WorldWideScience

Sample records for biofilm reactors modeling

  1. Biofilm development in fixed bed biofilm reactors: experiments and simple models for engineering design purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilágyi, N; Kovács, R; Kenyeres, I; Csikor, Zs

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm development in a fixed bed biofilm reactor system performing municipal wastewater treatment was monitored aiming at accumulating colonization and maximum biofilm mass data usable in engineering practice for process design purposes. Initially a 6 month experimental period was selected for investigations where the biofilm formation and the performance of the reactors were monitored. The results were analyzed by two methods: for simple, steady-state process design purposes the maximum biofilm mass on carriers versus influent load and a time constant of the biofilm growth were determined, whereas for design approaches using dynamic models a simple biofilm mass prediction model including attachment and detachment mechanisms was selected and fitted to the experimental data. According to a detailed statistical analysis, the collected data have not allowed us to determine both the time constant of biofilm growth and the maximum biofilm mass on carriers at the same time. The observed maximum biofilm mass could be determined with a reasonable error and ranged between 438 gTS/m(2) carrier surface and 843 gTS/m(2), depending on influent load, and hydrodynamic conditions. The parallel analysis of the attachment-detachment model showed that the experimental data set allowed us to determine the attachment rate coefficient which was in the range of 0.05-0.4 m d(-1) depending on influent load and hydrodynamic conditions.

  2. Establishing a laboratory model of dental unit waterlines bacterial biofilms using a CDC biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hye Young; Lee, Si Young

    2017-11-01

    In this study, a laboratory model to reproduce dental unit waterline (DUWL) biofilms was developed using a CDC biofilm reactor (CBR). Bacteria obtained from DUWLs were filtered and cultured in Reasoner's 2A (R2A) for 10 days, and were subsequently stored at -70°C. This stock was cultivated on R2A in batch mode. After culturing for five days, the bacteria were inoculated into the CBR. Biofilms were grown on polyurethane tubing for four days. Biofilm accumulation and thickness was 1.3 × 10 5  CFU cm -2 and 10-14 μm respectively, after four days. Bacteria in the biofilms included cocci and rods of short and medium lengths. In addition, 38 bacterial genera were detected in biofilms. In this study, the suitability and reproducibility of the CBR model for DUWL biofilm formation were demonstrated. The model provides a foundation for the development of bacterial control methods for DUWLs.

  3. Nitritation performance and biofilm development of co- and counter-diffusion biofilm reactors: Modeling and experimental comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Rongchang; Terada, Akihiko; Lackner, Susanne

    2009-01-01

    A comparative study was conducted on the start-up performance and biofilm development in two different biofilm reactors with aim of obtaining partial nitritation. The reactors were both operated under oxygen limited conditions, but differed in geometry. While substrates (O-2, NH3) co......-diffused in one geometry, they counter-diffused in the other. Mathematical simulations of these two geometries were implemented in two 1-D multispecies biofilm models using the AQUASIM software. Sensitivity analysis results showed that the oxygen mass transfer coefficient (K-i) and maximum specific growth rate...... results showed that the counter-diffusion biofilms developed faster and attained a larger maximum biofilm thickness than the co-diffusion biofilms. Under oxygen limited condition (DO

  4. Rotating Algal Biofilm Reactors: Mathematical Modeling and Lipid Production

    OpenAIRE

    Woolsey, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Harvesting of algal biomass presents a large barrier to the success of biofuels made from algae feedstock. Small cell sizes coupled with dilute concentrations of biomass in lagoon systems make separation an expensive and energy intense-process. The rotating algal biofilm reactor (RABR) has been developed at USU to provide a sustainable technology solution to this issue. Algae cells grown as a biofilm are concentrated in one location for ease of harvesting of high density biomass. A mathematic...

  5. Dimensioning of aerated submerged fixed bed biofilm reactors based on a mathematical biofilm model applied to petrochemical wastewater - the link between theory and practice

    OpenAIRE

    Trojanowicz, Karol; Wójcik, Wtodzimierz

    2014-01-01

    The description of a biofilm mathematical model application for dimensioning an aerated fixed bed biofilm reactor (ASFBBR) for petrochemical wastewater polishing is presented. A simple one-dimensional model of biofilm, developed by P Harremöes, was chosen for this purpose. The model was calibrated and verified under conditions of oil-refinery effluent. The results of ASFBBR dimensioning on the basis of the biofilm model were compared with the bioreactor dimensions determined by application of...

  6. Inverse modeling approach for evaluation of kinetic parameters of a biofilm reactor using tabu search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B Shiva; Venkateswarlu, Ch

    2014-08-01

    The complex nature of biological reactions in biofilm reactors often poses difficulties in analyzing such reactors experimentally. Mathematical models could be very useful for their design and analysis. However, application of biofilm reactor models to practical problems proves somewhat ineffective due to the lack of knowledge of accurate kinetic models and uncertainty in model parameters. In this work, we propose an inverse modeling approach based on tabu search (TS) to estimate the parameters of kinetic and film thickness models. TS is used to estimate these parameters as a consequence of the validation of the mathematical models of the process with the aid of measured data obtained from an experimental fixed-bed anaerobic biofilm reactor involving the treatment of pharmaceutical industry wastewater. The results evaluated for different modeling configurations of varying degrees of complexity illustrate the effectiveness of TS for accurate estimation of kinetic and film thickness model parameters of the biofilm process. The results show that the two-dimensional mathematical model with Edward kinetics (with its optimum parameters as mu(max)rho(s)/Y = 24.57, Ks = 1.352 and Ki = 102.36) and three-parameter film thickness expression (with its estimated parameters as a = 0.289 x 10(-5), b = 1.55 x 10(-4) and c = 15.2 x 10(-6)) better describes the biofilm reactor treating the industry wastewater.

  7. Modelling of toluene biodegradation and biofilm growth in a fixed biofilm reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcangeli, Jean-Pierre; Arvin, Erik

    1992-01-01

    The modelling of aerobic biodegradation of toluene and the associated biofilm growth in a fixed biofilm system is presented. The model includes four biomass fractions, three dissolved components, and seven processes. It is assumed that part of the active biomass is composed of filamentous bacteria...... which grow relatively fast and detach easily, leading to a biomass growth delayed with respect to substrate degradation. The non-filamentous bacteria inside the biofilm also degrade toluene but with a slower rate compared to the filamentous bacteria. Because the nonfilamentous bacteria do not detach......, they are primarily responsible for the biofilm growth. The active biomass decays into biodegradable and ``inert'' dead biomass which is hydrolyzed into soluble products at two different rates. These products are partly degradable by the biomass and constitute the endogenous respiration. The dynamic growth phase...

  8. Modelling of toluene biodegradation and biofilm growth in a fixed biofilm reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcangeli, Jean-Pierre; Arvin, Erik

    1992-01-01

    The modelling of aerobic biodegradation of toluene and the associated biofilm growth in a fixed biofilm system is presented. The model includes four biomass fractions, three dissolved components, and seven processes. It is assumed that part of the active biomass is composed of filamentous bacteria......, they are primarily responsible for the biofilm growth. The active biomass decays into biodegradable and ``inert'' dead biomass which is hydrolyzed into soluble products at two different rates. These products are partly degradable by the biomass and constitute the endogenous respiration. The dynamic growth phase...... which grow relatively fast and detach easily, leading to a biomass growth delayed with respect to substrate degradation. The non-filamentous bacteria inside the biofilm also degrade toluene but with a slower rate compared to the filamentous bacteria. Because the nonfilamentous bacteria do not detach...

  9. Biofilm reactors for ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, J L; Clausen, E C; Gaddy, J L

    1988-07-01

    Whole cell immobilization has been studied in the laboratory during the last few years as a method to improve the performance and economics of most fermentation processes. Among the various techniques available for cell immobilization, methods that provide generation of a biofilm offer reduced diffusional resistance, high productivities, and simple operation. This paper reviews some of the important aspects of biofilm reactors for ethanol production, including reactor start-up, steady state behavior, process stability, and mathematical modeling. Special emphasis is placed on covalently bonded Saccharomyces cerevisiae in packed bed reactors.

  10. Modelling the competition of planktonic and sessile aerobic heterotrophs for complementary nutrients in biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, T; Saikaly, P E; Oerther, D B

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive, simplified microbial biofilm model was developed to evaluate the impact of bioreactor operating parameters on changes in microbial population abundance. Biofilm simulations were conducted using three special cases: fully penetrated, internal mass transfer resistance and external mass transfer resistance. The results of model simulations showed that for certain operating conditions, competition for growth limiting nutrients generated oscillations in the abundance of planktonic and sessile microbial populations. These oscillations resulted in the violation of the competitive exclusion principle where the number of microbial populations was greater than the number of growth limiting nutrients. However, the operating conditions which impacted microbial community diversity were different for the three special cases. Comparing the results of model simulations for dispersed-growth, biofilms and bioflocs showed that oscillations and microbial community diversity were a function of competition as well as other key features of the ecosystem. The significance of the current study is that it is the first to examine competition as a mechanism for controlling microbial community diversity in biofilm reactors.

  11. Dimensioning of aerated submerged fixed bed biofilm reactors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The description of a biofilm mathematical model application for dimensioning an aerated fixed bed biofilm reactor (ASFBBR) for petrochemical wastewater polishing is presented. A simple one-dimensional model of biofilm, developed by P Harremöes, was chosen for this purpose. The model was calibrated and verified ...

  12. Modeling of simultaneous anaerobic methane and ammonium oxidation in a membrane biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueming; Guo, Jianhua; Shi, Ying; Hu, Shihu; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2014-08-19

    Nitrogen removal by using the synergy of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) microorganisms in a membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) has previously been demonstrated experimentally. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to describe the simultaneous anaerobic methane and ammonium oxidation by DAMO and Anammox microorganisms in an MBfR for the first time. In this model, DAMO archaea convert nitrate, both externally fed and/or produced by Anammox, to nitrite, with methane as the electron donor. Anammox and DAMO bacteria jointly remove the nitrite fed/produced, with ammonium and methane as the electron donor, respectively. The model is successfully calibrated and validated using the long-term (over 400 days) dynamic experimental data from the MBfR, as well as two independent batch tests at different operational stages of the MBfR. The model satisfactorily describes the methane oxidation and nitrogen conversion data from the system. Modeling results show the concentration gradients of methane and nitrogen would cause stratification of the biofilm, where Anammox bacteria mainly grow in the biofilm layer close to the bulk liquid and DAMO organisms attach close to the membrane surface. The low surface methane loadings result in a low fraction of DAMO microorganisms, but the high surface methane loadings would lead to overgrowth of DAMO bacteria, which would compete with Anammox for nitrite and decrease the fraction of Anammox bacteria. The results suggest an optimal methane supply under the given condition should be applied not only to benefit the nitrogen removal but also to avoid potential methane emissions.

  13. An integrated mathematical model for chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal in moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBR) including predation and hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla, Marta; Galán, Berta; Viguri, Javier R

    2016-07-01

    An integrated mathematical model is proposed for modelling a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) for removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) under aerobic conditions. The composite model combines the following: (i) a one-dimensional biofilm model, (ii) a bulk liquid model, and (iii) biological processes in the bulk liquid and biofilm considering the interactions among autotrophic, heterotrophic and predator microorganisms. Depending on the values for the soluble biodegradable COD loading rate (SCLR), the model takes into account a) the hydrolysis of slowly biodegradable compounds in the bulk liquid, and b) the growth of predator microorganisms in the bulk liquid and in the biofilm. The integration of the model and the SCLR allows a general description of the behaviour of COD removal by the MBBR under various conditions. The model is applied for two in-series MBBR wastewater plant from an integrated cellulose and viscose production and accurately describes the experimental concentrations of COD, total suspended solids (TSS), nitrogen and phosphorous obtained during 14 months working at different SCLRs and nutrient dosages. The representation of the microorganism group distribution in the biofilm and in the bulk liquid allow for verification of the presence of predator microorganisms in the second reactor under some operational conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. From biofilm ecology to reactors: a focused review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltz, Joshua P.; Smets, Barth F.; Rittmann, Bruce E.

    2017-01-01

    the following three topics: (1) biofilm ecology, (2) biofilm reactor technology and design, and (3) biofilm modeling. In so doing, it addresses the processes occurring in the biofilm, and how these affect and are affected by the broader biofilm system. The symphonic application of a suite of biological methods...... on the performance of various systems, but they can also be used beneficially for the treatment of water (defined herein as potable water, municipal and industrial wastewater, fresh/brackish/salt water bodies, groundwater) as well as in water stream-based biological resource recovery systems. This review addresses...... polymeric substance matrix are somewhat known, but their exact composition and role in the microbial conversion kinetics and biochemical transformations are still to be resolved. Biofilm grown microorganisms may contribute to increased metabolism of micro-pollutants. Several types of biofilm reactors have...

  15. Calibration of hydrodynamic behavior and biokinetics for TOC removal modeling in biofilm reactors under different hydraulic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ming; Soric, Audrey; Roche, Nicolas

    2013-09-01

    In this study, total organic carbon (TOC) biodegradation was simulated by GPS-X software in biofilm reactors with carriers of plastic rings and glass beads under different hydraulic conditions. Hydrodynamic model by retention time distribution and biokinetic measurement by in-situ batch test served as two significant parts of model calibration. Experimental results showed that TOC removal efficiency was stable in both media due to the enough height of column, although the actual hydraulic volume changed during the variation of hydraulic condition. Simulated TOC removal efficiencies were close to experimental ones with low theil inequality coefficient values (below 0.15). Compared with glass beads, more TOC was removed in the filter with plastic rings due to the larger actual hydraulic volume and lower half saturation coefficient in spite of its lower maximum specific growth rate of biofilm, which highlighted the importance of calibrating hydrodynamic behavior and biokinetics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Biofilm architecture in a novel pressurized biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Xia, Siqing; Duan, Liang; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

    2015-01-01

    A novel pure-oxygen pressurized biofilm reactor was operated at different organic loading, mechanical shear and hydrodynamic conditions to understand the relationships between biofilm architecture and its operation. The ultimate goal was to improve the performance of the biofilm reactor. The biofilm was labeled with seven stains and observed with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Unusual biofilm architecture of a ribbon embedded between two surfaces with very few points of attachment was observed. As organic loading increased, the biofilm morphology changed from a moderately rough layer into a locally smoother biomass with significant bulging protuberances, although the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency remained unchanged at about 75%. At higher organic loadings, biofilms contained a larger fraction of active cells distributed uniformly within a proteinaceous matrix with decreasing polysaccharide content. Higher hydrodynamic shear in combination with high organic loading resulted in the collapse of biofilm structure and a substantial decrease in reactor performance (a COD removal of 16%). Moreover, the important role of proteins for the spatial distribution of active cells was demonstrated quantitatively.

  17. Activated Sludge and Aerobic Biofilm Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Von Sperling, Marcos

    2007-01-01

    "Activated Sludge and Aerobic Biofilm Reactors is the fifth volume in the series Biological Wastewater Treatment. The first part of the book is devoted to the activated sludge process, covering the removal of organic matter, nitrogen and phosphorus.A detailed analysis of the biological reactor (aeration tank) and the final sedimentation tanks is provided. The second part of the book covers aerobic biofilm reactors, especially trickling filters, rotating biological contractors and submerged ae...

  18. Monitoring and modeling of nitrogen conversions in membrane-aerated biofilm reactors: Effects of intermittent aeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Yunjie

    Nitrogen can be removed from sewage by a variety of physicochemical and biological processes. Due to the high removal efficiency and relatively low costs, biological processes have been widely adopted for treating nitrogen-rich wastewaters. Among the biological technologies, biofilm processes show...... the membrane, whilst NH4+ is provid-ed from the bulk liquid phase. The counter substrate supply not only offers flexible aeration control, but also supports the development of a unique mi-crobial community and spatial structure inside the biofilm. In this study, lab-scale MABRs were operated under two types...... relevant biological N2O production pathways. Sensitive kinetic parameters were estimated with long-term bulk performance data. With the calibrated model, roles of HB and AnAOB were discussed and evaluated in mitigating N2O emissions in auto-trophic nitrogen removal MABRs. Moreover, I developed a 1-D...

  19. Current and future trends for biofilm reactors for fermentation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, Duygu; Demirci, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Biofilms in the environment can both cause detrimental and beneficial effects. However, their use in bioreactors provides many advantages including lesser tendencies to develop membrane fouling and lower required capital costs, their higher biomass density and operation stability, contribution to resistance of microorganisms, etc. Biofilm formation occurs naturally by the attachment of microbial cells to the support without use of any chemicals agent in biofilm reactors. Biofilm reactors have been studied and commercially used for waste water treatment and bench and pilot-scale production of value-added products in the past decades. It is important to understand the fundamentals of biofilm formation, physical and chemical properties of a biofilm matrix to run the biofilm reactor at optimum conditions. This review includes the principles of biofilm formation; properties of a biofilm matrix and their roles in the biofilm formation; factors that improve the biofilm formation, such as support materials; advantages and disadvantages of biofilm reactors; and industrial applications of biofilm reactors.

  20. Biodegradation of phenol with chromium(VI) reduction in an anaerobic fixed-biofilm process-Kinetic model and reactor performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Yen-Hui; Wu, Chih-Lung; Hsu, Chih-Hao; Li, Hsin-Lung

    2009-01-01

    A mathematical model system was derived to describe the simultaneous removal of phenol biodegradation with chromium(VI) reduction in an anaerobic fixed-biofilm reactor. The model system incorporates diffusive mass transport and double Monod kinetics. The model was solved using a combination of the orthogonal collocation method and Gear's method. A laboratory-scale column reactor was employed to validate the kinetic model system. Batch kinetic tests were conducted independently to evaluate the biokinetic parameters used in the model simulation. The removal efficiencies of phenol and chromium(VI) in an anaerobic fixed-biofilm process were approximately 980 mg/g and 910 mg/g, respectively, under a steady-state condition. In the steady state, model-predicted biofilm thickness reached up to 350 μm and suspended cells in the effluent were 85 mg cell/l. The experimental results agree closely with the results of the model simulations.

  1. Anaerobic granular sludge and biofilm reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiadas, Ioannis V.; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2003-01-01

    by the immobilization of the biomass, which forms static biofilms, particle-supported biofilms, or granules depending on the reactor's operational conditions. The advantages of the high-rate anaerobic digestion over the conventional aerobic wastewater treatment methods has created a clear trend for the change......-rate anaerobic treatment systems based on anaerobic granular sludge and biofilm are described in this chapter. Emphasis is given to a) the Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) systems, b) the main characteristics of the anaerobic granular sludge, and c) the factors that control the granulation process...

  2. Biofilm formation in attached microalgal reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y; Zhu, W; Chen, C; Nie, Y; Lin, X

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the fundamental question of biofilm formation. First, a drum biofilm reactor was introduced. The drums were coated with three porous substrates (cotton rope, canvas, and spandex), respectively. The relationships among the substrate, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and adhesion ratio were analyzed. Second, a plate biofilm reactor (PBR) was applied by replacing the drum with multiple parallel vertical plates to increase the surface area. The plates were coated with porous substrates on each side, and the nutrients were delivered to the cells by diffusion. The influence of nitrogen source and concentration on compositions of EPS and biofilm formation was analyzed using PBR under sunlight. The results indicated that both substrate and nitrogen were critical on the EPS compositions and biofilm formation. Under the optimal condition (glycine with concentration of 1 g l(-1) and substrate of canvas), the maximum biofilm productivity of 54.46 g m(-2) d(-1) with adhesion ratio of 84.4 % was achieved.

  3. Experimental and theoretical investigation of anaerobic fluidized bed biofilm reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fuentes

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of anaerobic fluidized bed reactors (AFBRs. The bioreactors are modeled as dynamic three-phase systems. Biochemical transformations are assumed to occur only in the fluidized bed zone. The biofilm process model is coupled to the system hydrodynamic model through the biofilm detachment rate; which is assumed to be a first-order function of the energy dissipation parameter and a second order function of biofilm thickness. Non-active biomass is considered to be particulate material subject to hydrolysis. The model includes the anaerobic conversion for complex substrate degradation and kinetic parameters selected from the literature. The experimental set-up consisted of two mesophilic (36±1ºC lab-scale AFBRs (R1 and R2 loaded with sand as inert support for biofilm development. The reactor start-up policy was based on gradual increments in the organic loading rate (OLR, over a four month period. Step-type disturbances were applied on the inlet (glucose and acetic acid substrate concentration (chemical oxygen demand (COD from 0.85 to 2.66 g L-1 and on the feed flow rate (from 3.2 up to 6.0 L d-1 considering the maximum efficiency as the reactor loading rate switching. The predicted and measured responses of the total and soluble COD, volatile fatty acid (VFA concentrations, biogas production rate and pH were investigated. Regarding hydrodynamic and fluidization aspects, variations of the bed expansion due to disturbances in the inlet flow rate and the biofilm growth were measured. As rate coefficients for the biofilm detachment model, empirical values of 3.73⋅10(4 and 0.75⋅10(4 s² kg-1 m-1 for R1 and R2, respectively, were estimated.

  4. Combined Reactor and Microelectrode Measurements in Laboratory Grown Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tove; Harremoës, Poul

    1994-01-01

    A combined biofilm reactor-/microelectrode experimental set-up has been constructed, allowing for simultaneous reactor mass balances and measurements of concentration profiles within the biofilm. The system consists of an annular biofilm reactor equipped with an oxygen microelectrode. Experiments...... were carried out with aerobic glucose and starch degrading biofilms. The well described aerobic glucose degradation biofilm system was used to test the combined reactor set-up. Results predicted from known biofilm kinetics were obtained. In the starch degrading biofilm, basic assumptions were tested...... with the microelectrode measurements. It was established, that even with a high molecular weight, non-diffusible substrate, degradation took place in the depths of the biofilm. Intrinsic enzymatic hydrolysis was not limiting and the volumetric removal rate of oxygen was zero order....

  5. Model-based evaluation of the role of Anammox on nitric oxide and nitrous oxide productions in membrane aerated biofilm reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Smets, Barth F.; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2013-01-01

    A multispecies one-dimensional biofilm model considering nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) productions for membrane aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) that remove nitrogen autotrophically through aerobic ammonia oxidation followed by Anammox is used to study the role of Anammox activity...... on the total nitrogen (TN) removal and the productions of NO and N2O. The model is applied to evaluate how periodic aeration as a control parameter reduces NO and N2O production but maintains high TN removal in MABR. The simulation results show over 3.5% of the removed TN could be attributed to NO and N2O...... production in MABR under the operational conditions optimal for TN removal (72%). An analysis of factors governing the Anammox activity in MABR shows that enhancing Anammox activity not only helps to achieve a high level of nitrogen removal but also reduces NO and N2O productions. Comparison of aeration...

  6. A novel approach for harnessing biofilm communities in moving bed biofilm reactors for industrial wastewater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Joe A. Lemire; Marc A. Demeter; Iain George; Howard Ceri; Raymond J. Turner

    2015-01-01

    Moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) are an effective biotechnology for treating industrial wastewater. Biomass retention on moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) carriers (biofilm support materials), allows for the ease-of-operation and high treatment capacity of MBBR systems. Optimization of MBBR systems has largely focused on aspects of carrier design, while little attention has been paid to enhancing strategies for harnessing microbial biomass. Previously, our research group demonstrated that ...

  7. Development of the floating sulphur biofilm reactor for sulphide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development of the floating sulphur biofilm reactor for sulphide oxidation in biological water treatment systems. ... The effect of influent sulphide concentrations, flow rate and reactor dimensions on the sulphur biofilm formation were investigated for the optimisation of elemental sulphur recovery and sulphide removal ...

  8. Oxygen Transfer Model for a Flow-Through Hollow-Fiber Membrane Biofilm Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilmore, K. R.; Little, J. C.; Smets, Barth F.

    2009-01-01

    overpredicted the oxygen transfer by a factor of 1.3 relative to the result calculated from the outlet gas oxygen concentration, which was considered the most accurate of the measured benchmarks. A mass transfer coefficient derived from the clean water testing with oxygen sensors at the membrane......-liquid interface was the most accurate of the predictive models (overpredicted by a factor of 1.1) while a coefficient determined by measuring bulk liquid dissolved oxygen underpredicted the oxygen transfer by a factor of 3. The mechanistic model was found to be an adequate tool for design because it used...

  9. Model-Based Feasibility Assessment of Membrane Biofilm Reactor to Achieve Simultaneous Ammonium, Dissolved Methane, and Sulfide Removal from Anaerobic Digestion Liquor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueming; Liu, Yiwen; Peng, Lai; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) is proposed to achieve simultaneous removal of ammonium, dissolved methane, and sulfide from main-stream and side-stream anaerobic digestion liquors. To avoid dissolved methane stripping, oxygen is introduced through gas-permeable membranes, which also from the substratum for the growth of a biofilm likely comprising ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB), anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) bacteria, denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) microorganisms, aerobic methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB), and sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB). A mathematical model is developed and applied to assess the feasibility of such a system and the associated microbial community structure under different operational conditions. The simulation studies demonstrate the feasibility of achieving high-level (>97.0%), simultaneous removal of ammonium, dissolved methane, and sulfide in the MBfRs from both main-stream and side-stream anaerobic digestion liquors through adjusting the influent surface loading (or hydraulic retention time (HRT)) and the oxygen surface loading. The optimal HRT was found to be inversely proportional to the corresponding oxygen surface loading. Under the optimal operational conditions, AOB, DAMO bacteria, MOB, and SOB dominate the biofilm of the main-stream MBfR, while AOB, Anammox bacteria, DAMO bacteria, and SOB coexist in the side-stream MBfR to remove ammonium, dissolved methane, and sulfide simultaneously. PMID:27112502

  10. Biofilm models of polymicrobial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrilska, Rebecca A; Rumbaugh, Kendra P

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between microbes are complex and play an important role in the pathogenesis of infections. These interactions can range from fierce competition for nutrients and niches to highly evolved cooperative mechanisms between different species that support their mutual growth. An increasing appreciation for these interactions, and desire to uncover the mechanisms that govern them, has resulted in a shift from monomicrobial to polymicrobial biofilm studies in different disease models. Here we provide an overview of biofilm models used to study select polymicrobial infections and highlight the impact that the interactions between microbes within these biofilms have on disease progression. Notable recent advances in the development of polymicrobial biofilm-associated infection models and challenges facing the study of polymicrobial biofilms are addressed.

  11. Biofilm models for the practitioner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgenroth, Eberhard Friedrich; van Loosdrecht, M. C. M.; Wanner, O.

    2000-01-01

    Even though mathematical biofilm models are extensively used in biofilm research, there has been very little application of these models in the engineering practice so far. However, practitioners would be interested in models that can be used as tools to control plant operation under dynamic...... conditions or to help them handle complex interactions between particle removal, carbon oxidation, nitrification, denitrification and biological phosphorus removal. But even though there is a whole range of biofilm models available, it is difficult for the practitioner to select the appropriate modeling...

  12. Calibration and verification of models of organic carbon removal kinetics in Aerated Submerged Fixed-Bed Biofilm Reactors (ASFBBR): a case study of wastewater from an oil-refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojanowicz, Karol; Wójcik, Włodzimierz

    2011-01-01

    The article presents a case-study on the calibration and verification of mathematical models of organic carbon removal kinetics in biofilm. The chosen Harremöes and Wanner & Reichert models were calibrated with a set of model parameters obtained both during dedicated studies conducted at pilot- and lab-scales for petrochemical wastewater conditions and from the literature. Next, the models were successfully verified through studies carried out utilizing a pilot ASFBBR type bioreactor installed in an oil-refinery wastewater treatment plant. During verification the pilot biofilm reactor worked under varying surface organic loading rates (SOL), dissolved oxygen concentrations and temperatures. The verification proved that the models can be applied in practice to petrochemical wastewater treatment engineering for e.g. biofilm bioreactor dimensioning.

  13. Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Daniel; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2010-07-01

    The ability to form biofilms is a universal attribute of bacteria. Biofilms are multicellular communities held together by a self-produced extracellular matrix. The mechanisms that different bacteria employ to form biofilms vary, frequently depending on environmental conditions and specific strain attributes. In this review, we emphasize four well-studied model systems to give an overview of how several organisms form biofilms: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Using these bacteria as examples, we discuss the key features of biofilms as well as mechanisms by which extracellular signals trigger biofilm formation.

  14. Microbial activity catalyzes oxygen transfer in membrane-aerated nitritating biofilm reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Domingo Felez, Carlos; Lackner, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    The remarkable oxygen transfer efficiencies attainable in membrane-aerated biofilm reactors (MABRs) are expected to favor their prompt industrial implementation. However, tests in clean water, currently used for the estimation of their oxygen transfer potential, lead to wrong estimates once biofilm...... is present, significantly complicating reactor modelling and control. This study shows for the first time the factors affecting oxygen mass transfer across membranes during clean water tests and reactor operation via undisturbed microelectrode inspection and bulk measurements. The mass transfer resistance...... of the liquid boundary layer developed at the membrane-liquid interface during clean water tests accounted for two thirds of the total mass transfer resistance, suggesting a strong underestimation of the oxygen transfer rates when it is absent (e.g. after biofilm growth). Reactor operation to attain partial...

  15. Biological Phosphorus Removal in a Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helness, Herman

    2007-09-15

    The scope of this study was to investigate use of the moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) process for biological phosphorus removal. The goal has been to describe the operating conditions required for biological phosphorus and nitrogen removal in a MBBR operated as a sequencing batch reactor (SBR), and determine dimensioning criteria for such a process

  16. Mixing and scale affect moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamstra, Andries; Blom, Ewout; Terjesen, Bendik Fyhn

    2017-01-01

    Moving Bed Biofilm Reactors (MBBR) are used increasingly in closed systems for farming of fish. Scaling, i.e. design of units of increasing size, is an important issue in general bio-reactor design since mixing behaviour will differ between small and large scale. Research is mostly performed on

  17. Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    López, Daniel; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The ability to form biofilms is a universal attribute of bacteria. Biofilms are multicellular communities held together by a self-produced extracellular matrix. The mechanisms that different bacteria employ to form biofilms vary, frequently depending on environmental conditions and specific strain attributes. In this review, we emphasize four well-studied model systems to give an overview of how several organisms form biofilms: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, and ...

  18. Biofilm Fixed Film Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipesh Das

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The work reviewed here was published between 2008 and 2010 and describes research that involved aerobic and anoxic biofilm treatment of water pollutants. Biofilm denitrification systems are covered when appropriate. References catalogued here are divided on the basis of fundamental research area or reactor types. Fundamental research into biofilms is presented in two sections, Biofilm Measurement and Characterization and Growth and Modeling. The reactor types covered are: trickling filters, rotating biological contactors, fluidized bed bioreactors, submerged bed biofilm reactors, biological granular activated carbon, membrane bioreactors, and immobilized cell reactors. Innovative reactors, not easily classified, are then presented, followed by a section on biofilms on sand, soil and sediment.

  19. A novel approach for harnessing biofilm communities in moving bed biofilm reactors for industrial wastewater treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe A. Lemire

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs are an effective biotechnology for treating industrial wastewater. Biomass retention on moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR carriers (biofilm support materials, allows for the ease-of-operation and high treatment capacity of MBBR systems. Optimization of MBBR systems has largely focused on aspects of carrier design, while little attention has been paid to enhancing strategies for harnessing microbial biomass. Previously, our research group demonstrated that mixed-species biofilms can be harvested from an industrial wastewater inoculum [oil sands process water (OSPW] using the Calgary Biofilm Device (CBD. Moreover, the resultant biofilm communities had the capacity to degrade organic toxins (naphthenic acids—NAs that are found in OSPW. Therefore, we hypothesized that harnessing microbial communities from industrial wastewater, as biofilms, on MBBR carriers may be an effective method to bioremediate industrial wastewater.Here, we detail our methodology adapting the workflow employed for using the CBD, to generate inoculant carriers to seed an MBBR.In this study, OSPW-derived biofilm communities were successfully grown, and their efficacy evaluated, on commercially available MBBR carriers affixed within a modified CBD system. The resultant biofilms demonstrated the capacity to transfer biomass to recipient carriers within a scaled MBBR. Moreover, MBBR systems inoculated in this manner were fully active 2 days post-inoculation, and readily degraded a select population of NAs. Together, these findings suggest that harnessing microbial communities on carriers affixed within a modified CBD system may represent a facile and rapid method for obtaining functional inoculants for use in wastewater MBBR treatment systems.

  20. Physicochemical characteristics and microbial community evolution of biofilms during the start-up period in a moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Yan; Ren, Hong-Qiang; Geng, Jin-Ju; Xu, Ke; Huang, Hui; Ding, Li-Li

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate biofilm properties evolution coupled with different ages during the start-up period in a moving bed biofilm reactor system. Physicochemical characteristics including adhesion force, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), morphology as well as volatile solid and microbial community were studied. Results showed that the formation and development of biofilms exhibited four stages, including (I) initial attachment and young biofilm formation, (II) biofilms accumulation, (III) biofilm sloughing and updating, and (IV) biofilm maturation. During the whole start-up period, adhesion force was positively and significantly correlated with the contents of EPS, especially the content of polysaccharide. In addition, increased adhesion force and EPS were beneficial for biofilm retention. Gram-negative bacteria mainly including Sphaerotilus, Zoogloea and Haliscomenobacter were predominant in the initial stage. Actinobacteria was beneficial to resist sloughing. Furthermore, filamentous bacteria were dominant in maturation biofilm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Degradation Mechanisms of Colloidal Organic Matter in Biofilm Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tove; Harremoës, Poul

    1994-01-01

    -diffusible organic matter in a biofilm reactor. DH depends on the combined volumetric and surface hydraulic loading rate, Q2/(AV). In full-scale wastewater treatment plants, the degradation mechanism presented in this paper can explain important differences between the performance of trickling filters and RBC...

  2. DEGRADATION OF AROMATIC COMPOUNDS USING MOVING BED BIOFILM REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ayati, H. Ganjidoust, M. Mir Fattah

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available For biological treatment of water, there are many different biofilm systems in use. Examples of them are trickling filters, rotating biological contactors, fixed media submerged biofilters, granular media biofilters and fluidized bed reactors. They all have their advantages and disadvantages. Hence, the Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor process was developed in Norway in the late 1980s and early 1990s to adopt the best features of the activated sludge process as well as those of the biofilter processes, without including the worst. Two cylindrical moving bed biofilm reactors were used in this study working in upflow stream conditions. Experiments have been done in aerobic batch flow regime. Laboratory experiments were conducted at room temperature (23–28C and synthetic wastewater comprising a composition of phenol and hydroquinone in each reactor as the main organic constituents, plus balanced nutrients and alkalinity were used to feed the reactor. The ratio of influent to effluent COD was determined at different retention times. The results indicated that the removal efficiency of each selected compound is affected by the detention time. At low phenol and hydroquinone concentration (from 700 to 1000 mg/L maximum removal efficiency (over 80 % was obtained. By further increasing in COD loading rate up to 3000 mg/L, a decrease in COD removal rate was occurred. In the reactor containing pyrogallol in COD of 1500 mg/L, the removal rate decreased to 10 percent because of its toxicity for microorganisms.

  3. Benzene degradation in a denitrifying biofilm reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waals, van der Marcelle J.; Atashgahi, Siavash; Rocha, da Ulisses Nunes; Zaan, van der Bas M.; Smidt, Hauke; Gerritse, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Benzene is an aromatic compound and harmful for the environment. Biodegradation of benzene can reduce the toxicological risk after accidental or controlled release of this chemical in the environment. In this study, we further characterized an anaerobic continuous biofilm culture grown for more

  4. An overview on the reactors to study drinking water biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, I B; Simões, M; Simões, L C

    2014-10-01

    The development of biofilms in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) can cause pipe degradation, changes in the water organoleptic properties but the main problem is related to the public health. Biofilms are the main responsible for the microbial presence in drinking water (DW) and can be reservoirs for pathogens. Therefore, the understanding of the mechanisms underlying biofilm formation and behavior is of utmost importance in order to create effective control strategies. As the study of biofilms in real DWDS is difficult, several devices have been developed. These devices allow biofilm formation under controlled conditions of physical (flow velocity, shear stress, temperature, type of pipe material, etc), chemical (type and amount of nutrients, type of disinfectant and residuals, organic and inorganic particles, ions, etc) and biological (composition of microbial community - type of microorganism and characteristics) parameters, ensuring that the operational conditions are similar as possible to the DWDS conditions in order to achieve results that can be applied to the real scenarios. The devices used in DW biofilm studies can be divided essentially in two groups, those usually applied in situ and the bench top laboratorial reactors. The selection of a device should be obviously in accordance with the aim of the study and its advantages and limitations should be evaluated to obtain reproducible results that can be transposed into the reality of the DWDS. The aim of this review is to provide an overview on the main reactors used in DW biofilm studies, describing their characteristics and applications, taking into account their main advantages and limitations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Modelling the growth of a methanotrophic biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcangeli, J.-P.; Arvin, E.

    1999-01-01

    This article discusses the growth of methanotrophic biofilms. Several independent biofilm growths scenarios involving different inocula were examined. Biofilm growth, substrate removal and product formation were monitored throughout the experiments. Based on the oxygen consumption it was concluded...... that heterotrophs and nitrifiers co-existed with methanotrophs in the biofilm. Heterotrophic biomass grew on soluble polymers formed by the hydrolysis of dead biomass entrapped in the biofilm. Nitrifier populations developed because of the presence of ammonia in the mineral medium. Based on these experimental...... was performed on this model. It indicated that the most influential parameters were those related to the biofilm (i.e. density; solid-volume fraction; thickness). This suggests that in order to improve the model, further research regarding the biofilm structure and composition is needed....

  6. Material modeling of biofilm mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laspidou, C S; Spyrou, L A; Aravas, N; Rittmann, B E

    2014-05-01

    A biofilm material model and a procedure for numerical integration are developed in this article. They enable calculation of a composite Young's modulus that varies in the biofilm and evolves with deformation. The biofilm-material model makes it possible to introduce a modeling example, produced by the Unified Multi-Component Cellular Automaton model, into the general-purpose finite-element code ABAQUS. Compressive, tensile, and shear loads are imposed, and the way the biofilm mechanical properties evolve is assessed. Results show that the local values of Young's modulus increase under compressive loading, since compression results in the voids "closing," thus making the material stiffer. For the opposite reason, biofilm stiffness decreases when tensile loads are imposed. Furthermore, the biofilm is more compliant in shear than in compression or tension due to the how the elastic shear modulus relates to Young's modulus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Standardized reactors for the study of medical biofilms: a review of the principles and latest modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Inês B; Meireles, Ana; Gonçalves, Ana L; Goeres, Darla M; Sjollema, Jelmer; Simões, Lúcia C; Simões, Manuel

    2018-08-01

    Biofilms can cause severe problems to human health due to the high tolerance to antimicrobials; consequently, biofilm science and technology constitutes an important research field. Growing a relevant biofilm in the laboratory provides insights into the basic understanding of the biofilm life cycle including responses to antibiotic therapies. Therefore, the selection of an appropriate biofilm reactor is a critical decision, necessary to obtain reproducible and reliable in vitro results. A reactor should be chosen based upon the study goals and a balance between the pros and cons associated with its use and operational conditions that are as similar as possible to the clinical setting. However, standardization in biofilm studies is rare. This review will focus on the four reactors (Calgary biofilm device, Center for Disease Control biofilm reactor, drip flow biofilm reactor, and rotating disk reactor) approved by a standard setting organization (ASTM International) for biofilm experiments and how researchers have modified these standardized reactors and associated protocols to improve the study and understanding of medical biofilms.

  8. Biofilm reactors for industrial bioconversion processes: employing potential of enhanced reaction rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karcher Patrick

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article describes the use of biofilm reactors for the production of various chemicals by fermentation and wastewater treatment. Biofilm formation is a natural process where microbial cells attach to the support (adsorbent or form flocs/aggregates (also called granules without use of chemicals and form thick layers of cells known as "biofilms." As a result of biofilm formation, cell densities in the reactor increase and cell concentrations as high as 74 gL-1 can be achieved. The reactor configurations can be as simple as a batch reactor, continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR, packed bed reactor (PBR, fluidized bed reactor (FBR, airlift reactor (ALR, upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB reactor, or any other suitable configuration. In UASB granular biofilm particles are used. This article demonstrates that reactor productivities in these reactors have been superior to any other reactor types. This article describes production of ethanol, butanol, lactic acid, acetic acid/vinegar, succinic acid, and fumaric acid in addition to wastewater treatment in the biofilm reactors. As the title suggests, biofilm reactors have high potential to be employed in biotechnology/bioconversion industry for viable economic reasons. In this article, various reactor types have been compared for the above bioconversion processes.

  9. Biofilm reactors for industrial bioconversion processes: employing potential of enhanced reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Nasib; Annous, Bassam A; Ezeji, Thaddeus C; Karcher, Patrick; Maddox, Ian S

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the use of biofilm reactors for the production of various chemicals by fermentation and wastewater treatment. Biofilm formation is a natural process where microbial cells attach to the support (adsorbent) or form flocs/aggregates (also called granules) without use of chemicals and form thick layers of cells known as "biofilms." As a result of biofilm formation, cell densities in the reactor increase and cell concentrations as high as 74 gL-1 can be achieved. The reactor configurations can be as simple as a batch reactor, continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), packed bed reactor (PBR), fluidized bed reactor (FBR), airlift reactor (ALR), upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, or any other suitable configuration. In UASB granular biofilm particles are used. This article demonstrates that reactor productivities in these reactors have been superior to any other reactor types. This article describes production of ethanol, butanol, lactic acid, acetic acid/vinegar, succinic acid, and fumaric acid in addition to wastewater treatment in the biofilm reactors. As the title suggests, biofilm reactors have high potential to be employed in biotechnology/bioconversion industry for viable economic reasons. In this article, various reactor types have been compared for the above bioconversion processes. PMID:16122390

  10. Biofilm reactors for industrial bioconversion processes: employing potential of enhanced reaction rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Nasib; Annous, Bassam A; Ezeji, Thaddeus C; Karcher, Patrick; Maddox, Ian S

    2005-08-25

    This article describes the use of biofilm reactors for the production of various chemicals by fermentation and wastewater treatment. Biofilm formation is a natural process where microbial cells attach to the support (adsorbent) or form flocs/aggregates (also called granules) without use of chemicals and form thick layers of cells known as "biofilms." As a result of biofilm formation, cell densities in the reactor increase and cell concentrations as high as 74 gL(-1) can be achieved. The reactor configurations can be as simple as a batch reactor, continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), packed bed reactor (PBR), fluidized bed reactor (FBR), airlift reactor (ALR), upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, or any other suitable configuration. In UASB granular biofilm particles are used. This article demonstrates that reactor productivities in these reactors have been superior to any other reactor types. This article describes production of ethanol, butanol, lactic acid, acetic acid/vinegar, succinic acid, and fumaric acid in addition to wastewater treatment in the biofilm reactors. As the title suggests, biofilm reactors have high potential to be employed in biotechnology/bioconversion industry for viable economic reasons. In this article, various reactor types have been compared for the above bioconversion processes.

  11. Transformation products of clindamycin in moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Gordon Tze Hoong; Escola Casas, Monica; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    Clindamycin is widely prescribed for its ability to treat a number of common bacterial infections. Thus, clindamycin enters wastewater via human excretion or disposal of unused medication and widespread detection of pharmaceuticals in rivers proves the insufficiency of conventional wastewater...... treatment plants in removing clindamycin. Recently, it has been discovered that attached biofilm reactors, e.g., moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) obtain a higher removal of pharmaceuticals than conventional sludge wastewater treatment plants. Therefore, this study investigated the capability of MBBRs...... process converts clindamycin into the, possibly persistent, products clindamycin sulfoxide and N-desmethyl clindamycin as well as 3 other mono-oxygenated products. Subsequently, the removal kinetics of clindamycin and the formation of the two identified products were investigated in batch experiments...

  12. A new method to measure and model dynamic oxygen microdistributions in moving biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Hui; Chen, You-Peng; Dong, Yang; Wang, Xi-Xi; Guo, Jin-Song; Shen, Yu; Yan, Peng; Ma, Teng-Fei; Sun, Xiu-Qian; Fang, Fang; Wang, Jing

    2017-10-01

    Biofilms in natural environments offer a superior solution to mitigate water pollution. Artificially intensified biofilm reactors represented by rotating biological contactors (RBCs) are widely applied and studied. Understanding the oxygen transfer process in biofilms is an important aspect of these studies, and describing this process in moving biofilms (such as biofilms in RBCs) is a particular challenge. Oxygen transfer in RBCs behaves differently than in other biological reactors due to the special oxygen supply mode that results from alternate exposure of the biofilm to wastewater and air. The study of oxygen transfer in biofilms is indispensable for understanding biodegradation in RBCs. However, the mechanisms are still not well known due to a lack of effective tools to dynamically analyze oxygen diffusion, reaction, and microdistribution in biofilms. A new experimental device, the Oxygen Transfer Modeling Device (OTMD), was designed and manufactured for this purpose, and a mathematical model was developed to model oxygen transfer in biofilm produced by an RBC. This device allowed the simulation of the local environment around the biofilm during normal RBC operation, and oxygen concentrations varying with time and depth in biofilm were measured using an oxygen microelectrode. The experimental data conformed well to the model description, indicating that the OTMD and the model were stable and reliable. Moreover, the OTMD offered a flexible approach to study the impact of a single-factor on oxygen transfer in moving biofilms. In situ environment of biofilm in an RBC was simulated, and dynamic oxygen microdistributions in the biofilm were measured and well fitted to the built model description. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Inactivation model for disinfection of biofilms in drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlicki, A.; O'Leary, K.C.; Gagnon, G.A.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to investigate experimentally the effects of free chlorine, monochloramine and chlorine dioxide on the removal of biofilm growth in water as it applies to drinking water in distribution systems. In particular, biofilm kill for a particular dosage of disinfectant was measured as a function of time for each disinfectant over a range of disinfectant concentrations. These results were used to formulate concentration-time (Ct) inactivation values for each disinfectant to compare the efficacy of the three disinfectants for biofilm control. The biofilm reactor system consisted of a 125 mL columns, each containing tightly packed 3 mm glass beads on which heterotrophic bacterial biofilm is established. Following an initial biofilm inoculation period, the glass beads were removed from the columns and placed into glass jars for disinfection with free chlorine, monochloramine and chlorine dioxide. Cell counts were determined on a time series basis with the goal of achieving a Ct inactivation model that is similar to models presently used for inactivation of suspended cells. Ultimately this research could be used to develop a rationale method for setting regulatory values for secondary disinfection in drinking water distribution systems, which presently in only a few states and provinces. (author)

  14. Biofilm formation on membranes used for membrane aerated biological reactors, under different stress conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade-Molinar, C.; Ballinas-Casarrubias, M. L.; Solis-Martinez, F. J.; Rivera-Chavira, B. E.; Cuevas-Rodirguez, G.; Nevarez-Moorillon, G. V.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm play an important role in wastewater treatment processes, and have been optimized in the membrane aerated biofilm reactors (MABR). In MABR, a hydrophobic membrane is used as support for the formation of biofilm, and supplements enough aeration to assure an aerobic process. (Author)

  15. Application of two component biodegradable carriers in a particle-fixed biofilm airlift suspension reactor: development and structure of biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hille, Andrea; He, Mei; Ochmann, Clemens; Neu, Thomas R; Horn, Harald

    2009-01-01

    Two component biodegradable carriers for biofilm airlift suspension (BAS) reactors were investigated with respect to development of biofilm structure and oxygen transport inside the biofilm. The carriers were composed of PHB (polyhydroxybutyrate), which is easily degradable and PCL (caprolactone), which is less easily degradable by heterotrophic microorganisms. Cryosectioning combined with classical light microscopy and CLSM was used to identify the surface structure of the carrier material over a period of 250 days of biofilm cultivation in an airlift reactor. Pores of 50 to several hundred micrometers depth are formed due to the preferred degradation of PHB. Furthermore, microelectrode studies show the transport mechanism for different types of biofilm structures, which were generated under different substrate conditions. At high loading rates, the growth of a rather loosely structured biofilm with high penetration depths of oxygen was found. Strong changes of substrate concentration during fed-batch mode operation of the reactor enhance the growth of filamentous biofilms on the carriers. Mass transport in the outer regions of such biofilms was mainly driven by advection.

  16. Microbial community stratification in Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactors for Completely Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Ruscalleda, Maël; Terada, Akihiko

    of bacterial granules or biofilms. In this sense, completely autotrophic nitrogen removal from high ammonium strength wastewater was achieved in a Membrane-Aereated Biofilm Reactor (MABR) in a single step. Here, a biofilm containing nitrifiers (Aerobic Ammonium and Nitrite Oxidizing Bacteria, AOB and NOB......, respectively) and Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidizing Bacteria (AnAOB) is grown on bubbleless aeration membranes to remove ammonium. Since oxygen permeates through the membrane-biofilm interface while ammonium diffuses into the biofilm from the biofilm-liquid interface, oxygen gradients can be established across...... the biofilm, allowing nitrogen removal in a single reactor by simultaneous activity of the mentioned biocatalysts. This work consists on the analysis of the microbial community existing in two laboratory-scale reactors operated for more than 300 days, which removed up to 5.5 g-N/m2/day. The system contained...

  17. A new dry-surface biofilm model: An essential tool for efficacy testing of hospital surface decontamination procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almatroudi, Ahmad; Hu, Honghua; Deva, Anand; Gosbell, Iain B; Jacombs, Anita; Jensen, Slade O; Whiteley, Greg; Glasbey, Trevor; Vickery, Karen

    2015-10-01

    The environment has been shown to be a source of pathogens causing infections in hospitalised patients. Incorporation of pathogens into biofilms, contaminating dry hospital surfaces, prolongs their survival and renders them tolerant to normal hospital cleaning and disinfection procedures. Currently there is no standard method for testing efficacy of detergents and disinfectants against biofilm formed on dry surfaces. The aim of this study was to develop a reproducible method of producing Staphylococcus aureus biofilm with properties similar to those of biofilm obtained from dry hospital clinical surfaces, for use in efficacy testing of decontamination products. The properties (composition, architecture) of model biofilm and biofilm obtained from clinical dry surfaces within an intensive care unit were compared. The CDC Biofilm Reactor was adapted to create a dry surface biofilm model. S. aureus ATCC 25923 was grown on polycarbonate coupons. Alternating cycles of dehydration and hydration in tryptone soy broth (TSB) were performed over 12 days. Number of biofilm bacteria attached to individual coupons was determined by plate culture and the coefficient of variation (CV%) calculated. The DNA, glycoconjugates and protein content of the biofilm were determined by analysing biofilm stained with SYTO 60, Alexa-488-labelled Aleuria aurantia lectin and SyproOrange respectively using Image J and Imaris software. Biofilm architecture was analysed using live/dead staining and confocal microscopy (CM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Model biofilm was compared to naturally formed biofilm containing S. aureus on dry clinical surfaces. The CDC Biofilm reactor reproducibly formed a multi-layered, biofilm containing about 10(7) CFU/coupon embedded in thick extracellular polymeric substances. Within run CV was 9.5% and the between run CV was 10.1%. Protein was the principal component of both the in vitro model biofilm and the biofilms found on clinical surfaces. Continued

  18. Removal of micropollutants in Moving Bed Biofilm reactors (MBBRs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torresi, Elena

    Numerous pollutants such as pharmaceuticals and personal care products are continuously released into municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTP). Present at concentration of nano- to milligram per liter, they are defined as micropollutants. Micropollutants are only partially removed, possibly due...... compared to conventional activated sludge. In MBBRs, biofilm grow on plastic carriers kept in suspension in the reactor basin via mechanical mixing or aeration, offering a suit of benefits, amongst all comparably small footprint. Despite few existing evidences in aerobic MBBR, an in-depth understanding...

  19. Persistence in a single species CSTR model with suspended flocs and wall attached biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mašić, Alma; Eberl, Hermann J

    2012-04-01

    We consider a mathematical model for a bacterial population in a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with wall attachment. This is a modification of the Freter model, in which we model the sessile bacteria as a microbial biofilm. Our analysis indicates that the results of the algebraically simpler original Freter model largely carry over. In a computational simulation study, we find that the vast majority of bacteria in the reactor will eventually be sessile. However, we also find that suspended biomass is relatively more efficient in removing substrate from the reactor than biofilm bacteria.

