WorldWideScience

Sample records for biofouling

  1. Biofouling on PM stainless steels

    OpenAIRE

    García Ruiz, Ana María; Cisneros Belmonte, Manuel; Moreno Gómez, Diego Alejandro; Ruiz Román, José Manuel; García Cambronero, Luis Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Powder metallurgy (PM) consists in obtaining pieces of powder metal that are processed at high temperatures and pressure. Due to its characteristic manufacturing process, the materials can have a specific and controlled porosity, which makes it possible to obtain porous parts such as ball bearings, gears, and roller bearings, etc. This porosity is what made us think about how easy biofouling would be on these materials and its possible environmental applications.

  2. Biofouling protection for marine environmental sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Delauney

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available These days, many marine autonomous environment monitoring networks are set up in the world. These systems take advantage of existing superstructures such as offshore platforms, lightships, piers, breakwaters or are placed on specially designed buoys or underwater oceanographic structures. These systems commonly use various sensors to measure parameters such as dissolved oxygen, turbidity, conductivity, pH or fluorescence. Emphasis has to be put on the long term quality of measurements, yet sensors may face very short-term biofouling effects. Biofouling can disrupt the quality of the measurements, sometimes in less than a week.

    Many techniques to prevent biofouling on instrumentation are listed and studied by researchers and manufacturers. Very few of them are implemented on instruments and of those very few have been tested in situ on oceanographic sensors for deployment of at least one or two months.

    This paper presents a review of techniques used to protect against biofouling of in situ sensors and gives a short list and description of promising techniques.

  3. PROBLEMS OF BIOFOULING ON FISH–CAGE NETS IN AQUACULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Merica Slišković; Gorana Jelić

    2002-01-01

    Biofouling on fish–cage netting is a serious technical and economical problem to aquaculture worldwide. Compensation for the effects of biofouling must be included in cage system design and planning, as fouling can dramatically increase both weight and drag. Settlements of sessile plants and animals, with accumulation of the detritus diminish the size of mesh and can rapidly occlude mesh. Negative effect of smaller mesh size is changing in water flow trough the cages. Biofouling problems nece...

  4. Bioactive coatings to control marine biofouling

    OpenAIRE

    Tasso, Mariana Patricia

    2009-01-01

    The colonization of immersed surfaces by a myriad of marine organisms is a complex, multi-stage, species-specific process giving rise to economic and environmental costs. This unwanted accumulation of organisms in the marine environment, called biofouling, has been attacked from different fronts, going from the ‘problem-elimination-as-problem-solving’ strategy (essentially through the use of biocides) to more elaborated and environmentally-friendly options based on the principle of ‘non-stick...

  5. Hydrogel coatings for biomedical and biofouling applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ekblad, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Many applications share a substantial and yet unmet need for prediction and control of interactions between surfaces and proteins or living cells. Examples are blood-contacting biomaterials, biosensors, and non-toxic anti-biofouling coatings for ship hulls. The main focus of this thesis work has been the synthesis, characterization and properties of a group of coatings, designed for such applications. Many types of substrates, particularly plastics, were coated directly with ultrathin, hydrop...

  6. Biofouling problems in freshwater cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In aqueous environments, microorganisms (bacteria, algae, fungi etc.,) are attracted towards surfaces, which they readily colonise resulting in the formation of biofilms. The implications of biofouling are energy losses due to increased fluid frictional resistance and increased heat transfer resistance. The temperatures prevalent inside the condenser system provide a favorable environment for the rapid growth of microorganisms. This results in thick slime deposit, which is responsible for heat transfer losses, thereby enhancing aggregation of deposits on the material surface and induces localised corrosion. There have been instances of increased capital costs due to premature replacement of equipment caused by severe under deposit corrosion due to biofouling. Moreover, fouling of service water systems of nuclear power plants is of concern, because it reduces the heat transfer capacity during an emergency or an accident. The growth of microbial films (slimes) a few tens of microns thick, in a condenser tube is sufficient to induce microbiologically influenced corrosion and cause irreparable damage to the condenser tubes and other structural materials. The down time costs to power plant due to condenser fouling and corrosion are quite large. This paper presents the author's experience in biofouling and corrosion problems in various power plants cooled by freshwater. (author)

  7. Study of electroplated silver-palladium biofouling inhibiting coating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Møller, Per

    The undesired microbial and biofilm adhesions on the surfaces of food industrial facilities, water supply systems and etc. are so called as “biofouling”. Biofouling can cause many undesirable effects. Until now for solving biofouling, there are few non-toxic inhibiting treatments. In this study, a...

  8. Novel Self-Cleaning Surfaces for Biofouling Prevention Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — One of the most problematic issues that facing efficient water reclamation processes for long duration space missions is biofilm growth and biofouling on RO...

  9. Variation in biofouling on different species of Indian timbers

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raveendran, T.V.; Wagh, A.B.

    Biofouling on twenty species of wood exposed in waters of Mormugao Harbour, Goa, India have been presented. Macrofouling biomass varied from species to species. Maximum biomass was recorded on Artocarpus chaplasha (4 kg/m2) and minimum on Hopea...

  10. Quorum Quenching Mediated Approaches for Control of Membrane Biofouling

    OpenAIRE

    Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby; Kweon, Ji Hyang

    2014-01-01

    Membrane biofouling is widely acknowledged as the most frequent adverse event in wastewater treatment systems resulting in significant loss of treatment efficiency and economy. Different strategies including physical cleaning and use of antimicrobial chemicals or antibiotics have been tried for reducing membrane biofouling. Such traditional practices are aimed to eradicate biofilms or kill the bacteria involved, but the greater efficacy in membrane performance would be achieved by inhibiting ...

  11. Linking ceragenins to water-treatment membranes to minimize biofouling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Feng, Yanshu (Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah); Savage, Paul B. (Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah); Pollard, Jacob (Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah); Branda, Steven S.; Goeres, Darla (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Buckingham-Meyer, Kelli (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Stafslien, Shane (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Marry, Christopher; Jones, Howland D. T.; Lichtenberger, Alyssa; Kirk, Matthew F.; McGrath, Lucas K. (LMATA, Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-01-01

    Ceragenins were used to create biofouling resistant water-treatment membranes. Ceragenins are synthetically produced antimicrobial peptide mimics that display broad-spectrum bactericidal activity. While ceragenins have been used on bio-medical devices, use of ceragenins on water-treatment membranes is novel. Biofouling impacts membrane separation processes for many industrial applications such as desalination, waste-water treatment, oil and gas extraction, and power generation. Biofouling results in a loss of permeate flux and increase in energy use. Creation of biofouling resistant membranes will assist in creation of clean water with lower energy usage and energy with lower water usage. Five methods of attaching three different ceragenin molecules were conducted and tested. Biofouling reduction was observed in the majority of the tests, indicating the ceragenins are a viable solution to biofouling on water treatment membranes. Silane direct attachment appears to be the most promising attachment method if a high concentration of CSA-121a is used. Additional refinement of the attachment methods are needed in order to achieve our goal of several log-reduction in biofilm cell density without impacting the membrane flux. Concurrently, biofilm forming bacteria were isolated from source waters relevant for water treatment: wastewater, agricultural drainage, river water, seawater, and brackish groundwater. These isolates can be used for future testing of methods to control biofouling. Once isolated, the ability of the isolates to grow biofilms was tested with high-throughput multiwell methods. Based on these tests, the following species were selected for further testing in tube reactors and CDC reactors: Pseudomonas ssp. (wastewater, agricultural drainage, and Colorado River water), Nocardia coeliaca or Rhodococcus spp. (wastewater), Pseudomonas fluorescens and Hydrogenophaga palleronii (agricultural drainage), Sulfitobacter donghicola, Rhodococcus fascians, Rhodobacter

  12. Quorum Quenching Mediated Approaches for Control of Membrane Biofouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby; Kweon, Ji Hyang

    2014-01-01

    Membrane biofouling is widely acknowledged as the most frequent adverse event in wastewater treatment systems resulting in significant loss of treatment efficiency and economy. Different strategies including physical cleaning and use of antimicrobial chemicals or antibiotics have been tried for reducing membrane biofouling. Such traditional practices are aimed to eradicate biofilms or kill the bacteria involved, but the greater efficacy in membrane performance would be achieved by inhibiting biofouling without interfering with bacterial growth. As a result, the search for environmental friendly non-antibiotic antifouling strategies has received much greater attention among scientific community. The use of quorum quenching natural compounds and enzymes will be a potential approach for control of membrane biofouling. This approach has previously proven useful in diseases and membrane biofouling control by triggering the expression of desired phenotypes. In view of this, the present review is provided to give the updated information on quorum quenching compounds and elucidate the significance of quorum sensing inhibition in control of membrane biofouling. PMID:24910534

  13. New approaches to characterizing and understanding biofouling of spiral wound membrane systems

    KAUST Repository

    van Loosdrecht, Mark C.M.

    2012-06-01

    Historically, biofouling research on spiral wound membrane systems is typically problem solving oriented. Membrane modules are studied as black box systems, investigated by autopsies. Biofouling is not a simple process. Many factors influence each other in a non-linear fashion. These features make biofouling a subject which is not easy to study using a fundamental scientific approach. Nevertheless to solve or minimize the negative impacts of biofouling, a clear understanding of the interacting basic principles is needed. Recent research into microbiological characterizing of biofouling, small scale test units, application of in situ visualization methods, and model approaches allow such an integrated study of biofouling. © IWA Publishing 2012.

  14. PROBLEMS OF BIOFOULING ON FISH–CAGE NETS IN AQUACULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merica Slišković

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Biofouling on fish–cage netting is a serious technical and economical problem to aquaculture worldwide. Compensation for the effects of biofouling must be included in cage system design and planning, as fouling can dramatically increase both weight and drag. Settlements of sessile plants and animals, with accumulation of the detritus diminish the size of mesh and can rapidly occlude mesh. Negative effect of smaller mesh size is changing in water flow trough the cages. Biofouling problems necessitating purchase of a second sets of nets or more, and frequent cleaning and changing of biofouling. Changing and cleaning frequency depend on many factors such as: location of cages (near the coast or off shore, productivity of that location, time of the year, time period in which the cages are placed on that location (cause of loading of phosphorus and nitrogen from the unconsumed food in the sediment. Net changing and cleaning procedures are labor and capital intensive. Process of the cleaning of the nets is inadequate, especially when there isnžt adequate equipment available as it is case in smaller aquaculture industry. Chemical control of biofouling e. g. use of antifoulants is questioningly cause of their possible negative effects on breeding species and environment.

  15. Study of electroplated silver-palladium biofouling inhibiting coating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Schroll, Casper;

    2008-01-01

    Biofouling can cause many undesirable effects in industrial and medical settings. In this study, a new biofouling inhibiting Ag-Pd surface was designed to form an inhibiting effect by itself. This design was based on silver combined with nobler palladium, both with catalytic properties. Owing to...... the potential difference between silver and palladium while contacting with an electrolyte, the surface can form numerous discrete anodic and cathodic areas, so that an inhibiting reaction can occur. In this paper, a series of electrochemical and biological investigations were conducted to study the...

  16. Impact of spacer thickness on biofouling in forward osmosis

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, Rodrigo

    2014-06-01

    Forward osmosis (FO) indirect desalination systems integrate wastewater recovery with seawater desalination. Niche applications for FO systems have been reported recently, due to the demonstrated advantages compared to conventional high-pressure membrane processes such as nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO). Among them, wastewater recovery has been identified to be particularly suitable for practical applications. However, biofouling in FO membranes has rarely been studied in applications involving wastewater effluents. Feed spacers separating the membrane sheets in cross-flow systems play an important role in biofilm formation. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of feed spacer thickness (28, 31 and 46mil) on biofouling development and membrane performance in a FO system, using identical cross-flow cells in parallel studies. Flux development, biomass accumulation, fouling localization and composition were determined and analyzed. For all spacer thicknesses, operated at the same feed flow and the same run time, the same amount of biomass was found, while the flux reduction decreased with thicker spacers. These observations are in good agreement with biofouling studies for RO systems, considering the key differences between FO and RO. Our findings contradict previous cross-flow studies on particulate/colloidal fouling, where higher cross-flow velocities improved system performance. Thicker spacers reduced the impact of biofouling on FO membrane flux. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Role of Reverse Divalent Cation Diffusion in Forward Osmosis Biofouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ming; Bar-Zeev, Edo; Hashmi, Sara M; Nghiem, Long D; Elimelech, Menachem

    2015-11-17

    We investigated the role of reverse divalent cation diffusion in forward osmosis (FO) biofouling. FO biofouling by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was simulated using pristine and chlorine-treated thin-film composite polyamide membranes with either MgCl2 or CaCl2 draw solution. We related FO biofouling behavior-water flux decline, biofilm architecture, and biofilm composition-to reverse cation diffusion. Experimental results demonstrated that reverse calcium diffusion led to significantly more severe water flux decline in comparison with reverse magnesium permeation. Unlike magnesium, reverse calcium permeation dramatically altered the biofilm architecture and composition, where extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) formed a thicker, denser, and more stable biofilm. We propose that FO biofouling was enhanced by complexation of calcium ions to bacterial EPS. This hypothesis was confirmed by dynamic and static light scattering measurements using extracted bacterial EPS with the addition of either MgCl2 or CaCl2 solution. We observed a dramatic increase in the hydrodynamic radius of bacterial EPS with the addition of CaCl2, but no change was observed after addition of MgCl2. Static light scattering revealed that the radius of gyration of bacterial EPS with addition of CaCl2 was 20 times larger than that with the addition of MgCl2. These observations were further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy imaging, where bacterial EPS in the presence of calcium ions was globular, while that with magnesium ions was rod-shaped. PMID:26503882

  18. Influence of biofouling on pharmaceuticals rejection in NF membrane filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botton, Sabrina; Verliefde, Arne R D; Quach, Nhut T; Cornelissen, Emile R

    2012-11-15

    The effects of biomass attachment and growth on the surface characteristics and organic micropollutants rejection performance of nanofiltration membranes were investigated in a pilot installation. Biomass growth was induced by dosing of a readily biodegradable carbon source resulting in the formation of a biofouling in the investigated membrane elements. Surface properties and rejection behaviour of a biofouled and virgin membrane were investigated and compared in terms of surface charge, surface energy and hydrophobicity. The last two were accomplished by performing contact angle measurements on fully hydrated membrane surfaces, in order to mimic the operating conditions of a membrane in contact with water. Compared to a virgin membrane, deposition and growth of biofilm did slightly alter the surface charge, which became more negative, and resulted in a higher hydrophilicity of the membrane surface. In addition, the presence of the negatively charged biofilm induced accumulation of positively charged pharmaceuticals within the biomass layer, which probably also hindered back diffusion. This caused a reduction in rejection efficiency of positively charged solutes but did not alter rejection of neutral and negatively charged pharmaceuticals. Pharmaceuticals rejection was found to positively correlate with the specific free energy of interaction between virgin or biofouled membranes and pharmaceuticals dissolved in the water phase. The rejection values obtained with both virgin and biofouled membranes were compared and found in good agreement with the predictions calculated with a solute transport model earlier developed for high pressure filtration processes. PMID:22960036

  19. Biofouling of various metal oxides in marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biofouling has induced serious problems in various industrial fields such as marine structures, bio materials, microbially induced corrosion (MIC) etc. The effects of various metals on biofouling have been investigated so far and the mechanism has been clarified to some extent(1,2), and we proposed that Fe ion attracted lots of bacteria and formed biofilm very easily(3). In this study, we investigated the possibility for biofouling of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on various metal oxides such as Fe2O3, TiO2, WO3, AgO, Cr2O3 etc. And in addition of such a model experiment on laboratory scale, they were immersed into actual sea water as well as artificial sea water. As for the preparation of metal oxides, commercial oxide powders were used as starting material and those whose particle sizes were under 100 micrometers were formed into pellets by a press. Some of them were heated to 700 C and sintered for 10 hours at the temperatures. After the calcinations, they were immersed into the culture of P. aeruginosa at 35 C in about one week. After the immersion, they were taken out of the culture and the biofouling behaviors were observed by optical microscopy, low pressure scanning electron microscopy (low pressure SEM) etc. Biofouling is generally classified into several steps. Firstly, conditioning films composed of organic matters were formed on specimens. Then bacterial were attached to the specimen's surfaces, seeking for conditioning films as nutrition. Then bacteria formed biofilm on the specimens. In marine environment, more larger living matters such as shells etc would be attached to biofilms. However, in the culture media, only biofilms were formed.

  20. Early non-destructive biofouling detection and spatial distribution: Application of oxygen sensing optodes

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, N.M.

    2015-06-11

    Biofouling is a serious problem in reverse osmosis/nanofiltration (RO/NF) applications, reducing membrane performance. Early detection of biofouling plays an essential role in an adequate anti-biofouling strategy. Presently, fouling of membrane filtration systems is mainly determined by measuring changes in pressure drop, which is not exclusively linked to biofouling. Non-destructive imaging of oxygen concentrations (i) is specific for biological activity of biofilms and (ii) may enable earlier detection of biofilm accumulation than pressure drop. The objective of this study was to test whether transparent luminescent planar O2 optodes, in combination with a simple imaging system, can be used for early non-destructive biofouling detection. This biofouling detection is done by mapping the two-dimensional distribution of O2 concentrations and O2 decrease rates inside a membrane fouling simulator (MFS). Results show that at an early stage, biofouling development was detected by the oxygen sensing optodes while no significant increase in pressure drop was yet observed. Additionally, optodes could detect spatial heterogeneities in biofouling distribution at a micro scale. Biofilm development started mainly at the feed spacer crossings. The spatial and quantitative information on biological activity will lead to better understanding of the biofouling processes, contributing to the development of more effective biofouling control strategies.

  1. Short-term adhesion and long-term biofouling testing of polydopamine and poly(ethylene glycol) surface modifications of membranes and feed spacers for biofouling control

    KAUST Repository

    Miller, Daniel J.

    2012-08-01

    Ultrafiltration, nanofiltration membranes and feed spacers were hydrophilized with polydopamine and polydopamine- g-poly(ethylene glycol) surface coatings. The fouling propensity of modified and unmodified membranes was evaluated by short-term batch protein and bacterial adhesion tests. The fouling propensity of modified and unmodified membranes and spacers was evaluated by continuous biofouling experiments in a membrane fouling simulator. The goals of the study were: 1) to determine the effectiveness of polydopamine and polydopamine- g-poly(ethylene glycol) membrane coatings for biofouling control and 2) to compare techniques commonly used in assessment of membrane biofouling propensity with biofouling experiments under practical conditions. Short-term adhesion tests were carried out under static, no-flow conditions for 1 h using bovine serum albumin, a common model globular protein, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common model Gram-negative bacterium. Biofouling tests were performed in a membrane fouling simulator (MFS) for several days under flow conditions similar to those encountered in industrial modules with the autochthonous drinking water population and acetate dosage as organic substrate. Polydopamine- and polydopamine- g-poly(ethylene glycol)-modified membranes showed significantly reduced adhesion of bovine serum albumin and P. aeruginosa in the short-term adhesion tests, but no reduction of biofouling was observed during longer biofouling experiments with modified membranes and spacers. These results demonstrate that short-term batch adhesion experiments using model proteins or bacteria under static conditions are not indicative of biofouling, while continuous biofouling experiments showed that membrane surface modification by polydopamine and polydopamine- g-poly(ethylene glycol) is not effective for biofouling control. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. A nanomolecular approach to decrease adhesion of biofouling-producing bacteria to graphene-coated material

    OpenAIRE

    Parra, Carolina; Dorta, Fernando; Jimenez, Edra; Henríquez, Ricardo; Ramírez, Cristian; Rojas, Rodrigo; Villalobos, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Background Biofouling, the colonization of artificial and natural surfaces by unwanted microorganisms, has an important economic impact on a wide range of industries. Low cost antifouling strategies are typically based on biocides which exhibit a negative environmental impact, affecting surrounding organisms related and not related to biofouling. Considering that the critical processes resulting in biofouling occur in the nanoscale/microscale dimensions, in this work we present a bionanotechn...

  3. Microbial speciation and biofouling potential of cooling water used by Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cooling water composition and microbial components of biofilms attached to stainless steel wafers submerged in three lake water types were evaluated to determine whether their biofouling potential differed in a predictable manner. The composition of the lake waters was different which affected biofilm composition, where the predominance of specific microbial groups varied between test systems and with time. Some prediction of biofouling potential was possible, and it was concluded that the cooling water in the vicinity of Bruce NGS had the lowest biofouling potential whereas greater biofouling could be expected in the Pickering and Nanticoke stations

  4. Does Chlorination of Seawater Reverse Osmosis Membranes Control Biofouling?

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Muhammad Tariq

    2015-04-01

    Biofouling is the major problem of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes used for desalting seawater (SW). The use of chlorine is a conventional and common practice to control/prevent biofouling. Unlike polyamide RO membranes, cellulose triacetate (CTA) RO membranes display a high chlorine tolerance. Due to this characteristic, CTA membranes are used in most of the RO plants located in the Middle East region where the elevated seawater temperature and water quality promote the risk of membrane biofouling. However, there is no detailed study on the investigation/characterization of CTA-RO membrane fouling. In this investigation, the fouling profile of a full–scale SWRO desalination plant operating with not only continuous chlorination of raw seawater but also intermittent chlorination of CTA-RO membranes was studied. Detailed water quality and membrane fouling analyses were conducted. Profiles of microbiological, inorganic, and organic constituents of analysed fouling layers were extensively discussed. Our results clearly identified biofilm development on these membranes. The incapability of chlorination on preventing biofilm formation on SWRO membranes could be assigned to its failure in effectively reaching throughout the different regions of the permeators. This failure could have occurred due to three main factors: plugging of membrane fibers, chlorine consumption by organics accumulated on the front side fibers, or chlorine adaptation of certain bacterial populations.

  5. Does chlorination of seawater reverse osmosis membranes control biofouling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Tariq; Hong, Pei-Ying; Nada, Nabil; Croue, Jean Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Biofouling is the major problem of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes used for desalting seawater (SW). The use of chlorine is a conventional and common practice to control/prevent biofouling. Unlike polyamide RO membranes, cellulose triacetate (CTA) RO membranes display a high chlorine tolerance. Due to this characteristic, CTA membranes are used in most of the RO plants located in the Middle East region where the elevated seawater temperature and water quality promote the risk of membrane biofouling. However, there is no detailed study on the investigation/characterization of CTA-RO membrane fouling. In this investigation, the fouling profile of a full-scale SWRO desalination plant operating with not only continuous chlorination of raw seawater but also intermittent chlorination of CTA-RO membranes was studied. Detailed water quality and membrane fouling analyses were conducted. Profiles of microbiological, inorganic, and organic constituents of analysed fouling layers were extensively discussed. Our results clearly identified biofilm development on these membranes. The incapability of chlorination on preventing biofilm formation on SWRO membranes could be assigned to its failure in effectively reaching throughout the different regions of the permeators. This failure could have occurred due to three main factors: plugging of membrane fibers, chlorine consumption by organics accumulated on the front side fibers, or chlorine adaptation of certain bacterial populations. PMID:25917390

  6. The biofilm ecology of microbial biofouling, biocide resistance and corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Center for Environmental Biotechnology]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Science Div.; Kirkegaard, R.D.; Palmer, R.J. Jr.; Flemming, C.A.; Chen, G.; Leung, K.T.; Phiefer, C.B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Center for Environmental Biotechnology; Arrage, A.A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Center for Environmental Biotechnology]|[Microbial Insights, Inc., Rockford, TN (United States)

    1997-06-01

    In biotechnological or bioremediation processes it is often the aim to promote biofilm formation, and maintain active, high density biomass. In other situations, biofouling can seriously restrict effective heat transport, membrane processes, and potentate macrofouling with loss of transportation efficiency. In biotechnological or bioremediation processes it is often the aim to promote biofilm formation, and maintain active, high density biomass. In other situations, biofouling can seriously restrict effective heat transport, membrane processes, and potentate macrofouling with loss of transportation efficiency. Heterogeneous distribution of microbes and/or their metabolic activity can promote microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) which is a multibillion dollar problem. Consequently, it is important that biofilm microbial ecology be understood so it can be manipulated rationally. It is usually simple to select organisms that form biofilms by flowing a considerably dilute media over a substratum, and propagating the organisms that attach. To examine the biofilm most expeditiously, the biomass accumulation, desquamation, and metabolic activities need to be monitored on-line and non-destructively. This on-line monitoring becomes even more valuable if the activities can be locally mapped in time and space within the biofilm. Herein the authors describe quantitative measures of microbial biofouling, the ecology of pathogens in drinking water distributions systems, and localization of microbial biofilms and activities with localized MIC.

  7. Biofouling and barnacle adhesion data for fouling-release coatings subjected to static immersion at seven marine sites

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Swain, G.; Anil, A.C.; Baier, R.E.; Chia, F.-S.; Conte, E.; Cook, A.; Hadfield, M.; Haslbeck, E.; Holm, E.; Kavanagh, C.; Kohrs, D.; Kovach, B.; Lee, C.; Mazzella, L.; Meyer, A.E.; Qian, P.-Y.; Sawant, S.S.; Schultz, M.; Sigurdsson, J.; Smith, C.; Soo, L.; Terlizzi, A.; Wagh, A.; Zimmerman, R.; Zupo, V.

    Little is known about the performance of fouling release coatings at different geographical locations. An investigation was designed to measure the differences in biofouling and biofouling adhesion strength on three known silicone formulations...

  8. An Investigation of Low Biofouling Copper-charged Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asapu, Sunitha

    Water is essential for the survival of life on Earth, but pollutants in water can cause dangerous diseases and fatalities. The need for purified water has been increasing with increasing world population; however, natural sources of water such as rivers, lakes and streams, are progressively falling shorter and shorter of meeting water needs. The provision of clean, drinkable water to people is a key factor for the development of novel and alternative water purification technologies, such as membrane separations. Nanofiltration (NF) is a membrane separations technology that purifies water from lower quality sources, such as brackish water, seawater and wastewater. During the filtration of such sources, materials that are rejected by the membrane may accumulate on the surface of the membrane to foul it. Such materials include organic and inorganic matter, colloids, salts and microorganisms. The former four can often be controlled via pretreatment; however, the accumulation of microorganisms is more problematic to membranes. Biofouling is the accumulation and growth of microorganisms on the surface of membranes and on feed spacers. After attachment, microorganisms excrete extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which form a matrix around the organism's outer surface as biofilm. These biofilms are detrimental and result in irreversible membrane fouling. Copper and silver ions inactivate the bacterial cells and prevent the DNA replication in microbial cells. Previous studies using copper-charged feed spacers have shown the ability of copper to control biofouling without a significant amount of copper leaching from copper-charged polypropylene (PP) feed spacers during crossflow filtration. Also, filtration using unmodified speed facers experienced almost 70% flux decline, while filtration using copper-charged feed spacers displayed only 25% flux decline. These intriguing results led to the hypothesis that the polymer chemistry could be extrapolated to produce membranes

  9. Experimental investigation of interactions between the temperature field and biofouling in a synthetic treated sewage stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qianpeng; Wilson, D Ian; Chen, Xiaodong; Shi, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Biofouling causes significant losses in efficiency in heat exchangers recovering waste heat from treated sewage. The influence of the temperature field on biofouling was investigated using a flat plate heat exchanger which simulated the channels in a plate and frame unit. The test surface was a 316 stainless steel plate, and a solution of Bacillus sp. and Aeromonas sp. was used as a model process liquid. The test cell was operated under co-current, counter-current, and constant wall temperature configurations, which gave different temperature distributions. Biofouling was monitored via changes in heat transfer and biofilm thickness. The effect of uniform temperature on biofouling formation was similar to the effect of uniform temperature on planktonic growth of the organisms. Further results showed that the temperature field, and particularly the wall temperature, influenced the rate of biofouling strongly. The importance of wall temperature suggests that fouling could be mitigated by using different configurations in summer and winter. PMID:23668358

  10. Online monitoring of biofouling using coaxial stub resonator technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Hoog

    2015-03-01

    Analysis of the biofilm and the stub resonator signal, both as function of time, indicates that the sensor allows detection of early stages of biofilm formation. In addition, the sensor signal clearly discriminates between the first stages of biofilm formation (characterized by separated, individual spots of bacterial growth on the glass beads and the presence of a nearly homogeneous biofilm later on in time. Model simulations based on the transmission line theory predict a shift of the sensor response in the same direction and order of magnitude as observed in the biofouling experiments, thereby confirming the operating principle of the sensor.

  11. Marine biofouling in Hong Kong:a review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zongguo Huang

    2003-01-01

    From 1980 to 1998, biofouling communities in Hong Kong waters, the Zhujiang RiverEstuary and the Mirs Bay were studied and a total of 610 samples. The samples were collected from ves-sels, buoys, piers and cages. Totally, 340 species (see Appendix Ⅰ ) have been recorded and identified,six of which are new. At the same time, research on the biology of the cirripede, bryozoan, polychaeteand mollusc communities were also conducted. Twenty-three related papers have been published. Thisreview summarizes works in Hong Kong over past twenty years, and some unpublished data are also re-ported.

  12. Chemical composition influence of cement based mortars on algal biofouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelle, Dalod; Alexandre, Govin; Philippe, Grosseau; Christine, Lors; René, Guyonnet; Denis, Damidot

    2013-04-01

    The main cause of building-facade biodegradation is the growth of microorganisms. This phenomenon depends on several parameters such as the geographical situation, the environmental conditions and the surface state of the substrate. Several researches have been devoted to the study of the effect of porosity and roughness on the biofouling of stones and mortars. However, none of them have addressed the influence of the mortar chemistry on the microorganism growth kinetic. The main objective of this study is to highlight the influence of the mortar chemistry in relationship with its physical properties on biological weathering. Earlier work showed a good resistance of Calcium Aluminate Cements to biodeterioration by acidogenic bacteria (Thiobacillus) and fungi (Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus Niger and Coniosporium uncinatum). In order to characterize the influence of the mortar chemistry on biofouling, two Portland cements and two alumina cements are used. Among micro-organisms able to grow, green algae are most involved in the aesthetic deterioration of facades. Indeed, they can colonize any type of media and can be a source of nutrients for other micro-organisms such as fungi. The green algae Klebsormidium flaccidum is chosen because of its representativeness. It is indeed the species the most frequently identified and isolated from samples taken on sites. The biofouling kinetic is followed on samples exposed outdoor and on samples tested in a laboratory bench which consists in spraying an algae culture on mortar specimens. The results obtained by in situ trials are compared with the results obtained on the laboratory bench. The microorganism growth kinetic is measured by image analysis. To improve the detection of algae on the surface of the cementitious samples, the raw image is converted in the YIQ color space. Y, I and Q correspond respectively to luminance, in-phase, and quadrature. On the Q channel, the areas covered by algae and the areas of clean mortar

  13. Identification of biofoulant of membrane bioreactors in soluble microbial products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Daisuke; Mori, Yoshihiko; Hashimoto, Tomotaka; Hori, Katsutoshi

    2009-09-01

    To reveal primary biofoulant in soluble microbial products (SMP) and/or soluble extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), after removal of sludge particles, activated sludge samples were subjected to microfiltration tests in a submerged MBR. Filtration resistance directly correlates with the saccharide concentration. Saccharides in wastewater from several sources contained uronic acids, which increased the filtration resistance. When the microfiltration test liquids contained saccharides over 80mg l(-1), a gelatinous mass remained on the membrane surface after filtration and contained concentrations of saccharides and uronic acids 50 times higher than the original test liquid while only trace amounts of these substances were contained in the filtrate. The gelatinous mass contained high molecular weight substances of 10(6)-10(8)Da, suggesting the presence of polysaccharides. However, molecules of this size were calculated to be much smaller than the pore size of the membrane. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid decreased filtration resistance, suggesting that polysaccharides containing uronic acid units could undergo intermolecular or intramolecular ionic cross-linking by polyvalent cations and form the gel, thus clogging the membrane pores as an actual biofoulant. PMID:19596130

  14. Prevention of marine biofouling using natural compounds from marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, E; Boyd, K G; Burgess, J G

    2000-01-01

    All surfaces that are submerged in the sea rapidly become covered by a biofilm. This process, called biofouling, has substantial economic consequences. Paints containing tri-butyl-tin (TBT) and copper compounds are used to protect marine structures by reducing biofouling. However, these compounds have damaging effects on the marine environment, as they are not biodegradable. It has been noted that many seaweeds and invertebrates found in the sea are not covered by a mature biofilm. This is due to the release of compounds into the surrounding seawater that deter the settlement of fouling organisms. In addition, seaweeds and invertebrates have bacteria on their surfaces that produce compounds to deter settling organisms. The production of compounds by bacteria and their living hosts work in concert to protect the hosts' surfaces. All of these compounds can be collected so they may be natural alternatives to TBT and copper compounds. However, the benefits associated with the use of bacteria as sources of these compounds means that bacteria are the organisms of choice for obtaining natural products for antifouling coatings. PMID:11193296

  15. Biofouling of Water Treatment Membranes: A Review of the Underlying Causes, Monitoring Techniques and Control Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicity A. Roddick

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Biofouling is a critical issue in membrane water and wastewater treatment as it greatly compromises the efficiency of the treatment processes. It is difficult to control, and significant economic resources have been dedicated to the development of effective biofouling monitoring and control strategies. This paper highlights the underlying causes of membrane biofouling and provides a review on recent developments of potential monitoring and control methods in water and wastewater treatment with the aim of identifying the remaining issues and challenges in this area.

  16. Mini-review: Assessing the drivers of ship biofouling management - aligning industry and biosecurity goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Ian; Scianni, Christopher; Hewitt, Chad; Everett, Richard; Holm, Eric; Tamburri, Mario; Ruiz, Gregory

    2016-04-01

    Biofouling exerts a frictional and cost penalty on ships and is a direct cause of invasion by marine species. These negative consequences provide a unifying purpose for the maritime industry and biosecurity managers to prevent biofouling accumulation and transfer, but important gaps exist between these sectors. This mini-review examines the approach to assessments of ship biofouling among sectors (industry, biosecurity and marine science) and the implications for existing and emerging management of biofouling. The primary distinctions between industry and biosecurity in assessment of vessels biofouling revolve around the resolution of biological information collected and the specific wetted surface areas of primary concern to each sector. The morphological characteristics of biofouling and their effects on propulsion dynamics are of primary concern to industry, with an almost exclusive focus on the vertical sides and flat bottom of hulls and an emphasis on antifouling and operational performance. In contrast, the identity, biogeography, and ecology of translocated organisms is of highest concern to invasion researchers and biosecurity managers and policymakers, especially as it relates to species with known histories of invasion elsewhere. Current management practices often provide adequate, although not complete, provision for hull surfaces, but niche areas are well known to enhance biosecurity risk. As regulations to prevent invasions emerge in this arena, there is a growing opportunity for industry, biosecurity and academic stakeholders to collaborate and harmonize efforts to assess and manage biofouling of ships that should lead to more comprehensive biofouling solutions that promote industry goals while reducing biosecurity risk and greenhouse gas emissions. PMID:26930397

  17. Biofouling development and its effect on growth and reproduction of the farmed pearl oyster Pinctada margaritifera

    OpenAIRE

    Lacoste, Elise; Le Moullac, Gilles; Levy, Peva; Gueguen, Yannick; Gaertner-Mazouni, Nabila

    2014-01-01

    In bivalve aquaculture, dominant fouling organisms are filter feeders which can compete for food with reared bivalves, sometimes causing mortality or reducing their growth rate. This study investigated the effect of biofouling on the farmed pearl oyster Pinctada margaritifera in two lagoons of French Polynesia. Survival, growth and reproduction of 2 year-old pearl oysters were monitored with regular sampling schedules, from the initial stage of colonization up to 20 months of biofouling accum...

  18. Nitric Oxide Treatment for the Control of Reverse Osmosis Membrane Biofouling

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, Robert J.; Low, Jiun Hui; Bandi, Ratnaharika R.; Tay, Martin; Chua, Felicia; Aung, Theingi; Fane, Anthony G.; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Rice, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Biofouling remains a key challenge for membrane-based water treatment systems. This study investigated the dispersal potential of the nitric oxide (NO) donor compound, PROLI NONOate, on single- and mixed-species biofilms formed by bacteria isolated from industrial membrane bioreactor and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. The potential of PROLI NONOate to control RO membrane biofouling was also examined. Confocal microscopy revealed that PROLI NONOate exposure induced biofilm dispersal in all bu...

  19. The potential of standard and modified feed spacers for biofouling control

    KAUST Repository

    Araújo, Paula A.

    2012-06-01

    The impact of feed spacers on initial feed channel pressure (FCP) drop, FCP increase and biomass accumulation has been studied in membrane fouling simulators using feed spacers applied in commercially available nanofiltration and reverse osmosis spiral wound membrane modules. All spacers had a similar geometry.Our studies showed that biofouling was not prevented by (i) variation of spacer thickness, (ii) feed spacer orientation, (iii) feed spacer coating with silver, copper or gold and (iv) using a biostatic feed spacer. At constant feed flow, a lower FCP and FCP increase were observed for a thicker feed spacer. At constant linear flow velocity, roughly the same FCP development and biomass accumulation were found irrespective of the feed spacer thickness: hydrodynamics and substrate load were more important for development and impact of biofouling than the thickness of currently applied spacers. Use of biostatic and metal coated spacers were not effective for biofouling control. The same small reduction of biofouling rate was observed with copper and silver coated spacers as well as uncoated 45° rotated spacers.The studied modified spacers were not effective for biofouling prevention and control. The impact of biofouling on FCP increase was reduced significantly by a lower linear flow velocity, while spacer orientation and spacer thickness in membrane modules had a smaller but still significant effect. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Nanocomposite strategies for limiting medical and marine biofouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Scott Patrick

    Microorganisms affect many aspects of human life. When microorganisms colonize a surface, the resulting microbial community is called a biofilm. Biofilms can negatively affect human health and productivity. Osteomyelitis is caused by biofilms of bacteria attached to the bone. These biofilms pose a threat to human life and lead to the loss of healthy tissue. Biofilms attached to marine vessels decrease the fuel economy of ships, resulting in a significant economic cost. There is a need to develop new materials which eradicate and prevent biofouling. Nanocomposites and mixed-phase organic/inorganic materials are presented in various embodiments as a means to limit biofouling. Antibiotic-filled microspheres are created to improve the treatment of osteomyelitis. These microspheres consist of bioactive glass and poly(n-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) or gelatin. Bioactive glasses have historically been shown to promote the regeneration of bone. Sol-gel chemistry is used to make the bioactive glass component, in this case a calcium silicate. The low temperature of the reaction allows organic molecules such as drugs and polymers to be blended with the glass. The catalyst used during the sol-gel reaction affects the structure and composition of the microspheres. Base catalysis leads to microspheres that exhibit behavior indicative of a nanocomposite structure. Acid catalysis produces microspheres that appear to exist as more as a mixed phase between silica and PVP. These structures directly affect the stability of the microspheres in simulated body fluid (SBF): base-catalyzed microspheres degrade within the first day in SBF, while acid-catalyzed microspheres are stable for at least one week. The morphology of acid-catalyzed microspheres is directly affected by the following compositional parameters: molecular weight of PVP, concentration of PVP, and concentration of calcium. Solid, hollow, and core/shell morphologies are produced by adjusting these parameters. These morphologies

  1. Potential radiation control of biofouling bacteria on intake filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichholz, G.G.; Jones, C.G.; Haynes, H.E.

    1988-01-01

    The biofouling of filters at deep wells supplying water for industrial and drinking water purposes by various iron- and sulfur-reducing bacteria is a wide-spread problem in the United States and can cause serious economic losses. Among the means of control, steam heating or chemical additives can be applied only intermittently and have their own environmental impact. Preliminary studies have shown that installation of a sealed gamma radiation source may provide an alternative solution. Analysis of a range of water samples from contaminated wells identified many of the samples as rich in siderocapsa and pseudomona bacteria. Static and dynamic experiments on water samples at various doses and dose rates have shown that these organisms are relatively radiation-sensitive, with a lethal dose in the range of 200-400Gy (20-40kR). Since the main objective is to restrict growth or deposit of plaque on filters, dose rates of the order of 50-75 Gy/hr would be adequate. Such dose rates could be obtained with relatively weak sources, depending on filter dimensions. A conceptual design for such systems has been proposed.

  2. Potential radiation control of biofouling bacteria on intake filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biofouling of filters at deep wells supplying water for industrial and drinking water purposes by various iron- and sulfur-reducing bacteria is a wide-spread problem in the United States and can cause serious economic losses. Among the means of control, steam heating or chemical additives can be applied only intermittently and have their own environmental impact. Preliminary studies have shown that installation of a sealed gamma radiation source may provide an alternative solution. Analysis of a range of water samples from contaminated wells identified many of the samples as rich in siderocapsa and pseudomona bacteria. Static and dynamic experiments on water samples at various doses and dose rates have shown that these organisms are relatively radiation-sensitive, with a lethal dose in the range of 200-400Gy (20-40kR). Since the main objective is to restrict growth or deposit of plaque on filters, dose rates of the order of 50-75 Gy/hr would be adequate. Such dose rates could be obtained with relatively weak sources, depending on filter dimensions. A conceptual design for such systems has been proposed. (author)

  3. Development and testing of a transparent membrane biofouling monitor

    KAUST Repository

    Dreszer, C.

    2014-01-02

    A modified version of the membrane fouling simulator (MFS) was developed for assessment of (i) hydraulic biofilm resistance, (ii) performance parameters feed-channel pressure drop and transmembrane pressure drop, and (iii) in situ spatial visual and optical observations of the biofilm in the transparent monitor, e.g. using optical coherence tomography. The flow channel height equals the feed spacer thickness enabling operation with and without feed spacer. The effective membrane surface area was enlarged from 80 to 200 cm2 by increasing the monitor width compared to the standard MFS, resulting in larger biomass amounts for analysis. By use of a microfiltration membrane (pore size 0.05 μm) in the monitor salt concentration polarization is avoided, allowing operation at low pressures enabling accurate measurement of the intrinsic hydraulic biofilm resistance. Validation tests on e.g. hydrodynamic behavior, flow field distribution, and reproducibility showed that the small-sized monitor was a representative tool for membranes used in practice under the same operating conditions, such as spiral-wound nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes. Monitor studies with and without feed spacer use at a flux of 20 L m-2 h-1 and a cross-flow velocity of 0.1 m s-1 clearly showed the suitability of the monitor to determine hydraulic biofilm resistance and for controlled biofouling studies. © 2013 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of biofouling on ion transport through cation exchange membranes and microbial fuel cell performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mi-Jin; Chae, Kyu-Jung; Ajayi, Folusho F; Kim, Kyoung-Yeol; Yu, Hye-Weon; Kim, Chang-Won; Kim, In S

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the effects of biofouling on the electrochemical properties of cation exchange membranes (CEMs), such as membrane electrical resistance (MER), specific proton conductivity (SC), and ion transport number (t(+)), in addition to on microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance. CEM biofouling using a 15.5 ± 4.6 μm biofilm was found to slightly increase the MER from 15.65 Ω cm(2) (fresh Nafion) to 19.1 Ω cm(2), whereas an increase of almost two times was achieved when the electrolyte was changed from deionized water to an anolyte containing a high cation concentration supporting bacterial growth. The simple physical cleaning of CEMs had little effect on the Coulombic efficiency (CE), whereas replacing a biofouled CEM with new one resulted in considerable increase of up to 59.3%, compared to 45.1% for a biofouled membrane. These results clearly suggest the internal resistance increase of MFC was mainly caused by the sulfonate functional groups of CEM being occupied with cations contained in the anolyte, rather than biofouling itself. PMID:20659795

  5. Effect of different commercial feed spacers on biofouling of reverse osmosis membrane systems: A numerical study

    KAUST Repository

    Bucs, Szilard

    2014-06-01

    Feed spacers and hydrodynamics have been found relevant for the impact of biofouling on performance in reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane systems.The objectives of this study on biofouling development were to determine the impact of (i) linear flow velocity and bacterial cell load, (ii) biomass location and (iii) various feed spacer geometries as applied in practice as well as a modified geometry spacer.A three-dimensional mathematical model for biofouling of feed spacer channels including hydrodynamics, solute mass transport and biofilm formation was developed in COMSOL Multiphysics and MATLAB software.Results of this study indicate that the feed channel pressure drop increase caused by biofilm formation can be reduced by using thicker and/or modified feed spacer geometry and/or a lower flow rate in the feed channel. The increase of feed channel pressure drop by biomass accumulation is shown to be strongly influenced by the location of biomass. Results of numerical simulations are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data, indicating that this micro-scale mechanistic model is representative for practice. The developed model can help to understand better the biofouling process of spiral-wound RO and NF membrane systems and to develop strategies to reduce and control biofouling. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Slippery liquid-infused porous surface bio-inspired by pitcher plant for marine anti-biofouling application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Zhang, Dun; Lu, Zhou

    2015-12-01

    Marine biofouling, caused by the adhesion of microorganism, is a worldwide problem in marine systems. In this research work, slippery liquid-infused porous surface (SLIPS), inspired by Nepenthes pitcher plant, was constructed over aluminum for marine anti-biofouling application. The as-fabricated SLIPS was characterized with SEM, AFM, and contact angle meter. Its anti-biofouling performance was evaluated with settlement experiment of a typical marine biofouling organism Chlorella vulgaris in both static and dynamic conditions. The effect of solid substrate micro-structure on anti-biofouling property of SLIPS was studied. It was suggested that the micro-structure with low length scale and high degree of regularity should be considered for designing stable SLIPS with exceptional anti-biofouling property. The liquid-like property is proven to be the main contributor for the exceptional anti-biofouling performance of SLIPS in both static and dynamic conditions. The low roughness, which facilitates removing the settled C. vulgaris under shear force, is also a main contributor for the anti-biofouling performance of SLIPS in dynamic condition. PMID:26402422

  7. Influence of polyelectrolyte multilayer coating on the degree and type of biofouling in freshwater environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frueh, Johannes; Gai, Meiyu; Yang, Zhibo; He, Qiang

    2014-06-01

    Biofouling is one of the biggest problems of water-borne systems. Since not only marine but also freshwater-based structures are affected, the biofouling in this environment is studied. The focus of this study lies on the antifouling properties of novel coating materials like polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) compared with currently used silicon rubber (PDMS) based fouling release coatings. The following article contains the results of a systematical screening of the mechanical, surface charge and surface nano-heterogeneous properties of the investigated PEM and PDMS systems. The results show that negatively charged non crosslinked and crosslinked PEM coated PDMS can surpass current PDMS based fouling release coatings. The PEM films are not only able to reduce the biofouling, but are additionally able to control the type of settled bacteria (gram positive or negative). The negative terminated surfaces inhibit the settlement of gram positive bacteria, whereby the positive terminated surfaces inhibit the settlement of gram negative bacteria. PMID:24738394

  8. Biofouling and corrosion studies. Final report, Part I, May 1, 1976-December 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahalingam, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    Three sets of biofouling experiments were conducted. Two of these sets were done in the Pacific Ocean at Keahole Point, Hawaii, and one was in the Caribbean at St. Croix, Virgin Islands. Data and results from these experiments are presented and discussed. Heat transfer, biological, and metallurgical measurements are presented. A brief account of the data analysis procedures, and an assessment of the hardware performance are given. Recommendations are made to improve the quality of the current efforts in the OTEC Biofouling, Corrosion and Materials program.

  9. Comparison of biofouling mechanisms between cellulose triacetate (CTA) and thin-film composite (TFC) polyamide forward osmosis membranes in osmotic membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinhua; Zhao, Yanxiao; Yuan, Bo; Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Xiufen; Ren, Yueping

    2016-02-01

    There are two types of popular forward osmosis (FO) membrane materials applied for researches on FO process, cellulose triacetate (CTA) and thin film composite (TFC) polyamide. However, performance and fouling mechanisms of commercial TFC FO membrane in osmotic membrane bioreactors (OMBRs) are still unknown. In current study, its biofouling behaviors in OMBRs were investigated and further compared to the CTA FO membrane. The results indicated that β-D-glucopyranose polysaccharides and microorganisms accounted for approximately 77% of total biovolume on the CTA FO membrane while β-D-glucopyranose polysaccharides (biovolume ratio of 81.1%) were the only dominant biofoulants on the TFC FO membrane. The analyses on the biofouling structure implied that a tighter biofouling layer with a larger biovolume was formed on the CTA FO membrane. The differences in biofouling behaviors including biofoulants composition and biofouling structure between CTA and TFC FO membranes were attributed to different membrane surface properties. PMID:26700758

  10. Marine biofouling of surfaces: morphology, and nanomechanics of Barnacle Cyprid adhesion proteins by AFM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phang, In Yee

    2008-01-01

    The understanding of biointerfaces in contact with seawater is crucially important in tackling the problems of marine biofouling. Such biointerfaces involve the bioadhesives used by marine organisms to attach temporary or permanently to the surfaces immersed in water. The aim of this Thesis is to ad

  11. Development of a setup to enable stable and accurate flow conditions for membrane biofouling studies

    KAUST Repository

    Bucs, Szilárd S.

    2015-07-10

    Systematic laboratory studies on membrane biofouling require experimental conditions that are well defined and representative for practice. Hydrodynamics and flow rate variations affect biofilm formation, morphology, and detachment and impacts on membrane performance parameters such as feed channel pressure drop. There is a suite of available monitors to study biofouling, but systems to operate monitors have not been well designed to achieve an accurate, constant water flow required for a reliable determination of biomass accumulation and feed channel pressure drop increase. Studies were done with membrane fouling simulators operated in parallel with manual and automated flow control, with and without dosage of a biodegradable substrate to the feedwater to enhance biofouling rate. High flow rate variations were observed for the manual water flow system (up to ≈9%) compared to the automatic flow control system (<1%). The flow rate variation in the manual system was strongly increased by biofilm accumulation, while the automatic system maintained an accurate and constant water flow in the monitor. The flow rate influences the biofilm accumulation and the impact of accumulated biofilm on membrane performance. The effect of the same amount of accumulated biomass on the pressure drop increase was related to the linear flow velocity. Stable and accurate feedwater flow rates are essential for biofouling studies in well-defined conditions in membrane systems. © 2015 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of feed spacer and membrane modification by hydrophilic, bactericidal and biocidal coating on biofouling control

    KAUST Repository

    Araújo, Paula A.

    2012-06-01

    The influence of polydopamine- and polydopamine-. graft-poly(ethylene glycol)-coated feed spacers and membranes, copper-coated feed spacers, and commercially-available biostatic feed spacers on biofouling has been studied in membrane fouling simulators. Feed spacers and membranes applied in practical membrane filtration systems were used; biofouling development was monitored by feed channel pressure drop increase and biomass accumulation. Polydopamine and polydopamine-. g-PEG are hydrophilic surface modification agents expected to resist protein and bacterial adhesion, while copper feed spacer coatings and biocides infused in feed spacers are expected to restrict biological growth. Our studies showed that polydopamine and polydopamine-. g-PEG coatings on feed spacers and membranes, copper coatings on feed spacers, and a commercial biostatic feed spacer did not have a significant impact on feed channel pressure drop increase and biofilm accumulation as measured by ATP and TOC content. The studied spacer and membrane modifications were not effective for biofouling control; it is doubtful that feed spacer and membrane modification, in general, may be effective for biofouling control regardless of the type of applied coating. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Plasma deposition of silver nanoparticles on ultrafiltration membranes: antibacterial and anti-biofouling properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Mercedes Cecilia; Ruano, Gustavo; Wolf, Marcus; Hecker, Dominic; Vidaurre, Elza Castro; Schmittgens, Ralph; Rajal, Verónica Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    A novel and versatile plasma reactor was used to modify Polyethersulphone commercial membranes. The equipment was applied to: i) functionalize the membranes with low-temperature plasmas, ii) deposit a film of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) and, iii) deposit silver nanoparticles (SNP) by Gas Flow Sputtering. Each modification process was performed in the same reactor consecutively, without exposure of the membranes to atmospheric air. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the particles and modified membranes. SNP are evenly distributed on the membrane surface. Particle fixation and transport inside membranes were assessed before- and after-washing assays by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth profiling analysis. PMMA addition improved SNP fixation. Plasma-treated membranes showed higher hydrophilicity. Anti-biofouling activity was successfully achieved against Gram-positive (Enterococcus faecalis) and -negative (Salmonella Typhimurium) bacteria. Therefore, disinfection by ultrafiltration showed substantial resistance to biofouling. The post-synthesis functionalization process developed provides a more efficient fabrication route for anti-biofouling and anti-bacterial membranes used in the water treatment field. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a gas phase condensation process combined with a PECVD procedure in order to deposit SNP on commercial membranes to inhibit biofouling formation. PMID:26166926

  14. Living biofouling-resistant membranes as a model for the beneficial use of engineered biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Thammajun L.; Guha, Rajarshi; Tang, Li; Geitner, Michael; Kumar, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Membrane systems are used increasingly for water treatment, recycling water from wastewater, during food processing, and energy production. They thus are a key technology to ensure water, energy, and food sustainability. However, biofouling, the build-up of microbes and their polymeric matrix, clogs these systems and reduces their efficiency. Realizing that a microbial film is inevitable, we engineered a beneficial biofilm that prevents membrane biofouling, limiting its own thickness by sensing the number of its cells that are present via a quorum-sensing circuit. The beneficial biofilm also prevents biofilm formation by deleterious bacteria by secreting nitric oxide, a general biofilm dispersal agent, as demonstrated by both short-term dead-end filtration and long-term cross-flow filtration tests. In addition, the beneficial biofilm was engineered to produce an epoxide hydrolase so that it efficiently removes the environmental pollutant epichlorohydrin. Thus, we have created a living biofouling-resistant membrane system that simultaneously reduces biofouling and provides a platform for biodegradation of persistent organic pollutants. PMID:27140616

  15. Analysis of micromixers and biocidal coatings on water-treatment membranes to minimize biofouling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Stephen W.; James, Darryl L. (Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX); Hibbs, Michael R.; Jones, Howland D. T.; Hart, William Eugene; Khalsa, Siri Sahib; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Elimelech, Menachem (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Cornelius, Christopher James; Sanchez, Andres L. (LMATA Government Services LLC, Albuquerque, NM); Noek, Rachael M.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Kang, Seokatae (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Adout, Atar (Yale University, New Haven, CT); McGrath, Lucas K. (LMATA Government Services LLC, Albuquerque, NM); Cappelle, Malynda A.; Cook, Adam W.

    2009-12-01

    Biofouling, the unwanted growth of biofilms on a surface, of water-treatment membranes negatively impacts in desalination and water treatment. With biofouling there is a decrease in permeate production, degradation of permeate water quality, and an increase in energy expenditure due to increased cross-flow pressure needed. To date, a universal successful and cost-effect method for controlling biofouling has not been implemented. The overall goal of the work described in this report was to use high-performance computing to direct polymer, material, and biological research to create the next generation of water-treatment membranes. Both physical (micromixers - UV-curable epoxy traces printed on the surface of a water-treatment membrane that promote chaotic mixing) and chemical (quaternary ammonium groups) modifications of the membranes for the purpose of increasing resistance to biofouling were evaluated. Creation of low-cost, efficient water-treatment membranes helps assure the availability of fresh water for human use, a growing need in both the U. S. and the world.

  16. Living biofouling-resistant membranes as a model for the beneficial use of engineered biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Thammajun L; Guha, Rajarshi; Tang, Li; Geitner, Michael; Kumar, Manish; Wood, Thomas K

    2016-05-17

    Membrane systems are used increasingly for water treatment, recycling water from wastewater, during food processing, and energy production. They thus are a key technology to ensure water, energy, and food sustainability. However, biofouling, the build-up of microbes and their polymeric matrix, clogs these systems and reduces their efficiency. Realizing that a microbial film is inevitable, we engineered a beneficial biofilm that prevents membrane biofouling, limiting its own thickness by sensing the number of its cells that are present via a quorum-sensing circuit. The beneficial biofilm also prevents biofilm formation by deleterious bacteria by secreting nitric oxide, a general biofilm dispersal agent, as demonstrated by both short-term dead-end filtration and long-term cross-flow filtration tests. In addition, the beneficial biofilm was engineered to produce an epoxide hydrolase so that it efficiently removes the environmental pollutant epichlorohydrin. Thus, we have created a living biofouling-resistant membrane system that simultaneously reduces biofouling and provides a platform for biodegradation of persistent organic pollutants. PMID:27140616

  17. Biofouling of Cr-Nickel Spray Coated Films on Steel Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays, corrosion of metals brings us serious economic loss and it often reaches several percentage of GNP. Particularly the marine corrosion was serious and the counter measure was very hard to be established, since the number of factors is huge and complicated. One of the complicated factors in marine corrosion is biofouling. Biofouling was classified into two main categories, microfouling and macrofouling. The former is composed of biofilm formation mainly. Marine bacteria are attached to material surfaces, seeking for nutrition in oligotrophic environment and they excrete polysaccharide to form biofilm on metal surfaces. Then larger living matters are attached on the biofilms to develop biofouling on metal surfaces, which often lead loss and failures of metals in marine environments. From the viewpoint of corrosion protection and maintenance of marine structures, biofouling should be mitigated as much as possible. In this study, we applied spray coating to steels and investigated if chromium-nickel spray coating could mitigate the biofouling, being compared with the conventional aluminium-zinc spray coating in marine environments. The specimens used for this investigation are aluminium, zinc, aluminium-zinc, stacked chromium/nickel and those films were formed on carbon steel (JIS SS400). And the pores formed by spray coating were sealed by a commercial reagent for some specimens. All of those specimens were immersed into sea water located at Marina Kawage (854-3, Chisato, Tsu, Mie Prefecture) in Ise Bay for two weeks. The depth of the specimen was two meter from sea water surface and the distance was always kept constant, since they were suspended from the floating pier. The temperature in sea water changed from 10 to 15 degrees Celsius during the immersion test. The biofouling behavior was investigated by low vacuum SEM (Hitachi Miniscope TM1000) and X-ray fluorescent analysis. When the spray coated specimens with and without sealing agents were compared

  18. Do biological-based strategies hold promise to biofouling control in MBRs?

    KAUST Repository

    Malaeb, Lilian

    2013-10-01

    Biofouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs) remains a primary challenge for their wider application, despite the growing acceptance of MBRs worldwide. Research studies on membrane fouling are extensive in the literature, with more than 200 publications on MBR fouling in the last 3 years; yet, improvements in practice on biofouling control and management have been remarkably slow. Commonly applied cleaning methods are only partially effective and membrane replacement often becomes frequent. The reason for the slow advancement in successful control of biofouling is largely attributed to the complex interactions of involved biological compounds and the lack of representative-for-practice experimental approaches to evaluate potential effective control strategies. Biofouling is driven by microorganisms and their associated extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) and microbial products. Microorganisms and their products convene together to form matrices that are commonly treated as a black box in conventional control approaches. Biological-based antifouling strategies seem to be a promising constituent of an effective integrated control approach since they target the essence of biofouling problems. However, biological-based strategies are in their developmental phase and several questions should be addressed to set a roadmap for translating existing and new information into sustainable and effective control techniques. This paper investigates membrane biofouling in MBRs from the microbiological perspective to evaluate the potential of biological-based strategies in offering viable control alternatives. Limitations of available control methods highlight the importance of an integrated anti-fouling approach including biological strategies. Successful development of these strategies requires detailed characterization of microorganisms and EPS through the proper selection of analytical tools and assembly of results. Existing microbiological/EPS studies reveal a number of

  19. Do biological-based strategies hold promise to biofouling control in MBRs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaeb, Lilian; Le-Clech, Pierre; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S; Ayoub, George M; Saikaly, Pascal E

    2013-10-01

    Biofouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs) remains a primary challenge for their wider application, despite the growing acceptance of MBRs worldwide. Research studies on membrane fouling are extensive in the literature, with more than 200 publications on MBR fouling in the last 3 years; yet, improvements in practice on biofouling control and management have been remarkably slow. Commonly applied cleaning methods are only partially effective and membrane replacement often becomes frequent. The reason for the slow advancement in successful control of biofouling is largely attributed to the complex interactions of involved biological compounds and the lack of representative-for-practice experimental approaches to evaluate potential effective control strategies. Biofouling is driven by microorganisms and their associated extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) and microbial products. Microorganisms and their products convene together to form matrices that are commonly treated as a black box in conventional control approaches. Biological-based antifouling strategies seem to be a promising constituent of an effective integrated control approach since they target the essence of biofouling problems. However, biological-based strategies are in their developmental phase and several questions should be addressed to set a roadmap for translating existing and new information into sustainable and effective control techniques. This paper investigates membrane biofouling in MBRs from the microbiological perspective to evaluate the potential of biological-based strategies in offering viable control alternatives. Limitations of available control methods highlight the importance of an integrated anti-fouling approach including biological strategies. Successful development of these strategies requires detailed characterization of microorganisms and EPS through the proper selection of analytical tools and assembly of results. Existing microbiological/EPS studies reveal a number of

  20. Biofouling community composition across a range of environmental conditions and geographical locations suitable for floating marine renewable energy generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, Adrian K; Stanley, Michele S; Day, John G; Cook, Elizabeth J

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of biofouling typical of marine structures is essential for engineers to define appropriate loading criteria in addition to informing other stakeholders about the ecological implications of creating novel artificial environments. There is a lack of information regarding biofouling community composition (including weight and density characteristics) on floating structures associated with future marine renewable energy generation technologies. A network of navigation buoys were identified across a range of geographical areas, environmental conditions (tidal flow speed, temperature and salinity), and deployment durations suitable for future developments. Despite the perceived importance of environmental and temporal factors, geographical location explained the greatest proportion of the observed variation in community composition, emphasising the importance of considering geography when assessing the impact of biofouling on device functioning and associated ecology. The principal taxa associated with variation in biofouling community composition were mussels (Mytilus edulis), which were also important when determining loading criteria. PMID:26900732

  1. Biofouling evaluation in the seawater cooling circuit of an operating coastal power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorination is the most commonly used method of biofouling control in cooling water systems of coastal power stations. In the present study, we report results of extensive sampling in different sections of the cooling water system of an operating power station undertaken during three consecutive maintenance shutdowns. The power plant employed continuous low level chlorination (0.2 ± 0.1 mg L-1 TRO) with twice-a-week booster dosing (0.4 ± 0.1 mg L-1 TRO for 8 hours). In addition, the process seawater heat exchangers received supplementary dosing of bromide treatment (0.2 ± 0.1 mg L-1 TRO for 1 hour in every 8 h shift). Biofouling samples were collected from the cooling water conduits, heat exchanger water boxes, pipelines, heated discharge conduits and outfall section during the annual maintenance shutdown of the plant in the years 2007, 2008 and 2009. Simultaneous monitoring of biofouling on test coupons in coastal waters enabled direct comparison of fouling situation on test panels and that in the cooling system. The data showed significant reduction in biofouling inside the cooling circuit as compared to the coastal waters. However, significant amount of fouling was still evident at several places, indicating inadequacy of the biocide treatment regime. The maximum load of 31.3 kg m2 y-1 was observed in the conduits leading to the process seawater heat exchangers (PSW-HX) and the minimum of 1.3 kg m2 y-1 was observed in the outfall section. Fouling loads of 12.2 - 14.7 kg m2 y-1 were observed in the concrete conduits feeding the main condensers. Bromide treatment ahead of the PSW-HX could marginally reduce the fouling load in the downstream section of the dosing point; the HX inlets still showed good biofouling. Species diversity across the cooling water system showed the pre-condenser section to be dominated by green mussels (Perna viridis), pearl oysters (Pinctada sp.) and edible oysters (Crassostrea sp.), whereas the post-condenser section and heat

  2. Light as a key driver of freshwater biofouling surface roughness in an experimental hydrocanal pipe rig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravizza, Matilde; Giosio, Dean; Henderson, Alan; Hovenden, Mark; Hudson, Monica; Salleh, Sazlina; Sargison, Jane; Shaw, Jennifer L; Walker, Jessica; Hallegraeff, Gustaaf

    2016-07-01

    Biofouling in canals and pipelines used for hydroelectric power generation decreases the flow capacity of conduits. A pipeline rig was designed consisting of test sections of varying substrata (PVC, painted steel) and light levels (transparent, frosted, opaque). Stalk-forming diatoms were abundant in both the frosted and transparent PVC pipes but negligible in the painted steel and opaque PVC pipes. Fungi were slightly more abundant in the painted steel pipe but equally present in all the other pipes while bacterial diversity was similar in all pipes. Photosynthetically functional biofouling (mainly diatoms) was able to develop in near darkness. Different biological fouling compositions generated differing friction factors. The highest friction factor was observed in the transparent pipe (densest diatom fouling), the lowest peak friction for the opaque PVC pipe (lowest fouling biomass), and with the painted steel pipe (high fouling biomass, but composed of fungal and bacterial crusts) being intermediate between the opaque and frosted PVC pipes. PMID:27244248

  3. Extremely durable biofouling-resistant metallic surfaces based on electrodeposited nanoporous tungstite films on steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesler, Alexander B.; Kim, Philseok; Kolle, Stefan; Howell, Caitlin; Ahanotu, Onye; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2015-10-01

    Formation of unwanted deposits on steels during their interaction with liquids is an inherent problem that often leads to corrosion, biofouling and results in reduction in durability and function. Here we report a new route to form anti-fouling steel surfaces by electrodeposition of nanoporous tungsten oxide (TO) films. TO-modified steels are as mechanically durable as bare steel and highly tolerant to compressive and tensile stresses due to chemical bonding to the substrate and island-like morphology. When inherently superhydrophilic TO coatings are converted to superhydrophobic, they remain non-wetting even after impingement with yttria-stabilized-zirconia particles, or exposure to ultraviolet light and extreme temperatures. Upon lubrication, these surfaces display omniphobicity against highly contaminating media retaining hitherto unseen mechanical durability. To illustrate the applicability of such a durable coating in biofouling conditions, we modified naval construction steels and surgical instruments and demonstrated significantly reduced marine algal film adhesion, Escherichia coli attachment and blood staining.

  4. Preparation and evaluation of biocide-loaded particles to control the biofouling zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha

    OpenAIRE

    R. Costa; Aldridge, D. C.; Moggridge, G. D.

    2011-01-01

    The freshwater zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha is a powerful biofouling bivalve, which has tremendous impact on industrial facilities whose operation depends on the intensive use of freshwater, such as waterworks and power stations. The control of the pest in industrial environments remains a major challenge due to low selectivity over non-target organisms and the expense of the large quantities of biocides required. A novel delivery technique involving the encapsulation of a toxin within h...

  5. Marine biofouling of surfaces: morphology, and nanomechanics of Barnacle Cyprid adhesion proteins by AFM

    OpenAIRE

    Phang, In Yee

    2008-01-01

    The understanding of biointerfaces in contact with seawater is crucially important in tackling the problems of marine biofouling. Such biointerfaces involve the bioadhesives used by marine organisms to attach temporary or permanently to the surfaces immersed in water. The aim of this Thesis is to address a particular problem, i.e. barnacle adhesion, to the biointerface and the corresponding fouling process. We try to understand the first steps of the fouling process of this species, and help ...

  6. Composition and Variability of Biofouling Organisms in Seawater Reverse Osmosis Desalination Plants ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Minglu; Jiang, Sunny; Tanuwidjaja, Dian; Voutchkov, Nikolay; Hoek, Eric M.V.; Cai, Baoli

    2011-01-01

    Seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membrane biofouling remains a common challenge in the desalination industry, but the marine bacterial community that causes membrane fouling is poorly understood. Microbial communities at different stages of treatment processes (intake, cartridge filtration, and SWRO) of a desalination pilot plant were examined by both culture-based and culture-independent approaches. Bacterial isolates were identified to match the genera Shewanella, Alteromonas, Vibrio, and Ce...

