases, etc. [2]. Mitochondrial biogenesis is therefore defined as the process via which cells increase their individual mitochondrial mass [3]. Recent discoveries have raised attention to mitochondrial biogenesis as a potential target to treat diseases which up to date do not have an efficient cure. Mitochondria, as the major ROS producer and the major antioxidant producer exert a crucial role within the cell mediating processes such as apoptosis, detoxification, Ca2+ buffering, etc. This pivotal role makes mitochondria a potential target to treat a great variety of diseases. Mitochondrial biogenesis can be pharmacologically manipulated. This issue tries to cover a number of approaches to treat several diseases through triggering mitochondrial biogenesis. It contains recent discoveries in this novel field, focusing on advanced mitochondrial therapies to chronic and degenerative diseases, mitochondrial diseases, lifespan extension, mitohormesis, intracellular signaling, new pharmacological targets and natural therapies. It contributes to the field by covering and gathering the scarcely reported pharmacological approaches in the novel and promising field of mitochondrial biogenesis. There are several diseases that have a mitochondrial origin such as chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) and the Kearns- Sayre syndrome (KSS

  3. Cellulose biogenesis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanton, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    Organisms that synthesize cellulose can be found amongst the bacteria, protistans, fungi, and animals, but it is in plants that the importance of cellulose in function (as the major structural constituent of plant cell walls) and economic use (as wood and fiber) can be best appreciated. The structure of cellulose and its biosynthesis have been the subjects of intense investigation. One of the most important insights gained from these studies is that the synthesis of cellulose by living organisms involves much more than simply the polymerization of glucose into a (1{r_arrow}4)-{beta}-linked polymer. The number of glucoses in a polymer (the degree of polymerization), the crystalline form assumed by the glucan chains when they crystallize to form a microfibril, and the dimensions and orientation of the microfibrils are all subject to cellular control. Instead of cellulose biosynthesis, a more appropriate term might be cellulose biogenesis, to emphasize the involvement of cellular structures and mechanisms in controlling polymerization and directing crystallization and deposition. Dictyostelium discoideum is uniquely suitable for the study of cellulose biogenesis because of its amenability to experimental study and manipulation and the extent of our knowledge of its basic cellular mechanisms (as will be evident from the rest of this volume). In this chapter, I will summarize what is known about cellulose biogenesis in D. discoideum, emphasizing its potential to illuminate our understanding both of D. discoideum development and plant cellulose biogenesis.

  4. ERES : sites for autophagosome biogenesis and maturation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Wandelmer, Jana; Ktistakis, Nicholas T; Reggiori, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    Autophagosomes are the hallmark of autophagy, but despite their central role in this degradative pathway that involves vesicle transport to lysosomes or vacuoles, the mechanism underlying their biogenesis still remains largely unknown. Our current concepts about autophagosome biogenesis are based on

  5. Selenium supplementation induces mitochondrial biogenesis in trophoblasts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Khera, A.; Dong, L. F.; Holland, O.; Vanderlelie, J.; Pasdar, E.A.; Neužil, Jiří; Perkins, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 8 (2015), s. 363-369. ISSN 0143-4004 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Selenium * Reactive oxygen species * Mitochondrial biogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.710, year: 2014

  6. Oil Body Biogenesis during Brassica napus Embryogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Qing He; Yan Wu

    2009-01-01

    Although the oil body is known to be an important membrane enclosed compartment for oil storage in seeds, we have little understanding about its biogenesis during embryogenesis. In the present study we investigated the oil body emergence and variations in Brassica napus cv. Topas. The results demonstrate that the oil bodies could be detected already at the heart stage, at the same time as the embryos began to tum green, and the starch grains accumulated in the chloroplast stroma. In comparison, we have studied the development of oil bodies between Arabidopsis thaliana wild type (Col) and the low-seed-oil mutant wrinkled1-3. We observed that the oil body development in the embryos of Col is similar to that of B. napus cv. Topas, and that the size of the oil bodies was obviously smaller in the embryos of wrinkled1-3. Our results suggest that the oil body biogenesis might be coupled with the embryo chloroplast.

  7. The circadian clock coordinates ribosome biogenesis.

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    Céline Jouffe

    Full Text Available Biological rhythms play a fundamental role in the physiology and behavior of most living organisms. Rhythmic circadian expression of clock-controlled genes is orchestrated by a molecular clock that relies on interconnected negative feedback loops of transcription regulators. Here we show that the circadian clock exerts its function also through the regulation of mRNA translation. Namely, the circadian clock influences the temporal translation of a subset of mRNAs involved in ribosome biogenesis by controlling the transcription of translation initiation factors as well as the clock-dependent rhythmic activation of signaling pathways involved in their regulation. Moreover, the circadian oscillator directly regulates the transcription of ribosomal protein mRNAs and ribosomal RNAs. Thus the circadian clock exerts a major role in coordinating transcription and translation steps underlying ribosome biogenesis.

  8. Ribosome biogenesis during skeletal muscle hypertrophy

    OpenAIRE

    von Walden, Ferdinand

    2014-01-01

    Muscle adaptation to chronic resistance exercise (RE) is the result of a cumulative effect on gene expression and protein content. Following a bout of RE, muscle protein synthesis increases and, if followed by consecutive bouts (training), protein accretion and muscle hypertrophy develops. The protein synthetic capacity of the muscle is dictated by ribosome content. Therefore, the general aim of this thesis is to investigate the regulation of ribosome biogenesis during skeletal muscle hypertr...

  9. Biogenesis, delivery, and function of extracellular RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G. Patton

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Extracellular RNA (exRNA Communication Consortium was launched by the National Institutes of Health to focus on the extent to which RNA might function in a non-cell-autonomous manner. With the availability of increasingly sensitive tools, small amounts of RNA can be detected in serum, plasma, and other bodily fluids. The exact mechanism(s by which RNA can be secreted from cells and the mechanisms for the delivery and uptake by recipient cells remain to be determined. This review will summarize current knowledge about the biogenesis and delivery of exRNA and outline projects seeking to understand the functional impact of exRNA.

  10. Unravelling the mechanisms regulating muscle mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, David A; Tryon, Liam D; Carter, Heather N; Kim, Yuho; Chen, Chris C W

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal muscle is a tissue with a low mitochondrial content under basal conditions, but it is responsive to acute increases in contractile activity patterns (i.e. exercise) which initiate the signalling of a compensatory response, leading to the biogenesis of mitochondria and improved organelle function. Exercise also promotes the degradation of poorly functioning mitochondria (i.e. mitophagy), thereby accelerating mitochondrial turnover, and preserving a pool of healthy organelles. In contrast, muscle disuse, as well as the aging process, are associated with reduced mitochondrial quality and quantity in muscle. This has strong negative implications for whole-body metabolic health and the preservation of muscle mass. A number of traditional, as well as novel regulatory pathways exist in muscle that control both biogenesis and mitophagy. Interestingly, although the ablation of single regulatory transcription factors within these pathways often leads to a reduction in the basal mitochondrial content of muscle, this can invariably be overcome with exercise, signifying that exercise activates a multitude of pathways which can respond to restore mitochondrial health. This knowledge, along with growing realization that pharmacological agents can also promote mitochondrial health independently of exercise, leads to an optimistic outlook in which the maintenance of mitochondrial and whole-body metabolic health can be achieved by taking advantage of the broad benefits of exercise, along with the potential specificity of drug action. PMID:27470593

  11. The Biogenesis of Nascent Circular RNAs

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    Yang Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Steady-state circular RNAs (circRNAs have been mapped to thousands of genomic loci in mammals. We studied circRNA processing using metabolic tagging of nascent RNAs with 4-thiouridine (4sU. Strikingly, the efficiency of circRNA processing from pre-mRNA is extremely low endogenously. Additional studies revealed that back-splicing outcomes correlate with fast RNA Polymerase II elongation rate and are tightly controlled by cis-elements in vivo. Additionally, prolonged 4sU labeling in cells shows that circRNAs are largely processed post-transcriptionally and that circRNAs are stable. Circular RNAs that are abundant at a steady-state level tend to accumulate. This is particularly true in cells, such as neurons, that have slow division rates. This study uncovers features of circRNA biogenesis by investigating the link between nascent circRNA processing and transcription.

  12. Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Control of Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar D. Yoboue

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial biogenesis is a complex process. It necessitates the contribution of both the nuclear and the mitochondrial genomes and therefore crosstalk between the nucleus and mitochondria. It is now well established that cellular mitochondrial content can vary according to a number of stimuli and physiological states in eukaryotes. The knowledge of the actors and signals regulating the mitochondrial biogenesis is thus of high importance. The cellular redox state has been considered for a long time as a key element in the regulation of various processes. In this paper, we report the involvement of the oxidative stress in the regulation of some actors of mitochondrial biogenesis.

  13. VEGF stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis: requirement of AKT3 kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Gary L.; Maroulakou, Ioanna G.; Eldridge, Juanita; Liby, Tiera L.; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Tsichlis, Philip N.; Muise-Helmericks, Robin C.

    2008-01-01

    The growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), induces angiogenesis and promotes endothelial cell (EC) proliferation. Affymetrix gene array analyses show that VEGF stimulates the expression of a cluster of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes, suggesting a role for VEGF in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. We show that the serine threonine kinase Akt3 specifically links VEGF to mitochondrial biogenesis. A direct comparison of Akt1 vs. Akt3 gene silencing was performed ...

  14. On the Non-observability of Recent Biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Lineweaver, Charles H.; Davis, Tamara M.

    2003-01-01

    In a previous paper we addressed the question "Does the Rapid Appearance of Life on Earth Suggest that Life is Common in the Universe?" The non-observability of recent biogenesis is a self-selection effect that needs to be considered if inferences are to be drawn from the rapidity of terrestrial biogenesis. We discuss several approaches that have been proposed to take this effect into account.

  15. Specialized membrane biogenesis in mammary epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The apical membrane of the mammary gland epithelial cell is highly differentiated and adapted to participate in the process of fat secretion. Certain of the apical membrane differentiation antigens are frequently expressed on membrane carcinoma cells, and knowledge of the normal mechanisms by which these antigens are regulated may have implications for a better understanding of tumor antigen expression. Because the apical membrane of the cell is lost during secretion, active membrane biosynthesis must accompany fat secretion, and the cell represents a good model for studying membrane biogenesis in polarized epithelial cells. Experiments have been carried out using primary cultures of cells established from mammary glands of late pregnant mice and also a mouse cell line, COMMA-1-D, that differentiates in an appropriate milieu. When fat globule membranes are purified from mouse milk and the protein composition analyzed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, four major proteins are identifiable with molecular weights of 55, 67, 90, and 150 kDa. The 67-kDa component was identified as butyrophilin and the 150-kDa one as xanthine oxidase. In addition, a high molecular weight carbohydrate rich glycoprotein, PAS-O, is also present. 3 refs., 3 figs

  16. Biogenesis and architecture of arterivirus replication organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hoeven, Barbara; Oudshoorn, Diede; Koster, Abraham J; Snijder, Eric J; Kikkert, Marjolein; Bárcena, Montserrat

    2016-07-15

    All eukaryotic positive-stranded RNA (+RNA) viruses appropriate host cell membranes and transform them into replication organelles, specialized micro-environments that are thought to support viral RNA synthesis. Arteriviruses (order Nidovirales) belong to the subset of +RNA viruses that induce double-membrane vesicles (DMVs), similar to the structures induced by e.g. coronaviruses, picornaviruses and hepatitis C virus. In the last years, electron tomography has revealed substantial differences between the structures induced by these different virus groups. Arterivirus-induced DMVs appear to be closed compartments that are continuous with endoplasmic reticulum membranes, thus forming an extensive reticulovesicular network (RVN) of intriguing complexity. This RVN is remarkably similar to that described for the distantly related coronaviruses (also order Nidovirales) and sets them apart from other DMV-inducing viruses analysed to date. We review here the current knowledge and open questions on arterivirus replication organelles and discuss them in the light of the latest studies on other DMV-inducing viruses, particularly coronaviruses. Using the equine arteritis virus (EAV) model system and electron tomography, we present new data regarding the biogenesis of arterivirus-induced DMVs and uncover numerous putative intermediates in DMV formation. We generated cell lines that can be induced to express specific EAV replicase proteins and showed that DMVs induced by the transmembrane proteins nsp2 and nsp3 form an RVN and are comparable in topology and architecture to those formed during viral infection. Co-expression of the third EAV transmembrane protein (nsp5), expressed as part of a self-cleaving polypeptide that mimics viral polyprotein processing in infected cells, led to the formation of DMVs whose size was more homogenous and closer to what is observed upon EAV infection, suggesting a regulatory role for nsp5 in modulating membrane curvature and DMV formation. PMID

  17. Nonequilibrium mechanisms underlying de novo biogenesis of Golgi cisternae

    CERN Document Server

    Sachdeva, Himani; Rao, Madan

    2016-01-01

    A central issue in cell biology is the physico-chemical basis of organelle biogenesis in intracellular trafficking pathways, its most impressive manifestation being the biogenesis of Golgi cisternae. At a basic level, such morphologically and chemically distinct compartments should arise from an interplay between the molecular transport and chemical maturation. Here, we formulate analytically tractable, minimalist models, that incorporate this interplay between transport and chemical progression in physical space, and explore the conditions for de novo biogenesis of distinct cisternae. We propose new quantitative measures that can discriminate between the various models of transport in a qualitative manner- this includes measures of the dynamics in steady state and the dynamical response to perturbations of the kind amenable to live-cell imaging.

  18. Exercise induces mitochondrial biogenesis after brain ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q; Wu, Y; Zhang, P; Sha, H; Jia, J; Hu, Y; Zhu, J

    2012-03-15

    Stroke is a major cause of death worldwide. Previous studies have suggested both exercise and mitochondrial biogenesis contribute to improved post-ischemic recovery of brain function. However, the exact mechanism underlying this effect is unclear. On the other hand, the benefit of exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in brain has been confirmed. In this study, we attempted to determine whether treadmill exercise induces functional improvement through regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis after brain ischemia. We subjected adult male rats to ischemia, followed by either treadmill exercise or non-exercise and analyzed the effect of exercise on the amount of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors, and mitochondrial protein. In the ischemia-exercise group, only peroxisome proliferator activated receptor coactivator-1 (PGC-1) expression was increased significantly after 3 days of treadmill training. However, after 7 days of training, the levels of mtDNA, nuclear respiratory factor 1, NRF-1, mitochondrial transcription factor A, TFAM, and the mitochondrial protein cytochrome C oxidase subunit IV (COXIV) and heat shock protein-60 (HSP60) also increased above levels observed in non-exercised ischemic animals. These changes followed with significant changes in behavioral scores and cerebral infarct volume. The results indicate that exercise can promote mitochondrial biogenesis after ischemic injury, which may serve as a novel component of exercise-induced repair mechanisms of the brain. Understanding the molecular basis for exercise-induced neuroprotection may be beneficial in the development of therapeutic approaches for brain recovery from the ischemic injury. Based upon our findings, stimulation or enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis may prove a novel neuroprotective strategy in the future. PMID:22266265

  19. Targeting mitochondrial biogenesis to overcome drug resistance to MAPK inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gao; Frederick, Dennie T; Wu, Lawrence; Wei, Zhi; Krepler, Clemens; Srinivasan, Satish; Chae, Young Chan; Xu, Xiaowei; Choi, Harry; Dimwamwa, Elaida; Ope, Omotayo; Shannan, Batool; Basu, Devraj; Zhang, Dongmei; Guha, Manti; Xiao, Min; Randell, Sergio; Sproesser, Katrin; Xu, Wei; Liu, Jephrey; Karakousis, Giorgos C; Schuchter, Lynn M; Gangadhar, Tara C; Amaravadi, Ravi K; Gu, Mengnan; Xu, Caiyue; Ghosh, Abheek; Xu, Weiting; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Jie; Zha, Shijie; Liu, Qin; Brafford, Patricia; Weeraratna, Ashani; Davies, Michael A; Wargo, Jennifer A; Avadhani, Narayan G; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B; Altieri, Dario C; Flaherty, Keith T; Herlyn, Meenhard

    2016-05-01

    Targeting multiple components of the MAPK pathway can prolong the survival of patients with BRAFV600E melanoma. This approach is not curative, as some BRAF-mutated melanoma cells are intrinsically resistant to MAPK inhibitors (MAPKi). At the systemic level, our knowledge of how signaling pathways underlie drug resistance needs to be further expanded. Here, we have shown that intrinsically resistant BRAF-mutated melanoma cells with a low basal level of mitochondrial biogenesis depend on this process to survive MAPKi. Intrinsically resistant cells exploited an integrated stress response, exhibited an increase in mitochondrial DNA content, and required oxidative phosphorylation to meet their bioenergetic needs. We determined that intrinsically resistant cells rely on the genes encoding TFAM, which controls mitochondrial genome replication and transcription, and TRAP1, which regulates mitochondrial protein folding. Therefore, we targeted mitochondrial biogenesis with a mitochondrium-targeted, small-molecule HSP90 inhibitor (Gamitrinib), which eradicated intrinsically resistant cells and augmented the efficacy of MAPKi by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibiting tumor bioenergetics. A subset of tumor biopsies from patients with disease progression despite MAPKi treatment showed increased mitochondrial biogenesis and tumor bioenergetics. A subset of acquired drug-resistant melanoma cell lines was sensitive to Gamitrinib. Our study establishes mitochondrial biogenesis, coupled with aberrant tumor bioenergetics, as a potential therapy escape mechanism and paves the way for a rationale-based combinatorial strategy to improve the efficacy of MAPKi. PMID:27043285

  20. Folding and Biogenesis of Mitochondrial Small Tim Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrain Ceh-Pavia

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Correct and timely folding is critical to the function of all proteins. The importance of this is illustrated in the biogenesis of the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS “small Tim” proteins. Biogenesis of the small Tim proteins is regulated by dedicated systems or pathways, beginning with synthesis in the cytosol and ending with assembly of individually folded proteins into functional complexes in the mitochondrial IMS. The process is mostly centered on regulating the redox states of the conserved cysteine residues: oxidative folding is crucial for protein function in the IMS, but oxidized (disulfide bonded proteins cannot be imported into mitochondria. How the redox-sensitive small Tim precursor proteins are maintained in a reduced, import-competent form in the cytosol is not well understood. Recent studies suggest that zinc and the cytosolic thioredoxin system play a role in the biogenesis of these proteins. In the IMS, the mitochondrial import and assembly (MIA pathway catalyzes both import into the IMS and oxidative folding of the small Tim proteins. Finally, assembly of the small Tim complexes is a multistep process driven by electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions; however, the chaperone function of the complex might require destabilization of these interactions to accommodate the substrate. Here, we review how folding of the small Tim proteins is regulated during their biogenesis, from maintenance of the unfolded precursors in the cytosol, to their import, oxidative folding, complex assembly and function in the IMS.

  1. Yeast peroxisomes : function and biogenesis of a versatile cell organelle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Klei, IJ; Veenhuis, M

    1997-01-01

    Yeast peroxisomes harbour enzymes involved in the metabolism of specific growth substrates, Sequestration of these enzymes increases the efficiency of such pathways. Currently, 16 genes involved in peroxisome biogenesis have been identified, and analysis of their products suggests novel mechanisms f

  2. Peroxisome Biogenesis Disorders: Biological, Clinical and Pathophysiological Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Nancy E.; D'Agostino, Maria Daniela; MacLean, Gillian E.

    2013-01-01

    The peroxisome biogenesis disorders (PBD) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders in which peroxisome assembly is impaired, leading to multiple peroxisome enzyme deficiencies, complex developmental sequelae and progressive disabilities. Mammalian peroxisome assembly involves the protein products of 16 "PEX" genes;…

  3. Perfluorooctanoic acid stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis and gene transcription in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), used in the production of non-stick surface compounds, exhibits a worldwide distribution in the serum of humans and wildlife. In rodents PFOA transactivates PPARα and PPARγ nuclear receptors and increases mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number, which may be critical to the altered metabolic state of affected animals. A key regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and transcription of mitochondrial genes is the PPARγ coactivator-1α (Pgc-1α) protein. The purpose of this study was to determine if Pgc-1α is implicated in the stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis that occurs following the treatment of rats with PFOA. Livers from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats that received a 30 mg/kg daily oral dose of PFOA for 28 days were used for all experiments. Analysis of mitochondrial replication and transcription was performed by real time PCR, and proteins were detected using western blotting. PFOA treatment caused a transcriptional activation of the mitochondrial biogenesis pathway leading to a doubling of mtDNA copy number. Further, transcription of OXPHOS genes encoded by mtDNA was 3-4 times greater than that of nuclear encoded genes, suggestive of a preferential induction of mtDNA transcription. Western blot analysis revealed an increase in Pgc-1α, unchanged Tfam and decreased Cox II and Cox IV subunit protein expression. We conclude that PFOA treatment in rats induces mitochondrial biogenesis at the transcriptional level with a preferential stimulation of mtDNA transcription and that this occurs by way of activation of the Pgc-1α pathway. Implication of the Pgc-1α pathway is consistent with PPARγ transactivation by PFOA and reveals new understanding and possibly new critical targets for assessing or averting the associated metabolic disease.

  4. Regulation of chloroplast biogenesis: the immutans mutant of Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodermel, Steven

    2015-11-16

    The immutans (im) variegation mutant of Arabidopsis is an ideal model to gain insight into factors that control chloroplast biogenesis. im defines the gene for PTOX, a plastoquinol terminal oxidase that participates in control of thylakoid redox. Here, we report that the im defect can be suppressed during the late stages of plant development by gigantea (gi2), which defines the gene for GIGANTEA (GI), a central component of the circadian clock that plays a poorly-understood role in diverse plant developmental processes. imgi2 mutants are late-flowering and display other well-known phenotypes associated with gi2, such as starch accumulation and resistance to oxidative stress. We show that the restoration of chloroplast biogenesis in imgi2 is caused by a developmental-specific de-repression of cytokinin signaling that involves crosstalk with signaling pathways mediated by gibberellin (GA) and SPINDLY (SPY), a GA response inhibitor. Suppression of the plastid defect in imgi2 is likely caused by a relaxation of excitation pressures in developing plastids by factors contributed by gi2, including enhanced rates of photosynthesis and increased resistance to oxidative stress. Interestingly, the suppression phenotype of imgi can be mimicked by crossing im with the starch accumulation mutant, sex1, perhaps because sex1 utilizes pathways similar to gi. We conclude that our studies provide a direct genetic linkage between GIGANTEA and chloroplast biogenesis, and we construct a model of interactions between signaling pathways mediated by gi, GA, SPY, cytokinins, and sex1 that are required for chloroplast biogenesis.

  5. Altered Endosome Biogenesis in Prostate Cancer has Biomarker Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Ian R D; Parkinson-Lawrence, Emma J.; Shandala, Tetyana; Weigert, Roberto; Lisa M Butler; Brooks, Doug A.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common form of cancer in males, affecting one in eight men by the time they reach the age of 70. Current diagnostic tests for prostate cancer have significant problems with both false negatives and false positives, necessitating the search for new molecular markers. A recent investigation of endosomal and lysosomal proteins revealed that the critical process of endosomal biogenesis might be altered in prostate cancer. Here, a panel of endosomal markers was e...

  6. Regulation of ribosome biogenesis in maize embryonic axes during germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Hernández, J M; Dinkova, T D; Aguilar-Caballero, R; Rivera-Cabrera, F; Sánchez de Jiménez, E; Pérez-Flores, L J

    2013-10-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a pre-requisite for cell growth and proliferation; it is however, a highly regulated process that consumes a great quantity of energy. It requires the coordinated production of rRNA, ribosomal proteins and non-ribosomal factors which participate in the processing and mobilization of the new ribosomes. Ribosome biogenesis has been studied in yeast and animals; however, there is little information about this process in plants. The objective of the present work was to study ribosome biogenesis in maize seeds during germination, a stage characterized for its fast growth, and the effect of insulin in this process. Insulin has been reported to accelerate germination and to induce seedling growth. It was observed that among the first events reactivated just after 3 h of imbibition are the rDNA transcription and the pre-rRNA processing and that insulin stimulates both of them (40-230%). The transcript of nucleolin, a protein which regulates rDNA transcription and pre-rRNA processing, is among the messages stored in quiescent dry seeds and it is mobilized into the polysomal fraction during the first hours of imbibition (6 h). In contrast, de novo ribosomal protein synthesis was low during the first hours of imbibition (3 and 6 h) increasing by 60 times in later stages (24 h). Insulin increased this synthesis (75%) at 24 h of imbibition; however, not all ribosomal proteins were similarly regulated. In this regard, an increase in RPS6 and RPL7 protein levels was observed, whereas RPL3 protein levels did not change even though its transcription was induced. Results show that ribosome biogenesis in the first stages of imbibition is carried out with newly synthesized rRNA and ribosomal proteins translated from stored mRNA. PMID:23806421

  7. Mitochondria biogenesis and the development of diabetic retinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    dos Santos, Julia M.; Tewari, Shikha; Goldberg, Andrew F. X.; Kowluru, Renu A.

    2011-01-01

    Retinal mitochondria become dysfunctional and their DNA (mtDNA) is damaged in diabetes. Biogenesis of mitochondria DNA is tightly controlled by nuclear-mitochondrial transcriptional factors, and translocation of transcription factor A (TFAM) to the mitochondria is essential for transcription and replication. Our aim is to investigate the effect of diabetes on nuclear-mitochondrial communication in the retina, and its role in the development of retinopathy. Damage of mtDNA, copy number and bio...

  8. The miRNA biogenesis in marine bivalves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosani, Umberto; Pallavicini, Alberto; Venier, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs include powerful regulators of gene expression, transposon mobility and virus activity. Among the various categories, mature microRNAs (miRNAs) guide the translational repression and decay of several targeted mRNAs. The biogenesis of miRNAs depends on few gene products, essentially conserved from basal to higher metazoans, whose protein domains allow specific interactions with dsRNA. Here, we report the identification of key genes responsible of the miRNA biogenesis in 32 bivalves, with particular attention to the aquaculture species Mytilus galloprovincialis and Crassostrea gigas. In detail, we have identified and phylogenetically compared eight evolutionary conserved proteins: DROSHA, DGCR8, EXP5, RAN, DICER TARBP2, AGO and PIWI. In mussels, we recognized several other proteins participating in the miRNA biogenesis or in the subsequent RNA silencing. According to digital expression analysis, these genes display low and not inducible expression levels in adult mussels and oysters whereas they are considerably expressed during development. As miRNAs play an important role also in the antiviral responses, knowledge on their production and regulative effects can shed light on essential molecular processes and provide new hints for disease prevention in bivalves. PMID:26989613

  9. Genome-wide analysis of effectors of peroxisome biogenesis.

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    Ramsey A Saleem

    Full Text Available Peroxisomes are intracellular organelles that house a number of diverse metabolic processes, notably those required for beta-oxidation of fatty acids. Peroxisomes biogenesis can be induced by the presence of peroxisome proliferators, including fatty acids, which activate complex cellular programs that underlie the induction process. Here, we used multi-parameter quantitative phenotype analyses of an arrayed mutant collection of yeast cells induced to proliferate peroxisomes, to establish a comprehensive inventory of genes required for peroxisome induction and function. The assays employed include growth in the presence of fatty acids, and confocal imaging and flow cytometry through the induction process. In addition to the classical phenotypes associated with loss of peroxisomal functions, these studies identified 169 genes required for robust signaling, transcription, normal peroxisomal development and morphologies, and transmission of peroxisomes to daughter cells. These gene products are localized throughout the cell, and many have indirect connections to peroxisome function. By integration with extant data sets, we present a total of 211 genes linked to peroxisome biogenesis and highlight the complex networks through which information flows during peroxisome biogenesis and function.

  10. Coordination of plant mitochondrial biogenesis: keeping pace with cellular requirements.

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    Elina eWelchen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant mitochondria are complex organelles that carry out numerous metabolic processes related with the generation of energy for cellular functions and the synthesis and degradation of several compounds. Mitochondria are semiautonomous and dynamic organelles changing in shape, number and composition depending on tissue or developmental stage. The biogenesis of functional mitochondria requires the coordination of genes present both in the nucleus and the organelle. In addition, due to their central role, all processes held inside mitochondria must be finely coordinated with those in other organelles according to cellular demands. Coordination is achieved by transcriptional control of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins by specific transcription factors that recognize conserved elements in their promoter regions. In turn, the expression of most of these transcription factors is linked to developmental and environmental cues, according to the availability of nutrients, light-dark cycles and warning signals generated in response to stress conditions. Among the signals impacting in the expression of nuclear genes, retrograde signals that originate inside mitochondria help to adjust mitochondrial biogenesis to organelle demands. Adding more complexity, several nuclear encoded proteins are dual localized to mitochondria and either chloroplasts or the nucleus. Dual targeting might establish a crosstalk between the nucleus and cell organelles to ensure a fine coordination of cellular activities. In this article, we discuss how the different levels of coordination of mitochondrial biogenesis interconnect to optimize the function of the organelle according to both internal and external demands.

  11. Ribosome biogenesis in replicating cells: Integration of experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnest, Tyler M; Cole, John A; Peterson, Joseph R; Hallock, Michael J; Kuhlman, Thomas E; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2016-10-01

    Ribosomes-the primary macromolecular machines responsible for translating the genetic code into proteins-are complexes of precisely folded RNA and proteins. The ways in which their production and assembly are managed by the living cell is of deep biological importance. Here we extend a recent spatially resolved whole-cell model of ribosome biogenesis in a fixed volume [Earnest et al., Biophys J 2015, 109, 1117-1135] to include the effects of growth, DNA replication, and cell division. All biological processes are described in terms of reaction-diffusion master equations and solved stochastically using the Lattice Microbes simulation software. In order to determine the replication parameters, we construct and analyze a series of Escherichia coli strains with fluorescently labeled genes distributed evenly throughout their chromosomes. By measuring these cells' lengths and number of gene copies at the single-cell level, we could fit a statistical model of the initiation and duration of chromosome replication. We found that for our slow-growing (120 min doubling time) E. coli cells, replication was initiated 42 min into the cell cycle and completed after an additional 42 min. While simulations of the biogenesis model produce the correct ribosome and mRNA counts over the cell cycle, the kinetic parameters for transcription and degradation are lower than anticipated from a recent analytical time dependent model of in vivo mRNA production. Describing expression in terms of a simple chemical master equation, we show that the discrepancies are due to the lack of nonribosomal genes in the extended biogenesis model which effects the competition of mRNA for ribosome binding, and suggest corrections to parameters to be used in the whole-cell model when modeling expression of the entire transcriptome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 735-751, 2016. PMID:27294303

  12. Biogenesis and Functions of Exosomes and Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Florian; Baur, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Research on extracellular vesicles (EVs) is a new and emerging field that is rapidly growing. Many features of these structures still need to be described and discovered. This concerns their biogenesis, their release and cellular entrance mechanisms, as well as their functions, particularly in vivo. Hence our knowledge on EV is constantly evolving and sometimes changing. In our review we summarize the most important facts of our current knowledge about extracellular vesicles and described some of the assumed functions in the context of cancer and HIV infection. PMID:27317183

  13. The Biogenesis of Lysosomes and Lysosome-Related Organelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzio, J. Paul; Hackmann, Yvonne; Dieckmann, Nele M.G.; Griffiths, Gillian M.

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomes were once considered the end point of endocytosis, simply used for macromolecule degradation. They are now recognized to be dynamic organelles, able to fuse with a variety of targets and to be re-formed after fusion events. They are also now known to be the site of nutrient sensing and signaling to the cell nucleus. In addition, lysosomes are secretory organelles, with specialized machinery for regulated secretion of proteins in some cell types. The biogenesis of lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles is discussed, taking into account their dynamic nature and multiple roles. PMID:25183830

  14. Serine Protease Autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs: Biogenesis and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Dautin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Serine Protease Autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs constitute a large family of proteases secreted by Escherichia coli and Shigella. SPATEs exhibit two distinct proteolytic activities. First, a C-terminal catalytic site triggers an intra-molecular cleavage that releases the N-terminal portion of these proteins in the extracellular medium. Second, the secreted N-terminal domains of SPATEs are themselves proteases; each contains a canonical serine-protease catalytic site. Some of these secreted proteases are toxins, eliciting various effects on mammalian cells. Here, we discuss the biogenesis of SPATEs and their function as toxins.

  15. Mitochondrial biogenesis in the pulmonary vasculature during inhalation lung injury and fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cell survival and injury repair is facilitated by mitochondrial biogenesis; however, the role of this process in lung repair is unknown. We evaluated mitochondrial biogenesis in the mouse lung in two injuries that cause acute inflammation and in two that cause chronic inflammatio...

  16. Vulnerability of microRNA biogenesis in FTD-ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitan, Chen; Hornstein, Eran

    2016-09-15

    The genetics of the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) turn our attention to RNA metabolism, primarily because many of the identified diseases-associated genes encode for RNA-binding proteins. microRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous noncoding RNAs that play critical roles in maintaining brain integrity. The current review sheds light on miRNA dysregulation in neurodegenerative diseases, focusing on FTD-ALS. We propose that miRNAs are susceptible to fail when protein factors that are critical for miRNA biogenesis malfunction. Accordingly, potential insufficiencies of the 'microprocessor' complex, the nucleo-cytoplasmic export of miRNA precursors or their processing by Dicer were recently reported. Furthermore, specific miRNAs are involved in the regulation of pathways that are essential for neuronal survival or function. Any change in the expression of these specific miRNAs or in their ability to recognize their target sequences will have negative consequences. Taken together, recent reports strengthens the hypothesis that dysregulation of miRNAs might play an important role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, and highlights the miRNA biogenesis machinery as an interesting target for therapeutic interventions for ALS as well as FTD. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:RNA Metabolism in Disease. PMID:26778173

  17. Dysregulation of microRNA biogenesis machinery in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Akiko; Kashima, Risa

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are integral to the gene regulatory network. A single miRNA is capable of controlling the expression of hundreds of protein coding genes and modulate a wide spectrum of biological functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, stress responses, DNA repair, cell adhesion, motility, inflammation, cell survival, senescence and apoptosis, all of which are fundamental to tumorigenesis. Overexpression, genetic amplification, and gain-of-function mutation of oncogenic miRNAs ("onco-miRs") as well as genetic deletion and loss-of-function mutation of tumor suppressor miRNAs ("suppressor-miRs") are linked to human cancer. In addition to the dysregulation of a specific onco-miR or suppressor-miRs, changes in global miRNA levels resulting from a defective miRNA biogenesis pathway play a role in tumorigenesis. The function of individual onco-miRs and suppressor-miRs and their target genes in cancer has been described in many different articles elsewhere. In this review, we primarily focus on the recent development regarding the dysregulation of the miRNA biogenesis pathway and its contribution to cancer. PMID:26628006

  18. Biogenesis and Function of T Cell-Derived Exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventimiglia, Leandro N; Alonso, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are a particular type of extracellular vesicle, characterized by their endosomal origin as intraluminal vesicles present in large endosomes with a multivesicular structure. After these endosomes fuse with the plasma membrane, exosomes are secreted into the extracellular space. The ability of exosomes to carry and selectively deliver bioactive molecules (e.g., lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids) confers on them the capacity to modulate the activity of receptor cells, even if these cells are located in distant tissues or organs. Since exosomal cargo depends on cell type, a detailed understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the biochemical composition of exosomes is fundamental to a comprehensive view of exosome function. Here, we review the latest advances concerning exosome function and biogenesis in T cells, with particular focus on the mechanism of protein sorting at multivesicular endosomes. Exosomes secreted by specific T-cell subsets can modulate the activity of immune cells, including other T-cell subsets. Ceramide, tetraspanins and MAL have been revealed to be important in exosome biogenesis by T cells. These molecules, therefore, constitute potential molecular targets for artificially modulating exosome production and, hence, the immune response for therapeutic purposes. PMID:27583248

  19. PEX16: a multifaceted regulator of peroxisome biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eKim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisomes are formed by two distinct pathways: the growth and fission of mature peroxisomes and de novo synthesis at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. While many of the molecular mechanisms underlying these two pathways remain to be elucidated, it is generally accepted that their relative contribution to peroxisome formation may vary depending on the species, cell type and/or physiological status of the organism. One pertinent example of the apparent differences in the regulation of peroxisome biogenesis among evolutionarily diverse species is the involvement of the peroxin PEX16. In Yarrowia lipolytica, for instance, PEX16 is an intraperoxisomal peripheral membrane protein that participates in peroxisomal fission. By contrast, Human PEX16 is an integral membrane protein that is thought to function at the ER during the early stages of de novo peroxisome formation and also recruits peroxisomal membrane proteins directly to mature peroxisomes. Similarly, PEX16 in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana is speculated to be a PMP receptor at the ER and peroxisomes, and is also required for the formation of other ER-derived organelles, such as oil and protein bodies. Here we briefly review the current knowledge of Y. lipolytica, human and A. thaliana PEX16 in the context of our overall understanding of peroxisome biogenesis and the role of the ER in this process in these three divergent species.

  20. Outer membrane lipoprotein biogenesis: Lol is not the end.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalova, Anna; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are lipid-anchored proteins that contain acyl groups covalently attached to the N-terminal cysteine residue of the mature protein. Lipoproteins are synthesized in precursor form with an N-terminal signal sequence (SS) that targets translocation across the cytoplasmic or inner membrane (IM). Lipid modification and SS processing take place at the periplasmic face of the IM. Outer membrane (OM) lipoproteins take the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) export pathway, which ends with the insertion of the N-terminal lipid moiety into the inner leaflet of the OM. For many lipoproteins, the biogenesis pathway ends here. We provide examples of lipoproteins that adopt complex topologies in the OM that include transmembrane and surface-exposed domains. Biogenesis of such lipoproteins requires additional steps beyond the Lol pathway. In at least one case, lipoprotein sequences reach the cell surface by being threaded through the lumen of a beta-barrel protein in an assembly reaction that requires the heteropentomeric Bam complex. The inability to predict surface exposure reinforces the importance of experimental verification of lipoprotein topology and we will discuss some of the methods used to study OM protein topology. PMID:26370942

  1. SMALL NONCODING RNA AS PERSPECTIVE BIOMARKERS: BIOGENESIS AND THERAPEUTIC STRATIGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Tiguntsev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The review presents the opening story, biogenesis and functions of basic groups of human’s small noncoding RNA: microRNA and short interfering RNA. These RNA molecules inhibit gene expression during translation by RNA interference. It was found that microRNA and short interfering RNA circulate in bioliquids and can serve as biomarkers of different human diseases because of its conservative sequences, tissue specificity and resistance to environment factors. The paper considers techniques to study noncoding RNA (cloning, bioinformatics analysis and hybridization methods: northern-blotting, RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, microarray analysis, reporter analysis. Possible noncoding RNA-targeted therapy can suggest delivery microRNA, anti-microRNA, antagomirs, microRNAsponges to target tissue by virus molecules, liposomes or nanoparticles. 

  2. Cell wall structure and biogenesis in Aspergillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimi, Akira; Miyazawa, Ken; Abe, Keietsu

    2016-09-01

    Aspergillus species are among the most important filamentous fungi from the viewpoints of industry, pathogenesis, and mycotoxin production. Fungal cells are exposed to a variety of environmental stimuli, including changes in osmolality, temperature, and pH, which create stresses that primarily act on fungal cell walls. In addition, fungal cell walls are the first interactions with host cells in either human or plants. Thus, understanding cell wall structure and the mechanism of their biogenesis is important for the industrial, medical, and agricultural fields. Here, we provide a systematic review of fungal cell wall structure and recent findings regarding the cell wall integrity signaling pathways in aspergilli. This accumulated knowledge will be useful for understanding and improving the use of industrial aspergilli fermentation processes as well as treatments for some fungal infections. PMID:27140698

  3. Flexibility in targeting and insertion during bacterial membrane protein biogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biogenesis of Escherichia coli inner membrane proteins (IMPs) is assisted by targeting and insertion factors such as the signal recognition particle (SRP), the Sec-translocon and YidC with translocation of (large) periplasmic domains energized by SecA and the proton motive force (pmf). The use of these factors and forces is probably primarily determined by specific structural features of an IMP. To analyze these features we have engineered a set of model IMPs based on endogenous E. coli IMPs known to follow distinct targeting and insertion pathways. The modified model IMPs were analyzed for altered routing using an in vivo protease mapping approach. The data suggest a facultative use of different combinations of factors

  4. Exosome Biogenesis, Regulation, and Function in Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Alenquer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are extracellular vesicles released upon fusion of multivesicular bodies(MVBs with the cellular plasma membrane. They originate as intraluminal vesicles (ILVs duringthe process of MVB formation. Exosomes were shown to contain selectively sorted functionalproteins, lipids, and RNAs, mediating cell-to-cell communications and hence playing a role in thephysiology of the healthy and diseased organism. Challenges in the field include the identificationof mechanisms sustaining packaging of membrane-bound and soluble material to these vesicles andthe understanding of the underlying processes directing MVBs for degradation or fusion with theplasma membrane. The investigation into the formation and roles of exosomes in viral infection is inits early years. Although still controversial, exosomes can, in principle, incorporate any functionalfactor, provided they have an appropriate sorting signal, and thus are prone to viral exploitation.This review initially focuses on the composition and biogenesis of exosomes. It then explores theregulatory mechanisms underlying their biogenesis. Exosomes are part of the endocytic system,which is tightly regulated and able to respond to several stimuli that lead to alterations in thecomposition of its sub-compartments. We discuss the current knowledge of how these changesaffect exosomal release. We then summarize how different viruses exploit specific proteins ofendocytic sub-compartments and speculate that it could interfere with exosome function, althoughno direct link between viral usage of the endocytic system and exosome release has yet beenreported. Many recent reports have ascribed functions to exosomes released from cells infectedwith a variety of animal viruses, including viral spread, host immunity, and manipulation of themicroenvironment, which are discussed. Given the ever-growing roles and importance of exosomesin viral infections, understanding what regulates their composition and levels, and

  5. Myristoylated CIL-7 regulates ciliary extracellular vesicle biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Julie E; Silva, Malan; Nguyen, Ken C Q; Hellen, Elizabeth; Kern, Andrew D; Hall, David H; Barr, Maureen M

    2015-08-01

    The cilium both releases and binds to extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs may be used by cells as a form of intercellular communication and mediate a broad range of physiological and pathological processes. The mammalian polycystins (PCs) localize to cilia, as well as to urinary EVs released from renal epithelial cells. PC ciliary trafficking defects may be an underlying cause of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (PKD), and ciliary-EV interactions have been proposed to play a central role in the biology of PKD. In Caenorhabditis elegans and mammals, PC1 and PC2 act in the same genetic pathway, act in a sensory capacity, localize to cilia, and are contained in secreted EVs, suggesting ancient conservation. However, the relationship between cilia and EVs and the mechanisms generating PC-containing EVs remain an enigma. In a forward genetic screen for regulators of C. elegans PKD-2 ciliary localization, we identified CIL-7, a myristoylated protein that regulates EV biogenesis. Loss of CIL-7 results in male mating behavioral defects, excessive accumulation of EVs in the lumen of the cephalic sensory organ, and failure to release PKD-2::GFP-containing EVs to the environment. Fatty acylation, such as myristoylation and palmitoylation, targets proteins to cilia and flagella. The CIL-7 myristoylation motif is essential for CIL-7 function and for targeting CIL-7 to EVs. C. elegans is a powerful model with which to study ciliary EV biogenesis in vivo and identify cis-targeting motifs such as myristoylation that are necessary for EV-cargo association and function. PMID:26041936

  6. Bioenergetics of lung tumors: Alteration of mitochondrial biogenesis and respiratory kapacity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bellance, N.; Benard, G.; Furt, F.; Begueret, H.; Smolková, Katarína; Passerieux, E.; Delage, J.P.; Baste, J.M.; Moreau, P.; Rossignol, R.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 12 (2009), s. 2566-2577. ISSN 1357-2725 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : tumors * bioenergetics * biogenesis Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.887, year: 2009

  7. Role of Surf1 in heme recruitment for bacterial COX biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannappel, Achim; Bundschuh, Freya A; Ludwig, Bernd

    2012-06-01

    Biogenesis of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is a highly complex process involving subunits encoded both in the nuclear and the organellar genome; in addition, a large number of assembly factors participate in this process. The soil bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans is an interesting alternative model for the study of COX biogenesis events because the number of chaperones involved is restricted to an essential set acting in the metal centre formation of oxidase, and the high degree of sequence homology suggests the same basic mechanisms during early COX assembly. Over the last years, studies on the P. denitrificans Surf1 protein shed some light on this important assembly factor as a heme a binding protein associated with Leigh syndrome in humans. Here, we summarise our current knowledge about Surf1 and its role in heme a incorporation events during bacterial COX biogenesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biogenesis/Assembly of Respiratory Enzyme Complexes. PMID:21945856

  8. The mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP) coordinates mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis with iron sulfur cluster biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vranken, Jonathan G; Jeong, Mi-Young; Wei, Peng; Chen, Yu-Chan; Gygi, Steven P; Winge, Dennis R; Rutter, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (FASII) and iron sulfur cluster (FeS) biogenesis are both vital biosynthetic processes within mitochondria. In this study, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP), which has a well-known role in FASII, plays an unexpected and evolutionarily conserved role in FeS biogenesis. ACP is a stable and essential subunit of the eukaryotic FeS biogenesis complex. In the absence of ACP, the complex is destabilized resulting in a profound depletion of FeS throughout the cell. This role of ACP depends upon its covalently bound 4'-phosphopantetheine (4-PP)-conjugated acyl chain to support maximal cysteine desulfurase activity. Thus, it is likely that ACP is not simply an obligate subunit but also exploits the 4-PP-conjugated acyl chain to coordinate mitochondrial fatty acid and FeS biogenesis. PMID:27540631

  9. Exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis - with special reference to mitochondrial transcription factors and lipin-1

    OpenAIRE

    Wallman Appel, Susanna E

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is one prominent adaptation to endurance training in skeletal muscle tissue. An increased mitochondrial density of the muscle fibres contributes to an enhanced aerobic capacity and thereby to improved fatigueresistance. Multiple signalling pathways and transcriptional networks are involved in controlling mitochondrial biogenesis. The transcriptional co-regulator lipin-1 is one factor proposed to contribute, based on its ability to interact with PGC-1α a...

  10. Hypoxia Mediated Downregulation of miRNA Biogenesis Promotes Tumor Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Wu, Sherry Y.; Pradeep, Sunila; Ivan, Cristina; Pecot, Chad V.; Gharpure, Kshipra M.; Nagaraja, Archana S; Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N.; McGuire, Michael; Zand, Behrouz; Dalton, Heather J.; Filant, Justyna; Miller, Justin Bottsford; Lu, Chunhua; Sadaoui, Nouara C.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-related deregulation of miRNA biogenesis has been suggested, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we report a previously unrecognized effect of hypoxia in the downregulation of Drosha and Dicer in cancer cells that leads to dysregulation of miRNA biogenesis and increased tumor progression. We show that hypoxia mediated downregulation of Drosha is dependent on ETS1/ELK1 transcription factors. Moreover, mature miRNA array and deep sequencing studies reveal altered miRNA ma...

  11. Peroxisome biogenesis and degradation in yeast: A structure/function analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Veenhuis, M; Salomons, FA; van der Klei, IJ

    2000-01-01

    In yeast, peroxisomes are the site of specific catabolic pathways that characteristically include hydrogen peroxide producing oxidases and catalase. During the last 10 years, much progress has been made in unravelling the molecular mechanisms involved in the biogenesis of this organelle. At present, 23 different genes (PEX genes) have been identified that are involved in different aspects of peroxisome biogenesis (e.g., proliferation, formation of the peroxisomal membrane, import of matrix pr...

  12. Alternative miRNA biogenesis pathways and the interpretation of core miRNA pathway mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Shiuan; Lai, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Since the establishment of a canonical animal microRNA biogenesis pathway driven by the RNase III enzymes Drosha and Dicer, an unexpected variety of alternative mechanisms that generate functional microRNAs have emerged. We review here the many Drosha-independent and Dicer-independent microRNA biogenesis strategies characterized over the past few years. Beyond reflecting the flexibility of small RNA machineries, the existence of non-canonical pathways has consequences for interpreting mutants...

  13. Utilizing small nutrient compounds as enhancers of exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Craig, Daniel M.; Ashcroft, Stephen P.; Belew, Micah Y.; Stocks, Ben; Currell, Kevin; Baar, Keith; Philp, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Endurance exercise, when performed regularly as part of a training program, leads to increases in whole-body and skeletal muscle-specific oxidative capacity. At the cellular level, this adaptive response is manifested by an increased number of oxidative fibers (Type I and IIA myosin heavy chain), an increase in capillarity and an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis. The increase in mitochondrial biogenesis (increased volume and functional capacity) is fundamentally important as it leads to g...

  14. Canonical and alternate functions of the microRNA biogenesis machinery

    OpenAIRE

    Chong, Mark M.W.; Zhang, Guoan; Cheloufi, Sihem; Neubert, Thomas A.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Littman, Dan R.

    2010-01-01

    The canonical microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis pathway requires two RNaseIII enzymes: Drosha and Dicer. To understand their functions in mammals in vivo, we engineered mice with germline or tissue-specific inactivation of the genes encoding these two proteins. Changes in proteomic and transcriptional profiles that were shared in Dicer- and Drosha-deficient mice confirmed the requirement for both enzymes in canonical miRNA biogenesis. However, deficiency in Drosha or Dicer did not always result in ...

  15. Adiponectin Increases Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Biogenesis by Suppressing Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase-1

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, Liping; Kinney, Brice; Yoo, Hyung sun; Lee, Bonggi; Schaack, Jerome; Shao, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    Adiponectin enhances mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. This study aimed to investigate the underlying mechanisms through which adiponectin induces mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. Mitochondrial contents, expression, and activation status of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and PPARγ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) were compared between skeletal muscle samples from adiponectin gene knockout, adiponectin-reconstituted, and control mice. Adenovi...

  16. Oligodendroglial membrane dynamics in relation to myelin biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgen, Hande; Baron, Wia; Hoekstra, Dick; Kahya, Nicoletta

    2016-09-01

    In the central nervous system, oligodendrocytes synthesize a specialized membrane, the myelin membrane, which enwraps the axons in a multilamellar fashion to provide fast action potential conduction and to ensure axonal integrity. When compared to other membranes, the composition of myelin membranes is unique with its relatively high lipid to protein ratio. Their biogenesis is quite complex and requires a tight regulation of sequential events, which are deregulated in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. To devise strategies for remedying such defects, it is crucial to understand molecular mechanisms that underlie myelin assembly and dynamics, including the ability of specific lipids to organize proteins and/or mediate protein-protein interactions in healthy versus diseased myelin membranes. The tight regulation of myelin membrane formation has been widely investigated with classical biochemical and cell biological techniques, both in vitro and in vivo. However, our knowledge about myelin membrane dynamics, such as membrane fluidity in conjunction with the movement/diffusion of proteins and lipids in the membrane and the specificity and role of distinct lipid-protein and protein-protein interactions, is limited. Here, we provide an overview of recent findings about the myelin structure in terms of myelin lipids, proteins and membrane microdomains. To give insight into myelin membrane dynamics, we will particularly highlight the application of model membranes and advanced biophysical techniques, i.e., approaches which clearly provide an added value to insight obtained by classical biochemical techniques. PMID:27141942

  17. Signaling Pathways in Exosomes Biogenesis, Secretion and Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Emiliani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small extracellular vesicles (30–100 nm derived from the endosomal system, which have raised considerable interest in the last decade. Several studies have shown that they mediate cell-to-cell communication in a variety of biological processes. Thus, in addition to cell-to-cell direct interaction or secretion of active molecules, they are now considered another class of signal mediators. Exosomes can be secreted by several cell types and retrieved in many body fluids, such as blood, urine, saliva and cerebrospinal fluid. In addition to proteins and lipids, they also contain nucleic acids, namely mRNA and miRNA. These features have prompted extensive research to exploit them as a source of biomarkers for several pathologies, such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. In this context, exosomes also appear attractive as gene delivery vehicles. Furthermore, exosome immunomodulatory and regenerative properties are also encouraging their application for further therapeutic purposes. Nevertheless, several issues remain to be addressed: exosome biogenesis and secretion mechanisms have not been clearly understood, and physiological functions, as well as pathological roles, are far from being satisfactorily elucidated.

  18. Speciated High-Density Lipoprotein Biogenesis and Functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, C; Davidson, W S; Gillard, B K; Gotto, A M; Pownall, H J

    2016-05-01

    Plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration is a negative risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). Despite this, most attempts to raise plasma HDL-C concentrations in a cardioprotective way have failed. Recently, hypotheses about the atheroprotective effects of HDL have shifted away from quantity to quality, mostly HDL function in reverse cholesterol transport. Plasma HDL from CVD patients is a poorer acceptor of cellular cholesterol than plasma from healthy controls, independent of plasma HDL-C concentrations. The function of HDL is likely determined by two other factors, stability and composition. The kinetic instability of HDL, which varies according to subclass, is a likely determinant of its reactivity in response to many HDL-modifying activities. HDL composition is also heterogeneous and variable; all HDL particles contain apo AI but only about two-thirds contain apo AII. This occurs despite the fact that apo AI and apo AII are hepatically secreted on separate HDL that later fuse in plasma. HDL also contains traces of other proteins, some of which have not yet been associated with HDL function. One minor HDL species are those that are secreted with intact signal peptides, which enhances their binding to HDL; these HDL have special properties that are independent of cholesterol transport. Here, we review and provide a perspective about what is currently known about speciated HDL biogenesis in the context of health and disease. PMID:27005803

  19. Impaired Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Adipose Tissue in Acquired Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Sini; Buzkova, Jana; Muniandy, Maheswary; Kaksonen, Risto; Ollikainen, Miina; Ismail, Khadeeja; Hakkarainen, Antti; Lundbom, Jesse; Lundbom, Nina; Vuolteenaho, Katriina; Moilanen, Eeva; Kaprio, Jaakko; Rissanen, Aila; Suomalainen, Anu; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H

    2015-09-01

    Low mitochondrial number and activity have been suggested as underlying factors in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. However, the stage at which mitochondrial dysfunction manifests in adipose tissue after the onset of obesity remains unknown. Here we examined subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) samples from healthy monozygotic twin pairs, 22.8-36.2 years of age, who were discordant (ΔBMI >3 kg/m(2), mean length of discordance 6.3 ± 0.3 years, n = 26) and concordant (ΔBMI <3 kg/m(2), n = 14) for body weight, and assessed their detailed mitochondrial metabolic characteristics: mitochondrial-related transcriptomes with dysregulated pathways, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) amount, mtDNA-encoded transcripts, and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) protein levels. We report global expressional downregulation of mitochondrial oxidative pathways with concomitant downregulation of mtDNA amount, mtDNA-dependent translation system, and protein levels of the OXPHOS machinery in the obese compared with the lean co-twins. Pathway analysis indicated downshifting of fatty acid oxidation, ketone body production and breakdown, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, which inversely correlated with adiposity, insulin resistance, and inflammatory cytokines. Our results suggest that mitochondrial biogenesis, oxidative metabolic pathways, and OXPHOS proteins in SAT are downregulated in acquired obesity, and are associated with metabolic disturbances already at the preclinical stage. PMID:25972572

  20. Chemistry, biogenesis, and biological activities of Cinnamomum zeylanicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakasha, G K; Rao, L Jagan Mohan

    2011-07-01

    The genus Cinnamomum comprises of several hundreds of species, which are distributed in Asia and Australia. Cinnamomum zeylanicum, the source of cinnamon bark and leaf oils, is an indigenous tree of Sri Lanka, although most oil now comes from cultivated areas. C. zeylanicum is an important spice and aromatic crop having wide applications in flavoring, perfumery, beverages, and medicines. Volatile oils from different parts of cinnamon such as leaves, bark, fruits, root bark, flowers, and buds have been isolated by hydro distillation/steam distillation and supercritical fluid extraction. The chemical compositions of the volatile oils have been identified by GC and GC-MS. More than 80 compounds were identified from different parts of cinnamon. The leaf oil has a major component called eugenol. Cinnamaldehyde and camphor have been reported to be the major components of volatile oils from stem bark and root bark, respectively. Trans-cinnamyl acetate was found to be the major compound in fruits, flowers, and fruit stalks. These volatile oils were found to exhibit antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antidiabetic activities. C. zeylanicum bark and fruits were found to contain proanthocyandins with doubly linked bis-flavan-3-ol units in the molecule. The present review provides a coherent presentation of scattered literature on the chemistry, biogenesis, and biological activities of cinnamon. PMID:21929331

  1. Biogenesis of iron-sulfur clusters in mammalian cells: new insights and relevance to human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey A. Rouault

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron-sulfur (Fe-S clusters are ubiquitous cofactors composed of iron and inorganic sulfur. They are required for the function of proteins involved in a wide range of activities, including electron transport in respiratory chain complexes, regulatory sensing, photosynthesis and DNA repair. The proteins involved in the biogenesis of Fe-S clusters are evolutionarily conserved from bacteria to humans, and many insights into the process of Fe-S cluster biogenesis have come from studies of model organisms, including bacteria, fungi and plants. It is now clear that several rare and seemingly dissimilar human diseases are attributable to defects in the basic process of Fe-S cluster biogenesis. Although these diseases –which include Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA, ISCU myopathy, a rare form of sideroblastic anemia, an encephalomyopathy caused by dysfunction of respiratory chain complex I and multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome – affect different tissues, a feature common to many of them is that mitochondrial iron overload develops as a secondary consequence of a defect in Fe-S cluster biogenesis. This Commentary outlines the basic steps of Fe-S cluster biogenesis as they have been defined in model organisms. In addition, it draws attention to refinements of the process that might be specific to the subcellular compartmentalization of Fe-S cluster biogenesis proteins in some eukaryotes, including mammals. Finally, it outlines several important unresolved questions in the field that, once addressed, should offer important clues into how mitochondrial iron homeostasis is regulated, and how dysfunction in Fe-S cluster biogenesis can contribute to disease.

  2. Autophagy plays a role in skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis in an endurance exercise-trained condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jeong-Sun; Jeon, Sei-Il; Park, Je-Young; Lee, Jong-Young; Lee, Seong-Cheol; Cho, Ki-Jung; Jeong, Jong-Moon

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial homeostasis is tightly regulated by two major processes: mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial degradation by autophagy (mitophagy). Research in mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle in response to endurance exercise training has been well established, while the mechanisms regulating mitophagy and the interplay between mitochondrial biogenesis and degradation following endurance exercise training are not yet well defined. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a short-term inhibition of autophagy in response to acute endurance exercise on skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics in an exercise-trained condition. Male wild-type C57BL/6 mice performed five daily bouts of 1-h swimming per week for 8 weeks. In order to measure autophagy flux in mouse skeletal muscle, mice were treated with or without 2 days of 0.4 mg/kg/day intraperitoneal colchicine (blocking the degradation of autophagosomes) following swimming exercise training. The autophagic flux assay demonstrated that swimming training resulted in an increase in the autophagic flux (~100 % increase in LC3-II) in mouse skeletal muscle. Mitochondrial fusion proteins, Opa1 and MFN2, were significantly elevated, and mitochondrial fission protein, Drp1, was also increased in trained mouse skeletal muscle, suggesting that endurance exercise training promotes both mitochondrial fusion and fission processes. A mitochondrial receptor, Bnip3, was further increased in exercised muscle when treated with colchicine while Pink/Parkin protein levels were unchanged. The endurance exercise training induced increases in mitochondrial biogenesis marker proteins, SDH, COX IV, and a mitochondrial biogenesis promoting factor, PGC-1α but this effect was abolished in colchicine-treated mouse skeletal muscle. This suggests that autophagy plays an important role in mitochondrial biogenesis and this coordination between these opposing processes is involved in the cellular

  3. Hyperglycemia decreases mitochondrial function: The regulatory role of mitochondrial biogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in 'glucose toxicity' in diabetes. However, little is known about the action of glucose on the expression of transcription factors in hepatocytes, especially those involved in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and transcription. Since mitochondrial functional capacity is dynamically regulated, we hypothesized that stressful conditions of hyperglycemia induce adaptations in the transcriptional control of cellular energy metabolism, including inhibition of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism. Cell viability, mitochondrial respiration, ROS generation and oxidized proteins were determined in HepG2 cells cultured in the presence of either 5.5 mM (control) or 30 mM glucose (high glucose) for 48 h, 96 h and 7 days. Additionally, mtDNA abundance, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) transcripts were evaluated by real time PCR. High glucose induced a progressive increase in ROS generation and accumulation of oxidized proteins, with no changes in cell viability. Increased expression of PAI-1 was observed as early as 96 h of exposure to high glucose. After 7 days in hyperglycemia, HepG2 cells exhibited inhibited uncoupled respiration and decreased MitoTracker Red fluorescence associated with a 25% decrease in mtDNA and 16% decrease in TFAM transcripts. These results indicate that glucose may regulate mtDNA copy number by modulating the transcriptional activity of TFAM in response to hyperglycemia-induced ROS production. The decrease of mtDNA content and inhibition of mitochondrial function may be pathogenic hallmarks in the altered metabolic status associated with diabetes

  4. Directing experimental biology: a case study in mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Hibbs

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Computational approaches have promised to organize collections of functional genomics data into testable predictions of gene and protein involvement in biological processes and pathways. However, few such predictions have been experimentally validated on a large scale, leaving many bioinformatic methods unproven and underutilized in the biology community. Further, it remains unclear what biological concerns should be taken into account when using computational methods to drive real-world experimental efforts. To investigate these concerns and to establish the utility of computational predictions of gene function, we experimentally tested hundreds of predictions generated from an ensemble of three complementary methods for the process of mitochondrial organization and biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The biological data with respect to the mitochondria are presented in a companion manuscript published in PLoS Genetics (doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1000407. Here we analyze and explore the results of this study that are broadly applicable for computationalists applying gene function prediction techniques, including a new experimental comparison with 48 genes representing the genomic background. Our study leads to several conclusions that are important to consider when driving laboratory investigations using computational prediction approaches. While most genes in yeast are already known to participate in at least one biological process, we confirm that genes with known functions can still be strong candidates for annotation of additional gene functions. We find that different analysis techniques and different underlying data can both greatly affect the types of functional predictions produced by computational methods. This diversity allows an ensemble of techniques to substantially broaden the biological scope and breadth of predictions. We also find that performing prediction and validation steps iteratively allows us to more completely

  5. T-tubule biogenesis and triad formation in skeletal muscle and implication in human diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Qusairi Lama

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In skeletal muscle, the excitation-contraction (EC coupling machinery mediates the translation of the action potential transmitted by the nerve into intracellular calcium release and muscle contraction. EC coupling requires a highly specialized membranous structure, the triad, composed of a central T-tubule surrounded by two terminal cisternae from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. While several proteins located on these structures have been identified, mechanisms governing T-tubule biogenesis and triad formation remain largely unknown. Here, we provide a description of triad structure and plasticity and review the role of proteins that have been linked to T-tubule biogenesis and triad formation and/or maintenance specifically in skeletal muscle: caveolin 3, amphiphysin 2, dysferlin, mitsugumins, junctophilins, myotubularin, ryanodine receptor, and dihydhropyridine Receptor. The importance of these proteins in triad biogenesis and subsequently in muscle contraction is sustained by studies on animal models and by the direct implication of most of these proteins in human myopathies.

  6. Calorie restriction increases muscle mitochondrial biogenesis in healthy humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony E Civitarese

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Caloric restriction without malnutrition extends life span in a range of organisms including insects and mammals and lowers free radical production by the mitochondria. However, the mechanism responsible for this adaptation are poorly understood. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The current study was undertaken to examine muscle mitochondrial bioenergetics in response to caloric restriction alone or in combination with exercise in 36 young (36.8 +/- 1.0 y, overweight (body mass index, 27.8 +/- 0.7 kg/m(2 individuals randomized into one of three groups for a 6-mo intervention: Control, 100% of energy requirements; CR, 25% caloric restriction; and CREX, caloric restriction with exercise (CREX, 12.5% CR + 12.5% increased energy expenditure (EE. In the controls, 24-h EE was unchanged, but in CR and CREX it was significantly reduced from baseline even after adjustment for the loss of metabolic mass (CR, -135 +/- 42 kcal/d, p = 0.002 and CREX, -117 +/- 52 kcal/d, p = 0.008. Participants in the CR and CREX groups had increased expression of genes encoding proteins involved in mitochondrial function such as PPARGC1A, TFAM, eNOS, SIRT1, and PARL (all, p < 0.05. In parallel, mitochondrial DNA content increased by 35% +/- 5% in the CR group (p = 0.005 and 21% +/- 4% in the CREX group (p < 0.004, with no change in the control group (2% +/- 2%. However, the activity of key mitochondrial enzymes of the TCA (tricarboxylic acid cycle (citrate synthase, beta-oxidation (beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and electron transport chain (cytochrome C oxidase II was unchanged. DNA damage was reduced from baseline in the CR (-0.56 +/- 0.11 arbitrary units, p = 0.003 and CREX (-0.45 +/- 0.12 arbitrary units, p = 0.011, but not in the controls. In primary cultures of human myotubes, a nitric oxide donor (mimicking eNOS signaling induced mitochondrial biogenesis but failed to induce SIRT1 protein expression, suggesting that additional factors may regulate SIRT1 content

  7. Augmentation of aerobic respiration and mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle by hypoxia preconditioning with cobalt chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High altitude/hypoxia training is known to improve physical performance in athletes. Hypoxia induces hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and its downstream genes that facilitate hypoxia adaptation in muscle to increase physical performance. Cobalt chloride (CoCl2), a hypoxia mimetic, stabilizes HIF-1, which otherwise is degraded in normoxic conditions. We studied the effects of hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl2 supplementation on physical performance, glucose metabolism, and mitochondrial biogenesis using rodent model. The results showed significant increase in physical performance in cobalt supplemented rats without (two times) or with training (3.3 times) as compared to control animals. CoCl2 supplementation in rats augmented the biological activities of enzymes of TCA cycle, glycolysis and cytochrome c oxidase (COX); and increased the expression of glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) in muscle showing increased glucose metabolism by aerobic respiration. There was also an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle observed by increased mRNA expressions of mitochondrial biogenesis markers which was further confirmed by electron microscopy. Moreover, nitric oxide production increased in skeletal muscle in cobalt supplemented rats, which seems to be the major reason for peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) induction and mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, in conclusion, we state that hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl2 supplementation in rats increases mitochondrial biogenesis, glucose uptake and metabolism by aerobic respiration in skeletal muscle, which leads to increased physical performance. The significance of this study lies in understanding the molecular mechanism of hypoxia adaptation and improvement of work performance in normal as well as extreme conditions like hypoxia via hypoxia preconditioning. -- Highlights: ► We supplemented rats with CoCl2 for 15 days along with training. ► CoCl2 supplementation augmented

  8. Proteomic Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions within the CSD Fe-S Cluster Biogenesis System

    OpenAIRE

    Bolstad, Heather M.; Botelho, Danielle J.; Wood, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    Fe-S cluster biogenesis is of interest to many fields, including bioenergetics and gene regulation. The CSD system is one of three Fe-S cluster biogenesis systems in E. coli and is comprised of the cysteine desulfurase CsdA, the sulfur acceptor protein CsdE, and the E1-like protein CsdL. The biological role, biochemical mechanism, and protein targets of the system remain uncharacterized. Here we present that the active site CsdE C61 has a lowered pKa value of 6.5, which is nearly identical to...

  9. A novel mechanism involved in the coupling of mitochondrial biogenesis to oxidative phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Ostojić

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are essential organelles that are central to a multitude of cellular processes, including oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS, which produces most of the ATP in animal cells. Thus it is important to understand not only the mechanisms and biogenesis of this energy production machinery but also how it is regulated in both physiological and pathological contexts. A recent study by Ostojić et al. [Cell Metabolism (2013 18, 567-577] has uncovered a regulatory loop by which the biogenesis of a major enzyme of the OXPHOS pathway, the respiratory complex III, is coupled to the energy producing activity of the mitochondria.

  10. Mitochondrial OXA Translocase Plays a Major Role in Biogenesis of Inner-Membrane Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, Sebastian B; Höpker, Jan; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schütze, Conny; Schrempp, Sandra G; Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Horvath, Susanne E; Frazier, Ann E; Gebert, Natalia; van der Laan, Martin; Bohnert, Maria; Warscheid, Bettina; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Wiedemann, Nils

    2016-05-10

    The mitochondrial inner membrane harbors three protein translocases. Presequence translocase and carrier translocase are essential for importing nuclear-encoded proteins. The oxidase assembly (OXA) translocase is required for exporting mitochondrial-encoded proteins; however, different views exist about its relevance for nuclear-encoded proteins. We report that OXA plays a dual role in the biogenesis of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. First, a systematic analysis of OXA-deficient mitochondria led to an unexpected expansion of the spectrum of OXA substrates imported via the presequence pathway. Second, biogenesis of numerous metabolite carriers depends on OXA, although they are not imported by the presequence pathway. We show that OXA is crucial for the biogenesis of the Tim18-Sdh3 module of the carrier translocase. The export translocase OXA is thus required for the import of metabolite carriers by promoting assembly of the carrier translocase. We conclude that OXA is of central importance for the biogenesis of the mitochondrial inner membrane. PMID:27166948

  11. Effect of regional muscle location but not adiposity on mitochondrial biogenesis-regulating proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponce-González, Jesús Gustavo; Ara, Ignacio; Larsen, Steen; Guerra, Borja; Calbet, Jose A L; Helge, Jørn Wulff

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to determine if the expression of the mitochondrial biogenesis-regulating proteins SIRT1, SIRT3 and PGC-1alpha in human skeletal muscle is influenced by adiposity. METHOD: Twenty-nine male subjects were recruited into three groups: control (n = 10), obese (n = 10...

  12. The Effects of NAD+ on Apoptotic Neuronal Death and Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Function after Glutamate Excitotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowan Wang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available NAD+ is an essential co-enzyme for cellular energy metabolism and is also involved as a substrate for many cellular enzymatic reactions. It has been shown that NAD+ has a beneficial effect on neuronal survival and brain injury in in vitro and in vivo ischemic models. However, the effect of NAD+ on mitochondrial biogenesis and function in ischemia has not been well investigated. In the present study, we used an in vitro glutamate excitotoxicity model of primary cultured cortical neurons to study the effect of NAD+ on apoptotic neuronal death and mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Our results show that supplementation of NAD+ could effectively reduce apoptotic neuronal death, and apoptotic inducing factor translocation after neurons were challenged with excitotoxic glutamate stimulation. Using different approaches including confocal imaging, mitochondrial DNA measurement and Western blot analysis of PGC-1 and NRF-1, we also found that NAD+ could significantly attenuate glutamate-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and the impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis. Furthermore, NAD+ treatment effectively inhibited mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization and NADH redistribution after excitotoxic glutamate stimulation. Taken together, our results demonstrated that NAD+ is capable of inhibiting apoptotic neuronal death after glutamate excitotoxicity via preserving mitochondrial biogenesis and integrity. Our findings provide insights into potential neuroprotective strategies in ischemic stroke.