  20. PERKEMBANGAN BIOFILM NITRIFIKASI DI FIXED BED REACTOR PADA SALINITAS TINGGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarno

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of nitrification biomass that is growing attached on carried material was examined by measuring its ammonium or nitrit oxidation rates. Porous ceramic rings (36 pieces were put into the fixed bed reactor (FBR . The fixed bed reactor that was operated continuously for more than 500 day was continued to be operated at a HRT of 1 day, a DO of above 5 mg L-1 and pH of 8. Ammonia concentration in the feeding was 50 mg NH4+-N L-1. At days 1, 5, 12, 20, 33 and 50, six porous ceramic rings were taken out and then ammonia and nitrite removal rate by biofilm in the ceramic rings was separately measured. The measurement of rates was done in small cylindrical glass reactors with initial concentration of ammonia and nitrite was 10 mg N L-1. Until 50 days of incubation AORs were always higher than NORs. Additionally, ammonia oxidizers attach or grow faster in the porous ceramic material than nitrite oxidizers.

  1. Modeling physiological resistance in bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, N G; Cortez, Ricardo; Fauci, Lisa

    2005-07-01

    A mathematical model of the action of antimicrobial agents on bacterial biofilms is presented. The model includes the fluid dynamics in and around the biofilm, advective and diffusive transport of two chemical constituents and the mechanism of physiological resistance. Although the mathematical model applies in three dimensions, we present two-dimensional simulations for arbitrary biofilm domains and various dosing strategies. The model allows the prediction of the spatial evolution of bacterial population and chemical constituents as well as different dosing strategies based on the fluid motion. We find that the interaction between the nutrient and the antimicrobial agent can reproduce survival curves which are comparable to other model predictions as well as experimental results. The model predicts that exposing the biofilm to low concentration doses of antimicrobial agent for longer time is more effective than short time dosing with high antimicrobial agent concentration. The effects of flow reversal and the roughness of the fluid/biofilm are also investigated. We find that reversing the flow increases the effectiveness of dosing. In addition, we show that overall survival decreases with increasing surface roughness.

  2. Biofilm Community Dynamics in Bench-Scale Annular Reactors Simulating Arrestment of Chloraminated Drinking Water Nitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annular reactors (ARs) were used to study biofilm community succession and provide an ecological insight during nitrification arrestment through simultaneously increasing monochloramine (NH2Cl) and chlorine to nitrogen mass ratios, resulting in four operational periods (I to IV)....

  3. Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal in a Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactor Under Continuous Aeration: A Demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilmore, Kevin R.; Terada, Akihiko; Smets, Barth F.

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the successful coupling of partial nitrification (nitritation) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation in a membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) with continuous aeration. Controlling the relative surface loadings of oxygen versus ammonium prevented complete nitrite oxidation and a...

  4. Evaluation of a hybrid anaerobic biofilm reactor treating winery effluents and using grape stalks as biofilm carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, Mohamed Ali; Habouzit, Frédéric; Bernet, Nicolas; Jedidi, Naceur; Escudié, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Wine production processes generate large amount of both winery wastewater and solid wastes. Furthermore, working periods, volumes and pollution loads greatly vary over the year. Therefore, it is recommended to develop a low-cost treatment technology for the treatment of winery effluents taking into account the variation of the organic loading rate (OLR). Accordingly, we have investigated the sequential operation of an anaerobic biofilm reactor treating winery effluents and using grape stalks (GSs) as biofilm carrier with an OLR ranging from 0.65 to 27 gCOD/L/d. The result showed that, during the start-up with wastewater influent, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate ranged from 83% to 93% and was about 91% at the end of the start-up period that lasted for 40 days. After 3 months of inactivity period of the reactor (no influent feeding), we have succeeded in restarting-up the reactor in only 15 days with a COD removal of 82% and a low concentration of volatile fatty acids (1 g/L), which confirms the robustness of the reactor. As a consequence, GSs can be used as an efficient carrier support, allowing a fast reactor start-up, while the biofilm conserves its activity during a non-feeding period. The proposed hybrid reactor thus permits to treat both winery effluents and GSs.

  5. Citric acid application for denitrification process support in biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielcarek, Artur; Rodziewicz, Joanna; Janczukowicz, Wojciech; Dabrowska, Dorota; Ciesielski, Slawomir; Thornton, Arthur; Struk-Sokołowska, Joanna

    2017-03-01

    The study demonstrated that citric acid, as an organic carbon source, can improve denitrification in Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Biofilm Reactor (AnSBBR). The consumption rate of the organic substrate and the denitrification rate were lower during the period of the reactor's acclimatization (cycles 1-60; 71.5 mgCOD L -1  h -1 and 17.81 mgN L -1  h -1 , respectively) than under the steady state conditions (cycles 61-180; 143.8 mgCOD L -1  h -1 and 24.38 mgN L -1  h -1 ). The biomass yield coefficient reached 0.04 ± 0.02 mgTSS· mgCOD re -1 (0.22 ± 0.09 mgTSS mgN re -1 ). Observations revealed the diversified microbiological ecology of the denitrifying bacteria. Citric acid was used mainly by bacteria representing the Trichoccocus genus, which represented above 40% of the sample during the first phase of the process (cycles 1-60). In the second phase (cycles 61-180) the microorganisms the genera that consumed the acetate and formate, as the result of citric acid decomposition were Propionibacterium (5.74%), Agrobacterium (5.23%), Flavobacterium (1.32%), Sphaerotilus (1.35%), Erysipelothrix (1.08%). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Microbiology and performance of a methanogenic biofilm reactor during the start-up period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresson, R; Dabert, P; Bernet, N

    2009-03-01

    To understand the interactions between anaerobic biofilm development and process performances during the start-up period of methanogenic biofilm reactor. Two methanogenic inverse turbulent bed reactors have been started and monitored for 81 days. Biofilm development (adhesion, growth, population dynamic) and characteristics (biodiversity, structure) were investigated using molecular tools (PCR-SSCP, FISH-CSLM). Identification of the dominant populations, in relation to process performances and to the present knowledge of their metabolic activities, was used to propose a global scheme of the degradation routes involved. The inoculum, which determines the microbial species present in the biofilm influences bioreactor performances during the start-up period. FISH observations revealed a homogeneous distribution of the Archaea and bacterial populations inside the biofilm. This study points out the link between biodiversity, functional stability and methanogenic process performances during start-up of anaerobic biofilm reactor. It shows that inoculum and substrate composition greatly influence biodiversity, physiology and structure of the biofilm. The combination of molecular techniques associated to a biochemical engineering approach is useful to get relevant information on the microbiology of a methanogenic growing biofilm, in relation with the start-up of the process.

  7. Biodegradation Rates of Aromatic Contaminants in Biofilm Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcangeli, Jean-Pierre; Arvin, Erik

    1995-01-01

    This study has shown that microorganisms can adapt to degrade mixtures of aromatic pollutants at relatively high rates in the μg/l concentration range. The biodegradation rates of the following compounds were investigated in biofilm systems: aromatic hydrocarbons, phenol, methylphenols......-reducing conditions, toluene was easily biodegraded. The xylenes and ethylbenzene were degraded cometabolically if toluene was used as a primary carbon source; their removal was influenced by competitive inhibition with toluene. These interaction phenomena are discussed in this paper and a kinetic model taking...

  8. Influence of dissolved oxygen on the nitrification kinetics in a circulating bed biofilm reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, R.; Melo, L.F. [University of Minho, Braga (Portugal). Dept. Bioengineering; Lazarova, V.; Manem, J. [Centre of International Research for Water and Environment (CIRSEE), Lyonnaise des Eaux, Le Pecq (France)

    1998-12-01

    The influence of dissolved oxygen concentration on the nitrification kinetics was studied in the circulating bed reactor (CBR). The study was partly performed at laboratory scale with synthetic water, and partly at pilot scale with secondary effluent as feed water. The nitrification kinetics of the laboratory CBR as a function of the oxygen concentration can be described according to the half order and zero order rate equations of the diffusion-reaction model applied to porous catalysts. When oxygen was the rate limiting substrate, the nitrification rate was close to a half order function of the oxygen concentration. The average oxygen diffusion coefficient estimated by fitting the diffusion-reaction model to the experimental results was around 66% of the respective value in water. The experimental results showed that either the ammonia or the oxygen concentration could be limiting for the nitrification kinetics. The latter occurred for an oxygen to ammonia concentration ratio below 1.5-2 gO{sub 2}/gN-NH{sub 4}{sup +} for both laboratory and pilot scale reactors. The volumetric oxygen mass transfer coefficient (k{sub L}a) determined in the laboratory scale reactor was 0.017 s{sup -1} for a superficial air velocity of 0.02 m s{sup -1}, and the one determined in the pilot scale reactor was 0.040 s{sup -1} for a superficial air velocity of 0.031 m s{sup -1}. The k{sub L}a for the pilot scale reactor did not change significantly after biofilm development, compared to the value measured without biofilm. (orig.) With 7 figs., 5 tabs., 24 refs.

  9. Characterization of biofilm in 200W fluidized bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Michelle H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Saurey, Sabrina D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lee, Brady D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Parker, Kent E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Eisenhauer, Emalee E. R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cordova, Elsa A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Golovich, Elizabeth C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-29

    Contaminated groundwater beneath the 200 West Area at the Hanford Site in Southeast Washington is currently being treated using a pump and treat system to remove organics, inorganics, radionuclides, and metals. A granular activated carbon-based fluidized bed reactor (FBR) has been added to remove nitrate, hexavalent chromium and carbon tetrachloride. Initial analytical results indicated the microorganisms effectively reduced many of the contaminants to less than cleanup levels. However shortly thereafter operational upsets of the FBR include carbon carry over, over production of microbial extracellular polymeric substance (biofilm) materials, and over production of hydrogen sulfide. As a result detailed investigations were undertaken to understand the functional diversity and activity of the microbial community present in the FBR over time. Molecular analyses including terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses were performed on the microbial community extracted from the biofilm within the bed and from the inoculum, to determine functional dynamics of the FBR bed over time and following operational changes. Findings from these analyses indicated: 1) the microbial community within the bed was completely different than community used for inoculation, and was likely from the groundwater; 2) analyses early in the testing showed an FBR community dominated by a few Curvibacter and Flavobacterium species; 3) the final sample taken indicated that the microbial community in the FBR bed had become more diverse; and 4) qPCR analyses indicated that bacteria involved in nitrogen cycling, including denitrifiers and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria, were dominant in the bed. These results indicate that molecular tools can be powerful for determining functional diversity within FBR type reactors. Coupled with micronutrient, influent and effluent chemistry

  10. Dynamical Analysis of a Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactor with the Formation of Biofilms for Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen López Buriticá

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the dynamics of a system that models the formation of biofilms in a continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR when it is utilized for wastewater treatment. The growth rate of the microorganisms is modeled using two different kinetics, Monod and Haldane kinetics, with the goal of studying the influence of each in the system. The equilibrium points are identified through a stability analysis, and the bifurcations found are characterized.

  11. Efficacy of NVC-422 against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in a sheep biofilm model of sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Deepti; Jekle, Andreas; Debabov, Dmitri; Wang, Lu; Khosrovi, Bez; Anderson, Mark; Foreman, Andrew; Wormald, Peter-John

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a major obstacle in management of recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis. NVC-422 is a potent, fast-acting, broad-spectrum, nonantibiotic, antimicrobial with a new mechanism of action effective against biofilm bacteria in in vitro conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and efficacy of NVC-422 as local antibiofilm treatment in a sheep model of rhinosinusitis. After accessing and occluding frontal sinus ostia in 24 merino sheep via staged endoscopic procedures, S. aureus clinical isolate was instilled in frontal sinuses. Following biofilm formation, ostial obstruction was removed and sinuses irrigated with 0.1% and 0.5% NVC-422 in 5 mM acetate isotonic saline at pH 4.0. Sheep were monitored for adverse effects and euthanized 24 hours after treatment. Frontal sinuses were assessed for infection and changes in mucosa after the treatment. S. aureus biofilms were identified with Baclight-confocal scanning microscopy protocol and the biofilm biomass assayed by applying the COMSTAT2 program to recorded image stacks. After 2 irrigations with 0.1% NVC-422, S. aureus biofilm biomass was reduced when compared to control sinuses (p = 0.0001), though this effect was variable in samples. NVC-422 0.5% solution irrigations reduced biofilm even more significantly and consistently over all samples (p biofilm biomass (p biofilms, with dose-dependent efficacy in this animal model of biofilm-associated sinusitis. Copyright © 2012 American Rhinologic Society-American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy, LLC.

  12. Bioremoval of trivalent chromium using Bacillus biofilms through continuous flow reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundar, K.; Sadiq, I. Mohammed; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, N.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Effective bioremoval of Cr(III) using bacterial biofilms. ► Simplified bioreactor was fabricated for the biofilm development and Cr(III) removal. ► Economically feasible substrate like coarse sand and pebbles were used. - Abstract: Present study deals with the applicability of bacterial biofilms for the bioremoval of trivalent chromium from tannery effluents. A continuous flow reactor was designed for the development of biofilms on different substrates like glass beads, pebbles and coarse sand. The parameters for the continuous flow reactor were 20 ml/min flow rate at 30 °C, pH4. Biofilm biomass on the substrates was in the following sequence: coarse sand > pebbles > glass beads (4.8 × 10 7 , 4.5 × 10 7 and 3.5 × 10 5 CFU/cm 2 ), which was confirmed by CLSM. Biofilms developed using consortium of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus on coarse sand had more surface area and was able to remove 98% of Cr(III), SEM-EDX proved 92.60% Cr(III) adsorption on biofilms supported by coarse sand. Utilization of Bacillus biofilms for effective bioremoval of Cr(III) from chrome tanning effluent could be a better option for tannery industry, especially during post chrome tanning operation.

  13. Bioremoval of trivalent chromium using Bacillus biofilms through continuous flow reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundar, K.; Sadiq, I. Mohammed; Mukherjee, Amitava [Centre for Nanobiotechnology, Nano Bio-Medicine Laboratory School of Bio Sciences and Technology VIT University, Vellore - 632014 (India); Chandrasekaran, N., E-mail: nchandrasekaran@vit.ac.in [Centre for Nanobiotechnology, Nano Bio-Medicine Laboratory School of Bio Sciences and Technology VIT University, Vellore - 632014 (India)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effective bioremoval of Cr(III) using bacterial biofilms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simplified bioreactor was fabricated for the biofilm development and Cr(III) removal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Economically feasible substrate like coarse sand and pebbles were used. - Abstract: Present study deals with the applicability of bacterial biofilms for the bioremoval of trivalent chromium from tannery effluents. A continuous flow reactor was designed for the development of biofilms on different substrates like glass beads, pebbles and coarse sand. The parameters for the continuous flow reactor were 20 ml/min flow rate at 30 Degree-Sign C, pH4. Biofilm biomass on the substrates was in the following sequence: coarse sand > pebbles > glass beads (4.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7}, 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} and 3.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} CFU/cm{sup 2}), which was confirmed by CLSM. Biofilms developed using consortium of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus on coarse sand had more surface area and was able to remove 98% of Cr(III), SEM-EDX proved 92.60% Cr(III) adsorption on biofilms supported by coarse sand. Utilization of Bacillus biofilms for effective bioremoval of Cr(III) from chrome tanning effluent could be a better option for tannery industry, especially during post chrome tanning operation.

  14. Fungal Biofilms: In Vivo Models for Discovery of Anti-Biofilm Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nett, Jeniel E; Andes, David R

    2015-06-01

    During infection, fungi frequently transition to a biofilm lifestyle, proliferating as communities of surface-adherent aggregates of cells. Phenotypically, cells in a biofilm are distinct from free-floating cells. Their high tolerance of antifungals and ability to withstand host defenses are two characteristics that foster resilience. Biofilm infections are particularly difficult to eradicate, and most available antifungals have minimal activity. Therefore, the discovery of novel compounds and innovative strategies to treat fungal biofilms is of great interest. Although many fungi have been observed to form biofilms, the most well-studied is Candida albicans. Animal models have been developed to simulate common Candida device-associated infections, including those involving vascular catheters, dentures, urinary catheters, and subcutaneous implants. Models have also reproduced the most common mucosal biofilm infections: oropharyngeal and vaginal candidiasis. These models incorporate the anatomical site, immune components, and fluid dynamics of clinical niches and have been instrumental in the study of drug resistance and investigation of novel therapies. This chapter describes the significance of fungal biofilm infections, the animal models developed for biofilm study, and how these models have contributed to the development of new strategies for the eradication of fungal biofilm infections.

  15. Biohydrogen production from diary processing wastewater by anaerobic biofilm reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios-Gonzalez, L.J.; Moreno-Davila, I.M.; Rodriguez-Martinez, J.; Garza-Garcia, Y. [Universidad Autonoma de Coahuila, Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico)]. E-mail: leopoldo.rios@mail.uadec.mx

    2009-09-15

    This article describes biological hydrogen production from diary wastewater via anaerobic fermentation using pretreated heat shock (100 degrees Celsius, 30 min.) and acid (pH 3.0, 24 h) treatment procedures to selectively enrich the hydrogen producing mixed consortia prior to inoculation to batch reactors. Bioreactor used for immobilization consortia was operated at mesophilic (room) temperature (20{+-}3 degrees Celsius), under acidophilic conditions (pH 4.0-4.5), HRT (2h), and a natural support for generate hydrogen producing mixed consortia biofilm: Opuntia imbricata. Reactor was initially operated with sorbitol (5g/L) for 60 days of operation. Batch tests were conducted using 20{+-}0.02g of natural support with biofilm. Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of COD (2.9-21.1 g-COD/L), at initial pH of 7.0, 32{+-}1 degrees Celsius. Maximum hydrogen yield was obtained at 21.1 g-COD/L. Experiments of pH effect were conducted using the optimal substrate concentration (21.2 g-COD/L), at pH 4 to 7 and 11.32 (pH diary wastewater) ,and 32{+-}1 degrees Celsius. Experiments results indicate the optimum initial cultivation was pH 4.0, but we can consider also a stable hydrogen production at pH 11.32 (pH diary wastewater), so we can avoid to fit the pH, and use diary wastewater as it left the process of cheese manufacture. The operational pH of 4.0 is 1.5 units below that of previously reported hydrogen producing organisms. The influence of the effect of temperature were conducted using the optimal substrate concentration (21.2 g-COD/L), two pH levels: 4.0 and 11.32, and four different temperatures: 16{+-}3 degrees Celsius (room temperature), 3 C, 45{+-}1 degrees Celsius y 55{+-}1 degrees Celsius.Optimal temperature for hydrogen production from diary wastewater at pH 4.0 was 55{+-}1 degrees Celsius, and for pH 11.32 was 16{+-}3 degrees Celsius.Therefore, the results suggests biofilm reactors in a natural support like Opuntia imbricata have good potential

  16. Adsorption effect on the dynamic response of a biochemical reaction in a biofilm reactor for wastewater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuneda, S.; Inoue, Y.; Auresenia, J.; Hirata, A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2003-09-01

    The dynamic behavior of a completely mixed, three-phase, fluidized bed biofilm reactor treating simulated domestic wastewater was studied with step changes in inlet concentration. It was found that the response curves showed second order characteristics, i.e., as the inlet concentration was increased, the outlet concentration also increased, reached a peak value and then decreased until it leveled to a new steady-state value corresponding to the new inlet concentration level. Nonlinear regression analysis was performed using Monod-type rate equations with and without an adsorption term. As a result, the theoretical curve of the kinetic model that incorporates the adsorption term has best fit to the actual response in most cases. Thus, it was concluded that the adsorption of a substrate onto the biofilm and carrier particles has a significant effect on the dynamic response in biofilm processes. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Microbiological and chemical approaches to degradation of mecoprop in a Moving-Bed Biofilm-Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escola, Monica; Tue Kjærgaard Nielsen, Tue; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg

    Micro-pollutants are ubiquitous in wastewater effluents. Therefore, in-situ treatments of highly polluted water or polishing treatments after classical wastewater treatment have been proposed as a solution. Moving Bed Biofilm-Reactors (MBBRs) are a recent-developed biofilm technology for wastewater...... treatment. MBBRs consist incontain biofilms which are grown on small (1-4 cm diameter) plastic chips that are suspended and mixed in a water tank. These systems have been recognized as robust and versatile. Besides, biofilm systems fdescribe acilitatedemonstrate a clear, but slow, biodegradation of some...... recalcitrant compounds. For all these reasonsThus, MBBRs are pointed as a valuable tool for the elimination of micro-pollutants. Several studies have focused in on describing degradation processes in biofilm by quantifying the loss of micro-pollutants over time. This can be helpful foraid optimizing...

  18. Sludge granulation in an UASB-moving bed biofilm hybrid reactor for efficient organic matter removal and nitrogen removal in biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Pritha; Ghangrekar, M M; Rao, Surampalli

    2018-02-01

    A hybrid upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB)-moving bed biofilm (MBB) and rope bed biofilm (RBB) reactor was designed for treatment of sewage. Possibility of enhancing granulation in an UASB reactor using moving media to improve sludge retention was explored while treating low-strength wastewater. The presence of moving media in the top portion of the UASB reactor allowed a high solid retention time even at very short hydraulic retention times and helped in maintaining selection pressure in the sludge bed to promote formation of different sized sludge granules with an average settling velocity of 67 m/h. These granules were also found to contain plenty of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) such as 58 mg of polysaccharides (PS) per gram of volatile suspended solids (VSS) and protein (PN) content of 37 mg/g VSS. Enriched sludge of nitrogen-removing bacteria forming a porous biofilm on the media in RBB was also observed in a concentration of around 894 g/m 2 . The nitrogen removing sludge also had a high EPS content of around 22 mg PS/g VSS and 28 mg PN/g VSS. This hybrid UASB-MBB-RBB reactor with enhanced anaerobic granular sludge treating both carbonaceous and nitrogenous matter may be a sustainable solution for decentralized sewage treatment.

  19. Denitrification performance of Pseudomonas denitrificans in a fluidized-bed biofilm reactor and in a stirred tank reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cattaneo, C.; Nicolella, C.; Rovatti, M. [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Genoa, Via Opera Pia 15, 16145 Genoa (Italy)

    2003-04-09

    Denitrification of a synthetic wastewater containing nitrates and methanol as carbon source was carried out in two systems - a fluidized-bed biofilm reactor (FBBR) and a stirred tank reactor (STR) - using Pseudomonas denitrificans over a period of five months. Nitrogen loading was varied during operation of both reactors to assess differences in the response to transient conditions. Experimental data were analyzed to obtain a comparison of denitrification kinetics in biofilm and suspended growth reactors. The comparison showed that the volumetric degradation capacity in the FBBR (5.36 kg {sub N} . m{sup -3} . d{sup -1}) was higher than in the STR, due to higher biomass concentration (10 kg {sub BM} . m{sup -3} vs 1.2 kg {sub BM} m{sup -3}). (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  20. Nitrification of industrial and domestic saline wastewaters in moving bed biofilm reactor and sequencing batch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassin, Joao P.; Dezotti, Marcia; Sant'Anna, Geraldo L.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrification of saline wastewaters was investigated in bench-scale moving-bed biofilm reactors (MBBR). Wastewater from a chemical industry and domestic sewage, both treated by the activated sludge process, were fed to moving-bed reactors. The industrial wastewater contained 8000 mg Cl - /L and the salinity of the treated sewage was gradually increased until that level. Residual substances present in the treated industrial wastewater had a strong inhibitory effect on the nitrification process. Assays to determine inhibitory effects were performed with the industrial wastewater, which was submitted to ozonation and carbon adsorption pretreatments. The latter treatment was effective for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal and improved nitrification efficiency. Nitrification percentage of the treated domestic sewage was higher than 90% for all tested chloride concentrations up to 8000 mg/L. Results obtained in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) were consistent with those attained in the MBBR systems, allowing tertiary nitrification and providing adequate conditions for adaptation of nitrifying microorganisms even under stressing and inhibitory conditions.

  1. Prediction of moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) performance for the treatment of aniline using artificial neural networks (ANN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delnavaz, M. [Tarbiat Modares University, Civil Engineering Department, Environmental Engineering Division, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ayati, B., E-mail: ayati_bi@modares.ac.ir [Tarbiat Modares University, Civil Engineering Department, Environmental Engineering Division, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ganjidoust, H. [Tarbiat Modares University, Civil Engineering Department, Environmental Engineering Division, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-07-15

    In this study, the results of 1-year efficiency forecasting using artificial neural networks (ANN) models of a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) for a toxic and hard biodegradable aniline removal were investigated. The reactor was operated in an aerobic batch and continuous condition with 50% by volume which was filled with light expanded clay aggregate (LECA) as carrier. Efficiency evaluation of the reactors was obtained at different retention time (RT) of 8, 24, 48 and 72 h with an influent COD from 100 to 4000 mg/L. Exploratory data analysis was used to detect relationships between the data and dependent evaluated one. The appropriate architecture of the neural network models was determined using several steps of training and testing of the models. The ANN-based models were found to provide an efficient and a robust tool in predicting MBBR performance for treating aromatic amine compounds.

  2. Low-biodegradable composite chemical wastewater treatment by biofilm configured sequencing batch reactor (SBBR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, S. Venkata; Rao, N. Chandrasekhara; Sarma, P.N.

    2007-01-01

    Biofilm configured system with sequencing/periodic discontinuous batch mode operation was evaluated for the treatment of low-biodegradable composite chemical wastewater (low BOD/COD ratio ∼0.3, high sulfate content: 1.75 g/l) in aerobic metabolic function. Reactor was operated under anoxic-aerobic-anoxic microenvironment conditions with a total cycle period of 24 h [fill: 15 min; reaction: 23 h (aeration along with recirculation); settle: 30 min; decant: 15 min] and the performance of the system was studied at organic loading rates (OLR) of 0.92, 1.50, 3.07 and 4.76 kg COD/cum-day. Substrate utilization showed a steady increase with increase in OLR and system performance sustained at higher loading rates. Maximum non-cumulative substrate utilization was observed after 4 h of the cycle operation. Sulfate removal efficiency of 20% was observed due to the induced anoxic conditions prevailing during the sequence phase operation of the reactor and the existing internal anoxic zones in the biofilm matrix. Biofilm configured sequencing batch reactor (SBR) showed comparatively higher efficiency to the corresponding suspended growth and granular activated carbon (GAC) configured systems studied with same wastewater. Periodic discontinuous batch mode operation of the biofilm reactors results in a more even distribution of the biomass throughout the reactor and was able to treat large shock loads than the continuous flow process. Biofilm configured system coupled with periodic discontinuous batch mode operation imposes regular variations in the substrate concentration on biofilm organisms. As a result, organisms throughout the film achieve maximum growth rates resulting in improved reaction potential leading to stable and robust system which is well suited for treating highly variable wastes

  3. Low-biodegradable composite chemical wastewater treatment by biofilm configured sequencing batch reactor (SBBR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, S. Venkata [Bioengineering and Environmental Engineering Centre, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad 500 007 (India)]. E-mail: vmohan_s@yahoo.com; Rao, N. Chandrasekhara [Bioengineering and Environmental Engineering Centre, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad 500 007 (India); Biotechnologies and Process Engineering for the Environment, Universite de Savoie Technolac, Chambery, 73376 Le Bourget Du Lac Cedex (France); Sarma, P.N. [Bioengineering and Environmental Engineering Centre, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad 500 007 (India)

    2007-06-01

    Biofilm configured system with sequencing/periodic discontinuous batch mode operation was evaluated for the treatment of low-biodegradable composite chemical wastewater (low BOD/COD ratio {approx}0.3, high sulfate content: 1.75 g/l) in aerobic metabolic function. Reactor was operated under anoxic-aerobic-anoxic microenvironment conditions with a total cycle period of 24 h [fill: 15 min; reaction: 23 h (aeration along with recirculation); settle: 30 min; decant: 15 min] and the performance of the system was studied at organic loading rates (OLR) of 0.92, 1.50, 3.07 and 4.76 kg COD/cum-day. Substrate utilization showed a steady increase with increase in OLR and system performance sustained at higher loading rates. Maximum non-cumulative substrate utilization was observed after 4 h of the cycle operation. Sulfate removal efficiency of 20% was observed due to the induced anoxic conditions prevailing during the sequence phase operation of the reactor and the existing internal anoxic zones in the biofilm matrix. Biofilm configured sequencing batch reactor (SBR) showed comparatively higher efficiency to the corresponding suspended growth and granular activated carbon (GAC) configured systems studied with same wastewater. Periodic discontinuous batch mode operation of the biofilm reactors results in a more even distribution of the biomass throughout the reactor and was able to treat large shock loads than the continuous flow process. Biofilm configured system coupled with periodic discontinuous batch mode operation imposes regular variations in the substrate concentration on biofilm organisms. As a result, organisms throughout the film achieve maximum growth rates resulting in improved reaction potential leading to stable and robust system which is well suited for treating highly variable wastes.

  4. Early stages in biofilm development in methanogenic fluidized-bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauwers, A.M.; Heinen, W.; Gorris, L.G.M.; Drift, C. van der (Katholieke Univ. Nijmegen (Netherlands). Dept. of Microbiology and Evolution Biology)

    1990-06-01

    Biofilm development in methanogenic fluidized-bed reactors with sand as the carrier was studied on a laboratory scale. The microorganisms present in consecutive layers of the biofilm of mature sludge granules were prelimilarily characterized on the basis of their morphology, element composition and adhesion capacity and were compared to bacteria which take part in the initial colonization of sand. The early phase of biofilm development was monitored with reactors receiving waste-waters containing different mixtures of volatile fatty acids and inoculated with fluidized-bed reactor effluent for different lengths of time. The results obtained indicate that facultative anaerobic bacteria abundantly present in the outermost biofilm layers of mature sludge granules are probably the main primary colonizers of the sand. Methanothrix spp. or other methanogens were rarely observed among the primary colonizers. The course of biofilm formation was comparable under the various start-up conditions employed including variations in waste-water composition, inoculation and anaerobicity. However, omission of waste-water and thus of substrate resulted in rapid wash-out of the attached biomass. (orig.).

  5. Hydroxylamine diffusion can enhance N₂O emissions in nitrifying biofilms: a modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabba, Fabrizio; Picioreanu, Cristian; Pérez, Julio; Nerenberg, Robert

    2015-02-03

    Wastewater treatment plants can be significant sources of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas. However, little is known about N2O emissions from biofilm processes. We adapted an existing suspended-growth mathematical model to explore N2O emissions from nitrifying biofilms. The model included N2O formation by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) via the hydroxylamine and the nitrifier denitrification pathways. Our model suggested that N2O emissions from nitrifying biofilms could be significantly greater than from suspended growth systems under similar conditions. The main cause was the formation and diffusion of hydroxylamine, an AOB nitrification intermediate, from the aerobic to the anoxic regions of the biofilm. In the anoxic regions, hydroxylamine oxidation by AOB provided reducing equivalents used solely for nitrite reduction to N2O, since there was no competition with oxygen. For a continuous system, very high and very low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations resulted in lower emissions, while intermediate values led to higher emissions. Higher bulk ammonia concentrations and greater biofilm thicknesses increased emissions. The model effectively predicted N2O emissions from an actual pilot-scale granular sludge reactor for sidestream nitritation, but significantly underestimated the emissions when the NH2OH diffusion coefficient was assumed to be minimal. This numerical study suggests an unexpected and important role of hydroxylamine in N2O emission in biofilms.

  6. From Mouth to Model: Combining in vivo and in vitro oral biofilm growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Klug

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Oral biofilm studies based on simplified experimental setups are difficult to interpret. Models are limited mostly by the number of bacterial species observed and the insufficiency of artificial media. Few studies have attempted to overcome these limitations and to cultivate native oral biofilm. This study aimed to grow oral biofilm in vivo before transfer to a biofilm reactor for ex-situ incubation. The in-vitro survival of this oral biofilm and the changes in bacterial composition over time were observed. Six human enamel-dentin slabs embedded buccally in dental splints were used as biofilm carriers. Fitted individually to the upper jaw of 25 non-smoking male volunteers, the splints were worn continuously for 48 hours. During this time, tooth-brushing and alcohol-consumption were not permitted. The biofilm was then transferred on slabs into a biofilm reactor and incubated there for 48 hours while being nourished in BHI medium. Live/dead staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to observe bacterial survival over four points in time: directly after removal (T0 and after 1h (T1, 24h (T2 and 48h (T3 of incubation. Bacterial diversity at T0 and T3 was compared with 454-pyrosequencing. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed to show specific taxa. Survival curves were calculated with a specially designed MATLAB script. Acacia and QIIME 1.9.1 were used to process pyrosequencing data. SPSS 21.0 and R 3.3.1 were used for statistical analysis.After initial fluctuations at T1, survival curves mostly showed approximation of the bacterial numbers to the initial level at T3. Pyrosequencing analysis resulted in 117 OTUs common to all samples. The genera Streptococcus and Veillonella (both Firmicutes dominated at T0 and T3. They make up two thirds of the biofilm. Genera with lower relative abundance had grown significantly at T3. FISH analysis confirmed the pyrosequencing results, i.e. the predominant staining of Firmicutes. We

  7. Heavy metals-bioremediation by highly radioresistant Deinococcus radiodurans biofilm prospective use in nuclear reactor decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Sudhir K.; Subba Rao, T.

    2015-01-01

    of heavy metals. The study signifies the potential use of D. radiodurans biofilms, which can tolerate >20 kGy in nuclear reactor decontamination process for the removal of active heavy metals. (author)

  8. Sequentially aerated membrane biofilm reactors for autotrophic nitrogen removal: microbial community composition and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Franck, Stephanie; Gülay, Arda

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-aerated biofilm reactors performing autotrophic nitrogen removal can be successfully applied to treat concentrated nitrogen streams. However, their process performance is seriously hampered by the growth of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). In this work we document how sequential aeration...

  9. Fixed-biofilm reactors applied to waste water treatment and aquacultural water recirculating systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovendeur, J.

    1989-01-01

    Fixed-biofilm waste water treatment may be regarded as one of the oldest engineered biological waste water treatment methods. With the recent introduction of modern packing materials, this type of reactor has received a renewed impuls for implementation in a wide field of water treatment.

    In

  10. An electrochemical impedance model for integrated bacterial biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Freeman, Amihay; Sternheim, Marek; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial cells attachment onto solid surfaces and the following growth into mature microbial biofilms may result in highly antibiotic resistant biofilms. Such biofilms may be incidentally formed on tissues or implanted devices, or intentionally formed by directed deposition of microbial sensors on whole-cell bio-chip surface. A new method for electrical characterization of the later on-chip microbial biofilm buildup is presented in this paper. Measurement of impedance vs. frequency in the range of 100 mHz to 400 kHz of Escherichia coli cells attachment to indium-tin-oxide-coated electrodes was carried out while using optical microscopy estimating the electrode area coverage. We show that impedance spectroscopy measurements can be interpreted by a simple electrical equivalent model characterizing both attachment and growth of the biofilm. The correlation of extracted equivalent electrical lumped components with the visual biofilm parameters and their dependence on the attachment and growth phases is confirmed.

  11. Development of the floating sulphur biofilm reactor for sulphide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    driniev

    The formation of floating sulphur biofilm was observed in the microbial ecology studies of tannery ponds undertaken by the. Environmental Biotechnology Group at Rhodes University. This was related to the steep Redox gradients established at the air/ water interface of anaerobic, organically loaded and actively sulphate ...

  12. Modeling Substrate Utilization, Metabolite Production, and Uranium Immobilization in Shewanella oneidensis Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan S. Renslow

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we developed a two-dimensional mathematical model to predict substrate utilization and metabolite production rates in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilm in the presence and absence of uranium (U. In our model, lactate and fumarate are used as the electron donor and the electron acceptor, respectively. The model includes the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS. The EPS bound to the cell surface and distributed in the biofilm were considered bound EPS (bEPS and loosely associated EPS (laEPS, respectively. COMSOL® Multiphysics finite element analysis software was used to solve the model numerically (model file provided in the Supplementary Material. The input variables of the model were the lactate, fumarate, cell, and EPS concentrations, half saturation constant for fumarate, and diffusion coefficients of the substrates and metabolites. To estimate unknown parameters and calibrate the model, we used a custom designed biofilm reactor placed inside a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR microimaging and spectroscopy system and measured substrate utilization and metabolite production rates. From these data we estimated the yield coefficients, maximum substrate utilization rate, half saturation constant for lactate, stoichiometric ratio of fumarate and acetate to lactate and stoichiometric ratio of succinate to fumarate. These parameters are critical to predicting the activity of biofilms and are not available in the literature. Lastly, the model was used to predict uranium immobilization in S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilms by considering reduction and adsorption processes in the cells and in the EPS. We found that the majority of immobilization was due to cells, and that EPS was less efficient at immobilizing U. Furthermore, most of the immobilization occurred within the top 10 μm of the biofilm. To the best of our knowledge, this research is one of the first biofilm immobilization mathematical models based on experimental

  13. Modeling of the Bacillus subtilis Bacterial Biofilm Growing on an Agar Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Guoqing; Hao, Mudong

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are organized communities composed of millions of microorganisms that accumulate on almost any kinds of surfaces. In this paper, a biofilm growth model on an agar substrate is developed based on mass conservation principles, Fick's first law, and Monod's kinetic reaction, by considering nutrient diffusion between biofilm and agar substrate. Our results show biofilm growth evolution characteristics such as biofilm thickness, active biomass, and nutrient concentration in the agar substrate. We quantitatively obtain biofilm growth dependence on different parameters. We provide an alternative mathematical method to describe other kinds of biofilm growth such as multiple bacterial species biofilm and also biofilm growth on various complex substrates.

  14. Membrane-aerated biofilm reactor for the removal of 1,2-dichloroethane by Pseudomonas sp strain DCA1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hage, J.C.; Houten, R.T.; Tramper, J.; Hartmans, S.

    2004-01-01

    A membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MBR) with a biofilm of Pseudomonas sp. strain DCA1 was studied for the removal of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA) from water. A hydrophobic membrane was used to create a barrier between the liquid and the gas phase. Inoculation of the MBR with cells of strain DCA1 grown

  15. Mathematical Modeling of Biofilm Structures Using COMSTAT Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Verotta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling holds great potential for quantitatively describing biofilm growth in presence or absence of chemical agents used to limit or promote biofilm growth. In this paper, we describe a general mathematical/statistical framework that allows for the characterization of complex data in terms of few parameters and the capability to (i compare different experiments and exposures to different agents, (ii test different hypotheses regarding biofilm growth and interaction with different agents, and (iii simulate arbitrary administrations of agents. The mathematical framework is divided to submodels characterizing biofilm, including new models characterizing live biofilm growth and dead cell accumulation; the interaction with agents inhibiting or stimulating growth; the kinetics of the agents. The statistical framework can take into account measurement and interexperiment variation. We demonstrate the application of (some of the models using confocal microscopy data obtained using the computer program COMSTAT.

  16. The effect of harvesting on biomass production and nutrient removal in phototrophic biofilm reactors for effluent polishing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelee, N.C.; Janssen, M.; Temmink, H.; Taparaviciute, L.; Khiewwijit, R.; Janoska, A.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of wastewater treatment plants require post-treatment to remove residual nitrogen and phosphorus. This study investigated various harvesting regimes that would achieve consistent low effluent concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus in a phototrophic biofilm reactor.

  17. Mathematical Modeling of Biofilm Structures Using COMSTAT Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verotta, Davide; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2017-01-01

    Mathematical modeling holds great potential for quantitatively describing biofilm growth in presence or absence of chemical agents used to limit or promote biofilm growth. In this paper, we describe a general mathematical/statistical framework that allows for the characterization of complex data...... in terms of few parameters and the capability to (i) compare different experiments and exposures to different agents, (ii) test different hypotheses regarding biofilm growth and interaction with different agents, and (iii) simulate arbitrary administrations of agents. The mathematical framework is divided...... to submodels characterizing biofilm, including new models characterizing live biofilm growth and dead cell accumulation; the interaction with agents inhibiting or stimulating growth; the kinetics of the agents. The statistical framework can take into account measurement and interexperiment variation. We...

  18. [Rapid startup and nitrogen removal characteristic of anaerobic ammonium oxidation reactor in packed bed biofilm reactor with suspended carrier].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Sun, De-zhi; Yu, Guang-lu

    2010-03-01

    Packed bed biofilm reactor with suspended carrier was used to cultivate ANAMMOX bacteria with sludge inoculums from WWTP secondary settler. The startup of ANAMMOX reactor was comparatively studied using high nitrogen loading method and low nitrogen loading method with aerobically biofilmed on the carrier, and the nitrogen removal characteristic was further investigated. The results showed that the reactor could be started up successfully within 90 days using low nitrogen loading method, the removal efficiencies of ammonium and nitrite were nearly 100% and the TN removal efficiencywas over 75% , however, the high nitrogen loading method was proved unsuccessfully for startup of ANAMMOX reactor probably because of the inhibition effect of high concentration of ammonium and nitrite. The pH value of effluent was slightly higher than the influent and the pH value can be used as an indicator for the process of ANAMMOX reaction. The packed bed ANAMMOX reactor with suspended carrier showed good characteristics of high nitrogen loading and high removal efficiency, 100% of removal efficiency could be achieved when the influent ammonium and nitrite concentration was lower than 800 mg/L.

  19. [Bacterial diversity in sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) for landfill leachate treatment using PCR-DGGE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yong; Yang, Zhao-hui; Zeng, Guang-ming; Ma, Yan-he; Liu, You-sheng; Wang, Rong-juan; Xu, Zheng-yong

    2007-05-01

    For studying the bacterial diversity and the mechanism of denitrification in sequencing bath biofilm reactor (SBBR) treating landfill leachate to provide microbial evidence for technique improvements, total microbial DNA was extracted from samples which were collected from natural landfill leachate and biofilm of a SBBR that could efficiently remove NH4+ -N and COD of high concentration. 16S rDNA fragments were amplified from the total DNA successfully using a pair of universal bacterial 16S rDNA primer, GC341F and 907R, and then were used for denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis. The bands in the gel were analyzed by statistical methods and excided from the gel for sequencing, and the sequences were used for homology analysis and then two phylogenetic trees were constructed using DNAStar software. Results indicated that the bacterial diversity of the biofilm in SBBR and the landfill leachate was abundant, and no obvious change of community structure happened during running in the biofilm, in which most bacteria came from the landfill leachate. There may be three different modes of denitrification in the reactor because several different nitrifying bacteria, denitrifying bacteria and anaerobic ammonia oxidation bacteria coexisted in it. The results provided some valuable references for studying microbiological mechanism of denitrification in SBBR.

  20. Syntrophic microbial communities on straw as biofilm carrier increase the methane yield of a biowaste-digesting biogas reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank R. Bengelsdorf

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Biogas from biowaste can be an important source of renewable energy, but the fermentation process of low-structure waste is often unstable. The present study uses a full-scale biogas reactor to test the hypothesis that straw as an additional biofilm carrier will increase methane yield; and this effect is mirrored in a specific microbial community attached to the straw. Better reactor performance after addition of straw, at simultaneously higher organic loading rate and specific methane yield confirmed the hypothesis. The microbial communities on straw as a biofilm carrier and of the liquid reactor content were investigated using 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing by means of 454 pyrosequencing technology. The results revealed high diversity of the bacterial communities in the liquid reactor content as well as the biofilms on the straw. The most abundant archaea in all samples belonged to the genera Methanoculleus and Methanosarcina. Addition of straw resulted in a significantly different microbial community attached to the biofilm carrier. The bacterium Candidatus Cloacamonas acidaminovorans and methanogenic archaea of the genus Methanoculleus dominated the biofilm on straw. Syntrophic interactions between the hydrogenotrophic Methanoculleus sp. and members of the hydrogen-producing bacterial community within biofilms may explain the improved methane yield. Thus, straw addition can be used to improve and to stabilize the anaerobic process in substrates lacking biofilm-supporting structures.

  1. Wastewater treatment with submerged fixed bed biofilm reactor systems--design rules, operating experiences and ongoing developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, S; Koeser, H

    2007-01-01

    Wastewater treatment systems using bio-films that grow attached to a support media are an alternative to the widely used suspended growth activated sludge process. Different fixed growth biofilm reactors are commercially used for the treatment of municipal as well as industrial wastewater. In this paper a fairly new fixed growth biofilm system, the submerged fixed bed biofilm reactor (SFBBR), is discussed. SFBBRs are based on aerated submerged fixed open structured plastic media for the support of the biofilm. They are generally operated without sludge recirculation in order to avoid clogging of the support media and problems with the control of the biofilm. Reactor and process design considerations for these reactors are reviewed. Measures to ensure the development and maintenance of an active biofilm are examined. SFBBRs have been applied successfully to small wastewater treatment plants where complete nitrification but no high degree of denitrification is necessary. For the pre-treatment of industrial wastewater the use of SFBBRs is advantageous, especially in cases of wastewater with high organic loading or high content of compounds with low biodegradability. Performance data from exemplary commercial plants are given. Ongoing research and development efforts aim at achieving a high simultaneous total nitrogen (TN) removal of aerated SFBBRs and at improving the efficiency of TN removal in anoxic SFBBRs.

  2. Particle bed reactor modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapyta, Joe; Reid, Hank; Walton, Lew

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: particle bed reactor (PBR) core cross section; PBR bleed cycle; fuel and moderator flow paths; PBR modeling requirements; characteristics of PBR and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) modeling; challenges for PBR and NTP modeling; thermal hydraulic computer codes; capabilities for PBR/reactor application; thermal/hydralic codes; limitations; physical correlations; comparison of predicted friction factor and experimental data; frit pressure drop testing; cold frit mask factor; decay heat flow rate; startup transient simulation; and philosophy of systems modeling.

  3. Biological nutrient removal from municipal wastewater in sequencing batch biofilm reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnz, P

    2001-07-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) has only been put into practice in activated sludge systems. In recent years, the Sequencing Batch Biofilm Reactor (SBBR) has emerged as an alternative allowing EBPR to be achieved in a biofilm reactor. High efficiency of phosphate removal was demonstrated in a SBBR fed with synthetic wastewater containing acetate. The aim of this study was to investigate EBPR from municipal wastewater in semi full-scale and laboratory-scale SBBRs. The focus of the investigation in the semi full-scale reactor was on determination of achievable reaction rates and effluent concentrations under varying influent conditions throughout all seasons of a year. Interactions between nitrogen and phosphorus removal and the influence of backwashing on the reactor performance was examined. Summing up, it can be stated that the SBBR proved to be an attractive alternative to activated sludge systems. Phosphorus elimination efficiency was comparable to common systems but biomass sedimentation problems were avoided. In order to further exploit the potential of the SBBR and to achieve reactor performances superior to those of existing systems designing a special biofilm carrier material may allow to increase the phenomenon of simultaneous nitrification/denitrification while maintaining EBPR activity. (orig.) [German] Die vermehrte biologische Phosphorelimination (Bio-P) aus Abwasser wurde bisher nur in Belebtschlammsystemen praktiziert. In den letzten Jahren konnte jedoch gezeigt werden, dass sich durch die Anwendung des Sequencing Batch Biofilm Reactor (SBBR) - Verfahrens auch in Biofilmreaktoren Bio-P verwirklichen laesst. Versuche in Laboranlagen haben ergeben, dass sich eine weitgehende Phosphorelimination aufrecht erhalten laesst, wenn die Reaktoren mit einem ideal zusammengesetzten, synthetischen Abwasser beschickt werden. Ziel dieser Arbeit war es, Bio-P aus kommunalem Abwasser in SBBR-Versuchsanlagen im halbtechnischen und im Labormassstab zu

  4. Nitrogen Removal by Anammox Biofilm Column Reactor at Moderately Low Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuty Emilia Agustina

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox as a new biological approach for nitrogen removal has been considered to be more cost-effective compared with the combination of nitrification and denitrification process. However, the anammox bioreactors are mostly explored at high temperature (>300C in which temperature controlling system is fully required. This research was intended to develop and to apply anammox process for high nitrogen concentration removal at ambient temperature used for treating wastewater in tropical countries. An up-flow biofilm column reactor, which the upper part constructed with a porous polyester non-woven fabric material as a carrier to attach the anammox bacteria was operated without heating system. A maximum nitrogen removal rate (NRR of 1.05 kg-N m3 d-1 was reached in the operation days of 178 with a Total Nitrogen (TN removal efficiency of 74%. This showed the biofilm column anammox reactor was successfully applied to moderate high nitrogen removal from synthetic wastewater at moderately low temperature. Keywords: Anammox, biofilm column reactor, ambient temperature, nitrogen removal

  5. Start-up and bacterial community compositions of partial nitrification in moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Mao, Yan-Jun; Shi, Yan-Ping; Quan, Xie

    2017-03-01

    Partial nitrification (PN) has been considered as one of the promising processes for pretreatment of ammonium-rich wastewater. In this study, a kind of novel carriers with enhanced hydrophilicity and electrophilicity was implemented in a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) to start up PN process. Results indicated that biofilm formation rate was higher on modified carriers. In comparison with the reactor filled with traditional carriers (start-up period of 21 days), it took only 14 days to start up PN successfully with ammonia removal efficiency and nitrite accumulation rate of 90 and 91%, respectively, in the reactor filled with modified carriers. Evident changes of spatial distributions and community structures had been detected during the start-up. Free-floating cells existed in planktonic sludge, while these microorganisms trended to form flocs in the biofilm. High-throughput pyrosequencing results indicated that Nitrosomonas was the predominant ammonia-oxidizing bacterium (AOB) in the PN system, while Comamonas might also play a vital role for nitrogen oxidation. Additionally, some other bacteria such as Ferruginibacter, Ottowia, Saprospiraceae, and Rhizobacter were selected to establish stable footholds. This study would be potentially significant for better understanding the microbial features and developing efficient strategies accordingly for MBBR-based PN operation.

  6. Experimental model of biofilm implant-related osteomyelitis to test combination biomaterials using biofilms as initial inocula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Dustin L; Haymond, Bryan S; Woodbury, Kassie L; Beck, J Peter; Moore, David E; Epperson, R Tyler; Bloebaum, Roy D

    2012-07-01

    Currently, the majority of animal models that are used to study biofilm-related infections use planktonic bacterial cells as initial inocula to produce positive signals of infection in biomaterials studies. However, the use of planktonic cells has potentially led to inconsistent results in infection outcomes. In this study, well-established biofilms of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were grown and used as initial inocula in an animal model of a Type IIIB open fracture. The goal of the work was to establish, for the first time, a repeatable model of biofilm implant-related osteomyelitis, wherein biofilms were used as initial inocula to test combination biomaterials. Results showed that 100% of animals that were treated with biofilms developed osteomyelitis, whereas 0% of animals not treated with biofilm developed infection. The development of this experimental model may lead to an important shift in biofilm and biomaterials research by showing that when biofilms are used as initial inocula, they may provide additional insights into how biofilm-related infections in the clinic develop and how they can be treated with combination biomaterials to eradicate and/or prevent biofilm formation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Microbial community composition and dynamics of moving bed biofilm reactor systems treating municipal sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Kristi; Turner, Susan J

    2012-02-01

    Moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems are increasingly used for municipal and industrial wastewater treatment, yet in contrast to activated sludge (AS) systems, little is known about their constituent microbial communities. This study investigated the community composition of two municipal MBBR wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Wellington, New Zealand. Monthly samples comprising biofilm and suspended biomass were collected over a 12-month period. Bacterial and archaeal community composition was determined using a full-cycle community approach, including analysis of 16S rRNA gene libraries, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA). Differences in microbial community structure and abundance were observed between the two WWTPs and between biofilm and suspended biomass. Biofilms from both plants were dominated by Clostridia and sulfate-reducing members of the Deltaproteobacteria (SRBs). FISH analyses indicated morphological differences in the Deltaproteobacteria detected at the two plants and also revealed distinctive clustering between SRBs and members of the Methanosarcinales, which were the only Archaea detected and were present in low abundance (<5%). Biovolume estimates of the SRBs were higher in biofilm samples from one of the WWTPs which receives both domestic and industrial waste and is influenced by seawater infiltration. The suspended communities from both plants were diverse and dominated by aerobic members of the Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. This study represents the first detailed analysis of microbial communities in full-scale MBBR systems and indicates that this process selects for distinctive biofilm and planktonic communities, both of which differ from those found in conventional AS systems.