  7. Construction of phospholipid anti-biofouling multilayer on biomedical PET surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biomimetic phospholipid anti-biofouling multilayers were constructed on the biomedical poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) through the combination of layer-by-layer assembly and Michael addition reaction. Two biomacromolecules with opposite charges, alginate and chitosan, were sequentially adsorbed onto PET samples. The assembled multilayer was subsequently crosslinked with glutaraldehyde and biomimetic phospholipids was introduced into the assembled multilayer through the Michael addition of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC). The multilayer and phospholipid-modified PETs showed excellent hemocompatibility

  8. Nitric oxide treatment for the control of reverse osmosis membrane biofouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Robert J; Low, Jiun Hui; Bandi, Ratnaharika R; Tay, Martin; Chua, Felicia; Aung, Theingi; Fane, Anthony G; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Rice, Scott A

    2015-04-01

    Biofouling remains a key challenge for membrane-based water treatment systems. This study investigated the dispersal potential of the nitric oxide (NO) donor compound, PROLI NONOate, on single- and mixed-species biofilms formed by bacteria isolated from industrial membrane bioreactor and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. The potential of PROLI NONOate to control RO membrane biofouling was also examined. Confocal microscopy revealed that PROLI NONOate exposure induced biofilm dispersal in all but two of the bacteria tested and successfully dispersed mixed-species biofilms. The addition of 40 μM PROLI NONOate at 24-h intervals to a laboratory-scale RO system led to a 92% reduction in the rate of biofouling (pressure rise over a given period) by a bacterial community cultured from an industrial RO membrane. Confocal microscopy and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extraction revealed that PROLI NONOate treatment led to a 48% reduction in polysaccharides, a 66% reduction in proteins, and a 29% reduction in microbial cells compared to the untreated control. A reduction in biofilm surface coverage (59% compared to 98%, treated compared to control) and average thickness (20 μm compared to 26 μm, treated compared to control) was also observed. The addition of PROLI NONOate led to a 22% increase in the time required for the RO module to reach its maximum transmembrane pressure (TMP), further indicating that NO treatment delayed fouling. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed that the NO treatment did not significantly alter the microbial community composition of the membrane biofilm. These results present strong evidence for the application of PROLI NONOate for prevention of RO biofouling. PMID:25636842

  9. Influence of GlidArc treatment on layers formation of biofouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatiuc, B.; Sabau, A.; Ghita, S.; Hnatiuc, M.; Dumitrache, C. L.; Pellerin, S.

    2015-02-01

    Corrosion in marine environment is a complex dynamic process influenced mainly by physical chemical, microbiological and mechanical parameters. Times for maintenance related to corrosion are greater than 80% of the total repair. Reducing this cost would be a significant saving, and an effective treatment can reduce times related to ships repairing. Biofouling is a main cause of corrosion and its formation contains four steps. To inhibit biofouling it is proposed a treatment based on non-thermal plasma produced by GlidArc, which can be applied before the immersion of small boats in the sea, as well as cleaning treatment of the hull after a period of time. This work presents the microbiological results of treatment of metal surfaces (naval OL36 steel) with GlidArc technology, according to the first, respectively the second phase formation of biofouling. Samples of naval steel were prepared with three specific naval paints and before the treatment have been introduced in seawater. Microbiological results have been compared for two types of treatments based on GlidArc. In the first case the painted samples are submitted to direct action of non-thermal plasma. In the second case the plasma produced by GlidArc technology is used to activate a solution (plasma activated water = PAW) and then the samples are introduced into this water.

  10. Charged hydrophilic polymer brushes and their relevance for understanding marine biofouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yandi, Wetra; Mieszkin, Sophie; di Fino, Alessio; Martin-Tanchereau, Pierre; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A; Tyson, Lyndsey; Clare, Anthony S; Ederth, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The resistance of charged polymers to biofouling was investigated by subjecting cationic (PDMAEMA), anionic (PSPMA), neutral (PHEMA-co-PEG10MA), and zwitterionic (PSBMA) brushes to assays testing protein adsorption; attachment of the marine bacterium Cobetia marina; settlement and adhesion strength of zoospores of the green alga Ulva linza; settlement of barnacle (Balanus amphitrite and B. improvisus) cypris larvae; and field immersion tests. Several results go beyond the expected dependence on direct electrostatic attraction; PSPMA showed good resistance towards attachment of C. marina, low settlement and adhesion of U. linza zoospores, and significantly lower biofouling than on PHEMA-co-PEG10MA or PSBMA after a field test for one week. PDMAEMA showed potential as a contact-active anti-algal coating due to its capacity to damage attached spores. However, after field testing for eight weeks, there were no significant differences in biofouling coverage among the surfaces. While charged polymers are unsuitable as antifouling coatings in the natural environment, they provide valuable insights into fouling processes, and are relevant for studies due to charging of nominally neutral surfaces. PMID:27125564

  11. Assessment of the anti-biofouling potentials of a copper iodide-doped nylon mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tetsuya; Fujimori, Yoshie; Nakayama, Tsuruo; Gotoh, Yasuo; Sunaga, Yoshihiko; Nemoto, Michiko; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2012-08-01

    We propose a copper iodide (CuI)-doped nylon mesh prepared using polyiodide ions as a precursor toward anti-biofouling polymer textile. The CuI-doped nylon mesh was subjected to the prevention of biofouling in marine environments. The attachment of the marine organisms was markedly inhibited on the CuI-doped nylon mesh surface until 249 days. Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray analysis indicated that copper compounds were maintained in the nylon mesh after the field experiment, although copper content in the nylon mesh was reduced. Therefore, the copper ions slowly dissolved from nylon mesh will contribute to the long-term prevention of biofouling. Furthermore, electron spin resonance analysis revealed the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from CuI-doped nylon mesh after the field experiment. One of the possibilities for toxic action of copper ions will be the direct effect of Cu+ -induced ROS on biofilm forming on nylon mesh surface. The proposed polymer textile can be applied to fishing and aquafarming nets, mooring rope for ship, or silt fence to restrict polluted water in marine environments. PMID:22113562

  12. Effect of water temperature on biofouling development in reverse osmosis membrane systems

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, N.M.

    2016-07-14

    Understanding the factors that determine the spatial and temporal biofilm development is a key to formulate effective control strategies in reverse osmosis membrane systems for desalination and wastewater reuse. In this study, biofilm development was investigated at different water temperatures (10, 20, and 30 °C) inside a membrane fouling simulator (MFS) flow cell. The MFS studies were done at the same crossflow velocity with the same type of membrane and spacer materials, and the same feed water type and nutrient concentration, differing only in water temperature. Spatially resolved biofilm parameters such as oxygen decrease rate, biovolume, biofilm spatial distribution, thickness and composition were measured using in-situ imaging techniques. Pressure drop (PD) increase in time was used as a benchmark as to when to stop the experiments. Biofilm measurements were performed daily, and experiments were stopped once the average PD increased to 40 mbar/cm. The results of the biofouling study showed that with increasing feed water temperature (i) the biofilm activity developed faster, (ii) the pressure drop increased faster, while (iii) the biofilm thickness decreased. At an average pressure drop increase of 40 mbar/cm over the MFS for the different feed water temperatures, different biofilm activities, structures, and quantities were found, indicating that diagnosis of biofouling of membranes operated at different or varying (seasonal) feed water temperatures may be challenging. Membrane installations with a high temperature feed water are more susceptible to biofouling than installations fed with low temperature feed water.

  13. Biofouling Prevention of Ancient Brick Surfaces by TiO2-Based Nano-Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Graziani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Brick constitutes a significant part of the construction materials used in historic buildings around the world. This material was used in Architectural Heritage for structural scope, and even for building envelopes. Thus, components made of clay brick were subjected to weathering for a long time, and this causes their deterioration. One of the most important causes for deterioration is biodeterioration caused by algae and cyanobacteria. It compromises the aesthetical properties, and, at a later stage, the integrity of the elements. In fact, traditional products used for the remediation/prevention of biofouling do not ensure long-term protection, and they need re-application over time. The use of nanotechnology, especially the use of photocatalytic products for the prevention of organic contamination of building façades is increasing. In this study, TiO2-based photocatalytic nano-coatings were applied to ancient brick, and its efficiency towards biofouling was studied. A composed suspension of algae and cyanobacteria was sprinkled on the bricks’ surface for a duration of twelve weeks. Digital Image Analysis and colorimetric measurements were carried out to evaluate algal growth on specimens’ surfaces. Results show that photocatalytic nano-coating was able to inhibit biofouling on bricks’ surfaces. In addition, substrata (their porosity and roughness clearly influences the adhesion of algal cells.

  14. Early non-destructive biofouling detection in spiral wound RO Membranes using a mobile earth's field NMR

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, E.O.

    2015-04-20

    We demonstrate the use of Earth\\'s field (EF) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to provide early non-destructive detection of active biofouling of a commercial spiral wound reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module. The RO membrane module was actively biofouled to different extents, by the addition of biodegradable nutrients to the feed stream, as revealed by a subtle feed-channel pressure drop increase. Easily accessible EF NMR parameters (signal relaxation parameters T1, T2 and the total NMR signal modified to be sensitive to stagnant fluid only) were measured and analysed in terms of their ability to detect the onset of biofouling. The EF NMR showed that fouling near the membrane module entrance significantly distorted the flow field through the whole membrane module. The total NMR signal is shown to be suitable for non-destructive early biofouling detection of spiral wound membrane modules, it was readily deployed at high (operational) flow rates, was particularly sensitive to flow field changes due to biofouling and could be deployed at any position along the membrane module axis. In addition to providing early fouling detection, the mobile EF NMR apparatus could also be used to (i) evaluate the production process of spiral wound membrane modules, and (ii) provide an in-situ determination of module cleaning process efficiency.

  15. Effect of anti-biofouling potential of multi-walled carbon nanotubes-filled polydimethylsiloxane composites on pioneer microbial colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuan; Lang, Yanhe; Sun, Qian; Liang, Shuang; Liu, Yongkang; Zhang, Zhizhou

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, two carbon nanotube (CNT) nanofillers, namely the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and the carboxyl-modified MWCNTs (cMWCNTs), were introduced into the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix respectively, in order to produce the PDMS composites with reinforced anti-biofouling properties. The anti-biofouling capacity of the silicone-based coatings, including the unfilled PDMS (P0), the MWCNTs-filled PDMS (PM) and the cMWCNTs-filled PDMS (PC), was examined via the field assays conducted in Weihai, China. The effect of different silicone-based coatings on the dynamic variations of the pioneer microbial-community diversity was analyzed using the single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique. The PM and PC surfaces have exhibited excellent anti-biofouling properties in contrast to that of the PDMS surface, with extremely low attachment of the early colonizers, such as juvenile invertebrates, seaweeds and algae sporelings. The PM and PC surfaces can effectively prevent biofouling for more than 12 weeks. These combined results suggest that the incorporation of MWCNTs or cMWCNTs into the PDMS matrix can dramatically reinforce its anti-biofouling properties. The SSCP analysis reveals that compared with the PDMS surfaces, the PM and PC surfaces have strong modulating effect on the pioneer prokaryotic and eukaryotic communities, particularly on the colonization of pioneer eukaryotic microbes. The significantly reduced pioneer eukaryotic-community diversity may contribute to the weakening of the subsequent colonization of macrofoulers. PMID:27137800

  16. Enzymatic cleaning of biofouled thin-film composite reverse osmosis (RO) membrane operated in a biofilm membrane reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohiuddin; Danielsen, Steffen; Johansen, Katja; Lorenz, Lindsey; Nelson, Sara; Camper, Anne

    2014-02-01

    Application of environmentally friendly enzymes to remove thin-film composite (TFC) reverse osmosis (RO) membrane biofoulants without changing the physico-chemical properties of the RO surface is a challenging and new concept. Eight enzymes from Novozyme A/S were tested using a commercially available biofouling-resistant TFC polyamide RO membrane (BW30, FilmTech Corporation, Dow Chemical Co.) without filtration in a rotating disk reactor system operated for 58 days. At the end of the operation, the accumulated biofoulants on the TFC RO surfaces were treated with the three best enzymes, Subtilisin protease and lipase; dextranase; and polygalacturonase (PG) based enzymes, at neutral pH (~7) and doses of 50, 100, and 150 ppm. Contact times were 18 and 36 h. Live/dead staining, epifluorescence microscopy measurements, and 5 μm thick cryo-sections of enzyme and physically treated biofouled membranes revealed that Subtilisin protease- and lipase-based enzymes at 100 ppm and 18 h contact time were optimal for removing most of the cells and proteins from the RO surface. Culturable cells inside the biofilm declined by more than five logs even at the lower dose (50 ppm) and shorter incubation period (18 h). Subtilisin protease- and lipase-based enzyme cleaning at 100 ppm and for 18 h contact time restored the hydrophobicity of the TFC RO surface to its virgin condition while physical cleaning alone resulted in a 50° increase in hydrophobicity. Moreover, at this optimum working condition, the Subtilisin protease- and lipase-based enzyme treatment of biofouled RO surface also restored the surface roughness measured with atomic force microscopy and the mass percentage of the chemical compositions on the TFC surface estimated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to its virgin condition. This novel study will encourage the further development and application of enzymes to remove biofoulants on the RO surface without changing its surface properties. PMID:24329165

  17. Membrane biofouling in a wastewater nitrification reactor: microbial succession from autotrophic colonization to heterotrophic domination

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Huijie

    2015-10-22

    Membrane biofouling is a complex process that involves bacterial adhesion, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) excretion and utilization, and species interactions. To obtain a better understanding of the microbial ecology of biofouling process, this study conducted rigorous, time-course analyses on the structure, EPS and microbial composition of the fouling layer developed on ultrafiltration membranes in a nitrification bioreactor. During a 14-day fouling event, three phases were determined according to the flux decline and microbial succession patterns. In Phase I (0-2 days), small sludge flocs in the bulk liquid were selectively attached on membrane surfaces, leading to the formation of similar EPS and microbial community composition as the early biofilms. Dominant populations in small flocs, e.g., Nitrosomonas, Nitrobacter, and Acinetobacter spp., were also the major initial colonizers on membranes. In Phase II (2-4 d), fouling layer structure, EPS composition, and bacterial community went through significant changes. Initial colonizers were replaced by fast-growing and metabolically versatile heterotrophs (e.g., unclassified Sphingobacteria). The declining EPS polysaccharide to protein (PS:PN) ratios could be correlated well with the increase in microbial community diversity. In Phase III (5-14 d), heterotrophs comprised over 90% of the community, whereas biofilm structure and EPS composition remained relatively stable. In all phases, AOB and NOB were constantly found within the top 40% of the fouling layer, with the maximum concentrations around 15% from the top. The overall microbial succession pattern from autotrophic colonization to heterotrophic domination implied that MBR biofouling could be alleviated by forming larger bacterial flocs in bioreactor suspension (reducing autotrophic colonization), and by designing more specific cleaning procedures targeting dominant heterotrophs during typical filtration cycles.

  18. Impaired Performance of Pressure-Retarded Osmosis due to Irreversible Biofouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Zeev, Edo; Perreault, François; Straub, Anthony P; Elimelech, Menachem

    2015-11-01

    Next-generation pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) approaches aim to harness the energy potential of streams with high salinity differences, such as wastewater effluent and seawater desalination plant brine. In this study, we evaluated biofouling propensity in PRO. Bench-scale experiments were carried out for 24 h using a model wastewater effluent feed solution and simulated seawater desalination brine pressurized to 24 bar. For biofouling tests, wastewater effluent was inoculated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and artificial seawater desalination plant brine draw solution was seeded with Pseudoalteromonas atlantica. Our results indicate that biological growth in the feed wastewater stream channel severely fouled both the membrane support layer and feed spacer, resulting in ∼50% water flux decline. We also observed an increase in the pumping pressure required to force water through the spacer-filled feed channel, with pressure drop increasing from 6.4±0.8 bar m(-1) to 15.1±2.6 bar m(-1) due to spacer blockage from the developing biofilm. Neither the water flux decline nor the increased pressure drop in the feed channel could be reversed using a pressure-aided osmotic backwash. In contrast, biofouling in the seawater brine draw channel was negligible. Overall, the reduced performance due to water flux decline and increased pumping energy requirements from spacer blockage highlight the serious challenges of using high fouling potential feed sources in PRO, such as secondary wastewater effluent. We conclude that PRO power generation using wastewater effluent and seawater desalination plant brine may become possible only with rigorous pretreatment or new spacer and membrane designs. PMID:26426100

  19. Modeling investigation of membrane biofouling phenomena by considering the adsorption of protein, polysaccharide and humic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demneh, Seyedeh Marzieh Ghasemi; Nasernejad, Bahram; Modarres, Hamid

    2011-11-01

    The importance of solute adsorption in the biofouling membrane has been clearly verified for the performance of membrane bioreactor (MBR). In order to quantify the mechanism of static adsorption in biofouling during of MBR process, we characterize membrane biofouling caused by model solutions containing a protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA), a humic substance (humic acid, HA) and a polysaccharide (alginic acid, Alg) on commercial hydrophilic polyethersulfone (PES) membrane. For static adsorption experiments, membranes were immersed in well-defined model solutions in three temperatures (298, 308 and 318 K) to obtain equilibrium data. To determine the characteristic parameters for this process, 7 isotherm models were applied to the experimental data. Three error analysis methods; the coefficient of nonlinear regression (R(2)), the sum of the squared errors (SSE) and standard deviation of residuals (S(yx)), were used to evaluate the data and determine the best fit isotherm for each model solutions. The error values demonstrated that the Sips isotherm model provided the best fit to the experimental data. AFM images were used for determination of changes in membrane surface after adsorption. These images confirmed the results obtained from adsorption isotherm study. Thermodynamic parameters such as standard free energy (Δ(r)G(θ)), enthalpy (Δ(r)H(θ)) and entropy (Δ(r)S(θ)) changes were determined; these adsorption processes were found to be feasible and endothermic but not spontaneous. The distribution of the substances adsorbed on PES surface were more chaotic than that in the aqueous solutions. Parameters obtained in this study can be used to determine the "fouling potential" of a given feed stream and a membrane. PMID:21798726

  20. Modeling the effect of spacers and biofouling on forward osmosis performance

    KAUST Repository

    Mosqueira Santillán, María José

    2014-11-01

    Currently, the most utilized desalination technology is reverse osmosis (RO), where a membrane is used as a physical barrier to separate the salts from the seawater, using high hydraulic pressure as driving force. A major problem in RO systems is biofouling, caused by severe growth of bacterial biofilms. Both, the need of an external energy input, as well as biofouling, impose a high cost on RO operation. Forward osmosis (FO) is an alternative membrane process that uses an osmotic pressure difference as driving force. FO uses a concentrated draw solution to generate high osmotic pressure, which extracts water across a semi permeable membrane from a feed solution. One of the main advantages of FO is the limited amount of external energy required to extract water from the feed solution. The objective of this research is the assessment of the impact of spacers, separating the membrane sheets, and biofouling on the FO system performance. This type of studies allow the optimization of membrane devices and operational conditions. For this, a two dimensional numerical model for FO systems was developed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This model allowed the evaluation of the impact of (i) spacers and (ii) biofilm, and (iii) the combined impact of spacers and biofilm on the performance of FO systems. The results obtained showed that the presence of spacers improved the performance of FO systems. Cavity configuration spacer gave the higher water flux across the membrane in clean systems; whereas for biofouled systems, the submerged configuration showed a better performance. In absence of spacers, the thickness or amount of biofilm is inversely proportional with the water flux. Furthermore, membrane surface coverage of the biofilm is more important than the amount of biofilm in terms of the impact on the performance. The numerical model can be adapted with other parameters (e.g. membrane and spacer thickness, feed and draw solution, solution concentration, etc.) to

  1. Effects of poly-ether B on proteome and phosphoproteome expression in biofouling Balanus amphitrite cyprids

    KAUST Repository

    Dash, Swagatika

    2012-04-01

    Biofouling is ubiquitous in marine environments, and the barnacle Balanus amphitrite is one of the most recalcitrant and aggressive biofoulers in tropical waters. Several natural antifoulants that were claimed to be non-toxic have been isolated in recent years, although the mechanism by which they inhibit fouling is yet to be investigated. Poly-ether B has shown promise in the non-toxic inhibition of larval barnacle attachment. Hence, in this study, multiplex two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) was applied in conjunction with mass spectrometry to investigate the effects of poly-ether B on barnacle larvae at the molecular level. The cyprid proteome response to poly-ether B treatment was analyzed at the total proteome and phosphoproteome levels, with 65 protein and 19 phosphoprotein spots found to be up- or down-regulated. The proteins were found to be related to energy-metabolism, oxidative stress, and molecular chaperones, thus indicating that poly-ether B may interfere with the redox-regulatory mechanisms governing the settlement of barnacle larvae. The results of this study demonstrate the usefulness of the proteomic technique in revealing the working mechanisms of antifouling compounds. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  2. Biofouling management in the cooling circuit of a power industry using electrochemical process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biofouling is one of the major issues in the power industry using seawater for cooling and other purposes. Presence of biological organisms such as bacteria and algae that could foul pipes and expensive equipment need to be managed from economical and safety point of view. Generally, the biofouling problem is aggravated in hot climate regions. Various means of disinfection processes are available for this purpose, such as chlorination, UV or ozone. In the present study electrochemical technology for the production of sodium hypochlorite was evaluated for onsite disinfection of seawater for applications in a nuclear power industry. A continues flow laboratory scale experimental setup was fabricated and influence of various operating parameters such as electrode material, applied current density, power consumption, surface area of electrode and interelectrode spacing were evaluated. It was found that efficiency of the electrochemical disinfection process was strongly dependent on these studied operating parameters. It was concluded that the production of sodium hypochlorite on site using an electrochemical process is a feasible and promising option for the power industry using seawater as cooling and/or process water. An optimum design of the electrochemical cell was also suggested. (author)

  3. Combined biofouling and scaling in membrane feed channels: a new modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, A I; Bergwerff, L; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Picioreanu, C

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed for combined fouling due to biofilms and mineral precipitates in membrane feed channels with spacers. Finite element simulation of flow and solute transport in two-dimensional geometries was coupled with a particle-based approach for the development of a composite (cells and crystals) foulant layer. Three fouling scenarios were compared: biofouling only, scaling only and combined fouling. Combined fouling causes a quicker flux decline than the summed flux deterioration when scaling and biofouling act independently. The model results indicate that the presence of biofilms leads to more mineral formation due to: (1) an enhanced degree of saturation for salts next to the membrane and within the biofilm; and (2) more available surface for nucleation to occur. The impact of biofilm in accelerating gypsum precipitation depends on the composition of the feed water (eg the presence of NaCl) and the kinetics of crystal nucleation and growth. Interactions between flow, solute transport and biofilm-induced mineralization are discussed. PMID:25587632

  4. A biomimetic nano hybrid coating based on the lotus effect and its anti-biofouling behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang; Wang, Guoqing; Meng, Qinghua; Ding, Chunhua; Jiang, Hong; Fang, Yongzeng

    2014-10-01

    To develop an environmentally friendly anti-biofouling coating in virtue of bionics, a block copolymer containing fluorine (Coplm_F) of low surface energy was prepared by copolymerization. The Ag-loaded mesoporous silica (Ag@SBA) acting as a controlled-release antifoulant was prepared from the mesoporous silica (SBA-15). The nano hybrid coating (Ag@SBA/Coplm_F) composing of the Coplm_F and Ag@SBA was to biomimetically simulate the lotus microstructure. The concentration of fluorine element on surface was analyzed by the energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and found rising to 1.45% after hybridation, which could be explained by the driving effect of SBA-15 via the hydrogen bond. This nanoscale morphology of the hybrid coating was measured and found highly semblable to the microstructure of the lotus surface. The contact angle was determined as 151° which confirmed the superhydrophobicity and lotus effect. The adhesion behaviors of Pseudomonas fluorescens, Diatoms, and Chlorella on the surface of the nano hybrid coating (Ag@SBA/Coplm_F) were studied and good effects of anti-biofouling were observed.

  5. Biofouling in cooling water system of nuclear power plant and its safety consequences: a perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Nuclear power plants require large quantities of water to cool system components and extract heat from the steam. This water is supplied from rivers, lakes, oceans and estuaries that support a large number of biological organisms, many of which cannot be removed from the water before it is used. These aquatic organisms can cause serious problems in nuclear power plant cooling water systems. Over the past several years, many cooling water systems at nuclear power plants have become infested with fouling organisms. These organisms have clogged cooling water flow, endangering the safety-related systems at some power plants. Therefore, the potential exists for biofouling to adversely affect the operability of plant components and cooling water systems during normal operation, shutdown, or accident conditions. This paper discusses reported cases of biofouling in cooling water system affecting directly or indirectly the safety components in nuclear power plants. It also describes the current status of control and surveillance strategies in use at nuclear power plants. Projected improvements and alternatives strategies are also touched upon

  6. Study on interactions between suspended matter and biofouling formed by treated sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qianpeng; Chang, Siyuan; Shi, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Heat exchangers used for treated sewage energy recovery usually suffer from the composite fouling problem, which seriously impairs the heat transfer efficiency. Treated sewage heat exchanger composite fouling is mostly composed of biofouling and is notably affected by interactions between the biofouling and suspended matter. Experiments were performed using simulated treated sewage and two kinds of simulated suspended matter, silicon dioxide particles and polyamide filaments, to model the interactions. Different flow velocities, particle sizes and concentrations were tested with their influences presented by the fouling wet weight changes. Empirical equation and threshold were developed based on the results to predict whether the suspended matter promotes or impedes fouling growth. The results indicate that proper control of the flow velocities, particle sizes and concentrations of suspended matter using empirical equation and threshold can inhibit fouling by reducing unwanted positive interactions and promoting beneficial negative interactions. The filament interactions were analysed and the unique attachment mechanisms of filaments were discussed for the first time. PMID:25950118

  7. Preparation, anti-biofouling and drag-reduction properties of a biomimetic shark skin surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Pu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Shark skin surfaces show non-smoothness characteristics due to the presence of a riblet structure. In this study, biomimetic shark skin was prepared by using the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS-embedded elastomeric stamping (PEES method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to examine the surface microstructure and fine structure of shark skin and biomimetic shark skin. To analyse the hydrophobic mechanism of the shark skin surface microstructure, the effect of biomimetic shark skin surface microstructure on surface wettability was evaluated by recording water contact angle. Additionally, protein adhesion experiments and anti-algae adhesion performance testing experiments were used to investigate and evaluate the anti-biofouling properties of the surface microstructure of biomimetic shark skin. The recorded values of the water contact angle of differently microstructured surfaces revealed that specific microstructures have certain effects on surface wettability. The anti-biofouling properties of the biomimetic shark skin surface with microstructures were superior to a smooth surface using the same polymers as substrates. Moreover, the air layer fixed on the surface of the biomimetic shark skin was found to play a key role in their antibiont adhesion property. An experiment into drag reduction was also conducted. Based on the experimental results, the microstructured surface of the prepared biomimetic shark skin played a significant role in reducing drag. The maximum of drag reduction rate is 12.5%, which is higher than the corresponding maximum drag reduction rate of membrane material with a smooth surface.

  8. Control of biofouling on reverse osmosis polyamide membranes modified with biocidal nanoparticles and antifouling polymer brushes

    KAUST Repository

    Rahaman, Md. Saifur

    2014-01-01

    Thin-film composite (TFC) polyamide reverse osmosis (RO) membranes are prone to biofouling due to their inherent physicochemical surface properties. In order to address the biofouling problem, we have developed novel surface coatings functionalized with biocidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and antifouling polymer brushes via polyelectrolyte layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly. The novel surface coating was prepared with polyelectrolyte LBL films containing poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(ethylene imine) (PEI), with the latter being either pure PEI or silver nanoparticles coated with PEI (Ag-PEI). The coatings were further functionalized by grafting of polymer brushes, using either hydrophilic poly(sulfobetaine) or low surface energy poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). The presence of both LBL films and sulfobetaine polymer brushes at the interface significantly increased the hydrophilicity of the membrane surface, while PDMS brushes lowered the membrane surface energy. Overall, all surface modifications resulted in significant reduction of irreversible bacterial cell adhesion. In microbial adhesion tests with E. coli bacteria, a normalized cell adhesion in the range of only 4 to 16% on the modified membrane surfaces was observed. Modified surfaces containing silver nanoparticles also exhibited strong antimicrobial activity. Membranes coated with LBL films of PAA/Ag-PEI achieved over 95% inactivation of bacteria attached to the surface within 1 hour of contact time. Both the antifouling and antimicrobial results suggest the potential of using these novel surface coatings in controlling the fouling of RO membranes. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2014.

  9. Chlorine dioxide as biocide to prevent biofouling in the hydro technical structures at KKNPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorination is envisaged in the sea water systems of KKNPP to control macro and micro bio-fouling of underwater structures and equipments. KKNPP intake and the fore bay structures are shown in detail. The sodium hypo chlorite required for chlorination is produced in the electro chlorination plant at site by the electrolysis of sea water. It is added in the sea water at the intake structure, tunnels and fore bay on continuous as well as periodic basis. The sea water to chlorination plant is supplied by the pumps located at the main pump house. Chlorination of sea water system by electro-chlorination is possible only after pump house flooding and commissioning of electro-chlorination plant. So for the period from breach of temporary dyke till commissioning of electro chlorination plant, chlorination by temporary method has to be done to prevent the bio-fouling of underwater structures and equipments. The flooding of the pump house subsequent to breach of temporary dyke is done

  10. Interrogating chemical variation via layer-by-layer SERS during biofouling and cleaning of nanofiltration membranes with further investigations into cleaning efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Li; Chen, Pengyu; Zhang, Bifeng; Zhang, Dayi; Li, Junyi; Martin, Francis L; Zhang, Kaisong

    2015-12-15

    Periodic chemical cleaning is an essential step to maintain nanofiltration (NF) membrane performance and mitigate biofouling, a major impediment in high-quality water reclamation from wastewater effluent. To target the important issue of how to clean and control biofouling more efficiently, this study developed surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as a layer-by-layer tool to interrogate the chemical variations during both biofouling and cleaning processes. The fact that SERS only reveals information on the surface composition of biofouling directly exposed to cleaning reagents makes it ideal for evaluating cleaning processes and efficiency. SERS features were highly distinct and consistent with different biofouling stages (bacterial adhesion, rapid growth, mature and aged biofilm). Cleaning was performed on two levels of biofouling after 18 h (rapid growth of biofilm) and 48 h (aged biofilm) development. An opposing profile of SERS bands between biofouling and cleaning was observed and this suggests a layer-by-layer cleaning mode. In addition, further dynamic biochemical and infrastructural changes were demonstrated to occur in the more severe 48-h biofouling, resulting in the easier removal of sessile cells from the NF membrane. Biofouling substance-dependent cleaning efficiency was also evaluated using the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). SDS appeared more efficient in cleaning lipid than polysaccharide and DNA. Protein and DNA were the predominant residual substances (irreversible fouling) on NF membrane leading to permanent flux loss. The chemical information revealed by layer-by-layer SERS will lend new insights into the optimization of cleaning reagents and protocols for practical membrane processes. PMID:26433006

  11. Environmentally Benign and Permanent Modifications to Prevent Biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Zhang

    2012-04-19

    Semprus Biosciences is developing environmentally benign and permanent modifications to prevent biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. Biofouling, including growth on external surfaces by bacteria, algae, barnacles, mussels, and other marine organisms, accumulate quickly on MHK devices, causing mechanical wear and changes in performance. Biofouling on crucial components of hydrokinetic devices, such as rotors, generators, and turbines, imposes substantial mass and hydrodynamic loading with associated efficiency loss and maintenance costs. Most antifouling coatings leach toxic ingredients, such as copper and tributyltin, through an eroding process, but increasingly stringent regulation of biocides has led to interest in the development of non-biocidal technologies to control fouling. Semprus Biosciences research team is developing modifications to prevent fouling from a broad spectrum of organisms on devices of all shapes, sizes, and materials for the life of the product. The research team designed and developed betaine-based polymers as novel underwater coatings to resist the attachment of marine organisms. Different betaine-based monomers and polymers were synthesized and incorporated within various coating formulations. The formulations and application methods were developed on aluminum panels with required adhesion strength and mechanical properties. The coating polymers were chemically stable under UV, hydrolytic and oxidative environments. The sulfobetaine formulations are applicable as nonleaching and stable underwater coatings. For the first time, coating formulations modified with highly packed sulfobetaine polymers were prepared and demonstrated resistance to a broad spectrum of marine organisms. Assays for comparing nonfouling performance were developed to evaluate protein adsorption and bacteria attachment. Barnacle settlement and removal were evaluated and a 60-day field test was performed. Silicone substrates including a commercial

  12. Membrane biofouling characterization: effects of sample preparation procedures on biofilm structure and the microbial community

    KAUST Repository

    Xue, Zheng

    2014-07-15

    Ensuring the quality and reproducibility of results from biofilm structure and microbial community analysis is essential to membrane biofouling studies. This study evaluated the impacts of three sample preparation factors (ie number of buffer rinses, storage time at 4°C, and DNA extraction method) on the downstream analysis of nitrifying biofilms grown on ultrafiltration membranes. Both rinse and storage affected biofilm structure, as suggested by their strong correlation with total biovolume, biofilm thickness, roughness and the spatial distribution of EPS. Significant variations in DNA yields and microbial community diversity were also observed among samples treated by different rinses, storage and DNA extraction methods. For the tested biofilms, two rinses, no storage and DNA extraction with both mechanical and chemical cell lysis from attached biofilm were the optimal sample preparation procedures for obtaining accurate information about biofilm structure, EPS distribution and the microbial community. © 2014 © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  13. Membrane biofouling characterization: effects of sample preparation procedures on biofilm structure and the microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zheng; Lu, Huijie; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2014-01-01

    Ensuring the quality and reproducibility of results from biofilm structure and microbial community analysis is essential to membrane biofouling studies. This study evaluated the impacts of three sample preparation factors (ie number of buffer rinses, storage time at 4°C, and DNA extraction method) on the downstream analysis of nitrifying biofilms grown on ultrafiltration membranes. Both rinse and storage affected biofilm structure, as suggested by their strong correlation with total biovolume, biofilm thickness, roughness and the spatial distribution of EPS. Significant variations in DNA yields and microbial community diversity were also observed among samples treated by different rinses, storage and DNA extraction methods. For the tested biofilms, two rinses, no storage and DNA extraction with both mechanical and chemical cell lysis from attached biofilm were the optimal sample preparation procedures for obtaining accurate information about biofilm structure, EPS distribution and the microbial community. PMID:25115516

  14. Use of ceragenins to create novel biofouling resistant water-treatment membranes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Feng, Yanshu (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Savage, Paul B. (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Pollard, Jacob (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Sanchez, Andres L. (LMATA, Albuquerque, NM); Fellows, Benjamin D.; Jones, Howland D. T.; McGrath, Lucas K. (LMATA, Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-12-01

    Scoping studies have demonstrated that ceragenins, when linked to water-treatment membranes have the potential to create biofouling resistant water-treatment membranes. Ceragenins are synthetically produced molecules that mimic antimicrobial peptides. Evidence includes measurements of CSA-13 prohibiting the growth of and killing planktonic Pseudomonas fluorescens. In addition, imaging of biofilms that were in contact of a ceragenin showed more dead cells relative to live cells than in a biofilm that had not been treated with a ceragenin. This work has demonstrated that ceragenins can be attached to polyamide reverse osmosis (RO) membranes, though work needs to improve the uniformity of the attachment. Finally, methods have been developed to use hyperspectral imaging with multivariate curve resolution to view ceragenins attached to the RO membrane. Future work will be conducted to better attach the ceragenin to the RO membranes and more completely test the biocidal effectiveness of the ceragenins on the membranes.

  15. Superhydrophobic PVDF and PVDF-HFP nanofibrous mats with antibacterial and anti-biofouling properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasova, M.; Manolova, N.; Markova, N.; Rashkov, I.

    2016-02-01

    Superhydrophobic nanofibrous materials of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) were prepared by one-pot electrospinning technique. The mats were decorated with ZnO nanoparticles with silanized surface and a model drug - 5-chloro-8-hydroxyquinolinol (5Cl8HQ). The obtained hybrid nanofibrous materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), contact angle measurements, mechanical and microbiological tests. The results showed that the incorporation of ZnO nanoparticles into PVDF and PVDF-HFP nanofibers increased the hydrophobicity (contact angle 152°), improved the thermal stability and imparted to the nanofibrous materials anti-adhesive and antimicrobial properties. The mats containing the model drug possessed antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The results suggested that the obtained hybrid mats could find potential biomedical applications requiring antibacterial and anti-biofouling properties.

  16. Use of ceregenins to create novel biofouling resistant water water-treatment membranes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Matthew F.; Jones, Howland D. T.; Feng, Yanshu; McGrath, Lucas K.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Pollard, Jacob; Hibbs, Michael R.; Savage, Paul B.

    2010-05-01

    Scoping studies have demonstrated that ceragenins, when linked to water-treatment membranes have the potential to create biofouling resistant water-treatment membranes. Ceragenins are synthetically produced molecules that mimic antimicrobial peptides. Evidence includes measurements of CSA-13 prohibiting the growth of and killing planktonic Pseudomonas fluorescens. In addition, imaging of biofilms that were in contact of a ceragenin showed more dead cells relative to live cells than in a biofilm that had not been treated with a ceragenin. This work has demonstrated that ceragenins can be attached to polyamide reverse osmosis (RO) membranes, though work needs to improve the uniformity of the attachment. Finally, methods have been developed to use hyperspectral imaging with multivariate curve resolution to view ceragenins attached to the RO membrane. Future work will be conducted to better attach the ceragenin to the RO membranes and more completely test the biocidal effectiveness of the ceragenins on the membranes.

  17. Biofouling on polymeric heat exchanger surfaces with E. coli and native biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, S; Madzgalla, M; Manz, W; Bart, H J

    2015-01-01

    The biofouling affinity of different polymeric surfaces (polypropylene, polysulfone, polyethylene terephthalate, and polyether ether ketone) in comparison to stainless steel (SS) was studied for the model bacterium Escherichia coli K12 DSM 498 and native biofilms originating from Rhine water. The biofilm mass deposited on the polymer surfaces was minimized by several magnitudes compared to SS. The cell count and the accumulated biomass of E. coli on the polymer surfaces showed an opposing linear trend. The promising low biofilm formation on the polymers is attributed to the combination of inherent surface properties (roughness, surface energy and hydrophobicity) when compared to SS. The fouling characteristics of E. coli biofilms show good conformity with the more complex native biofilms investigated. The results can be utilized for the development of new polymer heat exchangers when using untreated river water as coolant or for other processes needing antifouling materials. PMID:26479780

  18. Mitigation of biofouling using electromagnetic fields in tubular heat exchangers-condensers cooled by seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueba, Alfredo; García, Sergio; Otero, Félix M

    2014-01-01

    Electromagnetic field (EMF) treatment is presented as an alternative physical treatment for the mitigation of biofouling adhered to the tubes of a heat exchanger-condenser cooled by seawater. During an experimental phase, a fouling biofilm was allowed to grow until experimental variables indicated that its growth had stabilised. Subsequently, EMF treatment was applied to seawater to eliminate the biofilm and to maintain the achieved cleanliness. The results showed that EMFs precipitated ions dissolved in the seawater. As a consequence of the application of EMFs, erosion altered the intermolecular bonding of extracellular polymers, causing the destruction of the biofilm matrix and its detachment from the inner surface of the heat exchanger-condenser tubes. This detachment led to the partial removal of a mature biofilm and a partial recovery of the efficiency lost in the heat transfer process by using a physical treatment that is harmless to the marine environment. PMID:24266611

  19. Biofouling behavior and performance of forward osmosis membranes with bioinspired surface modification in osmotic membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Cheng, Qianxun; Tian, Qing; Yang, Bo; Chen, Qianyuan

    2016-07-01

    Forward osmosis (FO) has received considerable interest for water and energy related applications in recent years. Biofouling behavior and performance of cellulose triacetate (CTA) forward osmosis membranes with bioinspired surface modification via polydopamine (PD) coating and poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) grafting (PD-g-PEG) in a submerged osmotic membrane bioreactor (OMBR) were investigated in this work. The modified membranes exhibited lower flux decline than the pristine one in OMBR, confirming that the bioinspired surface modification improved the antifouling ability of the CTA FO membrane. The result showed that the decline of membrane flux related to the increase of the salinity and MLSS concentration of the mixed liquid. It was concluded that the antifouling ability of modified membranes ascribed to the change of surface morphology in addition to the improvement of membrane hydrophilicity. The bioinspired surface modifications might improve the anti-adhesion for the biopolymers and biocake. PMID:27089532

  20. Metabarcoding improves detection of eukaryotes from early biofouling communities: implications for pest monitoring and pathway management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaiko, Anastasija; Schimanski, Kate; Pochon, Xavier; Hopkins, Grant A; Goldstien, Sharyn; Floerl, Oliver; Wood, Susanna A

    2016-07-01

    In this experimental study the patterns in early marine biofouling communities and possible implications for surveillance and environmental management were explored using metabarcoding, viz. 18S ribosomal RNA gene barcoding in combination with high-throughput sequencing. The community structure of eukaryotic assemblages and the patterns of initial succession were assessed from settlement plates deployed in a busy port for one, five and 15 days. The metabarcoding results were verified with traditional morphological identification of taxa from selected experimental plates. Metabarcoding analysis identified > 400 taxa at a comparatively low taxonomic level and morphological analysis resulted in the detection of 25 taxa at varying levels of resolution. Despite the differences in resolution, data from both methods were consistent at high taxonomic levels and similar patterns in community shifts were observed. A high percentage of sequences belonging to genera known to contain non-indigenous species (NIS) were detected after exposure for only one day. PMID:27212415

  1. Control of biofouling on titanium condenser tubes with the use of electroless copper plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In sea water environments titanium condenser tubes face serious issues of biofouling and biomineralization. Electroless plating of nanocopper film is attempted inside the tubes for the control of biofilm formation. Using advanced techniques like AFM, SEM, and XPS, electroless copper plated flat Ti specimens were characterized. Examination of Cu coated Ti surfaces using AFM and SEM showed more reduction in the microroughness compared to anodized Ti surface. Cu 2p3/2 peak in XPS spectral analysis showed the shift in binding energy inferring the reduction of the hydroxide to metallic copper. Tubular specimens were exposed to sea water up to three months and withdrawn at monthly intervals to evaluate antibacterial activity and long term stability of the coating. Total viable counts and epifluorescence microscopy analyses showed two orders decrease in bacterial counts on copper coated Ti specimens when compared to as polished control Ti specimens. Molecular biology techniques like DGGE and protein expression analysis system were done to get insight into the community diversity and copper tolerance of microorganisms. DGGE gel bands clearly showed the difference in the bacterial diversity inferring from the 16S rRNA gene fragments (V3 regions). Protein analysis showed distinct protein spots appearing in electroless copper coated Ti biofilm protein samples in addition to protein spots common to both the biofilms of Cu coated and as polished Ti. The results indicated copper accumulating proteins in copper resistant bacterial species of biofilm. Reduced microroughness of the surface and toxic copper ions resulted in good biofouling control even after three months exposure to sea water. (author)

  2. The influence of antiscalants on biofouling of RO membranes in seawater desalination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweity, Amer; Oren, Yoram; Ronen, Zeev; Herzberg, Moshe

    2013-06-15

    Antiscalants are surface active polyelectrolyte compounds commonly used in reverse osmosis (RO) desalination processes to avoid membrane scaling. In spite of the significant roles of antiscalants in preventing membrane scaling, they are prone to enhance biofilm growth on RO membranes by either altering membrane surface properties or by serving as nutritional source for microorganisms. In this study, the contribution of antiscalants to membrane biofouling in seawater desalination was investigated. The effects of two commonly used antiscalants, polyphosphonate- and polyacrylate-based, were tested. The effects of RO membrane (DOW-Filmtec SW30 HRLE-400) exposure to antiscalants on its physico-chemical properties were studied, including the consequent effects on initial deposition and growth of the sessile microorganisms on the RO membrane surface. The effects of antiscalants on membrane physico-chemical properties were investigated by filtration of seawater supplemented with the antiscalants through flat-sheet RO membrane and changes in surface zeta potential and hydrophobicity were delineated. Adsorption of antiscalants to polyamide surfaces simulating RO membrane's polyamide layer and their effects on the consequent bacterial adhesion was tested using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring technology (QCM-D) and direct fluorescent microscopy. A significant increase in biofilm formation rate on RO membranes surface was observed in the presence of both types of antiscalants. Polyacrylate-based antiscalant was shown to enhance initial cell attachment as observed with the QCM-D and a parallel plate flow cell, due to rendering the polyamide surface more hydrophobic. Polyphosphonate-based antiscalants also increased biofilm formation rate, most likely by serving as an additional source of phosphorous to the seawater microbial population. A thicker biofilm layer was formed on the RO membrane when the polyacrylate-based antiscalant was used. Following

  3. N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone-Mediated Quorum Sensing with Special Reference to Use of Quorum Quenching Bacteria in Membrane Biofouling Control

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Membrane biofouling remains a severe problem to be addressed in wastewater treatment systems affecting reactor performance and economy. The finding that many wastewater bacteria rely on N-acyl homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing to synchronize their activities essential for biofilm formations; the quenching bacterial quorum sensing suggests a promising approach for control of membrane biofouling. A variety of quorum quenching compounds of both synthetic and natural origin have been id...

  4. Self-cleaning Metal Organic Framework (MOF) based ultra filtration membranes - A solution to bio-fouling in membrane separation processes

    OpenAIRE

    Prince, J. A.; Bhuvana, S.; Anbharasi, V.; Ayyanar, N.; Boodhoo, K. V. K.; Singh, G.

    2014-01-01

    Bio-fouling is a serious problem in many membrane-based separation processes for water and wastewater treatment. Current state of the art methods to overcome this are to modify the membranes with either hydrophilic additives or with an antibacterial compound. In this study, we propose and practise a novel concept to prevent bio-fouling by developing a killing and self-cleaning membrane surface incorporating antibacterial silver nanoparticles and highly hydrophilic negatively charged carboxyli...

  5. Biofouling Growth in Cold Estuarine Waters and Evaluation of Some Chitosan and Copper Anti-Fouling Paints

    OpenAIRE

    Karine Lemarchand; Claudie Bonnet; Émilien Pelletier

    2009-01-01

    Ecological concerns about antifouling paints containing non-green tin and copper compounds have highlighted the need for environmentally friendly alternatives. We report here a field test conducted in estuarine waters over two months designed to evaluate the efficiency of a number of active natural and man-made chemical ingredients added into a silicon-polyurethane marine paint. Early steps of biofouling in cold seawater of the St. Lawrence Estuary (Canada) were observed. Analyses, including ...

  6. Effect of microbial community structure on organic removal and biofouling in membrane adsorption bioreactor used in seawater pretreatment

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Sanghyun

    2016-03-03

    Membrane bioreactors (MBRs) were operated on-site for 56 d with different powdered activated carbon (PAC) dosages of 0, 1.5 and 5.0 g/L to pretreat seawater for reverse osmosis desalination. It was hypothesized that PAC would stimulate adsorption and biological degradation of organic compounds. The microbial communities responsible for biofouling on microfiltration (MF) membranes and biological organic removal in MBR were assessed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting and 454-pyrosequencing. The PAC addition improved assimilable organic carbon removal (53-59%), and resulted in reduced biofouling development on MF (> 50%) with only a marginal development in trans-membrane pressure. Interestingly, the bacterial community composition was significantly differentiated by the PAC addition. Cyanobacterium, Pelagibaca and Maricoccus were dominant in the PAC-free conditions, while Thiothrix and Sphingomonas were presumably responsible for the better reactor performances in PAC-added conditions. In contrast, the archaeal communities were consistent with predominance of Candidatus Nitrosopumilus. These data therefore show that the addition of PAC can improve MBR performance by developing different bacterial species, controlling AOC and associated biofouling on the membranes.

  7. Advanced Monitoring and Characterization of Biofouling in Gravity-driven Membrane Filtration

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yiran

    2016-05-01

    Gravity-driven membrane (GDM) filtration is one of the promising membrane bioreactor (MBR) technologies. It operates at a low pressure by gravity, requiring a minimal energy. Thus, it exhibits a great potential for a decentralized system, conducting household in developing and transition countries. Biofouling is a universal problem in almost all membrane filtration applications, leading to the decrease in flux or the increase in transmembrane pressure depending on different operation mode. Air scoring or regular membrane cleaning has been utilized for fouling mitigation, which requires increased energy consumption as well as complicated operations. Besides, repeating cleaning will trigger the deterioration of membranes and shorten their lifetime, elevating cost expenditures accordingly. In this way, GDM filtration stands out from conventional MBR technologies in a long-term operation with relative stable flux, which has been observed in many studies. The objective of this study was to monitor the biofilm development on a flat sheet membrane submerged in a GDM reactor with constant gravitational pressure. Morphology of biofilm layer in a fixed position was acquired by an in-situ and on-line OCT (optical coherence tomography) scanning at regular intervals for both visual investigation and structure analysis. The calculated thickness and roughness were compared to the variation of flux, fouling resistance and permeate quality, showing expected consistency. At the end of experiment, the morphology of entire membrane surface was scanned and recorded by OCT. Membrane autopsy was carried out for biofilm composition analysis by total organic carbon (TOC) and liquid chromatography with organic carbon detection (LC-OCD). In addition, biomass concentration was obtained by flow cytometer and adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) method. The data of biofilm components indicated a homogeneous biofilm structure formed after a long-term running of the GDM system, based on the morphology

  8. Coral-associated bacteria, quorum sensing disrupters, and the regulation of biofouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golberg, Karina; Pavlov, Valentina; Marks, Robert S; Kushmaro, Ariel

    2013-01-01

    Marine biofouling, the settlement of microorganisms and macroorganisms on structures submerged in seawater, although economically detrimental, is a successful strategy for survival in hostile environments, where coordinated bacterial communities establish biofilms via the regulation of quorum sensing (QS) communication systems. The inhibition of QS activity among bacteria isolated from different coral species was investigated to gain further insight into its potency in the attenuation, or even the prevention, of undesirable biofouling on marine organisms. It is hypothesized that coral mucus/microorganism interactions are competitive, suggesting that the dominant communities secrete QS disruptive compounds. One hundred and twenty bacterial isolates were collected from healthy coral species and screened for their ability to inhibit QS using three bioreporter strains. Approximately 12, 11, and 24% of the isolates exhibited anti-QS activity against Escherichia coli pSB1075, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens KYC55 indicator strains, respectively. Isolates with positive activity against the bioluminescent monitor strains were scanned via a cytotoxic/genotoxic, E. coli TV1061 and DPD2794 antimicrobial panel. Isolates detected by C. violaceum CV026 and A. tumefaciens KYC55 reporter strains were tested for their ability to inhibit the growth of these reporter strains, which were found to be unaffected. Tests of the Favia sp. coral isolate Fav 2-50-7 (>98% similarity to Vibrio harveyi) for its ability to attenuate the formation of biofilm showed extensive inhibitory activity against biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. To ascertain the stability and general structure of the active compound, cell-free culture supernatants exposed to an increasing temperature gradient or to digestion by proteinase K, were shown to maintain potent QS attenuation and the ability to inhibit the growth of biofilms. Mass spectrometry confirmed

  9. Prevention and protection of the effects of biocorrosion and biofouling minimizing the environmental impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez de Saravia, S. G.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Biocorrosion and biofouling processes are mediated by microorganisms adhered to the metal surfaces or embedded in a gelatinous matrix called biofilm. Biofilms affect the interaction between metals and the environment not only in deleterious processes like corrosion but also in several biological processes applied to materials recovery and handling. The growth of the microorganisms capable to induce biocorrosion is conditioned by favorable environmental conditions. However, the chemical agents generally used to prevent or protect metallic structures from biocorrosion are highly toxic and after use can have a negative impact on the environment. Four different approaches developed in our laboratory to prevent and control biocorrosion but minimizing the environmental impact, are successively presented in this paper: a the use of ozone as an environmentally friend biocide for cooling water systems; b the assay of the effectiveness of natural biocides on planktonic and sessile bacteria; c the potential use of film forming corrosion inhibitors; d the use of innovative preventing substances.

    Los procesos de biocorrosión y biofouling están mediados por microorganismos que adhieren a las superficies metálicas embebidos en una matriz gelatinosa llamada biofilm. Los biofilms afectan a la interacción entre metales y el medio ambiente, no solo a través de procesos deletéreos tales como la corrosión sino, también, en el manipuleo de diversos materiales. El crecimiento de los microorganismos capaces de inducir biocorrosión esta condicionado por un medio ambiente favorable. Sin embargo, generalmente, los agentes químicos usados para prevenir o proteger las estructuras metálicas de la biocorrosión son altamente tóxicos y su uso puede tener un impacto negativo para el ambiente. En este trabajo se presentan cuatro vías diferentes, desarrolladas en nuestro laboratorio, para prevenir y controlar la biocorrosión minimizando el impacto

  10. Biofouling community pattern on various metallic surfaces in the coastal waters of Kalpakkam, Southwestern Bay of Bengal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biofouling causes great operational hazard in different marine installations across the globe. And the expenditure incurred on combating biofouling is astounding. It is reported that shut down of a 235 MW (e) power station due to fouling, costs about 170 lakhs (at Rs. 3.00 per kw/h) per day. Because of this economic implication, biofouling has been a thrust area of study for the marine researchers. To assess the biofouling pattern, metallic surfaces are the best options because of their extensive use at various installations in the marine environment. Hence, knowledge on qualitative and quantitative aspects of biofouling with respect to metal surfaces is of great value to design an efficient fouling control strategy. Keeping this in mind, nine types of metal (SS-316, SS-304, MS, Titanium, Admiralty Brass, Aluminum Brass, Copper, Monel and Cupro-nickel) panels (12 x 9 x 0.1 cm) were exposed to coastal water of Kalpakkam from MAPS jetty at a depth of 2 m below the lowest low tide. Results indicated that copper based panels were found to be foul-free except monel. Although, fouling settlement was encountered on monel, the adherence was weak. Non-copper based metals showed 100% area coverage with high population density. However, in case of MS, due to exfoliation of corrosion deposits, unevenness in fouling colonization at later stages of development took place, though the early settlement was unaffected by initial corrosion. As expected, Titanium showed high rate of fouling growth along with high fouling diversity compared to other non-copper based metals. Absence of specific foulants such as, crustaceans and algae on Titanium surface reported by others was not observed during our study. The information on Titanium would be handy for Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) cooling water system wherein, the same has been selected as condenser and process water heat exchanger material. For non-copper based alloys including monel the fouling load ranged from 18 to 40 g

  11. Biofouling on buoyant marine plastics: An experimental study into the effect of size on surface longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazey, Francesca M C; Ryan, Peter G

    2016-03-01

    Recent estimates suggest that roughly 100 times more plastic litter enters the sea than is found floating at the sea surface, despite the buoyancy and durability of many plastic polymers. Biofouling by marine biota is one possible mechanism responsible for this discrepancy. Microplastics (plastic items with high surface area to volume ratios sank more rapidly by submerging 15 different sizes of polyethylene samples in False Bay, South Africa, for 12 weeks to determine the time required for samples to sink. All samples became sufficiently fouled to sink within the study period, but small samples lost buoyancy much faster than larger ones. There was a direct relationship between sample volume (buoyancy) and the time to attain a 50% probability of sinking, which ranged from 17 to 66 days of exposure. Our results provide the first estimates of the longevity of different sizes of plastic debris at the ocean surface. Further research is required to determine how fouling rates differ on free floating debris in different regions and in different types of marine environments. Such estimates could be used to improve model predictions of the distribution and abundance of floating plastic debris globally. PMID:26803792

  12. Nanoclay embedded mixed matrix PVDF nanocomposite membrane: Preparation, characterization and biofouling resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajabi, Hamid [Membrane Research Centre, Department of Chemical Engineering, Razi University, Tagh Bostan, 67149 Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Civil Engineering, Razi University, 67149 Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghaemi, Negin, E-mail: negin_ghaemi@kut.ac.ir [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kermanshah University of Technology, 67178 Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Madaeni, Sayed S. [Membrane Research Centre, Department of Chemical Engineering, Razi University, Tagh Bostan, 67149 Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Daraei, Parisa [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kermanshah University of Technology, 67178 Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khadivi, Mohammad Ali [Friedrich-Alexander University, Erlangen-Nuremberg, Egerland Strasse 3, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Falsafi, Monir [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Razi University, 67149 Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Nanocomposite membranes were prepared by addition of OMMT to PVDF membrane. • Addition of nanoclay considerably increased the hydrophilicity of PVDF membrane. • Nanocomposite membranes had higher water flux and antifouling properties. • Fouling of membranes blended with nanoclay (<4 wt.%) reduced. - Abstract: In this paper, nanocomposite PVDF/nanoclay membranes were prepared with addition of different concentrations of organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT) into the polymeric casting solution using combination of solution dispersion and phase inversion methods. Membranes were characterized by use of X-ray diffraction (XRD), water contact angle, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and their performances were evaluated in terms of pure water flux and fouling parameters. The surface hydrophilicity of all nanocomposites markedly improved compared to nascent PVDF. In addition, XRD patterns revealed the formation of intercalated layers of mineral clays in PVDF matrix. SEM and AFM images showed that addition of OMMT resulted in nanocomposite membranes with thinner skin layer and higher porosity rather than PVDF membranes. Pure water flux of PVDF/OMMT membranes increased significantly (particularly for fabricated membranes by 4 and 6 wt.% OMMT) compared to that of PVDF membrane. Moreover, nanocomposite membranes showed the elevated antifouling properties, and flux recovery of nascent PVDF membranes increased from 51 to 72% with addition of 2 wt.% OMMT nanoparticles. These nanocomposite membranes also offered a remarkable reusability and durability against biofouling.

  13. Nanoclay embedded mixed matrix PVDF nanocomposite membrane: Preparation, characterization and biofouling resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Nanocomposite membranes were prepared by addition of OMMT to PVDF membrane. • Addition of nanoclay considerably increased the hydrophilicity of PVDF membrane. • Nanocomposite membranes had higher water flux and antifouling properties. • Fouling of membranes blended with nanoclay (<4 wt.%) reduced. - Abstract: In this paper, nanocomposite PVDF/nanoclay membranes were prepared with addition of different concentrations of organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT) into the polymeric casting solution using combination of solution dispersion and phase inversion methods. Membranes were characterized by use of X-ray diffraction (XRD), water contact angle, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and their performances were evaluated in terms of pure water flux and fouling parameters. The surface hydrophilicity of all nanocomposites markedly improved compared to nascent PVDF. In addition, XRD patterns revealed the formation of intercalated layers of mineral clays in PVDF matrix. SEM and AFM images showed that addition of OMMT resulted in nanocomposite membranes with thinner skin layer and higher porosity rather than PVDF membranes. Pure water flux of PVDF/OMMT membranes increased significantly (particularly for fabricated membranes by 4 and 6 wt.% OMMT) compared to that of PVDF membrane. Moreover, nanocomposite membranes showed the elevated antifouling properties, and flux recovery of nascent PVDF membranes increased from 51 to 72% with addition of 2 wt.% OMMT nanoparticles. These nanocomposite membranes also offered a remarkable reusability and durability against biofouling

  14. Composition and variability of biofouling organisms in seawater reverse osmosis desalination plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minglu; Jiang, Sunny; Tanuwidjaja, Dian; Voutchkov, Nikolay; Hoek, Eric M V; Cai, Baoli

    2011-07-01

    Seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membrane biofouling remains a common challenge in the desalination industry, but the marine bacterial community that causes membrane fouling is poorly understood. Microbial communities at different stages of treatment processes (intake, cartridge filtration, and SWRO) of a desalination pilot plant were examined by both culture-based and culture-independent approaches. Bacterial isolates were identified to match the genera Shewanella, Alteromonas, Vibrio, and Cellulophaga based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. The 16S rRNA gene clone library of the SWRO membrane biofilm showed that a filamentous bacterium, Leucothrix mucor, which belongs to the gammaproteobacteria, accounted for nearly 30% of the clone library, while the rest of the microorganisms (61.2% of the total clones) were related to the alphaproteobacteria. 16S rRNA gene terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis indicated that bacteria colonizing the SWRO membrane represented a subportion of microbes in the source seawater; however, they were quite different from those colonizing the cartridge filter. The examination of five SWRO membranes from desalination plants located in different parts of the world showed that although the bacterial communities from the membranes were not identical to each other, some dominant bacteria were commonly observed. In contrast, bacterial communities in source seawater were significantly different based on location and season. Microbial profiles from 14 cartridge filters collected from different plants also revealed spatial trends. PMID:21551282

  15. Composition and Variability of Biofouling Organisms in Seawater Reverse Osmosis Desalination Plants ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minglu; Jiang, Sunny; Tanuwidjaja, Dian; Voutchkov, Nikolay; Hoek, Eric M. V.; Cai, Baoli

    2011-01-01

    Seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membrane biofouling remains a common challenge in the desalination industry, but the marine bacterial community that causes membrane fouling is poorly understood. Microbial communities at different stages of treatment processes (intake, cartridge filtration, and SWRO) of a desalination pilot plant were examined by both culture-based and culture-independent approaches. Bacterial isolates were identified to match the genera Shewanella, Alteromonas, Vibrio, and Cellulophaga based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. The 16S rRNA gene clone library of the SWRO membrane biofilm showed that a filamentous bacterium, Leucothrix mucor, which belongs to the gammaproteobacteria, accounted for nearly 30% of the clone library, while the rest of the microorganisms (61.2% of the total clones) were related to the alphaproteobacteria. 16S rRNA gene terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis indicated that bacteria colonizing the SWRO membrane represented a subportion of microbes in the source seawater; however, they were quite different from those colonizing the cartridge filter. The examination of five SWRO membranes from desalination plants located in different parts of the world showed that although the bacterial communities from the membranes were not identical to each other, some dominant bacteria were commonly observed. In contrast, bacterial communities in source seawater were significantly different based on location and season. Microbial profiles from 14 cartridge filters collected from different plants also revealed spatial trends. PMID:21551282

  16. Effect of flow velocity, substrate concentration and hydraulic cleaning on biofouling of reverse osmosis feed channels

    KAUST Repository

    Radu, Andrea I.

    2012-04-01

    A two-dimensional mathematical model coupling fluid dynamics, salt and substrate transport and biofilm development in time was used to investigate the effects of cross-flow velocity and substrate availability on biofouling in reverse osmosis (RO)/nanofiltration (NF) feed channels. Simulations performed in channels with or without spacer filaments describe how higher liquid velocities lead to less overall biomass amount in the channel by increasing the shear stress. In all studied cases at constant feed flow rate, biomass accumulation in the channel reached a steady state. Replicate simulation runs prove that the stochastic biomass attachment model does not affect the stationary biomass level achieved and has only a slight influence on the dynamics of biomass accumulation. Biofilm removal strategies based on velocity variations are evaluated. Numerical results indicate that sudden velocity increase could lead to biomass sloughing, followed however by biomass re-growth when returning to initial operating conditions. Simulations show particularities of substrate availability in membrane devices used for water treatment, e.g., the accumulation of rejected substrates at the membrane surface due to concentration polarization. Interestingly, with an increased biofilm thickness, the overall substrate consumption rate dominates over accumulation due to substrate concentration polarization, eventually leading to decreased substrate concentrations in the biofilm compared to bulk liquid. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Design, Fabrication, and In Vitro Testing of an Anti-biofouling Glaucoma Micro-shunt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harake, Ryan S; Ding, Yuzhe; Brown, J David; Pan, Tingrui

    2015-10-01

    Glaucoma, one of the leading causes of irreversible blindness, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease. Chronic elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), a prime risk factor for glaucoma, can be treated by aqueous shunts, implantable devices, which reduce IOP in glaucoma patients by providing alternative aqueous outflow pathways. Although initially effective at delaying glaucoma progression, contemporary aqueous shunts often lead to numerous complications and only 50% of implanted devices remain functional after 5 years. In this work, we introduce a novel micro-device which provides an innovative platform for IOP reduction in glaucoma patients. The device design features an array of parallel micro-channels to provide precision aqueous outflow resistance control. Additionally, the device's microfluidic channels are composed of a unique combination of polyethylene glycol materials in order to provide enhanced biocompatibility and resistance to problematic channel clogging from biofouling of aqueous proteins. The microfabrication process employed to produce the devices results in additional advantages such as enhanced device uniformity and increased manufacturing throughput. Surface characterization experimental results show the device's surfaces exhibit significantly less non-specific protein adsorption compared to traditional implant materials. Results of in vitro flow experiments verify the device's ability to provide aqueous resistance control, continuous long-term stability through 10-day protein flow testing, and safety from risk of infection due to bacterial ingression. PMID:25821113

  18. Metagenomes reveal microbial structures, functional potentials, and biofouling-related genes in a membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinxing; Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Huan; Park, Hee-Deung; Wu, Zhichao

    2016-06-01

    Metagenomic sequencing was used to investigate the microbial structures, functional potentials, and biofouling-related genes in a membrane bioreactor (MBR). The results showed that the microbial community in the MBR was highly diverse. Notably, function analysis of the dominant genera indicated that common genes from different phylotypes were identified for important functional potentials with the observation of variation of abundances of genes in a certain taxon (e.g., Dechloromonas). Despite maintaining similar metabolic functional potentials with a parallel full-scale conventional activated sludge (CAS) system due to treating the identical wastewater, the MBR had more abundant nitrification-related bacteria and coding genes of ammonia monooxygenase, which could well explain its excellent ammonia removal in the low-temperature period. Furthermore, according to quantification of the genes involved in exopolysaccharide and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) protein metabolism, the MBR did not show a much different potential in producing EPS compared to the CAS system, and bacteria from the membrane biofilm had lower abundances of genes associated with EPS biosynthesis and transport compared to the activated sludge in the MBR. PMID:26816093

  19. Potential biofouling of spacecraft propellant systems due to contaminated deionized water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Patrick

    2006-08-01

    Deionized (DI) water, with a density close to hydrazine, is used to fill spacecraft propellant tanks for mechanical testing during ground operations, after which is it removed and the tanks dried for use with anhydrous hydrazine. Pure nitrogen is used as a pressurant during storage and during water fill and drain operations. Since DI water systems are notorious for contamination by slime-forming bacteria, DI water intended for use in New Horizons and STEREO hydrazine tanks at APL was assessed for microorganism content using the heterotrophic plate count (HPC) method. Results show that some growth occurred during storage of DI water in propellant tanks, however not at the logarithmic rate associated with well-nourished bacteria. Ralstonia and Burkholderia were present in DI water on-loaded however only Ralstonia was present in off-loaded water. One possible source of nutrients during water storage in propellant tanks is organic material originating from the EPDM (EPR per AF-E-332) expulsion diaphragm. This paper will demonstrate potential for bio-fouling of spacecraft propulsion systems due to growth of slime-forming bacteria and will suggest that specifications controlling microorganism content should be imposed on water used for spacecraft ground testing.