  13. Reactive oxygen species mediates homocysteine-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in human endothelial cells: Modulation by antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been proposed that homocysteine (Hcy)-induces endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A previous report has shown that Hcy promotes mitochondrial damage. Considering that oxidative stress can affect mitochondrial biogenesis, we hypothesized that Hcy-induced ROS in endothelial cells may lead to increased mitochondrial biogenesis. We found that Hcy-induced ROS (1.85-fold), leading to a NF-κB activation and increase the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine. Furthermore, expression of the mitochondrial biogenesis factors, nuclear respiratory factor-1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A, was significantly elevated in Hcy-treated cells. These changes were accompanied by increase in mitochondrial mass and higher mRNA and protein expression of the subunit III of cytochrome c oxidase. These effects were significantly prevented by pretreatment with the antioxidants, catechin and trolox. Taken together, our results suggest that ROS is an important mediator of mitochondrial biogenesis induced by Hcy, and that modulation of oxidative stress by antioxidants may protect against the adverse vascular effects of Hcy

  14. Syringaresinol induces mitochondrial biogenesis through activation of PPARβ pathway in skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thach, Trung Thanh; Lee, Chan-Kyu; Park, Hyun Woo; Lee, Sang-Jun; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2016-08-15

    Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) plays a crucial role in cellular energy metabolism that directly impacts mitochondrial biogenesis. In this study, we demonstrate that syringaresinol, a pharmacological lignan extracted from Panax ginseng berry, moderately binds to and activates PPARβ with KD and EC50 values of 27.62±15.76μM and 18.11±4.77μM, respectively. Subsequently, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α together with PPARβ transcriptional targets, mitochondrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 and uncoupling protein 2, was also enhanced in terms of both mRNA and protein levels. The activation of these proteins induced mitochondrial biogenesis by enrichment of mitochondrial replication and density within C2C12 myotubes. Importantly, knockdown of PPARβ reduced the syringaresinol-induced protein expression followed by the significant reduction of mitochondrial biogenesis. Taken together, our results indicate that syringaresinol induces mitochondrial biogenesis by activating PPARβ pathway. PMID:27450788

  15. Peroxynitrite induced mitochondrial biogenesis following MnSOD knockdown in normal rat kidney (NRK cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Marine

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Superoxide is widely regarded as the primary reactive oxygen species (ROS which initiates downstream oxidative stress. Increased oxidative stress contributes, in part, to many disease conditions such as cancer, atherosclerosis, ischemia/reperfusion, diabetes, aging, and neurodegeneration. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD catalyzes the dismutation of superoxide into hydrogen peroxide which can then be further detoxified by other antioxidant enzymes. MnSOD is critical in maintaining the normal function of mitochondria, thus its inactivation is thought to lead to compromised mitochondria. Previously, our laboratory observed increased mitochondrial biogenesis in a novel kidney-specific MnSOD knockout mouse. The current study used transient siRNA mediated MnSOD knockdown of normal rat kidney (NRK cells as the in vitro model, and confirmed functional mitochondrial biogenesis evidenced by increased PGC1α expression, mitochondrial DNA copy numbers and integrity, electron transport chain protein CORE II, mitochondrial mass, oxygen consumption rate, and overall ATP production. Further mechanistic studies using mitoquinone (MitoQ, a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant and L-NAME, a nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibitor demonstrated that peroxynitrite (at low micromolar levels induced mitochondrial biogenesis. These findings provide the first evidence that low levels of peroxynitrite can initiate a protective signaling cascade involving mitochondrial biogenesis which may help to restore mitochondrial function following transient MnSOD inactivation.

  16. Canonical and alternate functions of the microRNA biogenesis machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Mark M W; Zhang, Guoan; Cheloufi, Sihem; Neubert, Thomas A; Hannon, Gregory J; Littman, Dan R

    2010-09-01

    The canonical microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis pathway requires two RNaseIII enzymes: Drosha and Dicer. To understand their functions in mammals in vivo, we engineered mice with germline or tissue-specific inactivation of the genes encoding these two proteins. Changes in proteomic and transcriptional profiles that were shared in Dicer- and Drosha-deficient mice confirmed the requirement for both enzymes in canonical miRNA biogenesis. However, deficiency in Drosha or Dicer did not always result in identical phenotypes, suggesting additional functions. We found that, in early-stage thymocytes, Drosha recognizes and directly cleaves many protein-coding messenger RNAs (mRNAs) with secondary stem-loop structures. In addition, we identified a subset of miRNAs generated by a Dicer-dependent but Drosha-independent mechanism. These were distinct from previously described mirtrons. Thus, in mammalian cells, Dicer is required for the biogenesis of multiple classes of miRNAs. Together, these findings extend the range of function of RNaseIII enzymes beyond canonical miRNA biogenesis, and help explain the nonoverlapping phenotypes caused by Drosha and Dicer deficiency. PMID:20713509

  17. Increased biogenesis of glucagon-containing secretory granules and glucagon secretion in BIG3-knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Li

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: Together with our previous studies, the current data reveal a conserved role for BIG3 in regulating alpha- and beta-cell functions. We propose that BIG3 negatively regulates hormone production at the secretory granule biogenesis stage and that such regulatory mechanism may be used in secretory pathways of other endocrine cells.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA deletion and impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis by reactive oxygen species in ionizing radiation-induced premature senescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an increase of ROS level in cellular senescence induced by IR could mediate mtDNA deletion via impairment of mitochondria biogenesis in IMR-90 human lung fibroblast cells. Our results showed that IR induced cellular senescence, intracellular ROS, and mtDNA deletion, and in particular, suppressed the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis genes (NRF-1, TFAM). Furthermore, these IR-induced events were abolished using a potent antioxidant, NAC, which suggests that ROS is a key cause of mtDNA deletion in IR-induced cellular senescence, and that the alteration of mitochondrial biogenesis may mediate these processes

  19. Mitochondrial DNA deletion and impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis by reactive oxygen species in ionizing radiation-induced premature senescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Hyeon Soo; Jung, U Hee; Jo, Sung Kee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an increase of ROS level in cellular senescence induced by IR could mediate mtDNA deletion via impairment of mitochondria biogenesis in IMR-90 human lung fibroblast cells. Our results showed that IR induced cellular senescence, intracellular ROS, and mtDNA deletion, and in particular, suppressed the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis genes (NRF-1, TFAM). Furthermore, these IR-induced events were abolished using a potent antioxidant, NAC, which suggests that ROS is a key cause of mtDNA deletion in IR-induced cellular senescence, and that the alteration of mitochondrial biogenesis may mediate these processes

  20. Augmentation of aerobic respiration and mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle by hypoxia preconditioning with cobalt chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Saurabh [Experimental Biology Division, Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences, Lucknow Road, Timarpur, Delhi, 110054 (India); Shukla, Dhananjay [Department of Biotechnology, Gitam University, Gandhi Nagar, Rushikonda, Visakhapatnam-530 045 Andhra Pradesh (India); Bansal, Anju, E-mail: anjubansaldipas@gmail.com [Experimental Biology Division, Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences, Lucknow Road, Timarpur, Delhi, 110054 (India)

    2012-11-01

    High altitude/hypoxia training is known to improve physical performance in athletes. Hypoxia induces hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and its downstream genes that facilitate hypoxia adaptation in muscle to increase physical performance. Cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}), a hypoxia mimetic, stabilizes HIF-1, which otherwise is degraded in normoxic conditions. We studied the effects of hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl{sub 2} supplementation on physical performance, glucose metabolism, and mitochondrial biogenesis using rodent model. The results showed significant increase in physical performance in cobalt supplemented rats without (two times) or with training (3.3 times) as compared to control animals. CoCl{sub 2} supplementation in rats augmented the biological activities of enzymes of TCA cycle, glycolysis and cytochrome c oxidase (COX); and increased the expression of glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) in muscle showing increased glucose metabolism by aerobic respiration. There was also an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle observed by increased mRNA expressions of mitochondrial biogenesis markers which was further confirmed by electron microscopy. Moreover, nitric oxide production increased in skeletal muscle in cobalt supplemented rats, which seems to be the major reason for peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) induction and mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, in conclusion, we state that hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl{sub 2} supplementation in rats increases mitochondrial biogenesis, glucose uptake and metabolism by aerobic respiration in skeletal muscle, which leads to increased physical performance. The significance of this study lies in understanding the molecular mechanism of hypoxia adaptation and improvement of work performance in normal as well as extreme conditions like hypoxia via hypoxia preconditioning. -- Highlights: ► We supplemented rats with CoCl{sub 2} for 15 days along with training. ► Co

  1. Vive la différence: biogenesis and evolution of microRNAs in plants and animals

    OpenAIRE

    Axtell, Michael J.; Westholm, Jakub O.; Eric C Lai

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs are pervasive in both plants and animals, but many aspects of their biogenesis, function and evolution differ. We reveal how these differences contribute to characteristic features of microRNA evolution in the two kingdoms.

  2. Enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis contributes to Wnt induced osteoblastic differentiation of C3H10T1/2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jee Hyun; Yang, Jae-Yeon; Ahn, Byung Yong; Cho, Sun Wook; Jung, Ju Yeon; Cho, Hwa Young; Cho, Young Min; Kim, Sang Wan; Park, Kyong Soo; Kim, Seong Yeon; Lee, Hong Kyu; Shin, Chan Soo

    2010-07-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in cell physiology including cell differentiation and proliferation. We investigated the changes of mitochondrial biogenesis during Wnt-induced osteoblastic differentiation of murine mesenchymal C3H10T1/2 cells. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that activation of Wnt signaling by Wnt-3A conditioned medicum (CM) resulted in significant increase in the number of mitochondria in C3H10T1/2 cells. In addition, the induction of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities by Wnt-3A CM was accompanied by significant increase in mitochondrial mass (pactivities as well as mitochondrial biogenesis markers. Upregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis by overexpression of mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) significantly enhanced Wnt-induced osteogenesis as measured by ALP activities. In contrast, inhibition of mitochondrial biogenesis by treatment with Zidovudine (AZT) resulted in significant inhibition of ALP activities. Finally, ALP activities in human osteosarcoma cell line devoid of mitochondrial DNA (rho(0) cells) was significantly suppressed both in basal and Wnt-3A stimulated state compared to those from mitochondria-intact cells (rho+ cells). As a mechanism for Wnt-mediated mitochondrial biogenesis, we found that Wnt increased the expression of PGC-1alpha, a critical molecules in mitochondrial biogenesis, through Erk and p38 MAPK pathway independent of beta-catenin signaling. We also found that increased mitochondrial biogenesis is in turn positively regulating TOPflash reporter activity as well as beta-catenin levels. To summarize, mitochodrial biogenesis is upregulated by Wnt signaling and this upregulation contributes to the osteoblastic differentiation of mouse mesenchymal C3H10T1/2 cells. PMID:20399290

  3. Complementary RNA and Protein Profiling Identifies Iron as a Key Regulator of Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarred W. Rensvold

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are centers of metabolism and signaling whose content and function must adapt to changing cellular environments. The biological signals that initiate mitochondrial restructuring and the cellular processes that drive this adaptive response are largely obscure. To better define these systems, we performed matched quantitative genomic and proteomic analyses of mouse muscle cells as they performed mitochondrial biogenesis. We find that proteins involved in cellular iron homeostasis are highly coordinated with this process and that depletion of cellular iron results in a rapid, dose-dependent decrease of select mitochondrial protein levels and oxidative capacity. We further show that this process is universal across a broad range of cell types and fully reversed when iron is reintroduced. Collectively, our work reveals that cellular iron is a key regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, and provides quantitative data sets that can be leveraged to explore posttranscriptional and posttranslational processes that are essential for mitochondrial adaptation.

  4. Explosive cell lysis as a mechanism for the biogenesis of bacterial membrane vesicles and biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Lynne; Toyofuku, Masanori; Hynen, Amelia L; Kurosawa, Masaharu; Pessi, Gabriella; Petty, Nicola K; Osvath, Sarah R; Cárcamo-Oyarce, Gerardo; Gloag, Erin S; Shimoni, Raz; Omasits, Ulrich; Ito, Satoshi; Yap, Xinhui; Monahan, Leigh G; Cavaliere, Rosalia; Ahrens, Christian H; Charles, Ian G; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Eberl, Leo; Whitchurch, Cynthia B

    2016-01-01

    Many bacteria produce extracellular and surface-associated components such as membrane vesicles (MVs), extracellular DNA and moonlighting cytosolic proteins for which the biogenesis and export pathways are not fully understood. Here we show that the explosive cell lysis of a sub-population of cells accounts for the liberation of cytosolic content in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Super-resolution microscopy reveals that explosive cell lysis also produces shattered membrane fragments that rapidly form MVs. A prophage endolysin encoded within the R- and F-pyocin gene cluster is essential for explosive cell lysis. Endolysin-deficient mutants are defective in MV production and biofilm development, consistent with a crucial role in the biogenesis of MVs and liberation of extracellular DNA and other biofilm matrix components. Our findings reveal that explosive cell lysis, mediated through the activity of a cryptic prophage endolysin, acts as a mechanism for the production of bacterial MVs. PMID:27075392

  5. Two distinct arginine methyltransferases are required for biogenesis of Sm-class ribonucleoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalvez, Graydon B.; Tian, Liping; Ospina, Jason K.; Boisvert, François-Michel; Lamond, Angus I.; Matera, A. Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) are core components of the spliceosome. The U1, U2, U4, and U5 snRNPs each contain a common set of seven Sm proteins. Three of these Sm proteins are posttranslationally modified to contain symmetric dimethylarginine (sDMA) residues within their C-terminal tails. However, the precise function of this modification in the snRNP biogenesis pathway is unclear. Several lines of evidence suggest that the methyltransferase protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is responsible for sDMA modification of Sm proteins. We found that in human cells, PRMT5 and a newly discovered type II methyltransferase, PRMT7, are each required for Sm protein sDMA modification. Furthermore, we show that the two enzymes function nonredundantly in Sm protein methylation. Lastly, we provide in vivo evidence demonstrating that Sm protein sDMA modification is required for snRNP biogenesis in human cells. PMID:17709427

  6. PBR1 selectively controls biogenesis of photosynthetic complexes by modulating translation of the large chloroplast gene Ycf1 in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Yu-Ting; Chen, Si-Ting; Li, Ji-Kai; Shen, Hong-Tao; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The biogenesis of photosystem I (PSI), cytochrome b 6 f (Cytb 6 f) and NADH dehydrogenase (NDH) complexes relies on the spatially and temporally coordinated expression and translation of both nuclear and chloroplast genes. Here we report the identification of photosystem biogenesis regulator 1 (PBR1), a nuclear-encoded chloroplast RNA-binding protein that regulates the concerted biogenesis of NDH, PSI and Cytb 6 f complexes. We identified Ycf1, one of the two largest chloroplast genome-encoded open reading frames as the direct downstream target protein of PBR1. Biochemical and molecular analyses reveal that PBR1 regulates Ycf1 translation by directly binding to its mRNA. Surprisingly, we further demonstrate that relocation of the chloroplast gene Ycf1 fused with a plastid-transit sequence to the nucleus bypasses the requirement of PBR1 for Ycf1 translation, which sufficiently complements the defects in biogenesis of NDH, PSI and Cytb 6 f complexes in PBR1-deficient plants. Remarkably, the nuclear-encoded PBR1 tightly controls the expression of the chloroplast gene Ycf1 at the translational level, which is sufficient to sustain the coordinated biogenesis of NDH, PSI and Cytb 6 f complexes as a whole. Our findings provide deep insights into better understanding of how a predominant nuclear-encoded factor can act as a migratory mediator and undergoes selective translational regulation of the target plastid gene in controlling biogenesis of photosynthetic complexes. PMID:27462450

  7. Karrikins delay soybean seed germination by mediating abscisic acid and gibberellin biogenesis under shaded conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Yongjie Meng; Feng Chen; Haiwei Shuai; Xiaofeng Luo; Jun Ding; Shengwen Tang; Shuanshuan Xu; Jianwei Liu; Weiguo Liu; Junbo Du; Jiang Liu; Feng Yang; Xin Sun; Taiwen Yong; Xiaochun Wang

    2016-01-01

    Karrikins (KAR) are a class of signal compounds, discovered in wildfire smoke, which affect seed germination. Currently, numerous studies have focused on the model plant Arabidopsis in the KAR research field, rather than on crops. Thus the regulatory mechanisms underlying KAR regulation of crop seed germination are largely unknown. Here, we report that KAR delayed soybean seed germination through enhancing abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis, while impairing gibberellin (GA) biogenesis. Interest...

  8. Key Regulators of Mitochondrial Biogenesis are Increased in Kidneys of Growth Hormone Receptor Knockout (GHRKO) Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Gesing, Adam; Bartke, Andrzej; Wang, Feiya; Karbownik-Lewinska, Malgorzata; Masternak, Michal M.

    2011-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH) receptor knockout mice (GHRKO) are remarkably long-lived and highly insulin sensitive. Alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis are associated with aging and various metabolic derangements. We have previously demonstrated increased gene expression of key regulators of mitochondriogenesis in kidneys, hearts and skeletal muscles of GHRKO mice. The aim of the present study was to quantify the protein levels of the following regulators of mitochondriogenesis: peroxisome pro...

  9. The effect of ethidium bromide and chloramphenicol on mitochondrial biogenesis in primary human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expression of mitochondrial components is controlled by an intricate interplay between nuclear transcription factors and retrograde signaling from mitochondria. The role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mtDNA-encoded proteins in mitochondrial biogenesis is, however, poorly understood and thus far has mainly been studied in transformed cell lines. We treated primary human fibroblasts with ethidium bromide (EtBr) or chloramphenicol for six weeks to inhibit mtDNA replication or mitochondrial protein synthesis, respectively, and investigated how the cells recovered from these insults two weeks after removal of the drugs. Although cellular growth and mitochondrial gene expression were severely impaired after both inhibitor treatments we observed marked differences in mitochondrial structure, membrane potential, glycolysis, gene expression, and redox status between fibroblasts treated with EtBr and chloramphenicol. Following removal of the drugs we further detected clear differences in expression of both mtDNA-encoded genes and nuclear transcription factors that control mitochondrial biogenesis, suggesting that the cells possess different compensatory mechanisms to recover from drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Our data reveal new aspects of the interplay between mitochondrial retrograde signaling and the expression of nuclear regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, a process with direct relevance to mitochondrial diseases and chloramphenicol toxicity in humans. -- Highlights: ► Cells respond to certain environmental toxins by increasing mitochondrial biogenesis. ► We investigated the effect of Chloramphenicol and EtBr in primary human fibroblasts. ► Inhibiting mitochondrial protein synthesis or DNA replication elicit different effects. ► We provide novel insights into the cellular responses toxins and antibiotics.

  10. Rev-erb-α modulates skeletal muscle oxidative capacity by regulating mitochondrial biogenesis and autophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Woldt, Estelle; Sebti, Yasmine; Solt, Laura A.; Duhem, Christian; Lancel, Steve; Eeckhoute, Jérôme; Matthijs K. C. Hesselink; Paquet, Charlotte; Delhaye, Stéphane; Shin, Youseung; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Schaart, Gert; Lefebvre, Philippe; Nevière, Rémi; Burris, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear receptor Rev-erb-α modulates hepatic lipid and glucose metabolism, adipogenesis and the inflammatory response in macrophages. We show here that Rev-erb-α is highly expressed in oxidative skeletal muscle and plays a role in mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative function, in gain- and loss-of function studies. Rev-erb-α-deficiency in skeletal muscle leads to reduced mitochondrial content and oxidative function, resulting in compromised exercise capacity. This phenotype was recapitu...

  11. The effect of ethidium bromide and chloramphenicol on mitochondrial biogenesis in primary human fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Li-Pin; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Wolvetang, Ernst, E-mail: e.wolvetang@uq.edu.au

    2012-05-15

    The expression of mitochondrial components is controlled by an intricate interplay between nuclear transcription factors and retrograde signaling from mitochondria. The role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mtDNA-encoded proteins in mitochondrial biogenesis is, however, poorly understood and thus far has mainly been studied in transformed cell lines. We treated primary human fibroblasts with ethidium bromide (EtBr) or chloramphenicol for six weeks to inhibit mtDNA replication or mitochondrial protein synthesis, respectively, and investigated how the cells recovered from these insults two weeks after removal of the drugs. Although cellular growth and mitochondrial gene expression were severely impaired after both inhibitor treatments we observed marked differences in mitochondrial structure, membrane potential, glycolysis, gene expression, and redox status between fibroblasts treated with EtBr and chloramphenicol. Following removal of the drugs we further detected clear differences in expression of both mtDNA-encoded genes and nuclear transcription factors that control mitochondrial biogenesis, suggesting that the cells possess different compensatory mechanisms to recover from drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Our data reveal new aspects of the interplay between mitochondrial retrograde signaling and the expression of nuclear regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, a process with direct relevance to mitochondrial diseases and chloramphenicol toxicity in humans. -- Highlights: ► Cells respond to certain environmental toxins by increasing mitochondrial biogenesis. ► We investigated the effect of Chloramphenicol and EtBr in primary human fibroblasts. ► Inhibiting mitochondrial protein synthesis or DNA replication elicit different effects. ► We provide novel insights into the cellular responses toxins and antibiotics.

  12. Biogenesis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Membrane Vesicles Provoked by Induction of PagC▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kitagawa, Ryo; Takaya, Akiko; Ohya, Mai; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu; Takade, Akemi; Yoshida, Shin-ichi; Isogai, Emiko; Yamamoto, Tomoko

    2010-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria ubiquitously release membrane vesicles (MVs) into the extracellular milieu. Although MVs are the product of growing bacteria, not of cell lysis or death, the regulatory mechanisms underlying MV formation remained unknown. We have found that MV biogenesis is provoked by the induction of PagC, a Salmonella-specific protein whose expression is activated by conditions that mimic acidified macrophage phagosomes. PagC is a major constituent of Salmonella MVs, and increased ex...

  13. Three peroxisome protein packaging pathways suggested by selective permeabilization of yeast mutants defective in peroxisome biogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, J W; Luckey, C; Lazarow, P B

    1993-01-01

    We have identified five complementation groups of peroxisome biogenesis (peb) mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by a positive selection procedure. Three of these contained morphologically recognizable peroxisomes, and two appeared to lack the organelle altogether. The packaging of peroxisomal proteins in these mutants has been analyzed with a new gentle cell fractionation procedure. It employs digitonin titration for the selective permeabilization of yeast plasma and intracellular membranes...

  14. Regulation of exercise-induced fiber type transformation, mitochondrial biogenesis, and angiogenesis in skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Zhen; Okutsu, Mitsuharu; Akhtar, Yasir N.; Lira, Vitor A.

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscle exhibits superb plasticity in response to changes in functional demands. Chronic increases of skeletal muscle contractile activity, such as endurance exercise, lead to a variety of physiological and biochemical adaptations in skeletal muscle, including mitochondrial biogenesis, angiogenesis, and fiber type transformation. These adaptive changes are the basis for the improvement of physical performance and other health benefits. This review focuses on recent findings in genetic...

  15. A Novel Regulator Couples Sporogenesis and Trehalose Biogenesis in Aspergillus nidulans

    OpenAIRE

    Ni, Min; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2007-01-01

    Trehalose is a compatible osmolyte produced by bacteria, fungi, insects and plants to protect the integrity of cells against various environmental stresses. Spores, the reproductive, survival and infection bodies of fungi require high amounts of trehalose for long-term survival. Here, via a gain-of-function genetic screen, we identify the novel regulator VosA that couples the formation of spores and focal trehalose biogenesis in the model fungus Aspergillus nidulans. The vosA gene is expresse...

  16. Positive selection of novel peroxisome biogenesis-defective mutants of the yeast Pichia pastoris

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Monique A.; Waterham, Hans R.; Ksheminska, Galyna P.; Fayura, Liubov R.; Cereghino, Joan Lin; Stasyk, Oleh V.; Veenhuis, Marten; Kulachkovsky, Aleksander R.; Sibirny, Andrei A.; Cregg, James M

    1999-01-01

    We have developed two novel schemes for the direct selection of peroxisome-biogenesis-defective (pex) mutants of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. Both schemes take advantage of our observation that methanol-induced pex mutants contain little or no alcohol oxidase (AOX) activity. AOX is a peroxisomal matrix enzyme that catalyzes the first step in the methanol-utilization pathway. One scheme utilizes allyl alcohol, a compound that is not toxic to cells but is oxidized by AOX to acrolei...

  17. Mitochondrial Dysregulation in the Pathogenesis of Diabetes: Potential for Mitochondrial Biogenesis-Mediated Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Anna-Maria Joseph; Joanisse, Denis R.; Baillot, Richard G.; Hood, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Muscle mitochondrial metabolism is a tightly controlled process that involves the coordination of signaling pathways and factors from both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Perhaps the most important pathway regulating metabolism in muscle is mitochondrial biogenesis. In response to physiological stimuli such as exercise, retrograde signaling pathways are activated that allow crosstalk between the nucleus and mitochondria, upregulating hundreds of genes and leading to higher mitochondria...

  18. Pharmacological inhibition of ABCA1 degradation increases HDL biogenesis and exhibits antiatherogenesis[S

    OpenAIRE

    Arakawa, Reijiro; Tsujita, Maki; Iwamoto, Noriyuki; Ito-Ohsumi, Chisato; Lu, Rui; Wu, Chen-Ai; Shimizu, Kenji; Aotsuka, Tomoji; Kanazawa, Hashime; Abe-Dohmae, Sumiko; Yokoyama, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    Expression of ABCA1 is regulated by transcription of the gene and calpain-mediated proteolytic degradation, and inhibition ABCA1 degradation results in increased ABCA1 and HDL biogenesis in vitro. We examined whether this approach could be a potential antiatherogenic treatment. Although probucol inhibits both the activity and degradation of ABCA1, its oxidized products, spiroquinone and diphenoquinone, reduce degradation of ABCA1 without inhibiting its activity or altering transcription of th...

  19. Mitochondria Biogenesis and Bioenergetics Gene Profiles in Isogenic Prostate Cells with Different Malignant Phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Tanya C. Burch; Rhim, Johng S.; Julius O Nyalwidhe

    2016-01-01

    Background. The most significant hallmarks of cancer are directly or indirectly linked to deregulated mitochondria. In this study, we sought to profile mitochondria associated genes in isogenic prostate cell lines with different tumorigenic phenotypes from the same patient. Results. Two isogenic human prostate cell lines RC77N/E (nonmalignant cells) and RC77T/E (malignant cells) were profiled for expression of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism genes by qRT-PCR using the Human Mit...

  20. PICK1 deficiency impairs secretory vesicle biogenesis and leads to growth retardation and decreased glucose tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Holst, Birgitte; Madsen, Kenneth L.; Jansen, Anna M.; Jin, Chunyu; Rickhag, Karl Mattias; Lund, Viktor K.; Jensen, Morten; Bhatia, Vikram; Sørensen, Gunnar; Madsen, Andreas N.; Xue, Zhichao; Møller, Siri K; Woldbye, David; Qvortrup, Klaus; Huganir, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Secretory vesicles in endocrine cells store hormones such as growth hormone (GH) and insulin before their release into the bloodstream. The molecular mechanisms governing budding of immature secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and their subsequent maturation remain unclear. Here, we identify the lipid binding BAR (Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs) domain protein PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) as a key component early in the biogenesis of secretory vesicles in GH-producing ce...

  1. Selenium preserves mitochondrial function, stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis, and reduces infarct volume after focal cerebral ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Suresh L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial dysfunction is one of the major events responsible for activation of neuronal cell death pathways during cerebral ischemia. Trace element selenium has been shown to protect neurons in various diseases conditions. Present study is conducted to demonstrate that selenium preserves mitochondrial functional performance, activates mitochondrial biogenesis and prevents hypoxic/ischemic cell damage. Results The study conducted on HT22 cells exposed to glutamate or hypoxia and mice subjected to 60-min focal cerebral ischemia revealed that selenium (100 nM pretreatment (24 h significantly attenuated cell death induced by either glutamate toxicity or hypoxia. The protective effects were associated with reduction of glutamate and hypoxia-induced ROS production and alleviation of hypoxia-induced suppression of mitochondrial respiratory complex activities. The animal studies demonstrated that selenite pretreatment (0.2 mg/kg i.p. once a day for 7 days ameliorated cerebral infarct volume and reduced DNA oxidation. Furthermore, selenite increased protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1alpha (PGC-1α and nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1, two key nuclear factors that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis. Finally, selenite normalized the ischemia-induced activation of Beclin 1 and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II, markers for autophagy. Conclusions These results suggest that selenium protects neurons against hypoxic/ischemic damage by reducing oxidative stress, restoring mitochondrial functional activities and stimulating mitochondrial biogenesis.

  2. Ribosome Biogenesis Factor Bmsl-like Is Essential for Liver Development in Zebrafish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Wang; Yue Luo; Yunhan Hong; Jinrong Peng; Lijan Lo

    2012-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis in the nucleolus requires numerous nucleolar proteins and small non-coding RNAs.Among them is ribosome biogenesis factor Bmsl,which is highly conserved from yeast to human.In yeast,Bmsl initiates ribosome biogenesis through recruiting Rcll to pre-ribosomes.However,little is known about the biological function of Bmsl in vertebrates.Here we report that Bmsl plays an essential role in zebrafish liver development.We identified a zebrafish bmsllsq163 mutant which carries a T to A mutation in the gene bmsl-like (bmsll).This mutation results in L152 to Q152 substitution in a GTPase motif in Bmsll.Surprisingly,bmsllsq163 mutation confers hypoplasia specifically in the liver,exocrine pancreas and intestine after 3 days post-fertilization (dpf).Consistent with the bmsllsq163 mutant phenotypes,whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH) on wild type embryos showed that bmsll transcripts are abundant in the entire digestive tract and its accessory organs.Immunostaining for phospho-Histone 3 (P-H3) and TUNEL assay revealed that impairment of hepatoblast proliferation rather than cell apoptosis is one of the consequences of bmsllsq163 giving rise to an underdeveloped liver.Therefore,our findings demonstrate that Bmsll is necessary for zebrafish liver development.

  3. Chronic Arsenic Exposure-Induced Oxidative Stress is Mediated by Decreased Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Rat Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Chandra; Kumar, Vijay

    2016-09-01

    The present study was executed to study the effect of chronic arsenic exposure on generation of mitochondrial oxidative stress and biogenesis in rat liver. Chronic sodium arsenite treatment (25 ppm for 12 weeks) decreased mitochondrial complexes activity in rat liver. There was a decrease in mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity in arsenic-treated rats that might be responsible for increased protein and lipid oxidation as observed in our study. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of mitochondrial and nuclear-encoded subunits of complexes I (ND1 and ND2) and IV (COX I and COX IV) was downregulated in arsenic-treated rats only. The protein and mRNA expression of MnSOD was reduced suggesting increased mitochondrial oxidative damage after arsenic treatment. There was activation of Bax and caspase-3 followed by release of cytochrome c from mitochondria suggesting induction of apoptotic pathway under oxidative stress. The entire phenomenon was associated with decrease in mitochondrial biogenesis as evident by decreased protein and mRNA expression of nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1), nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2), peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) in arsenic-treated rat liver. The results of the present study indicate that arsenic-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis in rat liver that may present one of the mechanisms for arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:26767369

  4. Peroxisome biogenesis in mammalian cells: The impact of genes and environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Rebecca L; Lismont, Celien; Terlecky, Stanley R; Fransen, Marc

    2016-05-01

    The initiation and progression of many human diseases are mediated by a complex interplay of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. As all diseases begin with an imbalance at the cellular level, it is essential to understand how various types of molecular aberrations, metabolic changes, and environmental stressors function as switching points in essential communication networks. In recent years, peroxisomes have emerged as important intracellular hubs for redox-, lipid-, inflammatory-, and nucleic acid-mediated signaling pathways. In this review, we focus on how nature and nurture modulate peroxisome biogenesis and function in mammalian cells. First, we review emerging evidence that changes in peroxisome activity can be linked to the epigenetic regulation of cell function. Next, we outline how defects in peroxisome biogenesis may directly impact cellular pathways involved in the development of disease. In addition, we discuss how changes in the cellular microenvironment can modulate peroxisome biogenesis and function. Finally, given the importance of peroxisome function in multiple aspects of health, disease, and aging, we highlight the need for more research in this still understudied field. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Peroxisomes edited by Ralf Erdmann. PMID:26305119

  5. Cilostazol promotes mitochondrial biogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells through activating the expression of PGC-1α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► First time to show that cilostazol promotes the expressions of PGC-1α. ► First time to show that cilostazol stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis in HUVECs. ► PKA/CREB pathway mediates the effect of cilostazol on PGC-1α expression. ► Suggesting the roles of cilostazol in mitochondrial dysfunction related disease. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial dysfunction is frequently observed in vascular diseases. Cilostazol is a drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of intermittent claudication. Cilostazol increases intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels through inhibition of type III phosphodiesterase. The effects of cilostazol in mitochondrial biogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were investigated in this study. Cilostazol treated HUVECs displayed increased levels of ATP, mitochondrial DNA/nuclear DNA ratio, expressions of cytochrome B, and mitochondrial mass, suggesting an enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis induced by cilostazol. The promoted mitochondrial biogenesis could be abolished by Protein kinase A (PKA) specific inhibitor H-89, implying that PKA pathway played a critical role in increased mitochondrial biogenesis after cilostazol treatment. Indeed, expression levels of peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), NRF 1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) were significantly increased in HUVECs after incubation with cilostazol at both mRNA levels and protein levels. Importantly, knockdown of PGC-1α could abolish cilostazol-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. Enhanced expression of p-CREB and PGC-1α induced by cilostazol could be inhibited by H-89. Moreover, the increased expression of PGC-1α induced by cilostazol could be inhibited by downregulation of CREB using CREB siRNA at both mRNA and protein levels. All the results indicated that cilostazol promoted mitochondrial biogenesis through activating the expression of PGC-1α in

  6. Cilostazol promotes mitochondrial biogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells through activating the expression of PGC-1α

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, Luning [Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Department of Cardiology, Yantaishan Hospital, Yantai, Shandong 264001 (China); Li, Qiang; Sun, Bei; Xu, Zhiying [Department of Cardiology, Yantaishan Hospital, Yantai, Shandong 264001 (China); Ge, Zhiming, E-mail: zhimingge2000@hotmail.com [Department of Cardiology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► First time to show that cilostazol promotes the expressions of PGC-1α. ► First time to show that cilostazol stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis in HUVECs. ► PKA/CREB pathway mediates the effect of cilostazol on PGC-1α expression. ► Suggesting the roles of cilostazol in mitochondrial dysfunction related disease. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial dysfunction is frequently observed in vascular diseases. Cilostazol is a drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of intermittent claudication. Cilostazol increases intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels through inhibition of type III phosphodiesterase. The effects of cilostazol in mitochondrial biogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were investigated in this study. Cilostazol treated HUVECs displayed increased levels of ATP, mitochondrial DNA/nuclear DNA ratio, expressions of cytochrome B, and mitochondrial mass, suggesting an enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis induced by cilostazol. The promoted mitochondrial biogenesis could be abolished by Protein kinase A (PKA) specific inhibitor H-89, implying that PKA pathway played a critical role in increased mitochondrial biogenesis after cilostazol treatment. Indeed, expression levels of peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), NRF 1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) were significantly increased in HUVECs after incubation with cilostazol at both mRNA levels and protein levels. Importantly, knockdown of PGC-1α could abolish cilostazol-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. Enhanced expression of p-CREB and PGC-1α induced by cilostazol could be inhibited by H-89. Moreover, the increased expression of PGC-1α induced by cilostazol could be inhibited by downregulation of CREB using CREB siRNA at both mRNA and protein levels. All the results indicated that cilostazol promoted mitochondrial biogenesis through activating the expression of PGC-1α in

  7. Identification of a TcpC-TcpQ Outer Membrane Complex Involved in the Biogenesis of the Toxin-Coregulated Pilus of Vibrio cholerae

    OpenAIRE

    Bose, Niranjan; Taylor, Ronald K.

    2005-01-01

    The toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) of Vibrio cholerae and the soluble TcpF protein that is secreted via the TCP biogenesis apparatus are essential for intestinal colonization. The TCP biogenesis apparatus is composed of at least nine proteins but is largely uncharacterized. TcpC is an outer membrane lipoprotein required for TCP biogenesis that is a member of the secretin protein superfamily. In the present study, analysis of TcpC in a series of strains deficient in each of the TCP biogenesis p...

  8. eIF1A augments Ago2-mediated Dicer-independent miRNA biogenesis and RNA interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Tingfang; Arthanari, Haribabu; Akabayov, Barak; Song, Huaidong; Papadopoulos, Evangelos; Qi, Hank H.; Jedrychowski, Mark; Güttler, Thomas; Guo, Cuicui; Luna, Rafael E.; Gygi, Steven P.; Huang, Stephen A.; Wagner, Gerhard

    2015-05-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and miRNA-guided RNA interference (RNAi) are essential for gene expression in eukaryotes. Here we report that translation initiation factor eIF1A directly interacts with Ago2 and promotes Ago2 activities in RNAi and miR-451 biogenesis. Biochemical and NMR analyses demonstrate that eIF1A binds to the MID domain of Ago2 and this interaction does not impair translation initiation. Alanine mutation of the Ago2-facing Lys56 in eIF1A impairs RNAi activities in human cells and zebrafish. The eIF1A-Ago2 assembly facilitates Dicer-independent biogenesis of miR-451, which mediates erythrocyte maturation. Human eIF1A (heIF1A), but not heIF1A(K56A), rescues the erythrocyte maturation delay in eif1axb knockdown zebrafish. Consistently, miR-451 partly compensates erythrocyte maturation defects in zebrafish with eif1axb knockdown and eIF1A(K56A) expression, supporting a role of eIF1A in miRNA-451 biogenesis in this model. Our results suggest that eIF1A is a novel component of the Ago2-centred RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs) and augments Ago2-dependent RNAi and miRNA biogenesis.

  9. Nebivolol stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Nebivolol may act as a partial agonist of β3-adrenergic receptor (AR). •Nebivolol stimulates mitochondrial DNA replication and protein expression. •Nebivolol promotes mitochondrial synthesis via activation of eNOS by β3-AR. -- Abstract: Nebivolol is a third-generation β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) blocker with additional beneficial effects, including the improvement of lipid and glucose metabolism in obese individuals. However, the underlying mechanism of nebivolol’s role in regulating the lipid profile remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of nebivolol in mitochondrial biogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Exposure of 3T3-L1 cells to nebivolol for 24 h increased mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial protein levels and the expression of transcription factors involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, including PPAR-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), Sirtuin 3 (Sirt3), mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) and nuclear related factor 1 (Nrf1). These changes were accompanied by an increase in oxygen consumption and in the expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation and antioxidant enzymes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, including nebivolol-induced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), as well as an increase in the formation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Pretreatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) attenuated nebivolol-induced mitochondrial biogenesis, as did the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, ODQ. Treatment with nebivolol and β3-AR blocker SR59230A markedly attenuated PGC-1α, Sirt3 and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) protein levels in comparison to treatment with nebivolol alone. These data indicate that the mitochondrial synthesis and metabolism in adipocytes that is promoted by nebivolol is primarily mediated through the eNOS/cGMP-dependent pathway and is initiated by the activation of β3-AR receptors

  10. Ribosome biogenesis adaptation in resistance training-induced human skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Vandre C; Caldow, Marissa K; Massie, Vivien; Markworth, James F; Cameron-Smith, David; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2015-07-01

    Resistance training (RT) has the capacity to increase skeletal muscle mass, which is due in part to transient increases in the rate of muscle protein synthesis during postexercise recovery. The role of ribosome biogenesis in supporting the increased muscle protein synthetic demands is not known. This study examined the effect of both a single acute bout of resistance exercise (RE) and a chronic RT program on the muscle ribosome biogenesis response. Fourteen healthy young men performed a single bout of RE both before and after 8 wk of chronic RT. Muscle cross-sectional area was increased by 6 ± 4.5% in response to 8 wk of RT. Acute RE-induced activation of the ERK and mTOR pathways were similar before and after RT, as assessed by phosphorylation of ERK, MNK1, p70S6K, and S6 ribosomal protein 1 h postexercise. Phosphorylation of TIF-IA was also similarly elevated following both RE sessions. Cyclin D1 protein levels, which appeared to be regulated at the translational rather than transcriptional level, were acutely increased after RE. UBF was the only protein found to be highly phosphorylated at rest after 8 wk of training. Also, muscle levels of the rRNAs, including the precursor 45S and the mature transcripts (28S, 18S, and 5.8S), were increased in response to RT. We propose that ribosome biogenesis is an important yet overlooked event in RE-induced muscle hypertrophy that warrants further investigation. PMID:25968575

  11. Nebivolol stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chenglin; Chen, Dongrui; Xie, Qihai [State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Vascular Biology, Department of Hypertension, Ruijin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200025 (China); Yang, Ying, E-mail: yangying_sh@yahoo.com [Department of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Shanghai Clinical Center for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Ruijin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200025 (China); Shen, Weili, E-mail: weili_shen@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Vascular Biology, Department of Hypertension, Ruijin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •Nebivolol may act as a partial agonist of β3-adrenergic receptor (AR). •Nebivolol stimulates mitochondrial DNA replication and protein expression. •Nebivolol promotes mitochondrial synthesis via activation of eNOS by β3-AR. -- Abstract: Nebivolol is a third-generation β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) blocker with additional beneficial effects, including the improvement of lipid and glucose metabolism in obese individuals. However, the underlying mechanism of nebivolol’s role in regulating the lipid profile remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of nebivolol in mitochondrial biogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Exposure of 3T3-L1 cells to nebivolol for 24 h increased mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial protein levels and the expression of transcription factors involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, including PPAR-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), Sirtuin 3 (Sirt3), mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) and nuclear related factor 1 (Nrf1). These changes were accompanied by an increase in oxygen consumption and in the expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation and antioxidant enzymes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, including nebivolol-induced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), as well as an increase in the formation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Pretreatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) attenuated nebivolol-induced mitochondrial biogenesis, as did the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, ODQ. Treatment with nebivolol and β3-AR blocker SR59230A markedly attenuated PGC-1α, Sirt3 and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) protein levels in comparison to treatment with nebivolol alone. These data indicate that the mitochondrial synthesis and metabolism in adipocytes that is promoted by nebivolol is primarily mediated through the eNOS/cGMP-dependent pathway and is initiated by the activation of β3-AR receptors.

  12. Radiation induced mitochondrial biogenesis: limitations of metabolic viability based assays in measuring radiation induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many techniques based on metabolic viability of cells employing MTT and MTS assay are being widely used to measure the radiation and chemotherapeutics induced cell death, because of their high throughput capability. These assays are based on mitochondrial potential of cells to convert the substrate in to measurable products and remain dependent on this notion that all the cells untreated and treated will have equal mitochondrial content and metabolic potential. However, it is increasingly becoming clear that treatment induced changes in both mitochondrial content and metabolism can influence the metabolic viability of cells and radiation is a potential mitochondrial biogenesis inducer. Therefore, we tested if metabolic viability based assays are true measure of radiation induced cell death using the widely used cell lines like RAW264.7, HEK293, NIH3T3, J774.1, BMG-1, MDAMB231, MCF-7, A549 and HeLa. Cells were irradiated with gamma rays (60Co) and enumerated cell numbers (by hemocytometer) and metabolic viability using MTT assay at 24 and 48 hours after exposure. At all the absorbed doses (0-5 Gy), the extent of reduction in cell number was found to be larger than the decrease in formazan formation in all the cell lines tested. Further, this difference in the cell number and formazan formation varied significantly among the cell lines. To test if the increased formazan formation is due to increased mitochondrial content per cell, we analyzed the radiation induced mitochondrial biogenesis using mitochondria specific dye mitotracker red and found a 1.5 to 2 fold increase in mitochondrial content. These findings suggest that radiation induces mitochondrial biogenesis that enhances the metabolic potential leading to increased formazan formation. Therefore, conclusions drawn on radiation induced cytotoxicity based on metabolic viability assays are likely to be erroneous as it may not correlate with growth inhibition and/or loss of clonogenic survival. (author)

  13. DRB2 is required for microRNA biogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew L Eamens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis DOUBLE-STRANDED RNA BINDING (DRB protein family consists of five members, DRB1 to DRB5. The biogenesis of two developmentally important small RNA (sRNA species, the microRNAs (miRNAs and trans-acting small interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs by DICER-LIKE (DCL endonucleases requires the assistance of DRB1 and DRB4 respectively. The importance of miRNA-directed target gene expression in plant development is exemplified by the phenotypic consequence of loss of DRB1 activity (drb1 plants. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report that the developmental phenotype of the drb235 triple mutant plant is the result of deregulated miRNA biogenesis in the shoot apical meristem (SAM region. The expression of DRB2, DRB3 and DRB5 in wild-type seedlings is restricted to the SAM region. Small RNA sequencing of the corresponding tissue of drb235 plants revealed altered miRNA accumulation. Approximately half of the miRNAs detected remained at levels equivalent to those of wild-type plants. However, the accumulation of the remaining miRNAs was either elevated or reduced in the triple mutant. Examination of different single and multiple drb mutants revealed a clear association between the loss of DRB2 activity and altered accumulation for both the elevated and reduced miRNA classes. Furthermore, we show that the constitutive over-expression of DRB2 outside of its wild-type expression domain can compensate for the loss of DRB1 activity in drb1 plants. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that in the SAM region, DRB2 is both antagonistic and synergistic to the role of DRB1 in miRNA biogenesis, adding an additional layer of gene regulatory complexity in this developmentally important tissue.

  14. Improving recombinant Rubisco biogenesis, plant photosynthesis and growth by coexpressing its ancillary RAF1 chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Spencer M; Birch, Rosemary; Kelso, Celine; Beck, Jennifer L; Kapralov, Maxim V

    2015-03-17

    Enabling improvements to crop yield and resource use by enhancing the catalysis of the photosynthetic CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco has been a longstanding challenge. Efforts toward realization of this goal have been greatly assisted by advances in understanding the complexities of Rubisco's biogenesis in plastids and the development of tailored chloroplast transformation tools. Here we generate transplastomic tobacco genotypes expressing Arabidopsis Rubisco large subunits (AtL), both on their own (producing tob(AtL) plants) and with a cognate Rubisco accumulation factor 1 (AtRAF1) chaperone (producing tob(AtL-R1) plants) that has undergone parallel functional coevolution with AtL. We show AtRAF1 assembles as a dimer and is produced in tob(AtL-R1) and Arabidopsis leaves at 10-15 nmol AtRAF1 monomers per square meter. Consistent with a postchaperonin large (L)-subunit assembly role, the AtRAF1 facilitated two to threefold improvements in the amount and biogenesis rate of hybrid L8(A)S8(t) Rubisco [comprising AtL and tobacco small (S) subunits] in tob(AtL-R1) leaves compared with tob(AtL), despite >threefold lower steady-state Rubisco mRNA levels in tob(AtL-R1). Accompanying twofold increases in photosynthetic CO2-assimilation rate and plant growth were measured for tob(AtL-R1) lines. These findings highlight the importance of ancillary protein complementarity during Rubisco biogenesis in plastids, the possible constraints this has imposed on Rubisco adaptive evolution, and the likely need for such interaction specificity to be considered when optimizing recombinant Rubisco bioengineering in plants. PMID:25733857

  15. Melatonin enhances mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis in rats with carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung-Woo; Hong, Jeong-Min; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2016-05-01

    Liver fibrosis leads to liver cirrhosis and failure, and no effective treatment is currently available. Growing evidence supports a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and liver fibrogenesis and mitochondrial quality control-based therapy has emerged as a new therapeutic target. We investigated the protective mechanisms of melatonin against mitochondrial dysfunction-involved liver fibrosis, focusing on mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis. Rats were treated with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 ) dissolved in olive oil (0.5 mL/kg, twice a week, i.p.) for 8 wk. Melatonin was administered orally at 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg once a day. Chronic CCl4 exposure induced collagen deposition, hepatocellular damage, and oxidative stress, and melatonin attenuated these increases. Increases in mRNA and protein expression levels of transforming growth factor β1 and α-smooth muscle actin in response to CCl4 were attenuated by melatonin. Melatonin attenuated hallmarks of mitochondrial dysfunction, such as mitochondrial swelling and glutamate dehydrogenase release. Chronic CCl4 exposure impaired mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis, and melatonin attenuated this impairment, as indicated by increases in mitochondrial DNA and in protein levels of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1); Parkin; peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1α (PGC-1α); nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1); and transcription factor A, mitochondrial (TFAM). CCl4 -mediated decreases in mitochondrial fission- and fusion-related proteins, such as dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) and mitofusin 2, were also attenuated by melatonin. Moreover, melatonin induced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation. These results suggest that melatonin protects against liver fibrosis via upregulation of mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis, and may be useful as an anti-fibrotic treatment. PMID:26882442

  16. Direct relationship between the level of p53 stabilization induced by rRNA synthesis-inhibiting drugs and the cell ribosome biogenesis rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, F; Brighenti, E; Govoni, M; Imbrogno, E; Fornari, F; Treré, D; Montanaro, L; Derenzini, M

    2016-02-25

    Many drugs currently used in chemotherapy work by hindering the process of ribosome biogenesis. In tumors with functional p53, the inhibition of ribosome biogenesis may contribute to the efficacy of this treatment by inducing p53 stabilization. As the level of stabilized p53 is critical for the induction of cytotoxic effects, it seems useful to highlight those cancer cell characteristics that can predict the degree of p53 stabilization following the treatment with inhibitors of ribosome biogenesis. In the present study we exposed a series of p53 wild-type human cancer cell lines to drugs such as actinomycin D (ActD), doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil and CX-5461, which hinder ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis. We found that the amount of stabilized p53 was directly related to the level of ribosome biogenesis in cells before the drug treatment. This was due to different levels of inactivation of the ribosomal proteins-MDM2 pathway of p53 digestion. Inhibition of rRNA synthesis always caused cell cycle arrest, independent of the ribosome biogenesis rate of the cells, whereas apoptosis occurred only in cells with a high rDNA transcription rate. The level of p53 stabilization induced by drugs acting in different ways from the inhibition of ribosome biogenesis, such as hydroxyurea (HU) and nutlin-3, was independent of the level of ribosome biogenesis in cells and always lower than that occurring after the inhibition of rRNA synthesis. Interestingly, in cells with a low ribosome biogenesis rate, the combined treatment with ActD and HU exerted an additive effect on p53 stabilization. These results indicated that (i) drugs inhibiting ribosome biogenesis may be highly effective in p53 wild-type cancers with a high ribosome biogenesis rate, as they induce apoptotic cell death, and (ii) the combination of drugs capable of stabilizing p53 through different mechanisms may be useful for treating cancers with a low ribosome biogenesis rate. PMID:25961931

  17. Microscale purification of proteins by line immunoelectrophoresis: application of the technique in protein biogenesis studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M; Cowell, G M

    1983-01-01

    A small-scale version of line immunoelectrophoresis in combination with immunoprecipitate excision is described as a rapid and convenient technique to purify proteins on a micro scale in biogenesis studies. In the purification and to result in a higher state of purity than an isolation procedure...... using protein A-Sepharose. Since the method furthermore allows a simultaneous purification of several different protein antigens from the same sample, it may be of interest as an alternative method to other procedures in the purification of proteins on a micro scale....

  18. The evolution of core proteins involved in microRNA biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown James R

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a recently discovered class of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs which play important roles in eukaryotic gene regulation. miRNA biogenesis and activation is a complex process involving multiple protein catalysts and involves the large macromolecular RNAi Silencing Complex or RISC. While phylogenetic analyses of miRNA genes have been previously published, the evolution of miRNA biogenesis itself has been little studied. In order to better understand the origin of miRNA processing in animals and plants, we determined the phyletic occurrences and evolutionary relationships of four major miRNA pathway protein components; Dicer, Argonaute, RISC RNA-binding proteins, and Exportin-5. Results Phylogenetic analyses show that all four miRNA pathway proteins were derived from large multiple protein families. As an example, vertebrate and invertebrate Argonaute (Ago proteins diverged from a larger family of PIWI/Argonaute proteins found throughout eukaryotes. Further gene duplications among vertebrates after the evolution of chordates from urochordates but prior to the emergence of fishes lead to the evolution of four Ago paralogues. Invertebrate RISC RNA-binding proteins R2D2 and Loquacious are related to other RNA-binding protein families such as Staufens as well as vertebrate-specific TAR (HIV trans-activator RNA RNA-binding protein (TRBP and protein kinase R-activating protein (PACT. Export of small RNAs from the nucleus, including miRNA, is facilitated by three closely related karyopherin-related nuclear transporters, Exportin-5, Exportin-1 and Exportin-T. While all three exportins have direct orthologues in deutrostomes, missing exportins in arthropods (Exportin-T and nematodes (Exportin-5 are likely compensated by dual specificities of one of the other exportin paralogues. Conclusion Co-opting particular isoforms from large, diverse protein families seems to be a common theme in the evolution of miRNA biogenesis

  19. Straightforward synthesis of deuterated precursors to demonstrate the biogenesis of aromatic thiols in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Aurélie; Schneider, Rémi; Razungles, Alain; Le Guernevé, Christine; Cavelier, Florine

    2010-10-13

    Straightforward synthesis of labeled S-3-(hexan-1-ol)-glutathione and S-4-(4-methylpentan-2-one)-glutathione has been developed through a conjugate addition optimization study. Sauvignon blanc fermentation experiments with the [(2)H(10)] S-4-(4-methylpentan-2-one)-glutathione used as a tracer released the corresponding deuterated thiol, thus proving the direct relationship with the 4-mercapto-4-methylpentan-2-one under enological conditions. The conversion yield of such transformation was estimated to be close to 0.3%, opening an avenue for additional study on varietal thiol biogenesis. PMID:20825191

  20. Biogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa type IV pili and regulation of their function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, Tiffany L; Buensuceso, Ryan N C; Howell, P Lynne; Burrows, Lori L

    2015-11-01

    Type IV pili (T4P) are bacterial virulence factors involved in a wide variety of functions including deoxyribonucleic acid uptake, surface attachment, biofilm formation and twitching motility. While T4P are common surface appendages, the systems that assemble them and the regulation of their function differ between species. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Neisseria spp. and Myxococcus xanthus are common model systems used to study T4P biology. This review focuses on recent advances in P. aeruginosa T4P structural biology, and the regulatory pathways controlling T4P biogenesis and function. PMID:25808785

  1. PapD, a periplasmic transport protein in P-pilus biogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Lindberg, F; Tennent, J M; Hultgren, S. J.; Lund, B; Normark, S

    1989-01-01

    The product of the papD gene of uropathogenic Escherichia coli is required for the biogenesis of digalactoside-binding P pili. Mutations within papD result in complete degradation of the major pilus subunit, PapA, and of the pilinlike proteins PapE and PapF and also cause partial breakdown of the PapG adhesin. The papD gene was sequenced, and the gene product was purified from the periplasm. The deduced amino acid sequence and the N-terminal sequence obtained from the purified protein reveale...

  2. Autoregulation and multiple DNA interactions by a transcriptional regulatory protein in E. coli pili biogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Forsman, K; M. Göransson; Uhlin, B E

    1989-01-01

    An operon mediating biogenesis of digalactoside-binding pilus-adhesin of serotype F13 in uropathogenic Escherichia coli includes the regulatory gene papB. The papB gene product was found to act as transcriptional activator of an operon which includes the papB gene and several pap cistrons encoding the proteins of the pilus polymer. Studies of how pap gene expression was affected by increasing amounts of PapB protein in the cells showed that high levels did not stimulate transcription but caus...

  3. 14,15-EET promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and protects cortical neurons against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • 14,15-EET inhibits OGD-induced apoptosis in cortical neurons. • Mitochondrial biogenesis of cortical neurons is promoted by 14,15-EET. • 14,15-EET preserves mitochondrial function of cortical neurons under OGD. • CREB mediates effect of 14,15-EET on mitochondrial biogenesis and function. - Abstract: 14,15-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET), a metabolite of arachidonic acid, is enriched in the brain cortex and exerts protective effect against neuronal apoptosis induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Although apoptosis has been well recognized to be closely associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and function, it is still unclear whether the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET is mediated by promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in cortical neurons under the condition of oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD). In this study, we found that 14,15-EET improved cell viability and inhibited apoptosis of cortical neurons. 14,15-EET significantly increased the mitochondrial mass and the ratio of mitochondrial DNA to nuclear DNA. Key makers of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were elevated at both mRNA and protein levels in the cortical neurons treated with 14,15-EET. Moreover, 14,15-EET markedly attenuated the decline of mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced ROS, while increased ATP synthesis. Knockdown of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) by siRNA blunted the up-regulation of PGC-1α and NRF-1 stimulated by 14,15-EET, and consequently abolished the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET. Our results indicate that 14,15-EET protects neurons from OGD-induced apoptosis by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function through CREB mediated activation of PGC-1α and NRF-1

  4. 14,15-EET promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and protects cortical neurons against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lai; Chen, Man; Yuan, Lin; Xiang, Yuting [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China); Zheng, Ruimao, E-mail: rmzheng@pku.edu.cn [Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China); Zhu, Shigong, E-mail: sgzhu@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • 14,15-EET inhibits OGD-induced apoptosis in cortical neurons. • Mitochondrial biogenesis of cortical neurons is promoted by 14,15-EET. • 14,15-EET preserves mitochondrial function of cortical neurons under OGD. • CREB mediates effect of 14,15-EET on mitochondrial biogenesis and function. - Abstract: 14,15-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET), a metabolite of arachidonic acid, is enriched in the brain cortex and exerts protective effect against neuronal apoptosis induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Although apoptosis has been well recognized to be closely associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and function, it is still unclear whether the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET is mediated by promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in cortical neurons under the condition of oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD). In this study, we found that 14,15-EET improved cell viability and inhibited apoptosis of cortical neurons. 14,15-EET significantly increased the mitochondrial mass and the ratio of mitochondrial DNA to nuclear DNA. Key makers of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were elevated at both mRNA and protein levels in the cortical neurons treated with 14,15-EET. Moreover, 14,15-EET markedly attenuated the decline of mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced ROS, while increased ATP synthesis. Knockdown of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) by siRNA blunted the up-regulation of PGC-1α and NRF-1 stimulated by 14,15-EET, and consequently abolished the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET. Our results indicate that 14,15-EET protects neurons from OGD-induced apoptosis by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function through CREB mediated activation of PGC-1α and NRF-1.

  5. Membrane trafficking and organelle biogenesis in Giardia lamblia: use it or lose it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faso, Carmen; Hehl, Adrian B

    2011-04-01

    The secretory transport capacity of Giardia trophozoites is perfectly adapted to the changing environment in the small intestine of the host and is able to deploy essential protective surface coats as well as molecules which act on epithelia. These lumen-dwelling parasites take up nutrients by bulk endocytosis through peripheral vesicles or by receptor-mediated transport. The environmentally-resistant cyst form is quiescent but poised for activation following stomach passage. Its versatility and fidelity notwithstanding, the giardial trafficking systems appear to be the product of a general secondary reduction process geared towards minimization of all components and machineries identified to date. Since membrane transport is directly linked to organelle biogenesis and maintenance, less complexity also means loss of organelle structures and functions. A case in point is the Golgi apparatus which is missing as a steady-state organelle system. Only a few basic Golgi functions have been experimentally demonstrated in trophozoites undergoing encystation. Similarly, mitochondrial remnants have reached a terminally minimized state and appear to be functionally restricted to essential iron-sulfur protein maturation processes. Giardia's minimized organization combined with its genetic tractability provides unique opportunities to study basic principles of secretory transport in an uncluttered cellular environment. Not surprisingly, Giardia is gaining increasing attention as a model for the investigation of gene regulation, organelle biogenesis, and export of simple but highly protective cell wall biopolymers, a hallmark of all perorally transmitted protozoan and metazoan parasites. PMID:21296082

  6. Cyclovirobuxine D Attenuates Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiomyopathy by Suppression of Oxidative Damage and Mitochondrial Biogenesis Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical application of doxorubicin (DOX is compromised by its cardiac toxic effect. Cyclovirobuxine D (CVB-D is a steroid alkaloid extracted from a traditional Chinese medicine, Buxus microphylla. Our results showed that CVB-D pretreatment markedly attenuated DOX-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction and histological alterations. By using TUNEL assay and western blot analysis, we found that CVB-D pretreatment reduced DOX-induced apoptosis of myocardial cells and mitochondrial cytochrome c release to cytosol. CVB-D pretreatment ameliorated DOX-induced cardiac oxidative damage including lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation and a decrease in the ratio of reduced glutathione (GSH to oxidized glutathione (GSSG. Moreover, CVB-D was found to prevent DOX-induced mitochondrial biogenesis impairment as evidenced by preservation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α and nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1, as well as mitochondrial DNA copy number. These findings demonstrate that CVB-D protects against DOX-induced cardiomyopathy, at least in part, by suppression of oxidative damage and mitochondrial biogenesis impairment.

  7. Role of membrane glycerolipids in photosynthesis, thylakoid biogenesis and chloroplast development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    The lipid bilayer of the thylakoid membrane in plant chloroplasts and cyanobacterial cells is predominantly composed of four unique lipid classes; monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). MGDG and DGDG are uncharged galactolipids that constitute the bulk of thylakoid membrane lipids and provide a lipid bilayer matrix for photosynthetic complexes as the main constituents. The glycolipid SQDG and phospholipid PG are anionic lipids with a negative charge on their head groups. SQDG and PG substitute for each other to maintain the amount of total anionic lipids in the thylakoid membrane, with PG having indispensable functions in photosynthesis. In addition to biochemical studies, extensive analyses of mutants deficient in thylakoid lipids have revealed important roles of these lipids in photosynthesis and thylakoid membrane biogenesis. Moreover, recent studies of Arabidopsis thaliana suggest that thylakoid lipid biosynthesis triggers the expression of photosynthesis-associated genes in both the nucleus and plastids and activates the formation of photosynthetic machineries and chloroplast development. Meanwhile, galactolipid biosynthesis is regulated in response to chloroplast functionality and lipid metabolism at transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review summarizes the roles of thylakoid lipids with their biosynthetic pathways in plants and discusses the coordinated regulation of thylakoid lipid biosynthesis with the development of photosynthetic machinery during chloroplast biogenesis. PMID:27114097

  8. Roles of Oxidative Stress, Apoptosis, PGC-1α and Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding-I Yang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The primary physiological function of mitochondria is to generate adenosine triphosphate through oxidative phosphorylation via the electron transport chain. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS as byproducts generated from mitochondria have been implicated in acute brain injuries such as stroke from cerebral ischemia. It was well-documented that mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway involves pro- and anti-apoptotic protein binding, release of cytochrome c, leading ultimately to neuronal death. On the other hand, mitochondria also play a role to counteract the detrimental effects elicited by excessive oxidative stress. Recent studies have revealed that oxidative stress and the redox state of ischemic neurons are also implicated in the signaling pathway that involves peroxisome proliferative activated receptor-γ (PPARγ co-activator 1α (PGC1-α. PGC1-α is a master regulator of ROS scavenging enzymes including manganese superoxide dismutase 2 and the uncoupling protein 2, both are mitochondrial proteins, and may contribute to neuronal survival. PGC1-α is also involved in mitochondrial biogenesis that is vital for cell survival. Experimental evidence supports the roles of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress as determinants of neuronal death as well as endogenous protective mechanisms after stroke. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge focusing on the molecular mechanisms underlying cerebral ischemia involving ROS, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, mitochondrial proteins capable of ROS scavenging, and mitochondrial biogenesis.

  9. The role of MmpL8 in sulfatide biogenesis and virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenech, Pilar; Reed, Michael B; Dowd, Cynthia S; Manca, Claudia; Kaplan, Gilla; Barry, Clifton E

    2004-05-14

    To study the role of MmpL8-mediated lipid transport in sulfatide biogenesis, we insertionally inactivated the mmpL8 gene in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Characterization of this strain showed that the synthesis of mature sulfolipid SL-1 was interrupted and that a more polar sulfated molecule, termed SL-N, accumulated within the cell. Purification of SL-N and structural analysis identified this molecule as a family of 2,3-diacyl-alpha,alpha'-D-trehalose-2'-sulfates. This structure suggests that transport and biogenesis of SL-1 are coupled and that the final step in sulfatide biosynthesis may be the extra-cellular esterification of two trehalose 6-positions with hydroxyphthioceranic acids. To assess the effect of the loss of this anionic surface lipid on virulence, we infected mice via aerosol with the MmpL8 mutant and found that, although initial replication rates and containment levels were identical, compared with the wild type, a significant attenuation of the MmpL8 mutant strain in time-to-death was observed. Early in infection, differential expression of cytokines and cytokine receptors revealed that the mutant strain less efficiently suppresses key indicators of a Th1-type immune response, suggesting an immunomodulatory role for sulfatides in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis. PMID:15001577

  10. ADAR1 Activation Drives Leukemia Stem Cell Self-Renewal by Impairing Let-7 Biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipeto, Maria Anna; Court, Angela C; Sadarangani, Anil; Delos Santos, Nathaniel P; Balaian, Larisa; Chun, Hye-Jung; Pineda, Gabriel; Morris, Sheldon R; Mason, Cayla N; Geron, Ifat; Barrett, Christian; Goff, Daniel J; Wall, Russell; Pellecchia, Maurizio; Minden, Mark; Frazer, Kelly A; Marra, Marco A; Crews, Leslie A; Jiang, Qingfei; Jamieson, Catriona H M

    2016-08-01

    Post-transcriptional adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing mediated by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA1 (ADAR1) promotes cancer progression and therapeutic resistance. However, ADAR1 editase-dependent mechanisms governing leukemia stem cell (LSC) generation have not been elucidated. In blast crisis chronic myeloid leukemia (BC CML), we show that increased JAK2 signaling and BCR-ABL1 amplification activate ADAR1. In a humanized BC CML mouse model, combined JAK2 and BCR-ABL1 inhibition prevents LSC self-renewal commensurate with ADAR1 downregulation. Lentiviral ADAR1 wild-type, but not an editing-defective ADAR1(E912A) mutant, induces self-renewal gene expression and impairs biogenesis of stem cell regulatory let-7 microRNAs. Combined RNA sequencing, qRT-PCR, CLIP-ADAR1, and pri-let-7 mutagenesis data suggest that ADAR1 promotes LSC generation via let-7 pri-microRNA editing and LIN28B upregulation. A small-molecule tool compound antagonizes ADAR1's effect on LSC self-renewal in stromal co-cultures and restores let-7 biogenesis. Thus, ADAR1 activation represents a unique therapeutic vulnerability in LSCs with active JAK2 signaling. PMID:27292188

  11. Nitrite reductase activity and inhibition of H₂S biogenesis by human cystathionine ß-synthase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Gherasim

    Full Text Available Nitrite was recognized as a potent vasodilator >130 years and has more recently emerged as an endogenous signaling molecule and modulator of gene expression. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate nitrite metabolism is essential for its use as a potential diagnostic marker as well as therapeutic agent for cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we have identified human cystathionine ß-synthase (CBS as a new player in nitrite reduction with implications for the nitrite-dependent control of H₂S production. This novel activity of CBS exploits the catalytic property of its unusual heme cofactor to reduce nitrite and generate NO. Evidence for the possible physiological relevance of this reaction is provided by the formation of ferrous-nitrosyl (Fe(II-NO CBS in the presence of NADPH, the human diflavin methionine synthase reductase (MSR and nitrite. Formation of Fe(II-NO CBS via its nitrite reductase activity inhibits CBS, providing an avenue for regulating biogenesis of H₂S and cysteine, the limiting reagent for synthesis of glutathione, a major antioxidant. Our results also suggest a possible role for CBS in intracellular NO biogenesis particularly under hypoxic conditions. The participation of a regulatory heme cofactor in CBS in nitrite reduction is unexpected and expands the repertoire of proteins that can liberate NO from the intracellular nitrite pool. Our results reveal a potential molecular mechanism for cross-talk between nitrite, NO and H₂S biology.

  12. Structure of BamA, an essential factor in outer membrane protein biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Reinhard; Schütz, Monika; Oberhettinger, Philipp; Faulstich, Michaela; Bermejo, Ivan; Rudel, Thomas; Diederichs, Kay; Zeth, Kornelius

    2014-06-01

    Outer membrane protein (OMP) biogenesis is an essential process for maintaining the bacterial cell envelope and involves the β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) for OMP recognition, folding and assembly. In Escherichia coli this function is orchestrated by five proteins: the integral outer membrane protein BamA of the Omp85 superfamily and four associated lipoproteins. To unravel the mechanism underlying OMP folding and insertion, the structure of the E. coli BamA β-barrel and P5 domain was determined at 3 Å resolution. These data add information beyond that provided in the recently published crystal structures of BamA from Haemophilus ducreyi and Neisseria gonorrhoeae and are a valuable basis for the interpretation of pertinent functional studies. In an `open' conformation, E. coli BamA displays a significant degree of flexibility between P5 and the barrel domain, which is indicative of a multi-state function in substrate transfer. E. coli BamA is characterized by a discontinuous β-barrel with impaired β1-β16 strand interactions denoted by only two connecting hydrogen bonds and a disordered C-terminus. The 16-stranded barrel surrounds a large cavity which implies a function in OMP substrate binding and partial folding. These findings strongly support a mechanism of OMP biogenesis in which substrates are partially folded inside the barrel cavity and are subsequently released laterally into the lipid bilayer. PMID:24914988

  13. MIWI2 and MILI Have Differential Effects on piRNA Biogenesis and DNA Methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei A. Manakov

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In developing male germ cells, prospermatogonia, two Piwi proteins, MILI and MIWI2, use Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA guides to repress transposable element (TE expression and ensure genome stability and proper gametogenesis. In addition to their roles in post-transcriptional TE repression, both proteins are required for DNA methylation of TE sequences. Here, we analyzed the effect of Miwi2 deficiency on piRNA biogenesis and transposon repression. Miwi2 deficiency had only a minor impact on piRNA biogenesis; however, the piRNA profile of Miwi2-knockout mice indicated overexpression of several LINE1 TE families that led to activation of the ping-pong piRNA cycle. Furthermore, we found that MILI and MIWI2 have distinct functions in TE repression in the nucleus. MILI is responsible for DNA methylation of a larger subset of TE families than MIWI2 is, suggesting that the proteins have independent roles in establishing DNA methylation patterns.