  8. In vitro efficacy of cold atmospheric pressure plasma on S. sanguinis biofilms in comparison of two test models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorynia, Susanne

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] Dental plaque critically affects the etiology of caries, periodontitis and periimplantitis. The mechanical removal of plaque can only be performed partially due to limited accessibility. Therefore, plaque still represents one of the major therapeutic challenges. Even though antiseptic mouth rinses reduce the extent of biofilm temporarily, plaque removal remains incomplete and continuous usage can even result in side effects. Here we tested argon plasma produced by kinpen09 as one option to inactivate microorganisms and to eliminate plaque. biofilms cultivated in either the European Biofilm Reactor (EUREBI or in 24 well plates were treated with argon plasma. In both test systems a homogeneous, good analyzable and stable biofilm was produced on the surface of titan plates within 72 h (>6,9 log CFU/ml. Despite the significantly more powerful biofilm production in EUREBI, the difference of 0.4 log CFU/ml between EUREBI and the 24 well plates was practically not relevant. For that reason both test models were equally qualified for the analysis of efficacy of cold atmospheric pressure plasma. We demonstrate a significant reduction of the biofilm compared to the control in both test models. After plasma application of 180 s the biofilm produced in EUREBI or in 24 well plates was decreased by 0.6 log CFU/ml or 0.5 log CFU/ml, respectively. In comparison to recently published studies analyzing the efficacy of kinpen09, produces a hardly removable biofilm. Future investigations using reduced distances between plasma source and biofilm, various compositions of plasma and alternative plasma sources will contribute to further optimization of the efficacy against biofilms.

  9. The microbial community of a biofilm contact reactor for the treatment of winery wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, D M; Botes, M; Cloete, T E

    2018-02-01

    To utilize a three-tiered approach to provide insight into the microbial community structure, the spatial distribution and the metabolic capabilities of organisms of a biofilm in the two towers of a high-rate biological contact reactor treating winery wastewater. Next-generation sequencing indicated that bacteria primarily responsible for the removal of carbohydrates, sugars and alcohol were more abundant in tower 1 than tower 2 while nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria were more abundant in tower 2. Yeast populations differed in each tower. Fluorescent in situ hybridization coupled with confocal microscopy showed distribution of organisms confirming an oxygen gradient across the biofilm depth. The Biolog system (ECO plates) specified the different carbon-metabolizing profiles of the two biofilms. The three-tiered approach confirmed that the addition of a second subunit to the bioreactor, expanded the treatment capacity by augmenting the microbial and metabolic diversity of the system, improving the treatment scope of the system. A three-tiered biofilm analysis provided data required to optimize the design of a bioreactor to provide favourable conditions for the development of a microbial consortium, which has optimal waste removal properties for the treatment requirements at hand. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Biohydrogen production from glucose in upflow biofilm reactors with plastic carriers under extreme thermophilic conditions (70(degree)C)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, H.; Zeng, Raymond Jianxiong; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    Biohydrogen could efficiently be produced in glucose-fed biofilm reactors filled with plastic carriers and operated at 70°C. Batch experiments were, in addition, conducted to enrich and cultivate glucose-fed extremethermophilic hydrogen producing microorganisms from a biohydrogen CSTR reactor fed...

  11. Nitrification of an industrial wastewater in a moving-bed biofilm reactor: effect of salt concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendramel, Simone; Dezotti, Marcia; Sant'Anna, Geraldo L

    2011-01-01

    Nitrification of wastewaters from chemical industries can pose some challenges due to the presence of inhibitory compounds. Some wastewaters, besides their organic complexity present variable levels of salt concentration. In order to investigate the effect of salt (NaCl) content on the nitrification of a conventional biologically treated industrial wastewater, a bench scale moving-bed biofilm reactor was operated on a sequencing batch mode. The wastewater presenting a chloride content of 0.05 g l(-1) was supplemented with NaCl up to 12 g Cl(-) l(-1). The reactor operation cycle was: filling (5 min), aeration (12 or 24h), settling (5 min) and drawing (5 min). Each experimental run was conducted for 3 to 6 months to address problems related to the inherent wastewater variability and process stabilization. A PLC system assured automatic operation and control of the pertinent process variables. Data obtained from selected batch experiments were adjusted by a kinetic model, which considered ammonia, nitrite and nitrate variations. The average performance results indicated that nitrification efficiency was not influenced by chloride content in the range of 0.05 to 6 g Cl(-) l(-1) and remained around 90%. When the chloride content was 12 g Cl(-) l(-1), a significant drop in the nitrification efficiency was observed, even operating with a reaction period of 24 h. Also, a negative effect of the wastewater organic matter content on nitrification efficiency was observed, which was probably caused by growth of heterotrophs in detriment of autotrophs and nitrification inhibition by residual chemicals.

  12. Novel multiscale modeling tool applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Biggs

    Full Text Available Multiscale modeling is used to represent biological systems with increasing frequency and success. Multiscale models are often hybrids of different modeling frameworks and programming languages. We present the MATLAB-NetLogo extension (MatNet as a novel tool for multiscale modeling. We demonstrate the utility of the tool with a multiscale model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation that incorporates both an agent-based model (ABM and constraint-based metabolic modeling. The hybrid model correctly recapitulates oxygen-limited biofilm metabolic activity and predicts increased growth rate via anaerobic respiration with the addition of nitrate to the growth media. In addition, a genome-wide survey of metabolic mutants and biofilm formation exemplifies the powerful analyses that are enabled by this computational modeling tool.

  13. Novel multiscale modeling tool applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Matthew B; Papin, Jason A

    2013-01-01

    Multiscale modeling is used to represent biological systems with increasing frequency and success. Multiscale models are often hybrids of different modeling frameworks and programming languages. We present the MATLAB-NetLogo extension (MatNet) as a novel tool for multiscale modeling. We demonstrate the utility of the tool with a multiscale model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation that incorporates both an agent-based model (ABM) and constraint-based metabolic modeling. The hybrid model correctly recapitulates oxygen-limited biofilm metabolic activity and predicts increased growth rate via anaerobic respiration with the addition of nitrate to the growth media. In addition, a genome-wide survey of metabolic mutants and biofilm formation exemplifies the powerful analyses that are enabled by this computational modeling tool.

  14. Degradation of formaldehyde in anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (ASBBR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, N.S. [Laboratorio de Processos Biologicos (LPB), Departamento de Hidraulica e Saneamento, Escola de Engenharia de Sao Carlos (EESC), Universidade de Sao Paulo - USP, Engenharia Ambiental, Bloco 4-F, Av. Joao Dagnone, 1100 Santa Angelina, 13.563-120 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Zaiat, M. [Laboratorio de Processos Biologicos (LPB), Departamento de Hidraulica e Saneamento, Escola de Engenharia de Sao Carlos (EESC), Universidade de Sao Paulo - USP, Engenharia Ambiental, Bloco 4-F, Av. Joao Dagnone, 1100 Santa Angelina, 13.563-120 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: zaiat@sc.usp.br

    2009-04-30

    The present study evaluated the degradation of formaldehyde in a bench-scale anaerobic sequencing batch reactor, which contained biomass immobilized in polyurethane foam matrices. The reactor was operated for 212 days at 35 deg. C with 8 h sequential cycles, under different affluent formaldehyde concentrations ranging from 31.6 to 1104.4 mg/L (formaldehyde loading rates from 0.08 to 2.78 kg/m{sup 3} day). The results indicate excellent reactor stability and over 99% efficiency in formaldehyde removal, with average effluent formaldehyde concentration of 3.6 {+-} 1.7 mg/L. Formaldehyde degradation rates increased from 204.9 to 698.3 mg/L h as the initial concentration of formaldehyde was increased from around 100 to around 1100 mg/L. However, accumulation of organic matter was observed in the effluent (chemical oxygen demand (COD) values above 500 mg/L) due to the presence of non-degraded organic acids, especially acetic and propionic acids. This observation poses an important question regarding the anaerobic route of formaldehyde degradation, which might differ substantially from that reported in the literature. The anaerobic degradation pathway can be associated with the formation of long-chain oligomers from formaldehyde. Such long- or short-chain polymers are probably the precursors of organic acid formation by means of acidogenic anaerobic microorganisms.

  15. Degradation of formaldehyde in anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (ASBBR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, N.S.; Zaiat, M.

    2009-01-01

    The present study evaluated the degradation of formaldehyde in a bench-scale anaerobic sequencing batch reactor, which contained biomass immobilized in polyurethane foam matrices. The reactor was operated for 212 days at 35 deg. C with 8 h sequential cycles, under different affluent formaldehyde concentrations ranging from 31.6 to 1104.4 mg/L (formaldehyde loading rates from 0.08 to 2.78 kg/m 3 day). The results indicate excellent reactor stability and over 99% efficiency in formaldehyde removal, with average effluent formaldehyde concentration of 3.6 ± 1.7 mg/L. Formaldehyde degradation rates increased from 204.9 to 698.3 mg/L h as the initial concentration of formaldehyde was increased from around 100 to around 1100 mg/L. However, accumulation of organic matter was observed in the effluent (chemical oxygen demand (COD) values above 500 mg/L) due to the presence of non-degraded organic acids, especially acetic and propionic acids. This observation poses an important question regarding the anaerobic route of formaldehyde degradation, which might differ substantially from that reported in the literature. The anaerobic degradation pathway can be associated with the formation of long-chain oligomers from formaldehyde. Such long- or short-chain polymers are probably the precursors of organic acid formation by means of acidogenic anaerobic microorganisms

  16. Nitrate removal from groundwater by cooperating heterotrophic with autotrophic denitrification in a biofilm-electrode reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yingxin [School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 3058572 (Japan); Feng, Chuanping, E-mail: fengchuangping@gmail.com [School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, Qinghong; Yang, Yingnan; Zhang, Zhenya; Sugiura, Norio [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 3058572 (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Intensified biofilm-electrode reactor using cooperative denitrification is developed. {yields} IBER combines heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification. {yields} CO{sub 2} formed by heterotrophic denitrification is used by autotrophic bacteria. {yields} Optimum running conditions are C/N = 0.75, HRT = 8 h, and I = 40 mA. {yields} A novel degradation mechanism for cooperating denitrification process is proposed. - Abstract: An intensified biofilm-electrode reactor (IBER) combining heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification was developed for treatment of nitrate contaminated groundwater. The reactor was evaluated with synthetic groundwater (NO{sub 3}{sup -}N50 mg L{sup -1}) under different hydraulic retention times (HRTs), carbon to nitrogen ratios (C/N) and electric currents (I). The experimental results demonstrate that high nitrate and nitrite removal efficiency (100%) were achieved at C/N = 1, HRT = 8 h, and I = 10 mA. C/N ratios were reduced from 1 to 0.5 and the applied electric current was changed from 10 to 100 mA, showing that the optimum running condition was C/N = 0.75 and I = 40 mA, under which over 97% of NO{sub 3}{sup -}N was removed and organic carbon (methanol) was completely consumed in treated water. Simultaneously, the denitrification mechanism in this system was analyzed through pH variation in effluent. The CO{sub 2} produced from the anode acted as a good pH buffer, automatically controlling pH in the reaction zone. The intensified biofilm-electrode reactor developed in the study was effective for the treatment of groundwater polluted by nitrate.

  17. High-rate wastewater treatment combining a moving bed biofilm reactor and enhanced particle separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helness, H; Melin, E; Ulgenes, Y; Järvinen, P; Rasmussen, V; Odegaard, H

    2005-01-01

    Many cities around the world are looking for compact wastewater treatment alternatives since space for treatment plants is becoming scarce. In this paper development of a new compact, high-rate treatment concept with results from experiments in lab-scale and pilot-scale are presented. The idea behind the treatment concept is that coagulation/floc separation may be used to separate suspended and colloidal matter (resulting in > 70% organic matter removal in normal wastewater) while a high-rate biofilm process (based on Moving Bed biofilm reactors) may be used for removing low molecular weight, easily biodegradable, soluble organic matter. By using flotation for floc/biomass separation, the total residence time for a plant according to this concept will normally be treatment) and sufficient P-removal.

  18. Distributions and activities of ammonia oxidizing bacteria and polyphosphate accumulating organisms in a pumped-flow biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guangxue; Nielsen, Michael; Sorensen, Ketil; Zhan, Xinmin; Rodgers, Michael

    2009-10-01

    The spatial distributions and activities of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) were investigated for a novel laboratory-scale sequencing batch pumped-flow biofilm reactor (PFBR) system that was operated for carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus removal. The PFBR comprised of two 16.5l tanks (Reactors 1 and 2), each with a biofilm module of 2m(2) surface area. To facilitate the growth of AOB and PAOs in the reactor biofilms, the influent wastewater was held in Reactor 1 under stagnant un-aerated conditions for 6 h after feeding, and was then pumped over and back between Reactors 1 and 2 for 12 h, creating aerobic conditions in the two reactors during this period; as a consequence, the biofilm in Reactor 2 was in an aerobic environment for almost all the 18.2 h operating cycle. A combination of micro-sensor measurements, molecular techniques, batch experiments and reactor studies were carried out to analyse the performance of the PFBR system. After 100 days operation at a filtered chemical oxygen demand (COD(f)) loading rate of 3.46 g/m(2) per day, the removal efficiencies were 95% COD(f), 87% TN(f) and 74% TP(f). While the PFBR microbial community structure and function were found to be highly diversified with substantial AOB and PAO populations, about 70% of the phosphorus release potential and almost 100% of the nitrification potential were located in Reactors 1 and 2, respectively. Co-enrichment of AOB and PAOs was realized in the Reactor 2 biofilm, where molecular analyses revealed unexpected microbial distributions at micro-scale, with population peaks of AOB in a 100-250 microm deep sub-surface zone and of PAOs in the 0-150 microm surface zone. The micro-distribution of AOB coincided with the position of the nitrification peak identified during micro-sensor analyses. The study demonstrates that enrichment of PAOs can be realized in a constant or near constant aerobic biofilm environment. Furthermore, the findings suggest

  19. Nitrate removal from groundwater by cooperating heterotrophic with autotrophic denitrification in a biofilm-electrode reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yingxin; Feng, Chuanping; Wang, Qinghong; Yang, Yingnan; Zhang, Zhenya; Sugiura, Norio

    2011-09-15

    An intensified biofilm-electrode reactor (IBER) combining heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification was developed for treatment of nitrate contaminated groundwater. The reactor was evaluated with synthetic groundwater (NO(3)(-)-N50 mg L(-1)) under different hydraulic retention times (HRTs), carbon to nitrogen ratios (C/N) and electric currents (I). The experimental results demonstrate that high nitrate and nitrite removal efficiency (100%) were achieved at C/N = 1, HRT = 8h, and I = 10 mA. C/N ratios were reduced from 1 to 0.5 and the applied electric current was changed from 10 to 100 mA, showing that the optimum running condition was C/N = 0.75 and I = 40 mA, under which over 97% of NO(3)(-)-N was removed and organic carbon (methanol) was completely consumed in treated water. Simultaneously, the denitrification mechanism in this system was analyzed through pH variation in effluent. The CO(2) produced from the anode acted as a good pH buffer, automatically controlling pH in the reaction zone. The intensified biofilm-electrode reactor developed in the study was effective for the treatment of groundwater polluted by nitrate. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Natural genetic transformation in Acinetobacter sp. BD413 Biofilms: introducing natural genetic transformation as a tool for bioenhancement of biofilm reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickx, L

    2002-07-01

    This study focussed on the localization and quantification of natural genetic transformation using neutral and disadvantageous genes in monoculture biofilms to investigate gene transfer and expression of the transferred genes in the absence of a selective advantage. Data obtained by this investigation were regarded as initial steps for evaluating the applicability of adding catabolic traits into the indigenous bacterial community of biofilm reactors by in situ natural genetic transformation. Because Acinetobacter spp. strains are readily found in waste water treatment plants and because Acinetobacter sp. BD413 possesses a high effective level of competence, natural genetic transformation was investigated in monoculture Acinetobacter sp. BD413 biofilms. The genes used for transformation encoded for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its variants. Monitoring of transformation events were performed with the use of automated confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and semi automated digital image processing and analysis. (orig.)

  1. Multi-layer composite mechanical modeling for the inhomogeneous biofilm mechanical behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoling; Han, Jingshi; Li, Kui; Wang, Guoqing; Hao, Mudong

    2016-08-01

    Experiments showed that bacterial biofilms are heterogeneous, for example, the density, the diffusion coefficient, and mechanical properties of the biofilm are different along the biofilm thickness. In this paper, we establish a multi-layer composite model to describe the biofilm mechanical inhomogeneity based on unified multiple-component cellular automaton (UMCCA) model. By using our model, we develop finite element simulation procedure for biofilm tension experiment. The failure limit and biofilm extension displacement obtained from our model agree well with experimental measurements. This method provides an alternative theory to study the mechanical inhomogeneity in biological materials.

  2. Assessing the antimicrobial activity of zinc oxide thin films using disk diffusion and biofilm reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittard, Shaun D.; Perfect, John R.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.; Wei Wei; Jin Chunming; Narayan, Roger J.

    2009-01-01

    The electronic and chemical properties of semiconductor materials may be useful in preventing growth of microorganisms. In this article, in vitro methods for assessing microbial growth on semiconductor materials will be presented. The structural and biological properties of silicon wafers coated with zinc oxide thin films were evaluated using atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and MTT viability assay. The antimicrobial properties of zinc oxide thin films were established using disk diffusion and CDC Biofilm Reactor studies. Our results suggest that zinc oxide and other semiconductor materials may play a leading role in providing antimicrobial functionality to the next-generation medical devices

  3. Porcine models of biofilm infections with focus on pathomorphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Kruse; Johansen, Anne Sofie Boyum; Jensen, Henrik Elvang

    2017-01-01

    , and reproducible animal models of the infections. In this review, the advantages of in vivo studies are compared to in vitro studies of biofilm formation in infectious diseases. The pig is the animal of choice when developing and applying large animal models of infectious diseases due to its similarity of anatomy......, physiology, and immune system to humans. Furthermore, conventional pigs spontaneously develop many of the same chronic bacterial infections as seen in humans. Therefore, in this review porcine models of five different infectious diseases all associated with biofilm formation and chronicity in humans...

  4. Responses of biofilm characteristics to variations in temperature and NH4(+)-N loading in a moving-bed biofilm reactor treating micro-polluted raw water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuangfu; Wang, Yayi; He, Weitao; Wu, Min; Xing, Meiyan; Yang, Jian; Gao, Naiyun; Yin, Daqiang

    2013-03-01

    A pilot-scale moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) for biological treatment of micro-polluted raw water was operated over 400days to investigate the responses of biofilm characteristics and nitrification performance to variations in temperature and NH4(+)-N loading. The mean removal efficiency of NH4(+)-N in the MBBR reached 71.4±26.9%, and batch experiments were performed to study nitrification kinetics for better process understanding. Seven physical-chemical parameters, including volatile solids (VS), polysaccharides (PS) and phospholipids (PL) increased firstly, and then rapidly decreased with increasing temperature and NH4(+)-N loading, and properly characterized the attached biomass during biofilm development and detachment in the MBBR. The biofilm compositions were described by six ratios, e.g., PS/VS and PL/VS ratios showed different variation trends, indicating different responses of PS and PL to the changes in temperature and NH4(+)-N loading. Furthermore, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed that increased NH4(+)-N loadings caused an enrichment of the nitrifying biofilm. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Novel Multiscale Modeling Tool Applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Biggs, Matthew B.; Papin, Jason A.

    2013-01-01

    Multiscale modeling is used to represent biological systems with increasing frequency and success. Multiscale models are often hybrids of different modeling frameworks and programming languages. We present the MATLAB-NetLogo extension (MatNet) as a novel tool for multiscale modeling. We demonstrate the utility of the tool with a multiscale model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation that incorporates both an agent-based model (ABM) and constraint-based metabolic modeling. The hybrid mod...

  6. Inhibition and recovery of nitrification in treating real coal gasification wastewater with moving bed biofilm reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiqiang Li; Hongjun Han; Maoan Du; Wei Wang

    2011-01-01

    Moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) was used to treat real coal gasification wastewater.Nitrification of the MBBR was inhibited almost completely during start-up period.Sudden increase of influent total NH3 concentration was the main factor inducing nitrification inhibition.Increasing DO concentration in the bulk liquid (from 2 to 3 mg/L) had little effect on nitrification recovery.Nitrification of the MBBR recovered partially by the addition of nitrifying sludge into the reactor and almost ceased within 5 days.Nitrification ratio of the MBBR achieved 65% within 12 days by increasing dilute ratio of the influent wastewater with tap water.The ratio of nitrification decreased to 25% when infiuent COD concentration increased from 650 to 1000 mg/L after nitrification recovery and recovered 70%for another 4 days.

  7. Nitrite accumulation from simultaneous free-ammonia and free-nitrous-acid inhibition and oxygen limitation in a continuous-flow biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seongjun; Chung, Jinwook; Rittmann, Bruce E; Bae, Wookeun

    2015-01-01

    To achieve nitrite accumulation for shortcut biological nitrogen removal (SBNR) in a biofilm process, we explored the simultaneous effects of oxygen limitation and free ammonia (FA) and free nitrous acid (FNA) inhibition in the nitrifying biofilm. We used the multi-species nitrifying biofilm model (MSNBM) to identify conditions that should or should not lead to nitrite accumulation, and evaluated the effectiveness of those conditions with experiments in continuous flow biofilm reactors (CFBRs). CFBR experiments were organized into four sets with these expected outcomes based on the MSNBM as follows: (i) Control, giving full nitrification; (ii) oxygen limitation, giving modest long-term nitrite build up; (iii) FA inhibition, giving no long-term nitrite accumulation; and (iv) FA inhibition plus oxygen limitation, giving major long-term nitrite accumulation. Consistent with MSNBM predictions, the experimental results showed that nitrite accumulated in sets 2-4 in the short term, but long-term nitrite accumulation was maintained only in sets 2 and 4, which involved oxygen limitation. Furthermore, nitrite accumulation was substantially greater in set 4, which also included FA inhibition. However, FA inhibition (and accompanying FNA inhibition) alone in set 3 did not maintained long-term nitrite accumulation. Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) activity batch tests confirmed that little NOB or only a small fraction of NOB were present in the biofilms for sets 4 and 2, respectively. The experimental data supported the previous modeling results that nitrite accumulation could be achieved with a lower ammonium concentration than had been required for a suspended-growth process. Additional findings were that the biofilm exposed to low dissolved oxygen (DO) limitation and FA inhibition was substantially denser and probably had a lower detachment rate. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Accurate evaluation for the biofilm-activated sludge reactor using graphical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Moharram; Bhargava, Renu

    2018-05-01

    A complete graphical solution is obtained for the completely mixed biofilm-activated sludge reactor (hybrid reactor). The solution consists of a series of curves deduced from the principal equations of the hybrid system after converting them in dimensionless form. The curves estimate the basic parameters of the hybrid system such as suspended biomass concentration, sludge residence time, wasted mass of sludge, and food to biomass ratio. All of these parameters can be expressed as functions of hydraulic retention time, influent substrate concentration, substrate concentration in the bulk, stagnant liquid layer thickness, and the minimum substrate concentration which can maintain the biofilm growth in addition to the basic kinetics of the activated sludge process in which all these variables are expressed in a dimensionless form. Compared to other solutions of such system these curves are simple, easy to use, and provide an accurate tool for analyzing such system based on fundamental principles. Further, these curves may be used as a quick tool to get the effect of variables change on the other parameters and the whole system.

  9. Removal of triazine herbicides from aqueous systems by a biofilm reactor continuously or intermittently operated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sánchez, R; Ahuatzi-Chacón, D; Galíndez-Mayer, J; Ruiz-Ordaz, N; Salmerón-Alcocer, A

    2013-10-15

    The impact of pesticide movement via overland flow or tile drainage water on the quality of receiving water bodies has been a serious concern in the last decades; thus, for remediation of water contaminated with herbicides, bioreaction systems designed to retain biomass have been proposed. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the atrazine and terbutryn biodegradation capacity of a microbial consortium, immobilized in a biofilm reactor (PBR), packed with fragments of porous volcanic stone. The microbial consortium, constituted by four predominant bacterial strains, was used to degrade a commercial formulation of atrazine and terbutryn in the biofilm reactor, intermittently or continuously operated at volumetric loading rates ranging from 44 to 306 mg L(-1) d(-1). The complete removal of both herbicides was achieved in both systems; however, higher volumetric removal rates were obtained in the continuous system. It was demonstrated that the adjuvants of the commercial formulation of the herbicide significantly enhanced the removal of atrazine and terbutryn. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A simple 2D biofilm model yields a variety of morphological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanowicz, S W

    2001-01-01

    A two-dimensional biofilm model was developed based on the concept of cellular automata. Three simple, generic processes were included in the model: cell growth, internal and external mass transport and cell detachment (erosion). The model generated a diverse range of biofilm morphologies (from dense layers to open, mushroom-like forms) similar to those observed in real biofilm systems. Bulk nutrient concentration and external mass transfer resistance had a large influence on the biofilm structure.

  11. Modeling of Mesoscale Variability in Biofilm Shear Behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallab Barai

    Full Text Available Formation of bacterial colonies as biofilm on the surface/interface of various objects has the potential to impact not only human health and disease but also energy and environmental considerations. Biofilms can be regarded as soft materials, and comprehension of their shear response to external forces is a key element to the fundamental understanding. A mesoscale model has been presented in this article based on digitization of a biofilm microstructure. Its response under externally applied shear load is analyzed. Strain stiffening type behavior is readily observed under high strain loads due to the unfolding of chains within soft polymeric substrate. Sustained shear loading of the biofilm network results in strain localization along the diagonal direction. Rupture of the soft polymeric matrix can potentially reduce the intercellular interaction between the bacterial cells. Evolution of stiffness within the biofilm network under shear reveals two regimes: a initial increase in stiffness due to strain stiffening of polymer matrix, and b eventual reduction in stiffness because of tear in polymeric substrate.

  12. Fluid-Structure Interaction in Continuum Models of Bacterial Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Jared A.

    Bacterial biofilms are aggregates of cells that adhere to nearly any solid-fluid interface. While many have harmful effects, such as industrial damage and nosocomial infections, certain biofilm species are now generating renewable energy as the fundamental components of Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs). In an MFC, bacteria consume organic waste and, as they respire, produce free electrons. To do so efficiently, the bacteria must operate at peak metabolic activity, and so require an ample supply of nutrients. But existing MFC systems face several nutrient delivery problems, including clogging and downstream depletion. Ameliorating these problems will require a better understanding of the interplay between structural development and the surrounding fluid flow. In addition to delivering nutrients that affect biofilm growth, the fluid also exerts stresses that cause erosion, detachment, and deformation. These structural changes, in turn, affect the flow and alter the nutrient distribution. To account for this feedback effect, I have developed a continuum model that couples the growth and deformation processes. My model augments an existing growth model with evolution equations derived from Morphoelasticity Theory, by showing that the growth tensor can be directly related to the biofilm velocity potential. This result helps overcome one of the major practical limitations of Morphoelasticity--there is no physical framework for specifying the growth tensor. Through further analysis of the growth tensor, I define the related adjugate and anisotropic growth tensors, which can be more meaningful measures of growth for some models. Under the assumption of small strain, I show that there exists a small correction to the biofilm growth velocity (the accommodation velocity) that represents the effect of the elastic response on the evolution of the biofilm shape. I derive a solvability condition for the accommodation velocity, and show that it leads to a novel evolution equation for

  13. Modeling of the Bacillus subtilis Bacterial Biofilm Growing on an Agar Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial biofilms are organized communities composed of millions of microorganisms that accumulate on almost any kinds of surfaces. In this paper, a biofilm growth model on an agar substrate is developed based on mass conservation principles, Fick’s first law, and Monod’s kinetic reaction, by considering nutrient diffusion between biofilm and agar substrate. Our results show biofilm growth evolution characteristics such as biofilm thickness, active biomass, and nutrient concentration in the agar substrate. We quantitatively obtain biofilm growth dependence on different parameters. We provide an alternative mathematical method to describe other kinds of biofilm growth such as multiple bacterial species biofilm and also biofilm growth on various complex substrates.

  14. Enhanced production of bacterial cellulose by using a biofilm reactor and its material property analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demirci Ali

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bacterial cellulose has been used in the food industry for applications such as low-calorie desserts, salads, and fabricated foods. It has also been used in the paper manufacturing industry to enhance paper strength, the electronics industry in acoustic diaphragms for audio speakers, the pharmaceutical industry as filtration membranes, and in the medical field as wound dressing and artificial skin material. In this study, different types of plastic composite support (PCS were implemented separately within a fermentation medium in order to enhance bacterial cellulose (BC production by Acetobacter xylinum. The optimal composition of nutritious compounds in PCS was chosen based on the amount of BC produced. The selected PCS was implemented within a bioreactor to examine the effects on BC production in a batch fermentation. The produced BC was analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. Among thirteen types of PCS, the type SFYR+ was selected as solid support for BC production by A. xylinum in a batch biofilm reactor due to its high nitrogen content, moderate nitrogen leaching rate, and sufficient biomass attached on PCS. The PCS biofilm reactor yielded BC production (7.05 g/L that was 2.5-fold greater than the control (2.82 g/L. The XRD results indicated that the PCS-grown BC exhibited higher crystallinity (93% and similar crystal size (5.2 nm to the control. FESEM results showed the attachment of A. xylinum on PCS, producing an interweaving BC product. TGA results demonstrated that PCS-grown BC had about 95% water retention ability, which was lower than BC produced within suspended-cell reactor. PCS-grown BC also exhibited higher Tmax compared to the control. Finally, DMA results showed that BC from the PCS biofilm reactor increased its mechanical property values, i.e., stress at break and Young's modulus when compared to

  15. Degradation of TCE using sequential anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapatwala, Kirit D.; Babu, G. R. V.; Baresi, Larry; Trunzo, Richard M.

    1995-01-01

    Bacteria capable of degrading trichloroethylene (TCE) were isolated from contaminated wastewaters and soil sites. The aerobic cultures were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (four species) and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The optimal conditions for the growth of aerobic cultures were determined. The minimal inhibitory concentration values of TCE for Pseudomonas sps. were also determined. The aerobic cells were immobilized in calcium alginate in the form of beads. Degradation of TCE by the anaerobic and dichloroethylene (DCE) by aerobic cultures was studied using dual reactors - anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor. The minimal mineral salt (MMS) medium saturated with TCE was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the anaerobic reactor. The MMS medium saturated with DCE and supplemented with xylenes and toluene (3 ppm each) was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the fluidized air-uplift-type reactor containing the immobilized aerobic cells. The concentrations of TCE and DCE and the metabolites formed during their degradation by the anaerobic and aerobic cultures were monitored by GC. The preliminary study suggests that the anaerobic and aerobic cultures of our isolates can degrade TCE and DCE.

  16. Analysis of Microbial Communities in Biofilms from CSTR-Type Hollow Fiber Membrane Biofilm Reactors for Autotrophic Nitrification and Hydrogenotrophic Denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung-Hun; Kim, Byung-Chun; Choi, Okkyoung; Kim, Hyunook; Sang, Byoung-In

    2015-10-01

    Two hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactors (HF-MBfRs) were operated for autotrophic nitrification and hydrogenotrophic denitrification for over 300 days. Oxygen and hydrogen were supplied through the hollow fiber membrane for nitrification and denitrification, respectively. During the period, the nitrogen was removed with the efficiency of 82-97% for ammonium and 87-97% for nitrate and with the nitrogen removal load of 0.09-0.26 kg NH4(+)-N/m(3)/d and 0.10-0.21 kg NO3(-)-N/m(3)/d, depending on hydraulic retention time variation by the two HF-MBfRs for autotrophic nitrification and hydrogenotrophic denitrification, respectively. Biofilms were collected from diverse topological positions in the reactors, each at different nitrogen loading rates, and the microbial communities were analyzed with partial 16S rRNA gene sequences in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Detected DGGE band sequences in the reactors were correlated with nitrification or denitrification. The profile of the DGGE bands depended on the NH4(+) or NO3(-) loading rate, but it was hard to find a major strain affecting the nitrogen removal efficiency. Nitrospira-related phylum was detected in all biofilm samples from the nitrification reactors. Paracoccus sp. and Aquaspirillum sp., which are an autohydrogenotrophic bacterium and an oligotrophic denitrifier, respectively, were observed in the denitrification reactors. The distribution of microbial communities was relatively stable at different nitrogen loading rates, and DGGE analysis based on 16S rRNA (341f /534r) could successfully detect nitrate-oxidizing and hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria but not ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in the HF-MBfRs.

  17. Nutrient Removal and Biomass Production in an Outdoor Pilot-Scale Phototrophic Biofilm Reactor for Effluent Polishing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelee, N.C.; Janssen, M.; Temmink, H.; Shrestha, R.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    An innovative pilot-scale phototrophic biofilm reactor was evaluated over a 5-month period to determine its capacity to remove nitrogen and phosphorus from Dutch municipal wastewater effluents. The areal biomass production rate ranged between 2.7 and 4.5 g dry weight/m2/day. The areal nitrogen and

  18. Effects of plastic composite support and pH profiles on pullulan production in a biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kuan-Chen; Demirci, Ali; Catchmark, Jeffrey M

    2010-04-01

    Pullulan is a linear homopolysaccharide which is composed of glucose units and often described as alpha-1, 6-linked maltotriose. The applications of pullulan range from usage as blood plasma substitutes to environmental pollution control agents. In this study, a biofilm reactor with plastic composite support (PCS) was evaluated for pullulan production using Aureobasidium pullulans. In test tube fermentations, PCS with soybean hulls, defatted soy bean flour, yeast extract, dried bovine red blood cells, and mineral salts was selected for biofilm reactor fermentation (due to its high nitrogen content, moderate nitrogen leaching rate, and high biomass attachment). Three pH profiles were later applied to evaluate their effects on pullulan production in a PCS biofilm reactor. The results demonstrated that when a constant pH at 5.0 was applied, the time course of pullulan production was advanced and the concentration of pullulan reached 32.9 g/L after 7-day cultivation, which is 1.8-fold higher than its respective suspension culture. The quality analysis demonstrated that the purity of produced pullulan was 95.8% and its viscosity was 2.4 centipoise. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra also supported the supposition that the produced exopolysaccharide was mostly pullulan. Overall, this study demonstrated that a biofilm reactor can be successfully implemented to enhance pullulan production and maintain its high purity.

  19. Simplified modeling of simultaneous reaction kinetics of carbon oxidation and nitrification in biofilm processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuneda, S.; Auresenia, J.; Hibiya, K.; Hirata, A. [Waseda University, Department of Chemical Engineering, 3-4-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2004-06-01

    Batch experiments with varying initial substrate concentrations and biomass volumes were performed in a three-phase fluidized bed biofilm reactor treating simulated domestic wastewater to study the simultaneous carbon oxidation and nitrification in the biofilm process. A simplified mass balance equation for the biofilm was proposed and five different kinetic rate equations were used to match the actual data. The kinetic parameters were obtained by nonlinear regression analysis on a set of two differential equations representing the simultaneous carbon oxidation and nitrification. The competitive inhibition model incorporating the effects of total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations on nitrification rates was the best-suited model based on the average r{sup 2}. In this model, oxygen concentration and its affinity constants were not included. Instead, it was assumed that the rate of carbon oxidation is independent of the NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N, while nitrification is affected by TOC. The number of parameters was successfully minimized without reducing its ability to accurately predict the bulk concentration time course, which would reduce computational complexity and possibly enhance the availability for an actual wastewater treatment process. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  20. Optimization of a horizontal-flow biofilm reactor for the removal of methane at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, E; Kennelly, C; Walsh, R; Gerrity, S; Reilly, E O; Collins, G

    2012-10-01

    Three pilot-scale, horizontal-flow biofilm reactors (HFBRs 1-3) were used to treat methane (CH4)-contaminated air to assess the potential of this technology to manage emissions from agricultural activities, waste and wastewater treatment facilities, and landfills. The study was conducted over two phases (Phase 1, lasting 90 days and Phase 2, lasting 45 days). The reactors were operated at 10 degrees C (typical of ambient air and wastewater temperatures in northern Europe), and were simultaneously dosed with CH4-contaminated air and a synthetic wastewater (SWW). The influent loading rates to the reactors were 8.6 g CH4/m3/hr (4.3 g CH4/m2 TPSA/hr; where TPSA is top plan surface area). Despite the low operating temperatures, an overall average removal of 4.63 g CH4/m3/day was observed during Phase 2. The maximum removal efficiency (RE) for the trial was 88%. Potential (maximum) rates of methane oxidation were measured and indicated that biofilm samples taken from various regions in the HFBRs had mostly equal CH4 removal potential. In situ activity rates were dependent on which part of the reactor samples were obtained. The results indicate the potential of the HFBR, a simple and robust technology, to biologically treat CH4 emissions. The results of this study indicate that the HFBR technology could be effectively applied to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from wastewater treatment plants and agricultural facilities at lower temperatures common to northern Europe. This could reduce the carbon footprint of waste treatment and agricultural livestock facilities. Activity tests indicate that methanotrophic communities can be supported at these temperatures. Furthermore, these data can lead to improved reactor design and optimization by allowing conditions to be engineered to allow for improved removal rates, particularly at lower temperatures. The technology is simple to construct and operate, and with some optimization of the liquid phase to improve mass

  1. Decolourization of remazol black-5 textile dyes using moving bed bio-film reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratiwi, R.; Notodarmojo, S.; Helmy, Q.

    2018-01-01

    The desizing and dyeing processes in the textile industries produces wastewaster containing high concentration of organic matter and colour, so it needs treatment before released to environment. In this research, removal of azo dye (Remazol Black 5/RB 5) and organic as COD was performed using Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR). MBBR is biological treatment process with attached growth media system that can increase removal of organic matter in textile wastewater. The effectiveness of ozonation as pre-treatment process to increase the removal efficiency in MBBR was studied. The results showed that in MBBR batch system with detention time of 1 hour, pre-treatment with ozonation prior to MBBR process able to increase the colour removal efficiency of up to 86.74%. While on the reactor without ozone pre-treatment, the colour removal efficiency of up to 68.6% was achieved. From the continuous reactor experiments found that both colour and COD removal efficiency depends on time detention of RB-5 dyes in the system. The higher of detention time, the higher of colour and COD removal efficiency. It was found that optimum removal of colour and COD was achieved in 24 hour detention time with its efficiency of 96.9% and 89.13%, respectively.

  2. Mathematical modelling of CRISPR-Cas system effects on biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Qasim; Wahl, Lindi M

    2017-08-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), linked with CRISPR associated (Cas) genes, can confer adaptive immunity to bacteria, against bacteriophage infections. Thus from a therapeutic standpoint, CRISPR immunity increases biofilm resistance to phage therapy. Recently, however, CRISPR-Cas genes have been implicated in reducing biofilm formation in lysogenized cells. Thus CRISPR immunity can have complex effects on phage-host-lysogen interactions, particularly in a biofilm. In this contribution, we develop and analyse a series of dynamical systems to elucidate and disentangle these interactions. Two competition models are used to study the effects of lysogens (first model) and CRISPR-immune bacteria (second model) in the biofilm. In the third model, the effect of delivering lysogens to a CRISPR-immune biofilm is investigated. Using standard analyses of equilibria, stability and bifurcations, our models predict that lysogens may be able to displace CRISPR-immune bacteria in a biofilm, and thus suggest strategies to eliminate phage-resistant biofilms.

  3. Removal of gaseous trichloroethylene (TCE) in a composite membrane biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Vercruyssen, Aline; Dewulf, Jo; Lens, Piet; Van Langenhove, Herman

    2012-01-01

    A membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) was investigated for the degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) vapors inoculated by Burkholderia vietnamiensis G4. Toluene (TOL) was used as the primary substrate. The MBfR was loaded sequentially with TOL, TCE (or both) during 110 days. In this study, a maximum steady-state TCE removal efficiency of 23% and a maximum volumetric elimination capacity (EC) of 2.1 g m(-3) h(-1) was achieved. A surface area based maximum elimination capacity (EC(m)) of 4.2 × 10(-3) g m(-2) h(-1) was observed, which is 2-10 times higher than reported in other gas phase biological treatment studies. However, further research is needed to optimize the TCE feeding cycle and to evaluate the inhibiting effects of TCE and its intermediates on TOL biodegradation.

  4. Sequentially aerated membrane biofilm reactors for autotrophic nitrogen removal: microbial community composition and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Franck, Stephanie; Gülay, Arda

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-aerated biofilm reactors performing autotrophic nitrogen removal can be successfully applied to treat concentrated nitrogen streams. However, their process performance is seriously hampered by the growth of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). In this work we document how sequential aeration...... (rich in oxygen) and AnAOB in regions neighbouring the liquid phase. Both communities were separated by a transition region potentially populated by denitrifying heterotrophic bacteria. AOB and AnAOB bacterial groups were more abundant and diverse than NOB, and dominated by the r......-strategists Nitrosomonas europaea and Ca. Brocadia anammoxidans, respectively. Taken together, the present work presents tools to better engineer, monitor and control the microbial communities that support robust, sustainable and efficient nitrogen removal....

  5. Model-based optimization biofilm based systems performing autotrophic nitrogen removal using the comprehensive NDHA model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valverde Pérez, Borja; Ma, Yunjie; Morset, Martin

    Completely autotrophic nitrogen removal (CANR) can be obtained in single stage biofilm-based bioreactors. However, their environmental footprint is compromised due to elevated N2O emissions. We developed novel spatially explicit biochemical process model of biofilm based CANR systems that predicts...

  6. How can in vitro models best reflect in vivo Staphylococcus biofilms?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Rikke Louise

    In vitro biofilm models are the basis for most studies of biofilm biology because they enable high-throughput analyses without the expenditure of animals. But how do we ensure that what we learn from in vitro studies is relevant in vivo? Biofilms grown in standard laboratory media do not interact...... with host factors and are thus profoundly different from in vivo biofilms. We therefore need in vitro models that are as in vivo-like as possible. We investigated how the addition of divalent cations and human plasma to brain heart infusion broth affected biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus...

  7. Nitrogen Removal from Milking Center Wastewater via Simultaneous Nitrification and Denitrification Using a Biofilm Filtration Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Gun Won

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Milking center wastewater (MCW has a relatively low ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C/N ratio, which should be separately managed from livestock manure due to the negative impacts of manure nutrients and harmful effects on down-stream in the livestock manure process with respect to the microbial growth. Simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND is linked to inhibition of the second nitrification and reduces around 40% of the carbonaceous energy available for denitrification. Thus, this study was conducted to find the optimal operational conditions for the treatment of MCW using an attached-growth biofilm reactor; i.e., nitrogen loading rate (NLR of 0.14, 0.28, 0.43, and 0.58 kg m−3 d−1 and aeration rate of 0.06, 0.12, and 0.24 m3 h−1 were evaluated and the comparison of air-diffuser position between one-third and bottom of the reactor was conducted. Four sand packed-bed reactors with the effective volume of 2.5 L were prepared and initially an air-diffuser was placed at one third from the bottom of the reactor. After the adaptation period of 2 weeks, SND was observed at all four reactors and the optimal NLR of 0.45 kg m−3 d−1 was found as a threshold value to obtain higher nitrogen removal efficiency. Dissolved oxygen (DO as one of key operational conditions was measured during the experiment and the reactor with an aeration rate of 0.12 m3 h−1 showed the best performance of NH4-N removal and the higher total nitrogen removal efficiency through SND with appropriate DO level of ~0.5 mg DO L−1. The air-diffuser position at one third from the bottom of the reactor resulted in better nitrogen removal than at the bottom position. Consequently, nitrogen in MCW with a low C/N ratio of 2.15 was successfully removed without the addition of external carbon sources.

  8. Membrane-aerated biofilm reactor for the removal of 1,2-dichloroethane by Pseudomonas sp. strain DCA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hage, J C; Van Houten, R T; Tramper, J; Hartmans, S

    2004-06-01

    A membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MBR) with a biofilm of Pseudomonas sp. strain DCA1 was studied for the removal of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA) from water. A hydrophobic membrane was used to create a barrier between the liquid and the gas phase. Inoculation of the MBR with cells of strain DCA1 grown in a continuous culture resulted in the formation of a stable and active DCA-degrading biofilm on the membrane. The maximum removal rate of the MBR was reached at a DCA concentration of approximately 80 micro M. Simulation of the DCA fluxes into the biofilm showed that the MBR performance at lower concentrations was limited by the DCA diffusion rate rather than by kinetic constraints of strain DCA1. Aerobic biodegradation of DCA present in anoxic water could be achieved by supplying oxygen solely from the gas phase to the biofilm grown on the liquid side of the membrane. As a result, direct aeration of the water, which leads to undesired coagulation of iron oxides, could be avoided.

  9. Evaluation of Heavy Metal Removal from Wastewater in a Modified Packed Bed Biofilm Reactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh Azizi

    Full Text Available For the effective application of a modified packed bed biofilm reactor (PBBR in wastewater industrial practice, it is essential to distinguish the tolerance of the system for heavy metals removal. The industrial contamination of wastewater from various sources (e.g. Zn, Cu, Cd and Ni was studied to assess the impacts on a PBBR. This biological system was examined by evaluating the tolerance of different strengths of composite heavy metals at the optimum hydraulic retention time (HRT of 2 hours. The heavy metal content of the wastewater outlet stream was then compared to the source material. Different biomass concentrations in the reactor were assessed. The results show that the system can efficiently treat 20 (mg/l concentrations of combined heavy metals at an optimum HRT condition (2 hours, while above this strength there should be a substantially negative impact on treatment efficiency. Average organic reduction, in terms of the chemical oxygen demand (COD of the system, is reduced above the tolerance limits for heavy metals as mentioned above. The PBBR biological system, in the presence of high surface area carrier media and a high microbial population to the tune of 10 000 (mg/l, is capable of removing the industrial contamination in wastewater.

  10. Evaluation of Heavy Metal Removal from Wastewater in a Modified Packed Bed Biofilm Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Shohreh; Kamika, Ilunga; Tekere, Memory

    2016-01-01

    For the effective application of a modified packed bed biofilm reactor (PBBR) in wastewater industrial practice, it is essential to distinguish the tolerance of the system for heavy metals removal. The industrial contamination of wastewater from various sources (e.g. Zn, Cu, Cd and Ni) was studied to assess the impacts on a PBBR. This biological system was examined by evaluating the tolerance of different strengths of composite heavy metals at the optimum hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2 hours. The heavy metal content of the wastewater outlet stream was then compared to the source material. Different biomass concentrations in the reactor were assessed. The results show that the system can efficiently treat 20 (mg/l) concentrations of combined heavy metals at an optimum HRT condition (2 hours), while above this strength there should be a substantially negative impact on treatment efficiency. Average organic reduction, in terms of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the system, is reduced above the tolerance limits for heavy metals as mentioned above. The PBBR biological system, in the presence of high surface area carrier media and a high microbial population to the tune of 10 000 (mg/l), is capable of removing the industrial contamination in wastewater. PMID:27186636

  11. Development and validation of a microfluidic reactor for biofilm monitoring via optical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Mariana T; Roy, Varnika; Bentley, William E; Ghodssi, Reza

    2011-01-01

    We present the design, fabrication, and verification of a microfluidic platform for optical monitoring of bacterial biofilms. Biofilm formation characterizes the majority of infections caused by bacteria that are developing increased resistance to traditional antibiotic treatment, necessitating the development of reliable tools not only for study of biofilm growth, but also for in situ examination of the response to applied stimuli. The presented platform was used to continuously and non-invasively observe the dependence of Escherichia coli biofilm formation on bacterial signaling by monitoring the change in biofilm optical density over the growth period. Results were corroborated by measurement of biofilm morphological properties via confocal microscopy, and statistical analysis was applied to verify the repeatability of observed optical and morphological differences in the biofilms formed. The presented platform will be used to characterize biofilm formation and response in drug discovery applications

  12. Selective degradation of ibuprofen and clofibric acid in two model river biofilm systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, M; Lawrence, J R; Neu, T R

    2001-09-01

    A field survey indicated that the Elbe and Saale Rivers were contaminated with both clofibric acid and ibuprofen. In Elbe River water we could detect the metabolite hydroxy-ibuprofen. Analyses of the city of Saskatoon sewage effluent discharged to the South Saskatchewan river detected clofibric acid but neither ibuprofen nor any metabolite. Laboratory studies indicated that the pharmaceutical ibuprofen was readily degraded in a river biofilm reactor. Two metabolites were detected and identified as hydroxy- and carboxy-ibuprofen. Both metabolites were observed to degrade in the biofilm reactors. However, in human metabolism the metabolite carboxy-ibuprofen appears and degrades second whereas the opposite occurs in biofilm systems. In biofilms the pharmacologically inactive stereoisomere of ibuprofen is degraded predominantly. In contrast, clofibric acid was not biologically degraded during the experimental period of 21 days. Similar results were obtained using biofilms developed using waters from either the South Saskatchewan or Elbe River. In a sterile reactor no losses of ibuprofen were observed. These results suggested that abiotic losses and adsorption played only a minimal role in the fate of the pharmaceuticals in the river biofilm reactors.

  13. Effect of UV on De-NOx performance and microbial community of a hybrid catalytic membrane biofilm reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhouyang; Huang, Zhensha; He, Yiming; Xiao, Xiaoliang; Wei, Zaishan

    2018-02-01

    The hybrid membrane catalytic biofilm reactor provides a new way of flue gas denitration. However, the effects of UV on denitrification performance, microbial community and microbial nitrogen metabolism are still unknown. In this study, the effects of UV on deNO x performance, nitrification and denitrification, microbial community and microbial nitrogen metabolism of a bench scale N-TiO2/PSF hybrid catalytic membrane biofilm reactor (HCMBR) were evaluated. The change from nature light to UV in the HCMBR leads to the fall of NO removal efficiency of HCMBR from 92.8% to 81.8%. UV affected the microbial community structure, but did not change microbial nitrogen metabolism, as shown by metagenomics sequencing method. Some dominant phyla, such as Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Alphaproteobacteria, increased in abundance, whereas others, such as Proteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria, decreased. There were nitrification, denitrification, nitrogen fixation, and organic nitrogen metabolism in the HCMBR.

  14. Carbonaceous materials in petrochemical wastewater before and after treatment in an aerated submerged fixed-bed biofilm reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Trojanowicz Karol; Wojcik Wlodzimierz

    2016-01-01

    Results of the studies for determining fractions of organic contaminants in a pretreated petrochemical wastewater flowing into a pilot Aerated Submerged Fixed-Bed Biofilm Reactor (ASFBBR) are presented and discussed. The method of chemical oxygen demand (COD) fractionation consisted of physical tests and biological assays. It was found that the main part of the total COD in the petrochemical, pretreated wastewater was soluble organic substance with average value of 57.6%. The fractions of par...

  15. Wound biofilms: lessons learned from oral biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Mancl, Kimberly A.; Kirsner, Robert S.; Ajdic, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many chronic infections. Oral biofilms, more commonly known as dental plaque,are a primary cause of oral diseases including caries, gingivitis and periodontitis. Oral biofilms are commonly studied as model biofilm systems as they are easily accessible, thus biofilm research in oral diseases is advanced with details of biofilm formation and bacterial interactions being well-elucidated. In contrast, wound research has relati...

  16. Continuum and discrete approach in modeling biofilm development and structure: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, M R; Frunzo, L; D'Acunto, B; Pechaud, Y; Pirozzi, F; Esposito, G

    2018-03-01

    The scientific community has recognized that almost 99% of the microbial life on earth is represented by biofilms. Considering the impacts of their sessile lifestyle on both natural and human activities, extensive experimental activity has been carried out to understand how biofilms grow and interact with the environment. Many mathematical models have also been developed to simulate and elucidate the main processes characterizing the biofilm growth. Two main mathematical approaches for biomass representation can be distinguished: continuum and discrete. This review is aimed at exploring the main characteristics of each approach. Continuum models can simulate the biofilm processes in a quantitative and deterministic way. However, they require a multidimensional formulation to take into account the biofilm spatial heterogeneity, which makes the models quite complicated, requiring significant computational effort. Discrete models are more recent and can represent the typical multidimensional structural heterogeneity of biofilm reflecting the experimental expectations, but they generate computational results including elements of randomness and introduce stochastic effects into the solutions.