  20. A superhydrophilic nitinol shape memory alloy with enhanced anti-biofouling and anti-corrosion properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, K; Min, T; Jung, J-Y; Shin, D; Nam, Y

    2016-05-01

    This work reports on a nitinol (NiTi) surface modification scheme based on a chemical oxidation method, and characterizes its effects on wetting, biofouling and corrosion. The scheme developed is also compared with selected previous oxidation methods. The proposed method turns NiTi into superhydrophilic in ~5 min, and the static contact angle and contact angle hysteresis were measured to be ~7° and ~12°, respectively. In the PRP (platelet rich plasma) test, platelet adhesion was reduced by ~89% and ~77% respectively, compared with the original NiTi and the NiTi treated with the previous chemical oxidation scheme. The method developed provides a high (~1.1 V) breakdown voltage, which surpasses the ASTM standard for intervascular medical devices. It also provides higher superhydrophilicity, hemo-compatibility and anti-corrosion resistance than previous oxidation schemes, with a significantly reduced process time (~5 min), and will help the development of high performance NiTi devices. PMID:27021115

  1. N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone-Mediated Quorum Sensing with Special Reference to Use of Quorum Quenching Bacteria in Membrane Biofouling Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshad Lade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane biofouling remains a severe problem to be addressed in wastewater treatment systems affecting reactor performance and economy. The finding that many wastewater bacteria rely on N-acyl homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing to synchronize their activities essential for biofilm formations; the quenching bacterial quorum sensing suggests a promising approach for control of membrane biofouling. A variety of quorum quenching compounds of both synthetic and natural origin have been identified and found effective in inhibition of membrane biofouling with much less environmental impact than traditional antimicrobials. Work over the past few years has demonstrated that enzymatic quorum quenching mechanisms are widely conserved in several prokaryotic organisms and can be utilized as a potent tool for inhibition of membrane biofouling. Such naturally occurring bacterial quorum quenching mechanisms also play important roles in microbe-microbe interactions and have been used to develop sustainable nonantibiotic antifouling strategies. Advances in membrane fabrication and bacteria entrapment techniques have allowed the implication of such quorum quenching bacteria for better design of membrane bioreactor with improved antibiofouling efficacies. In view of this, the present paper is designed to review and discuss the recent developments in control of membrane biofouling with special emphasis on quorum quenching bacteria that are applied in membrane bioreactors.

  2. Controlled Architecture of Dual-Functional Block Copolymer Brushes on Thin-Film Composite Membranes for Integrated "Defending" and "Attacking" Strategies against Biofouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Gang; Lee, Jongho; Perreault, François; Elimelech, Menachem

    2015-10-21

    We report a new macromolecular architecture of dual functional block copolymer brushes on commercial thin-film composite (TFC) membranes for integrated "defending" and "attacking" strategies against biofouling. Mussel-inspired catechol chemistry is used for a convenient immobilization of initiator molecules to the membrane surface with the aid of polydopamine (PDA). Zwitterionic polymer brushes with strong hydration capacity and quaternary ammonium salt (QAS) polymer brushes with bactericidal ability are sequentially grafted on TFC membranes via activators regenerated by electron transfer-atom transfer radical polymerization (ARGET-ATRP), an environmentally benign and controlled polymerization method. Measurement of membrane intrinsic transport properties in reverse osmosis experiments shows that the modified TFC membrane maintains the same water permeability and salt selectivity as the pristine TFC membrane. Chemical force microscopy and protein/bacterial adhesion studies are carried out for a comprehensive evaluation of the biofouling resistance and antimicrobial ability, demonstrating low biofouling propensity and excellent bacterial inactivation for the modified TFC membrane. We conclude that this polymer architecture, with complementary "defending" and "attacking" capabilities, can effectively prevent the attachment of biofoulants and formation of biofilms and thereby significantly mitigate biofouling on TFC membranes. PMID:26378606

  3. Probing biofouling resistant polymer brush surfaces by atomic force microscopy based force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schön, Peter; Kutnyanszky, Edit; ten Donkelaar, Bas; Santonicola, M Gabriella; Tecim, Tugba; Aldred, Nick; Clare, Anthony S; Vancso, G Julius

    2013-02-01

    The protein repellency and biofouling resistance of zwitterionic poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate)(pSBMA) brushes grafted via surface initiated polymerization (SIP) from silicon and glass substrata was assessed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) adherence experiments. Laboratory settlement assays were conducted with cypris larvae of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite. AFM adherence includes the determination of contact rupture forces when AFM probe tips are withdrawn from the substratum. When the surface of the AFM tip is modified, adherence can be assessed with chemical specifity using a method known as chemical force microscopy (CFM). In this study, AFM tips were chemically functionalized with (a) fibronectin- here used as model for a nonspecifically adhering protein - and (b) arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide motifs covalently attached to poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) brushes as biomimics of cellular adhesion receptors. Fibronectin functionalized tips showed significantly reduced nonspecific adhesion to pSBMA-modified substrata compared to bare gold (2.3±0.75 nN) and octadecanethiol (ODT) self-assembled monolayers (1.3±0.75 nN). PMAA and PMAA-RGD modified probes showed no significant adhesion to pSBMA modified silicon substrata. The results gathered through AFM protein adherence studies were complemented by laboratory fouling studies, which showed no adhesion of cypris larvae of Balanus amphitrite on pSBMA. With regard to its unusually high non-specific adsorption to a wide variety of materials the behavior of fibronectin is analogous to the barnacle cyprid temporary adhesive that also binds well to surfaces differing in polarity, charge and free energy. The antifouling efficacy of pSBMA may, therefore, be directly related to the ability of this surface to resist nonspecific protein adsorption. PMID:23138001

  4. Surface Functionalization of Polyethersulfone Membrane with Quaternary Ammonium Salts for Contact-Active Antibacterial and Anti-Biofouling Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Hu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm is a significant cause for membrane fouling. Antibacterial-coated surfaces can inhibit biofilm formation by killing bacteria. In this study, polyethersulfone (PES microfiltration membrane was photografted by four antibiotic quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs separately, which were synthesized from dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA by quaternization with butyl bromide (BB, octyl bromide (OB, dodecyl bromide (DB, or hexadecyl bromide (HB. XPS, ATR-FTIR, and SEM were used to confirm the surfaces’ composition and morphology. After modification, the pores on PES-g-DMAEMA-BB and PES-g-DMAEMA-OB were blocked, while PES-g-DMAEMA-DB and PES-g-DMAEMA-HB were retained. We supposed that DMAEMA-BB and DMAEMA-OB aggregated on the membrane surface due to the activities of intermolecular or intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Bacteria testing found the antibacterial activities of the membranes increased with the length of the substituted alkyl chain. Correspondingly, little bacteria were observed on PES-g-DMAEMA-DB and PES-g-DMAEMA-HB by SEM. The antifouling properties were investigated by filtration of a solution of Escherichia coli. Compared with the initial membrane, PES-g-DMAEMA-DB and PES-g-DMAEMA-HB showed excellent anti-biofouling performance with higher relative flux recovery (RFR of 88.3% and 92.7%, respectively. Thus, surface functionalization of the PES membrane with QACs can prevent bacteria adhesion and improve the anti-biofouling activity by the contact-active antibacterial property.

  5. Pesticide sequestration in passive samplers (SPMDs): considerations for deployment time, biofouling, and stream flow in a tropical watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polidoro, Beth A; Morra, Matthew J; Ruepert, Clemens; Castillo, Luisa Eugenia

    2009-10-01

    Semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs) provide an informative and cost-effective approach for monitoring contaminants in remote tropical streams. Estimation and interpretation of contaminant concentrations in streams derived from SPMDs can vary based on a number of environmental factors, including stream flow, biofouling, and deployment time. In three one-month long trials, SPMDs were concurrently deployed for 4, 15, and 28 days at three stream sites in an extensive agricultural area of southeastern Costa Rica. Water, bottom sediment, and suspended solids grab samples were also collected and several environmental variables were monitored at corresponding time intervals during each month-long study period. At all three sites, SPMD concentrations of the widely used insecticide chlorpyrifos increased with deployment time, with no relationship between SPMD biofouling and pesticide sequestration. Differences in SPMD chlorpyrifos sequestration among sites are likely due to differences in stream chlorpyrifos concentration rather than differences in SPMD sampling rates. The longer exposure period of SPMDs allowed for the detection of lower concentrations of chlorpyrifos, terbufos, and difenoconazole compared to water grab samples. In addition to the use of appropriate performance reference compounds (PRCs), other environmental variables such as stream turbidity, flow regime, stream morphology, and knowledge of pesticide application methods are important considerations for optimizing SPMD deployment and data interpretation in tropical regions. PMID:19809710

  6. Fine-Tuning the Surface of Forward Osmosis Membranes via Grafting Graphene Oxide: Performance Patterns and Biofouling Propensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegab, Hanaa M; ElMekawy, Ahmed; Barclay, Thomas G; Michelmore, Andrew; Zou, Linda; Saint, Christopher P; Ginic-Markovic, Milena

    2015-08-19

    Graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets were attached to the polyamide selective layer of thin film composite (TFC) forward osmosis (FO) membranes through a poly L-Lysine (PLL) intermediary using either layer-by-layer or hybrid (H) grafting strategies. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, zeta potential, and thermogravimetric analysis confirmed the successful attachment of GO/PLL, the surface modification enhancing both the hydrophilicity and smoothness of the membrane's surface demonstrated by water contact angle, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The biofouling resistance of the FO membranes determined using an adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence test showed a 99% reduction in surviving bacteria for GO/PLL-H modified membranes compared to pristine membrane. This antibiofouling property of the GO/PLL-H modified membrane was reflected in reduced flux decline compared to all other samples when filtering brackish water under biofouling conditions. Further, the high density and tightly bound GO nanosheets using the hybrid modification reduced the reverse solute flux compared to the pristine, which reflects improved membrane selectivity. These results illustrate that the GO/PLL-H modification is a valuable addition to improve the performance of FO TFC membranes. PMID:26214126

  7. Evidence of compositional and ultrastructural shifts during the development of calcareous tubes in the biofouling tubeworm, Hydroides elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Vera Bin San; Vinn, Olev; Li, Chaoyi; Lu, Xingwen; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy B; Schopf, J William; Shih, Kaimin; Zhang, Tong; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen

    2015-03-01

    The serpulid tubeworm, Hydroides elegans, is an ecologically and economically important species whose biology has been fairly well studied, especially in the context of larval development and settlement on man-made objects (biofouling). Nevertheless, ontogenetic changes associated with calcareous tube composition and structures have not yet been studied. Here, the ultrastructure and composition of the calcareous tubes built by H. elegans was examined in the three early calcifying juvenile stages and in the adult using XRD, FTIR, ICP-OES, SEM and Raman spectroscopy. Ontogenetic shifts in carbonate mineralogy were observed, for example, juvenile tubes contained more amorphous calcium carbonate and were predominantly aragonitic whereas adult tubes were bimineralic with considerably more calcite. The mineral composition gradually shifted during the tube development as shown by a decrease in Sr/Ca and an increase of Mg/Ca ratios with the tubeworm's age. The inner tube layer contained calcite, whereas the outer layer contained aragonite. Similarly, the tube complexity in terms of ultrastructure was associated with development. The sequential appearance of unoriented ultrastructures followed by oriented ultrastructures may reflect the evolutionary history of serpulid tube biominerals. As aragonitic structures are more susceptible to dissolution under ocean acidification (OA) conditions but are more difficult to be removed by anti-fouling treatments, the early developmental stages of the tubeworms may be vulnerable to OA but act as the important target for biofouling control. PMID:25600412

  8. Control of marine biofouling and medical biofilm formation with engineered topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, James Frederick

    Biofouling is the unwanted accumulation and growth of cells and organisms on clean surfaces. This process occurs readily on unprotected surfaces in both the marine and physiological environments. Surface protection in both systems has typically relied upon toxic materials and biocides. Metallic paints, based on tin and copper, have been extremely successful as antifouling coatings for the hulls of ships by killing the majority of fouling species. Similarly, antibacterial medical coatings incorporate metal-containing compounds such as silver or antibiotics that kill the bacteria. The environmental concerns over the use of toxic paints and biocides in the ocean, the developed antibiotic resistance of bacterial biofilms, and the toxicity concerns with silver suggest the need for non-toxic and non-kill solutions for these systems. The manipulation of surface topography on non-toxic materials at the size scale of the fouling species or bacteria is one approach for the development of alternative coatings. These surfaces would function simply as a physical deterrent of settlement of fouling organisms or a physical obstacle for the adequate formation of a bacterial biofilm without the need to kill the targeted microorganisms. Species-specific topographical designs called engineered topographies have been designed, fabricated and evaluated for potential applications as antifouling marine coatings and material surfaces capable of reducing biofilm formation. Engineered topographies fabricated on the surface of a non-toxic, polydimethylsiloxane elastomer, or silicone, were shown to significantly reduce the attachment of zoospores of a common ship fouling green algae (Ulva) in standard bioassays versus a smooth substrate. Other engineered topographies were effective at significantly deterring the settlement of the cyprids of barnacles (Balanus amphitrite). These results indicate the potential use of engineered topography applied to non-toxic materials as an environmentally

  9. Improving the reliability of open-cycle water systems: Application of biofouling surveillance and control techniques to sediment and corrosion fouling at nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, K.I.; Neitzel, D.A.

    1987-03-01

    Biofouling surveillance and control techniques are evaluated for their applicability to sediment and corrosion fouling and suggestions are given to improve their effectiveness. Alternate techniques to better detect and control sedimentation and corrosion are also evaluated. Environmental conditions that allow biofouling, sedimentation, and corrosion to occur are summarized. A correlation between sediment and corrosion is identified and the causes are described. Environmental regulations, especially those in the Clean Water Act of 1977, are reviewed to identify those that may limit or prevent the use of surveillance and control techniques described in this report. Flow velocity is the major design factor that determines whether or not biofouling, sedimentation, and corrosion will occur. Monitoring flow conditions can provide early warning of conditions that will allow fouling to occur. Visual inspection is the most common and most effective technique for identifying the cause and extent of fouling in the open-cycle water system. Most biofouling control techniques in current use are not effective against sediment and corrosion. Frequent, high-velocity flushing of cooling loops may effectively remove sediment and reduce under-sediment corrosion. Alternate biocide treatments such as targeted chlorination or the use of ozone or 2,2-dibromo-3-nitrilo propionamide (DBNPA) may also be effective in reducing under-sediment corrosion.

  10. Improving the reliability of open-cycle water systems: Application of biofouling surveillance and control techniques to sediment and corrosion fouling at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biofouling surveillance and control techniques are evaluated for their applicability to sediment and corrosion fouling and suggestions are given to improve their effectiveness. Alternate techniques to better detect and control sedimentation and corrosion are also evaluated. Environmental conditions that allow biofouling, sedimentation, and corrosion to occur are summarized. A correlation between sediment and corrosion is identified and the causes are described. Environmental regulations, especially those in the Clean Water Act of 1977, are reviewed to identify those that may limit or prevent the use of surveillance and control techniques described in this report. Flow velocity is the major design factor that determines whether or not biofouling, sedimentation, and corrosion will occur. Monitoring flow conditions can provide early warning of conditions that will allow fouling to occur. Visual inspection is the most common and most effective technique for identifying the cause and extent of fouling in the open-cycle water system. Most biofouling control techniques in current use are not effective against sediment and corrosion. Frequent, high-velocity flushing of cooling loops may effectively remove sediment and reduce under-sediment corrosion. Alternate biocide treatments such as targeted chlorination or the use of ozone or 2,2-dibromo-3-nitrilo propionamide (DBNPA) may also be effective in reducing under-sediment corrosion

  11. Compositional Similarities and Differences between Transparent Exopolymer Particles (TEP) from two Marine Bacteria and two Marine Algae: Significance to Surface Biofouling

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Sheng

    2015-06-12

    Transparent-exopolymer-particles (TEP) have been recently identified as a significant contributor to surface biofouling, such as on reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. TEP research has mainly focused on algal TEP/TEP precursors while limited investigations have been conducted on those released by bacteria. In this study, TEP/TEP precursors derived from both algae and bacteria were isolated and then characterized to investigate their similarities and/or differences using various advanced analytical techniques, thus providing a better understanding of their potential effect on biofouling. Bacterial TEP/TEP precursors were isolated from two species of marine bacteria (Pseudidiomarina homiensis and Pseudoalteromonas atlantica) while algal TEP/TEP precursors were isolated from two marine algae species (Alexandrium tamarense and Chaetoceros affinis). Results indicated that both isolated bacterial and algal TEP/TEP precursors were associated with protein-like materials, and most TEP precursors were high-molecular-weight biopolymers. Furthermore all investigated algal and bacterial TEP/TEP precursors showed a lectin-like property, which can enable them to act as a chemical conditioning layer and to agglutinate bacteria. This property may enhance surface biofouling. However, both proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and the nitrogen/carbon (N/C) ratios suggested that the algal TEP/TEP precursors contained much less protein content than the bacterial TEP/TEP precursors. This difference may influence their initial deposition and further development of surface biofouling.

  12. 2(5H-Furanone: a prospective strategy for biofouling-control in membrane biofilm bacteria by quorum sensing inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Ponnusamy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Biofouling of membranes demands costly periodic cleaning and membrane replacement. A sustainable and environmentally friendly solution for maintenance is not available and would be of great interest for many purposes including economical. As complex biofilm formation by environmental strains is the major cause of biofouling and biofilm formation in most cases are controlled by N-Acylhomoserine lactone (AHLmediated Quorum Sensing (QS. An effort was made to understand the appropriateness of 2(5H-furanone, to use against biofouling of membranes. QS inhibition activity by 2(5H-furanone was studied using bioindicator strains and known AHLs of different acyl chain lengths. The biofilm inhibition was studied by growth analysis on polystyrene plate of Aeromonas hyrdrophila, an environmental biofilm strain isolated from a bio-fouled reverse osmosis (RO membrane. Results showed a QS inhibition activity against a wide range of AHLs and also biofilm formation by 2(5H-furanone, which is believed to act as a potential quorum inhibition agent in a bacterial biofilm community.

  13. Efficacy of biofouling control measures in cooling water circuits of MAPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS) operates on a once through mode using seawater at the rate of 35 m3s-1 for condenser cooling purposes. Low level continuous chlorination (0.2 ± 0.1 mg L-1 TRO) and twice a week booster dosing (0.4 ± 0.2 mg L-1 TRO) for eight hours is practiced. In addition active bromide is being dosed ahead of the process seawater heat exchangers, 0.15 - 0.2 mg L-1for fouling control. Biofouling load in the cooling water circuits of UNIT-2 after a period of 24 months of operation was assessed during maintenance shutdown with a view to assess the efficacy of present chlorination regime. Different sections of the cooling circuit have unique geometries, structural materials, flow paths and environmental conditions (velocity, temperatures and concentration of biocides). The fouling community at the offshore intake well comprised of green mussels (Perna viridis) with a loading of 11.1 kg m2 y-1. Fouling load in the pump chamber (suction end) was found to be 8.7 kg m2 y-2, whereas the load in the discharge conduit of the pumps was 4.1 kg m2 y-2. From the pump house the water is pumped through circular concrete conduits (9.9 kg m2 y-2) to the main condensers. Before reaching the main condensers the water passes through a valve pit comprising of circular mild steel sections (7.6 kg m2 y-2). The main condenser inlet water box was relatively less fouled and was found to be dominated by the barnacle B. reticulatus with a load of 1.0 kg m2 y-2. Compared to the main condenser section, the load in concrete conduits feeding the process water heat exchangers was marginally less (8.3 kg m2 y-2) with barnacle Megabalanus tintinnabulum recorded in addition to those observed in the main condenser conduits. The loads in the mild steel pipe sections (after bromide dosing) were about 8.5 kg m2 y-2, indicating the inadequacy of the biocide in combating fouling. From this point the water passes through a rectangular concrete conduit (header) before entering the

  14. 2D Gel-Based Multiplexed Proteomic Analysis during Larval Development and Metamorphosis of the Biofouling Polychaete Tubeworm Hydroides elegans

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yu

    2010-09-03

    Larval settlement and metamorphosis of a common biofouling polychaete worm, Hydroides elegans, involve remarkable structural and physiological changes during this pelagic to sessile habitat shift. The endogenous protein molecules and post-translational modifications that drive this larval transition process are not only of interest to ecologists but also to the antifouling paint industry, which aims to control the settlement of this biofouling species on man-made structures (e.g., ship hulls). On the basis of our recent proteomic studies, we hypothesize that rapid larval settlement of H. elegans could be mediated through changes in phosphorylation status of proteins rather than extensive de novo synthesis of proteins. To test this hypothesis, 2D gel-based multiplexed proteomics technology was used to monitor the changes in protein expression and phosphorylation status during larval development and metamorphosis of H. elegans. The protein expression profiles of larvae before and after they reached competency to attach and metamorphose were similar in terms of major proteins, but the percentage of phosphorylated proteins increased from 41% to 49% after competency. Notably, both the protein and phosphoprotein profiles of the metamorphosed individuals (adult) were distinctly different from that of the larvae, with only 40% of the proteins phosphorylated in the adult stage. The intensity ratio of all phosphoprotein spots to all total protein spots was also the highest in the competent larval stage. Overall, our results indicated that the level of protein phosphorylation might play a crucial role in the initiation of larval settlement and metamorphosis. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  15. Biofouling potential reductions using a membrane hybrid system as a pre-treatment to seawater reverse osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sanghyun; Kim, Lan Hee; Kim, Sung-Jo; Nguyen, Tien Vinh; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu; Kim, In S

    2012-07-01

    Biofouling on reverse osmosis (RO) membranes is the most serious problem which affects desalination process efficiency and increases operation cost. The biofouling cannot be effectively removed by the conventional pre-treatment traditionally used in desalination plants. Hybrid membrane systems coupling the adsorption and/or coagulation with low-pressure membranes can be a sustainable pre-treatment in reducing membrane fouling and at the same time improving the feed water quality to the seawater reverse osmosis. The addition of powder activated carbon (PAC) of 1.5 g/L into submerged membrane system could help to remove significant amount of both hydrophobic compounds (81.4%) and hydrophilic compounds (73.3%). When this submerged membrane adsorption hybrid system (SMAHS) was combined with FeCl(3) coagulation of 0.5 mg of Fe(3+)/L, dissolved organic carbon removal efficiency was excellent even with lower dose of PAC (0.5 g/L). Detailed microbial studies conducted with the SMAHS and the submerged membrane coagulation-adsorption hybrid system (SMCAHS) showed that these hybrid systems can significantly remove the total bacteria which contain also live cells. As a result, microbial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as well as total ATP concentrations in treated seawater and foulants was considerably decreased. The bacteria number in feed water prior to RO reduced from 5.10E(+06) cells/mL to 3.10E(+03) cells/mL and 9.30E(+03) cells/mL after SMAHS and SMCAHS were applied as pre-treatment, respectively. These led to a significant reduction of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) by 10.1 μg/L acetate-C when SMCAHS was used as a pre-treatment after 45-h RO operation. In this study, AOC method was modified to measure the growth of bacteria in seawater by using the Pseudomonas P.60 strain. PMID:22238012

  16. Appreciating the role of carbon nanotube composites in preventing biofouling and promoting biofilms on material surfaces in environmental engineering: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyayula, Venkata K K; Gadhamshetty, Venkataramana

    2010-01-01

    The ability of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to undergo surface modification allows them to form nanocomposites (NCs) with materials such as polymers, metal nanoparticles, biomolecules, and metal oxides. The biocidal nature, protein fouling resistance, and fouling release properties of CNT-NCs render them the perfect material for biofouling prevention. At the same time, the cytotoxicity of CNT-NCs can be reduced before applying them as substrates to promote biofilm formation in environmental biotechnology applications. This paper reviews the potential prospects of CNT-NCs to accomplish two widely varying objectives in environmental engineering applications: (i) preventing biofouling, and (ii) promoting the formation of desirable biofilms on materials surface. This paper addresses practical issues such as costs, risks to human health, and ecological impacts that are associated with the application, development and commercialization of CNT-NC technology. PMID:20599491

  17. Eliminación del Biofouling en intercambiadores de calor-condensadores que minimicen el impacto ambiental en el medio marino

    OpenAIRE

    Río Calonge, Belén

    2011-01-01

    RESUMEN: La presente tesis doctoral tiene por objeto tratar de eliminar el fenómeno no deseable de formación de biofouling en diferentes superficies tubulares de intercambiadores de calor, mediante tratamientos físicos y químicos, intentando minimizar el impacto ambiental creado en los efluentes de las instalaciones industriales. El equipo experimental está compuesto por una planta piloto de intercambiadores de calor condensadores dotada de ocho tubos que funcionan como sistemas independie...

  18. Achieving highly effective non-biofouling performance for polypropylene membranes modified by UV-induced surface graft polymerization of two oppositely charged monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong-Hong; Zhu, Xiao-Ying; Wee, Kin-Ho; Bai, Renbi

    2010-02-25

    A major problem in membrane technology for applications such as wastewater treatment or desalination is often the loss of membrane permeability due to biofouling initiated from protein adsorption and biofilm formation on the membrane surface. In this study, we developed a relatively simple and yet versatile approach to prepare polypropylene (PP) membrane with highly effective non-biofouling performance. Copolymer brushes were grafted to the surface of PP membrane through UV-induced polymerization of two oppositely charged monomers, i.e., [2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl]trimethylammonium chloride (TM) and 3-sulfopropyl methacrylate potassium salt (SA), with varying TM:SA molar ratios. Surface analysis with scanning electron microscope (SEM) clearly showed the grafted copolymer brushes on the membrane surfaces and that with X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) revealed a similar TM:SA ratio of the grafted copolymer brushes to that of the monomer solution used for the polymerization. Water contact angle measurements indicated that the hydrophilicity of the membrane surfaces was remarkably improved by the grafting of the TM/SA copolymer brushes, with the lowest water contact angle of 27 degrees being achieved at the TM:SA ratio of around 1:1. Experiments for antiprotein adsorption with bovine serum album (BSA) and lysozyme (LYZ) and antibiofilm formation with Escherichia coli (E. coli) demonstrated a great dependence of the membrane performance on the TM:SA ratios of the grafted copolymer brushes. It was found that the characteristics of the surface charges of the membrane surfaces played a very important role in the non-biofouling performance, and the membrane surface with balanced positive and negative charges showed the best non-biofouling performance for the proteins and bacteria tested in this study. PMID:20121056

  19. Self-cleaning Metal Organic Framework (MOF) based ultra filtration membranes--a solution to bio-fouling in membrane separation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, J A; Bhuvana, S; Anbharasi, V; Ayyanar, N; Boodhoo, K V K; Singh, G

    2014-01-01

    Bio-fouling is a serious problem in many membrane-based separation processes for water and wastewater treatment. Current state of the art methods to overcome this are to modify the membranes with either hydrophilic additives or with an antibacterial compound. In this study, we propose and practise a novel concept to prevent bio-fouling by developing a killing and self-cleaning membrane surface incorporating antibacterial silver nanoparticles and highly hydrophilic negatively charged carboxylic and amine functional groups. The innovative surface chemistry helps to reduce the contact angle of the novel membrane by at least a 48% and increase the pure water flux by 39.4% compared to the control membrane. The flux drop for the novel membrane is also lower (16.3% of the initial flux) than the control membrane (55.3% of the initial flux) during the long term experiments with protein solution. Moreover, the novel membrane continues to exhibit inhibition to microbes even after 1320 min of protein filtration. Synthesis of self-cleaning ultrafiltration membrane with long lasting properties opens up a viable solution for bio-fouling in ultrafiltration application for wastewater purification. PMID:25296745

  20. Self-cleaning Metal Organic Framework (MOF) based ultra filtration membranes - A solution to bio-fouling in membrane separation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, J. A.; Bhuvana, S.; Anbharasi, V.; Ayyanar, N.; Boodhoo, K. V. K.; Singh, G.

    2014-10-01

    Bio-fouling is a serious problem in many membrane-based separation processes for water and wastewater treatment. Current state of the art methods to overcome this are to modify the membranes with either hydrophilic additives or with an antibacterial compound. In this study, we propose and practise a novel concept to prevent bio-fouling by developing a killing and self-cleaning membrane surface incorporating antibacterial silver nanoparticles and highly hydrophilic negatively charged carboxylic and amine functional groups. The innovative surface chemistry helps to reduce the contact angle of the novel membrane by at least a 48% and increase the pure water flux by 39.4% compared to the control membrane. The flux drop for the novel membrane is also lower (16.3% of the initial flux) than the control membrane (55.3% of the initial flux) during the long term experiments with protein solution. Moreover, the novel membrane continues to exhibit inhibition to microbes even after 1320 min of protein filtration. Synthesis of self-cleaning ultrafiltration membrane with long lasting properties opens up a viable solution for bio-fouling in ultrafiltration application for wastewater purification.

  1. Biofouling of granite-rapakivi in St. Petersburg monuments and in the quarry in Russia and Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasov, Dmitry; Panova, Elena; Alampieva, Elena; Olhovaya, Elena; Popova, Tatyana; Vlasov, Alexey; Zelenskaya, Marina

    2013-04-01

    Granite-rapakivi was widely used in the architecture of St. Petersburg: the facades of buildings, embankments of rivers and canals, bridges, sculptural monuments, pedestals, facing the metro stations. This stone is rapidly destroyed due to the peculiarities of its structure. Biofouling of granite is insufficiently studied. Cause the destruction of granite can be bacteria, microscopic algae, fungi, mosses, lichens, higher plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. They often form specific lithobiotic communities that contribute to the destruction of granite-rapakivi. The objects of research were monuments of St. Petersburg (granite sculpture, facades, facing embankments) as well as granite-rapakivi quarries in Russia and Finland, where the stone was quarried for use in St. Petersburg. Sampling was carried out from the most typical biofouling sites. Different methods were applied for the study of damaged granite: petrographic analysis, light and scanning electron microscopy, methods for detection and identification of microorganisms, X-ray microprobe analysis. As result the main forms of granite destruction were described: fractures, ovoid weathering, granular disintegration, surface films, crusts and layers, pitting and fouling. Lichens, mosses, herbaceous and micromycetes were dominated on the granite-rapakivi in quarries. For example, in a Monferran quarry (Virolahti region) the complicated lithobiotic community was revealed. It included 30 species of micromycetes, 31 species of lichens, 10 species of moss. Bacteriological analysis showed the dominance of bacteria Bacillus, and actinomycetes in microbial biofilms. More than 100 species of plants were found on the granite embankments in St. Petersburg. They were confined to the cracks, seams of granite blocks. Plants and mosses were common to the granite embankments of rivers and canals in the central (historical) part of the city. Dimensions of mosses depend on the area of the deepening which they occupy. The most

  2. Marine bio-fouling of different alloys exposed to continuous flowing fresh seawater by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Al-Muhanna

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The petroleum industry and desalination plants suffer from marine bio-fouling problems that have a major role in the stimulation of the corrosion process. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the micro and the macro-organisms, on the corrosion behavior of different alloys used in Kuwait’s industries. The alloys used in this study were; sanicro 28, stainless steel 316L, Cu–Ni 70–30, and titanium. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used in this study in order to determine the corrosion susceptibility of different alloys exposed to continuous fresh seawater. This was achieved by calculating the charge transfer resistance of the metal surface and the resistance of the solution. The total exposure time of the tests was about 180 days. The visual inspection of the tested samples, showed a bio-film formation on the surface of these samples. Also, it was observed that the stainless steel 316, sanicro 28, Cu–Ni 70–30, and titanium alloys exhibited good corrosion resistance.

  3. Corrosion and biofouling on the non-heat-exchanger surfaces of an ocean thermal energy conversion power plant: a survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelli, V.J. (ed.)

    1979-05-01

    Of the many foreseeable problems confronting economical ocean thermal energy conversion operation, two major items are the deterioration of the structural and functional components, which prevents efficient operation, and the biofouling of the surfaces, which adds excess weight to the floating ocean platform. The techniques required for effective long-term control of deterioration and corrosion have been investigated actively for many years, and successful solutions for most situations have been developed. For the most part, these solutions can be directly transferred to the ocean thermal energy conversion plant. The majority of problems in these areas are expected to be associated with scale-up and will require some advanced development due to the immensity of the ocean thermal energy conversion platform. Current antifouling control systems are not effective for long-term fouling prevention. Commercially available antifouling coatings are limited to a 3-year service life in temperate waters, and even shorter in tropical waters. However, underwater cleaning techniques and some fouling-control systems presently being used by conventional power plants may find utility on an ocean thermal energy conversion plant. In addition, some recent major advances in long-term antifouling coatings sponsored by the Navy may be applicable to ocean thermal energy conversion. 132 references.

  4. Biofouling and pollutant removal during long-term operation of an anaerobic membrane bioreactor treating municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Robledo, M; Morgan-Sagastume, J M; Noyola, A

    2010-01-01

    Two different sludge retention times (SRTs) were tested in order to assess the impact on membrane fouling and effluent quality in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR). Two up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors (1 l volume) coupled to external tubular ultrafiltration membranes (filtration area = 81 cm(2)) were operated at a hydraulic retention time of 3 h and two different SRTs (100 and 60 days). The transmembrane pressure (TMP), flux (J) and relevant parameters to assess water quality were measured. Effluents from UASB reactors were filtered for 500 h without intermediate cleaning. The permeate met Mexican standards for wastewater reclamation in both tested conditions. Abrupt and periodical changes in the TMP and J were noticed during the experimental period. A fouling layer collapse and compression hypothesis was set forth in order to explain these changes. An autopsy performed on biofouled membranes indicated that deposited mass was mainly composed of volatile solids (85%) and the rest related to mineral matter, with the presence of inorganic salts containing Ca, Mg, Fe, P and Si. Biomass in the fouling layer was estimated at 0.27% based on the DNA/biomass ratio for the bacterial biofilm. No clear difference in membrane fouling was detected under the two SRTs applied to the systems. However, when operated over 500 h, repetitive sudden TMP and flux changes occurred later in system A (SRT of 100 days) than in system B (SRT of 60 days) suggesting a stronger fouling layer structure in the former. PMID:20390553

  5. Biofouling Growth in Cold Estuarine Waters and Evaluation of Some Chitosan and Copper Anti-Fouling Paints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Lemarchand

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Ecological concerns about antifouling paints containing non-green tin and copper compounds have highlighted the need for environmentally friendly alternatives. We report here a field test conducted in estuarine waters over two months designed to evaluate the efficiency of a number of active natural and man-made chemical ingredients added into a silicon-polyurethane marine paint. Early steps of biofouling in cold seawater of the St. Lawrence Estuary (Canada were observed. Analyses, including dry biomass, flow cytometry and spectrofluorimetry, demonstrated a short-term antibacterial action of chitosan-based paints although no significant anti-algal action was observed. Cuprous oxide paints were efficient against bacteria and algae invasion in the first two weeks, especially those with added organic biocides such as isothiazolone and copper pyrithione. However, the overall dry biomass and chlorophyll a content were similar for all chitosan- and copper-based paints after 63 days. Microscopic observations revealed variation in the highly diverse benthic diatom population including species Navicula, Melosira, Cocconeis, Nitshzcia, Fragilaria and Amphora. Results suggest no real long-term efficiency for tested antifouling paints and highlight a particular need for green antifouling ingredients that are active under northern estuarine conditions.

  6. Biofouling growth in cold estuarine waters and evaluation of some chitosan and copper anti-fouling paints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Emilien; Bonnet, Claudie; Lemarchand, Karine

    2009-06-01

    Ecological concerns about antifouling paints containing non-green tin and copper compounds have highlighted the need for environmentally friendly alternatives. We report here a field test conducted in estuarine waters over two months designed to evaluate the efficiency of a number of active natural and man-made chemical ingredients added into a silicon-polyurethane marine paint. Early steps of biofouling in cold seawater of the St. Lawrence Estuary (Canada) were observed. Analyses, including dry biomass, flow cytometry and spectrofluorimetry, demonstrated a short-term antibacterial action of chitosan-based paints although no significant anti-algal action was observed. Cuprous oxide paints were efficient against bacteria and algae invasion in the first two weeks, especially those with added organic biocides such as isothiazolone and copper pyrithione. However, the overall dry biomass and chlorophyll a content were similar for all chitosan-and copper-based paints after 63 days. Microscopic observations revealed variation in the highly diverse benthic diatom population including species Navicula, Melosira, Cocconeis, Nitshzcia, Fragilaria and Amphora. Results suggest no real long-term efficiency for tested antifouling paints and highlight a particular need for green antifouling ingredients that are active under northern estuarine conditions. PMID:19742133

  7. Biocorrosion and biofouling of metals and alloys of industrial usage. Present state of the art at the beginning of the new millennium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Videla, H. A.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available An overview on the present state of the art on Biocorrosion and Biofouling of metals and alloys of industrial usage is offered on the basis of the experience gathered in our laboratory over 25 years of research. The key concepts to understand the main effects of microorganisms on metal decay are briefly discussed. New trends in monitoring and control strategies to mitigate biocorrosion and biofouling deleterious effects are also described. Several relevant cases of biocorrosion studied by our research group are successively described: i biocorrosion of aluminum and its alloys by fungal contaminants of jet fuels; ii Sulfate-reducing bacteria SRB induced corrosion of steel; iii biocorrosion and biofouling interactions in the marine environment; iv monitoring strategies for assessing biocorrosion in industrial water systems; v microbial inhibition of corrosion; vi use and limitations of electrochemical techniques for evaluating biocorrosion effects. The future perspective of the field is made considering the potential of innovative techniques in microscopy (environmental scanning electron microscopy, confocal scanning laser microscopy, atomic force microscopy, new spectroscopical techniques used for the study of corrosion products and biofilms (energy dispersion X-ray analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron microprobe analysis and electrochemistry (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, electrochemical noise analysis.

    Se ofrece una revisión del estado actual del conocimiento sobre Biocorrosión y Biofouling de metales y aleaciones de uso industrial basada en la experiencia desarrollada en nuestro laboratorio durante 25 años de investigación en el área. Se discuten brevemente los conceptos clave necesarios para entender los principales efectos de los microorganismos en el deterioro de los metales. También se presentan las nuevas tendencias seguidas para el monitoreo y las nuevas estrategias de control para mitigar

  8. An overall view on corrosion and bio-fouling problems in sea water cooling systems at MAPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MAPS is a twin unit-220 MWe Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) nuclear power station using seawater as cooling medium in main steam condensers and in the Process Sea Water Heat Exchangers (PSWHXs). The seawater system consists of intake structure, submarine tunnel, fore-bay and pump house, travelling water screens, associated pumps and piping, heat-exchangers and out-fall structure. The horseshoe type submarine tunnel of length 468 metres and diameter 3.85 metres carrying ∼ 1.3 lakh m3/hr seawater from the intake structure to the pump house is lined with special concrete of 225 mm thickness. The major portion of piping carrying seawater is made of concrete and coal-tar based epoxy coated mild steel. Some portions of the mild steel pipes were gunnited and coated with araldite to minimise corrosion and fouling. The tubes of the condensers and the PSWHXs are of aluminium brass and the tube sheets are of aluminium bronze. The water boxes are rubber-lined with 3 mm thick neoprene and 2% magnesium iron sacrificial anodes are also provided in the water boxes to minimise corrosion. Plastic inserts are installed at the inlets of the tubes to prevent damage due to impingement attack and erosion. Ferrous sulphate dosing is being carried out to minimize the corrosion of aluminium brass tubes. Biofouling control (both Micro/Macro) is effected by gaseous chlorination at the rate of 30 - 40 Kg/hr for ∼ 20 hrs daily with residuals of 0.20 ppm. Further, booster dose (Liquid chlorine injection through evaporator) is given twice a week with a residual of ∼ 0.50 ppm and the dose required for this treatment is met by using evaporators. The major marine species identified in the intake and forebay were large barnacles and green mussels whereas the species identified in the PSWHXs were small size Barnacles (B. Reticulatus, 3 - 4 mm in size) and Mussels ( M.Striatulus, 5 - 8 mm in size). The main condensers are being cleaned during planned outages whereas it is not possible to

  9. Principles of biofouling protection in marine sponges: a model for the design of novel biomimetic and bio-inspired coatings in the marine environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Werner E G; Wang, Xiaohong; Proksch, Peter; Perry, Carole C; Osinga, Ronald; Gardères, Johan; Schröder, Heinz C

    2013-08-01

    The process of biofouling of marine structures and substrates, such as platforms or ship hulls, proceeds in multiple steps. Soon after the formation of an initial conditioning film, formed via the adsorption of organic particles to natural or man-made substrates, a population of different bacterial taxa associates under the formation of a biofilm. These microorganisms communicate through a complex quorum sensing network. Macro-foulers, e.g., barnacles, then settle and form a fouling layer on the marine surfaces, a process that globally has severe impacts both on the economy and on the environment. Since the ban of tributyltin, an efficient replacement of this antifouling compound by next-generation antifouling coatings that are environmentally more acceptable and also showing longer half-lives has not yet been developed. The sponges, as sessile filter-feeder animals, have evolved antifouling strategies to protect themselves against micro- and subsequent macro-biofouling processes. Experimental data are summarized and suggest that coating of the sponge surface with bio-silica contributes to the inhibition of the formation of a conditioning film. A direct adsorption of the surfaces by microorganisms can be impaired through poisoning the organisms with direct-acting secondary metabolites or toxic peptides. In addition, first, compounds from sponges have been identified that interfere with the anti-quorum sensing network. Sponge secondary metabolites acting selectively on diatom colonization have not yet been identified. Finally, it is outlined that direct-acting secondary metabolites inhibiting the growth of macro-fouling animals and those that poison the multidrug resistance pump are available. It is concluded that rational screening programs for inhibitors of the complex and dynamic problem of biofilm production, based on multidisciplinary studies and using sponges as a model, are required in the future. PMID:23525893

  10. Spray- and spin-assisted layer-by-layer assembly of copper nanoparticles on thin-film composite reverse osmosis membrane for biofouling mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wen; Soroush, Adel; Van Anh Luong, Tran; Brennan, Gregory; Rahaman, Md Saifur; Asadishad, Bahareh; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2016-08-01

    Copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) have long been considered as highly effective biocides; however, the lack of suitable methods for loading CuNPs onto polymeric membranes is recognized as being one of the primary reasons for the limited research concerning their application in membrane industries. A highly efficient spray- and spin-assisted layer-by-layer (SSLbL) method was developed to functionalize the TFC polyamide RO membranes with controllable loading of CuNPs for biofouling control. The SSLbL method was able to produce a uniform bilayer of polyethyleneimine-coated CuNPs and poly(acrylic) acid in less than 1 min, which is far more efficient than the traditional dipping approach (25-60 min). The successful loading of CuNPs onto the membrane surface was confirmed by XPS analysis. Increasing the number of bilayers from 2 to 10 led to an increased quantity of CuNPs on the membrane surface, from 1.75 to 23.7 μg cm(-2). Multi-layer coating exhibited minor impact on the membrane water permeation flux (13.3% reduction) while retaining the original salt rejection ability. Both static bacterial inactivation and cross-flow filtration tests demonstrated that CuNPs could significantly improve anti-biofouling property of a polyamide membrane and effectively inhibit the permeate flux reduction caused by bacterial deposition on the membrane surface. Once depleted, CuNPs can also be potentially regenerated on the membrane surface via the same SSLbL method. PMID:27161885

  11. Heritage materials and biofouling mitigation through UV-C irradiation in show caves: state-of-the-art practices and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borderie, Fabien; Alaoui-Sossé, Badr; Aleya, Lotfi

    2015-03-01

    Biofouling, i.e., colonization of a given substrate by living organisms, has frequently been reported for heritage materials and particularly on stone surfaces such as building facades, historical monuments, and artworks. This also concerns subterranean environments such as show caves, in which the installation of artificial light for tourism has led to the proliferation of phototrophic microorganisms. In Europe nowadays, the use of chemicals in these very sensitive environments is scrutinized and regulated by the European Union. New and environmentally friendly processes must be developed as alternative methods for cave conservation. For several years, the UV irradiation currently used in medical facilities and for the treatment of drinking water has been studied as a new innovative method for the conservation of heritage materials. This paper first presents a review of the biofouling phenomena on stone materials such as building facades and historical monuments. The biological disturbances induced by tourist activity in show caves are then examined, with special attention given to the methods and means to combat them. Thirdly, a general overview is given of the effects of UV-C on living organisms, and especially on photosynthetic microorganisms, through different contexts and studies. Finally, the authors' own experiments and findings are presented concerning the study and use of UV-C irradiation to combat algal proliferation in show caves. Both laboratory and in situ results are summarized and synthesized from their previously published works. The application of UV in caves is discussed and further experiments are proposed to enhance research in this domain. PMID:25548019

  12. Biofouling and microbial corrosion problem in the thermo-fluid heat exchanger and cooling water system of a nuclear test reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, T S; Kora, Aruna Jyothi; Chandramohan, P; Panigrahi, B S; Narasimhan, S V

    2009-10-01

    This article discusses aspects of biofouling and corrosion in the thermo-fluid heat exchanger (TFHX) and in the cooling water system of a nuclear test reactor. During inspection, it was observed that >90% of the TFHX tube bundle was clogged with thick fouling deposits. Both X-ray diffraction and Mossbauer analyses of the fouling deposit demonstrated iron corrosion products. The exterior of the tubercle showed the presence of a calcium and magnesium carbonate mixture along with iron oxides. Raman spectroscopy analysis confirmed the presence of calcium carbonate scale in the calcite phase. The interior of the tubercle contained significant iron sulphide, magnetite and iron-oxy-hydroxide. A microbiological assay showed a considerable population of iron oxidizing bacteria and sulphate reducing bacteria (10(5) to 10(6) cfu g(-1) of deposit). As the temperature of the TFHX is in the range of 45-50 degrees C, the microbiota isolated/assayed from the fouling deposit are designated as thermo-tolerant bacteria. The mean corrosion rate of the CS coupons exposed online was approximately 2.0 mpy and the microbial counts of various corrosion causing bacteria were in the range 10(3) to 10(5) cfu ml(-1) in the cooling water and 10(6) to 10(8) cfu ml(-1) in the biofilm. PMID:20183117

  13. 碳钢在海水环境中的腐蚀和污损特性研究%Corrosion and Biofouling Character of Carbon Steel in Seawater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨海洋; 黄桂桥

    2013-01-01

    Change of corrosion rate of carbon steels in seawater was discussed. Corrosion and biofouling character of carbon steels in seawater were summarized. The result showed that corrosion rate of the carbon steel exposed to seawater decreases with time, which is stable after one or two years of exposure;the corrosion course can be divided into the process dynamics controlled stage, the oxygen diffusion controlled stage, the growth of fouling organism controlled stage, and microbiological corrosion controlled stage.%讨论了碳钢材料在海水环境中的腐蚀速率随时间的变化情况,总结了碳钢在海水中不同暴露阶段的腐蚀和生物污损特性。结果显示,碳钢在海水中的腐蚀速度随时间延长而下降,暴露1~2年后腐蚀速率变化不显著,其腐蚀过程可分为腐蚀过程控制阶段、氧扩散控制阶段、污损生物成长控制阶段和微生物腐蚀控制阶段等4个阶段。

  14. Single-Step Assembly of Multifunctional Poly(tannic acid)-Graphene Oxide Coating To Reduce Biofouling of Forward Osmosis Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegab, Hanaa M; ElMekawy, Ahmed; Barclay, Thomas G; Michelmore, Andrew; Zou, Linda; Saint, Christopher P; Ginic-Markovic, Milena

    2016-07-13

    Graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets have antibacterial properties that have been exploited as a biocidal agent used on desalination membrane surfaces in recent research. Nonetheless, improved strategies for efficient and stable attachment of GO nanosheets onto the membrane surface are still required for this idea to be commercially viable. To address this challenge, we adopted a novel, single-step surface modification approach using tannic acid cross-linked with polyethylene imine as a versatile platform to immobilize GO nanosheets to the surface of polyamide thin film composite forward osmosis (FO) membranes. An experimental design based on Taguchi's statistical method was applied to optimize the FO processing conditions in terms of water and reverse solute fluxes. Modified membranes were analyzed using water contact angle, adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence, total organic carbon, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ζ potential, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. These results show that membranes were modified with a nanoscale (<10 nm), smooth, hydrophilic coating that, compared to pristine membranes, improved filtration and significantly mitigated biofouling by 33% due to its extraordinary, synergistic antibacterial properties (99.9%). PMID:27294568

  15. Molecular characterization, biofilm analysis and experimental biofouling study of Fusarium isolates from recent cases of fungal keratitis in New York State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samsonoff William A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To characterize Fusarium isolates from recent cases of fungal keratitis in contact lens wearers, and to investigate fungal association with MoistureLoc solution. Methods We studied six fungal isolates from recent cases of keratitis in New York State. The isolates were characterized by nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of multiple genes, and then typed using minisatellite and microsatellite probes. Experimental fungal biofilm formation was tested by standard methods. MoistureLoc solutions were tested in biofouling studies for their efficacy in elimination of Fusarium contamination. Results Fusarium solani – corneal ulcers (2 isolates, lens case (1 isolate, and F. oxysporum – corneal ulcer (1 isolate, eye (1 isolate, were recovered from five patients. An opened bottle of MoistureLoc solution provided by a patient also yielded F. solani. Two distinct genotypes of F. solani as well as of F. oxysporum were present in the isolated strains. Remarkably, F. solani strains from the lens case and lens solution in one instance were similar, based on phylogenetic analyses and molecular typing. The solution isolate of F. solani formed biofilm on contact lenses in control conditions, but not when co-incubated with MoistureLoc solution. Both freshly opened and 3-month old MoistureLoc solutions effectively killed F. solani and F. oxysporum, when fungal contamination was simulated under recommended lens treatment regimen (4-hr. However, simulation of inappropriate use (15 – 60 min led to the recovery of less than 1% of original inoculum of F. solani or F. oxysporum. Conclusion Temporary survival of F. solani and F. oxysporum in MoistureLoc suggested that improper lens cleaning regimen could be a possible contributing factor in recent infections.

  16. Caracterización biológica del biofouling marino mediante métodos moleculares. Aislamiento y determinación de actividad quorum sensing de las especies implicadas en el proceso

    OpenAIRE

    González Grau, Juan Miguel

    2009-01-01

    La presente tesis investiga las comunidades bacterianas que colonizan el interior de los tubos de un sistema de refrigeración con agua de mar. Estas bacterias se establecen formando biopelículas produciendo efectos negativos sobre el rendimiento energético del sistema. Para mitigar la formación de biofouling (depósitos biológicos adheridos a las paredes de los tubos de refrigeración) se utilizan biocidas que revierten al medio marino causándo impacto ambiental. Se ha la composición bacteriana...

  17. Influence of elastomeric seal plate surface chemistry on interface integrity in biofouling-prone systems: Evaluation of a hydrophobic "easy-release" silicone-epoxy coating for maintaining water seal integrity of a sliding neoprene/steel interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolina, Vincent L.

    The scientific hypothesis of this work is that modulation of the properties of hard materials to exhibit abrasion-reducing and low-energy surfaces will extend the functional lifetimes of elastomeric seals pressed against them in abrasive underwater systems. The initial motivation of this work was to correct a problem noted in the leaking of seals at major hydropower generating facilities subject to fouling by abrasive zebra mussel shells and extensive corrosion. Similar biofouling-influenced problems can develop at seals in medical devices and appliances from regulators in anesthetic machines and SCUBA diving oxygen supply units to autoclave door seals, injection syringe gaskets, medical pumps, drug delivery components, and feeding devices, as well as in food handling equipment like pasteurizers and transfer lines. Maritime and many other heavy industrial seal interfaces could also benefit from this coating system. Little prior work has been done to elucidate the relationship of seal plate surface properties to the friction and wear of elastomeric seals during sliding contacts of these articulating materials, or to examine the secondary influence of mineralized debris within the contacting interfaces. This investigation utilized the seal materials relevant to the hydropower application---neoprene elastomer against carbon steel---with and without the application of a silicone-epoxy coating (WearlonRTM 2020.98) selected for its wear-resistance, hydrophobicity, and "easy-release" capabilities against biological fouling debris present in actual field use. Analytical techniques applied to these materials before and after wear-producing processes included comprehensive Contact Angle measurements for Critical Surface Tension (CA-CST) determination, Scanning Electron Microscopic inspections, together with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) measurements for determination of surface texture and inorganic composition, Multiple

  18. Influence of elastomeric seal plate surface chemistry on interface integrity in biofouling-prone systems: Evaluation of a hydrophobic "easy-release" silicone-epoxy coating for maintaining water seal integrity of a sliding neoprene/steel interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolina, Vincent L.

    The scientific hypothesis of this work is that modulation of the properties of hard materials to exhibit abrasion-reducing and low-energy surfaces will extend the functional lifetimes of elastomeric seals pressed against them in abrasive underwater systems. The initial motivation of this work was to correct a problem noted in the leaking of seals at major hydropower generating facilities subject to fouling by abrasive zebra mussel shells and extensive corrosion. Similar biofouling-influenced problems can develop at seals in medical devices and appliances from regulators in anesthetic machines and SCUBA diving oxygen supply units to autoclave door seals, injection syringe gaskets, medical pumps, drug delivery components, and feeding devices, as well as in food handling equipment like pasteurizers and transfer lines. Maritime and many other heavy industrial seal interfaces could also benefit from this coating system. Little prior work has been done to elucidate the relationship of seal plate surface properties to the friction and wear of elastomeric seals during sliding contacts of these articulating materials, or to examine the secondary influence of mineralized debris within the contacting interfaces. This investigation utilized the seal materials relevant to the hydropower application---neoprene elastomer against carbon steel---with and without the application of a silicone-epoxy coating (WearlonRTM 2020.98) selected for its wear-resistance, hydrophobicity, and "easy-release" capabilities against biological fouling debris present in actual field use. Analytical techniques applied to these materials before and after wear-producing processes included comprehensive Contact Angle measurements for Critical Surface Tension (CA-CST) determination, Scanning Electron Microscopic inspections, together with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) measurements for determination of surface texture and inorganic composition, Multiple

  19. Research Progress in Biofouling of Reverse Osmosis for Municipal Wastewater Advanced Reuse%市政污水深度回用系统中反渗透膜表面微生物污染特性研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于海琴; 杨成永; 赵宗升; 周煜坤

    2013-01-01

    Municipal wastewater reuse is a valuable means that can be one of the possible solutions to solve the crisis of water resources.Reverse osmosis (RO) is the key technology that ensures the highest water quality for advanced wastewater reclamation.The major types of RO membranes fouling in advanced wastewater reclamation are inorganic salt,organic,colloidal and microbiological foulants precipitation.The biofouling governed by bacterial biofilm formation is the major concern due to the complex.Based on the analysising results of the domestic and foreign researches and documents on RO membrane biofouling the regular change patterns of the permeate flux and the salt rejection along with biofouling were expounded,a series of analysis on RO biofouling characteristics,related theory and the influencing factors,the biofouling assessing method was conducted in order to control and minimize negative effects and elucidate the mechanisms governing the decline in RO membrane performance caused by cell deposition and biofilm growth,and the emphasis is on the analysis of microbial and EPS on biofilm formation.By putting forward the key researches in the future,the article hopes to achieve the target to provide a guidance for the analysis and reduction of the practical engineering biofouling.%污水深度回用是世界各国解决水资源危机的战略性选择,反渗透是污水深度回用不可替代的核心技术.中水水质有其自身的污染特点,微生物污染是最复杂的污染形式,是市政污水深度回用反渗透运行过程关注的焦点,目前对生物膜形成和其对反渗透运行性能的影响还知之甚少.结合国内外反渗透膜微生物污染研究及分析的文献成果,总结了微生物污染造成渗透通量和脱盐率变化的规律;为了阐明由于微生物细胞沉积和生物膜生长造成膜性能下降的机理,对微生物污染的性质、影响因素及相关理论、污染评价方法进行了总结,重点分析了

  20. Barnacles and their significance in biofouling

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Desai, D.V.; Khandeparker, L.; Gaonkar, C.A.

    from the floating object. The stalk of gooseneck barnacles is simply an elongation of the attached end of the animal's body. They are filter feeders using their legs to filter plankton, which then pass them to their mouth. The capitulum is ventral..., often protected by calcarious plates and is held away from the substratum by the peduncle (Fig.1a). It is roughly oblong with five smooth white plates, separated by red/brown or black tissue. The capitulum consists of most of the animal, including...

  1. Role of Diatoms in marine biofouling

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Patil, J.S..; Mitbavkar, S.; DeCosta, P.M.; DeSilva, S.; Hegde, S.; Naik, R.

    stream_size 43119 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Recent_Adv_Appl_Aspects_Indian_Mar_Algae_2006_1_351.pdf.txt stream_source_info Recent_Adv_Appl_Aspects_Indian_Mar_Algae_2006_1_351.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859...-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Recent Advances on Applied Aspects of Indian Marine Algae with Reference to Global Scenario, Volume 1, A. Tewari (Ed.), 2006 Central Salt & Marine Chemicals Research Institute Role of Diatoms...

  2. Biofouling control using microparticles carrying a biocide

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, C.; Rosmaninho, R; Simoes, M.; Pereira, MC; Bastos, MMSM; Nunes, OC; Coelho, M; Melo, LF

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a new technological approach to minimize the use of antimicrobial (AMB) agents and their deleterious effects, based on the principle of drug-delivery systems whereby the AMB chemicals are transported on microparticles. The efficacy of microparticles carrying the quaternary ammonium compound (QAC), benzyldimethyldodecyl ammonium chloride (BDMDAC), was assessed against Pseudomonas fluorescens in both the planktonic and the biofilm state. The microparticles were prepared usin...

  3. What do barnacle larvae feed on ? Implications in biofouling ecology

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaonkar, C.; Anil, A.C.

    (Figure 5). Analysis of variance also indicated a significant variation in barnacle recruitment among different sampling months (ANOVA: p≤0.05). DISCUSSION The mode of nutrition in larval forms plays an important role in their capability..., though the larvae raised in the microcosm experienced nutritional stress which was shown by lower ratios of RNA: DNA (Desai & Anil, 2002). This study further indicates their capability to feed on food materials other than diatoms. As the fecal...

  4. Processes And Apparatus For Inhibiting Membrane Bio-fouling

    KAUST Repository

    Missimer, Thomas M.

    2012-12-20

    Certain embodiments are directed to a process and apparatus for cleaning and/or regeneration of permeable or semipermeable membranes comprising modulating pressure of a feed stream feeding the permeable or semipermeable membrane and providing intermittent pressure pulses for cleaning and/or regeneration of the permeable or semipermeable membrane.

  5. Impact of biofouling on corrosion resistance of reinforced concrete

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, B.T.; Gajendragad, M.R.; Ranganna, G.; Wagh, A.B.; Sudhakaran, T.

    the structure from deterioration; a nonuniform deposit can lead to severe localized pitting corrosion. To study this cylindrical reinforced concrete electrodes were exposed to seawater. They were periodically removed and examined for the presence of fouling...

  6. Biofouling of an offshore oil platform: faunal composition and biomass

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Venugopalan, V.P.; Wagh, A.B.

    stream_size 4 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Indian_J_Mar_Sci_19_53.pdf.txt stream_source_info Indian_J_Mar_Sci_19_53.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  7. Analysis of Organohalogen Products From Chlorination of Natural Waters Under Simulated Biofouling Control Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bean, R. M.; Mann, D. C.; Riley, R. G.

    1980-06-01

    The products of low-level chlorination of natural waters from ten locations across the continental United States have been studied, with emphasis on volatile and lipophilic organohalogen components. A specially designed apparatus permitted continuous sampling and chlorination of water in a manner analogous to some types of cooling water treatments. Volatile components were analyzed using headspace, purge-and-trap, and resin adsorption methods. The less-volatile components were collected by passing large volumes of the chlorinated water over XAD-2 columns. Total organic halogen collected on XAD resins was compared with the halogen contribution of haloform compounds. The XAD samples were further separated into fractions according to molecular weight and polarity using liquid chrOmatography. These studies indicate that haloforms are the most abundant lipophilic halogenated products formed from low-level chlorination of natural waters, but that other halogenated lipophilic material is also formed.

  8. A Novel Technology for Simultaneous TOC Reduction and Biofouling Prevention Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Recycling of water using biological processes is a primary goal of NASA's advanced life support programs. This proposal concerns a technology to simultaneously...

  9. Correlation between microbial community structure and biofouling as determined by analysis of microbial community dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuechao; Miao, Yu; Wu, Bing; Ye, Lin; Yu, Haiyan; Liu, Su; Zhang, Xu-Xiang

    2015-12-01

    Three lab-scale membrane bioreactors (MBRs) were continuously operated to treat saline wastewater under 0%, 0.75% and 1.5% NaCl stress. 0.75% and 1.5% NaCl reduced the COD and NH4(+)-N removal at the beginning, while the removal efficiencies could be recovered along with the operation of MBRs. Also, the polysaccharide in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and soluble microbial products (SMP) played an important role in the membrane fouling. Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA gene showed that the increasing level of salinity reduced the diversity of the microbial community, and a higher salinity stimulated the growth of Bacteroidetes. At genus level, Flavobacterium, Aequorivita, Gelidibacter, Microbacterium, and Algoriphagus increased with the increase of salinity, which are shown to be highly salt tolerant. The strength of salinity or the duration of salinity could stimulate the microorganisms with similar functions, and the changes of polysaccharide in EPS and SMP were closely related to the membrane fouling rate as well as correlated with some saline-resistance genera. PMID:26318928

  10. Effects of solar PAR and UV radiation on tropical biofouling communities

    KAUST Repository

    Dobretsov, SV

    2010-03-08

    We investigated the effect of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) on the development of tropical micro- and macrofouling communities for 30 d. The experimental design involved 3 treatments: full spectrum (PAR+UVR), PAR only, and minimal light (reduced PAR and UVR). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis demonstrated that different light conditions resulted in the formation of highly different microbial communities. The lowest densities of bacteria were found under the full spectrum treatment, while the lowest densities of diatoms were found in the minimal light treatment. Macrofouling communities consisted of 13 species and differed among light treatments. In the presence of UVR, communities had low species diversity, evenness, and richness, while in minimal light and PAR treatments, communities had high species diversity, evenness, and richness. Similarity percentage (SIMPER) analysis revealed that the tubeworm Hydroides elegans, the alga Ulva (Enteromorpha) sp., and the bivalve Perna viridis were the species responsible for most of the dissimilarities in macrofouling communities among treatments. While densities of H. elegans were similar in the PAR and minimal light treatments, this polychaete had higher growth rates under minimal light conditions. We conclude that UVR and PAR directly control the development of shallow micro- and macrofouling communities by inhibiting the recruitment and growth of sensitive species and promoting the growth of resistant species, but also that these forms of solar radiation influence the surface cues available to competent larvae by altering the development of the microbial community.

  11. Biofouling Prevention of Ancient Brick Surfaces by TiO2-Based Nano-Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzo Graziani; Marco D'Orazio

    2015-01-01

    Brick constitutes a significant part of the construction materials used in historic buildings around the world. This material was used in Architectural Heritage for structural scope, and even for building envelopes. Thus, components made of clay brick were subjected to weathering for a long time, and this causes their deterioration. One of the most important causes for deterioration is biodeterioration caused by algae and cyanobacteria. It compromises the aesthetical properties, and, at a lat...

  12. Evaluation of oxidising biocide for biofouling control in cooling water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouling-induced blockage of process seawater heat exchangers in Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS) exists in spite of chlorination. A bromine-based biocide (Actibromide) is being used to control fouling in these heat exchangers. Efficacy of this biocide was assessed using biofilms and fouling mussel Modiolus striatulus in the laboratory. Biofilms (48h old) were developed on glass microscopic slides and exposed to O.5mg/L TRO of chlorine and a combination (1:1) of chlorine and actibromide for different contact times. Three different size groups of the fouling mussel M striatulus were also exposed to two concentrations (5mg/L and 9mg/L) of chlorine and the test biocide. The data indicated that chlorine along with actibromide is more effective in killing M. striatulus when compared to chlorine alone. However it is less effective in controlling bacterial films, when compared to chlorine. (author)

  13. The effect of electromagnetic fields on biofouling in a heat exchange system using seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueba, Alfredo; García, Sergio; Otero, Félix M; Vega, Luis M; Madariaga, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the antifouling action of a continuous physical treatment process comprising the application of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) to seawater used as the refrigerant fluid in a heat exchanger-condenser to maintain the initial 'clean tube' condition. The results demonstrated that the EMFs accelerated the ionic nucleation of calcium and precipitation as calcium carbonate, which weakened the growing biofilm and reduced its adhesion capacity. Consequently, EMFs induced an erosive effect that reduced biofilm formation and fouling. This treatment allowed for the maintenance of significantly lower fouling factors in the treated tubes compared to a control group of untreated tubes, thereby leading to a higher heat transfer efficiency. PMID:25567299

  14. Preparation, anti-biofouling and drag-reduction properties of a biomimetic shark skin surface

    OpenAIRE

    Xia Pu; Guangji Li; Hanlu Huang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Shark skin surfaces show non-smoothness characteristics due to the presence of a riblet structure. In this study, biomimetic shark skin was prepared by using the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-embedded elastomeric stamping (PEES) method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the surface microstructure and fine structure of shark skin and biomimetic shark skin. To analyse the hydrophobic mechanism of the shark skin surface microstructure, the effect of biomimetic shark s...

  15. Image Analysis Determination of the Influence of Surface Structure of Silicone Rubbers on Biofouling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevil Atarijabarzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on how the texture of the silicone rubber material affects the distribution of microbial growth on the surface of materials used for high voltage insulation. The analysis of surface wetting properties showed that the textured surfaces provide higher receding contact angles and therefore lower contact angle hysteresis. The textured surfaces decrease the risk for dry band formation and thus preserve the electrical properties of the material due to a more homogeneous distribution of water on the surface, which, however, promotes the formation of more extensive biofilms. The samples were inoculated with fungal suspension and incubated in a microenvironment chamber simulating authentic conditions in the field. The extent and distribution of microbial growth on the textured and plane surface samples representing the different parts of the insulator housing that is shank and shed were determined by visual inspection and image analysis methods. The results showed that the microbial growth was evenly distributed on the surface of the textured samples but restricted to limited areas on the plane samples. More intensive microbial growth was determined on the textured samples representing sheds. It would therefore be preferable to use the textured surface silicone rubber for the shank of the insulator.

  16. Characterization of biofoulants illustrates different membrane fouling mechanisms for aerobic and anaerobic membrane bioreactors

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Yanghui

    2015-11-17

    This study compares the membrane fouling mechanisms of aerobic (AeMBR) and anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR) of the same reactor configuration at similar operating conditions. Although both the AeMBR and AnMBR achieved more than 90% COD removal efficiency, the fouling mechanisms were different. Molecular weight (MW) fingerprint profiles showed that a majority of fragments in anaerobic soluble microbial products (SMP) were retained by the membrane and some fragments were present in both SMP and in soluble extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), suggesting that the physical retention of SMP components contributed to the AnMBR membrane fouling. One of the dominant fragments was comprised of glycoliproprotein (size 630-640 kD) and correlated in abundance in AnMBR-EPS with the extent of anaerobic membrane fouling. In contrast, all detected AeMBR-SMP fragments permeated through the membrane. Aerobic SMP and soluble EPS also showed very different fingerprinting profiles. A large amount of adenosine triphosphate was present in the AeMBR-EPS, suggesting that microbial activity arising from certain bacterial populations, such as unclassified Comamonadaceae and unclassified Chitinophagaceae, may play a role in aerobic membrane fouling. This study underlines the differences in fouling mechanisms between AeMBR and AnMBR systems and can be applied to facilitate the development of appropriate fouling control strategies.