  14. Mutants of Chlamydomonas: tools to study thylakoid membrane structure, function and biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vitry, C; Vallon, O

    1999-06-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model system for the study of photosynthesis and chloroplast biogenesis. C. reinhardtii has a photosynthesis apparatus similar to that of higher plants and it grows at rapid rate (generation time about 8 h). It is a facultative phototroph, which allows the isolation of mutants unable to perform photosynthesis and its sexual cycle allows a variety of genetic studies. Transformation of the nucleus and chloroplast genomes is easily performed. Gene transformation occurs mainly by homologous recombination in the chloroplast and heterologous recombination in the nucleus. Mutants are precious tools for studies of thylakoid membrane structure, photosynthetic function and assembly. Photosynthesis mutants affected in the biogenesis of a subunit of a protein complex usually lack the entire complex; this pleiotropic effect has been used in the identification of the other subunits, in the attribution of spectroscopic signals and also as a 'genetic cleaning' process which facilitates both protein complex purification, absorption spectroscopy studies or freeze-fracture analysis. The cytochrome b6f complex is not required for the growth of C. reinhardtii, unlike the case of photosynthetic prokaryotes in which the cytochrome complex is also part of the respiratory chain, and can be uniquely studied in Chlamydomonas by genetic approaches. We describe in greater detail the use of Chlamydomonas mutants in the study of this complex. PMID:10433117

  15. Rab11a Is Essential for Lamellar Body Biogenesis in the Human Epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynier, Marie; Allart, Sophie; Gaspard, Elise; Moga, Alain; Goudounèche, Dominique; Serre, Guy; Simon, Michel; Leprince, Corinne

    2016-06-01

    Most of the skin barrier function is attributable to the outermost layer of the epidermis, the stratum corneum, which is composed of flattened, anucleated cells called corneocytes surrounded by a lipid-enriched lamellar matrix. The composition of the stratum corneum is directly dependent on the underlying granular keratinocytes, which are the last living cells in the stratified epidermis. Many components present in the intercorneocyte matrix are delivered by the underlying granular keratinocytes through a secretion process dependent on lysosome-related organelles called lamellar bodies. Because of the importance of lamellar bodies in the maintenance of the epidermal barrier, the mechanisms regulating their biogenesis must be better understood. In this study, we show that the Rab11a GTPase is highly expressed in terminally differentiated keratinocytes, where it is partly associated with lamellar bodies. Rab11a silencing in three-dimensional in vitro reconstructed human epidermis induces a barrier defect, a decrease in the amount of lipid found in the stratum corneum, a reduction in lamellar body density and secretion areas in granular keratinocytes, and the mis-sorting of lamellar body cargoes being driven to the lysosomal degradation pathway. Our results highlight the importance of Rab11a-dependent regulation of lamellar body biogenesis in keratinocytes and consequently on epidermal barrier homeostasis. PMID:26872604

  16. Aroma biogenesis and distribution between olive pulps and seeds with identification of aroma trends among cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboredo-Rodríguez, P; González-Barreiro, C; Cancho-Grande, B; Simal-Gándara, J

    2013-11-01

    The two constitutive parts of four cultivars (Arbequina, Picual, Local and Manzanilla de Sevilla) grown in Spain were separately analysed in order to establish the role of pulp and seed in the biogenesis of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) aroma through the lipoxygenase (LOX) pathway. C6 and C5 volatile compounds responsible of EVOO aroma were produced by endogenous enzymes in both parts of olive fruits and the differences can be attributed to different enzymes distribution in pulp and seed. According to results, C6 and C5 volatile compounds have mainly their biogenesis in pulp (80-90%) vs. seed (20-10%), independently of the cultivar considered. A linear discriminant analysis was used to establish discriminant aroma compounds between pulp and seed related to the maturity index. A decrease in trans-2-hexen-1-al and an increase in 1-hexanol with ripeness were observed independently of the cultivar considered. Finally, Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression analysis between pulp and seed aroma compounds allowed to establish those volatile compounds that better describe each cultivar. PMID:23768404

  17. The MITF family of transcription factors: Role in endolysosomal biogenesis, Wnt signaling, and oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploper, Diego; De Robertis, Edward M

    2015-09-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling influences cellular fate and proliferation through inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase (GSK3) and the subsequent stabilization of its many substrates, most notably β-Catenin, a transcriptional co-activator. MITF, a melanoma oncogene member of the microphthalmia family of transcription factors (MiT), was recently found to contain novel GSK3 phosphorylation sites and to be stabilized by Wnt. Other MiT members, TFEB and TFE3, are known to play important roles in cellular clearance pathways by transcriptionally regulating the biogenesis of lysosomes and autophagosomes via activation of CLEAR elements in gene promoters of target genes. Recent studies suggest that MITF can also upregulate many lysosomal genes. MiT family members are dysregulated in cancer and are considered oncogenes, but the underlying oncogenic mechanisms remain unclear. Here we review the role of MiT members, including MITF, in lysosomal biogenesis, and how cancers overexpressing MITF, TFEB or TFE3 could rewire the lysosomal pathway, inhibit cellular senescence, and activate Wnt signaling by increasing sequestration of negative regulators of Wnt signaling in multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Microarray studies suggest that MITF expression inhibits macroautophagy. In melanoma the MITF-driven increase in MVBs generates a positive feedback loop between MITF, Wnt, and MVBs. PMID:26003288

  18. Analysis of Intron Sequences Reveals Hallmarks of Circular RNA Biogenesis in Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andranik Ivanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Circular RNAs (circRNAs are a large class of animal RNAs. To investigate possible circRNA functions, it is important to understand circRNA biogenesis. Besides human ALU repeats, sequence features that promote exon circularization are largely unknown. We experimentally identified circRNAs in C. elegans. Reverse complementary sequences between introns bracketing circRNAs were significantly enriched in comparison to linear controls. By scoring the presence of reverse complementary sequences in human introns, we predicted and experimentally validated circRNAs. We show that introns bracketing circRNAs are highly enriched in RNA editing or hyperediting events. Knockdown of the double-strand RNA-editing enzyme ADAR1 significantly and specifically upregulated circRNA expression. Together, our data support a model of animal circRNA biogenesis in which competing RNA-RNA interactions of introns form larger structures that promote circularization of embedded exons, whereas ADAR1 antagonizes circRNA expression by melting stems within these interactions.

  19. Rev-erb-α modulates skeletal muscle oxidative capacity by regulating mitochondrial biogenesis and autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldt, Estelle; Sebti, Yasmine; Solt, Laura A.; Duhem, Christian; Lancel, Steve; Eeckhoute, Jérôme; Hesselink, Matthijs K.C.; Paquet, Charlotte; Delhaye, Stéphane; Shin, Youseung; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Schaart, Gert; Lefebvre, Philippe; Nevière, Rémi; Burris, Thomas P.; Schrauwen, Patrick; Staels, Bart; Duez, Hélène

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear receptor Rev-erb-α modulates hepatic lipid and glucose metabolism, adipogenesis and the inflammatory response in macrophages. We show here that Rev-erb-α is highly expressed in oxidative skeletal muscle and plays a role in mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative function, in gain- and loss-of function studies. Rev-erb-α-deficiency in skeletal muscle leads to reduced mitochondrial content and oxidative function, resulting in compromised exercise capacity. This phenotype was recapitulated in isolated fibers and in muscle cells upon Rev-erbα knock-down, while Rev-erb-α over-expression increased the number of mitochondria with improved respiratory capacity. Rev-erb-α-deficiency resulted in deactivation of the Stk11–Ampk–Sirt1–Ppargc1-α signaling pathway, whereas autophagy was up-regulated, resulting in both impaired mitochondrial biogenesis and increased clearance. Muscle over-expression or pharmacological activation of Rev-erb-α increased respiration and exercise capacity. This study identifies Rev-erb-α as a pharmacological target which improves muscle oxidative function by modulating gene networks controlling mitochondrial number and function. PMID:23852339

  20. Mitochondria Biogenesis and Bioenergetics Gene Profiles in Isogenic Prostate Cells with Different Malignant Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Tanya C; Rhim, Johng S; Nyalwidhe, Julius O

    2016-01-01

    Background. The most significant hallmarks of cancer are directly or indirectly linked to deregulated mitochondria. In this study, we sought to profile mitochondria associated genes in isogenic prostate cell lines with different tumorigenic phenotypes from the same patient. Results. Two isogenic human prostate cell lines RC77N/E (nonmalignant cells) and RC77T/E (malignant cells) were profiled for expression of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism genes by qRT-PCR using the Human Mitochondria and the Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism RT(2) PCR arrays. Forty-seven genes were differentially regulated between the two cell lines. The interaction and regulatory networks of these genes were generated by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. UCP2 was the most significantly upregulated gene in primary adenocarcinoma cells in the current study. The overexpression of UCP2 upon malignant transformation was further validated using human prostatectomy clinical specimens. Conclusions. This study demonstrates the overexpression of multiple genes that are involved in mitochondria biogenesis, bioenergetics, and modulation of apoptosis. These genes may play a role in malignant transformation and disease progression. The upregulation of some of these genes in clinical samples indicates that some of the differentially transcribed genes could be the potential targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:27478826

  1. Mitochondria Biogenesis and Bioenergetics Gene Profiles in Isogenic Prostate Cells with Different Malignant Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya C. Burch

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The most significant hallmarks of cancer are directly or indirectly linked to deregulated mitochondria. In this study, we sought to profile mitochondria associated genes in isogenic prostate cell lines with different tumorigenic phenotypes from the same patient. Results. Two isogenic human prostate cell lines RC77N/E (nonmalignant cells and RC77T/E (malignant cells were profiled for expression of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism genes by qRT-PCR using the Human Mitochondria and the Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism RT2 PCR arrays. Forty-seven genes were differentially regulated between the two cell lines. The interaction and regulatory networks of these genes were generated by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. UCP2 was the most significantly upregulated gene in primary adenocarcinoma cells in the current study. The overexpression of UCP2 upon malignant transformation was further validated using human prostatectomy clinical specimens. Conclusions. This study demonstrates the overexpression of multiple genes that are involved in mitochondria biogenesis, bioenergetics, and modulation of apoptosis. These genes may play a role in malignant transformation and disease progression. The upregulation of some of these genes in clinical samples indicates that some of the differentially transcribed genes could be the potential targets for therapeutic interventions.

  2. Small GTPase Rab40c associates with lipid droplets and modulates the biogenesis of lipid droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ran; Wang, Weijie; Wang, Shicong; Wang, Zhen; Sun, Lixiang; He, Wei; Fan, Rong; Zhou, Yunhe; Xu, Xiaohui; Hong, Wanjin; Wang, Tuanlao

    2013-01-01

    The subcellular location and cell biological function of small GTPase Rab40c in mammalian cells have not been investigated in detail. In this study, we demonstrated that the exogenously expressed GFP-Rab40c associates with lipid droplets marked by neutral lipid specific dye Oil red or Nile red, but not with the Golgi or endosomal markers. Further examination demonstrated that Rab40c is also associated with ERGIC-53 containing structures, especially under the serum starvation condition. Rab40c is increasingly recruited to the surface of lipid droplets during lipid droplets formation and maturation in HepG2 cells. Rab40c knockdown moderately decreases the size of lipid droplets, suggesting that Rab40c is involved in the biogenesis of lipid droplets. Stimulation for adipocyte differentiation increases the expression of Rab40c in 3T3-L1 cells. Rab40c interacts with TIP47, and is appositionally associated with TIP47-labeled lipid droplets. In addition, over-expression of Rab40c causes the clustering of lipid droplets independent of its GTPase activity, but completely dependent of the intact SOCS box domain of Rab40c. In addition, Rab40c displayed self-interaction as well as interaction with TIP47 and the SOCS box is essential for its ability to induce clustering of lipid droplets. Our results suggest that Rab40c is a novel Rab protein associated with lipid droplets, and is likely involved in modulating the biogenesis of lipid droplets. PMID:23638186

  3. β-Hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate, mitochondrial biogenesis, and skeletal muscle health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xi; Duan, Yehui; Yao, Kang; Li, Fengna; Hou, Yongqing; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2016-03-01

    The metabolic roles of mitochondria go far beyond serving exclusively as the major producer of ATP in tissues and cells. Evidence has shown that mitochondria may function as a key regulator of skeletal muscle fiber types and overall well-being. Maintaining skeletal muscle mitochondrial content and function is important for sustaining health throughout the lifespan. Of great importance, β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB, a metabolite of L-leucine) has been proposed to enhance the protein deposition and efficiency of mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle, as well as muscle strength in both exercise and clinical settings. Specifically, dietary supplementation with HMB increases the gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), which represents an upstream inducer of genes of mitochondrial metabolism, coordinates the expression of both nuclear- and mitochondrion-encoded genes in mitochondrial biogenesis. Additionally, PGC-1α plays a key role in the transformation of skeletal muscle fiber type, leading to a shift toward type I muscle fibers that are rich in mitochondria and have a high capacity for oxidative metabolism. As a nitrogen-free metabolite, HMB holds great promise to improve skeletal muscle mass and function, as well as whole-body health and well-being of animals and humans. PMID:26573541

  4. Target-dependent biogenesis of cognate microRNAs in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Mainak; Bhattacharyya, Suvendra N

    2016-01-01

    Extensive research has established how miRNAs regulate target mRNAs by translation repression and/or endonucleolytic degradation in metazoans. However, information related to the effect of target mRNA on biogenesis and stability of corresponding miRNAs in animals is limited. Here we report regulated biogenesis of cognate miRNAs by their target mRNAs. Enhanced pre-miRNA processing by AGO-associated DICER1 contributes to this increased miRNP formation. The processed miRNAs are loaded onto AGO2 to form functionally competent miRISCs both in vivo and also in a cell-free in vitro system. Thus, we identify an additional layer of posttranscriptional regulation that helps the cell to maintain requisite levels of mature forms of respective miRNAs by modulating their processing in a target-dependent manner, a process happening for miR-122 during stress reversal in human hepatic cells. PMID:27448149

  5. Golgi Biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yanzhuang; Seemann, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    The kinase MEK1 stimulates disassembly of the Golgi at mitosis to facilitate its partitioning into daughter cells. SNARE proteins then promote fusion of the resulting vesicles to regenerate a functional Golgi apparatus at the end of mitosis.

  6. The ribosome biogenesis factor Nol11 is required for optimal rDNA transcription and craniofacial development in Xenopus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N Griffin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The production of ribosomes is ubiquitous and fundamental to life. As such, it is surprising that defects in ribosome biogenesis underlie a growing number of symptomatically distinct inherited disorders, collectively called ribosomopathies. We previously determined that the nucleolar protein, NOL11, is essential for optimal pre-rRNA transcription and processing in human tissue culture cells. However, the role of NOL11 in the development of a multicellular organism remains unknown. Here, we reveal a critical function for NOL11 in vertebrate ribosome biogenesis and craniofacial development. Nol11 is strongly expressed in the developing cranial neural crest (CNC of both amphibians and mammals, and knockdown of Xenopus nol11 results in impaired pre-rRNA transcription and processing, increased apoptosis, and abnormal development of the craniofacial cartilages. Inhibition of p53 rescues this skeletal phenotype, but not the underlying ribosome biogenesis defect, demonstrating an evolutionarily conserved control mechanism through which ribosome-impaired craniofacial cells are removed. Excessive activation of this mechanism impairs craniofacial development. Together, our findings reveal a novel requirement for Nol11 in craniofacial development, present the first frog model of a ribosomopathy, and provide further insight into the clinically important relationship between specific ribosome biogenesis proteins and craniofacial cell survival.

  7. Endothelial AMPK activation induces mitochondrial biogenesis and stress adaptation via eNOS-dependent mTORC1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunying; Reif, Michaella M; Craige, Siobhan M; Kant, Shashi; Keaney, John F

    2016-05-01

    Metabolic stress sensors like AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) are known to confer stress adaptation and promote longevity in lower organisms. This study demonstrates that activating the metabolic stress sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in endothelial cells helps maintain normal cellular function by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and stress adaptation. To better define the mechanisms whereby AMPK promotes endothelial stress resistance, we used 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) to chronically activate AMPK and observed stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis in wild type mouse endothelium, but not in endothelium from endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout (eNOS-null) mice. Interestingly, AICAR-enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis was blocked by pretreatment with the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibitor, rapamycin. Further, AICAR stimulated mTORC1 as determined by phosphorylation of its known downstream effectors in wild type, but not eNOS-null, endothelial cells. Together these data indicate that eNOS is needed to couple AMPK activation to mTORC1 and thus promote mitochondrial biogenesis and stress adaptation in the endothelium. These data suggest a novel mechanism for mTORC1 activation that is significant for investigations in vascular dysfunction. PMID:26989010

  8. Common genetic polymorphisms of microRNA biogenesis pathway genes and breast cancer survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Hyuna

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the role of microRNA’s (miRNA’s biogenesis pathway genes in cancer development and progression has been well established, the association between genetic variants of this pathway genes and breast cancer survival is still unknown. Methods We used genotype data available from a previously conducted case–control study to investigate association between common genetic variations in miRNA biogenesis pathway genes and breast cancer survival. We investigated the possible associations between 41 germ-line single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and both disease free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS among 488 breast cancer patients. During the median follow-up of 6.24 years, 90 cases developed disease progression and 48 cases died. Results Seven SNPs were significantly associated with breast cancer survival. Two SNPs in AGO2 (rs11786030 and rs2292779 and DICER1 rs1057035 were associated with both DFS and OS. Two SNPs in HIWI (rs4759659 and rs11060845 and DGCR8 rs9606250 were associated with DFS, while DROSHA rs874332 and GEMIN4 rs4968104 were associated with only OS. The most significant association was observed in variant allele of AGO2 rs11786030 with 2.62-fold increased risk of disease progression (95% confidence interval (CI, 1.41-4.88 and in minor allele homozygote of AGO2 rs2292779 with 2.94-fold increased risk of death (95% CI, 1.52-5.69. We also found cumulative effects of SNPs on DFS and OS. Compared to the subjects carrying 0 to 2 high-risk genotypes, those carrying 3 or 4–6 high-risk genotypes had an increased risk of disease progression with a hazard ratio of 2.16 (95% CI, 1.18- 3.93 and 4.47 (95% CI, 2.45- 8.14, respectively (P for trend, 6.11E-07. Conclusions Our results suggest that genetic variants in miRNA biogenesis pathway genes may be associated with breast cancer survival. Further studies in larger sample size and functional characterizations are warranted to validate these results.

  9. Common genetic polymorphisms of microRNA biogenesis pathway genes and breast cancer survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the role of microRNA’s (miRNA’s) biogenesis pathway genes in cancer development and progression has been well established, the association between genetic variants of this pathway genes and breast cancer survival is still unknown. We used genotype data available from a previously conducted case–control study to investigate association between common genetic variations in miRNA biogenesis pathway genes and breast cancer survival. We investigated the possible associations between 41 germ-line single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and both disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) among 488 breast cancer patients. During the median follow-up of 6.24 years, 90 cases developed disease progression and 48 cases died. Seven SNPs were significantly associated with breast cancer survival. Two SNPs in AGO2 (rs11786030 and rs2292779) and DICER1 rs1057035 were associated with both DFS and OS. Two SNPs in HIWI (rs4759659 and rs11060845) and DGCR8 rs9606250 were associated with DFS, while DROSHA rs874332 and GEMIN4 rs4968104 were associated with only OS. The most significant association was observed in variant allele of AGO2 rs11786030 with 2.62-fold increased risk of disease progression (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.41-4.88) and in minor allele homozygote of AGO2 rs2292779 with 2.94-fold increased risk of death (95% CI, 1.52-5.69). We also found cumulative effects of SNPs on DFS and OS. Compared to the subjects carrying 0 to 2 high-risk genotypes, those carrying 3 or 4–6 high-risk genotypes had an increased risk of disease progression with a hazard ratio of 2.16 (95% CI, 1.18- 3.93) and 4.47 (95% CI, 2.45- 8.14), respectively (P for trend, 6.11E-07). Our results suggest that genetic variants in miRNA biogenesis pathway genes may be associated with breast cancer survival. Further studies in larger sample size and functional characterizations are warranted to validate these results

  10. Roles of CUP-5, the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologue of human TRPML1, in lysosome and gut granule biogenesis

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    Fares Hanna

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CUP-5 is a Transient Receptor Potential protein in C. elegans that is the orthologue of mammalian TRPML1. Loss of TRPML1 results in the lysosomal storage disorder Mucolipidosis type IV. Loss of CUP-5 results in embryonic lethality and the accumulation of enlarged yolk granules in developing intestinal cells. The embryonic lethality of cup-5 mutants is rescued by mutations in mrp-4, which is required for gut granule differentiation. Gut granules are intestine-specific lysosome-related organelles that accumulate birefringent material. This link between CUP-5 and gut granules led us to determine the roles of CUP-5 in lysosome and gut granule biogenesis in developing intestinal cells. Results We show that CUP-5 protein localizes to lysosomes, but not to gut granules, in developing intestinal cells. Loss of CUP-5 results in defects in endo-lysosomal transport in developing intestinal cells of C. elegans embryos. This ultimately leads to the appearance of enlarged terminal vacuoles that show defective lysosomal degradation and that have lysosomal and endosomal markers. In contrast, gut granule biogenesis is normal in the absence of CUP-5. Furthermore, loss of CUP-5 does not result in inappropriate fusion or mixing of content between lysosomes and gut granules. Conclusions Using an in vivo model of MLIV, we show that there is a defect in lysosomal transport/biogenesis that is earlier than the presumed function of TRPML1 in terminal lysosomes. Our results indicate that CUP-5 is required for the biogenesis of lysosomes but not of gut granules. Thus, cellular phenotypes in Mucolipidosis type IV are likely not due to defects in lysosome-related organelle biogenesis, but due to progressive defects in lysosomal transport that lead to severe lysosomal dysfunction.

  11. Temperature and Carbon Assimilation Regulate the Chlorosome Biogenesis in Green Sulfur Bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Joseph Kuo-Hsiang; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Enriquez, Miriam M; Huh, Joonsuk; Frank, Harry A; Urban, Volker S; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Green photosynthetic bacteria adjust the structure and functionality of the chlorosome - the light absorbing antenna complex - in response to environmental stress factors. The chlorosome is a natural self-assembled aggregate of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules. In this study we report the regulation of the biogenesis of the Chlorobaculum tepidum chlorosome by carbon assimilation in conjunction with temperature changes. Our studies indicate that the carbon source and thermal stress culture of Cba. tepidum grows slower and incorporates less BChl c in the chlorosome. Compared with the chlorosome from other cultural conditions we investigated, the chlorosome from the carbon source and thermal stress culture displays: (a) smaller cross-sectional radius and overall size; (b) simplified BChl c homologues with smaller side chains; (c) blue-shifted Qy absorption maxima and (d) a sigmoid-shaped circular dichroism (CD) spectra. Using a theoretical model we analyze how the observed spectral modifications can be assoc...

  12. Regulation of Transcription from Two ssrS Promoters in 6S RNA Biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Young; Park, Hongmarn; Bak, Geunu; Kim, Kwang-sun; Lee, Younghoon

    2013-01-01

    ssrS-encoded 6S RNA is an abundant noncoding RNA that binds σ70-RNA polymerase and regulates expression at a subset of promoters in Escherichia coli. It is transcribed from two tandem promoters, ssrS P1 and ssrS P2. Regulation of transcription from two ssrS promoters in 6S RNA biogenesis was examined. Both P1 and P2 were growth phase-dependently regulated. Depletion of 6S RNA had no effect on growth-phase-dependent transcription from either promoter, whereas overexpression of 6S RNA increased P1 transcription and decreased P2 transcription, suggesting that transcription from P1 and P2 is subject to feedback activation and feedback inhibition, respectively. This feedback regulation disappeared in Δfis strains, supporting involvement of Fis in this process. The differential feedback regulation may provide a means for maintaining appropriate cellular concentrations of 6S RNA. PMID:23864284

  13. Introduction to Extracellular Vesicles: Biogenesis, RNA Cargo Selection, Content, Release, and Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abels, Erik R; Breakefield, Xandra O

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles are a heterogeneous group of membrane-limited vesicles loaded with various proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Release of extracellular vesicles from its cell of origin occurs either through the outward budding of the plasma membrane or through the inward budding of the endosomal membrane, resulting in the formation of multivesicular bodies, which release vesicles upon fusion with the plasma membrane. The release of vesicles can facilitate intercellular communication by contact with or by internalization of contents, either by fusion with the plasma membrane or by endocytosis into "recipient" cells. Although the interest in extracellular vesicle research is increasing, there are still no real standards in place to separate or classify the different types of vesicles. This review provides an introduction into this expanding and complex field of research focusing on the biogenesis, nucleic acid cargo loading, content, release, and uptake of extracellular vesicles. PMID:27053351

  14. Rab3 proteins involved in vesicle biogenesis and priming in embryonic mouse chromaffin cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schonn, Jean-Sébastien; van Weering, Jan R T; Mohrmann, Ralf;

    2010-01-01

    the size of the releasable vesicle pools but does not alter their fusion kinetics, consistent with an altered function in vesicle priming. The sustained release component has a sigmoid shape in ABCD(-/-) cells when normalized to the releasable pool size, indicating that vesicle priming follows at a...... higher rate after an initial delay. Rescue experiments showed that short-term (4-6 hours) overexpression of Rab3A or Rab3C suffices to rescue vesicle priming and secretion, but it does not restore the number of secretory vesicles. We conclude that Rab3 proteins play two distinct stimulating roles for...... LDCV fusion in embryonic chromaffin cells, by facilitating vesicle biogenesis and stabilizing the primed vesicle state....

  15. Curcumin, mitochondrial biogenesis, and mitophagy: Exploring recent data and indicating future needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Marcos Roberto; Jardim, Fernanda Rafaela; Setzer, William N; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic double-membrane bound organelles which have key roles in a variety of cellular functions such as energy producing, regulation of calcium flux, cellular stress responses including autophagy and apoptosis. A growing body of evidence indicates that mitochondrial dysfunction is the main culprit in a myriad of diseases such as neurodegenerative disease. This fact opens a new therapeutic window based on targeting mitochondrial dysfunction for treatment of these diseases. Recently an abundance of evidence shows the promising role of polyphenolic compounds on mitochondrial structure and function. Curcumin, a well-known polyphenolic compound, is an abundant component of turmeric. The promising roles of curcumin against different diseases are highly publicized. The aim of the present work is to critically review the scientific evidence to provide a clear view of how curcumin improves mitochondrial dynamics regarding mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy. We also present curcumin biosynthesis, source, bioavailability and metabolism in order to give an overview of this compound. PMID:27143655

  16. Shot and Patronin polarise microtubules to direct membrane traffic and biogenesis of microvilli in epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Ichha; Elbediwy, Ahmed; Diaz de la Loza, Maria Del Carmen; Fletcher, Georgina C; Thompson, Barry J

    2016-07-01

    In epithelial tissues, polarisation of microtubules and actin microvilli occurs along the apical-basal axis of each cell, yet how these cytoskeletal polarisation events are coordinated remains unclear. Here, we examine the hierarchy of events during cytoskeletal polarisation in Drosophila melanogaster epithelia. Core apical-basal polarity determinants polarise the spectrin cytoskeleton to recruit the microtubule-binding proteins Patronin (CAMSAP1, CAMSAP2 and CAMPSAP3 in humans) and Shortstop [Shot; MACF1 and BPAG1 (also known as DST) in humans] to the apical membrane domain. Patronin and Shot then act to polarise microtubules along the apical-basal axis to enable apical transport of Rab11 endosomes by the Nuf-Dynein microtubule motor complex. Finally, Rab11 endosomes are transferred to the MyoV (also known as Didum in Drosophila) actin motor to deliver the key microvillar determinant Cadherin 99C to the apical membrane to organise the biogenesis of actin microvilli. PMID:27231092

  17. Control of gene expression and mitochondrial biogenesis in the muscular adaption to endurance exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joseph, A. M.; Pilegaard, H.; Leick, L.;

    2006-01-01

    adaptations is an increase in mitochondrial content, which confers a greater resistance to muscle fatigue. This essay reviews current knowledge on the regulation of exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis at the molecular level. The major steps involved include, (i) transcriptional regulation of nuclear......-encoded genes encoding mitochondrial proteins by the coactivator peroxisome-proliferatoractivated receptor coactivator-1, (ii) control of mitochondrial DNA gene 1To whom correspondence should be addressed (email dhood@yorku.ca). 13 © 2006 The Biochemical Society Ch-02_essbiochem_hood.indd Page 13 11/13/06 10......:27:15 PM elhi /Volumes/ju108/POIN001/essbiochem_indd%0/Chapter 2 © 2006 The Biochemical Society 14 Essays in Biochemistry volume 42 2006 expression by the transcription factor Tfam, (iii) mitochondrial fi ssion and fusion mechanisms, and (iv) import of nuclear-derived gene products into the mitochondrion...

  18. PICK1 deficiency impairs secretory vesicle biogenesis and leads to growth retardation and decreased glucose tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Madsen, Kenneth L; Jansen, Anna M;

    2013-01-01

    Secretory vesicles in endocrine cells store hormones such as growth hormone (GH) and insulin before their release into the bloodstream. The molecular mechanisms governing budding of immature secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and their subsequent maturation remain unclear. Here......, we identify the lipid binding BAR (Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs) domain protein PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) as a key component early in the biogenesis of secretory vesicles in GH-producing cells. Both PICK1-deficient Drosophila and mice displayed somatic growth retardation. Growth retardation...... supported by electron microscopy showing prominent reduction in secretory vesicle number. Evidence was also obtained for impaired insulin secretion associated with decreased glucose tolerance. PICK1 localized in cells to immature secretory vesicles, and the PICK1 BAR domain was shown by live imaging to...

  19. Small GTPase Rab40c associates with lipid droplets and modulates the biogenesis of lipid droplets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Tan

    Full Text Available The subcellular location and cell biological function of small GTPase Rab40c in mammalian cells have not been investigated in detail. In this study, we demonstrated that the exogenously expressed GFP-Rab40c associates with lipid droplets marked by neutral lipid specific dye Oil red or Nile red, but not with the Golgi or endosomal markers. Further examination demonstrated that Rab40c is also associated with ERGIC-53 containing structures, especially under the serum starvation condition. Rab40c is increasingly recruited to the surface of lipid droplets during lipid droplets formation and maturation in HepG2 cells. Rab40c knockdown moderately decreases the size of lipid droplets, suggesting that Rab40c is involved in the biogenesis of lipid droplets. Stimulation for adipocyte differentiation increases the expression of Rab40c in 3T3-L1 cells. Rab40c interacts with TIP47, and is appositionally associated with TIP47-labeled lipid droplets. In addition, over-expression of Rab40c causes the clustering of lipid droplets independent of its GTPase activity, but completely dependent of the intact SOCS box domain of Rab40c. In addition, Rab40c displayed self-interaction as well as interaction with TIP47 and the SOCS box is essential for its ability to induce clustering of lipid droplets. Our results suggest that Rab40c is a novel Rab protein associated with lipid droplets, and is likely involved in modulating the biogenesis of lipid droplets.

  20. Insights into mRNP biogenesis provided by new genetic interactions among export and transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estruch Francisco

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The various steps of mRNP biogenesis (transcription, processing and export are interconnected. It has been shown that the transcription machinery plays a pivotal role in mRNP assembly, since several mRNA export factors are recruited during transcription and physically interact with components of the transcription machinery. Although the shuttling DEAD-box protein Dbp5p is concentrated on the cytoplasmic fibrils of the NPC, previous studies demonstrated that it interacts physically and genetically with factors involved in transcription initiation. Results We investigated the effect of mutations affecting various components of the transcription initiation apparatus on the phenotypes of mRNA export mutant strains. Our results show that growth and mRNA export defects of dbp5 and mex67 mutant strains can be suppressed by mutation of specific transcription initiation components, but suppression was not observed for mutants acting in the very first steps of the pre-initiation complex (PIC formation. Conclusions Our results indicate that mere reduction in the amount of mRNP produced is not sufficient to suppress the defects caused by a defective mRNA export factor. Suppression occurs only with mutants affecting events within a narrow window of the mRNP biogenesis process. We propose that reducing the speed with which transcription converts from initiation and promoter clearance to elongation may have a positive effect on mRNP formation by permitting more effective recruitment of partially-functional mRNP proteins to the nascent mRNP.

  1. Identification and Characterization of the Nickel Uptake System for Urease Biogenesis in Streptococcus salivarius 57.I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Ywan M.; Burne, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Ureases are multisubunit enzymes requiring Ni2+ for activity. The low pH-inducible urease gene cluster in Streptococcus salivarius 57.I is organized as an operon, beginning with ureI, followed by ureABC (structural genes), and ureEFGD (accessory genes). Urease biogenesis also requires a high-affinity Ni2+ uptake system. By searching the partial genome sequence of a closely related organism, Streptococcus thermophilus LMG18311, three open reading frame (ORFs) homologous to those encoding proteins involved in cobalamin biosynthesis and cobalt transport (cbiMQO) were identified immediately 3′ to the ure operon. To determine whether these genes were involved in urease biogenesis by catalyzing Ni2+ uptake in S. salivarius, regions 3′ to ureD were amplified by PCRs from S. salivarius by using primers identical to the S. thermophilus sequences. Sequence analysis of the products revealed three ORFs. Reverse transcriptase PCR was used to demonstrate that the ORFs are transcribed as part of the ure operon. Insertional inactivation of ORF1 with a polar kanamycin marker completely abolished urease activity and the ability to accumulate 63Ni2+ during growth. Supplementation of the growth medium with NiCl2 at concentrations as low as 2.5 μM partially restored urease activity in the mutant. Both wild-type and mutant strains showed enhanced urease activity when exogenous Ni2+ was provided at neutral pH. Enhancement of urease activity by adding nickel was regulated at the posttranslational level. Thus, ORF1, ORF2, and ORF3 are part of the ure operon, and these genes, designated ureM, ureQ, and ureO, respectively, likely encode a Ni2+-specific ATP-binding cassette transporter. PMID:14617641

  2. Nitazoxanide Inhibits Pilus Biogenesis by Interfering with Folding of the Usher Protein in the Outer Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahales, Peter; Hoffman, Paul S; Thanassi, David G

    2016-04-01

    Many bacterial pathogens assemble surface fibers termed pili or fimbriae that facilitate attachment to host cells and colonization of host tissues. The chaperone/usher (CU) pathway is a conserved secretion system that is responsible for the assembly of virulence-associated pili by many different Gram-negative bacteria. Pilus biogenesis by the CU pathway requires a dedicated periplasmic chaperone and an integral outer membrane (OM) assembly and secretion platform termed the usher. Nitazoxanide (NTZ), an antiparasitic drug, was previously shown to inhibit the function of aggregative adherence fimbriae and type 1 pili assembled by the CU pathway in enteroaggregativeEscherichia coli, an important causative agent of diarrhea. We show here that NTZ also inhibits the function of type 1 and P pili from uropathogenicE. coli(UPEC). UPEC is the primary causative agent of urinary tract infections, and type 1 and P pili mediate colonization of the bladder and kidneys, respectively. By analysis of the different stages of the CU pilus biogenesis pathway, we show that treatment of bacteria with NTZ causes a reduction in the number of usher molecules in the OM, resulting in a loss of pilus assembly on the bacterial surface. In addition, we determine that NTZ specifically prevents proper folding of the usher β-barrel domain in the OM. Our findings demonstrate that NTZ is a pilicide with a novel mechanism of action and activity against diverse CU pathways. This suggests that further development of the NTZ scaffold may lead to new antivirulence agents that target the usher to prevent pilus assembly. PMID:26824945

  3. Equatorin is not essential for acrosome biogenesis but is required for the acrosome reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Jianxiu [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Min [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Ji, Shaoyang; Wang, Xiaona; Wang, Yanbo [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Huang, Xingxu [MOE Key Laboratory of Model Animal for Disease Study, Model Animal Research Center of Nanjing University, Nanjing Biomedical Research Institute, National Resource Center for Mutant Mice, Nanjing 210061 (China); Yang, Lin; Wang, Yaqing [State Key Laboratory of Molecular and Developmental Biology, Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Cui, Xiuhong; Lv, Limin [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Liu, Yixun, E-mail: liuyx@ioz.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Gao, Fei, E-mail: gaof@ioz.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Eqtn knockout mice were used for these experiments. • In vivo and in vitro fertilization analyses were performed. • Eqtn-deficient sperm were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and an A23187-induced acrosome reaction (AR) assay. • Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) was performed to assess the interaction between Eqtn and the SNARE complex. - Abstract: The acrosome is a specialized organelle that covers the anterior part of the sperm nucleus and plays an essential role in mammalian fertilization. However, the regulatory mechanisms controlling acrosome biogenesis and acrosome exocytosis during fertilization are largely unknown. Equatorin (Eqtn) is a membrane protein that is specifically localized to the acrosomal membrane. In the present study, the physiological functions of Eqtn were investigated using a gene knockout mouse model. We found that Eqtn{sup −/−} males were subfertile. Only approximately 50% of plugged females were pregnant after mating with Eqtn{sup −/−} males, whereas more than 90% of plugged females were pregnant after mating with control males. Sperm and acrosomes from Eqtn{sup −/−} mice presented normal motility and morphology. However, the fertilization and induced acrosome exocytosis rates of Eqtn-deficient sperm were dramatically reduced. Further studies revealed that the Eqtn protein might interact with Syntaxin1a and SNAP25, but loss of Eqtn did not affect the protein levels of these genes. Therefore, our study demonstrates that Eqtn is not essential for acrosome biogenesis but is required for the acrosome reaction. Eqtn is involved in the fusion of the outer acrosomal membrane and the sperm plasma membrane during the acrosome reaction, most likely via an interaction with the SNARE complex.

  4. MITF drives endolysosomal biogenesis and potentiates Wnt signaling in melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploper, Diego; Taelman, Vincent F; Robert, Lidia; Perez, Brian S; Titz, Björn; Chen, Hsiao-Wang; Graeber, Thomas G; von Euw, Erika; Ribas, Antoni; De Robertis, Edward M

    2015-02-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling plays an important role in development and disease, regulating transcription of target genes and stabilizing many proteins phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). We observed that the MiT family of transcription factors, which includes the melanoma oncogene MITF (micropthalmia-associated transcription factor) and the lysosomal master regulator TFEB, had the highest phylogenetic conservation of three consecutive putative GSK3 phosphorylation sites in animal proteomes. This finding prompted us to examine the relationship between MITF, endolysosomal biogenesis, and Wnt signaling. Here we report that MITF expression levels correlated with the expression of a large subset of lysosomal genes in melanoma cell lines. MITF expression in the tetracycline-inducible C32 melanoma model caused a marked increase in vesicular structures, and increased expression of late endosomal proteins, such as Rab7, LAMP1, and CD63. These late endosomes were not functional lysosomes as they were less active in proteolysis, yet were able to concentrate Axin1, phospho-LRP6, phospho-β-catenin, and GSK3 in the presence of Wnt ligands. This relocalization significantly enhanced Wnt signaling by increasing the number of multivesicular bodies into which the Wnt signalosome/destruction complex becomes localized upon Wnt signaling. We also show that the MITF protein was stabilized by Wnt signaling, through the novel C-terminal GSK3 phosphorylations identified here. MITF stabilization caused an increase in multivesicular body biosynthesis, which in turn increased Wnt signaling, generating a positive-feedback loop that may function during the proliferative stages of melanoma. The results underscore the importance of misregulated endolysosomal biogenesis in Wnt signaling and cancer. PMID:25605940

  5. Equatorin is not essential for acrosome biogenesis but is required for the acrosome reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Eqtn knockout mice were used for these experiments. • In vivo and in vitro fertilization analyses were performed. • Eqtn-deficient sperm were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and an A23187-induced acrosome reaction (AR) assay. • Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) was performed to assess the interaction between Eqtn and the SNARE complex. - Abstract: The acrosome is a specialized organelle that covers the anterior part of the sperm nucleus and plays an essential role in mammalian fertilization. However, the regulatory mechanisms controlling acrosome biogenesis and acrosome exocytosis during fertilization are largely unknown. Equatorin (Eqtn) is a membrane protein that is specifically localized to the acrosomal membrane. In the present study, the physiological functions of Eqtn were investigated using a gene knockout mouse model. We found that Eqtn−/− males were subfertile. Only approximately 50% of plugged females were pregnant after mating with Eqtn−/− males, whereas more than 90% of plugged females were pregnant after mating with control males. Sperm and acrosomes from Eqtn−/− mice presented normal motility and morphology. However, the fertilization and induced acrosome exocytosis rates of Eqtn-deficient sperm were dramatically reduced. Further studies revealed that the Eqtn protein might interact with Syntaxin1a and SNAP25, but loss of Eqtn did not affect the protein levels of these genes. Therefore, our study demonstrates that Eqtn is not essential for acrosome biogenesis but is required for the acrosome reaction. Eqtn is involved in the fusion of the outer acrosomal membrane and the sperm plasma membrane during the acrosome reaction, most likely via an interaction with the SNARE complex

  6. Structure of the Membrane-tethering GRASP Domain Reveals a Unique PDZ Ligand Interaction That Mediates Golgi Biogenesis*

    OpenAIRE

    Truschel, Steven T.; Sengupta, Debrup; Foote, Adam; Heroux, Annie; Macbeth, Mark R.; Linstedt, Adam D.

    2011-01-01

    Biogenesis of the ribbon-like membrane network of the mammalian Golgi requires membrane tethering by the conserved GRASP domain in GRASP65 and GRASP55, yet the tethering mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GRASP55 GRASP domain, which revealed an unusual arrangement of two tandem PDZ folds that more closely resemble prokaryotic PDZ domains. Biochemical and functional data indicated that the interaction between the ligand-binding pocket of PDZ1 and an...

  7. Surf1, Associated with Leigh Syndrome in Humans, Is a Heme-binding Protein in Bacterial Oxidase Biogenesis*

    OpenAIRE

    Bundschuh, Freya A.; Hannappel, Achim; Anderka, Oliver; Ludwig, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    Biogenesis of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX) relies on a large number of assembly factors, among them the transmembrane protein Surf1. The loss of human Surf1 function is associated with Leigh syndrome, a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by severe COX deficiency. In the bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans, two homologous proteins, Surf1c and Surf1q, were identified, which we characterize in the present study. When coexpressed in Escherichia coli together with enzymes for heme ...

  8. Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Peroxisome Proliferator–Activated Receptor-γ Coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) Deacetylation by Physical Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ling; Pan, Ruping; Li, Rong; Niemann, Bernd; Aurich, Anne-Cathleen; Chen, Ying; Rohrbach, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Transcriptional peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) plays a key role in mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism and is suggested to be involved in the exercise-induced increase in mitochondrial content. PGC-1α activity is regulated by posttranslational modifications, among them acetylation or phosphorylation. Accordingly, the deacetylase SIRT1 and the kinase AMPK increase PGC-1α activity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We tested whether chronic t...

  9. Triglyceride Blisters in Lipid Bilayers: Implications for Lipid Droplet Biogenesis and the Mobile Lipid Signal in Cancer Cell Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Duelund, Lars; Pakkanen, Kirsi Inkeri; Ipsen, John Hjort

    2010-01-01

    aggregates of unknown function present in malignant cells, and to the early biogenesis of lipid droplets accommodated between the two leaflets of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The TO aggregates give the bilayer a blister-like appearance, and will hinder the formation of multi-lamellar phases in model......, and possibly living membranes. The blisters will result in anomalous membrane probe partitioning, which should be accounted for in the interpretation of probe-related measurements....

  10. Genomic Characterization of Non-Mucus-Adherent Derivatives of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Reveals Genes Affecting Pilus Biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Rasinkangas, Pia; Reunanen, Justus; Douillard, François P.; Ritari, Jarmo; Uotinen,Virva; Palva, Airi; de Vos, Willem M

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is one of the best-characterized lactic acid bacteria and can be considered a probiotic paradigm. Comparative and functional genome analysis showed that L. rhamnosus GG harbors a genomic island including the spaCBA-srtC1 gene cluster, encoding the cell surface-decorating host-interacting pili. Here, induced mutagenesis was used to study pilus biogenesis in L. rhamnosus GG. A combination of two powerful approaches, mutation selection and next-generation sequencing, w...

  11. Molecular Complexity Orchestrates Modulation of Phagosome Biogenesis and Escape to the Cytosol of macrophages by Francisella tularensis

    OpenAIRE

    Asare, Rexford; Kwaik, Yousef Abu

    2010-01-01

    Upon entry of Francisella tularensis to macrophages, the Francisella-containing phagosome (FCP) is trafficked into an acidified late endosome-like phagosome with limited fusion to the lysosomes followed by rapid escape into the cytosol where the organism replicates. Although the Francisella Pathogenicity Island (FPI), which encodes a type VI-like secretion apparatus, is required for modulation of phagosome biogenesis and escape into the cytosol, the mechanisms involved are not known. To decip...

  12. Chemical-genetic disruption of clathrin function spares adaptor complex 3–dependent endosome vesicle biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Zlatic, Stephanie A.; Grossniklaus, Emily J.; Ryder, Pearl V.; Salazar, Gloria; Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Peden, Andrew A.; Faundez, Victor

    2013-01-01

    A role for clathrin in AP-3–dependent vesicle biogenesis has been inferred from biochemical interactions and colocalization between this adaptor and clathrin. The functionality of these molecular associations, however, is controversial. We comprehensively explore the role of clathrin in AP-3–dependent vesicle budding, using rapid chemical-genetic perturbation of clathrin function with a clathrin light chain–FKBP chimera oligomerizable by the drug AP20187. We find that AP-3 interacts and coloc...

  13. A microRNA derived from an apparent canonical biogenesis pathway regulates variant surface protein gene expression in Giardia lamblia

    OpenAIRE

    Saraiya, Ashesh A.; Li, Wei; Wang, Ching C.

    2011-01-01

    Giardia is a deeply branching unicellular eukaryote. Here, the authors provide evidence for a microRNA, miR4, that regulates the expression of variant surface proteins (VSPs). Biogenesis of this miRNA requires Giardia dicer and the miRNA to be associated with the Giardia Argonaute protein. These results suggest a very ancient origin of miRNA regulatory systems.

  14. Structural, biophysical and functional characterization of Nop7-Erb1-Ytm1 complex and its implications in eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wegrecki, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    [EN] Ribosome biogenesis is one of the most important and energy-consuming processes in the cell. However, the vast majority of the events and factors that are involved in the synthesis of ribosomal subunits are not well understood. Ribosome maturation comprises multiple steps of rRNA processing that require sequential association and dissociation of numerous assembly factors. These proteins establish a complex network of interactions that are essential for the pathway to continue. Extensive ...

  15. Restrictive glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor synthesis in cwh6/gpi3 yeast cells causes aberrant biogenesis of cell wall proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Vossen, J.H.; Müller, W. H.; Lipke, P N; Klis, F. M.

    1997-01-01

    We previously reported that the defects in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cwh6 Calcofluor white-hypersensitive cell wall mutant are caused by a mutation in SPT14/GPI3, a gene involved in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor biosynthesis. Here we describe the effect of cwh6/spt14/gpi3 on the biogenesis of cell wall proteins. It was found that the release of precursors of cell wall proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was retarded. This was accompanied by proliferation of ER structur...

  16. The novel protein DELAYED PALE-GREENING1 is required for early chloroplast biogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Li, Weichun; Cheng, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast biogenesis is one of the most important subjects in plant biology. In this study, an Arabidopsis early chloroplast biogenesis mutant with a delayed pale-greening phenotype (dpg1) was isolated from a T-DNA insertion mutant collection. Both cotyledons and true leaves of dpg1 mutants were initially albino but gradually became pale green as the plant matured. Transmission electron microscopic observations revealed that the mutant displayed a delayed proplastid-to-chloroplast transition. Sequence and transcription analyses showed that AtDPG1 encodes a putatively chloroplast-localized protein containing three predicted transmembrane helices and that its expression depends on both light and developmental status. GUS staining for AtDPG1::GUS transgenic lines showed that this gene was widely expressed throughout the plant and that higher expression levels were predominantly found in green tissues during the early stages of Arabidopsis seedling development. Furthermore, quantitative real-time RT-PCR analyses revealed that a number of chloroplast- and nuclear-encoded genes involved in chlorophyll biosynthesis, photosynthesis and chloroplast development were substantially down-regulated in the dpg1 mutant. These data indicate that AtDPG1 plays an essential role in early chloroplast biogenesis, and its absence triggers chloroplast-to-nucleus retrograde signalling, which ultimately down-regulates the expression of nuclear genes encoding chloroplast-localized proteins. PMID:27160321

  17. DNA damage triggers SAF-A and RNA biogenesis factors exclusion from chromatin coupled to R-loops removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Sébastien; Dernoncourt, Emma; Delteil, Christine; Froment, Carine; Schiltz, Odile; Salles, Bernard; Frit, Philippe; Calsou, Patrick

    2014-08-01

    We previously identified the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein SAF-A/hnRNP U as a substrate for DNA-PK, a protein kinase involved in DNA damage response (DDR). Using laser micro-irradiation in human cells, we report here that SAF-A exhibits a two-phase dynamics at sites of DNA damage, with a rapid and transient recruitment followed by a prolonged exclusion. SAF-A recruitment corresponds to its binding to Poly(ADP-ribose) while its exclusion is dependent on the activity of ATM, ATR and DNA-PK and reflects the dissociation from chromatin of SAF-A associated with ongoing transcription. Having established that SAF-A RNA-binding domain recapitulates SAF-A dynamics, we show that this domain is part of a complex comprising several mRNA biogenesis proteins of which at least two, FUS/TLS and TAFII68/TAF15, exhibit similar biphasic dynamics at sites of damage. Using an original reporter for live imaging of DNA:RNA hybrids (R-loops), we show a transient transcription-dependent accumulation of R-loops at sites of DNA damage that is prolonged upon inhibition of RNA biogenesis factors exclusion. We propose that a new component of the DDR is an active anti-R-loop mechanism operating at damaged transcribed sites which includes the exclusion of mRNA biogenesis factors such as SAF-A, FUS and TAF15. PMID:25030905

  18. High-throughput identification of chemical inhibitors of E. coli Group 2 capsule biogenesis as anti-virulence agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos C Goller

    Full Text Available Rising antibiotic resistance among Escherichia coli, the leading cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs, has placed a new focus on molecular pathogenesis studies, aiming to identify new therapeutic targets. Anti-virulence agents are attractive as chemotherapeutics to attenuate an organism during disease but not necessarily during benign commensalism, thus decreasing the stress on beneficial microbial communities and lessening the emergence of resistance. We and others have demonstrated that the K antigen capsule of E. coli is a preeminent virulence determinant during UTI and more invasive diseases. Components of assembly and export are highly conserved among the major K antigen capsular types associated with UTI-causing E. coli and are distinct from the capsule biogenesis machinery of many commensal E. coli, making these attractive therapeutic targets. We conducted a screen for anti-capsular small molecules and identified an agent designated "C7" that blocks the production of K1 and K5 capsules, unrelated polysaccharide types among the Group 2-3 capsules. Herein lies proof-of-concept that this screen may be implemented with larger chemical libraries to identify second-generation small-molecule inhibitors of capsule biogenesis. These inhibitors will lead to a better understanding of capsule biogenesis and may represent a new class of therapeutics.

  19. Exercise training induces mitochondrial biogenesis and glucose uptake in subcutaneous adipose tissue through eNOS-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevellin, Elisabetta; Scorzeto, Michele; Olivieri, Massimiliano; Granzotto, Marnie; Valerio, Alessandra; Tedesco, Laura; Fabris, Roberto; Serra, Roberto; Quarta, Marco; Reggiani, Carlo; Nisoli, Enzo; Vettor, Roberto

    2014-08-01

    Insulin resistance and obesity are associated with a reduction of mitochondrial content in various tissues of mammals. Moreover, a reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability impairs several cellular functions, including mitochondrial biogenesis and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, two important mechanisms of body adaptation in response to physical exercise. Although these mechanisms have been thoroughly investigated in skeletal muscle and heart, few studies have focused on the effects of exercise on mitochondria and glucose metabolism in adipose tissue. In this study, we compared the in vivo effects of chronic exercise in subcutaneous adipose tissue of wild-type (WT) and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) knockout (eNOS(-/-)) mice after a swim training period. We then investigated the in vitro effects of NO on mouse 3T3-L1 and human subcutaneous adipose tissue-derived adipocytes after a chronic treatment with an NO donor: diethylenetriamine-NO (DETA-NO). We observed that swim training increases mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial DNA content, and glucose uptake in subcutaneous adipose tissue of WT but not eNOS(-/-) mice. Furthermore, we observed that DETA-NO promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and elongation, glucose uptake, and GLUT4 translocation in cultured murine and human adipocytes. These results point to the crucial role of the eNOS-derived NO in the metabolic adaptation of subcutaneous adipose tissue to exercise training. PMID:24622799

  20. The Extracellular Vesicles of the Helminth Pathogen, Fasciola hepatica: Biogenesis Pathways and Cargo Molecules Involved in Parasite Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwiklinski, Krystyna; de la Torre-Escudero, Eduardo; Trelis, Maria; Bernal, Dolores; Dufresne, Philippe J; Brennan, Gerard P; O'Neill, Sandra; Tort, Jose; Paterson, Steve; Marcilla, Antonio; Dalton, John P; Robinson, Mark W

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by parasites have important roles in establishing and maintaining infection. Analysis of the soluble and vesicular secretions of adult Fasciola hepatica has established a definitive characterization of the total secretome of this zoonotic parasite. Fasciola secretes at least two subpopulations of EVs that differ according to size, cargo molecules and site of release from the parasite. The larger EVs are released from the specialized cells that line the parasite gastrodermus and contain the zymogen of the 37 kDa cathepsin L peptidase that performs a digestive function. The smaller exosome-like vesicle population originate from multivesicular bodies within the tegumental syncytium and carry many previously described immunomodulatory molecules that could be delivered into host cells. By integrating our proteomics data with recently available transcriptomic data sets we have detailed the pathways involved with EV biogenesis in F. hepatica and propose that the small exosome biogenesis occurs via ESCRT-dependent MVB formation in the tegumental syncytium before being shed from the apical plasma membrane. Furthermore, we found that the molecular "machinery" required for EV biogenesis is constitutively expressed across the intramammalian development stages of the parasite. By contrast, the cargo molecules packaged within the EVs are developmentally regulated, most likely to facilitate the parasites migration through host tissue and to counteract host immune attack. PMID:26486420

  1. LYST controls the biogenesis of the endosomal compartment required for secretory lysosome function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Fernando E; Burgess, Agathe; Heiligenstein, Xavier; Goudin, Nicolas; Ménager, Mickaël M; Romao, Maryse; Côte, Marjorie; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Fischer, Alain; Raposo, Graça; Ménasché, Gaël; de Saint Basile, Geneviève

    2015-02-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding LYST protein, the function of which remains poorly understood. Prominent features of CHS include defective secretory lysosome exocytosis and the presence of enlarged, lysosome-like organelles in several cell types. In order to get further insight into the role of LYST in the biogenesis and exocytosis of cytotoxic granules, we analyzed cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) from patients with CHS. Using confocal microscopy and correlative light electron microscopy, we showed that the enlarged organelle in CTLs is a hybrid compartment that contains proteins components from recycling-late endosomes and lysosomes. Enlargement of cytotoxic granules results from the progressive clustering and then fusion of normal-sized endolysosomal organelles. At the immunological synapse (IS) in CHS CTLs, cytotoxic granules have limited motility and appear docked while nevertheless unable to degranulate. By increasing the expression of effectors of lytic granule exocytosis, such as Munc13-4, Rab27a and Slp3, in CHS CTLs, we were able to restore the dynamics and the secretory ability of cytotoxic granules at the IS. Our results indicate that LYST is involved in the trafficking of the effectors involved in exocytosis required for the terminal maturation of perforin-containing vesicles into secretory cytotoxic granules. PMID:25425525

  2. Rab5 is necessary for the biogenesis of the endolysosomal system in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigerer, Anja; Gilleron, Jerome; Bogorad, Roman L; Marsico, Giovanni; Nonaka, Hidenori; Seifert, Sarah; Epstein-Barash, Hila; Kuchimanchi, Satya; Peng, Chang Geng; Ruda, Vera M; Del Conte-Zerial, Perla; Hengstler, Jan G; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Koteliansky, Victor; Zerial, Marino

    2012-05-24

    An outstanding question is how cells control the number and size of membrane organelles. The small GTPase Rab5 has been proposed to be a master regulator of endosome biogenesis. Here, to test this hypothesis, we developed a mathematical model of endosome dependency on Rab5 and validated it by titrating down all three Rab5 isoforms in adult mouse liver using state-of-the-art RNA interference technology. Unexpectedly, the endocytic system was resilient to depletion of Rab5 and collapsed only when Rab5 decreased to a critical level. Loss of Rab5 below this threshold caused a marked reduction in the number of early endosomes, late endosomes and lysosomes, associated with a block of low-density lipoprotein endocytosis. Loss of endosomes caused failure to deliver apical proteins to the bile canaliculi, suggesting a requirement for polarized cargo sorting. Our results demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, the role of Rab5 as an endosome organizer in vivo and reveal the resilience mechanisms of the endocytic system. PMID:22622570

  3. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Biogenesis in the Pathogenesis of Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsu-Kung Lin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a progressive neurological disordermarked by nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration anddevelopment of cytoplasmic aggregates known as Lewy bodies.The impact of this disease is indicated by the fact that mortalityis two to five times as high among affected persons as amongage-matched controls. However, the cause of PD is stillunknown and no cure is available at present. Several biochemicalabnormalities have been described in the brains of patientswith PD, including oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.Recent identification of specific gene mutations that causePD has further reinforced the relevance of oxidative stress andmitochondrial dysfunction in the familial and sporadic forms ofthe disease. The proteins that are reported to be related to familialPD–PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1, DJ-1, α-synuclein, leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2, and, possibly,parkin–are either mitochondrial proteins or are associated with mitochondria, and all areinvolved in pathways that elicit oxidative stress or free radical damage. Mitochondria arecontinually exposed to reactive oxygen species and accumulate oxidative damage morerapidly than the rest of the cell. Therefore, Parkinson’s disease has been suggested to beassociated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Since mitochondria are the major intracellularorganelles that regulate both cell survival and death, clarifying the involvement of mitochondrialdysfunction and biogenesis during the process of PD could provide treatment strategiesthat might successfully intervene in the pathogenesis and slow the progression of the disease.

  4. Vaccinia virus p37 interacts with host proteins associated with LE-derived transport vesicle biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harver Chris

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins associated with the late endosome (LE appear to play a central role in the envelopment of a number of taxonomically diverse viruses. How viral proteins interact with LE-associated proteins to facilitate envelopment is not well understood. LE-derived transport vesicles form through the interaction of Rab9 GTPase with cargo proteins, and TIP47, a Rab9-specific effector protein. Vaccinia virus (VV induces a wrapping complex derived from intracellular host membranes to envelope intracellular mature virus particles producing egress-competent forms of virus. Results We show that VV p37 protein associates with TIP47-, Rab9-, and CI-MPR-containing membranes. Mutation of a di-aromatic motif in p37 blocks association with TIP47 and inhibits plaque formation. ST-246, a specific inhibitor of p37 function, inhibits these interactions and also blocks wrapped virus particle formation. Vaccinia virus expressing p37 variants with reduced ST-246 susceptibility associates with Rab9 and co-localizes with CI-MPR in the presence and absence of compound. Conclusion These results suggest that p37 localizes to the LE and interacts with proteins associated with LE-derived transport vesicle biogenesis to facilitate assembly of extracellular forms of virus.

  5. Structural insight into the biogenesis of β-barrel membrane proteins.

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    Noinaj, Nicholas; Kuszak, Adam J; Gumbart, James C; Lukacik, Petra; Chang, Hoshing; Easley, Nicole C; Lithgow, Trevor; Buchanan, Susan K

    2013-09-19

    β-barrel membrane proteins are essential for nutrient import, signalling, motility and survival. In Gram-negative bacteria, the β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) complex is responsible for the biogenesis of β-barrel membrane proteins, with homologous complexes found in mitochondria and chloroplasts. Here we describe the structure of BamA, the central and essential component of the BAM complex, from two species of bacteria: Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus ducreyi. BamA consists of a large periplasmic domain attached to a 16-strand transmembrane β-barrel domain. Three structural features shed light on the mechanism by which BamA catalyses β-barrel assembly. First, the interior cavity is accessible in one BamA structure and conformationally closed in the other. Second, an exterior rim of the β-barrel has a distinctly narrowed hydrophobic surface, locally destabilizing the outer membrane. And third, the β-barrel can undergo lateral opening, suggesting a route from the interior cavity in BamA into the outer membrane. PMID:23995689

  6. Biogenesis of RNA Polymerases II and III Requires the Conserved GPN Small GTPases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Minaker, Sean W.; Filiatrault, Megan C.; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Hieter, Philip; Stirling, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    The GPN proteins are a poorly characterized and deeply evolutionarily conserved family of three paralogous small GTPases, Gpn1, 2, and 3. The founding member, GPN1/NPA3/XAB1, is proposed to function in nuclear import of RNA polymerase II along with a recently described protein called Iwr1. Here we show that the previously uncharacterized protein Gpn2 binds both Gpn3 and Npa3/Gpn1 and that temperature-sensitive alleles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae GPN2 and GPN3 exhibit genetic interactions with RNA polymerase II mutants, hypersensitivity to transcription inhibition, and defects in RNA polymerase II nuclear localization. Importantly, we identify previously unrecognized RNA polymerase III localization defects in GPN2, GPN3, and IWR1 mutant backgrounds but find no localization defects of unrelated nuclear proteins or of RNA polymerase I. Previously, it was unclear whether the GPN proteins and Iwr1 had overlapping function in RNA polymerase II assembly or import. In this study, we show that the nuclear import defect of iwr1Δ, but not the GPN2 or GPN3 mutant defects, is partially suppressed by fusion of a nuclear localization signal to the RNA polymerase II subunit Rpb3. These data, combined with strong genetic interactions between GPN2 and IWR1, suggest that the GPN proteins function upstream of Iwr1 in RNA polymerase II and III biogenesis. We propose that the three GPN proteins execute a common, and likely essential, function in RNA polymerase assembly and transport. PMID:23267056

  7. Biogenesis of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium membrane vesicles provoked by induction of PagC.

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    Kitagawa, Ryo; Takaya, Akiko; Ohya, Mai; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu; Takade, Akemi; Yoshida, Shin-ichi; Isogai, Emiko; Yamamoto, Tomoko

    2010-11-01

    Gram-negative bacteria ubiquitously release membrane vesicles (MVs) into the extracellular milieu. Although MVs are the product of growing bacteria, not of cell lysis or death, the regulatory mechanisms underlying MV formation remained unknown. We have found that MV biogenesis is provoked by the induction of PagC, a Salmonella-specific protein whose expression is activated by conditions that mimic acidified macrophage phagosomes. PagC is a major constituent of Salmonella MVs, and increased expression accelerates vesiculation. Expression of PagC is regulated at the posttranscriptional and/or posttranslational level in a sigmaS (RpoS)-dependent manner. Serial quantitative analysis has demonstrated that MV formation can accelerate when the quantity of the MV constituents, OmpX and PagC, rises. Overproduction of PagC dramatically impacts the difference in the relative amount of vesiculation, but the corresponding overproduction of OmpX was less pronounced. Quantitative examination of the ratios of PagC and OmpX in the periplasm, outer membrane, and MVs demonstrates that PagC is preferentially enriched in MVs released from Salmonella cells. This suggests that specific protein sorting mechanisms operate when MVs are formed. The possible role(s) of PagC-MV in host cells is discussed. PMID:20802043

  8. Effects of dairy consumption on SIRT1 and mitochondrial biogenesis in adipocytes and muscle cells

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    Bruckbauer Antje

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent data from this laboratory suggest that components of dairy foods may serve as activators of SIRT1 (Silent Information Regulator Transcript 1, and thereby participate in regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism. In this study, an ex-vivo/in-vitro approach was used to examine the integrated effects of dairy diets on SIRT1 activation in two key target tissues (adipose and muscle tissue. Methods Serum from overweight and obese subjects fed low or high dairy diets for 28 days was added to culture medium (similar to conditioned media to treat cultured adipocytes and muscle cells for 48 hours. Results Treatment with high dairy group conditioned media resulted in 40% increased SIRT1 gene expression in both tissues (p Conclusions These data indicate that dairy consumption leads to systemic effects, which may promote mitochondrial biogenesis in key target tissues such as muscle and adipose tissue both by direct activation of SIRT1 as well as by SIRT1-independent pathways.

  9. Generic algorithm to predict the speed of translational elongation: implications for protein biogenesis.

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    Gong Zhang

    Full Text Available Synonymous codon usage and variations in the level of isoaccepting tRNAs exert a powerful selective force on translation fidelity. We have developed an algorithm to evaluate the relative rate of translation which allows large-scale comparisons of the non-uniform translation rate on the protein biogenesis. Using the complete genomes of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis we show that stretches of codons pairing to minor tRNAs form putative sites to locally attenuate translation; thereby the tendency is to cluster in near proximity whereas long contiguous stretches of slow-translating triplets are avoided. The presence of slow-translating segments positively correlates with the protein length irrespective of the protein abundance. The slow-translating clusters are predominantly located down-stream of the domain boundaries presumably to fine-tune translational accuracy with the folding fidelity of multidomain proteins. Translation attenuation patterns at highly structurally and functionally conserved domains are preserved across the species suggesting a concerted selective pressure on the codon selection and species-specific tRNA abundance in these regions.

  10. Morinda citrifolia leaf enhanced performance by improving angiogenesis, mitochondrial biogenesis, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory & stress responses.

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    Mohamad Shalan, Nor Aijratul Asikin; Mustapha, Noordin M; Mohamed, Suhaila

    2016-12-01

    Morinda citrifolia fruit, (noni), enhanced performances in athletes and post-menopausal women in clinical studies. This report shows the edible noni leaves water extract enhances performance in a weight-loaded swimming animal model better than the fruit or standardized green tea extract. The 4weeks study showed the extract (containing scopoletin and epicatechin) progressively prolonged the time to exhaustion by threefold longer than the control, fruit or tea extract. The extract improved (i) the mammalian antioxidant responses (MDA, GSH and SOD2 levels), (ii) tissue nutrient (glucose) and metabolite (lactate) management, (iii) stress hormone (cortisol) regulation; (iv) neurotransmitter (dopamine, noradrenaline, serotonin) expressions, transporter or receptor levels, (v) anti-inflammatory (IL4 & IL10) responses; (v) skeletal muscle angiogenesis (VEGFA) and (v) energy and mitochondrial biogenesis (via PGC, UCP3, NRF2, AMPK, MAPK1, and CAMK4). The ergogenic extract helped delay fatigue by enhancing energy production, regulation and efficiency, which suggests benefits for physical activities and disease recovery. PMID:27374554

  11. ABC transporters involved in the biogenesis of the outer membrane in gram-negative bacteria.

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    Narita, Shin-ichiro

    2011-01-01

    The outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria is an asymmetric lipid bilayer with phospholipids and lipopolysaccharides (LPSs). β-Barreled outer membrane proteins and lipoproteins are embedded in the outer membrane. All of these constituents are essential to the function of the outer membrane. The transport systems for lipoproteins have been characterized in detail. An ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, LolCDE, initiates sorting by mediating the detachment of lipoproteins from the inner membrane to form a water-soluble lipoprotein-LolA complex in the periplasm. Lipoproteins are then transferred to LolB at the outer membrane and are incorporated into the lipid bilayer. A model analogous to the Lol system has been suggested for the transport of LPS, where an ABC transporter, LptBFG, mediates the detachment of LPS from the inner membrane. Recent developments in the functional characterization of ABC transporters involved in the biogenesis of the outer membrane in gram-negative bacteria are discussed. PMID:21670534

  12. Studies on the role of NonA in mRNA biogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NonA protein of Drosophila melanogaster is an abundant nuclear protein that belongs to the DBHS (Drosophila behavior, human splicing) protein family. The DBHS proteins bind both DNA and RNA in vitro and have been involved in different aspects of gene expression, including pre-mRNA splicing, transcription regulation and nuclear retention of mRNA. We have used double-stranded RNA interference in Drosophila S2 cells to silence the expression of NonA and to investigate its role in mRNA biogenesis. We show that knockdown of NonA does not affect transcription nor splicing. We demonstrate that NonA forms a complex with the essential nuclear export factor NXF1 in an RNA-dependent manner. We have constructed stable S2 cell lines that express full-length and truncated NXF1 fused to GFP in order to perform fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. We show that knockdown of NonA reduces the intranuclear mobility of NXF1-GFP associated with poly(A)+ RNA in vivo, while the mobility of the truncated NXF1-GFP that does not bind RNA is not affected. Our data suggest that NonA facilitates the intranuclear mobility of mRNP particles

  13. Outer membrane vesicles of Lysobacter sp. XL1: biogenesis, functions, and applied prospects.

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    Kudryakova, Irina V; Shishkova, Nina A; Vasilyeva, Natalia V

    2016-06-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) produced by Gram-negative bacteria have been intensively investigated in recent times. Vesicle formation models have been proposed, some factors affecting the process were established, and important roles vesicles play in vital activities of their producing cells were determined. Studies of pathogenic bacterial vesicles contribute to understanding the causes of acute infection and developing drugs on their basis. Despite intensive research, issues associated with the understanding of vesicle biogenesis, the mechanisms of bacterium-bacterium and pathogen-host interactions with participation of vesicles, still remain unresolved. This review discusses some results obtained in the research into OMVs of Lysobacter sp. XL1 VKM B-1576. This bacterium secretes into the environment a spectrum of bacteriolytic enzymes that hydrolyze peptidoglycan of competing bacteria, thus leading to their lysis. One of these enzymes, lytic endopeptidase L5, has been shown not only to be secreted by means of vesicles but also to be involved in their formation. As part of vesicles, the antimicrobial potential of L5 enzyme has been found to be considerably expanded. Vesicles have been shown to have a therapeutic effect in respect of anthrax infection and staphylococcal sepsis modelled in mice. The scientific basis for constructing liposomal antimicrobial preparations from vesicle phospholipids and recombinant bacteriolytic enzyme L5 has been formed. PMID:27098257

  14. Small G proteins in peroxisome biogenesis: the potential involvement of ADP-ribosylation factor 6

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    Mannaerts Guy P

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peroxisomes execute diverse and vital functions in virtually every eukaryote. New peroxisomes form by budding from pre-existing organelles or de novo by vesiculation of the ER. It has been suggested that ADP-ribosylation factors and COPI coatomer complexes are involved in these processes. Results Here we show that all viable Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains deficient in one of the small GTPases which have an important role in the regulation of vesicular transport contain functional peroxisomes, and that the number of these organelles in oleate-grown cells is significantly upregulated in the arf1 and arf3 null strains compared to the wild-type strain. In addition, we provide evidence that a portion of endogenous Arf6, the mammalian orthologue of yeast Arf3, is associated with the cytoplasmic face of rat liver peroxisomes. Despite this, ablation of Arf6 did neither influence the regulation of peroxisome abundance nor affect the localization of peroxisomal proteins in cultured fetal hepatocytes. However, co-overexpression of wild-type, GTP hydrolysis-defective or (dominant-negative GTP binding-defective forms of Arf1 and Arf6 caused mislocalization of newly-synthesized peroxisomal proteins and resulted in an alteration of peroxisome morphology. Conclusion These observations suggest that Arf6 is a key player in mammalian peroxisome biogenesis. In addition, they also lend strong support to and extend the concept that specific Arf isoform pairs may act in tandem to regulate exclusive trafficking pathways.