  17. Interactive effect of trivalent iron on activated sludge digestion and biofilm structure in attached growth reactor of waste tire rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafat, Iqra; Saeed, Dania Khalid; Yasmin, Sumera; Imran, Asma; Zafar, Zargona; Hameed, Abdul; Ali, Naeem

    2018-01-01

    Waste tire rubber (WTR) has been introduced as an alternative, novel media for biofilm development in several experimental systems including attached growth bioreactors. In this context, four laboratory-scale static batch bioreactors containing WTR as a support material for biofilm development were run under anoxic condition for 90 days using waste activated sludge as an inoculum under the influence of different concentrations (2.5, 6.5, 8.5 mg/l) of trivalent ferric iron (Fe 3+ ). The data revealed that activated sludge with a Fe 3+ concentration of 8.5 mg/l supported the maximum bacterial biomass [4.73E + 10 CFU/ml cm 2 ]; besides, it removed 38% more Chemical oxygen demand compared to Fe 3+ free condition from the reactor. Biochemical testing and 16S rDNA phylogenetic analysis of WTR-derived biofilm communities further suggested the role of varying concentrations of Fe 3+ on the density and diversity of members of Enterobacteria(ceae), ammonium (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria. Furthermore, Fluorescent in situ hybridization with phylogenetic oligonucleotide probes and confocal laser scanning microscopy of WTR biofilms indicated a significant increase in density of eubacteria (3.00E + 01 to.05E + 02 cells/cm 2 ) and beta proteobacteria (8.10E + 01 to 1.42E + 02 cells/cm 2 ), respectively, with an increase in Fe 3+ concentration in the reactors, whereas, the cell density of gamma proteobacteria in biofilms decreased.

  18. TU electric reactor model verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willingham, C.E.; Killgore, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    Power reactor benchmark calculations using the code package CASMO-3/SIMULATE-3 have been performed for six cycles of Prairie Island Unit 1. The reload fuel designs for the selected cycles include gadolinia as a burnable absorber, natural uranium axial blankets, and increased water-to-fuel ratio. The calculated results for both low-power physics tests (boron end points, control rod worths, and isothermal temperature coefficients) and full-power operation (power distributions and boron letdown) are compared to measured plant data. These comparisons show that the TU Electric reactor physics models accurately predict important physics parameters for power reactors

  19. A fungal biofilm reactor based on metal structured packing improves the quality of a Gla::GFP fusion protein produced by Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zune, Q; Delepierre, A; Gofflot, S; Bauwens, J; Twizere, J C; Punt, P J; Francis, F; Toye, D; Bawin, T; Delvigne, F

    2015-08-01

    Fungal biofilm is known to promote the excretion of secondary metabolites in accordance with solid-state-related physiological mechanisms. This work is based on the comparative analysis of classical submerged fermentation with a fungal biofilm reactor for the production of a Gla::green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein by Aspergillus oryzae. The biofilm reactor comprises a metal structured packing allowing the attachment of the fungal biomass. Since the production of the target protein is under the control of the promoter glaB, specifically induced in solid-state fermentation, the biofilm mode of culture is expected to enhance the global productivity. Although production of the target protein was enhanced by using the biofilm mode of culture, we also found that fusion protein production is also significant when the submerged mode of culture is used. This result is related to high shear stress leading to biomass autolysis and leakage of intracellular fusion protein into the extracellular medium. Moreover, 2-D gel electrophoresis highlights the preservation of fusion protein integrity produced in biofilm conditions. Two fungal biofilm reactor designs were then investigated further, i.e. with full immersion of the packing or with medium recirculation on the packing, and the scale-up potentialities were evaluated. In this context, it has been shown that full immersion of the metal packing in the liquid medium during cultivation allows for a uniform colonization of the packing by the fungal biomass and leads to a better quality of the fusion protein.

  20. Determination of the external mass transfer coefficient and influence of mixing intensity in moving bed biofilm reactors for wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Bruno L; Pérez, Julio; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Secchi, Argimiro R; Dezotti, Márcia; Biscaia, Evaristo C

    2015-09-01

    In moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBR), the removal of pollutants from wastewater is due to the substrate consumption by bacteria attached on suspended carriers. As a biofilm process, the substrates are transported from the bulk phase to the biofilm passing through a mass transfer resistance layer. This study proposes a methodology to determine the external mass transfer coefficient and identify the influence of the mixing intensity on the conversion process in-situ in MBBR systems. The method allows the determination of the external mass transfer coefficient in the reactor, which is a major advantage when compared to the previous methods that require mimicking hydrodynamics of the reactor in a flow chamber or in a separate vessel. The proposed methodology was evaluated in an aerobic lab-scale system operating with COD removal and nitrification. The impact of the mixing intensity on the conversion rates for ammonium and COD was tested individually. When comparing the effect of mixing intensity on the removal rates of COD and ammonium, a higher apparent external mass transfer resistance was found for ammonium. For the used aeration intensities, the external mass transfer coefficient for ammonium oxidation was ranging from 0.68 to 13.50 m d(-1) and for COD removal 2.9 to 22.4 m d(-1). The lower coefficient range for ammonium oxidation is likely related to the location of nitrifiers deeper in the biofilm. The measurement of external mass transfer rates in MBBR will help in better design and evaluation of MBBR system-based technologies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pengolahan Lindi Menggunakan Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor dengan Proses Anaerobik-Aerobik-Anoksik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuriflalail Rio Jusepa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lindi mengandung konsentrasi organik, Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen, amonium, nitrit dan nitrat yang tinggi sehingga lindi yang tidak diolah dapat mencemari lingkungan. Pengolahan biologis dengan sistem fluidized attached growth seperti Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR dapat digunakan untuk menurunkan senyawa organik dan senyawa nitrogen. Konsentrasi organik dan nitrogen yang tinggi pada lindi dapat diolah dengan mengatur proses aerobik-anaerobik-anoksik di dalam MBBR. Kapasitas pengolahan MBBR yang digunakan sebesar 10 L dan media Kaldness (K1 sebanyak 2 L. MBBR dioperasikan dengan sistem batch, dengan kondisi aerobik yang berasal dari aerator dan pompa submersible, kondisi anaerobik berasal dari pompa submersible saja, dan kondisi anoksik yang berasal dari pompa submersible dan aerator. Hasil penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa MBBR dapat digunakan untuk menurunkan senyawa nitrogen dan senyawa organik. Efisiensi penyisihan optimum senyawa organik sebesar 87% pada proses anaerobik baik pada sistem fluidized attached growth maupun suspended growth. Efisiensi penyisihan optimum senyawa nitrogen sebesar 72% pada proses anoksik baik pada sistem fluidized attached growth maupun suspended growth.

  2. Treatment of Rural Wastewater Using a Spiral Fiber Based Salinity-Persistent Sequencing Batch Biofilm Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Xin Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Differing from municipal wastewater, rural wastewater in salinization areas is characterized with arbitrary discharge and high concentration of salt, COD, nitrogen and phosphorus, which would cause severe deterioration of rivers and lakes. To overcome the limits of traditional biological processes, a spiral fiber based salinity-persistent Sequencing Biofilm Batch Reactor (SBBR was developed and investigated with synthetic rural wastewater (COD = 500 mg/L, NH4+-N = 50 mg/L, TP = 6 mg/L under different salinity (0.0–10.0 g/L of NaCl. Results indicated that a quick start-up could be achieved in 15 days, along with sufficient biomass up to 7275 mg/L. During operating period, the removal of COD, NH4+-N, TN was almost not disturbed by salt varying from 0.0 to 10.0 g/L with stable efficiency reaching 92%, 82% and 80%, respectively. Although TP could be removed at high efficiency of 90% in low salinity conditions (from 0.0 to 5.0 g/L of NaCl, it was seriously inhibited due to nitrite accumulation and reduction of Phosphorus Accumulating Organisms (PAOs after addition of 10.0 g/L of salt. The behavior proposed in this study will provide theoretical foundation and guidance for application of SBBR in saline rural wastewater treatment.

  3. Study on treatment of coking wastewater by biofilm reactors combined with zero-valent iron process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Peng; Zhao Huazhang; Zeng Ming; Ni Jinren

    2009-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the behavior of the integrated system with biofilm reactors and zero-valent iron (ZVI) process for coking wastewater treatment. Particular attention was paid to the performance of the integrated system for removal of organic and inorganic nitrogen compounds. Maximal removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia nitrogen (NH 3 -N) and total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) were up to 96.1, 99.2 and 92.3%, respectively. Moreover, it was found that some phenolic compounds were effectively removed. The refractory organic compounds were primarily removed in ZVI process of the integrated system. These compounds, with molecular weights either ranged 10,000-30,000 Da or 0-2000 Da, were mainly the humic acid (HA) and hydrophilic (HyI) compounds. Oxidation-reduction and coagulation were the main removal mechanisms in ZVI process, which could enhance the biodegradability of the system effluent. Furthermore, the integrated system showed a rapid recovery performance against the sudden loading shock and remained high efficiencies for pollutants removal. Overall, the integrated system was proved feasible for coking wastewater treatment in practical applications

  4. Evaluating 3-D and 1-D mathematical models for mass transport in heterogeneous biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgenroth, Eberhard Friedrich; Eberl, H.; van Loosdrecht, M. C. M.

    2000-01-01

    Results from a three dimensional model for heterogeneous biofilms including the numerical solution of hydrodynamics were compared to simplified one dimensional models. A one dimensional model with a variable diffusion coefficient over the thickness of the biofilm was well suited to approximate...... average concentration profiles of three dimensional simulations of rough biofilms. A new compartmentalized one dimensional model is presented that is then used to evaluate effects of pores and channels on microbial competition in heterogeneous biofilms. Surface and pore regions of the biofilm are modeled...... using separate compartments coupled by a convective link. Local concentration profiles from the three dimensional simulations could be adequately reproduced using the compartmentalized one dimensional model. The compartmentalized one dimensional model was then used to evaluate bacterial competition...

  5. Biofilm Formation Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Predicted via Genome-Scale Kinetic Models of Bacterial Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-15

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Biofilm Formation Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Predicted via Genome-Scale Kinetic Models of Bacterial Metabolism Francisco G...jaques.reifman.civ@mail.mil Abstract A hallmark of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its ability to establish biofilm -based infections that are difficult to...eradicate. Biofilms are less susceptible to host inflammatory and immune responses and have higher antibiotic tolerance than free-living planktonic

  6. Ultrasonic Enhancement of Antibiotic Action on Escherichia coli Biofilms: an In Vivo Model

    OpenAIRE

    Rediske, Andrea M.; Roeder, Beverly L.; Brown, Maren K.; Nelson, Jared L.; Robison, Rachel L.; Draper, David O.; Schaalje, G. Bruce; Robison, Richard A.; Pitt, William G.

    1999-01-01

    Biofilm infections are a common complication of prosthetic devices in humans. Previous in vitro research has determined that low-frequency ultrasound combined with aminoglycoside antibiotics is an effective method of killing biofilms. We report the development of an in vivo model to determine if ultrasound enhances antibiotic action. Two 24-h-old Escherichia coli (ATCC 10798) biofilms grown on polyethylene disks were implanted subcutaneously on the backs of New Zealand White female rabbits, o...

  7. Protection of biofilms against toxic shocks by the adsorption and desorption capacity of carriers in anaerobic fluidized bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrozzi, S. (Biological Reaction Engineering Group, Chemical Engineering Dept., ETH, Zurich (Switzerland)); Kut, O.M. (Biological Reaction Engineering Group, Chemical Engineering Dept., ETH, Zurich (Switzerland)); Dunn, I.J. (Biological Reaction Engineering Group, Chemical Engineering Dept., ETH, Zurich (Switzerland))

    1993-05-01

    The aim of this study was to select a support medium for an anaerobic biofilm fluidized bed reactor (AFBR) for waste water treatment. Six materials, shale, pumice, porous glass, quartz sand, activated carbon and anthracite were used as carriers for the biofilm. The reactors were operated in parallel for several months with vapour condensate from a sulfite cellulose process as feed. The criteria used for the evaluation were: (a) Reproducibility of the reactor performance, (b) performance of the different carriers under various loading rates, (c) stability against toxic shock loadings using 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) as toxicant, (d) recovery capacity after intoxication and starvation, (e) adsorption/desorption behavior of the carriers. A comparison between four runs showed good reproducibility of the steady state removal rates. The performance of the reactors and the stability of the degradation rates were tested for a range of loading conditions. Unbuffered, buffered and pH controlled conditions were compared. The pumice carrier was best with respect to the degradation rate achieved per carrier mass. The response of the reactors to massive TCP step loadings was tested. Loadings less than 1.5 kg TCP/m[sup 3]d resulted in initially normal gas production rates for all the systems, except the activated carbon, whose gas production was partially inhibited from the start. After increasing the load to 1.5 kg TCP/m[sup 3]d the gas production rates of all the other reactors fell abruptly to zero. Restarting after 2 months, all reactors showed methanogenic activity without requiring new inoculum. (orig.)

  8. Real-time PCR expression profiling of genes encoding potential virulence factors in Candida albicans biofilms: identification of model-dependent and -independent gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Řičicová Markéta

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candida albicans infections are often associated with biofilm formation. Previous work demonstrated that the expression of HWP1 (hyphal wall protein and of genes belonging to the ALS (agglutinin-like sequence, SAP (secreted aspartyl protease, PLB (phospholipase B and LIP (lipase gene families is associated with biofilm growth on mucosal surfaces. We investigated using real-time PCR whether genes encoding potential virulence factors are also highly expressed in biofilms associated with abiotic surfaces. For this, C. albicans biofilms were grown on silicone in microtiter plates (MTP or in the Centres for Disease Control (CDC reactor, on polyurethane in an in vivo subcutaneous catheter rat (SCR model, and on mucosal surfaces in the reconstituted human epithelium (RHE model. Results HWP1 and genes belonging to the ALS, SAP, PLB and LIP gene families were constitutively expressed in C. albicans biofilms. ALS1-5 were upregulated in all model systems, while ALS9 was mostly downregulated. ALS6 and HWP1 were overexpressed in all models except in the RHE and MTP, respectively. The expression levels of SAP1 were more pronounced in both in vitro models, while those of SAP2, SAP4 and SAP6 were higher in the in vivo model. Furthermore, SAP5 was highly upregulated in the in vivo and RHE models. For SAP9 and SAP10 similar gene expression levels were observed in all model systems. PLB genes were not considerably upregulated in biofilms, while LIP1-3, LIP5-7 and LIP9-10 were highly overexpressed in both in vitro models. Furthermore, an elevated lipase activity was detected in supernatans of biofilms grown in the MTP and RHE model. Conclusions Our findings show that HWP1 and most of the genes belonging to the ALS, SAP and LIP gene families are upregulated in C. albicans biofilms. Comparison of the fold expression between the various model systems revealed similar expression levels for some genes, while for others model-dependent expression

  9. Treatment of pesticide wastewater by moving-bed biofilm reactor combined with Fenton-coagulation pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Sheng [School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China)]. E-mail: hitchensheng@126.com; Sun Dezhi [School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Chung, J.-S. [School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-01

    In order to treat pesticide wastewater having high chemical oxygen demand (COD) value and poor biodegradability, Fenton-coagulation process was first used to reduce COD and improve biodegradability and then was followed by biological treatment. Optimal experimental conditions for the Fenton process were determined to be Fe{sup 2+} concentration of 40 mmol/L and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dose of 97 mmol/L at initial pH 3. The interaction mechanism of organophosphorous pesticide and hydroxyl radicals was suggested to be the breakage of the P=S double bond and formation of sulfate ions and various organic intermediates, followed by formation of phosphate and consequent oxidation of intermediates. For the subsequent biological treatment, 3.2 g/L Ca(OH){sub 2} was added to adjust the pH and further coagulate the pollutants. The COD value could be evidently decreased from 33,700 to 9300 mg/L and the ratio of biological oxygen demand (BOD{sub 5}) to COD of the wastewater was enhanced to over 0.47 by Fenton oxidation and coagulation. The pre-treated wastewater was then subjected to biological oxidation by using moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) inside which tube chip type bio-carriers were fluidized upon air bubbling. Higher than 85% of COD removal efficiency could be achieved when the bio-carrier volume fraction was kept more than 20% by feeding the pretreated wastewater containing 3000 mg/L of inlet COD at one day of hydraulic retention time (HRT), but a noticeable decrease in the COD removal efficiency when the carrier volume was decreased down to 10%, only 72% was observed. With the improvement of biodegradability by using Fenton pretreatment, also due to the high concentration of biomass and high biofilm activity using the fluidizing bio-carriers, high removal efficiency and stable operation could be achieved in the biological process even at a high COD loading of 37.5 gCOD/(m{sup 2} carrier day)

  10. Treatment of pesticide wastewater by moving-bed biofilm reactor combined with Fenton-coagulation pretreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Sheng; Sun Dezhi; Chung, J.-S.

    2007-01-01

    In order to treat pesticide wastewater having high chemical oxygen demand (COD) value and poor biodegradability, Fenton-coagulation process was first used to reduce COD and improve biodegradability and then was followed by biological treatment. Optimal experimental conditions for the Fenton process were determined to be Fe 2+ concentration of 40 mmol/L and H 2 O 2 dose of 97 mmol/L at initial pH 3. The interaction mechanism of organophosphorous pesticide and hydroxyl radicals was suggested to be the breakage of the P=S double bond and formation of sulfate ions and various organic intermediates, followed by formation of phosphate and consequent oxidation of intermediates. For the subsequent biological treatment, 3.2 g/L Ca(OH) 2 was added to adjust the pH and further coagulate the pollutants. The COD value could be evidently decreased from 33,700 to 9300 mg/L and the ratio of biological oxygen demand (BOD 5 ) to COD of the wastewater was enhanced to over 0.47 by Fenton oxidation and coagulation. The pre-treated wastewater was then subjected to biological oxidation by using moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) inside which tube chip type bio-carriers were fluidized upon air bubbling. Higher than 85% of COD removal efficiency could be achieved when the bio-carrier volume fraction was kept more than 20% by feeding the pretreated wastewater containing 3000 mg/L of inlet COD at one day of hydraulic retention time (HRT), but a noticeable decrease in the COD removal efficiency when the carrier volume was decreased down to 10%, only 72% was observed. With the improvement of biodegradability by using Fenton pretreatment, also due to the high concentration of biomass and high biofilm activity using the fluidizing bio-carriers, high removal efficiency and stable operation could be achieved in the biological process even at a high COD loading of 37.5 gCOD/(m 2 carrier day)

  11. Packed- and fluidized-bed biofilm reactor performance for anaerobic wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denac, M; Dunn, I J

    1988-07-05

    Anaerobic degradation performance of a laboratory-scale packed-bed reactor (PBR) was compared with two fluidized-bed biofilm reactors (FBRs) on molasses and whey feeds. The reactors were operated under constant pH (7) and temperature (35 degrees C) conditions and were well mixed with high recirculation rates. The measured variables were chemical oxygen demand (COD), individual organic acids, gas composition, and gas rates. As carrier, sand of 0.3-0.5 mm diameter was used in the FBR, and porous clay spheres of 6 mm diameter were used in the PBR. Startup of the PBR was achieved with 1-5 day residence times. Start-up of the FBR was only successful if liquid residence times were held low at 2-3 h. COD degradations of 86% with molasses (90% was biodegradable) were reached in both the FBR and PBR at 6 h residence time and loadings of 10 g COD/L day. At higher loadings the FBR gave the best performance; even at 40-45 g COD/L day, with 6 h residence times, 70% COD was degraded. The PBR could not be operated above 20 g COD/L day without clogging. A comparison of the reaction rates show that the PBR and FBR per formed similarly at low concentrations in the reactors up to 1 g COD/L, while above 3 g COD/L the rates were 17.4 g COD/L day for the PBR and 38.4 g COD/L day for the FBR. This difference is probably due to diffusion limitations and a less active biomass content of the PBR compared with the fluidized bed.The results of dynamic step change experiments, in which residence times and feed concentrations were changed hanged at constant loading, demonstrated the rapid response of the reactors. Thus, the response times for an increase in gas rate or an increase in organic acids due to an increase in feed concentration were less than 1 day and could be explained by substrate limitation. Other slower responses were observed in which the reactor culture adapted over periods of 5-10 days; these were apparently growth related. An increase in loading of over 100% always resulted

  12. Nitritation and denitritation of ammonium-rich wastewater using fluidized-bed biofilm reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslan, Sukru [Cumhuriyet University, Department of Environmental Engineering, 58140 Sivas (Turkey)], E-mail: saslan@cumhuriyet.edu.tr; Dahab, Mohamed [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, W348 Nebraska Hall, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States)

    2008-08-15

    Fluidized-bed biofilm nitritation and denitritation reactors (FBBNR and FBBDR) were operated to eliminate the high concentrations of nitrogen by nitritation and denitritation process. The dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration was varied from 1.5 to 2.5 g/m{sup 3} at the top of the reactor throughout the experiment. NH{sub 4}-N conversion and NO{sub 2}-N accumulation in the nitritation reactor effluent was over 90 and 65%, respectively. The average NH{sub 4}-N removal efficiency was 99.2 and 90.1% at the NLR of 0.9 and 1.2 kg NH{sub 4}-N/m{sup 3} day, respectively. Increasing the NLR from 1.1 to 1.2 kg NH{sub 4}-N/m{sup 3} day decreased the NH{sub 4}-N elimination approximately two-fold while NH{sub 4}-N conversion to NO{sub 2}-N differences were negligible. The NO{sub 2}-N/NO{sub x}-N ratios corresponded to 0.74, 0.73, 0.72, and 0.69, respectively, indicating the occurrence of partial nitrification. An average free ammonia concentration in the FBBNR was high enough to inhibit nitrite oxidizers selectively, and it seems to be a determining factor for NO{sub 2}-N accumulation in the process. In the FBBDR, the NO{sub x}-N (NO{sub 2}-N + NO{sub 3}-N) concentrations supplied were between 227 and 330 mg N/l (NLR was between 0.08 and 0.4 kg/m{sup 3} day) and the influent flow was increased as long as the total nitrogen removal was close to 90%. The NO{sub 2}-N and NO{sub 3}-N concentrations in the effluent were 3.0 and 0.9 mg/l at 0.08 kg/m{sup 3} day loading rate. About 98% removal of NO{sub x}-N was achieved at the lowest NLR in the FBBDR. The FBBDR exhibited high nitrogen removal up to the NLR of 0.25 kg/m{sup 3} day. The NO{sub x}-N effluent concentration never exceeded 15 mg/l. The total nitrogen removal efficiency in the FBBRs was higher than 93% at 21 {+-} 1 deg. C.

  13. Enhancing mass transfer and ethanol production in syngas fermentation of Clostridium carboxidivorans P7 through a monolithic biofilm reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Yanwen; Brown, Robert; Wen, Zhiyou

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Syngas fermentation process is limited by gas-to-liquid mass transfer. • A novel monolithic biofilm reactor (MBR) for efficient mass transfer was developed. • MBR with slug flow resulted in higher k L a than bubble column reactor (BCR). • MBR enhanced ethanol productivity by 53% compared to BCR. • MBR was demonstrated as a promising reactor configuration for syngas fermentation. - Abstract: Syngas fermentation is a promising process for producing fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. Currently syngas fermentation faces several engineering challenges, with gas-to-liquid mass transfer limitation representing the major bottleneck. The aim of this work is to evaluate the performance of a monolithic biofilm reactor (MBR) as a novel reactor configuration for syngas fermentation. The volumetric mass transfer coefficient (k L a) of the MBR was evaluated in abiotic conditions within a wide range of gas flow rates (i.e., gas velocity in monolithic channels) and liquid flow rates (i.e., liquid velocity in the channels). The k L a values of the MBR were higher than those of a controlled bubble column reactor (BCR) in certain conditions, due to the slug flow pattern in the monolithic channels. A continuous syngas fermentation using Clostridium carboxidivorans P7 was conducted in the MBR system under varying operational conditions, with the variables including syngas flow rate, liquid recirculation between the monolithic column and reservoir, and dilution rate. It was found that the syngas fermentation performance – measured by such parameters as syngas utilization efficiency, ethanol concentration and productivity, and ratio of ethanol to acetic acid – depended not only on the mass transfer efficiency but also on the biofouling or abrading of the biofilm attached on the monolithic channel wall. At a condition of 300 mL/min of syngas flow rate, 500 mL/min of liquid flow rate, and 0.48 day −1 of dilution rate, the MBR produced much higher

  14. Sequential Aeration of Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactors for High-Rate Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal: Experimental Demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Sun, Sheng-Peng; Lackner, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    One-stage autotrophic nitrogen (N) removal, requiring the simultaneous activity of aerobic and anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB and AnAOB), can be obtained in spatially redox-stratified biofilms. However, previous experience with Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactors (MABRs) has revealed...... a difficulty in reducing the abundance and activity of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB), which drastically lowers process efficiency. Here we show how sequential aeration is an effective strategy to attain autotrophic N removal in MABRs: Two separate MABRs, which displayed limited or no N removal under...... continuous aeration, could remove more than 5.5 g N/m2/day (at loads up to 8 g N/m2/day) by controlled variation of sequential aeration regimes. Daily averaged ratios of the surficial loads of O2 (oxygen) to NH4+ (ammonium) (LO2/LNH4) were close to 1.73 at this optimum. Real-time quantitative PCR based on 16...

  15. Population dynamics of biofilm development during start-up of a butyrate-degrading fluidized-bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zellner, G.; Geveke, M.; Diekmann, H. (Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mikrobiologie); Conway de Macario, E. (New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States). Wadsworth Center for Laboratories and Research)

    1991-12-01

    Population dynamics during start-up of a fluidized-bed reactor with butyrate or butyrate plus acetate as sole substrates as well as biofilm development on the sand substratum were studied microbiologically, immunologically and by scanning electron microscopy. An adapted syntrophic consortium consisting of Syntrophospora sp., Methanothrix soehngenii, Methanosarcina mazei and Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus or Methanogenium sp. achieved high-rate butyrate degradation to methane and carbon dioxide. Desulfovibrio sp., Methanocorpusculum sp., and Methanobacterium sp. were also present in lower numbers. Immunological analysis demonstrated methanogens antigenically related to Methanobrevibacter ruminantium M1, Methanosarcina mazei S6, M. thermophila TM1, Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus AZ and Methanothrix soehngenii Opfikon in the biofilm. Immunological analysis also showed that the organisms isolated from the butyrate-degrading culture used as a source of inoculum were related to M. soehngenii Opfikon, Methanobacterium formicium MF and Methanospirillum hungatei JF1. (orig.).

  16. A novel in vitro wound biofilm model used to evaluate low-frequency ultrasonic-assisted wound debridement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crone, S.; Garde, Christian; Bjarnsholt, T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Bacterial biofilms remain difficult to treat. The biofilm mode of growth enables bacteria to survive antibiotic treatment and the inflammatory reaction. Low-frequency ultrasound has recently been shown to improve healing in a variety of settings. It is hypothesised that ultrasound...... disrupts the biofilm leaving bacteria more vulnerable to antiseptic or antibiotic treatment. The objective of this study is to develop a realistic model to elucidate the effect of ultrasound on biofilms. Method: A novel in vitro wound biofilm model was developed. Biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus were...

  17. The characteristics of extracellular polymeric substances and soluble microbial products in moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Liang; Jiang, Wei; Song, Yonghui; Xia, Siqing; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

    2013-11-01

    The characteristics of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and soluble microbial products (SMP) in conventional membrane bioreactor (MBR) and in moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactors (MBBR-MBR) were investigated in long-term (170 days) experiments. The results showed that all reactors had high removal efficiency of ammonium and COD, despite very different fouling conditions. The MBBR-MBR with media fill ratio of 26.7% had much lower total membrane resistance and no obvious fouling were detected during the whole operation. In contrast, MBR and MBBR-MBR with lower and higher media fill experienced more significant fouling. Low fouling at optimum fill ratio may be due to the higher percentage of small molecular size (100 kDa) of EPS and SMP in the reactor. The composition of EPS and SMP affected fouling due to different O-H bonds in hydroxyl functional groups, and less polysaccharides and lipids. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Biodegradation of pharmaceuticals from hospital wastewater in staged Moving Bed Biofilm Reactors (MBBR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escola, Monica; Kumar Chhetri, Ravi; Ooi, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    on biofilms that are grown on plastic-chips which are suspended and aerated in a treatment tank. Such biofilm systems have shown a clear (but slow) biodegradation of some compounds that are recalcitrant in activated sludge. This study investigated the performance of a pilot MBBR-plant for the removal...

  19. Performances and microbial features of an aerobic packed-bed biofilm reactor developed to post-treat an olive mill effluent from an anaerobic GAC reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchetti Leonardo

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Olive mill wastewater (OMW is the aqueous effluent of olive oil producing processes. Given its high COD and content of phenols, it has to be decontaminated before being discharged. Anaerobic digestion is one of the most promising treatment process for such an effluent, as it combines high decontamination efficiency with methane production. The large scale anaerobic digestion of OMWs is normally conducted in dispersed-growth reactors, where however are generally achieved unsatisfactory COD removal and methane production yields. The possibility of intensifying the performance of the process using a packed bed biofilm reactor, as anaerobic treatment alternative, was demonstrated. Even in this case, however, a post-treatment step is required to further reduce the COD. In this work, a biological post-treatment, consisting of an aerobic biological "Manville" silica bead-packed bed aerobic reactor, was developed, tested for its ability to complete COD removal from the anaerobic digestion effluents, and characterized biologically through molecular tools. Results The aerobic post-treatment was assessed through a 2 month-continuous feeding with the digested effluent at 50.42 and 2.04 gl-1day-1 of COD and phenol loading rates, respectively. It was found to be a stable process, able to remove 24 and 39% of such organic loads, respectively, and to account for 1/4 of the overall decontamination efficiency displayed by the anaerobic-aerobic integrated system when fed with an amended OMW at 31.74 and 1.70 gl-1day-1 of COD and phenol loading rates, respectively. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences of biomass samples from the aerobic reactor biofilm revealed that it was colonized by Rhodobacterales, Bacteroidales, Pseudomonadales, Enterobacteriales, Rhodocyclales and genera incertae sedis TM7. Some taxons occurring in the influent were not detected in the biofilm, whereas others, such as Paracoccus, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter and Enterobacter

  20. Modeling sediment transport with an integrated view of the biofilm effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, H. W.; Lai, H. J.; Cheng, W.; Huang, L.; He, G. J.

    2017-09-01

    Most natural sediment is invariably covered by biofilms in reservoirs and lakes, which have significant influence on bed form dynamics and sediment transport, and also play a crucial role in natural river evolution, pollutant transport, and habitat changes. However, most models for sediment transport are based on experiments using clean sediments without biological materials. In this study, a three-dimensional mathematical model of hydrodynamics and sediment transport is presented with a comprehensive consideration of the biofilm effects. The changes of the bed resistance mainly due to the different bed form dynamics of the biofilm-coated sediment (biosediment), which affect the hydrodynamic characteristics, are considered. Moreover, the variations of parameters related to sediment transport after the biofilm growth are integrated, including the significant changes of the incipient velocity, settling velocity, reference concentration, and equilibrium bed load transport rate. The proposed model is applied to evaluate the effects of biofilms on the hydrodynamic characteristics and sediment transport in laboratory experiments. Results indicate that the mean velocity increases after the biofilm growth, and the turbulence intensity near the river bed decreases under the same flow condition. Meanwhile, biofilm inhibits sediment from moving independently. Thus, the moderate erosion is observed for biosediment resulting in smaller suspended sediment concentrations. The proposed model can reasonably reflect these sediment transport characteristics with biofilms, and the approach to integration of the biological impact could also be used in other modeling of sediment transport, which can be further applied to provide references for the integrated management of natural aqueous systems.

  1. Syngas fermentation by Clostridium carboxidivorans P7 in a horizontal rotating packed bed biofilm reactor with enhanced ethanol production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Yanwen; Brown, Robert C.; Wen, Zhiyou

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel a horizontal rotating packed bed (h-RPB) reactor for syngas fermentation was reported. • The h-RPB reactor enhanced ethanol productivity by 3.3-folds compared to continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). • The h-RPB reactor has a unique feature of transfer gas from both bulk liquid phase and headspace phase. • The mass transfer in the headspace of h-PRB played an important role for enhanced ethanol production. - Abstract: Gasification of lignocellulosic biomass followed by syngas fermentation is a promising process for producing fuels and chemicals. Syngas fermentation, however, is commonly limited by low mass transfer rates. In this work, a horizontally oriented rotating packed bed (h-RPB) reactor was developed to improve mass transfer and enhance ethanol production. In the h-RPB reactor, cell attachment materials were packed in the reactor and half submerged in the liquid and half exposed to the headspace. With continuous rotation of the packing materials, the cells in biofilm were alternately in contact with liquid and headspace; thus, transport of syngas to the cells occurred in both the liquid phase and headspace. The volumetric mass transfer coefficient (k_La) of the h-RPB reactor was lower than that in a traditional continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), indicating the mass transfer in the liquid phase of h-PRB was lower than CSTR, and the mass transfer in the headspace phase played an important role in syngas fermentation. The syngas fermentation of Clostridium carboxidivorans P7 in h-RPB resulted in a 7.0 g/L titer and 6.7 g/L/day productivity of ethanol, respectively, 3.3 times higher than those obtained in a CSTR under the same operational conditions. The results demonstrate that the h-RPB reactor is an efficient system for syngas fermentation, making cellulosic ethanol biorefinery one step closer to technical and economic feasibility.

  2. Novel model for multispecies biofilms that uses rigid gas-permeable lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyyala, Rebecca; Kirakodu, Sreenatha S; Ebersole, Jeffrey L; Novak, Karen F

    2011-05-01

    Oral biofilms comprise complex multispecies consortia aided by specific inter- and intraspecies interactions occurring among commensals and pathogenic bacterial species. Oral biofilms are primary initiating factors of periodontal disease, although complex multifactorial biological influences, including host cell responses, contribute to the individual outcome of the disease. To provide a system to study initial stages of interaction between oral biofilms and the host cells that contribute to the disease process, we developed a novel in vitro model system to grow biofilms on rigid gas-permeable contact lenses (RGPLs), which enable oxygen to permeate through the lens material. Bacterial species belonging to early- and late-colonizing groups were successfully established as single- or three-species biofilms, with each group comprising Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus sanguinis; S. gordonii, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Fusobacterium nucleatum; or S. gordonii, F. nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Quantification of biofilm numbers by quantitative PCR (qPCR) revealed substantial differences in the magnitude of bacterial numbers in single-species and multispecies biofilms. We evaluated cell-permeable conventional nucleic acid stains acridine orange, hexidium iodide, and Hoechst 33258 and novel SYTO red, blue, and green fluorochromes for their effect on bacterial viability and fluorescence yield to allow visualization of the aggregates of individual bacterial species by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Substantial differences in the quantity and distribution of the species in the multispecies biofilms were identified. The specific features of these biofilms may help us better understand the role of various bacteria in local challenge of oral tissues.

  3. Survey of Basic Red 18 Dye Removal Using Biofilm Formed on Granular Bagass in Continuous Aerobic Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdos Kord Mostafapour

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dyes comprising a major pollutant in the effluent from textile plants are mostly toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, and non-biodegradable. This experimental-laboratory study was carried out using a biofilm formed on a granular bagass bed in a continuous aerobic reactor to investigate the kinetic coefficients of the aerobic reactor as well as the effects of color concentration (30-200 mg/l, hydraulic retention time (2-8 h, and BOD concentration (200-100 mg /l on the removal of Basic Red (18 from textile effluents. The results revealed a maximum removal efficiency of 90% for an initial color concentration of 30 mg/l and a hydraulic retention time of 8 hours. A color removal efficiency of 86% was recorded for an influent BOD concentration of 200 mg/l. Also, maximum substrate utilization rate (K for organic loadings of 100 and 200 mg/L were 0.23 and 1.41 while the half velocity constant values were 44.85 and 19.39, respectively. Moreover, for the same organic loadings, the values of 0.35 and 0.5 were recorded for decay coefficient (Kd and 37.36, 4.83 for maximum specific growth rate coefficient (μm, respectively. Based on the findings of this study, it may be claimed that the biofilm formed on a granular bagass bed in a continuous aerobic reactor has a good Basic Red (18 removal efficiency.

  4. Dynamics of biofilm formation in a model drinking water distribution system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boe-Hansen, Rasmus; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Arvin, Erik

    2002-01-01

    The dynamics of biofilm formation in non-chlorinated groundwater-based drinking water was studied in a model distribution system. The formation of biofilm was closely monitored for a period of 522 days by total bacterial counts (AODC), heterotrophic plate counts (R2A media), and ATP content...

  5. Investigation of mass transfer phenomena in biofilm systems; Untersuchung von Stoffuebergangsphaenomenen in Biofilmsystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waesche, S.; Hempel, D.C. [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Bioverfahrenstechnik; Horn, H. [Fachhochschule Magdeburg (Germany). Hydro- und Abfallchemie

    1999-07-01

    Substance transfer in the boundary layer bulk/biofilm can be only inadequately described by conventional model concepts. In such cases where the surface structure of a biofilm adapts to given hydraulic conditions, the substance transfer phenomena need to be studied in depth. In addition, the entire biofilm structure is much influenced both by substrate conditions and by hydrodynamic conditions during growth. With a view to quantifying these factors, biofilms were cultured under various substrate and hydrodynamic conditions in tube reactors with a diameter of 2.6 cm. For characterizing the cultured biofilms, biofilm density and substrate turnover measured as maximum mass transfer density were determined in each test series. Biofilm density (dry biomass/biofilm volume) was determined by gravimetry. Maximum mass transfer densities in biofilm were established in batch experiments with excess substrate. By means of oxygen microelectrodes, oxygen profiles in the biofilm were measured directly in the reactor. These measurements concerned biofilms of thicknesses ranging from 400 to 2000 {mu}m, where the biofilms did not yet exhibit erosion. (orig.) [German] Der Stoffuebergang in der Grenzschicht Bulk/Biofilm ist mit herkoemmlichen Modellvorstellungen nur ungenuegend beschreibbar. Eine sich an die aktuellen hydraulischen Bedingungen anpassende Oberflaechenstruktur des Biofilms erfordert eine intensive Untersuchung der Stoffuebergangsphaenomene in derartigen Systemen. Darueber hinaus wird die gesamte Biofilmstruktur sowohl von den Substratbedingungen als auch von den hydrodynamischen Bedingungen waehrend des Wachstums stark beeinflusst. Um diese Faktoren quantifizieren zu koennen, wurden Biofilme bei verschiedenen Substrat- und hydrodynamischen Bedingungen in Rohrreaktoren mit einem Durchmesser von 2,6 cm kultiviert. Zur Charakterisierung der kultivierten Biofilme wurde die Biofilmdichte und der Substratumsatz, gemessen als maximale Massestromdichte, bei jeder Versuchsreihe

  6. Drosophila melanogaster as an animal model for the study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Mulcahy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing both acute and chronic infections in susceptible hosts. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections are thought to be caused by bacterial biofilms. Biofilms are highly structured, multicellular, microbial communities encased in an extracellular matrix that enable long-term survival in the host. The aim of this research was to develop an animal model that would allow an in vivo study of P. aeruginosa biofilm infections in a Drosophila melanogaster host. At 24 h post oral infection of Drosophila, P. aeruginosa biofilms localized to and were visualized in dissected Drosophila crops. These biofilms had a characteristic aggregate structure and an extracellular matrix composed of DNA and exopolysaccharide. P. aeruginosa cells recovered from in vivo grown biofilms had increased antibiotic resistance relative to planktonically grown cells. In vivo, biofilm formation was dependent on expression of the pel exopolysaccharide genes, as a pelB::lux mutant failed to form biofilms. The pelB::lux mutant was significantly more virulent than PAO1, while a hyperbiofilm strain (PAZHI3 demonstrated significantly less virulence than PAO1, as indicated by survival of infected flies at day 14 postinfection. Biofilm formation, by strains PAO1 and PAZHI3, in the crop was associated with induction of diptericin, cecropin A1 and drosomycin antimicrobial peptide gene expression 24 h postinfection. In contrast, infection with the non-biofilm forming strain pelB::lux resulted in decreased AMP gene expression in the fly. In summary, these results provide novel insights into host-pathogen interactions during P. aeruginosa oral infection of Drosophila and highlight the use of Drosophila as an infection model that permits the study of P. aeruginosa biofilms in vivo.

  7. Biofilm inhibitory and eradicating activity of wound care products against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms in an in vitro chronic wound model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackman, G; De Meyer, L; Nelis, H J; Coenye, T

    2013-06-01

    Although several factors contribute to wound healing, bacterial infections and the presence of biofilm can significantly affect healing. Despite that this clearly indicates that therapies should address biofilm in wounds, only few wound care products have been evaluated for their antibiofilm effect. For this reason, we developed a rapid quantification approach to investigate the efficacy of wound care products on wounds infected with Staphylococcus spp. An in vitro chronic wound infection model was used in which a fluorescent Staph. aureus strain was used to allow the rapid quantification of the bacterial burden after treatment. A good correlation was observed between the fluorescence signal and the bacterial counts. When evaluated in this model, several commonly used wound dressings and wound care products inhibited biofilm formation resulting in a decrease between one and seven log CFU per biofilm compared with biofilm formed in the absence of products. In contrast, most dressings only moderately affected mature biofilms. Our model allowed the rapid quantification of the bacterial burden after treatment. However, the efficacy of treatment varied between the different types of dressings and/or wound care products. Our model can be used to compare the efficacy of wound care products to inhibit biofilm formation and/or eradicate mature biofilms. In addition, the results indicate that treatment of infected wounds should be started as soon as possible and that novel products with more potent antibiofilm activity are needed. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Moser, Claus Ernst

    A still increasing interest and emphasis on the sessile bacterial lifestyle biofilms has been seen since it was realized that the vast majority of the total microbial biomass exists as biofilms. Aggregation of bacteria was first described by Leeuwenhoek in 1677, but only recently recognized...... as being important in chronic infection. In 1993 the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) recognized that the biofilm mode of growth was relevant to microbiology. This book covers both the evidence for biofilms in many chronic bacterial infections as well as the problems facing these infections...... such as diagnostics, pathogenesis, treatment regimes and in vitro and in vivo models for studying biofilms. This is the first scientific book on biofilm infections, chapters written by the world leading scientist and clinicians. The intended audience of this book is scientists, teachers at university level as well...

  9. One dimensional reactor core model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinov, V.; Stritar, A.; Radovo, M.; Mavko, B.

    1984-01-01

    The one dimensional model of neutron dynamic in reactor core was developed. The core was divided in several axial nodes. The one group neutron diffusion equation for each node is solved. Feedback affects of fuel and water temperatures is calculated. The influence of xenon, boron and control rods is included in cross section calculations for each node. The system of equations is solved implicitly. The model is used in basic principle Training Simulator of NPP Krsko. (author)

  10. Pyrosequencing analysis yields comprehensive assessment of microbial communities in pilot-scale two-stage membrane biofilm reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontiveros-Valencia, Aura; Tang, Youneng; Zhao, He-Ping; Friese, David; Overstreet, Ryan; Smith, Jennifer; Evans, Patrick; Rittmann, Bruce E; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa

    2014-07-01

    We studied the microbial community structure of pilot two-stage membrane biofilm reactors (MBfRs) designed to reduce nitrate (NO3(-)) and perchlorate (ClO4(-)) in contaminated groundwater. The groundwater also contained oxygen (O2) and sulfate (SO4(2-)), which became important electron sinks that affected the NO3(-) and ClO4(-) removal rates. Using pyrosequencing, we elucidated how important phylotypes of each "primary" microbial group, i.e., denitrifying bacteria (DB), perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB), and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), responded to changes in electron-acceptor loading. UniFrac, principal coordinate analysis (PCoA), and diversity analyses documented that the microbial community of biofilms sampled when the MBfRs had a high acceptor loading were phylogenetically distant from and less diverse than the microbial community of biofilm samples with lower acceptor loadings. Diminished acceptor loading led to SO4(2-) reduction in the lag MBfR, which allowed Desulfovibrionales (an SRB) and Thiothrichales (sulfur-oxidizers) to thrive through S cycling. As a result of this cooperative relationship, they competed effectively with DB/PRB phylotypes such as Xanthomonadales and Rhodobacterales. Thus, pyrosequencing illustrated that while DB, PRB, and SRB responded predictably to changes in acceptor loading, a decrease in total acceptor loading led to important shifts within the "primary" groups, the onset of other members (e.g., Thiothrichales), and overall greater diversity.

  11. Anaerobic acidogenic digestion of olive mill wastewaters in biofilm reactors packed with ceramic filters or granular activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Lorenzo; Lampis, Silvia; Todaro, Daniela; Scoma, Alberto; Vallini, Giovanni; Marchetti, Leonardo; Majone, Mauro; Fava, Fabio

    2010-08-01

    Four identically configured anaerobic packed bed biofilm reactors were developed and employed in the continuous acidogenic digestion of olive mill wastewaters to produce volatile fatty acids (VFAs), which can be exploited in the biotechnological production of polyhydroxyalkanoates. Ceramic porous cubes or granular activated carbon were used as biofilm supports. Aside packing material, the role of temperature and organic loading rate (OLR) on VFA production yield and mixture composition were also studied. The process was monitored through a chemical, microbiological and molecular biology integrated procedure. The highest wastewater acidification yield was achieved with the ceramic-based technology at 25 degrees C, with an inlet COD and an OLR of about 17 g/L and 13 g/L/day, respectively. Under these conditions, about the 66% of the influent COD (not including its VFA content) was converted into VFAs, whose final amount represented more than 82% of the influent COD. In particular, acetic, propionic and butyric acids were the main VFAs by composing the 55.7, 21.5 and 14.4%, respectively, of the whole VFA mixture. Importantly, the relative concentrations of acetate and propionate were affected by the OLR parameter. The nature of the packing material remarkable influenced the process performances, by greatly affecting the biofilm bacterial community structure. In particular, ceramic cubes favoured the immobilization of Firmicutes of the genera Bacillus, Paenibacillus and Clostridium, which were probably involved in the VFA producing process. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. An In Vitro Model for Candida albicans–Streptococcus gordonii Biofilms on Titanium Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Montelongo-Jauregui

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The oral cavity serves as a nutrient-rich haven for over 600 species of microorganisms. Although many are essential to maintaining the oral microbiota, some can cause oral infections such as caries, periodontitis, mucositis, and endodontic infections, and this is further exacerbated with dental implants. Most of these infections are mixed species in nature and associated with a biofilm mode of growth. Here, after optimization of different parameters including cell density, growth media, and incubation conditions, we have developed an in vitro model of C. albicans–S. gordonii mixed-species biofilms on titanium discs that is relevant to infections of peri-implant diseases. Our results indicate a synergistic effect for the development of biofilms when both microorganisms were seeded together, confirming the existence of beneficial, mutualistic cross-kingdom interactions for biofilm formation. The morphological and architectural features of these dual-species biofilms formed on titanium were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Mixed biofilms formed on titanium discs showed a high level of resistance to combination therapy with antifungal and antibacterial drugs. This model can serve as a platform for further analyses of complex fungal/bacterial biofilms and can also be applied to screening of new drug candidates against mixed-species biofilms.

  13. A two-dimensional continuum model of biofilm growth incorporating fluid flow and shear stress based detachment

    KAUST Repository

    Duddu, Ravindra

    2009-05-01

    We present a two-dimensional biofilm growth model in a continuum framework using an Eulerian description. A computational technique based on the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) and the level set method is used to simulate the growth of the biofilm. The model considers fluid flow around the biofilm surface, the advection-diffusion and reaction of substrate, variable biomass volume fraction and erosion due to the interfacial shear stress at the biofilm-fluid interface. The key assumptions of the model and the governing equations of transport, biofilm kinetics and biofilm mechanics are presented. Our 2D biofilm growth results are in good agreement with those obtained by Picioreanu et al. (Biotechnol Bioeng 69(5):504-515, 2000). Detachment due to erosion is modeled using two continuous speed functions based on: (a) interfacial shear stress and (b) biofilm height. A relation between the two detachment models in the case of a 1D biofilm is established and simulated biofilm results with detachment in 2D are presented. The stress in the biofilm due to fluid flow is evaluated and higher stresses are observed close to the substratum where the biofilm is attached. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. From in vitro to in vivo Models of Bacterial Biofilm-Related Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeaux, David; Chauhan, Ashwini; Rendueles, Olaya; Beloin, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The influence of microorganisms growing as sessile communities in a large number of human infections has been extensively studied and recognized for 30–40 years, therefore warranting intense scientific and medical research. Nonetheless, mimicking the biofilm-life style of bacteria and biofilm-related infections has been an arduous task. Models used to study biofilms range from simple in vitro to complex in vivo models of tissues or device-related infections. These different models have progressively contributed to the current knowledge of biofilm physiology within the host context. While far from a complete understanding of the multiple elements controlling the dynamic interactions between the host and biofilms, we are nowadays witnessing the emergence of promising preventive or curative strategies to fight biofilm-related infections. This review undertakes a comprehensive analysis of the literature from a historic perspective commenting on the contribution of the different models and discussing future venues and new approaches that can be merged with more traditional techniques in order to model biofilm-infections and efficiently fight them. PMID:25437038

  15. Evaluating the impacts of migration in the biofilm anode using the model PCBIOFILM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, Andrew K.; Torres, Cesar I.; Rittmann, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    Microbial electrochemical cells depend on the reaction by anode-respiring bacteria (ARB). The ARB reaction generates multiple e - and H + , which take diverging paths, creating a charge imbalance. An electric field must migrate ions to restore electrical neutrality. Here, the model proton condition in bioflim (PCBIOFILM) expands for evaluating the impact of migration on the biofilm anode: the expansion makes the proton condition (PC) work in tandem with the electrical-neutrality condition, which is a novel methodological advancement. The analysis with PCBIOFILM examines relevant scenarios of phosphate- and carbonate-buffered biofilm anodes using established parameters. The analysis demonstrates how: (1) the proton condition (PC) maintains electrical neutrality by achieving charge balance; (2) migration influences the biofilm anode more than non-ARB biofilms; (3) migration increases the overall current density, but by less than 15 percent; and (4) PCBIOFILM without migration accurately captures large-scale trends in biofilm anodes.

  16. A two-dimensional continuum model of biofilm growth incorporating fluid flow and shear stress based detachment

    KAUST Repository

    Duddu, Ravindra; Chopp, David L.; Moran, Brian

    2009-01-01

    of the biofilm. The model considers fluid flow around the biofilm surface, the advection-diffusion and reaction of substrate, variable biomass volume fraction and erosion due to the interfacial shear stress at the biofilm-fluid interface. The key assumptions

  17. Bioreduction of para-chloronitrobenzene in drinking water using a continuous stirred hydrogen-based hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia Siqing, E-mail: siqingxia@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Li Haixiang; Zhang Zhiqiang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang Yanhao [College of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Shandong Jianzhu University, Jinan 250101 (China); Yang Xin; Jia Renyong; Xie Kang; Xu Xiaotian [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2011-08-30

    Highlights: {yields} We designed a novel hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor for p-CNB removal. {yields} Biotransformation pathway of p-CNB in the reactor was investigated in this study. {yields} Nitrate and sulfate competed more strongly for hydrogen than p-CNB. {yields} This reactor achieved high removal efficiency and hydrogen utilization efficiency. - Abstract: para-Chloronitrobenzene (p-CNB) is particularly harmful and persistent in the environment and is one of the priority pollutants. A feasible degradation pathway for p-CNB is bioreduction under anaerobic conditions. Bioreduction of p-CNB using a hydrogen-based hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor (HFMBfR) was investigated in the present study. The experiment results revealed that p-CNB was firstly reduced to para-chloraniline (p-CAN) as an intermediate and then reduced to aniline that involves nitro reduction and reductive dechlorination with H{sub 2} as the electron donor. The HFMBfR had reduced p-CNB to a major extent with a maximum removal percentage of 99.3% at an influent p-CNB concentration of 2 mg/L and a hydraulic residence time of 4.8 h, which corresponded to a p-CNB flux of 0.058 g/m{sup 2} d. The H{sub 2} availability, p-CNB loading, and the presence of competing electron acceptors affected the p-CNB reduction. Flux analysis indicated that the reduction of p-CNB and p-CAN could consume fewer electrons than that of nitrate and sulfate. The HFMBfR had high average hydrogen utilization efficiencies at different steady states in this experiment, with a maximum efficiency at 98.2%.

  18. TU Electric reactor physics model verification: Power reactor benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willingham, C.E.; Killgore, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    Power reactor benchmark calculations using the advanced code package CASMO-3/SIMULATE-3 have been performed for six cycles of Prairie Island Unit 1. The reload fuel designs for the selected cycles included gadolinia as a burnable absorber, natural uranium axial blankets and increased water-to-fuel ratio. The calculated results for both startup reactor physics tests (boron endpoints, control rod worths, and isothermal temperature coefficients) and full power depletion results were compared to measured plant data. These comparisons show that the TU Electric reactor physics models accurately predict important measured parameters for power reactors

  19. An individual-based model for biofilm formation at liquid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardré, Maxime; Henry, Hervé; Douarche, Carine; Plapp, Mathis

    2015-12-10

    The bacterium Bacillus subtilis frequently forms biofilms at the interface between the culture medium and the air. We present a mathematical model that couples a description of bacteria as individual discrete objects to the standard advection-diffusion equations for the environment. The model takes into account two different bacterial phenotypes. In the motile state, bacteria swim and perform a run-and-tumble motion that is biased toward regions of high oxygen concentration (aerotaxis). In the matrix-producer state they excrete extracellular polymers, which allows them to connect to other bacteria and to form a biofilm. Bacteria are also advected by the fluid, and can trigger bioconvection. Numerical simulations of the model reproduce all the stages of biofilm formation observed in laboratory experiments. Finally, we study the influence of various model parameters on the dynamics and morphology of biofilms.