  17. Biofouling of microfilters at the Savannah River Site F/H-Area Effluent Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The F/H-Effluent Treatment Facility uses state-of-the-art water treatment processes to remove contaminants from low-level radioactive wastewater at the Savannah River Site. The plant replaces seepage basins that were closed to comply with the 1984 amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The facility removes both radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants from the effluents orginating from onsite waste management facilities. The unit processes involve filtration, ion exchange, activated carbon absorption, and reverse osmosis. The filtration step is prone to considerable fouling, reducing the overall throughput of the facility. The filters utilized in the process are Norton Ceraflo trademark ceramic microfilters. It was discovered that bacteria were primarily responsible for the severe filter fouling. Inorganic fouling was also observed, but was not normally as severe as the bacterial fouling. The bacteria densities necessary to induce severe fouling were not significantly higher than those often found in surface water streams. Diversion of waste streams containing the highest quantity of bacteria, and various methods of source reduction were implemented, which dramatically improved the filter performance. Addition of aluminum nitrate at low pH further improved the filter performance

  18. Nanophase modified fly ash concrete with superior concrete properties, durability and biofouling resistance for seawater applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are many concrete structures in the cooling water system of nuclear power plants that are exposed to seawater in the form of tanks, pillars and reservoirs. These structures come in contact with aggressive chlorides and acid producing microbes and deteriorate by chemical and biological factors. Recently fly ash (FA) concrete has emerged exhibiting excellent degradation resistance in seawater environments. However some disadvantages are reported like lesser early strength, higher carbonation and calcium leaching. This work attempted to modify FA concrete by adding nanoparticles of TiO2 and CaCO3 for increased strength and degradation resistance. Four types of concrete and mortar mix namely fly ash concrete (FA), FA with 2% TiO2 nanoparticles (FAT), FA with 2% CaCO3 nanoparticles and FA with 2% TiO2: CaCO3 nanoparticles were cast and immersed in seawater for a year. Thermal analysis and Differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) analysis was done before exposing in sea water to know the changes in the physical properties of the specimens at higher temperature. Strength and durability were evaluated using parameters like compressive strength, split tensile test, Rapid chloride permeability test (RCPT), carbonation test and pH degradation. Detailed biofilm characterizations were attempted using microbiological and molecular biology tools to study the antibacterial properties. Calcium leaching and sulfate attack studies were carried out by laboratory exposure studies. Using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction technique (XRD), microstructural properties and chemical phases were identified. All the nanophase modified FA specimens showed superior properties compared to FA concrete with respect to strength, carbonation depth, calcium leaching and antibacterial activity. Results are discussed in detail in the paper. (author)

  19. Investigation of the biofouling properties of several algae on different textured chemical modified silicone surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jihai; Zhao, Wenjie; Peng, Shusen; Zeng, Zhixiang; Zhang, Xin; Wu, Xuedong; Xue, Qunji

    2014-08-01

    Engineered pillars, pits and grooves spaced 3, 6, 9 and 12 μm apart were fabricated on siloxane modified acrylic resin films. The effect of feature size, geometry, and wettability on the settlement of different algae was evaluated. These films showed various antifouling performances to Ulothrix, Closterium and Navicula. For Navicula (length: 10-12 μm), the feature size and geometry displayed a substantial correlation with the antifouling properties. The film with pillars spaced 3 μm reduced Navicula settlement by 73% compared to the control surface. For Closterium (length: 45-55 μm), their responses were governed by the same underlying thermodynamic principles as wettability, the largest reduction in Closterium, 81%, was obtained on the surface with grooves spaced 12 μm apart. For Ulothrix (length: 5-8 mm), the surface also showed the best antifouling performance, the reduction ratio of the settlement on the surface with grooves spaced 12 μm apart could even reach 92%. At last, physical fouling deterrent mechanisms for the films with various textures were analyzed in detail. The feature size and geometry display a substantial correlation with the antifouling properties when the size of fouling algae is close to the textures. With the increasing size for algae, antifouling performance was getting better on surface with pillars or grooves because the algae are bridged between two or more features other than stabilizing its entire mass on one single feature or able to settle between features.

  20. Anti-Biofouling Properties of Comblike Block Copolymers with Amphiphilic Side Chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surfaces of novel block copolymers with amphiphilic side chains were studied for their ability to influence the adhesion of marine organisms. The surface-active polymer, obtained by grafting fluorinated molecules with hydrophobic and hydrophilic blocks to a block copolymer precursor, showed interesting bioadhesion properties. Two different algal species, one of which adhered strongly to hydrophobic surfaces, and the other, to hydrophilic surfaces, showed notably weak adhesion to the amphiphilic surfaces. Both organisms are known to secrete adhesive macromolecules, with apparently different wetting characteristics, to attach to underwater surfaces. The ability of the amphiphilic surface to undergo an environment-dependent transformation in surface chemistry when in contact with the extracellular polymeric substances is a possible reason for its antifouling nature. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) was used, in a new approach based on angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), to determine the variation in chemical composition within the top few nanometers of the surface and also to study the surface segregation of the amphiphilic block. A mathematical model to extract depth-profile information from the normalized NEXAFS partial electron yield is developed

  1. Automated DNA extraction platforms offer solutions to challenges of assessing microbial biofouling in oil production facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Oldham, Athenia L.; Drilling, Heather S; Stamps, Blake W; Stevenson, Bradley S.; Kathleen E. Duncan

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of microbial assemblages in industrial, marine, and medical systems can inform decisions regarding quality control or mitigation. Modern molecular approaches to detect, characterize, and quantify microorganisms provide rapid and thorough measures unbiased by the need for cultivation. The requirement of timely extraction of high quality nucleic acids for molecular analysis is faced with specific challenges when used to study the influence of microorganisms on oil production. Produ...

  2. Biofoulers on aluminium and stainless steel panels at Vijaydurg harbour, central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Srinivas, D; Sawant, S.S.; Wagh, A.B.

    stream_size 3 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name I_J_Mar_Sci_21_143.pdf.txt stream_source_info I_J_Mar_Sci_21_143.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  3. Organoselenium Surface Modification of Stainless Steel Surfaces To Prevent Biofouling in Treatment of Space Wastestreams Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this work is to quantify the reduction of biofilm formation in a water distribution system resulting from an organoselenium surface coating on...

  4. Biofouling of microfilters at the Savannah River Site F/H-area effluent treatment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The F/H-Effluent Treatment Facility uses state-of-the-art water treatment processes to remove contaminants from low-level radioactive wastewater at the Savannah River Site, The plant replaces seepage basins that were closed to comply with the 1984 amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The facility removes both radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants from the effluents originating from onsite waste management facilities. The unit processes involve filtration, ion exchange, activated carbon absorption, and reverse osmosis. The filtration step is prone to considerable fouling, reducing the overall throughput of the facility. The Filters utilized in the process are Norton Ceraflo ceramic microfilters. It was discovered that bacteria were primarily responsible for the severe filter fouling. Inorganic fouling was also observed, but was not normally as severe as the bacterial fouling. The bacteria densities necessary to induce severe fouling were not significantly higher than those often found in surface water streams. Diversion of waste streams containing the highest quantity of bacteria, and various methods of source reduction were implemented, which dramatically unproved the filter performance. Addition of aluminum nitrate at low pH further improved the filter performance. (author)

  5. Proteomic profiling during the pre-competent to competent transition of the biofouling polychaete Hydroides elegans

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yu

    2014-08-22

    The polychaete, Hydroides elegans, is a tube-building worm that is widely distributed in tropical and subtropical seas. It is a dominant fouling species and thus a major target organism in antifouling research. Here, the first high-throughput proteomic profiling of pre-competent and competent larvae of H. elegans is reported with the identification of 1,519 and 1,322 proteins, respectively. These proteins were associated with a variety of biological processes. However, a large proportion was involved in energy metabolism, redox homeostasis, and microtubule-based processes. A comparative analysis revealed 21 proteins that were differentially regulated in larvae approaching competency.

  6. Quantitative techniques for the measurement and analysis of biofouling on stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    A model of wet-processing conditions tested the effects of corrosive treatment on bacterial attachment to stainless steel with different surface finishes. Electropolished samples resisted surface oxidation, corresponding with the visual observation of lower discoloration than the other samples. The ...

  7. Tannin and tannate from the quebracho tree: an eco-friendly alternative for controlling marine biofouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Miriam; García, Mónica; Blustein, Guillermo; Stupak, Mirta

    2007-01-01

    Current antifouling coatings are based on toxic compounds that can be harmful to the natural environment. A promising alternative to these compounds is the use of natural products that are non-toxic, but have antifouling properties. Tannins are natural, water-soluble, complex polyphenolic substances, which precipitate proteins and have anticorrosive and antimicrobial properties. In this study, the effect of quebracho tannin as a probable antifouling pigment in both laboratory and field trials is evaluated. As tannins have high solubility in aqueous media and consequently would leach rapidly, they were precipitated as aluminium tannate, which has an adequate solubility for use as a component in marine paints. In vitro exposure of Balanus amphitrite and Polydora ligni larvae to low concentrations of both quebracho tannin and saturated aluminium tannate solutions produced complete appendage immobilisation. In 28-d field trials of test gels, a significant decrease in micro- and macrofouling density and diversity in relation to the control gel was detected (p < 0.05). This study suggests that natural tannins could be employed as bioactive pigment for new antifouling technologies. PMID:17653926

  8. Submerged membrane adsorption bioreactor as a pretreatment in seawater desalination for biofouling control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sanghyun; Naidu, Gayathri; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu

    2013-08-01

    Submerged membrane adsorption bioreactor (SMABR) was investigated as a pretreatment to reverse osmosis (RO). SMABR removed organic matter by adsorption and biological degradation. At a powder activated carbon (PAC) residence time of 66 d (1.5% of PAC replacement daily), higher organic removal was achieved with removal of a majority of biopolymers (94-97%) and humics (71-76%). A continuous MBR operation with the optimal PAC residence time of 66 d was conducted and compared with MBR with no PAC replenishment in terms of the removal of organic and microbes. High removal of organics of up to 72% was maintained with only a marginal increment of trans-membrane pressure and stable bioactivity (total cell number and adenosine tri-phosphate) during the 50d of operation. The SMABR was found to be a sustainable biological pretreatment to RO with only a small amount of PAC requirement (2.14 g of PAC/m(3) of seawater treated). PMID:23385157

  9. Investigation of the biofouling properties of several algae on different textured chemical modified silicone surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Engineered pillars, pits and grooves spaced 3–12 μm apart were fabricated on siloxane modified acrylic resin films. • The effect of feature size, geometry, and wettability on the settlement of different algae was evaluated. • The feature size and geometry displayed a substantial correlation with the antifouling properties. • A comparatively physical fouling deterrent mechanism was analyzed. - Abstract: Engineered pillars, pits and grooves spaced 3, 6, 9 and 12 μm apart were fabricated on siloxane modified acrylic resin films. The effect of feature size, geometry, and wettability on the settlement of different algae was evaluated. These films showed various antifouling performances to Ulothrix, Closterium and Navicula. For Navicula (length: 10–12 μm), the feature size and geometry displayed a substantial correlation with the antifouling properties. The film with pillars spaced 3 μm reduced Navicula settlement by 73% compared to the control surface. For Closterium (length: 45–55 μm), their responses were governed by the same underlying thermodynamic principles as wettability, the largest reduction in Closterium, 81%, was obtained on the surface with grooves spaced 12 μm apart. For Ulothrix (length: 5–8 mm), the surface also showed the best antifouling performance, the reduction ratio of the settlement on the surface with grooves spaced 12 μm apart could even reach 92%. At last, physical fouling deterrent mechanisms for the films with various textures were analyzed in detail. The feature size and geometry display a substantial correlation with the antifouling properties when the size of fouling algae is close to the textures. With the increasing size for algae, antifouling performance was getting better on surface with pillars or grooves because the algae are bridged between two or more features other than stabilizing its entire mass on one single feature or able to settle between features

  10. A Novel Technology for Simultaneous TOC Reduction and Biofouling Prevention Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long-duration space missions such as the upcoming Moon and Mars missions require reliable systems for the preparation of potable water through efficient recycling,...

  11. Investigation of the biofouling properties of several algae on different textured chemical modified silicone surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jihai [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhao, Wenjie, E-mail: zhaowj@nimte.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Peng, Shusen; Zeng, Zhixiang; Zhang, Xin [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Wu, Xuedong, E-mail: xdwu@nimte.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Xue, Qunji [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • Engineered pillars, pits and grooves spaced 3–12 μm apart were fabricated on siloxane modified acrylic resin films. • The effect of feature size, geometry, and wettability on the settlement of different algae was evaluated. • The feature size and geometry displayed a substantial correlation with the antifouling properties. • A comparatively physical fouling deterrent mechanism was analyzed. - Abstract: Engineered pillars, pits and grooves spaced 3, 6, 9 and 12 μm apart were fabricated on siloxane modified acrylic resin films. The effect of feature size, geometry, and wettability on the settlement of different algae was evaluated. These films showed various antifouling performances to Ulothrix, Closterium and Navicula. For Navicula (length: 10–12 μm), the feature size and geometry displayed a substantial correlation with the antifouling properties. The film with pillars spaced 3 μm reduced Navicula settlement by 73% compared to the control surface. For Closterium (length: 45–55 μm), their responses were governed by the same underlying thermodynamic principles as wettability, the largest reduction in Closterium, 81%, was obtained on the surface with grooves spaced 12 μm apart. For Ulothrix (length: 5–8 mm), the surface also showed the best antifouling performance, the reduction ratio of the settlement on the surface with grooves spaced 12 μm apart could even reach 92%. At last, physical fouling deterrent mechanisms for the films with various textures were analyzed in detail. The feature size and geometry display a substantial correlation with the antifouling properties when the size of fouling algae is close to the textures. With the increasing size for algae, antifouling performance was getting better on surface with pillars or grooves because the algae are bridged between two or more features other than stabilizing its entire mass on one single feature or able to settle between features.

  12. Chlorine demand studies: a need for optimisation of chlorine doses for biofouling control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on chlorine demand, chlorine decay, rate of HOBr formation and speciation of chlorine residuals of cooling water from Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS) were carried out. April to September was found to be a high demand period. The rate of reaction is faster and also initial demand is relatively high for this seawater as compared to other sea areas. Decay occurs in two phases, the first being instantaneous and the second being very slow. (author). 9 refs., 1 fig

  13. Effect of powdered activated carbon (PAC) and cationic polymer on biofouling mitigation in hybrid MBRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal Khan, S; Visvanathan, C; Jegatheesan, V

    2012-06-01

    In this study, the influence of powdered activated carbon (PAC) and cationic polymer (MPE50) was investigated on the fouling propensity in hybrid MBRs. Three laboratory scale MBRs were operated simultaneously including MBR(Control), MBR(PAC), and MBR(Polymer). Optimum dosages of PAC and polymer to the MBR(PAC) and MBR(Polymer), respectively were determined using jar tests. It was found that the MBR(PAC) exhibited low fouling tendency and prolonged filtration as compared to the other MBRs. Improved filtration in MBR(PAC) was attributed to the flocculation and adsorption phenomena. The effective stability of the biomass by PAC in the form of biological activated carbon (BAC) was verified by the increase in mean particle size. The BAC aided sludge layer exhibited porous cake structure resulting in the prolong filtration. However, both the membrane hybrid systems revealed effective adsorption of organic matter by 40% reduction in the soluble EPS concentration. PMID:22264429

  14. Biofouling-resistant ceragenin-modified materials and structures for water treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibbs, Michael; Altman, Susan J.; Jones, Howland D. T.; Savage, Paul B.

    2013-09-10

    This invention relates to methods for chemically grafting and attaching ceragenin molecules to polymer substrates; methods for synthesizing ceragenin-containing copolymers; methods for making ceragenin-modified water treatment membranes and spacers; and methods of treating contaminated water using ceragenin-modified treatment membranes and spacers. Ceragenins are synthetically produced antimicrobial peptide mimics that display broad-spectrum bactericidal activity. Alkene-functionalized ceragenins (e.g., acrylamide-functionalized ceragenins) can be attached to polyamide reverse osmosis membranes using amine-linking, amide-linking, UV-grafting, or silane-coating methods. In addition, silane-functionalized ceragenins can be directly attached to polymer surfaces that have free hydroxyls.

  15. Proceedings of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling, Corrosion, and Materials Workshop, January 8-10, 1979, Rosslyn, Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    The 23 papers presented are entered in the data base separately. Round table sessions on measurement of R/sub f/ and analysis of heat transfer data, biology of fouling, corrosion and the application of materials, and fouling and countermeasures are included. (WHK)

  16. The characterization, replication and testing of dermal denticles of Scyliorhinus canicula for physical mechanisms of biofouling prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Timothy; Regan, Fiona, E-mail: fiona.regan@dcu.ie [Marine and Environmental Sensing Technology Hub (MESTECH), National Centre for Sensor Research, School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2011-12-15

    There is a current need to develop novel non-toxic antifouling materials. The mechanisms utilized by marine organisms to prevent fouling of external surfaces are of interest in this regard. Biomimicry of these mechanisms and the ability to transfer the antifouling characteristics of these surfaces to artificial surfaces are a highly attractive prospect to those developing antifouling technologies. In order to achieve this, the mechanisms responsible for any antifouling ability must be elucidated from the study of the natural organism and the critical surface parameters responsible for fouling reduction. Dermal denticles of members of the shark family have been speculated to possess some natural, as yet unidentified antifouling mechanism related to the physical presence of denticles. In this study, the dermal denticles of one particular member of the slow-swimming sharks, Scyliorhinus canicula were characterized and it was found that a significant natural variation in denticle dimensions exists in this species. The degree of denticle surface contamination was quantified on denticles at various locations and it was determined that the degree of contamination of the dorsal surface of denticles varies with the position on the shark body. In addition, we successfully produced synthetic sharkskin samples using the real skin as a template. Testing of the produced synthetic skin in field conditions resulted in significant differences in material attachment on surfaces exhibiting denticles of different dimensions.

  17. The effects of low level chlorination and chlorine dioxide on biofouling control in a once-through service water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continuous chlorination has been successfully used for the control of Corbicula at a nuclear power plant located on the Chattahoochee River in southeastern Alabama, since 1986. The purpose of this study was to investigate further minimization of chlorine usage and determine if chlorine dioxide is a feasible alternative. Four continuous biocide treatments were evaluated for macro and microfouling control effectiveness, operational feasibility, and environmental acceptability. One semi-continuous chlorination treatment was also evaluated for macrofouling control effectiveness. Higher treatment residuals were possible with chlorine dioxide than with chlorination due to the river discharge limitations. At the levels tested, continuous chlorine dioxide was significantly more effective in providing both macro and microfouling control. Semi-continuous chlorination was just as effective as continuous chlorination for controlling macrofouling. The Corbicula treatment programs that were tested should all provide sufficient control for zebra mussels. Chlorine dioxide was not as cost effective as chlorination for providing macrofouling control. The semi-continuous treatment save 50% on chemical usage and will allow for the simultaneous treatment of two service water systems. Chlorite levels produced during the chlorine dioxide treatments were found to be environmentally acceptable. Levels of trihalomethanes in the chlorinated service water were less than the maximum levels allowed in drinking water

  18. Effect of conventional chemical treatment on the microbial population in a biofouling layer of reverse osmosis systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bereschenko, L.A.; Prummel, H.; Euverink, G.J.W.; Stams, A.J.M.; Loosdrecht, van M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of conventional chemical treatment on initiation and spatiotemporal development of biofilms on reverse osmosis (RO) membranes was investigated in situ using flow cells placed in parallel with the RO system of a full-scale water treatment plant. The flow cells got the same feed (extensivel

  19. The characterization, replication and testing of dermal denticles of Scyliorhinus canicula for physical mechanisms of biofouling prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a current need to develop novel non-toxic antifouling materials. The mechanisms utilized by marine organisms to prevent fouling of external surfaces are of interest in this regard. Biomimicry of these mechanisms and the ability to transfer the antifouling characteristics of these surfaces to artificial surfaces are a highly attractive prospect to those developing antifouling technologies. In order to achieve this, the mechanisms responsible for any antifouling ability must be elucidated from the study of the natural organism and the critical surface parameters responsible for fouling reduction. Dermal denticles of members of the shark family have been speculated to possess some natural, as yet unidentified antifouling mechanism related to the physical presence of denticles. In this study, the dermal denticles of one particular member of the slow-swimming sharks, Scyliorhinus canicula were characterized and it was found that a significant natural variation in denticle dimensions exists in this species. The degree of denticle surface contamination was quantified on denticles at various locations and it was determined that the degree of contamination of the dorsal surface of denticles varies with the position on the shark body. In addition, we successfully produced synthetic sharkskin samples using the real skin as a template. Testing of the produced synthetic skin in field conditions resulted in significant differences in material attachment on surfaces exhibiting denticles of different dimensions.

  20. Photochemical modification of poly(ether sulfone) ultrafiltration membranes by UV-assisted graft polymerization for the prevention of biofouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieracci, John Paul

    Membranes are widely used by the biotechnology industry in the separation and recovery of proteins from biological solutions. Fouling of membrane surfaces by irreversible protein adsorption during ultrafiltration causes loss of membrane permeability and can reduce membrane selectivity and lead to significant product loss through denaturation. In this work, low fouling poly(ether sulfone) (PES) ultrafiltration membranes were produced by ultraviolet (UV) assisted graft polymerization of hydrophilic vinyl monomers using a newly developed photochemical dip modification technique. This technique was developed to make the UV modification process more easily adaptable to continuous membrane manufacturing processes. A method was also developed to measure and track the degree of polymer grafting on the membrane surface using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR/ATR). Grafting the hydrophilic monomer N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NVP) onto the membrane surface increased surface wettability and produced membranes with the high wettability of regenerated cellulose membranes. The enhanced surface wettability significantly decreased irreversible adsorptive fouling during the filtration of the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA). In order to maintain the rejection of BSA after modification, PES chain scission was tightly controlled by regulating the UV wavelength range and the light intensity used. The UV reactor system was operated with 300 nm UV lamps and a benzene filter used to remove high energy wavelengths below 275 nm that were determined to cause severe loss of BSA rejection due to pore enlargement from extensive chain scission. Dip modification caused membrane permeability to decrease due to the grafted chains blocking the membrane pores. The use of a chain transfer agent during modification followed by ethanol cleaning increased modified membrane permeability, but BSA rejection was severely decreased. The resultant membranes produced by dip modification using this new UV reactor configuration exhibited higher rejection, similar permeability, and similar irreversible fouling as regenerated cellulose membranes, the lowest fouling commercial ultrafiltration membranes currently available. Therefore, these modified membranes can be used as an alternative to regenerated cellulose membranes in the ultrafiltration of protein solutions.

  1. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Biofouling Bacteria and Profiling of Quorum Sensing Signal Molecules from Membrane Bioreactor Activated Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshad Lade

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The formation of biofilm in a membrane bioreactor depends on the production of various signaling molecules like N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs. In the present study, a total of 200 bacterial strains were isolated from membrane bioreactor activated sludge and screened for AHLs production using two biosensor systems, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136. A correlation between AHLs production and biofilm formation has been made among screened AHLs producing strains. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed the dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in AHLs production; however few a species of Serratia, Leclercia, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Raoultella and Citrobacter were also identified. The chromatographic characterization of sludge extract showed the presence of a broad range of quorum sensing signal molecules. Further identification of sludge AHLs by thin layer chromatography bioassay and high performance liquid chromatography confirms the presence of C4-HSL, C6-HSL, C8-HSL, 3-oxo-C8-HSL, C10-HSL, C12-HSL, 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C14-HSL. The occurrence of AHLs in sludge extract and dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in activated sludge suggests the key role of these bacterial strains in AHLs production and thereby membrane fouling.

  2. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Biofouling Bacteria and Profiling of Quorum Sensing Signal Molecules from Membrane Bioreactor Activated Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby; Kweon, Ji Hyang

    2014-01-01

    The formation of biofilm in a membrane bioreactor depends on the production of various signaling molecules like N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). In the present study, a total of 200 bacterial strains were isolated from membrane bioreactor activated sludge and screened for AHLs production using two biosensor systems, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136. A correlation between AHLs production and biofilm formation has been made among screened AHLs producing strains. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed the dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in AHLs production; however few a species of Serratia, Leclercia, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Raoultella and Citrobacter were also identified. The chromatographic characterization of sludge extract showed the presence of a broad range of quorum sensing signal molecules. Further identification of sludge AHLs by thin layer chromatography bioassay and high performance liquid chromatography confirms the presence of C4-HSL, C6-HSL, C8-HSL, 3-oxo-C8-HSL, C10-HSL, C12-HSL, 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C14-HSL. The occurrence of AHLs in sludge extract and dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in activated sludge suggests the key role of these bacterial strains in AHLs production and thereby membrane fouling. PMID:24499972

  3. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Biofouling Bacteria and Profiling of Quorum Sensing Signal Molecules from Membrane Bioreactor Activated Sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Harshad Lade; Diby Paul; Ji Hyang Kweon

    2014-01-01

    The formation of biofilm in a membrane bioreactor depends on the production of various signaling molecules like N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). In the present study, a total of 200 bacterial strains were isolated from membrane bioreactor activated sludge and screened for AHLs production using two biosensor systems, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136. A correlation between AHLs production and biofilm formation has been made among screened AHLs producing strai...

  4. Nano-silica fabricated with silver nanoparticles: antifouling adsorbent for efficient dye removal, effective water disinfection and biofouling control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sujoy K.; Khan, Md. Motiar R.; Parandhaman, T.; Laffir, Fathima; Guha, Arun K.; Sekaran, G.; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2013-05-01

    A nano-silica-AgNPs composite material is proposed as a novel antifouling adsorbent for cost-effective and ecofriendly water purification. Fabrication of well-dispersed AgNPs on the nano-silica surface, designated as NSAgNP, has been achieved through protein mediated reduction of silver ions at ambient temperature for development of sustainable nanotechnology. The coated proteins on AgNPs led to the formation of stable NSAgNP and protected the AgNPs from oxidation and other ions commonly present in water. The NSAgNP exhibited excellent dye adsorption capacity both in single and multicomponent systems, and demonstrated satisfactory tolerance against variations in pH and dye concentration. The adsorption mainly occurred through electrostatic interaction, though π-π interaction and pore diffusion also contributed to the process. Moreover, the NSAgNP showed long-term antibacterial activity against both planktonic cells and biofilms of Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs retarded the initial attachment of bacteria on NSAgNP and thus significantly improved the antifouling properties of the nanomaterial, which further inhibited biofilm formation. Scanning electron and fluorescence microscopic studies revealed that cell death occurred due to irreversible damage of the cell membrane upon electrostatic interaction of positively charged NSAgNP with the negatively charged bacterial cell membrane. The high adsorption capacity, reusability, good tolerance, removal of multicomponent dyes and E. coli from the simulated contaminated water and antifouling properties of NSAgNP will provide new opportunities to develop cost-effective and ecofriendly water purification processes.A nano-silica-AgNPs composite material is proposed as a novel antifouling adsorbent for cost-effective and ecofriendly water purification. Fabrication of well-dispersed AgNPs on the nano-silica surface, designated as NSAgNP, has been achieved through protein mediated reduction of silver ions at ambient temperature for development of sustainable nanotechnology. The coated proteins on AgNPs led to the formation of stable NSAgNP and protected the AgNPs from oxidation and other ions commonly present in water. The NSAgNP exhibited excellent dye adsorption capacity both in single and multicomponent systems, and demonstrated satisfactory tolerance against variations in pH and dye concentration. The adsorption mainly occurred through electrostatic interaction, though π-π interaction and pore diffusion also contributed to the process. Moreover, the NSAgNP showed long-term antibacterial activity against both planktonic cells and biofilms of Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs retarded the initial attachment of bacteria on NSAgNP and thus significantly improved the antifouling properties of the nanomaterial, which further inhibited biofilm formation. Scanning electron and fluorescence microscopic studies revealed that cell death occurred due to irreversible damage of the cell membrane upon electrostatic interaction of positively charged NSAgNP with the negatively charged bacterial cell membrane. The high adsorption capacity, reusability, good tolerance, removal of multicomponent dyes and E. coli from the simulated contaminated water and antifouling properties of NSAgNP will provide new opportunities to develop cost-effective and ecofriendly water purification processes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Other experimental details and additional results. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00856h

  5. In situ formation of silver nanoparticles on thin-film composite reverse osmosis membranes for biofouling mitigation

    KAUST Repository

    Ben-Sasson, Moshe

    2014-10-01

    The potential to incorporate silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) as biocides in membranes for water purification has gained much interest in recent years. However, a viable strategy for loading the Ag-NPs on the membrane remains challenging. This paper presents a novel, facile procedure for loading Ag-NPs on thin-film composite (TFC) reverse osmosis membranes. Reaction of silver salt with a reducing agent on the membrane surface resulted in uniform coverage of Ag-NPs, irreversibly bound to the membrane, as confirmed by XPS, TEM, and SEM analyses. Salt selectivity of the membrane as well its surface roughness, hydrophilicity, and zeta potential were not impacted by Ag-NP functionalization, while a slight reduction (up to 17%) in water permeability was observed. The formed Ag-NPs imparted strong antibacterial activity to the membrane, leading to reduction of more than 75% in the number of live bacteria attached to the membrane for three model bacteria strains. In addition, confocal microscopy analyses revealed that Ag-NPs significantly suppressed biofilm formation, with 41% reduction in total biovolume and significant reduction in EPS, dead, and live bacteria on the functionalized membrane. The simplicity of the method, the short reaction time, the ability to load the Ag-NPs on site, and the strong imparted antibacterial activity highlight the potential of this method in real-world RO membrane applications. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Prevention of biofouling on heat transfer surfaces of ocean thermal energy converters. Progress report, May 1, 1975--November 30, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrozynski, R.L.; Jones, P.E.

    1975-12-01

    The objectives of the program were to develop chemical processes utilizing a combination of certain fluorochemicals and tribulyltin based toxicants for treating the surfaces of metals which may be used to fabricate OTEC heat exchangers, and to demonstrate the effectiveness of these surface treatments as antibiofoulants. Aluminium alloy No. 3003-H14 and titanium were testd, neither of which proved satisfactory. (WDM)

  7. Combined effects of EPS and HRT enhanced biofouling on a submerged and hybrid PAC-MF membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohiuddin Md Taimur; Takizawa, Satoshi; Lewandowski, Zbigniew; Habibur Rahman, M; Komatsu, Kazuhiro; Nelson, Sara E; Kurisu, Futoshi; Camper, Anne K; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Ohgaki, Shinichiro

    2013-02-01

    The goal of this study was to quantify and demonstrate the dynamic effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT), organic carbon and various components of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced by microorganisms on the performance of submersed hollow-fiber microfiltration (MF) membrane in a hybrid powdered activated carbon (PAC)-MF membrane bioreactor (MBR). The reactors were operated continuously for 45 days to treat surface (river) water before and after pretreatment using a biofiltration unit. The real-time levels of organic carbon and the major components of EPS including five different carbohydrates (D(+) glucose and D(+) mannose, D(+) galactose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine and D-galactose, oligosaccharides and L(-) fucose), proteins, and polysaccharides were quantified in the influent water, foulants, and in the bulk phases of different reactors. The presence of PAC extended the filtration cycle and enhanced the organic carbon adsorption and removal more than two fold. Biological filtration improved the filtrate quality and decreased membrane fouling. However, HRT influenced the length of the filtration cycle and had less effect on organic carbon and EPS component removal and/or biodegradation. The abundance of carbohydrates in the foulants on MF surfaces was more than 40 times higher than in the bulk phase, which demonstrates that the accumulation of carbohydrates on membrane surfaces contributed to the increase in transmembrane pressure significantly and PAC was not a potential adsorbent of carbohydrates. The abundance of N-acetyl-d-galactosamine and d-galactose was the highest in the foulants on membranes receiving biofilter-treated river water. Most of the biological fouling compounds were produced inside the reactors due to biodegradation. PAC inside the reactor enhanced the biodegradation of polysaccharides up to 97% and that of proteins by more than 95%. This real-time extensive and novel study demonstrates that the PAC-MF hybrid MBR is a sustainable technology for treating river water. PMID:23218247

  8. Molecular characterization, biofilm analysis and experimental biofouling study of Fusarium isolates from recent cases of fungal keratitis in New York State

    OpenAIRE

    Samsonoff William A; Shah Mahendra K; Ritterband David C; Chu David S; Ramani Rama; Dyavaiah Madhu; Chaturvedi Sudha; Chaturvedi Vishnu

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background To characterize Fusarium isolates from recent cases of fungal keratitis in contact lens wearers, and to investigate fungal association with MoistureLoc solution. Methods We studied six fungal isolates from recent cases of keratitis in New York State. The isolates were characterized by nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of multiple genes, and then typed using minisatellite and microsatellite probes. Experimental fungal biofilm formation was tested by standard m...

  9. Abatement of biofouling and corrosion in OTEC heat exchangers using low energy surfaces. Final technical report, May 1, 1975--February 29, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrozynski, R.L.; Jones, P.E.

    1976-06-01

    The economic viability of OTEC as a means of harnessing solar thermal energy depends on the ability to control marine fouling and corrosion on OTEC heat exchanger surfaces. During the past year under ERDA sponsorship, Allied Chemical Corporation demonstrated the concept that fouling and corrosion are minimized on low energy metal surfaces treated with fluorochemicals without impairing their heat transport properties. Experimentally, the surfaces of selected metals were chemically modified with a fluorochemical monolayer to minimize their surface energy. The treated metals were then observed for fouling and corrosion in the ocean at Miami, Florida in an attempt to simulate the OTEC operational environment. Antifouling and anticorrosion performance was judged by comparing the extent of barnacle, algae and corrosion coverage of the treated surface to one that was untreated. Other components, viz. tributyltin bearing agents and organoreactive silanes were combined with the fluorochemical in an effort to improve monolayer performance. Lower energy surfaces produced by a fluorochemical monolayer abated algae fouling on aluminum alloy No. 3003-H14 and commercially pure titanium throughout the test period of six weeks. Also, they protected the aluminum and 90/10 copper-nickel alloy No. 706 from seawater corrosion for the same duration. However, barnacle fouling was observed on all panel surfaces. Electron spectroscopic and electron microscopic analysis of the outermost surface pointed to the possible reasons for this growth. Evidently in most instances and particularly on titanium, the surfaces were not covered with a continuous film of monolayer. Moreover, the treatments left the surfaces with a rough texture and hence in a state predisposed to barnacle fouling.

  10. Micro- and macrofouling in the OTEC program: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, R; Benson, P H

    1980-06-01

    The mechanism of formation and environmental factors affecting marine biofouling are reviewed. Methods of biofouling assessment, known and potential biofouling impacts upon plant performance, and control measures applicable to OTEC are also discussed. Areas of uncertainty and the needs for continuing R and D effort to resolve such issues are indicated.

  11. 海水淡化反渗透系统中膜生物污染控制的研究进展%A Review of Biofouling Control in SWRO Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金伟; 金泥沙; 魏伶宇

    2011-01-01

    海水反渗透膜生物污染是由微生物在膜表面沉积和生长而形成的生物膜造成的污染,因此控制膜生物污染可从杀死微生物和抑制其生长两方面进行。目前常用的控制膜生物污染的两大方法是通过投加杀菌剂(如氯、二氧化氯、臭氧、UV、DBNPA)来杀死微生物和去除碳营养元素来抑制其繁殖。应用“在线混凝+MF/UF”的预处理方法,通过去除磷来控制海水反渗透膜生物污染将成为未来的研究趋势。

  12. 'High throughput': new technique to evaluation of biocides for biofouling control in oil fields; 'High throughput': nova tecnologia para avaliacao da eficacia de biocidas no controle de biofilme na industria do petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Bei [DOW, IL(United States); Yang, Jeff [DOW, Shangai (China); Bertheas, Ute [DOW, Horgen (Switzerland); Takahashi, Debora F. [DOW, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The wide metabolism diversifications and versatile surviving mechanisms lead to the broad existence of microorganisms in oil fields. Water flooding in secondary production can encourage microbial growth and biofilm build-up. Microbial contamination in oil field can cause many problems including microbiologically induced corrosion, oil and gas souring, deposition of iron sulfide, degradation of polymer additives, and plugging oil and gas pipelines and water purification systems. In general, biocides are needed both topside and down hole to control problematic microorganisms. In this study, a high throughput test method was developed that enables a more realistic determination of biocides efficacy against anaerobic microorganisms commonly found in oil field environments. Using this method, a thorough comparison of several commonly used biocides products in oil field for their efficacy against oil field anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria isolates was executed. This study showed that for each individual application, it is important to screen biocides and their combinations against microorganisms cultured from the field. Since biocides vary in their mode of action, this study also demonstrated the critical importance of utilizing the high throughput method for determining the best and most customized solution for each application. (author)

  13. Antifouling activity of enzyme-functionalized silica nanobeads

    OpenAIRE

    Zanoni, Michelle; Habimana, Olivier; Amadio, Jessica; Casey, Eoin

    2015-01-01

    The amelioration of biofouling in industrial processing equipment is critical for performance and reliability. While conventional biocides are effective in biofouling control, they are potentially hazardous to the environment and in some cases corrosive to materials. Enzymatic approaches have been shown to be effective and can overcome the disadvantages of traditional biocides, however they are typically uneconomic for routine biofouling control. The aim of this study was to design a robust a...

  14. Bacterial Growth on Chitosan-Coated Polypropylene Textile

    OpenAIRE

    Erben, D; V. Hola; Jaros, J.; Rahel, J.

    2012-01-01

    Biofouling is a problem common in all systems where microorganisms and aqueous environment meet. Prevention of biofouling is therefore important in many industrial processes. The aim of this study was to develop a method to evaluate the ability of material coating to inhibit biofilm formation. Chitosan-coated polypropylene nonwoven textile was prepared using dielectric barrier discharge plasma activation. Resistance of the textile to biofouling was then tested. First, the textile was submerge...

  15. Countermeasures to Microbiofouling in Simulated Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Heat Exchangers with Surface and Deep Ocean Waters in Hawaii

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Leslie Ralph; Berger, Joyce A.

    1986-01-01

    Countermeasures to biofouling in simulated ocean thermal energy conversion heat exchangers have been studied in single-pass flow systems, using cold deep and warm surface ocean waters off the island of Hawaii. Manual brushing of the loops after free fouling periods removed most of the biofouling material. However, over a 2-year period a tenacious film formed. Daily free passage of sponge rubber balls through the tubing only removed the loose surface biofouling layer and was inadequate as a co...

  16. Testing animal-assisted cleaning prior to transplantation in coral reef restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Frias-Torres, Sarah; van de Geer, Casper

    2015-01-01

    Rearing coral fragments in nurseries and subsequent transplantation onto a degraded reef is a common approach for coral reef restoration. However, if barnacles and other biofouling organisms are not removed prior to transplantation, fish will dislodge newly cemented corals when feeding on biofouling organisms. This behavior can lead to an increase in diver time due to the need to reattach the corals. Thus, cleaning nurseries to remove biofouling organisms such as algae and invertebrates is ne...

  17. Carbohydrate production by Amphora coffeaeformis, marine fouling diatom

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Evans, L.; Edyvean, R.G.J.

    stream_size 11 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name biofouling_7_81.pdf.txt stream_source_info biofouling_7_81.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  18. Actiniarian Sea anemone fauna of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parulekar, A.H.

    stream_size 11 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Mar_Biofouling_Power_Plants_1990_218.pdf.txt stream_source_info Mar_Biofouling_Power_Plants_1990_218.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset...

  19. Exopolysaccharide production by Vibrio fischeri, a fouling marine bacterium

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rodrigues, C.L.; Bhosle, N.B

    stream_size 8 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Biofouling_4_301.pdf.txt stream_source_info Biofouling_4_301.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  20. Effects of cathodic polarisation on carbohydrate metabolism in Amphora coffeaeformis, a marine fouling diatom

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; McCarrol, D.; Evans, L.V; Edyvean, R.G.J.

    stream_size 15 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Biofouling_7_171.pdf.txt stream_source_info Biofouling_7_171.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  1. 76 FR 35920 - Notice of Buy American Waiver Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ... seawater for sampling as the ship is underway, and incubator water for keeping samples at the current sea... proven technology that offers excellent protection against marine biofouling in localized areas. Use...

  2. Long-term effect on membrane fouling in a new membrane bioreactor as a pretreatment to seawater desalination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sanghyun; Rice, Scott A; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu

    2014-08-01

    Submerged membrane adsorption bio-reactors (SMABR) were investigated as a new pretreatment for seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) desalination. They were tested with different doses of powder activated carbon (PAC) on-site for a long-term. The biofouling on the membrane was assessed in terms of DNA (cells) and polysaccharide distribution. MBR without PAC addition resulted in severe fouling on membrane. When PAC is added in the MBR, PAC could reduce the organic fouling. Hence the biofilm formation on membrane was reduced without any membrane damage. PAC also helped to remove low molecular weight (LMW) organics responsible for biofouling of RO membrane. A linear correlation between assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and LMW organics was observed. A small amount of PAC (2.4-8.0g of PAC/m(3) of seawater) was sufficient to reduce biofouling. It indicated that SMABR is an environmentally-friendly biological pretreatment to reduce biofouling for SWRO. PMID:24745896

  3. Development of biofilm on materials exposed in coastal waters near to a desalination plant intake at Kudankulam, east coast of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Biofouling is a major problem in power plant cooling systems, desalination plants and navigation etc. As biofouling is a site specific problem, studies on the various aspects of biofouling to a particular region is necessary for taking better antifouling strategy. This study was carried out at Kudankulam coastal waters, with an objective to analyse the process of biofilm formation and its further succession on Perspex test panels. The development of biofilm was observed over a period of 14 days during January and September 2005. Results indicated that the biofilm formation was initiated by bacteria, followed by diatom and macro algal spores. Psuedomonas and Desulphovibrio were the predominant bacterial genera observed during the initial 48 hours of panel exposure. Diatom community was dominated by restricted number of genera such as Navicula, Nitzschia and Amphora. The hydrobiological parameters such as temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, phosphate, nitrite and nitrate were examined in the context of biofouling activity in the coastal waters

  4. Identification of Balanus amphitrite larvae from field zooplankton using species-specific primers

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaonkar, C.C.; Khandeparker, L.; Desai, D.V.; Anil, A.C.

    Identification of marine invertebrate larvae using morphological characters is laborious and complicated by phenotypic plasticity. Balanus amphitrite is a dominant barnacle, important in the context of intertidal ecology and biofouling of manmade...

  5. Heat transfer monitor for measurements of fouling of industrial heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, C. B.

    1985-01-01

    A Heat Transfer Monitor (HTM) is a sensitive device that quantifies development of fouling on heat exchanger surfaces in terms of degradation in the heat transfer coefficient as fouling progresses. The Argonne HTM was originally developed by Carnegie-Mellon University for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) applications and later modified by Argonne National Laboratory. The HTM has been used for the OTEC biofouling and corrosion studies at the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii for the last four years. The major findings from the experimental investigation are: (1) periodic low level of 50 to 70 ppB of chlorination can remove and prevent biofouling; (2) biofouling for deep cold water is negligible; and (3) biofouling control methods for moderately enhanced surfaces are comparable to those for smooth surfaces.

  6. Ultrastructure of Biofilms Formed by Bacteria from Industrial Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Raulio, Mari

    2010-01-01

    Microorganisms exist predominantly as sessile multispecies communities in natural habitats. Most bacterial species can form these matrix-enclosed microbial communities called biofilms. Biofilms occur in a wide range of environments, on every surface with sufficient moisture and nutrients, also on surfaces in industrial settings and engineered water systems. This unwanted biofilm formation on equipment surfaces is called biofouling. Biofouling can significantly decrease equipment performance a...

  7. Effect of biofilm on fluorescence measurements derived from fast repetition rate fluorometers

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, J.S.; Saino, T.

    on the sensor surface (Miller et al. 1996). Similarly, Kerr et al. (1998) demonstrated that the early stages of biofouling, mostly by algae, can affect the performance of the optical sensors such as chlorophyll fluorometer and transmissometer. Until... recently, the biofouling effect on the optical instrument data has in most cases not been tested or quantified. So in this study, the effect of natural biofilms on the performance of optical instruments is addressed, using fast repetition rate (FRR...

  8. Adhesion,Presence and Antifouling of Deinococcus geothermalis in Paper Machine Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Peltola, Minna

    2011-01-01

    This thesis has two items: biofouling and antifouling in paper industry. Biofouling means unwanted microbial accumulation on surfaces causing e.g. disturbances in industrial processes, contamination of medical devices or of water distribution networks. Antifouling focuses on preventing accumulation of the biofilms in undesired places. Deinococcus geothermalis is a pink-pigmented, thermophilic bacterium, and extremely resistant towards radiation, UV-light and desiccation and known as a bi...

  9. Modern approaches to marine antifouling coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Chambers, Lily D.; Stokes, Keith R.; Walsh, Frank.C.; Robert J.K. Wood

    2006-01-01

    Marine structures such as platforms, jetties and ship hulls are subject to diverse and severe biofouling. Methods for inhibiting both organic and inorganic growth on wetted substrates are varied but most antifouling systems take the form of protective coatings. Biofouling can negatively affect the hydrodynamics of a hull by increasing the required propulsive power and the fuel consumption. This paper reviews the development of antifouling coatings for the prevention of marine biological fouli...

  10. Countermeasures to microbiofouling in simulated ocean thermal energy conversion heat exchangers with surface and deep ocean waters in hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, L R; Berger, J A

    1986-06-01

    Countermeasures to biofouling in simulated ocean thermal energy conversion heat exchangers have been studied in single-pass flow systems, using cold deep and warm surface ocean waters off the island of Hawaii. Manual brushing of the loops after free fouling periods removed most of the biofouling material. However, over a 2-year period a tenacious film formed. Daily free passage of sponge rubber balls through the tubing only removed the loose surface biofouling layer and was inadequate as a countermeasure in both titanium and aluminum alloy tubes. Chlorination at 0.05, 0.07, and 0.10 mg liter for 1 h day lowered biofouling rates. Only at 0.10 mg liter was chlorine adequate over a 1-year period to keep film formation and heat transfer resistance from rising above the maximum tolerated values. Lower chlorination regimens led to the buildup of uneven or patchy films which produced increased flow turbulence. The result was lower heat transfer resistance values which did not correlate with the amount of biofouling. Surfaces which were let foul and then treated with intermittent or continuous chlorination at 0.10 mg of chlorine or less per liter were only partially or unevenly cleaned, although heat transfer measurements did not indicate that fact. It took continuous chlorination at 0.25 mg liter to bring the heat transfer resistance to zero and eliminate the fouling layer. Biofouling in deep cold seawater was much slower than in the warm surface waters. Tubing in one stainless-steel loop had a barely detectable fouling layer after 1 year in flow. With aluminum alloys sufficient corrosion and biofouling material accumulated to require that some fouling coutermeasure be used in long-term operation of an ocean thermal energy conversion plant. PMID:16347076

  11. A new diatom growth inhibition assay using the XTT colorimetric method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weina; Akagi, Takuya; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Takimoto, Ayaka; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Marine biofouling, which leads to significant operational stress and economic damage on marine infrastructures, is a major problem in marine related industries. Currently, the most common way to avoid marine biofouling involves the use of biocidal products in surface coatings. However, the need for environmentally friendly antibiofouling compounds has increased rapidly with the recent global prohibition of harmful antifoulants, such as tributyltin (TBT). In particular, periphytic diatoms have been shown to contribute significantly to biofilms, which play an important role in biofouling. Therefore, inhibiting the proliferation of fouling diatoms is a very important step in the prevention of marine biofouling. In this study, we developed a new, rapid, accurate, and convenient growth inhibition assay using the XTT colorimetric method to prevent the growth of the fouling periphytic diatom, Nitzschia amabilis Hidek. Suzuki (replaced synonym, Nitzschia laevis Hustedt). The feasibility of this method was verified by determining the growth inhibition activities of two standard photosynthetic inhibitors, DCMU and CuSO4. However, neither inhibitor had any cytotoxic activities at the range of concentrations tested. Moreover, this method was applied by screening and purification of herbicidic but non-cytotoxic compounds from cyanobacteria extracts. Our results demonstrate the utility of this newly established growth inhibition assay for the identification of marine anti-biofouling compounds. PMID:26945522

  12. Ocean thermal energy conversion: Materials issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, J. B., Jr.

    The Ocean thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Program, in the Ocean Energy Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy, is concerned with the development of options that can be utilized to extract and distribute significant amounts of energy from the ocean. The biofouling control and materials portion of the program is concerned with the development of effective and environmentally acceptable methods to minimize biofouling and corrosion in high thermal conductivity materials suitable for use in heat exchangers and condensers. The mechanical and chemical techniques employed for biofouling control are reviewed and the recent success with chlorination is presented. The corrosion of aluminum alloys, copper alloys, stainless steel, stainless alloys, and titanium in near-surface warm and deep cold water is reviewed with emphasis on aluminum alloys. The major materials issues are reviewed with emphasis on lifetime and cost.

  13. Bacterial colonization of metallic surfaces exposed in marine environment. Use of bacterial lipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addressing fouling and more particularly biofouling phenomena occurring notably on structures in marine environment, this research thesis first describes the fouling phenomenon (components, sequences of biofouling development, bio-film chemical composition). The author reports the study of the composition of the biological veil (microbiological methods, presentation of the different components), addresses the various types of lipids (bacterial markers and others). Then, after a presentation of the experimental equipment and methods (test cells, sample preparation, gas phase chromatography, hydrogenation and bromination, mass spectrometry), the author discusses the influence of different parameters such as the substrate type, speed, season, chlorination, and correlation with thermal transfer

  14. Airfoil-shaped micro-mixers for reducing fouling on membrane surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Clifford K; Altman, Susan J; Clem, Paul G; Hibbs, Michael; Cook, Adam W

    2012-10-23

    An array of airfoil-shaped micro-mixers that enhances fluid mixing within permeable membrane channels, such as used in reverse-osmosis filtration units, while minimizing additional pressure drop. The enhanced mixing reduces fouling of the membrane surfaces. The airfoil-shaped micro-mixer can also be coated with or comprised of biofouling-resistant (biocidal/germicidal) ingredients.

  15. Microbial ecology in the vicinity of a coastal Atomic Power Plant at Kalpakkam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is the first of its kind in the world to assess the ecological damage, if any, caused by release of the heated water effluent into the tropical sea water. Apart from elevated temperature the discharges are known to contain chemical stress factors in the form of biocides used for the control of biofouling

  16. A System-Wide Approach to Identify the Mechanisms of Barnacle Attachment: Toward the Discovery of New Antifouling Compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Aqeel, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Biofouling is a significant economic problem, particularly for marine and offshore oil industries. The acorn barnacle (Amphibalanus (Balanus) amphitrite) is the main biofouling organism in marine environments. Environmental conditions, the physiology of the biofouling organism, the surrounding microbial community, and the properties of the substratum can all influence the attachment of biofouling organisms to substrates. My dissertation investigated the biological processes involved in B. amphitrite development and attachment in the unique environment of the Red Sea, where the average water surface temperature is 34°C and the salinity reaches 41‰. I profiled the transcriptome and proteome of B. amphitrite at different life stages (nauplius II, nauplius VI, and cyprid) and identified 65,784 expressed contigs and 1387 expressed proteins by quantitative proteomics. During the planktonic stage, genes related to osmotic stress, salt stress, the hyperosmotic response, and the Wnt signaling pathway were strongly up-regulated, hereas genes related to the MAPK pathway, lipid metabolism, and cuticle development were down-regulated. In the transition from the nauplius VI to cyprid stages, there was up-regulation of genes involved in blood coagulation, cuticle development, and eggshell formation, and down-regulation of genes in the nitric oxide pathway, which stimulates the swimming and feeding responses of marine invertebrates. This system-wide integrated approach elucidated the development and attachment pathways important in B. amphitrite. Enzymes and metabolites in these pathways are potential molecular targets for the development of new antifouling compounds.

  17. Quantitative measurement and visualization of biofilm O 2 consumption rates in membrane filtration systems

    KAUST Repository

    Prest, Emmanuelle I E C

    2012-03-01

    There is a strong need for techniques enabling direct assessment of biological activity of biofouling in membrane filtration systems. Here we present a new quantitative and non-destructive method for mapping O 2 dynamics in biofilms during biofouling studies in membrane fouling simulators (MFS). Transparent planar O 2 optodes in combination with a luminescence lifetime imaging system were used to map the two-dimensional distribution of O 2 concentrations and consumption rates inside the MFS. The O 2 distribution was indicative for biofilm development. Biofilm activity was characterized by imaging of O 2 consumption rates, where low and high activity areas could be clearly distinguished. The spatial development of O 2 consumption rates, flow channels and stagnant areas could be determined. This can be used for studies on concentration polarization, i.e. salt accumulation at the membrane surface resulting in increased salt passage and reduced water flux. The new optode-based O 2 imaging technique applied to MFS allows non-destructive and spatially resolved quantitative biological activity measurements (BAM) for on-site biofouling diagnosis and laboratory studies. The following set of complementary tools is now available to study development and control of biofouling in membrane systems: (i) MFS, (ii) sensitive pressure drop measurement, (iii) magnetic resonance imaging, (iv) numerical modelling, and (v) biological activity measurement based on O 2 imaging methodology. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Genome Sequences of Three Pseudoalteromonas Strains (P1-8, P1-11, and P1-30), Isolated from the Marine Hydroid Hydractinia echinata

    OpenAIRE

    Klassen, Jonathan L; Rischer, Maja; Wolf, Thomas; Guo, Huijuan; Shelest, Ekaterina; Clardy, Jon; Beemelmanns, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The genomes of three Pseudoalteromonas strains (P1-8, P1-11, and P1-30) were sequenced and assembled. These genomes will inform future study of the genes responsible for the production of biologically active compounds responsible for these strains’ antimicrobial, biofouling, and algicidal activities.

  19. Low temperature aqueous living/controlled (RAFT) polymerization of carboxybetaine methacrylamide up to high molecular weights

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar Adolfo; Schmidt, B. V. K. J.; Sedláková, Zdeňka; Šubr, Vladimír; Bologna Alles, A.; Brynda, Eduard; Barner-Kowollik, C.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 13 (2011), s. 958-965. ISSN 1022-1336 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701; GA AV ČR IAAX00500803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : biofouling * carboxybetaine methacrylamide * low temperature polymerization Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.596, year: 2011

  20. Bacterial growth on chitosan-coated polypropylene textile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erben, D; Hola, V; Jaros, J; Rahel, J

    2012-01-01

    Biofouling is a problem common in all systems where microorganisms and aqueous environment meet. Prevention of biofouling is therefore important in many industrial processes. The aim of this study was to develop a method to evaluate the ability of material coating to inhibit biofilm formation. Chitosan-coated polypropylene nonwoven textile was prepared using dielectric barrier discharge plasma activation. Resistance of the textile to biofouling was then tested. First, the textile was submerged into a growth medium inoculated with green fluorescein protein labelled Pseudomonas aeruginosa. After overnight incubation at 33°C, the textile was observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy for bacterial enumeration and biofilm structure characterisation. In the second stage, the textile was used as a filter medium for prefiltered river water, and the pressure development on the in-flow side was measured to quantify the overall level of biofouling. In both cases, nontreated textile samples were used as a control. The results indicate that the chitosan coating exhibits antibacterial properties. The developed method is applicable for the evaluation of the ability to inhibit biofilm formation. PMID:23724330

  1. Nove membranske tehnologije za obradu tekstilnih otpadnih voda i njihovu ponovnu uporabu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrinić, Irena; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Textile wastewater represents challenging feed streams to be treated by membrane separation due to the complex composition and presence of reactive components. Here we first briefly present some characteristics of textile wastewater remediation where a key issue is (bio)fouling. We then present...

  2. Towards new membrane-based technologies for water treatment and reuse in the textile industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrinić, Irena; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Textile wastewater represents challenging feed streams to be treated by membrane separation due to the complex composition and presence of reactive components. Here we first briefly present some characteristics of textile wastewater remediation where a key issue is (bio)fouling. We then present M...... and perspectives involving biomimetic aquaporin FO membranes and Osmotic Membrane Bioreactors (OMBRs)....

  3. Development of novel antibiofouling materials from natural phenol compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelikani, Rahul; Kim, Dong Shik

    2007-03-01

    Biofilms consist of a gelatinous matrix formed on a solid surface by microbial organisms.Biofilm is caused due to the adhesion of microbes to solid surfaces with production of extracellular polymers and the process of the biofilm formation is reffered to as biofouling.Biofouling causes serious problems in chemical, medical and pharmaceutical industries.Although there have been some antibiofouling materials developed over the years,no plausible results have been found yet.Natural polyphenolic compounds like flavanoids,cathechins have strong antioxidant and antimicrobial properties.Recently,apocynin,a phenol derivative,was polymerized to form oligomers,which can regulate intracellular pathways in cancer cells preventing cell proliferation and migration.These natural phenolic compounds have never been applied to solid surfaces to prevent biofouling.It is thought that probably because of the difficulty to crosslink them to form a stable coating.In this study,some novel polyphenolic compounds synthesized using enzymatic technique from cashew nut shell liquid,a cheap and renewable byproduct of the cashew industry are used as coating materials to prevent biofouling.The interaction of these materials with microbes preventing fouling on surfaces and the chemico-physical properties of the materials causing the antibiofouling effect will be discussed.It is critical to understand the antibiofouling mechanism of these materials for better design and application in various fields.

  4. Characterization of Membrane Foulants in Full-scale and Lab-scale Membrane Bioreactors for Wastewater Treatment and Reuse

    KAUST Repository

    Matar, Gerald

    2015-12-01

    Membrane bioreactors (MBRs) offer promising solution for wastewater treatment and reuse to address the problem of water scarcity. Nevertheless, this technology is still facing challenges associated with membrane biofouling. This phenomenon has been mainly investigated in lab-scale MBRs with little or no insight on biofouling in full-scale MBR plants. Furthermore, the temporal dynamics of biofouling microbial communities and their extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are less studied. Herein, a multidisciplinary approach was adopted to address the above knowledge gaps in lab- and full-scale MBRs. In the full-scale MBR study, 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing with multivariate statistical analysis revealed that the early and mature biofilm communities from five full-scale MBRs differed significantly from the source community (i.e. activated sludge), and random immigration of species from the source community was unlikely to shape the community structure of biofilms. Also, a core biofouling community was shared between the five MBR plants sampled despite differences in their operating conditions. In the lab-scale MBR studies, temporal dynamics of microbial communities and their EPS products were monitored on different hydrophobic and hydrophilic membranes during 30 days. At the early stages of filtration (1 d), the same early colonizers belonging to the class Betaproteobacteria were identified on all the membranes. However, their relative abundance decreased on day 20 and 30, and sequence reads belonging to the phylum Firmicutes and Chlorobi became dominant on all the membranes on day 20 and 30. In addition, the intrinsic membrane characteristic did not select any specific EPS fractions at the initial stages of filtration and the same EPS foulants developed with time on the hydrophobic and hydrophilic membranes. Our results indicated that the membrane surface characteristics did not select for specific biofouling communities or EPS foulants, and the same early

  5. Evolution and accumulation of organic foulants on hydrophobic and hydrophilic membrane surfaces in a submerged membrane bioreactor

    KAUST Repository

    Matar, Gerald

    2015-09-07

    Membrane surface modification is attracting more attention to mitigate biofouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs). Five membranes differing in chemistry and hydrophobic/hydrophilic potential were run in parallel in a lab-scale MBR under the same conditions. Membranes were sampled after 1, 10, 20 and 30 days of MBR operation with synthetic wastewater. Subsequently, accumulated organic foulants were characterised using several chemical analytical tools. Results showed similar development of organic foulants with time, illustrating that membrane surface chemistry did not affect the selection of specific organic foulants. Multivariate analysis showed that biofilm samples clustered according to the day of sampling. The composition of organic foulants shifted from protein-like substances towards humics and polysaccharides-like substances. We propose that to control biofouling in MBRs, one should focus less on the membrane surface chemistry.

  6. In-line deoxygenation for organic carbon detections in seawater using a marine microbial fuel cell-biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, Soon Bee; Cheng, Liang; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Assimilable organic carbon (AOC) is a key predictor for membrane biofouling in seawater desalination reverse osmosis (SWRO). Microbial fuel cells have been considered as biosensors for the detection of biodegradable organics. However, the presence of dissolved oxygen (DO) is known to completely suppress the signal production (i.e., current) of a typical MFC. This study describes AOC detection in normal oxygenated seawater by coupling an electrochemical cell for DO removal with a MFC-biosensor for AOC detection. The electrochemical deoxygenation for oxygen removal caused no interference in the AOC detection. A linear relationship (R(2)=0.991) between the AOC concentration and current production from the MFC biosensor was achieved. The coupling of an electrochemical cell with a MFC-biosensor can be effectively used as an online, rapid and inexpensive measure of AOC concentrations and hence as an indicator for biofouling potential of seawater. PMID:25679497

  7. Adsorption of alginate and albumin on aluminum coatings inhibits adhesion of Escherichia coli and enhances the anti-corrosion performances of the coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yi; Huang, Jing; Chen, Xiuyong; Ren, Kun; Li, Hua

    2015-03-01

    Thermal-sprayed aluminum coatings have been extensively used as protective layers against corrosion for steel structures in the marine environment. The corrosion usually deteriorates from marine biofouling, yet the mechanism of accelerated corrosion of the coatings remains elusive. As the first stage participating in biofouling process, adsorption of molecules plays critical roles in mediating formation of biofilm. Here, we report at molecular level the adsorption behaviors of albumin and marine polysaccharide on arc-sprayed aluminum coatings and their influence on adhesion of Escherichia coli. The adsorption of alginate and albumin was characterized by infrared spectra analyses and atomic force microscopic observation. The adsorption inhibits effectively adhesion of the bacteria. Further investigation indicates that alginate/albumin altered the hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of the coatings instead of impacting the survival of the bacteria to decline their adhesion. The conditioning layer composed of the molecules enhances anti-corrosion performances of the coatings.

  8. Self-Healing Underwater Superoleophobic and Antibiofouling Coatings Based on the Assembly of Hierarchical Microgel Spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kunlin; Zhou, Shuxue; Wu, Limin

    2016-01-26

    Marine biofouling has been plaguing people for thousands of years. While various strategies have been developed for antifouling (including superoleophobic) coatings, none of these exhibits self-healing properties because the bestowal of a zoetic self-repairing function to lifeless artificial water/solid interfacial materials is usually confronted with tremendous challenges. Here, we present a self-repairing underwater superoleophobic and antibiofouling coating through the self-assembly of hydrophilic polymeric chain modified hierarchical microgel spheres. The obtained surface material not only has excellent underwater superoleophobicity but also has very good subaqueous antibiofouling properties. More importantly, this surface material can recover the oil- and biofouling-resistant properties once its surface is mechanically damaged, similar to the skins of some marine organisms such as sharks or whales. This approach is feasible and easily mass-produced and could open a pathway and possibility for the fabrication of other self-healing functional water/solid interfacial materials. PMID:26687925

  9. Seawater-Soluble Pigments and Their Potential Use in Self-Polishing Antifouling Paints: Simulation-based Screening Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Weinell, Claus Erik;

    2002-01-01

    This work concerns the on-going development of efficient and environmentally friendly antifouling paints for biofouling control on large ocean-going ships. It is illustrated how a detailed mathematical model for a self-polishing antifouling paint exposed to seawater can be used as a product...... solubility and seawater diffusivity of dissolved pigment species have a significant influence on the polishing and leaching behaviour of a typical self-polishing paint system. The pigment size distribution, on the other hand, only has a minor influence on the paint-seawater interaction. Simulations also...... indicate that only compounds which are effective against biofouling at very low seawater concentrations are useful as active antifouling paint ingredients. The need for model verification and exploration of practical issues, subsequent a given pigment has been found of interest, is discussed. The model...

  10. Antifouling activity of symbiotic bacteria from sponge Aplysina gerardogreeni

    OpenAIRE

    Aguila-Ramirez, Ruth Noemi; Hernandez-Guerrero, Claudia Judith; Gonzalez-Acosta, Barbara; Id-Daoud, Ghezlane; Hewitt, Samantha; Pope, Josephine; Hellio, Claire

    2014-01-01

    A key area in marine antifoulant research is the discovery of new environmentally friendly solutions that prevent biofilm formation and associated biocorrosion. Taking into consideration the natural mechanisms of marine organisms to protect against epibiosis, new biomimetic solutions can be utilised against biofouling, and marine bacteria are promising agents. Therefore, the goal of this study was to identify cultivable bacteria with antifouling (AF) activity associated with the sponge Aplysi...

  11. Tidal turbines that survive?

    OpenAIRE

    Turnock, S.R.; Nicholls-Lee, R.; Wood, R. J. K.; Wharton, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Tidal turbines offer an exciting opportunity to exploit ocean current flows to generate sustainable energy. However, a key to their success is the ability to operate with minimal intervention in the ocean over extended periods (15-20 years). This talk explored the likely design and operational issues that will influence satisfactory performance associated with material corrosion and biofouling. The main difficulty is that turbine economic viability is capital driven so whole system, includin...

  12. Testing animal-assisted cleaning prior to transplantation in coral reef restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frias-Torres, Sarah; van de Geer, Casper

    2015-01-01

    Rearing coral fragments in nurseries and subsequent transplantation onto a degraded reef is a common approach for coral reef restoration. However, if barnacles and other biofouling organisms are not removed prior to transplantation, fish will dislodge newly cemented corals when feeding on biofouling organisms. This behavior can lead to an increase in diver time due to the need to reattach the corals. Thus, cleaning nurseries to remove biofouling organisms such as algae and invertebrates is necessary prior to transplantation, and this cleaning constitutes a significant time investment in a restoration project. We tested a novel biomimicry technique of animal-assisted cleaning on nursery corals prior to transplantation at a coral reef restoration site in Seychelles, Indian Ocean. To determine whether animal-assisted cleaning was possible, preliminary visual underwater surveys were performed to quantify the fish community at the study site. Then, cleaning stations consisting of nursery ropes carrying corals and biofouling organisms, set at 0.3 m, 2 m, 4 m, 6 m and 8 m from the seabed, were placed at both the transplantation (treatment) site and the nursery (control) site. Remote GoPro video cameras recorded fish feeding at the nursery ropes without human disturbance. A reef fish assemblage of 32 species from 4 trophic levels (18.8% herbivores, 18.8% omnivores, 59.3% secondary consumers and 3.1% carnivores) consumed 95% of the barnacles on the coral nursery ropes placed 0.3 m above the seabed. Using this cleaning station, we reduced coral dislodgement from 16% to zero. This cleaning station technique could be included as a step prior to coral transplantation worldwide on the basis of location-specific fish assemblages and during the early nursery phase of sexually produced juvenile corals. PMID:26468440

  13. Proteins at interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Evers, Florian

    2011-01-01

    Protein adsorption is a fundamental and ubiquitous phenomenon, which has severe implications in the fields of biomaterials as well as bio- and nanotechnology, e.g., in drug delivery, biofouling, the biocompatibility of implants, food chemistry, and biosensors. Therefore, the mechanisms of protein adsorption and controlling the interfacial affinity of proteins have become intriguing and interdisciplinary research topics. In this work, X-ray and neutron reflectometry are the main...

  14. Towards new membrane-based technologies for water treatment and reuse in the textile industry

    OpenAIRE

    Petrinić, Irena; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Textile wastewater represents challenging feed streams to be treated by membrane separation due to the complex composition and presence of reactive components. Here we first briefly present some characteristics of textile wastewater remediation where a key issue is (bio)fouling. We then present Membrane Bioreactors (MBRs) and Forward Osmosis (FO) membranes as both technologies have attracted considerable interest due to the low fouling propensity of FO membranes. This makes them an intriguing...

  15. Cooling water treatment for heavy water project (Paper No. 6.9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With minor exceptions, water is the preferred industrial medium for the removal of unwanted heat from process systems. The application of various chemical treatments is required to protect the system from water related and process related problems of corrosion, scale and deposition and biofouling. The paper discusses the cooling water problems for heavy water industries along with the impact caused by associated fertilizer units. (author). 6 figs

  16. Marine diatom Navicula jeffreyi: from biochemical composition and physico-chemical surface properties to understanding the first step of benthic biofilm formation

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Géraldine; Pierre, Guillaume; Bellon-Fontaine, Marie-Noëlle; Zhao, Jean-Michel; Breret, Martine; Maugard, Thierry; Graber, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    To understand the first step of marine benthic microbial mat formation and biofouling phenomena, caused by diatoms in the marine environment, the surface properties of the epipelic diatom Navicula jeffreyi were studied and the composition of its bound Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS) was determined. These parameters are determining factors for the initial adhesion step of diatoms to other constituents that start marine fouling. Surface energy of a diatom cell layer was determined usin...

  17. Impact of biofilms in simulated drinking water and urban heat supply systems

    OpenAIRE

    F. A. Lopes; Morin, P.; Oliveira, Rosário; L. F. Melo

    2009-01-01

    Biofouling and biocorrosion were studied in drinking water and heating water systems by forming biofilms on steel and on polymethylmetacrylate. In the drinking water system, biofilm development was more significant on corroded surfaces, suggesting that in these conditions they were largely protected from disinfection, probably because of sheltering and chlorine demand by corrosion products. In the urban heat supply system, results suggest a higher biofilm activity at lower p...