  15. A dicer-independent miRNA biogenesis pathway that requires Ago catalysis.

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    Cheloufi, Sihem; Dos Santos, Camila O; Chong, Mark M W; Hannon, Gregory J

    2010-06-01

    The nucleolytic activity of animal Argonaute proteins is deeply conserved, despite its having no obvious role in microRNA-directed gene regulation. In mice, Ago2 (also known as Eif2c2) is uniquely required for viability, and only this family member retains catalytic competence. To investigate the evolutionary pressure to conserve Argonaute enzymatic activity, we engineered a mouse with catalytically inactive Ago2 alleles. Homozygous mutants died shortly after birth with an obvious anaemia. Examination of microRNAs and their potential targets revealed a loss of miR-451, a small RNA important for erythropoiesis. Though this microRNA is processed by Drosha (also known as Rnasen), its maturation does not require Dicer. Instead, the pre-miRNA becomes loaded into Ago and is cleaved by the Ago catalytic centre to generate an intermediate 3' end, which is then further trimmed. Our findings link the conservation of Argonaute catalysis to a conserved mechanism of microRNA biogenesis that is important for vertebrate development. PMID:20424607

  16. Biogenesis and the growth of DNA-like polymer chains: a computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study, through computer simulation, a crucial step of Biogenesis, namely the growth of self-replicating codified DNA-like polymers starting from a mixture of oligomers. We have adopted the growth scheme that has been recently proposed by Ferreira and Tsallis which incorporates usual ideas of autocatalysis through complementary pairs and within which a central role is played by the hydrogen-like links (characterized by the probabilities pAT and pCG of chemical bonding of the A-T and C-G pairs respectively) between the two chains of the growing polymer. We find that the average equilibrium polymeric length ξ diverges, for any fixed ratio (1-pAT)/(1-p sub (CG)), as ξ ∝ 1/r1-pAT. Selection of patterns may happen at all stages and in particular at chemical equilibrium. Selection occurs via two different mechanisms: (i) away from the critical point pAT = pCG = 1 if pAT ≠ pCG; (ii) both on and away from the critical point if the initial concentrations of nucleotides (A, T, C and G or their precursors) are different. (author)

  17. Molecular and immunological analysis of an ABC transporter complex required for cytochrome c biogenesis.

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    Goldman, B S; Beckman, D L; Bali, A; Monika, E M; Gabbert, K K; Kranz, R G

    1997-05-16

    The helABC genes are predicted to encode an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter necessary for heme export for ligation in bacterial cytochrome c biogenesis. The recent discoveries of homologs of the helB and helC genes in plant mitochondrial genomes suggest this is a highly conserved transporter in prokaryotes and some eukaryotes with the HelB and HelC proteins comprising the transmembrane components. Molecular genetic analysis in the Gram-negative bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus was used to show that the helABC and helDX genes are part of an operon linked to the secDF genes. To facilitate analysis of this transporter, strains with non-polar deletions in each gene, epitope and reporter-tagged HelABCD proteins, and antisera specific to the HelA and HelX proteins were generated. We directly demonstrate that this transporter is present in the cytoplasmic membrane as an HelABCD complex. The HelB and HelC but not HelD proteins are necessary for the binding and stability of the HelA protein, the cytoplasmic subunit containing the ATP-binding region. In addition we show that the HelA protein co-immunoprecipitates with either the HelC or HelD proteins. Thus, the HelABCD heme export complex is distinguished by the presence of four membrane-associated subunits and represents a unique subfamily of ABC transporters. PMID:9175857

  18. In vitro Reconstitution Assay of miRNA Biogenesis by Arabidopsis DCL1

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    Wang, Tian; Castillo-González, Claudia; You, Lan; Li, Rui; Wen, Liwei; Zhu, Hongliang; Zhang, Xiuren

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs, regulating most if not all, biological processes in eukaryotic organisms. miRNAs are initially processed from primary transcripts (pri-miRNAs) to produce miRNA precursors (pre-miRNAs), that are further processed into miRNA and its complementary strands (miRNA/*). In Arabidopsis, and possibly other plants, the processing from pri-miRNAs to pre-miRNAs and from pre-miRNAs to miRNA/* are both implemented through Dicer-like 1 (DCL1) complexes. Recently, we demonstrated isolation of DCL1 complexes of unprecedented quality from in planta. We further successfully reconstituted DCL1 cleavage assays in vitro that were able to fully recapitulate in vivo miRNA biogenesis. Here we provide a detailed protocol of DCL1 reconstitution assays. The protocol comprises three major parts (Figure 1): 1) Preparation of pri- and pre-miRNA transcripts (Procedures A-C); 2) Purification of the recombinant Arabidopsis DCL1 machinery from Nicotiana benthamiana (N. benthamiana) through immunoprecipitation (IP) (Procedures D and E); and 3) in vitro processing of radioisotope-labeled pri- or pre-miRNAs using the isolated DCL1 complexes (Procedure F). It is our desire that the protocol be a powerful tool for the RNAi community to study mechanistic issues or to develop RNA silencing technologies.

  19. Biogenesis and dynamics of mitochondria during the cell cycle: significance of 3'UTRs.

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    Marta Martínez-Diez

    Full Text Available Nowadays, we are facing a renaissance of mitochondria in cancer biology. However, our knowledge of the basic cell biology and on the timing and mechanisms that control the biosynthesis of mitochondrial constituents during progression through the cell cycle of mammalian cells remain largely unknown. Herein, we document the in vivo changes on mitochondrial morphology and dynamics that accompany cellular mitosis, and illustrate the following key points of the biogenesis of mitochondria during progression of liver cells through the cycle: (i the replication of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes is synchronized during cellular proliferation, (ii the accretion of OXPHOS proteins is asynchronously regulated during proliferation being the synthesis of beta-F1-ATPase and Hsp60 carried out also at G2/M and, (iii the biosynthesis of cardiolipin is achieved during the S phase, although full development of the mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsim is attained at G2/M. Furthermore, we demonstrate using reporter constructs that the mechanism regulating the accretion of beta-F1-ATPase during cellular proliferation is controlled at the level of mRNA translation by the 3'UTR of the transcript. The 3'UTR-driven synthesis of the protein at G2/M is essential for conferring to the daughter cells the original phenotype of the parental cell. Our findings suggest that alterations on this process may promote deregulated beta-F1-ATPase expression in human cancer.

  20. The role of individual domains and the significance of shedding of ATP6AP2/(prorenin receptor in vacuolar H(+-ATPase biogenesis.

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    Kenichiro Kinouchi

    Full Text Available The ATPase 6 accessory protein 2 (ATP6AP2/(prorenin receptor (PRR is essential for the biogenesis of active vacuolar H(+-ATPase (V-ATPase. Genetic deletion of ATP6AP2/PRR causes V-ATPase dysfunction and compromises vesicular acidification. Here, we characterized the domains of ATP6AP2/PRR involved in active V-ATPase biogenesis. Three forms of ATP6AP2/PRR were found intracellularly: full-length protein and the N- and C-terminal fragments of furin cleavage products, with the N-terminal fragment secreted extracellularly. Genetic deletion of ATP6AP2/PRR did not affect the protein stability of V-ATPase subunits. The extracellular domain (ECD and transmembrane domain (TM of ATP6AP2/PRR were indispensable for the biogenesis of active V-ATPase. A deletion mutant of ATP6AP2/PRR, which lacks exon 4-encoded amino acids inside the ECD (Δ4M and causes X-linked mental retardation Hedera type (MRXSH and X-linked parkinsonism with spasticity (XPDS in humans, was defective as a V-ATPase-associated protein. Prorenin had no effect on the biogenesis of active V-ATPase. The cleavage of ATP6AP2/PRR by furin seemed also dispensable for the biogenesis of active V-ATPase. We conclude that the N-terminal ECD of ATP6AP2/PRR, which is also involved in binding to prorenin or renin, is required for the biogenesis of active V-ATPase. The V-ATPase assembly occurs prior to its delivery to the trans-Golgi network and hence shedding of ATP6AP2/PRR would not affect the biogenesis of active V-ATPase.

  1. Correlation between Ribosome Biogenesis and the Magnitude of Hypertrophy in Overloaded Skeletal Muscle.

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    Satoshi Nakada

    Full Text Available External loads applied to skeletal muscle cause increases in the protein translation rate, which leads to muscle hypertrophy. Although some studies have demonstrated that increases in the capacity and efficiency of translation are involved in this process, it remains unclear how these two factors are related to the magnitude of muscle hypertrophy. The present study aimed to clarify the roles played by the capacity and efficiency of translation in muscle hypertrophy. We used an improved synergist ablation in which the magnitude of compensatory hypertrophy could be controlled by partial removal of synergist muscles. Male rats were assigned to four groups in which the plantaris muscle was unilaterally subjected to weak (WK, moderate (MO, middle (MI, and strong (ST overloading by four types of synergist ablation. Fourteen days after surgery, the weight of the plantaris muscle per body weight increased by 8%, 22%, 32% and 45%, in the WK, MO, MI and ST groups, respectively. Five days after surgery, 18+28S rRNA content (an indicator of translational capacity increased with increasing overload, with increases of 1.8-fold (MO, 2.2-fold (MI, and 2.5-fold (ST, respectively, relative to non-overloaded muscle (NL in the WK group. rRNA content showed a strong correlation with relative muscle weight measured 14 days after surgery (r = 0.98. The phosphorylated form of p70S6K (a positive regulator of translational efficiency showed a marked increase in the MO group, but no further increase was observed with further increase in overload (increases of 22.6-fold (MO, 17.4-fold (MI, and 18.2-fold (ST, respectively, relative to NL in the WK group. These results indicate that increases in ribosome biogenesis at the early phase of overloading are strongly dependent on the amount of overloading, and may play an important role in increasing the translational capacity for further gain of muscular size.

  2. [RNA interference: biogenesis molecular mechanisms and its applications in cervical cancer].

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    Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Bermúdez-Morales, Víctor Hugo; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2010-01-01

    RNAi (RNA interference) is a natural process by which eukaryotic cells silence gene expression through small interference RNAs (siRNA) which are complementary to messenger RNA (mRNA). In this process, the siRNA that are 21-25 nucleotides long and are known as microRNA (miRNA), either associate with the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), which targets and cleaves the complementary mRNAs by the endonucleolytic pathway, or repress the translation. It is also possible to silence exogenous gene expression during viral infections by using DNA templates to transcribe siRNA with properties that are identical to those of bioactive microRNA. Persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the main etiological agent during cervical cancer development and the HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes, which induce cellular transformation and immortalization, represent strategic targets to be silenced with siRNA. In several in vitro and in vivo studies, it has been demonstrated that the introduction of siRNA directed against the E6 and E7 oncogenes in human tumoral cervical cells transformed by HPV, leads to the efficient silencing of HPV E6 and E7 oncogene expression, which induces the accumulation of the products of the p53 and pRb tumor suppressor genes and activates the mechanism of programmed cell death by apoptosis; thus, the progression of the tumoral growth process may be prevented. The goal of this review is to analyze the microRNA biogenesis process in the silencing of gene expression and to discuss the different protocols for the use of siRNA as a potential gene therapy strategy for the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:20415061

  3. The core components of organelle biogenesis and membrane transport in the hydrogenosomes of Trichomonas vaginalis.

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    Petr Rada

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis is a parasitic protist of the Excavata group. It contains an anaerobic form of mitochondria called hydrogenosomes, which produce hydrogen and ATP; the majority of mitochondrial pathways and the organellar genome were lost during the mitochondrion-to-hydrogenosome transition. Consequently, all hydrogenosomal proteins are encoded in the nucleus and imported into the organelles. However, little is known about the membrane machineries required for biogenesis of the organelle and metabolite exchange. Using a combination of mass spectrometry, immunofluorescence microscopy, in vitro import assays and reverse genetics, we characterized the membrane proteins of the hydrogenosome. We identified components of the outer membrane (TOM and inner membrane (TIM protein translocases include multiple paralogs of the core Tom40-type porins and Tim17/22/23 channel proteins, respectively, and uniquely modified small Tim chaperones. The inner membrane proteins TvTim17/22/23-1 and Pam18 were shown to possess conserved information for targeting to mitochondrial inner membranes, but too divergent in sequence to support the growth of yeast strains lacking Tim17, Tim22, Tim23 or Pam18. Full complementation was seen only when the J-domain of hydrogenosomal Pam18 was fused with N-terminal region and transmembrane segment of the yeast homolog. Candidates for metabolite exchange across the outer membrane were identified including multiple isoforms of the β-barrel proteins, Hmp35 and Hmp36; inner membrane MCF-type metabolite carriers were limited to five homologs of the ATP/ADP carrier, Hmp31. Lastly, hydrogenosomes possess a pathway for the assembly of C-tail-anchored proteins into their outer membrane with several new tail-anchored proteins being identified. These results show that hydrogenosomes and mitochondria share common core membrane components required for protein import and metabolite exchange; however, they also reveal remarkable differences

  4. Maize mutants lacking chloroplast FtsY exhibit pleiotropic defects in the biogenesis of thylakoid membranes.

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    Asakura, Yukari; Hirohashi, Toshiya; Kikuchi, Shingo; Belcher, Susan; Osborne, Erin; Yano, Satoshi; Terashima, Ichiro; Barkan, Alice; Nakai, Masato

    2004-01-01

    A chloroplast signal recognition particle (SRP) that is related to the SRP involved in secretion in bacteria and eukaryotic cells is used for the insertion of light-harvesting chlorophyll proteins (LHCPs) into the thylakoid membranes. A conserved component of the SRP mechanism is a membrane-bound SRP receptor, denoted FtsY in bacteria. Plant genomes encode FtsY homologs that are targeted to the chloroplast (cpFtsY). To investigate the in vivo roles of cpFtsY, we characterized maize cpFtsY and maize mutants having a Mu transposon insertion in the corresponding gene (chloroplast SRP receptor1, or csr1). Maize cpFtsY accumulates to much higher levels in leaf tissue than in roots and stems. Interestingly, it is present at similar levels in etiolated and green leaf tissue and was found to bind the prolamellar bodies of etioplasts. A null cpFtsY mutant, csr1-1, showed a substantial loss of leaf chlorophyll, whereas a "leaky" allele, csr1-3, conditioned a more moderate chlorophyll deficiency. Both alleles caused the loss of various LHCPs and the thylakoid-bound photosynthetic enzyme complexes and were seedling lethal. By contrast, levels of the membrane-bound components of the thylakoid protein transport machineries were not altered. The thylakoid membranes in csr1-1 chloroplasts were unstacked and reduced in abundance, but the prolamellar bodies in mutant etioplasts appeared normal. These results demonstrate the essentiality of cpFtsY for the biogenesis not only of the LHCPs but also for the assembly of the other membrane-bound components of the photosynthetic apparatus. PMID:14688289

  5. Outer membrane biogenesis in Helicobacter pylori: A deviation from the paradigm

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    George W. Liechti

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori is capable of colonizing the gastric mucosa of the human stomach using a variety of factors associated with or secreted from its outer membrane (OM. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS and numerous outer membrane proteins have been shown to be involved in adhesion and immune stimulation/evasion. Many of these factors are essential for colonization and/or pathogenesis in a variety of animal models. Despite this wide array of potential targets present on the bacterial surface, the ability of H. pylori to vary its outer membrane profile limits the effectiveness of vaccines that use any single one of these components. However, it has become evident that the proteins comprising the complexes that transport the majority of these molecules to the OM are highly conserved and often essential. The field of membrane biogenesis has progressed remarkably in the last few years, and the possibility now exists for targeting the mechanisms by which β-barrel proteins, lipoproteins, and LPS are transported to the OM, resulting in loss of bacterial fitness and significant altering of membrane permeability. In this review, the OM transport machinery for LPS, lipoproteins, and outer membrane proteins are discussed. While the principal investigations of these transport mechanisms have been conducted in Escherichia coli and Neisseria meningitidis, here these systems will be presented in the genetic context of ε- proteobacteria. Bioinformatic analysis reveals that minimalist genomes, such as that of Helicobacter pylori, offer insight into the smallest number of components required for these essential pathways to function. Interestingly, in the majority of ε-proteobacteria, while the inner and outer membrane associated apparatus of LPS, lipoprotein, and OM protein transport pathways appear to all be intact, most of the components associated with the periplasmic compartment are either missing or are almost unrecognizable when compared to

  6. Reciprocal regulation of protein synthesis and carbon metabolism for thylakoid membrane biogenesis.

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    Alexandra-Viola Bohne

    Full Text Available Metabolic control of gene expression coordinates the levels of specific gene products to meet cellular demand for their activities. This control can be exerted by metabolites acting as regulatory signals and/or a class of metabolic enzymes with dual functions as regulators of gene expression. However, little is known about how metabolic signals affect the balance between enzymatic and regulatory roles of these dual functional proteins. We previously described the RNA binding activity of a 63 kDa chloroplast protein from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which has been implicated in expression of the psbA mRNA, encoding the D1 protein of photosystem II. Here, we identify this factor as dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (DLA2, a subunit of the chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (cpPDC, which is known to provide acetyl-CoA for fatty acid synthesis. Analyses of RNAi lines revealed that DLA2 is involved in the synthesis of both D1 and acetyl-CoA. Gel filtration analyses demonstrated an RNP complex containing DLA2 and the chloroplast psbA mRNA specifically in cells metabolizing acetate. An intrinsic RNA binding activity of DLA2 was confirmed by in vitro RNA binding assays. Results of fluorescence microscopy and subcellular fractionation experiments support a role of DLA2 in acetate-dependent localization of the psbA mRNA to a translation zone within the chloroplast. Reciprocally, the activity of the cpPDC was specifically affected by binding of psbA mRNA. Beyond that, in silico analysis and in vitro RNA binding studies using recombinant proteins support the possibility that RNA binding is an ancient feature of dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferases. Our results suggest a regulatory function of DLA2 in response to growth on reduced carbon energy sources. This raises the intriguing possibility that this regulation functions to coordinate the synthesis of lipids and proteins for the biogenesis of photosynthetic membranes.

  7. Δ(1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate/glutamate biogenesis is required for fungal virulence and sporulation.

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    Ziting Yao

    Full Text Available Proline dehydrogenase (Prodh and Δ(1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5Cdh are two key enzymes in the cellular biogenesis of glutamate. Recombinant Prodh and P5Cdh proteins of the chestnut blight fungus Cryphonectria parasitica were investigated and showed activity in in vitro assays. Additionally, the C. parasitica Prodh and P5Cdh genes were able to complement the Saccharomyces cerevisiae put1 and put2 null mutants, respectively, to allow these proline auxotrophic yeast mutants to grow on media with proline as the sole source of nitrogen. Deletion of the Prodh gene in C. parasitica resulted in hypovirulence and a lower level of sporulation, whereas deletion of P5Cdh resulted in hypovirulence though no effect on sporulation; both Δprodh and Δp5cdh mutants were unable to grow on minimal medium with proline as the sole nitrogen source. In a wild-type strain, the intracellular level of proline and the activity of Prodh and P5Cdh increased after supplementation of exogenous proline, though the intracellular Δ(1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C content remained unchanged. Prodh and P5Cdh were both transcriptionally down-regulated in cells infected with hypovirus. The disruption of other genes with products involved in the conversion of arginine to ornithine, ornithine and glutamate to P5C, and P5C to proline in the cytosol did not appear to affect virulence; however, asexual sporulation was reduced in the Δpro1 and Δpro2 mutants. Taken together, our results showed that Prodh, P5Cdh and related mitochondrial functions are essential for virulence and that proline/glutamate pathway components may represent down-stream targets of hypovirus regulation in C. parasitica.

  8. Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1 associates with small nucleolar RNA which contributes to ribosome biogenesis

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    Shin-IchiroTakahashi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Insulin receptor substrates (IRSs are well known to play crucial roles in mediating intracellular signals of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs/insulin. Previously we showed that IRS-1 forms high molecular mass complexes containing RNAs. To identify RNAs in IRS-1 complexes, we performed UV cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP analysis using HEK293 cells expressing FLAG-IRS-1 and FLAG-IRS-2. We detected the radioactive signals in the immunoprecipitates of FLAG-IRS-1 proportional to the UV irradiation, but not in the immunoprecipitates of FLAG-IRS-2, suggesting the direct contact of RNAs with IRS-1. RNAs cross-linked to IRS-1 were then amplified by RT-PCR, followed by sequence analysis. We isolated sequence tags attributed to 25 messenger RNAs and 8 non-coding RNAs, including small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs. We focused on the interaction of IRS-1 with U96A snoRNA (U96A and its host Rack1 (receptor for activated C kinase 1 pre-mRNA. We confirmed the interaction of IRS-1 with U96A, and with RACK1 pre-mRNA by immunoprecipitation with IRS-1 followed by Northern blotting or RT-PCR analyses. Mature U96A in IRS-1-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts was quantitatively less than WT. We also found that a part of nuclear IRS-1 is localized in the Cajal body, a nuclear subcompartment where snoRNA mature. The unanticipated function of IRS-1 in snoRNA biogenesis highlights the potential of RNA-associated IRS-1 complex to open a new line of investigation to dissect the novel mechanisms regulating IGFs/insulin-mediated biological events.

  9. Enzymes in biogenesis of plant cell wall polysaccharides. Enzyme characterization using tracer techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enzymes and metabolic pathways, by which starch and cell wall polysaccharides are formed, were investigated in order to learn how these processes are regulated and to identify the enzymatic regulatory mechanisms involved. Germinating lily pollen was used for studies of cell wall formation, and pollen and maize endosperm for studies of starch biosynthesis. Hexokinase being the first step in conversion of hexoses to starch, wall polysaccharides and respiratory substrates, maize endosperm enzyme was assayed by its conversion of 14C-hexose to 14C-hexose-6-P, and rapid separation of the two labelled compounds on anion-exchange paper. This enzyme did not appear to be under tight regulation by feed-back inhibition or activation, nor to be severely inhibited by glucose-6-P or activated by citrate. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and other pyrophosphorylases were assayed radiochemically with 14C-glucose-1-P (forward direction) or 32-PPsub(i) (reverse direction). They showed that the maize endosperm enzyme was activated by the glycolytic intermediates fructose-6-P and 3-phosphoglycerate, and that low levels of the enzyme were present in the high sucrose-low starch mutant named shrunken-2. Under optimal in-vitro assay conditions, the pollen enzyme reacted four times faster than the observed in-vivo rate of starch accumulation. Biogenesis of plant cell wall polysaccharides requires the conversion of hexose phosphates to various sugar nucleotides and utilization of the latter by the appropriate polysaccharide synthetases. Lily pollen possesses a β-1,3-glucan synthetase which is activated up to six-fold by β-linked oligosaccharides. Hence, the in-vivo activity of this enzyme may be modulated by such effector molecules

  10. Lysosome biogenesis/scattering increases host cell susceptibility to invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic forms and resistance to tissue culture trypomastigotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Cristian; Real, Fernando; Yoshida, Nobuko

    2016-05-01

    A fundamental question to be clarified concerning the host cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi is whether the insect-borne and mammalian-stage parasites use similar mechanisms for invasion. To address that question, we analysed the cell invasion capacity of metacyclic trypomastigotes (MT) and tissue culture trypomastigotes (TCT) under diverse conditions. Incubation of parasites for 1 h with HeLa cells in nutrient-deprived medium, a condition that triggered lysosome biogenesis and scattering, increased MT invasion and reduced TCT entry into cells. Sucrose-induced lysosome biogenesis increased HeLa cell susceptibility to MT and resistance to TCT. Treatment of cells with rapamycin, which inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), induced perinuclear lysosome accumulation and reduced MT invasion while augmenting TCT invasion. Metacylic trypomastigotes, but not TCT, induced mTOR dephosphorylation and the nuclear translocation of transcription factor EB (TFEB), a mTOR-associated lysosome biogenesis regulator. Lysosome biogenesis/scattering was stimulated upon HeLa cell interaction with MT but not with TCT. Recently, internalized MT, but not TCT, were surrounded by colocalized lysosome marker LAMP2 and mTOR. The recombinant gp82 protein, the MT-specific surface molecule that mediates invasion, induced mTOR dephosphorylation, nuclear TFEB translocation and lysosome biogenesis/scattering. Taken together, our data clearly indicate that MT invasion is mainly lysosome-dependent, whereas TCT entry is predominantly lysosome-independent. PMID:26572924

  11. Three-Dimensional Visualization of the Tubular-Lamellar Transformation of the Internal Plastid Membrane Network during Runner Bean Chloroplast Biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewska, Łucja; Mazur, Radosław; Suski, Szymon; Garstka, Maciej; Mostowska, Agnieszka

    2016-04-01

    Chloroplast biogenesis is a complex process that is integrated with plant development, leading to fully differentiated and functionally mature plastids. In this work, we used electron tomography and confocal microscopy to reconstruct the process of structural membrane transformation during the etioplast-to-chloroplast transition in runner bean (Phaseolus coccineus). During chloroplast development, the regular tubular network of paracrystalline prolamellar bodies (PLBs) and the flattened porous membranes of prothylakoids develop into the chloroplast thylakoids. Three-dimensional reconstruction is required to provide us with a more complete understanding of this transformation. We provide spatial models of the bean chloroplast biogenesis that allow such reconstruction of the internal membranes of the developing chloroplast and visualize the transformation from the tubular arrangement to the linear system of parallel lamellae. We prove that the tubular structure of the PLB transforms directly to flat slats, without dispersion to vesicles. We demonstrate that the grana/stroma thylakoid connections have a helical character starting from the early stages of appressed membrane formation. Moreover, we point out the importance of particular chlorophyll-protein complex components in the membrane stacking during the biogenesis. The main stages of chloroplast internal membrane biogenesis are presented in a movie that shows the time development of the chloroplast biogenesis as a dynamic model of this process. PMID:27002023

  12. Tim50a, a nuclear isoform of the mitochondrial Tim50, interacts with proteins involved in snRNP biogenesis

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    Robinson Melvin L

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Cajal body (CB is a nuclear suborganelle involved in the biogenesis of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs, which are vital for pre-mRNA splicing. Newly imported Sm-class snRNPs traffic through CBs, where the snRNA component of the snRNP is modified, and then target to other nuclear domains such as speckles and perichromatin fibrils. It is not known how nascent snRNPs localize to the CB and are released from this structure after modification. The marker protein for CBs, coilin, may play a role in snRNP biogenesis given that it can interact with snRNPs and SMN, the protein mutated in Spinal Muscular Atrophy. Loss of coilin function in mice leads to significant viability and fertility problems and altered CB formation. Results In this report, we identify a minor isoform of the mitochondrial Tim50, Tim50a, as a coilin interacting protein. The Tim50a transcript can be detected in some cancer cell lines and normal brain tissue. The Tim50a protein differs only from Tim50 in that it contains an additional 103 aa N-terminal to the translation start of Tim50. Importantly, a putative nuclear localization signal is found within these 103 residues. In contrast to Tim50, which localizes to the cytoplasm and mitochondria, Tim50a is strictly nuclear and is enriched in speckles with snRNPs. In addition to coilin, Tim50a interacts with snRNPs and SMN. Competition binding experiments demonstrate that coilin competes with Sm proteins of snRNPs and SMN for binding sites on Tim50a. Conclusion Tim50a may play a role in snRNP biogenesis given its cellular localization and protein interaction characteristics. We hypothesize that Tim50a takes part in the release of snRNPs and SMN from the CB.

  13. Interrelationships between yeast ribosomal protein assembly events and transient ribosome biogenesis factors interactions in early pre-ribosomes.

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    Steffen Jakob

    Full Text Available Early steps of eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis require a large set of ribosome biogenesis factors which transiently interact with nascent rRNA precursors (pre-rRNA. Most likely, concomitant with that initial contacts between ribosomal proteins (r-proteins and ribosome precursors (pre-ribosomes are established which are converted into robust interactions between pre-rRNA and r-proteins during the course of ribosome maturation. Here we analysed the interrelationship between r-protein assembly events and the transient interactions of ribosome biogenesis factors with early pre-ribosomal intermediates termed 90S pre-ribosomes or small ribosomal subunit (SSU processome in yeast cells. We observed that components of the SSU processome UTP-A and UTP-B sub-modules were recruited to early pre-ribosomes independently of all tested r-proteins. On the other hand, groups of SSU processome components were identified whose association with early pre-ribosomes was affected by specific r-protein assembly events in the head-platform interface of the SSU. One of these components, Noc4p, appeared to be itself required for robust incorporation of r-proteins into the SSU head domain. Altogether, the data reveal an emerging network of specific interrelationships between local r-protein assembly events and the functional interactions of SSU processome components with early pre-ribosomes. They point towards some of these components being transient primary pre-rRNA in vivo binders and towards a role for others in coordinating the assembly of major SSU domains.

  14. The three major types of CRISPR-Cas systems function independently in CRISPR RNA biogenesis in Streptococcus thermophilus

    OpenAIRE

    Carte, Jason; Christopher, Ross T.; Smith, Justin T.; Olson, Sara; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Moineau, Sylvain; Glover, Claiborne V. C.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas systems are small RNA-based immune systems that protect prokaryotes from invaders such as viruses and plasmids. We have investigated the features and biogenesis of the CRISPR (cr)RNAs in Streptococcus thermophilus (Sth) strain DGCC7710, which possesses four different CRISPR-Cas systems including representatives from the three major types of CRISPR-Cas systems. Our results indicate that the crRNAs from each CRISPR locus are specifically processed into divergent crRNA species by Cas ...

  15. Mitochondrial DNA copy number and biogenesis in different tissues of early- and late-lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubenthal, L; Hoelker, M; Frahm, J; Dänicke, S; Gerlach, K; Südekum, K-H; Sauerwein, H; Häussler, S

    2016-02-01

    Energy balance in dairy cows changes during the course of lactation due to alterations in voluntary feed intake and energy required for milk synthesis. To adapt to the demands of lactation, energy metabolism needs to be regulated and coordinated in key organs such as adipose tissue (AT), liver, and mammary gland. Mitochondria are the main sites of energy production in mammalian cells and their number varies depending on age, organ, and physiological condition. The copy number of the mitochondrial genome, the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), reflects the abundance of mitochondria within a cell and is regulated by transcriptional and translational factors. Environmental, physiological, and energetic conditions change during lactation and we thus hypothesized that these changes may influence the mtDNA copy number and the abundance of genes regulating mitochondrial biogenesis. Therefore, we aimed to provide an overview of mitochondrial biogenesis in liver, subcutaneous (sc)AT, mammary gland, and peripheral blood cells during early and late lactation in dairy cows. German Holstein cows (n=21) were fed according to their requirements, and biopsies from scAT, liver, mammary gland, and blood were collected in early and late lactation and assayed for relative mtDNA copy numbers and the mRNA abundance of genes regulating mitochondrial biogenesis, such as nuclear-respiratory factor 1 and 2 (NRF-1, NRF-2), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1-α (PGC-1α). The number of mtDNA copies increased from early to late lactation in all tissues, whereas that in peripheral blood cells was greater in early compared with late lactation. Moreover, mitochondrial activity enzymes (i.e., citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase) increased from early to late lactation in scAT. Comparing the number of mtDNA copies between tissues and blood in dairy cows, the highest mtDNA content was observed in liver. The mRNA abundance of

  16. Cohibins C and D, two important metabolites in the biogenesis of acetogenins from Annona muricata and Annona nutans

    OpenAIRE

    Gleye, C.; Raynaud, S.; Fourneau, C.; Laurens, A.; Laprévote, O.; Serani, L.; Fournet, Alain; Hocquemiller, R

    2000-01-01

    Two new annonaceous acetogenins, cohibins C (1a) and D (1b), have been isolated by extensive chromatography of a hexane extract of #Annona muricata$ seeds and a cyclohexane extract of #Annona nutans$ root bark. Their structures have been established on the basis of spectral evidence (NMR, MS) and confirmed by chemical transformation into a pair of monotetrahydrofuran (mono-THF) acetogenins. The role of these compounds in the biogenesis of mono-THF acetogenins is discussed. (Résumé d'auteur)

  17. Decreased levels of proapoptotic factors and increased key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis constitute new potential beneficial features of long-lived growth hormone receptor gene-disrupted mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesing, Adam; Masternak, Michal M; Lewinski, Andrzej; Karbownik-Lewinska, Malgorzata; Kopchick, John J; Bartke, Andrzej

    2013-06-01

    Decreased somatotrophic signaling is among the most important mechanisms associated with extended longevity. Mice homozygous for the targeted disruption of the growth hormone (GH) receptor gene (GH receptor knockout; GHRKO) are obese and dwarf, are characterized by a reduced weight and body size, undetectable levels of GH receptor, high concentration of serum GH, and greatly reduced plasma levels of insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I, and are remarkably long lived. Recent results suggest new features of GHRKO mice that may positively affect longevity-decreased levels of proapoptotic factors and increased levels of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis. The alterations in levels of the proapoptotic factors and key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis were not further improved by two other potential life-extending interventions-calorie restriction and visceral fat removal. This may attribute the primary role to GH resistance in the regulation of apoptosis and mitochondrial biogenesis in GHRKO mice in terms of increased life span. PMID:23197187

  18. PICK1 deficiency impairs secretory vesicle biogenesis and leads to growth retardation and decreased glucose tolerance.

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    Birgitte Holst

    Full Text Available Secretory vesicles in endocrine cells store hormones such as growth hormone (GH and insulin before their release into the bloodstream. The molecular mechanisms governing budding of immature secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN and their subsequent maturation remain unclear. Here, we identify the lipid binding BAR (Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs domain protein PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1 as a key component early in the biogenesis of secretory vesicles in GH-producing cells. Both PICK1-deficient Drosophila and mice displayed somatic growth retardation. Growth retardation was rescued in flies by reintroducing PICK1 in neurosecretory cells producing somatotropic peptides. PICK1-deficient mice were characterized by decreased body weight and length, increased fat accumulation, impaired GH secretion, and decreased storage of GH in the pituitary. Decreased GH storage was supported by electron microscopy showing prominent reduction in secretory vesicle number. Evidence was also obtained for impaired insulin secretion associated with decreased glucose tolerance. PICK1 localized in cells to immature secretory vesicles, and the PICK1 BAR domain was shown by live imaging to associate with vesicles budding from the TGN and to possess membrane-sculpting properties in vitro. In mouse pituitary, PICK1 co-localized with the BAR domain protein ICA69, and PICK1 deficiency abolished ICA69 protein expression. In the Drosophila brain, PICK1 and ICA69 co-immunoprecipitated and showed mutually dependent expression. Finally, both in a Drosophila model of type 2 diabetes and in high-fat-diet-induced obese mice, we observed up-regulation of PICK1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest that PICK1, together with ICA69, is critical during budding of immature secretory vesicles from the TGN and thus for vesicular storage of GH and possibly other hormones. The data link two BAR domain proteins to membrane remodeling processes in the secretory pathway of

  19. Aluminium induced oxidative stress results in decreased mitochondrial biogenesis via modulation of PGC-1α expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Deep Raj; Sunkaria, Aditya; Wani, Willayat Yousuf; Sharma, Reeta Kumari; Kandimalla, Ramesh J.L. [Department of Biochemistry, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Bal, Amanjit [Department of Histopathology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India); Gill, Kiran Dip, E-mail: kdgill2002@yahoo.co.in [Department of Biochemistry, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh 160012 (India)

    2013-12-01

    The present investigation was carried out to elucidate a possible molecular mechanism related to the effects of aluminium-induced oxidative stress on various mitochondrial respiratory complex subunits with special emphasis on the role of Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) and its downstream targets i.e. Nuclear respiratory factor-1(NRF-1), Nuclear respiratory factor-2(NRF-2) and Mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) in mitochondrial biogenesis. Aluminium lactate (10 mg/kg b.wt./day) was administered intragastrically to rats for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks of exposure, we found an increase in ROS levels, mitochondrial DNA oxidation and decrease in citrate synthase activity in the Hippocampus (HC) and Corpus striatum (CS) regions of rat brain. On the other hand, there was a decrease in the mRNA levels of the mitochondrial encoded subunits–NADH dehydrogenase (ND) subunits i.e. ND1, ND2, ND3, Cytochrome b (Cytb), Cytochrome oxidase (COX) subunits i.e. COX1, COX3, ATP synthase (ATPase) subunit 6 along with reduced expression of nuclear encoded subunits COX4, COX5A, COX5B of Electron transport chain (ETC). Besides, a decrease in mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial content in both regions of rat brain was observed. The PGC-1α was down-regulated in aluminium treated rats along with NRF-1, NRF-2 and Tfam, which act downstream from PGC-1α in aluminium treated rats. Electron microscopy results revealed a significant increase in the mitochondrial swelling, loss of cristae, chromatin condensation and decreases in mitochondrial number in case of aluminium treated rats as compared to control. So, PGC-1α seems to be a potent target for aluminium neurotoxicity, which makes it an almost ideal target to control or limit the damage that has been associated with the defective mitochondrial function seen in neurodegenerative diseases. - Highlights: • Aluminium decreases the mRNA levels of mitochondrial and nuclear encoded

  20. Aluminium induced oxidative stress results in decreased mitochondrial biogenesis via modulation of PGC-1α expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present investigation was carried out to elucidate a possible molecular mechanism related to the effects of aluminium-induced oxidative stress on various mitochondrial respiratory complex subunits with special emphasis on the role of Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) and its downstream targets i.e. Nuclear respiratory factor-1(NRF-1), Nuclear respiratory factor-2(NRF-2) and Mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) in mitochondrial biogenesis. Aluminium lactate (10 mg/kg b.wt./day) was administered intragastrically to rats for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks of exposure, we found an increase in ROS levels, mitochondrial DNA oxidation and decrease in citrate synthase activity in the Hippocampus (HC) and Corpus striatum (CS) regions of rat brain. On the other hand, there was a decrease in the mRNA levels of the mitochondrial encoded subunits–NADH dehydrogenase (ND) subunits i.e. ND1, ND2, ND3, Cytochrome b (Cytb), Cytochrome oxidase (COX) subunits i.e. COX1, COX3, ATP synthase (ATPase) subunit 6 along with reduced expression of nuclear encoded subunits COX4, COX5A, COX5B of Electron transport chain (ETC). Besides, a decrease in mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial content in both regions of rat brain was observed. The PGC-1α was down-regulated in aluminium treated rats along with NRF-1, NRF-2 and Tfam, which act downstream from PGC-1α in aluminium treated rats. Electron microscopy results revealed a significant increase in the mitochondrial swelling, loss of cristae, chromatin condensation and decreases in mitochondrial number in case of aluminium treated rats as compared to control. So, PGC-1α seems to be a potent target for aluminium neurotoxicity, which makes it an almost ideal target to control or limit the damage that has been associated with the defective mitochondrial function seen in neurodegenerative diseases. - Highlights: • Aluminium decreases the mRNA levels of mitochondrial and nuclear encoded

  1. Biogenesis of influenza a virus hemagglutinin cross-protective stem epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magadán, Javier G; Altman, Meghan O; Ince, William L; Hickman, Heather D; Stevens, James; Chevalier, Aaron; Baker, David; Wilson, Patrick C; Ahmed, Rafi; Bennink, Jack R; Yewdell, Jonathan W

    2014-06-01

    Antigenic variation in the globular domain of influenza A virus (IAV) hemagglutinin (HA) precludes effective immunity to this major human pathogen. Although the HA stem is highly conserved between influenza virus strains, HA stem-reactive antibodies (StRAbs) were long considered biologically inert. It is now clear, however, that StRAbs reduce viral replication in animal models and protect against pathogenicity and death, supporting the potential of HA stem-based immunogens as drift-resistant vaccines. Optimally designing StRAb-inducing immunogens and understanding StRAb effector functions require thorough comprehension of HA stem structure and antigenicity. Here, we study the biogenesis of HA stem epitopes recognized in cells infected with various drifted IAV H1N1 strains using mouse and human StRAbs. Using a novel immunofluorescence (IF)-based assay, we find that human StRAbs bind monomeric HA in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and trimerized HA in the Golgi complex (GC) with similar high avidity, potentially good news for producing effective monomeric HA stem immunogens. Though HA stem epitopes are nestled among several N-linked oligosaccharides, glycosylation is not required for full antigenicity. Rather, as N-linked glycans increase in size during intracellular transport of HA through the GC, StRAb binding becomes temperature-sensitive, binding poorly to HA at 4°C and well at 37°C. A de novo designed, 65-residue protein binds the mature HA stem independently of temperature, consistent with a lack of N-linked oligosaccharide steric hindrance due to its small size. Likewise, StRAbs bind recombinant HA carrying simple N-linked glycans in a temperature-independent manner. Chemical cross-linking experiments show that N-linked oligosaccharides likely influence StRAb binding by direct local effects rather than by globally modifying the conformational flexibility of HA. Our findings indicate that StRAb binding to HA is precarious, raising the possibility that

  2. Biogenesis of influenza a virus hemagglutinin cross-protective stem epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier G Magadán

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Antigenic variation in the globular domain of influenza A virus (IAV hemagglutinin (HA precludes effective immunity to this major human pathogen. Although the HA stem is highly conserved between influenza virus strains, HA stem-reactive antibodies (StRAbs were long considered biologically inert. It is now clear, however, that StRAbs reduce viral replication in animal models and protect against pathogenicity and death, supporting the potential of HA stem-based immunogens as drift-resistant vaccines. Optimally designing StRAb-inducing immunogens and understanding StRAb effector functions require thorough comprehension of HA stem structure and antigenicity. Here, we study the biogenesis of HA stem epitopes recognized in cells infected with various drifted IAV H1N1 strains using mouse and human StRAbs. Using a novel immunofluorescence (IF-based assay, we find that human StRAbs bind monomeric HA in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and trimerized HA in the Golgi complex (GC with similar high avidity, potentially good news for producing effective monomeric HA stem immunogens. Though HA stem epitopes are nestled among several N-linked oligosaccharides, glycosylation is not required for full antigenicity. Rather, as N-linked glycans increase in size during intracellular transport of HA through the GC, StRAb binding becomes temperature-sensitive, binding poorly to HA at 4°C and well at 37°C. A de novo designed, 65-residue protein binds the mature HA stem independently of temperature, consistent with a lack of N-linked oligosaccharide steric hindrance due to its small size. Likewise, StRAbs bind recombinant HA carrying simple N-linked glycans in a temperature-independent manner. Chemical cross-linking experiments show that N-linked oligosaccharides likely influence StRAb binding by direct local effects rather than by globally modifying the conformational flexibility of HA. Our findings indicate that StRAb binding to HA is precarious, raising the possibility

  3. Comparative effects of whey protein versus L-leucine on skeletal muscle protein synthesis and markers of ribosome biogenesis following resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, C Brooks; Fox, Carlton D; Thompson, Richard M; Healy, James C; Santucci, Vincent; Kephart, Wesley C; McCloskey, Anna E; Kim, Mike; Pascoe, David D; Martin, Jeffrey S; Moon, Jordan R; Young, Kaelin C; Roberts, Michael D

    2016-03-01

    We compared immediate post-exercise whey protein (WP, 500 mg) versus L-leucine (LEU, 54 mg) feedings on skeletal muscle protein synthesis (MPS) mechanisms and ribosome biogenesis markers 3 h following unilateral plantarflexor resistance exercise in male, Wistar rats (~250 g). Additionally, in vitro experiments were performed on differentiated C2C12 myotubes to compare nutrient (i.e., WP, LEU) and 'exercise-like' treatments (i.e., caffeine, hydrogen peroxide, and AICAR) on ribosome biogenesis markers. LEU and WP significantly increased phosphorylated-rpS6 (Ser235/236) in the exercised (EX) leg 2.4-fold (P  0.05). Compared to the non-EX leg, MPS levels increased 32 % and 52 % in the EX leg of CTL (P  0.05). Several genes associated with ribosome biogenesis robustly increased in the EX versus non-EX legs of all treatments; specifically, c-Myc mRNA, Nop56 mRNA, Bop1 mRNA, Ncl mRNA, Npm1 mRNA, Fb1 mRNA, and Xpo-5 mRNA. However, only LEU significantly increased 45S pre-rRNA levels in the EX leg (63 %, P < 0.001). In vitro findings confirmed that 'exercise-like' treatments similarly altered markers of ribosome biogenesis, but only LEU increased 47S pre-rRNA levels (P < 0.01). Collectively, our data suggests that resistance exercise, as well as 'exercise-like' signals in vitro, acutely increase the expression of genes associated with ribosome biogenesis independent of nutrient provision. Moreover, while EX with or without WP appears superior for enhancing translational efficiency (i.e., increasing MPS per unit of RNA), LEU administration (or co-administration) may further enhance ribosome biogenesis over prolonged periods with resistance exercise. PMID:26507545

  4. Mitochondrial DNA deletion and impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis are mediated by reactive oxygen species in ionizing radiation-induced premature senescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion is a well-known marker for oxidative stress and aging, and contributes to harmful effects in cultured cells and animal tissues. mtDNA biogenesis genes (NRF-1, TFAM) are essential for the maintenance of mtDNA, as well as the transcription and replication of mitochondrial genomes. Considering that oxidative stress is known to affect mitochondrial biogenesis, we hypothesized that ionizing radiation (IR)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) causes mtDNA deletion by modulating the mitochondrial biogenesis, thereby leading to cellular senescence. Therefore, we examined the effects of IR on ROS levels, cellular senescence, mitochondrial biogenesis, and mtDNA deletion in IMR-90 human lung fibroblast cells. Young IMR-90 cells at population doubling (PD) 39 were irradiated at 4 or 8 Gy. Old cells at PD55, and H2O2-treated young cells at PD 39, were compared as a positive control. The IR increased the intracellular ROS level, senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity, and mtDNA common deletion (4977 bp), and it decreased the mRNA expression of NRF-1 and TFAM in IMR-90 cells. Similar results were also observed in old cells (PD 55) and H2O2-treated young cells. To confirm that a increase in ROS level is essential for mtDNA deletion and changes of mitochondrial biogenesis in irradiated cells, the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) were examined. In irradiated and H2O2-treated cells, 5 mM NAC significantly attenuated the increases of ROS, mtDNA deletion, and SA-β-gal activity, and recovered from decreased expressions of NRF-1 and TFAM mRNA. These results suggest that ROS is a key cause of IR-induced mtDNA deletion, and the suppression of the mitochondrial biogenesis gene may mediate this process.

  5. Mitochondrial DNA deletion and impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis are mediated by reactive oxygen species in ionizing radiation-induced premature senescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Hyeon Soo; Jung, U Hee; Jo, Sung Kee [Radiation Biotechnology Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Sang [College of Natural Sciences, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion is a well-known marker for oxidative stress and aging, and contributes to harmful effects in cultured cells and animal tissues. mtDNA biogenesis genes (NRF-1, TFAM) are essential for the maintenance of mtDNA, as well as the transcription and replication of mitochondrial genomes. Considering that oxidative stress is known to affect mitochondrial biogenesis, we hypothesized that ionizing radiation (IR)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) causes mtDNA deletion by modulating the mitochondrial biogenesis, thereby leading to cellular senescence. Therefore, we examined the effects of IR on ROS levels, cellular senescence, mitochondrial biogenesis, and mtDNA deletion in IMR-90 human lung fibroblast cells. Young IMR-90 cells at population doubling (PD) 39 were irradiated at 4 or 8 Gy. Old cells at PD55, and H2O2-treated young cells at PD 39, were compared as a positive control. The IR increased the intracellular ROS level, senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal) activity, and mtDNA common deletion (4977 bp), and it decreased the mRNA expression of NRF-1 and TFAM in IMR-90 cells. Similar results were also observed in old cells (PD 55) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated young cells. To confirm that a increase in ROS level is essential for mtDNA deletion and changes of mitochondrial biogenesis in irradiated cells, the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) were examined. In irradiated and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated cells, 5 mM NAC significantly attenuated the increases of ROS, mtDNA deletion, and SA-{beta}-gal activity, and recovered from decreased expressions of NRF-1 and TFAM mRNA. These results suggest that ROS is a key cause of IR-induced mtDNA deletion, and the suppression of the mitochondrial biogenesis gene may mediate this process.

  6. Chloroplast biogenesis-associated nuclear genes: Control by plastid signals evolved prior to their regulation as part of photomorphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison C HIlls

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The assembly of photosynthetically-competent chloroplasts occurs in angiosperm seedlings when first exposed to light, and is due to the control by light of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes (PhANGs, also dependent upon plastid-to-nucleus biogenic communication signals. The relationship between light- and plastid signal-regulation of PhANGs is close but poorly understood. In contrast, many conifers green in the dark and the promoter of a pine PhANG, Lhcb, is active in the dark in tobacco. Here we show that the activity of this promoter in tobacco is sensitive to plastid photobleaching, or to the inhibition of plastid translation in the light or the dark, and the same interventions reduce expression of the native gene in pine seedlings, demonstrating classic plastid biogenic signalling in gymnosperms. Furthermore, Arabidopsis mutations causing defective plastid biogenesis suppress the effect in darkness of mutations in COP1 and DET1, repressors of photomorphogenesis, for the expression of several PhANGs but not a photosynthesis-unrelated, light-regulated gene. GLK transcriptional regulators mediate the response of LHCB but not of other tested PhANGs. We propose gain of the ability by repressors of photomorphogenesis to suppress the response of PhANG promoters to positive plastid biogenic signals in the dark to have contributed to the evolution of light control of chloroplast biogenesis.

  7. De novo peroxisome biogenesis in Penicillium chrysogenum is not dependent on the Pex11 family members or Pex16.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Opaliński

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the role of the three members of the Pex11 protein family in peroxisome formation in the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. Two of these, Pex11 and Pex11C, are components of the peroxisomal membrane, while Pex11B is present at the endoplasmic reticulum. We show that Pex11 is a major factor involved in peroxisome proliferation. We also demonstrate that P. chrysogenum cells deleted for known peroxisome fission factors (all Pex11 family proteins and Vps1 still contain peroxisomes. Interestingly, we find that, unlike in mammals, Pex16 is not essential for peroxisome biogenesis in P. chrysogenum, as partially functional peroxisomes are present in a pex16 deletion strain. We also show that Pex16 is not involved in de novo biogenesis of peroxisomes, as peroxisomes were still present in quadruple Δpex11 Δpex11B Δpex11C Δpex16 mutant cells. By contrast, pex3 deletion in P. chrysogenum led to cells devoid of peroxisomes, suggesting that Pex3 may function independently of Pex16. Finally, we demonstrate that the presence of intact peroxisomes is important for the efficiency of ß-lactam antibiotics production by P. chrysogenum. Remarkably, distinct from earlier results with low penicillin producing laboratory strains, upregulation of peroxisome numbers in a high producing P. chrysogenum strain had no significant effect on penicillin production.

  8. YUCCA-mediated auxin biogenesis is required for cell fate transition occurring during de novo root organogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lyuqin; Tong, Jianhua; Xiao, Langtao; Ruan, Ying; Liu, Jingchun; Zeng, Minhuan; Huang, Hai; Wang, Jia-Wei; Xu, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Many plant organs have the ability to regenerate a new plant after detachment or wounding via de novo organogenesis. During de novo root organogenesis from Arabidopsis thaliana leaf explants, endogenic auxin is essential for the fate transition of regeneration-competent cells to become root founder cells via activation of WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX 11 (WOX11). However, the molecular events from leaf explant detachment to auxin-mediated cell fate transition are poorly understood. In this study, we used an assay to determine the concentration of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to provide direct evidence that auxin is produced after leaf explant detachment, a process that involves YUCCA (YUC)-mediated auxin biogenesis. Inhibition of YUC prevents expression of WOX11 and fate transition of competent cells, resulting in the blocking of rooting. Further analysis showed that YUC1 and YUC4 act quickly (within 4 hours) in response to wounding after detachment in both light and dark conditions and promote auxin biogenesis in both mesophyll and competent cells, whereas YUC5, YUC8, and YUC9 primarily respond in dark conditions. In addition, YUC2 and YUC6 contribute to rooting by providing a basal auxin level in the leaf. Overall, our study indicates that YUC genes exhibit a division of labour during de novo root organogenesis from leaf explants in response to multiple signals. PMID:27255928

  9. Elevation of Il6 is associated with disturbed let-7 biogenesis in a genetic model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y B; Liu, J J; Villaescusa, J C; Åberg, E; Brené, S; Wegener, G; Mathé, A A; Lavebratt, C

    2016-01-01

    Elevation of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 has been implicated in depression; however, the mechanisms remain elusive. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that inhibit gene expression post-transcriptionally. The lethal-7 (let-7) miRNA family was suggested to be involved in the inflammation process and IL-6 was shown to be one of its targets. In the present study, we report elevation of Il6 in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of a genetic rat model of depression, the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) compared to the control Flinders Resistant Line. This elevation was associated with an overexpression of LIN28B and downregulation of let-7 miRNAs, the former an RNA-binding protein that selectively represses let-7 synthesis. Also DROSHA, a key enzyme in miRNA biogenesis was downregulated in FSL. Running was previously shown to have an antidepressant-like effect in the FSL rat. We found that running reduced Il6 levels and selectively increased let-7i and miR-98 expression in the PFC of FSL, although there were no differences in LIN28B and DROSHA expression. Pri-let-7i was upregulated in the running FSL group, which associated with increased histone H4 acetylation. In conclusion, the disturbance of let-7 family biogenesis may underlie increased proinflammatory markers in the depressed FSL rats while physical activity could reduce their expression, possibly through regulating primary miRNA expression via epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:27529677

  10. Long-term high-fat-diet feeding induces skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis in rats in a sex-dependent and muscle-type specific manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Pérez Yolanda

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial dysfunction is thought to play a crucial role in the etiology of insulin resistance, in which skeletal muscle is the main tissue contributor. Sex differences in skeletal muscle insulin and antioxidant responses to high-fat-diet (HFD feeding have been described. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether there is a sex dimorphism in the effects of HFD feeding on skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and on the adiponectin signaling pathway, as well as the influence of the muscle type (oxidative or glycolytic. Methods Gastrocnemius and soleus muscles of male and female Wistar rats of 2 months of age fed with a high-fat-diet (HFD or a low fat diet for 26 weeks were used. Mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative damage markers, oxidative capacity and antioxidant defences were analyzed. Serum insulin sensitivity parameters and the levels of proteins involved in adiponectin signaling pathway were also determined. Results HFD feeding induced mitochondrial biogenesis in both sexes, but to a higher degree in male rats. Although HFD female rats showed greater antioxidant protection and maintained a better insulin sensitivity profile than their male counterparts, both sexes showed an impaired response to adiponectin, which was more evident in gastrocnemius muscle. Conclusions We conclude that HFD rats may induce skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis as an attempt to compensate the deleterious consequences of adiponectin and insulin resistance on oxidative metabolism, and that the effects of HFD feeding are sex-dependent and muscle-type specific.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) biogenesis: visualization and duel incorporation of BrdU and EdU into newly synthesized mtDNA in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Stephen I; Edwards, James L; Backus, Carey; McLean, Lisa L; Haines, Kristine M; Feldman, Eva L

    2010-02-01

    Mitochondria are key regulators of cellular energy and are the focus of a large number of studies examining the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and biogenesis in healthy and diseased conditions. One approach to monitoring mitochondrial biogenesis is to measure the rate of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. We developed a sensitive technique to visualize newly synthesized mtDNA in individual cells to study mtDNA replication within subcellular compartments of neurons. The technique combines the incorporation of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and/or 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) into mtDNA, together with a tyramide signal amplification protocol. Employing this technique, we visualized and measured mtDNA biogenesis in individual cells. The labeling procedure for EdU allows for more comprehensive results by allowing the comparison of its incorporation with other intracellular markers, because it does not require the harsh acid or enzyme digests necessary to recover the BrdU epitope. In addition, the utilization of both BrdU and EdU permits sequential pulse-chase experiments to follow the intracellular localization of mtDNA replication. The ability to quantify mitochondrial biogenesis provides an essential tool for investigating the alterations in mitochondrial dynamics involved in the pathogenesis of multiple cellular disorders, including neuropathies and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19875847

  12. Lipoamide Acts as an Indirect Antioxidant by Simultaneously Stimulating Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Phase II Antioxidant Enzyme Systems in ARPE-19 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhao

    Full Text Available In our previous study, we found that pretreatment with lipoamide (LM more effectively than alpha-lipoic acid (LA protected retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells from the acrolein-induced damage. However, the reasons and mechanisms for the greater effect of LM than LA are unclear. We hypothesize that LM, rather than the more direct antioxidant LA, may act more as an indirect antioxidant. In the present study, we treated ARPE-19 cells with LA and LM and compared their effects on activation of mitochondrial biogenesis and induction of phase II enzyme systems. It is found that LM is more effective than LA on increasing mitochondrial biogenesis and inducing the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 and its translocation to the nucleus, leading to an increase in expression or activity of phase II antioxidant enzymes (NQO-1, GST, GCL, catalase and Cu/Zn SOD. Further study demonstrated that mitochondrial biogenesis and phase II enzyme induction are closely coupled via energy requirements. These results suggest that LM, compared with the direct antioxidant LA, plays its protective effect on oxidative damage more as an indirect antioxidant to simultaneously stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and induction of phase II antioxidant enzymes.

  13. CTRP9 induces mitochondrial biogenesis and protects high glucose-induced endothelial oxidative damage via AdipoR1 -SIRT1- PGC-1α activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liang; Li, Bin; Chen, Xu; Su, Jie; Wang, Hongbing; Yu, Shiqiang; Zheng, Qijun

    2016-09-01

    Vascular lesions caused by endothelial dysfunction are the most common and serious complication of diabetes. The vasoactive potency of CTRP9 has been reported in our previous study via nitric oxide (NO) production. However, the effect of CTRP9 on vascular endothelial cells remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the protection role of CTRP9 in the primary aortic vascular endothelial cells and HAECs under high-glucose condition. We found that the aortic vascular endothelial cells isolated from mice fed with a high fat diet generated more ROS production than normal cells, along with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis, which was also found in HAECs treated with high glucose. However, the treatment of CTPR9 significantly reduced ROS production and increased the activities of endogenous antioxidant enzymes, the expression of PGC-1α, NRF1, TFAM, ATP5A1 and SIRT1, and the activity of cytochrome c oxidase, indicating an induction of mitochondrial biogenesis. Furthermore, silencing the expression of SIRT1 in HAECs impeded the effect of CTRP9 on mitochondrial biogenesis, while silencing the expression of AdipoR1 in HAECs reversed the expression of SIRT1 and PGC-1α. Based on these findings, this study showed that CTRP9 might induce mitochondrial biogenesis and protect high glucose-induced endothelial oxidative damage via AdipoR1-SIRT1-PGC-1α signaling pathway. PMID:27349872

  14. Structure of the Membrane-tethering GRASP Domain Reveals a Unique PDZ Ligand Interaction That Mediates Golgi Biogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Truschel; D Sengupta; A Foote; A Heroux; M Macbeth; A Linstedt

    2011-12-31

    Biogenesis of the ribbon-like membrane network of the mammalian Golgi requires membrane tethering by the conserved GRASP domain in GRASP65 and GRASP55, yet the tethering mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GRASP55 GRASP domain, which revealed an unusual arrangement of two tandem PDZ folds that more closely resemble prokaryotic PDZ domains. Biochemical and functional data indicated that the interaction between the ligand-binding pocket of PDZ1 and an internal ligand on PDZ2 mediates the GRASP self-interaction, and structural analyses suggest that this occurs via a unique mode of internal PDZ ligand recognition. Our data uncover the structural basis for ligand specificity and provide insight into the mechanism of GRASP-dependent membrane tethering of analogous Golgi cisternae.

  15. Structure of the Membrane-tethering GRASP Domain Reveals a Unique PDZ Ligand Interaction That Mediates Golgi Biogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truschel, S.T.; Heroux, A.; Sengupta, D.; Foote, A.; Macbeth, M. R.; Linstedt, A. D.

    2011-06-10

    Biogenesis of the ribbon-like membrane network of the mammalian Golgi requires membrane tethering by the conserved GRASP domain in GRASP65 and GRASP55, yet the tethering mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GRASP55 GRASP domain, which revealed an unusual arrangement of two tandem PDZ folds that more closely resemble prokaryotic PDZ domains. Biochemical and functional data indicated that the interaction between the ligand-binding pocket of PDZ1 and an internal ligand on PDZ2 mediates the GRASP self-interaction, and structural analyses suggest that this occurs via a unique mode of internal PDZ ligand recognition. Our data uncover the structural basis for ligand specificity and provide insight into the mechanism of GRASP-dependent membrane tethering of analogous Golgi cisternae.

  16. Elevation of Il6 is associated with disturbed let-7 biogenesis in a genetic model of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Y B; Liu, J J; Villaescusa, J C;

    2016-01-01

    inflammation process and IL-6 was shown to be one of its targets. In the present study, we report elevation of Il6 in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of a genetic rat model of depression, the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) compared to the control Flinders Resistant Line. This elevation was associated with an......Elevation of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 has been implicated in depression; however, the mechanisms remain elusive. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that inhibit gene expression post-transcriptionally. The lethal-7 (let-7) miRNA family was suggested to be involved in the...... disturbance of let-7 family biogenesis may underlie increased proinflammatory markers in the depressed FSL rats while physical activity could reduce their expression, possibly through regulating primary miRNA expression via epigenetic mechanisms....

  17. Prospects for improving CO2 fixation in C3-crops through understanding C4-Rubisco biogenesis and catalytic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharwood, Robert E; Ghannoum, Oula; Whitney, Spencer M

    2016-06-01

    By operating a CO2 concentrating mechanism, C4-photosynthesis offers highly successful solutions to remedy the inefficiency of the CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco. C4-plant Rubisco has characteristically evolved faster carboxylation rates with low CO2 affinity. Owing to high CO2 concentrations in bundle sheath chloroplasts, faster Rubisco enhances resource use efficiency in C4 plants by reducing the energy and carbon costs associated with photorespiration and lowering the nitrogen investment in Rubisco. Here, we show that C4-Rubisco from some NADP-ME species, such as maize, are also of potential benefit to C3-photosynthesis under current and future atmospheric CO2 pressures. Realizing this bioengineering endeavour necessitates improved understanding of the biogenesis requirements and catalytic variability of C4-Rubisco, as well as the development of transformation capabilities to engineer Rubisco in a wider variety of food and fibre crops. PMID:27131319

  18. Differential expression of THOC1 and ALY mRNP biogenesis/export factors in human cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One key step in gene expression is the biogenesis of mRNA ribonucleoparticle complexes (mRNPs). Formation of the mRNP requires the participation of a number of conserved factors such as the THO complex. THO interacts physically and functionally with the Sub2/UAP56 RNA-dependent ATPase, and the Yra1/REF1/ALY RNA-binding protein linking transcription, mRNA export and genome integrity. Given the link between genome instability and cancer, we have performed a comparative analysis of the expression patterns of THOC1, a THO complex subunit, and ALY in tumor samples. The mRNA levels were measured by quantitative real-time PCR and hybridization of a tumor tissue cDNA array; and the protein levels and distribution by immunostaining of a custom tissue array containing a set of paraffin-embedded samples of different tumor and normal tissues followed by statistical analysis. We show that the expression of two mRNP factors, THOC1 and ALY are altered in several tumor tissues. THOC1 mRNA and protein levels are up-regulated in ovarian and lung tumors and down-regulated in those of testis and skin, whereas ALY is altered in a wide variety of tumors. In contrast to THOC1, ALY protein is highly detected in normal proliferative cells, but poorly in high-grade cancers. These results suggest a differential connection between tumorogenesis and the expression levels of human THO and ALY. This study opens the possibility of defining mRNP biogenesis factors as putative players in cell proliferation that could contribute to tumor development

  19. Adipocyte-Specific Deletion of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Protects From Diet-Induced Obesity Through Increased Mitochondrial Uncoupling and Biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong Hwan; Buffolo, Márcio; Pires, Karla Maria; Pei, Shaobo; Scherer, Philipp E; Boudina, Sihem

    2016-09-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are associated with oxidative stress (OS). The causal role of adipose OS in the pathogenesis of these conditions is unknown. To address this issue, we generated mice with an adipocyte-selective deletion of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). When fed a high-fat diet (HFD), the AdSod2 knockout (KO) mice exhibited less adiposity, reduced adipocyte hypertrophy, and decreased circulating leptin. The resistance to diet-induced adiposity was the result of an increased metabolic rate and energy expenditure. Furthermore, palmitate oxidation was elevated in the white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue of AdSod2 KO mice fed an HFD, and the expression of key fatty acid oxidation genes was increased. To gain mechanistic insight into the increased fat oxidation in HFD-fed AdSod2 KO mice, we quantified the mitochondrial function and mitochondrial content in WAT and found that MnSOD deletion increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption and induced mitochondrial biogenesis. This effect was preserved in cultured adipocytes from AdSod2 KO mice in vitro. As expected from the enhanced fat oxidation, circulating levels of free fatty acids were reduced in the HFD-fed AdSod2 KO mice. Finally, HFD-fed AdSod2 KO mice were protected from hepatic steatosis, adipose tissue inflammation, and glucose and insulin intolerance. Taken together, these results demonstrate that MnSOD deletion in adipocytes triggered an adaptive stress response that activated mitochondrial biogenesis and enhanced mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, thereby preventing diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:27284109

  20. A combination of nutriments improves mitochondrial biogenesis and function in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weili Shen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent evidence indicates that insulin resistance in skeletal muscle may be related to reduce mitochondrial number and oxidation capacity. However, it is not known whether increasing mitochondrial number and function improves insulin resistance. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a combination of nutrients on insulin resistance and mitochondrial biogenesis/function in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrated that defect of glucose and lipid metabolism is associated with low mitochondrial content and reduced mitochondrial enzyme activity in skeletal muscle of the diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats. The treatment of combination of R-alpha-lipoic acid, acetyl-L-carnitine, nicotinamide, and biotin effectively improved glucose tolerance, decreased the basal insulin secretion and the level of circulating free fatty acid (FFA, and prevented the reduction of mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. The nutrients treatment also significantly increased mRNA levels of genes involved in lipid metabolism, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (Ppar alpha, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta (Ppar delta, and carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 (Mcpt-1 and activity of mitochondrial complex I and II in skeletal muscle. All of these effects of mitochondrial nutrients are comparable to that of the antidiabetic drug, pioglitazone. In addition, the treatment with nutrients, unlike pioglitazone, did not cause body weight gain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that a combination of mitochondrial targeting nutrients may improve skeletal mitochondrial dysfunction and exert hypoglycemic effects, without causing weight gain.

  1. Elucidation of separate, but collaborative functions of the rRNA methyltransferase-related human mitochondrial transcription factors B1 and B2 in mitochondrial biogenesis reveals new insight into maternally inherited deafness

    OpenAIRE

    Cotney, Justin; McKay, Sharen E.; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is controlled by signaling networks that relay information to and from the organelles. However, key mitochondrial factors that mediate such pathways and how they contribute to human disease are not understood fully. Here we demonstrate that the rRNA methyltransferase-related human mitochondrial transcription factors B1 and B2 are key downstream effectors of mitochondrial biogenesis that perform unique, yet cooperative functions. The primary function of h-mtTFB2 is mtD...

  2. High fat diet-induced liver steatosis promotes an increase in liver mitochondrial biogenesis in response to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabelli, Julieta; Burgueño, Adriana L; Rosselli, Maria Soledad; Gianotti, Tomas Fernández; Lago, Nestor R; Pirola, Carlos J; Sookoian, Silvia

    2011-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number plays a key role in the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome-related phenotypes, but its role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is not well understood. We evaluated the molecular mechanisms that may be involved in the regulation of liver mtDNA content in a high-fat-induced rat model of NAFLD. In particular, we tested the hypothesis that liver mtDNA copy number is associated with liver expression of HIF-1α. Rats were given either standard chow diet (SCD, n = 10) or high-fat diet (HFD, n = 15) for 20 weeks. Subsequently, mtDNA quantification using nuclear DNA (nDNA) as a reference was carried out using real time quantitative PCR. HFD induced a significant increase in liver mtDNA/nDNA ratio, which significantly correlated with the liver triglyceride content (R: 0.29, P < 0.05). The liver mtDNA/nDNA ratio significantly correlated with the hepatic expression of HIF-1α mRNA (R: 0.37, P < 0.001); liver HIF-1α mRNA was significantly higher in the HFD group. In addition, liver cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV isoform 1 (COX4I1) mRNA expression was also positively correlated with liver mtDNA content. The hepatic expression of mRNA of transcriptional factors that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and PGC-1β, nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ and Tfam, was not associated with the liver mtDNA content. Neither hepatocyte apoptosis nor oxidative stress was involved in the HIF-1α-mediated increase in mtDNA copy number. In conclusion, we found that HFD promotes an increase in liver mitochondrial biogenesis in response to hypoxia via HIF-1α, probably to enhance the mitochondrial function as well as to accommodate the metabolic load. PMID:20629985

  3. Expression of Key Regulators of Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Growth Hormone Receptor Knockout (GHRKO) Mice is Enhanced but is Not Further Improved by Other Potential Life-Extending Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Gesing, Adam; Masternak, Michal M.; Wang, Feiya; Joseph, Anna-Maria; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Westbrook, Reyhan; Lewinski, Andrzej; Karbownik-Lewinska, Malgorzata; Bartke, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is essential for cell viability. Growth hormone receptor knockout (GHRKO), calorie restriction, and surgical visceral fat removal constitute experimental interventions to delay aging and increase life span. We examined the expression of known regulators of mitochondriogenesis: peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ co-activator 1α (PGC-1α), adenosine monophosphate (AMP)–activated protein kinase (AMPK), sirtuin-1 (SIRT-1) and sirtuin-3 (SIRT-3), endothelial nitri...