  20. Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria multispecies biofilms in cystic fibrosis: development of an in vitro Mycobacterium abscessus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa dual species biofilm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sevilla, Graciela; García-Coca, Marta; Romera-García, David; Aguilera-Correa, John Jairo; Mahíllo-Fernández, Ignacio; Esteban, Jaime; Pérez-Jorge, Concepción

    2018-04-01

    Lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by the progressive colonization of the respiratory tract by different bacteria, which develop polymicrobial biofilms. In the past decades, there has been an increase in the number of CF patients infected with Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM). Although Mycobacterium abscessus is the main NTM isolated globally, little is known about M. abscessus multispecies biofilm formation. In the present study we developed an in vitro model to study the phenotypic characteristics of biofilms formed by M. abscessus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a major pathogen in CF. For that purpose, dual species biofilms were grown on polycarbonate membranes with a fixed concentration of P. aeruginosa and different inoculums of M. abscessus. The biofilms were sampled at 24, 48, and 72 h and bacteria were quantified in specific media. The results revealed that the increasing initial concentration of M. abscessus in dual species biofilms had an effect on its population only at 24 and 48 h, whereas P. aeruginosa was not affected by the different concentrations used of M. abscessus. Time elapsed increased biofilm formation of both species, specially between 24 and 48 h. According to the results, the conditions to produce a mature dual species biofilm in which the relative species distribution remained stable were 72 h growth of the mixed microbial culture at a 1:1 ratio. A significant decrease in mycobacterial population in dual compared to single species biofilms was found, suggesting that P. aeruginosa has a negative influence on M. abscessus. Finally, in a proof of concept experiment, young and mature dual species biofilms were exposed to clarithromycin. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Physical model of reactor pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, A.; Ravnik, M.

    2004-01-01

    Pulse experiments have been performed at J. Stefan Institute TRIGA reactor since 1991. In total, more than 130 pulses have been performed. Extensive experimental information on the pulse physical characteristics has been accumulated. Fuchs-Hansen adiabatic model has been used for predicting and analysing the pulse parameters. The model is based on point kinetics equation, neglecting the delayed neutrons and assuming constant inserted reactivity in form of step function. Deficiencies of the Fuchs-Hansen model and systematic experimental errors have been observed and analysed. Recently, the pulse model was improved by including the delayed neutrons and time dependence of inserted reactivity. The results explain the observed non-linearity of the pulse energy for high pulses due to finite time of pulse rod withdrawal and the contribution of the delayed neutrons after the prompt part of the pulse. The results of the improved model are in good agreement with experimental results. (author)

  2. Application of a Loop-Type Laboratory Biofilm Reactor to the Evaluation of Biofilm for Some Metallic Materials and Polymers such as Urinary Stents and Catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Kanematsu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory biofilm reactor (LBR was modified to a new loop-type closed system in order to evaluate novel stents and catheter materials using 3D optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Two metallic specimens, pure nickel and cupronickel (80% Cu-20% Ni, along with two polymers, silicone and polyurethane, were chosen as examples to ratify the system. Each set of specimens was assigned to the LBR using either tap water or an NB (Nutrient broth based on peptone from animal foods and beef extract mainly—cultured solution with E-coli formed over 48–72 h. The specimens were then analyzed using Raman Spectroscopy. 3D optical microscopy was employed to corroborate the Raman Spectroscopy results for only the metallic specimens since the inherent roughness of the polymer specimens made such measurements difficult. The findings suggest that the closed loop-type LBR together with Raman spectroscopy analysis is a useful method for evaluating biomaterials as a potential urinary system.

  3. The in vivo biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, Maria; Alhede, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria can grow and proliferate either as single, independent cells or organized in aggregates commonly referred to as biofilms. When bacteria succeed in forming a biofilm within the human host, the infection often becomes very resistant to treatment and can develop into a chronic state. Biofilms...... have been studied for decades using various in vitro models, but it remains debatable whether such in vitro biofilms actually resemble in vivo biofilms in chronic infections. In vivo biofilms share several structural characteristics that differ from most in vitro biofilms. Additionally, the in vivo...... experimental time span and presence of host defenses differ from chronic infections and the chemical microenvironment of both in vivo and in vitro biofilms is seldom taken into account. In this review, we discuss why the current in vitro models of biofilms might be limited for describing infectious biofilms...

  4. Modeling of Hybrid Growth Wastewater Bio-reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EI Nashaei, S.; Garhyan, P.; Prasad, P.; Abdel Halim, H.S.; Ibrahim, G.

    2004-01-01

    The attached/suspended growth mixed reactors are considered one of the recently tried approaches to improve the performance of the biological treatment by increasing the volume of the accumulated biomass in terms of attached growth as well as suspended growth. Moreover, the domestic WW can be easily mixed with a high strength non-hazardous industrial wastewater and treated together in these bio-reactors if the need arises. Modeling of Hybrid hybrid growth wastewater reactor addresses the need of understanding the rational of such system in order to achieve better design and operation parameters. This paper aims at developing a heterogeneous mathematical model for hybrid growth system considering the effect of diffusion, external mass transfer, and power input to the system in a rational manner. The model will be based on distinguishing between liquid/solid phase (bio-film and bio-floc). This model would be a step ahead to the fine tuning the design of hybrid systems based on the experimental data of a pilot plant to be implemented in near future

  5. Cytotoxicity, interaction with dentine and efficacy on multispecies biofilms of a modified salt solution intended for endodontic disinfection in a new in vitro biofilm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Waal, S V; Scheres, N; de Soet, J J; Wesselink, P R; Crielaard, W

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the cytotoxicity of a modified salt solution (MSS) and evaluate the antimicrobial properties of MSS on in vitro biofilm models. In a metabolic assay, fibroblasts derived from periodontal ligaments (PDL) of human extracted teeth were cultured and challenged with MSS or controls. Then, in active attachment biofilm models, the efficacy of MSS in the presence of dentine powder and in eliminating mature biofilms was investigated. In the dentine assay, a biofilm of Enterococcus faecalis was employed. For the final assay, microorganisms were retrieved from infected root canals and cultured to produce biofilms. After the treatments with MSS or the controls, the biofilms were collected, serially diluted and plated. The colony-forming units were counted. One-way anova was used to analyse the differences between the groups. A P 0.05). In endodontic biofilms, the culturable bacteria were equally reduced by MSS, 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) or 2% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) (P > 0.05). Modified salt solution is noncytotoxic in vitro and has good antimicrobial properties equal to CHX and NaOCl. Although the results are promising, ex vivo and in vivo studies are needed before its use as an interappointment root canal dressing can be considered. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Start-up strategies of membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) for completely autotrophic nitrogen removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Sheng-Peng; Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Terada, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    Completely autotrophic nitrogen removal, coupling aerobic and anaerobic ammonium oxidation, can be achieved via redox stratified biofilms growing on gas-permeable membranes. These sequential reactions are mediated by aerobic and anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB and AnAOB). The major...

  7. Benzene degradation in a denitrifying biofilm reactor : activity and microbial community composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waals, Marcelle J.; Atashgahi, Siavash; da Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; van der Zaan, Bas M.; Smidt, Hauke; Gerritse, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Benzene is an aromatic compound and harmful for the environment. Biodegradation of benzene can reduce the toxicological risk after accidental or controlled release of this chemical in the environment. In this study, we further characterized an anaerobic continuous biofilm culture grown for more than

  8. Toluene biodegradation and biofilm growth in an aerobic fixed-film reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcangeli, Jean-Pierre; Arvin, Erik

    1992-01-01

    Aerobic biodegradation of toluene in a biofilm system was investigated. Toluene is easily biodegradable, like several other aromatic compounds. The degradation was first order at bulk concentrations lower than 0.14 mg/l and zero order above 6–8 mg/l. An average yield coefficient of 1 mg biomass...

  9. Microbial succession within an anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (ASBBR treating cane vinasse at 55ºC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Magdalena Ferreira Ribas

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the anaerobic biomass formation capable of treating vinasse from the production of sugar cane alcohol, which was evolved within an anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (ASBBR as immobilized biomass on cubes of polyurethane foam at the temperature of 55ºC. The reactor was inoculated with mesophilic granular sludge originally treating poultry slaughterhouse wastewater. The evolution of the biofilm in the polyurethane foam matrices was assessed during seven experimental phases which were thus characterized by the changes in the organic matter concentrations as COD (1.0 to 20.0 g/L. Biomass characterization proceeded with the examination of sludge samples under optical and scanning electron microscopy. The reactor showed high microbial morphological diversity along the trial. The predominance of Methanosaeta-like cells was observed up to the organic load of 2.5 gCOD/L.d. On the other hand, Methanosarcinalike microorganisms were the predominant archaeal population within the foam matrices at high organic loading ratios above 3.3 gCOD/L.d. This was suggested to be associated to a higher specific rate of acetate consumption by the later organisms.Este trabalho investigou a formação de um biofilme anaeróbio capaz de tratar vinhaça da produção de álcool de cana-de-açúcar, que evoluiu dentro de um reator operado em bateladas seqüenciais com biofilme (ASBBR tendo a biomassa imobilizada em cubos de espuma de poliuretano na temperatura de 55ºC. O reator foi inoculado com lodo granular mesofílico tratando água residuária de abatedouro de aves. A evolução do biofilme nas matrizes de espuma de poliuretano foi observada durante sete fases experimentais que foram caracterizadas por mudanças nas concentrações de matéria orgânica como DQO (1,0 a 20,0 g/L. A caracterização da biomassa foi feita por exames de amostras do lodo em microscopia ótica e eletrônica de varredura. O reator apresentou

  10. Determination of the profile of DO and its mass transferring coefficient in a biofilm reactor packed with semi-suspended bio-carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bing; Song, Haoliang; Bin, Liying; Huang, Shaosong; Zhang, Wenxiang; Fu, Fenglian; Zhao, Yiliang; Chen, Qianyu

    2017-10-01

    The work aims at illustrating the profile of DO and its mass transferring process in a biofilm reactor packed with a novel semi-suspended bio-carrier, and further revealing the main factors that influence the mass transferring coefficient of DO within the biofilm. Results showed that the biofilm was very easy to attach and grow on the semi-suspended bio-carrier, which obviously changed the DO profile inside and outside the biofilm. The semi-suspended bio-carrier caused three different mass transfer zones occurring in the bioreactor, including the zones of bulk solution, boundary layer and biofilm, in which, the boundary layer zone had an obvious higher mass transfer resistance. Increasing the aeration rate might improve the hydrodynamic conditions in the bioreactor and accelerate the mass transfer of DO, but it also detached the biofilm from the surface of bio-carrier, which reduced the consumption of DO, and accordingly, decreased the DO gradient in the bioreactor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of phosphate addition on biofilm bacterial communities and water quality in annular reactors equipped with stainless steel and ductile cast iron pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun-Jung; Choi, Young-June; Ro, Hee-Myong; Ka, Jong-Ok

    2012-02-01

    The impact of orthophosphate addition on biofilm formation and water quality was studied in corrosion-resistant stainless steel (STS) pipe and corrosion-susceptible ductile cast iron (DCI) pipe using cultivation and culture-independent approaches. Sample coupons of DCI pipe and STS pipe were installed in annular reactors, which were operated for 9 months under hydraulic conditions similar to a domestic plumbing system. Addition of 5 mg/L of phosphate to the plumbing systems, under low residual chlorine conditions, promoted a more significant growth of biofilm and led to a greater rate reduction of disinfection by-products in DCI pipe than in STS pipe. While the level of THMs (trihalomethanes) increased under conditions of low biofilm concentration, the levels of HAAs (halo acetic acids) and CH (chloral hydrate) decreased in all cases in proportion to the amount of biofilm. It was also observed that chloroform, the main species of THM, was not readily decomposed biologically and decomposition was not proportional to the biofilm concentration; however, it was easily biodegraded after the addition of phosphate. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequences of 102 biofilm isolates revealed that Proteobacteria (50%) was the most frequently detected phylum, followed by Firmicutes (10%) and Actinobacteria (2%), with 37% of the bacteria unclassified. Bradyrhizobium was the dominant genus on corroded DCI pipe, while Sphingomonas was predominant on non-corroded STS pipe. Methylobacterium and Afipia were detected only in the reactor without added phosphate. PCR-DGGE analysis showed that the diversity of species in biofilm tended to increase when phosphate was added regardless of the pipe material, indicating that phosphate addition upset the biological stability in the plumbing systems.

  12. Novel Model for Multispecies Biofilms That Uses Rigid Gas-Permeable Lenses ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyyala, Rebecca; Kirakodu, Sreenatha S.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Novak, Karen F.

    2011-01-01

    Oral biofilms comprise complex multispecies consortia aided by specific inter- and intraspecies interactions occurring among commensals and pathogenic bacterial species. Oral biofilms are primary initiating factors of periodontal disease, although complex multifactorial biological influences, including host cell responses, contribute to the individual outcome of the disease. To provide a system to study initial stages of interaction between oral biofilms and the host cells that contribute to the disease process, we developed a novel in vitro model system to grow biofilms on rigid gas-permeable contact lenses (RGPLs), which enable oxygen to permeate through the lens material. Bacterial species belonging to early- and late-colonizing groups were successfully established as single- or three-species biofilms, with each group comprising Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus sanguinis; S. gordonii, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Fusobacterium nucleatum; or S. gordonii, F. nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Quantification of biofilm numbers by quantitative PCR (qPCR) revealed substantial differences in the magnitude of bacterial numbers in single-species and multispecies biofilms. We evaluated cell-permeable conventional nucleic acid stains acridine orange, hexidium iodide, and Hoechst 33258 and novel SYTO red, blue, and green fluorochromes for their effect on bacterial viability and fluorescence yield to allow visualization of the aggregates of individual bacterial species by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Substantial differences in the quantity and distribution of the species in the multispecies biofilms were identified. The specific features of these biofilms may help us better understand the role of various bacteria in local challenge of oral tissues. PMID:21421785

  13. A bibliographic review of mathematical models of packed-bed biological reactors (PBR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deisy Corredor

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Several authors have sublected packed-bed biological reactors to mathematical and theoretical analysis. They have taken reaction kinetics and single-dimensional, homogeneous, pseudo-homogeneous and heterogeneous models into account. Numerical methods have provided the set of equations so developed. The effect of physically important process variables in terms of design and operation have been investigated (i.e. residence time, operating- flow, substrate conversion, bio-film area and film thickness.

  14. A 3D Hydrodynamic Model for Heterogeneous Biofilms with Antimicrobial Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    David A. Weitz, and Michael P. Brenner. Osmotic spreading of bacillus subtilis biofilms driven by an extracellular matrix. PNAS, 2012. [38] Zhiya...Currently, the environmental impact of biocide or side-effect of antibiotics have become common concerns, which makes the derivation of an optimal...biofilms to penetration of antibiotics . To our best knowledge, there has yet been a mathematical model which takes into account both the hydrodynamic

  15. Can those organic micro-pollutants that are recalcitrant in activated sludge treatment be removed from wastewater by biofilm reactors (slow sand filters)?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escolà Casas, Mònica; Bester, Kai

    2015-01-01

    The degradation of seven compounds which are usually recalcitrant in classical activated sludge treatment (e.g., diclofenac, propranolol, iopromide, iohexol, iomeprol tebuconazole and propiconazole) was studied in a biofilm reactor (slow sand filtration). This reactor was used to treat real effluent-wastewater at different flow rates (hydraulic loadings) under aerobic conditions so removal and degradation kinetics of these recalcitrant compounds were calculated. With the hydraulic loading rate of 0.012 m 3 m 2 h −1 the reactor removed 41, 94, 58, 57 and 85% of diclofenac, propranolol, iopromide, iohexol and iomeprol respectively. For these compounds the removal efficiency was dependent on hydraulic residence-times. Only 59 and 21% of the incoming tebuconazole and propiconazole respectively were removed but their removal did not depend on hydraulic residence time. Biofilm reactors are thus efficient in removing micro-pollutants and could be considered as an option for advanced treatment in small wastewater treatment plants. - Highlights: • A biofilm reactor (biofilter) can remove micro-pollutants from WWTP effluent. • Sorption could be excluded as the dominant removal mechanism. • Biodegradation was responsible for removing seven compounds. • The removal efficiency was usually proportional to the hydraulic residence-time. • Single first-order removal rates apply for most compounds

  16. Can those organic micro-pollutants that are recalcitrant in activated sludge treatment be removed from wastewater by biofilm reactors (slow sand filters)?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escolà Casas, Mònica; Bester, Kai, E-mail: kb@dmu.dk

    2015-02-15

    The degradation of seven compounds which are usually recalcitrant in classical activated sludge treatment (e.g., diclofenac, propranolol, iopromide, iohexol, iomeprol tebuconazole and propiconazole) was studied in a biofilm reactor (slow sand filtration). This reactor was used to treat real effluent-wastewater at different flow rates (hydraulic loadings) under aerobic conditions so removal and degradation kinetics of these recalcitrant compounds were calculated. With the hydraulic loading rate of 0.012 m{sup 3} m{sup 2} h{sup −1} the reactor removed 41, 94, 58, 57 and 85% of diclofenac, propranolol, iopromide, iohexol and iomeprol respectively. For these compounds the removal efficiency was dependent on hydraulic residence-times. Only 59 and 21% of the incoming tebuconazole and propiconazole respectively were removed but their removal did not depend on hydraulic residence time. Biofilm reactors are thus efficient in removing micro-pollutants and could be considered as an option for advanced treatment in small wastewater treatment plants. - Highlights: • A biofilm reactor (biofilter) can remove micro-pollutants from WWTP effluent. • Sorption could be excluded as the dominant removal mechanism. • Biodegradation was responsible for removing seven compounds. • The removal efficiency was usually proportional to the hydraulic residence-time. • Single first-order removal rates apply for most compounds.

  17. De-mercurization of wastewater by Bacillus cereus (JUBT1): Growth kinetics, biofilm reactor study and field emission scanning electron microscopic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoshal, Sanjukta; Bhattacharya, Pinaki; Chowdhury, Ranjana

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The assembly of biofilm reactor, based on attached growth of Bacillus cereus (JUBT1) on rice husk packing, and an activated carbon filter has been able to ensure the removal of mercury up to near-zero level. Highlights: → A new mercury resistant bacterial strain, Bacillus cereus (JUBT1), has been isolated. → Growth kinetics has been determined. → Biofilm reactor using attached growth of bacteria ensures near-zero level of mercury. → Confinement of mercury is confirmed through energy dispersive spectrometric analysis. - Abstract: Removal of mercuric ions by a mercury resistant bacteria, called Bacillus cereus (JUBT1), isolated from the sludge of a local chlor-alkali industry, has been investigated. Growth kinetics of the bacteria have been determined. A multiplicative, non-competitive relationship between sucrose and mercury ions has been observed with respect to bacterial growth. A combination of biofilm reactor, using attached growth of Bacillus cereus (JUBT1) on rice husk packing, and an activated carbon filter has been able to ensure the removal of mercury up to near-zero level. Energy dispersive spectrometry analysis of biofilm and the activated carbon has proved the transformation of Hg 2+ to Hg 0 and its confinement in the system.

  18. Direct evaluation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm mediators in a chronic infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Matthew S; Pang, Bing; Hong, Wenzhou; Waligora, Elizabeth A; Juneau, Richard A; Armbruster, Chelsie E; Weimer, Kristen E D; Murrah, Kyle; Mann, Ethan E; Lu, Haiping; Sprinkle, April; Parsek, Matthew R; Kock, Nancy D; Wozniak, Daniel J; Swords, W Edward

    2011-08-01

    Biofilms contribute to Pseudomonas aeruginosa persistence in a variety of diseases, including cystic fibrosis, burn wounds, and chronic suppurative otitis media. However, few studies have directly addressed P. aeruginosa biofilms in vivo. We used a chinchilla model of otitis media, which has previously been used to study persistent Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae infections, to show that structures formed in vivo are biofilms of bacterial and host origin within a matrix that includes Psl, a P. aeruginosa biofilm polysaccharide. We evaluated three biofilm and/or virulence mediators of P. aeruginosa known to affect biofilm formation in vitro and pathogenesis in vivo--bis-(3',5')-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP), flagella, and quorum sensing--in a chinchilla model. We show that c-di-GMP overproduction has a positive impact on bacterial persistence, while quorum sensing increases virulence. We found no difference in persistence attributed to flagella. We conclude from these studies that a chinchilla otitis media model provides a means to evaluate pathogenic mediators of P. aeruginosa and that in vitro phenotypes should be examined in multiple infection systems to fully understand their role in disease.

  19. Simultaneous removal of selected oxidized contaminants in groundwater using a continuously stirred hydrogen-based membrane biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Siqing; Liang, Jun; Xu, Xiaoyin; Shen, Shuang

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory trial was conducted for evaluating the capability of a continuously stirred hydrogen-based membrane biofilm reactor to simultaneously reduce nitrate (NO(3-)-N), sulfate (SO4(2-)), bromate (BrO3-), hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and parachloronitrobenzene (p-CNB). The reactor contained two bundles of hollow fiber membranes functioning as an autotrophic biofilm carrier and hydrogen pipe as well. On the condition that hydrogen was supplied as electron donor and diffused into water through membrane pores, autohydrogenotrophic bacteria were capable of reducing contaminants to forms with lower toxicity. Reduction occurred within 1 day and removal fluxes for NO(3-)-N, SO4(2-), BrO3-, Cr(VI), and p-CNB reached 0.641, 2.396, 0.008, 0.016 and 0.031 g/(day x m2), respectively after 112 days of continuous operation. Except for the fact that sulfate was 37% removed under high surface loading, the other four contaminants were reduced by over 95%. The removal flux comparison between phases varying in surface loading and H2 pressure showed that decreasing surface loading or increasing H2 pressure would promote removal flux. Competition for electrons occurred among the five contaminants. Electron-equivalent flux analysis showed that the amount of utilized hydrogen was mainly controlled by NO(3-)-N and SO4(2-) reduction, which accounted for over 99% of the electron flux altogether. It also indicated the electron acceptor order, showing that nitrate was the most prior electron acceptor while suIfate was the second of the five contaminants.

  20. Diffusion Retardation by Binding of Tobramycin in an Alginate Biofilm Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Bao; Christophersen, Lars; Kolpen, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Microbial cells embedded in a self-produced extracellular biofilm matrix cause chronic infections, e. g. by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. The antibiotic killing of bacteria in biofilms is generally known to be reduced by 100–1000 times relative to planktonic...... bacteria. This makes such infections difficult to treat. We have therefore proposed that biofilms can be regarded as an independent compartment with distinct pharmacokinetics. To elucidate this pharmacokinetics we have measured the penetration of the tobramycin into seaweed alginate beads which serve...... to be uniformly distributed throughout the volume of the alginate bead. The power-law appears to be a consequence of binding to a multitude of different binding sites. In a diffusion model these results are shown to produce pronounced retardation of the penetration of tobramycin into the biofilm. This filtering...

  1. Calculation models for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashanii, Ahmed Ali

    2010-01-01

    Determination of different parameters of nuclear reactors requires neutron transport calculations. Due to complicity of geometry and material composition of the reactor core, neutron calculations were performed for simplified models of the real arrangement. In frame of the present work two models were used for calculations. First, an elementary cell model was used to prepare cross section data set for a homogenized-core reactor model. The homogenized-core reactor model was then used to perform neutron transport calculation. The nuclear reactor is a tank-shaped thermal reactor. The semi-cylindrical core arrangement consists of aluminum made fuel bundles immersed in water which acts as a moderator as well as a coolant. Each fuel bundle consists of aluminum cladded fuel rods arranged in square lattices. (author)

  2. An evaluation of the performance and optimization of a new wastewater treatment technology: the air suction flow-biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forde, P; Kennelly, C; Gerrity, S; Collins, G; Clifford, Eoghan

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory study, a novel wastewater treatment technology, the air suction flow-biofilm reactor (ASF-BR) - a sequencing batch biofilm reactor technology with a passive aeration mechanism - was investigated for its efficiency in removing organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, from high-strength synthetic wastewaters. A laboratory-scale ASF-BR comprising 2 reactors, 350 mm in diameter and 450 mm in height, was investigated over 2 studies (Studies 1 and 2) for a total of 430 days. Study 1 lasted a total of 166 days and involved a 9-step sequence alternating between aeration, anoxic treatment and settlement. The cycle time was 12.1 h and the reactors were operated at a substrate loading rate of 3.60 g filtered chemical oxygen demand (CODf)/m2 media/d, 0.28 g filtered total nitrogen (TNf)/m2 media/d, 0.24 g ammonium-nitrogen (NH4-N)/m2 media/d and 0.07 g ortho-phosphate (PO4-P)/m2 media/d. The average removal rates achieved during Study 1 were 98% CODf, 88% TNf, 97% NH4-N and 35% PO4-P. During Study 2 (264 days), the unit was operated at a loading rate of 2.49 g CODf/m2 media/d, 0.24 g TNf/m2 media/d, 0.20 g NH4-N/m2 media/d and 0.06 PO4-P/m2 media/d. The energy requirement during this study was reduced by modifying the treatment cycle in include fewer pumping cycles. Removal rates in Study 2 averaged 97% CODf, 86% TNf, 99% NH4-N and 76% PO4-P. The excess sludge production of the system was evaluated and detailed analyses of the treatment cycles were carried out. Biomass yields were estimated at 0.09 g SS/g CODf, removed and 0.21 g SS/g CODf, removed for Studies 1 and 2, respectively. Gene analysis showed that the use of a partial vacuum did not affect the growth of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. The results indicate that the ASF-BR and passive aeration technologies can offer efficient alternatives to existing technologies.

  3. Modeling bacterial attachment to surfaces as an early stage of biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Moustaid, Fadoua; Eladdadi, Amina; Uys, Lafras

    2013-06-01

    Biofilms are present in all natural, medical and industrial surroundings where bacteria live. Biofilm formation is a key factor in the growth and transport of both beneficial and harmful bacteria. While much is known about the later stages of biofilm formation, less is known about its initiation which is an important first step in the biofilm formation. In this paper, we develop a non-linear system of partial differential equations of Keller-Segel type model in one-dimensional space, which couples the dynamics of bacterial movement to that of the sensing molecules. In this case, bacteria perform a biased random walk towards the sensing molecules. We derive the boundary conditions of the adhesion of bacteria to a surface using zero-Dirichlet boundary conditions, while the equation describing sensing molecules at the interface needed particular conditions to be set. The numerical results show the profile of bacteria within the space and the time evolution of the density within the free-space and on the surface. Testing different parameter values indicate that significant amount of sensing molecules present on the surface leads to a faster bacterial movement toward the surface which is the first step of biofilm initiation. Our work gives rise to results that agree with the biological description of the early stages of biofilm formation.

  4. Mathematical model of the reactor coolant pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozuh, M.

    1989-01-01

    The mathematical model of reactor coolant pump is described in this paper. It is based on correlations for centrifugal reactor coolant pumps. This code is one of the elements needed for the simulation of the whole NPP primary system. In subroutine developed according to this model we tried in every possible detail to incorporate plant specific data for Krsko NPP. (author)

  5. Hydrogen sulfide oxidation in novel Horizontal-Flow Biofilm Reactors dominated by an Acidithiobacillus and a Thiobacillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrity, S; Kennelly, C; Clifford, E; Collins, G

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) is an odourous, highly toxic gas commonly encountered in various commercial and municipal sectors. Three novel, laboratory-scale, Horizontal-Flow Biofilm Reactors (HFBRs) were tested for the removal of H2S gas from air streams over a 178-day trial at 10°C. Removal rates of up to 15.1 g [H2S] m(-3) h(-1) were achieved, demonstrating the HFBRs as a feasible technology for the treatment of H2S-contaminated airstreams at low temperatures. Bio-oxidation of H2S in the reactors led to the production of H(+) and sulfate (SO(2-)4) ions, resulting in the acidification of the liquid phase. Reduced removal efficiency was observed at loading rates of 15.1 g [H2S] m(-3) h(-1). NaHCO3 addition to the liquid nutrient feed (synthetic wastewater (SWW)) resulted in improved H2S removal. Bacterial diversity, which was investigated by sequencing and fingerprinting 16S rRNA genes, was low, likely due to the harsh conditions prevailing in the systems. The HFBRs were dominated by two species from the genus Acidithiobacillus and Thiobacillus. Nonetheless, there were significant differences in microbial community structure between distinct HFBR zones due to the influence of alkalinity, pH and SO4 concentrations. Despite the low temperature, this study indicates HFBRs have an excellent potential to biologically treat H2S-contaminated airstreams.

  6. Cyanuric acid biodegradation by a mixed bacterial culture of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Acinetobacter sp. in a packed bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galíndez-Nájera, S P; Llamas-Martínez, M A; Ruiz-Ordaz, N; Juárez-Ramírez, C; Mondragón-Parada, M E; Ahuatzi-Chacón, D; Galíndez-Mayer, J

    2009-02-01

    Cyanuric acid (1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triol [OOOT]) is a common biodegradation byproduct of triazinic herbicides, frequently accumulated in soils or water when supplementary carbon sources are absent. A binary bacterial culture able to degrade OOOT was selected through a continuous selection process accomplished in a chemostat fed with a mineral salt (MS) medium containing cyanuric acid as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. By sequence comparison of their 16S rDNA amplicons, bacterial strains were identified as Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and Acinetobacter sp. When the binary culture immobilized in a packed bed reactor (PBR) was fed with MS medium containing OOOT (50 mg L(-1)), its removal efficiencies were about 95%; when it was fed with OOOT plus glucose (120 mg L(-1)) as a supplementary carbon source, its removal efficiencies were closer to 100%. From sessile cells, attached to PBR porous support, or free cells present in the outflowing medium, DNA was extracted and used for Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA analysis. Electrophoretic patterns obtained were compared to those of pure bacterial strains, a clear predominance of A. tumefaciens in PBR was observed. Although in continuous suspended cell culture, a stable binary community could be maintained, the attachment capability of A. tumefaciens represented a selective advantage over Acinetobacter sp. in the biofilm reactor, favoring its predominance in the porous stone support.

  7. Balancing the organic load and light supply in symbiotic microalgal–bacterial biofilm reactors treating synthetic municipal wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelee, N.C.; Temmink, B.G.; Janssen, M.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    Symbiotic microalgal–bacterial biofilms can be very attractive for municipal wastewater treatment. Microalgae remove nitrogen and phosphorus and simultaneously produce the oxygen that is required for the aerobic, heterotrophic degradation of organic pollutants. For the application of these biofilms

  8. Removal of absorbable organic halides (aox) from recycled paper mill effluent using granular activated carbon-sequencing batch biofilm reactor (GAC-SBBR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad, A.B.; Rahman, R.A.; Kadhum, A.A.H.; Abdullah, S.R.S.; Shaari, S.

    2006-01-01

    Paper mills generate varieties of pollutants depending upon the type of the pulping process. Paper mill wastewaters have high chemical oxygen demand (COD) and colour, indicating high concentrations of recalcitrant organics. The study was conducted employing a Granular Activated Carbon - Sequencing Batch Biofilm Reactor (GAC-SBBR), containing 3.0 L working volume, operated in aerobic condition and packed with 200 g/L of 2-3 mm granular activated carbon (coconut shells) as a medium for biofilm growth. For the first couple of month, the HRT was 36 hours and the HRT of this reactor was adjusted to 24 hours in order to evaluate the performance of the system. The treated wastewater sample for these studies came from a recycle paper factory from MNI Sdn Bhd with 4 different samples characteristics. The adsorbable organic halides (AOX) to be determined and treated were Pentachlorophenol (PCP), 2,3,4,5-Tetrachlorophenol (2,3,4,5-TeCP), 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), 2,4-Dichlorophenol ( 2,4-DCP), 2-Chlorophenol (CP) and phenol. Results showed that, the biofilm attached onto granular activated carbon (GAC) could substantially remove these recalcitrant in the wastewater. More over, results from the studies showed that high removal was achieved by the biofilm SBR with 10-100% removal of AOX and depending on HRT. (Author)

  9. Bond graph modeling of nuclear reactor dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tylee, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    A tenth-order linear model of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is developed using bond graph techniques. The model describes the nuclear heat generation process and the transfer of this heat to the reactor coolant. Comparisons between the calculated model response and test data from a small-scale PWR show the model to be an adequate representation of the actual plant dynamics. Possible application of the model in an advanced plant diagnostic system is discussed

  10. Reactor Thermal Hydraulic Numerical Calculation And Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duong Ngoc Hai; Dang The Ba

    2008-01-01

    In the paper the results of analysis of thermal hydraulic state models using the numerical codes such as COOLOD, EUREKA and RELAP5 for simulation of the reactor thermal hydraulic states are presented. The calculations, analyses of reactor thermal hydraulic state and safety were implemented using different codes. The received numerical results, which were compared each to other, to experiment measurement of Dalat (Vietnam) research reactor and published results, show their appropriateness and capacity for analyses of different appropriate cases. (author)

  11. Population changes in a biofilm reactor for phosphorus removal as evidenced by the use of FISH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkentoft, C.M.; Müller, E.; Arnz, P.

    2002-01-01

    as in the first run was seen after one month, although the phase lengths had not been varied. Hence, the decrease after 1 month in the first and second run should be seen as a start-up phenomenon. FISH could detect a noticeable shift in the microbial population mainly within the first 2 weeks ofoperation. Almost...... hybridised to the dominant bacterial groups in the reactors investigated. No noticeable changes were detected in the aerobic bench-scale reactor during this period, indicating that the observed changes in the lab-scale reactor were caused by the changed environment. r 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights...

  12. Chemical reactor modeling multiphase reactive flows

    CERN Document Server

    Jakobsen, Hugo A

    2014-01-01

    Chemical Reactor Modeling closes the gap between Chemical Reaction Engineering and Fluid Mechanics.  The second edition consists of two volumes: Volume 1: Fundamentals. Volume 2: Chemical Engineering Applications In volume 1 most of the fundamental theory is presented. A few numerical model simulation application examples are given to elucidate the link between theory and applications. In volume 2 the chemical reactor equipment to be modeled are described. Several engineering models are introduced and discussed. A survey of the frequently used numerical methods, algorithms and schemes is provided. A few practical engineering applications of the modeling tools are presented and discussed. The working principles of several experimental techniques employed in order to get data for model validation are outlined. The monograph is based on lectures regularly taught in the fourth and fifth years graduate courses in transport phenomena and chemical reactor modeling, and in a post graduate course in modern reactor m...

  13. A new rabbit model of implant-related biofilm infection: development and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Cheng-Bing; Zeng, Hong; Shen, Ding-Xia; Wang, Hui; Wang, Ji-Fang; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2016-03-01

    This study is to establish a rabbit model for human prosthetic joint infection and biofilm formation. Thirty-two healthy adult rabbits were randomly divided into four groups and implanted with stainless steel screws and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) washers in the non-articular surface of the femoral lateral condyle of the right hind knees. The rabbit knee joints were inoculated with 1 mL saline containing 0, 102, 103, 104 CFU of Staphylococcus epidermidis ( S. epidermidis) isolated from the patient with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) infection, respectively. On the 14th postoperative day, the UHMWPE washers from the optimal 103 CFU group were further examined. The SEM examination showed a typical biofilm construction that circular S. epidermidis were embedded in a mucous-like matrix. In addition, the LCSM examination showed that the biofilm consisted of the polysaccharide stained bright green fluorescence and S. epidermidis radiating red fluorescence. Thus, we successfully create a rabbit model for prosthetic joint infection and biofilm formation, which should be valuable for biofilm studies.

  14. Applying moving bed biofilm reactor for removing linear alkylbenzene sulfonate using synthetic media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalaleddin Mollaei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Detergents and problems of their attendance into water and wastewater cause varied difficulties such as producing foam, abnormality in the growth of algae, accumulation and dispersion in aqueous environments. One of the reactors was designated with 30% of the media with the similar conditions exactly same as the other which had filling rate about 10 %, in order to compare both of them together. A standard method methylene blue active substance was used to measure anionic surfactant. The concentrations of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate which examined were 50, 100, 200, 300 and 400 mg/l in HRT 72, 24 and 8 hrs. The removal percentage for both of reactors at the beginning of operating at50 mg/l concentration of pollutant had a bit difference and with gradually increasing the pollutant concentration and decreasing Hydraulic retention time, the variation between the removal percentage of both reactors became significant as the reactor that had the filling rate about 30 %, showed better condition than the other reactor with 10 % filling rate. Ideal condition in this experiment was caught at hydraulic retention time about 72 hrs and 200 mg/l pollutants concentration with 99.2% removal by the reactor with 30% filling rate. While the ideal condition for the reactor with 10% filling rate with the same hydraulic retention time and 100 mg/l pollutants concentrations was obtained about 99.4% removal. Regarding anionic surfactant standard in Iran which is 1.5 mg/l for surface water discharge, using this process is suitable for treating municipal wastewater and industrial wastewater which has a range of the pollutant between 100-200 mg/l. but for the industries that produce detergents products which make wastewater containing more than 200 mg/l surfactants, using secondary treatment process for achieving discharge standard is required.

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten; Hultqvist, Louise Dahl; Givskov, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Studies of biopsies from infectious sites, explanted tissue and medical devises have provided evidence that biofilms are the underlying cause of a variety of tissue-associated and implant-associated recalcitrant human infections. With a need for novel anti-biofilm treatment strategies, research...... in biofilm infection microbiology, biofilm formation mechanisms and biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance has become an important area in microbiology. Substantial knowledge about biofilm formation mechanisms, biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance and immune evasion mechanisms has been obtained...... through work with biofilms grown in in vitro experimental setups, and the relevance of this information in the context of chronic infections is being investigated by the use of animal models of infection. Because our current in vitro experimental setups and animal models have limitations, new advanced...

  16. A Biofilm Pocket Model to Evaluate Different Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment Modalities in Terms of Biofilm Removal and Reformation, Surface Alterations and Attachment of Periodontal Ligament Fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias T Hägi

    Full Text Available There is a lack of suitable in vitro models to evaluate various treatment modalities intending to remove subgingival bacterial biofilm. Consequently, the aims of this in vitro-study were: a to establish a pocket model enabling mechanical removal of biofilm and b to evaluate repeated non-surgical periodontal treatment with respect to biofilm removal and reformation, surface alterations, tooth hard-substance-loss, and attachment of periodontal ligament (PDL fibroblasts.Standardized human dentin specimens were colonized by multi-species biofilms for 3.5 days and subsequently placed into artificially created pockets. Non-surgical periodontal treatment was performed as follows: a hand-instrumentation with curettes (CUR, b ultrasonication (US, c subgingival air-polishing using erythritol (EAP and d subgingival air-polishing using erythritol combined with chlorhexidine digluconate (EAP-CHX. The reduction and recolonization of bacterial counts, surface roughness (Ra and Rz, the caused tooth substance-loss (thickness as well as the attachment of PDL fibroblasts were evaluated and statistically analyzed by means of ANOVA with Post-Hoc LSD.After 5 treatments, bacterial reduction in biofilms was highest when applying EAP-CHX (4 log10. The lowest reduction was found after CUR (2 log10. Additionally, substance-loss was the highest when using CUR (128±40 µm in comparison with US (14±12 µm, EAP (6±7 µm and EAP-CHX (11±10 µm. Surface was roughened when using CUR and US. Surfaces exposed to US and to EAP attracted the highest numbers of PDL fibroblasts.The established biofilm model simulating a periodontal pocket combined with interchangeable placements of test specimens with multi-species biofilms enables the evaluation of different non-surgical treatment modalities on biofilm removal and surface alterations. Compared to hand instrumentation the application of ultrasonication and of air-polishing with erythritol prevents from substance-loss and results

  17. Las degradation in a fluidized bed reactor and phylogenetic characterization of the biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Oliveira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A fluidized bed reactor was used to study the degradation of the surfactant linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS. The reactor was inoculated with anaerobic sludge and was fed with a synthetic substrate supplemented with LAS in increasing concentrations (8.2 to 45.8 mg l-1. The removal efficiency of 93% was obtained after 270 days of operation. Subsequently, 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the sample at the last stage of the reactor operation recovered 105 clones belonging to the domain Bacteria. These clones represented a variety of phyla with significant homology to Bacteroidetes (40%, Proteobacteria (42%, Verrucomicrobia (4%, Acidobacteria (3%, Firmicutes (2%, and Gemmatimonadetes (1%. A small fraction of the clones (8% was not related to any phylum. Such phyla variety indicated the role of microbial consortia in degrading the surfactant LAS.

  18. 3D digital image processing for biofilm quantification from confocal laser scanning microscopy: Multidimensional statistical analysis of biofilm modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Jerzy S.

    The dramatic increase in number and volume of digital images produced in medical diagnostics, and the escalating demand for rapid access to these relevant medical data, along with the need for interpretation and retrieval has become of paramount importance to a modern healthcare system. Therefore, there is an ever growing need for processed, interpreted and saved images of various types. Due to the high cost and unreliability of human-dependent image analysis, it is necessary to develop an automated method for feature extraction, using sophisticated mathematical algorithms and reasoning. This work is focused on digital image signal processing of biological and biomedical data in one- two- and three-dimensional space. Methods and algorithms presented in this work were used to acquire data from genomic sequences, breast cancer, and biofilm images. One-dimensional analysis was applied to DNA sequences which were presented as a non-stationary sequence and modeled by a time-dependent autoregressive moving average (TD-ARMA) model. Two-dimensional analyses used 2D-ARMA model and applied it to detect breast cancer from x-ray mammograms or ultrasound images. Three-dimensional detection and classification techniques were applied to biofilm images acquired using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Modern medical images are geometrically arranged arrays of data. The broadening scope of imaging as a way to organize our observations of the biophysical world has led to a dramatic increase in our ability to apply new processing techniques and to combine multiple channels of data into sophisticated and complex mathematical models of physiological function and dysfunction. With explosion of the amount of data produced in a field of biomedicine, it is crucial to be able to construct accurate mathematical models of the data at hand. Two main purposes of signal modeling are: data size conservation and parameter extraction. Specifically, in biomedical imaging we have four key problems

  19. Frequency of sucrose exposure on the cariogenicity of a biofilm-caries model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Garrido, Natalia; Lozano, Carla; Giacaman, Rodrigo A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Although sucrose is considered the most cariogenic carbohydrate in the human diet, the question of how many exposures are needed to induce damage on the hard dental tissues remains unclear. To approach this question, different frequencies of daily sucrose exposure were tested on a relevant biological caries model. Materials and Methods: Biofilms of the Streptococcus mutans were formed on enamel slabs and exposed to cariogenic challenges with 10% sucrose for 5 min at 0, 1, 3, 5, 8, or 10 times per day. After 5 days, biofilms were retrieved to analyze biomass, protein content, viable bacteria, and polysaccharide formation. Enamel demineralization was evaluated by percentage of microhardness loss (percentage surface hardness loss [%SHL]). Results: Biomass, protein content, polysaccharide production, acidogenicity of the biofilm, and %SHL proportionally increased with the number of daily exposures to sucrose (P 0.05). Conclusions: Higher sucrose exposure seems to increase cariogenicity, in a frequency-dependent manner, by the modification of bacterial virulent properties. PMID:27403051

  20. Pathology and biofilm formation in a porcine model of staphylococcal osteomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, L K; Koch, J; Frees, D

    2012-01-01

    A porcine model was used to examine the potential of human and porcine Staphylococcus aureus isolates to induce haematogenously spread osteomyelitis. Pigs were inoculated in the right femoral artery with one of the following S. aureus strains: S54F9 (from a porcine lung abscess; n = 3 animals), N...... dependent on the strain of bacteria inoculated and on the formation of a biofilm....... with colonies of S. aureus as demonstrated immunohistochemically. By peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization bacterial aggregates were demonstrated to be embedded in an opaque matrix, indicating that the bacteria had formed a biofilm. Development of experimental osteomyelitis was therefore...

  1. Study of a Mathematical Model of Biocide Effect on a Biofilm Isolated from a Cooling System Using the Microtiter Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahryar Shakeri

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial colonization on metal surfaces and their metabolic activities lead to biocorrosion. In fact, any agent removing the biofilm or decreasing its thickness is capable of preventing biocorrosion. Biocides make up one such agent. These agents can control bacterial biofilms, remove these structures, or kill cells within them. The object of this research is to study the thermodynamic model of biocide penetration into the biofilm using the microtiter plate test. First, the biofilm bacteria were isolated to form a mix- bacterial biofilm. The biocide effect on the mix-biofilm was then determined using the microtiter plate test. Results from this test were compared with those from a thermodynamic model and it was revealed that the effects of oxidizing biocides such as sodium hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide are in good agreement with the results from the model. The results indicated that increased biocide concentration leads to the removal of the biofilm or to the kill-off of the cells within it. However, in the case of non-oxidizing biocides such as sulfathiazol, glutaraldehyde, and alkyl dimethyl ammonium chloride, the efficiency results did not agree well with the results from the thermodynamic model such that increased biocide concentration did not remove the biofilm nor did it kill off the cells within it

  2. Hydrolysis and degradation of filtrated organic particulates in a biofilm reactor under anoxic and aerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janning, K.F.; Mesterton, K.; Harremoës, P.

    1997-01-01

    Two experiments were performed in order to investigate the anoxic and the aerobic degradation of filtrated organic matter in a biofilter. In submerged lab: scale reactors with Biocarbone media as filter material, accumulated particulate organic matter from pre-settled wastewater served as the only...

  3. Carbonaceous materials in petrochemical wastewater before and after treatment in an aerated submerged fixed-bed biofilm reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trojanowicz Karol

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Results of the studies for determining fractions of organic contaminants in a pretreated petrochemical wastewater flowing into a pilot Aerated Submerged Fixed-Bed Biofilm Reactor (ASFBBR are presented and discussed. The method of chemical oxygen demand (COD fractionation consisted of physical tests and biological assays. It was found that the main part of the total COD in the petrochemical, pretreated wastewater was soluble organic substance with average value of 57.6%. The fractions of particulate and colloidal organic matter were found to be 31.8% and 10.6%, respectively. About 40% of COD in the influent was determined as readily biodegradable COD. The inert fraction of the soluble organic matter in the petrochemical wastewater constituted about 60% of the influent colloidal and soluble COD. Determination of degree of hydrolysis (DH of the colloidal fraction of COD was also included in the paper. The estimated value of DH was about 62%. Values of the assayed COD fractions were compared with the same parameters obtained for municipal wastewater by other authors.

  4. Improvement of poly-γ-glutamic acid biosynthesis in a moving bed biofilm reactor by Bacillus subtilis NX-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yongxiang; Tang, Bao; Xu, Zongqi; Liu, Kun; Xu, Zheng; Feng, Xiaohai; Xu, Hong

    2016-10-01

    The production of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) by Bacillus subtilis NX-2 using a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) system was tested for the first time in this study. Polypropylene TL-2 was chosen as a suitable carrier, and γ-PGA concentration of 42.7±0.86g/L and productivity of 0.59±0.06g/(Lh) were obtained in batch fermentation. After application of the strategy of dissolved oxygen (DO)-stat feeding, higher γ-PGA concentration and productivity were achieved than with glucose feedback feeding. Finally, the repeated fed-batch cultures implemented in the MBBR system showed high stability, and the maximal γ-PGA concentration and productivity of 74.2g/L and 1.24g/(Lh) were achieved, respectively. In addition, the promotion of oxygen transfer by an MBBR carrier was well explained by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. These results suggest that an MBBR system could be applied to large-scale γ-PGA production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of Electrical Stimulation on the Degradation of Azo Dye in Three-Dimensional Biofilm Electrode Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Cao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional biofilm electrode reactors (3D-BERs were constructed to degrade the azo dye Reactive Brilliant Red (RBR X-3B. The 3D-BERs with different influent concentrations and external voltages were individually studied to investigate their influence on the removal of X-3B. Experimental results showed that 3D-BERs have good X-3B removal efficiency; even when the influent concentration was 800 mg/L, removal efficiency of 73.4% was still achieved. In addition, the X-3B removal efficiency stabilized shortly after the influent concentration increased. In 3D-BERs, the average X-3B removal efficiency increased from 52.8% to 85.4% when the external voltage rose from 0 to 2 V. We further identified the intermediate products via UV-Vis and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS analyses, and discussed the potential mechanism of degradation. After the conjugate structure of X-3B was destroyed, all of the substances generated mainly consisted of lower-molecular-weight organics.

  6. Simultaneous enrichment of denitrifying anaerobic methane-oxidizing microorganisms and anammox bacteria in a hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhao-Wei; Lu, Yong-Ze; Fu, Liang; Ding, Jing; Zeng, Raymond J

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the coculture system of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) microbes and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria was successfully enriched in a hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor (HfMBR) using freshwater sediment as the inoculum. The maximal removal rates of nitrate and ammonium were 78 mg N/L/day (131 mg N/m 2 /day) and 26 mg N/L/day (43 mg N/m 2 /day), respectively. Due to the high rate of methane mass transfer in HfMBR, the activity of DAMO archaea continued to increase during the enrichment period, indicating that HfMBR could be a powerful tool to enrich DAMO microorganisms. Effects of partial methane pressure, temperature, and pH on the cocultures were obvious. However, the microbial activity in HfMBR could be recovered quickly after the shock change of environmental factors. Furthermore, the result also found that DAMO bacteria likely had a stronger competitive advantage than anammox bacteria under the operating conditions in this study. High-throughput sequencing 16S rRNA genes illustrated that the dominant microbes were NC10, Euryarchaeota, Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Chlorobi with relative abundance of 38.8, 26.2, 13.78, 6.2, and 3.6 %, respectively.

  7. Characterization, morphology and composition of biofilm and precipitates from a sulphate-reducing fixed-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remoundaki, Emmanouela; Kousi, Pavlina; Joulian, Catherine; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne; Hatzikioseyian, Artin; Tsezos, Marios

    2008-01-01

    The characteristics of the biofilm and the solids formed during the operation of a sulphate-reducing fixed-bed reactor, fed with a moderately acidic synthetic effluent containing zinc and iron, are presented. A diverse population of δ-Proteobacteria SRB, affiliated to four distinct genera, colonized the system. The morphology, mineralogy and surface chemistry of the precipitates were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). The XRD patterns observed are characteristic of amorphous solid phases. Peaks corresponding to crystalline iron sulphide, marcasite, sphalerite and wurtzite were also identified. SEM-EDX results confirm the predominance of amorphous phases appearing as a cloudy haze. EDX spectra of spots on the surface of these amorphous phases reveal the predominance of iron, zinc and sulphur indicating the formation of iron and zinc sulphides. The predominance of these amorphous phases and the formation of very fine particles, during the operation of the SRB column, are in agreement and can be explained by the formation pathways of metal sulphides at ambient temperature, alkaline pH and reducing conditions. Solids are precipitated either as (i) amorphous phases deposited on the bed material, as well as on surface of crystals, e.g. Mg 3 (PO 4 ) 2 and (ii) as rod-shaped solids characterized by a rough hazy surface, indicating the encapsulation of bacterial cells by amorphous metal sulphides

  8. Technical, hygiene, economic, and life cycle assessment of full-scale moving bed biofilm reactors for wastewater treatment in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anju; Kamble, Sheetal Jaisingh; Sawant, Megha; Chakravarthy, Yogita; Kazmi, Absar; Aymerich, Enrique; Starkl, Markus; Ghangrekar, Makarand; Philip, Ligy

    2018-01-01

    Moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) is a highly effective biological treatment process applied to treat both urban and industrial wastewaters in developing countries. The present study investigated the technical performance of ten full-scale MBBR systems located across India. The biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, total suspended solid, pathogens, and nutrient removal efficiencies were low as compared to the values claimed in literature. Plant 1 was considered for evaluation of environmental impacts using life cycle assessment approach. CML 2 baseline 2000 methodology was adopted, in which 11 impact categories were considered. The life cycle impact assessment results revealed that the main environmental hot spot of this system was energy consumption. Additionally, two scenarios were compared: scenario 1 (direct discharge of treated effluent, i.e., no reuse) and scenario 2 (effluent reuse and tap water replacement). The results showed that scenario 2 significantly reduce the environmental impact in all the categories ultimately decreasing the environmental burden. Moreover, significant economic and environmental benefits can be obtained in scenario 2 by replacing the freshwater demand for non-potable uses. To enhance the performance of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), there is a need to optimize energy consumption and increase wastewater collection efficiency to maximize the operating capacity of plant and minimize overall environmental footprint. It was concluded that MBBR can be a good alternative for upgrading and optimizing existing municipal wastewater treatment plants with appropriate tertiary treatment. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  9. Stochastic model of energetic nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojko, R.V.; Ryazanov, V.V.