  18. Disinfection of a Polyamide Nanofiltration Membrane using Ethanol

    OpenAIRE

    Heffernan, R.; Semião, A.J.C.; Desmond, P; Cao, H.; Safari, A.; Habimana, O; Casey, E.

    2013-01-01

    It is imperative that nanofiltration membranes are disinfected before they are used for laboratory-scale bacterial adhesion or biofouling experiments, yet currently no suitable disinfection protocol exists. This study aimed to determine if an ethanol treatment at a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) could be used to effectively disinfect nanofiltration membranes without altering membrane properties which could affect research. Two strains of bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Staphyloc...

  19. Membrane Pre-treatment Using Chemical Disinfectants in Halide Impaired Waters

    OpenAIRE

    Haflich, Holly M.; Huang, Kun; Shah, Amisha D.; Howarter, John; Kearney, Logan

    2015-01-01

    The use of membrane filtration processes for desalination, water reuse, and water reclamation techniques are becoming more prevalent given freshwater shortages. However, the treatment of these waters is challenging because of the membranes used in these processes. During nanofiltration and reverse osmosis the membranes undergo biofouling. Reverse osmosis and nanofiltration are high-pressure membrane filtration techniques that treat seawater, brackish waters, and industrial wastewaters. Becaus...

  20. Sunlight-enhanced calcareous deposition on cathodic stainless steel in natural seawater

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Eashwar, M.; SathishKumar, P.; Ravishankar, R.; Subramanian, G.

    : Biofouling, vol.29(2); 2013; 185-193 Sunlight enhances calcareous deposition on cathodic stainless steel in natural seawater M. Eashwara,*, P. Sathish Kumara,b, R. Ravishankarb, G. Subramaniand aCSIR – Central Electrochemical Research Institute..., Corrosion Research Centre, Mandapam Camp - 623519, Tamil Nadu, India bCurrent Address: CSIR – National Institute of Oceanography, Marine Corrosion and Materials Research Division, Dona Paula, Goa - 403 004, India cCSIR – Central Electrochemical...

  1. Avrami's law based kinetic modeling of colonization of mortar surface by alga Klebsormidium flaccidum

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Thu Hien; Govin, Alexandre; Guyonnet, René; Grosseau, Philippe; Lors, Christine; Damidot, Denis; Devès, Olivier; Ruot, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    International audience The aim of this research was to modelize the colonization of mortar surface by green algae using Avrami's law. The resistance of mortars, with different intrinsic characteristics (porosity, roughness, carbonation state), to the biofouling was studied by means of an accelerated lab-scale test. A suspension of green alga Klebsormidium flaccidum, was performed to periodically sprinkle the mortar surfaces. The covered surface rate followed a sigmoidal type curve versus t...

  2. Bio-inspired strategies for designing antifouling biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Vinod B. Damodaran; Murthy, N. Sanjeeva

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of biomedical devices in a biological medium, biofouling, is a major cause of infection and is entirely avoidable. This mini-review will coherently present the broad range of antifouling strategies, germicidal, preventive and cleaning using one or more of biological, chemical and physical techniques. These techniques will be discussed from the point of view of their ability to inhibit protein adsorption, usually the first step that eventually leads to fouling. Many of these appr...

  3. Methods to study microbial adhesion on abiotic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Meireles; Gonçalves, Ana L.; Gomes, Inês B.; Lúcia Chaves Simões; Manuel Simões

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are a matrix of cells and exopolymeric substances attached to a wet and solid surface and are commonly associated to several problems, such as biofouling and corrosion in industries and infectious diseases in urinary catheters and prosthesis. However, these cells may have several benefits in distinct applications, such as wastewater treatment processes, microbial fuel cells for energy production and biosensors. As microbial adhesion is a key step on biofilm formation, it is...

  4. In-situ biofilm characterization in membrane systems using Optical Coherence Tomography: Formation, structure, detachment and impact of flux change

    KAUST Repository

    Dreszer, C.

    2014-12-01

    Biofouling causes performance loss in spiral wound nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membrane operation for process and drinking water production. The development of biofilm formation, structure and detachment was studied in-situ, non-destructively with Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) in direct relation with the hydraulic biofilm resistance and membrane performance parameters: transmembrane pressure drop (TMP) and feed-channel pressure drop (FCP). The objective was to evaluate the suitability of OCT for biofouling studies, applying a membrane biofouling test cell operated at constant crossflow velocity (0.1 m s-1) and permeate flux (20 L m-2h-1).In time, the biofilm thickness on the membrane increased continuously causing a decline in membrane performance. Local biofilm detachment was observed at the biofilm-membrane interface. A mature biofilm was subjected to permeate flux variation (20 to 60 to 20 L m-2h-1). An increase in permeate flux caused a decrease in biofilm thickness and an increase in biofilm resistance, indicating biofilm compaction. Restoring the original permeate flux did not completely restore the original biofilm parameters: After elevated flux operation the biofilm thickness was reduced to 75% and the hydraulic resistance increased to 116% of the original values. Therefore, after a temporarily permeate flux increase the impact of the biofilm on membrane performance was stronger. OCT imaging of the biofilm with increased permeate flux revealed that the biofilm became compacted, lost internal voids, and became more dense. Therefore, membrane performance losses were not only related to biofilm thickness but also to the internal biofilm structure, e.g. caused by changes in pressure.Optical Coherence Tomography proved to be a suitable tool for quantitative in-situ biofilm thickness and morphology studies which can be carried out non-destructively and in real-time in transparent membrane biofouling monitors.

  5. Evaluation of dihydrooroidin as an antifouling additive in marine paint

    OpenAIRE

    Melander, Christian; Moeller, Peter D. R.; Ballard, T. Eric; Justin J. Richards; Huigens, Robert W.; Cavanagh, John

    2009-01-01

    Methods used to deter biofouling of underwater structures and marine vessels present a serious environmental issue and are both problematic and costly for government and commercial marine vessels worldwide. Current antifouling methods include compounds that are toxic to aquatic wildlife and marine ecosystems. Dihydrooroidin (DHO) was shown to completely inhibit Halomonas pacifica biofilms at 100 μM in a static biofilm inhibition assay giving precedence for the inhibition of other marine-biofi...

  6. Antimicrobial Behavior of Novel Surfaces Generated by Electrophoretic Deposition and Breakdown Anodization

    OpenAIRE

    Flores, Jessamine Quijano

    2013-01-01

    Managing biofouling is a critical aspect in a wide range of industries and addressing this concern is of optimal interest. In this study, the mass transfer of a model marine bacterium (Halomonas pacific g) was investigated on engineered surfaces ranging from superhydrophobic to superhydrophilic. The quantification of the deposition kinetics was achieved using a specially designed parallel plate flow chamber system under a range of relevant solution chemistries on the test sufaces. Halomonas p...

  7. Metagenome Survey of a Multispecies and Alga-Associated Biofilm Revealed Key Elements of Bacterial-Algal Interactions in Photobioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Krohn-Molt, Ines; Wemheuer, Bernd; Alawi, Malik; Poehlein, Anja; Güllert, Simon; Schmeisser, Christel; Pommerening-Röser, Andreas; Grundhoff, Adam; Daniel, Rolf; Hanelt, Dieter; Wolfgang R Streit

    2013-01-01

    Photobioreactors (PBRs) are very attractive for sunlight-driven production of biofuels and capturing of anthropogenic CO2. One major problem associated with PBRs however, is that the bacteria usually associated with microalgae in nonaxenic cultures can lead to biofouling and thereby affect algal productivity. Here, we report on a phylogenetic, metagenome, and functional analysis of a mixed-species bacterial biofilm associated with the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus in ...

  8. Seasonal variations in the fouling diatom community structure from a monsoon influenced tropical estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mitbavkar, S.; Anil, A.C.

    submerged in seawater since it causes increase in water resistance, fuel consumption and microbial corrosion of metal surfaces (Schultz 2007). The economic consequence of biofouling is thus significant. In the process of fouling, a layer of microorganisms... in Mitbavkar & Anil (2007). The f/2 culture medium was prepared in filtered autoclaved seawater with salinities of 5, 15, 30, and 40. The culture medium with each of these salinities (5 ml) was transferred to polystyrene multiwells (Corning 430343...

  9. Antifouling activity of seaweed extracts from Guarujá, São Paulo, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Heloisa Elias Medeiros; Bernardo Antonio Perez da Gama; Gianfranco Gallerani

    2007-01-01

    Marine biofouling historically constitutes one of the major constraints faced by mankind in its oceanic activities. The search for alternatives to TBT-based antifouling paints has led several researchers to focus efforts in the development of environmentally friendly natural compounds. This work has contributed with this search, testing the antifouling potential of crude organic extracts from four seaweed species collected at Praia Branca, Guarujá district, São Paulo, Brazil. Throughout labor...

  10. Contact angle anomalies indicate that surface-active eluates from silicone coatings inhibit the adhesive mechanisms of fouling organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Anne; Baier, Robert; Wood, Christina Darkangelo; Stein, Judith; Truby, Kathryn; Holm, Eric; Montemarano, Jean; Kavanagh, Christopher; Nedved, Brian; Smith, Celia; Swain, Geoff; Wiebe, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    Silicone coatings with critical surface tensions (CST) between 20 and 30 mN m-1 more easily release diverse types of biofouling than do materials of higher and lower CST. Oils added to these coatings selectively further diminish the attachment strengths of different marine fouling organisms, without significantly modifying the initial CST. In a search for the mechanisms of this improved biofouling resistance, the interfacial instabilities of four silicone coatings were characterised by comprehensive contact angle analyses, using up to 12 different diagnostic fluids selected to mimic the side chain chemistries of the common amino acids of bioadhesive proteins. The surfaces of painted steel test panels were characterised both before and after exposure to freshwater, brackish water, and seawater over periods ranging from 9 months to nearly 4 years. Contact angle measurements demonstrated significant surface activity of the oil-amended coatings both before and after long-term underwater exposure. The surface activity of the control (coating without oil) increased as a result of underwater exposure, consistent with mild surface chain scission and hydrolysis imparting a self-surfactancy to the coating and providing a weak boundary layer promoting continuing easy release of attaching foulants. Coatings with additives that most effectively reduced biofouling showed both initial and persistent contact angle anomalies for the test liquid, thiodiglycol, suggesting lower-shear biofouling release mechanisms based upon diminished bioadhesive crosslinking by interfering with hydrogen- and sulfhydryl bonds. Swelling of the silicone elastomeric coatings by hydrocarbon fluids was observed for all four coatings, before and after immersion. PMID:17178574

  11. Analysis of the Behaviours Mediating Barnacle Cyprid Reversible Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Aldred, Nick; Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Maruzzo, Diego; Anthony S. Clare

    2013-01-01

    When exploring immersed surfaces the cypris larvae of barnacles employ a tenacious and rapidly reversible adhesion mechanism to facilitate their characteristic ‘walking’ behaviour. Although of direct relevance to the fields of marine biofouling and bio-inspired adhesive development, the mechanism of temporary adhesion in cyprids remains poorly understood. Cyprids secrete deposits of a proteinaceous substance during surface attachment and these are often visible as ‘footprints’ on previously e...

  12. Microbial community differences between propionate-fed microbial fuel cell systems under open and closed circuit conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Aguirre de Cárcer, Daniel; Ha, Phuc Yhi; Jang, Jae Kyung; Chang, In Seop

    2014-01-01

    We report the electrochemical characterization and microbial community analysis of closed circuit microbial fuel cells (CC-MFCs) and open circuit (OC) cells continuously fed with propionate as substrate. Differences in power output between MFCs correlated with their polarization behavior, which is related to the maturation of the anodophilic communities. The microbial communities residing in the biofilm growing on the electrode, biofouled cation-exchange membrane and anodic chamber l...

  13. Glycerol Based Polymers for Nonfouling and Switchable Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Becherer, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the preparation and application of glycerol based polymers as coatings were described. The coatings were classified into passive and responsive materials. Whereas the coatings of the first group were developed to passivate materials and thus reduce biofouling, the fouling behavior of the second group could be controlled by adjusting the ambient temperature. The first group was further subdivided into nonfouling surfaces for biomedical applications and on the other side marine ap...

  14. PEG-b-AGE Polymer Coated Magnetic Nanoparticle Probes with Facile Functionalization and Anti-fouling Properties for Reducing Non-specific Uptake and Improving Biomarker Targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yuancheng; Lin, Run; Wang, Liya; Huang, Jing; Wu, Hui; Cheng, Guojun; Zhou, Zhengyang; MacDonald, Tobey; Yang, Lily; Mao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Non-specific surface adsorption of bio-macromolecules (e.g. proteins) on nanoparticles, known as biofouling, and the uptake of nanoparticles by the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) and reticuloendothelial system (RES) lead to substantial reduction in the efficiency of target-directed imaging and delivery in biomedical applications of engineered nanomaterials in vitro and in vivo. In this work, a novel copolymer consisting of blocks of poly ethylene glycol and allyl glycidyl ether (PEG-b-AGE...

  15. Experimental biofilms within drinking water treatment plant origin; evaluation of nutrient concentration and temperature influences upon their development

    OpenAIRE

    Farkas, Anca; Brînduşa BOCOS; Tigan, Stefan; Corina MURESAN; Romeo CHIRA

    2009-01-01

    From the planktonic free-floating state, microorganisms pass to the solid state, the biofilm, cells being strongly attached to each other and usually to the interface. This changing in cells’ behavior induces surface colonization and complex interactions development within the biofilm. If the biofilm’s role into the natural aquatic habitats is, undoubtedly, a positive one, consisting in water self-purification, drinking water pipe networks biofouling can be responsible for a wide range of wat...

  16. Antifouling Self-assembled Monolayers on Microelectrodes for Patterning Biomolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Noel, John; Teizer, Winfried; Hwang, Wonmuk

    2009-01-01

    We present a procedure for forming a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) trimethoxysilane self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on a silicon substrate with gold microelectrodes. The PEG-SAM is formed in a single assembly step and prevents biofouling on silicon and gold surfaces. The SAM is used to coat microelectrodes patterned with standard, positive-tone lithography. Using the microtubule as an example, we apply a DC voltage to induce electrophoretic migration to the SAM-coated electrode in a reversible m...

  17. Antifouling Coatings Influence both Abundance and Community Structure of Colonizing Biofilms: a Case Study in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Camps, Mercedes; Barani, Aude; Gregori, Gerald; Bouchez, Agnes; Le Berre, Brigitte; Bressy, Christine; Blache , Yves

    2014-01-01

    When immersed in seawater, substrates are rapidly colonized by both micro- and macroorganisms. This process is responsible for important economic and ecological prejudices, particularly when related to ship hulls or aquaculture nets. Commercial antifouling coatings are supposed to reduce biofouling, i.e., micro- and macrofoulers. In this study, biofilms that primarily settled on seven different coatings (polyvinyl chloride [PVC], a fouling release coating [FRC], and five self-polishing copoly...

  18. Antibacterial activity of the sponge Ircinia ramosa: Importance of its surface-associated bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thakur, N.L.; Anil, A.C.

    inhibition by epibiota by Aus- tralian seaweeds. Biofouling 12:227–244. STIERLE, A. C., CARDELLINA, J. H., II, and SINGLETON, F. L. 1988. Marine Micrococcus produces metabolites ascribed to the sponge Tedania ignis. Experientia 44:1021. THOMPSON, J. E..., Ircinia ramosa, sponge-associated bacteria, fouling bacteria, epibiosis, chemical defense, antibacterial activity, nonpolar compounds, polar compounds. *To whom correspondence should be addressed. e-mail: acanil@csnio.ven.nic.in; acanil...

  19. Formation of tunable graphene oxide coating with high adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liangxu; Wu, Huaping; Green, Stephen J; Crompton, Joanna; Zhang, Shaowei; Horsell, David W

    2016-02-10

    Graphene oxide (GO) can be applied as a coating on metals, but few of these coatings have an adhesion suitable for practical applications. We demonstrate here how to form a GO coating on metals with a high adhesion (∼10.6 MPa) and tuneable surface, which can be further applied using similar/modified techniques for special applications (e.g. anti-corrosion and anti-biofouling). PMID:26814138

  20. Development of environmentally friendly antifouling paints using biodegradable polymer and lower toxic substances

    OpenAIRE

    Carteau, David; Vallee-rehel, Karine; Linossier, Isabelle; Quiniou, Francoise; Davy, Romain; Compere, Chantal; Delbury, Maxime; Fay, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    The development of new antifouling coatings with respect to the marine environment is actually crucial. The aim of the present work is to concept an erodible paint formulated with biodegradable polyester as binders and which combines two modes of prevention: chemical and physical repelling of biofouling. This system is principally dedicated to disturb durable settlement of microfouling. Each component was chosen according to its specific properties: chlorhexidine is a bisdiguanide antiseptic ...

  1. Graphene-Coated Hollow Fiber Membrane as the Cathode in Anaerobic Electrochemical Membrane Bioreactors - Effect of Configuration and Applied Voltage on Performance and Membrane Fouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Craig M; Katuri, Krishna P; Hari, Ananda Rao; Chen, Wei; Lai, Zhiping; Logan, Bruce E; Amy, Gary L; Saikaly, Pascal E

    2016-04-19

    Electrically conductive, graphene-coated, hollow-fiber porous membranes were used as cathodes in anaerobic electrochemical membrane bioreactors (AnEMBRs) operated at different applied voltages (0.7 and 0.9 V) using a new rectangular reactor configuration compared to a previous tubular design (0.7 V). The onset of biofouling was delayed and minimized in rectangular reactors operated at 0.9 V compared to those at 0.7 V due to higher rates of hydrogen production. Maximum transmembrane pressures for the rectangular reactor were only 0.10 bar (0.7 V) or 0.05 bar (0.9 V) after 56 days of operation compared to 0.46 bar (0.7 V) for the tubular reactor after 52 days. The thickness of the membrane biofouling layer was approximately 0.4 μm for rectangular reactors and 4 μm for the tubular reactor. Higher permeate quality (TSS = 0.05 mg/L) was achieved in the rectangular AnEMBR than that in the tubular AnEMBR (TSS = 17 mg/L), likely due to higher current densities that minimized the accumulation of cells in suspension. These results show that the new rectangular reactor design, which had increased rates of hydrogen production, successfully delayed the onset of cathode biofouling and improved reactor performance. PMID:26691927

  2. Biological control of biofilms on membranes by metazoans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Theresa; Zihlmann, David; Derlon, Nicolas; Isaacson, Carl; Szivak, Ilona; Weissbrodt, David G; Pronk, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, chemical and physical methods have been used to control biofouling on membranes by inactivating and removing the biofouling layer. Alternatively, the permeability can be increased using biological methods while accepting the presence of the biofouling layer. We have investigated two different types of metazoans for this purpose, the oligochaete Aelosoma hemprichi and the nematode Plectus aquatilis. The addition of these grazing metazoans in biofilm-controlled membrane systems resulted in a flux increase of 50% in presence of the oligochaetes (Aelosoma hemprichi), and a flux increase of 119-164% in presence of the nematodes (Plectus aquatilis) in comparison to the control system operated without metazoans. The change in flux resulted from (1) a change in the biofilm structure, from a homogeneous, cake-like biofilm to a more heterogeneous, porous structure and (2) a significant reduction in the thickness of the basal layer. Pyrosequencing data showed that due to the addition of the predators, also the community composition of the biofilm in terms of protists and bacteria was strongly affected. The results have implications for a range of membrane processes, including ultrafiltration for potable water production, membrane bioreactors and reverse osmosis. PMID:26458189

  3. Investigation of coal combustion by-product utilization for oyster reef development in Texas bay waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston Lighting and Power Company (HL and P), Texas A and M University at Galveston and JTM Industries, Inc. initiated research in May 1988 and coordinated it with state and federal resource protection agencies to investigate the use of certain HL and P coal combustion by-products (CCBP) for enhancing and creating oyster reefs. Initial research involved determining and optimum mix design based on compressive strength, leaching potential, biofouling success, and cost. CCBP material was found to exceed compressive strength criterion (300 psi for at sign 14 days) and was not a significant leaching source. Candidate mix designs and oyster shell controls were exposed to hatchery-reared oyster larvae to determine spat setability and biofouling success. Larvae setting on CCBP substrate developed into spat and grew at a rate comparable to that for larvae on controls. Since all candidate mix designs exhibited excellent biofouling, an optimum design was chosen based on strength and material cost factors. Chemical analyses conducted to determine materials did not significantly contribute to the trace element load in oysters. Development of oyster cultch material was initiated with input from commercial 2.5 to 7.6 cm (1 to 3 inch) diameter pellets which are irregularly shaped and rough textured. These pellets greatly enhance water circulation, provide maximum setting potential for oyster larvae, and maximize the surface area to volume potential of the CCBP material

  4. Comparative pyrosequencing analysis of bacterial community change in biofilm formed on seawater reverse osmosis membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In S; Lee, Jinwook; Kima, Sung-Jo; Yu, Hye-Weon; Jang, Am

    2014-01-01

    The change in bacterial community structure induced by bacterial competition and succession was investigated during seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) in order to elucidate a possible link between the bacterial consortium on SWRO membranes and biofouling. To date, there has been no definitive characterization of the microbial diversity in SWRO in terms of distinguishing time-dependent changes in the richness or abundance of bacterial species. For bacterial succession within biofilms on the membrane surface, SWRO using a cross-flow filtration membrane test unit was operated for 5 and 100h, respectively. As results of the pyrosequencing analysis, bacterial communities differed considerably among seawater and the 5 and 100 h samples. From a total of 33,876 pyrosequences (using a 95% sequence similarity), there were less than 1% of shared species, confirming the influence of the operational time factor and lack of similarity of these communities. During SWRO operation, the abundance of Pseudomonas stutzeri BBSPN3 (GU594474) belonging to gamma-Proteobacteria suggest that biofouling of SWRO membrane might be driven by the dominant influence of a specific species. In addition, among the bacterial competition of five bacterial species (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus sp., Rhodobacter sp., Flavobacterium sp., and Mycobacterium sp.) competing for bacterial colonization on the SWRO membrane surfaces, it was exhibited that Bacillus sp. was the most dominant. The dominant influences ofPseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. on biofouling during actual SWRO is decisive depending on higher removal efficiency of the seawater pretreatment. PMID:24600849

  5. Mussel-inspired dopamine- and plant-based cardanol-containing polymer coatings for multifunctional filtration membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yong-Seok; Kang, Hyo; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Cha, Sang-Ho; Lee, Jong-Chan

    2014-12-10

    A series of copolymers [PCD#s, where # is the weight percentage of dopamine methacrylamide (DMA) in polymers] containing mussel-inspired hydrophilic dopamine and plant-based hydrophobic cardanol moieties was prepared via radical polymerization using DMA and 2-hydroxy-3-cardanylpropyl methacrylate (HCPM) as the monomers. PCD#s were used as coating materials to prevent flux decline of the membranes caused by the adhesion of biofoulants and oil-foulants. Polysulfone (PSf) ultrafiltration membranes coated with PCD#s showed higher biofouling resistance than the bare PSf membrane, and the bactericidal properties of the membranes increased upon increasing the content of HCPM units in the PCD#s. Serendipitously, the PSf membranes coated with the more or less amphiphilic PCD54 and PCD74, having the optimum amount of both hydrophilic DMA and hydrophobic HCPM moieties, showed noticeably higher oil-fouling resistance than the more hydrophilic PCD91-coated membrane, the more hydrophobic PCD0-coated membrane, and the bare PSf membrane. Therefore, multifunctional coating materials having biofouling- and oil-fouling-resistant and bactericidal properties could be prepared from the monomers containing mussel-inspired dopamine and plant-based cardanol groups. PMID:25415754

  6. Studies on the variations in the settlement of macrofoulants in Kalpakkam coastal waters, east coast of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biofouling studies in the coastal waters of Kalpakkam were carried out with an aim to delineate the present seasonal succession and fouling potential of macrofoulants, the dominant species and their breeding period. Three series (weekly, monthly and cumulative at 30 d interval observations) of teak wood panels were exposed to coastal waters from a jetty. A marked variation was observed in the colonization of the biofoulers on the weekly panels during the present study. The highest and lowest numbers of organisms observed were 136 and 1 per sq. cm respectively. Dominance of barnacles (12.4 - 99 %) on weekly panels was found throughout the study period. A climax community of green mussels (Perna viridis) was observed in the cumulative observations. Biofouling biomass of weekly panels varied between 1 and 11 g. (100 cm)-2, however, a steep increase in biomass was observed in 28 d (77 g. (100 cm)-2), 56 d (97 g. (100 cm)-2), 112 d (185 g. (100 cm)-2) and 150 d (648 g. (100 cm)-2) old panels. In the present study, the biomass values found to be significantly higher than those of the earlier reported values (33 and 52 g. (100 cm)-2 in 43 d and 128 d exposure respectively). Interestingly, a visible shift in the peak settlement period of green mussels (Perna viridis) was observed in the present investigation, as compared to the earlier study. (author)

  7. Graphene-coated hollow fiber membrane as the cathode in anaerobic electrochemical membrane bioreactors – Effect of configuration and applied voltage on performance and membrane fouling

    KAUST Repository

    Werner, Craig

    2015-12-22

    Electrically conductive, graphene-coated hollow-fiber porous membranes were used as cathodes in anaerobic electrochemical membrane bioreactors (AnEMBRs) operated at different applied voltages (0.7 V and 0.9 V) using a new rectangular reactor configuration, compared to a previous tubular design (0.7 V). The onset of biofouling was delayed and minimized in rectangular reactors operated at 0.9 V, compared to those at 0.7 V due to higher rates of hydrogen production. Maximum transmembrane pressures for the rectangular reactor were only 0.10 bar (0.7 V) or 0.05 bar (0.9 V) after 56 days of operation, compared to 0.46 bar (0.7 V) for the tubular reactor after 52 days. The thickness of the membrane biofouling layer was approximately 0.4 µm for rectangular reactors and 4 µm for the tubular reactor. Higher permeate quality (TSS = 0.05 mg/L) was achieved in the rectangular AnEMBR than the tubular AnEMBR (TSS = 17 mg/L), likely due to higher current densities that minimized the accumulation of cells in suspension. These results show that the new rectangular reactor design, which had increased rates of hydrogen production, successfully delayed the onset of cathode biofouling and improved reactor performance.

  8. Antifouling activity of enzyme-functionalized silica nanobeads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoni, Michele; Habimana, Olivier; Amadio, Jessica; Casey, Eoin

    2016-03-01

    The amelioration of biofouling in industrial processing equipment is critical for performance and reliability. While conventional biocides are effective in biofouling control, they are potentially hazardous to the environment and in some cases corrosive to materials. Enzymatic approaches have been shown to be effective and can overcome the disadvantages of traditional biocides, however they are typically uneconomic for routine biofouling control. The aim of this study was to design a robust and reusable enzyme-functionalized nano-bead system having biofilm dispersion properties. This work describes the biochemical covalent functionalization of silica-based nanobeads (hereafter referred to as Si-NanoB) with Proteinase K (PK). Results showed that PK-functionalized Si-NanoB are effective in dispersing both protein-based model biofilms and structurally altering Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms, with significant decreases in surface coverage and thickness of 30.1% and 38.85%, respectively, while increasing surface roughness by 19 % following 24 h treatments on bacterial biofilms. This study shows that enzyme-functionalized nanobeads may potentially be an environmentally friendly and cost effective alternative to pure enzyme and chemical treatments. PMID:26370186

  9. Reusable nanoengineered surfaces for bacterial recruitment and decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ista, Linnea K; Yu, Qian; Parthasarathy, Anand; Schanze, Kirk S; López, Gabriel P

    2016-03-01

    Biofouling, or accumulation of unwanted biofilms, on surfaces is a major concern for public health and human industry. Materials either avoiding contamination (fouling resistant) and/or directly killing attached microbes (biocidal) have thus far failed to achieve the goal of eliminating biofouling; fouling resistant surfaces eventually foul and biocidal surfaces accumulate debris that eventually decrease their efficacy. Combined biocidal and fouling release materials offer the potential for both killing and removing debris and are promising candidates for reducing biofouling on manufactured materials. Interference lithography was used to create nanopatterns of initiators, which were then used to initiate atom transfer radical polymerization of the temperature-responsive polymer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) as a fouling release component. Biocidal activity was conferred by subsequent layer-by-layer deposition of cationic and anionic poly(phenylene ethynylenes) into the valleys between the PNIPAAm. For both Gram positive and Gram negative model bacteria, dark-regime biocidal activity was observed that did not increase upon exposure to light, suggesting that the mode of antimicrobial activity is due to ionic disruption of the cell wall. Subsequent to killing, bacteria and cellular debris were removed upon a temperature-induced phase transition of the PNIPAAm. These materials exhibited capture, killing, and release activity over multiple cycles of use. PMID:26739292

  10. Contribution of assimilable organic carbon to biological fouling in seawater reverse osmosis membrane treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrich, Lauren; LeChevallier, Mark; Haas, Charles N

    2016-09-15

    Biological fouling occurs on RO membranes when bacteria and nutrients are present in conditions that are conducive to growth and proliferation of the bacteria. Controlling microbial growth on the membranes is typically limited to biocide application (i.e., disinfectants) in seawater RO plants. However, biological growth and subsequent fouling has not been well-managed. Pretreatment has not been focused on nutrient limitation. This project used a biological assay, the assimilable organic carbon (AOC) test to evaluate pretreatment effects on the nutrient supply. The AOC test provided a useful surrogate measurement for the biodegradability or biofouling potential of RO feed water. Biofouling observed in controlled conditions at the bench- and pilot-scale resulted in statistically significant correlations between AOC and the operational effects caused by biofouling. Membrane fouling rates are observed through operational changes over time such as increased differential pressure between the membrane feed and concentrate locations and decreased permeate flux through the membrane. In full scale plants there were strong correlations when AOC was used as a predictor variable for increased differential pressure (0.28-0.55 bar from September-December 2012) and decreased specific flux (1.40 L per hour/(m(2) · bar)). Increased differential pressure was associated with RO membrane biological fouling when the median AOC was 50 μg/L during pilot testing. Conditions were also evaluated at the bench-scale using a flat sheet RO membrane. In a comparison test using 30 and 1000 μg/L AOC, fouling was detected on more portions of the membrane when AOC was higher. Biofilm and bacterial deposits were apparent from scanning electron microscope imaging and biomass measurements using ATP. PMID:27262548

  11. Assessment of microbial fouling in an ocean thermal energy conversion experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftring, R P; Taylor, B F

    1979-10-01

    A project to investigate biofouling, under conditions relevant to ocean thermal energy conversion heat exchangers, was conducted during July through September 1977 at a site about 13 km north of St. Croix (U.S. Virgin Islands). Seawater was drawn from a depth of 20 m, within the surface mixed layer, through aluminum pipes (2.6 m long, 2.5-cm internal diameter) at flow velocities of about 0.9 and 1.8 m/s. The temperature of the seawater entering the mock heat exchanger units was between 27.8 and 28.6 degrees C. After about 10 weeks of exposure to seawater, when their thermal conductivity was reported to be significantly impaired, the pipes were assayed for the accumulation of biological material on their inner surfaces. The extent of biofouling was very low and independent of flow velocity. Bacterial populations, determined from plate counts, were about 10 cells per cm. The ranges of mean areal densities for other biological components were: organic carbon, 18 to 27 mug/cm; organic nitrogen, 1.5 to 3.0 mug/cm; adenosine 5'-triphosphate, 4 to 28 ng/cm; carbohydrate (as glucose in the phenol assay), 3.8 to 7.0 mug/cm; chlorophyll a, 0.2 to 0.8 ng/cm. It was estimated from the adenosine 5'-triphosphate and nitrogen contents that the layer of live bacteria present after 10 weeks was only of the order of 1mum thick. The C/N ratio of the biological material suggested the presence of extracellular polysaccharidic material. Such compounds, because of their water-retaining capacities, could account for the related increase in thermal resistance associated with the pipes. This possibility merits further investigation, but the current results emphasize the minor degree of biofouling which is likely to be permissible in ocean thermal energy conversion heat exchangers. PMID:16345450

  12. Impact of organic nutrient load on biomass accumulation, feed channel pressure drop increase and permeate flux decline in membrane systems

    KAUST Repository

    Bucs, Szilard

    2014-12-01

    The influence of organic nutrient load on biomass accumulation (biofouling) and pressure drop development in membrane filtration systems was investigated. Nutrient load is the product of nutrient concentration and linear flow velocity. Biofouling - excessive growth of microbial biomass in membrane systems - hampers membrane performance. The influence of biodegradable organic nutrient load on biofouling was investigated at varying (i) crossflow velocity, (ii) nutrient concentration, (iii) shear, and (iv) feed spacer thickness. Experimental studies were performed with membrane fouling simulators (MFSs) containing a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane and a 31 mil thick feed spacer, commonly applied in practice in RO and nanofiltration (NF) spiral-wound membrane modules. Numerical modeling studies were done with identical feed spacer geometry differing in thickness (28, 31 and 34 mil). Additionally, experiments were done applying a forward osmosis (FO) membrane with varying spacer thickness (28, 31 and 34 mil), addressing the permeate flux decline and biofilm development. Assessed were the development of feed channel pressure drop (MFS studies), permeate flux (FO studies) and accumulated biomass amount measured by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and total organic carbon (TOC).Our studies showed that the organic nutrient load determined the accumulated amount of biomass. The same amount of accumulated biomass was found at constant nutrient load irrespective of linear flow velocity, shear, and/or feed spacer thickness. The impact of the same amount of accumulated biomass on feed channel pressure drop and permeate flux was influenced by membrane process design and operational conditions. Reducing the nutrient load by pretreatment slowed-down the biofilm formation. The impact of accumulated biomass on membrane performance was reduced by applying a lower crossflow velocity and/or a thicker and/or a modified geometry feed spacer. The results indicate that cleanings can be delayed

  13. Improving the antimicrobial properties of titanium condenser material by surface modification using nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biofouling is one of the major problems faced by condenser materials of power plants using seawater for cooling. Fouling control strategies in condensers include a combination of mechanical and chemical treatments like sponge ball cleaning, back washing and chlorination. In general, numerous studies have shown that no routine treatment regime can successfully keep the condenser tube clean over a period extending to years. Surface properties of the substratum influence initial adhesion and growth of bacterial cells on materials, modification of the surface for mitigating microbial attachment is the need of the hour. Metal nanoparticles are known to exhibit enhanced physical and chemical properties when compared to their bulk counter parts because of their high surface to volume ratios. Metals like copper are very toxic to microorganisms and effectively kill most of the microbes by blocking the respiratory enzyme. Copper alloys with their excellent resistance to biofouling are used extensively for marine applications. However, they are prone to localized corrosion initiation and consequently are getting replaced by extremely corrosion resistant titanium. Still, the inertness and biocompatibility of titanium makes it very susceptible to biofouling. Hence, this study attempts to use nano technology methods of surface modification of titanium using thin film of copper and also multilayers and bilayers of copper and nickel. This is aimed at improving the antimicrobial properties of this condenser pipe material. These nano structured thin films have been grown on titanium substrate using pulsed DC magnetron-sputtering and pulsed laser deposition. The thin films were characterized using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Glancing Incidence X-ray Diffraction (GIXRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM with EDAX analysis). Antimicrobial properties were evaluated by exposure studies in seawater and bacterial cultures and by post exposure analysis using culture and

  14. Microbial community analysis of fouled reverse osmosis membranes used in water recycling

    KAUST Repository

    Ayache, C.

    2013-06-01

    Biofouling on RO membranes has major cost implications in water reclamation. In this study membranes and water samples were collected from a RO pilot-plant operated on two sites to study the differences in microbial communities in order to develop a better understanding of the biofouling. For the two sites studied, the examination of the front membrane of the first stage and the tail membrane of the second stage of the RO train using 16S rRNA gene-based molecular technique showed that bacteria were similar on both stages and no significant effect of the membrane location within the RO train on the biofilm development could be discerned. However, the comparison of the identified bacteria from membrane samples between the two sites showed that each site is specific, leading to a different composition of microbial communities. The different nutrient concentrations in the RO feed water due to the different biological pre-treatments are one potential explanation for the observed differences in the microbial communities. Seasonal variations also play a major role in the development of microbial communities as shown by the significant differences observed between the communities measured in the samples in winter and summer on the second site. The results did not show similarity between the species identified on the RO membranes and in the feed water. Hence, the relationship of microbial community between the water generated during the pre-treatment process and RO membranes is not obvious. From this study, results showed that there is an actual need to investigate the development of microbial communities on membrane surface in real conditions in order to suggest tailored solutions for biofouling control and removal. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Environmental impact of condenser effluents into coastal marine environments: need for continuous monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electric plants working on the principle of steam-water cycle require large amounts of water for condenser cooling purpose. Nuclear power plants require, on an average, about 3m3 cooling water per minute per megawatt of electricity generated. Owning to the scarcity of large sources of freshwater for cooling, newer power plants, particularly in water-stressed parts of the world, tend to get located in coastal regions, where they can make use of the abundant seawater. However, this also poses a problem, in terms of the biofouling potential of coastal marine environments. Sessile benthic organism, which are generally present as part of the coastal marine ecosystem, extend their habitat into the cooling water system of the power plant. It is often observed that massive growth of such fouling organisms may endanger normal operation of the cooling water system, unless appropriate control measures are adopted. Presence of calcareous organisms such as mussels and barnacles in the pre-condenser sections of the power plant is a common sight; but these organisms, when lodged inside condenser tubes, can not only reduce the heat transfer efficiency but also can cause localized corrosion and tube leakage, leading of ingress of seawater into the steam-water system. It is, therefore, important that appropriate control measures are adopted to discourage the growth of the organisms. However, this needs to be done in an environmentally sustainable manner, as the cooling water is ultimately discharged back into the sea. The presentation aims to give and overview of the biofouling problems generally encountered in a typical tropical coastal power station operating in India and the chemical control measures adopted and their effectiveness. The talk also throws light on the more recent advances in biofouling control such as surface modification and use of nanotechnology which, in the foreseeable future, may provide more lasting and environmentally sustainable solutions. (author)

  16. In Situ Confocal Raman Microscopy of Hydrated Early Stages of Bacterial Biofilm Formation on Various Surfaces in a Flow Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Palmer, Truis; Lin, Sicheng; Oguejiofor, Ikenna; Leng, Tianyang; Pustam, Amanda; Yang, Jin; Graham, Lori L; Wyeth, Russell C; Bishop, Cory D; DeMont, M Edwin; Pink, David

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial biofilms are precursors to biofouling by other microorganisms. Understanding their initiation may allow us to design better ways to inhibit them, and thus to inhibit subsequent biofouling. In this study, the ability of confocal Raman microscopy to follow the initiation of biofouling by a marine bacterium, Pseudoalteromonas sp. NCIMB 2021 (NCIMB 2021), in a flow cell, using optical and confocal Raman microscopy, was investigated. The base of the flow cell comprised a cover glass. The cell was inoculated and the bacteria attached to, and grew on, the cover glass. Bright field images and Raman spectra were collected directly from the hydrated biofilms over several days. Although macroscopically the laser had no effect on the biofilm, within the first 24 h cells migrated away from the position of the laser beam. In the absence of flow, a buildup of extracellular substances occurred at the base of the biofilm. When different coatings were applied to cover glasses before they were assembled into the flow cells, the growth rate, structure, and composition of the resulting biofilm was affected. In particular, the ratio of Resonance Raman peaks from cytochrome c (CC) in the extracellular polymeric substances, to the Raman phenylalanine (Phe) peak from protein in the bacteria, depended on both the nature of the surface and the age of the biofilm. The ratios were highest for 24 h colonies on a hydrophobic surface. Absorption of a surfactant with an ethyleneoxy chain into the hydrophobic coating created a surface similar to that given with a simple PEG coating, where bacteria grew in colonies away from the surface rather than along the surface, and CC:Phe ratios were initially low but increased at least fivefold in the first 48 h. PMID:26903564

  17. Experience of chemical treatment for controlling corrosion in IDCT water of KGS 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KGS (Kaiga Generating Station) - 3 and 4 is 220 MWe pressurized heavy water reactor. Active Process Water Cooling system (APWC) cool active process cooling water through plate type heat exchanger. The heat from this system is dissipated to the atmosphere through Induced Draught Cooling Tower (IDCT). Continuous make up of system is carried out with raw water to compensate evaporation and blow down loss. Average Langlier Index (LI) of makeup water is -2.0. Cycle of concentration (COC) of APWC system water is around 4.0 and LI at this COC is around - 0.1. As per design chlorination of water is carried out and 0.2-0.5 ppm free residual chlorine (FRC) is maintained. Other than chlorination no chemical treatment was considered in the design. Considering that cooling water may have corrosion, scaling and bio-fouling problems, a detailed study was carried out. Corrosion, scaling and bio-fouling studies were carried out for three months by maintaining the COC around 4.0 and during this period normal chlorination was carried out. The results of the study had shown high corrosion rate for Carbon Steel (CS) but water did not have high scaling and the bio-fouling tendency. Sulphate Reducing Bacteria (SRB) and Total Bacteria Count (TBC) were evaluated and found within the limits. This indicated that water is corrosive in nature and a suitable chemical treatment needs to be carried out to control the corrosion of cooling water system. Chemical treatment in IDCT water with the formulation consisting of Zinc, Phosphonate, Azole and low molecular formulation was started along with chlorination. Biocide (Benzalkonium chloride) dosing was also started at regular intervals. After chemical dosing a downtrend trend of corrosion rate of CS was observed but still it was higher than limit. After increasing Zinc concentration in water from 0.2 to 0.5 ppm, CS corrosion was reduced to <2.0. (author)

  18. Superhydrophobic Materials Technology-PVC Bonding Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Scott R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Efird, Marty [VeloxFlow, LLC

    2013-05-03

    The purpose of the technology maturation project was to develop an enhanced application technique for applying diatomaceous earth with pinned polysiloxane oil to PVC pipes and materials. The oil infiltration technique is applied as a spray of diluted oil in a solvent onto the superhydrophobic diatomaceous earth substrate. This makes the surface take on the following characteristics: wet-cleanable; anti-biofouling; waterproof; and anti-corrosion. The project involved obtaining input and supplies from VeloxFlow and the development of successful techniques that would quickly result in a commercial license agreement with VeloxFlow and other companies that use PVC materials in a variety of other fields of use.

  19. Phosphate and arsenate removal efficiency by thermostable ferritin enzyme from Pyrococcus furiosus using radioisotopes

    KAUST Repository

    Sevcenco, Ana-Maria

    2015-03-13

    Oxo-anion binding properties of the thermostable enzyme ferritin from Pyrococcus furiosus were characterized with radiography. Radioisotopes 32P and 76As present as oxoanions were used to measure the extent and the rate of their absorption by the ferritin. Thermostable ferritin proved to be an excellent system for rapid phosphate and arsenate removal from aqueous solutions down to residual concentrations at the picomolar level. These very low concentrations make thermostable ferritin a potential tool to considerably mitigate industrial biofouling by phosphate limitation or to remove arsenate from drinking water.

  20. Polymerization of cardanol using soybean peroxidase and its potential application as anti-biofilm coating material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Hwan; An, Eun Suk; Song, Bong Keun; Kim, Dong Shik; Chelikani, Rahul

    2003-09-01

    Soybean peroxidase (20 mg) catalyzed the oxidative polymerization of cardanol in 2-propanol/phospate buffer solution (25 ml, 1:1 v/v) and yielded 62% polycardanol over 6 h. Cobalt naphthenate (0.5% w/w) catalyzed the crosslinking of polycardanol and the final hardness of crosslinked polycardanol film exceeded 9 H scale as pencil scratch hardness, which shows a high potential as a commercial coating material. In addition, it showed an excellent anti-biofouling activity to Pseudomonas fluorescens compared to other polymeric materials such as polypropylene. PMID:14571976

  1. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). Power system development. Preliminary design report, final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-04

    The preliminary design of the 10 MWe OTEC power module and the 200 kWe test articles is given in detail. System operation and performance; power system cost estimates; 10 MWe heat exchangers; 200 kWe heat exchanger articles; biofouling control;ammonia leak detection, and leak repair; rotating machinery; support subsystem; instrumentation and control; electrical subsystem; installation approach; net energy and resource analysis; and operability, maintainability, and safety are discussed. The conceptual design of the 40 MWe electrical power system includes four or five 10 MWe modules as designed for the 10 MWe pilot plant. (WHK)

  2. International Space Station (ISS) Orbital Replaceable Unit (ORU) Wet Storage Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Michael D.; Rotter, Henry A.; Lee, Jason; Packham, Nigel; Brady, Timothy K.; Kelly, Robert; Ott, C. Mark

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Program requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) to evaluate the risks posed by the practice of long-term wet storage of ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) regeneration system orbital replacement units (ORUs). The ISS ECLS regeneration system removes water from urine and humidity condensate and converts it into potable water and oxygen. A total of 29 ORUs are in the ECLS system, each designed to be replaced by the ISS crew when necessary. The NESC assembled a team to review the ISS ECLS regeneration system and evaluate the potential for biofouling and corrosion. This document contains the outcome of the evaluation.

  3. Microbiologically influenced corrosion testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This symposium was held November 16--17, 1992 in Miami, Florida. The purpose of the symposium was to provide a forum for state-of-the-art information on the effects of microorganisms on the corrosion of metals. Many industrial needs in the area of microbial influenced corrosion testing are identified in the presentations along with latest laboratory and field testing techniques. Strategies to monitor and control corrosion and biofouling in water distribution systems, underground pipelines, buildings, and marine vessels are discussed. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  4. Antibiofilm effect enhanced by modification of 1,2,3-triazole and palladium nanoparticles on polysulfone membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Hong

    2015-08-01

    Biofouling impedes the performance of membrane bioreactors. In this study, we investigated the antifouling effects of polysulfone membranes that were modified by 1,2,3-triazole and palladium nanoparticles. The membranes to be tested were embedded within a drip flow biofilm reactor, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was inoculated and allowed to establish biofilm on the tested membranes. It was found that 1,2,3-triazole and palladium nanoparticles can inhibit the bacterial growth in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The decrease in bacterial growth was observed along with a decrease in the amount of total polysaccharide and Pel polysaccharide within the biofilm matrix but not the protein content.

  5. Substratum-Associated Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furey, Paula C; Liess, Antonia

    2015-10-01

    This review of literature on substratumassociated microbiota from 2014 highlights topics on benthic algae and bacteria from a range of aquatic environments, but focuses on freshwater habitats. Advances in pollution and toxin detection, assessment methods, and applications of new technologies are highlighted as are updates in taxonomy and systematics. Aspects of general ecology, water quality, nutrient cycling, trophic interactions, land use changes, biofuels, biofouling, and environmental challenges such as climate change, pollutants, tar sands and fracking, oil spills and nuisance blooms are presented. PMID:26420102

  6. Ocean thermal energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    Activities are reported in the area of heat-exchanger development, including designs for aluminum-based heat exchangers, performance/cost models for waterside enhancements and techniques for low-cost manufacture. Specific objectives of the experimental verification and testing program element include experimentally verifying predicted thermohydraulic performance of heat exchangers and determining the biofouling and corrosion rates of various heat exchanger materials and the effects of heat-exchanger manufacturing processes on seawater corrosion. Progress on system performance/cost modelling is also reported.

  7. Role of conspecific cues and sugars in the settlement of cyprids of the barnacle, Balanus amphitrite

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.

    the settlement significantly at a lower concentration, that is 10 C08 M without any extract, whereas, D-glucose showed a reduced effect. In the present investigation, we examined whether the influence of different sugars is modulated by different proteinextracts...,A.,Dennis,B.,Julian,L.,Martin,R.,Keith,R.&James, D.W. (1994). Molecular biology of the cell, 3rd edn. New York: GarlandPublishing, Taylorand FrancisGroup. Clare, A.S. & Matsumura, K. (2000). Nature and perception of barnacle settlement pheromones. Biofouling 15, 57–71. Dobretsov...

  8. XPS depth profiling of an ultrathin bioorganic film with an argon gas cluster ion beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Paul M; Nietzold, Carolin; Weise, Matthias; Unger, Wolfgang E S; Alnabulsi, Saad; Moulder, John

    2016-01-01

    The growing interest in artificial bioorganic interfaces as a platform for applications in emerging areas as personalized medicine, clinical diagnostics, biosensing, biofilms, prevention of biofouling, and other fields of bioengineering is the origin of a need for in detail multitechnique characterizations of such layers and interfaces. The in-depth analysis of biointerfaces is of special interest as the properties of functional bioorganic coatings can be dramatically affected by in-depth variations of composition. In worst cases, the functionality of a device produced using such coatings can be substantially reduced or even fully lost. PMID:27137780

  9. Effect of sediment settling on controlling golden mussel invasion in water transfer project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mengzhen; Wang, Zhaoyin; Bogen, Jim; Pan, Baozhu

    2013-04-01

    Inter-basin water transfer projects have been widely used to solve uneven distribution of water resources and water shortage in China. Along with the transferring of water resources, golden mussel (Limnoperna fortunei), the filter-collector macro-invertebrate species originating from southern China has also been inadvertently transferred to new aquatic environment, resulting in quick and uncontrolled spread of the species. The golden mussels are invasive by nature and endowed with a strong byssus for attaching onto their habitat, allowing them to easily invade natural and artificial aquatic systems, which was resulted in high-density golden mussel attachment that causes serious bio-fouling. Invasion and bio-fouling by golden mussels in water transfer systems has drawn attention widely because it has resulted in high resistance to water flow, corrosion of pipe walls and even clogging of tunnels, as well as causing water pollution and ecological imbalance in the regions that receive water infested with golden mussels. Field investigation was conducted along the East River, which is the main drinking water resource for Cantong province and Hongkong, China, to study the natural habitats of golden mussels. Surveys of water transfer tunnels which carry water from the East River to several big cities in Cantong province were done to study golden mussel invasion and attachment in tunnels. It is found that in the natural habitat, golden mussels mainly attach to bedrock and bank stones and solid surfaces facing upstream, while no golden mussels are attached on the surfaces facing downstream and suffering sediment deposition. In the water transfer tunnels, golden mussel attachment densities of 40,000 individuals/m2 mainly occurred on the portion of tunnel walls which face downwards and thus avoid sedimentation. An experiment was designed to study the effect of sediment settling on golden mussel attachment. The results showed that settling of fine sediment particles affects

  10. Various mortars for anti-fouling purposes in marine environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanematsu, Hideyuki; Masuda, Tomoka [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Suzuka National College of Technology, Shiroko-cho, Suzuka, Mie 510-0294 (Japan); Miura, Yoko; Kuroda, Daisuke [Department of General Education, The Company, Suzuka National College of Technology, Shiroko-cho, Suzuka, Mie 510-0294 (Japan); Hirai, Nobumitsu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Suzuka National College of Technology, Shiroko-cho, Suzuka, Mie 510-0294 (Japan); Yokoyama, Seiji [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1, Hibarigaoka, Tenpaku, Toyohashi, Aichi, 441-8580 (Japan)

    2014-02-20

    The antifouling properties for some mortars with steel making slags were investigated by real marine immersion tests and a unique laboratory acceleration tests with a specially devised biofilm acceleration reactors. Mortars mixed with steel making slags containing abundant iron elements tended to form biofilm and also bifouling. The two kinds of biofilm formation tests were used in this study. Real immersion in marine environments and laboratory test with a specially devised biofilm acceleration reactor. The former evaluated the biofouling characteristics more properly, while the latter did the biofilm formation characteristics more effectively.

  11. CNRL thermal info sharing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myszczyszyn, M. [Canadian Natural Resources Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This presentation outlined some of the operational improvements in water treating systems and equipment at the Wolf Lake and Primrose facilities owned by Canadian Natural Resources Limited (CNRL). The biofouling management system was described along with the usage of Kynar Strainers in ion exchange vessels, ball blankets in water tanks, Hastelloy C276 material for ion exchange vessel regeneration headers and regen waste pumps, and P22 pipe material in boiler evaporation piping. Eight conductivity recycling setups were installed on the strong acid cation (SAC) and weak acid cation (WAC) regen waste lines. The operational improvements have resulted in lower daily disposal rates.

  12. Evaluation of the potential of ozone as a power plant biocide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattice, J.S.; Trabalka, J.R.; Adams, S.M.; Faust, R.A.; Jolley, R.L.

    1978-09-01

    A review of the literature on the chemistry and biological effects of ozone was conducted to evaluate the potential of ozone to function as a power plant biocide. Evaluation of this potential is dependent upon determining the ability of ozone to maintain the integrity of both the condenser cooling system and the associated ecosystem. The well-known bactericidal capacity of ozone and the limited biofouling control studies conducted thus far suggest that ozone can control both slime and macroinvertebrate fouling at power plants. However, full-scale demonstrations of the minimum levels of ozone required and of solution of the practical aspects of application have not been performed.

  13. Biological limiting factors in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, R. H.

    1977-06-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is one of several solar energy options being considered by the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). The OTEC concept utilizes the thermal difference between warm surface and cool, deep water in tropical oceans to operate a heat engine to produce either electricity or energy-intensive chemicals. Several OTEC system designs, both open and closed cycle, have been suggested. It is estimated that by the year 2020, 4 to 6% of the anticipated energy needs of the United States could be supplied by OTEC. However, primary biological films that reduce heat transfer at heat exchange surfaces are a major limiting factor to successful development of OTEC technology. Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) is managing an ERDA program aimed to define, prevent, and/or alleviate, potential biofouling problems associated with OTEC systems. Extensive research concerning open ocean biofouling and its control will be necessary. The OTEC concept, its history and potential advantages are discussed; various overall system designs are reviewed; and the biological limitations on OTEC development are dicussed. 33 references.

  14. Marketing netcoatings for aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Unsustainable harvesting of natural fish stocks is driving an ever growing marine aquaculture industry. Part of the aquaculture support industry is net suppliers who provide producers with nets used in confining fish while they are grown to market size. Biofouling must be addressed in marine environments to ensure maximum product growth by maintaining water flow and waste removal through the nets. Biofouling is managed with copper and organic biocide based net coatings. The aquaculture industry provides a case study for business issues related to entry of improved fouling management technology into the marketplace. Several major hurdles hinder entry of improved novel technologies into the market. The first hurdle is due to the structure of business relationships. Net suppliers can actually cut their business profits dramatically by introducing improved technologies. A second major hurdle is financial costs of registration and demonstration of efficacy and quality product with a new technology. Costs of registration are prohibitive if only the net coatings market is involved. Demonstration of quality product requires collaboration and a team approach between formulators, net suppliers and farmers. An alternative solution is a vertically integrated business model in which the support business and product production business are part of the same company. PMID:25329615

  15. Antibacterial copper-nickel bilayers and multilayer coatings by pulsed laser deposition on titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, Vinita; Josephine, J; George, R P; Krishnan, R; Dash, S; Kamruddin, M; Kalavathi, S; Manoharan, N; Tyagi, A K; Dayal, R K

    2009-11-01

    Biofouling, especially microfouling, is a major concern with the use of titanium (Ti) in the marine environment as a condenser material in cooling water systems. Earlier, copper-nickel (Cu/Ni) alloys were extensively used in marine environments due to their high corrosion and biofouling resistance. However, the choice of condenser material for the new fast breeder reactor in Kalpakkam is Ti to avoid steam side corrosion problems, which may pose a threat to steam generator parts having sodium as the secondary coolant. This study evaluates the surface modification of Ti using nano films of copper (Cu) and nickel (Ni) to utilize the antibacterial property of copper ions in reducing microfouling. The surface modification of Ti was carried out by the deposition of a Cu/Ni bilayer and (Cu/Ni)(10) multilayer films using a pulsed laser deposition technique. Various surface characterization studies revealed that the deposited Cu/Ni films were thin and nanocrystalline in nature. The antibacterial properties were evaluated using total viable count and epifluorescence microscopic techniques. The results showed an apparent decrease in bacterial attachment on multilayered and bilayered Cu/Ni thin films on Ti surfaces. Comparative studies between the two types of films showed a bigger reduction in numbers of microorganisms on the multilayers. PMID:20183129

  16. Hexacyanoferrate-adapted biofilm enables the development of a microbial fuel cell biosensor to detect trace levels of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in oxygenated seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liang; Quek, Soon Bee; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

    2014-12-01

    A marine microbial fuel cell (MFC) type biosensor was developed for the detection of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in ocean water for the purpose of online water quality monitoring for seawater desalination plants prone to biofouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. The anodophilic biofilm that developed on the graphite tissue anode could detect acetate as the model AOC to concentrations as low as 5 µM (120 µg/L of AOC), which is sufficiently sensitive as an online biofouling risk sensor. Although the sensor was operated at a higher (+200 ± 10 mV) than the usual (-300 mV) anodic potential, the presence of oxygen completely suppressed the electrical signal. In order to overcome this outcompeting effect of oxygen over the anode as electron acceptor by the bacteria, hexacyanoferrate (HCF(III)) was found to enable the development of an adapted biofilm that transferred electrons to HCF(III) rather than oxygen. As the resultant of the reduced HCF(II) could readily transfer electrons to the anode while being re-oxidised to HCF(III), the marine MFC biosensor developed could be demonstrated to work in the presence of oxygen unlike traditional MFC. The possibility of operating the marine MFC in batch or continuous (in-line) mode has been explored by using coulombic or potentiometric interpretation of the signal. PMID:24942462

  17. Synthesis and extracellular accumulation of silver nanoparticles by employing radiation-resistant Deinococcus radiodurans, their characterization, and determination of bioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni RR

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rasika R Kulkarni, Nayana S Shaiwale, Dileep N Deobagkar, Deepti D Deobagkar Molecular Biology Research Laboratory, Center of Advanced Studies, Department of Zoology, University of Pune, Pune, India Abstract: There has been rapid progress in exploring microorganisms for green synthesis of nanoparticles since microbes show extraordinary diversity in terms of species richness and niche localization. Microorganisms are easy to culture using relatively inexpensive and simple nutrients under varied conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, etc. In this work, Deinococcus radiodurans that possesses the ability to withstand extremely high radiation and desiccation stress has been employed for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs. D. radiodurans was able to accumulate AgNPs in medium under various conditions, and process optimization was carried out with respect to time, temperature, pH, and concentration of silver salt. AgNPs were characterized using UV/vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The microbially synthesized AgNPs exhibited good antimicrobial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms and anti-biofouling activity. Their ability to inhibit growth and proliferation of cancer cell line was also examined, and it could be seen that AgNPs synthesized using D. radiodurans exhibited excellent anticancer activity. Keywords: Deinococcus radiodurans, silver nanoparticles, anticancer, radiation resistance, antibacterial, anti-biofouling 

  18. Efficiency of surface modified Ti coated with copper nanoparticles to control marine bacterial adhesion under laboratory simulated conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CHOKKALINGAM PRIYA; GANESSIN ARAVIND; WILSON RICHARD THILAGARAJ

    2016-04-01

    Titanium (Ti) used as condenser material in nuclear power plants encounter severe biofouling in marine environment which in turn affects the efficiency of the metal. To reduce the biofouling by marine microorganisms, surface modification of the Ti was carried out by anodization process to obtain nanotubes (TiO$_2$-NTs). The electrolyte solution containing 1% of ammonium fluoride resulted in uniform growth of TiO$_2$-NTs. TiO$_2$-NTs were furthercoated with chemically synthesized copper nanoparticles (NT-CuNP) using 3-amino propyl triethoxy silane as a coupling agent. NT-CuNP was characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energydispersivespectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The stability of the coating was determined by the amount of Cu$^+$ ions released into the surrounding using AAS. The microbial adhesion on the surface of Ti, TiO$_2$-NTs and NT-CuNPcoupons were evaluated by sea water exposure studies using total viable count method and also characterized by FE-SEM for any morphological changes. The NT-CuNP coupons show a 60% reduction in microbial adhesion whencompared to control Ti coupons.

  19. Analysis of long-term performance and microbial community structure in bio-cathode microbial desalination cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huichao; Wen, Qinxue; An, Zhongyi; Chen, Zhiqiang; Nan, Jun

    2016-03-01

    A microbial desalination cell (MDC) could desalinate salt water without energy consumption and simultaneously generate bioenergy. Compared with an abiotic cathode MDC, an aerobic bio-cathode MDC is more sustainable and is less expensive to operate. In this study, the long-term operation (5500 h) performance of a bio-cathode MDC was investigated in which the power density, Coulombic efficiency, and salt removal rate were decreased by 71, 44, and 27 %, respectively. The primary reason for the system performance decrease was biofouling on the membranes, which increased internal resistance and reduced the ionic transfer and energy conversion efficiency. Changing membranes was an effective method to recover the MDC performance. The microbial community diversity in the MDC anode was low compared with that of the reported microbial fuel cell (MFC), while the abundance of Proteobacteria was 30 % higher. The content of Planctomycetes in the cathode biofilm sample was much higher than that in biofouling on the cation exchange membrane (CEM), indicating that Planctomycetes were relevant to cathode oxygen reduction. PMID:26596826

  20. Surface modification of reverse osmosis desalination membranes by thin-film coatings deposited by initiated chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaydin-Ince, Gozde, E-mail: gozdeince@sabanciuniv.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Matin, Asif, E-mail: amatin@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Khan, Zafarullah, E-mail: zukhan@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Zaidi, S.M. Javaid, E-mail: zaidismj@kfupm.edu.sa [Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Gleason, Karen K., E-mail: kkgleasn@mit.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-07-31

    Thin-film polymeric reverse osmosis membranes, due to their high permeation rates and good salt rejection capabilities, are widely used for seawater desalination. However, these membranes are prone to biofouling, which affects their performance and efficiency. In this work, we report a method to modify the membrane surface without damaging the active layer or significantly affecting the performance of the membrane. Amphiphilic copolymer films of hydrophilic hydroxyethylmethacrylate and hydrophobic perfluorodecylacrylate (PFA) were synthesized and deposited on commercial RO membranes using an initiated chemical vapor deposition technique which is a polymer deposition technique that involves free-radical polymerization initiated by gas-phase radicals. Relevant surface characteristics such as hydrophilicity and roughness could be systematically controlled by varying the polymer chemistry. Increasing the hydrophobic PFA content in the films leads to an increase in the surface roughness and hydrophobicity. Furthermore, the surface morphology studies performed using the atomic force microscopy show that as the thickness of the coating increases average surface roughness increases. Using this knowledge, the coating thickness and chemistry were optimized to achieve high permeate flux and to reduce cell attachment. Results of the static bacterial adhesion tests show that the attachment of bacterial cells is significantly reduced on the coated membranes. - Highlights: • Thin films are deposited on reverse osmosis membranes. • Amphiphilic thin films are resistant to protein attachment. • The permeation performance of the membranes is not affected by the coating. • The thin film coatings delayed the biofouling.

  1. Archaeal Diversity in Biofilm Technologies Applied to Treat Urban and Industrial Wastewater: Recent Advances and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús González-López

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Biological wastewater treatment (WWT frequently relies on biofilms for the removal of anthropogenic contaminants. The use of inert carrier materials to support biofilm development is often required, although under certain operating conditions microorganisms yield structures called granules, dense aggregates of self-immobilized cells with the characteristics of biofilms maintained in suspension. Molecular techniques have been successfully applied in recent years to identify the prokaryotic communities inhabiting biofilms in WWT plants. Although methanogenic Archaea are widely acknowledged as key players for the degradation of organic matter in anaerobic bioreactors, other biotechnological functions fulfilled by Archaea are less explored, and research on their significance and potential for WWT is largely needed. In addition, the occurrence of biofilms in WWT plants can sometimes be a source of operational problems. This is the case for membrane bioreactors (MBR, an advanced technology that combines conventional biological treatment with membrane filtration, which is strongly limited by biofouling, defined as the undesirable accumulation of microbial biofilms and other materials on membrane surfaces. The prevalence and spatial distribution of archaeal communities in biofilm-based WWT as well as their role in biofouling are reviewed here, in order to illustrate the significance of this prokaryotic cellular lineage in engineered environments devoted to WWT.

  2. Assessing the Antimicrobial Activity of Polyisoprene Based Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hope Badawy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available There has been an intense research effort in the last decades in the field of biofouling prevention as it concerns many aspects of everyday life and causes problems to devices, the environment, and human health. Many different antifouling and antimicrobial materials have been developed to struggle against bacteria and other micro- and macro-organism attachment to different surfaces. However the “miracle solution” has still to be found. The research presented here concerns the synthesis of bio-based polymeric materials and the biological tests that showed their antifouling and, at the same time, antibacterial activity. The raw material used for the coating synthesis was natural rubber. The polyisoprene chains were fragmented to obtain oligomers, which had reactive chemical groups at their chain ends, therefore they could be modified to insert polymerizable and biocidal groups. Films were obtained by radical photopolymerization of the natural rubber derived oligomers and their structure was altered, in order to understand the mechanism of attachment inhibition and to increase the efficiency of the anti-biofouling action. The adhesion of three species of pathogenic bacteria and six strains of marine bacteria was studied. The coatings were able to inhibit bacterial attachment by contact, as it was verified that no detectable leaching of toxic molecules occurred.

  3. The use of microbial and chemical analyses to characterize the variations in fouling profile of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Manes, Carmem Lara De O

    2013-01-01

    Biofouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes is one of the most common problems in desalinations plants reducing the efficiency of the water production process. The characterization of bacterial community composition from fouling layers as well as detailed analysis of surrounding chemical environment might reveal process specific bacterial groups/species that are involved in RO biofouling. In this study, advanced organics analytic methods (elemental analysis, FTIR, and ICP-OES) were combined with high-throughput 16S rRNA (pyro) sequencing to assess in parallel, the chemical properties and the active microbial community composition of SWRO membranes from a pilot desalination plant (MFT, Tarragona) in February 2011 and July 2011. Prefiltered ultrafiltration. waters fed SWRO membranes during third and fifth month of operation, respectively. SWRO samples were taken from three modules at different positions (first, fourth, and sixth) in order to investigate the spatial changes in fouling layers\\' chemical and microbiological composition. The overall assessment of chemical parameters revealed that fouling layers were mainly composed by bio and organic material (proteins and lipids). Ca and Fe were found to be the most abundant elements having an increasing concentration gradient according to the module position. Bacterial community composition of SWRO membranes is mostly represented by the Gammaproteobacteria class with interesting differences in genera/species spatial and temporal distribution. This preliminary result suggests that pretreatments and/or operational conditions might have selected different bacterial groups more adapted to colonize SWRO membranes. © 2013 Desalination Publications.

  4. Adsorption of alginate and albumin on aluminum coatings inhibits adhesion of Escherichia coli and enhances the anti-corrosion performances of the coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yi; Huang, Jing; Chen, Xiuyong; Ren, Kun; Li, Hua, E-mail: lihua@nimte.ac.cn

    2015-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Adsorption behaviors of alginate and albumin on Al coatings were investigated at molecular level. • The adsorption inhibits effectively the colonization of Escherichia coli bacteria. • The adsorption alters the wettability of the Al coatings. • The conditioning layer enhances anti-corrosion performances of the Al coatings. - Abstract: Thermal-sprayed aluminum coatings have been extensively used as protective layers against corrosion for steel structures in the marine environment. The corrosion usually deteriorates from marine biofouling, yet the mechanism of accelerated corrosion of the coatings remains elusive. As the first stage participating in biofouling process, adsorption of molecules plays critical roles in mediating formation of biofilm. Here, we report at molecular level the adsorption behaviors of albumin and marine polysaccharide on arc-sprayed aluminum coatings and their influence on adhesion of Escherichia coli. The adsorption of alginate and albumin was characterized by infrared spectra analyses and atomic force microscopic observation. The adsorption inhibits effectively adhesion of the bacteria. Further investigation indicates that alginate/albumin altered the hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of the coatings instead of impacting the survival of the bacteria to decline their adhesion. The conditioning layer composed of the molecules enhances anti-corrosion performances of the coatings.