  4. Aurora-A regulates MTOCs (centrosome) biogenesis but it does not trigger G2/M transition in mouse oocytes matured in vivo

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolc, Petr; Baran, V.; Panenková, Gabriela; Šašková, Adéla; Böhmová, Tereza; Mayer, Alexandra; Schultz, R. M.; Motlík, Jan

    San Juan Island : Friday Harbor Laboratories, 2010. s. 12-12. [Mechanism of Egg Maturation and Fertilization: From Sea to Land: An international symposium at Friday Harbor Laboratories. 10.09.-12.09.2010, San Juan Island] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME08030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Aurora-A * mouse oocytes * biogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  5. The Microphthalmia Transcription Factor (Mitf) Controls Expression of the Ocular Albinism Type 1 Gene: Link between Melanin Synthesis and Melanosome Biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Vetrini, Francesco; Auricchio, Alberto; Du, Jinyan; Angeletti, Barbara; Fisher, David E.; Ballabio, Andrea; Marigo, Valeria

    2004-01-01

    Melanogenesis is the process that regulates skin and eye pigmentation. Albinism, a genetic disease causing pigmentation defects and visual disorders, is caused by mutations in genes controlling either melanin synthesis or melanosome biogenesis. Here we show that a common transcriptional control regulates both of these processes. We performed an analysis of the regulatory region of Oa1, the murine homolog of the gene that is mutated in the X-linked form of ocular albinism, as Oa1's function af...

  6. Puf3p, a Pumilio family RNA binding protein, localizes to mitochondria and regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and motility in budding yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rodríguez, Luis J.; Gay, Anna Card; Pon, Liza A.

    2007-01-01

    Puf3p binds preferentially to messenger RNAs (mRNAs) for nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. We find that Puf3p localizes to the cytosolic face of the mitochondrial outer membrane. Overexpression of PUF3 results in reduced mitochondrial respiratory activity and reduced levels of Pet123p, a protein encoded by a Puf3p-binding mRNA. Puf3p levels are reduced during the diauxic shift and growth on a nonfermentable carbon source, conditions that stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis. These findings support a role for Puf3p in mitochondrial biogenesis through effects on mRNA interactions. In addition, Puf3p links the mitochore, a complex required for mitochondrial–cytoskeletal interactions, to the Arp2/3 complex, the force generator for actin-dependent, bud-directed mitochondrial movement. Puf3p, the mitochore, and the Arp2/3 complex coimmunoprecipitate and have two-hybrid interactions. Moreover, deletion of PUF3 results in reduced interaction between the mitochore and the Arp2/3 complex and defects in mitochondrial morphology and motility similar to those observed in Arp2/3 complex mutants. Thus, Puf3p is a mitochondrial protein that contributes to the biogenesis and motility of the organelle. PMID:17210948

  7. Cardiomyocyte-Restricted Deletion of PPARβ/δ in PPARα-Null Mice Causes Impaired Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Defense, but No Further Depression of Myocardial Fatty Acid Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well documented that PPARα and PPARβ/δ share overlapping functions in regulating myocardial lipid metabolism. However, previous studies demonstrated that cardiomyocyte-restricted PPARβ/δ deficiency in mice leads to severe cardiac pathological development, whereas global PPARα knockout shows a benign cardiac phenotype. It is unknown whether a PPARα-null background would alter the pathological development in mice with cardiomyocyte-restricted PPARβ/δ deficiency. In the present study, a mouse model with long-term PPARβ/δ deficiency in PPARα-null background showed a comparably reduced cardiac expression of lipid metabolism to those of single PPAR-deficient mouse models. The PPARα-null background did not rescue or aggravate the cardiac pathological development linked to cardiomyocyte-restricted PPARβ/δ deficiency. Moreover, PPARα-null did not alter the phenotypic development in adult mice with the short-term deletion of PPARβ/δ in their hearts, which showed mitochondrial abnormalities, depressed cardiac performance, and cardiac hypertrophy with attenuated expression of key factors in mitochondrial biogenesis and defense. The present study demonstrates that cardiomyocyte-restricted deletion of PPARβ/δ in PPARα-null mice causes impaired mitochondrial biogenesis and defense, but no further depression of fatty acid oxidation. Therefore, PPARβ/δ is essential for maintaining mitochondrial biogenesis and defense in cardiomyocytes independent of PPARα.

  8. Transcriptomic comparison of Drosophila snRNP biogenesis mutants reveals mutant-specific changes in pre-mRNA processing: implications for spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Eric L; Wen, Ying; Praveen, Kavita; Matera, A Gregory

    2016-08-01

    Survival motor neuron (SMN) functions in the assembly of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) that catalyze pre-mRNA splicing. Here, we used disruptions in Smn and two additional snRNP biogenesis genes, Phax and Ars2, to classify RNA processing differences as snRNP-dependent or gene-specific in Drosophila Phax and Smn mutants exhibited comparable reductions in snRNAs, and comparison of their transcriptomes uncovered shared sets of RNA processing changes. In contrast, Ars2 mutants displayed only small decreases in snRNA levels, and RNA processing changes in these mutants were generally distinct from those identified in Phax and Smn animals. Instead, RNA processing changes in Ars2 mutants support the known interaction of Ars2 protein with the cap-binding complex, as splicing changes showed a clear bias toward the first intron. Bypassing disruptions in snRNP biogenesis, direct knockdown of spliceosomal proteins caused similar changes in the splicing of snRNP-dependent events. However, these snRNP-dependent events were largely unaltered in three Smn mutants expressing missense mutations that were originally identified in human spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) patients. Hence, findings here clarify the contributions of Phax, Smn, and Ars2 to snRNP biogenesis in Drosophila, and loss-of-function mutants for these proteins reveal differences that help disentangle cause and effect in SMA model flies. PMID:27268418

  9. 20-Hydroxyecdysone stimulates nuclear accumulation of BmNep1, a nuclear ribosome biogenesis-related protein in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, M-M; Liu, A-Q; Sima, Y-H; Xu, S-Q

    2016-10-01

    The pathway of communication between endocrine hormones and ribosome biogenesis critical for physiological adaptation is largely unknown. Nucleolar essential protein 1 (Nep1) is an essential gene for ribosome biogenesis and is functionally conserved in many in vertebrate and invertebrate species. In this study, we cloned Bombyx mori Nep1 (BmNep1) due to its high expression in silk glands of silkworms on day 3 of the fifth instar. We found that BmNep1 mRNA and protein levels were upregulated in silk glands during fourth-instar ecdysis and larval-pupal metamorphosis. By immunoprecipitation with the anti-BmNep1 antibody and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analyses, it was shown that BmNep1 probably interacts with proteins related to ribosome structure formation. Immunohistochemistry, biochemical fractionation and immunocytochemistry revealed that BmNep1 is localized to the nuclei in Bombyx cells. Using BmN cells originally derived from ovaries, we demonstrated that 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) induced BmNep1 expression and stimulated nuclear accumulation of BmNep1. Under physiological conditions, BmNep1 was also upregulated in ovaries during larval-pupal metamorphosis. Overall, our results indicate that the endocrine hormone 20E facilitates nuclear accumulation of BmNep1, which is involved in nuclear ribosome biogenesis in Bombyx. PMID:27329527

  10. The tRNA 30-end Processing Enzyme tRNase Z2 Contributes to Chloroplast Biogenesis in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tuan Long; Dong Guo; Dong He; Wenjie Shen; Xianghua Li

    2013-01-01

    tRNase Z (TRZ) is a ubiquitous endonuclease that removes the 30-trailer from precursor tRNAs during maturation. In yeast and animals, TRZ regulates the cell cycle via its (t)RNA processing activity;however, its physiological function in higher plants has not been well characterized. This study describes the identification of a rice (Oryza sativa) TRZ2 mutant; plants homozygous for the osatrz2 mutation were albinos with deficient chlorophyll content. A microscopic analysis of the mutant plants revealed that the transition of proplastids to chloroplasts was arrested at an early stage, and the number and size of the plastids in callus cells was substantially decreased. A genetic complementation test and an RNA interference analysis confirmed that disruption of OsaTRZ2 was responsible for the mutant phenotype. OsaTRZ2 is expressed in all rice tissues, but is preferentially expressed in leaves, sheathes, and calli. OsaTRZ2 was subcellularly localized in chloroplasts, and displayed tRNA 30-end processing activity in both in vitro and in vivo assays. In the osatrz2 mutants, transcription of plastid-encoded and nucleus-encoded RNA polymerases was severely reduced and moderately increased, respectively. These results suggest that the tRNA 30 processing activity of OsaTRZ2 contributes to chloroplast biogenesis.

  11. Surf1, associated with Leigh syndrome in humans, is a heme-binding protein in bacterial oxidase biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundschuh, Freya A; Hannappel, Achim; Anderka, Oliver; Ludwig, Bernd

    2009-09-18

    Biogenesis of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX) relies on a large number of assembly factors, among them the transmembrane protein Surf1. The loss of human Surf1 function is associated with Leigh syndrome, a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by severe COX deficiency. In the bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans, two homologous proteins, Surf1c and Surf1q, were identified, which we characterize in the present study. When coexpressed in Escherichia coli together with enzymes for heme a synthesis, the bacterial Surf1 proteins bind heme a in vivo. Using redox difference spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry, the binding of the heme cofactor to purified apo-Surf1c and apo-Surf1q is quantified: Each of the Paracoccus proteins binds heme a in a 1:1 stoichiometry and with Kd values in the submicromolar range. In addition, we identify a conserved histidine as a residue crucial for heme binding. Contrary to most earlier concepts, these data support a direct role of Surf1 in heme a cofactor insertion into COX subunit I by providing a protein-bound heme a pool. PMID:19625251

  12. Mitochondrial transcription factor A regulated ionizing radiation-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), the first well-characterized transcription factor from vertebrate mitochondria, is closely related to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance and repair. Recent evidence has shown that the ratio of mtDNA to nuclearDNA (nDNA) is increased in both human cells and murine tissues after ionizing radiation (IR). However, the underlying mechanism has not as yet been clearly identified. In the present study, we demonstrated that in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells, expression of TFAM was upregulated, together with the increase of the relative mtDNA copy number and cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity after α-particle irradiation. Furthermore, short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated TFAM knockdown inhibited the enhancement of the relative mtDNA copy number and COX activity caused by α-particles. Taken together, our data suggested that TFAM plays a crucial role in regulating mtDNA amplification and mitochondrial biogenesis under IR conditions. (author)

  13. GAIP interacting protein C-terminus regulates autophagy and exosome biogenesis of pancreatic cancer through metabolic pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santanu Bhattacharya

    Full Text Available GAIP interacting protein C terminus (GIPC is known to play an important role in a variety of physiological and disease states. In the present study, we have identified a novel role for GIPC as a master regulator of autophagy and the exocytotic pathways in cancer. We show that depletion of GIPC-induced autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells, as evident from the upregulation of the autophagy marker LC3II. We further report that GIPC regulates cellular trafficking pathways by modulating the secretion, biogenesis, and molecular composition of exosomes. We also identified the involvement of GIPC on metabolic stress pathways regulating autophagy and microvesicular shedding, and observed that GIPC status determines the loading of cellular cargo in the exosome. Furthermore, we have shown the overexpression of the drug resistance gene ABCG2 in exosomes from GIPC-depleted pancreatic cancer cells. We also demonstrated that depletion of GIPC from cancer cells sensitized them to gemcitabine treatment, an avenue that can be explored as a potential therapeutic strategy to overcome drug resistance in cancer.

  14. Plastid RNA polymerases: orchestration of enzymes with different evolutionary origins controls chloroplast biogenesis during the plant life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfannschmidt, Thomas; Blanvillain, Robert; Merendino, Livia; Courtois, Florence; Chevalier, Fabien; Liebers, Monique; Grübler, Björn; Hommel, Elisabeth; Lerbs-Mache, Silva

    2015-12-01

    Chloroplasts are the sunlight-collecting organelles of photosynthetic eukaryotes that energetically drive the biosphere of our planet. They are the base for all major food webs by providing essential photosynthates to all heterotrophic organisms including humans. Recent research has focused largely on an understanding of the function of these organelles, but knowledge about the biogenesis of chloroplasts is rather limited. It is known that chloroplasts develop from undifferentiated precursor plastids, the proplastids, in meristematic cells. This review focuses on the activation and action of plastid RNA polymerases, which play a key role in the development of new chloroplasts from proplastids. Evolutionarily, plastids emerged from the endosymbiosis of a cyanobacterium-like ancestor into a heterotrophic eukaryote. As an evolutionary remnant of this process, they possess their own genome, which is expressed by two types of plastid RNA polymerase, phage-type and prokaryotic-type RNA polymerase. The protein subunits of these polymerases are encoded in both the nuclear and plastid genomes. Their activation and action therefore require a highly sophisticated regulation that controls and coordinates the expression of the components encoded in the plastid and nucleus. Stoichiometric expression and correct assembly of RNA polymerase complexes is achieved by a combination of developmental and environmentally induced programmes. This review highlights the current knowledge about the functional coordination between the different types of plastid RNA polymerases and provides working models of their sequential expression and function for future investigations. PMID:26355147

  15. Enhanced oxidative stress and aberrant mitochondrial biogenesis in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells during methamphetamine induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an abused drug that may cause psychiatric and neurotoxic damage, including degeneration of monoaminergic terminals and apoptosis of non-monoaminergic cells in Brain. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these METH-induced neurotoxic effects remain to be clarified. In this study, we performed a time course assessment to investigate the effects of METH on intracellular oxidative stress and mitochondrial alterations in a human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. We characterized that METH induces a temporal sequence of several cellular events including, firstly, a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential within 1 h of the METH treatment, secondly, an extensive decline in mitochondrial membrane potential and increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after 8 h of the treatment, thirdly, an increase in mitochondrial mass after the drug treatment for 24 h, and finally, a decrease in mtDNA copy number and mitochondrial proteins per mitochondrion as well as the occurrence of apoptosis after 48 h of the treatment. Importantly, vitamin E attenuated the METH-induced increases in intracellular ROS level and mitochondrial mass, and prevented METH-induced cell death. Our observations suggest that enhanced oxidative stress and aberrant mitochondrial biogenesis may play critical roles in METH-induced neurotoxic effects

  16. Rbfox proteins regulate microRNA biogenesis by sequence-specific binding to their precursors and target downstream Dicer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Zubovic, Lorena; Yang, Fan; Godin, Katherine; Pavelitz, Tom; Castellanos, Javier; Macchi, Paolo; Varani, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Rbfox proteins regulate tissue-specific splicing by targeting a conserved GCAUG sequence within pre-mRNAs. We report here that sequence-specific binding of the conserved Rbfox RRM to miRNA precursors containing the same sequence motif in their terminal loops, including miR-20b and miR-107, suppresses their nuclear processing. The structure of the complex between precursor miR-20b and Rbfox RRM shows the molecular basis for recognition, and reveals changes in the stem-loop upon protein binding. In mammalian cells, Rbfox2 downregulates mature miR-20b and miR-107 levels and increases the expression of their downstream targets PTEN and Dicer, respectively, suggesting that Rbfox2 indirectly regulates many more cellular miRNAs. Thus, some of the widespread cellular functions of Rbfox2 protein are attributable to regulation of miRNA biogenesis, and might include the mis-regulation of miR-20b and miR-107 in cancer and neurodegeneration. PMID:27001519

  17. HIV and Cocaine Impact Glial Metabolism: Energy Sensor AMP-activated protein kinase Role in Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Epigenetic Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samikkannu, Thangavel; Atluri, Venkata S R; Nair, Madhavan P N

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection and cocaine use have been identified as risk factors for triggering neuronal dysfunction. In the central nervous system (CNS), energy resource and metabolic function are regulated by astroglia. Glia is the major reservoir of HIV infection and disease progression in CNS. However, the role of cocaine in accelerating HIV associated energy deficit and its impact on neuronal dysfunction has not been elucidated yet. The aim of this study is to elucidate the molecular mechanism of HIV associated neuropathogenesis in cocaine abuse and how it accelerates the energy sensor AMPKs and its subsequent effect on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), BRSKs, CDC25B/C, MAP/Tau, Wee1 and epigenetics remodeling complex SWI/SNF. Results showed that cocaine exposure during HIV infection significantly increased the level of p24, reactive oxygen species (ROS), ATP-utilization and upregulated energy sensor AMPKs, CDC25B/C, MAP/Tau and Wee1 protein expression. Increased ROS production subsequently inhibits OCR/ECAR ratio and OXPHOS, and eventually upregulate epigenetics remodeling complex SWI/SNF in CHME-5 cells. These results suggest that HIV infection induced energy deficit and metabolic dysfunction is accelerated by cocaine inducing energy sensor AMPKs, mitochondrial biogenesis and chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF activation, which may lead to neuroAIDS disease progression. PMID:27535703

  18. Short-Chain Fatty Acid Acetate Stimulates Adipogenesis and Mitochondrial Biogenesis via GPR43 in Brown Adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiamiao; Kyrou, Ioannis; Tan, Bee K; Dimitriadis, Georgios K; Ramanjaneya, Manjunath; Tripathi, Gyanendra; Patel, Vanlata; James, Sean; Kawan, Mohamed; Chen, Jing; Randeva, Harpal S

    2016-05-01

    Short-chain fatty acids play crucial roles in a range of physiological functions. However, the effects of short-chain fatty acids on brown adipose tissue have not been fully investigated. We examined the role of acetate, a short-chain fatty acid formed by fermentation in the gut, in the regulation of brown adipocyte metabolism. Our results show that acetate up-regulates adipocyte protein 2, peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, and uncoupling protein-1 expression and affects the morphological changes of brown adipocytes during adipogenesis. Moreover, an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis was observed after acetate treatment. Acetate also elicited the activation of ERK and cAMP response element-binding protein, and these responses were sensitive to G(i/o)-type G protein inactivator, Gβγ-subunit inhibitor, phospholipase C inhibitor, and MAPK kinase inhibitor, indicating a role for the G(i/o)βγ/phospholipase C/protein kinase C/MAPK kinase signaling pathway in these responses. These effects of acetate were mimicked by treatment with 4-chloro-α-(1-methylethyl)-N-2-thiazolylbenzeneacetamide, a synthetic G protein-coupled receptor 43 (GPR43) agonist and were impaired in GPR43 knockdown cells. Taken together, our results indicate that acetate may have important physiological roles in brown adipocytes through the activation of GPR43. PMID:26990063

  19. Rab GTPases and the Autophagy Pathway: Bacterial Targets for a Suitable Biogenesis and Trafficking of Their Own Vacuoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    López de Armentia, María Milagros; Amaya, Celina; Colombo, María Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular process that comprises degradation of damaged organelles, protein aggregates and intracellular pathogens, having an important role in controlling the fate of invading microorganisms. Intracellular pathogens are internalized by professional and non-professional phagocytes, localizing in compartments called phagosomes. To degrade the internalized microorganism, the microbial phagosome matures by fusion events with early and late endosomal compartments and lysosomes, a process that is regulated by Rab GTPases. Interestingly, in order to survive and replicate in the phagosome, some pathogens employ different strategies to manipulate vesicular traffic, inhibiting phagolysosomal biogenesis (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis) or surviving in acidic compartments and forming replicative vacuoles (e.g., Coxiella burnetti and Legionella pneumophila). The bacteria described in this review often use secretion systems to control the host’s response and thus disseminate. To date, eight types of secretion systems (Type I to Type VIII) are known. Some of these systems are used by bacteria to translocate pathogenic proteins into the host cell and regulate replicative vacuole formation, apoptosis, cytokine responses, and autophagy. Herein, we have focused on how bacteria manipulate small Rab GTPases to control many of these processes. The growing knowledge in this field may facilitate the development of new treatments or contribute to the prevention of these types of bacterial infections. PMID:27005665

  20. Tracking the Biogenesis and Inheritance of Subpellicular Microtubule in Trypanosoma brucei with Inducible YFP-α-Tubulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Sheriff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The microtubule cytoskeleton forms the most prominent structural system in Trypanosoma brucei, undergoing extensive modifications during the cell cycle. Visualization of tyrosinated microtubules leads to a semiconservative mode of inheritance, whereas recent studies employing microtubule plus end tracking proteins have hinted at an asymmetric pattern of cytoskeletal inheritance. To further the knowledge of microtubule synthesis and inheritance during T. brucei cell cycle, the dynamics of the microtubule cytoskeleton was visualized by inducible YFP-α-tubulin expression. During new flagellum/flagellum attachment zone (FAZ biogenesis and cell growth, YFP-α-tubulin was incorporated mainly between the old and new flagellum/FAZ complexes. Cytoskeletal modifications at the posterior end of the cells were observed with EB1, a microtubule plus end binding protein, particularly during mitosis. Additionally, the newly formed microtubules segregated asymmetrically, with the daughter cell inheriting the new flagellum/FAZ complex retaining most of the new microtubules. Together, our results suggest an intimate connection between new microtubule formation and new FAZ assembly, consequently leading to asymmetric microtubule inheritance and cell division.

  1. Rbfox proteins regulate microRNA biogenesis by sequence-specific binding to their precursors and target downstream Dicer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Zubovic, Lorena; Yang, Fan; Godin, Katherine; Pavelitz, Tom; Castellanos, Javier; Macchi, Paolo; Varani, Gabriele

    2016-05-19

    Rbfox proteins regulate tissue-specific splicing by targeting a conserved GCAUG sequence within pre-mRNAs. We report here that sequence-specific binding of the conserved Rbfox RRM to miRNA precursors containing the same sequence motif in their terminal loops, including miR-20b and miR-107, suppresses their nuclear processing. The structure of the complex between precursor miR-20b and Rbfox RRM shows the molecular basis for recognition, and reveals changes in the stem-loop upon protein binding. In mammalian cells, Rbfox2 downregulates mature miR-20b and miR-107 levels and increases the expression of their downstream targets PTEN and Dicer, respectively, suggesting that Rbfox2 indirectly regulates many more cellular miRNAs. Thus, some of the widespread cellular functions of Rbfox2 protein are attributable to regulation of miRNA biogenesis, and might include the mis-regulation of miR-20b and miR-107 in cancer and neurodegeneration. PMID:27001519

  2. Comparative proteomic analysis of the silkworm middle silk gland reveals the importance of ribosome biogenesis in silk protein production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-ying; Ye, Lu-peng; Che, Jia-qian; Song, Jia; You, Zheng-ying; Yun, Ki-chan; Wang, Shao-hua; Zhong, Bo-xiong

    2015-08-01

    The silkworm middle silk gland (MSG) is the sericin synthesis and secretion unique sub-organ. The molecular mechanisms of regulating MSG protein synthesis are largely unknown. Here, we performed shotgun proteomic analysis on the three MSG subsections: the anterior (MSG-A), middle (MSG-M), and posterior (MSG-P) regions. The results showed that more strongly expressed proteins in the MSG-A were involved in multiple processes, such as silk gland development and silk protein protection. The proteins that were highly expressed in the MSG-M were enriched in the ribosome pathway. MSG-P proteins with stronger expression were mainly involved in the oxidative phosphorylation and citrate cycle pathways. These results suggest that the MSG-M is the most active region in the sericin synthesis. Furthermore, comparing the proteome of the MSG with the posterior silk gland (PSG) revealed that the specific and highly expressed proteins in the MSG were primarily involved in the ribosome and aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis pathways. These results indicate that silk protein synthesis is much more active as a result of the enhancement of translation-related pathways in the MSG. These results also suggest that enhancing ribosome biogenesis is important to the efficient synthesis of silk proteins. PMID:26051239

  3. Mcp3 is a novel mitochondrial outer membrane protein that follows a unique IMP-dependent biogenesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinzel, Monika; Tan, Tao; Wendling, Philipp; Kalbacher, Hubert; Özbalci, Cagakan; Chelius, Xenia; Westermann, Benedikt; Brügger, Britta; Rapaport, Doron; Dimmer, Kai Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria are separated from the remainder of the eukaryotic cell by the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). The MOM plays an important role in different transport processes like lipid trafficking and protein import. In yeast, the ER-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) has a central, but poorly defined role in both activities. To understand the functions of the ERMES, we searched for suppressors of the deficiency of one of its components, Mdm10, and identified a novel mitochondrial protein that we named Mdm10 complementing protein 3 (Mcp3). Mcp3 partially rescues a variety of ERMES-related phenotypes. We further demonstrate that Mcp3 is an integral protein of the MOM that follows a unique import pathway. It is recognized initially by the import receptor Tom70 and then crosses the MOM via the translocase of the outer membrane. Mcp3 is next relayed to the TIM23 translocase at the inner membrane, gets processed by the inner membrane peptidase (IMP) and finally integrates into the MOM. Hence, Mcp3 follows a novel biogenesis route where a MOM protein is processed by a peptidase of the inner membrane. PMID:27226123

  4. HIV and Cocaine Impact Glial Metabolism: Energy Sensor AMP-activated protein kinase Role in Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Epigenetic Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samikkannu, Thangavel; Atluri, Venkata S. R.; Nair, Madhavan P. N.

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection and cocaine use have been identified as risk factors for triggering neuronal dysfunction. In the central nervous system (CNS), energy resource and metabolic function are regulated by astroglia. Glia is the major reservoir of HIV infection and disease progression in CNS. However, the role of cocaine in accelerating HIV associated energy deficit and its impact on neuronal dysfunction has not been elucidated yet. The aim of this study is to elucidate the molecular mechanism of HIV associated neuropathogenesis in cocaine abuse and how it accelerates the energy sensor AMPKs and its subsequent effect on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), BRSKs, CDC25B/C, MAP/Tau, Wee1 and epigenetics remodeling complex SWI/SNF. Results showed that cocaine exposure during HIV infection significantly increased the level of p24, reactive oxygen species (ROS), ATP-utilization and upregulated energy sensor AMPKs, CDC25B/C, MAP/Tau and Wee1 protein expression. Increased ROS production subsequently inhibits OCR/ECAR ratio and OXPHOS, and eventually upregulate epigenetics remodeling complex SWI/SNF in CHME-5 cells. These results suggest that HIV infection induced energy deficit and metabolic dysfunction is accelerated by cocaine inducing energy sensor AMPKs, mitochondrial biogenesis and chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF activation, which may lead to neuroAIDS disease progression. PMID:27535703

  5. A Single Module Type I Polyketide Synthase Directs de Novo Macrolactone Biogenesis during Galbonolide Biosynthesis in Streptomyces galbus*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Ju; Karki, Suman; Kwon, So-Yeon; Park, Si-Hyung; Nahm, Baek-Hie; Kim, Yeon-Ki; Kwon, Hyung-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Galbonolide (GAL) A and B are antifungal macrolactone polyketides produced by Streptomyces galbus. During their polyketide chain assembly, GAL-A and -B incorporate methoxymalonate and methylmalonate, respectively, in the fourth chain extension step. The methoxymalonyl-acyl carrier protein biosynthesis locus (galG to K) is specifically involved in GAL-A biosynthesis, and this locus is neighbored by a gene cluster composed of galA-E. GalA-C constitute a single module, highly reducing type I polyketide synthase (PKS). GalD and GalE are cytochrome P450 and Rieske domain protein, respectively. Gene knock-out experiments verified that galB, -C, and -D are essential for GAL biosynthesis. A galD mutant accumulated a GAL-C that lacked two hydroxyl groups and a double bond when compared with GAL-B. A [U-13C]propionate feeding experiment indicated that no rare precursor other than methoxymalonate was incorporated during GAL biogenesis. A search of the S. galbus genome for a modular type I PKS system, the type that was expected to direct GAL biosynthesis, resulted in the identification of only one modular type I PKS gene cluster. Homology analysis indicated that this PKS gene cluster is the locus for vicenistatin biosynthesis. This cluster was previously reported in Streptomyces halstedii. A gene deletion of the vinP2 ortholog clearly demonstrated that this modular type I PKS system is not involved in GAL biosynthesis. Therefore, we propose that GalA-C direct macrolactone polyketide formation for GAL. Our studies provide a glimpse into a novel biochemical strategy used for polyketide synthesis; that is, the iterative assembly of propionates with highly programmed β-keto group modifications. PMID:25336658

  6. A single module type I polyketide synthase directs de novo macrolactone biogenesis during galbonolide biosynthesis in Streptomyces galbus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Ju; Karki, Suman; Kwon, So-Yeon; Park, Si-Hyung; Nahm, Baek-Hie; Kim, Yeon-Ki; Kwon, Hyung-Jin

    2014-12-12

    Galbonolide (GAL) A and B are antifungal macrolactone polyketides produced by Streptomyces galbus. During their polyketide chain assembly, GAL-A and -B incorporate methoxymalonate and methylmalonate, respectively, in the fourth chain extension step. The methoxymalonyl-acyl carrier protein biosynthesis locus (galG to K) is specifically involved in GAL-A biosynthesis, and this locus is neighbored by a gene cluster composed of galA-E. GalA-C constitute a single module, highly reducing type I polyketide synthase (PKS). GalD and GalE are cytochrome P450 and Rieske domain protein, respectively. Gene knock-out experiments verified that galB, -C, and -D are essential for GAL biosynthesis. A galD mutant accumulated a GAL-C that lacked two hydroxyl groups and a double bond when compared with GAL-B. A [U-(13)C]propionate feeding experiment indicated that no rare precursor other than methoxymalonate was incorporated during GAL biogenesis. A search of the S. galbus genome for a modular type I PKS system, the type that was expected to direct GAL biosynthesis, resulted in the identification of only one modular type I PKS gene cluster. Homology analysis indicated that this PKS gene cluster is the locus for vicenistatin biosynthesis. This cluster was previously reported in Streptomyces halstedii. A gene deletion of the vinP2 ortholog clearly demonstrated that this modular type I PKS system is not involved in GAL biosynthesis. Therefore, we propose that GalA-C direct macrolactone polyketide formation for GAL. Our studies provide a glimpse into a novel biochemical strategy used for polyketide synthesis; that is, the iterative assembly of propionates with highly programmed β-keto group modifications. PMID:25336658

  7. Fiber type conversion by PGC-1α activates lysosomal and autophagosomal biogenesis in both unaffected and Pompe skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoichi Takikita

    Full Text Available PGC-1α is a transcriptional co-activator that plays a central role in the regulation of energy metabolism. Our interest in this protein was driven by its ability to promote muscle remodeling. Conversion from fast glycolytic to slow oxidative fibers seemed a promising therapeutic approach in Pompe disease, a severe myopathy caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA which is responsible for the degradation of glycogen. The recently approved enzyme replacement therapy (ERT has only a partial effect in skeletal muscle. In our Pompe mouse model (KO, the poor muscle response is seen in fast but not in slow muscle and is associated with massive accumulation of autophagic debris and ineffective autophagy. In an attempt to turn the therapy-resistant fibers into fibers amenable to therapy, we made transgenic KO mice expressing PGC-1α in muscle (tgKO. The successful switch from fast to slow fibers prevented the formation of autophagic buildup in the converted fibers, but PGC-1α failed to improve the clearance of glycogen by ERT. This outcome is likely explained by an unexpected dramatic increase in muscle glycogen load to levels much closer to those observed in patients, in particular infants, with the disease. We have also found a remarkable rise in the number of lysosomes and autophagosomes in the tgKO compared to the KO. These data point to the role of PGC-1α in muscle glucose metabolism and its possible role as a master regulator for organelle biogenesis - not only for mitochondria but also for lysosomes and autophagosomes. These findings may have implications for therapy of lysosomal diseases and other disorders with altered autophagy.

  8. Tumor necrosis factor-α impairs adiponectin signalling, mitochondrial biogenesis, and myogenesis in primary human myotubes cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sente, Tahnee; Van Berendoncks, An M; Fransen, Erik; Vrints, Christiaan J; Hoymans, Vicky Y

    2016-05-01

    Skeletal muscle metabolic changes are common in patients with chronic heart failure (HF). Previously, we demonstrated a functional skeletal muscle adiponectin resistance in HF patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFrEF). We aimed to examine the impact of adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1) deficiency and TNF-α treatment on adiponectin signaling, proliferative capacity, myogenic differentiation, and mitochondrial biogenesis in primary human skeletal muscle cells. Primary cultures of myoblasts and myotubes were initiated from the musculus vastus lateralis of 10 HFrEF patients (left ventricular ejection fraction; 31.30 ± 2.89%) and 10 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Healthy control cultures were transfected with siAdipoR1 and/or exposed to TNF-α (10 ng/ml; 72 h). Primary cultures from HFrEF patients preserved the features of adiponectin resistance in vivo. AdipoR1 mRNA was negatively correlated with time to reach maximal cell index (r = -0.7319, P = 0.003). SiRNA-mediated AdipoR1 silencing reduced pAMPK (P mitochondrial (FOXO3, P = 0.018) metabolism, impaired myogenesis (MyoD1, P = 0.053; myogenin, P = 0.048) and polarized cytokine secretion toward a growth-promoting phenotype (IL-10, IL-1β, IFN-γ, P < 0.05 for all; Meso Scale Discovery Technology). Major features of adiponectin resistance are retained in primary cultures from the skeletal muscle of HFrEF patients. In addition, our results suggest that an increased inflammatory constitution contributes to adiponectin resistance and confers alterations in skeletal muscle differentiation, growth, and function. PMID:26921438

  9. piRNA biogenesis during adult spermatogenesis in mice is independent of the ping-pong mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ergin Beyret; Na Liu; Haifan Lin

    2012-01-01

    piRNAs,a class of small non-coding RNAs associated with PIWI proteins,have broad functions in germline development,transposon silencing,and epigenetic regulation.In diverse organisms,a subset of piRNAs derived from repeat sequences are produced via the interplay between two PIWI proteins.This mechanism,termed "ping-pong"cycle,operates among the PIWI proteins of the primordial mouse testis; however,its involvement in postnatal testes remains elusive.Here we show that adult testicular piRNAs are produced independent of the ping-pong mechanism.We identified and characterized large populations of piRNAs in the adult and postnatal developing testes associated with MILI and MIWI,the only PIWI proteins detectable in these testes.No interaction between MILI and MIWI or sequence feature for the ping-pong mechanism among their piRNAs was detected in the adult testis.The majority of MILI-and MIWI-associated piRNAs originate from the same DNA strands within the same loci.Both populations of piRNAs are biased for 5′ Uracil but not for Adenine on the 10th nucleotide position,and display no complementarity.Furthermore,in Miwi mutants,MILI-associated piRNAs are not downregulated,but instead upregulated.These results indicate that the adult testicular piRNAs are predominantly,if not exclusively,produced by a primary processing mechanism instead of the ping-pong mechanism.In this primary pathway,biogenesis of MILI-and MIWI-associated piRNAs may compete for the same precursors; the types of piRNAs produced tend to be non-selectively dictated by the available precursors in the cell; and precursors with introns tend to be spliced before processed into piRNAs.

  10. High-Level Accumulation of Exogenous Small RNAs Not Affecting Endogenous Small RNA Biogenesis and Function in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Wan-xia; Neil A Smith; ZHOU Chang-yong; WANG Ming-bo

    2014-01-01

    RNA silencing is a fundamental plant defence and gene control mechanism in plants that are directed by 20-24 nucleotide (nt) small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA). Infection of plants with viral pathogens or transformation of plants with RNA interference (RNAi) constructs is usually associated with high levels of exogenous siRNAs, but it is unclear if these siRNAs interfere with endogenous small RNA pathways and hence affect plant development. Here we provide evidence that viral satellite RNA (satRNA) infection does not affect siRNA and miRNA biogenesis or plant growth despite the extremely high level of satRNA-derived siRNAs. We generated transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants that no longer develop the speciifc yellowing symptoms generally associated with infection by Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) Y-satellite RNA (Y-Sat). We then used these plants to show that CMV Y-Sat infection did not cause any visible phenotypic changes in comparison to uninfected plants, despite the presence of high-level Y-Sat siRNAs. Furthermore, we showed that the accumulation of hairpin RNA (hpRNA)-derived siRNAs or miRNAs, and the level of siRNA-directed transgene silencing, are not signiifcantly affected by CMV Y-Sat infection. Taken together, our results suggest that the high levels of exogenous siRNAs associated with viral infection or RNAi-inducing transgenes do not saturate the endogenous RNA silencing machineries and have no signiifcant impact on normal plant development.

  11. Role of calcium and AMP kinase in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and GLUT4 levels in muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojuka, Edward O

    2004-05-01

    Contractile activity induces mitochondrial biogenesis and increases glucose transport capacity in muscle. There has been much research on the mechanisms responsible for these adaptations. The present paper reviews the evidence, which indicates that the decrease in the levels of high-energy phosphates, leading to activation of AMP kinase (AMPK), and the increase in cytosolic Ca(2+), which activates Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CAMK), are signals that initiate these adaptative responses. Although the events downstream of AMPK and CAMK have not been well characterized, these events lead to activation of various transcription factors, including: nuclear respiratory factors (NRF) 1 and 2, which cause increased expression of proteins of the respiratory chain; PPAR-alpha, which up regulates the levels of enzymes of beta oxidation; mitochondrial transcription factor A, which activates expression of the mitochondrial genome; myocyte-enhancing factor 2A, the transcription factor that regulates GLUT4 expression. The well-orchestrated expression of the multitude of proteins involved in these adaptations is mediated by the rapid activation of PPAR gamma co-activator (PGC) 1, a protein that binds to various transcription factors to maximize transcriptional activity. Activating AMPK using 5-aminoimidizole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-riboside (AICAR) and increasing cytoplasmic Ca(2+) using caffeine, W7 or ionomycin in L6 myotubes increases the concentration of mitochondrial enzymes and GLUT4 and enhances the binding of NRF-1 and NRF-2 to DNA. AICAR and Ca-releasing agents also increase the levels of PGC-1, mitochondrial transcription factor A and myocyte-enhancing factors 2A and 2D. These results are similar to the responses seen in muscle during the adaptation to endurance exercise and show that L6 myotubes are a suitable model for studying the mechanisms by which exercise causes the adaptive responses in muscle mitochondria and glucose transport. PMID:15294043

  12. Molecular phylogenetics and comparative modeling of HEN1, a methyltransferase involved in plant microRNA biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obarska Agnieszka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, HEN1 protein from Arabidopsis thaliana was discovered as an essential enzyme in plant microRNA (miRNA biogenesis. HEN1 transfers a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine to the 2'-OH or 3'-OH group of the last nucleotide of miRNA/miRNA* duplexes produced by the nuclease Dicer. Previously it was found that HEN1 possesses a Rossmann-fold methyltransferase (RFM domain and a long N-terminal extension including a putative double-stranded RNA-binding motif (DSRM. However, little is known about the details of the structure and the mechanism of action of this enzyme, and about its phylogenetic origin. Results Extensive database searches were carried out to identify orthologs and close paralogs of HEN1. Based on the multiple sequence alignment a phylogenetic tree of the HEN1 family was constructed. The fold-recognition approach was used to identify related methyltransferases with experimentally solved structures and to guide the homology modeling of the HEN1 catalytic domain. Additionally, we identified a La-like predicted RNA binding domain located C-terminally to the DSRM domain and a domain with a peptide prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase fold, but without the conserved PPIase active site, located N-terminally to the catalytic domain. Conclusion The bioinformatics analysis revealed that the catalytic domain of HEN1 is not closely related to any known RNA:2'-OH methyltransferases (e.g. to the RrmJ/fibrillarin superfamily, but rather to small-molecule methyltransferases. The structural model was used as a platform to identify the putative active site and substrate-binding residues of HEN and to propose its mechanism of action.

  13. DNA repair and biogenesis of mitochondria studied autoradiographically in the mouse brain in situ after a prenatal low dose X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korr, H.; Benders, J.; Rohde, H.T.; Schmitz, C. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Anatomy and Cell Biology

    1999-07-01

    Mice were X-irradiated with 0, 10, or 50 cGy at day 13 of pregnancy. One day later, or postnatally at day 25 [P25] or P180, the offspring were sacrificed in order to investigate autoradiographically on different types of neurons whether the X-irradiation has led to unrepaired nuclear [n] DNA damage. This was studied by analysing both (i) the extent of nDNA repair via unscheduled DNA synthesis after injection of {sup 3}H-thymidine in vivo 2 h before the animal's death, and (ii) the relative content of DNA single strand breaks [SSB] by 'in situ nick translation' carried out on sections using {sup 3}H-dTTP and E. coli polymerase I. Furthermore, mitochondrial [mt] DNA synthesis which represents mt biogenesis was measured via the cytoplasmic labeling after injection of {sup 3}H-thymidine in vivo. The results can be summarized and interpreted as follows: One day after X-irradiation no unrepaired SSB could be detected. However, distinct types of neurons showed increased SSB as well as increased mt biogenesis at P25. This might be caused by an accumulation of unrepaired mtDNA damage. The finding that mt biogenesis and SSB of cortical lyer V and hippocampal pyramidal cells (area CA1-2) significantly decreased (p<0.05) after prenatal X-irradiation of 50 cGy but not 10 cGy between P25 and P180, led to the conclusion that neurons with higher grain numbers, i.e. neurons with a lot of unrepaired SSB, have died between P25 and P180. This late effect after prenatal low dose X-irradiation which will be studied in more detail with modern stereological methods, was unknown up to now. (orig.)

  14. Induction of mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration is associated with mTOR regulation in hepatocytes of rats treated with the pan-PPAR activator tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We investigated mechanisms of mitochondrial regulation in rat hepatocytes. ► Tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) was employed to activate mitochondrial oxidation. ► Mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration were induced. ► It was confirmed that PPAR target genes were induced. ► The mechanism involved activation mTOR. -- Abstract: The hypolipidemic effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) activators has been explained by increasing mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, as observed in livers of rats treated with the pan-PPAR activator tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA). PPAR-activation does, however, not fully explain the metabolic adaptations observed in hepatocytes after treatment with TTA. We therefore characterized the mitochondrial effects, and linked this to signalling by the metabolic sensor, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). In hepatocytes isolated from TTA-treated rats, the changes in cellular content and morphology were consistent with hypertrophy. This was associated with induction of multiple mitochondrial biomarkers, including mitochondrial DNA, citrate synthase and mRNAs of mitochondrial proteins. Transcription analysis further confirmed activation of PPARα-associated genes, in addition to genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Analysis of mitochondrial respiration revealed that the capacity of both electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation were increased. These effects coincided with activation of the stress related factor, ERK1/2, and mTOR. The protein level and phosphorylation of the downstream mTOR actors eIF4G and 4E-BP1 were induced. In summary, TTA increases mitochondrial respiration by inducing hypertrophy and mitochondrial biogenesis in rat hepatocytes, via adaptive regulation of PPARs as well as mTOR.

  15. DNA repair and biogenesis of mitochondria studied autoradiographically in the mouse brain in situ after a prenatal low dose X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mice were X-irradiated with 0, 10, or 50 cGy at day 13 of pregnancy. One day later, or postnatally at day 25 [P25] or P180, the offspring were sacrificed in order to investigate autoradiographically on different types of neurons whether the X-irradiation has led to unrepaired nuclear [n] DNA damage. This was studied by analysing both (i) the extent of nDNA repair via unscheduled DNA synthesis after injection of 3H-thymidine in vivo 2 h before the animal's death, and (ii) the relative content of DNA single strand breaks [SSB] by 'in situ nick translation' carried out on sections using 3H-dTTP and E. coli polymerase I. Furthermore, mitochondrial [mt] DNA synthesis which represents mt biogenesis was measured via the cytoplasmic labeling after injection of 3H-thymidine in vivo. The results can be summarized and interpreted as follows: One day after X-irradiation no unrepaired SSB could be detected. However, distinct types of neurons showed increased SSB as well as increased mt biogenesis at P25. This might be caused by an accumulation of unrepaired mtDNA damage. The finding that mt biogenesis and SSB of cortical lyer V and hippocampal pyramidal cells (area CA1-2) significantly decreased (p<0.05) after prenatal X-irradiation of 50 cGy but not 10 cGy between P25 and P180, led to the conclusion that neurons with higher grain numbers, i.e. neurons with a lot of unrepaired SSB, have died between P25 and P180. This late effect after prenatal low dose X-irradiation which will be studied in more detail with modern stereological methods, was unknown up to now. (orig.)

  16. Induction of mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration is associated with mTOR regulation in hepatocytes of rats treated with the pan-PPAR activator tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagland, Hanne R.; Nilsson, Linn I.H. [Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen (Norway); Burri, Lena [Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Haukeland University Hospital (Norway); Nikolaisen, Julie [Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen (Norway); Berge, Rolf K. [Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Haukeland University Hospital (Norway); Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital (Norway); Tronstad, Karl J., E-mail: karl.tronstad@biomed.uib.no [Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen (Norway)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated mechanisms of mitochondrial regulation in rat hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) was employed to activate mitochondrial oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was confirmed that PPAR target genes were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanism involved activation mTOR. -- Abstract: The hypolipidemic effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) activators has been explained by increasing mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, as observed in livers of rats treated with the pan-PPAR activator tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA). PPAR-activation does, however, not fully explain the metabolic adaptations observed in hepatocytes after treatment with TTA. We therefore characterized the mitochondrial effects, and linked this to signalling by the metabolic sensor, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). In hepatocytes isolated from TTA-treated rats, the changes in cellular content and morphology were consistent with hypertrophy. This was associated with induction of multiple mitochondrial biomarkers, including mitochondrial DNA, citrate synthase and mRNAs of mitochondrial proteins. Transcription analysis further confirmed activation of PPAR{alpha}-associated genes, in addition to genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Analysis of mitochondrial respiration revealed that the capacity of both electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation were increased. These effects coincided with activation of the stress related factor, ERK1/2, and mTOR. The protein level and phosphorylation of the downstream mTOR actors eIF4G and 4E-BP1 were induced. In summary, TTA increases mitochondrial respiration by inducing hypertrophy and mitochondrial biogenesis in rat hepatocytes, via adaptive regulation of PPARs as well as mTOR.

  17. Folded Functional Lipid-Poor Apolipoprotein A-I Obtained by Heating of High-Density Lipoproteins: Relevance to HDL Biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Jayaraman, Shobini; Cavigiolio, Giorgio; Gursky, Olga

    2012-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDL) remove cell cholesterol and protect from atherosclerosis. The major HDL protein is apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I). Most plasma apoA-I circulates in lipoproteins, yet ~5% forms monomeric lipid-poor/free species. This metabolically active species is a primary cholesterol acceptor and is central to HDL biogenesis. Structural properties of lipid-poor apoA-I are unclear due to difficulties in isolating this transient species. We used thermal denaturation of human HDL t...

  18. Expression, Covariation, and Genetic Regulation of miRNA Biogenesis Genes in Brain Supports their Role in Addiction, Psychiatric Disorders, and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Kathleen Mulligan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of miRNA and miRNA biogenesis genes in the adult brain is just beginning to be explored. In this study we have performed a comprehensive analysis of the expression, genetic regulation, and co-expression of major components of the miRNA biogenesis pathway using human and mouse data sets and resources available on the GeneNetwork web site (genenetwork.org. We found a wide range of variation in expression in both species for key components of the pathway—Drosha, Pasha, and Dicer. Across species, tissues, and expression platforms all three genes are generally well correlated. No single genetic locus exerts a strong and consistent influence on the expression of these key genes across murine brain regions. However, in mouse striatum, many members of the miRNA pathway are correlated—including Dicer, Drosha, Pasha, Ars2 (Srrt, Eif2c1 (Ago1, Eif2c2 (Ago2, Zcchc11, and Snip1. The expression of these genes may be partly influenced by a locus on Chromosome 9 (105.67 to 106.32 Mb. We explored ~1500 brain phenotypes available for the C57BL/6J x DBA/2J (BXD genetic mouse population in order to identify miRNA biogenesis genes correlated with traits related to addiction and psychiatric disorders. We found a significant association between expression of Dicer and Drosha in several brain regions and the response to many drugs of abuse, including ethanol, cocaine, and methamphetamine. Expression of Dicer, Drosha, and Pasha in most of the brain regions explored is strongly correlated with the expression of key members of the dopamine system. Drosha, Pasha, and Dicer expression is also correlated with the expression of behavioral traits measuring depression and sensorimotor gating, impulsivity, and anxiety, respectively. Our study provides a global survey of the expression and regulation of key miRNA biogenesis genes in brain and provides preliminary support for the involvement of these genes and their product miRNAs in addiction and psychiatric disease

  19. Relative Contributions of Cystathionine β-Synthase and γ-Cystathionase to H2S Biogenesis via Alternative Trans-sulfuration Reactions*

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Sangita; Padovani, Dominique; Leslie, Rachel A; Chiku, Taurai; Banerjee, Ruma

    2009-01-01

    In mammals, the two enzymes in the trans-sulfuration pathway, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), are believed to be chiefly responsible for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) biogenesis. In this study, we report a detailed kinetic analysis of the human and yeast CBS-catalyzed reactions that result in H2S generation. CBS from both organisms shows a marked preference for H2S generation by β-replacement of cysteine by homocysteine. The alternative H2S-generating reactions, i.e. ...

  20. Sirtuin 3, a new target of PGC-1alpha, plays an important role in the suppression of ROS and mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingxing Kong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3 is one of the seven mammalian sirtuins, which are homologs of the yeast Sir2 gene. SIRT3 is the only sirtuin with a reported association with the human life span. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha plays important roles in adaptive thermogenesis, gluconeogenesis, mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration. PGC-1alpha induces several key reactive oxygen species (ROS-detoxifying enzymes, but the molecular mechanism underlying this is not well understood. RESULTS: Here we show that PGC-1alpha strongly stimulated mouse Sirt3 gene expression in muscle cells and hepatocytes. Knockdown of PGC-1alpha led to decreased Sirt3 gene expression. PGC-1alpha activated the mouse SIRT3 promoter, which was mediated by an estrogen-related receptor (ERR binding element (ERRE (-407/-399 mapped to the promoter region. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed that ERRalpha bound to the identified ERRE and PGC-1alpha co-localized with ERRalpha in the mSirt3 promoter. Knockdown of ERRalpha reduced the induction of Sirt3 by PGC-1alpha in C(2C(12 myotubes. Furthermore, Sirt3 was essential for PGC-1alpha-dependent induction of ROS-detoxifying enzymes and several components of the respiratory chain, including glutathione peroxidase-1, superoxide dismutase 2, ATP synthase 5c, and cytochrome c. Overexpression of SIRT3 or PGC-1alpha in C(2C(12 myotubes decreased basal ROS level. In contrast, knockdown of mSIRT3 increased basal ROS level and blocked the inhibitory effect of PGC-1alpha on cellular ROS production. Finally, SIRT3 stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis, and SIRT3 knockdown decreased the stimulatory effect of PGC-1alpha on mitochondrial biogenesis in C(2C(12 myotubes. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that Sirt3 functions as a downstream target gene of PGC-1alpha and mediates the PGC-1alpha effects on cellular ROS production and mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus

  1. Cre-mediated stress affects sirtuin expression levels, peroxisome biogenesis and metabolism, antioxidant and proinflammatory signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xiao

    Full Text Available Cre-mediated excision of loxP sites is widely used in mice to manipulate gene function in a tissue-specific manner. To analyze phenotypic alterations related to Cre-expression, we have used AMH-Cre-transgenic mice as a model system. Different Cre expression levels were obtained by investigation of C57BL/6J wild type as well as heterozygous and homozygous AMH-Cre-mice. Our results indicate that Cre-expression itself in Sertoli cells already has led to oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation (4-HNE lysine adducts, inducing PPARα/γ, peroxisome proliferation and alterations of peroxisome biogenesis (PEX5, PEX13 and PEX14 as well as metabolic proteins (ABCD1, ABCD3, MFP1, thiolase B, catalase. In addition to the strong catalase increase, a NRF2- and FOXO3-mediated antioxidative response (HMOX1 of the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial SOD2 and a NF-κB activation were noted. TGFβ1 and proinflammatory cytokines like IL1, IL6 and TNFα were upregulated and stress-related signaling pathways were induced. Sertoli cell mRNA-microarray analysis revealed an increase of TNFR2-signaling components. 53BP1 recruitment and expression levels for DNA repair genes as well as for p53 were elevated and the ones for related sirtuin deacetylases affected (SIRT 1, 3-7 in Sertoli cells. Under chronic Cre-mediated DNA damage conditions a strong downregulation of Sirt1 was observed, suggesting that the decrease of this important coordinator between DNA repair and metabolic signaling might induce the repression release of major transcription factors regulating metabolic and cytokine-mediated stress pathways. Indeed, caspase-3 was activated and increased germ cell apoptosis was observed, suggesting paracrine effects. In conclusion, the observed wide stress-induced effects and metabolic alterations suggest that it is essential to use the correct control animals (Cre/Wt with matched Cre expression levels to differentiate between Cre-mediated and specific gene-knock out

  2. Decreased ovarian reserve, dysregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, and increased lipid peroxidation in female mouse offspring exposed to an obesogenic maternal diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Catherine E; Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Penfold, Naomi C; Dearden, Laura; Ozanne, Susan E

    2016-04-01

    Maternal diet during pregnancy influences the later life reproductive potential of female offspring. We investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the depletion of ovarian follicular reserve in young adult females following exposure to obesogenic diet in early life. Furthermore, we explore the interaction between adverse maternal diet and postweaning diet in generating reduced ovarian reserve. Female mice were exposed to either maternal obesogenic (high fat/high sugar) or maternal control dietin uteroand during lactation, then weaned onto either obesogenic or control diet. At 12 wk of age, the offspring ovarian reserve was depleted following exposure to maternal obesogenic diet (Pcopy numberPcopper/zinc superoxide dismutasePcentral role in determining follicular reserve in adult female offspring. Our observations suggest that lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial biogenesis are the key intracellular pathways involved in programming of ovarian reserve.-Aiken, C. E., Tarry-Adkins, J. L., Penfold, N. C., Dearden, L., Ozanne, S. E. Decreased ovarian reserve, dysregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, and increased lipid peroxidation in female mouse offspring exposed to an obesogenic maternal diet. PMID:26700734

  3. Deficiency of the ribosome biogenesis gene Sbds in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells causes neutropenia in mice by attenuating lineage progression in myelocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambetti, Noemi A; Bindels, Eric M J; Van Strien, Paulina M H; Valkhof, Marijke G; Adisty, Maria N; Hoogenboezem, Remco M; Sanders, Mathijs A; Rommens, Johanna M; Touw, Ivo P; Raaijmakers, Marc H G P

    2015-10-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome is a congenital bone marrow failure disorder characterized by debilitating neutropenia. The disease is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the SBDS gene, implicated in ribosome biogenesis, but the cellular and molecular events driving cell specific phenotypes in ribosomopathies remain poorly defined. Here, we established what is to our knowledge the first mammalian model of neutropenia in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome through targeted downregulation of Sbds in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells expressing the myeloid transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (Cebpa). Sbds deficiency in the myeloid lineage specifically affected myelocytes and their downstream progeny while, unexpectedly, it was well tolerated by rapidly cycling hematopoietic progenitor cells. Molecular insights provided by massive parallel sequencing supported cellular observations of impaired cell cycle exit and formation of secondary granules associated with the defect of myeloid lineage progression in myelocytes. Mechanistically, Sbds deficiency activated the p53 tumor suppressor pathway and induced apoptosis in these cells. Collectively, the data reveal a previously unanticipated, selective dependency of myelocytes and downstream progeny, but not rapidly cycling progenitors, on this ubiquitous ribosome biogenesis protein, thus providing a cellular basis for the understanding of myeloid lineage biased defects in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome. PMID:26185170

  4. The RNA-binding protein HOS5 and serine/arginine-rich proteins RS40 and RS41 participate in miRNA biogenesis in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tao

    2015-07-30

    MicroRNAs are a class of small regulatory RNAs that are generated from primary miRNA (pri-miRNA) transcripts with a stem-loop structure. Accuracy of the processing of pri-miRNA into mature miRNA in plants can be enhanced by SERRATE (SE) and HYPONASTIC LEAVES 1 (HYL1). HYL1 activity is regulated by the FIERY2 (FRY2)/RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphatase-like 1 (CPL1). Here, we discover that HIGH OSMOTIC STRESS GENE EXPRESSION 5 (HOS5) and two serine/arginine-rich splicing factors RS40 and RS41, previously shown to be involved in pre-mRNA splicing, affect the biogenesis of a subset of miRNA. These proteins are required for correct miRNA strand selection and the maintenance of miRNA levels. FRY2 dephosphorylates HOS5 whose phosphorylation status affects its subnuclear localization. HOS5 and the RS proteins bind both intronless and intron-containing pri-miRNAs. Importantly, all of these splicing-related factors directly interact with both HYL1 and SE in nuclear splicing speckles. Our results indicate that these splicing factors are directly involved in the biogenesis of a group of miRNA.

  5. Protection of scaffold protein Isu from degradation by the Lon protease Pim1 as a component of Fe–S cluster biogenesis regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesielski, Szymon J.; Schilke, Brenda; Marszalek, Jaroslaw; Craig, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Iron–sulfur (Fe–S) clusters, essential protein cofactors, are assembled on the mitochondrial scaffold protein Isu and then transferred to recipient proteins via a multistep process in which Isu interacts sequentially with multiple protein factors. This pathway is in part regulated posttranslationally by modulation of the degradation of Isu, whose abundance increases >10-fold upon perturbation of the biogenesis process. We tested a model in which direct interaction with protein partners protects Isu from degradation by the mitochondrial Lon-type protease. Using purified components, we demonstrated that Isu is indeed a substrate of the Lon-type protease and that it is protected from degradation by Nfs1, the sulfur donor for Fe–S cluster assembly, as well as by Jac1, the J-protein Hsp70 cochaperone that functions in cluster transfer from Isu. Nfs1 and Jac1 variants known to be defective in interaction with Isu were also defective in protecting Isu from degradation. Furthermore, overproduction of Jac1 protected Isu from degradation in vivo, as did Nfs1. Taken together, our results lead to a model of dynamic interplay between a protease and protein factors throughout the Fe–S cluster assembly and transfer process, leading to up-regulation of Isu levels under conditions when Fe–S cluster biogenesis does not meet cellular demands. PMID:26842892

  6. Biogenesis of Fe/S proteins and pathogenicity: IscR plays a key role in allowing Erwinia chrysanthemi to adapt to hostile conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon-Enriquez, Gabriel; Crété, Patrice; Barras, Frédéric; Py, Béatrice

    2008-03-01

    The Erwinia chrysanthemi genome is predicted to encode three systems, Nif, Isc and Suf, known to assist Fe/S cluster biogenesis and the CsdAE cysteine desulphurase. Single iscU, hscA and fdx mutants were found sensitive to paraquat and exhibited reduced virulence on both chicory leaves and Arabidopsis thaliana. Depletion of the whole Isc system led to a pleiotropic phenotype, including sensitivity to both paraquat and 2,2'-dipyridyl, auxotrophies for branched-chain amino acids, thiamine, nicotinic acid, and drastic alteration in virulence. IscR was able to suppress all of the phenotypes listed above in a sufC-dependent manner while depletion of the Isc system led to IscR-dependent activation of the suf operon. No virulence defects were found associated with csdA or nifS mutations. Surprisingly, we found that the sufC mutant was virulent against A. thaliana, whereas its virulence had been found altered in Saintpaulia. Collectively, these results lead us to propose that E. chrysanthemi possess the Fe/S biogenesis strategy suited to the physico-chemical conditions encountered in its host upon infection. In this view, the IscR regulator, which controls both Isc and Suf, is predicted to play a major role in the ability of E. chrysanthemi to colonize a wide array of different plants. PMID:18284573

  7. Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma: A ceRNA Analysis Pointed to a Crosstalk between SOX2, TP53, and microRNA Biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Arancio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that cancer stem cells (CSC may play a central role in oncogenesis, especially in undifferentiated tumours. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC has characteristics suggestive of a tumour enriched in CSC. Previous studies suggested that the stem cell factor SOX2 has a preeminent hierarchical role in determining the characteristics of stem cells in SW1736 ATC cell line. In detail, silencing SOX2 in SW1736 is able to suppress the expression of the stem markers analysed, strongly sensitizing the line to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, in order to further investigate the role of SOX2 in ATC, a competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA analysis was conducted in order to isolate new functional partners of SOX2. Among the interactors, of particular interest are genes involved in the biogenesis of miRNAs (DICER1, RNASEN, and EIF2C2, in the control cell cycle (TP53, CCND1, and in mitochondrial activity (COX8A. The data suggest that stemness, microRNA biogenesis and functions, p53 regulatory network, cyclin D1, and cell cycle control, together with mitochondrial activity, might be coregulated.

  8. The Biogenesis of Chylomicrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansbach, Charles M.; Siddiqi, Shadab A.

    2016-01-01

    The absorption of dietary fat is of increasing concern given the rise of obesity not only in the United States but throughout the developed world. This review explores what happens to dietary fat within the enterocyte. Absorbed fatty acids and monoacylglycerols are required to be bound to intracellular proteins and/or to be rapidly converted to triacylglycerols to prevent cellular membrane disruption. The triacylglycerol produced at the level of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is either incorporated into prechylomicrons within the ER lumen or shunted to triacylglycerol storage pools. The prechylomicrons exit the ER in a specialized transport vesicle in the rate-limiting step in the intracellular transit of triacylglycerol across the enterocyte. The prechylomicrons are further processed in the Golgi and are transported to the basolateral membrane via a separate vesicular system for exocytosis into the intestinal lamina propria. Fatty acids and monoacylglycerols entering the enterocyte via the basolateral membrane are also incorporated into triacylglycerol, but the basolaterally entering lipid is much more likely to enter the triacylglycerol storage pool than the lipid entering via the apical membrane. PMID:20148678

  9. NUCLEAR PORE COMPLEX BIOGENESIS

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Rout, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are the sole mediators of transport between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. NPCs have a life cycle: they assemble, disassemble, turn over and age. The molecular mechanisms governing these different vital steps are beginning to emerge, suggesting key roles for the core structural scaffold of the NPC and auxiliary factors in the assembly of this large macromolecular complex, and connections between NPC maintenance, NPC turnover, and ageing of the cell.

  10. The Arabidopsis gene DIG6 encodes a large 60S subunit nuclear export GTPase 1 that is involved in ribosome biogenesis and affects multiple auxin-regulated development processes

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Huayan

    2015-08-13

    The circularly permuted GTPase large subunit GTPase 1 (LSG1) is involved in the maturation step of the 60S ribosome and is essential for cell viability in yeast. Here, an Arabidopsis mutant dig6 (drought inhibited growth of lateral roots) was isolated. The mutant exhibited multiple auxin-related phenotypes, which included reduced lateral root number, altered leaf veins, and shorter roots. Genetic mapping combined with next-generation DNA sequencing identified that the mutation occurred in AtLSG1-2. This gene was highly expressed in regions of auxin accumulation. Ribosome profiling revealed that a loss of function of AtLSG1-2 led to decreased levels of monosomes, further demonstrating its role in ribosome biogenesis. Quantitative proteomics showed that the expression of certain proteins involved in ribosome biogenesis was differentially regulated, indicating that ribosome biogenesis processes were impaired in the mutant. Further investigations showed that an AtLSG1-2 deficiency caused the alteration of auxin distribution, response, and transport in plants. It is concluded that AtLSG1-2 is integral to ribosome biogenesis, consequently affecting auxin homeostasis and plant development.

  11. Impaired Telomere Maintenance and Decreased Canonical WNT Signaling but Normal Ribosome Biogenesis in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from X-Linked Dyskeratosis Congenita Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Bai-Wei; Apicella, Marisa; Mills, Jason; Fan, Jian-Meng; Reeves, Dara A; French, Deborah; Podsakoff, Gregory M; Bessler, Monica; Mason, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome characterized by the presence of short telomeres at presentation. Mutations in ten different genes, whose products are involved in the telomere maintenance pathway, have been shown to cause DC. The X-linked form is the most common form of the disease and is caused by mutations in the gene DKC1, encoding the protein dyskerin. Dyskerin is required for the assembly and stability of telomerase and is also involved in ribosomal RNA (rRNA) processing where it converts specific uridines to pseudouridine. DC is thought to result from failure to maintain tissues, like blood, that are renewed by stem cell activity, but research into pathogenic mechanisms has been hampered by the difficulty of obtaining stem cells from patients. We reasoned that induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from X-linked DC patients may provide information about the mechanisms involved. Here we describe the production of iPS cells from DC patients with DKC1 mutations Q31E, A353V and ΔL37. In addition we constructed "corrected" lines with a copy of the wild type dyskerin cDNA expressed from the AAVS1 safe harbor locus. We show that in iPS cells with DKC1 mutations telomere maintenance is compromised with short telomere lengths and decreased telomerase activity. The degree to which telomere lengths are affected by expression of telomerase during reprograming, or with ectopic expression of wild type dyskerin, is variable. The recurrent mutation A353V shows the most severe effect on telomere maintenance. A353V cells but not Q31E or ΔL37 cells, are refractory to correction by expression of wild type DKC1 cDNA. Because dyskerin is involved in both telomere maintenance and ribosome biogenesis it has been postulated that defective ribosome biogenesis and translation may contribute to the disease phenotype. Evidence from mouse and zebra fish models has supported the involvement of ribosome biogenesis but primary cells from human

  12. Tgf-β1 inhibits Cftr biogenesis and prevents functional rescue of ΔF508-Cftr in primary differentiated human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Snodgrass

    Full Text Available CFTR is an integral transmembrane glycoprotein and a cAMP-activated Cl(- channel. Mutations in the CFTR gene lead to Cystic Fibrosis (CF-an autosomal recessive disease with majority of the morbidity and mortality resulting from airway infection, inflammation, and fibrosis. The most common disease-associated mutation in the CFTR gene-deletion of Phe508 (ΔF508 leads to a biosynthetic processing defect of CFTR. Correction of the defect and delivery of ΔF508-CFTR to the cell surface has been highly anticipated as a disease modifying therapy. Compared to promising results in cultured cell this approach was much less effective in CF patients in an early clinical trial. Although the cause of failure to rescue ΔF508-CFTR in the clinical trial has not been determined, presence of factor(s that interfere with the rescue in vivo could be considered. The cytokine TGF-β1 is frequently elevated in CF patients. TGF-β1 has pleiotropic effects in different disease models and genetic backgrounds and little is known about TGF-β1 effects on CFTR in human airway epithelial cells. Moreover, there are no published studies examining TGF-β1 effects on the functional rescue of ΔF508-CFTR. Here we found that TGF-β1 inhibits CFTR biogenesis by reducing mRNA levels and protein abundance in primary differentiated human bronchial epithelial (HBE cells from non-CF individuals. TGF-β1 inhibits CFTR biogenesis without compromising the epithelial phenotype or integrity of HBE cells. TGF-β1 also inhibits biogenesis and impairs the functional rescue of ΔF508-CFTR in HBE cells from patients homozygous for the ΔF508 mutation. Our data indicate that activation of TGF-β1 signaling may inhibit CFTR function in non-CF individuals and may interfere with therapies directed at correcting the processing defect of ΔF508-CFTR in CF patients.

  13. Carbohydrate restricted recovery from long term endurance exercise does not affect gene responses involved in mitochondrial biogenesis in highly trained athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Line; Gejl, Kasper D; Ørtenblad, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to determine if the metabolic adaptations, particularly PGC-1α and downstream metabolic genes were affected by restricting CHO following an endurance exercise bout in trained endurance athletes. A second aim was to compare baseline expression level of these genes to untrained. Elite......; nevertheless, the gene expression was not different between groups. Glycogen and most gene expression levels returned to baseline by 24 h in both CHO and H2O. Baseline mRNA expression of NRF-1, COX-IV, GLUT4 and PPAR-α gene targets were higher in trained compared to untrained. Additionally, the proportion of...... type I muscle fibers positively correlated with baseline mRNA for PGC-1α, TFAM, NRF-1, COX-IV, PPAR-α, and GLUT4 for both trained and untrained. CHO restriction during recovery from glycogen depleting exercise does not improve the mRNA response of markers of mitochondrial biogenesis. Further, baseline...