    2002-01-01

    Behaviour of nuclear reactor was treated using the theory of branching processes. As mathematical model descriptive the neutron number in time the Markov occasional process is proposed. Application of branching occasional processes with variable regime to the description of neutron behaviour in the reactor makes possible conducting strong description of critical operation regime and demonstrates the severity of the process. Three regimes of the critical behaviour depending on the sign of manipulated variables and feedbacks were discovered. Probability regularities peculiar to the behaviour of the reactor are embodied to the suggested stochastic model [ru

  10. A model for nuclear research reactor dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barati, Ramin, E-mail: Barati.ramin@aut.ac.ir; Setayeshi, Saeed, E-mail: setayesh@aut.ac.ir

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • A thirty-fourth order model is used to simulate the dynamics of a research reactor. • We consider delayed neutrons fraction as a function of time. • Variable fuel and temperature reactivity coefficients are used. • WIMS, BORGES and CITVAP codes are used for initial condition calculations. • Results are in agreement with experimental data rather than common codes. -- Abstract: In this paper, a useful thirty-fourth order model is presented to simulate the kinetics and dynamics of a research reactor core. The model considers relevant physical phenomena that govern the core such as reactor kinetics, reactivity feedbacks due to coolant and fuel temperatures (Doppler effects) with variable reactivity coefficients, xenon, samarium, boron concentration, fuel burn up and thermal hydraulics. WIMS and CITVAP codes are used to extract neutron cross sections and calculate the initial neuron flux respectively. The purpose is to present a model with results similar to reality as much as possible with reducing common simplifications in reactor modeling to be used in different analyses such as reactor control, functional reliability and safety. The model predictions are qualified by comparing with experimental data, detailed simulations of reactivity insertion transients, and steady state for Tehran research reactor reported in the literature and satisfactory results have been obtained.

  11. Modelling aerosol behavior in reactor cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, B.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of some of the areas of concern in using computer codes to model fission-product aerosol behavior in the reactor cooling system (RCS) of a water-cooled nuclear reactor during a loss-of-coolant accident. The basic physical processes that require modelling include: fission product release and aerosol formation in the reactor core, aerosol transport and deposition in the reactor core and throughout the rest of the RCS, and the interaction between aerosol transport processes and the thermalhydraulics. In addition to these basic physical processes, chemical reactions can have a large influence on the nature of the aerosol and its behavior in the RCS. The focus is on the physics and the implications of numerical methods used in the computer codes to model aerosol behavior in the RCS

  12. Flow model study of 'Monju' reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaguchi, Kimihide

    1980-01-01

    In the case of designing the structures in nuclear reactors, various problems to be considered regarding thermo-hydrodynamics exist, such as the distribution of flow quantity and the pressure loss in reactors and the thermal shock to inlet and outlet nozzles. In order to grasp the flow characteristics of coolant in reactors, the 1/2 scale model of the reactor structure of ''Monju'' was attached to the water flow testing facility in the Oarai Engineering Center, and the simulation experiment has been carried out. The flow characteristics in reactors clarified by experiment and analysis so far are the distribution of flow quantity between high and low pressure regions in reactors, the distribution of flow quantity among flow zones in respective regions of high and low pressure, the pressure loss in respective parts in reactors, the flow pattern and the mixing effect of coolant in upper and lower plenums, the effect of the twisting angle of inlet nozzles on the flow characteristics in lower plenums, the effect of internal cylinders on the flow characteristics in upper plenums and so on. On the basis of these test results, the improvement of the design of structures in reactors was made, and the confirmation test on the improved structures was carried out. The testing method, the calculation method, the test results and the reflection to the design of actual machines are described. (Kako, I.)

  13. Enhanced nitrogen removal from piggery wastewater with high NH4+ and low COD/TN ratio in a novel upflow microaerobic biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jia; Li, Jiuling; Li, Jianzheng; Antwi, Philip; Deng, Kaiwen; Nan, Jun; Xu, Pianpian

    2018-02-01

    To enhance nutrient removal more cost-efficiently in microaerobic process treating piggery wastewater characterized by high ammonium (NH 4 + -N) and low chemical oxygen demand (COD) to total nitrogen (TN) ratio, a novel upflow microaerobic biofilm reactor (UMBR) was constructed and the efficiency in nutrient removal was evaluated with various influent COD/TN ratios and reflux ratios. The results showed that the biofilm on the carriers had increased the biomass in the UMBR and enhanced the enrichment of slow-growth-rate bacteria such as nitrifiers, denitrifiers and anammox bacteria. The packed bed allowed the microaerobic biofilm process perform well at a low reflux ratio of 35 with a NH 4 + -N and TN removal as high as 93.1% and 89.9%, respectively. Compared with the previously developed upflow microaerobic sludge reactor, the UMBR had not changed the dominant anammox approach to nitrogen removal, but was more cost-efficiently in treating organic wastewater with high NH 4 + -N and low COD/TN ratio. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Modeling of the reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve technical - economical parameters fuel with 2.4% enrichment and burnable absorber is started to be used at Ignalina NPP. Using code QUABOX/CUBBOX the main neutronic - physical characteristics were calculated for selected reactor core conditions

  15. Effects of marine microbial biofilms on the biocide release rate from antifouling paints – A model-based analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yebra, Diego Meseguer; Kiil, Søren; Erik Weinell, Claus

    2006-01-01

    The antifouling (AF) paint model of Kiil et al. [S. Kiil, C.E. Weinell, M.S. Pedersen, K. Dam-Johansen, Analysis of self-polishing antifouling paints using rotary experiments and mathematical modelling, Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 40 (2001) 3906-3920] and the simplified biofilm. growth model of Gujer...... and Warmer [W. Gujer, O. Warmer, Modeling mixed population biofilms, in: W.G. Characklis, K.C. Marshall (Eds.), Biofilms, Wiley-Interscience, New York, 1990] are used to provide a reaction engineering-based insight to the effects of marine microbial slimes on biocide leaching and, to a minor extent...

  16. Ozo-Dyes mixture degradation in a fixed bed biofilm reactor packed with volcanic porous rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras-Blancas, E.; Cobos-Vasconcelos, D. de los; Juarez-Ramirez, C.; Poggi-Varaldo, H. M.; Ruiz-Ordaz, N.; Galindez-Mayer, J.

    2009-01-01

    Textile industries discharge great amounts of dyes and dyeing-process auxiliaries, which pollute streams and water bodies. Several dyes, especially the ones containing the azo group, can cause harmful effects to different organisms including humans. Through bacterial and mammalian tests, azo dyes or their derived aromatic amines have shown cell genotoxicity. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of air flow rate on azo-dyes mixture biodegradation by a microbial community immobilized in a packed bed reactor. (Author)

  17. Ozo-Dyes mixture degradation in a fixed bed biofilm reactor packed with volcanic porous rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras-Blancas, E.; Cobos-Vasconcelos, D. de los; Juarez-Ramirez, C.; Poggi-Varaldo, H. M.; Ruiz-Ordaz, N.; Galindez-Mayer, J.

    2009-07-01

    Textile industries discharge great amounts of dyes and dyeing-process auxiliaries, which pollute streams and water bodies. Several dyes, especially the ones containing the azo group, can cause harmful effects to different organisms including humans. Through bacterial and mammalian tests, azo dyes or their derived aromatic amines have shown cell genotoxicity. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of air flow rate on azo-dyes mixture biodegradation by a microbial community immobilized in a packed bed reactor. (Author)

  18. Study on improvement of continuous hydrogen production by photosynthetic biofilm in interior illuminant reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenhui; Yuan, Linjiang; Wei, Bo

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, a new type of interior optical fiber illuminating reactor was developed for H2 production to solve the problem of luminous intensity attenuation at the center portion of a reactor, and an immobilization technique was used to enhance the stability of a continuous hydrogen production process with attached photosynthetic bacteria, using glucose as a sole carbon substrate for the indigenous photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) Rhodopseudomonas palustris SP-6. Results of the experiments showed that the interior optical fiber illuminating reactor produces H2 more efficiently and productively than the exterior light source reactor, with the cumulative H2 production, the maximum H2 production rate and H2 yield increased by 813ml, 11.3ml l-1 h-1 and 22.3%, respectively. The stability of the product of continuous hydrogen was realized by immobilizing PSB on the surface of powder active carbon(PAC). After adding the dosage of 2.0g l-1 PAC, the continuous steady operation of H2 production gave a high H2 yield of 1.398 mol H2 mol-1 glucose and an average H2 production rate of 35.1ml l-1 h-1 illuminating with a single interior optical fiber light source. Meanwhile, a higher H2 yield of 1.495 mol H2 mol-1 glucose and an average H2 production rate of 38.7ml l-1 h-1 were attained illuminating with a compound lamp in the continuous H2 production for 20 days.

  19. Formation of Biofilms by Foodborne Pathogens and Development of Laboratory In Vitro Model for the Study of Campylobacter Genus Bacteria Based on These Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimochkina, N R; Bykova, I B; Markova, Yu M; Korotkevich, Yu V; Stetsenko, V V; Minaeva, L P; Sheveleva, S A

    2017-02-01

    We analyzed the formation of biofilms by 7 strains of Campylobacter genus bacteria and 18 strains of Enterobacteriaceae genus bacteria that were isolated from plant and animal raw materials, from finished products, and swabs from the equipment of the food industry. Biofilm formation on glass plates, slides and coverslips, microtubes made of polymeric materials and Petri dishes, and polystyrene plates of different profiles were analyzed. When studying the process of films formation, different effects on bacterial populations were simulated, including variation of growth factor composition of culture media, technique of creating of anaerobiosis, and biocide treatment (active chlorine solutions in a concentration of 100 mg/dm 3 ). The formation of biofilms by the studied cultures was assessed by the formation of extracellular matrix stained with aniline dyes on glass and polystyrene surfaces after incubation; 0.1% crystal violet solution was used as the dye. The presence and density of biomatrix were assessed by staining intensity of the surfaces of contact with broth cultures or by optical density of the stained inoculum on a spectrophotometer. Biofilms were formed by 57% Campylobacter strains and 44% Enterobacteriaceae strains. The intensity of the film formation depended on culturing conditions and protocols, species and genus of studied isolates, and largely on adhesion properties of abiotic surfaces. In 30% of Enterobacteriaceae strains, the biofilm formation capacity tended to increase under the influence of chlorine-containing biocide solutions. Thus, we developed and tested under laboratory conditions a plate version of in vitro chromogenic model for evaluation of biofilm formation capacity of C. jejuni strains and studied stress responses to negative environmental factors.

  20. Using Multiscale Modeling to Study Coupled Flow, Transport, Reaction and Biofilm Growth Processes in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valocchi, A. J.; Laleian, A.; Werth, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    Perturbation of natural subsurface systems by fluid inputs may induce geochemical or microbiological reactions that change porosity and permeability, leading to complex coupled feedbacks between reaction and transport processes. Some examples are precipitation/dissolution processes associated with carbon capture and storage and biofilm growth associated with contaminant transport and remediation. We study biofilm growth due to mixing controlled reaction of multiple substrates. As biofilms grow, pore clogging occurs which alters pore-scale flow paths thus changing the mixing and reaction. These interactions are challenging to quantify using conventional continuum-scale porosity-permeability relations. Pore-scale models can accurately resolve coupled reaction, biofilm growth and transport processes, but modeling at this scale is not feasible for practical applications. There are two approaches to address this challenge. Results from pore-scale models in generic pore structures can be used to develop empirical relations between porosity and continuum-scale parameters, such as permeability and dispersion coefficients. The other approach is to develop a multiscale model of biofilm growth in which non-overlapping regions at pore and continuum spatial scales are coupled by a suitable method that ensures continuity of flux across the interface. Thus, regions of high reactivity where flow alteration occurs are resolved at the pore scale for accuracy while regions of low reactivity are resolved at the continuum scale for efficiency. This approach thus avoids the need for empirical upscaling relations in regions with strong feedbacks between reaction and porosity change. We explore and compare these approaches for several two-dimensional cases.

  1. Hydrodynamic and biological study of a methanogenic bio-film process: the inverse turbulent bed reactor; Etude hydrodynamique et biologique d'un procede de methanisation a biofilm: le reacteur a lit turbule inverse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaud, S.

    2001-11-01

    This work deals with the operation and start-up of a turbulent bed reactor with ExtendospheresO as a support, for the anaerobic treatment of a food process wastewater. An hydrodynamic study was carried out to characterise the liquid flow and mixing with this carrier of small size (147 {mu}m) and density (0.7). Phase behaviour during fluidizing gas injection can be described by an homogeneous liquid-solid pseudo-fluid whose apparent viscosity depends on the solid concentration. A biological study showed that the initial contact between cells and particles caused a physiological adaptation of microorganisms to the presence of solid after a transitory inhibition of methane production. The methane yield has been showed to be an interesting parameter to monitor bio-film formation and detachment. A low hydraulic retention time during the start-up period has been decisive to reduce the lag-period during carrier colonization. A robust continuous operation of the reactor has been obtained using a pH-controlled feeding. Gas velocity has been shown to be an important parameter to control cells concentration, density and durability of the bio-film. (author)

  2. Reactor systems modeling for ICF hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berwald, D.H.; Meier, W.R.

    1980-10-01

    The computational models of ICF reactor subsystems developed by LLNL and TRW are described and a computer program was incorporated for use in the EPRI-sponsored Feasibility Assessment of Fusion-Fission Hybrids. Representative parametric variations have been examined. Many of the ICF subsystem models are very preliminary and more quantitative models need to be developed and included in the code

  3. A meta-proteomics approach to study the interspecies interactions affecting microbial biofilm development in a model community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herschend, Jakob; Damholt, Zacharias Brimnes Visby; Marquard, Andrea Marion

    2017-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are omnipresent in nature and relevant to a broad spectrum of industries ranging from bioremediation and food production to biomedical applications. To date little is understood about how multi-species biofilm communities develop and function on a molecular level, due to the co......Microbial biofilms are omnipresent in nature and relevant to a broad spectrum of industries ranging from bioremediation and food production to biomedical applications. To date little is understood about how multi-species biofilm communities develop and function on a molecular level, due...... to the complexity of these biological systems. Here we apply a meta-proteomics approach to investigate the mechanisms influencing biofilm formation in a model consortium of four bacterial soil isolates; Stenotrophomonas rhizophila, Xanthomonas retroflexus, Microbacterium oxydans and Paenibacillus amylolyticus...

  4. Modeling how soluble microbial products (SMP) support heterotrophic bacteria in autotroph-based biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merkey, Brian; Rittmann, Bruce E.; Chopp, David L.

    2009-01-01

    . In this paper, we develop and use a mathematical model to describe a model biofilm system that includes autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria and the key products produced by the bacteria. The model combines the methods of earlier multi-species models with a multi-component biofilm model in order to explore...... the interaction between species via exchange of soluble microbial products (SMP). We show that multiple parameter sets are able to describe the findings of experimental studies, and that heterotrophs growing on autotrophically produced SMP may pursue either r- or K-strategies to sustain themselves when SMP...... is their only substrate. We also show that heterotrophs can colonize some distance from the autotrophs and still be sustained by autotrophically produced SMP. This work defines the feasible range of parameters for utilization of SMP by heterotrophs and the nature of the interactions between autotrophs...

  5. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidaspow, D. [IIT Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this investigation is to convert a {open_quotes}learning gas-solid-liquid{close_quotes} fluidization model into a predictive design model. This model is capable of predicting local gas, liquid and solids hold-ups and the basic flow regimes: the uniform bubbling, the industrially practical churn-turbulent (bubble coalescence) and the slugging regimes. Current reactor models incorrectly assume that the gas and the particle hold-ups (volume fractions) are uniform in the reactor. They must be given in terms of empirical correlations determined under conditions that radically differ from reactor operation. In the proposed hydrodynamic approach these hold-ups are computed from separate phase momentum balances. Furthermore, the kinetic theory approach computes the high slurry viscosities from collisions of the catalyst particles. Thus particle rheology is not an input into the model.

  6. Synthesis, antimicrobial, anti-biofilm evaluation, and molecular modelling study of new chalcone linked amines derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Messery, Shahenda M; Habib, El-Sayed E; Al-Rashood, Sarah T A; Hassan, Ghada S

    2018-12-01

    A series of amide chalcones conjugated with different secondary amines were synthesised and characterised by different spectroscopic techniques 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR, and ESI-MS. They were screened for in vitro antibacterial activity. Compounds 36, 37, 38, 42, and 44 are the most active among the synthesised series exhibiting MIC value of 2.0-10.0 µg/ml against different bacterial strains. Compound 36 was equipotent to the standard drug Ampicillin displaying MBC value of 2.0 µg/ml against the bacterial strain Staphylococcus aureus. The products were screened for anti-biofilm activity. Compounds 36, 37, and 38 exhibited promising anti-biofilm activity with IC 50 value ranges from 2.4 to 8.6 µg. Molecular modelling was performed suggesting parameters of signalling anti-biofilm mechanism. AspB327 HisB340 (arene-arene interaction) and IleB328 amino acid residues seemed of higher importance to inhibit c-di-GMP. Hydrophobicity may be crucial for activity. ADME calculations suggested that compounds 36, 37, and 38 could be used as good orally absorbed anti-biofilm agents.

  7. Complete bromate and nitrate reduction using hydrogen as the sole electron donor in a rotating biofilm-electrode reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Yu; Li, Xin; Yang, Qi; Wang, Dongbo; Yao, Fubing; Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Jianwei; Xu, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Chang; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Main mechanism of simultaneous bromate and nitrate removal in the RBER. - Highlights: • Cathode of RBER was designed to automatically rotate. • Simultaneous bromate and nitrate removal was achieved by auto-hydrogenotrophic reduction. • The maximum bromate reduction rate estimated by the Monod equation was 109.12 μg/L h. • An electron transfer process and main reaction mechanism in RBER was explored. - Abstract: Simultaneous reduction of bromate and nitrate was investigated using a rotating biofilm-electrode reactor (RBER) with graphite carbon (GC) rods as anode and activated carbon fiber (ACF) bonded with steel ring as cathode. In RBER, the community of denitrifying bacteria immobilized on the cathode surface could completely utilize hydrogen (H 2 ) as the electron donor, which was internally produced by the electrolysis of water. The short-term test confirmed that the RBER system could reduce 150–800 μg/L bromate to below 10 μg/L under autotrophic conditions. The reduced bromate was considered to be roughly equivalent to the amount of bromide in effluent, indicating that bromate was completely reduced to bromide without accumulation of by-products. The long-term test (over 120 days) showed that the removal fluxes of bromate and nitrate could be improved by increasing the electric current and decreasing the hydraulic retention time (HRT). But nitrite in effluent was significantly accumulated when the electric current was beyond 10 mA and the HRT was less than 6 h. The maximum bromate reduction rate estimated by the Monod equation was 109.12 μg/L h when the electric current was 10 mA and HRT was 12 h. It was proposed that the electron transfer process in RBER produced H 2 on the surface of the ACF cathode, and the microbial cultures attached closely on the cathode which could completely utilize H 2 as electron donors for reduction of bromate and nitrate.

  8. Attached biomass growth and substrate utilization rate in a moving bed biofilm reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Marques

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A moving bed bioreactor containing cubes of polyether foam immersed in a synthetic wastewater (an aqueous mixture of meat extract, yeast extract, dextrose, meat peptone, ammonium chloride, potassium chloride, sodium chloride, sodium bicarbonate, potassium mono-hydrogen-phosphate and magnesium sulphate was used to evaluate bacterial growth and biomass yield parameters based on Monod's equation. The wastewater was supplied in the bottom of the equipment flowing ascending in parallel with a diffused air current that provided the mixing of the reactor content. Suspended and attached biomass concentration was measured through gravimetric methods. Good agreement was found between experimental kinetic parameters values and those obtained by other researchers. The only significant difference was the high global biomass content about 2 times the values obtained in conventional processes, providing high performance with volumetric loading rates up to 5.5 kg COD/m³/d.

  9. Modelling an industrial anaerobic granular reactor using a multi-scale approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldman, Hannah; Flores Alsina, Xavier; Ramin, Pedram

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to show the results of an industrial project dealing with modelling of anaerobic digesters. A multi-scale mathematical approach is developed to describe reactor hydrodynamics, granule growth/distribution and microbial competition/inhibition for substrate/space within...... the biofilm. The main biochemical and physico-chemical processes in the model are based on the Anaerobic Digestion Model No 1 (ADM1) extended with the fate of phosphorus (P), sulfur (S) and ethanol (Et-OH). Wastewater dynamic conditions are reproduced and data frequency increased using the Benchmark...... simulations show the effects on the overall process performance when operational (pH) and loading (S:COD) conditions are modified. Lastly, the effect of intra-granular precipitation on the overall organic/inorganic distribution is assessed at: 1) different times; and, 2) reactor heights. Finally...

  10. Interfacial separation of a mature biofilm from a glass surface - A combined experimental and cohesive zone modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Ashkan; Tukovic, Zeljko; Cardiff, Philip; Walter, Maik; Casey, Eoin; Ivankovic, Alojz

    2016-02-01

    A good understanding of the mechanical stability of biofilms is essential for biofouling management, particularly when mechanical forces are used. Previous biofilm studies lack a damage-based theoretical model to describe the biofilm separation from a surface. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the interfacial separation of a mature biofilm from a rigid glass substrate using a combined experimental and numerical modelling approach. In the current work, the biofilm-glass interfacial separation process was investigated under tensile and shear stresses at the macroscale level, known as modes I and II failure mechanisms respectively. The numerical simulations were performed using a Finite Volume (FV)-based simulation package (OpenFOAM®) to predict the separation initiation using the cohesive zone model (CZM). Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based retraction curve was used to obtain the separation properties between the biofilm and glass colloid at microscale level, where the CZM parameters were estimated using the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model. In this study CZM is introduced as a reliable method for the investigation of interfacial separation between a biofilm and rigid substrate, in which a high local stress at the interface edge acts as an ultimate stress at the crack tip.This study demonstrated that the total interfacial failure energy measured at the macroscale, was significantly higher than the pure interfacial separation energy obtained by AFM at the microscale, indicating a highly ductile deformation behaviour within the bulk biofilm matrix. The results of this study can significantly contribute to the understanding of biofilm detachments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mass transfer of therapeutics through natural human plaque biofilms: a model for therapeutic delivery to pathological bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Colin

    2011-09-01

    Bacterial biofilms in the mouth are prime mediators of the destruction of the dental and oral tissues. This brief review summarises recent work using a device for generating intact plaque in the mouth on natural enamel surfaces such that quantitative studies of mass transfer through natural plaque biofilms could be carried out in relation to plaque architecture. This data is discussed against the background of existing information. The device revealed complex plaque architecture with high a surface area to mass ratio decreasing from the exterior of the biofilm towards the tissue surface. Fluoride, a potent inhibitor of caries was concentrated in the outer regions of the biofilm. This implies some restriction of diffusion and possibly binding to the high surface area of the outer biofilm. Whilst all components examined conformed to this distribution pattern, some relatively uncharged materials penetrated the bacterial biomass whilst other, more highly charged materials tended to be restricted to the channels or biomass surface. Plaque architecture was robust but could be altered using detergent indicating that biomass architecture and chemistry could be manipulated as a possible means of facilitating mass transport of therapeutics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Dynamics of development and dispersal in sessile microbial communities: examples from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida model biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, M.; Gjermansen, Morten; Kreft, J.-U.

    2006-01-01

    Surface-associated microbial communities in many cases display dynamic developmental patterns. Model biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida in laboratory flow-chamber setups represent examples of such behaviour. Dependent on the experimental conditions the bacteria...

  13. KMT moving bed biofilm reactor (KMT MBBR) experience of a pilot plant in Spain. Proceso KMT de biomasa fija sobre lecho movil. Experiencias en planta piloto en Espaa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya Aranda, A.; Rodrigo Alonso, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    It describes the experiments carried out by INFILCO ESPAOLA, S.A. in a pilot plant using the KMT Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor process involving a fixed biomass on a moveable bed. This is an innovative process for treating both industrial and urban waste waters with or without the elimination of nutrients. The experimental findings demonstrate the need for a minimum amount of space for the biologial reagent (in comparison with that required for active sludge EDARs). They also show the ease with which existing EDARs can be adapted with very little civil engineering work by increasing either the design capacity or the elimination of nutrients. 10 refs.

  14. Biofilm Structures in a Mono-Associated Mouse Model of Clostridium difficile Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna P. Soavelomandroso

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is a major healthcare-associated disease with high recurrence rates. Host colonization is critical for the infectious process, both in first episodes and in recurrent disease, with biofilm formation playing a key role. The ability of C. difficile to form a biofilm on abiotic surfaces is established, but has not yet been confirmed in the intestinal tract. Here, four different isolates of C. difficile, which are in vitro biofilm producers, were studied for their ability to colonize germ-free mice. The level of colonization achieved was similar for all isolates in the different parts of the murine gastrointestinal tract, but pathogen burden was higher in the cecum and colon. Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that C. difficile bacteria were distributed heterogeneously over the intestinal tissue, without contact with epithelial cells. The R20291 strain, which belongs to the Ribotype 027 lineage, displayed a unique behavior compared to the other strains by forming numerous aggregates. By immunochemistry analyses, we showed that bacteria were localized inside and outside the mucus layer, irrespective of the strains tested. Most bacteria were entrapped in 3-D structures overlaying the mucus layer. For the R20291 strain, the cell-wall associated polysaccharide PS-II was detected in large amounts in the 3-D structure. As this component has been detected in the extrapolymeric matrix of in vitro C. difficile biofilms, our data suggest strongly that at least the R20291 strain is organized in the mono-associated mouse model in glycan-rich biofilm architecture, which sustainably maintains bacteria outside the mucus layer.

  15. Impact of external carbon dose on the removal of micropollutants using methanol and ethanol in post-denitrifying Moving Bed Biofilm Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torresi, Elena; Escolà Casas, Mònica; Polesel, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    of venlafaxine, carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole and sulfamethizole could be described with a cometabolic model. Analyses of the microbial composition in the biofilms using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing revealed that the methanol-dosed MBBR contained higher microbial richness than the one dosed with ethanol...

  16. An improved cellular automaton method to model multispecies biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Youneng; Valocchi, Albert J

    2013-10-01

    Biomass-spreading rules used in previous cellular automaton methods to simulate multispecies biofilm introduced extensive mixing between different biomass species or resulted in spatially discontinuous biomass concentration and distribution; this caused results based on the cellular automaton methods to deviate from experimental results and those from the more computationally intensive continuous method. To overcome the problems, we propose new biomass-spreading rules in this work: Excess biomass spreads by pushing a line of grid cells that are on the shortest path from the source grid cell to the destination grid cell, and the fractions of different biomass species in the grid cells on the path change due to the spreading. To evaluate the new rules, three two-dimensional simulation examples are used to compare the biomass distribution computed using the continuous method and three cellular automaton methods, one based on the new rules and the other two based on rules presented in two previous studies. The relationship between the biomass species is syntrophic in one example and competitive in the other two examples. Simulation results generated using the cellular automaton method based on the new rules agree much better with the continuous method than do results using the other two cellular automaton methods. The new biomass-spreading rules are no more complex to implement than the existing rules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Image-based Modeling of Biofilm-induced Calcium Carbonate Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, J. M.; Rothman, A.; Jackson, B.; Klapper, I.; Cunningham, A. B.; Gerlach, R.

    2013-12-01

    Pore scale biological processes in the subsurface environment are important to understand in relation to many engineering applications including environmental contaminant remediation, geologic carbon sequestration, and petroleum production. Specifically, biofilm induced calcium carbonate precipitation has been identified as an attractive option to reduce permeability in a lasting way in the subsurface. This technology may be able to replace typical cement-based grouting in some circumstances; however, pore-scale processes must be better understood for it to be applied in a controlled manor. The work presented will focus on efforts to observe biofilm growth and ureolysis-induced mineral precipitation in micro-fabricated flow cells combined with finite element modelling as a tool to predict local chemical gradients of interest (see figure). We have been able to observe this phenomenon over time using a novel model organism that is able to hydrolyse urea and express a fluorescent protein allowing for non-invasive observation over time with confocal microscopy. The results of this study show the likely existence of a wide range of local saturation indices even in a small (1 cm length scale) experimental system. Interestingly, the locations of high predicted index do not correspond to the locations of higher precipitation density, highlighting the need for further understanding. Figure 1 - A micro-fabricated flow cell containing biofilm-induced calcium carbonate precipitation. (A) Experimental results: Active biofilm is in green and dark circles are calcium carbonate crystals. Note the channeling behavior in the top of the image, leaving a large hydraulically inactive area in the biofilm mass. (B) Finite element model: The prediction of relative saturation of calcium carbonate (as calcite). Fluid enters the system at a low saturation state (blue) but areas of high supersaturation (red) are predicted within the hydraulically inactive area in the biofilm. If only effluent

  18. Investigating the role of biofilms in trihalomethane formation in water distribution systems with a multicomponent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abokifa, Ahmed A; Yang, Y Jeffrey; Lo, Cynthia S; Biswas, Pratim

    2016-11-01

    Biofilms are ubiquitous in the pipes of drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs), and recent experimental studies revealed that the chlorination of the microbial carbon associated with the biofilm contributes to the total disinfection by-products (DBPs) formation with distinct mechanisms from those formed from precursors derived from natural organic matter (NOM). A multiple species reactive-transport model was developed to explain the role of biofilms in DBPs formation by accounting for the simultaneous transport and interactions of disinfectants, organic compounds, and biomass. Using parameter values from experimental studies in the literature, the model equations were solved to predict chlorine decay and microbial regrowth dynamics in an actual DWDS, and trihalomethanes (THMs) formation in a pilot-scale distribution system simulator. The model's capability of reproducing the measured concentrations of free chlorine, suspended biomass, and THMs under different hydrodynamic and temperature conditions was demonstrated. The contribution of bacteria-derived precursors to the total THMs production was found to have a significant dependence on the system's hydraulics, seasonal variables, and the quality of the treated drinking water. Under system conditions that promoted fast bacterial re-growth, the transformation of non-microbial into microbial carbon DBP precursors by the biofilms showed a noticeable effect on the kinetics of THMs formation, especially when a high initial chlorine dose was applied. These conditions included elevated water temperature and high concentrations of nutrients in the influent water. The fraction of THMs formed from microbial sources was found to reach a peak of 12% of the total produced THMs under the investigated scenarios. The results demonstrated the importance of integrating bacterial regrowth dynamics in predictive DBPs formation models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. An in vitro Model for Oral Mixed Biofilms of Candida albicans and Streptococcus gordonii in Synthetic Saliva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eMontelongo-Jauregui

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available As a member of the normal human oral microbiota, the fungus C. albicans is often found in association with Streptococcus gordonii, a member of dental plaque forming bacteria. Evidence suggests that S. gordonii serves as a facilitator of C. albicans adherence to dental tissues, which represents a clinically relevant problem, particularly for immunocompromised individuals that could subsequently develop fungal infections. In this study we describe the development of a relatively simple and economical in vitro model that allows for the growth of mixed bacterial/fungal biofilms in 96-well microtiter plates. We have applied this method to test and compare the growth characteristics of single and dual species biofilms in traditional microbiological media versus a synthetic saliva medium (basal medium mucin, BMM that more closely resembles physiological conditions within the oral cavity. Results indicated a synergistic effect for the formation of biofilms when both microorganisms were seeded together under all conditions tested. The structural and architectural features of the resulting biofilms were further characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM. We also performed drug susceptibility assays against single and mixed species biofilms using commonly used antifungals and antibacterial antibiotics, both in monotherapy and in combination therapy, for a direct comparison of resistance against antimicrobial treatment. As expected, mixed species biofilms displayed higher levels of resistance to antimicrobial treatment at every dose tested in both traditional media and BMM synthetic saliva, as compared to single-species biofilms.

  20. The Impact of Alkaliphilic Biofilm Formation on the Release and Retention of Carbon Isotopes from Nuclear Reactor Graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, S P; Payne, L; Walker, S; Scott, T; Heard, P; Eccles, H; Bond, G; Shah, P; Bills, P; Jackson, B R; Boxall, S A; Laws, A P; Charles, C; Williams, S J; Humphreys, P N

    2018-03-13

    14 C is an important consideration within safety assessments for proposed geological disposal facilities for radioactive wastes, since it is capable of re-entering the biosphere through the generation of 14 C bearing gases. The irradiation of graphite moderators in the UK gas-cooled nuclear power stations has led to the generation of a significant volume of 14 C-containing intermediate level wastes. Some of this 14 C is present as a carbonaceous deposit on channel wall surfaces. Within this study, the potential of biofilm growth upon irradiated and 13 C doped graphite at alkaline pH was investigated. Complex biofilms were established on both active and simulant samples. High throughput sequencing showed the biofilms to be dominated by Alcaligenes sp at pH 9.5 and Dietzia sp at pH 11.0. Surface characterisation revealed that the biofilms were limited to growth upon the graphite surface with no penetration of the deeper porosity. Biofilm formation resulted in the generation of a low porosity surface layer without the removal or modification of the surface deposits or the release of the associated 14 C/ 13 C. Our results indicated that biofilm formation upon irradiated graphite is likely to occur at the pH values studied, without any additional release of the associated 14 C.

  1. Model predictive controller design of hydrocracker reactors

    OpenAIRE

    GÖKÇE, Dila

    2011-01-01

    This study summarizes the design of a Model Predictive Controller (MPC) in Tüpraş, İzmit Refinery Hydrocracker Unit Reactors. Hydrocracking process, in which heavy vacuum gasoil is converted into lighter and valuable products at high temperature and pressure is described briefly. Controller design description, identification and modeling studies are examined and the model variables are presented. WABT (Weighted Average Bed Temperature) equalization and conversion increase are simulate...

  2. Innovative hybrid biological reactors using membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diez, R.; Esteban-Garcia, A. L.; Florio, L. de; Rodriguez-Hernandez, L.; Tejero, I.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present two lines of research on hybrid reactors including the use of membranes, although with different functions: RBPM, biofilm reactors and membranes filtration RBSOM, supported biofilm reactors and oxygen membranes. (Author) 14 refs.

  3. Computer Modeling of Platinum Reforming Reactors | Momoh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper, instead of using a theoretical approach has considered a computer model as means of assessing the reformate composition for three-stage fixed bed reactors in platforming unit. This is done by identifying many possible hydrocarbon transformation reactions that are peculiar to the process unit, identify the ...

  4. Myroides odoratimimus Forms Structurally Complex and Inherently Antibiotic-Resistant Biofilm in a Wound-Like in vitro Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Pompilio

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Myroides odoratimimus is an aerobic, non-fermenting Gram-negative multidrug-resistant bacterium widely distributed in nature that rarely causes infections in immunocompromised patients. We recently described in a diabetic patient a case of recurrent calcaneal ulcer infection caused by a M. odoratimimus strain showing potential for biofilm formation. For the first time, we therefore evaluated the ability of M. odoratimimus to form biofilm under different pH values and glucose concentrations using an in vitro “skin-like” model, and its susceptibility to levofloxacin, meropenem, and tigecycline. The expression of some antibiotic-resistance related genes was also monitored by RT-PCR during planktonic-to-biofilm transition. Our results indicated that M. odoratimimus can produce relevant amounts of biofilm biomass, in a time-dependent manner, especially at acidic pH and regardless of glucose concentration tested. The comparative analysis of MIC and MBC values between planktonic and sessile cells showed that resistance to antibiotics increased during the planktonic-to-biofilm transition. Viable cell count indicated that none of the tested antibiotics were able to completely eradicate preformed biofilms, although meropenem and levofloxacin were the most active causing a significant, dose-independent, reduction of biofilm's viability, as also confirmed by microscopic analysis. RT-PCR showed that antibiotic-resistance related gyrA and acrB genes are over-expressed during the transition from planktonic to sessile (biofilm lifestyle. Overall, our findings showed that M. odoratimimus can form relevant amounts of inherently antibiotic-resistant biofilm under conditions relevant to wound site, therefore suggesting a role in the pathogenesis of chronic ulcer infections.

  5. Combating biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are complex microbial communities consisting of microcolonies embedded in a matrix of self-produced polymer substances. Biofilm cells show much greater resistance to environmental challenges including antimicrobial agents than their free-living counterparts. The biofilm mode of life...... is believed to significantly contribute to successful microbial survival in hostile environments. Conventional treatment, disinfection and cleaning strategies do not proficiently deal with biofilm-related problems, such as persistent infections and contamination of food production facilities. In this review......, strategies to control biofilms are discussed, including those of inhibition of microbial attachment, interference of biofilm structure development and differentiation, killing of biofilm cells and induction of biofilm dispersion....

  6. Hybrid Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor for the biodegradation of benzotriazoles and hydroxy-benzothiazole in wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazioti, Aikaterini A.; Stasinakis, Athanasios S.; Psoma, Aikaterini K.

    2017-01-01

    and a settling tank. The average removal of target compounds ranged between 41% (4-methyl-1H-benzotriazole; 4TTR) and 88% (2-hydroxybenzothiazole; OHBTH). Except for 4TTR, degradation mainly occurred in the first bioreactor. Calculation of biodegradation constants in batch experiments and application of a model...

  7. The impact of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy on Streptococcus mutans in an artificial biofilm model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Martin; Kirfel, Gregor; Krause, Felix; Berthold, Michael; Brede, Olivier; Frentzen, Matthias; Braun, Andreas

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the impact of laser induced antimicrobial photodynamic therapy on the viability of Streptococcus mutans cells employing an aritificial biofilm model. Employing sterile chambered coverglasses, a salivary pellicle layer formation was induced in 19 chambers. Streptococcus mutans cells were inoculated in a sterile culture medium. Using a live/dead bacterial viability kit, bacteria with intact cell membranes stain fluorescent green. Test chambers containing each the pellicle layer and 0.5 ml of the bacterial culture were analyzed using a confocal laser scan microscope within a layer of 10 μm at intervals of 1 μm from the pellicle layer. A photosensitizer was added to the test chambers and irradiated with a diode laser (wavelength: 660 nm, output power: 100 mW, Helbo) for 2 min each. Comparing the baseline fluorescence (median: 13.8 [U], min: 3.7, max: 26.2) with the values after adding the photosensitizer (median: 3.7, min: 1.1, max: 9), a dilution caused decrease of fluorescence could be observed (p0.05). The present study indicates that antimicrobial photodynamic therapy can reduce living bacteria within a layer of 10 μm in an artificial biofilm model. Further studies have to evaluate the maximum biofilm thickness that still allows a toxic effect on microorganisms.

  8. Complete bromate and nitrate reduction using hydrogen as the sole electron donor in a rotating biofilm-electrode reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Yu; Li, Xin [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Yang, Qi, E-mail: yangqi@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Wang, Dongbo [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Advanced Water Management Centre, The University of Queensland, QLD 4072 (Australia); Yao, Fubing [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Li, Xiaoming, E-mail: xmli@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhao, Jianwei; Xu, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Chang; Zeng, Guangming [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: Main mechanism of simultaneous bromate and nitrate removal in the RBER. - Highlights: • Cathode of RBER was designed to automatically rotate. • Simultaneous bromate and nitrate removal was achieved by auto-hydrogenotrophic reduction. • The maximum bromate reduction rate estimated by the Monod equation was 109.12 μg/L h. • An electron transfer process and main reaction mechanism in RBER was explored. - Abstract: Simultaneous reduction of bromate and nitrate was investigated using a rotating biofilm-electrode reactor (RBER) with graphite carbon (GC) rods as anode and activated carbon fiber (ACF) bonded with steel ring as cathode. In RBER, the community of denitrifying bacteria immobilized on the cathode surface could completely utilize hydrogen (H{sub 2}) as the electron donor, which was internally produced by the electrolysis of water. The short-term test confirmed that the RBER system could reduce 150–800 μg/L bromate to below 10 μg/L under autotrophic conditions. The reduced bromate was considered to be roughly equivalent to the amount of bromide in effluent, indicating that bromate was completely reduced to bromide without accumulation of by-products. The long-term test (over 120 days) showed that the removal fluxes of bromate and nitrate could be improved by increasing the electric current and decreasing the hydraulic retention time (HRT). But nitrite in effluent was significantly accumulated when the electric current was beyond 10 mA and the HRT was less than 6 h. The maximum bromate reduction rate estimated by the Monod equation was 109.12 μg/L h when the electric current was 10 mA and HRT was 12 h. It was proposed that the electron transfer process in RBER produced H{sub 2} on the surface of the ACF cathode, and the microbial cultures attached closely on the cathode which could completely utilize H{sub 2} as electron donors for reduction of bromate and nitrate.

  9. Modeling a nuclear reactor for experimental purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berta, V.T.

    1980-01-01

    The Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Facility is a scale model of a commercial PWR and is as fully functional and operational as the generic commercial counterpart. LOFT was designed and built for experimental purposes as part of the overall NRC reactor safety research program. The purpose of LOFT is to assess the capability of reactor safety systems to perform their intended functions during occurrences of off-normal conditions in a commercial nuclear reactor. Off-normal conditions arising from large and small break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA), operational transients, and anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) were to be investigated. This paper describes the LOFT model of the generic PWR and summarizes the experiments that have been conducted in the context of the significant findings involving the complex transient thermal-hydraulics and the consequent effects on the commercial reactor analytical licensing techniques. Through these techniques the validity of the LOFT model as a scaled counterpart of the generic PWR is shown

  10. Models of iodine behavior in reactor containments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, C.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Kress, T.S.

    1992-10-01

    Models are developed for many phenomena of interest concerning iodine behavior in reactor containments during severe accidents. Processes include speciation in both gas and liquid phases, reactions with surfaces, airborne aerosols, and other materials, and gas-liquid interface behavior. Although some models are largely empirical formulations, every effort has been made to construct mechanistic and rigorous descriptions of relevant chemical processes. All are based on actual experimental data generated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) or elsewhere, and, hence, considerable data evaluation and parameter estimation are contained in this study. No application or encoding is attempted, but each model is stated in terms of rate processes, with the intention of allowing mechanistic simulation. Taken together, this collection of models represents a best estimate iodine behavior and transport in reactor accidents.

  11. Models of iodine behavior in reactor containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, C.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Kress, T.S.

    1992-10-01

    Models are developed for many phenomena of interest concerning iodine behavior in reactor containments during severe accidents. Processes include speciation in both gas and liquid phases, reactions with surfaces, airborne aerosols, and other materials, and gas-liquid interface behavior. Although some models are largely empirical formulations, every effort has been made to construct mechanistic and rigorous descriptions of relevant chemical processes. All are based on actual experimental data generated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) or elsewhere, and, hence, considerable data evaluation and parameter estimation are contained in this study. No application or encoding is attempted, but each model is stated in terms of rate processes, with the intention of allowing mechanistic simulation. Taken together, this collection of models represents a best estimate iodine behavior and transport in reactor accidents

  12. Regression models of reactor diagnostic signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavrin, J.

    1989-01-01

    The application is described of an autoregression model as the simplest regression model of diagnostic signals in experimental analysis of diagnostic systems, in in-service monitoring of normal and anomalous conditions and their diagnostics. The method of diagnostics is described using a regression type diagnostic data base and regression spectral diagnostics. The diagnostics is described of neutron noise signals from anomalous modes in the experimental fuel assembly of a reactor. (author)

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm aggravates skin inflammatory response in BALB/c mice in a novel chronic wound model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trøstrup, Hannah; Thomsen, Kim; Christophersen, Lars J

    2013-01-01

    model in C3H/HeN and BALB/c mice. The chronic wound was established by an injection of seaweed alginate-embedded P. aeruginosa PAO1 beneath a third-degree thermal lesion providing full thickness skin necrosis, as in human chronic wounds. Cultures revealed growth of PA, and both alginate with or without......Chronic wounds are presumed to persist in the inflammatory state, preventing healing. Emerging evidence indicates a clinical impact of bacterial biofilms in soft tissues, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) biofilms. To further investigate this, we developed a chronic PA biofilm wound infection...... bacteria organized in clusters, resembling biofilms, and inflammation located adjacent to the PA. The chronic wound infection showed a higher number of PAO1 in the BALB/c mice at day 4 after infection as compared to C3H/HeN mice (p

  14. Ultrasonic enhancement of antibiotic action on Escherichia coli biofilms: an in vivo model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rediske, A M; Roeder, B L; Brown, M K; Nelson, J L; Robison, R L; Draper, D O; Schaalje, G B; Robison, R A; Pitt, W G

    1999-05-01

    Biofilm infections are a common complication of prosthetic devices in humans. Previous in vitro research has determined that low-frequency ultrasound combined with aminoglycoside antibiotics is an effective method of killing biofilms. We report the development of an in vivo model to determine if ultrasound enhances antibiotic action. Two 24-h-old Escherichia coli (ATCC 10798) biofilms grown on polyethylene disks were implanted subcutaneously on the backs of New Zealand White female rabbits, one on each side of the spine. Low-frequency (28.48-kHz) and low-power-density (100- and 300-mW/cm2) continuous ultrasound treatment was applied for 24 h with and without systemic administration of gentamicin. The disks were then removed, and the number of viable bacteria on each disk was determined. At the low ultrasonic power used in this study, exposure to ultrasound only (no gentamicin) caused no significant difference in bacterial viability. In the presence of antibiotic, there was a significant reduction due to 300-mW/cm2 ultrasound (P = 0.0485) but no significant reduction due to 100-mW/cm2 ultrasound. Tissue damage to the skin was noted at the 300-mW/cm2 treatment level. Further development of this technique has promise in treatment of clinical implant infections.

  15. Pebble Bed Reactor Dust Production Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Joshua J. Cogliati

    2008-09-01

    The operation of pebble bed reactors, including fuel circulation, can generate graphite dust, which in turn could be a concern for internal components; and to the near field in the remote event of a break in the coolant circuits. The design of the reactor system must, therefore, take the dust into account and the operation must include contingencies for dust removal and for mitigation of potential releases. Such planning requires a proper assessment of the dust inventory. This paper presents a predictive model of dust generation in an operating pebble bed with recirculating fuel. In this preliminary work the production model is based on the use of the assumption of proportionality between the dust production and the normal force and distance traveled. The model developed in this work uses the slip distances and the inter-pebble forces computed by the authors’ PEBBLES. The code, based on the discrete element method, simulates the relevant static and kinetic friction interactions between the pebbles as well as the recirculation of the pebbles through the reactor vessel. The interaction between pebbles and walls of the reactor vat is treated using the same approach. The amount of dust produced is proportional to the wear coefficient for adhesive wear (taken from literature) and to the slip volume, the product of the contact area and the slip distance. The paper will compare the predicted volume with the measured production rates. The simulation tallies the dust production based on the location of creation. Two peak production zones from intra pebble forces are predicted within the bed. The first zone is located near the pebble inlet chute due to the speed of the dropping pebbles. The second peak zone occurs lower in the reactor with increased pebble contact force due to the weight of supported pebbles. This paper presents the first use of a Discrete Element Method simulation of pebble bed dust production.

  16. Pebble Bed Reactor Dust Production Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Joshua J. Cogliati

    2008-01-01

    The operation of pebble bed reactors, including fuel circulation, can generate graphite dust, which in turn could be a concern for internal components; and to the near field in the remote event of a break in the coolant circuits. The design of the reactor system must, therefore, take the dust into account and the operation must include contingencies for dust removal and for mitigation of potential releases. Such planning requires a proper assessment of the dust inventory. This paper presents a predictive model of dust generation in an operating pebble bed with recirculating fuel. In this preliminary work the production model is based on the use of the assumption of proportionality between the dust production and the normal force and distance traveled. The model developed in this work uses the slip distances and the inter-pebble forces computed by the authors PEBBLES. The code, based on the discrete element method, simulates the relevant static and kinetic friction interactions between the pebbles as well as the recirculation of the pebbles through the reactor vessel. The interaction between pebbles and walls of the reactor vat is treated using the same approach. The amount of dust produced is proportional to the wear coefficient for adhesive wear (taken from literature) and to the slip volume, the product of the contact area and the slip distance. The paper will compare the predicted volume with the measured production rates. The simulation tallies the dust production based on the location of creation. Two peak production zones from intra pebble forces are predicted within the bed. The first zone is located near the pebble inlet chute due to the speed of the dropping pebbles. The second peak zone occurs lower in the reactor with increased pebble contact force due to the weight of supported pebbles. This paper presents the first use of a Discrete Element Method simulation of pebble bed dust production

  17. Facultative control of matrix production optimizes competitive fitness in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 biofilm models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Jonas S; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Squyres, Georgia R; Price-Whelan, Alexa; de Santiago Torio, Ana; Song, Angela; Cornell, William C; Sørensen, Søren J; Xavier, Joao B; Dietrich, Lars E P

    2015-12-01

    As biofilms grow, resident cells inevitably face the challenge of resource limitation. In the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, electron acceptor availability affects matrix production and, as a result, biofilm morphogenesis. The secreted matrix polysaccharide Pel is required for pellicle formation and for colony wrinkling, two activities that promote access to O2. We examined the exploitability and evolvability of Pel production at the air-liquid interface (during pellicle formation) and on solid surfaces (during colony formation). Although Pel contributes to the developmental response to electron acceptor limitation in both biofilm formation regimes, we found variation in the exploitability of its production and necessity for competitive fitness between the two systems. The wild type showed a competitive advantage against a non-Pel-producing mutant in pellicles but no advantage in colonies. Adaptation to the pellicle environment selected for mutants with a competitive advantage against the wild type in pellicles but also caused a severe disadvantage in colonies, even in wrinkled colony centers. Evolution in the colony center produced divergent phenotypes, while adaptation to the colony edge produced mutants with clear competitive advantages against the wild type in this O2-replete niche. In general, the structurally heterogeneous colony environment promoted more diversification than the more homogeneous pellicle. These results suggest that the role of Pel in community structure formation in response to electron acceptor limitation is unique to specific biofilm models and that the facultative control of Pel production is required for PA14 to maintain optimum benefit in different types of communities. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. A review of investigations on wastewater treatment with MSOBR (membrane supported and oxygenated biofilm reactors); Una revision de las investigaciones sobre el tratamiento de aguas residuales con RBSOM (reactores de biopelicula que emplean membranas con material soporte y medio de oxigenacion)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteban Garcia, A. L.; Tejero Monzon, I.

    2007-07-01

    MSOBR (membrane supported and oxygenated biofilm reactors) are biological reactors for wastewater treatment in which biofilm support and oxygenation functions are carried out by gas permeable membranes. In these conditions, with oxygen and substratum (carbonaceous, nitroge neous) diffusing into the biofilm from opposite sides, different environments are developed inside the biofilm, allowing simultaneous nitrification, denitrification and carbon removal. Other added advantages, such us the possibility of a high oxygen transfer efficiency or those derived from the absence of bubbles in aeration (minimizing foaming and VOC emissions), have lead numerous research groups to work in the development of different MSOBR systems, with promising results that make possible to consider their practical applicability in the near future. (Author) 69 refs.

  19. Fischer-Tropsch Slurry Reactor modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soong, Y.; Gamwo, I.K.; Harke, F.W. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    This paper reports experimental and theoretical results on hydrodynamic studies. The experiments were conducted in a hot-pressurized Slurry-Bubble Column Reactor (SBCR). It includes experimental results of Drakeol-10 oil/nitrogen/glass beads hydrodynamic study and the development of an ultrasonic technique for measuring solids concentration. A model to describe the flow behavior in reactors was developed. The hydrodynamic properties in a 10.16 cm diameter bubble column with a perforated-plate gas distributor were studied at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 1.36 MPa, and at temperatures from 20 to 200{degrees}C, using a dual hot-wire probe with nitrogen, glass beads, and Drakeol-10 oil as the gas, solid, and liquid phase, respectively. It was found that the addition of 20 oil wt% glass beads in the system has a slight effect on the average gas holdup and bubble size. A well-posed three-dimensional model for bed dynamics was developed from an ill-posed model. The new model has computed solid holdup distributions consistent with experimental observations with no artificial {open_quotes}fountain{close_quotes} as predicted by the earlier model. The model can be applied to a variety of multiphase flows of practical interest. An ultrasonic technique is being developed to measure solids concentration in a three-phase slurry reactor. Preliminary measurements have been made on slurries consisting of molten paraffin wax, glass beads, and nitrogen bubbles at 180 {degrees}C and 0.1 MPa. The data show that both the sound speed and attenuation are well-defined functions of both the solid and gas concentrations in the slurries. The results suggest possibilities to directly measure solids concentration during the operation of an autoclave reactor containing molten wax.