  5. Antibiofilm and anti-infection of a marine bacterial exopolysaccharide against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimei eWu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a well-known pathogenic bacterium that forms biofilms and produces virulence factors, thus leading to major problems in many fields, such as clinical infection, food contamination and marine biofouling. In this study, we report the purification and characterization of an exopolysaccharide EPS273 from the culture supernatant of marine bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri 273. The exopolysaccharide EPS273 not only effectively inhibits biofilm formation but also disperses preformed biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. High performance liquid chromatography traces of the hydrolyzed polysaccharides shows that EPS273 primarily consists of glucosamine, rhamnose, glucose and mannose. Further investigation demonstrates that EPS273 reduces the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin, exoprotease and rhamnolipid, and the virulence of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to human lung cells A549 and zebrafish embryos is also obviously attenuated by EPS273. In addition, EPS273 also greatly reduces the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and extracellular DNA (eDNA, which are important factors for biofilm formation. Furthermore, EPS273 exhibits strong antioxidant potential by quenching hydroxyl and superoxide anion radicals. Notably, the antibiofouling activity of EPS273 is observed in the marine environment up to two weeks according to the amounts of bacteria and diatoms in the glass slides submerged in the ocean. Taken together, the properties of EPS273 indicate that it has a promising prospect in combating bacterial biofilm-associated infection, food-processing contamination and marine biofouling.

  6. Membrane Bioreactor (MBR) Technology for Wastewater Treatment and Reclamation: Membrane Fouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorhemen, Oliver Terna; Hamza, Rania Ahmed; Tay, Joo Hwa

    2016-01-01

    The membrane bioreactor (MBR) has emerged as an efficient compact technology for municipal and industrial wastewater treatment. The major drawback impeding wider application of MBRs is membrane fouling, which significantly reduces membrane performance and lifespan, resulting in a significant increase in maintenance and operating costs. Finding sustainable membrane fouling mitigation strategies in MBRs has been one of the main concerns over the last two decades. This paper provides an overview of membrane fouling and studies conducted to identify mitigating strategies for fouling in MBRs. Classes of foulants, including biofoulants, organic foulants and inorganic foulants, as well as factors influencing membrane fouling are outlined. Recent research attempts on fouling control, including addition of coagulants and adsorbents, combination of aerobic granulation with MBRs, introduction of granular materials with air scouring in the MBR tank, and quorum quenching are presented. The addition of coagulants and adsorbents shows a significant membrane fouling reduction, but further research is needed to establish optimum dosages of the various coagulants/adsorbents. Similarly, the integration of aerobic granulation with MBRs, which targets biofoulants and organic foulants, shows outstanding filtration performance and a significant reduction in fouling rate, as well as excellent nutrients removal. However, further research is needed on the enhancement of long-term granule integrity. Quorum quenching also offers a strong potential for fouling control, but pilot-scale testing is required to explore the feasibility of full-scale application. PMID:27314394

  7. Utilization of artificial recharged effluent as makeup water for industrial cooling system: corrosion and scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liangliang; Qin, Kena; Zhao, Qingliang; Noguera, Daniel R; Xin, Ming; Liu, Chengcai; Keene, Natalie; Wang, Kun; Cui, Fuyi

    2016-01-01

    The secondary effluent from wastewater treatment plants was reused for industrial cooling water after pre-treatment with a laboratory-scale soil aquifer treatment (SAT) system. Up to a 95.3% removal efficiency for suspended solids (SS), 51.4% for chemical oxygen demand (COD), 32.1% for Cl(-) and 30.0% SO4(2-) were observed for the recharged secondary effluent after the SAT operation, which is essential for controlling scaling and corrosion during the cooling process. As compared to the secondary effluent, the reuse of the 1.5 m depth SAT effluent decreased the corrosion by 75.0%, in addition to a 55.1% decline of the scales/biofouling formation (with a compacted structure). The experimental results can satisfy the Chinese criterion of Design Criterion of the Industrial Circulating Cooling Water Treatment (GB 50050-95), and was more efficient than tertiary effluent which coagulated with ferric chloride. In addition, chemical structure of the scales/biofouling obtained from the cooling system was analyzed. PMID:27191579

  8. Estudio de casos Aislamiento de bacterias del hierro y azufre como productoras de biodeterioro o corrosión anaeróbica en tuberías y daño a otros materiales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Montero Campos

    Full Text Available Los procesos de biodeterioro son reconocidos actualmente como una de las mayores causas de deterioro en superficies de diversos materiales, queafectan a una gran cantidad y diversos tipos de industrias. Una superficie metálica en contacto con agua o tierra experimenta una serie de cambios biológicos e inorgánicos que constituyen el fouling. La posterior secuencia de cambios biológicos es debido a la adherencia irreversible de diferentes tipos de microorganismos sobre el metal a través del material polimérico extracelular, constituyendo ello, el biofouling. La biocorrosión y el biofouling de las superficies se deben a procesos biológicos y electroquímicos que ocurren mediante la participación de microorganismos adheridos a las superficies a través de biofilmes. Estas películas biológicas modifican las condiciones de la interfase metal/solución, formando una barrera al contacto entre el metal o material y el medio circundante, se considera que la corrosión microbiológica transcurre entonces sobre una superficie modificada con características fisicoquímicas y biológicas muy particulares y condicionadas, donde no se puede interpretar con los mismos parámetros de un proceso de corrosión inorgánica.

  9. Influence of Chlorination and Choice of Materials on Fouling in Cooling Water System under Brackish Seawater Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauliina Rajala

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cooling systems remove heat from components and industrial equipment. Water cooling, employing natural waters, is typically used for cooling large industrial facilities, such as power plants, factories or refineries. Due to moderate temperatures, cooling water cycles are susceptible to biofouling, inorganic fouling and scaling, which may reduce heat transfer and enhance corrosion. Hypochlorite treatment or antifouling coatings are used to prevent biological fouling in these systems. In this research, we examine biofouling and materials’ degradation in a brackish seawater environment using a range of test materials, both uncoated and coated. The fouling and corrosion resistance of titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V, super austenitic stainless steel (254SMO and epoxy-coated carbon steel (Intershield Inerta160 were studied in the absence and presence of hypochlorite. Our results demonstrate that biological fouling is intensive in cooling systems using brackish seawater in sub-arctic areas. The microfouling comprised a vast diversity of bacteria, archaea, fungi, algae and protozoa. Chlorination was effective against biological fouling: up to a 10–1000-fold decrease in bacterial and archaeal numbers was detected. Chlorination also changed the diversity of the biofilm-forming community. Nevertheless, our results also suggest that chlorination enhances cracking of the epoxy coating.

  10. Biopolymer-induced calcium phosphate scaling in membrane-based water treatment systems: Langmuir model films studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahdal, Yara N; Oren, Yoram; Schwahn, Dietmar; Pipich, Vitaliy; Herzberg, Moshe; Ying, Wang; Kasher, Roni; Rapaport, Hanna

    2016-07-01

    Biofouling and scaling on reverse osmosis (RO) or nanofiltration (NF) membranes during desalination of secondary and tertiary effluents pose an obstacle that limits the reuse of wastewater. In this study we explored the mineral scaling induced by biopolymers originated from bacterial biofilms: bovine serum albumin (BSA), fibrinogen, lysozyme and alginic acid, as well as an extracts of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from bio-fouled RO membranes from wastewater treatment facility. Mineralization studies were performed on Langmuir films of the biopolymers deposited at the interface of a solution simulating RO desalination of secondary-treated wastewater effluents. All studied biopolymers and EPS induced heterogeneous mineralization of mainly calcium phosphate. Using IR spectroscopy coupled with systematic quantitative analysis of the surface pressure versus molecular-area isotherms, we determined the mineralization tendencies of the biopolymers to be in the order of: fibrinogen>lysozyme>BSA>alginic acid. The biopolymers and EPS studied here were found to be accelerators of calcium-phosphate mineralization. This study demonstrates the utilization of Langmuir surface-pressure area isotherms and a model solution in quantitatively assessing the mineralization tendencies of various molecular components of EPS in context of membrane-based water treatment systems. PMID:27015648

  11. Zwitterionic modification of polyurethane membranes for enhancing the anti-fouling property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peiming; Huang, Tao; Liu, Pingsheng; Shi, Shufeng; Chen, Qiang; Li, Li; Shen, Jian

    2016-10-15

    Polyurethane (PU) is a biopolymer that has been commonly used for biomedical applications. However, the biofouling phenomenon on the hydrophobic PU surface is one of the crucial issues that embarrassing its applications. Here, we report a facile & efficient approach to improve the anti-biofouling ability of the PU substrates. Active residues were firstly generated on the PU surface by using the low temperature air-plasma treatment, promoting the immobilization of the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiators on the surface. Then, three types of zwitterionic polymer brushes, as well as PEG brushes, have been fabricated on the PU substrates through surface-initiated ATRP (SI-ATRP). Robust surface characterizations that capable of revealing the surface chemistry (including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and wettability tests), and antifouling evaluations of the PU substrates (protein adsorption, platelet adhesion, and cell adhesion measurements) were performed. Results showed that three types of zwitterionic brushes have been successful grafted on the PU surface, respectively. And the three types of zwitterionic brushes, in general, significantly inhibited the protein adsorption, the platelet adhesion, and the cell adhesion on the PU surface, endowing a significantly improved anti-fouling ability to the PU substrates. Furthermore, we found that this facial zwitterionic surface modification did not compromise the mechanical property of the PU substrates. This strategy could be easily exploited to PU-based biomaterials to improve their performance in many applications. PMID:27416290

  12. Marketing Netcoatings for Aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Unsustainable harvesting of natural fish stocks is driving an ever growing marine aquaculture industry. Part of the aquaculture support industry is net suppliers who provide producers with nets used in confining fish while they are grown to market size. Biofouling must be addressed in marine environments to ensure maximum product growth by maintaining water flow and waste removal through the nets. Biofouling is managed with copper and organic biocide based net coatings. The aquaculture industry provides a case study for business issues related to entry of improved fouling management technology into the marketplace. Several major hurdles hinder entry of improved novel technologies into the market. The first hurdle is due to the structure of business relationships. Net suppliers can actually cut their business profits dramatically by introducing improved technologies. A second major hurdle is financial costs of registration and demonstration of efficacy and quality product with a new technology. Costs of registration are prohibitive if only the net coatings market is involved. Demonstration of quality product requires collaboration and a team approach between formulators, net suppliers and farmers. An alternative solution is a vertically integrated business model in which the support business and product production business are part of the same company. PMID:25329615

  13. Real-time petroleum spill detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A real-time autonomous oil and fuel spill detection system has been developed to rapidly detect of a wide range of petroleum products floating on, or suspended in water. The system consists of an array of spill detection buoys distributed within the area to be monitored. The buoys are composed of a float and a multispectral fluorometer, which looks up through the top 5 cm of water to detect floating and suspended petroleum products. The buoys communicate to a base station computer that controls the sampling of the buoys and analyses the data from each buoy to determine if a spill has occurred. If statistically significant background petroleum levels are detected, the system raises an oil spill alarm. The system is useful because early detection of a marine oil spill allows for faster containment, thereby minimizing the contaminated area and reducing cleanup costs. This paper also provided test results for biofouling, various petroleum product detection, water turbidity and wave tolerance. The technology has been successfully demonstrated. The UV light source keeps the optic window free from biofouling, and the electronics are fully submerged so there is no risk that the unit could ignite the vapours of a potential oil spill. The system can also tolerate moderately turbid waters and can therefore be used in many rivers, harbours, water intakes and sumps. The system can detect petroleum products with an average thickness of less than 3 micrometers floating on the water surface. 3 refs., 15 figs

  14. In situ glass antifouling using Pt nanoparticle coating for periodic electrolysis of seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuxi; Zhao, Jin; Qiu, Ri; Zheng, Jiyong; Lin, Cunguo; Ma, Bojiang; Wang, Peng

    2015-12-01

    In situ electrochemical chlorination is a promising way to prohibit the biofouling on glass used for optical devices in seawater. To make this approach practical, a conductive glass should have low overpotential to generate Cl2, so that the electrical energy consumption, a critical issue for field application, will be low. Moreover, a long sustainability should also be taken into consideration from the application perspective. Following these criteria, we propose Pt/ITO surface to electrochemically generate Cl2, which immunizes biofouling for glass substrate. In this report, firstly, Pt nanoparticle/ITO is prepared via an electrodeposition approach. Secondly, electrocatalysis capability of Pt/ITO is elucidated, which shows the catalysis for Cl2 generation from NaCl solution and seawater has been sparked with Pt on the surface. Also, Pt/ITO is more sustainable and efficient than the bare ITO in natural seawater. Thirdly, the antifouling property is evaluated taking diatom as the target organism. Electrochemical chlorination on Pt/ITO can efficiently prevent the glass from fouling.

  15. Use of microcapsules as controlled release devices for coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson Trojer, Markus; Nordstierna, Lars; Bergek, Jonatan; Blanck, Hans; Holmberg, Krister; Nydén, Magnus

    2015-08-01

    Biofouling of surfaces is a considerable problem in many industrial sectors and for the public community in general. The problem is usually approached by the use of functional coatings and most of such antifouling coatings rely on the effect of biocides. However, a substantial drawback is the poor control over the release of the biocide as well as its degradation in the paint. Encapsulation of the biocides in microcapsules is a promising approach that may overcome some of the problems associated with the more traditional ways of incorporating the antifouling agent into the formulation. In this review, we summarize more than a decade of microcapsule research from our lab as well as from other groups working on this topic. Focus will be on two coacervation-based encapsulation techniques; the internal phase separation method and the double emulsion method, which together enable the encapsulation of a broad spectrum of biocides with different physicochemical properties. The release of the biocide from core-shell particles and from encapsulated biocides in coatings is treated in detail. The release behaviour is interpreted in terms of the physicochemical properties of the core-shell particle and the coating matrix. In addition, special attention is given to the experimental release methodology and the implementation of proper diffusion models to describe the release. At the end of the review examples of antifouling properties of some coatings against common biofoulers are presented. PMID:25441449

  16. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Programmatic Environmental Analysis--Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Authors, Various

    1980-01-01

    The programmatic environmental analysis is an initial assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology considering development, demonstration and commercialization. It is concluded that the OTEC development program should continue because the development, demonstration, and commercialization on a single-plant deployment basis should not present significant environmental impacts. However, several areas within the OTEC program require further investigation in order to assess the potential for environmental impacts from OTEC operation, particularly in large-scale deployments and in defining alternatives to closed-cycle biofouling control: (1) Larger-scale deployments of OTEC clusters or parks require further investigations in order to assess optimal platform siting distances necessary to minimize adverse environmental impacts. (2) The deployment and operation of the preoperational platform (OTEC-1) and future demonstration platforms must be carefully monitored to refine environmental assessment predictions, and to provide design modifications which may mitigate or reduce environmental impacts for larger-scale operations. These platforms will provide a valuable opportunity to fully evaluate the intake and discharge configurations, biofouling control methods, and both short-term and long-term environmental effects associated with platform operations. (3) Successful development of OTEC technology to use the maximal resource capabilities and to minimize environmental effects will require a concerted environmental management program, encompassing many different disciplines and environmental specialties. This volume contains these appendices: Appendix A -- Deployment Scenario; Appendix B -- OTEC Regional Characterization; and Appendix C -- Impact and Related Calculations.

  17. Quorum sensing in water and wastewater treatment biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lin; Wu, Zhuoying; Yu, Xin

    2013-04-01

    Fixed film processes and activated sludge processes are two main families of wastewater treatment systems which all refer to the heterogeneous microbial communities. Meanwhile, biofilms in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) and biofouling in membrane systems are significant problems in the water and wastewater treatment which reduce the microbial quality of drinking water and limit the development of membrane system respectively. Since biofilms and quorum sensing (QS) as two microbial social behaviors have been inextricably linked, a number of studies have focused on the role of QS signaling and QS inhibition in the processes of water and wastewater treatment, which will help us engineer these biological treatment processes successfully and develop promising approaches for control of microbial adhesion, colonization and biofilm formation. This review gives a summary of recent known QS mechanisms and their role in biofilm formation for different species. Particular attentions are dedicated to the signaling molecules involved in some microbial granulation processes and the potential applications by some of their natural and synthetic analogues in the treatment of membrane biofouling. PMID:24620615

  18. Biopelículas: una comunidad microscópica en desarrollo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisol Betancourth

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Las biopelículas son organizaciones microbianas compuestas por microorganismos que se adhieren a las superficies gracias a la secreción de un exopolímero. Estas conformaciones microbianas presentan características como heterogeneidad, diversidad de microambientes, resistencia a antimicrobianos y capacidad de comunicación intercelular que las convierten en complejos difíciles de erradicar de los ambientes donde se establecen. En el hombre las biopelículas se asocian con un gran número de procesos infecciosos que por lo general son de transcurso lento, ocasionando que su control sea dispendioso. En el área industrial y del medio ambiente el papel de las biopelículas se centra en el biofouling y la bioremediación. El biofouling es la contaminación de un sistema producido por la actividad microbiana de la biopelícula, mientras que la bioremediación utiliza las biopelículas para mejorar las condiciones de un sistema contaminado. El estudio de las biopelículas es un área excitante en continua evolución; tienen repercusiones importantes para la humanidad las implicaciones que presentan estas asociaciones en los diversos ámbitos de la medicina y la industria.

  19. Positive impact of biofilm on reducing the permeation of ampicillin through membrane for membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Liang; Yuan, Xia; Shen, Weihuang; He, Ning; Wang, Yuanpeng; Lu, Haoliang; Lu, Yinghua

    2014-02-01

    The membrane bioreactor (MBR) has recently been the focus of research for the treatment of emerging contaminants such as antibiotics in wastewater. Although the biofilm on membrane in an MBR has been considered a cause of "membrane biofouling", its positive impact on removing pollutants has not been well-studied. This study was designed to investigate the retention effect on the permeation of ampicillin (AMP) by the biofilm coated on cellulose acetate (CA) membrane (commonly used for MBRs) utilizing a novel method based on microbial sensitivity test. The bioflim layer (thickness of 12-16μm) increased the resistance of the membrane for AMP permeation by 3-28%. Diffusion appeared to be the main driving force for the mass transfer of AMP across the membrane. Besides, the biofilm increased the retention of AMP by 23% but exhibited similar adsorption capacity with comparison of the suspended activated sludge, which indicates that the compact structure of the biofilm was the major contributor for the added retention effect on AMP by the biofilm-coated CA membrane. This study suggests that biofilm (biofouling) in MBRs increases the retention of small-molecule constituents such as antibiotics. A delicate tradeoff between reduced wastewater throughput and increased retention of contaminants should be obtained when an MBR is designed and operated. PMID:24268345

  20. Surface functionalization of thin-film composite membranes with copper nanoparticles for antimicrobial surface properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Sasson, Moshe; Zodrow, Katherine R; Genggeng, Qi; Kang, Yan; Giannelis, Emmanuel P; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-01-01

    Biofouling is a major operational challenge in reverse osmosis (RO) desalination, motivating a search for improved biofouling control strategies. Copper, long known for its antibacterial activity and relatively low cost, is an attractive potential biocidal agent. In this paper, we present a method for loading copper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs) on the surface of a thin-film composite (TFC) polyamide RO membrane. Cu-NPs were synthesized using polyethyleneimine (PEI) as a capping agent, resulting in particles with an average radius of 34 nm and a copper content between 39 and 49 wt.%. The positive charge of the Cu-NPs imparted by the PEI allowed a simple electrostatic functionalization of the negatively charged RO membrane. We confirmed functionalization and irreversible binding of the Cu-NPs to the membrane surface with SEM and XPS after exposing the membrane to bath sonication. We also demonstrated that Cu-NP functionalization can be repeated after the Cu-NPs dissolve from the membrane surface. The Cu-NP functionalization had minimal impact on the intrinsic membrane transport parameters. Surface hydrophilicity and surface roughness were also maintained, and the membrane surface charge became positive after functionalization. The functionalized membrane exhibited significant antibacterial activity, leading to an 80-95% reduction in the number of attached live bacteria for three different model bacterial strains. Challenges associated with this functionalization method and its implementation in RO desalination are discussed. PMID:24308843

  1. Antibacterial activity and QSAR of chalcones against biofilm-producing bacteria isolated from marine waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, P M; Prabhawathi, V; Doble, M

    2010-04-01

    Biofouling in the marine environment is a major problem. In this study, three marine organisms, namely Bacillus flexus (LD1), Pseudomonas fluorescens (MD3) and Vibrio natriegens (MD6), were isolated from biofilms formed on polymer and metal surfaces immersed in ocean water. Phylogenetic analysis of these three organisms indicated that they were good model systems for studying marine biofouling. The in vitro antifouling activity of 47 synthesized chalcone derivatives was investigated by estimating the minimum inhibitory concentration against these organisms using a twofold dilution technique. Compounds C-5, C-16, C-24, C-33, C-34 and C-37 were found to be the most active. In the majority of the cases it was found that these active compounds had hydroxyl substitutions. A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) was developed after dividing the total data into training and test sets. The statistical measures r(2), [image omitted] (>0.6) q(2) (>0.5) and the F-ratio were found to be satisfactory. Spatial, structural and electronic descriptors were found to be predominantly affecting the antibiofouling activity of these compounds. Among the spatial descriptors, Jurs descriptors showed their contribution in all the three antibacterial QSARs. PMID:20544550

  2. Surface Functionalization of Thin-Film Composite Membranes with Copper Nanoparticles for Antimicrobial Surface Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Ben-Sasson, Moshe

    2014-01-07

    Biofouling is a major operational challenge in reverse osmosis (RO) desalination, motivating a search for improved biofouling control strategies. Copper, long known for its antibacterial activity and relatively low cost, is an attractive potential biocidal agent. In this paper, we present a method for loading copper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs) on the surface of a thin-film composite (TFC) polyamide RO membrane. Cu-NPs were synthesized using polyethyleneimine (PEI) as a capping agent, resulting in particles with an average radius of 34 nm and a copper content between 39 and 49 wt.%. The positive charge of the Cu-NPs imparted by the PEI allowed a simple electrostatic functionalization of the negatively charged RO membrane. We confirmed functionalization and irreversible binding of the Cu-NPs to the membrane surface with SEM and XPS after exposing the membrane to bath sonication. We also demonstrated that Cu-NP functionalization can be repeated after the Cu-NPs dissolve from the membrane surface. The Cu-NP functionalization had minimal impact on the intrinsic membrane transport parameters. Surface hydrophilicity and surface roughness were also maintained, and the membrane surface charge became positive after functionalization. The functionalized membrane exhibited significant antibacterial activity, leading to an 80-95% reduction in the number of attached live bacteria for three different model bacterial strains. Challenges associated with this functionalization method and its implementation in RO desalination are discussed. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  3. Biomimetic phosphorylcholine polymer grafting from polydimethylsiloxane surface using photo-induced polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Tatsuro; Konno, Tomohiro; Takai, Madoka; Moro, Toru; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2006-10-01

    The biomimetic synthetic phospholipid polymer containing a phosphorylcholine group, 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), has improved the surface property of biomaterials. Both hydrophilic and anti-biofouling surfaces were prepared on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with MPC grafted by surface-initiated photo-induced radical polymerization. Benzophenone was used as the photoinitiator. The quantity of the adsorbed initiator on PDMS was determined by UV absorption and ellipsometry. The poly(MPC)-grafted PDMS surfaces were characterized by XPS, ATR-FTIR and static water contact angle (SCA) measurements. The SCA on PDMS decreased from 115 degrees to 25 degrees after the poly(MPC) grafting. The in vitro single protein adsorption on the poly(MPC)-grafted PDMS decreased 50-75% compared to the unmodified PDMS. The surface friction of the poly(MPC)-grafted PDMS was lower than the unmodified PDMS under wet conditions. The oxygen permeability of the poly(MPC)-grafted PDMS was as high as the unmodified PDMS. The tensile property of PDMS was maintained at about 90% of the ultimate stress and strain after the poly(MPC) grafting. The surface-modified PDMS is expected to be a novel medical elastomer which possesses an excellent surface hydrophilicity, anti-biofouling property, oxygen permeability and tensile property. PMID:16797692

  4. Development of plastic heat exchangers for ocean thermal energy conversion. Final report, August 1976--December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, G.K.; Lee, C.O.; Latour, S.R.

    1979-01-01

    Materials and processes have been selected and design information obtained for plastic ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) heat exchangers as the result of a program comprising five types of laboratory experiments. Tests to evaluate the chemical resistance of seven commercially available thermoplastics to sea water and several possible working fluids were conducted with emphasis placed on compatibility with ammonia. Environmental rupture tests involving exposure of stressed specimens to sea water or liquid ammonia indicated that the high density polyethylene (HDPE) is the best suited candidate and produced an extrapolated 100,000 hour failure stress of 1060 psi for HDPE. Long term durability tests of extruded HDPE plate-tube panel confirmed that plastic heat transfer surface is mechanically reliable in an OTEC environment. Thermal conductivity measurements of acetylene black filled HDPE indicated that conductivity may be increased by 50% with a 35% by weight filler loading. The permeability coefficient measured for liquid ammonia through HDPE was higher than previous estimates. Test showed that the rate can be significantly reduced by sulfonation of HDPE. A review of biofouling mechanisms revealed that the permeable nature of the plastic heat exchanger surface may be used to control primary biofouling form formation by allowing incorporation of non-toxic organic repellents into the plastic. A preliminary design and fabrication development program suggests that construction of an ammonia condenser test unit is feasible using currently available materials and manufacturing techniques.

  5. Turbulent boundary-layer structure of flows over freshwater biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, J. M.; Sargison, J. E.; Henderson, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    The structure of the turbulent boundary-layer for flows over freshwater biofilms dominated by the diatom Tabellaria flocculosa was investigated. Biofilms were grown on large test plates under flow conditions in an Australian hydropower canal for periods up to 12 months. Velocity-profile measurements were obtained using LDV in a recirculating water tunnel for biofouled, smooth and artificially sandgrain roughened surfaces over a momentum thickness Reynolds number range of 3,000-8,000. Significant increases in skin friction coefficient of up to 160 % were measured over smooth-wall values. The effective roughnesses of the biofilms, k s, were significantly higher than their physical roughness measured using novel photogrammetry techniques and consisted of the physical roughness and a component due to the vibration of the biofilm mat. The biofilms displayed a k-type roughness function, and a logarithmic relationship was found between the roughness function and roughness Reynolds number based on the maximum peak-to-valley height of the biofilm, R t. The structure of the boundary layer adhered to Townsend's wall-similarity hypothesis even though the scale separation between the effective roughness height and the boundary-layer thickness was small. The biofouled velocity-defect profiles collapsed with smooth and sandgrain profiles in the outer region of the boundary layer. The Reynolds stresses and quadrant analysis also collapsed in the outer region of the boundary layer.

  6. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sands, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    This programmatic environmental analysis is an initial assessment of OTEC technology considering development, demonstration and commercialization; it is concluded that the OTEC development program should continue because the development, demonstration, and commercialization on a single-plant deployment basis should not present significant environmental impacts. However, several areas within the OTEC program require further investigation in order to assess the potential for environmental impacts from OTEC operation, particularly in large-scale deployments and in defining alternatives to closed-cycle biofouling control: (1) Larger-scale deployments of OTEC clusters or parks require further investigations in order to assess optimal platform siting distances necessary to minimize adverse environmental impacts. (2) The deployment and operation of the preoperational platform (OTEC-1) and future demonstration platforms must be carefully monitored to refine environmental assessment predictions, and to provide design modifications which may mitigate or reduce environmental impacts for larger-scale operations. These platforms will provide a valuable opportunity to fully evaluate the intake and discharge configurations, biofouling control methods, and both short-term and long-term environmental effects associated with platform operations. (3) Successful development of OTEC technology to use the maximal resource capabilities and to minimize environmental effects will require a concerted environmental management program, encompassing many different disciplines and environmental specialties.

  7. Biocontrol of fouling pests: Effect of diversity, identity and density of control agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalah, Javier; Newcombe, Emma M; Zaiko, Anastasija

    2016-04-01

    Augmentative biocontrol, using native natural enemies, has been suggested as a promising tool to control marine biofouling pests on artificial structures. However, there are still important knowledge gaps to be addressed before biocontrol can be considered as a management tool. In a field experiment on floating marine structures we examined intra- and interspecific consumer interactions among biocontrol agents on different surface orientations. We tested the effect of identity, density and diversity of three invertebrates (the 11-arm seastar Coscinasterias muricata, the sea urchin Evechinus chloroticus and the gastropod Cook's turban Cookia sulcata) to reduce established biofouling and to prevent fouling growth on defouled surfaces. High densities of biocontrol agents were not more effective at fouling control (cover and biomass) than low densities. Nor did multi-species treatments function more effectively than mono-specific ones. However, biocontrol agent identity was important, with the 11-arm seastar and Cook's turban being the most effective at fouling reduction and prevention, respectively. Surface orientation had a strong effect on the effectiveness of control agents, with the best results obtained on vertical compared to diagonal and underside surfaces. This study confirmed the potential of biocontrol as a management tool for marine pest, indicating that identity is more important than richness and density of control agents. It also highlighted the limitations of this approach on diagonal and underside surfaces, where control agents have limited retention ability. PMID:26845376

  8. Nanotechnology applications to desalination : a report for the joint water reuse & desalination task force.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, Patrick Vane; Mayer, Tom; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Nanomaterials and nanotechnology methods have been an integral part of international research over the past decade. Because many traditional water treatment technologies (e.g. membrane filtration, biofouling, scale inhibition, etc.) depend on nanoscale processes, it is reasonable to expect one outcome of nanotechnology research to be better, nano-engineered water treatment approaches. The most immediate, and possibly greatest, impact of nanotechnology on desalination methods will likely be the development of membranes engineered at the near-molecular level. Aquaporin proteins that channel water across cell membranes with very low energy inputs point to the potential for dramatically improved performance. Aquaporin-laced polymer membranes and aquaporin-mimicking carbon nanotubes and metal oxide membranes developed in the lab support this. A critical limitation to widespread use of nanoengineered desalination membranes will be their scalability to industrial fabrication processes. Subsequent, long-term improvements in nanoengineered membranes may result in self-healing membranes that ideally are (1) more resistant to biofouling, (2) have biocidal properties, and/or (3) selectively target trace contaminants.

  9. Surface modification of reverse osmosis desalination membranes by thin-film coatings deposited by initiated chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin-film polymeric reverse osmosis membranes, due to their high permeation rates and good salt rejection capabilities, are widely used for seawater desalination. However, these membranes are prone to biofouling, which affects their performance and efficiency. In this work, we report a method to modify the membrane surface without damaging the active layer or significantly affecting the performance of the membrane. Amphiphilic copolymer films of hydrophilic hydroxyethylmethacrylate and hydrophobic perfluorodecylacrylate (PFA) were synthesized and deposited on commercial RO membranes using an initiated chemical vapor deposition technique which is a polymer deposition technique that involves free-radical polymerization initiated by gas-phase radicals. Relevant surface characteristics such as hydrophilicity and roughness could be systematically controlled by varying the polymer chemistry. Increasing the hydrophobic PFA content in the films leads to an increase in the surface roughness and hydrophobicity. Furthermore, the surface morphology studies performed using the atomic force microscopy show that as the thickness of the coating increases average surface roughness increases. Using this knowledge, the coating thickness and chemistry were optimized to achieve high permeate flux and to reduce cell attachment. Results of the static bacterial adhesion tests show that the attachment of bacterial cells is significantly reduced on the coated membranes. - Highlights: • Thin films are deposited on reverse osmosis membranes. • Amphiphilic thin films are resistant to protein attachment. • The permeation performance of the membranes is not affected by the coating. • The thin film coatings delayed the biofouling

  10. Adsorption of alginate and albumin on aluminum coatings inhibits adhesion of Escherichia coli and enhances the anti-corrosion performances of the coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Adsorption behaviors of alginate and albumin on Al coatings were investigated at molecular level. • The adsorption inhibits effectively the colonization of Escherichia coli bacteria. • The adsorption alters the wettability of the Al coatings. • The conditioning layer enhances anti-corrosion performances of the Al coatings. - Abstract: Thermal-sprayed aluminum coatings have been extensively used as protective layers against corrosion for steel structures in the marine environment. The corrosion usually deteriorates from marine biofouling, yet the mechanism of accelerated corrosion of the coatings remains elusive. As the first stage participating in biofouling process, adsorption of molecules plays critical roles in mediating formation of biofilm. Here, we report at molecular level the adsorption behaviors of albumin and marine polysaccharide on arc-sprayed aluminum coatings and their influence on adhesion of Escherichia coli. The adsorption of alginate and albumin was characterized by infrared spectra analyses and atomic force microscopic observation. The adsorption inhibits effectively adhesion of the bacteria. Further investigation indicates that alginate/albumin altered the hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of the coatings instead of impacting the survival of the bacteria to decline their adhesion. The conditioning layer composed of the molecules enhances anti-corrosion performances of the coatings

  11. Structures and antifouling properties of low surface energy non-toxic antifouling coatings modified by nano-SiO2 powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN MeiLing; QU YuanYuan; YANG Li; GAO Hong

    2008-01-01

    Antifouling coatings are used to improve the speed and energy efficiency of ships by preventing or-ganisms, such as barnacles and weed, building up on the underwater hull and helping the ships movement through the water. Typically, marine coatings are tributyltin self-polishing copolymer paints containing toxic molecules called biocides. They have been the most successful in combating bio-fouling on ships, but their widespread use has caused severe pollution in the marine ecosystem. The low surface energy marine coating is an entirely non-toxic alternative, which reduces the adhesion strength of marine organisms, facilitating their hydrodynamic removal at high speeds. In this paper, the novel low surface energy non-toxic marine antifouling coatings were prepared with modified acrylic resin, nano-SiO2, and other pigments. The effects of nano-SiO2 on the surface structure and elastic modulus of coating films have been studied, and the seawater test has been carried out in the Dalian Bay. The results showed that micro-nano layered structures on the coating films and the lowest surface energy and elastic modulus could be obtained when an appropriate mass ratio of resin, nano-SiO2, and other pigments in coatings approached. The seawater exposure test has shown that the lower the sur-face energy and elastic modulus of coatings are, the less the marine biofouling adheres on the coating films.

  12. Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Dzombak; Radisav Vidic; Amy Landis

    2012-06-30

    Treated municipal wastewater is a common, widely available alternative source of cooling water for thermoelectric power plants across the U.S. However, the biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, carbonate and phosphates in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, respectively. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the benefits and life cycle costs of implementing tertiary treatment of secondary treated municipal wastewater prior to use in recirculating cooling systems. The study comprised bench- and pilot-scale experimental studies with three different tertiary treated municipal wastewaters, and life cycle costing and environmental analyses of various tertiary treatment schemes. Sustainability factors and metrics for reuse of treated wastewater in power plant cooling systems were also evaluated. The three tertiary treated wastewaters studied were: secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to acid addition for pH control (MWW_pH); secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF); and secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected nitrification, sand filtration, and GAC adsorption (MWW_NFG). Tertiary treatment was determined to be essential to achieve appropriate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control for use of secondary treated municipal wastewater in power plant cooling systems. The ability to control scaling, in particular, was found to be significantly enhanced with tertiary treated wastewater compared to secondary treated wastewater. MWW_pH treated water (adjustment to pH 7.8) was effective in reducing scale formation, but increased corrosion and the amount of biocide required to achieve appropriate biofouling control. Corrosion could be adequately controlled with tolytriazole addition (4-5 ppm TTA), however, which was the case for all of the tertiary treated waters. For MWW_NF treated water, the removal of ammonia by

  13. Environmentally benign sol-gel antifouling and foul-releasing coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detty, Michael R; Ciriminna, Rosaria; Bright, Frank V; Pagliaro, Mario

    2014-02-18

    Biofouling on ships and boats, characterized by aquatic bacteria and small organisms attaching to the hull, is an important global issue, since over 80000 tons of antifouling paint is used annually. This biofilm, which can form in as little as 48 hours depending on water temperature, increases drag on watercraft, which greatly reduces their fuel efficiency. In addition, biofouling can lead to microbially induced corrosion (MIC) due to H2S formed by the bacteria, especially sulfate-reducing bacteria. When the International Maritime Organization (IMO) international convention banned the use of effective but environmentally damaging coatings containing tributyl tin in 2008, the development of clean and effective antifouling systems became more important than ever. New nonbiocidal coatings are now in high demand. Scientists have developed new polymers, materials, and biocides, including new elastomeric coatings that they have obtained by improving the original silicone (polydimethylsiloxane) formulation patented in 1975. However, the high cost of silicones, especially of fluoropolymer-modified silicones, has generally prevented their large-scale diffusion. In 2009, traditional antifouling coatings using cuprous oxide formulated in copolymer paints still represented 95% of the global market volume of anti-fouling paints. The sol-gel nanochemistry approach to functional materials has emerged as an attractive candidate for creating low fouling surfaces due to the unique structure and properties of silica-based coatings and of hybrid inorganic-organic silicas in particular. Sol-gel formulations easily bind to all types of surfaces, such as steel, fiberglass, aluminum, and wood. In addition, they can cure at room temperature and form thin glassy coatings that are markedly different from thick silicone elastomeric foul-releasing coatings. Good to excellent performance against biofouling, low cure temperatures, enhanced and prolonged chemical and physical stability, ease of

  14. Innovative coatings and surface modification of titanium for sea water condenser applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effectiveness of cooling water systems in various power plants to maintain highest electrical energy output per tonne of fuel is important as part of good energy management. Cooling water systems of nuclear power plants using seawater for cooling comes under constant attack from the marine and sea water environment. Many metallic components and civil structures in the cooling water systems like bridges, intake wells, intake pipes, pump house wells, water boxes, condenser pipes are subjected to severe fouling and corrosion which limits the service life and availability of power plants. The experience with a coastal water cooled power plant at Kalpakkam (MAPS), India, showed that chlorination and screening control macrofouling to a great extend by controlling protozoans, invertebrates, algae and fungi. However 90% of marine bacteria are resistant to such control measures, and they cause microfouling of condenser pipes leading to poor heat transfer and microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) failures. Titanium is used as condenser for Indian nuclear power plants employing sea water cooling, including the PFBR at Kalpakkam. Though titanium is excellent with respect to corrosion behavior under sea water conditions, its biocompatible nature results in biofouling and MIC during service. Therefore innovative antifouling coatings and surface modification techniques for titanium condenser applications in seawater and marine environments are the need of the hour. Extensive investigations were carried out by different methods including nanostructuring of surfaces for making them antibacterial. The microroughness of titanium was produced by repeated pickling and polishing which by itself reduced microbial adhesion. To utilize photocatalytic activity for antibacterial property, anodization of titanium surfaces followed by heat treatment was adopted and this also has controlled microbial fouling. Electroless plating of nanofilm of copper-nickel alloy decreased biofouling of

  15. Self-Cleaning Coatings and Materials for Decontaminating Field-Deployable Land and Water-Based Optical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Robert; Underwood, Lauren; Holekamp, Kara; May, George; Spiering, Bruce; Davis, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    This technology exploits the organic decomposition capability and hydrophilic properties of the photocatalytic material titanium dioxide (TiO2), a nontoxic and non-hazardous substance, to address contamination and biofouling issues in field-deployed optical sensor systems. Specifically, this technology incorporates TiO2 coatings and materials applied to, or integrated as a part of, the optical surfaces of sensors and calibration sources, including lenses, windows, and mirrors that are used in remote, unattended, ground-based (land or maritime) optical sensor systems. Current methods used to address contamination or biofouling of these optical surfaces in deployed systems are costly, toxic, labor intensive, and non-preventative. By implementing this novel technology, many of these negative aspects can be reduced. The functionality of this innovative self-cleaning solution to address the problem of contamination or biofouling depends on the availability of a sufficient light source with the appropriate spectral properties, which can be attained naturally via sunlight or supplemented using artificial illumination such as UV LEDs (light emitting diodes). In land-based or above-water systems, the TiO2 optical surface is exposed to sunlight, which catalyzes the photocatalytic reaction, facilitating both the decomposition of inorganic and organic compounds, and the activation of superhydrophilic properties. Since underwater optical surfaces are submerged and have limited sunlight exposure, supplementary UV light sources would be required to activate the TiO2 on these optical surfaces. Nighttime operation of land-based or above-water systems would require this addition as well. For most superhydrophilic self-cleaning purposes, a rainwater wash will suffice; however, for some applications an attached rainwater collector/ dispenser or other fresh water dispensing system may be required to wash the optical surface and initiate the removal of contaminates. Deployment of this

  16. Development and characterization of 3D-printed feed spacers for spiral wound membrane systems

    KAUST Repository

    Siddiqui, Amber

    2016-01-02

    Feed spacers are important for the impact of biofouling on the performance of spiral-wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane systems. The objective of this study was to propose a strategy for developing, characterizing, and testing of feed spacers by numerical modeling, three-dimensional (3D) printing of feed spacers and experimental membrane fouling simulator (MFS) studies. The results of numerical modeling on the hydraulic behavior of various feed spacer geometries suggested that the impact of spacers on hydraulics and biofouling can be improved. A good agreement was found for the modeled and measured relationship between linear flow velocity and pressure drop for feed spacers with the same geometry, indicating that modeling can serve as first step in spacer characterization. An experimental comparison study of a feed spacer currently applied in practice and a 3D printed feed spacer with the same geometry showed (i) similar hydraulic behavior, (ii) similar pressure drop development with time and (iii) similar biomass accumulation during MFS biofouling studies, indicating that 3D printing technology is an alternative strategy for development of thin feed spacers with a complex geometry. Based on the numerical modeling results, a modified feed spacer with low pressure drop was selected for 3D printing. The comparison study of the feed spacer from practice and the modified geometry 3D printed feed spacer established that the 3D printed spacer had (i) a lower pressure drop during hydraulic testing, (ii) a lower pressure drop increase in time with the same accumulated biomass amount, indicating that modifying feed spacer geometries can reduce the impact of accumulated biomass on membrane performance. The combination of numerical modeling of feed spacers and experimental testing of 3D printed feed spacers is a promising strategy (rapid, low cost and representative) to develop advanced feed spacers aiming to reduce the impact of biofilm formation on

  17. Development and characterization of 3D-printed feed spacers for spiral wound membrane systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Amber; Farhat, Nadia; Bucs, Szilárd S; Linares, Rodrigo Valladares; Picioreanu, Cristian; Kruithof, Joop C; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Kidwell, James; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S

    2016-03-15

    Feed spacers are important for the impact of biofouling on the performance of spiral-wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane systems. The objective of this study was to propose a strategy for developing, characterizing, and testing of feed spacers by numerical modeling, three-dimensional (3D) printing of feed spacers and experimental membrane fouling simulator (MFS) studies. The results of numerical modeling on the hydrodynamic behavior of various feed spacer geometries suggested that the impact of spacers on hydrodynamics and biofouling can be improved. A good agreement was found for the modeled and measured relationship between linear flow velocity and pressure drop for feed spacers with the same geometry, indicating that modeling can serve as the first step in spacer characterization. An experimental comparison study of a feed spacer currently applied in practice and a 3D printed feed spacer with the same geometry showed (i) similar hydrodynamic behavior, (ii) similar pressure drop development with time and (iii) similar biomass accumulation during MFS biofouling studies, indicating that 3D printing technology is an alternative strategy for development of thin feed spacers with a complex geometry. Based on the numerical modeling results, a modified feed spacer with low pressure drop was selected for 3D printing. The comparison study of the feed spacer from practice and the modified geometry 3D printed feed spacer established that the 3D printed spacer had (i) a lower pressure drop during hydrodynamic testing, (ii) a lower pressure drop increase in time with the same accumulated biomass amount, indicating that modifying feed spacer geometries can reduce the impact of accumulated biomass on membrane performance. The combination of numerical modeling of feed spacers and experimental testing of 3D printed feed spacers is a promising strategy (rapid, low cost and representative) to develop advanced feed spacers aiming to reduce the impact of

  18. Energy. A power station at sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As seas represent 70 per cent of the Earth surface, projects are developed to recover the solar energy they absorb. 10 MW Pilot units are announced for 2013 or 2014 and should be followed by 50 and 100 MW ocean thermal energy production offshore plants. The French company DCNS is presently studying three projects in Martinique, Reunion and Tahiti, and Lockheed Martin is working in Hawaii on such projects. These projects take advantage of the temperature difference between surface and deep waters. The main technological challenge is the design of heat exchangers which will work with only a 20 degree temperature difference, will suffer biofouling, will need a peculiar fluid, and also the design of the different equipment and hardware which will have to cope with the environment (sea water, tropical swells, hurricanes, deep water high pressures)

  19. Investigation of hot roller embossing for microfluidic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microfluidics for most bio-related diagnostic applications typically requires single usage disposable chips to avoid bio-fouling and cross-contamination. Individual piece-wise manufacturing of polymeric microfluidic devices has been widely employed in recent years. To significantly lower the manufacturing costs, one possible way is to improve the production yield of polymer microfluidic chips via the hot roller embossing method. This paper discusses the effects of varying the process parameters such as roller temperature, applied pressure and substrate preheating during hot roller embossing (according to a systematic set of experiment designs) and its influence on the corresponding mold to pattern fidelity in terms of normalized embossed depths on the poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) substrate. Concurrently, pattern density studies on the mold were also conducted. Functional testing in terms of fluid flow and micromixing was carried out to evaluate the feasibility of using hot roller embossed PMMA substrates as microfluidic chips

  20. Field experimental evaluation of secondary metabolites from marine invertebrates as antifoulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, R C; Carvalho, A G V; Gama, B A P; Coutinho, R

    2002-05-01

    The crude organic extracts of the endemic gorgonian Phyllogorgia dilatata and two sponge species Aplysina fulva and Mycale microsigmatosa were evaluated for anti-fouling properties through field experiments. To investigate this property in ecologically meaningful conditions, crude extracts from these invertebrates were incorporated at concentrations naturally found in these marine organisms into a stable gel used as a substratum for fouling settlement. Crude extract from A. fulva showed no significant anti-fouling property at the natural concentrations used in the field experiments. In fact, fouling organisms settled significantly more on gels treated with A. fulva extract than on the control gel. On the other hand, both M. microsigmatosa and P. dilatata yielded crude extracts that exhibited a selective action inhibiting only the settlement of barnacles. The evidences obtained here by means of field experiments can provide a basis for future development of one kind of natural antifoulant technology to prevent marine biofouling. PMID:12489403

  1. Optically Transparent, Mechanically Durable, Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Surfaces Enabled by Spinodally Phase-Separated Glass Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aytug, Tolga [ORNL; Christen, David K [ORNL; Hillesheim, Daniel A [ORNL; Hunter, Scott Robert [ORNL; Ivanov, Ilia N [ORNL; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle [ORNL; Lupini, Andrew R [ORNL; Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL; Trejo, Rosa M [ORNL; Winters, Kyle O. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Haynes, James A [ORNL; Simpson, John T [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by highly non-wetting natural biological surfaces (e.g., lotus leaves and water strider legs), artificial superhydrophobic surfaces that exhibit water droplet contact angles exceeding 150o have previously been constructed by utilizing various synthesis strategies.[ , , ] Such bio-inspired, water-repellent surfaces offer significant potential for numerous uses ranging from marine applications (e.g., anti-biofouling, anti-corrosion), anti-condensation (e.g., anti-icing, anti-fogging), membranes for selective separation (e.g., oil-water, gas-liquid), microfluidic systems, surfaces requiring reduced maintenance and cleaning, to applications involving glasses and optical materials.[ ] In addition to superhydrophobic attributes, for integration into device systems that have extended operational limits and overall improved performance, surfaces that also possess multifunctional characteristics are desired, where the functionality should match to the application-specific requirements.

  2. Environmental Applications of Interfacial Materials with Special Wettability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhangxin; Elimelech, Menachem; Lin, Shihong

    2016-03-01

    Interfacial materials with special wettability have become a burgeoning research area in materials science in the past decade. The unique surface properties of materials and interfaces generated by biomimetic approaches can be leveraged to develop effective solutions to challenging environmental problems. This critical review presents the concept, mechanisms, and fabrication techniques of interfacial materials with special wettability, and assesses the environmental applications of these materials for oil-water separation, membrane-based water purification and desalination, biofouling control, high performance vapor condensation, and atmospheric water collection. We also highlight the most promising properties of interfacial materials with special wettability that enable innovative environmental applications and discuss the practical challenges for large-scale implementation of these novel materials. PMID:26829583

  3. Antifouling Ultrafiltration Membranes via Post-Fabrication Grafting of Biocidal Nanomaterials

    KAUST Repository

    Mauter, Meagan S.

    2011-08-24

    Figure Presented: Ultrafiltration (UF) membranes perform critical pre-treatment functions in advanced water treatment processes. In operational systems, however, biofouling decreases membrane performance and increases the frequency and cost of chemical cleaning. The present work demonstrates a novel technique for covalently or ionically tethering antimicrobial nanoparticles to the surface of UF membranes. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) encapsulated in positively charged polyethyleneimine (PEI) were reacted with an oxygen plasma modified polysulfone UF membrane with and without 1-ethyl-3-(3- dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) present. The nucleophilic primary amines of the PEI react with the electrophilic carboxyl groups on the UF membrane surface to form electrostatic and covalent bonds. The irreversible modification process imparts significant antimicrobial activity to the membrane surface. Post-synthesis functionalization methods, such as the one presented here, maximize the density of nanomaterials at the membrane surface and may provide a more efficient route for fabricating diverse array of reactive nanocomposite membranes. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  4. Microbial Relevant Fouling in Membrane Bioreactors: Influencing Factors, Characterization, and Fouling Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony G. Fane

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms in membrane bioreactors (MBRs play important roles on degradation of organic/inorganic substances in wastewaters, while microbial deposition/growth and microbial product accumulation on membranes potentially induce membrane fouling. Generally, there is a need to characterize membrane foulants and to determine their relations to the evolution of membrane fouling in order to identify a suitable fouling control approach in MBRs. This review summarized the factors in MBRs that influence microbial behaviors (community compositions, physical properties, and microbial products. The state-of-the-art techniques to characterize biofoulants in MBRs were reported. The strategies for controlling microbial relevant fouling were discussed and the future studies on membrane fouling mechanisms in MBRs were proposed.

  5. Microbial fouling control in heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biofilm formation in turbulent flow has been studied a great deal during the last 15 years. Such studies have provided the basis for further experiments designed to test the efficacy of industrial antimicrobials against biofilms in laboratory models and in actual real-world industrial water-treatment programs. Biofilm microbiology is relevant from the industrial perspective because adherent populations of microorganisms often cause an economic impact on industrial processes. For example, it is the adherent population of microorganisms in cooling-water systems that can eventually contribute to significant heat transfer and fluid frictional resistances. The microbiology of biofilms in heat exchangers can be related to the performance of industrial antimicrobials. The development of fouling biofilms and methods to quantitatively observe the effect of biofouling control agents are discussed in this paper

  6. Benthic plastic debris in marine and fresh water environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Patricia L

    2015-08-01

    This review provides a discussion of the published literature concerning benthic plastic debris in ocean, sea, lake, estuary and river bottoms throughout the world. Although numerous investigations of shoreline, surface and near-surface plastic debris provide important information on plastic types, distribution, accumulation, and degradation, studies of submerged plastic debris have been sporadic in the past and have become more prominent only recently. The distribution of benthic debris is controlled mainly by combinations of urban proximity and its association with fishing-related activities, geomorphology, hydrological conditions, and river input. High density plastics, biofouled products, polymers with mineral fillers or adsorbed minerals, and plastic-metal composites all have the potential to sink. Once deposited on the bottoms of water basins and channels, plastics are shielded from UV light, thus slowing the degradation process significantly. Investigations of the interactions between benthic plastic debris and bottom-dwelling organisms will help shed light on the potential dangers of submerged plastic litter. PMID:26129903

  7. Studies with solid chlorine chemical for chlorination of sea water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorination is one of the conventional methods to control biofouling of condenser cooling water systems using either river water, reservoir water or sea water. However, there are many safety concerns associated with handling, storage and application of gaseous chlorine. Studies were carried out with suitable alternative chlorine chemical compounds which do not involve majority of these concerns but meet the functional requirement of gas chlorine. Trichloroisocyanuric Acid (TCCA) is one of the suitable alternatives to Gas chlorine. TCCA is a chlorine stabilized compound, stabilized with Cyanuric acid, thus similar to Gas Chlorine in its functions except that it is available in solid form. Release of chlorine is a gradual process in TCCA unlike Gaseous chlorine. Field studies with TCCA indicated gradual and near uniform release rate of chlorine, for longer duration with the requisite free residual chlorine levels (FRC). Thus, use of TCCA could be considered as a suitable alternative for gas chlorine for regular chlorination requirements. (author)

  8. Debris size and buoyancy influence the dispersal distance of stranded litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazey, Francesca M C; Ryan, Peter G

    2016-09-15

    Recent at sea surveys of floating macro-debris in the southeast Atlantic Ocean found that debris increases in size with distance from shore, suggesting that many smaller items, which dominate litter close to urban source areas, sink before dispersing far into the ocean. We test whether this pattern is evident in beach litter in the same region. Freshly stranded beach litter was collected at increasing distances (0km, 100km, 200km and 2800km) from Cape Town, a major urban litter source. Mean size and buoyancy of litter items increased significantly with distance from Cape Town. Size-specific sedimentation due to the ballasting effect of biofouling is a plausible explanation for the disappearance of smaller, less buoyant items. Our results provide further evidence that many low buoyancy items sink and support the hypothesis that size and buoyancy are strong predictors of dispersal distance for floating debris. PMID:27389460

  9. Use of Ultrasonic Sensors for Characterization of Membrane Fouling and Cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmira Kujundzic, Ph.D.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The modern challenges for membrane separations in a wide range of processes require more sophisticated approaches for the detection and remediation of fouling, i.e., the association of solutes, particulate matter, and colloids on and/or within a membrane. Most commonly, fouling is assessed from inferred measurements of permeation rate and/or permeate quality. The use of acoustic techniques for direct observations of membrane fouling was introduced over 10 years ago. We summarize here, recent developments in ultrasonic reflectometry that use both time-domain and frequency-domain spectra for noninvasive, real-time assessments of fouling in a variety of module configurations and geometries. In addition, we describe recent developments and applications of scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM for post-mortem characterization of membranes with particular emphasis on biofouling.

  10. Spacer geometry and particle deposition in spiral wound membrane feed channels

    KAUST Repository

    Radu, A.I.

    2014-11-01

    Deposition of microspheres mimicking bacterial cells was studied experimentally and with a numerical model in feed spacer membrane channels, as used in spiral wound nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membrane systems. In-situ microscopic observations in membrane fouling simulators revealed formation of specific particle deposition patterns for different diamond and ladder feed spacer orientations. A three-dimensional numerical model combining fluid flow with a Lagrangian approach for particle trajectory calculations could describe very well the in-situ observations on particle deposition in flow cells. Feed spacer geometry, positioning and cross-flow velocity sensitively influenced the particle transport and deposition patterns. The deposition patterns were not influenced by permeate production. This combined experimental-modeling approach could be used for feed spacer geometry optimization studies for reduced (bio)fouling. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Analysis of holographic microscopy data to quantitatively investigate three-dimensional settlement dynamics of algal zoospores in the vicinity of surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydt, M.; Divós, P.; Grunze, M.; Rosenhahn, A.

    2009-10-01

    In this article we describe the technical aspects of digital in-line holographic microscopy to track multiple macrofouling Ulva linza zoospores simultaneously during their exploration of surfaces. Using an effective method of artefact suppression at the edges of holograms in combination with projection of volume reconstructions, a fast algorithm was developed which allows a reliable determination of a large number of subsequent spore positions. Thus, statistical analysis of swimming behaviour in the vicinity of surfaces becomes possible. Using glass surfaces as example, velocity and diving direction distributions are calculated and the swimming behaviour is statistically analysed. Diving direction analysis provides a straightforward way to determine segments within traces with surface contact. The presented method of data analysis allows high throughput analysis of holographic microscopy data and sets the basis for different applications including biofouling.

  12. Glucose Recognition in Vitro Using Fluorescent Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noronha, G; Heiss, A M; Reilly, J R; Vachon, Jr, D J; Cary, D R; Zaitseva, N P; Reibold, R A; Lane, S M; Peyser, T A; Satcher, J H

    2001-04-25

    Diabetes is a disease that affects over 16 million people in the USA at a cost of 100 billion dollars annually. The ability to regulate insulin delivery in people with Type 1 diabetes is imperative as is the need to manage glucose levels in all people with this disease. Our current method for monitoring glucose is a (FDA approved) minimally invasive enzymatic sensor that can measure glucose levels in vivo for three days. We are focused on developing a noninvasive implantable glucose sensor that will be interrogated by an external device. The material must be robust, easy to process, biocompatible and resistant to biofouling. In this Presentation we will discuss the development of a new polymeric matrix that can recognize physiological levels of glucose in vitro using fluorescent spectroscopy.

  13. Biofilms: a developing microscopic community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivera Sandra Patricia

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are microbial communities composed by different microbiota embebbed in a special adaptive environment. These communities show different characteristics such as heterogeneity, diversity in microenvironments, capacity to resist antimicrobial therapy and ability to allow bacterial communication. These characteristics convert them in complex organizations that are difficult to eradicate in their own environment. In the man, biofilms are associated to a great number of slow-development infectious processes which greatly difficulties their eradication. In the industry and environment, biofilms are centered in processes known as biofouling and bioremediation. The former is the contamination of a system due to the microbial activity of a biofilm. The latter uses biofilms to improve the conditions of a contaminated system. The study of biofilms is a new and exciting field which is constantly evolving and whose implications in medicine and industry would have important repercussions for the humankind.

  14. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, Einar Orn

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth\\'s magnetic field system.

  15. Antifouling ultrafiltration membranes via post-fabrication grafting of biocidal nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauter, Meagan S; Wang, Yue; Okemgbo, Kaetochi C; Osuji, Chinedum O; Giannelis, Emmanuel P; Elimelech, Menachem

    2011-08-01

    Ultrafiltration (UF) membranes perform critical pre-treatment functions in advanced water treatment processes. In operational systems, however, biofouling decreases membrane performance and increases the frequency and cost of chemical cleaning. The present work demonstrates a novel technique for covalently or ionically tethering antimicrobial nanoparticles to the surface of UF membranes. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) encapsulated in positively charged polyethyleneimine (PEI) were reacted with an oxygen plasma modified polysulfone UF membrane with and without 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) present. The nucleophilic primary amines of the PEI react with the electrophilic carboxyl groups on the UF membrane surface to form electrostatic and covalent bonds. The irreversible modification process imparts significant antimicrobial activity to the membrane surface. Post-synthesis functionalization methods, such as the one presented here, maximize the density of nanomaterials at the membrane surface and may provide a more efficient route for fabricating diverse array of reactive nanocomposite membranes. PMID:21736330

  16. A passive apparatus for controlled-flux delivery of biocides: hydrogen peroxide as an example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Stefan Møller; Pedersen, L.T.; Dam-Johansen, Kim;

    2010-01-01

    A new test method has been developed to estimate the required release rate of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to prevent marine biofouling. The technique exploits a well-defined concentration gradient of biocide across a cellulose acetate membrane. A controlled flux of H2O2, an environmentally friendly......) were applied. However, release rates of 40 mu g cm(-2) day(-1) significantly displaced the distribution of settled larvae towards the area of the chamber farthest away from the membrane. Membrane tests in seawater (Jyllinge Harbour, Denmark) for over 16 weeks showed that release rates of H2O2...... membrane release rates of H2O2 (factor of between 5 and 50) than laboratory membrane exposure assays using barnacle larvae....

  17. Nanoparticles for Control of Biofilms of Acinetobacter Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Singh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are the cause of 80% of microbial infections. Acinetobacter species have emerged as multi- and pan-drug-resistant bacteria and pose a great threat to human health. These act as nosocomial pathogens and form excellent biofilms, both on biotic and abiotic surfaces, leading to severe infections and diseases. Various methods have been developed for treatment and control of Acinetobacter biofilm including photodynamic therapy, radioimmunotherapy, prophylactic vaccines and antimicrobial peptides. Nanotechnology, in the present scenario, offers a promising alternative. Nanomaterials possess unique properties, and multiple bactericidal mechanisms render them more effective than conventional drugs. This review intends to provide an overview of Acinetobacter biofilm and the significant role of various nanoparticles as anti-biofouling agents, surface-coating materials and drug-delivery vehicles for biofilm control and treatment of Acinetobacter infections.

  18. Identification et caractérisation des exopolymères de biofilms de bactéries marines

    OpenAIRE

    Brian-Jaisson, Florence,

    2014-01-01

    Dans l’environnement marin, les surfaces artificielles sont rapidement colonisées par des bactéries qui s’organisent en communautés appelées biofilms, s’entourant d’une matrice de substances polymériques extracellulaires (EPS). La formation d’un biofilm est une étape critique du processus nommé biofouling, c’est-à-dire l’accumulation de micro- et de macro-organismes sur une surface immergée, pouvant conduire à des conséquences néfastes dans le secteur marin. Dans cette étude, il s’agit d’iden...

  19. Fouling-resistant polymer brush coatings

    KAUST Repository

    Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse

    2011-11-01

    A major problem to be addressed with thin composite films used in processes such as coatings or water purification is the biofouling of the surface. To address this problem in a model system, functionalized polyaramide membranes containing an atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator were synthesized as a versatile approach to easily modify the surface properties of the polyaramide. Poly(methacrylic acid) brushes were grown using surface initiated ATRP followed by the functionalization of the poly(methacrylic acid) brushes with different side-chains chosen to reduce adhesion between the membrane and foulant. The relation between membrane fouling and the physicochemical properties of the surface was investigated in detail. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Summary of research on microbiological processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, A.L.

    1992-09-01

    Storage of thermal energy in aquifers has obvious benefits of saving energy and decreasing the consumption of fossil fuels. However, aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES), which involves groundwater aquifers as the storage medium for heat or chill, impinges on the environment. A literature review of pertinent microbiology publications (Hicks and Stewart, 1988) identified the potential for the interaction of ATES systems and microbiological processes to create a source of infectious diseases and the potential for damage to the environment. In addition, the review identified a potential for microbiological processes to develop conditions that would interfere with the operation of an ATES system. As a result of this research effort, investigators from Finland, Germany, Switzerland, and the United States have examined several ATES systems in operation and have observed that the ATES systems studied do not contribute to infectious disease transmission, do not adversely affect the environment, and do not contribute significantly to biofouling or biocorrosion.

  1. Summary of research on microbiological processes. International Energy Agency Subtask D, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, A.L.

    1992-09-01

    Storage of thermal energy in aquifers has obvious benefits of saving energy and decreasing the consumption of fossil fuels. However, aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES), which involves groundwater aquifers as the storage medium for heat or chill, impinges on the environment. A literature review of pertinent microbiology publications (Hicks and Stewart, 1988) identified the potential for the interaction of ATES systems and microbiological processes to create a source of infectious diseases and the potential for damage to the environment. In addition, the review identified a potential for microbiological processes to develop conditions that would interfere with the operation of an ATES system. As a result of this research effort, investigators from Finland, Germany, Switzerland, and the United States have examined several ATES systems in operation and have observed that the ATES systems studied do not contribute to infectious disease transmission, do not adversely affect the environment, and do not contribute significantly to biofouling or biocorrosion.

  2. Operational measures for the mitigation of MIC [microbiologically influenced corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although entitled Operational Measure, this section of the workshop encompasses aspects of mitigating MIC by controlling the hydraulic characteristics of a system. In order for operational considerations outside of the chemical treatment program to be effective, the system must be designed, constructed or modified, and maintained with MIC in mind. Since other papers in these proceedings discuss in detail the proper selection of materials, chemical treatments and detection of monitoring techniques, this paper is limited to quidelines for mitigating MIC and its effects by the mechanical design, maintenance and operation of the system. The key concept behind this philosophy is the synergistic relationships among microbes and among microbes and larger biofouling organisms. If the slime formers or other marine organisms can be prevented from attaching to the components, conducive environments for attack by other species is avoided

  3. Applied Chemistry Division progress report for the period 1993-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report covers the research and development (R and D) activities of the Applied Chemistry Division for the period January 1993 to December 1995. This period is marked by important contributions pertaining to the R and D programmes on chemistry aspects related to nuclear power stations. The thrust areas of the Division's R and D programmes are : chemical decontamination of nuclear reactor systems, metal-water interactions relevant to the Nuclear Power Stations and other industrial units of the Department, biofouling and its control in cooling water circuits and cooling water treatment. Other major research programmes are in the areas of radiation chemistry, solid state reactions and thermodynamic studies aimed at reactor applications. refs., 9 tabs., 1 fig

  4. Identification and management of potential problems in aquifer thermal energy storage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, F.A. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, ON (Canada); Allen, D.M. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    There is renewed interest in alternative renewable energy sources because of high energy prices, shortages in peak load electrical supplies, and environmental considerations. Worldwide efforts are being made to extract thermal energy from the ground for heating and cooling individual dwellings and industrial and institutional complexes. Aquifer thermal energy storage systems offer a viable option. Often, there is a poor understanding of the problems associated with the well field, resulting in resistance in the consideration and implementation of the technology. Well-field problems include pressure build-up in the reinjection wells resulting in reduced flow conditions. Other problems associated with well-field configuration include wellbore clogging due to sediment accumulation, scaling, degassing or bio-fouling. These problems are often associated with changes in temperature and pressure. The authors examined these problems and presented guidelines to assist in the identification and management of the potential problems. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Antennular sensory organs in cyprids of balanomorphan cirripedes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bielecki, Jan; Chan, Benny K K; Høeg, Jens Thorvald;

    2009-01-01

    Cirripedes are one of the major groups of fouling organism in the marine environment. The cyprid can, before a permanent attachment, actively explore and walk on the substratum using its antennules in a bipedal fashion without leaving the surface. Studying the structure of the cyprid antennule is...... therefore important for understanding the events that culminate in biofouling by barnacles. There are at present no complete, standardised accounts of the structure of the cyprid antennules in thoracican barnacles, and moreover, the existing accounts vary in their use of terminology. This article describes...... aesthetasc-like seta and mechano-sensory setae. More setae were found on the attachment disc than in previous scanning electron microscope-based studies, but not all structures that can be seen with transmission electron microscopy were visible. The disc itself seems to have a variable surface area, which...

  6. Distinctive colonization of Bacillus sp. bacteria and the influence of the bacterial biofilm on electrochemical behaviors of aluminum coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoli, Leila; Suo, Xinkun; Li, Hua

    2016-09-01

    Formation of biofilm is usually essential for the development of biofouling and crucially impacts the corrosion of marine structures. Here we report the attachment behaviors of Bacillus sp. bacteria and subsequent formation of bacterial biofilm on stainless steel and thermal sprayed aluminum coatings in artificial seawater. The colonized bacteria accelerate the corrosion of the steel plates, and markedly enhance the anti-corrosion performances of the Al coatings in early growth stage of the bacterial biofilm. After 7days incubation, the biofilm formed on the steel is heterogeneous while exhibits homogeneous feature on the Al coating. Atomic force microscopy examination discloses inception of formation of local pitting on steel plates associated with significantly roughened surface. Electrochemical testing suggests that the impact of the bacterial biofilm on the corrosion behaviors of marine structures is not decided by the biofilm alone, it is instead attributed to synergistic influence by both the biofilm and physicochemical characteristics of the substratum materials. PMID:27289310

  7. Separators used in microbial electrochemical technologies: Current status and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, Siti Mariam; Kim, Byung Hong; Ghasemi, Mostafa; Daud, Wan Ramli Wan

    2015-11-01

    Microbial electrochemical technologies (METs) are emerging green processes producing useful products from renewable sources without causing environmental pollution and treating wastes. The separator, an important part of METs that greatly affects the latter's performance, is commonly made of Nafion proton exchange membrane (PEM). However, many problems have been identified associated with the Nafion PEM such as high cost of membrane, significant oxygen and substrate crossovers, and transport of cations other than protons protons and biofouling. A variety of materials have been offered as alternative separators such as ion-exchange membranes, salt bridges, glass fibers, composite membranes and porous materials. It has been claimed that low cost porous materials perform better than PEM. These include J-cloth, nylon filter, glass fiber mat, non-woven cloth, earthen pot and ceramics that enable non-ion selective charge transfer. This paper provides an up-to-date review on porous separators and plots directions for future studies. PMID:26141668

  8. Antifouling Alkaloids from Crinum augustum (Amaryllidaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Refaat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Fractionation and purification of the ethanolic extract of the bulbs of Crinum augustum Rox. (Amaryllidaceae cultivated in Egypt yielded five alkaloids 6-methoxy-crinamine (1 , crinamine (2 , buphanisine (3 , ungeremine (4 , and hippadine (5 ; two fatty acid derivatives: myristic acid ethyl ester (6 and palmitic acid ethyl ester (7 ; four terpenoidal and steroidal compounds: ursolic acid (8 , β-sitosterol-O- β glucopyranoside (9 and mixture of β--sitosterol (10 and stigmasterol (11 . The structures of all compounds were determined by interpretation of their spectroscopic data; 1D ( 1 H and 13 C, 2D (HSQC, COSY, DQF, NOE and HMBC NMR; MS and UV analyses. The compounds (1 -4 and (6-8 were tested towards biofouling activity using larvae of barnacle Balance amphitrie. Significant activities of 1, 2 and 3 with EC 50 1.8, 1.2 and 0.75 μg/mL respectively, were observed.