  14. Folded functional lipid-poor apolipoprotein A-I obtained by heating of high-density lipoproteins: relevance to high-density lipoprotein biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Shobini; Cavigiolio, Giorgio; Gursky, Olga

    2012-03-15

    HDL (high-density lipoproteins) remove cell cholesterol and protect from atherosclerosis. The major HDL protein is apoA-I (apolipoprotein A-I). Most plasma apoA-I circulates in lipoproteins, yet ~5% forms monomeric lipid-poor/free species. This metabolically active species is a primary cholesterol acceptor and is central to HDL biogenesis. Structural properties of lipid-poor apoA-I are unclear due to difficulties in isolating this transient species. We used thermal denaturation of human HDL to produce lipid-poor apoA-I. Analysis of the isolated lipid-poor fraction showed a protein/lipid weight ratio of 3:1, with apoA-I, PC (phosphatidylcholine) and CE (cholesterol ester) at approximate molar ratios of 1:8:1. Compared with lipid-free apoA-I, lipid-poor apoA-I showed slightly altered secondary structure and aromatic packing, reduced thermodynamic stability, lower self-associating propensity, increased adsorption to phospholipid surface and comparable ability to remodel phospholipids and form reconstituted HDL. Lipid-poor apoA-I can be formed by heating of either plasma or reconstituted HDL. We propose the first structural model of lipid-poor apoA-I which corroborates its distinct biophysical properties and postulates the lipid-induced ordering of the labile C-terminal region. In summary, HDL heating produces folded functional monomolecular lipid-poor apoA-I that is distinct from lipid-free apoA-I. Increased adsorption to phospholipid surface and reduced C-terminal disorder may help direct lipid-poor apoA-I towards HDL biogenesis. PMID:22150513

  15. Knockdown of human Oxa1l impairs the biogenesis of F1Fo-ATP synthase and NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiburek, Lukas; Fornuskova, Daniela; Wenchich, Laszlo; Pejznochova, Martina; Hansikova, Hana; Zeman, Jiri

    2007-11-23

    The Oxa1 protein is a founding member of the evolutionarily conserved Oxa1/Alb3/YidC protein family, which is involved in the biogenesis of membrane proteins in mitochondria, chloroplasts and bacteria. The predicted human homologue, Oxa1l, was originally identified by partial functional complementation of the respiratory growth defect of the yeast oxa1 mutant. Here we demonstrate that both the endogenous human Oxa1l, with an apparent molecular mass of 42 kDa, and the Oxa1l-FLAG chimeric protein localize exclusively to mitochondria in HEK293 cells. Furthermore, human Oxa1l was found to be an integral membrane protein, and, using two-dimensional blue native/denaturing PAGE, the majority of the protein was identified as part of a 600-700 kDa complex. The stable short hairpin (sh)RNA-mediated knockdown of Oxa1l in HEK293 cells resulted in markedly decreased steady-state levels and ATP hydrolytic activity of the F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase and moderately reduced levels and activity of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I). However, no significant accumulation of corresponding sub-complexes could be detected on blue native immunoblots. Intriguingly, the achieved depletion of Oxa1l protein did not adversely affect the assembly or activity of cytochrome c oxidase or the cytochrome bc(1) complex. Taken together, our results indicate that human Oxa1l represents a mitochondrial integral membrane protein required for the correct biogenesis of F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase and NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase. PMID:17936786

  16. Overproduction of CcmG and CcmFHRc Fully Suppresses the c-Type Cytochrome Biogenesis Defect of Rhodobacter capsulatus CcmI-Null Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Carsten; Deshmukh, Meenal; Astor, Doniel; Kranz, Robert G.; Daldal, Fevzi

    2005-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria like Rhodobacter capsulatus use intertwined pathways to carry out the posttranslational maturation of c-type cytochromes (Cyts). This periplasmic process requires at least 10 essential components for apo-Cyt c chaperoning, thio-oxidoreduction, and the delivery of heme and its covalent ligation. One of these components, CcmI (also called CycH), is thought to act as an apo-Cyt c chaperone. In R. capsulatus, CcmI-null mutants are unable to produce c-type Cyts and thus sustain photosynthetic (Ps) growth. Previously, we have shown that overproduction of the putative heme ligation components CcmF and CcmHRc (also called Ccl1 and Ccl2) can partially bypass the function of CcmI on minimal, but not on enriched, media. Here, we demonstrate that either additional overproduction of CcmG (also called HelX) or hyperproduction of CcmF-CcmHRc is needed to completely overcome the role of CcmI during the biogenesis of c-type Cyts on both minimal and enriched media. These findings indicate that, in the absence of CcmI, interactions between the heme ligation and thioreduction pathways become restricted for sufficient Cyt c production. We therefore suggest that CcmI, along with its apo-Cyt chaperoning function, is also critical for the efficacy of holo-Cyt c formation, possibly via its close interactions with other components performing the final heme ligation steps during Cyt c biogenesis. PMID:15937187

  17. Research Progress on the Biogenesis and Related Proteins of piRNA%piRNA的发生和相关蛋白的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘雪青; 杨浩; 王建刚; 曹斌云

    2012-01-01

    Small RNAs regulate gene expression at multi-level, such as chromosome construction, transcription, translation, RNA modification and stability. piRNA (Piwi-interacting RNA) mainly participates in the process of development of germ cells, scilence of transposon, formation of heterochromatin, DNA integrity of germ cells, and so on. It is significant to steady heredity of hereditary substance. As a novel small RNA, piRNA has received wide attention. Since piRNA was found in 2006, considerable inference, quest and verification about the biogenesis and function of piRNA have been carried out by researchers. Studies found that piRNA mainly distributed in the animal testes spermatogonial cells and ovarian oocytes, and there are also a small number of piRNAs in Drosophila ovarian somatic cells (follicle cells). piRNA is generated by different ways in germ cells and somatic cells. The way in somatic cells is relatively simpler than that in germ cells, the way in germ cells is mainly through the "ping-pong cycle". In the "ping-pong cycle", Piwi locate in the nucleus, Ago3 and Aub locate in the cytoplasm. This phenomenon imply the piRNA may generate and play function in different compartments. The 3' end hyperm-ethylation of piRNA is widespread, which is significant to the stability of piRNA, but not the necessary conditions to determine the length of of mature piRNAs. Known fuctions of piRNA-re-lated proteins are important clues to predict the biogenesis and fuctions of piRNA. At present, some proteins related to piRNA biogenesis and function have been discovered. piRNA expression is limited to germline cells and its regulatory network is more complex than that of siRNA (small interference RNA) and miRNA (microRNA). The emergence of novel methodology and system speed up the research process of piRNA biogenesis and function. This article is a brief overview focusing on piRNA biogenesis, produce and function related proteins and research methods.%小RNA能在多水平(染色

  18. Helicase-like transcription factor (Hltf regulates G2/M transition, Wt1/Gata4/Hif-1a cardiac transcription networks, and collagen biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Helmer

    Full Text Available HLTF/Hltf regulates transcription, remodels chromatin, and coordinates DNA damage repair. Hltf is expressed in mouse brain and heart during embryonic and postnatal development. Silencing Hltf is semilethal. Seventy-four percent of congenic C57BL/6J Hltf knockout mice died, 75% within 12-24 hours of birth. Previous studies in neonatal (6-8 hour postpartum brain revealed silencing Hltf disrupted cell cycle progression, and attenuated DNA damage repair. An RNA-Seq snapshot of neonatal heart transcriptome showed 1,536 of 20,000 total transcripts were altered (p < 0.05 - 10 up- and 1,526 downregulated. Pathway enrichment analysis with MetaCore™ showed Hltf's regulation of the G2/M transition (p=9.726E(-15 of the cell cycle in heart is nearly identical to its role in brain. In addition, Brca1 and 12 members of the Brca1 associated genome surveillance complex are also downregulated. Activation of caspase 3 coincides with transcriptional repression of Bcl-2. Hltf loss caused downregulation of Wt1/Gata4/Hif-1a signaling cascades as well as Myh7b/miR499 transcription. Hltf-specific binding to promoters and/or regulatory regions of these genes was authenticated by ChIP-PCR. Hif-1a targets for prolyl (P4ha1, P4ha2 and lysyl (Plod2 collagen hydroxylation, PPIase enzymes (Ppid, Ppif, Ppil3 for collagen trimerization, and lysyl oxidase (Loxl2 for collagen-elastin crosslinking were downregulated. However, transcription of genes for collagens, fibronectin, Mmps and their inhibitors (Timps was unaffected. The collective downregulation of genes whose protein products control collagen biogenesis caused disorganization of the interstitial and perivascular myocardial collagen fibrillar network as viewed with picrosirius red-staining, and authenticated with spectral imaging. Wavy collagen bundles in control hearts contrasted with collagen fibers that were thin, short and disorganized in Hltf null hearts. Collagen bundles in Hltf null hearts were tangled and

  19. OM2, a Novel Oligomannuronate-Chromium(III Complex, Promotes Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Lipid Metabolism in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes via the AMPK-PGC1α Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiejie Hao

    Full Text Available In our previous studies, we prepared novel oligomannuronate-chromium(III complexes (OM2, OM4 from marine alginate, and found that these compounds sensitize insulin action better than oligomannuronate(OM, chromium, and metformin in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells. In the present study, we studied their effects on mitochondrial biogenesis, lipid metabolism, and the underlying molecular mechanisms in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes.We firstly used the pGL3-PGC1α and pGL3-ATGL promoter plasmids to compare their effects on PGC1α and ATGL transcription activities. Then mitochondrial biogenesis was quantified by transmission electron microscopy and MitoTracker staining. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption and fatty acid oxidation were measured by an oxygen biosensor system and ³H-labelled water scintillation. The mitochondrial DNA and mRNA involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and lipid oxidation were evaluated by real-time PCR. AMPK together with other protein expression levels were measured by western blotting. The inhibitor compound C and siRNA of PGC1α were used to inhibit the OM2-induced AMPK-PGC1α signaling pathway. And we found that OM2 stimulated AMPK-PGC1α pathway in the 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which were correlated with induced mitochondrial biogenesis, improved mitochondrial function, and reduced lipid accumulation by enhanced fatty acid β-oxidation and augmented ATGL protein expression.Our data indicated that the marine oligosaccharide-derived OM2 might represent a novel class of molecules that could be useful for type 2 diabetes prevention and treatment by up-regulating AMPK-PGC1α signaling pathway.

  20. OM2, a Novel Oligomannuronate-Chromium(III) Complex, Promotes Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Lipid Metabolism in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes via the AMPK-PGC1α Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jiejie; Hao, Cui; Zhang, Lijuan; Liu, Xin; Zhou, Xiaolin; Dun, Yunlou; Li, Haihua; Li, Guangsheng; Zhao, Xiaoliang; An, Yuanyuan; Liu, Jiankang; Yu, Guangli

    2015-01-01

    Background In our previous studies, we prepared novel oligomannuronate-chromium(III) complexes (OM2, OM4) from marine alginate, and found that these compounds sensitize insulin action better than oligomannuronate(OM), chromium, and metformin in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells. In the present study, we studied their effects on mitochondrial biogenesis, lipid metabolism, and the underlying molecular mechanisms in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings We firstly used the pGL3-PGC1α and pGL3-ATGL promoter plasmids to compare their effects on PGC1α and ATGL transcription activities. Then mitochondrial biogenesis was quantified by transmission electron microscopy and MitoTracker staining. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption and fatty acid oxidation were measured by an oxygen biosensor system and ³H-labelled water scintillation. The mitochondrial DNA and mRNA involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and lipid oxidation were evaluated by real-time PCR. AMPK together with other protein expression levels were measured by western blotting. The inhibitor compound C and siRNA of PGC1α were used to inhibit the OM2-induced AMPK-PGC1α signaling pathway. And we found that OM2 stimulated AMPK-PGC1α pathway in the 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which were correlated with induced mitochondrial biogenesis, improved mitochondrial function, and reduced lipid accumulation by enhanced fatty acid β-oxidation and augmented ATGL protein expression. Conclusions/Significance Our data indicated that the marine oligosaccharide-derived OM2 might represent a novel class of molecules that could be useful for type 2 diabetes prevention and treatment by up-regulating AMPK-PGC1α signaling pathway. PMID:26176781

  1. The neurogenic basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD6 enhances mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics to confer tolerance of neuronal PC12-NeuroD6 cells to the mitochondrial stressor rotenone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental question of how and which neuronal specific transcription factors tailor mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics to the need of developing neuronal cells has remained largely unexplored. In this study, we report that the neurogenic basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD6 possesses mitochondrial biogenic properties by amplifying the mitochondrial DNA content and TFAM expression levels, a key regulator for mitochondrial biogenesis. NeuroD6-mediated increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in the neuronal progenitor-like PC12-NEUROD6 cells is concomitant with enhanced mitochondrial bioenergetic functions, including increased expression levels of specific subunits of respiratory complexes of the electron transport chain, elevated mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels produced by oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, NeuroD6 augments the bioenergetic capacity of PC12-NEUROD6 cells to generate an energetic reserve, which confers tolerance to the mitochondrial stressor, rotenone. We found that NeuroD6 induces an adaptive bioenergetic response throughout rotenone treatment involving maintenance of the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels in conjunction with preservation of the actin network. In conclusion, our results support the concept that NeuroD6 plays an integrative role in regulating and coordinating the onset of neuronal differentiation with acquisition of adequate mitochondrial mass and energetic capacity to ensure energy demanding events, such as cytoskeletal remodeling, plasmalemmal expansion, and growth cone formation. -- Highlights: ► NeuroD6 induces mitochondrial biogenesis in neuroprogenitor-like cells. ► NeuroD6 augments the bioenergetic reserve of the neuronal PC12-NeuroD6 cells. ► NeuroD6 increases the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels. ► NeuroD6 confers tolerance to rotenone via an adaptive mitochondrial response.

  2. The neurogenic basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD6 enhances mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics to confer tolerance of neuronal PC12-NeuroD6 cells to the mitochondrial stressor rotenone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Kristin Kathleen; Uittenbogaard, Martine [Department of Anatomy and Regenerative Biology, George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Chiaramello, Anne, E-mail: achiaram@gwu.edu [Department of Anatomy and Regenerative Biology, George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-10-15

    The fundamental question of how and which neuronal specific transcription factors tailor mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics to the need of developing neuronal cells has remained largely unexplored. In this study, we report that the neurogenic basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD6 possesses mitochondrial biogenic properties by amplifying the mitochondrial DNA content and TFAM expression levels, a key regulator for mitochondrial biogenesis. NeuroD6-mediated increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in the neuronal progenitor-like PC12-NEUROD6 cells is concomitant with enhanced mitochondrial bioenergetic functions, including increased expression levels of specific subunits of respiratory complexes of the electron transport chain, elevated mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels produced by oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, NeuroD6 augments the bioenergetic capacity of PC12-NEUROD6 cells to generate an energetic reserve, which confers tolerance to the mitochondrial stressor, rotenone. We found that NeuroD6 induces an adaptive bioenergetic response throughout rotenone treatment involving maintenance of the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels in conjunction with preservation of the actin network. In conclusion, our results support the concept that NeuroD6 plays an integrative role in regulating and coordinating the onset of neuronal differentiation with acquisition of adequate mitochondrial mass and energetic capacity to ensure energy demanding events, such as cytoskeletal remodeling, plasmalemmal expansion, and growth cone formation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 induces mitochondrial biogenesis in neuroprogenitor-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 augments the bioenergetic reserve of the neuronal PC12-NeuroD6 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 increases the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 confers tolerance to rotenone via an adaptive

  3. Small Molecule Inhibition of miR-544 Biogenesis Disrupts Adaptive Responses to Hypoxia by Modulating ATM-mTOR Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, Christopher L; Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Strivelli, Jacqueline R; Yang, Wang-Yong; Disney, Matthew D; Phinney, Donald G

    2015-10-16

    Hypoxia induces a complex circuit of gene expression that drives tumor progression and increases drug resistance. Defining these changes allows for an understanding of how hypoxia alters tumor biology and informs design of lead therapeutics. We probed the role of microRNA-544 (miR-544), which silences mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), in a hypoxic breast cancer model by using a small molecule (1) that selectively impedes the microRNA's biogenesis. Application of 1 to hypoxic tumor cells selectively inhibited production of the mature microRNA, sensitized cells to 5-fluorouracil, and derepressed mRNAs affected by miR-544 in cellulo and in vivo, including boosting mTOR expression. Thus, small molecule inhibition of miR-544 reverses a tumor cell's physiological response to hypoxia. Importantly, 1 sensitized tumor cells to hypoxia-associated apoptosis at a 25-fold lower concentration than a 2'-O-methyl RNA antagomir and was as selective. Further, the apoptotic effect of 1 was suppressed by treatment of cell with rapamycin, a well-known inhibitor of the mTOR signaling pathway, illustrating the selectivity of the compound. Thus, RNA-directed chemical probes, which could also serve as lead therapeutics, enable interrogation of complex cellular networks in cells and animals. PMID:26181590

  4. Monoallelic deletion of the microRNA biogenesis gene Dgcr8 produces deficits in the development of excitatory synaptic transmission in the prefrontal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barker Alison J

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuronal phenotypes associated with hemizygosity of individual genes within the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome locus hold potential towards understanding the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and autism. Included among these genes is Dgcr8, which encodes an RNA-binding protein required for microRNA biogenesis. Dgcr8 haploinsufficient mice (Dgcr8+/- have reduced expression of microRNAs in brain and display cognitive deficits, but how microRNA deficiency affects the development and function of neurons in the cerebral cortex is not fully understood. Results In this study, we show that Dgcr8+/- mice display reduced expression of a subset of microRNAs in the prefrontal cortex, a deficit that emerges over postnatal development. Layer V pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex of Dgcr8+/- mice have altered electrical properties, decreased complexity of basal dendrites, and reduced excitatory synaptic transmission. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that precise microRNA expression is critical for the postnatal development of prefrontal cortical circuitry. Similar defects in neuronal maturation resulting from microRNA deficiency could represent endophenotypes of certain neuropsychiatric diseases of developmental onset.

  5. A phosphatidylinositol transfer protein integrates phosphoinositide signaling with lipid droplet metabolism to regulate a developmental program of nutrient stress-induced membrane biogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Jihui; Lin, Coney Pei-Chen; Pathak, Manish C.; Temple, Brenda R.S.; Nile, Aaron H.; Mousley, Carl J.; Duncan, Mara C.; Eckert, Debra M.; Leiker, Thomas J.; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Myers, David S.; Murphy, Robert C.; Brown, H. Alex; Verdaasdonk, Jolien; Bloom, Kerry S.; Ortlund, Eric A.; Neiman, Aaron M.; Bankaitis, Vytas A. [Emory-MED; (SBU); (TAM); (UNC); (Vanderbilt-MED); (Utah); (UCHSC)

    2014-07-11

    Lipid droplet (LD) utilization is an important cellular activity that regulates energy balance and release of lipid second messengers. Because fatty acids exhibit both beneficial and toxic properties, their release from LDs must be controlled. Here we demonstrate that yeast Sfh3, an unusual Sec14-like phosphatidylinositol transfer protein, is an LD-associated protein that inhibits lipid mobilization from these particles. We further document a complex biochemical diversification of LDs during sporulation in which Sfh3 and select other LD proteins redistribute into discrete LD subpopulations. The data show that Sfh3 modulates the efficiency with which a neutral lipid hydrolase-rich LD subclass is consumed during biogenesis of specialized membrane envelopes that package replicated haploid meiotic genomes. These results present novel insights into the interface between phosphoinositide signaling and developmental regulation of LD metabolism and unveil meiosis-specific aspects of Sfh3 (and phosphoinositide) biology that are invisible to contemporary haploid-centric cell biological, proteomic, and functional genomics approaches.

  6. The helicase and RNaseIIIa domains of Arabidopsis Dicer-Like1 modulate catalytic parameters during MicroRNA biogenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Chenggang

    2012-04-03

    Dicer-Like1 (DCL1), an RNaseIII endonuclease, and Hyponastic Leaves1 (HYL1), a double-stranded RNA-binding protein, are core components of the plant microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis machinery. hyl1 mutants accumulate low levels of miRNAs and display pleiotropic developmental phenotypes. We report the identification of five new hyl1 suppressor mutants, all of which are alleles of DCL1. These new alleles affect either the helicase or the RNaseIIIa domains of DCL1, highlighting the critical functions of these domains. Biochemical analysis of the DCL1 suppressor variants reveals that they process the primary transcript (pri-miRNA) more efficiently than wild-type DCL1, with both higher Kcat and lower Km values. The DCL1 variants largely rescue wild-type miRNA accumulation levels in vivo, but do not rescue the MIRNA processing precision defects of the hyl1 mutant. In vitro, the helicase domain confers ATP dependence on DCL1-catalyzed MIRNA processing, attenuates DCL1 cleavage activity, and is required for precise MIRNA processing of some substrates. © 2012 American Society of Plant Biologists.

  7. MicroRNA regulation of stem cell differentiation and diseases of the bone and adipose tissue: Perspectives on miRNA biogenesis and cellular transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E C; Qureshi, A T; Dasa, V; Freitas, M A; Gimble, J M; Davis, T A

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression through targeting and suppression of mRNAs. miRNAs have been under investigation for the past twenty years and there is a large breadth of information on miRNAs in diseases such as cancer and immunology. Only more recently have miRNAs shown promise as a mechanism for intervention with respect to diseases of the bone and adipose tissue. In mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation, alterations in miRNA expression patterns can differentially promote an osteogenic, adipogenic, or myogenic phenotype. This manuscript reviews the current literature with respect to miRNAs in the context of MSC function with a particular focus on novel avenues for the examination of miRNA associated with bone and adipose tissue biology and disease. Specifically we highlight the need for a greater depth of investigation on MSCs with respect to miRNA biogenesis, processing, strand selection, and heterogeneity. We discuss how these mechanisms facilitate both altered miRNA expression and function. PMID:25726914

  8. Expression of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis in growth hormone receptor knockout (GHRKO) mice is enhanced but is not further improved by other potential life-extending interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesing, Adam; Masternak, Michal M; Wang, Feiya; Joseph, Anna-Maria; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Westbrook, Reyhan; Lewinski, Andrzej; Karbownik-Lewinska, Malgorzata; Bartke, Andrzej

    2011-10-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is essential for cell viability. Growth hormone receptor knockout (GHRKO), calorie restriction, and surgical visceral fat removal constitute experimental interventions to delay aging and increase life span. We examined the expression of known regulators of mitochondriogenesis: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator 1α (PGC-1α), adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK), sirtuin-1 (SIRT-1) and sirtuin-3 (SIRT-3), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), nuclear respiratory factor-1, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), and mitofusin-2 (MFN-2) in the skeletal muscles and hearts of control and calorie-restricted female GHRKO mice and in the kidneys of male GHRKOs after visceral fat removal or sham surgery. Expression of PGC-1α in skeletal muscles, AMPK, SIRT-1, SIRT-3, eNOS, and MFN-2 in the heart and PGC-1α, AMPK, SIRT-3, eNOS, and MFN-2 in kidneys was increased in GHRKO mice but was not affected by calorie restriction or visceral fat removal. GHRKO mice have increased expression of key regulators of mitochondriogenesis, which is not improved further by calorie restriction or visceral fat removal. PMID:21788651

  9. Blocking miRNA Biogenesis in Adult Forebrain Neurons Enhances Seizure Susceptibility, Fear Memory, and Food Intake by Increasing Neuronal Responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorenza, Anna; Lopez-Atalaya, Jose P; Rovira, Victor; Scandaglia, Marilyn; Geijo-Barrientos, Emilio; Barco, Angel

    2016-04-01

    The RNase Dicer is essential for the maturation of most microRNAs, a molecular system that plays an essential role in fine-tuning gene expression. To gain molecular insight into the role of Dicer and the microRNA system in brain function, we conducted 2 complementary RNA-seq screens in the hippocampus of inducible forebrain-restricted Dicer1 mutants aimed at identifying the microRNAs primarily affected by Dicer loss and their targets, respectively. Functional genomics analyses predicted the main biological processes and phenotypes associated with impaired microRNA maturation, including categories related to microRNA biology, signal transduction, seizures, and synaptic transmission and plasticity. Consistent with these predictions, we found that, soon after recombination, Dicer-deficient mice exhibited an exaggerated seizure response, enhanced induction of immediate early genes in response to different stimuli, stronger and more stable fear memory, hyperphagia, and increased excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons. In the long term, we also observed slow and progressive excitotoxic neurodegeneration. Overall, our results indicate that interfering with microRNA biogenesis causes an increase in neuronal responsiveness and disrupts homeostatic mechanisms that protect the neuron against overactivation, which may explain both the initial and late phenotypes associated with the loss of Dicer in excitatory neurons. PMID:25595182

  10. Platycodon grandiflorum A. De Candolle Ethanolic Extract Inhibits Adipogenic Regulators in 3T3-L1 Cells and Induces Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Primary Brown Preadipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye-Lin; Park, Jinbong; Park, Hyewon; Jung, Yunu; Youn, Dong-Hyun; Kang, JongWook; Jeong, Mi-Young; Um, Jae-Young

    2015-09-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of Platycodon grandiflorum A. DC. ethanolic extract (PG) on obesity in brown/white preadipocytes. The effect of PG on the differentiation and mitochondrial biogenesis of brown adipocytes is still not examined. An in vivo study showed that PG induced weight loss in mice with high-fat-diet-induced obesity. PG successfully suppressed the differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells by down-regulating cellular induction of the peroxisome proliferators activated receptor γ (PPARγ), CCAAT enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα), lipin-1, and adiponectin but increasing expression of silent mating type information regulation 2 homologue 1 (SIRT1) and the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα). The effect of PG on the adipogenic factors was compared with that of its bioactive compound platycodin D. In addition, PG increased expressions of mitochondria-related genes, including uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-coactivator 1 α (PGC1α), PR domain containing 16 (PRDM16), SIRT3, nuclear respiratory factor (NRF), and cytochrome C (CytC) in primary brown adipocytes. These results indicate that PG stimulates the differentiation of brown adipocytes through modulation of mitochondria-related genes and could offer clinical benefits as a supplement to treat obesity. PMID:26244589

  11. Structural features of microRNA (miRNA) precursors and their relevance to miRNA biogenesis and small interfering RNA/short hairpin RNA design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, Jacek; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Wilczynska, Urszula; Drath, Maria; Jasinska, Anna; Kaczynska, Danuta; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J

    2004-10-01

    We have established the structures of 10 human microRNA (miRNA) precursors using biochemical methods. Eight of these structures turned out to be different from those that were computer-predicted. The differences localized in the terminal loop region and at the opposite side of the precursor hairpin stem. We have analyzed the features of these structures from the perspectives of miRNA biogenesis and active strand selection. We demonstrated the different thermodynamic stability profiles for pre-miRNA hairpins harboring miRNAs at their 5'- and 3'-sides and discussed their functional implications. Our results showed that miRNA prediction based on predicted precursor structures may give ambiguous results, and the success rate is significantly higher for the experimentally determined structures. On the other hand, the differences between the predicted and experimentally determined structures did not affect the stability of termini produced through "conceptual dicing." This result confirms the value of thermodynamic analysis based on mfold as a predictor of strand section by RNAi-induced silencing complex (RISC). PMID:15292246

  12. A phosphatidylinositol transfer protein integrates phosphoinositide signaling with lipid droplet metabolism to regulate a developmental program of nutrient stress-induced membrane biogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Jihui; Lin, Coney Pei-Chen; Pathak, Manish C.; Temple, Brenda R.S.; Nile, Aaron H.; Mousley, Carl J.; Duncan, Mara C.; Eckert, Debra M.; Leiker, Thomas J.; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Myers, David S.; Murphy, Robert C.; Brown, H. Alex; Verdaasdonk, Jolien; Bloom, Kerry S.; Ortlund, Eric A.; Neiman, Aaron M.; Bankaitis, Vytas A. (Emory-MED); (UNCSM); (UNC); (UCHSC); (TAM); (Vanderbilt-MED); (SBU); (Utah)

    2016-07-06

    Lipid droplet (LD) utilization is an important cellular activity that regulates energy balance and release of lipid second messengers. Because fatty acids exhibit both beneficial and toxic properties, their release from LDs must be controlled. Here we demonstrate that yeast Sfh3, an unusual Sec14-like phosphatidylinositol transfer protein, is an LD-associated protein that inhibits lipid mobilization from these particles. We further document a complex biochemical diversification of LDs during sporulation in which Sfh3 and select other LD proteins redistribute into discrete LD subpopulations. The data show that Sfh3 modulates the efficiency with which a neutral lipid hydrolase-rich LD subclass is consumed during biogenesis of specialized membrane envelopes that package replicated haploid meiotic genomes. These results present novel insights into the interface between phosphoinositide signaling and developmental regulation of LD metabolism and unveil meiosis-specific aspects of Sfh3 (and phosphoinositide) biology that are invisible to contemporary haploid-centric cell biological, proteomic, and functional genomics approaches.

  13. Menin-mediated regulation of miRNA biogenesis uncovers the IRS2 pathway as a target for regulating pancreatic beta cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Buddha; Katona, Bryson W.; Hua, Xianxin

    2014-01-01

    Menin, a protein encoded by the MEN1 gene, is mutated in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). Menin acts as a tumor suppressor in endocrine organs while it is also required for transformation of a subgroup of leukemia. The recently solved crystal structure of menin with different binding partners reveals that menin is a key scaffold protein that cross-talks with various partners, including transcription factors, to regulate gene transcription. Our recent findings unravel a previously undiscovered mechanism for menin-mediated control of gene expression via processing of certain microRNA’s, thus adding to the plethora of ways in which menin regulates gene expression. By interacting with ARS2, an RNA binding protein, menin facilitates the processing of pri-let 7a and pri-miR155 to pre-let 7a and pre-miR155 respectively. Consistently, excision of the Men1 gene results in upregulation of IRS2, a let-7a target. As IRS2 is known to mediate both insulin signaling and insulin-induced cell proliferation, and let-7a targets include oncogenes like RAS and HMGA2, a deeper understanding of the menin-ARS2 complex in regulating miRNA biogenesis will yield further insights into the pathogenesis of the MEN1 syndrome and other menin-associated malignancies. PMID:25594065

  14. Disruption of ribosome assembly in yeast blocks cotranscriptional pre-rRNA processing and affects the global hierarchy of ribosome biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talkish, Jason; Biedka, Stephanie; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Zhang, Jingyu; Tang, Lan; Strahler, John R; Andrews, Philip C; Maddock, Janine R; Woolford, John L

    2016-06-01

    In higher eukaryotes, pre-rRNA processing occurs almost exclusively post-transcriptionally. This is not the case in rapidly dividing yeast, as the majority of nascent pre-rRNAs are processed cotranscriptionally, with cleavage at the A2 site first releasing a pre-40S ribosomal subunit followed by release of a pre-60S ribosomal subunit upon transcription termination. Ribosome assembly is driven in part by hierarchical association of assembly factors and r-proteins. Groups of proteins are thought to associate with pre-ribosomes cotranscriptionally during early assembly steps, whereas others associate later, after transcription is completed. Here we describe a previously uncharacterized phenotype observed upon disruption of ribosome assembly, in which normally late-binding proteins associate earlier, with pre-ribosomes containing 35S pre-rRNA. As previously observed by many other groups, we show that disruption of 60S subunit biogenesis results in increased amounts of 35S pre-rRNA, suggesting that a greater fraction of pre-rRNAs are processed post-transcriptionally. Surprisingly, we found that early pre-ribosomes containing 35S pre-rRNA also contain proteins previously thought to only associate with pre-ribosomes after early pre-rRNA processing steps have separated maturation of the two subunits. We believe the shift to post-transcriptional processing is ultimately due to decreased cellular division upon disruption of ribosome assembly. When cells are grown under stress or to high density, a greater fraction of pre-rRNAs are processed post-transcriptionally and follow an alternative processing pathway. Together, these results affirm the principle that ribosome assembly occurs through different, parallel assembly pathways and suggest that there is a kinetic foot-race between the formation of protein binding sites and pre-rRNA processing events. PMID:27036125

  15. Expression of Mitochondrial Gene Fragments within the Tapetum Induce Male Sterility by Limiting the Biogenesis of the Respiratory Machinery in Transgenic Tobacco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Felix Shaya; Svetlana Gaiduk; Ido Keren; Sofia Shevtsov; Hanita Zemah; Eduard Belausov; Dalia Evenor; Moshe Reuveni; Oren Ostersetzer-Biran

    2012-01-01

    Plant mitochondrial genomes (mtDNAs) are large and undergo frequent recombination events.A common phenotype that emerges as a consequence of altered mtDNA structure is cytoplasmic-male sterility (CMS).The molecular basis for CMS remains unclear,but it seems logical that altered respiration activities would result in reduced pollen production.Analysis of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mtDNAs indicated that CMS-associated loci often contain fragments of known organellar genes.These may assemble with organellar complexes and thereby interfere with normal respiratory functions.Here,we analyzed whether the expression of truncated fragments of mitochondrial genes (i.e.atp4,cox1 and rps3) may induce male sterility by limiting the biogenesis of the respiratory machinery.cDNA fragments corresponding to atp4f,cox1f and rps3f were cloned in-frame to a mitochondrial localization signal and a C-termini HA-tag under a tapetum-speciflc promoter and introduced to tobacco plants by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.The constructs were then analyzed for their effect on mitochondrial activity and pollen fertility.Atp4f,Cox1f and Rps3f plants demonstrated male sterility phenotypes,which were tightly correlated with the expression of the recombinant fragments in the floral meristem.Fractionation of native organellar extracts showed that the recombinant ATP4f-HA,COX1f-HA and RPS3f-HA proteins are found in large membrane-associated particles.Analysis of the respiratory activities and protein profiles indicated that organellar complex I was altered in Atp4f,Cox1f and Rps3f plants.

  16. Comparative metabolism of branched-chain amino acids to precursors of juvenile hormone biogenesis in corpora allata of lepidopterous versus nonlepidopterous insects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brindle, P.A.; Schooley, D.A.; Tsai, L.W.; Baker, F.C.

    1988-08-05

    Comparative studies were performed on the role of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) in juvenile hormone (JH) biosynthesis using several lepidopterous and nonlepidopterous insects. Corpora cardiaca-corpora allata complexes (CC-CA, the corpora allata being the organ of JH biogenesis) were maintained in culture medium containing a uniformly /sup 14/C-labeled BCAA, together with (methyl-/sup 3/H)methionine as mass marker for JH quantification. BCAA catabolism was quantified by directly analyzing the medium for the presence of /sup 14/C-labeled propionate and/or acetate, while JHs were extracted, purified by liquid chromatography, and subjected to double-label liquid scintillation counting. Our results indicate that active BCAA catabolism occurs within the CC-CA of lepidopterans, and this efficiently provides propionyl-CoA (from isoleucine or valine) for the biosynthesis of the ethyl branches of JH I and II. Acetyl-CoA, formed from isoleucine or leucine catabolism, is also utilized by lepidopteran CC-CA for biosynthesizing JH III and the acetate-derived portions of the ethyl-branched JHs. In contrast, CC-CA of nonlepidopterans fail to catabolize BCAA. Consequently, exogenous isoleucine or leucine does not serve as a carbon source for the biosynthesis of JH III by these glands, and no propionyl-CoA is produced for genesis of ethyl-branched JHs. This is the first observation of a tissue-specific metabolic difference which in part explains why these novel homosesquiterpenoids exist in lepidopterans, but not in nonlepidopterans.

  17. SUPPRESSOR OF VARIEGATION4,a New var2 Suppressor Locus,Encodes a Pioneer Protein that Is Required for Chloroplast Biogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Yu; Gordon R.Gray; Steven R.Rodermel; Sung-Soon Park; Xiayan Liu; Andrew Foudree; Aigen Fu; Marta Powikrowska; Anastassia Khrouchtchova; Poul Erik Jensen; Jillian N.Kriger

    2011-01-01

    VAR2 is an integral thylakoid membrane protein and a member of the versatile FtsH class of metalloproteases in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Recessive mutations in the VAR2 locus give rise to variegated plants (var2) that contain white sectors with abnormal plastids and green sectors with normal-appearing chloroplasts. In a continuing effort to isolate second-site suppressors of var2 variegation,we characterize in this report ems2505,a suppressor strain that has a vi-rescent phenotype due to a missense mutation in At4g28590,the gene for a pioneer protein. We designated this gene SVR4 (for SUPPRESSOR OF VARIEGATI0N4) and the mutant allele in ems2505 as svr4-1. We demonstrate that SVR4 is located in chloroplasts and that svr4-1 single mutants are normal with respect to chloroplast anatomy and thylakoid membrane protein accumulation. However,they are modestly impaired in several aspects of photochemistry and have enhanced non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) capacity. A T-DNA insertion allele of SVR4,svr4-2,is seedling-lethal due to an early blockage of chloroplast development. We conclude that SVR4 is essential for chloroplast biogenesis,and hypothesize that SVR4 mediates some aspect of thylakoid structure or function that controls NPQ. We propose that in the suppressor strain,photoinhibitory pressure caused by a lack of VAR2 is ameliorated early in chloroplast development by enhanced NPQ capacity caused by reduced SVR4 activity. This would result in an increase in the number of chloroplasts that are able to surmount a threshold necessary to avoid photo-damage and thereby develop into functional chloroplasts.

  18. A Critical Role of Lyst-Interacting Protein5, a Positive Regulator of Multivesicular Body Biogenesis, in Plant Responses to Heat and Salt Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Yang, Yan; Wang, Zhe; Zhou, Jie; Fan, Baofang; Chen, Zhixiang

    2015-09-01

    Multivesicular bodies (MVBs) are unique endosomes containing vesicles in the lumen and play critical roles in many cellular processes. We have recently shown that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Lyst-Interacting Protein5 (LIP5), a positive regulator of the Suppressor of K(+) Transport Growth Defect1 (SKD1) AAA ATPase in MVB biogenesis, is a critical target of the mitogen-activated protein kinases MPK3 and MPK6 and plays an important role in the plant immune system. In this study, we report that the LIP5-regulated MVB pathway also plays a critical role in plant responses to abiotic stresses. Disruption of LIP5 causes compromised tolerance to both heat and salt stresses. The critical role of LIP5 in plant tolerance to abiotic stresses is dependent on its ability to interact with Suppressor of K(+) Transport Growth Defect1. When compared with wild-type plants, lip5 mutants accumulate increased levels of ubiquitinated protein aggregates and NaCl under heat and salt stresses, respectively. Further analysis using fluorescent dye and MVB markers reveals that abiotic stress increases the formation of endocytic vesicles and MVBs in a largely LIP5-dependent manner. LIP5 is also required for the salt-induced increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species, which have been implicated in signaling of salt stress responses. Basal levels of LIP5 phosphorylation by MPKs and the stability of LIP5 are elevated by salt stress, and mutation of MPK phosphorylation sites in LIP5 reduces the stability and compromises the ability to complement the lip5 salt-sensitive mutant phenotype. These results collectively indicate that the MVB pathway is positively regulated by pathogen/stress-responsive MPK3/6 through LIP5 phosphorylation and plays a critical role in broad plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. PMID:26229051

  19. The Yb body, a major site for Piwi-associated RNA biogenesis and a gateway for Piwi expression and transport to the nucleus in somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hongying; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Ku, Hsueh-Yen; Liu, Na; Zhong, Mei; Lin, Haifan

    2011-02-01

    Despite exciting progress in understanding the Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway in the germ line, less is known about this pathway in somatic cells. We showed previously that Piwi, a key component of the piRNA pathway in Drosophila, is regulated in somatic cells by Yb, a novel protein containing an RNA helicase-like motif and a Tudor-like domain. Yb is specifically expressed in gonadal somatic cells and regulates piwi in somatic niche cells to control germ line and somatic stem cell self-renewal. However, the molecular basis of the regulation remains elusive. Here, we report that Yb recruits Armitage (Armi), a putative RNA helicase involved in the piRNA pathway, to the Yb body, a cytoplasmic sphere to which Yb is exclusively localized. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation experiments show that Yb forms a complex with Armi. In Yb mutants, Armi is dispersed throughout the cytoplasm, and Piwi fails to enter the nucleus and is rarely detectable in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, somatic piRNAs are drastically diminished, and soma-expressing transposons are desilenced. These observations indicate a crucial role of Yb and the Yb body in piRNA biogenesis, possibly by regulating the activity of Armi that controls the entry of Piwi into the nucleus for its function. Finally, we discovered putative endo-siRNAs in the flamenco locus and the Yb dependence of their expression. These observations further implicate a role for Yb in transposon silencing via both the piRNA and endo-siRNA pathways. PMID:21106531

  20. Disruption of snRNP biogenesis factors Tgs1 and pICln induces phenotypes that mirror aspects of SMN-Gemins complex perturbation in Drosophila, providing new insights into spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Rebecca M; Fenech Salerno, Benji; Vassallo, Neville; Bordonne, Rémy; Cauchi, Ruben J

    2016-10-01

    The neuromuscular disorder, spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), results from insufficient levels of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. Together with Gemins 2-8 and Unrip, SMN forms the large macromolecular SMN-Gemins complex, which is known to be indispensable for chaperoning the assembly of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). It remains unclear whether disruption of this function is responsible for the selective neuromuscular degeneration in SMA. In the present study, we first show that loss of wmd, the Drosophila Unrip orthologue, has a negative impact on the motor system. However, due to lack of a functional relationship between wmd/Unrip and Gemin3, it is likely that Unrip joined the SMN-Gemins complex only recently in evolution. Second, we uncover that disruption of either Tgs1 or pICln, two cardinal players in snRNP biogenesis, results in viability and motor phenotypes that closely resemble those previously uncovered on loss of the constituent members of the SMN-Gemins complex. Interestingly, overexpression of both factors leads to motor dysfunction in Drosophila, a situation analogous to that of Gemin2. Toxicity is conserved in the yeast S. pombe where pICln overexpression induces a surplus of Sm proteins in the cytoplasm, indicating that a block in snRNP biogenesis is partly responsible for this phenotype. Importantly, we show a strong functional relationship and a physical interaction between Gemin3 and either Tgs1 or pICln. We propose that snRNP biogenesis is the pathway connecting the SMN-Gemins complex to a functional neuromuscular system, and its disturbance most likely leads to the motor dysfunction that is typical in SMA. PMID:27388936

  1. 运动性骨骼肌线粒体生物合成的转录及转录后调节%Transcriptional and Post-transcriptional Regulation of Exercise-induced Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻伯海; 朱立艳; 余洲

    2011-01-01

    One of the most dramatic phenotypic alterations in adults occurs in mitochondria in response to exercise or chronic contractile activity.Contractile activity-induced mitochondrial adaptations in muscle are highly specific,and dependent upon the type of exercise(i.e.resistance versus endurance),as well as its frequency,intensity and duration.Changes in mitochondrial biogenesis produced by exercise are a result of multiple molecular events.The multiple transcriptional and post-transcriptional pathways are operative in exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis.In skeletal muscle,exercise can play a significant role in accelerating the rate of mitochondrial biogenesis,which can serve to attenuate the possible mitochondrial dysfunction that arises during aging and conditions of muscle disuse,thereby improving work performance and the quality of life.%运动或长期运动可引起线粒体的表型发生改变。运动性骨骼肌线粒体的适应具有高度特异性,取决于训练类型(力量或耐力)以及训练的频率、强度和持续时间。运动诱导线粒体的生物合成是多分子事件相互作用的结果。转录及转录后调节在运动诱导线粒体的生物合成起着重要的作用。运动可促进骨骼肌线粒体的生物合成,减缓由于年龄或不运动引起线粒体功能失调,从而提高工作能力和生活的质量。

  2. In vivo roles of BamA, BamB and BamD in the biogenesis of BamA, a core protein of the β-barrel assembly machine of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Rajeev; Stikeleather, Ryan; Gabriele, Rebecca

    2015-03-13

    Assembly of the β-barrel outer membrane proteins (OMPs) is an essential cellular process in Gram-negative bacteria and in the mitochondria and chloroplasts of eukaryotes--two organelles of bacterial origin. Central to this process is the conserved β-barrel OMP that belongs to the Omp85 superfamily. In Escherichia coli, BamA is the core β-barrel OMP and, together with four outer membrane lipoproteins, BamBCDE, constitutes the β-barrel assembly machine (BAM). In this paper, we investigated the roles of BamD, an essential lipoprotein, and BamB in BamA biogenesis. Depletion of BamD caused impairment in BamA biogenesis and cessation of cell growth. These defects of BamD depletion were partly reversed by single-amino-acid substitutions mapping within the β-barrel domain of BamA. However, in the absence of BamB, the positive effects of the β-barrel substitutions on BamA biogenesis under BamD depletion conditions were nullified. By employing a BamA protein bearing one such substitution, F474L, it was demonstrated that the mutant BamA protein could not only assemble without BamD but also facilitate the assembly of wild-type BamA expressed in trans. Based on these data, we propose a model in which the Bam lipoproteins, which are localized to the outer membrane by the BAM-independent Lol pathway, aid in the creation of new BAM complexes by serving as outer membrane receptors and folding factors for nascent BamA molecules. The newly assembled BAM holocomplex then catalyzes the assembly of substrate OMPs and BamA. These in vivo findings are corroborated by recently published in vitro data. PMID:24792419

  3. Skeletal Mineralization Deficits and Impaired Biogenesis and Function of Chondrocyte-Derived Matrix Vesicles in Phospho1(-/-) and Phospho1/Pi t1 Double-Knockout Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Manisha C; Bottini, Massimo; Cory, Esther; Bhattacharya, Kunal; Kuss, Pia; Narisawa, Sonoko; Sah, Robert L; Beck, Laurent; Fadeel, Bengt; Farquharson, Colin; Millán, José Luis

    2016-06-01

    provide compelling evidence that PHOSPHO1 function is involved in MV biogenesis. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26773408

  4. Proteomic analyses reveal the key roles of BrlA and AbaA in biogenesis of gliotoxin in Aspergillus fumigatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Kwang-Soo, E-mail: shinks@dju.kr [Division of Life Science, Daejeon University, Daejeon, 300-716 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Hwan [Biomedical Omics Team, Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI), Ohcang, 368-883 (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Analytical Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Bio-Analytical Science, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Jae-Hyuk, E-mail: jyu1@wisc.edu [Departments of Bacteriology and Genetics, The University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, WI, 53706 (United States)

    2015-07-31

    The opportunistic human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus primarily reproduces by forming a large number of asexual spores (conidia). Sequential activation of the central regulators BrlA, AbaA and WetA is necessary for the fungus to undergo asexual development. In this study, to address the presumed roles of these key developmental regulators during proliferation of the fungus, we analyzed and compared the proteomes of vegetative cells of wild type (WT) and individual mutant strains. Approximately 1300 protein spots were detectable from 2-D electrophoresis gels. Among these, 13 proteins exhibiting significantly altered accumulation levels were further identified by ESI-MS/MS. Markedly, we found that the GliM and GliT proteins associated with gliotoxin (GT) biosynthesis and self-protection of the fungus from GT were significantly down-regulated in the ΔabaA and ΔbrlA mutants. Moreover, mRNA levels of other GT biosynthetic genes including gliM, gliP, gliT, and gliZ were significantly reduced in both mutant strains, and no and low levels of GT were detectable in the ΔbrlA and ΔabaA mutant strains, respectively. As GliT is required for the protection of the fungus from GT, growth of the ΔbrlA mutant with reduced levels of GliT was severely impaired by exogenous GT. Our studies demonstrate that AbaA and BrlA positively regulate expression of the GT biosynthetic gene cluster in actively growing vegetative cells, and likely bridge morphological and chemical development during the life-cycle of A. fumigatus. - Highlights: • Proteome analyses of WT and mutants reveal 13 differentially expressed proteins. • The GliT and GliM proteins are significantly down-regulated by ΔabaA and ΔbrlA. • Expression of other gliotoxin biosynthetic genes is lowered by ΔabaA and ΔbrlA. • Growth of ΔbrlA strain lacking GliT is completely inhibited by exogenous gliotoxin. • BrlA and AbaA play key roles in biogenesis of gliotoxin in Aspergillus fumigatus.

  5. Proteomic analyses reveal the key roles of BrlA and AbaA in biogenesis of gliotoxin in Aspergillus fumigatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The opportunistic human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus primarily reproduces by forming a large number of asexual spores (conidia). Sequential activation of the central regulators BrlA, AbaA and WetA is necessary for the fungus to undergo asexual development. In this study, to address the presumed roles of these key developmental regulators during proliferation of the fungus, we analyzed and compared the proteomes of vegetative cells of wild type (WT) and individual mutant strains. Approximately 1300 protein spots were detectable from 2-D electrophoresis gels. Among these, 13 proteins exhibiting significantly altered accumulation levels were further identified by ESI-MS/MS. Markedly, we found that the GliM and GliT proteins associated with gliotoxin (GT) biosynthesis and self-protection of the fungus from GT were significantly down-regulated in the ΔabaA and ΔbrlA mutants. Moreover, mRNA levels of other GT biosynthetic genes including gliM, gliP, gliT, and gliZ were significantly reduced in both mutant strains, and no and low levels of GT were detectable in the ΔbrlA and ΔabaA mutant strains, respectively. As GliT is required for the protection of the fungus from GT, growth of the ΔbrlA mutant with reduced levels of GliT was severely impaired by exogenous GT. Our studies demonstrate that AbaA and BrlA positively regulate expression of the GT biosynthetic gene cluster in actively growing vegetative cells, and likely bridge morphological and chemical development during the life-cycle of A. fumigatus. - Highlights: • Proteome analyses of WT and mutants reveal 13 differentially expressed proteins. • The GliT and GliM proteins are significantly down-regulated by ΔabaA and ΔbrlA. • Expression of other gliotoxin biosynthetic genes is lowered by ΔabaA and ΔbrlA. • Growth of ΔbrlA strain lacking GliT is completely inhibited by exogenous gliotoxin. • BrlA and AbaA play key roles in biogenesis of gliotoxin in Aspergillus fumigatus

  6. Discovery of a Promiscuous Non-Heme Iron Halogenase in Ambiguine Alkaloid Biogenesis: Implication for an Evolvable Enzyme Family for Late-Stage Halogenation of Aliphatic Carbons in Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillwig, Matthew L; Zhu, Qin; Ittiamornkul, Kuljira; Liu, Xinyu

    2016-05-01

    The elucidation of enigmatic enzymatic chlorination timing in ambiguine indole alkaloid biogenesis led to the discovery and characterization of AmbO5 protein as a promiscuous non-heme iron aliphatic halogenase. AmbO5 was shown capable of selectively modifying seven structurally distinct ambiguine, fischerindole and hapalindole alkaloids with chlorine via late-stage aliphatic C-H group functionalization. Cross-comparison of AmbO5 with a previously characterized aliphatic halogenase homolog WelO5 that has a restricted substrate scope led to the identification of a C-terminal sequence motif important for substrate tolerance and specificity. Mutagenesis of 18 residues of WelO5 within the identified sequence motif led to a functional mutant with an expanded substrate scope identical to AmbO5, but an altered substrate specificity from the wild-type enzymes. These observations collectively provide evidence on the evolvable nature of AmbO5/WelO5 enzyme duo in the context of hapalindole-type alkaloid biogenesis and implicate their promise for the future development of designer biocatalysis for the selective late-stage modification of unactivated aliphatic carbon centers in small molecules with halogens. PMID:27027281

  7. Evolution: from cosmogenesis to biogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The volume contains the material of an interdisciplinary evolution symposium. The purpose was to shed some light on possible connections between steps of evolution of matter on different levels of organisation. The topics involved are as follow: cosmogenesis; galactic and stellar evolution; formation and evolution of the solar system; global atmospheric and tectonic changes of Earth; viral evolution; phylogeny and evolution of terrestrial life; evolution of neural system; hominization. The material also includes some discussions of the underlying phenomena and laws of nature. (author)

  8. A Neutral Theory of Biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracin, Alessandro

    1981-12-01

    The selective Darwinian theory of chemical evolution is critically reviewed and the tentative conclusion is reached that neither the theoretical analyses nor the experiments with phages can really prove it. An alternative proposal is put forth which considers the possibility that the biogenetic process has been driven by stochastic forces, e.g. it took place in the absence of Darwinian selection which, in turn, started only when the first protocells came into existence. The dynamics of the early self-organization of living structures should be understood in terms of self-assembly. The complexification of living matter is thus not represented as a gradual phenomenon but as a series of abrupt and relatively fast transitions consisting in the aggregation of pre-systems which had evolved by their own. The shift towards new and variegated states proposed by the bifurcation theory are not considered particularly relevant for reasons reported in the text, nor is it believed that dissipation can entirely account for the order observed in living cells.

  9. EPO对慢性缺氧心肌细胞线粒体生物合成的影响%Effect of erythropoietin on mitochondrial biogenesis in cardiomyocytes during chronic hypoxia in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周胜凯; 秦川; 陈林; 肖颖彬

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of erythropoietin (EPO) on the mitochondrial biogenesis in rat cardiomyocytes under the condition of chronic hypoxia.Methods Rat cardiomyocyte-derived H9c2 cells were deprived of oxygen for 7 d to establish the chronic hypoxia model (94% N2,5%CO2and 1% O2).Then the obtained H9c2 cells were treated by recombinant human EPO (rhEPO,5,10 and 20 U/ml) for 3 or 7 d.Fluorescent probe was used to mark mitochondria in the cells for the amount of mitochondria.The protein levds of Akt,phospho-Akt (serine473),endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS),and phospho-eNOS (serine1177) were determined with Western blotting.RT-PCR was used to detect the relative copy number of mitochondrial DNA.Results rhEPO treatment for 7 d resulted in a significant increase in the amount and copy number of mitochondria (P < 0.05).The phosphorylation levels of Akt and eNOS were also enhanced,but those of akt and eNOS had no change (P > 0.05).Conclusion EPO improves mitochondrial biogenesis in the cardiomyocytes exposure to chronic hypoxia,probably through Akt and eNOS signal transduction.%目的 观察促红细胞生成素(erythropoietin,EPO)在慢性缺氧条件下对心肌线粒体生物合成的影响及其可能的机制.方法 将H9c2心肌细胞株置入缺氧培养箱7 d(94%N2,5% CO2,1%O2),建立H9c2心肌细胞株慢性缺氧模型;采用5、10、20 U/mL不同浓度的rhEPO(recombinant human erythropoietin;重组人促红细胞生成素)干预处理后,用荧光探针标记线粒体,观察线粒体数目的变化;RT-PCR技术检测线粒体DNA的相对拷贝数变化;Western blot技术检测Akt、eNOS及其磷酸化蛋白水平的变化.结果 rhEPO干预7d后线粒体数目及拷贝数增加(P<0.05);Akt、eNOS蛋白磷酸化水平增强(P<0.05),Akt、eNOS总蛋白无明显变化(P>0.05).结论 EPO增强了慢性缺氧心肌细胞的线粒体生物合成,Akt、eNOS可能是EPO增强线粒体生物合成的重要信号通路.

  10. eNOS se correlaciona com a biogênese mitocondrial em corações com cardiopatia congênita e cianose eNOS correlates with mitochondrial biogenesis in hearts of congenital heart disease with cyanosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Xiao

    2012-09-01

    cardiopatia congênita com cianose, que poderia ser a resposta adaptativa à hipóxia crônica e possivelmente envolve suprarregulação da eNOS. (Arq Bras Cardiol. 2012; [online].ahead print, PP.0-0BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial biogenesis program in heart appears to exhibit adaptive remodeling following biomechanical and oxidative stress. The adaptive mechanisms that protect myocardium metabolism during hypoxia are coordinated in part by nitric oxide (NO. OBJECTIVE: To observe mitochondrial biogenesis and nitric oxide synthase (NOS expression in hearts of congenital heart disease with cyanosis, discuss mitochondrial response to chronic hypoxia in myocardium. METHODS: 20 patients with cyanotic (n=10 or acyanotic cardiac defects (n=10 were investigated. Samples from the right ventricular outflow tract myocardium taken during operation were studied. Morphometric analysis of mitochondria was performed with transmission electron microscope. Relative mtDNA/nDNA ratio was determined with real-time PCR. Cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COXI, peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1, and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam transcript levels were detected by real-time fluorescent RT-PCR. COXI and nNOS, iNOS and eNOS protein levels were measured with western blot. RESULTS: Mitochondrial volume density (Vv and numerical density (Nv were significantly elevated in patients with cyanotic compared to acyanotic congenital heart disease. Elevated mtDNA and up-regulated COXI, PGC-1α, NRF1 and Tfam mRNA levels were observed in cyanotic patients. Protein levels of COXI and eNOS were significantly higher in the myocardium of cyanotic than of acyanotic patients. PGC-1α transcript levels correlated with the levels of eNOS. Conclusion: Mitochondrial biogenesis is activated in right ventricular outflow tract myocardium in congenital heart disease with cyanosis, which could be the adaptive response to chronic hypoxia and possibly

  11. 运动诱导骨骼肌线粒体生成中沉默信息调节因子1的作用**☆%Silent information regulator factor-1 regulates exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in the skeletal muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国华

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Silent information regulator factor-1 is an energy metabolism regulator newly received attention in sports science, which playing roles in skeletal exercise-induced muscle mitochondrial biogenesis with other regulatory factors. OBJECTIVE: To review the effect and mechanism of silent information regulator factor-1 on skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis in exercise. METHODS:The PubMed database and Highwire database were retrieved with computer for the articles on exercise, silent information regulator factor-1 and skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis from January 2000 to January 2013 with the key words of“SIRT1, AMPK, PGC-1α, mitochondrial biogenesis, skeletal muscle, exercise”in English. After primary search, the articles about the association between silent information regulator factor-1 and skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis in exercise were selected. Articles on repeated experiment were excluded. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Total y 165 relevant articles were selected, and articles on repetitive research were excluded, so finaly 62 articles were included. As a NAD+-depended deacetylase, silent information regulator factor-1 induced skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis by up-regulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator after activated during exercise. The molecular mechanism involved adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and hypoxia-inducible factor 2α. In recent years, the effect of silent information regulator factor-1 on skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis was doubt, the researchers though that silent information regulator factor-1 was not required for exercise-induced muscle mitochondrial biogenesis. Silent information regulator factor-1 plays an important role in exercise-induced muscle mitochondrial biogenesis. But protein and activity detection methods are different in experimental results.%  背景:沉默信息调节因子1是新近受到体育科学领域关注的能量代谢调节

  12. Discovery of Evolutionary Divergence of Biological Nitrogen Fixation and Photosynthesis: Fine Tuning of Biogenesis of the NifH and the ChlL by a Peptidyl-Prolyl Cis/Trans Isomerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nara Gavini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Despite the structural and functional similarities between the nitrogenase that performs biological nitrogen fixation reaction and the Dark Protochlorphyllide Oxidoreductase (DPOR that performs chlorophyll-biosynthesis, attempts to substitute nitrogenase-components with DPOR-components have hitherto failed. This investigation was undertaken to test if Chlamydomonas reinhardtii protochlorophyllide (Pchlide reductase (ChlL that shares some structural similarity with Nitrogenase Reductase (NifH could complement the functions of NifH in biological nitrogen fixation of Azotobacter vinelandii. Approach: Genetic complementation studies were performed to test if the chlL gene and its mutants cloned under transcriptional control of nifH promoter (nifHp in a broad-host range low copy plasmid pBG1380 could render a Nif+ phenotype to NifH-deficient A. vinelandii strains. Results: Expression of ChlL could render Nif+ phenotype to NifH-deficient A. vinelandii only in the absence of NifM, a nif-specific PPIase essential for biogenesis of NifH. The ChlL mutants Cys95Thr and Cys129Thr were unable to substitute for NifH. Thus, the conserved cysteine ligands of [4Fe-4S] cluster in ChlL are essential for successful substitution of NifH by ChlL. Since C-termini of NifH and ChlL demonstrated the least similarity and Pro258, a substrate for the PPIase activity of NifM, is located in the C-terminus of NifH, we posited that replacing the C-terminus of NifH with that of ChlL would render NifM-independence to NifH. The NifH-ChlL chimera could support the growth of NifH- and NifM-deficient A. vinelandii in nitrogen limiting conditions implying that it has acquired NifM-independence. Conclusion/Recommendations: Collectively, these observations suggest that NifM, an evolutionarily conserved nif-specific PPIase, could have contributed to the functional divergence of biological nitrogen fixation and photosynthesis during evolution by virtue of its ability to

  13. Chromoplast biogenesis in Chelidonium majus petals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Ljubešić

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The differentiation of chromoplasts, with special emphasis on the formation and the organisation of chromoplast fibrils, was followed in the petals of the greater celandine, Chelidonium majus L. Electron microscopic observations showed that, in the epidermis, differentiation of chromoplasts started from leucoplasts, while mesophyll chromoplasts originated from chloroplasts. During petal maturation, fibrils accumulated in the plastids, often arranging in a parallel fashion to form compact birefringent bundles. Immediately before flower opening, these fibrillar bundles started to disorganise, and, at anthesis, most chromoplasts contained widely spaced fibrils which were irregularly dispersed through the plastid interior. During chromoplast differentiation, fibrils were commonly observed to protrude from plastoglobules, suggesting the possible site of their formation. Western analysis indicated that a protein antigenically related to fibrillin from pepper chromoplasts participates in the constitution of fibrils in Chelidonium petals.

  14. Biogenesis of the mitochondrial phosphate carrier

    OpenAIRE

    Zara, Vincenzo; Rassow, Joachim; Wachter, Elmar; Tropschug, Maximilian; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Neupert, Walter; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    1991-01-01

    The mitochondrial phosphate carrier (PiC) is a member of the family of inner-membrane carrier proteins which are generally synthesized without a cleavable presequence. Surprisingly, the cDNA sequences of bovine and rat PiC suggested the existence of an amino-terminal extension sequence in the precursor of PiC. By expressing PiC in vitro, we found that PiC is indeed synthesized as a larger precursor. This precursor was imported and proteolytically processed by mitochondria, whereby the correct...

  15. Protein translocation and thylakoid biogenesis in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frain, Kelly M; Gangl, Doris; Jones, Alexander; Zedler, Julie A Z; Robinson, Colin

    2016-03-01

    Cyanobacteria exhibit a complex form of membrane differentiation that sets them apart from most bacteria. Many processes take place in the plasma membrane, but photosynthetic light capture, electron transport and ATP synthesis take place in an abundant internal thylakoid membrane. This review considers how this system of subcellular compartmentalisation is maintained, and how proteins are directed towards the various subcompartments--specifically the plasma membrane, periplasm, thylakoid membrane and thylakoid lumen. The involvement of Sec-, Tat- and signal recognition particle- (SRP)-dependent protein targeting pathways is discussed, together with the possible involvement of a so-called 'spontaneous' pathway for the insertion of membrane proteins, previously characterised for chloroplast thylakoid membrane proteins. An intriguing aspect of cyanobacterial cell biology is that most contain only a single set of genes encoding Sec, Tat and SRP components, yet the proteomes of the plasma and thylakoid membranes are very different. The implications for protein sorting mechanisms are considered. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Prof Conrad Mullineaux. PMID:26341016

  16. MiRNA Biogenesis and Intersecting Pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ben Chaabane, Samir

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that function as guide molecules in RNA silencing. Plant miRNAs are critical for plant growth, development and stress response, and are processed in Arabidopsis from primary miRNA transcripts (pri-miRNAs) by the endonuclease activity of the DICER-LIKE1...... (DCL1) protein complex. Mature miRNAs are loaded onto and guide an ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1) effector complex, leading to target mRNA silencing. The miRNA pathway is under tight temporal and spatial control and is regulated at multiple levels from transcription and precursor processing through miRNA mode of...... action and turnover. During my PhD period we have shown that the STA1 protein, a factor for pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA stability, is specifically involved in the splicing of pri-miRNAs and in the modulation of DCL1 transcript levels. Also, we established a novel and essential regulatory network in which...

  17. Biogenesis and Membrane Targeting of Lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Shin-Ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-09-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins represent a unique class of membrane proteins, which are anchored to membranes through triacyl chains attached to the amino-terminal cysteine. They are involved in various functions localized in cell envelope. Escherichia coli possesses more than 90 species of lipoproteins, most of which are localized in the outer membrane, with others being in the inner membrane. All lipoproteins are synthesized in the cytoplasm with an N-terminal signal peptide, translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the periplasmic surface of the inner membrane, and converted to mature lipoproteins through sequential reactions catalyzed by three lipoprotein-processing enzymes: Lgt, LspA, and Lnt. The sorting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane requires a system comprising five Lol proteins. An ATP-binding cassette transporter, LolCDE, initiates the sorting by mediating the detachment of lipoproteins from the inner membrane. Formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex is coupled to this LolCDE-dependent release reaction. LolA accommodates the amino-terminal acyl chain of lipoproteins in its hydrophobic cavity, thereby generating a hydrophilic complex that can traverse the periplasmic space by diffusion. Lipoproteins are then transferred to LolB on the outer membrane and anchored to the inner leaflet of the outer membrane by the action of LolB. In contrast, since LolCDE does not recognize lipoproteins possessing Asp at position +2, these lipoproteins remain anchored to the inner membrane. Genes for Lol proteins are widely conserved among gram-negative bacteria, and Lol-mediated outer membrane targeting of lipoproteins is considered to be the general lipoprotein localization mechanism. PMID:26443779

  18. Biogenesis of Multivesicular Body and Protein Sorting: No One of ESCRT,Vps4 and Ubiquitination Can Be Missed%多囊体生物发生和蛋白质分拣——ESCRT、Vps4、Ubiquitination一个都不能少

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏恒传; 张春霞; 冯凡; 袁弋; 周阳; 刘晓勇; 朱克明; 姚勤; 陈克平

    2013-01-01

    Multivesicular body (MVB) is a dynamic subcellular organelle formed by invagination of the limiting membrane of late endosome. MVB is an essential transport and sorting station for membranes and proteins in eukaryotic organisms. MVB pathway is intimately involved in various processes, including signal transduction, cytokinesis, gene silencing, autophagy, protein quality control and virus budding. The biogenesis of MVB requires more than 20 vacuolar protein sorting (Vps) proteins. Many of them can assemble into four distinct complexes ESCRT 0, Ⅰ,Ⅱ,Ⅲ(endosomal sorting complexs required for transport) on the endosomal membrane. ESCRTs and Vps4 are considered to be the most important components in MVB pathway. ESCRT 0 together with clathrin can form microdomain on endosomal membrane where they cluster ubiquitinated cargo proteins. ESCRT Ⅰ and Ⅱ can induce the budding of intraluminal vesicles (ILVs), prompt the formation process and sort protein cargoes into ILVs. ESCRT Ⅲ can constrict, cleave the bud neck and finish the membrane abscission, the last stage of MVB formation. Vps4 can disassemble ESCRT complexes and recycle them. Ubiquitinated cargo proteins and ubiquitination can also regulate the localization and function of ESCRTs. Together, these recent discoveries demonstrate that the sequential and co-ordinated actions of ubiquitinated cargo proteins, ESCRTs and Vps4 are the major driving force for the biogenesis of MVB and protein sorting process. In this review, we focus on the protein-protein interaction and mainly discuss the assembly mechanism, interaction and function of ESCRT complexes and Vps4 high-order oligomers, as well as the regulation of ESCRTs by ubiquitinated proteins and ubiquitination. We also suggest prospective studies based on these discussions.%多囊体(multivesicular body,MVB)是由晚期内吞体的限制膜内陷出芽而形成的动态的亚细胞结构,是真核细胞重要的膜和蛋白质运输与分拣中心,并与信号

  19. Utility of transplantation in studying adipocyte biogenesis and function

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yiying

    2009-01-01

    Adipose tissue plays important roles in the regulation of energy homeostasis and metabolism. Two features distinguish adipose tissue from other organs - the ability to greatly expand its mass, via increases in cell size and/or number, and the wide anatomical distribution. While adipose tissue function is greatly affected by adipocyte size and anatomic location, regulations of adipocyte size, number, and body fat distribution are poorly understood. Transplantation of either mature adipose tiss...

  20. The biogenesis and function of small RNAs in C. elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tops, B.B.J.

    2007-01-01

    RNAi is the process by which double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) induces sequence-specific mRNA degradation. DsRNA is diced into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) of ~21-23 nt by a complex containing the RNaseIII enzyme DICER. The mature siRNAs are subsequently bound by Argonaute proteins and incorporated int

  1. Biogenesis of photosystem II complexes: transcriptional, translational, and posttranslational regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The integral membrane proteins of photosystem II (PS II) reaction center complexes are encoded by chloroplast genomes. These proteins are absent from thylakoids of PS II mutants of algae and vascular plants as a result of either chloroplast or nuclear gene mutations. To resolve the molecular basis and the concurrent absence of the PS II polypeptides, protein synthesis rates and mRNA levels were measured in mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that lack PS II. The analyses show that one nuclear gene product regulates the levels of transcripts from the chloroplast gene encoding the 51-kD chlorophyll α-binding polypeptide (polypeptide 5) but is not involved in the synthesis of other chloroplast mRNAs. The other nuclear product is specifically required for translation of mRNA encoding the 32-34-kD polypeptide, D1. The absence of either D1 or polypeptide 5 does not eliminate the synthesis and thylakoid insertion of two other integral membrane proteins of PS II, the chlorophyll α-binding polypeptide of 46 kD (polypeptide 6) and the 30-kD D1-like protein, D2. However, these two unassembled subunits cannot be properly processed and/or are degraded in the mutants even though they reside in the membrane. In addition, pulse labeling of the nuclear mutants and a chloroplast mutant that does not synthesize D1 mRNA indicates that synthesis of polypeptide 5 and D1 is coordinated at the translational level. A model is presented to explain how absence of one of the two proteins could lead to translational arrest of the other

  2. Assay Methods for H2S Biogenesis and Catabolism Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Ruma; Chiku, Taurai; Kabil, Omer; Libiad, Marouane; Motl, Nicole; Yadav, Pramod K.

    2015-01-01

    H2S is produced from sulfur-containing amino acids, cysteine and homocysteine, or a catabolite, 3-mercaptopyruvate, by three known enzymes: cystathionine β-synthase, γ-cystathionase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase. Of these, the first two enzymes reside in the cytoplasm and comprise the transsulfuration pathway, while the third enzyme is found both in the cytoplasm and in the mitochondrion. The following mitochondrial enzymes oxidize H2S: sulfide quinone oxidoreductase, sulfur dioxy...

  3. Mitochondrial biogenesis and angiogenesis in skeletal muscle of the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Ninna; Krustrup, Peter; Rasmussen, Hans N;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypotheses that 1) skeletal muscles of elderly subjects can adapt to a single endurance exercise bout and 2) endurance trained elderly subjects have higher expression/activity of oxidative and angiogenic proteins in skeletal muscle than untrained elderly people...... recovery. Capillarization was detected histochemically and oxidative enzyme activities were determined on isolated mitochondria. GLUT4, HKII, Cyt c and VEGF protein expression was measured on muscle lysates from Pre-biopsies, phosphorylation of AMPK and P38 on lysates from Pre and 0h biopsies, while PGC-1a......, VEGF, HKII and TFAM mRNA content was determined at all time points. ET had ~40% higher PDH, CS, SDH, a-KG-DH and ATP synthase activities and 27% higher capillarization than UT, reflecting increased skeletal muscle oxidative capacity with lifelong endurance exercise training. In addition, acute exercise...

  4. Molecular regulation of insulin granule biogenesis and exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röder, Pia V; Wong, Xiuming; Hong, Wanjin; Han, Weiping

    2016-09-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia in early disease stages but a relative insulin insufficiency in later stages. Insulin, a peptide hormone, is produced in and secreted from pancreatic β-cells following elevated blood glucose levels. Upon its release, insulin induces the removal of excessive exogenous glucose from the bloodstream primarily by stimulating glucose uptake into insulin-dependent tissues as well as promoting hepatic glycogenesis. Given the increasing prevalence of T2DM worldwide, elucidating the underlying mechanisms and identifying the various players involved in the synthesis and exocytosis of insulin from β-cells is of utmost importance. This review summarizes our current understanding of the route insulin takes through the cell after its synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum as well as our knowledge of the highly elaborate network that controls insulin release from the β-cell. This network harbors potential targets for anti-diabetic drugs and is regulated by signaling cascades from several endocrine systems. PMID:27621482

  5. CRISPR RNA biogenesis by a Cas6 nuclease

    OpenAIRE

    Sokolowski, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and associated (Cas) proteins form the basis of a prokaryotic adaptive immune system. Acquired sections of viral DNA are stored within the host genome as ‘spacers’ flanked by ‘repeat’ sequences. The CRISPR arrays are transcribed and processed to release mature CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) – containing a single, intact spacer sequence – that are used by effector complexes to base-pair with matching hostile genetic elements and silence...

  6. Linked biogenesis and degradation of human non-coding RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Refsing

    2012-01-01

    afspejles i menneskeceller. Vi har også påvist at exosomal nedbrydning at 3’-forlængede snRNAer foregår via samme molekylære mekanisme som PROMPTs. Overraskende nok viste denne mekanisme sig at være forbundet til transkriptionsterminering, idet vi har kunnet fastslå at nyligt identificerede komponenter af...... og exosomal nedbrydning af humane snoRNA-værtsgenstranskripter....

  7. The plasma membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: structure, function, and biogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    van der Rest, M E; Kamminga, A H; Nakano, A.; Anraku, Y; Poolman, B; Konings, W N

    1995-01-01

    The composition of phospholipids, sphingolipids, and sterols in the plasma membrane has a strong influence on the activity of the proteins associated or embedded in the lipid bilayer. Since most lipid-synthesizing enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are located in intracellular organelles, an extensive flux of lipids from these organelles to the plasma membrane is required. Although the pathway of protein traffic to the plasma membrane is similar to that of most of the lipids, the bulk flow o...