  20. Modeling of hydrogenation reactor of soya oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotudeh-Gharebagh, R.; Niknam, L.; Mostoufi, N.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a batch hydrogenation reactor performance was modeled using a hydrodynamic and reaction sub-models. The reaction expressions were obtained from the information reported in literature. Experimental studies were conducted in order to generate the experimental data needed to validate the model. The comparison between the experimental data and model predictions seems quite satisfactory considering the hydrodynamic limitations and simplifications made on the reaction scheme. The results of this study could be considered as framework in developing new process equipment and also soya oil product design for new applications

  1. Scaling laws for modeling nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahavandi, A.N.; Castellana, F.S.; Moradkhanian, E.N.

    1979-01-01

    Scale models are used to predict the behavior of nuclear reactor systems during normal and abnormal operation as well as under accident conditions. Three types of scaling procedures are considered: time-reducing, time-preserving volumetric, and time-preserving idealized model/prototype. The necessary relations between the model and the full-scale unit are developed for each scaling type. Based on these relationships, it is shown that scaling procedures can lead to distortion in certain areas that are discussed. It is advised that, depending on the specific unit to be scaled, a suitable procedure be chosen to minimize model-prototype distortion

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria in natural, industrial and clinical settings predominantly live in biofilms, i.e., sessile structured microbial communities encased in self-produced extracellular matrix material. One of the most important characteristics of microbial biofilms is that the resident bacteria display...... a remarkable increased tolerance toward antimicrobial attack. Biofilms formed by opportunistic pathogenic bacteria are involved in devastating persistent medical device-associated infections, and chronic infections in individuals who are immune-compromised or otherwise impaired in the host defense. Because...... the use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  3. Innovative hybrid biological reactors using membranes; Reactores biologico hibrido innovadores utilizando membranas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diez, R.; Esteban-Garcia, A. L.; Florio, L. de; Rodriguez-Hernandez, L.; Tejero, I.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we present two lines of research on hybrid reactors including the use of membranes, although with different functions: RBPM, biofilm reactors and membranes filtration RBSOM, supported biofilm reactors and oxygen membranes. (Author) 14 refs.

  4. Animal models of chronic wound care: the application of biofilms in clinical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trøstrup H

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hannah Trøstrup,1 Kim Thomsen,1 Henrik Calum,2 Niels Høiby,1,3 Claus Moser1 1Department of Clinical Microbiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, 2Department of Clinical Microbiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, 3Institute for Immunology and Microbiology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract: Chronic wounds are a substantial clinical problem affecting millions of people worldwide. Pathophysiologically, chronic wounds are stuck in the inflammatory state of healing. The role of bacterial biofilms in suppression and perturbation of host response could be an explanation for this observation. An inhibiting effect of bacterial biofilms on wound healing is gaining significant clinical attention over the last few years. There is still a paucity of suitable animal models to recapitulate human chronic wounds. The etiology of the wound (venous insufficiency, ischemia, diabetes, pressure has to be taken into consideration as underlying pathophysiological mechanisms and comorbidities display tremendous variation in humans. Confounders such as infection, smoking, chronological age, sex, medication, metabolic disturbances, and renal impairment add to the difficulty in gaining systematic and comparable studies on nonhealing wounds. Relevant hypotheses based on clinical or in vitro observations can be tested in representative animal models, which provide crucial tools to uncover the pathophysiology of cutaneous skin repair in infectious environments. Disposing factors, species of the infectious agent(s, and time of establishment of the infection are well defined in suitable animal models. In addition, several endpoints can be involved for evaluation. Animals do not display chronic wounds in the way that humans do. However, in many cases, animal models can mirror the pathological conditions observed in humans, although discrepancies between human and animal wound repair are obvious. The use of animal models should

  5. Fate of deposited cells in an aerobic binary bacterial biofilm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    A biofilm is a matrix of microbial cells and their extracellular products that is associated with a solid surface. Previous studies on biofilm development have employed only dissolved compounds as growth limiting substrates, without the influence of microbial species invading from the bulk liquid. The goal of this research project was to quantify the kinetics of processes governing suspended biomass turnover in biofilm systems, and the accompanying effects of suspended cell deposition on biofilm population dynamics. Experiments were conducted with two species of bacteria, Pseudomonas putida ATCC 11172 grown on glucose, and Hyphomicrobium ZV620 grown on methanol. Cryptic growth and particulate hydrolysis studies were evaluated, using combinations of these two bacteria, by measuring the uptake of radiolabelled cell lysis products, under batch conditions. Biofilms studies were performed to investigate bacterial deposition, continual biofilm removal by shear induced erosion, and biofilm ecology. Biofilms were developed in a flow cell reactor, under laminar flow conditions. Bacterial species were differentiated by radioactively labelling each species with their carbon substrate. A mathematical model was developed to predict the biofilm ecology of mixed cultures. The equations developed predict biofilm accumulation, as well as substrate and oxygen consumption. Results indicate that cryptic growth will occur for bacteria growing on their own species soluble lysis products and in some cases, bacteria growing on the soluble lysis products of other species. Particulate hydrolysis only occurred for Pseudomonas putida growing on Pseudomonas putida lysis products, but the lack of particulate hydrolysis occurring in the other studies may have been due to the short experimental period

  6. Dynamic model for a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscettola, M.

    1963-07-01

    A theoretical formulation is derived for the dynamics of a boiling water reactor of the pressure tube and forced circulation type. Attention is concentrated on neutron kinetics, fuel element heat transfer dynamics, and the primary circuit - that is the boiling channel, riser, steam drum, downcomer and recirculating pump of a conventional La Mont loop. Models for the steam and feedwater plant are not derived. (author)

  7. Foreign Body Infection Models to Study Host-Pathogen Response and Antimicrobial Tolerance of Bacterial Biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Nowakowska

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The number of implanted medical devices is steadily increasing and has become an effective intervention improving life quality, but still carries the risk of infection. These infections are mainly caused by biofilm-forming staphylococci that are difficult to treat due to the decreased susceptibility to both antibiotics and host defense mechanisms. To understand the particular pathogenesis and treatment tolerance of implant-associated infection (IAI animal models that closely resemble human disease are needed. Applications of the tissue cage and catheter abscess foreign body infection models in the mouse will be discussed herein. Both models allow the investigation of biofilm and virulence of various bacterial species and a comprehensive insight into the host response at the same time. They have also been proven to serve as very suitable tools to study the anti-adhesive and anti-infective efficacy of different biomaterial coatings. The tissue cage model can additionally be used to determine pharmacokinetics, efficacy and cytotoxicity of antimicrobial compounds as the tissue cage fluid can be aspirated repeatedly without the need to sacrifice the animal. Moreover, with the advance in innovative imaging systems in rodents, these models may offer new diagnostic measures of infection. In summary, animal foreign body infection models are important tools in the development of new antimicrobials against IAI and can help to elucidate the complex interactions between bacteria, the host immune system, and prosthetic materials.

  8. Modelling of a falling sludge bed reactor using AQUASIM | Ristow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Modelling of a falling sludge bed reactor using AQUASIM. ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING AJOL · RESOURCES ... a system of mixed reactors connected by water flow and mass flux streams.

  9. Mathematical modelling of fluidized bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werther, J [BASF A.G., Ludwigshafen am Rhein (Germany, F.R.)

    1978-11-01

    Among the many fluidized bed models to be found in the literature, the two-phase model originally proposed by May has proved most suitable for accomodation of recent advances in flow mechanics: this model resolves the gas/solids fluidized bed into a bubble phase and a suspension phase surrounding the bubbles. Its limitation to slow reactions is a disadvantage. On the basis of the analogy between fluidized beds and gas/liquid systems, a general two-phase model that is valid for fast reactions has therefore been developed and its validity is confirmed by comparison with the experimental results obtained by others. The model describes mass transfer across the phase interface with the aid of the film theory known from gas/liquid reactor technology, and the reaction occurring in the suspension phase as a pseudo-homogeneous reaction. Since the dependence of the performance of fluidized bed reactors upon geometry is accounted for, the model can also be used for scale-up calculations. Its use is illustrated with the aid of design diagrams.

  10. In Vitro Efficacy of Nonantibiotic Treatments on Biofilm Disruption of Gram-Negative Pathogens and an In Vivo Model of Infectious Endometritis Utilizing Isolates from the Equine Uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Ryan A; McCue, Patrick M; Borlee, Grace I; Loncar, Kristen D; Hennet, Margo L; Borlee, Bradley R

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we evaluated the ability of the equine clinical treatments N-acetylcysteine, EDTA, and hydrogen peroxide to disrupt in vitro biofilms and kill equine reproductive pathogens (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or Klebsiella pneumoniae) isolated from clinical cases. N-acetylcysteine (3.3%) decreased biofilm biomass and killed bacteria within the biofilms of E. coli isolates. The CFU of recoverable P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae isolates were decreased, but the biofilm biomass was unchanged. Exposure to hydrogen peroxide (1%) decreased the biofilm biomass and reduced the CFU of E. coli isolates, K. pneumoniae isolates were observed to have a reduction in CFU, and minimal effects were observed for P. aeruginosa isolates. Chelating agents (EDTA formulations) reduced E. coli CFU but were ineffective at disrupting preformed biofilms or decreasing the CFU of P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae within a biofilm. No single nonantibiotic treatment commonly used in equine veterinary practice was able to reduce the CFU and biofilm biomass of all three Gram-negative species of bacteria evaluated. An in vivo equine model of infectious endometritis was also developed to monitor biofilm formation, utilizing bioluminescence imaging with equine P. aeruginosa isolates from this study. Following infection, the endometrial surface contained focal areas of bacterial growth encased in a strongly adherent "biofilm-like" matrix, suggesting that biofilms are present during clinical cases of infectious equine endometritis. Our results indicate that Gram-negative bacteria isolated from the equine uterus are capable of producing a biofilm in vitro, and P. aeruginosa is capable of producing biofilm-like material in vivo. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Biodegradation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol in a packed-bed biofilm reactor equipped with an internal net draft tube riser for aeration and liquid circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-De Jesus, A.; Romano-Baez, F.J.; Leyva-Amezcua, L.; Juarez-Ramirez, C.; Ruiz-Ordaz, N. [Departamento de Ingenieria Bioquimica, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biologicas, IPN. Prol. Carpio y Plan de Ayala, Colonia Santo Tomas, s/n. CP 11340, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Galindez-Mayer, J. [Departamento de Ingenieria Bioquimica, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biologicas, IPN. Prol. Carpio y Plan de Ayala, Colonia Santo Tomas, s/n. CP 11340, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: cmayer@encb.ipn.mx

    2009-01-30

    For the aerobic biodegradation of the fungicide and defoliant 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), a bench-scale packed-bed bioreactor equipped with a net draft tube riser for liquid circulation and oxygenation (PB-ALR) was constructed. To obtain a high packed-bed volume relative to the whole bioreactor volume, a high A{sub D}/A{sub R} ratio was used. Reactor's downcomer was packed with a porous support of volcanic stone fragments. PB-ALR hydrodynamics and oxygen mass transfer behavior was evaluated and compared to the observed behavior of the unpacked reactor operating as an internal airlift reactor (ALR). Overall gas holdup values {epsilon}{sub G}, and zonal oxygen mass transfer coefficients determined at various airflow rates in the PB-ALR, were higher than those obtained with the ALR. When comparing mixing time values obtained in both cases, a slight increment in mixing time was observed when reactor was operated as a PB-ALR. By using a mixed microbial community, the biofilm reactor was used to evaluate the aerobic biodegradation of 2,4,6-TCP. Three bacterial strains identified as Burkholderia sp., Burkholderia kururiensis and Stenotrophomonas sp. constituted the microbial consortium able to cometabolically degrade the 2,4,6-TCP, using phenol as primary substrate. This consortium removed 100% of phenol and near 99% of 2,4,6-TCP. Mineralization and dehalogenation of 2,4,6-TCP was evidenced by high COD removal efficiencies ({approx}95%), and by the stoichiometric release of chloride ions from the halogenated compound ({approx}80%). Finally, it was observed that the microbial consortium was also capable to metabolize 2,4,6-TCP without phenol as primary substrate, with high removal efficiencies (near 100% for 2,4,6-TCP, 92% for COD and 88% for chloride ions)

  12. Development of a system model for advanced small modular reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a system model that can be used to analyze three advance small modular reactor (SMR) designs through their lifetime. Neutronics of these reactor designs were evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX/6). The system models were developed in Matlab and Simulink. A major thrust of this research was the initial scoping analysis of Sandias concept of a long-life fast reactor (LLFR). The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional light water reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs (e.g. high temperature gas reactor (HTGR)). The system model has subroutines for lifetime reactor feedback and operation calculations, thermal hydraulic effects, load demand changes and a simplified SCO2 Brayton cycle for power conversion.

  13. Oral Biofilm Architecture on Natural Teeth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijnge, Vincent; van Leeuwen, M. Barbara M.; Degener, John E.; Abbas, Frank; Thurnheer, Thomas; Gmuer, Rudolf; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Periodontitis and caries are infectious diseases of the oral cavity in which oral biofilms play a causative role. Moreover, oral biofilms are widely studied as model systems for bacterial adhesion, biofilm development, and biofilm resistance to antibiotics, due to their widespread presence and

  14. State space modeling of reactor core in a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashaari, A.; Ahmad, T.; M, Wan Munirah W. [Department of Mathematical Science, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Shamsuddin, Mustaffa [Institute of Ibnu Sina, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Abdullah, M. Adib [Swinburne University of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Computing and Science, Jalan Simpang Tiga, 93350 Kuching, Sarawak (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10

    The power control system of a nuclear reactor is the key system that ensures a safe operation for a nuclear power plant. However, a mathematical model of a nuclear power plant is in the form of nonlinear process and time dependent that give very hard to be described. One of the important components of a Pressurized Water Reactor is the Reactor core. The aim of this study is to analyze the performance of power produced from a reactor core using temperature of the moderator as an input. Mathematical representation of the state space model of the reactor core control system is presented and analyzed in this paper. The data and parameters are taken from a real time VVER-type Pressurized Water Reactor and will be verified using Matlab and Simulink. Based on the simulation conducted, the results show that the temperature of the moderator plays an important role in determining the power of reactor core.

  15. Development of a laboratory model of a phototroph-heterotroph mixed-species biofilm at the stone/air interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica eVilla

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent scientific investigations have shed light on the ecological importance and physiological complexity of subaerial biofilms (SABs inhabiting lithic surfaces. In the field of sustainable cultural heritage (CH preservation, mechanistic approaches aimed at investigation of the spatiotemporal patterns of interactions between the biofilm, the stone, and the atmosphere are of outstanding importance. However, these interactions have proven difficult to explore with field experiments due to the inaccessibility of samples, the complexity of the ecosystem under investigation and the temporal resolution of the experiments.To overcome these limitations, we aimed at developing a unifying methodology to reproduce a fast-growing, phototroph-heterotroph mixed species biofilm at the stone/air interface. Our experiments underscore the ability of the dual-species SAB model to capture functional traits characteristic of biofilms inhabiting lithic substrate such as: i microcolonies of aggregated bacteria; ii network like structure following surface topography; iii cooperation between phototrophs and heterotrophs and cross feeding processes; iv ability to change the chemical parameters that characterize the microhabitats; v survival under desiccation and vi biocide tolerance. With its advantages in control, replication, range of different experimental scenarios and matches with the real ecosystem, the developed model system is a powerful tool to advance our mechanistic understanding of the stone-biofilm-atmosphere interplay in different environments.

  16. Efficacy of silk fibroin–nano silver against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in a rabbit model of sinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia M

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Minghui Jia,1,2 Zhongchun Chen,2 Yongwei Guo,2 Xin Chen,3 Xia Zhao2 1Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, 2Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, 3State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Department of Macromolecular Science, Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai, China Background: Staphylococcus aureus biofilms contribute significantly to the recalcitrant nature of chronic rhinosinusitis. In previous studies, it has been shown that silk fibroin–nano silver solution can eliminate S. aureus biofilms in vitro, which suggests a potential role of this novel agent in the treatment of biofilm-associated diseases, such as sinusitis.Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of silk fibroin–nano silver solution as a topical anti-biofilm agent in a rabbit model of sinusitis.Methods: Biofilm-associated sinusitis models were established in 24 New Zealand White rabbits by gelatin sponge placement and S. aureus inoculation through a hole drilled into the anterolateral wall of the right maxillary sinus. After 4 weeks, indwelling catheters were placed into the maxillary sinus. Different concentrations of silk fibroin–nano silver solution or normal saline were irrigated slowly into the maxillary sinus via the indwelling catheters. After 7 days of irrigation, the rabbits were sacrificed. The sinus mucosa was harvested and examined for biofilm biomass as well as morphological integrity of the epithelium by scanning electron microscopy.Results: Silk fibroin–nano silver solution was found to be most effective in reducing the biomass of the S. aureus biofilms at a concentration of 384 mg/L, followed by the concentration of 153.6 mg/L, when compared with saline. After treatment with 384 mg/L silk fibroin–nano silver solution, the biofilms were completely

  17. Removal of pharmaceuticals in conventionally treated wastewater by a polishing Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR) with intermittent feeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Kai; Ooi, Gordon Tze Hoong; Litty, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    of pharmaceuticals was enhanced through the intermittent feeding of the MBBR. First-order rate constants for pharmaceutical removal, normalised to biomass, were significantly higher compared to other studies on activated sludge and suspended biofilms, especially for diclofenac, metoprolol and atenolol. Due...... to the intermittently feeding, degradation of diclofenac occurred with a half-life of only 2.1 hours and was thus much faster than any hitherto described wastewater bioreactor treatment....

  18. Modelling chemical behavior of water reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, R G.J.; Hanshaw, J; Mason, P K; Mignanelli, M A [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    For many applications, large computer codes have been developed which use correlation`s, simplifications and approximations in order to describe the complex situations which may occur during the operation of nuclear power plant or during fault scenarios. However, it is important to have a firm physical basis for simplifications and approximations in such codes and, therefore, there has been an emphasis on modelling the behaviour of materials and processes on a more detailed or fundamental basis. The application of fundamental modelling techniques to simulated various chemical phenomena in thermal reactor fuel systems are described in this paper. These methods include thermochemical modelling, kinetic and mass transfer modelling and atomistic simulation and examples of each approach are presented. In each of these applications a summary of the methods are discussed together with the assessment process adopted to provide the fundamental parameters which form the basis of the calculation. (author). 25 refs, 9 figs, 2 tabs.

  19. Nuclear reactor core modelling in multifunctional simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puska, E.K.

    1999-01-01

    The thesis concentrates on the development of nuclear reactor core models for the APROS multifunctional simulation environment and the use of the core models in various kinds of applications. The work was started in 1986 as a part of the development of the entire APROS simulation system. The aim was to create core models that would serve in a reliable manner in an interactive, modular and multifunctional simulator/plant analyser environment. One-dimensional and three-dimensional core neutronics models have been developed. Both models have two energy groups and six delayed neutron groups. The three-dimensional finite difference type core model is able to describe both BWR- and PWR-type cores with quadratic fuel assemblies and VVER-type cores with hexagonal fuel assemblies. The one- and three-dimensional core neutronics models can be connected with the homogeneous, the five-equation or the six-equation thermal hydraulic models of APROS. The key feature of APROS is that the same physical models can be used in various applications. The nuclear reactor core models of APROS have been built in such a manner that the same models can be used in simulator and plant analyser applications, as well as in safety analysis. In the APROS environment the user can select the number of flow channels in the three-dimensional reactor core and either the homogeneous, the five- or the six-equation thermal hydraulic model for these channels. The thermal hydraulic model and the number of flow channels have a decisive effect on the calculation time of the three-dimensional core model and thus, at present, these particular selections make the major difference between a safety analysis core model and a training simulator core model. The emphasis on this thesis is on the three-dimensional core model and its capability to analyse symmetric and asymmetric events in the core. The factors affecting the calculation times of various three-dimensional BWR, PWR and WWER-type APROS core models have been

  20. Nuclear reactor core modelling in multifunctional simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puska, E.K. [VTT Energy, Nuclear Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-06-01

    The thesis concentrates on the development of nuclear reactor core models for the APROS multifunctional simulation environment and the use of the core models in various kinds of applications. The work was started in 1986 as a part of the development of the entire APROS simulation system. The aim was to create core models that would serve in a reliable manner in an interactive, modular and multifunctional simulator/plant analyser environment. One-dimensional and three-dimensional core neutronics models have been developed. Both models have two energy groups and six delayed neutron groups. The three-dimensional finite difference type core model is able to describe both BWR- and PWR-type cores with quadratic fuel assemblies and VVER-type cores with hexagonal fuel assemblies. The one- and three-dimensional core neutronics models can be connected with the homogeneous, the five-equation or the six-equation thermal hydraulic models of APROS. The key feature of APROS is that the same physical models can be used in various applications. The nuclear reactor core models of APROS have been built in such a manner that the same models can be used in simulator and plant analyser applications, as well as in safety analysis. In the APROS environment the user can select the number of flow channels in the three-dimensional reactor core and either the homogeneous, the five- or the six-equation thermal hydraulic model for these channels. The thermal hydraulic model and the number of flow channels have a decisive effect on the calculation time of the three-dimensional core model and thus, at present, these particular selections make the major difference between a safety analysis core model and a training simulator core model. The emphasis on this thesis is on the three-dimensional core model and its capability to analyse symmetric and asymmetric events in the core. The factors affecting the calculation times of various three-dimensional BWR, PWR and WWER-type APROS core models have been

  1. Monte Carlo modelling of TRIGA research reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bakkari, B.; Nacir, B.; El Bardouni, T.; El Younoussi, C.; Merroun, O.; Htet, A.; Boulaich, Y.; Zoubair, M.; Boukhal, H.; Chakir, M.

    2010-10-01

    The Moroccan 2 MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at Centre des Etudes Nucléaires de la Maâmora (CENM) achieved initial criticality on May 2, 2007. The reactor is designed to effectively implement the various fields of basic nuclear research, manpower training, and production of radioisotopes for their use in agriculture, industry, and medicine. This study deals with the neutronic analysis of the 2-MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at CENM and validation of the results by comparisons with the experimental, operational, and available final safety analysis report (FSAR) values. The study was prepared in collaboration between the Laboratory of Radiation and Nuclear Systems (ERSN-LMR) from Faculty of Sciences of Tetuan (Morocco) and CENM. The 3-D continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP (version 5) was used to develop a versatile and accurate full model of the TRIGA core. The model represents in detailed all components of the core with literally no physical approximation. Continuous energy cross-section data from the more recent nuclear data evaluations (ENDF/B-VI.8, ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, and JENDL-3.3) as well as S( α, β) thermal neutron scattering functions distributed with the MCNP code were used. The cross-section libraries were generated by using the NJOY99 system updated to its more recent patch file "up259". The consistency and accuracy of both the Monte Carlo simulation and neutron transport physics were established by benchmarking the TRIGA experiments. Core excess reactivity, total and integral control rods worth as well as power peaking factors were used in the validation process. Results of calculations are analysed and discussed.

  2. Biofilm Risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirtanen, Gun Linnea; Salo, Satu

    2016-01-01

    This chapter on biofilm risks deals with biofilm formation of pathogenic microbes, sampling and detection methods, biofilm removal, and prevention of biofilm formation. Several common pathogens produce sticky and/or slimy structures in which the cells are embedded, that is, biofilms, on various...... surfaces in food processing. Biofilms of common foodborne pathogens are reviewed. The issue of persistent and nonpersistent microbial contamination in food processing is also discussed. It has been shown that biofilms can be difficult to remove and can thus cause severe disinfection and cleaning problems...... in food factories. In the prevention of biofilm formation microbial control in process lines should both limit the number of microbes on surfaces and reduce microbial activity in the process. Thus the hygienic design of process equipment and process lines is important in improving the process hygiene...

  3. Biofilm Effect on Flow Structure over a Permeable Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemifar, F.; Blois, G.; Aybar, M.; Perez-Calleja, P.; Nerenberg, R.; Sinha, S.; Hardy, R. J.; Best, J.; Sambrook Smith, G.; Christensen, K. T.

    2017-12-01

    Biofilms constitute an important form of bacterial life in aquatic environments and are present at the fluid-solid interfaces in natural and industrial settings, such as water distribution systems and riverbeds among others. The permeable, heterogeneous, and deformable structure of biofilms can influence mass and momentum transport between the subsurface and freestream. However, this interaction is not fully understood, in part due to technical obstacles impeding quantitative experimental investigations. In this work, the effect of biofilm on flow structure over a permeable bed is studied. Experiments are conducted in a closed water channel equipped with an idealized two-dimensional permeable bed. Prior to conducting flow experiments, the models are placed within an independent recirculating reactor for biofilm growth. Once a targeted biofilm growth stage is achieved, the models are transferred to the water channel and subjected to transitional and turbulent flows. Long-distance microscopic particle image velocimetry measurements are performed to quantify the effect of biofilm on the turbulence structure of the free flow as well as the freestream-subsurface flow interaction.

  4. A Numerical Model for Trickle Bed Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propp, Richard M.; Colella, Phillip; Crutchfield, William Y.; Day, Marcus S.

    2000-12-01

    Trickle bed reactors are governed by equations of flow in porous media such as Darcy's law and the conservation of mass. Our numerical method for solving these equations is based on a total-velocity splitting, sequential formulation which leads to an implicit pressure equation and a semi-implicit mass conservation equation. We use high-resolution finite-difference methods to discretize these equations. Our solution scheme extends previous work in modeling porous media flows in two ways. First, we incorporate physical effects due to capillary pressure, a nonlinear inlet boundary condition, spatial porosity variations, and inertial effects on phase mobilities. In particular, capillary forces introduce a parabolic component into the recast evolution equation, and the inertial effects give rise to hyperbolic nonconvexity. Second, we introduce a modification of the slope-limiting algorithm to prevent our numerical method from producing spurious shocks. We present a numerical algorithm for accommodating these difficulties, show the algorithm is second-order accurate, and demonstrate its performance on a number of simplified problems relevant to trickle bed reactor modeling.

  5. Simulation of Escherichia coli Dynamics in Biofilms and Submerged Colonies with an Individual-Based Model Including Metabolic Network Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Ignace L M M; Nimmegeers, Philippe; Akkermans, Simen; Hashem, Ihab; Van Impe, Jan F M

    2017-01-01

    Clustered microbial communities are omnipresent in the food industry, e.g., as colonies of microbial pathogens in/on food media or as biofilms on food processing surfaces. These clustered communities are often characterized by metabolic differentiation among their constituting cells as a result of heterogeneous environmental conditions in the cellular surroundings. This paper focuses on the role of metabolic differentiation due to oxygen gradients in the development of Escherichia coli cell communities, whereby low local oxygen concentrations lead to cellular secretion of weak acid products. For this reason, a metabolic model has been developed for the facultative anaerobe E. coli covering the range of aerobic, microaerobic, and anaerobic environmental conditions. This metabolic model is expressed as a multiparametric programming problem, in which the influence of low extracellular pH values and the presence of undissociated acid cell products in the environment has been taken into account. Furthermore, the developed metabolic model is incorporated in MICRODIMS, an in-house developed individual-based modeling framework to simulate microbial colony and biofilm dynamics. Two case studies have been elaborated using the MICRODIMS simulator: (i) biofilm growth on a substratum surface and (ii) submerged colony growth in a semi-solid mixed food product. In the first case study, the acidification of the biofilm environment and the emergence of typical biofilm morphologies have been observed, such as the mushroom-shaped structure of mature biofilms and the formation of cellular chains at the exterior surface of the biofilm. The simulations show that these morphological phenomena are respectively dependent on the initial affinity of pioneer cells for the substratum surface and the cell detachment process at the outer surface of the biofilm. In the second case study, a no-growth zone emerges in the colony center due to a local decline of the environmental pH. As a result

  6. Simulation of Escherichia coli Dynamics in Biofilms and Submerged Colonies with an Individual-Based Model Including Metabolic Network Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignace L. M. M. Tack

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Clustered microbial communities are omnipresent in the food industry, e.g., as colonies of microbial pathogens in/on food media or as biofilms on food processing surfaces. These clustered communities are often characterized by metabolic differentiation among their constituting cells as a result of heterogeneous environmental conditions in the cellular surroundings. This paper focuses on the role of metabolic differentiation due to oxygen gradients in the development of Escherichia coli cell communities, whereby low local oxygen concentrations lead to cellular secretion of weak acid products. For this reason, a metabolic model has been developed for the facultative anaerobe E. coli covering the range of aerobic, microaerobic, and anaerobic environmental conditions. This metabolic model is expressed as a multiparametric programming problem, in which the influence of low extracellular pH values and the presence of undissociated acid cell products in the environment has been taken into account. Furthermore, the developed metabolic model is incorporated in MICRODIMS, an in-house developed individual-based modeling framework to simulate microbial colony and biofilm dynamics. Two case studies have been elaborated using the MICRODIMS simulator: (i biofilm growth on a substratum surface and (ii submerged colony growth in a semi-solid mixed food product. In the first case study, the acidification of the biofilm environment and the emergence of typical biofilm morphologies have been observed, such as the mushroom-shaped structure of mature biofilms and the formation of cellular chains at the exterior surface of the biofilm. The simulations show that these morphological phenomena are respectively dependent on the initial affinity of pioneer cells for the substratum surface and the cell detachment process at the outer surface of the biofilm. In the second case study, a no-growth zone emerges in the colony center due to a local decline of the environmental p

  7. Salmonella biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castelijn, G.A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Salmonellaspp. is a problem in the food industry, since biofilms may act as a persistent source of product contamination. Therefore the aim of this study was to obtain more insight in the processes involved and the factors contributing to Salmonellabiofilm

  8. RSMASS: A simple model for estimating reactor and shield masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, A.C.; Aragon, J.; Gallup, D.

    1987-01-01

    A simple mathematical model (RSMASS) has been developed to provide rapid estimates of reactor and shield masses for space-based reactor power systems. Approximations are used rather than correlations or detailed calculations to estimate the reactor fuel mass and the masses of the moderator, structure, reflector, pressure vessel, miscellaneous components, and the reactor shield. The fuel mass is determined either by neutronics limits, thermal/hydraulic limits, or fuel damage limits, whichever yields the largest mass. RSMASS requires the reactor power and energy, 24 reactor parameters, and 20 shield parameters to be specified. This parametric approach should be applicable to a very broad range of reactor types. Reactor and shield masses calculated by RSMASS were found to be in good agreement with the masses obtained from detailed calculations

  9. In Situ Identification and Stratification of Monochloramine Inhibition Effects on Nitrifying Biofilms as Determined by the Use of Microelectrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nitrifying biofilm grown in an annular biofilm reactor and the microbial deactivation achieved after monochloramine treatment were investigated using microelectrodes. The nitrifying biofilm ammonium microprofile was measured and the effect of monochloramine on nitrifying bio...

  10. Treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater using a sequential anaerobic-aerobic moving-bed biofilm reactor system based on suspended ceramsite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mang; Gu, Li-Peng; Xu, Wen-Hao

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a novel suspended ceramsite was prepared, which has high strength, optimum density (close to water), and high porosity. The ceramsite was used to feed a moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) system with an anaerobic-aerobic (A/O) arrangement to treat petroleum refinery wastewater for simultaneous removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonium. The hydraulic retention time (HRT) of the anaerobic-aerobic MBBR system was varied from 72 to 18 h. The anaerobic-aerobic system had a strong tolerance to shock loading. Compared with the professional emission standard of China, the effluent concentrations of COD and NH3-N in the system could satisfy grade I at HRTs of 72 and 36 h, and grade II at HRT of 18 h. The average sludge yield of the anaerobic reactor was estimated to be 0.0575 g suspended solid/g CODremoved. This work demonstrated that the anaerobic-aerobic MBBR system using the suspended ceramsite as bio-carrier could be applied to achieving high wastewater treatment efficiency.

  11. Characterization of algae removal in a fluidized bed biofilm reactor system for lake water treatment; Kokisei ryudosho seibutsu rokaho ni yoru kosuichu no sorui jokyo tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T.; Tsuzuki, K.; Nishijima, N.; Takagi, T. [Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Terazono, K. [Water Resources Environment Technology Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-04-10

    This paper describes a pilot plant study on algae removal of a fluidized bed biofilm reactor system for lake water treatment. The system does not need backwashing because the fluidized bed suffers no clogging. Moreover, the system uses dissolved oxygen in influent water for aerobic biological treatment without aeration equipment. Thus, this system is a low energy and easy maintenance way to purify eutrophic lake water. The system was operated continuously at a flow rate of 1500 m{sup 3}/d{sup 1} for 9 months at Tsuchiura Port in Lake Kasumigaura. In this study, chlorophyll-a and dissolved oxygen in both influent and effluent water were monitored continuously. In summer (August to September) when water bloom occurred, the average removal efficiency of chlorophyll-a was 64% at the average influent chlorophyll-a concentration of 137.8 {mu}g/l{sup 1}. During the total experimental period (9 months), the average daily amount of removed chlorophyll-a was 40.3 g/d{sup 1} at the average influent chlorophyll-a concentration of 89.5 {mu}g/l{sup 1}. By analyzing the relationship between the removed chlorophyll-a and the consumption of dissolved oxygen, it was estimated that almost all of algae trapped in the reactor was degraded biologically. 20 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Biodegradation of a commercial mixture of the herbicides atrazine and S-metolachlor in a multi-channel packed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Orozco, Alberto; Galíndez-Nájera, Silvia Patricia; Ruiz-Ordaz, Nora; Galíndez-Mayer, Juvencio; Martínez-Jerónimo, Fernando

    2017-11-01

    Atrazine and S-metolachlor are two of the most widely used herbicides for agricultural purposes; consequently, residues of both compounds and their metabolites had been detected in ground and superficial waters. Unlike atrazine, the complete degradation of metolachlor has not been achieved. Hence, the purpose of this research is to study the biodegradation of a commercial mixture of atrazine and S-metolachlor in a prototype of a multi-channel packed-bed-biofilm reactor (MC-PBR) designed with the aim of solving the problems of pressure drop and oxygen transfer, typically found on this type of bioreactors.Because the removal efficiency of the herbicides was increased when Candida tropicalis was added to the original microbial community isolated, the reactor was inoculated with this enriched community. The operational conditions tested in batch and continuous mode did not affect the removal efficiency of atrazine; however, this was not the case for S-metolachlor. The removal rates and efficiencies showed a notable variation along the MC-PBR operation.

  13. The occurrence of biofilm in an equine experimental wound model of healing by secondary intention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Elin Lisby Kastbjerg; Bay, Lene; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    impaired healing. Presence of biofilm in tissue biopsies was assessed by peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Bandaged limb wounds developed EGT and displayed delayed healing, while shoulder and un-bandaged limb wounds healed.......009). The finding that biofilm was most prevalent in bandaged limb wounds with EGT formation suggests that biofilm may be linked to delayed wound healing in horses, as has been observed in humans. The inability to clear bacteria could be related to hypoxia and low-grade inflammation in the EGT, but the interaction......In humans, biofilm is a well-known cause of delayed healing and low-grade inflammation of chronic wounds. In horses, biofilm formation in wounds has been studied to a very limited degree. The objective of this study was thus to investigate the occurrence of biofilm in equine experimental wounds...

  14. Kinetic experiments for evaluating the Nernst-Monod model for anode-respiring bacteria (ARB) in a biofilm anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, César I; Marcus, Andrew Kato; Parameswaran, Prathap; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2008-09-01

    Anode-respiring bacteria (ARB) are able to transfer electrons from reduced substrates to a solid electrode. Previously, we developed a biofilm model based on the Nernst-Monod equation to describe the anode potential losses of ARB that transfer electrons through a solid conductive matrix. In this work, we develop an experimental setup to demonstrate how well the Nernst-Monod equation is able to represent anode potential losses in an ARB biofilm. We performed low-scan cyclic voltammetry (LSCV) throughout the growth phase of an ARB biofilm on a graphite electrode growing on acetate in continuous mode. The (j)V response of 9 LSCVs corresponded well to the Nernst-Monod equation, and the half-saturation potential (E(KA)) was -0.425 +/- 0.002 V vs Ag/AgCl at 30 degrees C (-0.155 +/- 0.002 V vs SHE). Anode-potential losses from the potential of acetate reached approximately 0.225 V at current density saturation, and this loss was determined by our microbial community's E(KA) value. The LSCVs at high current densities showed no significant deviation from the Nernst-Monod ideal shape, indicating that the conductivity of the biofilm matrix (kappa(bio)) was high enough (> or = 0.5 mS/cm) that potential loss did not affect the performance of the biofilm anode. Our results confirm the applicability of the Nernst-Monod equation for a conductive biofilm anode and give insights of the processes that dominate anode potential losses in microbial fuel cells.

  15. A WIMS-NESTLE reactor physics model for an RBMK reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, R.T.; Meriwether, G.H.

    1996-01-01

    This work describes the static neutronic calculations made for a three-dimensional model of an RBMK (Russian) reactor. Future work will involve the use of this neutronic model and a thermal-hydraulic model in coupled calculations. The lattice code, WIMS-D, was used to obtain the cross sections for the static neutronic calculations. The static reactor neutronic calculations were made with NESTLE, a three-dimensional nodal diffusion code. The methods used to establish an RBMK reactor model for use in these codes are discussed, and the cross sections calculated are given

  16. A WIMS-NESTLE reactor physics model for an RBMK reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, R.T.; Meriwether, G.H.

    1996-01-01

    This work describes the static neutronic calculations made for a three-dimensional model of an RBMK (Russian) reactor. Future work will involve the use of this neutronic model and a thermal-hydraulic model in coupled calculations. The lattice code, WIMS-D, was used to obtain the cross sections for the static neutronic calculations. The static reactor neutronic calculations were made with NESTLE, a three-dimensional nodal diffusion code. The methods used to establish an RBMK reactor model for use in these codes are discussed, and the cross sections calculated are given. (author)

  17. Influence of filling ratio and carrier type on organic matter removal in a moving bed biofilm reactor with pretreatment of electrocoagulation in wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Lopez, C; Martín-Pascual, J; González-Martínez, A; Calderón, K; González-López, J; Hontoria, E; Poyatos, J M

    2012-01-01

    At present, there is great concern about limited water resources and water quality, which require a more advanced technology. The Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR) has been shown to be an efficient technology for removal of organic matter and nutrients in industrial and urban wastewater treatment. However, there are some pollutants which are more difficult to remove by biological processes, so this process can be improved with additional physical and chemical treatments such as electrocoagulation, which appears to be a promising technology in electrochemical treatments. In this research, urban wastewater was treated in an MBBR plant with an electrocoagulation pre-treatment. K1 from AnoxKaldnes and AQWISE ABC5 from Aqwise were the carriers studied under three different filling ratios (20, 35, and 50%). The experimental pilot plant had four bioreactors with 20 L of operation volume and a common feed tank with 100 L of operation volume. The movement of the carriers was generated by aeration and stirrer systems. Organic matter removal was studied by analysis of soluble chemical oxygen demand (sCOD). The maximum organic matter removal in this MBBR system was 65.8% ± 1.4% and 78.4% ± 0.1% for K1 and Aqwise ABC5 carriers, respectively. Moreover, the bacterial diversity of the biofilm was studied by temperature-gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) of PCR-amplified partial 16S rRNA genes. 20 prominent TGGE bands were successfully reamplified and sequenced, being the predominant population: β-Proteobacteria, α-Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria.

  18. Advanced Small Modular Reactor Economics Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2014-10-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) research and development activities focus on four key areas: Developing assessment methods for evaluating advanced SMR technologies and characteristics; and Developing and testing of materials, fuels and fabrication techniques; and Resolving key regulatory issues identified by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and industry; and Developing advanced instrumentation and controls and human-machine interfaces. This report focuses on development of assessment methods to evaluate advanced SMR technologies and characteristics. Specifically, this report describes the expansion and application of the economic modeling effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Analysis of the current modeling methods shows that one of the primary concerns for the modeling effort is the handling of uncertainty in cost estimates. Monte Carlo–based methods are commonly used to handle uncertainty, especially when implemented by a stand-alone script within a program such as Python or MATLAB. However, a script-based model requires each potential user to have access to a compiler and an executable capable of handling the script. Making the model accessible to multiple independent analysts is best accomplished by implementing the model in a common computing tool such as Microsoft Excel. Excel is readily available and accessible to most system analysts, but it is not designed for straightforward implementation of a Monte Carlo–based method. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm requires in-spreadsheet scripting and statistical analyses or the use of add-ons such as Crystal Ball. An alternative method uses propagation of error calculations in the existing Excel-based system to estimate system cost uncertainty. This method has the advantage of using Microsoft Excel as is, but it requires the use of simplifying assumptions. These assumptions do not necessarily bring into question the analytical results. In fact, the

  19. An immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann model for biofilm growth and its impact on the NAPL dissolution in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benioug, M.; Yang, X.

    2017-12-01

    The evolution of microbial phase within porous medium is a complex process that involves growth, mortality, and detachment of the biofilm or attachment of moving cells. A better understanding of the interactions among biofilm growth, flow and solute transport and a rigorous modeling of such processes are essential for a more accurate prediction of the fate of pollutants (e.g. NAPLs) in soils. However, very few works are focused on the study of such processes in multiphase conditions (oil/water/biofilm systems). Our proposed numerical model takes into account the mechanisms that control bacterial growth and its impact on the dissolution of NAPL. An Immersed Boundary - Lattice Boltzmann Model (IB-LBM) is developed for flow simulations along with non-boundary conforming finite volume methods (volume of fluid and reconstruction methods) used for reactive solute transport. A sophisticated cellular automaton model is also developed to describe the spatial distribution of bacteria. A series of numerical simulations have been performed on complex porous media. A quantitative diagram representing the transitions between the different biofilm growth patterns is proposed. The bioenhanced dissolution of NAPL in the presence of biofilms is simulated at the pore scale. A uniform dissolution approach has been adopted to describe the temporal evolution of trapped blobs. Our simulations focus on the dissolution of NAPL in abiotic and biotic conditions. In abiotic conditions, we analyze the effect of the spatial distribution of NAPL blobs on the dissolution rate under different assumptions (blobs size, Péclet number). In biotic conditions, different conditions are also considered (spatial distribution, reaction kinetics, toxicity) and analyzed. The simulated results are consistent with those obtained from the literature.

  20. Modeling the PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor using MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Hairie Rabir; Mark Dennis Usang; Naim Syauqi Hamzah; Julia Abdul Karim; Mohd Amin Sharifuldin Salleh

    2012-01-01

    The 1 MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at Malaysian Nuclear Agency achieved initial criticality on June 28, 1982. The reactor is designed to effectively implement the various fields of basic nuclear research, manpower training, and production of radioisotopes. This paper describes the reactor parameters calculation for the PUSPATI TRIGA REACTOR (RTP); focusing on the application of the developed reactor 3D model for criticality calculation, analysis of power and neutron flux distribution and depletion study of TRIGA fuel. The 3D continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP was used to develop a versatile and accurate full model of the TRIGA reactor. The model represents in detailed all important components of the core and shielding with literally no physical approximation. (author)

  1. Computerized cost model for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneely, T.K.; Tabata, Hiroaki; Labourey, P.

    1999-01-01

    A computerized cost model has been developed in order to allow utility users to improve their familiarity with pressurized water reactor overnight capital costs and the various factors which influence them. This model organizes its cost data in the standard format of the Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB), and encapsulates simplified relationships between physical plant design information and capital cost information in a computer code. Model calculations are initiated from a base case, which was established using traditional cost calculation techniques. The user enters a set of plant design parameters, selected to allow consideration of plant models throughout the typical three- and four-loop PWR power range, and for plant sites in Japan, Europe, and the United States. Calculation of the new capital cost is then performed in a very brief time. The presentation of the program's output allows comparison of various cases with each other or with separately calculated baseline data. The user can start at a high level summary, and by selecting values of interest on a display grid show progressively more and more detailed information, including links to background information such as individual cost driver accounts and physical plant variables for each case. Graphical presentation of the comparison summaries is provided, and the numerical results may be exported to a spreadsheet for further processing. (author)

  2. Adapting Dynamic Mathematical Models to a Pilot Anaerobic Digestion Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Haugen, R. Bakke, and B. Lie

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic model has been adapted to a pilot anaerobic reactor fed diarymanure. Both steady-state data from online sensors and laboratory analysis anddynamic operational data from online sensors are used in the model adaptation.The model is based on material balances, and comprises four state variables,namely biodegradable volatile solids, volatile fatty acids, acid generatingmicrobes (acidogens, and methane generating microbes (methanogens. The modelcan predict the methane gas flow produced in the reactor. The model may beused for optimal reactor design and operation, state-estimation and control.Also, a dynamic model for the reactor temperature based on energy balance ofthe liquid in the reactor is adapted. This model may be used for optimizationand control when energy and economy are taken into account.

  3. Application of autoregressive moving average model in reactor noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Dinh Tri

    1993-01-01

    The application of an autoregressive (AR) model to estimating noise measurements has achieved many successes in reactor noise analysis in the last ten years. The physical processes that take place in the nuclear reactor, however, are described by an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model rather than by an AR model. Consequently more correct results could be obtained by applying the ARMA model instead of the AR model to reactor noise analysis. In this paper the system of the generalised Yule-Walker equations is derived from the equation of an ARMA model, then a method for its solution is given. Numerical results show the applications of the method proposed. (author)

  4. The development of model generators for specific reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, J.C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    Authoring reactor models is a routine task for practitioners in nuclear engineering for reactor design, safety analysis, and code validation. The conventional approach is to use a text-editor to either manually manipulate an existing model or to assemble a new model by copying and pasting or direct typing. This approach is error-prone and substantial effort is required for verification. Alternatively, models can be generated programmatically for a specific system via a centralized data source and with rigid algorithms to generate models consistently and efficiently. This approach is demonstrated here for model generators for MCNP and KENO for the ZED-2 reactor. (author)

  5. Stochastic processes analysis in nuclear reactor using ARMA models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavaljevski, N.

    1990-01-01

    The analysis of ARMA model derived from general stochastic state equations of nuclear reactor is given. The dependence of ARMA model parameters on the main physical characteristics of RB nuclear reactor in Vinca is presented. Preliminary identification results are presented, observed discrepancies between theory and experiment are explained and the possibilities of identification improvement are anticipated. (author)

  6. Neutron field control cybernetics model of RBMK reactor operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, V.V.; Postnikov, V.V.; Sviridenkov, A.N.

    1992-01-01

    Results on parameter optimization for cybernetics model of RBMK reactor operator by power release control function are presented. Convolutions of various criteria applied previously in algorithms of the program 'Adviser to reactor operator' formed the basis of the model. 7 refs.; 4 figs

  7. Modeling atmospheric dispersion for reactor accident consequence evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpert, D.J.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Woodard, K.

    1982-01-01

    Atmospheric dispersion models are a central part of computer codes for the evaluation of potential reactor accident consequences. A variety of ways of treating to varying degrees the many physical processes that can have an impact on the predicted consequences exists. The currently available models are reviewed and their capabilities and limitations, as applied to reactor accident consequence analyses, are discussed

  8. A model to describe the performance of the UASB reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Gómez, Raúl; Renman, Gunno; Moreno, Luis; Liu, Longcheng

    2014-04-01

    A dynamic model to describe the performance of the Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactor was developed. It includes dispersion, advection, and reaction terms, as well as the resistances through which the substrate passes before its biotransformation. The UASB reactor is viewed as several continuous stirred tank reactors connected in series. The good agreement between experimental and simulated results shows that the model is able to predict the performance of the UASB reactor (i.e. substrate concentration, biomass concentration, granule size, and height of the sludge bed).

  9. Growth dependence of conjugation explains limited plasmid invasion in biofilms: an individual‐based modelling study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merkey, Brian; Lardon, Laurent; Seoane, Jose Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Plasmid invasion in biofilms is often surprisingly limited in spite of the close contact of cells in a biofilm. We hypothesized that this poor plasmid spread into deeper biofilm layers is caused by a dependence of conjugation on the growth rate (relative to the maximum growth rate) of the donor......, we find that invasion of a resident biofilm is indeed limited when plasmid transfer depends on growth, but not so in the absence of growth dependence. Using sensitivity analysis we also find that parameters related to timing (i.e. a lag before the transconjugant can transfer, transfer proficiency...... and scan speed) and spatial reach (EPS yield, conjugal pilus length) are more important for successful plasmid invasion than the recipients' growth rate or the probability of segregational loss. While this study identifies one factor that can limit plasmid invasion in biofilms, the new individual...

  10. MATLAB/SIMULINK model of CANDU reactor for control studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javidnia, H.; Jiang, J.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a MATLAB/SIMULINK model is developed for a CANDU type reactor. The data for the reactor are taken from an Indian PHWR, which is very similar to CANDU in its design. Among the different feedback mechanisms in the core of the reactor, only xenon has been considered which plays an important role in spatial oscillations. The model is verified under closed loop scenarios with simple PI controller. The results of the simulation show that this model can be used for controller design and simulation of the reactor systems. Adding models of the other components of a CANDU reactor would ultimately result in a complete model of CANDU plant in MATLAB/SIMULINK. (author)

  11. AtlA Mediates Extracellular DNA Release, Which Contributes to Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation in an Experimental Rat Model of Infective Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chiau-Jing; Hsu, Ron-Bin; Shun, Chia-Tung; Hsu, Chih-Chieh; Chia, Jean-San

    2017-09-01

    Host factors, such as platelets, have been shown to enhance biofilm formation by oral commensal streptococci, inducing infective endocarditis (IE), but how bacterial components contribute to biofilm formation in vivo is still not clear. We demonstrated previously that an isogenic mutant strain of Streptococcus mutans deficient in autolysin AtlA (Δ atlA ) showed a reduced ability to cause vegetation in a rat model of bacterial endocarditis. However, the role of AtlA in bacterial biofilm formation is unclear. In this study, confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis showed that extracellular DNA (eDNA) was embedded in S. mutans GS5 floes during biofilm formation on damaged heart valves, but an Δ atlA strain could not form bacterial aggregates. Semiquantification of eDNA by PCR with bacterial 16S rRNA primers demonstrated that the Δ atlA mutant strain produced dramatically less eDNA than the wild type. Similar results were observed with in vitro biofilm models. The addition of polyanethol sulfonate, a chemical lysis inhibitor, revealed that eDNA release mediated by bacterial cell lysis is required for biofilm initiation and maturation in the wild-type strain. Supplementation of cultures with calcium ions reduced wild-type growth but increased eDNA release and biofilm mass. The effect of calcium ions on biofilm formation was abolished in Δ atlA cultures and by the addition of polyanethol sulfonate. The VicK sensor, but not CiaH, was found to be required for the induction of eDNA release or the stimulation of biofilm formation by calcium ions. These data suggest that calcium ion-regulated AtlA maturation mediates the release of eDNA by S. mutans , which contributes to biofilm formation in infective endocarditis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Simultaneous evaluation of effective diffusion coefficients of the substrates in a biofilm with a novel experimental method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyenal, H.; Tanyolac, A. [Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey)

    1996-08-01

    A pure culture of Zoogloea ramigera was grown as a film on active carbon particles in a differential fluidized bed biofilm reactor. Pseudo-steady state conditions were established within this reactor and thus, the stable substrate concentrations and flux values were obtained within definite time intervals, along with homogeneous biofilm thickness and density. The free-growth kinetics of the culture were studied in a continuous fermenter and a multi-substrate growth model was used to describe the utilization of limiting substrate in the biofilm. The limiting substrates for the culture were determined to be glucose, ammonium and oxygen. The effective diffusion coefficients of these substrates were calculated simultaneously with a diffusion-reaction model. Results of the model solution revealed that the effective diffusion coefficient for all three substrates through the biofilm decreased with increased biofilm density and observed biofilm thickness up to a critical value of about 90 x 10{sup -6} m. After this critical point, all diffusion coefficients started to increase slowly due to diminished biofilm density. 31 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Biofilm Formation Protects Salmonella from the Antibiotic Ciprofloxacin In Vitro and In Vivo in the Mouse Model of chronic Carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Juan F; Alberts, Halley; Lee, Joel; Doolittle, Lauren; Gunn, John S

    2018-01-09

    Typhoid fever is caused by the human-restricted pathogen Salmonella enterica sv. Typhi. Approximately 5% of people that resolve the disease become chronic carriers, with the gallbladder as the main reservoir of the bacteria. Of these, about 90% present with gallstones, on which Salmonella form biofilms. Because S. Typhi is a human-restricted pathogen, these carriers are the main source of dissemination of the disease; unfortunately, antibiotic treatment has shown to be an ineffective therapy. This is believed to be caused by the inherent antibiotic resistance conferred by Salmonella biofilms growing on gallstones. The gallstone mouse model with S. Typhimurium has proven to be an excellent surrogate for S. Typhi chronic infection. In this study, we test the hypothesis that the biofilm state confers Salmonella with the increased resistance to antibiotics observed in cases of chronic carriage. We found that, in the biofilm state, Salmonella is significantly more resistant to ciprofloxacin, a common antibiotic used for the treatment of Salmonella, both in vitro (p < 0.001 for both S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium with respect to planktonic cells) and in vivo (p = 0.0035 with respect to control mice).