  9. Antimicrobial behavior of novel surfaces generated by electrophoretic deposition and breakdown anodization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Jessamine Q; Joung, Young Soo; Kinsinger, Nichola M; Lu, Xinglin; Buie, Cullen R; Walker, Sharon L

    2015-10-01

    Biofilms have devastating impacts on many industries such as increased fuel consumption and damage to surfaces in maritime industries. Ideal biofouling management is inhibition of initial bacterial attachment. The attachment of a model marine bacterium (Halomonas pacfica g) was investigated to evaluate the potential of these new novel surfaces to resist initial bacterial adhesion. Novel engineered surfaces were generated via breakdown anodization or electrophoretic deposition, to modify three parameters: hydrophobicity, surface chemistry, and roughness. Mass transfer rates were determined using a parallel plate flow chamber under relevant solution chemistries. The greatest deposition was observed on the superhydrophilic surface, which had micro- and nano-scale hierarchical structures composed of titanium oxide deposited on a titanium plate. Conversely, one of the hydrophobic surfaces with micro-porous films overlaid with polydimethylsiloxane appeared to be most resistant to cell attachment. PMID:26196093

  10. Towards a large scale high energy cosmic neutrino undersea detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azoulay, R.; Berthier, R. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Direction des Sciences de la Matiere; Arpesella, C. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 13 - Marseille (France). Centre de Physique Theorique] [and others

    1997-06-01

    ANTARES collaboration proposes to study high energy cosmic neutrinos by using a deep sea Cherenkov detector. The potential interest of such a study for astrophysicists and particle physicists is developed. The different origins of cosmic neutrinos are reviewed. In order to observe with relevant statistic the flux of neutrinos from extra-galactic sources, a km-scale detector is necessary. The feasibility of such a detector is studied. A variety of technical problems have been solved. Some of them are standard for particle physicists: choice of photo-multipliers, monitoring, trigger, electronics, data acquisition, detector optimization. Others are more specific of sea science engineering particularly: detector deployment in deep sea, data transmission through optical cables, bio-fouling, effect of sea current. The solutions are presented and the sea engineering part involving detector installation will be tested near French coasts. It is scheduled to build a reduced-scale demonstrator within the next 2 years. (A.C.) 50 refs.

  11. Deposit control in process cooling water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to achieve efficient heat transfer in cooling water systems, it is essential to control the fouling of heat exchanger surfaces. Solubilities of scale forming salts, their growth into crystals, and the nature of the surfaces play important roles in the deposition phenomenon. Condensed phosphates, organic polymers and compounds like phosphates are effective in controlling deposition of scale forming salts. The surface active agents inhibit crystal growth and modify the crystals of the scale forming salts, and thus prevent deposition of dense, uniformly structured crystalline mass on the heat transfer surface. Understanding the mechanism of biofouling is essential to control it by surface active agents. Certain measures taken in the plant, such as back flushing, to control scaling, sometimes may not be effective and can be detrimental to the system itself. (author)

  12. Energy. A power station at sea; Energie - une centrale a la mer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, Th.

    2011-02-15

    As seas represent 70 per cent of the Earth surface, projects are developed to recover the solar energy they absorb. 10 MW Pilot units are announced for 2013 or 2014 and should be followed by 50 and 100 MW ocean thermal energy production offshore plants. The French company DCNS is presently studying three projects in Martinique, Reunion and Tahiti, and Lockheed Martin is working in Hawaii on such projects. These projects take advantage of the temperature difference between surface and deep waters. The main technological challenge is the design of heat exchangers which will work with only a 20 degree temperature difference, will suffer biofouling, will need a peculiar fluid, and also the design of the different equipment and hardware which will have to cope with the environment (sea water, tropical swells, hurricanes, deep water high pressures)

  13. Portable, Constriction-Expansion Blood Plasma Separation and Polymerization-Based Malaria Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatova, Tatyana A; Lathwal, Shefali; Engle, Marissa R; Sikes, Hadley D; Jensen, Klavs F

    2016-08-01

    A portable, microfluidic blood plasma separation device is presented featuring a constriction-expansion design, which produces 100.0% purity for undiluted blood at 9% yield. This level of purity represents an improvement of at least 1 order of magnitude with increased yield compared to that achieved previously using passive separation. The system features high flow rates, 5-30 μL/min plasma collection, with minimal clogging and biofouling. The simple, portable blood plasma separation design is hand-driven and can easily be incorporated with microfluidic or laboratory scale diagnostic assays. The separation system was applied to a paper-based diagnostic test for malaria that produced an amplified color change in the presence of Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 at a concentration well below clinical relevancy for undiluted whole blood. PMID:27366819

  14. The effect of electromagnetic fields, from two commercially available water treatment devices, on bacterial culturability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piyadasa, Chathuri; Yeager, Thomas R; Gray, Stephen R; Stewart, Matthew B; Ridgway, Harry F; Pelekani, Con; Orbell, John D

    2016-01-01

    Commercially available pulsed-electromagnetic field (PEMF) devices are currently being marketed and employed to ostensibly manage biofouling. The reliable application and industry acceptance of such technologies require thorough scientific validation - and this is currently lacking. We have initiated proof-of-principle research in an effort to investigate whether such commercially available PEMF devices can influence the viability (culturability) of planktonic bacteria in an aqueous environment. Thus two different commercial PEMF devices were investigated via a static (i.e. non-flowing) treatment system. 'Healthy' Escherichia coli cells, as well as cultures that were physiologically compromised by silver nano-particles, were exposed to the PEMFs from both devices under controlled conditions. Although relatively minor, the observed effects were nevertheless statistically significant and consistent with the hypothesis that PEMF exposure under controlled conditions may result in a decrease in cellular viability and culturability. It has also been observed that under certain conditions bacterial growth is actually stimulated. PMID:27003078

  15. Antifouling technology-past, present and future steps towards efficient and environmentally friendly antifouling coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yebra, Diego Meseguer; Kiil, Søren; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2004-01-01

    . In addition, the most common booster biocides used to replace TBT-containing compounds are listed and described. It must be stressed that there is still a lack of knowledge of their potential environmental side effects. The current interest in providing innovative antifouling technologies based on an improved......The imminent ban of environmentally harmful tributyltin (TBT)-based paint products has been the cause of a major change in the antifouling paint industry. In the past decade, several tin-free products have reached the commercial market, and claimed their effectiveness as regards the prevention...... of marine biofouling on ships in an environmentally friendly manner. The main objective of this review is to describe these products in as much detail as possible based on the knowledge available in the open literature. This knowledge has been supplemented by means of performance data provided, upon request...

  16. Mechanical robustness of the calcareous tubeworm Hydroides elegans: warming mitigates the adverse effects of ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaoyi; Meng, Yuan; He, Chong; Chan, Vera B S; Yao, Haimin; Thiyagarajan, V

    2016-01-01

    Development of antifouling strategies requires knowledge of how fouling organisms would respond to climate change associated environmental stressors. Here, a calcareous tube built by the tubeworm, Hydroides elegans, was used as an example to evaluate the individual and interactive effects of ocean acidification (OA), warming and reduced salinity on the mechanical properties of a tube. Tubeworms produce a mechanically weaker tube with less resistance to simulated predator attack under OA (pH 7.8). Warming (29°C) increased tube volume, tube mineral density and the tube's resistance to a simulated predatory attack. A weakening effect by OA did not make the removal of tubeworms easier except for the earliest stage, in which warming had the least effect. Reduced salinity (27 psu) did not affect tubes. This study showed that both mechanical analysis and computational modeling can be integrated with biofouling research to provide insights into how fouling communities might develop in future ocean conditions. PMID:26820060

  17. Field experimental evaluation of secondary metabolites from marine invertebrates as antifoulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PEREIRA R. C

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The crude organic extracts of the endemic gorgonian Phyllogorgia dilatata and two sponge species Aplysina fulva and Mycale microsigmatosa were evaluated for anti-fouling properties through field experiments. To investigate this property in ecologically meaningful conditions, crude extracts from these invertebrates were incorporated at concentrations naturally found in these marine organisms into a stable gel used as a substratum for fouling settlement. Crude extract from A. fulva showed no significant anti-fouling property at the natural concentrations used in the field experiments. In fact, fouling organisms settled significantly more on gels treated with A. fulva extract than on the control gel. On the other hand, both M. microsigmatosa and P. dilatata yielded crude extracts that exhibited a selective action inhibiting only the settlement of barnacles. The evidences obtained here by means of field experiments can provide a basis for future development of one kind of natural antifoulant technology to prevent marine biofouling.

  18. High Speed Water Sterilization Using One-Dimensional Nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Schoen, David T.

    2010-09-08

    The removal of bacteria and other organisms from water is an extremely important process, not only for drinking and sanitation but also industrially as biofouling is a commonplace and serious problem. We here present a textile based multiscale device for the high speed electrical sterilization of water using silver nanowires, carbon nanotubes, and cotton. This approach, which combines several materials spanning three very different length scales with simple dying based fabrication, makes a gravity fed device operating at 100000 L/(h m2) which can inactivate >98% of bacteria with only several seconds of total incubation time. This excellent performance is enabled by the use of an electrical mechanism rather than size exclusion, while the very high surface area of the device coupled with large electric field concentrations near the silver nanowire tips allows for effective bacterial inactivation. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  19. Developing Sustainable Spacecraft Water Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Evan A.; Klaus, David M.

    2009-01-01

    It is well recognized that water handling systems used in a spacecraft are prone to failure caused by biofouling and mineral scaling, which can clog mechanical systems and degrade the performance of capillary-based technologies. Long duration spaceflight applications, such as extended stays at a Lunar Outpost or during a Mars transit mission, will increasingly benefit from hardware that is generally more robust and operationally sustainable overtime. This paper presents potential design and testing considerations for improving the reliability of water handling technologies for exploration spacecraft. Our application of interest is to devise a spacecraft wastewater management system wherein fouling can be accommodated by design attributes of the management hardware, rather than implementing some means of preventing its occurrence.

  20. Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development. Final design report: PSD-I, Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-06-30

    The PSD-I program provides a heat exchanger sytem consisting of an evaporator, condenser and various ancillaries with ammonia used as a working fluid in a closed simulated Rankine cycle. It is to be installed on the Chepachet Research Vessel for test and evaluation of a number of OTEC concepts in a true ocean environment. It is one of several test articles to be tested. Primary design concerns include control of biofouling, corrosion and erosion of aluminum tubes, selection of materials, and the development of a basis for scale-up to large heat exchangers so as to ultimately demonstrate economic feasibility on a commercial scale. The PSD-I test article is devised to verify thermodynamic, environmental, and mechanical performance of basic design concepts. The detailed design, development, fabrication, checklist, delivery, installation support, and operation support for the Test Article Heat Exchangers are described. (WHK)

  1. Summary of research on microbiological processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storage of thermal energy in aquifers has obvious benefits of saving energy and decreasing the consumption of fossil fuels. However, aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES), which involves groundwater aquifers as the storage medium for heat or chill, impinges on the environment. A literature review of pertinent microbiology publications (Hicks and Stewart, 1988) identified the potential for the interaction of ATES systems and microbiological processes to create a source of infectious diseases and the potential for damage to the environment. In addition, the review identified a potential for microbiological processes to develop conditions that would interfere with the operation of an ATES system. As a result of this research effort, investigators from Finland, Germany, Switzerland, and the United States have examined several ATES systems in operation and have observed that the ATES systems studied do not contribute to infectious disease transmission, do not adversely affect the environment, and do not contribute significantly to biofouling or biocorrosion

  2. 铬酸盐化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    [ 篇名] Chromate-free conversion coatings for aluminum, [篇名 ] Chrome-Free Conversion Coating for in Service Repair of Aircraft Components, [ 篇名 ] Chromium remediation or release: effect of iron (Ⅱ)sulfate addition on chromium (Ⅵ) leaching from columns of chromite ore processing residue, [篇名] Coating steel wires by polymers in hydrodynamic drawing, [篇名 ] Composition of chromate conversion coatings formed on multi-layered thin films of AA2024-T3 matrix and Al{sub}2Cu, Al{sub}CuMg and Al{sub}20Cu {sub }2(MnFe){ sub } 3, [篇名] Conversion coating science and technology: is it evolving or is it stuck? [篇名] Corrosion and biofouling control in refinery cooling water system using sewage water as a makeup.

  3. Study of lysozyme mobility and binding free energy during adsorption on a graphene surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, C. Masato [Flintridge Preparatory School, La Canada Flintridge, California 91011 (United States); Ma, Heng; Wei, Tao, E-mail: twei@lamar.edu [Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, Texas 77710 (United States)

    2015-04-13

    Understanding protein adsorption is a key to the development of biosensors and anti-biofouling materials. Hydration essentially controls the adsorption process on hydrophobic surfaces, but its effect is complicated by various factors. Here, we present an ideal model system to isolate hydration effects—lysozyme adsorption on a flat hydrophobic graphene surface. Our all-atom molecular dynamics and molecular-mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area computation study reveal that lysozyme on graphene displays much larger diffusivity than in bulk water. Protein's hydration free energy within the first hydration shell is dominated by the protein-water electrostatic interactions and acts as an energy barrier for protein adsorption. On the other hand, the surface tension, especially that from the hydrophobic graphene, can effectively weaken the barrier to promote adsorption.

  4. Cytotoxicity assessment of antibiofouling compounds and by-products in marine bivalve cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domart-Coulon, I; Auzoux-Bordenave, S; Doumenc, D; Khalanski, M

    2000-06-01

    Short-term primary cell cultures were derived from adult marine bivalve tissues: the heart of oyster Crassostrea gigas and the gill of clam Ruditapes decussatus. These cultures were used as experimental in vitro models to assess the acute cytotoxicity of an organic molluscicide, Mexel-432, used in antibiofouling treatments in industrial cooling water systems. A microplate cell viability assay, based on the enzymatic reduction of tetrazolium dye (MTT) in living bivalve cells, was adapted to test the cytotoxicity of this compound: in both in vitro models, toxicity thresholds of Mexel-432 were compared to those determined in vivo with classic acute toxicity tests. The clam gill cell model was also used to assess the cytotoxicity of by-products of chlorination, a major strategy of biofouling control in the marine environment. The applications and limits of these new in vitro models for monitoring aquatic pollutants were discussed, in reference with the standardized Microtox test. PMID:10806375

  5. Multiple Roles of Biosurfactants in Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satputea, Surekha K; Banpurkar, Arun G; Banat, Ibrahim M; Sangshetti, Jaiprakash N; Patil, Rajendra H; Gade, Wasudev N

    2016-01-01

    Microbial growth and biofilms formation are a continuous source of contamination on most surfaces with biological, inanimate, natural or man-made. The use of chemical surfactants in daily practice to control growth, presence or adhesion of microorganisms and ultimately the formation of biofilms and biofouling is therefore becoming essential. Synthetic surfactants are, however, not preferred or ideal and biologically derived surface active biosurfactants (BSs) molecules produced mainly by microorganisms are therefore becoming attractive and sought by many industries. The search for innovative and interesting BS molecules that have effective antimicrobial activities and to use as innovative alternatives to chemical surfactants with added antimicrobial value among many other advantages has been ongoing for some time. This review discusses the various roles of BS molecules in association with biofilm formation. Recent updates on several mechanisms involved in biofilm development and control are presented vide this article. PMID:26786675

  6. Towards a large scale high energy cosmic neutrino undersea detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ANTARES collaboration proposes to study high energy cosmic neutrinos by using a deep sea Cherenkov detector. The potential interest of such a study for astrophysicists and particle physicists is developed. The different origins of cosmic neutrinos are reviewed. In order to observe with relevant statistic the flux of neutrinos from extra-galactic sources, a km-scale detector is necessary. The feasibility of such a detector is studied. A variety of technical problems have been solved. Some of them are standard for particle physicists: choice of photo-multipliers, monitoring, trigger, electronics, data acquisition, detector optimization. Others are more specific of sea science engineering particularly: detector deployment in deep sea, data transmission through optical cables, bio-fouling, effect of sea current. The solutions are presented and the sea engineering part involving detector installation will be tested near French coasts. It is scheduled to build a reduced-scale demonstrator within the next 2 years. (A.C.)

  7. Antifouling self-assembled monolayers on microelectrodes for patterning biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, John; Teizer, Winfried; Hwang, Wonmuk

    2009-01-01

    We present a procedure for forming a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) trimethoxysilane self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on a silicon substrate with gold microelectrodes. The PEG-SAM is formed in a single assembly step and prevents biofouling on silicon and gold surfaces. The SAM is used to coat microelectrodes patterned with standard, positive-tone lithography. Using the microtubule as an example, we apply a DC voltage to induce electrophoretic migration to the SAM-coated electrode in a reversible manner. A flow chamber is used for imaging the electrophoretic migration and microtubule patterning in situ using epifluorescence microscopy. This method is generally applicable to biomolecule patterning, as it employs electrophoresis to immobilize target molecules and thus does not require specific molecular interactions. Further, it avoids problems encountered when attempting to pattern the SAM molecules directly using lithographic techniques. The compatibility with electron beam lithography allows this method to be used to pattern biomolecules at the nanoscale. PMID:19707178

  8. Joint-action of antifouling substances in copper-free paints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faÿ, Fabienne; Carteau, David; Linossier, Isabelle; Delbury, Maxime; Vallée-Réhel, Karine

    2013-02-01

    Due to the environmentally harmful impact of tributyltin self-polishing paints, there is a critical need of more ecological alternatives. The aim of the present work is to study the joint-action of three molecules chosen in order to combine the two modes of prevention: chemical and physical repelling of biofouling. This "hybrid" system is principally dedicated to disturb durable settlement of microfouling. Each component was chosen according to its specific properties: chlorhexidine is a bisdiguanide antiseptic with antibacterial activity, zinc peroxide is an inorganic precursor of high instable entities which react with seawater to create hydrogen peroxide, Tween 85 is a non ionic surfactant disturbing interactions between colonizing organisms and surface. Obtained results highlighted the interest on mixing such molecules to get additive action on antifouling efficiency. PMID:23104027

  9. Thermodynamics of Trapping Gases for Underwater Superhydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patankar, Neelesh A

    2016-07-12

    Rough surfaces submerged in a liquid can remain almost dry if the liquid does not fully wet the roughness, and gases are sustained in roughness grooves. Such partially dry surfaces can help reduce drag, enhance boiling, and reduce biofouling. Gases sustained in roughness grooves would be composed of air and the vapor phase of the liquid itself. In this work, the thermodynamics of sustaining gases (e.g., air) is considered. Governing equations are presented along with a solution methodology to determine a critical condition to sustain gases. The critical roughness scale to sustain gases is estimated for different degrees of saturation of gases dissolved in the liquid. It is shown that roughness spacings of less than a micron are essential to sustain gases on surfaces submerged in water at atmospheric pressure. This is consistent with prior empirical data. PMID:27276525

  10. Use of aquifer testing to complete ground water remedial design, shallow aquifer Nellis Air Force Base, Las Vegas, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of a US Army Corps of Engineers-directed remedial action, a ground water treatment system is being installed at Site 27, Nellis Air Force Base, Las Vegas, Nevada. Twenty-three extraction wells were installed in the center and on the leading edge of a jet fuel plume of free and dissolved product in the uppermost (nonpotable) aquifer. The purpose of the extraction well system is to contain and remediate the plume, and to recover free product, which is over 10 feet thick in one well. Aquifer testing, including step and constant discharge tests, was conducted during well installation in order to (1) assist in location of subsequent wells, (2) obtain dynamic product thickness data for selection of wells in which skimmer pumps will be installed, (3) determine initial pumping rates, (4) determine aquifer parameters for modeling and optimization, and (5) provide baseline data on well performance to evaluate possible future biofouling

  11. Kinetic model for predicting the concentrations of active halogen species in chlorinated saline cooling waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lietzke, M. H.; Haag, W. R.

    1979-01-01

    A kinetic model for predicting the composition of chlorinated water discharged from power plants using fresh water for cooling was previously reported. The model has now been extended to be applicable to power plants located on estuaries or on the seacoast where saline water is used for cooling purposes. When chloride is added to seawater to prevent biofouling in cooling systems, bromine is liberated. Since this reaction proceeds at a finite rate there is a competition between the bromine (i.e., hypobromous acid) and the added chlorine (i.e., hypochlorous acid) for halogenation of any amine species present in the water. Hence not only chloramines but also bromamines and bromochloramines will be formed, with the relative concentrations a function of the pH, temperature, and salinity of the water. The kinetic model takes into account the chemical reactions leading to the formation and disappearance of the more important halamines and hypohalous acids likely to be encountered in chlorinated saline water.

  12. Upon impact: the fate of adhering Pseudomonas fluorescens cells during nanofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habimana, Olivier; Semião, Andrea J C; Casey, Eoin

    2014-08-19

    Nanofiltration (NF) is a high-pressure membrane filtration process increasingly applied in drinking water treatment and water reuse processes. NF typically rejects divalent salts, organic matter, and micropollutants. However, the efficiency of NF is adversely affected by membrane biofouling, during which microorganisms adhere to the membrane and proliferate to create a biofilm. Here we show that adhered Pseudomonas fluorescens cells under high permeate flux conditions are met with high fluid shear and convective fluxes at the membrane-liquid interface, resulting in their structural damage and collapse. These results were confirmed by fluorescent staining, flow cytometry, and scanning electron microscopy. This present study offers a "first-glimpse" of cell damage and death during the initial phases of bacterial adhesion to NF membranes and raises a key question about the role of this observed phenomena during early-stage biofilm formation under permeate flux and cross-flow conditions. PMID:25072514

  13. On-line mechanical tube cleaning for steam electric power plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-18

    In July 1991, Superior I.D. Tube Cleaners, Inc. (SIDTEC{trademark}) received a grant through the Department of Energy and the Energy Related Invention Program to conduct a long term demonstration of a proprietary technology for on-line mechanical condenser tube cleaning in thermal Power plants on open or once-through cooling water systems where the warmed condenser cooling water is discharged through a canal. The purpose of the demonstration was to confirm and establish the use of this mechanical method as an alternative to the application of chemical biocides in condenser cooling water for the control of biofouling, the growth of micro-organisms which can reduce a unit`s operating efficiency. The SIDTEC on-line mechanical tube cleaner, the Rocket{trademark}, is used to physically remove accumulated deposits on the water side of the main steam condenser, and the non-intrusive tube cleaner recovery system, the Skimmer{trademark}, is used to recover and recirculate tube cleaners. The periodic circulation of tube cleaners can maintain optimum condenser cleanliness and improve unit heat rate. Thermal power plants which discharge condenser cooling water through a canal now have a viable alternative to the chemical treatment of condenser cooling water, whether the principal foulant is biofouling, chemical scaling, silting, or a combination of the three. At prices competitive with scale inhibitors, and a fraction of competing mechanical systems, this technology is provided as a service requiring no capital investment; minimal retrofit modifications to plant structures or equipment; can be installed and maintained without a unit shutdown; does not add any restrictions in the cooling water system; and is environmentally benign.

  14. Technical note: Assessing gas equilibration systems for continuous pCO2 measurements in inland waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Tae Kyung; Jin, Hyojin; Oh, Neung-Hwan; Park, Ji-Hyung

    2016-07-01

    High-frequency continuous measurements of the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) are crucial for constraining the spatiotemporal dynamics of CO2 emissions from inland water systems. However, direct measurements of pCO2 are scarce, and no systematic comparisons have been conducted on the suitability of the widely used measurement systems for continuous underway or long-term deployment in various field conditions. We compared spray- and marble-type equilibrators and a membrane-enclosed CO2 sensor to assess their suitability for continuous long-term or underway pCO2 measurements in an urbanized river system in Korea. Both equilibrators had a shorter response time compared with the membrane-enclosed sensor, and could capture large spatial variations of pCO2 during a transect study along a highly urbanized river reach. The membrane-enclosed sensor based on passive equilibration provided comparable underway measurements along the river sections where pCO2 varied within the sensor detection range. When deployed in a eutrophic river site, the membrane-enclosed sensor was able to detect large diel variations in pCO2. However, biofouling on the membrane could reduce the accuracy of the measurement during long deployments exceeding several days. The overall results suggest that the fast response of the equilibrator systems facilitates capturing large spatial variations in pCO2 during short underway measurements. However, the attendant technical challenges of these systems, such as clogging and desiccant maintenance, have to be addressed carefully to enable their long-term deployment. The membrane-enclosed sensor would be suitable as an alternative tool for long-term continuous measurements if membrane biofouling could be overcome by appropriate antifouling measures such as copper mesh coverings.

  15. Environmental impact assessment for an OTEC plant in Martinique Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) is a marine renewable energy system that uses the temperature difference between the cold deep waters and warm surface waters to produce electricity. DCNS, a world-expert in naval defence and an innovator in energy has conducted technical, juridical and environmental feasibility studies of a plant offshore Martinique under an agreement with the Regional Council. In this context, DCNS realised a preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment in order to prepare public debate to be done further. Due to innovation of such a project, a specific methodology has been done for that. First step was to study bibliography in details, for site assessment of course, but also for impacts of other projects in the world that should present relevant similarities with OTEC (coastal thermal power plants for example). This bibliographic study dealt with thematic synthesis for each topic of physical, biological and human field that could be impacted by the project (total of 28 topics). The aim was to define priorities for specific assessments that have been done further: acoustic impacts, biogeochemical impacts of artificial upwelling, biofouling impacts, etc. Some of these topics are now on course with specific scientific research programs that have been launched at the end of this study. For each new topic, a specific methodology has been used or adapted for OTEC. These methods are made step by step, with a preliminary approach followed by a specific research program when it is necessary. Noise prediction has been done with a specific tool used for ship construction industry and a 3D propagation modelling. Biofouling has been assessed by a bibliographic approach and will be precised further with experimental moorings. Biogeochemical and biological impacts due to artificial and localised upwelling are now being studied in details with a double skill approach (physical modelling and plankton analysis), after preliminary water chemicals

  16. Bromination vis-a-vis chlorination as a biocide feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water is used extensively as a cooling medium in various heat transfer equipment's of a power industry such as condenser, heat exchangers and cooling towers. At elevated temperature, the breeding of microbiological growth can form slimes, underneath of this, accelerated corrosion can take place resulting into sudden and catastrophic failure of equipment's. The microbiological growth unchecked in the various systems especially in low velocity areas can lead to large growth of micro organisms such as algae which can even reduce the flow of the fluid thus affecting the efficiency of plant equipment's. Therefore, chlorination is a mandatory requirement in industrial cooling water to reduce biofouling in heat transfer equipment's. The chlorination in drinking water produces germicidal effect and thus reduces the bacterial counts. At NAPS the water quality is good and mild doses of chlorine (5 ppm) two times a day, as envisaged in design is noticed to be satisfactory. The chlorination of recirculating condenser cooling water presently is being done with the established doses for a fixed time twice a day. Some of the problems noticed with the chlorination process are : Corrosion of constructional material of chlorination plant and equipment's and pipelines causing large input of efforts on maintenance for keeping high availability of the chlorination plant. In addition to this, the leakages in the equipment could be a potential safety hazard. The effectiveness of chlorine is observed to be less in alkaline pH (above 9.0) as encountered at NAPS. This results is large quantities of chlorine injection for extended periods. The cost of chlorine and bleaching powder keeps fluctuating in the market as noticed in past few years. Many a times this results in scarcity of chlorine/bleaching powder causing interruption in biofouling control programme. Hence it was felt prudent to work on the alternative biocides which could be cost effective, non-polluting and nature and user

  17. Antibacterial Activity of Ti3C2Tx MXene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasool, Kashif; Helal, Mohamed; Ali, Adnan; Ren, Chang E; Gogotsi, Yury; Mahmoud, Khaled A

    2016-03-22

    MXenes are a family of atomically thin, two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides and carbonitrides with many attractive properties. Two-dimensional Ti3C2Tx (MXene) has been recently explored for applications in water desalination/purification membranes. A major success indicator for any water treatment membrane is the resistance to biofouling. To validate this and to understand better the health and environmental impacts of the new 2D carbides, we investigated the antibacterial properties of single- and few-layer Ti3C2Tx MXene flakes in colloidal solution. The antibacterial properties of Ti3C2Tx were tested against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) by using bacterial growth curves based on optical densities (OD) and colonies growth on agar nutritive plates. Ti3C2Tx shows a higher antibacterial efficiency toward both Gram-negative E. coli and Gram-positive B. subtilis compared with graphene oxide (GO), which has been widely reported as an antibacterial agent. Concentration dependent antibacterial activity was observed and more than 98% bacterial cell viability loss was found at 200 μg/mL Ti3C2Tx for both bacterial cells within 4 h of exposure, as confirmed by colony forming unit (CFU) and regrowth curve. Antibacterial mechanism investigation by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay indicated the damage to the cell membrane, which resulted in release of cytoplasmic materials from the bacterial cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) dependent and independent stress induction by Ti3C2Tx was investigated in two separate abiotic assays. MXenes are expected to be resistant to biofouling and offer bactericidal properties. PMID:26909865

  18. Temporal changes in extracellular polymeric substances on hydrophobic and hydrophilic membrane surfaces in a submerged membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, Gerald; Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Maab, Husnul; Nunes, Suzana; Le-Clech, Pierre; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes; Saikaly, Pascal E

    2016-05-15

    Membrane surface hydrophilic modification has always been considered to mitigating biofouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs). Four hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membranes (pore sizes ∼0.1 μm) differing only in hydrophobic or hydrophilic surface characteristics were operated at a permeate flux of 10 L/m(2) h in the same lab-scale MBR fed with synthetic wastewater. In addition, identical membrane modules without permeate production (0 L/m(2) h) were operated in the same lab-scale MBR. Membrane modules were autopsied after 1, 10, 20 and 30 days of MBR operation, and total extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) accumulated on the membranes were extracted and characterized in detail using several analytical tools, including conventional colorimetric tests (Lowry and Dubois), liquid chromatography with organic carbon detection (LC-OCD), fluorescence excitation - emission matrices (FEEM), fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). The transmembrane pressure (TMP) quickly stabilized with higher values for the hydrophobic membranes than hydrophilic ones. The sulfonated polysulfone (SPSU) membrane had the highest negatively charged membrane surface, accumulated the least amount of foulants and displayed the lowest TMP. The same type of organic foulants developed with time on the four membranes and the composition of biopolymers shifted from protein dominance at early stages of filtration (day 1) towards polysaccharides dominance during later stages of MBR filtration. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling of LC-OCD data showed that biofilm samples clustered according to the sampling event (time) regardless of the membrane surface chemistry (hydrophobic or hydrophilic) or operating mode (with or without permeate flux). These results suggest that EPS composition may not be the dominant parameter for evaluating membrane performance and possibly other parameters such as biofilm thickness, porosity, compactness and structure should be

  19. Reuse of Treated Internal or External Wastewaters in the Cooling Systems of Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radisav Vidic; David Dzombak; Ming-Kai Hsieh; Heng Li; Shih-Hsiang Chien; Yinghua Feng; Indranil Chowdhury; Jason Monnell

    2009-06-30

    This study evaluated the feasibility of using three impaired waters - secondary treated municipal wastewater, passively treated abandoned mine drainage (AMD), and effluent from ash sedimentation ponds at power plants - for use as makeup water in recirculating cooling water systems at thermoelectric power plants. The evaluation included assessment of water availability based on proximity and relevant regulations as well as feasibility of managing cooling water quality with traditional chemical management schemes. Options for chemical treatment to prevent corrosion, scaling, and biofouling were identified through review of current practices, and were tested at bench and pilot-scale. Secondary treated wastewater is the most widely available impaired water that can serve as a reliable source of cooling water makeup. There are no federal regulations specifically related to impaired water reuse but a number of states have introduced regulations with primary focus on water aerosol 'drift' emitted from cooling towers, which has the potential to contain elevated concentrations of chemicals and microorganisms and may pose health risk to the public. It was determined that corrosion, scaling, and biofouling can be controlled adequately in cooling systems using secondary treated municipal wastewater at 4-6 cycles of concentration. The high concentration of dissolved solids in treated AMD rendered difficulties in scaling inhibition and requires more comprehensive pretreatment and scaling controls. Addition of appropriate chemicals can adequately control corrosion, scaling and biological growth in ash transport water, which typically has the best water quality among the three waters evaluated in this study. The high TDS in the blowdown from pilot-scale testing units with both passively treated mine drainage and secondary treated municipal wastewater and the high sulfate concentration in the mine drainage blowdown water were identified as the main challenges for blowdown

  20. Effects of operating conditions on the adhesive strength of Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms in tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M J; Zhang, Z; Bott, T R

    2005-06-25

    Understanding the mechanical properties of biofilms, especially the force required to disrupt them and remove them from substrata is very important to development of antibiofouling strategies. In this work, a novel micromanipulation technique with a specially designed T-shaped probe has been developed to serve as an experimental means to measure directly the adhesive strength of biofouling deposits on the surface of a glass test stud. The basic principle of this novel technique is to pull away a whole biofilm accumulated on the surface of a glass test stud with T-shaped probe, and to measure simultaneously the force imposed on the biofilm. The adhesive strength between the biofilms and the surface to which they are attached, is defined as the work per unit area required to remove the biofilms from the surface. The biofouling experiments were performed on an elaborate design of a simulated heat exchanger system. A monoculture of Pseudomonas fluorescens was chosen as the fouling microorganism for the laboratory studies. Results indicate that the adhesive strength of the biofilm was affected by the conditions of operation, such as biofilm age, nutrient concentration, suspended cell concentration, pH, surface roughness of the substratum and fluid velocity. As noted, the effect of fluid velocity on the biofilm adhesive strength seemed to overwhelm other factors. At the same operating conditions, the biofilm adhesive strength increased as the fluid velocity increased within the range of 0.6-1.6m/s. In addition, the flow-related biofilm structures were observed that biofilms generally grew as a more compact pattern at the higher fluid velocity. Apparently, the fluid velocity can affect the biofilm structure, which in turn determines the biofilm adhesive strength. The knowledge of the biofilm adhesive strength with associated influences of the operating conditions may be used to define better cleaning procedures. PMID:15913966

  1. Characterization of N-Acylhomoserine Lactones Produced by Bacteria Isolated from Industrial Cooling Water Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriya Okutsu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The cooling water systems are used to remove heat generated in the various industries. Biofouling of the cooling water systems causes blocking of condenser pipes and the heat exchanger tubes. In many Gram-negative bacteria, N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL are used as quorum-sensing signal molecule and associated with biofilm formation. To investigate the relationship between quorum sensing and biofouling in the cooling water system, we isolated a total of 192 bacterial strains from the five cooling water systems, and screened for AHL production. Seven isolates stimulated AHL-mediated purple pigment production in AHL reporter strain Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 or VIR07. Based on their 16S rRNA gene sequences, AHL-producing isolates were assigned to Aeromonas hydrophila, Lysobacter sp., Methylobacterium oryzae, and Bosea massiliensis. To the best of our knowledge, B. massiliensis and Lysobacter sp. have not been reported as AHL-producing species in the previous researches. AHLs extracted from the culture supernatants of B. massiliensis and Lysobacter sp. were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. AHLs produced by B. massiliensis were assigned as N-hexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL, N-(3-oxohexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL, and N-(3-oxooctanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C8-HSL. AHLs produced by Lysobacter sp. were assigned as N-decanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL and N-(3-oxodecanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C10-HSL. This is the first report of identification of AHLs produced by B. massiliensis and Lysobacter sp. isolated from the cooling water system.

  2. Amphiphilic Surface Active Triblock Copolymers with Mixed Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Side Chains for Tuned Marine Fouling-Release Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, D.; Weinman, C; Finlay, J; Fletcher, B; Paik, M; Sundaram, H; Dimitriou, M; Sohn, K; Callow, M; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Two series of amphiphilic triblock surface active block copolymers (SABCs) were prepared through chemical modification of two polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-ran-butylene)-block-polyisoprene ABC triblock copolymer precursors. The methyl ether of poly(ethylene glycol) [M{sub n} {approx} 550 g/mol (PEG550)] and a semifluorinated alcohol (CF{sub 3}(CF{sub 2}){sub 9}(CH{sub 2}){sub 10}OH) [F10H10] were attached at different molar ratios to impart both hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups to the isoprene segment. Coatings on glass slides consisting of a thin layer of the amphiphilic SABC deposited on a thicker layer of an ABA polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-ran-butylene)-block-polystyrene thermoplastic elastomer were prepared for biofouling assays with algae. Dynamic water contact angle analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) measurements were utilized to characterize the surfaces. Clear differences in surface structure were realized as the composition of attached side chains was varied. In biofouling assays, the settlement (attachment) of zoospores of the green alga Ulva was higher for surfaces incorporating a large proportion of the hydrophobic F10H10 side chains, while surfaces with a large proportion of the PEG550 side chains inhibited settlement. The trend in attachment strength of sporelings (young plants) of Ulva did not show such an obvious pattern. However, amphiphilic SABCs incorporating a mixture of PEG550 and F10H10 side chains performed the best. The number of cells of the diatom Navicula attached after exposure to flow decreased as the content of PEG550 to F10H10 side chains increased.

  3. Temporal Changes in Extracellular Polymeric Substances on Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Membrane Surfaces in a Submerged Membrane Bioreactor

    KAUST Repository

    Matar, Gerald

    2016-03-02

    Membrane surface hydrophilic modification has always been considered to mitigating biofouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs). Four hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membranes (pore sizes ∼0.1 μm) differing only in hydrophobic or hydrophilic surface characteristics were operated at a permeate flux of 10 L/m2.h in the same lab-scale MBR fed with synthetic wastewater. In addition, identical membrane modules without permeate production (0 L/m2.h) were operated in the same lab-scale MBR. Membrane modules were autopsied after 1, 10, 20 and 30 days of MBR operation, and total extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) accumulated on the membranes were extracted and characterized in detail using several analytical tools, including conventional colorimetric tests (Lowry and Dubois), liquid chromatography with organic carbon detection (LC-OCD), fluorescence excitation - emission matrices (FEEM), fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). The transmembrane pressure (TMP) quickly stabilized with higher values for the hydrophobic membranes than hydrophilic ones. The sulfonated polysulfone (SPSU) membrane had the highest negatively charged membrane surface, accumulated the least amount of foulants and displayed the lowest TMP. The same type of organic foulants developed with time on the four membranes and the composition of biopolymers shifted from protein dominance at early stages of filtration (day 1) towards polysaccharides dominance during later stages of MBR filtration. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling of LC-OCD data showed that biofilm samples clustered according to the sampling event (time) regardless of the membrane surface chemistry (hydrophobic or hydrophilic) or operating mode (with or without permeate flux). These results suggest that EPS composition may not be the dominant parameter for evaluating membrane performance and possibly other parameters such as biofilm thickness, porosity, compactness and structure should be considered

  4. Neutral hydrophilic cathode catalyst binders for microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Saito, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    Improving oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes requires a better understanding of the effects of the catalyst binder chemistry and properties on performance. A series of polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO) polymers with systematically varying hydrophilicity were designed to determine the effect of the hydrophilic character of the binder on cathode performance. Increasing the hydrophilicity of the PS-b-PEO binders enhanced the electrochemical response of the cathode and MFC power density by ∼15%, compared to the hydrophobic PS-OH binder. Increased cathode performance was likely a result of greater water uptake by the hydrophilic binder, which would increase the accessible surface area for oxygen reduction. Based on these results and due to the high cost of PS-b-PEO, the performance of an inexpensive hydrophilic neutral polymer, poly(bisphenol A-co-epichlorohydrin) (BAEH), was examined in MFCs and compared to a hydrophilic sulfonated binder (Nafion). MFCs with BAEH-based cathodes with two different Pt loadings initially (after 2 cycles) had lower MFC performance (1360 and 630 mW m-2 for 0.5 and 0.05 mg Pt cm-2) than Nafion cathodes (1980 and 1080 mW m -2 for 0.5 and 0.05 mg Pt cm-2). However, after long-term operation (22 cycles, 40 days), power production of each cell was similar (∼1200 and 700-800 mW m-2 for 0.5 and 0.05 mg Pt cm-2) likely due to cathode biofouling that could not be completely reversed through physical cleaning. While binder chemistry could improve initial electrochemical cathode performance, binder materials had less impact on overall long-term MFC performance. This observation suggests that long-term operation of MFCs will require better methods to avoid cathode biofouling. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  5. Compaction and relaxation of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, R.

    2015-06-18

    Operation of membrane systems for water treatment can be seriously hampered by biofouling. A better characterization of biofilms in membrane systems and their impact on membrane performance may help to develop effective biofouling control strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence, extent and timescale of biofilm compaction and relaxation (decompaction), caused by permeate flux variations. The impact of permeate flux changes on biofilm thickness, structure and stiffness was investigated in situ and non-destructively with optical coherence tomography using membrane fouling monitors operated at a constant crossflow velocity of 0.1 m s−1 with permeate production. The permeate flux was varied sequentially from 20 to 60 and back to 20 L m−2 h−1. The study showed that the average biofilm thickness on the membrane decreased after elevating the permeate flux from 20 to 60 L m−2 h−1 while the biofilm thickness increased again after restoring the original flux of 20 L m−2 h−1, indicating the occurrence of biofilm compaction and relaxation. Within a few seconds after the flux change, the biofilm thickness was changed and stabilized, biofilm compaction occurred faster than the relaxation after restoring the original permeate flux. The initial biofilm parameters were not fully reinstated: the biofilm thickness was reduced by 21%, biofilm stiffness had increased and the hydraulic biofilm resistance was elevated by 16%. Biofilm thickness was related to the hydraulic biofilm resistance. Membrane performance losses are related to the biofilm thickness, density and morphology, which are influenced by (variations in) hydraulic conditions. A (temporarily) permeate flux increase caused biofilm compaction, together with membrane performance losses. The impact of biofilms on membrane performance can be influenced (increased and reduced) by operational parameters. The article shows that a (temporary) pressure increase leads to more

  6. Drag of Clean and Fouled Net Panels--Measurements and Parameterization of Fouling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Christian Gansel

    Full Text Available Biofouling is a serious problem in marine aquaculture and it has a number of negative impacts including increased forces on aquaculture structures and reduced water exchange across nets. This in turn affects the behavior of fish cages in waves and currents and has an impact on the water volume and quality inside net pens. Even though these negative effects are acknowledged by the research community and governmental institutions, there is limited knowledge about fouling related effects on the flow past nets, and more detailed investigations distinguishing between different fouling types have been called for. This study evaluates the effect of hydroids, an important fouling organism in Norwegian aquaculture, on the forces acting on net panels. Drag forces on clean and fouled nets were measured in a flume tank, and net solidity including effect of fouling were determined using image analysis. The relationship between net solidity and drag was assessed, and it was found that a solidity increase due to hydroids caused less additional drag than a similar increase caused by change in clean net parameters. For solidities tested in this study, the difference in drag force increase could be as high as 43% between fouled and clean nets with same solidity. The relationship between solidity and drag force is well described by exponential functions for clean as well as for fouled nets. A method is proposed to parameterize the effect of fouling in terms of an increase in net solidity. This allows existing numerical methods developed for clean nets to be used to model the effects of biofouling on nets. Measurements with other types of fouling can be added to build a database on effects of the accumulation of different fouling organisms on aquaculture nets.

  7. Quorum quenching enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetzner, Susanne

    2015-05-10

    Bacteria use cell-to-cell communication systems based on chemical signal molecules to coordinate their behavior within the population. These quorum sensing systems are potential targets for antivirulence therapies, because many bacterial pathogens control the expression of virulence factors via quorum sensing networks. Since biofilm maturation is also usually influenced by quorum sensing, quenching these systems may contribute to combat biofouling. One possibility to interfere with quorum sensing is signal inactivation by enzymatic degradation or modification. Such quorum quenching enzymes are wide-spread in the bacterial world and have also been found in eukaryotes. Lactonases and acylases that hydrolyze N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signaling molecules have been investigated most intensively, however, different oxidoreductases active toward AHLs or 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolone signals as well as other signal-converting enzymes have been described. Several approaches have been assessed which aim at alleviating virulence, or biofilm formation, by reducing the signal concentration in the bacterial environment. These involve the application or stimulation of signal-degrading bacteria as biocontrol agents in the protection of crop plants against soft-rot disease, the use of signal-degrading bacteria as probiotics in aquaculture, and the immobilization or entrapment of quorum quenching enzymes or bacteria to control biofouling in membrane bioreactors. While most approaches to use quorum quenching as antivirulence strategy are still in the research phase, the growing number of organisms and enzymes known to interfere with quorum sensing opens up new perspectives for the development of innovative antibacterial strategies. PMID:25220028

  8. Characterization of N-Acylhomoserine Lactones Produced by Bacteria Isolated from Industrial Cooling Water Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okutsu, Noriya; Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Xie, Xiaonan; Kato, Norihiro; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2015-01-01

    The cooling water systems are used to remove heat generated in the various industries. Biofouling of the cooling water systems causes blocking of condenser pipes and the heat exchanger tubes. In many Gram-negative bacteria, N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) are used as quorum-sensing signal molecule and associated with biofilm formation. To investigate the relationship between quorum sensing and biofouling in the cooling water system, we isolated a total of 192 bacterial strains from the five cooling water systems, and screened for AHL production. Seven isolates stimulated AHL-mediated purple pigment production in AHL reporter strain Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 or VIR07. Based on their 16S rRNA gene sequences, AHL-producing isolates were assigned to Aeromonas hydrophila, Lysobacter sp., Methylobacterium oryzae, and Bosea massiliensis. To the best of our knowledge, B. massiliensis and Lysobacter sp. have not been reported as AHL-producing species in the previous researches. AHLs extracted from the culture supernatants of B. massiliensis and Lysobacter sp. were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. AHLs produced by B. massiliensis were assigned as N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL), N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL), and N-(3-oxooctanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C8-HSL). AHLs produced by Lysobacter sp. were assigned as N-decanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL) and N-(3-oxodecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C10-HSL). This is the first report of identification of AHLs produced by B. massiliensis and Lysobacter sp. isolated from the cooling water system. PMID:26729121

  9. STUDI KUALITAS PERAIRAN PADA KEGIATAN BUDIDAYA TIRAM MUTIARA (Pinctada maxima DI KECAMATAN GEROKGAK, KABUPATEN BULELENG, BALI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    apri i supi'i

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study were to know the effect of pearl oyster culture activities to the water quality(physical, chemical, biological parameters, and the sediment of culture site, waters quality status of pearloyster culture site as well.The research was done at 10 stations, which were 9 stations located around pearl oyster culture site, and1 station located at out of pearl oyster culture site (as control. Results showed that the sources of pollutionwere from pearl oyster feces and biofouling produced from cleaning of pocket and its shell. An in organicmatter of the feces produced (50.52-78.75 % was higher than the organic matter (21.25-49.48 %. The amountof biofoulling trash increased with the size and dominated by organic matter. Sea water quality observed wasunder sea water quality standard of marine organism (aquaculture decided by government, except phosphate.Twenty four species of plankton collected, consist of 4 phylum, that were Bacillarophyta (diatom,Protozoa, Arthropoda, and Mollusca. Plankton Diversity Index showed the level of low to high pollutioncondition indicated ecological suppression and decreasing of waters quality. The amount of total bacteria andVibrio spp. at all stations were normal, that was less than 106 cfu/ml.Integrated physical, chemical and biological parameters assessment found that pollution index was 2-3,mean of low pollution. Result of Cluster assessment indicate that there was real characteristic differentiationbetween first group (1-9 and second group (control. First group was around the pearl oyster culture waters,and second group was out of the pearl oyster culture waters. So the pearl oyster culture activities affected thewaters quality.

  10. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three copper-based alloys, CDA 102 (oxygen-free, high-purity copper), CDA 613 (aluminum bronze), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni), are candidates for the fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers. Waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as borosilicate glass, and will be sent to the prospective repository site at Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada. The decay of radionuclides will result in the generation of substantial heat and in fluxes of gamma radiation outside the containers. In this environment, container materials might degrade by atmospheric oxidation, general aqueous phase corrosion, localized corrosion (LC), and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). This volume is a critical survey of available data on pitting and crevice corrosion of the copper-based candidates. Pitting and crevice corrosion are two of the most common forms of LC of these materials. Data on the SCC of these alloys is surveyed in Volume 4. Pitting usually occurs in water that contains low concentrations of bicarbonate and chloride anions, such as water from Well J-13 at the Nevada Test Site. Consequently, this mode of degradation might occur in the repository environment. Though few quantitative data on LC were found, a tentative ranking based on pitting corrosion, local dealloying, crevice corrosion, and biofouling is presented. CDA 102 performs well in the categories of pitting corrosion, local dealloying, and biofouling, but susceptibility to crevice corrosion diminishes its attractiveness as a candidate. The cupronickel alloy, CDA 715, probably has the best overall resistance to such localized forms of attack. 123 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Impact of biofilm accumulation on transmembrane and feed channel pressure drop: Effects of crossflow velocity, feed spacer and biodegradable nutrient

    KAUST Repository

    Dreszer, C.

    2014-03-01

    Biofilm formation causes performance loss in spiral-wound membrane systems. In this study a microfiltration membrane was used in experiments to simulate fouling in spiral-wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane modules without the influence of concentration polarization. The resistance of a microfiltration membrane is much lower than the intrinsic biofilm resistance, enabling the detection of biofilm accumulation in an early stage. The impact of biofilm accumulation on the transmembrane (biofilm) resistance and feed channel pressure drop as a function of the crossflow velocity (0.05 and 0.20ms-1) and feed spacer presence was studied in transparent membrane biofouling monitors operated at a permeate flux of 20Lm-2h-1. As biodegradable nutrient, acetate was dosed to the feed water (1.0 and 0.25mgL-1 carbon) to enhance biofilm accumulation in the monitors. The studies showed that biofilm formation caused an increased transmembrane resistance and feed channel pressure drop. The effect was strongest at the highest crossflow velocity (0.2ms-1) and in the presence of a feed spacer. Simulating conditions as currently applied in nanofiltration and reverse osmosis installations (crossflow velocity 0.2ms-1 and standard feed spacer) showed that the impact of biofilm formation on performance, in terms of transmembrane and feed channel pressure drop, was strong. This emphasized the importance of hydrodynamics and feed spacer design. Biomass accumulation was related to the nutrient load (nutrient concentration and linear flow velocity). Reducing the nutrient concentration of the feed water enabled the application of higher crossflow velocities. Pretreatment to remove biodegradable nutrient and removal of biomass from the membrane elements played an important part to prevent or restrict biofouling. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. A survey of biofilms on wastewater aeration diffusers suggests bacterial community composition and function vary by substrate type and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Peter A; Park, Hee-Deung; Olson, Betty H; Asvapathanagul, Pitiporn; Hunter, M Colby; Garrido-Baserba, Manel; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Rosso, Diego

    2016-07-01

    Aeration diffusers in wastewater treatment plants generate air bubbles that promote mixing, distribution of dissolved oxygen, and microbial processing of dissolved and suspended matter in bulk solution. Biofouling of diffusers represents a significant problem to wastewater treatment plants because biofilms decrease oxygen transfer efficiency and increase backpressure on the blower. To better understand biofouling, we conducted a pilot study to survey the bacterial community composition and function of biofilms on different diffuser substrates and compare them to those in the bulk solution. DNA was extracted from the surface of ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM), polyurethane, and silicone diffusers operated for 15 months in a municipal treatment plant and sampled at 3 and 9 months. The bacterial community composition and function of the biofilms and bulk solution were determined by amplifying the 16S rRNA genes and pyrosequencing the amplicons and raw metagenomic DNA. The ordination plots and dendrograms of the 16S rRNA and functional genes showed that while the bacterial community composition and function of the bulk solution was independent of sampling time, the composition and function of the biofilms differed by diffuser type and testing time. For the EPDM and silicone diffusers, the biofilm communities were more similar in composition to the bulk solution at 3 months than 9 months. In contrast, the bacteria on the polyurethane diffusers were more dissimilar to the bulk solution at 3 months than 9 months. Taken together, the survey showed that the community composition and function of bacterial biofilms depend on the diffuser substrate and testing time, which warrants further elucidation. PMID:27294381

  13. Antifouling coatings: recent developments in the design of surfaces that prevent fouling by proteins, bacteria, and marine organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Indrani; Pangule, Ravindra C.; Kane, Ravi S. [Howard P. Isermann Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Ricketts Building, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

    2011-02-08

    The major strategies for designing surfaces that prevent fouling due to proteins, bacteria, and marine organisms are reviewed. Biofouling is of great concern in numerous applications ranging from biosensors to biomedical implants and devices, and from food packaging to industrial and marine equipment. The two major approaches to combat surface fouling are based on either preventing biofoulants from attaching or degrading them. One of the key strategies for imparting adhesion resistance involves the functionalization of surfaces with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) or oligo(ethylene glycol). Several alternatives to PEG-based coatings have also been designed over the past decade. While protein-resistant coatings may also resist bacterial attachment and subsequent biofilm formation, in order to overcome the fouling-mediated risk of bacterial infection it is highly desirable to design coatings that are bactericidal. Traditional techniques involve the design of coatings that release biocidal agents, including antibiotics, quaternary ammonium salts (QAS), and silver, into the surrounding aqueous environment. However, the emergence of antibiotic- and silver-resistant pathogenic strains has necessitated the development of alternative strategies. Therefore, other techniques based on the use of polycations, enzymes, nanomaterials, and photoactive agents are being investigated. With regard to marine antifouling coatings, restrictions on the use of biocide-releasing coatings have made the generation of nontoxic antifouling surfaces more important. While considerable progress has been made in the design of antifouling coatings, ongoing research in this area should result in the development of even better antifouling materials in the future. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Studies with anti fouling coating on seawater intake system screens of MAPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biofouling has been a concern for cooling water systems of coastal power plants and the same is being experienced in Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS). Macro fouling organisms cause major problems for smooth operation and maintenance of the cooling water system. The cooling water intake structures particularly the screens, which act as the barrier for marine organisms to enter into the cooling water system, gets fouled severely in a short period of time. Though chlorination is being done to control biofouling, it is ineffective due to the inward flow of seawater. Severely fouled gates necessitate frequent cleaning and maintenance which involves lifting of heavy structures, laborious manual cleaning and maintenance. In order to find remedial measures for the said concern, studies have been taken up for identification of simple but effective methods in controlling bio fouling. Accordingly studies with Anti Fouling Coating (AFC) applications have been identified and field studies were carried out to review its effectiveness in meeting the given requirement. One of the gates was coated with Anti Fouling Coating (AFC) and exposed to sea water and the bio fouling tendency was regularly monitored. It was noted that the AFC coated gate was observed to have less bio fouling compared to the in-practice coal tar epoxy coatings. The small quantity of fouling deposits was generally observed to be on the side opposite to the sea water current. The area exposed to sea water currents had relatively less biogrowth. The dislodgement or removal of bio growth could be achieved by gentle pressure or scrapping thus demonstrating its effectiveness in controlling the bio fouling. Studies are also in progress to with Foul release coatings (FRC) to study its effectiveness. (author)

  15. Antifouling effect of two saturated copper coatings applied on carbon steel structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiamet, P. S.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Biofouling is the colonization of man-made substrata by sessile organisms. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the performance of two antifouling saturated copper coating. Bioassays were carried out at a harbor in Argentine (38°02’S- 57°32’W. During six months, one series of pipes and panels were removed monthly to estimate the recruitment of macro and microfouling species and immediately replaced by clean ones. Another series was removed from the beginning of exposure to monitor the development of the established community (accumulative pipes and panels along six months. Data obtained from control (without a saturated copper coating and saturated-copper coated pipes and panels were compared in order to estimate performance of the coating. One of two saturated copper coating demonstrated a good effect antifouling.

    El biofouling es la colonización por organismos sésiles en sistemas de sustratos hechos por el hombre. El objetivo fue evaluar el efecto antifouling de dos cubiertas saturadas de cobre. Los estudios se llevaron a cabo en un puerto de la Argentina (38°02’S-57°32’W. Durante seis meses, una serie de caños y paneles fueron removidos mensualmente para estimar el reclutamiento de las especies del macro y microfouling, y fueron sustituidos inmediatamente por caños y paneles limpios. La otra serie de caños y paneles fueron removidas desde el inicio de la exposición en forma acumulativa durante los seis meses, para seguir el desarrollo de la comunidad. Los datos obtenidos de los controles sin cubierta y de los caños y paneles con las cubiertas saturadas de cobre fueron comparados para estimar el comportamiento antifouling de las mismas. Una de las dos cubiertas saturadas de cobre demostró un buen efecto antifouling.

  16. An autonomous drifting buoy system for long term pCO2 observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Y.; Fujiki, T.; Wakita, M.; Azetsu-Scott, K.; Watanabe, S.

    2009-04-01

    within 3 µatm. One of the challenges we faced was developing an anti-biofouling paint for the buoy and pCO2 sensor. When the buoy system is utilized for long-term observations, the instruments are susceptible to biofouling, in the form of microbial and algal films. Minimizing toxicity is important for the buoy system. In order to reduce the effects of biofouling on the sensors, we tried the antifouling tests with some paints in our port side (Aomori, Japan) for 18.5 months. We avoided using metal (Cu, Zn) type paint despite good results because our buoy is made of aluminum. Following tests, the silicon type paint was adapted as an anti-biofouling paint for drifting buoy. To test the long-term durability and effect of anti-biofouling, the buoy systems were moored with TRITON buoy in the western tropical Pacific Ocean (2N, 156E) and with K-TRITON buoy in the western North Pacific Ocean (38N, 146.5E). Our first deployment of drifting buoy system was made in the east Labrador Sea in May 2008, with the support of the Bedford Institute of Oceanography. The buoy system is measuring sea-surface pCO2 four times a day (also collecting temperature and salinity data) and every six days intervals, because of limited battery capacity. We succeeded in obtaining the data for six months. We will need to perform some laboratory experiments and an in situ long-term test for the buoy system. As a result of our tests, some components will be modified. We hope to produce the improved buoy system on a wide-scale. In order to have a network of pCO2 observation all over the world's ocean, the buoy must be produced at a reasonable cost. The goal of keeping costs within limits is one of the important aspects in the development. We aim for that one buoy cost 15,000 or less when large numbers of buoys are produced.

  17. Biofilm monitoring using complex permittivity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altman, Susan Jeanne; McGrath, Lucas K.; Dolan, Patricia L.; Yelton, William Graham

    2008-10-01

    There is strong interest in the detection and monitoring of bio-fouling. Bio-fouling problems are common in numerous water treatments systems, medical and dental apparatus and food processing equipment. Current bio-fouling control protocols are time consuming and costly. New early detection techniques to monitor bio-forming contaminates are means to enhanced efficiency. Understanding the unique dielectric properties of biofilm development, colony forming bacteria and nutrient background will provide a basis to the effectiveness of controlling or preventing biofilm growth. Dielectric spectroscopy measurements provide values of complex permittivity, {var_epsilon}*, of biofilm formation by applying a weak alternating electric field at various frequencies. The dielectric characteristic of the biofilm, {var_epsilon}{prime}, is the real component of {var_epsilon}* and measures the biofilm's unique ability to store energy. Graphically observed dependencies of {var_epsilon}{prime} to frequency indicate dielectric relaxation or dielectric dispersion behaviors that mark the particular stage of progression during the development of biofilms. In contrast, any frequency dependency of the imaginary component, {var_epsilon}{double_prime} the loss factor, is expressed as dielectric losses from the biofilm due to dipole relaxation. The tangent angle of these two component vectors is the ratio of the imaginary component to the real component, {var_epsilon}{double_prime}/{var_epsilon}{prime} and is referred to as the loss angle tangent (tan {delta}) or dielectric loss. Changes in tan {delta} are characteristic of changes in dielectric losses during various developmental stages of the films. Permittivity scans in the above figure are of biofilm growth from P. Fluorescens (10e7 CFU's at the start). Three trends are apparent from these scans, the first being a small drop in the imaginary permittivity over a 7 hours period, best seen in the Cole-Cole plot (a). The second trend

  18. Improving the Performance and Antifouling Properties of Thin-Film Composite Membranes for Water Separation Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiraferri, Alberto

    Membrane-based water separation processes utilize semi-permeable membranes to retain dissolved solids and contaminants. Deployment of these technologies for desalination and wastewater reuse has the potential to sustainably increase the supply of potable, agricultural, and industrial water. Despite considerable development of semi-permeable membranes in the last decades, several design obstacles hampering their progress have yet to be overcome. Specifically, major membrane improvements are currently sought with respect to their performance and productivity, as well as their resistance to fouling. This dissertation research aims at the advancement of semi-permeable membranes by rational optimization of their design to: (i) understand and improve their transport properties and (ii) reduce fouling by organic molecules and delay biofouling by microorganisms. In particular, thin-film composite polyamide membranes for both reverse osmosis and forward osmosis processes are the main target of the investigation. The structural and physicochemical properties of thin-film composite membranes are both characterized and tailored through implementation of original techniques and novel functionalization protocols. The membrane structure and morphology are rationally modified to enhance the mass transport within the support layer. The influence of fabrication conditions on support layer formation and on its final structure is elucidated. The intricate interrelationship among the performance of the different layers of the composite membrane is highlighted and a new protocol is developed to characterize the transport properties of membranes deployed in forward osmosis processes. Novel approaches to impart targeted properties to the active surface of thin-film composite membranes are also proposed. The functionalization is achieved by exploiting the inherent moieties of the polyamide layer to irreversibly bind nanomaterials with desired properties. An experimental method to determine

  19. XPS - an essential tool in biomaterial research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    non-smooth materials such as contact lenses, coating thicknesses can be determined by incorporating slope histograms obtained by atomic force microscopy into XPS photoelectron intensity algorithms. A key limiting factor is the irreversible, uncontrolled accumulation of biological material on the surface of devices placed in contact with biological media ('biofouling'). XPS can be used to study quantitatively the rates of biofouling events and to assess the nature of adsorbing molecules; combined with other techniques such as TOF-SSIMS and Surface-matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectroscopy (MALDI-MS), it is possible to gain molecular understanding of which biological components adsorb on various surface chemistries. Copyright (1999) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  20. Evaluation of cooling water treatment programme at RAPS-3 and 4 with reference to chlorination and microbial control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water from Rana Pratap Sagar Lake is used in Rajasthan Atomic Power Station (RAPS) units 3 and 4 for cooling the condenser system. As the lake water is rich in nutrients and microflora, investigations were carried out on the nutrient quality, microflora distribution and chlorine decay to evaluate the cooling water treatment programme. Algal growth in emergency storage makeup water pools, weed growth on the cooling tower decks and biofilm growth on various materials (carbon steel, stainless steel, admiralty brass and cupronickel) were studied with an objective to understand the reasons for corrosion and failure of fire water pipeline. Visual examination showed that the emergency makeup water pools were infested with green algae and cyano-bacterial mats. Some algal growth was observed on induced draft cooling tower-3 structures. The bacterial counts in various water samples were low, except in emergency makeup water pool. Sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) were present in makeup and demineralised waters. Chlorophyll pigment analysis showed that the makeup and emergency storage water pool had abundant algal growth. To prevent biofouling, chlorine is dosed at the rate of 7 kg/hr for 10 minutes; free residual oxidant (FRO) and chlorine decay were monitored at regular intervals. After 24 hrs, biofilm thickness on different materials ranged from 27-45 μm. However, the thickness was reduced by 50 % after exposure to 2 ppm of chlorine for 15 minutes. In further investigations, it was found that the anion resin beads of demineraliser plant were infested with filamentous microbes. Hence, It is recommended to treat the feed water of DM plant. Tubercles were observed inside the failed fire water carbon steel pipeline and on removing the tubercles concentric ring patterns, typical signatures of SRB corrosion were observed. For controlling the biofouling problem in the cooling water system, it is recommended to maintain a chlorine dose of 2.3 ppm (which gives 0.8 ppm FRO) for two

  1. A Practical Approach for Studying Fouling Process in Li-Recovery Pilot Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, M.; Yoon, H.; Eom, C.; Kim, B.; Chung, K.

    2011-12-01

    The efficiency of selective ion recovery such as lithium from seawater has been major interest of previous studies. However, the characterization of adsorption behavior as well as dissolution yield as discharging environmentally problematic chemical species must carefully studied in various conditions including different seawater conditions [1]. Marine biofouling communities are complex, highly dynamic ecosystems consisting of a diverse range of organisms. The development of such communities begins with bacterial attachment followed by the colonization of higher organisms such as invertebrate larvae and algal spores [2-3]. Monitoring and field studies regarding fouling problems during operation of Li-recovery pilot plant which is designed by the Korea Institute of Geoscience & Mineral Resources (KIGAM) were major concern of this study. We examined fouling process for the duration of exposure time in real marine environment. Substrated with no-antifouling treated material and antifouling treated material were exposed and tested for different behaviors toward fouling in ocean. SEM-EDS (Scanning Electron Microscope-Energy dispersive Spectroscopy) analysis was done for surface identification of specific elements for possible dissolution during seawater exposure. To identify organic compound was used GC-MS (Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometer) analysis. Experiment results, organisms such as alga are fouled the most on 30 days and antitreated material is fouled less than non antitreated material. Operating Li-recovery pilot plant to sea, we need to consider in order to effectively and economically resolve the fouling problem. Acknowledgement : This research was supported by the national research project titled "The Development of Technology for Extraction of Resources Dissolved in Seawater" of the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) funded by the Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime Affairs. References [1] M. Y. Diego, K. Soren, and D. J. Kim

  2. Anti-Biofilm Compounds Derived from Marine Sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Melander

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial biofilms are surface-attached communities of microorganisms that are protected by an extracellular matrix of biomolecules. In the biofilm state, bacteria are significantly more resistant to external assault, including attack by antibiotics. In their native environment, bacterial biofilms underpin costly biofouling that wreaks havoc on shipping, utilities, and offshore industry. Within a host environment, they are insensitive to antiseptics and basic host immune responses. It is estimated that up to 80% of all microbial infections are biofilm-based. Biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are of particular concern, since once the device is colonized, infection is almost impossible to eliminate. Given the prominence of biofilms in infectious diseases, there is a notable effort towards developing small, synthetically available molecules that will modulate bacterial biofilm development and maintenance. Here, we highlight the development of small molecules that inhibit and/or disperse bacterial biofilms specifically through non-microbicidal mechanisms. Importantly, we discuss several sets of compounds derived from marine sponges that we are developing in our labs to address the persistent biofilm problem. We will discuss: discovery/synthesis of natural products and their analogues—including our marine sponge-derived compounds and initial adjuvant activity and toxicological screening of our novel anti-biofilm compounds.