  8. The Plasma Membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Structure, Function, and Biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    VANDERREST, ME; KAMMINGA, AH; Nakano, A.; Anraku, Y; Poolman, B; KONINGS, WN

    1995-01-01

    The composition of phospholipids, sphingolipids, and sterols in the plasma membrane has a strong influence on the activity of the proteins associated or embedded in the lipid bilayer. Since most lipid-synthesizing enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are located in intracellular organelles, an extensive pur of lipids fi om these organelles to the plasma membrane is required. Although the pathway of protein traffic to the plasma membrane is similar to that of most of the lipids, the bulk flow o...

  9. From Biogenesis to Overexpression of Membrane Proteins in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Samuel

    2008-01-01

    In both pro- and eukaryotes 20-30% of all genes encode alpha-helical transmembrane domain proteins, which act in various and often essential capacities. Notably, membrane proteins play key roles in disease and they constitute more than half of all known drug targets. The natural abundance of membrane proteins is in general too low to conveniently isolate sufficient material for functional and structural studies. Therefore, most membrane proteins have to be obtained through overexpression. Esc...

  10. MTERF3 Regulates Mitochondrial Ribosome Biogenesis in Invertebrates and Mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Wredenberg, Anna; Lagouge, Marie; Bratic, Ana; Metodiev, Metodi D; Spåhr, Henrik; Mourier, Arnaud; Freyer, Christoph; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Tain, Luke; Grönke, Sebastian; Baggio, Francesca; Kukat, Christian; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Wibom, Rolf; Polosa, Paola Loguercio

    2013-01-01

    Author Summary One of the main functions of the mitochondrial network is to provide the energy currency ATP to drive a large array of cellular metabolic processes. The formation of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which allows this energy supply, is under the control of two separate genetic systems, the nuclear and the mitochondrial genomes, whose expressions have to be tightly coordinated to ensure efficient mitochondrial function. The regulation of mitochondrial genome expression is sti...

  11. SmD1 is required for spliced leader biogenesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zeiner, G. M.; Foldynová, Silvie; Sturm, N. R.; Lukeš, Julius; Campbell, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 1 (2004), s. 241-244. ISSN 1535-9778 Grant ostatní: NIH(US) AI34536; NIH(US) AI054496 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : Kinetoplastida * Trypanosoma * spliced leader RNA Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.954, year: 2004

  12. Remaining challenges in cellular flavin cofactor homeostasis and flavoprotein biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Anna eGiancaspero

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, oxidases and reductases involved in energetic metabolism, epigenetics, protein folding, as well as in a number of diverse regulatory processes. The problem of localisation of flavin cofactor synthesis events and in particular of the FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2 in HepG2 cells is addressed here by confocal microscopy in the frame of its relationships with kinetics of FAD synthesis and delivery to client apo-flavoproteins. FAD synthesis catalysed by recombinant isoform 2 of FADS occurs via an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which ATP binds prior to FMN, and pyrophosphate is released before FAD. Spectrophotometric continuous assays of the reconstitution rate of apo-D-aminoacid oxidase with its cofactor, allowed us to propose that besides its FAD synthesising activity, hFADS is able to operate as a FAD chaperone.The physical interaction between FAD forming enzyme and its clients was further confirmed by dot blot and immunoprecipitation experiments carried out testing as a client either a nuclear or a mitochondrial enzyme that is lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1, EC 1.-.-.- and dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (Me2GlyDH, EC 1.5.8.4, respectively which carry out similar reactions of oxidative demethylation, assisted by tetrahydrofolate used to form 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. A direct transfer of the cofactor from hFADS2 to apo-dimethyl glycine dehydrogenase was also demonstrated. Thus, FAD synthesis and delivery to these enzymes are crucial processes for bioenergetics and nutri-epigenetics of liver cells.

  13. Remaining challenges in cellular flavin cofactor homeostasis and flavoprotein biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Colella, Matilde; Brizio, Carmen; Difonzo, Graziana; Fiorino, Giuseppina Maria; Leone, Piero; Brandsch, Roderich; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Barile, Maria

    2015-04-01

    The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin) in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, oxidases and reductases involved in energetic metabolism, epigenetics, protein folding, as well as in a number of diverse regulatory processes. The problem of localisation of flavin cofactor synthesis events and in particular of the FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2) in HepG2 cells is addressed here by confocal microscopy in the frame of its relationships with kinetics of FAD synthesis and delivery to client apo-flavoproteins. FAD synthesis catalysed by recombinant isoform 2 of FADS occurs via an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which ATP binds prior to FMN, and pyrophosphate is released before FAD. Spectrophotometric continuous assays of the reconstitution rate of apo-D-aminoacid oxidase with its cofactor, allowed us to propose that besides its FAD synthesising activity, hFADS is able to operate as a FAD "chaperone". The physical interaction between FAD forming enzyme and its clients was further confirmed by dot blot and immunoprecipitation experiments carried out testing as a client either a nuclear or a mitochondrial enzyme that is lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1, EC 1.-.-.-) and dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (Me2GlyDH, EC 1.5.8.4), respectively which carry out similar reactions of oxidative demethylation, assisted by tetrahydrofolate used to form 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. A direct transfer of the cofactor from hFADS2 to apo-dimethyl glycine dehydrogenase was also demonstrated. Thus, FAD synthesis and delivery to these enzymes are crucial processes for bioenergetics and nutri-epigenetics of liver cells.

  14. Role of adaptor proteins in secretory granule biogenesis and maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RichardEMains

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the regulated secretory pathway, secretory granules (SGs store peptide hormones that are released on demand. SGs are formed at the trans-Golgi network (TGN and must undergo a maturation process to become responsive to secretagogues. The production of mature SGs requires concentrating newly synthesized soluble content proteins in granules whose membranes contain the appropriate integral membrane proteins. The mechanisms underlying the sorting of soluble and integral membrane proteins destined for SGs from other proteins are not yet well understood. For soluble proteins, luminal pH and divalent metals can affect aggregation and interaction with surrounding membranes. The trafficking of granule membrane proteins can be controlled by both luminal and cytosolic factors. Cytosolic adaptor proteins, which recognize the cytosolic domains of proteins that span the SG membrane, have been shown to play essential roles in the assembly of functional SGs. Adaptor protein 1A (AP-1A is known to interact with specific motifs in its cargo proteins and with the clathrin heavy chain, contributing to the formation of a clathrin coat. AP-1A is present in patches on immature SG membranes, where it removes cargo and facilitates SG maturation. AP-1A recruitment to membranes can be modulated by PACS-1 (Phosphofurin Acidic Cluster Sorting protein 1, a cytosolic protein which interacts with both AP-1A and cargo that has been phosphorylated by casein kinase II. A cargo/PACS-1/AP-1A complex is necessary to drive the appropriate transport of several cargo proteins within the regulated secretory pathway. The GGA (Golgi-localized, -ear containing, ADP-ribosylation factor binding family of adaptor proteins serve a similar role. We review the functions of AP-1A, PACS-1 and GGAs in facilitating the retrieval of proteins from immature SGs and review examples of cargo proteins whose trafficking within the regulated secretory pathway is governed by adaptor proteins.

  15. Regulation of the Flagellar Biogenesis in Legionella pneumophila

    OpenAIRE

    Albert-Weißenberger, Christiane

    2009-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila replicates intracellularly in protozoa, but can also cause severe pneumonia, called Legionnaires' disease. The bacteria invade and proliferate in the alveolar macrophages of the human lung. L. pneumophila bacteria exhibit a biphasic life cycle: replicative bacteria are avirulent; in contrast, transmissive bacteria express virulence traits and flagella. Primarily aim of this thesis was to evaluate the impact of the regulatory proteins FleQ, FleR, a...

  16. Biogenesis of outer membranes in Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Hajime

    2009-03-23

    The outer membrane, an essential organelle of Gram-negative bacteria, is composed of four major components: lipopolysaccharide, phospholipids, beta-barrel proteins, and lipoproteins. The mechanisms underlying the transport of these components to outer membranes are currently under extensive examination. Among them, the sorting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane of Escherichia coli has been clarified in detail. The Lol system, composed of five proteins, catalyzes outer membrane sorting of lipoproteins. Various Lpt proteins have recently been identified as factors involved in the transport of lipopolysaccharide to the outer membrane, although the mechanism remains largely unknown. Proteins with alpha-helical membrane spanning segments are found in the inner membrane, whereas amphipathic beta-barrel proteins span the outer membrane. These beta-barrel proteins are inserted into the outer membranes through a central core protein BamA (YaeT) with the help of four outer membrane lipoproteins. In contrast, little is known about how phospholipids are transported to the outer membrane. PMID:19270402

  17. Cystatin F Ensures Eosinophil Survival by Regulating Granule Biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Stephen P.; McMillan, Sarah J.; Colbert, Jeff D.; Lawrence, Rachel A.; Watts, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Eosinophils are now recognized as multifunctional leukocytes that provide critical homeostatic signals to maintain other immune cells and aid tissue repair. Paradoxically, eosinophils also express an armory of granule-localized toxins and hydrolases believed to contribute to pathology in inflammatory disease. How eosinophils deliver their supporting functions while avoiding self-inflicted injury is poorly understood. We have demonstrated that cystatin F (CF) is a critical survival factor for eosinophils. Eosinophils from CF null mice had reduced lifespan, reduced granularity, and disturbed granule morphology. In vitro, cysteine protease inhibitors restored granularity, demonstrating that control of cysteine protease activity by CF is critical for normal eosinophil development. CF null mice showed reduced pulmonary pathology in a model of allergic lung inflammation but also reduced ability to combat infection by the nematode Brugia malayi. These data identify CF as a “cytoprotectant” that promotes eosinophil survival and function by ensuring granule integrity. Video Abstract PMID:27067058

  18. Enhancing lysosome biogenesis attenuates BNIP3-induced cardiomyocyte death

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Xiucui; Godar, Rebecca J.; Liu, Haiyan; Diwan, Abhinav

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible pro-death protein BNIP3 (BCL-2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa interacting protein 3), provokes mitochondrial permeabilization causing cardiomyocyte death in ischemia-reperfusion injury. Inhibition of autophagy accelerates BNIP3-induced cell death, by preventing removal of damaged mitochondria. We tested the hypothesis that stimulating autophagy will attenuate BNIP3-induced cardiomyocyte death. Neonatal rat cardiac myocytes (NRCMs) were adenovirally transduced with BNIP3 (or LacZ as c...

  19. Fe/S protein biogenesis in trypanosomes — A review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukeš, Julius; Basu, Somuvro

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1853, č. 6 (2015), s. 1481-1492. ISSN 0167-4889 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/2261; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-23986S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316304 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Fe/S cluster * Trypanosoma brucei * protists * Kinetoplastida Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.019, year: 2014

  20. Metabolic and Molecular Events Occurring during Chromoplast Biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanping Bian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromoplasts are nonphotosynthetic plastids that accumulate carotenoids. They derive from other plastid forms, mostly chloroplasts. The biochemical events responsible for the interconversion of one plastid form into another are poorly documented. However, thanks to transcriptomics and proteomics approaches, novel information is now available. Data of proteomic and biochemical analysis revealed the importance of lipid metabolism and carotenoids biosynthetic activities. The loss of photosynthetic activity was associated with the absence of the chlorophyll biosynthesis branch and the presence of proteins involved in chlorophyll degradation. Surprisingly, the entire set of Calvin cycle and of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway persisted after the transition from chloroplast to chromoplast. The role of plastoglobules in the formation and organisation of carotenoid-containing structures and that of the Or gene in the control of chromoplastogenesis are reviewed. Finally, using transcriptomic data, an overview is given the expression pattern of a number of genes encoding plastid-located proteins during tomato fruit ripening.

  1. Crucial Roles of Abscisic Acid Biogenesis in Virulence of Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

    OpenAIRE

    Spence, Carla A.; Lakshmanan, Venkatachalam; Donofrio, Nicole; Bais, Harsh P.

    2015-01-01

    Rice suffers dramatic yield losses due to blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. Pseudomonas chlororaphis EA105, a bacterium that was isolated from the rice rhizosphere, inhibits M. oryzae. It was shown previously that pre-treatment of rice with EA105 reduced the size of blast lesions through jasmonic acid (JA)- and ethylene (ETH)-mediated ISR. Abscisic acid (ABA) acts antagonistically toward salicylic acid (SA), JA, and ETH signaling, to impede plant defense responses. EA105 may be reducing the ...

  2. Gamma-Glutamyltransferase Fractions in Human Plasma and Bile: Characteristic and Biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Fornaciari, Irene; Fierabracci, Vanna; Corti, Alessandro; Aziz Elawadi, Hassan; Lorenzini, Evelina; Emdin, Michele; Paolicchi, Aldo; Franzini, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Total plasma gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity is a sensitive, non-specific marker of liver dysfunction. Four GGT fractions (b-, m-, s-, f-GGT) were described in plasma and their differential specificity in the diagnosis of liver diseases was suggested. Nevertheless fractional GGT properties have not been investigated yet. The aim of this study was to characterize the molecular nature of fractional GGT in both human plasma and bile. Plasma was obtained from healthy volunteers; whereas ...

  3. Mitochondrially Targeted Vitamin E Succinate Modulates Expression of Mitochondrial DNA Transcripts and Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Truksa, Jaroslav; Dong, L.F.; Rohlena, Jakub; Stursa, J.; Vondrusová, Magdaléna; Goodwin, J.; Nguyen, M.; Klučková, Katarína; Rychtarčíková, Zuzana; Lettlová, Sandra; Spáčilová, Jana; Stapelberg, M.; Zoratti, M.; Neužil, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 11 (2015), s. 883-900. ISSN 1523-0864 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP301/10/1937; GA AV ČR KAN200520703; GA ČR GAP305/12/1708; GA ČR GAP301/12/1851; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : ALPHA-TOCOPHERYL SUCCINATE * ELECTRON-TRANSPORT CHAIN * RESPIRATORY COMPLEX-II Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.407, year: 2014

  4. Flavan-3-ol fraction from cocoa powder promotes mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle in mice

    OpenAIRE

    WATANABE Naoki; Inagawa, Kodai; Shibata, Masahiro; Osakabe, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous clinical studies have reported that ingestion of chocolate has reduced risk of metabolic syndrome. In order to elucidate the mechanism, we evaluated the influence of flavan-3-ols derived from cocoa powder on energy metabolism in mice using an indirect calorimetric method. Method The mice were divided into two groups, and administered either distilled water or 50 mg/kg of flavan-3-ol fraction for 2 weeks. At the end of the experimental period, animals were sacrificed after ...

  5. The cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis factor AtCOX17 modulates stress responses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Lucila; Welchen, Elina; Gey, Uta; Arce, Agustín L; Steinebrunner, Iris; Gonzalez, Daniel H

    2016-03-01

    COX17 is a soluble protein from the mitochondrial intermembrane space that participates in the transfer of copper for cytochrome c oxidase (COX) assembly in eukaryotic organisms. In this work, we studied the function of both Arabidopsis thaliana AtCOX17 genes using plants with altered expression levels of these genes. Silencing of AtCOX17-1 in a cox17-2 knockout background generates plants with smaller rosettes and decreased expression of genes involved in the response of plants to different stress conditions, including several genes that are induced by mitochondrial dysfunctions. Silencing of either of the AtCOX17 genes does not affect plant development or COX activity but causes a decrease in the response of genes to salt stress. In addition, these plants contain higher reactive oxygen and lipid peroxidation levels after irrigation with high NaCl concentrations and are less sensitive to abscisic acid. In agreement with a role of AtCOX17 in stress and abscisic acid responses, both AtCOX17 genes are induced by several stress conditions, abscisic acid and mutation of the transcription factor ABI4. The results indicate that AtCOX17 is required for optimal expression of a group of stress-responsive genes, probably as a component of signalling pathways that link stress conditions to gene expression responses. PMID:26436309

  6. Transcription-independent role for human mitochondrial RNA polymerase in mitochondrial ribosome biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Surovtseva, Yulia V; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2013-01-01

    Human mitochondrial RNA polymerase, POLRMT, is required for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) transcription and forms initiation complexes with human mitochondrial transcription factor B2 (h-mtTFB2). However, POLRMT also interacts with the paralogue of h-mtTFB2, h-mtTFB1, which is a 12S ribosomal RNA methyltransferase required for small (28S) mitochondrial ribosome subunit assembly. Herein, we show that POLRMT associates with h-mtTFB1 in 28S mitochondrial ribosome complexes that are stable in the abs...

  7. GABP Transcription Factor (Nuclear Respiratory Factor 2) Is Required for Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Zhong-Fa; Drumea, Karen; Mott, Stephanie; Wang, Junling; Rosmarin, Alan G.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are membrane-bound cytoplasmic organelles that serve as the major source of ATP production in eukaryotic cells. GABP (also known as nuclear respiratory factor 2) is a nuclear E26 transformation-specific transcription factor (ETS) that binds and activates mitochondrial genes that are required for electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation. We conditionally deleted Gabpa, the DNA-binding component of this transcription factor complex, from mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) t...

  8. Recessive mutations in POLR1C cause a leukodystrophy by impairing biogenesis of RNA polymerase III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiffault, Isabelle; Wolf, Nicole I.; Forget, Diane; Guerrero, Kether; Tran, Luan T.; Choquet, Karine; Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Poitras, Christian; Brais, Bernard; Yoon, Grace; Sztriha, Laszlo; Webster, Richard I.; Timmann, Dagmar; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.; Seeger, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Alíz; Máté, Adrienn; Goizet, Cyril; Fung, Eva; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Fribourg, Sébastien; Vanderver, Adeline; Simons, Cas; Taft, Ryan J.; Yates III, John R.; Coulombe, Benoit; Bernard, Geneviève

    2015-01-01

    A small proportion of 4H (Hypomyelination, Hypodontia and Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism) or RNA polymerase III (POLR3)-related leukodystrophy cases are negative for mutations in the previously identified causative genes POLR3A and POLR3B. Here we report eight of these cases carrying recessive mutations in POLR1C, a gene encoding a shared POLR1 and POLR3 subunit, also mutated in some Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) cases. Using shotgun proteomics and ChIP sequencing, we demonstrate that leukodystrophy-causative mutations, but not TCS mutations, in POLR1C impair assembly and nuclear import of POLR3, but not POLR1, leading to decreased binding to POLR3 target genes. This study is the first to show that distinct mutations in a gene coding for a shared subunit of two RNA polymerases lead to selective modification of the enzymes' availability leading to two different clinical conditions and to shed some light on the pathophysiological mechanism of one of the most common hypomyelinating leukodystrophies, POLR3-related leukodystrophy. PMID:26151409

  9. Salidroside Stimulates Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Protects against H2O2-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Salidroside (SAL) is an active component of Rhodiola rosea with documented antioxidative properties. The purpose of this study is to explore the mechanism of the protective effect of SAL on hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced endothelial dysfunction. Pretreatment of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with SAL significantly reduced the cytotoxicity brought by H2O2. Functional studies on the rat aortas found that SAL rescued the endothelium-dependent relaxation and reduced super...

  10. The role of Pex3p in early events of peroxisome biogenesis in Hansenula polymorpha

    OpenAIRE

    de Haan, G

    2003-01-01

    Life on earth can be divided into three kingdoms: The Archeae, the eubacteria, and the eukarya. The kingdom of eukarya accommodates all plants, animals, and fungi. The hallmark of eukarya is the presence of a nucleus and other compartments, named organelles, in the eukaryotic cell.... Zie: Summary

  11. Disruption of mouse Cenpj, a regulator of centriole biogenesis, phenocopies Seckel syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca E McIntyre

    Full Text Available Disruption of the centromere protein J gene, CENPJ (CPAP, MCPH6, SCKL4, which is a highly conserved and ubiquitiously expressed centrosomal protein, has been associated with primary microcephaly and the microcephalic primordial dwarfism disorder Seckel syndrome. The mechanism by which disruption of CENPJ causes the proportionate, primordial growth failure that is characteristic of Seckel syndrome is unknown. By generating a hypomorphic allele of Cenpj, we have developed a mouse (Cenpj(tm/tm that recapitulates many of the clinical features of Seckel syndrome, including intrauterine dwarfism, microcephaly with memory impairment, ossification defects, and ocular and skeletal abnormalities, thus providing clear confirmation that specific mutations of CENPJ can cause Seckel syndrome. Immunohistochemistry revealed increased levels of DNA damage and apoptosis throughout Cenpj(tm/tm embryos and adult mice showed an elevated frequency of micronucleus induction, suggesting that Cenpj-deficiency results in genomic instability. Notably, however, genomic instability was not the result of defective ATR-dependent DNA damage signaling, as is the case for the majority of genes associated with Seckel syndrome. Instead, Cenpj(tm/tm embryonic fibroblasts exhibited irregular centriole and centrosome numbers and mono- and multipolar spindles, and many were near-tetraploid with numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities when compared to passage-matched wild-type cells. Increased cell death due to mitotic failure during embryonic development is likely to contribute to the proportionate dwarfism that is associated with CENPJ-Seckel syndrome.

  12. Adaptation of respiratory chain biogenesis to cytochrome c oxidase deficiency caused by SURF1 gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovářová, Nikola; Cížková Vrbacká, Alena; Pecina, Petr; Stránecký, Viktor; Pronicka, Ewa; Kmoch, Stanislav; Houštěk, Josef

    2012-07-01

    The loss of Surf1 protein leads to a severe COX deficiency manifested as a fatal neurodegenerative disorder, the Leigh syndrome (LS(COX)). Surf1 appears to be involved in the early step of COX assembly but its function remains unknown. The aim of the study was to find out how SURF1 gene mutations influence expression of OXPHOS and other pro-mitochondrial genes and to further characterize the altered COX assembly. Analysis of fibroblast cell lines from 9 patients with SURF1 mutations revealed a 70% decrease of the COX complex content to be associated with 32-54% upregulation of respiratory chain complexes I, III and V and accumulation of Cox5a subunit. Whole genome expression profiling showed a general decrease of transcriptional activity in LS(COX) cells and indicated that the adaptive changes in OXPHOS complexes are due to a posttranscriptional compensatory mechanism. Electrophoretic and WB analysis showed that in mitochondria of LS(COX) cells compared to controls, the assembled COX is present entirely in a supercomplex form, as I-III₂-IV supercomplex but not as larger supercomplexes. The lack of COX also caused an accumulation of I-III₂ supercomplex. The accumulated Cox5a was mainly present as a free subunit. We have found out that the major COX assembly subcomplexes accumulated due to SURF1 mutations range in size between approximately 85-140kDa. In addition to the originally proposed S2 intermediate they might also represent Cox1-containing complexes lacking other COX subunits. Unlike the assembled COX, subcomplexes are unable to associate with complexes I and III. PMID:22465034

  13. Adaptation of respiratory chain biogenesis to cytochrome c oxidase deficiency caused by SURF1 gene mutations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovářová, Nikola; Vrbacká-Čížková, Alena; Pecina, Petr; Stránecký, V.; Pronicka, E.; Kmoch, S.; Houštěk, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 1822, č. 7 (2012), s. 1114-1124. ISSN 0925-4439 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NS9759; GA MZd(CZ) NT12370; GA ČR(CZ) GD305/08/H037 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondrial disorder * SURF1 gene * Leigh syndrome * gene expression * oxidative phosphorylation * cytochrome c oxidase Subject RIV: FG - Pediatrics Impact factor: 4.910, year: 2012

  14. Induction of mitochondrial biogenesis by n-3 polyunsatured fatty acids in white adipose tissue

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flachs, Pavel; Horáková, Olga; Brauner, Petr; Rossmeisl, Martin; Pecina, Petr; Franssen-van Hal, N.; Růžičková, Jana; Šponarová, Jana; Drahota, Zdeněk; Vlček, Čestmír; Keijer, J.; Houštěk, Josef; Kopecký, Jan

    2005. s. 29-29. [International nutrigenomics conference /3./. 02.11.2005-04.11.2005, Palma de Mallorca] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR(CZ) GA303/05/2580 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : biochemistry Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  15. Time-course of hormonal induction of mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase biogenesis in rat liver

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mráček, Tomáš; Ješina, Pavel; Křiváková, P.; Bolehovská, R.; Červinková, Z.; Drahota, Zdeněk; Houštěk, Josef

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 1726, č. 2 (2005), s. 217-223. ISSN 0304-4165 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA303/03/0799; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : thyroid hormones * mitochondrial protein turnover * glycerophosphate dehydrogenase Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 2.418, year: 2005

  16. Targeting microparticle biogenesis: a novel approach to the circumvention of cancer multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseblade, Ariane; Luk, Frederick; Ung, Alison; Bebawy, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Microparticles (MPs) are released from most eukaryotic cells after the vesiculation of the plasma membrane and serve as vectors of long and short-range signaling. MPs derived from multidrug resistant (MDR) cancer cells carry molecular components of the donor cell such as nucleic acids and proteins, and can alter the activity of drug-sensitive recipient cells through the transfer of their cargo. Given the substantial role of MPs in the acquisition and dissemination of MDR, we propose that the inhibition of MP release provides a novel therapeutic approach. This study characterises the effect of a panel of molecules known to act on MP-biosynthetic pathways. We demonstrate a differential effect by these molecules on MP inhibition that appear dependent on the release of intracellular calcium stores following activation with the calcium ionophore A23187. Calpain inhibitor, PD-150606; a selective inhibitor of Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase (ROCK), Y-27632; and the vitamin B5 derivative pantethine, inhibited MP release only upon prior activation with A23187. Calpain inhibitor II showed significant inhibition in the absence of cell activation, whereas the vitamin B5 derivatives cystamine dihydrochloride and cysteamine hydrochloride showed no effect on MP inhibition under either condition. In contrast the classical pharmacological inhibitor of MDR, the calcium channel blocker Verapamil, showed an increase in MP formation on resting cells. These results suggest a potential role for calcium in the mechanism of action for PD-150606, Y-27632 and pantethine. These molecules, together with calpain inhibitor II have shown promise as modulators of MP release and warrant consideration as potential candidates for the development of an alternative therapeutic strategy for the prevention of MP-mediated MDR in cancer. PMID:25714701

  17. Erythropoietin Activates Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Couples Red Cell Mass to Mitochondrial Mass in the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    RATIONALE: Erythropoietin (EPO) is often administered to cardiac patients with anemia, particularly from chronic kidney disease, and stimulation of erythropoiesis may stabilize left ventricular and renal function by recruiting protective effects beyond the correction of anemia. O...

  18. Bioavailable inhibitors of HIV-1 RNA biogenesis identified through a Rev-based screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Silvia; Beltrán, Manuela; Coiras, Mayte; Bedoya, Luis M; Alcamí, José; Gallego, José

    2016-05-01

    New antiretroviral agents with alternative mechanisms are needed to complement the combination therapies used to treat HIV-1 infections. Here we report the identification of bioavailable molecules that interfere with the gene expression processes of HIV-1. The compounds were detected by screening a small library of FDA-approved drugs with an assay based on measuring the displacement of Rev, and essential virus-encoded protein, from its high-affinity RNA binding site. The antiretroviral activity of two hits was based on interference with post-integration steps of the HIV-1 cycle. Both hits inhibited RRE-Rev complex formation in vitro, and blocked LTR-dependent gene expression and viral transcription in cellular assays. The best compound altered the splicing pattern of HIV-1 transcripts in a manner consistent with Rev inhibition. This mechanism of action is different from those used by current antiretroviral agents. The screening hits recognized the Rev binding site in the viral RNA, and the best compound did so with substantial selectivity, allowing the identification of a new RNA-binding scaffold. These results may be used for developing novel antiretroviral drugs. PMID:26896646

  19. Biogenesis pathways of RNA guides in archaeal and bacterial CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Richter, Hagen; Oost, van der John; White, Malcolm F.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas is an RNA-mediated adaptive immune system that defends bacteria and archaea against mobile genetic elements. Short mature CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) are key elements in the interference step of the immune pathway. A CRISPR array composed of a series of repeats interspaced by spacer sequences

  20. Biogenesis of antibacterial silver nanoparticles using the endophytic bacterium Bacillus cereus isolated from Garcinia xanthochymus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Swetha Sunkar; C Valli Nachiyar

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To synthesize the ecofriendly nanoparticles, which is viewed as an alternative to the chemical method which initiated the use of microbes like bacteria and fungi in their synthesis. Methods: The current study uses the endophytic bacterium Bacillus cereus isolated from the Garcinia xanthochymus to synthesize the silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The AgNPs were synthesized by reduction of silver nitrate solution by the endophytic bacterium after incubation for 3-5 d at room temperature. The synthesis was initially observed by colour change from pale white to brown which was confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The AgNPs were further characterized using FTIR, SEM-EDX and TEM analyses. Results:The synthesized nanoparticles were found to be spherical with the size in the range of 20-40 nm which showed a slight aggregation. The energy-dispersive spectra of the nanoparticle dispersion confirmed the presence of elemental silver. The AgNPs were found to have antibacterial activity against a few pathogenic bacteria like Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Conclusions:The endophytic bacteria identified as Bacillus cereus was able to synthesize silver nanoparticles with potential antibacterial activity.

  1. On the role of complementarity in biogenesis: a critical phenomenon approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the series of processes leading to the origin of life, the growth of information-containing self-replicating polymers from a mixture of oligomers probably was one of the very last equilibrium steps, before the onset of non-equilibrium phenomena which characterize living systems. It is described that crucial step as a critical phenomenon, treated within the renormalization group framework. It is shown that the diversity-stability duality of Darwinian evolution is achieved at this stage if is started from four different monomers capable of forming two complementary pairs. (Author)

  2. Mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipose tissue is associated with differential expression of transcription regulatory factors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Villena, J. A.; Carmona, M. C.; Rodriguez de la Concepción, M.; Rossmeisl, Martin; Vinas, O.; Mampel, T.; Iglesias, R.; Giralt, M.; Villarroya, F.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 11 (2002), s. 1934-1944. ISSN 1420-682X Grant ostatní: Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnología(ES) PM98.0188 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : brown adipose tissue * mitochondria * transcription factors Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.259, year: 2002

  3. Exercise strategies to improve aerobic capacity, insulin sensitivity and mitochondrial biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Per

    2014-01-01

    Regular exercise plays a key role in the maintenance of health and physical capabilities. Extensive research shows that exercise is an efficient method to prevent diabetes. Both resistance and aerobic exercise training are well known countermeasures for insulin resistance. However, depending on factors like purpose, capability and accessibility, different exercise modes need to be evaluated on both applied and molecular levels. In addition, exercise is the means to improve performance. New tr...

  4. Plasma membrane biogenesis in eukaryotic cells: translocation of newly synthesized lipid.

    OpenAIRE

    Mills, J T; Furlong, S T; Dawidowicz, E A

    1984-01-01

    We examined the transfer of sterols and phospholipids from their site of synthesis to the plasma membrane of Acanthamoeba castellanii. Cells were labeled with [3H]acetate, and plasma membrane fractions were isolated under conditions that minimize the nonspecific exchange of lipids between subcellular membrane fractions. Sterols and phospholipids were purified from both whole-cell homogenates and isolated plasma membrane. In whole cells, 3H-labeled lipids were formed, with no apparent time lag...

  5. Micrometric segregation of fluorescent membrane lipids: relevance for endogenous lipids and biogenesis in erythrocytes[S

    OpenAIRE

    D'Auria, Ludovic; Fenaux, Marisa; Aleksandrowicz, Paulina; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; Chantrain, Christophe; Vermylen, Christiane; Vikkula, Miikka; Courtoy, Pierre J.; Tyteca, Donatienne

    2013-01-01

    Micrometric membrane lipid segregation is controversial. We addressed this issue in attached erythrocytes and found that fluorescent boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) analogs of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) [glucosylceramide (BODIPY-GlcCer) and monosialotetrahexosylganglioside (GM1BODIPY)], sphingomyelin (BODIPY-SM), and phosphatidylcholine (BODIPY-PC inserted into the plasma membrane spontaneously gathered into distinct submicrometric domains. GM1BODIPY domains colocalized with endogenous GM1 label...

  6. Myelin Biogenesis And Oligodendrocyte Development: Parsing Out The Roles Of Glycosphingolipids

    OpenAIRE

    Jackman, Nicole; Ishii, Akihiro; Bansal, Rashmi

    2009-01-01

    The myelin sheath is an extension of the oligoddendrocyte (OL) plasma membrane enriched in lipids which ensheaths the axons of the central and peripheral nervous system. Here we review the involvement of glycosphingolipid in myelin/OL functions; including the regulation of OL differentiation, lipid raft-mediated trafficking and signaling, and neuron-glia interactions.

  7. Bronchial smooth muscle remodeling involves calcium-dependent enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis in asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Trian, Thomas; Benard, Giovanni; Begueret, Hugues; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Girodet, Pierre-Olivier; Ghosh, Debajyoti; Ousova, Olga; Vernejoux, Jean-Marc; Marthan, Roger; Tunon-de-Lara, José-Manuel; Berger, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are characterized by different patterns of airway remodeling, which all include an increased mass of bronchial smooth muscle (BSM). A remaining major question concerns the mechanisms underlying such a remodeling of BSM. Because mitochondria play a major role in both cell proliferation and apoptosis, we hypothesized that mitochondrial activation in BSM could play a role in this remodeling. We describe that both the mitochondrial mass and ...

  8. The role of lipids in the biogenesis of integral membrane proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Schneiter, Roger; Toulmay, Alexandre

    2007-01-01

    Most integral membrane proteins are cotranslationally inserted into the lipid bilayer. In prokaryotes, membrane insertion of the nascent chain takes place at the plasma membrane, whereas in eukaryotes insertion takes place into the endoplasmatic reticulum. In both kingdoms of life, however, the same membrane that acquaints the newly born membrane protein also synthesizes the bilayer lipids and thus ensures the balanced growth of the membrane as a whole. Recent evidence indicates that the lipi...

  9. Diamond Blackfan Anemia at the Crossroad between Ribosome Biogenesis and Heme Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Chiabrando

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA is a rare, pure red-cell aplasia that presents during infancy. Approximately 40% of cases are associated with other congenital defects, particularly malformations of the upper limb or craniofacial region. Mutations in the gene coding for the ribosomal protein RPS19 have been identified in 25% of patients with DBA, with resulting impairment of 18S rRNA processing and 40S ribosomal subunit formation. Moreover, mutations in other ribosomal protein coding genes account for about 25% of other DBA cases. Recently, the analysis of mice from which the gene coding for the heme exporter Feline Leukemia Virus subgroup C Receptor (FLVCR1 is deleted suggested that this gene may be involved in the pathogenesis of DBA. FLVCR1-null mice show a phenotype resembling that of DBA patients, including erythroid failure and malformations. Interestingly, some DBA patients have disease linkage to chromosome 1q31, where FLVCR1 is mapped. Moreover, it has been reported that cells from DBA patients express alternatively spliced isoforms of FLVCR1 which encode non-functional proteins. Herein, we review the known roles of RPS19 and FLVCR1 in ribosome function and heme metabolism respectively, and discuss how the deficiency of a ribosomal protein or of a heme exporter may result in the same phenotype.

  10. Lamellar granule biogenesis: a role for ceramide glucosyltransferase, lysosomal enzyme transport, and the Golgi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, K C; Sando, G N; Howard, E J; True, C A; Gilbert, D; Swartzendruber, D C; Wertz, P W

    1998-08-01

    Although lamellar granules are critical to the formation of the epidermal permeability barrier and are a known marker of late keratinocyte differentiation, very little is known about the physiologic regulators of lamellar granule assembly and extrusion. Ceramide glucosyltransferase (CGT), the enzyme responsible for the synthesis of lamellar granule glucosylceramides (GlcCer; the precursors of the stratum corneum ceramides), is localized to the Golgi apparatus in other cell types. We have found that CGT is induced during keratinocyte culture differentiation coincident with increased GlcCer content and the appearance of lamellar granules. In this study we show that the differentiation-related CGT induction is likely mediated at the transcriptional level. In addition, all-trans retinoic acid, a well-known inhibitor of keratinocyte differentiation, prevents the appearance of lamellar granules and decreases culture CGT activity and GlcCer content without affecting sphingomyelin or total lipid content, indicating a specific inhibition of this enzymatic pathway. These data show a direct relationship between CGT activity and epidermal differentiation, suggesting that regulation of CGT expression is a critical part of epidermal barrier generation. The differentiation dependence of CGT activity, the key role of this Golgi-localized enzyme in epidermal GlcCer synthesis, and our previous finding that ceramides are converted to GlcCer in the Golgi apparatus in keratinocyte cultures, strongly suggest a Golgi origin for lamellar granules. In contrast to CGT, the activity of the lysosomal enzymes acid lipase and glucocerebrosidase is less clearly related to epidermal differentiation and the appearance of lamellar granules, although both enzymes show striking colocalization and enrichment in a subcellular lamellar granule fraction derived from pig epidermis. Acid lipase activity in the lamellar granule fraction was found to contain primarily a small lysosomal form of the enzyme, whereas total acid lipase secreted by keratinocyte cultures was found to contain a mannose-6-phosphorylated large prelysosomal form as well as a small lysosomal form. That secreted acid lipase activity is derived from both prelysosomal and lysosomal compartments suggests there may be multiple pathways by which lysosomal enzymes are secreted from keratinocytes. The combined secretion of lipid and lysosomal enzymes from lamellar granules places these organelles in the category of "dual-function" specialized secretory vesicles described in certain other cell types. Electron microscopic images of lamellar granules show shapes consistent with cross-sections of tubules or buds from tubules in addition to vesicles. These images provide evidence for the involvement of trans-Golgi network tubules and/or buds in lamellar granule synthesis and secretion. PMID:9734819

  11. PAS3, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gene Encoding a Peroxisomal Integral Membrane Protein Essential for Peroxisome Biogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Höhfeld, Jörg; Veenhuis, Marten; Kunau, Wolf-H.

    1991-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae pas3-mutants are described which conform the pas-phenotype recently reported for the peroxisomal assembly mutants pas1-1 and pas2 (Erdmann, R., M. Veenhuis, D. Mertens, and W.-H Kunau. 1989. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 86:5419-5423). The isolation of pas3-mutants enabled us

  12. The SMC Loader Scc2 Promotes ncRNA Biogenesis and Translational Fidelity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musinu Zakari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Scc2-Scc4 complex is essential for loading the cohesin complex onto DNA. Cohesin has important roles in chromosome segregation, DSB repair, and chromosome condensation. Here we report that Scc2 is important for gene expression in budding yeast. Scc2 and the transcriptional regulator Paf1 collaborate to promote the production of Box H/ACA snoRNAs which guide pseudouridylation of RNAs including ribosomal RNA. Mutation of SCC2 was associated with defects in the production of ribosomal RNA, ribosome assembly, and splicing. While the scc2 mutant does not have a general defect in protein synthesis, it shows increased frameshifting and reduced cap-independent translation. These findings suggest Scc2 normally promotes a gene expression program that supports translational fidelity. We hypothesize that translational dysfunction may contribute to the human disorder Cornelia de Lange syndrome, which is caused by mutations in NIPBL, the human ortholog of SCC2.

  13. Rab11A Controls the Biogenesis of Birbeck Granules by Regulating Langerin Recycling and Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Uzan-Gafsou, Stéphanie; Bausinger, Huguette; Proamer, Fabienne; Monier, Solange; Lipsker, Dan; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Goud, Bruno; de la Salle, Henri; Hanau, Daniel; Salamero, Jean

    2007-01-01

    The extent to which Rab GTPases, Rab-interacting proteins, and cargo molecules cooperate in the dynamic organization of membrane architecture remains to be clarified. Langerin, a recycling protein accumulating in the Rab11-positive compartments of Langerhans cells, induces the formation of Birbeck granules (BGs), which are membrane subdomains of the endosomal recycling network. We investigated the role of Rab11A and two members of the Rab11 family of interacting proteins, Rip11 and RCP, in La...

  14. Genotype-phenotype correlation in PEX5-deficient peroxisome biogenesis defective cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.S. Ebberink; P.A.W. Mooyer; J. Koster; C.J.M. Dekker; F.J.M. Eyskens; C. Dionisi-Vici; P.T. Clayton; P.G. Barth; R.J.A. Wanders; H.R. Waterham

    2009-01-01

    Proteins destined for the peroxisomal matrix are targeted by virtue of a peroxisomal targeting sequence type 1 (PTS1) or type 2 (PTS2). In humans, targeting of either class of proteins relies oil a cytosolic receptor protein encoded by the PEX5 gene. Alternative splicing of PEX5 results in two prote

  15. In planta modification of potato starch granule biogenesis by different granule-bound fusion proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nazarian, F.

    2007-01-01

    Starch is composed of amylose and amylopectin and it is deposited in amyloplasts/choloroplasts as semi-crystalline granules. Many biosynthetic enzymes are involved in starch degradation and biosynthesis. Some microbial starch degrading enzymes have a Starch Binding Domain (SBD) which has affinity fo

  16. Biogenesis of natural substances - chemistry, metabolism, genetics. Part of a coordinated programme on radiation microbiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on the following main topics is reported: applied genetics in antibiotic drug production (tetracycline); formation of ergot alkaloids by saprophytic cultures of Claviceps paspali and C. purpurea; genetic studies of bacidiomycetes (Oudemansiella mucida). In the antibiotic drug production, the effect of mutagenic factors on biosynthetic activity of S. aureofaciens was studied. UV-light and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NMG) were the most effective mutagens. The genetic and metabolic regulation of biosynthesis of tetracycline was studied by using 14C and 32P labelled compounds. The formation of ergot alkaloids was found to take place only at a certain stage of development of cultures of Claviceps paspali and C. purpurea. It was found that the ergot alkaloids influence the primary metabolism of the producing cell. Experiments with spores of Oudemansiella mucida showed that the spores are very resistant to UV light (lethal dose 43.000 erg/mm2). The effect of gamma rays and NMG was also studied and the biosynthesis of mucidin was followed using 14C labelled compounds

  17. Diverse Evolutionary Trajectories for Small RNA Biogenesis Genes in the Oomycete Genus Phytophthora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollmann, Stephanie R; Fang, Yufeng; Press, Caroline M; Tyler, Brett M; Grünwald, Niklaus J

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulation by small RNA pathways is ubiquitous among eukaryotes, but little is known about small RNA pathways in the Stramenopile kingdom. Phytophthora, a genus of filamentous oomycetes, contains many devastating plant pathogens, causing multibillion-dollar damage to crops, ornamental plants, and natural environments. The genomes of several oomycetes including Phytophthora species such as the soybean pathogen P. sojae, have been sequenced, allowing evolutionary analysis of small RNA-processing enzymes. This study examined the evolutionary origins of the oomycete small RNA-related genes Dicer-like (DCL), and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDR) through broad phylogenetic analyses of the key domains. Two Dicer gene homologs, DCL1 and DCL2, and one RDR homolog were cloned and analyzed from P. sojae. Gene expression analysis revealed only minor changes in transcript levels among different life stages. Oomycete DCL1 homologs clustered with animal and plant Dicer homologs in evolutionary trees, whereas oomycete DCL2 homologs clustered basally to the tree along with Drosha homologs. Phylogenetic analysis of the RDR homologs confirmed a previous study that suggested the last common eukaryote ancestor possessed three RDR homologs, which were selectively retained or lost in later lineages. Our analysis clarifies the position of some Unikont and Chromalveolate RDR lineages within the tree, including oomycete homologs. Finally, we analyzed alterations in the domain structure of oomycete Dicer and RDR homologs, specifically focusing on the proposed domain transfer of the DEAD-box helicase domain from Dicer to RDR. Implications of the oomycete domain structure are discussed, and possible roles of the two oomycete Dicer homologs are proposed. PMID:27014308

  18. Diverse Evolutionary Trajectories for Small RNA Biogenesis Genes in the Oomycete Genus Phytophthora

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie R Bollmann; Fang, Yufeng; Press, Caroline M.; Tyler, Brett M.; Niklaus J Grünwald

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulation by small RNA pathways is ubiquitous among eukaryotes, but little is known about small RNA pathways in the Stramenopile kingdom. Phytophthora, a genus of filamentous oomycetes, contains many devastating plant pathogens, causing multibillion-dollar damage to crops, ornamental plants, and natural environments. The genomes of several oomycetes including Phytophthora species such as the soybean pathogen P. sojae, have been sequenced, allowing evolutionary analysis of small RNA-proc...

  19. The Hsp90 chaperone controls the biogenesis of L7Ae RNPs through conserved machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulon, Séverine; Marmier-Gourrier, Nathalie; Pradet-Balade, Bérengère; Wurth, Laurence; Verheggen, Céline; Jády, Beáta E.; Rothé, Benjamin; Pescia, Christina; Robert, Marie-Cécile; Kiss, Tamás; Bardoni, Barbara; Krol, Alain; Branlant, Christiane; Allmang, Christine; Bertrand, Edouard; Charpentier, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins of the L7Ae family are at the heart of many essential ribonucleoproteins (RNPs), including box C/D and H/ACA small nucleolar RNPs, U4 small nuclear RNP, telomerase, and messenger RNPs coding for selenoproteins. In this study, we show that Nufip and its yeast homologue Rsa1 are key components of the machinery that assembles these RNPs. We observed that Rsa1 and Nufip bind several L7Ae proteins and tether them to other core proteins in the immature particles. Surprisingly, Rsa1 and Nufip also link assembling RNPs with the AAA + adenosine triphosphatases hRvb1 and hRvb2 and with the Hsp90 chaperone through two conserved adaptors, Tah1/hSpagh and Pih1. Inhibition of Hsp90 in human cells prevents the accumulation of U3, U4, and telomerase RNAs and decreases the levels of newly synthesized hNop58, hNHP2, 15.5K, and SBP2. Thus, Hsp90 may control the folding of these proteins during the formation of new RNPs. This suggests that Hsp90 functions as a master regulator of cell proliferation by allowing simultaneous control of cell signaling and cell growth. PMID:18268104

  20. Biogenesis pathways of RNA guides in archaeal and bacterial CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Richter, Hagen; van der Oost, John; White, Malcolm F

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas is an RNA-mediated adaptive immune system that defends bacteria and archaea against mobile genetic elements. Short mature CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) are key elements in the interference step of the immune pathway. A CRISPR array composed of a series of repeats interspaced by spacer sequences acquired from invading mobile genomes is transcribed as a precursor crRNA (pre-crRNA) molecule. This pre-crRNA undergoes one or two maturation steps to generate the mature crRNAs that guide CRISPR-as...

  1. EB1 and EB3 promote cilia biogenesis by several centrosome-related mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Jacob M; Larsen, Jesper; Komarova, Yulia;

    2011-01-01

    surrounded by vesicles. Further, GST pull-down assays, mass spectrometry and immunoprecipitation indicated that EB1 and EB3 interact with proteins implicated in MT minus-end anchoring or vesicular trafficking to the cilia base, suggesting that EB1 and EB3 promote ciliogenesis by facilitating such trafficking...

  2. The SNARE protein vti1a functions in dense-core vesicle biogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Alexander M; Kurps, Julia; de Wit, Heidi;

    2014-01-01

    The SNARE protein vti1a is proposed to drive fusion of intracellular organelles, but recent data also implicated vti1a in exocytosis. Here we show that vti1a is absent from mature secretory vesicles in adrenal chromaffin cells, but localizes to a compartment near the trans-Golgi network, partially...... necessary for restoration of secretory capacity, whereas strong short-term expression (hours) was ineffective, consistent with vti1a involvement in an upstream step related to vesicle generation, rather than in fusion. We conclude that vti1a functions in vesicle generation and Ca(2+)-channel trafficking...

  3. On the biogenesis of myelin membranes : Sorting, trafficking and cell polarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baron, Wia; Hoekstra, Dick

    2010-01-01

    In the central nervous system, a multilayered membrane layer known as the myelin sheath enwraps axons, and is required for optimal saltatory signal conductance. The sheath develops from membrane processes that extend from the plasma membrane of oligodendrocytes and displays a unique lipid and protei

  4. The Forkhead Transcription Factor Hcm1 Promotes Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Stress Resistance in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Colman, Maria José; Reverter Branchat, Gemma; Sorolla Bardají, Maria Alba; Tamarit Sumalla, Jordi; Ros Salvador, Joaquim; Cabiscol Català, Elisa

    2010-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the forkhead transcription factor Hcm1 is involved in chromosome segregation, spindle pole dynamics, and budding. We found that Hcm1 interacts with the histone deacetylase Sir2 and shifts from cytoplasm to the nucleus in the G1/S phase or in response to oxidative stress stimuli. The nuclear localization of Hcm1 depends on the activity of Sir2 as revealed by activators and inhibitors of the sirtuins and the Δsir2 mutant. Hcm1-overexpressing cells display more mitoc...

  5. miR-125b affects mitochondrial biogenesis and impairs brite adipocyte formation and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maude Giroud

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Collectively, our results demonstrate that miR-125b-5p plays an important role in the repression of brite adipocyte function by modulating oxygen consumption and mitochondrial gene expression.

  6. Components of SurA required for outer membrane biogenesis in uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin M Watts

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SurA is a periplasmic peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase and chaperone of Escherichia coli and other Gram-negative bacteria. In contrast to other PPIases, SurA appears to have a distinct role in chaperoning newly synthesized porins destined for insertion into the outer membrane. Previous studies have indicated that the chaperone activity of SurA rests in its "core module" (the N- plus C-terminal domains, based on in vivo envelope phenotypes and in vitro binding and protection of non-native substrates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we determined the components of SurA required for chaperone activity using in vivo phenotypes relevant to disease causation by uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC, namely membrane resistance to permeation by antimicrobials and maturation of the type 1 pilus usher FimD. FimD is a SurA-dependent, integral outer membrane protein through which heteropolymeric type 1 pili, which confer bladder epithelial binding and invasion capacity upon uropathogenic E. coli, are assembled and extruded. Consistent with prior results, the in vivo chaperone activity of SurA in UPEC rested primarily in the core module. However, the PPIase domains I and II were not expendable for wild-type resistance to novobiocin in broth culture. Steady-state levels of FimD were substantially restored in the UPEC surA mutant complemented with the SurA N- plus C-terminal domains. The addition of PPIase domain I augmented FimD maturation into the outer membrane, consistent with a model in which domain I enhances stability of and/or substrate binding by the core module. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results confirm the core module of E. coli SurA as a potential target for novel anti-infective development.

  7. Multiple sclerosis-associated CLEC16A controls HLA class II expression via late endosome biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Luijn, Marvin M; Kreft, Karim L; Jongsma, Marlieke L; Mes, Steven W; Wierenga-Wolf, Annet F; van Meurs, Marjan; Melief, Marie-José; der Kant, Rik van; Janssen, Lennert; Janssen, Hans; Tan, Rusung; Priatel, John J; Neefjes, Jacques; Laman, Jon D; Hintzen, Rogier Q

    2015-06-01

    C-type lectins are key players in immune regulation by driving distinct functions of antigen-presenting cells. The C-type lectin CLEC16A gene is located at 16p13, a susceptibility locus for several autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis. However, the function of this gene and its potential contribution to these diseases in humans are poorly understood. In this study, we found a strong upregulation of CLEC16A expression in the white matter of multiple sclerosis patients (n = 14) compared to non-demented controls (n = 11), mainly in perivascular leukocyte infiltrates. Moreover, CLEC16A levels were significantly enhanced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of multiple sclerosis patients (n = 69) versus healthy controls (n = 46). In peripheral blood mononuclear cells, CLEC16A was most abundant in monocyte-derived dendritic cells, in which it strongly co-localized with human leukocyte antigen class II. Treatment of these professional antigen-presenting cells with vitamin D, a key protective environmental factor in multiple sclerosis, downmodulated CLEC16A in parallel with human leukocyte antigen class II. Knockdown of CLEC16A in distinct types of model and primary antigen-presenting cells resulted in severely impaired cytoplasmic distribution and formation of human leucocyte antigen class II-positive late endosomes, as determined by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Mechanistically, CLEC16A participated in the molecular machinery of human leukocyte antigen class II-positive late endosome formation and trafficking to perinuclear regions, involving the dynein motor complex. By performing co-immunoprecipitations, we found that CLEC16A directly binds to two critical members of this complex, RILP and the HOPS complex. CLEC16A silencing in antigen-presenting cells disturbed RILP-mediated recruitment of human leukocyte antigen class II-positive late endosomes to perinuclear regions. Together, we identify CLEC16A as a pivotal gene in multiple sclerosis that serves as a direct regulator of the human leukocyte antigen class II pathway in antigen-presenting cells. These findings are a first step in coupling multiple sclerosis-associated genes to the regulation of the strongest genetic factor in multiple sclerosis, human leukocyte antigen class II. PMID:25823473

  8. Multiple sclerosis-associated CLEC16A controls HLA class II expression via late endosome biogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. van Luijn (Marvin M.); K.L. Kreft (Karim); M.L. Jongsma (Marlieke L.); S.W. Mes (Steven); A.F. Wierenga-Wolf (Annet); M. van Meurs (Marjan); M.J. Melief; Rv. der Kant (Rik van); L. Janssen (Lennert); H. Janssen (Hans); R. Tan (Rusung); J.J. Priatel (John J.); J. Neefjes (Jacques); J.D. Laman (Jon); R.Q. Hintzen (Rogier)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractC-type lectins are key players in immune regulation by driving distinct functions of antigen-presenting cells. The C-type lectin CLEC16A gene is located at 16p13, a susceptibility locus for several autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis. However, the function of this gene and

  9. Tudor domain containing 12 (TDRD12) is essential for secondary PIWI interacting RNA biogenesis in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, R. R.; Tokuzawa, Y.; Z. Yang; Hayashi, E; Ichisaka, T.; Kajita, S.; Asano, Y; Kunieda, T.; Sachidanandam, R.; Chuma, S.; Yamanaka, S; Pillai, R.S.

    2013-01-01

    Large parts of eukaryotic genomes are composed of transposons. Mammalian genomes use DNA methylation to silence these genomic parasites. A class of small RNAs called Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) is used to specifically guide the DNA methylation machinery to the transposon DNA elements. How germ cells make piRNAs is not entirely understood. We identify a mouse protein and demonstrate its importance for transposon silencing. We find that the protein collaborates with other factors already imp...

  10. Co-and post-translational events in the biogenesis of pig small intestinal aminopeptidase N

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Erik Michael; Norén, O; Sjöström, H

    1982-01-01

    high mannose to complex glycosylation and the appearance of the enzyme in the microvillar membrane, indicating a role of the Golgi complex in these processes. Colchicine prevented aminopeptidase N from reaching the microvillar membrane, suggesting the involvement of microtubules in the transport....

  11. Nanoparticle analysis sheds budding insights into genetic drivers of extracellular vesicle biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Meckes, Jr, David G.; Stephanie N. Hurwitz; Meghan M. Conlon; Rider, Mark A.; Brownstein, Naomi C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are important mediators of cell-to-cell communication in healthy and pathological environments. Because EVs are present in a variety of biological fluids and contain molecular signatures of their cell or tissue of origin, they have great diagnostic and prognostic value. The ability of EVs to deliver biologically active proteins, RNAs and lipids to cells has generated interest in developing novel therapeutics. Despite their potential medical use, many o...

  12. Biogenesis of C-Glycosyl Flavones and Profiling of Flavonoid Glycosides in Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera)

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shan-Shan; Wu, Jie; Chen, Li-Guang; Du, Hui; Xu, Yan-Jun; Wang, Li-Jing; Zhang, Hui-Jin; Zheng, Xu-Chen; Wang, Liang-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids in nine tissues of Nelumbo nucifera Gaertner were identified and quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) and HPLC-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MSn). Thirty-eight flavonoids were identified; eleven C-glycosides and five O-glycosides were discovered for the first time in N. nucifera. Most importantly, the C-glycosyl apigenin or luteolin detected in lotus plumules proved valuable for deep elucidation of flavonoid...

  13. Effects of whole-body x irradiation on the biogenesis of creatine in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influences of whole-body x irradiation on various aspects of creatine metabolism have been studied. Exposures to sublethal or lethal doses of x radiation results in excessive urinary excretion as well as higher accumulation of creatine in the skeletal muscle of x-irradiated rats. A sudden fall in CPK activity in muscle with a concomitant rise in serum suggests that changes in serum and tissue CPK activity are of an adaptive nature in rats exposed to sublethal doses of x radiation. In vitro studies on creatine synthesis shows that transaminidase and methyl transferase activities in kidneys and liver, respectively, are decreased on the 5th day in the x-irradiated, are decreased on the 5th day in the x-irradiated rat. However, on the 8th day, the enzyme activities are restored to normal

  14. Mutations in Novel Lipopolysaccharide Biogenesis Genes Confer Resistance to Amoebal Grazing in Synechococcus elongatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkovsky, Ryan; Effner, Emily E; Iglesias-Sánchez, Maria José; Golden, Susan S

    2016-05-01

    In natural and artificial aquatic environments, population structures and dynamics of photosynthetic microbes are heavily influenced by the grazing activity of protistan predators. Understanding the molecular factors that affect predation is critical for controlling toxic cyanobacterial blooms and maintaining cyanobacterial biomass production ponds for generating biofuels and other bioproducts. We previously demonstrated that impairment of the synthesis or transport of the O-antigen component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) enables resistance to amoebal grazing in the model predator-prey system consisting of the heterolobosean amoeba HGG1 and the cyanobacteriumSynechococcus elongatusPCC 7942 (R. S. Simkovsky et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:16678-16683, 2012,http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1214904109). In this study, we used this model system to identify additional gene products involved in the synthesis of O antigen, the ligation of O antigen to the lipid A-core conjugated molecule (including a novel ligase gene), the generation of GDP-fucose, and the incorporation of sugars into the lipid A core oligosaccharide ofS. elongatus Knockout of any of these genes enables resistance to HGG1, and of these, only disruption of the genes involved in synthesis or incorporation of GDP-fucose into the lipid A-core molecule impairs growth. Because these LPS synthesis genes are well conserved across the diverse range of cyanobacteria, they enable a broader understanding of the structure and synthesis of cyanobacterial LPS and represent mutational targets for generating resistance to amoebal grazers in novel biomass production strains. PMID:26921432

  15. Evolution of Fe/S cluster biogenesis in the anaerobic parasite Blastocystis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tsaousis, A.D.; de Choudens, S. O.; Gentekaki, E.; Long, Shaojun; Gaston, D.; Stechmann, A.; Vinella, D.; Py, B.; Fontecave, M.; Barras, F.; Lukeš, Julius; Roger, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 26 (2012), s. 10426-10431. ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1667; GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2179 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : iron/sulfur cluster biosynthesis * lateral gene transfer * parasite evolution * sulfur-mobilization machinery * oxygen stress adaptation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.737, year: 2012

  16. Metastasis suppressor KISS1 seems to reverse the Warburg effect by enhancing mitochondrial biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer cells tend to utilize aerobic glycolysis even under normoxic conditions, commonly called the "Warburg Effect." Aerobic glycolysis often directly correlates with malignancy, but its purpose, if any, in metastasis remains unclear. When wild-type KISS1 metastasis suppressor is expressed, aerob...

  17. Phosphorylation of CFTR and other membrane proteins: a role in biogenesis and traffic?

    OpenAIRE

    Romeiras, Francisco Maria de Sousa de Macedo Malta, 1986-

    2009-01-01

    Tese de mestrado, Bioquímica (Bioquímica Médica), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2009 Cystic Fibrosis (CF), the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder among Caucasians, is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes for the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR). With more than 1600 mutations reported, a single mutation– the deletion of phenylalanine residue at position 508 – accounts for more than 70% of chromosomes worldwide. The presence of ...

  18. 3-Sulfanylhexanol precursor biogenesis in grapevine cells: the stimulating effect of Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibon, Cécile; Cluzet, Stéphanie; Mérillon, Jean Michel; Darriet, Philippe; Dubourdieu, Denis

    2011-02-23

    Volatile thiols, compounds that contribute strongly to the varietal aroma, are present in much higher concentrations in sweet wines than in dry wines. This positive effect, due to the presence of Botrytis cinerea on the berries, in fact results from a strong enrichment of cysteine S-conjugate precursors in botrytized berries. In the present study, a convenient model was investigated to reproduce and therefore study this phenomenon. A Vitis vinifera cell culture was used as a simple model, and we focused on S-3-(hexan-1-ol)-l-cysteine (P-3SH), the cysteinylated precursor of 3-sulfanylhexanol. We demonstrated that grapevine cells were able to produce P-3SH and that the presence of B. cinerea considerably increased the precursor level (up to 1000-fold). This positive result was determined to be due to metabolites secreted by the fungus. These molecules were temperature sensitive, unstable over time, and their production was activated in the presence of grapevine cells. Moreover, part of the pathway leading to P-3SH was deciphered: it was directly derived from the cleavage of S-3-(hexan-1-ol)-l-glutathione, which itself was generated after a conjugation of glutathione on (E)-2-hexenal. PMID:21235257

  19. A Dicer-independent miRNA biogenesis pathway that requires Ago catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Cheloufi, Sihem; dos Santos, Camila O.; Chong, Mark M.W.; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    The nucleolytic activity of animal Argonaute proteins is deeply conserved, despite its having no obvious role in microRNA-directed gene regulation. In mice, Ago2 (also known as Eif2c2) is uniquely required for viability, and only this family member retains catalytic competence. To investigate the evolutionary pressure to conserve Argonaute enzymatic activity, we engineered a mouse with catalytically inactive Ago2 alleles. Homozygous mutants died shortly after birth with an obvious anaemia. Ex...

  20. Genetic interaction maps in Escherichia coli reveal functional crosstalk among cell envelope biogenesis pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Babu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available As the interface between a microbe and its environment, the bacterial cell envelope has broad biological and clinical significance. While numerous biosynthesis genes and pathways have been identified and studied in isolation, how these intersect functionally to ensure envelope integrity during adaptive responses to environmental challenge remains unclear. To this end, we performed high-density synthetic genetic screens to generate quantitative functional association maps encompassing virtually the entire cell envelope biosynthetic machinery of Escherichia coli under both auxotrophic (rich medium and prototrophic (minimal medium culture conditions. The differential patterns of genetic interactions detected among > 235,000 digenic mutant combinations tested reveal unexpected condition-specific functional crosstalk and genetic backup mechanisms that ensure stress-resistant envelope assembly and maintenance. These networks also provide insights into the global systems connectivity and dynamic functional reorganization of a universal bacterial structure that is both broadly conserved among eubacteria (including pathogens and an important target.

  1. Specific ER quality control components required for biogenesis of the plant innate immune receptor EFR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jing; Zhao-Hui, Chu; Batoux, Martine; Nekrasov, Vladimir; Roux, Milena; Chinchilla, Delphine; Zipfel, Cyril; Jones, Jonathan D G

    2009-01-01

    Plant innate immunity depends in part on recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as bacterial flagellin, EF-Tu, and fungal chitin. Recognition is mediated by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) and results in PAMP-triggered immunity. EF-Tu and flagellin, and the derived....... ERD2B seems therefore to be a specific HDEL receptor for CRT3 that allows its retro-translocation from the Golgi to the ER. These data reveal a previously unsuspected role of a specific subset of ER-QC machinery components for PRR accumulation in plant innate immunity....

  2. Induction of mitochondrial biogenesis by omega 3 polyunsatured fatty acids in white adipose tissue

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flachs, Pavel; Kopecký, Jan; Horáková, Olga; Pecina, Petr; Franssen-van Hal, N.; Rossmeisl, Martin; Brauner, Petr; Keijer, J.; Houštěk, Josef

    Oslo: European Science Foundation, 2005. s. 93-93. [ESF Functional Genomics Conference /2./. 06.09.2005-10.09.2005, Oslo] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA303/05/2580; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : adipose tissue * n-3 PUFA * mitochondria Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  3. In planta modification of potato starch granule biogenesis by different granule-bound fusion proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Nazarian, F.

    2007-01-01

    Starch is composed of amylose and amylopectin and it is deposited in amyloplasts/choloroplasts as semi-crystalline granules. Many biosynthetic enzymes are involved in starch degradation and biosynthesis. Some microbial starch degrading enzymes have a Starch Binding Domain (SBD) which has affinity for the starch granules on its own. In our laboratory, expression of SBD alone or fused to other effector proteins has been demonstrated. In industry, starch is modified after harvesting by chemical,...

  4. A crucial role of the mitochondrial protein import receptor MOM19 for the biogenesis of mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    Harkness, Troy A. A.; Nargang, Frank E.; van der Klei, Ida; Neupert, Walter; Lill, Roland

    1994-01-01

    The novel genetic method of "sheltered RIP" (repeat induced point mutation) was used to generate a Neurospora crassa mutant in which MOM19, a component of the protein import machinery of the mitochondrial outer membrane, can be depleted. Deficiency in MOM19 resulted in a severe growth defect, but the cells remained viable. The number of mitochondrial profiles was not grossly changed, but mutant mitochondria were highly deficient in cristae membranes, cytochromes, and protein synthesis activit...

  5. Mutations affecting mRNA processing and fimbrial biogenesis in the Escherichia coli pap operon.

    OpenAIRE

    P. Nilsson; Naureckiene, S; Uhlin, B E

    1996-01-01

    The Escherichia coli pap genetic determinant includes 11 genes and encodes expression of Pap pili on the bacterial surface. An RNase E-dependent mRNA-processing event in the intercistronic papB-papA region results in the accumulation of a papA-gene-specific mRNA in considerable excess of the primary papB-papA mRNA transcription product. We have introduced mutations in the intercistronic region and studied the effect in vivo of these mutations on the processing event, PapA protein expression, ...

  6. Suppressed Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Folic Acid-Induced Acute Kidney Injury and Early Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Stallons, L. Jay; Whitaker, Ryan M; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2013-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a disease with mitochondrial dysfunction and a newly established risk factor for the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and fibrosis. We examined mitochondrial homeostasis in the folic acid (FA)-induced AKI model that develops early fibrosis over a rapid time course. Mice given a single dose of FA had elevated serum creatinine (3-fold) and urine glucose (2.2-fold) 1 and 2 d after injection that resolved by 4 d. In contrast, peroxisome proliferator gamma c...

  7. Pioglitazone enhances mitochondrial biogenesis and ribosomal protein biosynthesis in skeletal muscle in polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Vibe; Glintborg, Dorte; Knudsen, Steen;

    2008-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a common metabolic abnormality in women with PCOS and leads to an elevated risk of type 2 diabetes. Studies have shown that thiazolidinediones (TZDs) improve metabolic disturbances in PCOS patients. We hypothesized that the effect of TZDs in PCOS is, in part, mediated...... by changes in the transcriptional profile of muscle favoring insulin sensitivity. Using Affymetrix microarrays, we examined the effect of pioglitazone (30 mg/day for 16 weeks) on gene expression in skeletal muscle of 10 obese women with PCOS metabolically characterized by a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp....... Moreover, we explored gene expression changes between these PCOS patients before treatment and 13 healthy women. Treatment with pioglitazone improved insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism and plasma adiponectin, and reduced fasting serum insulin (all P

  8. Multiple Exocytotic Markers Accumulate at the Sites of Perifungal Membrane Biogenesis in Arbuscular Mycorrhizas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Genre, A.; Ivanov, S.; Fendrych, Matyáš; Faccio, A.; Žárský, Viktor; Bisseling, T.; Bonfante, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 1 (2012), s. 244-255. ISSN 0032-0781 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/1629 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Daucus carota * Exocytosis * Medicago truncatula Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.134, year: 2012

  9. Regulation of Cell Wall Biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: The Cell Wall Integrity Signaling Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, David E.

    2011-01-01

    The yeast cell wall is a strong, but elastic, structure that is essential not only for the maintenance of cell shape and integrity, but also for progression through the cell cycle. During growth and morphogenesis, and in response to environmental challenges, the cell wall is remodeled in a highly regulated and polarized manner, a process that is principally under the control of the cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling pathway. This pathway transmits wall stress signals from the cell surface to...

  10. The microbial community of Vetiver root and its involvement into essential oil biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giudice, Luigi; Massardo, Domenica Rita; Pontieri, Paola; Bertea, Cinzia M; Mombello, Domenico; Carata, Elisabetta; Tredici, Salvatore Maurizio; Talà, Adelfia; Mucciarelli, Marco; Groudeva, Veneta Ivanova; De Stefano, Mario; Vigliotta, Giovanni; Maffei, Massimo E; Alifano, Pietro

    2008-10-01

    Vetiver is the only grass cultivated worldwide for the root essential oil, which is a mixture of sesquiterpene alcohols and hydrocarbons, used extensively in perfumery and cosmetics. Light and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of bacteria in the cortical parenchymatous essential oil-producing cells and in the lysigen lacunae in close association with the essential oil. This finding and the evidence that axenic Vetiver produces in vitro only trace amounts of oil with a strikingly different composition compared with the oils from in vivo Vetiver plants stimulated the hypothesis of an involvement of these bacteria in the oil metabolism. We used culture-based and culture-independent approaches to analyse the microbial community of the Vetiver root. Results demonstrate a broad phylogenetic spectrum of bacteria, including alpha-, beta- and gamma-Proteobacteria, high-G+C-content Gram-positive bacteria, and microbes belonging to the Fibrobacteres/Acidobacteria group. We isolated root-associated bacteria and showed that most of them are able to grow by using oil sesquiterpenes as a carbon source and to metabolize them releasing into the medium a large number of compounds typically found in commercial Vetiver oils. Several bacteria were also able to induce gene expression of a Vetiver sesquiterpene synthase. These results support the intriguing hypothesis that bacteria may have a role in essential oil biosynthesis opening the possibility to use them to manoeuvre the Vetiver oil molecular structure. PMID:18662308

  11. Genetic and Ultrastructural Analysis Reveals the Key Players and Initial Steps of Bacterial Magnetosome Membrane Biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschdorf, Oliver; Forstner, Yvonne; Kolinko, Isabel; Uebe, René; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Schüler, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    Magnetosomes of magnetotactic bacteria contain well-ordered nanocrystals for magnetic navigation and have recently emerged as the most sophisticated model system to study the formation of membrane bounded organelles in prokaryotes. Magnetosome biosynthesis is thought to begin with the formation of a dedicated compartment, the magnetosome membrane (MM), in which the biosynthesis of a magnetic mineral is strictly controlled. While the biomineralization of magnetosomes and their subsequent assembly into linear chains recently have become increasingly well studied, the molecular mechanisms and early stages involved in MM formation remained poorly understood. In the Alphaproteobacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense, approximately 30 genes were found to control magnetosome biosynthesis. By cryo-electron tomography of several key mutant strains we identified the gene complement controlling MM formation in this model organism. Whereas the putative magnetosomal iron transporter MamB was most crucial for the process and caused the most severe MM phenotype upon elimination, MamM, MamQ and MamL were also required for the formation of wild-type-like MMs. A subset of seven genes (mamLQBIEMO) combined within a synthetic operon was sufficient to restore the formation of intracellular membranes in the absence of other genes from the key mamAB operon. Tracking of de novo magnetosome membrane formation by genetic induction revealed that magnetosomes originate from unspecific cytoplasmic membrane locations before alignment into coherent chains. Our results indicate that no single factor alone is essential for MM formation, which instead is orchestrated by the cumulative action of several magnetosome proteins. PMID:27286560

  12. Protein biogenesis machinery is a driver of replicative aging in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Georges E.; Meinema, Anne C.; Gonzalez, Javier; Wolters, Justina C.; Schmidt, Alexander; Guryev, Victor; Bischoff, Rainer; Wit, Ernst C.; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; Heinemann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    An integrated account of the molecular changes occurring during the process of cellular aging is crucial towards understanding the underlying mechanisms. Here, using novel culturing and computational methods as well as latest analytical techniques, we mapped the proteome and transcriptome during the

  13. Crosstalk between the lipopolysaccharide and phospholipid pathways during outer membrane biogenesis in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Emiola, Akintunde; Andrews, Steven S; Heller, Carolin; George, John

    2016-01-01

    This work examines the relationship between bacterial phospholipid biosynthesis and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) regulation. Because LPS is a potent endotoxin in addition to being essential for the survival of gram-negative bacteria, our experimental findings are of importance to the fields of microbiology, immunology, and drug design. In addition, the computational aspect of this work represents an in-depth kinetic model comprising 81 chemical reactions; hence, computational and systems biologi...

  14. Polyunsaturated fatty acids of marine origin induce mitochondrial biogenesis and beta-oxidation in white fat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flachs, Pavel; Matějková, Olga; Pecina, Petr; Frassen, N.; Brauner, Petr; Rossmeisl, Martin; Keijer, J.; Houštěk, Josef; Kopecký, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. S1 (2005), s. 10-10. ISSN 1467-7881. [European Congress on Obesity /14./. 01.06.2005-04.06.2005, Athens] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/05/2580; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : adipose tissue * n-3 PUFA * mitochondria * fatty acid oxidation * gene expression Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  15. Induction of mitochondrial biogenesis by n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in white adipoes tissue

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flachs, Pavel; Horáková, Olga; Brauner, Petr; Rossmeisl, Martin; Pecina, Petr; Franssen-van Hal, N.; Růžičková, Jana; Šponarová, Jana; Drahota, Zdeněk; Vlček, Čestmír; Keijer, J.; Houštěk, Josef; Kopecký, Jan

    2005. s. 29-29. [International nutrigenomics conference /3./. 02.11.2005-04.11.2005, Palma de Mallorca] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/05/2580; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : adipose tissue * mitochondria * n-3 PUFA * gene expression Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  16. Polyunsaturated fatty acids of marine origin induce mitochondrial biogenesis and beta-oxidation in white fat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flachs, Pavel; Matějková, Olga; Pecina, Petr; Frassen, N.; Brauner, Petr; Rossmeisl, Martin; Keijer, J.; Houštěk, Josef; Kopecký, Jan

    Elsevier. Roč. 6, č. 1 (2005), s. 8-8. ISSN 1567-5688. [Congress of the European Atherosclerosis Society /75./. 23.04.2005-26.04.2005, Prague] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/05/2580; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : n-3 PUFA * adipose tissue * mitochondria * fatty acid oxidation * gene expression Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  17. Polyunsaturated fatty acids of marine origin upregulate mitochondrial biogenesis and induce beta - oxidation in white fat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flachs, Pavel; Horáková, Olga; Brauner, Petr; Rossmeisl, Martin; Pecina, Petr; Franssen-van Hal, N.; Růžičková, Jana; Šponarová, Jana; Drahota, Zdeněk; Vlček, Čestmír; Keijer, J.; Houštěk, Josef; Kopecký, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 11 (2005), s. 2365-2375. ISSN 0012-186X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB5011410; GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB5011303; GA ČR(CZ) GA303/05/2580; GA ČR(CZ) GA303/03/0749; GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A079; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Grant ostatní: GA-(NO) Pronova Biocare; GA-(NL) Ministry of Agriculture, Nature Management and Food Control Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : fish oil * PGC-1 * adipose tissue Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 5.337, year: 2005

  18. Role of the group B antigen of Streptococcus agalactiae a peptidoglycan-anchored polysaccharide involved in cell wall biogenesis : a Peptidoglycan-Anchored Polysaccharide involved in cell wall biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Élise Caliot; Shaynoor Dramsi; Marie-Pierre Chapot-Chartier; Pascal Courtin; Saulius Kulakauskas; Christine Péchoux; Patrick Trieu-Cuot; Michel-Yves Mistou

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus, GBS) is a leading cause of infections in neonates and an emerging pathogen in adults. The Lancefield Group B carbohydrate (GBC) is a peptidoglycan-anchored antigen that defines this species as a Group B Streptococcus. Despite earlier immunological and biochemical characterizations, the function of this abundant glycopolymer has never been addressed experimentally. Here, we inactivated the gene gbcO encoding a putative UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-1-...

  19. Evaluation of the energy potential, biogenesis and essential characteristics of the geothermal submarine systems in Mexico; Evaluacion del potencial, biogenesis y caracteristicas esenciales de los sistemas geotermicos submarinos en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez Arriaga, Mario Cesar [Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2004-12-01

    Geothermal energy in Mexico embraces both near-surface traditional reservoirs located between 500 and 3000 meters depth, and deep geothermal resources over 3000 meters in depth. Non-traditional geothermal energy sources in Mexico include the deep portions and boundaries of traditional hydrothermal reservoirs, systems in hot dry or wet rock, geo-pressured reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico and hydrothermal submarine systems mainly located close to the northern Mexican coast of the Pacific Ocean. Deep submarine energy is related to the existence of hydrothermal vents emerging in many places along the oceanic spreading centers between tectonic plates. These systems have a total length of about 65,000 km in the Earth's oceanic crust. There are two kinds of ocean systems in the Gulf of California: deep resources, located along the rifts between tectonic plates of oceanic crust over 2000 m below sea level, and shallow resources near continental platforms at 20-50 m depth. The shallow, submarine heat is related to faults and fractures in the sea bottom close to some coasts. This type of shallow, sub-sea system is found offshore at Punta Banda in Ensenada, Baja California. The preliminary energy potential of such reservoirs is estimated at an average of 1120 MWt per cubic kilometer of sub-sea rock. The specific chemical characteristics of the submarine hydrothermal waters found in those systems indicate that water-oceanic rock interactions occur under high-temperature and high-pressure conditions. At the same time, submarine geothermal energy supports rich biological communities at depths where living organisms find no sunlight for photosynthesis. Recent research suggests that possible locations for the synthesis of chemical needed for the origin of life include submarine hydrothermal systems. [Spanish] La energia geotermica en Mexico abarca todos los tipos de sistemas conocidos. Desde los grandes reservorios tradicionales, localizados entre 500 y 3000 metros de profundidad, hasta los recursos geotermicos profundos, a mas de 3000 metros de profundidad. Las fuentes geotermicas no tradicionales incluyen las partes profundas y los limites de los reservorios hidrotermales tradicionales, los sistemas en roca seca o humeda caliente, los yacimientos geopresurizados del Golfo de Mexico y los sistemas submarinos hidrotermales observados principalmente en la costa norte mexicana del Oceano Pacifico. La energia geotermica submarina surge por la existencia de rupturas profundas en el fondo marino, a lo largo de los centros de dispersion oceanicos entre las placas tectonicas. Estos sistemas tienen una longitud total aproximada de 65,000 Km. en la corteza oceanica. Hay dos tipos basicos de sistemas marinos existentes en el Golfo de California: los recursos profundos, localizados a lo largo de las cordilleras entre las placas de la corteza oceanica a mas de 2000 m bajo el nivel del mar, y los recursos poco profundos cerca de las plataformas continentales, entre 20 y 50 metros de profundidad. El calor submarino poco profundo tambien se relaciona con fallas y fracturas en el fondo del mar cerca de algunas costas. Este subsistema se encuentra tambien en la costa de Punta Banda en Ensenada, Baja California. El potencial preliminar de la energia contenida en tales reservorios se estima, en promedio, en 1120 MWt por cada km3 de roca submarina. Las caracteristicas quimicas especificas de las aguas hidrotermales encontradas en esos sistemas oceanicos indican que las interacciones agua-roca, ocurren bajo condiciones de presion y temperatura altas. La energia geotermica submarina soporta ricas variedades de comunidades biologicas a profundidades donde las plantas no tienen acceso a la luz solar para realizar la fotosintesis. Hay indicios de que las posibles condiciones para la sintesis de sustancias y elementos quimicos necesaria para el origen de la vida primitiva, pudieron ser los sistemas hidrotermales submarinos.

  20. Biogenesis of non-structural protein 1 (nsp1) and nsp1-mediated type I interferon modulation in arteriviruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Type I interferons (IFNs-α/β) play a key role for the antiviral state of host, and the porcine arterivirus; porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), has been shown to down-regulate the production of IFNs during infection. Non-structural protein (nsp) 1 of PRRSV has been identified as a viral IFN antagonist, and the nsp1α subunit of nsp1 has been shown to degrade the CREB-binding protein (CBP) and to inhibit the formation of enhanceosome thus resulting in the suppression of IFN production. The study was expanded to other member viruses in the family Arteriviridae: equine arteritis virus (EAV), murine lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV), and simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV). While PRRSV–nsp1 and LDV–nsp1 were auto-cleaved to produce the nsp1α and nsp1β subunits, EAV–nsp1 remained uncleaved. SHFV–nsp1 was initially predicted to be cleaved to generate three subunits (nsp1α, nsp1β, and nsp1γ), but only two subunits were generated as SHFV–nsp1αβ and SHFV–nsp1γ. The papain-like cysteine protease (PLP) 1α motif in nsp1α remained inactive for SHFV, and only the PLP1β motif of nsp1β was functional to generate SHFV–nsp1γ subunit. All subunits of arterivirus nsp1 were localized in the both nucleus and cytoplasm, but PRRSV–nsp1β, LDV–nsp1β, EAV–nsp1, and SHFV–nsp1γ were predominantly found in the nucleus. All subunits of arterivirus nsp1 contained the IFN suppressive activity and inhibited both interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and NF-κB mediated IFN promoter activities. Similar to PRRSV–nsp1α, CBP degradation was evident in cells expressing LDV–nsp1α and SHFV–nsp1γ, but no such degradation was observed for EAV–nsp1. Regardless of CBP degradation, all subunits of arterivirus nsp1 suppressed the IFN-sensitive response element (ISRE)-promoter activities. Our data show that the nsp1-mediated IFN modulation is a common strategy for all arteriviruses but their mechanism of action may differ from each other. - Highlights: • LDV–nsp1 was cleaved to nsp1α and nsp1β whereas EAV–nsp1 was uncleaved. • SHFV–nsp1 was cleaved to nsp1αβ and nsp1γ. • PRRSV–nsp1β, LDV–nsp1β, EAV–nsp1, and SHFV–nsp1γ were nuclear proteins. • PRRSV–nsp1α, LDV–nsp1α, and SHFV–nsp1γ caused CBP degradation. • All nsp1 subunits contained interferon and ISRE suppressive activities

  1. Effect of the three-dimensional organization of liver cells on the biogenesis of the γ-glutamyltransferase fraction pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Alessandro; Fierabracci, Vanna; Caponi, Laura; Paolicchi, Aldo; Lorenzini, Evelina; Campani, Daniela; Belcastro, Eugenia; Franzini, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Context Four gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) fractions with different molecular weights (big-, medium-, small- and free-GGT) are detectable in human plasma. Objective Verify if liver cells can release all four GGT fractions and if the spatial cell organization influences their release. Methods Hepatoma (HepG2) and melanoma (Me665/2/60) cells were cultured as monolayers or spheroids. GGT released in culture media was analysed by gel-filtration chromatography. Results HepG2 and Me665/2/60 monolayers released the b-GGT fraction, while significative levels of s-GGT and f-GGT were detectable only in media of HepG2-spheroids. Bile acids alone or in combination with papain promoted the conversion of b-GGT in s-GGT or f-GGT, respectively. Conclusions GGT is usually released as b-GGT, while s-GGT and f-GGT are likely to be produced in the liver extracellular environment by the combined action of bile acids and proteases. PMID:27027926

  2. G protein coupled receptor kinase 2 interacting protein 1 (GIT1) is a novel regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis in heart

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Jinjiang; Xu, Xiangbin; Getman, Michael R.; Shi, Xi; Belmonte, Stephen L.; Michaloski, Heidi; Mohan, Amy; Blaxall, Burns C.; Berk, Bradford C.

    2011-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-kinase interacting protein-1 (GIT1) is a multi-function scaffold protein. However, little is known about its physiological role in the heart. Here we sought to identify the cardiac function of GIT1. Global GIT1 knockout (KO) mice were generated and exhibited significant cardiac hypertrophy that progressed to heart failure. Electron microscopy revealed that the hearts of GIT1 KO mice demonstrated significant morphological abnormities in mitochondria, including...

  3. Characterization of two common 5' polymorphisms in PEX1 and correlation to survival in PEX1 peroxisome biogenesis disorder patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thoms Sven

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in PEX1 are the most common primary cause of Zellweger syndrome. In addition to exonic mutations, deletions and splice site mutations two 5' polymorphisms at c.-137 and c.-53 with a potential influence on PEX1 protein levels have been described in the 5' untranslated region (UTR of the PEX1 gene. Methods We used RACE and in silico promoter prediction analysis to study the 5' UTR of PEX1. We determined the distribution of PEX1 5' polymorphisms in a cohort of 30 Zellweger syndrome patients by standard DNA sequencing. 5' polymorphisms were analysed in relation to the two most common mutations in PEX1 and were incorporated into a novel genotype-phenotype analysis by correlation of three classes of PEX1 mutations with patient survival. Results We provide evidence that the polymorphism 137 bp upstream of the ATG codon is not part of the UTR, rendering it a promoter polymorphism. We show that the first, but not the second most common PEX1 mutation arose independently of a specific upstream polymorphic constellation. By genotype-phenotype analysis we identified patients with identical exonic mutation and identical 5' polymorphisms, but strongly differing survival. Conclusions Our study suggests that two different types of PEX1 5' polymorphisms have to be distinguished: a 5' UTR polymorphism at position c.-53 and a promoter polymorphism 137 bp upstream of the PEX1 start codon. Our results indicate that the exonic PEX1 mutation correlates with patient survival, but the two 5' polymorphisms analysed in this study do not have to be considered for diagnostic and/or prognostic purposes.

  4. SURF1, encoding a factor involved in the biogenesis of cytochrome c oxidase, is mutated in Leigh syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Z; Yao, J; Johns, T.; K. Fu; De Brie, I; Macmillan, C; Cuthbert, AP; Newbold, RF; J. Wang(Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing); Cheverette, M

    1998-01-01

    Leigh Syndrome (LS) is a severe neurological disorder characterized by bilaterally symmetrical necrotic lesions in subcortical brain regions that is commonly associated with systemic cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency. COX deficiency is an autosomal recessive trait and most patients belong to a single genetic complementation group. DNA sequence analysis of the genes encoding the structural subunits of the COX complex has failed to identify a pathogenic mutation. Using microcell-mediated ch...

  5. Biogenesis and fate of the cell-cell adhesion molecule, agglutinin, during gametogenesis and fertilization of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fertilization in Chlamydomonas begins with the species-specific recognition and adhesion between gametes of opposite mating types via agglutinin molecules on the flagellar surface. This adhesion generates a cAMP-mediated sexual signal that initiates the subsequent events of call wall release, mating structure activation, and cell fusion. Although flagella of paired gametes remain attached to each other until the zygote forms, the process is dynamic. Engaged agglutinins rapidly become inactivated and turnover, requiring the constant supply of new agglutinins to replace the lost molecules. A population of cell body associated agglutinins has been postulated to the pool of agglutinins recruited during this turnover. Cell body agglutinins, therefore were identified, purified, localized within the cells and compared to flagellar agglutinins. The relationship between these two agglutinin populations was also examined. Cell body agglutinins were biochemically indistinguishable from the flagellar form with respect to their Mr, sedimentation coefficient, and hydrophobicity elution properties. Functionally, however, these molecules were inactive in situ. The calculated surface density of agglutinins in the cell body and flagellar domains was similar and thus could not explain their functional difference, but two domains contiguous and yet distinctive suggested they may be separated by a functional barrier. To test this, a method was developed, using a monoclonal antibody and cycloheximide, that removed the flagellar agglutinins so movement between the domains could be monitored. Mobilization of agglutinins onto the flagella did not occur unless sexual signaling was induced with cAMP and papaverine

  6. Transient hypoxia stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis in brain subcortex by a neuronal nitric oxide synthase-dependent mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    The adaptive mechanisms that protect brain metabolism during and after hypoxia, for instance, during hypoxic preconditioning, are coordinated in part by nitric oxide (NO). We tested the hypothesis that acute transient hypoxia stimulates NO synthase (NOS)-activated mechanisms of m...

  7. Kinetoplastid guide RNA biogenesis is dependent on subunits of the mitochondrial RNA binding complex 1 and mitochondrial RNA polymerase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hashimi, Hassan; Číčová, Zdeňka; Novotná, Lucie; Wen, Y.-Z.; Lukeš, Julius

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2009), s. 588-599. ISSN 1355-8382 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1667; GA AV ČR IAA500960705; GA MŠk LC07032; GA MŠk 2B06129; GA ČR GD524/03/H133 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : RNA editing * guide RNA * mitochondrion * trypanosome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.198, year: 2009

  8. Sucrose mobilization in relation to essential oil biogenesis during palmarosa (Cymbopogon martinii Roxb. Wats. var. motia) inflorescence development

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vinod Shanker Dubey; Ritu Bhalla; Rajesh Luthra

    2003-06-01

    Palmarosa inflorescence with partially opened spikelets is biogenetically active to incorporate [U-14C]sucrose into essential oil. The percent distribution of 14C-radioactivity incorporated into geranyl acetate was relatively higher as compared to that in geraniol, the major essential oil constituent of palmarosa. At the partially opened spikelet stage, more of the geraniol synthesized was acetylated to form geranyl acetate, suggesting that majority of the newly synthesized geraniol undergoes acetylation, thus producing more geranyl acetate. In vitro development of palmarosa inflorescence, fed with [U-14C]sucrose, resulted in a substantial reduction in percent label from geranyl acetate with a corresponding increase in free geraniol, thereby suggesting the role of an esterase in the production of geraniol from geranyl acetate. At time course measurement of 14CO2 incorporation into geraniol and geranyl acetate substantiated this observation. Soluble acid invertase was the major enzyme involved in the sucrose breakdown throughout the inflorescence development. The activities of cell wall bound acid invertase, alkaline invertase and sucrose synthase were relatively lower as compared to the soluble acid invertase. Sucrose to reducing sugars ratio decreased till fully opened spikelets stage, concomitant with increased acid invertase activity and higher metabolic activity. The phenomenon of essential oil biosynthesis has been discussed in relation to changes in these physiological parameters.

  9. Impaired Chloroplast Biogenesis in Immutans, an Arabidopsis Variegation Mutant, Modifies Developmental Programming, Cell Wall Composition and Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelko, Gennady V.; Kambakam, Sekhar; Nolan, Trevor; Foudree, Andrew; Zabotina, Olga A.; Rodermel, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    The immutans (im) variegation mutation of Arabidopsis has green- and white- sectored leaves due to action of a nuclear recessive gene. IM codes for PTOX, a plastoquinol oxidase in plastid membranes. Previous studies have revealed that the green and white sectors develop into sources (green tissues) and sinks (white tissues) early in leaf development. In this report we focus on white sectors, and show that their transformation into effective sinks involves a sharp reduction in plastid number and size. Despite these reductions, cells in the white sectors have near-normal amounts of plastid RNA and protein, and surprisingly, a marked amplification of chloroplast DNA. The maintenance of protein synthesis capacity in the white sectors might poise plastids for their development into other plastid types. The green and white im sectors have different cell wall compositions: whereas cell walls in the green sectors resemble those in wild type, cell walls in the white sectors have reduced lignin and cellulose microfibrils, as well as alterations in galactomannans and the decoration of xyloglucan. These changes promote susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Enhanced susceptibility can also be explained by repressed expression of some, but not all, defense genes. We suggest that differences in morphology, physiology and biochemistry between the green and white sectors is caused by a reprogramming of leaf development that is coordinated, in part, by mechanisms of retrograde (plastid-to-nucleus) signaling, perhaps mediated by ROS. We conclude that variegation mutants offer a novel system to study leaf developmental programming, cell wall metabolism and host-pathogen interactions. PMID:27050746

  10. Lipid-dependent surface transport of the proton pumping ATPase: A model to study plasma membrane biogenesis in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Toulmay, Alexandre; Schneiter, Roger

    2007-01-01

    The proton pumping H+-ATPase, Pma1, is one of the most abundant integral membrane proteins of the yeast plasma membrane. Pma1 activity controls the intracellular pH and maintains the electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane, two essential cellular functions. The maintenance of the proton gradient, on the other hand, also requires a specialized lipid composition of this membrane. The plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells is typically rich in sphingolipids and sterols. These two lipids...

  11. A new role for the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein: stimulation of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complex biogenesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hervouet, E.; Demont, J.; Pecina, Petr; Vojtíšková, Alena; Houštěk, Josef; Simonnet, H.; Godinot, C.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 3 (2005), s. 531-539. ISSN 0143-3334 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/03/0749; GA MZd NR7790 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : von Hippel-Lindau * clear cell renal carcinoma (CCRC) * mitochondria Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.108, year: 2005

  12. Aurora kinase a drives mtoc biogenesis but does not trigger resumption of meiosis in mouse oocytes matured in vivo

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolc, Petr; Baran, Vladimír; Mayer, Alexandra; Böhmová, Tereza; Panenková, Gabriela; Šašková, Adéla; Schultz, R. M.; Motlík, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 4 (2012), s. 1-12. ISSN 0006-3363 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME08030; GA MŠk LH12057; GA ČR(CZ) GPP301/11/P081 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : γ-tubulin * AURKA * CDC25B Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.027, year: 2012

  13. Role of the Group B antigen of Streptococcus agalactiae: a peptidoglycan-anchored polysaccharide involved in cell wall biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Élise Caliot

    Full Text Available Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus, GBS is a leading cause of infections in neonates and an emerging pathogen in adults. The Lancefield Group B carbohydrate (GBC is a peptidoglycan-anchored antigen that defines this species as a Group B Streptococcus. Despite earlier immunological and biochemical characterizations, the function of this abundant glycopolymer has never been addressed experimentally. Here, we inactivated the gene gbcO encoding a putative UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate:lipid phosphate transferase thought to catalyze the first step of GBC synthesis. Indeed, the gbcO mutant was unable to synthesize the GBC polymer, and displayed an important growth defect in vitro. Electron microscopy study of the GBC-depleted strain of S. agalactiae revealed a series of growth-related abnormalities: random placement of septa, defective cell division and separation processes, and aberrant cell morphology. Furthermore, vancomycin labeling and peptidoglycan structure analysis demonstrated that, in the absence of GBC, cells failed to initiate normal PG synthesis and cannot complete polymerization of the murein sacculus. Finally, the subcellular localization of the PG hydrolase PcsB, which has a critical role in cell division of streptococci, was altered in the gbcO mutant. Collectively, these findings show that GBC is an essential component of the cell wall of S. agalactiae whose function is reminiscent of that of conventional wall teichoic acids found in Staphylococcus aureus or Bacillus subtilis. Furthermore, our findings raise the possibility that GBC-like molecules play a major role in the growth of most if not all beta-hemolytic streptococci.

  14. Regulation of Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Biogenesis by Estrogens/Estrogen Receptors and Physiological, Pathological and Pharmacological Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jin-Qiang; Cammarata, Patrick R.; Baines, Christopher P.; Yager, James D.

    2009-01-01

    There has been increasing evidence pointing to the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) as a novel and important target for the actions of 17β-estradiol(E2) and estrogen receptors (ER) in a number of cell types and tissues that have high demands for mitochondrial energy metabolism. This novel E2-mediated mitochondrial pathway involves the cooperation of both nuclear and mitochondrial ERα and ERβ and their co-activators on the coordinate regulation of both nuclear DNA- and mitochondrial DNA-e...

  15. Genome-Wide Analysis of Arabidopsis Pentatricopeptide Repeat Proteins Reveals Their Essential Role in Organelle BiogenesisW⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurin, Claire; Andrés, Charles; Aubourg, Sébastien; Bellaoui, Mohammed; Bitton, Frédérique; Bruyère, Clémence; Caboche, Michel; Debast, Cédrig; Gualberto, José; Hoffmann, Beate; Lecharny, Alain; Le Ret, Monique; Martin-Magniette, Marie-Laure; Mireau, Hakim; Peeters, Nemo; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Szurek, Boris; Taconnat, Ludivine; Small, Ian

    2004-01-01

    The complete sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome revealed thousands of previously unsuspected genes, many of which cannot be ascribed even putative functions. One of the largest and most enigmatic gene families discovered in this way is characterized by tandem arrays of pentatricopeptide repeats (PPRs). We describe a detailed bioinformatic analysis of 441 members of the Arabidopsis PPR family plus genomic and genetic data on the expression (microarray data), localization (green fluorescent protein and red fluorescent protein fusions), and general function (insertion mutants and RNA binding assays) of many family members. The basic picture that arises from these studies is that PPR proteins play constitutive, often essential roles in mitochondria and chloroplasts, probably via binding to organellar transcripts. These results confirm, but massively extend, the very sparse observations previously obtained from detailed characterization of individual mutants in other organisms. PMID:15269332

  16. Common miR-590 Variant rs6971711 Present Only in African Americans Reduces miR-590 Biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaoping; Steinberg, Steven; Kandasamy, Suresh K; Afzal, Junaid; Mbiyangandu, Blaid; Liao, Susan E; Guan, Yufan; Corona-Villalobos, Celia P; Matkovich, Scot J; Epstein, Neal; Tripodi, Dotti; Huo, Zhaoxia; Cutting, Garry; Abraham, Theodore P; Fukunaga, Ryuya; Abraham, M Roselle

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are recognized as important regulators of cardiac development, hypertrophy and fibrosis. Recent studies have demonstrated that genetic variations which cause alterations in miRNA:target interactions can lead to disease. We hypothesized that genetic variations in miRNAs that regulate cardiac hypertrophy/fibrosis might be involved in generation of the cardiac phenotype in patients diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). To investigate this question, we Sanger sequenced 18 miRNA genes previously implicated in myocyte hypertrophy/fibrosis and apoptosis, using genomic DNA isolated from the leukocytes of 199 HCM patients. We identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs6971711, C57T SNP) at the 17th position of mature miR-590-3p (= 57th position of pre-miR-590) that is common in individuals of African ancestry. SNP frequency was higher in African American HCM patients (n = 55) than ethnically-matched controls (n = 100), but the difference was not statistically significant (8.2% vs. 6.5%; p = 0.5). Using a cell culture system, we discovered that presence of this SNP resulted in markedly lower levels of mature miR-590-5p (39 ± 16%, pAfrican Americans, population studies in this patient population would be valuable to investigate effects of this SNP on myocyte function and cardiac physiology. PMID:27196440

  17. The Escherichia coli membrane protein insertase YidC assists in the biogenesis of Penicillin Binding Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Sousa Borges, Anabela; de Keyzer, Jeanine; Driessen, Arnold J M; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins need to be properly inserted and folded in the membrane in order to perform a range of activities that are essential for the survival of bacteria. The Sec translocon and the YidC insertase are responsible for the insertion of the majority of proteins into the cytoplasmic membrane.

  18. De Novo Peroxisome Biogenesis in Penicillium Chrysogenum Is Not Dependent on the Pex11 Family Members or Pex16

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opalinski, Lukasz; Bartoszewska, Magdalena; Fekken, Susan; Liu, Haiyin; de Boer, Rinse; van der Klei, Ida; Veenhuis, Marten; Kiel, Jan A. K. W.; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2012-01-01

    We have analyzed the role of the three members of the Pex11 protein family in peroxisome formation in the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. Two of these, Pex11 and Pex11C, are components of the peroxisomal membrane, while Pex11B is present at the endoplasmic reticulum. We show that Pex11 i

  19. Dynamics of a novel centromeric histone variant CenH3 reveals the evolutionary ancestral timing of centromere biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Dubin, Manu; Fuchs, Jörg; Gräf, Ralph; Schubert, Ingo; Nellen, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    The centromeric histone H3 variant (CenH3) serves to target the kinetochore to the centromeres and thus ensures correct chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. The Dictyostelium H3-like variant H3v1 was identified as the CenH3 ortholog. Dictyostelium CenH3 has an extended N-terminal domain with no similarity to any other known proteins and a histone fold domain at its C-terminus. Within the histone fold, α-helix 2 (α2) and an extended loop 1 (L1) have been shown to be required for ...

  20. High-Throughput Identification of Chemical Inhibitors of E. coli Group 2 Capsule Biogenesis as Anti-Virulence Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Goller, Carlos C.; Seed, Patrick C.

    2010-01-01

    Rising antibiotic resistance among Escherichia coli, the leading cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs), has placed a new focus on molecular pathogenesis studies, aiming to identify new therapeutic targets. Anti-virulence agents are attractive as chemotherapeutics to attenuate an organism during disease but not necessarily during benign commensalism, thus decreasing the stress on beneficial microbial communities and lessening the emergence of resistance. We and others have demonstrated that...

  1. Characterization of CRISPR RNA Biogenesis and Cas6 Cleavage-Mediated Inhibition of a Provirus in the Haloarchaeon Haloferax mediterranei

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ming; Liu, Hailong; Han, Jing; Liu, Jingfang; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Dahe; Zhou, Jian; Xiang, Hua

    2013-01-01

    The adaptive immune system comprising CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) arrays and cas (CRISPR-associated) genes has been discovered in a wide range of bacteria and archaea and has recently attracted comprehensive investigations. However, the subtype I-B CRISPR-Cas system in haloarchaea has been less characterized. Here, we investigated Cas6-mediated RNA processing in Haloferax mediterranei. The Cas6 cleavage site, as well as the CRISPR transcription start sit...

  2. Auxin Transport and Ribosome Biogenesis Mutant/Reporter Lines to Study Plant Cell Growth and Proliferation under Altered Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbuena, Miguel A.; Manzano, Ana I.; van Loon, Jack JWA.; Saez-Vasquez, Julio; Carnero-Diaz, Eugenie; Herranz, Raul; Medina, F. J.

    2013-02-01

    We tested different Arabidopsis thaliana strains to check their availability for space use in the International Space Station (ISS). We used mutants and reporter gene strains affecting factors of cell proliferation and cell growth, to check variations induced by an altered gravity vector. Seedlings were grown either in a Random Positioning Machine (RPM), under simulated microgravity (μg), or in a Large Diameter Centrifuge (LDC), under hypergravity (2g). A combination of the two devices (μgRPM+LDC) was also used. Under all gravity alterations, seedling roots were longer than in control 1g conditions, while the levels of the nucleolar protein nucleolin were depleted. Alterations in the pattern of expression of PIN2, an auxin transporter, and of cyclin B1, a cell cycle regulator, were shown. All these alterations are compatible with previous space data, so the use of these strains will be useful in the next experiments in ISS, under real microgravity.

  3. Biogenesis of phycobiliproteins. III. CpcM is the asparagine methyltransferase for phycobiliprotein beta-subunits in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Crystal A; Leonard, Heidi S; Pinsky, Ivan G; Turner, Brandy M; Williams, Shervonda R; Harrison, Leon; Fletcher, Ariane F; Shen, Gaozhong; Bryant, Donald A; Schluchter, Wendy M

    2008-07-11

    All phycobiliproteins contain a conserved, post-translational modification on asparagine 72 of their beta-subunits. Methylation of this Asn to produce gamma-N-methylasparagine has been shown to increase energy transfer efficiency within the phycobilisome and to prevent photoinhibition. We report here the biochemical characterization of the product of sll0487, which we have named cpcM, from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Recombinant apo-phycocyanin and apo-allophycocyanin subunits were used as the substrates for assays with [methyl-3H]S-adenosylmethionine and recombinant CpcM. CpcM methylated the beta-subunits of phycobiliproteins (CpcB, ApcB, and ApcF) and did not methylate the corresponding alpha-subunits (CpcA, ApcA, and ApcD), although they are similar in primary and tertiary structure. CpcM preferentially methylated its CpcB substrate after chromophorylation had occurred at Cys82. CpcM exhibited lower activity on trimeric phycocyanin after complete chromophorylation and oligomerization had occurred. Based upon these in vitro studies, we conclude that this post-translational modification probably occurs after chromophorylation but before trimer assembly in vivo. PMID:18482977

  4. MHC class II-associated proteins in B-cell exosomes and potential functional implications for exosome biogenesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buschow, S.I.; Balkom, B.W.M. van; Aalberts, M.; Heck, A.J.R. van; Wauben, M.; Stoorvogel, W.

    2010-01-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells secrete major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) carrying exosomes with unclear physiological function(s). Exosomes are first generated as the intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) of a specific type of multivesicular body, and are then secreted by fusion of th

  5. Influence of O Polysaccharides on Biofilm Development and Outer Membrane Vesicle Biogenesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Kathleen; Park, Amber J.; Hao, Youai; Brewer, Dyanne; Lam, Joseph S.; Khursigara, Cezar M.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common opportunistic human pathogen known for its ability to adapt to changes in its environment during the course of infection. These adaptations include changes in the expression of cell surface lipopolysaccharide (LPS), biofilm development, and the production of a protective extracellular exopolysaccharide matrix. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been identified as an important component of the extracellular matrix of P. aeruginosa biofilms and are thought to...

  6. SpoIIB Localizes to Active Sites of Septal Biogenesis and Spatially Regulates Septal Thinning during Engulfment in Bacillus subtilis

    OpenAIRE

    Perez, Ana R.; Abanes-De Mello, Angelica; Pogliano, Kit

    2000-01-01

    A key step in the Bacillus subtilis spore formation pathway is the engulfment of the forespore by the mother cell, a phagocytosis-like process normally accompanied by the loss of peptidoglycan within the sporulation septum. We have reinvestigated the role of SpoIIB in engulfment by using the fluorescent membrane stain FM 4-64 and deconvolution microscopy. We have found that spoIIB mutant sporangia display a transient engulfment defect in which the forespore pushes through the septum and bulge...

  7. Biogenesis of non-structural protein 1 (nsp1) and nsp1-mediated type I interferon modulation in arteriviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Mingyuan; Kim, Chi Yong [Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 South Lincoln Avenue, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Rowland, Raymond R.R.; Fang, Ying [Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Kim, Daewoo [Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 South Lincoln Avenue, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Yoo, Dongwan, E-mail: dyoo@illinois.edu [Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 South Lincoln Avenue, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Type I interferons (IFNs-α/β) play a key role for the antiviral state of host, and the porcine arterivirus; porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), has been shown to down-regulate the production of IFNs during infection. Non-structural protein (nsp) 1 of PRRSV has been identified as a viral IFN antagonist, and the nsp1α subunit of nsp1 has been shown to degrade the CREB-binding protein (CBP) and to inhibit the formation of enhanceosome thus resulting in the suppression of IFN production. The study was expanded to other member viruses in the family Arteriviridae: equine arteritis virus (EAV), murine lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV), and simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV). While PRRSV–nsp1 and LDV–nsp1 were auto-cleaved to produce the nsp1α and nsp1β subunits, EAV–nsp1 remained uncleaved. SHFV–nsp1 was initially predicted to be cleaved to generate three subunits (nsp1α, nsp1β, and nsp1γ), but only two subunits were generated as SHFV–nsp1αβ and SHFV–nsp1γ. The papain-like cysteine protease (PLP) 1α motif in nsp1α remained inactive for SHFV, and only the PLP1β motif of nsp1β was functional to generate SHFV–nsp1γ subunit. All subunits of arterivirus nsp1 were localized in the both nucleus and cytoplasm, but PRRSV–nsp1β, LDV–nsp1β, EAV–nsp1, and SHFV–nsp1γ were predominantly found in the nucleus. All subunits of arterivirus nsp1 contained the IFN suppressive activity and inhibited both interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and NF-κB mediated IFN promoter activities. Similar to PRRSV–nsp1α, CBP degradation was evident in cells expressing LDV–nsp1α and SHFV–nsp1γ, but no such degradation was observed for EAV–nsp1. Regardless of CBP degradation, all subunits of arterivirus nsp1 suppressed the IFN-sensitive response element (ISRE)-promoter activities. Our data show that the nsp1-mediated IFN modulation is a common strategy for all arteriviruses but their mechanism of action may differ from each other. - Highlights: • LDV–nsp1 was cleaved to nsp1α and nsp1β whereas EAV–nsp1 was uncleaved. • SHFV–nsp1 was cleaved to nsp1αβ and nsp1γ. • PRRSV–nsp1β, LDV–nsp1β, EAV–nsp1, and SHFV–nsp1γ were nuclear proteins. • PRRSV–nsp1α, LDV–nsp1α, and SHFV–nsp1γ caused CBP degradation. • All nsp1 subunits contained interferon and ISRE suppressive activities.

  8. Rhodococcus equi Virulence-Associated Protein A Is Required for Diversion of Phagosome Biogenesis but Not for Cytotoxicity▿

    OpenAIRE

    von Bargen, Kristine; Polidori, Marco; Becken, Ulrike; Huth, Gitta; Prescott, John F.; Haas, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a gram-positive facultative intracellular pathogen that can cause severe bronchopneumonia in foals and AIDS patients. Virulence is plasmid regulated and is accompanied by phagosome maturation arrest and host cell necrosis. A replacement mutant in the gene for VapA (virulence-associated protein A), a major virulence factor of R. equi, was tested for its activities during macrophage infection. Early in infection, phagosomes containing the vapA mutant did not fuse with lysoso...

  9. The evolution of ERMIONE in mitochondrial biogenesis and lipid homeostasis: An evolutionary view from comparative cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wideman, Jeremy G; Muñoz-Gómez, Sergio A

    2016-08-01

    The ER-mitochondria organizing network (ERMIONE) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is involved in maintaining mitochondrial morphology and lipid homeostasis. ERMES and MICOS are two scaffolding complexes of ERMIONE that contribute to these processes. ERMES is ancient but has been lost in several lineages including animals, plants, and SAR (stramenopiles, alveolates and rhizaria). On the other hand, MICOS is ancient and has remained present in all organisms bearing mitochondrial cristae. The ERMIONE precursor evolved in the α-proteobacterial ancestor of mitochondria which had the central subunit of MICOS, Mic60. The subsequent evolution of ERMIONE and its interactors in eukaryotes reflects the integrative co-evolution of mitochondria and their hosts and the adaptive paths that some lineages have followed in their specialization to certain environments. By approaching the ERMIONE from a perspective of comparative evolutionary cell biology, we hope to shed light on not only its evolutionary history, but also how ERMIONE components may function in organisms other than S. cerevisiae. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon. PMID:26825688

  10. Posttranslational Modification of Mitochondrial Transcription Factor A in Impaired Mitochondria Biogenesis: Implications in Diabetic Retinopathy and Metabolic Memory Phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Julia M.; Mishra, Manish; Kowluru, Renu A.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is one of the key regulators of the transcription of mtDNA. In diabetes, despite increase in gene transcripts of TFAM, its protein levels in the mitochondria are decreased and mitochondria copy numbers become subnormal. The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanism(s) responsible for decreased mitochondrial TFAM in diabetes. Using retinal endothelial cells, we have investigated the effect of overexpression of cytosolic chaperone, Hsp70, and ...

  11. Homeostatic restitution of cell membranes. Nuclear membrane lipid biogenesis and transport of protein from cytosol to intranuclear spaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia Slomiany, Maria Grabska, Bronislaw L. Slomiany

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Our studies on homeostatic restitution of cellular and subcellular membranes showed that vesicular intracellular transport is engaged in systematic and coordinated replacement of lipids and proteins in the membranes of the secretory, non-dividing epithelial cells (Slomiany et al., J. Physiol. Pharmacol. 2004; 55: 837-860. In this report, we present evidence on the homeostatic restitution of lipids in the biomembranes that constitute nuclear envelopes. We investigated nuclear membranes lipid synthesis by employing purified intact nuclei (IN, the outer nuclear membrane (ONM, the inner nuclear membrane (INM and the cell cytosol (CC. In contrast to Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER which in the presence of CC generates new biomembrane that forms ER vesicles transporting ER products to Golgi, the IN, ONM and INM are not producing transport vesicles. Instead, the newly synthesized lipids remain in the nuclear membranes. The membranes (INM, ONM of IN incubated with CC become enriched with newly synthesized phosphatidylcholine (PC, phosphatidylinositol (PI, phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPs and phosphatidic acid (PA. The incubation of separated ONM and INM with CC also enriched the membranes with IN specific lipids identified above. Moreover, the incubation of IN or its membranes with CC afforded retention of numerous CC proteins on the nuclear membrane. Here, we concentrated on 30kDa CC protein that displayed affinity to nuclear membrane PIP2. The 30kDa CC protein bound to PIP2 of IN, INM, and ONM. With IN, initially the PIP2-30kDa CC protein complex was detected on ONM, after 30-120 min of incubation, was found on INM and in nuclear contents. At the same time when the 30 kDa protein was released from INM and found in nuclear contents, the PIP2 of INM and ONM became undetectable, while the lipid extract from the membrane displaced from IN contained labeled PI only. Since ONM is an uninterrupted continuum of ER and INM, we speculate that the synthesis of the lipids in the ER, in the region adjacent to nucleus, is defining nuclear outer and inner biomembrane composition, is responsible for transport of the cytosolic protein into the nucleus and, replenishment of ER membrane used for vesicular transport.

  12. Oncostatin M regulates membrane traffic and stimulates bile canalicular membrane biogenesis in HepG2 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wouden, Johanna M.; Van IJzendoorn, Sven C.D.; Hoekstra, Dick

    2002-01-01

    Hepatocytes are the major epithelial cells of the liver and they display membrane polarity: the sinusoidal membrane representing the basolateral surface, while the bile canalicular membrane is typical of the apical membrane. In polarized HepG2 cells an endosomal organelle, SAC, fulfills a prominent

  13. Cytochrome c Biogenesis: Mechanisms for Covalent Modifications and Trafficking of Heme and for Heme-Iron Redox Control

    OpenAIRE

    Kranz, Robert G.; Richard-Fogal, Cynthia; Taylor, John-Stephen; Frawley, Elaine R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Heme is the prosthetic group for cytochromes, which are directly involved in oxidation/reduction reactions inside and outside the cell. Many cytochromes contain heme with covalent additions at one or both vinyl groups. These include farnesylation at one vinyl in hemes o and a and thioether linkages to each vinyl in cytochrome c (at CXXCH of the protein). Here we review the mechanisms for these covalent attachments, with emphasis on the three unique cytochrome c assembly pathways call...

  14. Cytochrome c Biogenesis: Mechanisms for Covalent Modifications and Trafficking of Heme and for Heme-Iron Redox Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, Robert G.; Richard-Fogal, Cynthia; Taylor, John-Stephen; Frawley, Elaine R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Heme is the prosthetic group for cytochromes, which are directly involved in oxidation/reduction reactions inside and outside the cell. Many cytochromes contain heme with covalent additions at one or both vinyl groups. These include farnesylation at one vinyl in hemes o and a and thioether linkages to each vinyl in cytochrome c (at CXXCH of the protein). Here we review the mechanisms for these covalent attachments, with emphasis on the three unique cytochrome c assembly pathways called systems I, II, and III. All proteins in system I (called Ccm proteins) and system II (Ccs proteins) are integral membrane proteins. Recent biochemical analyses suggest mechanisms for heme channeling to the outside, heme-iron redox control, and attachment to the CXXCH. For system II, the CcsB and CcsA proteins form a cytochrome c synthetase complex which specifically channels heme to an external heme binding domain; in this conserved tryptophan-rich “WWD domain” (in CcsA), the heme is maintained in the reduced state by two external histidines and then ligated to the CXXCH motif. In system I, a two-step process is described. Step 1 is the CcmABCD-mediated synthesis and release of oxidized holoCcmE (heme in the Fe+3 state). We describe how external histidines in CcmC are involved in heme attachment to CcmE, and the chemical mechanism to form oxidized holoCcmE is discussed. Step 2 includes the CcmFH-mediated reduction (to Fe+2) of holoCcmE and ligation of the heme to CXXCH. The evolutionary and ecological advantages for each system are discussed with respect to iron limitation and oxidizing environments. PMID:19721088

  15. Structural Studies of RNA Helicases Involved in Eukaryotic Pre-mRNA Splicing, Ribosome Biogenesis, and Translation Initiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Yangzi

    Ribonucleic acids (RNAs) take centre stage in gene expression. In eukaryotes, most RNAs are transcribed as precursors, and these precursors are co- or post-transcriptionally processed and assemble with particular proteins to form ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). Mature RNPs participate in various gene...... expression events, are then subject to recycling, disassembly or degradation. RNA helicases are highly conserved enzymes that use ATP to bind or remodel RNA or RNPs. They function in nearly every aspect of eukaryotic RNA metabolism. The spliceosome catalyzes pre-mRNAs splicing, which removes introns and...

  16. Berberine protects against high fat diet-induced dysfunction in muscle mitochondria by inducing SIRT1-dependent mitochondrial biogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomes, A.P.; Duarte, F.V.; Nunes, P.M.; Hubbard, B.P.; Teodoro, J.o.S.; Varela, A.T.; Jones, J.G.; Sinclair, D.A.; Palmeira, C.M.; Rolo, A.P.

    2012-01-01

    Berberine (BBR) has recently been shown to improve insulin sensitivity in rodent models of insulin resistance. Although this effect was explained partly through an observed activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), the upstream and downstream mediators of this phenotype were not explored. H

  17. Perturbation of Ribosome Biogenesis Drives Cells into Senescence through 5S RNP-Mediated p53 Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuho Nishimura

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP complex, consisting of RPL11, RPL5, and 5S rRNA, is implicated in p53 regulation under ribotoxic stress. Here, we show that the 5S RNP contributes to p53 activation and promotes cellular senescence in response to oncogenic or replicative stress. Oncogenic stress accelerates rRNA transcription and replicative stress delays rRNA processing, resulting in RPL11 and RPL5 accumulation in the ribosome-free fraction, where they bind MDM2. Experimental upregulation of rRNA transcription or downregulation of rRNA processing, mimicking the nucleolus under oncogenic or replicative stress, respectively, also induces RPL11-mediated p53 activation and cellular senescence. We demonstrate that exogenous expression of certain rRNA-processing factors rescues the processing defect, attenuates p53 accumulation, and increases replicative lifespan. To summarize, the nucleolar-5S RNP-p53 pathway functions as a senescence inducer in response to oncogenic and replicative stresses.

  18. BIOGENESIS OF THYLAKOID MEMBRANES WITH RECONSTRUCTION OF CHLOROPHYLL-PROTEIN COMPLEXES IN DELETION-MUTANT OF ORF469 IN BLUE-GREEN ALGA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WuQingyu; WangRuiyong; XuHong; WireVermaas

    1997-01-01

    The transformable blue green alga is used productively for mutation and deletion studies to provide functional information regarding photosynthetic reaction center complexes. We wish to take the application of transformable blue-green algal systems one step further ,and set out the

  19. Structures and Biogenesis of Fallaxosides D4, D5, D6 and D7, Trisulfated Non-Holostane Triterpene Glycosides from the Sea Cucumber Cucumaria fallax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra S. Silchenko

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Four new trisulfated triterpene glycosides, fallaxosides D4 (1, D5 (2, D6 (3 and D7 (4 have been isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria fallax (Cucumariidae, Dendrochirotida. The structures of the glycosides have been elucidated by 2D NMR spectroscopy and HRESIMS. All the glycosides have the lanostane aglycones of a rare non-holostane type with 7(8-, 8(9- or 9(11-double bonds, one or two hydroxyl groups occupying unusual positions in the polycyclic nucleus and shortened or normal side chains. The pentasaccharide carbohydrate moieties of 1–4 have three sulfate groups. The cytotoxic activity of glycosides 1–4 against the ascite form of mouse Ehrlich carcinoma cells and mouse spleen lymphocytes and hemolytic activity against mouse erythrocytes have been studied.

  20. Structures and Biogenesis of Fallaxosides D₄, D₅, D₆ and D₇, Trisulfated Non-Holostane Triterpene Glycosides from the Sea Cucumber Cucumaria fallax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silchenko, Alexandra S; Kalinovsky, Anatoly I; Avilov, Sergey A; Andryjaschenko, Pelageya V; Dmitrenok, Pavel S; Kalinin, Vladimir I; Chingizova, Ekaterina A; Minin, Kirill V; Stonik, Valentin A

    2016-01-01

    Four new trisulfated triterpene glycosides, fallaxosides D₄ (1), D₅ (2), D₆ (3) and D₇ (4) have been isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria fallax (Cucumariidae, Dendrochirotida). The structures of the glycosides have been elucidated by 2D NMR spectroscopy and HRESIMS. All the glycosides have the lanostane aglycones of a rare non-holostane type with 7(8)-, 8(9)- or 9(11)-double bonds, one or two hydroxyl groups occupying unusual positions in the polycyclic nucleus and shortened or normal side chains. The pentasaccharide carbohydrate moieties of 1-4 have three sulfate groups. The cytotoxic activity of glycosides 1-4 against the ascite form of mouse Ehrlich carcinoma cells and mouse spleen lymphocytes and hemolytic activity against mouse erythrocytes have been studied. PMID:27447601

  1. Structures and Biogenesis of Fallaxosides D4, D5, D6 and D7, Trisulfated Non-Holostane Triterpene Glycosides from the Sea Cucumber Cucumaria fallax

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra S. Silchenko; Anatoly I. Kalinovsky; Avilov, Sergey A.; Pelageya V. Andryjaschenko; Dmitrenok, Pavel S.; Vladimir I. Kalinin; Ekaterina A. Chingizova; Kirill V. Minin; Valentin A. Stonik

    2016-01-01

    Four new trisulfated triterpene glycosides, fallaxosides D4 (1), D5 (2), D6 (3) and D7 (4) have been isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria fallax (Cucumariidae, Dendrochirotida). The structures of the glycosides have been elucidated by 2D NMR spectroscopy and HRESIMS. All the glycosides have the lanostane aglycones of a rare non-holostane type with 7(8)-, 8(9)- or 9(11)-double bonds, one or two hydroxyl groups occupying unusual positions in the polycyclic nucleus and shortened or normal si...

  2. Decreased Levels of Proapoptotic Factors and Increased Key Regulators of Mitochondrial Biogenesis Constitute New Potential Beneficial Features of Long-lived Growth Hormone Receptor Gene–Disrupted Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Gesing, Adam; Masternak, Michal M.; Lewinski, Andrzej; Karbownik-Lewinska, Malgorzata; Kopchick, John J.; Bartke, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Decreased somatotrophic signaling is among the most important mechanisms associated with extended longevity. Mice homozygous for the targeted disruption of the growth hormone (GH) receptor gene (GH receptor knockout; GHRKO) are obese and dwarf, are characterized by a reduced weight and body size, undetectable levels of GH receptor, high concentration of serum GH, and greatly reduced plasma levels of insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I, and are remarkably long lived. Recent results sugges...

  3. Aurora-A regulates MTOCs (centrosome) biogenesis it does not trigger G2/M transition in mouse oocytes matured in vivo

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolc, Petr; Baran, Vladimír; Panenková, Gabriela; Šašková, Adéla; Böhmová, Tereza; Mayer, Alexandra; Schultz, R. M.; Motlík, Jan

    Liběchov : Institute of Animal Physiology and Genetics AS CR, v.v ,, 2010. s. 22-22. [Czech‐Japan Joint Symposium for Animal Reproduction. 20.09.-21.09.2010, Liblice] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME08030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Aurora-A * mouse oocytes * MTOCs Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  4. Dissection of the roles of FtsH protease in chloroplast biogenesis and stability at moderately high temperature: a quantitative proteomics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chloroplast-targeted FtsH11 protease has been identified as essential for Arabidopsis survival at moderately high temperatures. The ftsh11 plants display a host of dramatic changes in photosynthetic parameters, cessation of growth and development, and eventual death if temperature exceeds 30ºC a...

  5. Expression of the uncoupling protein 1 from the aP2 gene promoter stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis in unilocular adipocytes in vivo

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rossmeisl, Martin; Barbatelli, G.; Flachs, Pavel; Brauner, Petr; Zingaretti, M. C.; Marelli, M.; Janovská, Petra; Horáková, Milada; Syrový, Ivo; Cinti, S.; Kopecký, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 269, č. 1 (2002), s. 19-28. ISSN 0014-2956 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A079; GA ČR GA311/99/0196; GA AV ČR IAA5011710; GA ČR GA303/02/1220; GA MŠk OC 918.30 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : mitochondria * white fat * brown fat Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.999, year: 2002

  6. The May-Hegglin anomaly gene MYH9 is a negative regulator of platelet biogenesis modulated by the Rho-ROCK pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zhao; Naveiras, Olaia; Balduini, Alessandra; Mammoto, Akiko; Conti, Mary Anne; Adelstein, Robert S.; Ingber, Donald; Daley, George Q.; Shivdasani, Ramesh A.

    2007-01-01

    The gene implicated in the May-Hegglin anomaly and related macrothrombocytopenias, MYH9, encodes myosin-IIA, a protein that enables morphogenesis in diverse cell types. Defective myosin-IIA complexes are presumed to perturb megakaryocyte (MK) differentiation or generation of proplatelets. We observed that Myh9(-/-) mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells differentiate into MKs that are fully capable of proplatelet formation (PPF). In contrast, elevation of myosin-IIA activity, by exogenous expression...

  7. PGC-1α plays a functional role in exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis and angiogenesis but not fiber-type transformation in mouse skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Geng, Tuoyu; Li, Ping; Okutsu, Mitsuharu; Yin, Xinhe; Kwek, Jyeyi; ZHANG, MEI; Yan, Zhen

    2009-01-01

    Endurance exercise stimulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) expression in skeletal muscle, and forced expression of PGC-1α changes muscle metabolism and exercise capacity in mice. However, it is unclear if PGC-1α is indispensible for endurance exercise-induced metabolic and contractile adaptations in skeletal muscle. In this study, we showed that endurance exercise-induced expression of mitochondrial enzymes (cytochrome oxidase IV and cytochrome c) and i...

  8. Accumulation of amyloid-like Aβ1–42 in AEL (autophagy–endosomal–lysosomal vesicles: potential implications for plaque biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daijun Ling

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal accumulation of Aβ (amyloid β within AEL (autophagy–endosomal–lysosomal vesicles is a prominent neuropathological feature of AD (Alzheimer's disease, but the mechanism of accumulation within vesicles is not clear. We express secretory forms of human Aβ1–40 or Aβ1–42 in Drosophila neurons and observe preferential localization of Aβ1–42 within AEL vesicles. In young animals, Aβ1–42 appears to associate with plasma membrane, whereas Aβ1–40 does not, suggesting that recycling endocytosis may underlie its routing to AEL vesicles. Aβ1–40, in contrast, appears to partially localize in extracellular spaces in whole brain and is preferentially secreted by cultured neurons. As animals become older, AEL vesicles become dysfunctional, enlarge and their turnover appears delayed. Genetic inhibition of AEL function results in decreased Aβ1–42 accumulation. In samples from older animals, Aβ1–42 is broadly distributed within neurons, but only the Aβ1–42 within dysfunctional AEL vesicles appears to be in an amyloid-like state. Moreover, the Aβ1–42-containing AEL vesicles share properties with AD-like extracellular plaques. They appear to be able to relocate to extracellular spaces either as a consequence of age-dependent neurodegeneration or a non-neurodegenerative separation from host neurons by plasma membrane infolding. We propose that dysfunctional AEL vesicles may thus be the source of amyloid-like plaque accumulation in Aβ1–42-expressing Drosophila with potential relevance for AD.

  9. Final Report for DE-FG02-04ER15626: P-type ATPases in Plants – Role of Lipid Flippases in Membrane Biogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, Jeffrey F. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2015-02-24

    The long-range goal of the research is to understand the structure and biological functions of different P-type ATPases (ion pumps) in plant cells, and to use that knowledge to enhance the production of bioenergy from plants, or plant-research inspired technologies. Ptype ATPases include ion pumps that specifically transport H+, Ca2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, K+, or Na+, as well as at least one unusual subfamily that appears to function as lipid flippases, flipping specific lipids from one side of a membrane bilayer to the other. As a group, P-type ATPases are thought to consume more than 1/3 of the cellular ATP in typical eukaryotic cells. Recent research in the Harper lab focused on understanding the biochemical and biological functions of P-type ATPases that flip lipids. These flippases belong to the P4 subfamily of P-type ATPases. The activity of lipid flippases is thought to induce membrane curvature and/or create an asymmetry in which certain lipid head groups are preferential exposed to one surface or the other. In Arabidopsis thaliana there are 12 members of this family referred to as Aminophospholipid ATPase (ALA) 1 to ALA12. Using genetic knockouts, the Harper lab has established that this unusual subfamily of P-type ATPases are critical for plants to cope with even modest changes in temperature (e.g., down to 15°C, or up to 30°C). In addition, members of one subclade are critical for cell expansion, and loss of function mutants result in severe dwarfism. Other members of this same sub-clade are critical for pollen tube growth, and loss of function mutants are sterile under conditions of hot days and cold nights. While the cellular processes that depend on lipid flippases are still unclear, the genetic analysis of loss of function mutants clearly show they are of fundamental importance to plant growth and response to the environment.

  10. Biogenesis of the rat hepatocyte plasma membrane in vivo: comparison of the pathways taken by apical and basolateral proteins using subcellular fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have used pulse-chase metabolic radiolabeling with L-[35S]methionine in conjunction with subcellular fractionation and specific protein immunoprecipitation techniques to compare the posttranslational transport pathways taken by endogenous domain-specific integral proteins of the rat hepatocyte plasma membrane in vivo. Our results suggest that both apical (HA 4, dipeptidylpeptidase IV, and aminopeptidase N) and basolateral (CE 9 and the asialoglycoprotein receptor [ASGP-R]) proteins reach the hepatocyte plasma membrane with similar kinetics. The mature molecular mass form of each of these proteins reaches its maximum specific radioactivity in a purified hepatocyte plasma membrane fraction after only 45 min of chase. However, at this time, the mature radiolabeled apical proteins are not associated with vesicles derived from the apical domain of the hepatocyte plasma membrane, but instead are associated with vesicles which, by several criteria, appear to be basolateral plasma membrane. These vesicles: (a) fractionate like basolateral plasma membrane in sucrose density gradients and in free-flow electrophoresis; (b) can be separated from the bulk of the likely organellar contaminants, including membranes derived from the late Golgi cisternae, transtubular network, and endosomes; (c) contain the proven basolateral constituents CE 9 and the ASGP-R, as judged by vesicle immunoadsorption using fixed Staphylococcus aureus cells and anti-ASGP-R antibodies; and (d) are oriented with their ectoplasmic surfaces facing outward, based on the results of vesicle immunoadsorption experiments using antibodies specific for the ectoplasmic domain of the ASGP-R. Only at times of chase greater than 45 min do significant amounts of the mature radiolabeled apical proteins arrive at the apical domain, and they do so at different rates

  11. Cardiomyocyte-Restricted Deletion of PPAR β / δ in PPAR α -Null Mice Causes Impaired Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Defense, but No Further Depression of Myocardial Fatty Acid Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Jian Liu; Peiyong Wang; Lan He; Yuquan Li; Jinwen Luo; Lihong Cheng; Qianhong Qin; Brako, Lawrence A.; Woo-kuen Lo; William Lewis; Qinglin Yang

    2011-01-01

    It is well documented that PPAR α and PPAR β / δ share overlapping functions in regulating myocardial lipid metabolism. However, previous studies demonstrated that cardiomyocyte-restricted PPAR β / δ deficiency in mice leads to severe cardiac pathological development, whereas global PPAR α knockout shows a benign cardiac phenotype. It is unknown whether a PPAR α -null background would alter the pathological development in mice with cardiomyocyte-restricted PPAR β / δ deficiency. In the presen...

  12. Contribution of Individual Ebp Pilus Subunits of Enterococcus faecalis OG1RF to Pilus Biogenesis, Biofilm Formation and Urinary Tract Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillanpää, Jouko; Chang, Chungyu; Singh, Kavindra V.; Montealegre, Maria Camila; Nallapareddy, Sreedhar R.; Harvey, Barrett R.; Ton-That, Hung; Murray, Barbara E.

    2013-01-01

    The endocarditis and biofilm-associated pilus (Ebp) operon is a component of the core genome of Enterococcus faecalis that has been shown to be important for biofilm formation, adherence to host fibrinogen, collagen and platelets, and in experimental endocarditis and urinary tract infection models. Here, we created single and double deletion mutants of the pilus subunits and sortases; next, by combining western blotting, immunoelectron microscopy, and using ebpR in trans to increase pilus production, we identified EbpA as the tip pilin and EbpB as anchor at the pilus base, the latter attached to cell wall by the housekeeping sortase, SrtA. We also confirmed EbpC and Bps as the major pilin and pilin-specific sortase, respectively, both required for pilus polymerization. Interestingly, pilus length was increased and the number of pili decreased by deleting ebpA, while control overexpression of ebpA in trans restored wild-type levels, suggesting a dual role for EbpA in both initiation and termination of pilus polymerization. We next investigated the contribution of each pilin subunit to biofilm formation and UTI. Significant reduction in biofilm formation was observed with deletion of ebpA or ebpC (P<0.001) while ebpB was found to be dispensable; a similar result was seen in kidney CFUs in experimental UTI (ΔebpA, ΔebpC, P≤0.0093; ΔebpB, non-significant, each vs. OG1RF). Hence, our data provide important structural and functional information about these ubiquitous E. faecalis pili and, based on their demonstrated importance in biofilm and infection, suggest EbpA and EbpC as potential targets for antibody-based therapeutic approaches. PMID:23874774

  13. An RNA-binding complex involved in ribosome biogenesis contains a protein with homology to tRNA CCA-adding enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinzhong Lin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A multitude of proteins and small nucleolar RNAs transiently associate with eukaryotic ribosomal RNAs to direct their modification and processing and the assembly of ribosomal proteins. Utp22 and Rrp7, two interacting proteins with no recognizable domain, are components of the 90S preribosome or the small subunit processome that conducts early processing of 18S rRNA. Here, we determine the cocrystal structure of Utp22 and Rrp7 complex at 1.97 Å resolution and the NMR structure of a C-terminal fragment of Rrp7, which is not visible in the crystal structure. The structure reveals that Utp22 surprisingly resembles a dimeric class I tRNA CCA-adding enzyme yet with degenerate active sites, raising an interesting evolutionary connection between tRNA and rRNA processing machineries. Rrp7 binds extensively to Utp22 using a deviant RNA recognition motif and an extended linker. Functional sites on the two proteins were identified by structure-based mutagenesis in yeast. We show that Rrp7 contains a flexible RNA-binding C-terminal tail that is essential for association with preribosomes. RNA-protein crosslinking shows that Rrp7 binds at the central domain of 18S rRNA and shares a neighborhood with two processing H/ACA snoRNAs snR30 and snR10. Depletion of snR30 prevents the stable assembly of Rrp7 into preribosomes. Our results provide insight into the evolutionary origin and functional context of Utp22 and Rrp7.

  14. DICER-LIKE1 processed trans-acting siRNAs mediate DNA methylation: Case study of complex small RNA biogenesis and action pathways in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Liang

    2012-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) emerge as exquisite molecules that are guided for transcriptional and posttranscriptional gene regulation in eukaryotes. As one class of most important sRNAs in plants, trans-acting small interfering RNAs (ta-siRNAs) initiate from microRNA (miRNA) – mediated cleavage of TAS gene transcripts and subsequently are stabilized by SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING3 (SGS3) and converted to double–stranded RNA (dsRNA) by the actions of RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE6 (RDR6). Ge...

  15. A Short Open Reading Frame Encompassing the MicroRNA173 Target Site Plays a Role in trans-Acting Small Interfering RNA Biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Manabu; Iki, Taichiro; Numa, Hisataka; Miyashita, Kyoko; Meshi, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2016-05-01

    trans-Acting small interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs) participate in the regulation of organ morphogenesis and determination of developmental timing in plants by down-regulating target genes through mRNA cleavage. The production of tasiRNAs is triggered by microRNA173 (miR173) and other specific microRNA-mediated cleavage of 5'-capped and 3'-polyadenylated primary TAS transcripts (pri-TASs). Although pri-TASs are not thought to encode functional proteins, they contain multiple short open reading frames (ORFs). For example, the primary TAS2 transcript (pri-TAS2) contains 11 short ORFs, and the third ORF from the 5' terminus (ORF3) encompasses the miR173 target site. Here, we show that nonsense mutations in ORF3 of pri-TAS2 upstream of the miR173 recognition site suppress tasiRNA accumulation and that ORF3 is translated in vitro. Glycerol gradient centrifugation analysis of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plant extracts revealed that pri-TAS2 and its miR173-cleaved 5' and 3' fragments are fractionated together in the polysome fractions. These and previous results suggest that the 3' fragment of pri-TAS2, which is a source of tasiRNAs, forms a huge complex containing SGS3, miR173-programmed AGO1 RNA-induced silencing complex, the 5' fragment, and ribosomes. This complex overaccumulated, moderately accumulated, and did not accumulate in rdr6, sde5, and sgs3 mutants, respectively. The sgs3 sde5 and rdr6 sde5 double mutants showed phenotypes similar to those of sgs3 and sde5 single mutants, respectively, with regard to the TAS2-related RNA accumulation, suggesting that the complex is formed in an SGS3-dependent manner, somehow modified and stabilized by SDE5, and becomes competent for RDR6 action. Ribosomes in this complex likely play an important role in this process. PMID:26966170

  16. Aurora-A regulates MTOCs (centrosome) biogenesis but it does not trigger G2/M transition in mouse oocytes matured in vivo

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolc, Petr; Panenková, Gabriela; Baran, Vladimír; Šašková, Adéla; Schultz, R. M.; Motlík, Jan

    Waterville : -, 2009. s. 1-1. [Cell Growth & Proliferation. 05.07.2009-10.07.2009, Waterville] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME08030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Aurora-A Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  17. A Conserved UDP-Glucose Dehydrogenase Encoded outside the hasABC Operon Contributes to Capsule Biogenesis in Group A Streptococcus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cole, Jason N.; Aziz, Ramy K.; Kuipers, Kirsten; Timmer, Anjuli M.; Nizet, Victor; van Sorge, Nina M.

    2012-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a human-specific bacterial pathogen responsible for serious morbidity and mortality worldwide. The hyaluronic acid (HA) capsule of GAS is a major virulence factor, contributing to bloodstream survival through resistance to neutrophil and antimicrobial peptide killing a

  18. Proteomic analyses reveal the key roles of BrlA and AbaA in biogenesis of gliotoxin in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Young Hwan; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2015-07-31

    The opportunistic human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus primarily reproduces by forming a large number of asexual spores (conidia). Sequential activation of the central regulators BrlA, AbaA and WetA is necessary for the fungus to undergo asexual development. In this study, to address the presumed roles of these key developmental regulators during proliferation of the fungus, we analyzed and compared the proteomes of vegetative cells of wild type (WT) and individual mutant strains. Approximately 1300 protein spots were detectable from 2-D electrophoresis gels. Among these, 13 proteins exhibiting significantly altered accumulation levels were further identified by ESI-MS/MS. Markedly, we found that the GliM and GliT proteins associated with gliotoxin (GT) biosynthesis and self-protection of the fungus from GT were significantly down-regulated in the ΔabaA and ΔbrlA mutants. Moreover, mRNA levels of other GT biosynthetic genes including gliM, gliP, gliT, and gliZ were significantly reduced in both mutant strains, and no and low levels of GT were detectable in the ΔbrlA and ΔabaA mutant strains, respectively. As GliT is required for the protection of the fungus from GT, growth of the ΔbrlA mutant with reduced levels of GliT was severely impaired by exogenous GT. Our studies demonstrate that AbaA and BrlA positively regulate expression of the GT biosynthetic gene cluster in actively growing vegetative cells, and likely bridge morphological and chemical development during the life-cycle of A. fumigatus. PMID:26032501

  19. Dicer-Dependent Biogenesis of Small RNAs and Evidence for MicroRNA-Like RNAs in the Penicillin Producing Fungus Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim A Dahlmann

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are non-coding small RNAs (sRNAs that regulate gene expression in a wide range of eukaryotes. In this study, we analyzed regulatory sRNAs in Penicillium chrysogenum, the industrial producer of the β-lactam antibiotic penicillin. To identify sRNAs and microRNA-like RNAs (milRNAs on a global approach, two sRNA sequencing libraries were constructed. One library was created with pooled total RNA, obtained from twelve differently grown cultures (RNA Mix, and the other with total RNA from a single submerged cultivation (∆ku70FRT2. Illumina sequencing of both RNA libraries produced 84,322,825 mapped reads. To distinguish between Dicer-dependent and independent sRNA formation, we further constructed two single dicer gene mutants (∆dcl2 and ∆dcl1 and a dicer double mutant (∆dcl2∆dcl1 and analyzed an sRNA library from the Dicer-deficient double-mutant. We identified 661 Dicer-dependent loci and in silico prediction revealed 34 milRNAs. Northern blot hybridization of two milRNAs provided evidence for mature milRNAs that are processed either in a complete or partial Dicer-dependent manner from an RNA precursor. Identified milRNAs share typical characteristics of previously discovered fungal milRNAs, like a strong preference for a 5' uracil and the typical length distribution. The detection of potential milRNA target sites in the genome suggests that milRNAs might play a role in posttranscriptional gene regulation. Our data will further increase our knowledge of sRNA dependent gene regulation processes, which is an important prerequisite to develop more effective strategies for improving industrial fermentations with P. chrysogenum.

  20. Control of lysosomal biogenesis and Notch-dependent tissue patterning by components of the TFEB-V-ATPase axis in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tognon, Emiliana; Kobia, Francis; Busi, Ilaria;

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrates, TFEB (transcription factor EB) and MITF (microphthalmia-associated transcription factor) family of basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factors regulates both lysosomal function and organ development. However, it is not clear whether these 2 processes are interconnected. Here......16-1 expression follows differentiation of proneural regions of the disc. These regions, that will form sensory organs in the adult, appear to possess a distinctive endo-lysosomal compartment and Notch (N) localization. Modulation of Mitf activity in the disc in vivo alters endo-lysosomal function...... and disrupts proneural patterning. Similar to our findings in Drosophila, in human breast epithelial cells we observe that impairment of the Vha16-1 human ortholog ATP6V0C changes the size and function of the endo-lysosomal compartment and that depletion of TFEB reduces ligand-independent N signaling...