  3. Subsurface intake systems: Green choice for improving feed water quality at SWRO desalination plants, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehwah, Abdullah H A; Missimer, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    An investigation of three seawater reverse osmosis facilities located along the shoreline of the Red Sea of Saudi Arabia that use well intake systems showed that the pumping-induced flow of raw seawater through a coastal aquifer significantly improves feed water quality. A comparison between the surface seawater and the discharge from the wells shows that turbidity, algae, bacteria, total organic carbon, most fractions of natural organic matter (NOM), and particulate and colloidal transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) have significant reductions in concentration. Nearly all of the algae, up to 99% of the bacteria, between 84 and 100% of the biopolymer fraction of NOM, and a high percentage of the TEP were removed during transport. The data suggest that the flowpath length and hydraulic retention time in the aquifer play the most important roles in removal of the organic matter. Since the collective concentrations of bacteria, biopolymers, and TEP in the intake seawater play important roles in the biofouling of SWRO membranes, the observed reductions suggest that the desalination facilities that use well intakes systems will have a potentially lower fouling rate compared to open-ocean intake systems. Furthermore, well intake system intakes also reduce the need for chemical usage during complex pretreatment systems required for operation of SWRO facilities using open-ocean intakes and reduce environmental impacts. PMID:26497939

  4. Antifouling Activity of Secondary Metabolites Isolated from Chinese Marine Organisms

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yong Xin

    2013-04-25

    Biofouling results in tremendous economic losses to maritime industries around the world. A recent global ban on the use of organotin compounds as antifouling agents has further raised demand for safe and effective antifouling compounds. In this study, 49 secondary metabolites, including diterpenoids, steroids, and polyketides, were isolated from soft corals, gorgonians, brown algae, and fungi collected along the coast of China, and their antifouling activity was tested against cyprids of the barnacle Balanus (Amphibalanus) amphitrite. Twenty of the compounds were found to inhibit larval settlement significantly at a concentration of 25 μg ml-1. Two briarane diterpenoids, juncin O (2) and juncenolide H (3), were the most promising non-toxic antilarval settlement candidates, with EC50 values less than 0.13 μg ml-1 and a safety ratio (LC50/EC50) higher than 400. A preliminary structure-activity relationships study indicated that both furanon and furan moieties are important for antifouling activity. Intriguingly, the presence of hydroxyls enhanced their antisettlement activity. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  5. Transport and antifouling properties of papain-based antifouling coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Rafael S.; Armelin, Elaine; Moreno-Martínez, Juan A.; Alemán, Carlos; Ferreira, Carlos A.

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this work is to study the antifouling performance and water uptake behaviour of coatings formulated with papain (an environmentally friendly pigment). Antifouling coatings have been formulated using rosin (natural resin) as matrix and papain adsorbed in activated carbon as pigment. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were used to evaluate the behaviour of the formulated coatings in the marine environment and to calculate the apparent water coefficient of diffusion (D). FTIR and XPS analyses confirm the presence of papain adsorbed inside the activated carbon pores and the release of papain in water. Immersion tests in the Mediterranean Sea were carried out for 7 months to verify the degree of biofouling of the tested coatings. These field assays clearly indicate the excellent behaviour of papain-based antifouling coatings; the results being similar to those achieved using a commercial coating. Additionally, the EIS technique is shown to be a great tool to predict the coating diffusivity of antifouling coatings before immersion tests. Furthermore, the use of biodegradable papain as a nature-friendly antifouling agent can eliminate the negative environmental impact caused by metals and chemical biocides typically used in current commercial formulations.

  6. On some physical and dynamical properties of microplastic particles in marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubarenko, I; Bagaev, A; Zobkov, M; Esiukova, E

    2016-07-15

    Simplified physical models and geometrical considerations reveal general physical and dynamical properties of microplastic particles (0.5-5mm) of different density, shape and size in marine environment. Windage of extremely light foamed particles, surface area and fouling rate of slightly positively buoyant microplastic spheres, films and fibres and settling velocities of negatively buoyant particles are analysed. For the Baltic Sea dimensions and under the considered idealised external conditions, (i) only one day is required for a foamed polystyrene particle to cross the sea (ca. 250km); (ii) polyethylene fibres should spend about 6-8months in the euphotic zone before sinking due to bio-fouling, whilst spherical particles can be retained on the surface up to 10-15years; (iii) for heavy microplastic particles, the time of settling through the water column in the central Gotland basin (ca. 250m) is less than 18h. Proper physical setting of the problem of microplastics transport and developing of physically-based parameterisations are seen as applications. PMID:27184128

  7. Comparative Proteome and Phosphoproteome Analyses during Cyprid Development of the Barnacle Balanus ( =Amphibalanus ) amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yu

    2010-06-04

    The barnacle Balanus amphitrite (=Amphibalanus amphitrite) is a major marine biofouling invertebrate worldwide. It has a complex life cycle during which the larva (called a nauplius) molts six times before transforming into the cyprid stage. The cyprid stage in B. amphitrite is the critical stage for the larval decision to attach and metamorphose. In this study, proteome and phosphoproteome alterations during cyprid development/aging and upon treatment with the antifouling agent butenolide were examined with a two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) multiplexed fluorescent staining approach. Optimized protein separation strategies, including solution-phase isoelectric fractionation and narrow-pH-range 2-DE, were used in a proteomic analysis. Our results show that the differential regulation of the target proteins is highly dynamic on the levels of both protein expression and posttranslational modification. Two groups of proteins, stress-associated and energy metabolism-related proteins, are differentially expressed during cyprid development. Comparison of the control and treatment groups suggests that butenolide exerts its effects by sustaining the expression levels of these proteins. Altogether, our data suggest that proteins involved in stress regulation and energy metabolism play crucial roles in regulating larval attachment and metamorphosis of B. amphitrite. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  8. Protein-resistant polymer coatings obtained by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusen, L. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-16, 077125, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Mustaciosu, C. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Mitu, B.; Filipescu, M.; Dinescu, M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-16, 077125, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Dinca, V., E-mail: dinali@nipne.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-16, 077125, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania)

    2013-08-01

    Adsorption of proteins and polysaccharides is known to facilitate microbial attachment and subsequent formation of biofilm on surfaces that ultimately results in its biofouling. Therefore, protein repellent modified surfaces are necessary to block the irreversible attachment of microorganisms. Within this context, the feasibility of using the Poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(ε-caprolactone) methyl ether (PEG-block-PCL Me) copolymer as potential protein-resistant coating was explored in this work. The films were deposited using Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE), a technique that allows good control of composition, thickness and homogeneity. The chemical and morphological characteristics of the films were examined using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), contact angle measurements and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The FTIR data demonstrates that the functional groups in the MAPLE-deposited films remain intact, especially for fluences below 0.5 J cm{sup −2}. Optical Microscopy and AFM images show that the homogeneity and the roughness of the coatings are related to both laser parameters (fluence, number of pulses) and target composition. Protein adsorption tests were performed on the PEG-block-PCL Me copolymer coated glass and on bare glass surface as a control. The results show that the presence of copolymer as coating significantly reduces the adsorption of proteins.

  9. Implications of Extracellular Polymeric Substance Matrices of Microbial Habitats Associated with Coastal Aquaculture Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Camacho-Chab

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Coastal zones support fisheries that provide food for humans and feed for animals. The decline of fisheries worldwide has fostered the development of aquaculture. Recent research has shown that extracellular polymeric substances (EPS synthesized by microorganisms contribute to sustainable aquaculture production, providing feed to the cultured species, removing waste and contributing to the hygiene of closed systems. As ubiquitous components of coastal microbial habitats at the air–seawater and seawater–sediment interfaces as well as of biofilms and microbial aggregates, EPS mediate deleterious processes that affect the performance and productivity of aquaculture facilities, including biofouling of marine cages, bioaccumulation and transport of pollutants. These biomolecules may also contribute to the persistence of harmful algal blooms (HABs and their impact on cultured species. EPS may also exert a positive influence on aquaculture activity by enhancing the settling of aquaculturally valuable larvae and treating wastes in bioflocculation processes. EPS display properties that may have biotechnological applications in the aquaculture industry as antiviral agents and immunostimulants and as a novel source of antifouling bioproducts.

  10. Development of nanocomposite membranes with photocatalytic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, I; Keuter, V; Gross, F

    2012-12-01

    In 2030, 47% of the world population will be living in areas of high water stress (UN World Water Development Report 3, 2009). The global water shortage results in an emerging need for novel, more efficient and cost saving water purification methods. Membrane technology with its very low use of chemical substances and secure retention of contaminants represents a promising water cleaning method. The approach presented focuses on the application of nanocoating procedures to membrane processes which aims at reducing the fouling potential of membranes and destroying water contaminants. Photocatalytic titanium dioxide nanoparticles are applied. Novel suitable microsieves including a homogeneous pore size distribution and high robustness were developed from metallic material. An appropriate multilayer coating system was developed and applied on a new nanocomposite filter resulting in high photocatalytic activities with maximum photon efficiencies of 0.0733. The coating layer do not have a negative influence on the permeate flux. The effectiveness of the nanocomposite filter was proven in a 12 days biofouling experiment with activated sludge suspensions. PMID:23447972

  11. Biofilms and Marine Invertebrate Larvae: What Bacteria Produce That Larvae Use to Choose Settlement Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadfield, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Communities of microorganisms form thin coats across solid surfaces in the sea. Larvae of many marine invertebrates use biofilm components as cues to appropriate settlement sites. Research on the tube-dwelling polychaete worm Hydroides elegans, a globally common member of biofouling communities, is described to exemplify approaches to understanding biofilm bacteria as a source of settlement cues and larvae as bearers of receptors for bacterial cues. The association of species of the bacterial genus Pseudoalteromonas with larval settlement in many phyla is described, and the question of whether cues are soluble or surface-bound is reviewed, concluding that most evidence points to surface-bound cues. Seemingly contradictory data for stimulation of barnacle settlement are discussed; possibly both explanations are true. Paleontological evidence reveals a relationship between metazoans and biofilms very early in metazoan evolution, and thus the receptors for bacterial cues of invertebrate larvae are very old and possibly unique. Finally, despite more than 60 years of intense investigation, we still know very little about either the bacterial ligands that stimulate larval settlement or the cellular basis of their detection by larvae.

  12. Micro-structured surfaces for algal biofilm growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathananthan, Suthamathy; Genin, Scott N.; Aitchison, J. Stewart; Allen, D. Grant

    2013-12-01

    It is well known that cells respond to structured surface cues that are on the micro/nanometer scale. Tissue engineering and bio-fouling fields have utilized the semiconductor device fabrication processes to make micro- and nanometer patterned surfaces to study animal cell tissue formation and to prevent algae attachment on marine surfaces respectively. In this paper we describe the use of micro-structured surfaces to study the attachment and growth of algal films. This paper gives an overview of how micro-structured surfaces are made for this purpose, how they are incorporated into a photo bioreactor and how this patterning influences the growth of an algal biofilm. Our results suggest that surface patterning with deeper V-groove patterns that are of the same size scale as the algal species has resulted in higher biomass productivity giving them a chance to embed and attach on the slope and flat surfaces whereas shallower size grooves and completely flat surfaces did not show this trend.

  13. 2009 - 2012: the age of platypus neutron reflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Your average Platypus is a shy, secretive creature with a lifespan of around 11 years, and so the Platypus time-of-flight neutron reflectometer at OPAL is barely out of its adolescence. A multipurpose spectrometer for the characterisation of solid thin films, materials adsorbed at the solid-liquid interface and free-liquid surfaces; it also has the capacity to study magnetic thin films using spin-polarized neutrons. Since mid-2009, we have run more than 70 user experiments for researchers from Australia, New Zealand, Korea, Singapore, Taiwan, the UK, Germany, Italy and the USA. This presentation highlights the performance of the Platypus neutron reflectometer by reference to key published studies that have used neutron reflectometry as the central technique. Minimum reflectivity values of 10-7 are observed; with the capacity to measure samples of thickness ranging between 1 and 400 nm. and data collection times ranging between minutes and a few hours. Published studies include: microphase separation of diblock copolymers; dendhmer explosive sensors; anti-biofouling surfaces; organic photovoltaics; DNA sensing monolayers; polyelectrolyte/DNA complexes; surface interactions with ionic liquids, peptide surfactants and bio-functional surfaces; action of antimicrobial peptides on biomimetic membranes, organic light emitting diodes, and exchange bias in iron oxide magnetic thin films.

  14. Antibiofilm effect enhanced by modification of 1,2,3-triazole and palladium nanoparticles on polysulfone membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hong; Xie, Yihui; Villalobos, Luis Francisco; Song, Liyan; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor; Nunes, Suzana; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Biofouling impedes the performance of membrane bioreactors. In this study, we investigated the antifouling effects of polysulfone membranes that were modified by 1,2,3-triazole and palladium (Pd) nanoparticles. The modified membranes were evaluated for antibacterial and antifouling efficacy in a monoculture species biofilm (i.e., drip flow biofilm reactor, DFR) and mixed species biofilm experiment (i.e., aerobic membrane reactor, AeMBR). 1,2,3-triazole and Pd nanoparticles inhibited growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The decrease in bacterial growth was observed along with a decrease in the amount of total polysaccharide within the monoculture species biofilm matrix. When the modified membranes were connected to AeMBR, the increase in transmembrane pressure was lower than that of the non-modified membranes. This was accompanied by a decrease in protein and polysaccharide concentrations within the mixed species biofilm matrix. Biomass amount in the biofilm layer was also lower in the presence of modified membranes, and there was no detrimental effect on the performance of the reactor as evaluated from the nutrient removal rates. 16S rRNA analysis further attributed the delay in membrane fouling to the decrease in relative abundance of selected bacterial groups. These observations collectively point to a lower fouling occurrence achieved by the modified membranes. PMID:27068576

  15. Applied Chemistry Division progress report for the period 1990-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report covers the research and development (R and D) activities of the Applied Chemistry Division for the period January 1990 to December, 1992. R and D programmes of the Division are formulated to study the chemical aspects related to nuclear power plants and heavy water plants. The Division also gives consultancy to DAE units and outside agencies on water chemistry problems. The thrust areas of the Division's R and D programmes are : decontamination of nuclear facilities, metal water interaction of the materials used in PHT system, chemistry of soluble poisons, biofouling and its control in cooling water circuits, and treatment of cooling waters. Other major R and D activities are in the areas of: solid state reactions and high temperature thermodynamics, primary coolant water chemistry, speciation studies in metal amine systems, high temperature aqueous radiation chemistry. The Division was engaged in studies in novel areas such as dental implants, remote sealing of pipes in MS pipes, and cold fusion. The Division also designed and fabricated instruments like the Knudsen cell mass spectrometer, calorimeters and developed required software. All these R and D activities are reported in the form of individual summaries. A list of publications from the Division and a list of the staff members of the Division are given at the end of the report. (author). tabs., figs., appendices

  16. Biofabrication Using Pyrrole Electropolymerization for the Immobilization of Glucose Oxidase and Lactate Oxidase on Implanted Microfabricated Biotransducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian N. Kotanen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The dual responsive Electrochemical Cell-on-a-Chip Microdisc Electrode Array (ECC MDEA 5037 is a recently developed electrochemical transducer for use in a wireless, implantable biosensor system for the continuous measurement of interstitial glucose and lactate. Fabrication of the biorecognition membrane via pyrrole electropolymerization and both in vitro and in vivo characterization of the resulting biotransducer is described. The influence of EDC-NHS covalent conjugation of glucose oxidase with 4-(3-pyrrolyl butyric acid (monomerization and with 4-sulfobenzoic acid (sulfonization on biosensor performance was examined. As the extent of enzyme conjugation was increased sensitivity decreased for monomerized enzymes but increased for sulfonized enzymes. Implanted biotransducers were examined in a Sprague-Dawley rat hemorrhage model. Resection after 4 h and subsequent in vitro re-characterization showed a decreased sensitivity from 0.68 (±0.40 to 0.22 (±0.17 µA·cm−2·mM−1, an increase in the limit of detection from 0.05 (±0.03 to 0.27 (±0.27 mM and a six-fold increase in the response time from 41 (±18 to 244 (±193 s. This evidence reconfirms the importance of biofouling at the bio-abio interface and the need for mitigation strategies to address the foreign body response.

  17. Antibiofilm effect enhanced by modification of 1,2,3-triazole and palladium nanoparticles on polysulfone membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Hong

    2016-04-12

    Biofouling impedes the performance of membrane bioreactors. In this study, we investigated the antifouling effects of polysulfone membranes that were modified by 1,2,3-triazole and palladium (Pd) nanoparticles. The modified membranes were evaluated for antibacterial and antifouling efficacy in a monoculture species biofilm (i.e., drip flow biofilm reactor, DFR) and mixed species biofilm experiment (i.e., aerobic membrane reactor, AeMBR). 1,2,3-triazole and Pd nanoparticles inhibited growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The decrease in bacterial growth was observed along with a decrease in the amount of total polysaccharide within the monoculture species biofilm matrix. When the modified membranes were connected to AeMBR, the increase in transmembrane pressure was lower than that of the non-modified membranes. This was accompanied by a decrease in protein and polysaccharide concentrations within the mixed species biofilm matrix. Biomass amount in the biofilm layer was also lower in the presence of modified membranes, and there was no detrimental effect on the performance of the reactor as evaluated from the nutrient removal rates. 16S rRNA analysis further attributed the delay in membrane fouling to the decrease in relative abundance of selected bacterial groups. These observations collectively point to a lower fouling occurrence achieved by the modified membranes.

  18. Evaluation of potential particulate/colloidal TEP foulants on a pilot scale SWRO desalination study

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Sheng

    2016-01-21

    This pilot study investigated the variation of potential foulants and different fractions of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP), along the treatment scheme under different conditions. The objectives are to provide a comprehensive understanding on which fraction of TEP is more problematic in seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) fouling, and which pretreatment can better reduce the concentration of TEP. Results showed that TEP deposited on the RO membranes, and the extent of RO fouling increased with the increase of TEP concentration in RO feed water. More TEP was produced in water after chlorination, probably because of the breakdown of bacterial cells and thus the release of internal exopolymers. Moreover, the cartridge filters could behave as an incubator for the regrowth of bacteria deactivated by chlorination and a spot for potential foulant (bacterial TEP) production, and thus enhance the RO membranes fouling. The presence of residual iron and addition of phosphate based antiscalant may also contribute to the higher biofouling of RO membranes. This pilot study provided an opportunity to identify the TEP related issues under different operational conditions in RO desalination of Red Sea water.

  19. In-depth analyses of organic matters in a full-scale seawater desalination plant and an autopsy of reverse osmosis membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Sanghyun

    2016-02-17

    In order to facilitate the global performance of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) systems, it is important to improve the feed water quality before it enters the RO. Currently, many desalination plants experience production losses due to incidents of organic and biofouling. Consequently, monitoring or characterizing the pretreatment step using more advanced organic and biological parameters are required for better operation to lessen fouling issues. In this study, the performance of pretreatment processes (including coagulation, dual media filtration (DMF), polishing with cartridge filter (CF) coupled with anti-scalant) used at Perth Seawater Desalination Plant (PSDP) located in Western Australia were characterized in terms of organic and biological fouling parameters. These analyses were carried out using liquid chromatography with organic carbon detector (LC-OCD), three dimensional-fluorescence excitation emission matrix (3D-FEEM) and assimilable organic carbon (AOC). Furthermore, the used (exhausted) RO membrane and CF were autopsied so that the fates and behaviors of organic foulants in these treatment systems could be better understood.

  20. Dynamics of microbial communities in an integrated ultrafiltration–reverse osmosis desalination pilot plant located at the Arabian Gulf

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Pei-Ying

    2015-08-27

    This study demonstrated the use of high-throughput sequencing to assess the efficacy of an integrated ultrafiltration (UF)–reverse osmosis (RO) desalination pilot plant located at the Arabian Gulf, and to identify potential microbial-associated problems that may arise in this plant. When integrated into the desalination treatment system, the UF membranes were able to serve as a good pretreatment strategy to delay RO fouling by achieving up to 1.96-log removal of cells from the seawater. Consequently, the differential pressure of the RO membrane remained around 1 bar for the entire six-month study, suggesting no significant biofouling performance issue identified for this RO system. Examples of microbial populations effectively removed by the UF membranes from the feed waters included Nitrosoarchaeum limnia and phototrophic eukaryotes. Microbial-associated problems observed in this pilot plant included the presence of Pseudomonas spp. in coexistence with Desulfovibrio spp. These two bacterial populations can reduce sulfate and produce hydrogen sulfide, which would in turn cause corrosion problems or compromise membrane integrities. Chemical-enhanced backwashing (CEB) can be used as an effective strategy to minimize the associated microbial problems by removing bacterial populations including sulfate reducers from the UF membranes.

  1. Chemical maintenance of heat exchangers and condensers for prevention of corrosion and fouling [Paper No.: VI B-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper describes the various types of corrosion, viz., inlet local and malignant impingement attacks, biofouling, sand erosion, etc. to which condenser tubes of the heat exchangers of the nuclear power plants are susceptible. Mention is also made to the effects of under deposit differential oxygen cell attack, leading to general wastage/pitting corrosion of heat exchanger shells and tubes outer surfaces because of stagnant conditions. Regular and systematic monitoring of water chemistry parameters helps in formulation of remedial measures whenever necessary; the data obtained from the improved maintenance methods serve as useful feed back. In the present paper these aspects of chemical maintenance are illustrated by reference to two methods commonly employed in pre-treatment of condenser cooling water/process water used in heat exchangers. Ferrous sulphate is added to condenser cooling water for promoting the formation of protective coating on inside surfaces of condenser tubes. In addition, inhibitors are also employed for corrosion prevention. Chlorine is injected as biocide in the process water/condenser cooling water to remove biogrowth which would seriously interfere with the efficiency of heat transfer. In both instances treatment schedules and treatment levels are constantly kept under review for efficient management. (author)

  2. Subsurface intakes for seawater reverse osmosis facilities: Capacity limitation, water quality improvement, and economics

    KAUST Repository

    Missimer, Thomas M.

    2013-08-01

    The use of subsurface intake systems for seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) desalination plants significantly improves raw water quality, reduces chemical usage and environmental impacts, decreases the carbon footprint, and reduces cost of treated water to consumers. These intakes include wells (vertical, angle, and radial type) and galleries, which can be located either on the beach or in the seabed. Subsurface intakes act both as intakes and as part of the pretreatment system by providing filtration and active biological treatment of the raw seawater. Recent investigations of the improvement in water quality made by subsurface intakes show lowering of the silt density index by 75 to 90%, removal of nearly all algae, removal of over 90% of bacteria, reduction in the concentrations of TOC and DOC, and virtual elimination of biopolymers and polysaccharides that cause organic biofouling of membranes. Economic analyses show that overall SWRO operating costs can be reduced by 5 to 30% by using subsurface intake systems. Although capital costs can be slightly to significantly higher compared to open-ocean intake system costs, a preliminary life-cycle cost analysis shows significant cost saving over operating periods of 10 to 30. years. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Optimal scheduling of biocide dosing for seawater-cooled power and desalination plants

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Abdullah Bin

    2011-02-13

    Thermal desalination systems are typically integrated with power plants to exploit the excess heat resulting from the power-generation units. Using seawater in cooling the power plant and the desalination system is a common practice in many parts of the world where there is a shortage of freshwater. Biofouling is one of the major problems associated with the usage of seawater in cooling systems. Because of the dynamic variation in the power and water demands as well as the changes in the characteristics of seawater and the process, there is a need to develop an optimal policy for scheduling biocide usage and cleaning maintenance of the heat exchangers. The objective of this article is to introduce a systematic procedure for the optimization of scheduling the dosing of biocide and dechlorination chemicals as well as cleaning maintenance for a power production/thermal desalination plant. A multi-period optimization formulation is developed and solved to determine: the optimal levels of dosing and dechlorination chemicals; the timing of maintenance to clean the heat-exchange surfaces; and the dynamic dependence of the biofilm growth on the applied doses, the seawater-biocide chemistry, the process conditions, and seawater characteristics for each time period. The technical, economic, and environmental considerations of the system are accounted for. A case study is solved to elucidate the applicability of the developed optimization approach. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Accelerating Ocean Energy to the Marketplace - Environmental Research at the U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) has mobilized its National Laboratories to address the broad range of environmental effects of ocean and river energy development. The National Laboratories are using a risk-based approach to set priorities among environmental effects, and to direct research activities. Case studies will be constructed to determine the most significant environmental effects of ocean energy harvest for tidal systems in temperate estuaries, for wave energy installations in temperate coastal areas, wave installations in sub-tropical waters, and riverine energy installations in large rivers. In addition, the National Laboratories are investigating the effects of energy removal from waves, tides and river currents using numerical modeling studies. Laboratory and field research is also underway to understand the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF), acoustic noise, toxicity from anti-biofouling coatings, effects on benthic habitats, and physical interactions with tidal and wave devices on marine and freshwater organisms and ecosystems. Outreach and interactions with stakeholders allow the National Laboratories to understand and mitigate for use conflicts and to provide useful information for marine spatial planning at the national and regional level.

  5. Potent antifouling compounds produced by marine Streptomyces

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Ying

    2010-02-01

    Biofouling causes huge economic loss and a recent global ban on organotin compounds as antifouling agents has increased the need for safe and effective antifouling compounds. Five structurally similar compounds were isolated from the crude extract of a marine Streptomyces strain obtained from deep-sea sediments. Antifouling activities of these five compounds and four other structurally-related compounds isolated from a North Sea Streptomyces strain against major fouling organisms were compared to probe structure-activity relationships of compounds. The functional moiety responsible for antifouling activity lies in the 2-furanone ring and that the lipophilicity of compounds substantially affects their antifouling activities. Based on these findings, a compound with a straight alkyl side-chain was synthesized and proved itself as a very effective non-toxic, anti-larval settlement agent against three major fouling organisms. The strong antifouling activity, relatively low toxicity, and simple structures of these compounds make them promising candidates for new antifouling additives. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion power system development. Phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-04

    This report covers the conceptual and preliminary design of closed-cycle, ammonia, ocean thermal energy conversion power plants by Westinghouse Electric Corporation. Preliminary designs for evaporator and condenser test articles (0.13 MWe size) and a 10 MWe modular experiment power system are described. Conceptual designs for 50 MWe power systems, and 100 MWe power plants are also descirbed. Design and cost algorithms were developed, and an optimized power system design at the 50 MWe size was completed. This design was modeled very closely in the test articles and in the 10 MWe Modular Application. Major component and auxiliary system design, materials, biofouling, control response, availability, safety and cost aspects are developed with the greatest emphasis on the 10 MWe Modular Application Power System. It is concluded that all power plant subsystems are state-of-practice and require design verification only, rather than continued research. A complete test program, which verifies the mechanical reliability as well as thermal performance, is recommended and described.

  7. Self-driven jamming in growing microbial populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delarue, Morgan; Hartung, Jörn; Schreck, Carl; Gniewek, Pawel; Hu, Lucy; Herminghaus, Stephan; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2016-08-01

    In natural settings, microbes tend to grow in dense populations where they need to push against their surroundings to accommodate space for new cells. The associated contact forces play a critical role in a variety of population-level processes, including biofilm formation, the colonization of porous media, and the invasion of biological tissues. Although mechanical forces have been characterized at the single-cell level, it remains elusive how collective pushing forces result from the combination of single-cell forces. Here, we reveal a collective mechanism of confinement, which we call self-driven jamming, that promotes the build-up of large mechanical pressures in microbial populations. Microfluidic experiments on budding yeast populations in space-limited environments show that self-driven jamming arises from the gradual formation and sudden collapse of force chains driven by microbial proliferation, extending the framework of driven granular matter. The resulting contact pressures can become large enough to slow down cell growth, to delay the cell cycle in the G1 phase, and to strain or even destroy the micro-environment through crack propagation. Our results suggest that self-driven jamming and build-up of large mechanical pressures is a natural tendency of microbes growing in confined spaces, contributing to microbial pathogenesis and biofouling.

  8. Biofilm structure and its influence on clogging in drip irrigation emitters distributing reclaimed wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Dazhuang; BAI Zhihui; Mike Rowan; GU Likun; Ren Shumei; YANG Peiling

    2009-01-01

    Using reclaimed wastewater for crop irrigation is a practical alternative to discharge wastewater treatment plant effluents into surface waters.However,biofouling has been identified as a major contributor to emitter clogging in drip irrigation systems distributing reclaimed wastewater.Little is known about the biofilm structure and its influence on clogging in the drip emitter flow path.This study was first to investigate the microbial characteristics of mature biofilms present in the emitters and the effect of flow path structures on the biofilm microbial communities.The analysis of biofilm matrix structure using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that particles in the matrix of the biofilm coupled extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) and formed sediment in the emitter flow path.Analysis of biofilm mass including protein,polysaccharide and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) showed that emitter flow path style influenced biofilm community structure and diversity.The correlations of biofilm biomass and discharge reduction after 360 h irrigation were computed and suggest that PFLAs provide the best correlation coefficient.Comparatively,the emitter with the unsymmetrical dentate structure and shorter flow path (Emitter C) had the best anti-clogging capability.By optimizing the dentate structure,the internal flow pattern within the flow path could be enhanced as an important method to control the biofilm within emitter flow path.This study established electron microscope techniques and biochemical microbial analysis methods that may provide a framework for future emitter biofilm studies.

  9. An implantable compound-releasing capsule triggered on demand by ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordeig, Olga; Chin, Sau Yin; Kim, Sohyun; Chitnis, Parag V.; Sia, Samuel K.

    2016-03-01

    Implantable devices have a large potential to improve human health, but they are often made of biofouling materials that necessitate special coatings, rely on electrical connections for external communication, and require a continuous power source. This paper demonstrates an alternative platform, which we call iTAG (implantable thermally actuated gel), where an implanted capsule can be wirelessly controlled by ultrasound to trigger the release of compounds. We constructed a millimeter-sized capsule containing a co-polymer gel (NiPAAm-co-AAm) that contracts above body temperature (i.e. at 45 °C) to release compounds through an opening. This gel-containing capsule is biocompatible and free of toxic electronic or battery components. An ultrasound hardware, with a focused ultrasound (FUS) transducer and a co-axial A-mode imaging transducer, was used to image the capsule (to monitor in real time its position, temperature, and effectiveness of dose delivery), as well as to trigger a rapid local rise in temperature, contraction of gel, and release of compounds in vitro and in vivo. The combination of this gel-based capsule and compact ultrasound hardware can serve as a platform for triggering local release of compounds, including potentially in deep tissue, to achieve tailored personalized therapy.

  10. Prospects of Nanobiomaterials for Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra P. Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress and development in biosensor development will inevitably focus upon the technology of the nanomaterials that offer promise to solve the biocompatibility and biofouling problems. The biosensors using smart nanomaterials have applications for rapid, specific, sensitive, inexpensive, in-field, on-line and/or real-time detection of pesticides, antibiotics, pathogens, toxins, proteins, microbes, plants, animals, foods, soil, air, and water. Thus, biosensors are excellent analytical tools for pollution monitoring, by which implementation of legislative provisions to safeguard our biosphere could be made effectively plausible. The current trends and challenges with nanomaterials for various applications will have focus biosensor development and miniaturization. All these growing areas will have a remarkable influence on the development of new ultrasensitive biosensing devices to resolve the severe pollution problems in the future that not only challenges the human health but also affects adversely other various comforts to living entities. This review paper summarizes recent progress in the development of biosensors by integrating functional biomolecules with different types of nanomaterials, including metallic nanoparticles, semiconductor nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles, inorganic/organic hybrid, dendrimers, and carbon nanotubes/graphene.

  11. Enhanced Oxygen and Hydroxide Transport in a Cathode Interface by Efficient Antibacterial Property of a Silver Nanoparticle-Modified, Activated Carbon Cathode in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da; Qu, Youpeng; Liu, Jia; Liu, Guohong; Zhang, Jie; Feng, Yujie

    2016-08-17

    A biofilm growing on an air cathode is responsible for the decreased performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). For the undesired biofilm to be minimized, silver nanoparticles were synthesized on activated carbon as the cathodic catalyst (Ag/AC) in MFCs. Ag/AC enhanced maximum power density by 14.6% compared to that of a bare activated carbon cathode (AC) due to the additional silver catalysis. After operating MFCs over five months, protein content on the Ag/AC cathode was only 38.3% of that on the AC cathode, which resulted in a higher oxygen concentration diffusing through the Ag/AC cathode. In addition, a lower pH increment (0.2 units) was obtained near the Ag/AC catalyst surface after biofouling compared to 0.8 units of the AC cathode, indicating that less biofilm on the Ag/AC cathode had a minor resistance on hydroxide transported from the catalyst layer interfaces to the bulk solution. Therefore, less decrements of the Ag/AC activity and MFC performance were obtained. This result indicated that accelerated transport of oxygen and hydroxide, benefitting from the antibacterial property of the cathode, could efficiently maintain higher cathode stability during long-term operation. PMID:27441786

  12. Surface Tension Mediated Under-Water Adhesion of Rigid Spheres on Soft, Charged Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Shayandev; Das, Siddhartha

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the phenomenon of surface-tension-mediated under-water adhesion is necessary for studying a plethora of physiological and technical phenomena, such as the uptake of bacteria or nanoparticle by cells, attachment of virus on bacterial surfaces, biofouling on large ocean vessels and marine devices, etc. This adhesion phenomenon becomes highly non-trivial in case the soft surface where the adhesion occurs is also charged. Here we propose a theory for analyzing such an under-water adhesion of a rigid sphere on a soft, charged surface, represented by a grafted polyelectrolyte layer (PEL). We develop a model based on the minimization of free energy that, in addition to considering the elastic and the surface-tension-mediated adhesion energies, also accounts for the PEL electric double layer (EDL) induced electrostatic energies. We show that in the presence of surface charges, adhesion gets enhanced. This can be explained by the fact that the increase in the elastic energy is better balanced by the lowering of the EDL energy associated with the adhesion process. The entire behaviour is further dictated by the surface tension components that govern the adhesion energy.

  13. Biofilm control with natural and genetically-modified phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motlagh, Amir Mohaghegh; Bhattacharjee, Ananda Shankar; Goel, Ramesh

    2016-04-01

    Bacteriophages, as the most dominant and diverse entities in the universe, have the potential to be one of the most promising therapeutic agents. The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria and the antibiotic crisis in the last few decades have resulted in a renewed interest in phage therapy. Furthermore, bacteriophages, with the capacity to rapidly infect and overcome bacterial resistance, have demonstrated a sustainable approach against bacterial pathogens-particularly in biofilm. Biofilm, as complex microbial communities located at interphases embedded in a matrix of bacterial extracellular polysaccharide substances (EPS), is involved in health issues such as infections associated with the use of biomaterials and chronic infections by multidrug resistant bacteria, as well as industrial issues such as biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces in food industry and membrane biofouling in water and wastewater treatment processes. In this paper, the most recent studies on the potential of phage therapy using natural and genetically-modified lytic phages and their associated enzymes in fighting biofilm development in various fields including engineering, industry, and medical applications are reviewed. Phage-mediated prevention approaches as an indirect phage therapy strategy are also explored in this review. In addition, the limitations of these approaches and suggestions to overcome these constraints are discussed to enhance the efficiency of phage therapy process. Finally, future perspectives and directions for further research towards a better understanding of phage therapy to control biofilm are recommended. PMID:26931607

  14. Characterization of floating element balance for field panel testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsucker, J. Travis; Gardner, Harrison; Swain, Geoffrey

    2015-11-01

    Multiple experiments were performed to investigate and characterize the uncertainty and bias of a through-hull flush mounted floating element balance designed to measure the hydrodynamic drag forces of biofouling and marine coatings on 25 x 30 cm test panels. The instrument is located in a wet well on the aft portion of a 27' Chris Craft Commander. Testing occurs over a series of speeds ranging from a Froude number of 0.50-2.20 on calm days (force 3 or less) in waters along the central east coast of Florida. Recent modifications have been made to the instrumentation in an effort to improve the overall accuracy of the system. This study compares frictional drag measurements of the floating element balance to those obtained using the Clauser chart and Preston tube methods for a smooth surface. Boundary layer velocity profiles are examined to understand the nature of the flow over the testing section. Roughness function values for 60 and 220 grit sandpaper were calculated from data obtained using the floating element balance. These values were compared with previous work to examine the overall bias of the methodology. Repeat measurements for a smooth panel were analyzed to characterize the overall uncertainty in the system. This research was supported by the Office of Naval Research under grants N00014-10-1-0919 and N00014-11-1-0915.

  15. Three-Dimensionally Printed Microfluidic Cross-flow System for Ultrafiltration/Nanofiltration Membrane Performance Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardrip, Nathaniel C; Arnusch, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Minimization and management of membrane fouling is a formidable challenge in diverse industrial processes and other practices that utilize membrane technology. Understanding the fouling process could lead to optimization and higher efficiency of membrane based filtration. Here we show the design and fabrication of an automated three-dimensionally (3-D) printed microfluidic cross-flow filtration system that can test up to 4 membranes in parallel. The microfluidic cells were printed using multi-material photopolymer 3-D printing technology, which used a transparent hard polymer for the microfluidic cell body and incorporated a thin rubber-like polymer layer, which prevents leakages during operation. The performance of ultrafiltration (UF), and nanofiltration (NF) membranes were tested and membrane fouling could be observed with a model foulant bovine serum albumin (BSA). Feed solutions containing BSA showed flux decline of the membrane. This protocol may be extended to measure fouling or biofouling with many other organic, inorganic or microbial containing solutions. The microfluidic design is especially advantageous for testing materials that are costly or only available in small quantities, for example polysaccharides, proteins, or lipids due to the small surface area of the membrane being tested. This modular system may also be easily expanded for high throughput testing of membranes. PMID:26968008

  16. Sedimentation and Fouling of Optical Surfaces at the ANTARES Site

    CERN Document Server

    Amram, P

    2003-01-01

    ANTARES is a project leading towards the construction and deployment of a neutrino telescope in the deep Mediterranean Sea. The telescope will use an array of photomultiplier tubes to detect the Cherenkov light emitted by muons resulting from the interaction with matter of high energy neutrinos. In the vicinity of the deployment site the ANTARES collaboration has performed a series of in-situ measurements to study the change in light transmission through glass surfaces during immersions of several months. The average loss of light transmission is estimated to be only ~2% at the equator of a glass sphere one year after deployment. It decreases with increasing zenith angle, and tends to saturate with time. The transmission loss, therefore, is expected to remain small for the several year lifetime of the ANTARES detector whose optical modules are oriented downwards. The measurements were complemented by the analysis of the ^{210}Pb activity profile in sediment cores and the study of biofouling on glass plates. D...

  17. Microfabrication of patterns of adherent marine bacterium Phaeobacter inhibens using soft lithography and scanning probe lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chuan; Burchardt, Malte; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Beardsley, Christine; Simon, Meinhard; Wittstock, Gunther

    2010-06-01

    Two lithographic approaches have been explored for the microfabrication of cellular patterns based on the attachment of marine bacterium Phaeobacter inhibens strain T5. Strain T5 produces a new antibiotic that makes this bacterium potentially interesting for the pharmaceutical market and as a probiotic organism in aquacultures and in controlling biofouling. The microcontact printing (microCP) method is based on the micropatterning of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) terminated with adhesive end groups such as CH(3) and COOH and nonadhesive groups (e.g., short oligomers of ethylene glycol (OEG)) to form micropatterned substrates for the adhesion of strain T5. The scanning probe lithographic method is based on the surface modification of OEG SAM by using a microelectrode, the probe of a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM). Oxidizing agents (e.g., Br(2)) were electrogenerated in situ at the microelectrodes from Br(-) in aqueous solution to remove OEG SAMs locally, which allows the subsequent adsorption of bacteria. Various micropatterns of bacteria could be formed in situ on the substrate without a prefabricated template. The fabricated cellular patterns may be applied to a variety of marine biological studies that require the analysis of biofilm formation, cell-cell and cell-surface interactions, and cell-based biosensors and bioelectronics. PMID:20397716

  18. Microbial diversity associated with copepods in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Katyanne M; Moisander, Pia H

    2015-07-01

    Patchiness of marine microbial communities has an important influence on microbial activities in the ocean, particularly in the oligotrophic open ocean where bioavailable nutrients are otherwise scarce. Such spatial heterogeneity is present in associations with dead and living particles, including zooplankton. The microbial community composition of mesozooplankton was investigated from the Sargasso Sea using 16S rRNA amplicon pyrosequencing. Zooplankton microbiomes were studied on the copepods Undinula vulgaris, Pleuromamma spp., Sapphirina metalina, Pseudocalanus spp. and Tigriopus sp., and an amphipod, Phrosina semilunata. The overall richness was lower in the zooplankton than in the seawater, and zooplankton-specific bacterial communities were distinct from the communities in seawater. Gammaproteobacteria dominated in all zooplankton studied, with Vibrio spp. highly represented. Firmicutes were detected in all copepods, providing evidence for anaerobic conditions present on the copepods. Bacterial groups known to grow on concentrated organic substrates or to prevent biofouling were highly represented in association with copepods, suggesting they benefit from copepod-derived nutrients or carbon. The described copepod microbiome has similarities to communities previously described in coastal copepods, suggesting some aspects of the copepod microbiome are not habitat specific. The communities are distinct of that in seawater, demonstrating significant microbial patchiness in association with marine zooplankton in the oligotrophic open ocean. PMID:26077986

  19. FATE OF REVERSE OSMOSIS (RO) MEMBRANES DURING OXIDATION BY DISINFECTANTS USED IN WATER TREATMENT: IMPACT ON MEMBRANE STRUCTURE AND PERFORMANCES

    KAUST Repository

    Maugin, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Providing pretreatment prior RO filtration is essential to avoid biofouling and subsequent loss of membrane performances. Chlorine is known to degrade polymeric membrane, improving or reducing membrane efficiency depending on oxidation conditions. This study aimed to assess the impact of alternative disinfectant, NH2Cl, as well as secondary oxidants formed during chloramination of seawater, e.g. HOBr, HOI, or used in water treatment e.g. ClO2, O3, on membrane structure and performances. Permeability, total and specific rejection (Cl-, SO4 2-, Br-, Boron), FTIR profile, elemental composition were analyzed. Results showed that each oxidant seems to react differently with the membrane. HOCl, HOBr, ClO2 and O3 improved membrane permeability but decreased rejection in different extent. In comparison, chloramines resulted in identical trends but oxidized membrane very slowly. On the contrary, iodine improved membrane rejection e.g. boron, but decreased permeability. Reaction conducted with chlorine, bromine, iodine and chloramines resulted in the incorporation of halogen in the membrane structure. All oxidant except iodine were able to break amide bonds of the membrane structure in our condition. In addition, chloramine seemed to react with membrane differently, involving a potential addition of nitrogen. Chloramination of seawater amplified membrane performances evolutions due to generation of bromochloramine. Moreover, chloramines reacted both with NOM and membrane during oxidation in natural seawater, leading to additional rejection drop.

  20. Pulmonary toxicity and kinetic study of Cy5.5-conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by optical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in the development of nanotechnology and devices now make it possible to accurately deliver drugs or genes to the lung. Magnetic nanoparticles can be used as contrast agents, thermal therapy for cancer, and be made to concentrate to target sites through an external magnetic field. However, these advantages may also become problematic when taking into account safety and toxicological factors. This study demonstrated the pulmonary toxicity and kinetic profile of anti-biofouling polymer coated, Cy5.5-conjugated thermally cross-linked superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (TCL-SPION) by optical imaging. Negatively charged, 36 nm-sized, Cy5.5-conjugated TCL-SPION was prepared for optical imaging probe. Cy5.5-conjugated TCL-SPION was intratracheally instilled into the lung by a non-surgical method. Cy5.5-conjugated TCL-SPION slightly induced pulmonary inflammation. The instilled nanoparticles were distributed mainly in the lung and excreted in the urine via glomerular filtration. Urinary excretion was peaked at 3 h after instillation. No toxicity was found under the concentration of 1.8 mg/kg and the half-lives of nanoparticles in the lung and urine were estimated to be about 14.4 ± 0.54 h and 24.7 ± 1.02 h, respectively. Although further studies are required, our results showed that Cy5.5-conjugated TCL-SPION can be a good candidate for use in pulmonary delivery vehicles and diagnostic probes.

  1. Disinfection by-product formation during seawater desalination: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daekyun; Amy, Gary L; Karanfil, Tanju

    2015-09-15

    Due to increased freshwater demand across the globe, seawater desalination has become the technology of choice in augmenting water supplies in many parts of the world. The use of chemical disinfection is necessary in desalination plants for pre-treatment to control both biofouling as well as the post-disinfection of desalinated water. Although chlorine is the most commonly used disinfectant in desalination plants, its reaction with organic matter produces various disinfection by-products (DBPs) (e.g., trihalomethanes [THMs], haloacetic acids [HAAs], and haloacetonitriles [HANs]), and some DBPs are regulated in many countries due to their potential risks to public health. To reduce the formation of chlorinated DBPs, alternative oxidants (disinfectants) such as chloramines, chlorine dioxide, and ozone can be considered, but they also produce other types of DBPs. In addition, due to high levels of bromide and iodide concentrations in seawater, highly cytotoxic and genotoxic DBP species (i.e., brominated and iodinated DBPs) may form in distribution systems, especially when desalinated water is blended with other source waters having higher levels of organic matter. This article reviews the knowledge accumulated in the last few decades on DBP formation during seawater desalination, and summarizes in detail, the occurrence of DBPs in various thermal and membrane plants involving different desalination processes. The review also identifies the current challenges and future research needs for controlling DBP formation in seawater desalination plants and to reduce the potential toxicity of desalinated water. PMID:26099832

  2. Reaction rate estimation of controlled-release antifouling paint binders: Rosin-based systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meseguer Yebra, Diego; Kiil, Søren; Dam-Johansen, Kim;

    2005-01-01

    Biofouling on ship hulls is prevented by the use of antifouling (A/F) paints. Typically, sea water soluble rosin or rosin-derivatives are used as the primary means of adjusting the polishing rate of the current chemically active self-polishing paint systems to a suitable value. Previous studies...... have shown that mathematical coating models based on a fundamental knowledge of the underlying mechanisms of A/F paints is a promising tool for accelerated product testing at different operational conditions of a sailing ship or a paint rotor. Such models can also be used for generation of ideas aiming...... steady state Zn2+ release rate resulting from the reaction of the Zn-carboxylate with sea water: [GRAPHICS] [GRAPHICS] [GRAPHICS] where the natural logarithm of the pre-exponential factor, In (A), is 18.0 +/- 2.5 (the unit of A being the same as k(1)), the activation energy, E-a, is 18.5 +/- 6.0 k...

  3. Characterization of the teneurin C-terminal associated peptide (TCAP) in the vase tunicate, Ciona intestinalis: A novel peptide system associated with energy metabolism and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colacci, Michael; De Almeida, Reuben; Chand, Dhan; Lovejoy, Sabine R; Sephton, Dawn; Vercaemer, Benedikte; Lovejoy, David A

    2015-05-15

    The vase tunicate, Ciona intestinalis, is a protochordate and is considered a sister lineage to the chordates. The recent sequencing of its genome has made this species a particularly important model to understand the genetic basis of vertebrate evolution. However, C. intestinalis is also a highly invasive species along the Atlantic coast of North America and other regions of the world which have caused considerable economic stress due to its biofouling actions and, in particular, negative impacts on the mussel- and oyster-based aquaculture industry. Despite this background, little is known about C. intestinalis physiology. The teneurin C-terminal associated peptides (TCAP) are a family of highly conserved peptide hormones found in most metazoans. Moreover, these peptides have been implicated in the inhibition of stress and stimulation of feeding-based metabolism. We have, therefore, identified this peptide using an in silico approach and characterized its immunological expression in tissues using a mouse polyclonal antiserum. These data indicate that its primary structure is more similar to invertebrate TCAPs relative to vertebrate TCAPs. Immunological expression indicates that it is highly expressed in the digestive tract and gonads consistent with findings in vertebrates. Synthetic mouse TCAP-1 administered into the brachial basket significantly increases the incidence of non-stress contractile behaviors. These findings support the hypothesis that TCAP is a bioactive peptide in C. intestinalis. Thus, C. intestinalis and tunicates in general may offer a simple model to investigate peptide interaction while providing information on how to control this invasive species. PMID:25687741

  4. Surface modification of seawater desalination reverse osmosis membranes: Characterization studies & performance evaluation

    KAUST Repository

    Matin, Asif

    2014-06-01

    In this work we report surface modification of commercial reverse osmosis membranes by depositing ultrathin copolymer coatings, which could potentially enhance the biofouling resistance of RO membranes. Hydrophilic monomer hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and a hydrophobic monomer, perfluorodecyl acrylate (PFDA) were copolymerized directly on the active layer of commercial aromatic polyamide reverse osmosis (RO) membranes using an initiated Chemical Vapor Deposition (iCVD) technique. Attenuated total reflective Fourier transform infrared spectra (ATR-FTIR) verified the successful modification of the membrane surfaces as a new FTIR adsorption band around 1730cm-1 corresponding to carbonyl groups in the copolymer film appeared after the deposition. X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis also confirmed the presence of the copolymer film on the membrane surface by showing strong fluorine peaks emanating from the fluorinated alkyl side chains of the PFA molecules. Contact angle measurements with deionized water showed the modified membrane surfaces to be initially very hydrophobic but quickly assumed a hydrophilic character within few minutes. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) revealed that the deposited films were smooth and conformal as the surface topology of the underlying membrane surface remained virtually unchanged after the deposition. FESEM images of the top surface also showed that the typical ridge-and-valley structure associated with polyamide remained intact after the deposition. Short-term permeation tests using DI water and 2000ppm NaCl water showed that the deposited copolymer coatings had negligible effect on permeate water flux and salt rejection. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Wenzel Wetting on Slippery Rough Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stogin, Birgitt; Dai, Xianming; Wong, Tak-Sing

    2015-11-01

    Liquid repellency is an important surface property used in a wide range of applications including self-cleaning, anti-icing, anti-biofouling, and condensation heat transfer, and is characterized by apparent contact angle (θ*) and contact angle hysteresis (Δθ*). The Wenzel equation (1936) predicts θ* of liquids in the Wenzel state, and is one of the most fundamental equations in the wetting field. However, droplets in the Wenzel state on conventional rough surfaces exhibit large Δθ* , making it difficult to experimentally verify the model with precision. As a result, precise verification of the Wenzel wetting model has remained an open scientific question for the past 79 years. Here we introduce a new class of liquid-infused surfaces called slippery rough surfaces -- surfaces with significantly reduced Δθ* compared to conventional rough surfaces--and use them to experimentally assess the Wenzel equation with the highest precision to date. We acknowledge the funding support by National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award #: 1351462 and Office of Navy Research MURI Award #: N00014-12-1-0875. Stogin acknowledges the support from the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship (Grant No. DGE1255832).

  6. Offshore Windfarm Impact on Pelagic Primary Production in the Southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavik, Kaela; Zhang, Wenyan; Lemmen, Carsten; Wirtz, Kai

    2016-04-01

    As society struggles to find solutions to mitigate global warming, the demand for renewable energy technology has increased. Especially investment in offshore wind energy has proliferated in the European Union, with projections over the next 15 years estimating an over 40 fold increase in total offshore wind electricity. Though built with the goal of reducing the environmental impacts associated with traditional energy production, the long-term ecological impacts of offshore windfarm structures is not yet well understood. The consequences are of particular importance in the southern North Sea, where the expansion of offshore windfarms is focused. Our study investigates how the gradual accumulation of epifaunal biomass on submerged substrate at offshore windfarms impacts ecosystem services in the southern North Sea. Biofouling is governed predominately by the filter feeder Mytilus edulis, which, as an ecological engineer, will further alter the surrounding benthic and pelagic environment. We reconstruct the distribution of benthic filter feeders in the SNS and generate scenarios of increased potential distribution based on available information of Mytilus edulis settlement at turbines and of turbine locations. These maps are coupled through the MOSSCO (Modular Coupling System for Shelves and Coasts) to state-of-the-art and high resolution hydrodynamic and ecosystem models. We find a substantial change in pelagic primary production as a result of additional Mytilus edulis growth at offshore windfarms.

  7. Bifunctional quaternary ammonium compounds to inhibit biofilm growth and enhance performance for activated carbon air-cathode in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Liu, Yinan; An, Jingkun; Feng, Cuijuan; Wang, Xin

    2014-12-01

    The slow diffusion of hydroxyl out of the catalyst layer as well as the biofouling on the surface of cathode are two problems affecting power for membrane-less air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In order to solve both of them simultaneously, here we simply modify activated carbon air-cathode using a bifunctional quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) by forced evaporation. The maximum power density reaches 1041 ± 12 mW m-2 in an unbuffered medium (0.5 g L-1 NaCl), which is 17% higher than the control, probably due to the accelerated anion transport in the catalyst layer. After 2 months, the protein content reduced by a factor of 26 and the power density increases by 33%, indicating that the QAC modification can effectively inhibit the growth of cathodic biofilm and improve the stability of performance. The addition of NaOH and QAC epoxy have a negative effect on power production due to the clogging of pores in catalyst layer.

  8. Dynamic bacterial communities on reverse-osmosis membranes in a full-scale desalination plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manes, C-L de O; West, N; Rapenne, S; Lebaron, P

    2011-01-01

    To better understand biofouling of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes, bacterial diversity was characterized in the intake water, in subsequently pretreated water and on SWRO membranes from a full-scale desalination plant (FSDP) during a 9 month period. 16S rRNA gene fingerprinting and sequencing revealed that bacterial communities in the water samples and on the SWRO membranes were very different. For the different sampling dates, the bacterial diversity of the active and the total bacterial fractions of the water samples remained relatively stable over the sampling period whereas the bacterial community structure on the four SWRO membrane samples was significantly different. The richness and evenness of the SWRO membrane bacterial communities increased with usage time with an increase in the Shannon diversity index of 2.2 to 3.7. In the oldest SWRO membrane (330 days), no single operational taxonomic unit (OTU) dominated and the majority of the OTUs fell into the Alphaproteobacteria or the Planctomycetes. In striking contrast, a Betaproteobacteria OTU affiliated to the genus Ideonella was dominant and exclusively found in the membrane used for the shortest time (10 days). This suggests that bacteria belonging to this genus could be one of the primary colonizers of the SWRO membrane. Knowledge of the dominant bacterial species on SWRO membranes and their dynamics should help guide culture studies for physiological characterization of biofilm forming species. PMID:21108068

  9. Estimating suspended sediment concentrations using a broadband ADCP in Mahshahr tidal channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ghaffari

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Data sets of Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP backscatter intensities (ABS were used to evaluate suspended sediment concentrations (SSC in the Mahshahr Channel (MC of the Persian Gulf. Since the echo intensity is closely related to turbidity in water, the ADCP may be a promising tool to monitor the sediment transport. The low susceptibility of the acoustic backscatter to bio-fouling and the ADCP provision of current profiles as well as sediment time series makes this monitoring method more advantageous compared with the traditional methods. Time series of ADCP backscatter intensity profiles were used for improving temporal resolution of SSC estimates. Backscatter and traditional observational data were separated into two segments. The first part was utilized for calibrating the backscatter data and attributing the intensity to suspended particle concentrations and using the second part acoustic intensities were validated. Acoustic based SSC estimates are slightly underestimated in comparison with traditional water sample based SSC values, but still there is good agreement between acoustic SSC and traditional observations. Results illustrate a rather high correlation between lab based and acoustic based particles in suspension (R2 = 88 %. Additionally measurements reveal the domination of a semidiurnal ebb asymmetric system in the MC. Tidal currents provide the main energy source for particle resuspension and transport. Maximum suspended load concentrations are evident in ebb tides, while the currents strengths are enough to refloat loads from the bed. In general spring tides show higher SSC values compared with neap tides in the study area.

  10. European coatings conference - Marine coatings. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This volume contains 13 lectures (manuscripts or powerpoint foils) with the following topics: 1. Impact of containerization on polyurethane and polyurea in marine and protective coatings (Malte Homann); 2. The application of combinatorial/high-throughput methods to the development of marine coatings (Bret Chisholm); 3. Progress and perspectives in the AMBIO (advanced nanostructured surfaces for the control of biofouling) Project (James Callow); 4. Release behaviour due to shear and pull-off of silicone coatings with a thickness gradient (James G. Kohl); 5. New liquid rheology additives for high build marine coatings (Andreas Freytag); 6. Effective corrosion protection with polyaniline, polpyrrole and polythiophene as anticorrosice additives for marine paints (Carlos Aleman); 7. Potential applications of sol gel technology for marine applications (Robert Akid); 8: Performance of biocide-free Antifouling Coatings for leisure boats (Bernd Daehne); 9. Novel biocidefree nanostructured antifouling coatings - can nano do the job? (Corne Rentrop); 10. One component high solids, VOC compliant high durability finish technology (Adrian Andrews); 11. High solid coatings - the hybrid solution (Luca Prezzi); 12. Unique organofunctional silicone resins for environmentally friendly high-performance coatings (Dieter Heldmann); 13. Silicone-alkyd paints for marine applications: from battleship-grey to green (Thomas Easton).

  11. Backscattering particle immunoassays in wire-guide droplet manipulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeong-Yeol; You, David J

    2008-01-01

    A simpler way for manipulating droplets on a flat surface was demonstrated, eliminating the complications in the existing methods of open-surface digital microfluidics. Programmed and motorized movements of 10 muL droplets were demonstrated using stepper motors and microcontrollers, including merging, complicated movement along the programmed path, and rapid mixing. Latex immunoagglutination assays for mouse immunoglobulin G, bovine viral diarrhea virus and Escherichia coli were demonstrated by merging two droplets on a superhydrophobic surface (contact angle = 155 +/- 2 degrees ) and using subsequent back light scattering detection, with detection limits of 50 pg mL-1, 2.5 TCID50 mL-1 and 85 CFU mL-1, respectively, all significantly lower than the other immunoassay demonstrations in conventional microfluidics (~1 ng mL-1 for proteins, ~100 TCID50 mL-1 for viruses and ~100 CFU mL-1 for bacteria). Advantages of this system over conventional microfluidics or microwell plate assays include: (1) minimized biofouling and repeated use (>100 times) of a platform; (2) possibility of nanoliter droplet manipulation; (3) reprogrammability with a computer or a game pad interface. PMID:19014703

  12. Wingtip Devices for Marine Hydrokinetic Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedyalkov, Ivaylo; Shull, Jesse; Gagnon, Ian; Brindley, John; Wosnik, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Wingtip devices have become widely used in aircraft and wind turbine applications. There are only a few examples of their usage on Marine Hydrokinetic Turbines (MHK), which have only recently been developed to utility scale. Novel wingtip devices were designed for use specifically in marine applications, to reduce wingtip vortex induced drag and with the additional considerations for suppressing tip vortex cavitation and avoiding significant bio-fouling. A reference foil, a generic wingtip, and new wingtip designs were studied numerically using OpenFOAM, and some of the wingtips (including the reference foil and the generic wingtip) were studied experimentally in the University of New Hampshire High-Speed Water Tunnel. The experimental test bed was designed specifically for this study and can accommodate various wingtips which extend to the center of the tunnel. Lift and drag were measured for different angles of attack and cavitation inception was studied. Additionally, pressure was recorded at 4 locations on each tip. The pressure ports were also used for mass injection studies.

  13. Application of gas diffusion electrodes in bioelectrochemical syntheses and energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Angelika E W; Mangold, Klaus-Michael; Holtmann, Dirk

    2016-02-01

    Combining the advantages of biological components (e.g., reaction specificity, self-replication) and electrochemical techniques in bioelectrochemical systems offers the opportunity to develop novel efficient and sustainable processes for the production of a number of valuable products. The choice of electrode material has a great impact on the performance of bioelectrochemical systems. In addition to the redox process at the electrodes, interactions of biocatalysts with electrodes (e.g., enzyme denaturation or biofouling) need to be considered. In recent years, gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs) have proved to be very attractive electrodes for bioelectrochemical purposes. GDEs are porous electrodes, that posses a large three-phase boundary surface. At this interface, a solid catalyst supports the electrochemical reaction between gaseous and liquid phase. This mini-review discusses the application of GDEs in microbial and enzymatic fuel cells, for microbial electrolysis, in biosensors and for electroenzymatic synthesis reactions. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 260-267. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26152235

  14. Adsorption combined with ultrafiltration to remove organic matter from seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansakul, Chatkaew; Laborie, Stéphanie; Cabassud, Corinne

    2011-12-01

    Organic fouling and biofouling are the major severe types of fouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes in seawater (SW) desalination. Low pressure membrane filtration such as ultrafiltration (UF) has been developed as a pre-treatment before reverse osmosis. However, UF alone may not be an effective enough pre-treatment because of the existence of low-molecular weight dissolved organic matter in seawater. Therefore, the objective of the present work is to study a hybrid process, powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorption/UF, with real seawater and to evaluate its performance in terms of organic matter removal and membrane fouling. The effect of different PAC types and concentrations is evaluated. Stream-activated wood-based PAC addition increased marine organic matter removal by up to 70% in some conditions. Moreover, coupling PAC adsorption with UF decreased UF membrane fouling and the fouling occurring during short-term UF was totally reversible. It can be concluded that the hybrid PAC adsorption/UF process performed in crossflow filtration mode is a relevant pre-treatment process before RO desalination, allowing organic matter removal of 75% and showing no flux decline for short-term experiments. PMID:21996607

  15. Spray-on polyvinyl alcohol separators and impact on power production in air-cathode microbial fuel cells with different solution conductivities

    KAUST Repository

    Hoskins, Daniel L.

    2014-11-01

    © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Separators are used to protect cathodes from biofouling and to avoid electrode short-circuiting, but they can adversely affect microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance. A spray method was used to apply a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) separator to the cathode. Power densities were unaffected by the PVA separator (339 ± 29 mW/m2), compared to a control lacking a separator in a low conductivity solution (1mS/cm) similar to wastewater. Power was reduced with separators in solutions typical of laboratory tests (7-13 mS/cm), compared to separatorless controls. The PVA separator produced more power in a separator assembly (SEA) configuration (444 ± 8 mW/m2) in the 1mS/cm solution, but power was reduced if a PVA or wipe separator was used in higher conductivity solutions with either Pt or activated carbon catalysts. Spray and cast PVA separators performed similarly, but the spray method is preferred as it was easier to apply and use.

  16. Bio-inspired strategies for designing antifouling biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Vinod B; Murthy, N Sanjeeva

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of biomedical devices in a biological medium, biofouling, is a major cause of infection and is entirely avoidable. This mini-review will coherently present the broad range of antifouling strategies, germicidal, preventive and cleaning using one or more of biological, chemical and physical techniques. These techniques will be discussed from the point of view of their ability to inhibit protein adsorption, usually the first step that eventually leads to fouling. Many of these approaches draw their inspiration from nature, such as emulating the nitric oxide production in endothelium, use of peptoids that mimic protein repellant peptides, zwitterionic functionalities found in membrane structures, and catechol functionalities used by mussel to immobilize poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). More intriguing are the physical modifications, creation of micropatterns on the surface to control the hydration layer, making them either superhydrophobic or superhydrophilic. This has led to technologies that emulate the texture of shark skin, and the superhyprophobicity of self-cleaning textures found in lotus leaves. The mechanism of antifouling in each of these methods is described, and implementation of these ideas is illustrated with examples in a way that could be adapted to prevent infection in medical devices. PMID:27326371

  17. An investigation of vibration-induced protein desorption mechanism using a micromachined membrane and PZT plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Po Ying; Le, Yevgeniya; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Chiao, Mu

    2008-10-01

    A micromachined vibrating membrane is used to remove adsorbed proteins on a surface. A lead zirconate titanate (PZT) composite (3 x 1 x 0.5 mm) is attached to a silicon membrane (2,000 x 500 x 3 microm) and vibrates in a flexural plate wave (FPW) mode with wavelength of 4,000/3 microm at a resonant frequency of 308 kHz. The surface charge on the membrane and fluid shear stress contribute in minimizing the protein adsorption on the SiO(2) surface. In vitro characterization shows that 57 +/- 10% of the adsorbed bovine serum albumin (BSA), 47 +/- 13% of the immunoglobulin G (IgG), and 55.3~59.2 +/- 8% of the proteins from blood plasma are effectively removed from the vibrating surface. A simulation study of the vibration-frequency spectrum and vibrating amplitude distribution matches well with the experimental data. Potentially, a microelectromechanical system (MEMS)-based vibrating membrane could be the tool to minimize biofouling of in vivo MEMS devices. PMID:18427993

  18. Calibration and field evaluation of polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) for monitoring pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler (POCIS) is a new tool for the sampling of organic pollutants in water. We tested this device for the monitoring of pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater. After calibration, a field application was carried out in a French hospital for six pharmaceutical compounds (Atenolol, Prednisolone, Methylprednisolone, Sulfamethoxazole, Ofloxacin, Ketoprofen). POCIS were calibrated in tap water and wastewater in laboratory conditions close to relevant environmental conditions (temperature, flow velocity). Sampling rates (Rs) were determined and we observed a significant increase with flow velocity and temperature. Whatever the compound, the Rs value was lower in wastewater and the linear phase of uptake was shorter. POCIS were deployed in a hospital sewage pipe during four days and the estimated water concentrations were close to those obtained with twenty-four hour composite samples. -- Highlights: ► Calibration of POCIS for the monitoring of pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater. ► Uptake profile presents a shorter linear phase in wastewater than in tap water. ► Influence of Rs values by temperature, flow velocity and bio-fouling. ► Correlation between concentrations estimated from POCIS or measured in TWA samples. ► Deployment period should be no longer than five days. -- After calibration in tap water and hospital wastewater, POCIS were used to monitor pharmaceuticals in hospital sewage and were compared to TWA sampling

  19. Rapid and simple preparation of a reagentless glucose electrochemical biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dan; Vashist, Sandeep Kumar; Al-Rubeaan, Khalid; Luong, John H T; Sheu, Fwu-Shan

    2012-08-21

    A rapid and simple procedure was developed for the preparation of a highly stable and leach-proof glucose oxidase (GOx)-bound glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Crosslinked GOx via glutaraldehyde was drop-cast on a KOH-pretreated GCE followed by drop-casting of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) to form a stable bioactive layer. At -0.45 V, the biosensor exhibited a wide dynamic detection range of 0.5-48 mM for commercial glucose and 1.3-28.2 mM for Sugar-Chex blood glucose linearity standards. Several endogenous electroactive substances and drug metabolites commonly found in blood were tested and provoked no signal response. To our knowledge, the developed procedure is the most rapid method for preparing a glucose biosensor. The biosensor suffered no biofouling after 7 days of immersion in Sugar-Chex blood glucose. With excellent production reproducibility, GOx-bound electrodes stored dry at room temperature retained their initial activity after several weeks. PMID:22763782

  20. EPRI's zebra mussel monitoring and control guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Zebra Mussel Monitoring and Control Guidelines is a comprehensive compilation of US and European practices. The zebra mussel has infested all the Great Lakes and is positioned to spread to the adjoining river basins. The impact of the zebra mussel on power plants is as a biofouler clogging water systems and heat exchangers. The EPRI guidelines discuss the distribution of the zebra mussel in the US, identification of the zebra mussel, potential threats to power plants, and methods to initiate the monitoring and control program. Both preventive and corrective measures are presented. Preventive measures include various monitoring methods to initiate control techniques. The control techniques include both chemical and nonchemical together with combining techniques. Corrective methods include operational considerations, chemical cleaning, and mechanical/physical cleaning. It may also be possible to incorporate design changes, such as open to closed-loop backfit, backflushing, or pretreatment for closed systems. Table 1 shows a matrix of the monitoring methods. Table 2 presents a control matrix related to nuclear, fossil, and hydro raw water systems. Table 3 is a summary of the applicability of treatments to the various raw water systems. Appendixes are included that contain specifications to aid utilities in implementing several of the control technologies