  14. Detection of Alpha-Toxin and Other Virulence Factors in Biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus on Polystyrene and a Human Epidermal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Reijer, P M; Haisma, E M; Lemmens-den Toom, N A; Willemse, J; Koning, R I; Koning, R A; Demmers, J A A; Dekkers, D H W; Rijkers, E; El Ghalbzouri, A; Nibbering, P H; van Wamel, W

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Staphylococcus aureus to successfully colonize (a)biotic surfaces may be explained by biofilm formation and the actions of virulence factors. The aim of the present study was to establish the presence of 52 proteins, including virulence factors such as alpha-toxin, during biofilm formation of five different (methicillin resistant) S. aureus strains on Leiden human epidermal models (LEMs) and polystyrene surfaces (PS) using a competitive Luminex-based assay. All five S. aureus strains formed biofilms on PS, whereas only three out of five strains formed biofilms on LEMs. Out of the 52 tested proteins, six functionally diverse proteins (ClfB, glucosaminidase, IsdA, IsaA, SACOL0688 and nuclease) were detected in biofilms of all strains on both PS and LEMs. At the same time, four toxins (alpha-toxin, gamma-hemolysin B and leukocidins D and E), two immune modulators (formyl peptide receptor-like inhibitory protein and Staphylococcal superantigen-like protein 1), and two other proteins (lipase and LytM) were detectable in biofilms by all five S. aureus strains on LEMs, but not on PS. In contrast, fibronectin-binding protein B (FnbpB) was detectable in biofilms by all S. aureus biofilms on PS, but not on LEMs. These data were largely confirmed by the results from proteomic and transcriptomic analyses and in case of alpha-toxin additionally by GFP-reporter technology. Functionally diverse virulence factors of (methicillin-resistant) S. aureus are present during biofilm formation on LEMs and PS. These results could aid in identifying novel targets for future treatment strategies against biofilm-associated infections.

  15. Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Vivek; Vaz Salles, Marcos António

    2018-01-01

    The requirements for OLTP database systems are becoming ever more demanding. Domains such as finance and computer games increasingly mandate that developers be able to encode complex application logic and control transaction latencies in in-memory databases. At the same time, infrastructure...... engineers in these domains need to experiment with and deploy OLTP database architectures that ensure application scalability and maximize resource utilization in modern machines. In this paper, we propose a relational actor programming model for in-memory databases as a novel, holistic approach towards......-level function calls. In contrast to classic transactional models, however, reactors allow developers to take advantage of intra-transaction parallelism and state encapsulation in their applications to reduce latency and improve locality. Moreover, reactors enable a new degree of flexibility in database...

  16. Verification of thermo-fluidic CVD reactor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisik, Z; Turczynski, M; Ruta, L; Raj, E

    2014-01-01

    Presented paper describes the numerical model of CVD (Chemical Vapour Deposition) reactor created in ANSYS CFX, whose main purpose is the evaluation of numerical approaches used to modelling of heat and mass transfer inside the reactor chamber. Verification of the worked out CVD model has been conducted with measurements under various thermal, pressure and gas flow rate conditions. Good agreement between experimental and numerical results confirms correctness of the elaborated model.

  17. Biodegradation of bilge water: Batch test under anaerobic and aerobic conditions and performance of three pilot aerobic Moving Bed Biofilm Reactors (MBBRs) at different filling fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyrides, Ioannis; Drakou, Efi-Maria; Ioannou, Stavros; Michael, Fotoula; Gatidou, Georgia; Stasinakis, Athanasios S

    2018-07-01

    The bilge water that is stored at the bottom of the ships is saline and greasy wastewater with a high Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) fluctuations (2-12 g COD L -1 ). The aim of this study was to examine at a laboratory scale the biodegradation of bilge water using first anaerobic granular sludge followed by aerobic microbial consortium (consisted of 5 strains) and vice versa and then based on this to implement a pilot scale study. Batch results showed that granular sludge and aerobic consortium can remove up to 28% of COD in 13 days and 65% of COD removal in 4 days, respectively. The post treatment of anaerobic and aerobic effluent with aerobic consortium and granular sludge resulted in further 35% and 5% COD removal, respectively. The addition of glycine betaine or nitrates to the aerobic consortium did not enhance significantly its ability to remove COD from bilge water. The aerobic microbial consortium was inoculated in 3 pilot (200 L) Moving Bed Biofilm Reactors (MBBRs) under filling fractions of 10%, 20% and 40% and treated real bilge water for 165 days under 36 h HRT. The MBBR with a filling fraction of 40% resulted in the highest COD decrease (60%) compared to the operation of the MBBRs with a filling fraction of 10% and 20%. GC-MS analysis on 165 day pointed out the main organic compounds presence in the influent and in the MBBR (10% filling fraction) effluent. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Application of response surface methodology (RSM) for optimisation of COD, NH3-N and 2,4-DCP removal from recycled paper wastewater in a pilot-scale granular activated carbon sequencing batch biofilm reactor (GAC-SBBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamad, Mohd Hafizuddin; Sheikh Abdullah, Siti Rozaimah; Mohamad, Abu Bakar; Abdul Rahman, Rakmi; Hasan Kadhum, Abdul Amir

    2013-05-30

    In this study, the potential of a pilot-scale granular activated carbon sequencing batch biofilm reactor (GAC-SBBR) for removing chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammoniacal nitrogen (NH3-N) and 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) from recycled paper wastewater was assessed. For this purpose, the response surface methodology (RSM) was employed, using a central composite face-centred design (CCFD), to optimise three of the most important operating variables, i.e., hydraulic retention time (HRT), aeration rate (AR) and influent feed concentration (IFC), in the pilot-scale GAC-SBBR process for recycled paper wastewater treatment. Quadratic models were developed for the response variables, i.e., COD, NH3-N and 2,4-DCP removal, based on the high value (>0.9) of the coefficient of determination (R(2)) obtained from the analysis of variance (ANOVA). The optimal conditions were established at 750 mg COD/L IFC, 3.2 m(3)/min AR and 1 day HRT, corresponding to predicted COD, NH3-N and 2,4-DCP removal percentages of 94.8, 100 and 80.9%, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Silver or Copper Nanoparticles-Dispersed Silane Coatings on Biofilm Formation in Cooling Water Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Akiko; Kanematsu, Hideyuki; Sano, Katsuhiko; Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Ishida, Kunimitsu; Beech, Iwona B.; Suzuki, Osamu; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Biofouling often occurs in cooling water systems, resulting in the reduction of heat exchange efficiency and corrosion of the cooling pipes, which raises the running costs. Therefore, controlling biofouling is very important. To regulate biofouling, we focus on the formation of biofilm, which is the early step of biofouling. In this study, we investigated whether silver or copper nanoparticles-dispersed silane coatings inhibited biofilm formation in cooling systems. We developed a closed laboratory biofilm reactor as a model of a cooling pipe and used seawater as a model for cooling water. Silver or copper nanoparticles-dispersed silane coating (Ag coating and Cu coating) coupons were soaked in seawater, and the seawater was circulated in the laboratory biofilm reactor for several days to create biofilms. Three-dimensional images of the surface showed that sea-island-like structures were formed on silane coatings and low concentration Cu coating, whereas nothing was formed on high concentration Cu coatings and low concentration Ag coating. The sea-island-like structures were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy to estimate the components of the biofilm. We found that both the Cu coating and Ag coating were effective methods to inhibit biofilm formation in cooling pipes. PMID:28773758

  20. Influence of Nutrient Availability and Quorum Sensing on the Formation of Metabolically Inactive Microcolonies Within Structurally Heterogeneous Bacterial Biofilms: An Individual-Based 3D Cellular Automata Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machineni, Lakshmi; Rajapantul, Anil; Nandamuri, Vandana; Pawar, Parag D

    2017-03-01

    The resistance of bacterial biofilms to antibiotic treatment has been attributed to the emergence of structurally heterogeneous microenvironments containing metabolically inactive cell populations. In this study, we use a three-dimensional individual-based cellular automata model to investigate the influence of nutrient availability and quorum sensing on microbial heterogeneity in growing biofilms. Mature biofilms exhibited at least three structurally distinct strata: a high-volume, homogeneous region sandwiched between two compact sections of high heterogeneity. Cell death occurred preferentially in layers in close proximity to the substratum, resulting in increased heterogeneity in this section of the biofilm; the thickness and heterogeneity of this lowermost layer increased with time, ultimately leading to sloughing. The model predicted the formation of metabolically dormant cellular microniches embedded within faster-growing cell clusters. Biofilms utilizing quorum sensing were more heterogeneous compared to their non-quorum sensing counterparts, and resisted sloughing, featuring a cell-devoid layer of EPS atop the substratum upon which the remainder of the biofilm developed. Overall, our study provides a computational framework to analyze metabolic diversity and heterogeneity of biofilm-associated microorganisms and may pave the way toward gaining further insights into the biophysical mechanisms of antibiotic resistance.

  1. INTERVAL OBSERVER FOR A BIOLOGICAL REACTOR MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Kharkovskaia

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The method of an interval observer design for nonlinear systems with parametric uncertainties is considered. The interval observer synthesis problem for systems with varying parameters consists in the following. If there is the uncertainty restraint for the state values of the system, limiting the initial conditions of the system and the set of admissible values for the vector of unknown parameters and inputs, the interval existence condition for the estimations of the system state variables, containing the actual state at a given time, needs to be held valid over the whole considered time segment as well. Conditions of the interval observers design for the considered class of systems are shown. They are: limitation of the input and state, the existence of a majorizing function defining the uncertainty vector for the system, Lipschitz continuity or finiteness of this function, the existence of an observer gain with the suitable Lyapunov matrix. The main condition for design of such a device is cooperativity of the interval estimation error dynamics. An individual observer gain matrix selection problem is considered. In order to ensure the property of cooperativity for interval estimation error dynamics, a static transformation of coordinates is proposed. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated by computer modeling of the biological reactor. Possible applications of these interval estimation systems are the spheres of robust control, where the presence of various types of uncertainties in the system dynamics is assumed, biotechnology and environmental systems and processes, mechatronics and robotics, etc.

  2. MODELING OF TUBULAR ELECTROCHEMICAL REACTOR FOR DYE REMOVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. VIJAYAKUMAR

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present investigation is to model a tubular electrochemical reactor for the treatment of synthetic dye wastewater. The tubular reactor was modeled and solved by finite difference method. For the model solution, the column was divided into 11 nodes in the axial direction and the variation in the radial direction has been neglected. An initial dye concentration of 200 mg L-1was taken in the reservoir. The reactor was operated in a batch with recirculation operation. Based on preliminary experiments all parameters have been optimized. The model simulation is compared with the experimental value and it is observed that the model fairly matches well with the experiment. The modeling of tubular electrochemical reactors for dye waste water treatment could be useful in the design and scale up of electrochemical process.

  3. Successful treatment of high azo dye concentration wastewater using combined anaerobic/aerobic granular activated carbon-sequencing batch biofilm reactor (GAC-SBBR): simultaneous adsorption and biodegradation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini Koupaie, E; Alavi Moghaddam, M R; Hashemi, S H

    2013-01-01

    The application of a granular activated carbon-sequencing batch biofilm reactor (GAC-SBBR) for treatment of wastewater containing 1,000 mg/L Acid Red 18 (AR18) was investigated in this research. The treatment system consisted of a sequencing batch reactor equipped with moving GAC as biofilm support. Each treatment cycle consisted of two successive anaerobic (14 h) and aerobic (8 h) reaction phases. Removal of more than 91% chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 97% AR18 was achieved in this study. Investigation of dye decolorization kinetics showed that the dye removal was stimulated by the adsorption capacity of the GAC at the beginning of the anaerobic phase and then progressed following a first-order reaction. Based on COD analysis results, at least 77.8% of the dye total metabolites were mineralized during the applied treatment system. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that more than 97% of 1-naphthyalamine-4-sulfonate as one of the main sulfonated aromatic constituents of AR18 was removed during the aerobic reaction phase. According to the scanning electron microscopic analysis, the microbial biofilms grew in most cavities and pores of the GAC, but not on the external surfaces of the GAC.

  4. Mechanistic modeling of biocorrosion caused by biofilms of sulfate reducing bacteria and acid producing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dake; Li, Yingchao; Gu, Tingyue

    2016-08-01

    Biocorrosion is also known as microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Most anaerobic MIC cases can be classified into two major types. Type I MIC involves non-oxygen oxidants such as sulfate and nitrate that require biocatalysis for their reduction in the cytoplasm of microbes such as sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and nitrate reducing bacteria (NRB). This means that the extracellular electrons from the oxidation of metal such as iron must be transported across cell walls into the cytoplasm. Type II MIC involves oxidants such as protons that are secreted by microbes such as acid producing bacteria (APB). The biofilms in this case supply the locally high concentrations of oxidants that are corrosive without biocatalysis. This work describes a mechanistic model that is based on the biocatalytic cathodic sulfate reduction (BCSR) theory. The model utilizes charge transfer and mass transfer concepts to describe the SRB biocorrosion process. The model also includes a mechanism to describe APB attack based on the local acidic pH at a pit bottom. A pitting prediction software package has been created based on the mechanisms. It predicts long-term pitting rates and worst-case scenarios after calibration using SRB short-term pit depth data. Various parameters can be investigated through computer simulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Dynamic modeling of the advanced neutron source reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; Ibn-Khayat, M.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary description and some applications of a computer model that has been developed to simulate the dynamic behavior of the advanced neutron source (ANS) reactor. The ANS dynamic model is coded in the advanced continuous simulation language (ACSL), and it represents the reactor core, vessel, primary cooling system, and secondary cooling systems. The use of a simple dynamic model in the early stages of the reactor design has proven very valuable not only in the development of the control and plant protection system but also of components such as pumps and heat exchangers that are usually sized based on steady-state calculations

  6. Intermittent Aeration Suppresses Nitrite-Oxidizing Bacteria in Membrane-Aerated Biofilms: A Model-Based Explanation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Yunjie; Domingo Felez, Carlos; Plósz, Benedek G.

    2017-01-01

    . On the basis of dissolved oxygen (DO), ammonium, nitrite, and nitrate profiles within the biofilm and in the bulk, a 1-dimensional nitrifying biofilm model was developed and calibrated. The model was utilized to explore the potential mechanisms of NOB suppression associated with intermittent aeration...... nitritation, strategies to suppress nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) are needed, which are ideally grounded on an understanding of underlying mechanisms. In this study, a nitrifying MABR was operated under intermittent aeration. During eight months of operation, AOB dominated, while NOB were suppressed...... during intermittent aeration was mostly explained by periodic inhibition caused by free ammonia due to periodic transient pH upshifts. Dissolved oxygen limitation did not govern NOB suppression. Different intermittent aeration strategies were then evaluated for nitritation success in intermittently...

  7. Mammary Gland Pathology Subsequent to Acute Infection with Strong versus Weak Biofilm Forming Staphylococcus aureus Bovine Mastitis Isolates: A Pilot Study Using Non-Invasive Mouse Mastitis Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jully Gogoi-Tiwari

    Full Text Available Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus is an important virulence attribute because of its potential to induce persistent antibiotic resistance, retard phagocytosis and either attenuate or promote inflammation, depending upon the disease syndrome, in vivo. This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential significance of strength of biofilm formation by clinical bovine mastitis-associated S. aureus in mammary tissue damage by using a mouse mastitis model.Two S. aureus strains of the same capsular phenotype with different biofilm forming strengths were used to non-invasively infect mammary glands of lactating mice. Biofilm forming potential of these strains were determined by tissue culture plate method, ica typing and virulence gene profile per detection by PCR. Delivery of the infectious dose of S. aureus was directly through the teat lactiferous duct without invasive scraping of the teat surface. Both bacteriological and histological methods were used for analysis of mammary gland pathology of mice post-infection.Histopathological analysis of the infected mammary glands revealed that mice inoculated with the strong biofilm forming S. aureus strain produced marked acute mastitic lesions, showing profuse infiltration predominantly with neutrophils, with evidence of necrosis in the affected mammary glands. In contrast, the damage was significantly less severe in mammary glands of mice infected with the weak biofilm-forming S. aureus strain. Although both IL-1β and TNF-α inflammatory biomarkers were produced in infected mice, level of TNF-α produced was significantly higher (p<0.05 in mice inoculated with strong biofilm forming S. aureus than the weak biofilm forming strain.This finding suggests an important role of TNF-α in mammary gland pathology post-infection with strong biofilm-forming S. aureus in the acute mouse mastitis model, and offers an opportunity for the development of novel strategies for reduction of mammary tissue damage

  8. Safe design and operation of fluidized-bed reactors: Choice between reactor models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, E.J.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    For three different catalytic fluidized bed reactor models, two models presented by Werther and a model presented by van Deemter, the region of safe and unique operation for a chosen reaction system was investigated. Three reaction systems were used: the oxidation of benzene to maleic anhydride, the

  9. Numerical modeling of a nuclear production reactor cooling lake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, L.L.; Pepper, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    A finite element model has been developed which predicts flow and temperature distributions within a nuclear reactor cooling lake at the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina. Numerical results agree with values obtained from a 3-D EPA numerical lake model and actual measurements obtained from the lake. Because the effluent water from the reactor heat exchangers discharges directly into the lake, downstream temperatures at mid-lake could exceed the South Carolina DHEC guidelines for thermal exchanges during the summer months. Therefore, reactor power was reduced to maintain temperature compliance at mid-lake. Thermal mitigation measures were studied that included placing a 6.1 m deep fabric curtain across mid-lake and moving the reactor outfall upstream. These measurements were calculated to permit about an 8% improvement in reactor power during summer operation

  10. Babcock and Wilcox model for predicting in-reactor densification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buescher, B.J.; Pegram, J.W.

    1975-06-01

    The B and W fuel densification model is used to describe the extent and kinetics of in-reactor densification in B and W production fuel. The model and approach are qualified against an extensive data base available through B and W's participation in the EEI Fuel Densification Program. Out-of-reactor resintering tests on representative pellets from each batch of fuel are used to provide input parameters to the B and W densification model. The B and W densification model predicts in-reactor densification very accurately for pellets operated at heat rates above 5 kW/ft and with considerable conservation for pellets operated at heat rates less than 5 kW/ft. This model represents a technically rigorous and conservative basis for predicting the extent and kinetics of in-reactor densification. 9 references. (U.S.)

  11. Extracellular polymeric substances affect the responses of multi-species biofilms in the presence of sulfamethizole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Longfei; Li, Yi; Wang, Li; Zhang, Huanjun; Zhu, Mengjie; Zhang, Peisheng; Zhu, Xiaoxiao

    2018-04-01

    The occurrence and transportation of antibiotics in biofilms from natural and engineered sources have attracted increasing interests. Nevertheless, the effects of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on the responses of biofilms to the exposure to antibiotics are not clear. In this study, the effects of EPS on the sorption and biological responses to one representative antibiotic, sulfamethizole (STZ), in model biofilms were investigated. Proteins dominated the interactions between the EPS and the STZ and the EPS from a moving bed biofilm reactor exhibited the strongest interaction with the STZ. The EPS served as important reservoirs for the STZ and the tested biofilms all showed reduced sorption capacities for the STZ after the EPS were extracted. The respiratory rates and typical enzymatic activities were reduced after the EPS were extracted. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing results confirmed that the bacterial community in the biofilm without the EPS was more vulnerable to antibiotic shock as indicated by the community diversity and richness indices. A greater increase in the abundance of susceptible species was observed in the natural biofilm. The results comprehensively suggested that the EPS played important role in biosorption of STZ and alleviated the direct damage of the antibiotic to the cells; in addition the extent of the bacterial community response was associated with the origins of the biofilms. Our study provided details on the responses of multi-species biofilms to the exposure to an antibiotic and highlighted the role of the EPS in interacting with the antibiotic, thereby providing a deeper understanding of the bioremediation of antibiotics in real-life natural and engineered biofilm systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of a calibration protocol and identification of the most sensitive parameters for the particulate biofilm models used in biological wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldyasti, Ahmed; Nakhla, George; Zhu, Jesse

    2012-05-01

    Biofilm models are valuable tools for process engineers to simulate biological wastewater treatment. In order to enhance the use of biofilm models implemented in contemporary simulation software, model calibration is both necessary and helpful. The aim of this work was to develop a calibration protocol of the particulate biofilm model with a help of the sensitivity analysis of the most important parameters in the biofilm model implemented in BioWin® and verify the predictability of the calibration protocol. A case study of a circulating fluidized bed bioreactor (CFBBR) system used for biological nutrient removal (BNR) with a fluidized bed respirometric study of the biofilm stoichiometry and kinetics was used to verify and validate the proposed calibration protocol. Applying the five stages of the biofilm calibration procedures enhanced the applicability of BioWin®, which was capable of predicting most of the performance parameters with an average percentage error (APE) of 0-20%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nuclear reactor power control system based on flexibility model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Gang; Zhao Fuyu; Li Chong; Tai Yun

    2011-01-01

    Design the nuclear reactor power control system in this paper to cater to a nonlinear nuclear reactor. First, calculate linear power models at five power levels of the reactor as five local models and design controllers of the local models as local controllers. Every local controller consists of an optimal controller contrived by the toolbox of Optimal Controller Designer (OCD) and a proportion-integration-differentiation (PID) controller devised via Genetic Algorithm (GA) to set parameters of the PID controller. According to the local models and controllers, apply the principle of flexibility model developed in the paper to obtain the flexibility model and the flexibility controller at every power level. Second, the flexibility model and the flexibility controller at a level structure the power control system of this level. The set of the whole power control systems corresponding to global power levels is to approximately carry out the power control of the reactor. Finally, the nuclear reactor power control system is simulated. The simulation result shows that the idea of flexibility model is feasible and the nuclear reactor power control system is effective. (author)

  14. Development of a continuous flow model system for studies of biofilm formation on polymers and its application on PVC-C and PVC-P

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corfitzen, Charlotte B.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    could be harvested from three different combinations of flow velocity and residence time. Biofilm formation was followed by ATP analysis on test material (chlorinated polyvinylchloride, PVC-C), negative control (stainless steel) and positive control (plasticized polyvinylchloride, PVC-P) incubated......-C, while most of the very deviating values for PVC-P were between 2-13,000 pg ATP/cm2. During 43 weeks of operation of the continuous flow model systems the biofilm formation increased on all three materials, with biofilm formation on PVC-C at the same level as on the negative steel control (values of 75...... system. In this study, a continuous flow model system was developed, for investigating biofilm formation on polymers, simulating conditions in the distribution system. Commercially available pipes were used for exchangeable test pieces, which allowed for testing over prolonged time periods. Test pieces...

  15. Lavage with allicin in combination with vancomycin inhibits biofilm formation by Staphylococcus epidermidis in a rabbit model of prosthetic joint infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haohan Zhai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: The present anti-infection strategy for prosthetic joint infections (PJI includes the use of antibiotics and surgical treatments, but the bacterial eradication rates are still low. One of the major challenges is the formation of biofilm causing poor bacterial eradication. Recently it has been reported that allicin (diallyl thiosulphinate, an antibacterial principle of garlic, can inhibit bacteria adherence and prevent biofilm formation in vitro. However, whether allicin could inhibit biofilm formation in vivo is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of allicin on biofilm formation, and whether allicin could potentiate the bactericidal effect of vancomycin in a rabbit PJI model. METHODS: A sterile stainless-steel screw with a sterile ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene washer was inserted into the lateral femoral condyle of the right hind knee joint of rabbit, and 1 mL inoculum containing 104 colony-forming units of Staphylococcus epidermidis was inoculated into the knee joint (n = 32. Fourteen days later, rabbits randomly received one of the following 4 treatments using continuous lavages: normal saline, vancomycin (20 mcg/mL, allicin (4 mg/L, or allicin (4 mg/L plus vancomycin (20 mcg/mL. Three days later, the washer surface biofilm formation was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The bacterial counts within the biofilm of implanted screws were determined by bacterial culture. RESULTS: The lowest number of viable bacterial counts of Staphylococcus epidermidis recovered from the biofilm was in the rabbits treated with allicin plus vancomycin (P<0.01 vs. all other groups. The biofilm formation was significantly reduced or undetectable by SEM in rabbits receiving allicin or allicin plus vancomycin. CONCLUSION: Intra-articular allicincan inhibit biofilm formation and enhance the bactericidal effect of vancomycin on implant surface in vivo. Allicin in combination with vancomycin may be

  16. COPS model estimates of LLEA availability near selected reactor sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkbigler, K.P.

    1979-11-01

    The COPS computer model has been used to estimate local law enforcement agency (LLEA) officer availability in the neighborhood of selected nuclear reactor sites. The results of these analyses are presented both in graphic and tabular form in this report

  17. Modeling issues associated with production reactor safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stack, D.W.; Thomas, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes several Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) modeling issues that are related to the unique design and operation of the production reactors. The identification of initiating events and determination of a set of success criteria for the production reactors is of concern because of their unique design. The modeling of accident recovery must take into account the unique operation of these reactors. Finally, a more thorough search and evaluation of common-cause events is required to account for combinations of unique design features and operation that might otherwise not be included in the PSA. It is expected that most of these modeling issues also would be encountered when modeling some of the other more unique reactor and nonreactor facilities that are part of the DOE nuclear materials production complex. 9 refs., 2 figs

  18. Simulation of MILD combustion using Perfectly Stirred Reactor model

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Z.; Vanteru, Mahendra Reddy; Ruan, S.; Doan, N. A K; Roberts, William L.; Swaminathan, N.

    2016-01-01

    A simple model based on a Perfectly Stirred Reactor (PSR) is proposed for moderate or intense low-oxygen dilution (MILD) combustion. The PSR calculation is performed covering the entire flammability range and the tabulated chemistry approach is used

  19. Catalytic biofilms on structured packing for the production of glycolic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuan Zhong; Hauer, Bernhard; Rosche, Bettina

    2013-02-01

    While structured packing modules are known to be efficient for surface wetting and gas-liquid exchange in abiotic surface catalysis, this model study explores structured packing as a growth surface for catalytic biofilms. Microbial biofilms have been proposed as self-immobilized and self-regenerating catalysts for the production of chemicals. A concern is that the complex and dynamic nature of biofilms may cause fluctuations in their catalytic performance over time or may affect process reproducibility. An aerated continuous trickle-bed biofilm reactor system was designed with a 3 L structured packing, liquid recycling and pH control. Pseudomonas diminuta established a biofilm on the stainless steel structured packing with a specific surface area of 500 m2 m-3 and catalyzed the oxidation of ethylene glycol to glycolic acid for over two months of continuous operation. A steady-state productivity of up to 1.6 gl-1h-1 was achieved at a dilution rate of 0.33 h-1. Process reproducibility between three independent runs was excellent, despite process interruptions and activity variations in cultures grown from biofilm effluent cells. The results demonstrate the robustness of a catalytic biofilm on structured packing, despite its dynamic nature. Implementation is recommended for whole-cell processes that require efficient gas-liquid exchange, catalyst retention for continuous operation, or improved catalyst stability.

  20. Application of phototrophic biofilms: from fundamentals to processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strieth, D; Ulber, R; Muffler, K

    2018-03-01

    Biotechnological production of valuables by microorganisms is commonly achieved by cultivating the cells as suspended solids in an appropriate liquid medium. However, the main portion of these organisms features a surface-attached growth in their native habitats. The utilization of such biofilms shows significant challenges, e.g. concerning control of pH, nutrient supply, and heat/mass transfer. But the use of biofilms might also enable novel and innovative production processes addressing robustness and strength of the applied biocatalyst, for example if variable conditions might occur in the process or a feedstock (substrate) is changed in its composition. Besides the robustness of a biofilm, the high density of the immobilized biocatalyst facilitates a simple separation of the catalyst and the extracellular product, whereas intracellular target compounds occur in a concentrated form; thus, expenses for downstream processing can be drastically reduced. While phototrophic organisms feature a fabulous spectrum of metabolites ranging from biofuels to biologically active compounds, the low cell density of phototrophic suspension cultures is still limiting their application for production processes. The review is focusing on pro- and eukaryotic microalgae featuring the production of valuable compounds and highlights requirements for their cultivation as phototrophic biofilms, i.e. setup as well as operation of biofilm reactors, and modeling of phototrophic growth.

  1. Babcock and Wilcox model for predicting in-reactor densification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buescher, B.J.; Pegram, J.W.

    1977-07-01

    The B and W densification model is based on a correlation between in-reactor densification and a thermal resintering test. The densification model has been found to predict in-reactor densification with a remarkable degree of accuracy for fuel pellets operated at heat rates above 5 kW/ft and with considerable conservatism for pellelts operating at heat rates below 5 kW/ft

  2. Topical colloidal silver as an anti-biofilm agent in a Staphylococcus aureus chronic rhinosinusitis sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajiv, Sukanya; Drilling, Amanda; Bassiouni, Ahmed; James, Craig; Vreugde, Sarah; Wormald, Peter-John

    2015-04-01

    Treatment of recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a challenge with increasing antibiotic resistance, leading to re-emergence of topical therapies. The aim of this study was to assess safety and efficacy of topical colloidal silver solution for the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in a sheep model. In the safety study, normal saline (control) and 30-ppm colloidal silver solution (test) was used to flush the frontal sinuses for 14 days in 8 sheep (4 sheep each). In the efficacy study, following frontal sinus infection with Staphylococcus aureus, sheep were treated with either control saline or topical silver solution of varying concentrations (30 ppm/20 ppm/10 ppm/5 ppm) for 5 days, with 4 sheep in each group. Blood silver level, full blood counts, and biochemical parameters were analyzed in both safety and efficacy studies. Sinus tissue was harvested for histological examination and ciliary structure analysis in safety and for biofilm biomass quantification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique and COMSTAT 2 software in the efficacy study. Results were analyzed using appropriate statistical tests. Sheep treated with silver showed a significant decrease in biofilm biomass (0.004, 0.004, 0.004, and 0.007, in the 4 silver-treated groups, respectively) compared to saline control (0.175), p silver levels were higher in the treated groups compared to controls (p colloidal silver solution has effective antibiofilm activity in Staphylococcus aureus CRS in a sheep model and appears safe. © 2015 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  3. Biofilm Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade we have gained much knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that are involved in initiation and termination of biofilm formation. In many bacteria, these processes appear to occur in response to specific environmental cues and result in, respectively, induction or terminat......During the past decade we have gained much knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that are involved in initiation and termination of biofilm formation. In many bacteria, these processes appear to occur in response to specific environmental cues and result in, respectively, induction...... or termination of biofilm matrix production via the second messenger molecule c-di-GMP. In between initiation and termination of biofilm formation we have defined specific biofilm stages, but the currently available evidence suggests that these transitions are mainly governed by adaptive responses......, and not by specific genetic programs. It appears that biofilm formation can occur through multiple pathways and that the spatial structure of the biofilms is species dependent as well as dependent on environmental conditions. Bacterial subpopulations, e.g., motile and nonmotile subpopulations, can develop...

  4. Metabolic modeling of synthesis gas fermentation in bubble column reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Gomez, Jose A; Höffner, Kai; Barton, Paul I; Henson, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    A promising route to renewable liquid fuels and chemicals is the fermentation of synthesis gas (syngas) streams to synthesize desired products such as ethanol and 2,3-butanediol. While commercial development of syngas fermentation technology is underway, an unmet need is the development of integrated metabolic and transport models for industrially relevant syngas bubble column reactors. We developed and evaluated a spatiotemporal metabolic model for bubble column reactors with the syngas fermenting bacterium Clostridium ljungdahlii as the microbial catalyst. Our modeling approach involved combining a genome-scale reconstruction of C. ljungdahlii metabolism with multiphase transport equations that govern convective and dispersive processes within the spatially varying column. The reactor model was spatially discretized to yield a large set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) in time with embedded linear programs (LPs) and solved using the MATLAB based code DFBAlab. Simulations were performed to analyze the effects of important process and cellular parameters on key measures of reactor performance including ethanol titer, ethanol-to-acetate ratio, and CO and H2 conversions. Our computational study demonstrated that mathematical modeling provides a complementary tool to experimentation for understanding, predicting, and optimizing syngas fermentation reactors. These model predictions could guide future cellular and process engineering efforts aimed at alleviating bottlenecks to biochemical production in syngas bubble column reactors.

  5. Boiling water reactor modeling capabilities of MMS-02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, R.S.; Abdollahian, D.A.; Elias, E.; Shak, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    During the development period for the Modular Modeling System (MMS) library modules, the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) has been the last major component to be addressed. The BWRX module includes models of the reactor core, reactor vessel, and recirculation loop. A pre-release version was made available for utility use in September 1983. Since that time a number of changes have been incorporated in BWRX to (1) improve running time for most transient events of interest, (2) extend its capability to include certain events of interest in reactor safety analysis, and (3) incorporate a variety of improvements to the module interfaces and user input formats. The purposes of this study were to briefly review the module structure and physical models, to point the differences between the MMS-02 BWRX module and the BWRX version previously available in the TESTREV1 library, to provide guidelines for choosing among the various user options, and to present some representative results

  6. Influence of CeO2 NPs on biological phosphorus removal and bacterial community shifts in a sequencing batch biofilm reactor with the differential effects of molecular oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yi; Wang, Chao; Hou, Jun; Wang, Peifang; You, Guoxiang; Miao, Lingzhan; Lv, Bowen; Yang, Yangyang

    2016-01-01

    The effects of CeO 2 nanoparticles (CeO 2 NPs) on a sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) with established biological phosphorus (P) removal were investigated from the processes of anaerobic P release and aerobic P uptake. At low concentration (0.1 mg/L), no significant impact was observed on total phosphorus (TP) removal after operating for 8 h. However, at a concentration of 20 mg/L, TP removal efficiency decreased from 83.68% to 55.88% and 16.76% when the CeO 2 NPs were added at the beginning of the anaerobic and aerobic periods, respectively. Further studies illustrated that the inhibition of the specific P release rate was caused by the reversible states of Ce 3+ and Ce 4+ , which inhibited the activity of exopolyphosphatase (PPX) and transformation of poly-β-hydoxyalkanoates (PHA) and glycogen, as well as the uptake of volatile fatty acids (VFAs). The decrease in the specific P uptake rate was mainly attributed to the significantly suppressed energy generation and decreased abundance of Burkholderia caused by excess reactive oxygen species. The removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was not influenced by CeO 2 NPs under aerobic conditions, due to the increased abundance of Acetobacter and Acidocella after exposure. The inhibitory effects of CeO 2 NPs with molecular oxygen were reduced after anaerobic exposure due to the enhanced particle size and the presence of Ce 3+ . - Highlights: • CeO 2 NPs (20 mg/L) had a notable toxicity effect on P removal in SBBR system. • The deteriorated SPRR was caused by the inhibited key enzyme activity (PPX). • The decreased SPUR was caused by the bacterial community shifts. • Ce ions converting and excess ROS generation are related toxicity mechanisms.

  7. Spatial Arrangement of Colonies in Intact Biofilms from a Model Cooling Water System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Taylor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is disagreement among microbiologists about whether Legionella requires a protozoan host in order to replicate. This research sought to determine where in biofilm Legionellae are found and whether all biofilm associated Legionella would be located within protozoan hosts. While it is accepted that Legionella colonizes biofilm, its life cycle and nutritional fastidiousness suggest that Legionella employs multiple survival strategies to persist within microbial systems. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM demonstrated an undulating biofilm surface architecture and a roughly homogenous distribution of heterotrophic bacteria with clusters of protozoa. Legionella displayed 3 distinct spatial arrangements either contained within or directly associated with protozoa, or dispersed in loosely associated clusters or in tightly packed aggregations of cells forming dense colonial clusters. The formation of discreet clusters of tightly packed Legionella suggests that colony formation is influenced by specific environmental conditions allowing for limited extracellular replication. This work represents the first time that an environmentally representative, multispecies biofilm containing Legionella has been fluorescently tagged and Legionella colony morphology noted within a complex microbial system.

  8. Modeling a Packed Bed Reactor Utilizing the Sabatier Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Malay G.; Meier, Anne J.; Hintze, Paul E.

    2017-01-01

    A numerical model is being developed using Python which characterizes the conversion and temperature profiles of a packed bed reactor (PBR) that utilizes the Sabatier process; the reaction produces methane and water from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. While the specific kinetics of the Sabatier reaction on the RuAl2O3 catalyst pellets are unknown, an empirical reaction rate equation1 is used for the overall reaction. As this reaction is highly exothermic, proper thermal control is of the utmost importance to ensure maximum conversion and to avoid reactor runaway. It is therefore necessary to determine what wall temperature profile will ensure safe and efficient operation of the reactor. This wall temperature will be maintained by active thermal controls on the outer surface of the reactor. Two cylindrical PBRs are currently being tested experimentally and will be used for validation of the Python model. They are similar in design except one of them is larger and incorporates a preheat loop by feeding the reactant gas through a pipe along the center of the catalyst bed. The further complexity of adding a preheat pipe to the model to mimic the larger reactor is yet to be implemented and validated; preliminary validation is done using the smaller PBR with no reactant preheating. When mapping experimental values of the wall temperature from the smaller PBR into the Python model, a good approximation of the total conversion and temperature profile has been achieved. A separate CFD model incorporates more complex three-dimensional effects by including the solid catalyst pellets within the domain. The goal is to improve the Python model to the point where the results of other reactor geometry can be reasonably predicted relatively quickly when compared to the much more computationally expensive CFD approach. Once a reactor size is narrowed down using the Python approach, CFD will be used to generate a more thorough prediction of the reactors performance.

  9. Modelling an industrial anaerobic granular reactor using a multi-scale approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, H; Flores-Alsina, X; Ramin, P; Kjellberg, K; Jeppsson, U; Batstone, D J; Gernaey, K V

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to show the results of an industrial project dealing with modelling of anaerobic digesters. A multi-scale mathematical approach is developed to describe reactor hydrodynamics, granule growth/distribution and microbial competition/inhibition for substrate/space within the biofilm. The main biochemical and physico-chemical processes in the model are based on the Anaerobic Digestion Model No 1 (ADM1) extended with the fate of phosphorus (P), sulfur (S) and ethanol (Et-OH). Wastewater dynamic conditions are reproduced and data frequency increased using the Benchmark Simulation Model No 2 (BSM2) influent generator. All models are tested using two plant data sets corresponding to different operational periods (#D1, #D2). Simulation results reveal that the proposed approach can satisfactorily describe the transformation of organics, nutrients and minerals, the production of methane, carbon dioxide and sulfide and the potential formation of precipitates within the bulk (average deviation between computer simulations and measurements for both #D1, #D2 is around 10%). Model predictions suggest a stratified structure within the granule which is the result of: 1) applied loading rates, 2) mass transfer limitations and 3) specific (bacterial) affinity for substrate. Hence, inerts (X I ) and methanogens (X ac ) are situated in the inner zone, and this fraction lowers as the radius increases favouring the presence of acidogens (X su ,X aa , X fa ) and acetogens (X c4 ,X pro ). Additional simulations show the effects on the overall process performance when operational (pH) and loading (S:COD) conditions are modified. Lastly, the effect of intra-granular precipitation on the overall organic/inorganic distribution is assessed at: 1) different times; and, 2) reactor heights. Finally, the possibilities and opportunities offered by the proposed approach for conducting engineering optimization projects are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All

  10. Performance evaluation of a granular activated carbon-sequencing batch biofilm reactor pilot plant system used in treating real wastewater from recycled paper industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamad, Mohd Hafizuddin; Sheikh Abdullah, Siti Rozaimah; Mohamad, Abu Bakar; Rahman, Rakmi Abdul; Kadhum, Abdul Amir Hasan

    2012-01-01

    A pilot scale granular activated carbon-sequencing batch biofilm reactor with a capacity of 2.2 m3 was operated for over three months to evaluate its performance treating real recycled paper industry wastewater under different operational conditions. In this study, dissolved air floatation (DAF) and clarifier effluents were used as influent sources of the pilot plant. During the course of the study, the reactor was able to biodegrade the contaminants in the incoming recycled paper mill wastewater in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD), adsorbable organic halides (AOX; specifically 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP)) and ammoniacal nitrogen (NH3-N) removal efficiencies at varying hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 1-3 days, aeration rates (ARs) of 2.1-3.4 m3/min and influent feed concentration of 40-950 mg COD/l. Percentages of COD, 2,4-DCP and NH3-N removals increased with increasing HRT, resulting in more than 90% COD, 2,4-DCP and NH3-N removals at HRT values above two days. Degradation of COD, 2,4-DCP and NH3-N were seriously affected by variation of ARs, which resulted in significant decrease of COD, 2,4-DCP and NH3-N removals by decreasing ARs from 3.4 m3/min to 2.1 m3/min, varying in the ranges of 24-80%, 6-96% and 5-42%, respectively. In comparison to the clarifier effluent, the treatment performance of DAF effluent, containing high COD concentration, resulted in a higher COD removal of 82%. The use of diluted DAF effluent did not improve significantly the COD removal. Higher NH3-N removal efficiency of almost 100% was observed during operation after maintenance shutdown compared to normal operation, even at the same HRT of one day due to the higher dissolved oxygen concentrations (1-7 mg/l), while no significant difference in COD removal efficiency was observed.

  11. Laboratory tools to quantify biogenic dissolution of rocks and minerals: a model rock biofilm growing in percolation columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz eSeiffert

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sub-aerial biofilms (SAB are ubiquitous, self-sufficient microbial ecosystems found on mineral surfaces at all altitudes and latitudes. SABs, which are the principal causes of weathering on exposed terrestrial surfaces, are characterised by patchy growth dominated by associations of algae, cyanobacteria, fungi and heterotrophic bacteria. A recently developed in vitro system to study colonisation of rocks exposed to air included two key SAB participants - the rock-inhabiting ascomycete Knufia petricola (CBS 123872 and the phototrophic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC29133. Both partners are genetically tractable and we used them here to study weathering of granite, K-feldspar and plagioclase. Small fragments of the various rocks or minerals (1 to 6 mm were packed into flow-through columns and incubated with 0.1% glucose and 10 µM thiamine-hydrochloride (90 µL.min-1 to compare weathering with and without biofilms. Dissolution of the minerals was followed by: analysing (i the degradation products in the effluent from the columns via Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy and (ii by studying polished sections of the incubated mineral fragment/grains using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analyses. K. petricola/N. punctiforme stimulated release of Ca, Na, Mg and Mn. Analyses of the polished sections confirmed depletion of Ca, Na and K near the surface of the fragments. The abrupt decrease in Ca concentration observed in peripheral areas of plagioclase fragments favoured a dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism. Percolation columns in combination with a model biofilm can thus be used to study weathering in closed systems. Columns can easily be filled with different minerals and biofilms, the effluent as well as grains can be collected after long-term exposure under axenic conditions and easily analysed.

  12. Laboratory tools to quantify biogenic dissolution of rocks and minerals: a model rock biofilm growing in percolation columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffert, Franz; Bandow, Nicole; Kalbe, Ute; Milke, Ralf; Gorbushina, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Sub-aerial biofilms (SAB) are ubiquitous, self-sufficient microbial ecosystems found on mineral surfaces at all altitudes and latitudes. SABs, which are the principal causes of weathering on exposed terrestrial surfaces, are characterised by patchy growth dominated by associations of algae, cyanobacteria, fungi and heterotrophic bacteria. A recently developed in vitro system to study colonisation of rocks exposed to air included two key SAB participants - the rock-inhabiting ascomycete Knufia petricola (CBS 123872) and the phototrophic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC29133. Both partners are genetically tractable and we used them here to study weathering of granite, K-feldspar and plagioclase. Small fragments of the various rocks or minerals (1 to 6 mm) were packed into flow-through columns and incubated with 0.1% glucose and 10 µM thiamine-hydrochloride (90 µL.min-1) to compare weathering with and without biofilms. Dissolution of the minerals was followed by: analysing (i) the degradation products in the effluent from the columns via Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy and (ii) by studying polished sections of the incubated mineral fragment/grains using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analyses. K. petricola/N. punctiforme stimulated release of Ca, Na, Mg and Mn. Analyses of the polished sections confirmed depletion of Ca, Na and K near the surface of the fragments. The abrupt decrease in Ca concentration observed in peripheral areas of plagioclase fragments favoured a dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism. Percolation columns in combination with a model biofilm can thus be used to study weathering in closed systems. Columns can easily be filled with different minerals and biofilms, the effluent as well as grains can be collected after long-term exposure under axenic conditions and easily analysed.

  13. Neutron density optimal control of A-1 reactor analoque model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grof, V.

    1975-01-01

    Two applications are described of the optimal control of a reactor analog model. Both cases consider the control of neutron density. Control loops containing the on-line controlled process, the reactor of the first Czechoslovak nuclear power plant A-1, are simulated on an analog computer. Two versions of the optimal control algorithm are derived using modern control theory (Pontryagin's maximum principle, the calculus of variations, and Kalman's estimation theory), the minimum time performance index, and the quadratic performance index. The results of the optimal control analysis are compared with the A-1 reactor conventional control. (author)

  14. Modelling and control design for SHARON/Anammox reactor sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valverde Perez, Borja; Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Sin, Gürkan

    2012-01-01

    metabolism against fast chemical reaction and mass transfer. Likewise, the analysis of the dynamics contributed to establish qualitatively the requirements for control of the reactors, both for regulation and for optimal operation. Work in progress on quantitatively analysing different control structure......With the perspective of investigating a suitable control design for autotrophic nitrogen removal, this work presents a complete model of the SHARON/Anammox reactor sequence. The dynamics of the reactor were explored pointing out the different scales of the rates in the system: slow microbial...

  15. A friendly Maple module for one and two group reactor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista, Camila O.; Pavan, Guilherme A.; Braga, Kelmo L.; Silva, Marcelo V.; Pereira, P.G.S.; Werner, Rodrigo; Antunes, Valdir; Vellozo, Sergio O.

    2015-01-01

    The well known two energy groups core reactor design model is revisited. A simple and friendly Maple module was built to cover the steps calculations of a plate reactor in five situations: 1. one group bare reactor, 2. two groups bare reactor, 3. one group reflected reactor, 4. 1-1/2 groups reflected reactor and 5. two groups reflected reactor. The results show the convergent path of critical size, as it should be. (author)

  16. A friendly Maple module for one and two group reactor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Camila O.; Pavan, Guilherme A.; Braga, Kelmo L.; Silva, Marcelo V.; Pereira, P.G.S.; Werner, Rodrigo; Antunes, Valdir; Vellozo, Sergio O., E-mail: camila.oliv.baptista@gmail.com, E-mail: pavanguilherme@gmail.com, E-mail: kelmo.lins@gmail.com, E-mail: marcelovilelasilva@gmail.com, E-mail: rodrigowerner@hotmail.com, E-mail: neutron201566@yahoo.com, E-mail: vellozo@ime.eb.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The well known two energy groups core reactor design model is revisited. A simple and friendly Maple module was built to cover the steps calculations of a plate reactor in five situations: 1. one group bare reactor, 2. two groups bare reactor, 3. one group reflected reactor, 4. 1-1/2 groups reflected reactor and 5. two groups reflected reactor. The results show the convergent path of critical size, as it should be. (author)

  17. Overview of the reactor safety study consequence model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, I.B.; Yaniv, S.S.; Blond, R.M.; McGrath, P.E.; Church, H.W.; Wayland, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400) is a comprehensive assessment of the potential risk to the public from accidents in light water power reactors. The engineering analysis of the plants is described in detail in the Reactor Safety Study: it provides an estimate of the probability versus magnitude of the release of radioactive material. The consequence model, which is the subject of this paper, describes the progression of the postulated accident after the release of the radioactive material from the containment. A brief discussion of the manner in which the consequence calculations are performed is presented. The emphasis in the description is on the models and data that differ significantly from those previously used for these types of assessments. The results of the risk calculations for 100 light water power reactors are summarized

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Alters Staphylococcus aureus Sensitivity to Vancomycin in a Biofilm Model of Cystic Fibrosis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Orazi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The airways of cystic fibrosis (CF patients have thick mucus, which fosters chronic, polymicrobial infections. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are two of the most prevalent respiratory pathogens in CF patients. In this study, we tested whether P. aeruginosa influences the susceptibility of S. aureus to frontline antibiotics used to treat CF lung infections. Using our in vitro coculture model, we observed that addition of P. aeruginosa supernatants to S. aureus biofilms grown either on epithelial cells or on plastic significantly decreased the susceptibility of S. aureus to vancomycin. Mutant analyses showed that 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide (HQNO, a component of the P. aeruginosa Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS system, protects S. aureus from the antimicrobial activity of vancomycin. Similarly, the siderophores pyoverdine and pyochelin also contribute to the ability of P. aeruginosa to protect S. aureus from vancomycin, as did growth under anoxia. Under our experimental conditions, HQNO, P. aeruginosa supernatant, and growth under anoxia decreased S. aureus growth, likely explaining why this cell wall-targeting antibiotic is less effective. P. aeruginosa supernatant did not confer additional protection to slow-growing S. aureus small colony variants. Importantly, P. aeruginosa supernatant protects S. aureus from other inhibitors of cell wall synthesis as well as protein synthesis-targeting antibiotics in an HQNO- and siderophore-dependent manner. We propose a model whereby P. aeruginosa causes S. aureus to shift to fermentative growth when these organisms are grown in coculture, leading to reduction in S. aureus growth and decreased susceptibility to antibiotics targeting cell wall and protein synthesis.

  19. RELAP5 kinetics model development for the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judd, J.L.; Terry, W.K.

    1990-01-01

    A point-kinetics model of the Advanced Test Reactor has been developed for the RELAP5 code. Reactivity feedback parameters were calculated by a three-dimensional analysis with the PDQ neutron diffusion code. Analyses of several hypothetical reactivity insertion events by the new model and two earlier models are discussed. 3 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs

  20. Modeling of hydrodynamic cavitation reactors: a unified approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moholkar, V.S.; Pandit, A.B.

    2001-01-01

    An attempt has been made to present a unified theoretical model for the cavitating flow in a hydrodynamic cavitation reactor using the nonlinear continuum mixture model for two-phase flow as the basis. This model has been used to describe the radial motion of bubble in the cavitating flow in two

  1. Identification of Chemical Reactor Plant’s Mathematical Model

    OpenAIRE

    Pyakullya, Boris Ivanovich; Kladiev, Sergey Nikolaevich

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a solution of the identification problem of chemical reactor plant’s mathematical model. The main goal is to obtain a mathematical description of a chemical reactor plant from experimental data, which based on plant’s time response measurements. This data consists sequence of measurements for water jacket temperature and information about control input signal, which is used to govern plant’s behavior.

  2. Identification of Chemical Reactor Plant’s Mathematical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyakillya Boris

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a solution of the identification problem of chemical reactor plant’s mathematical model. The main goal is to obtain a mathematical description of a chemical reactor plant from experimental data, which based on plant’s time response measurements. This data consists sequence of measurements for water jacket temperature and information about control input signal, which is used to govern plant’s behavior.

  3. Application of Mortar Coupling in Multiscale Modelling of Coupled Flow, Transport, and Biofilm Growth in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laleian, A.; Valocchi, A. J.; Werth, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    Multiscale models of reactive transport in porous media are capable of capturing complex pore-scale processes while leveraging the efficiency of continuum-scale models. In particular, porosity changes caused by biofilm development yield complex feedbacks between transport and reaction that are difficult to quantify at the continuum scale. Pore-scale models, needed to accurately resolve these dynamics, are often impractical for applications due to their computational cost. To address this challenge, we are developing a multiscale model of biofilm growth in which non-overlapping regions at pore and continuum spatial scales are coupled with a mortar method providing continuity at interfaces. We explore two decompositions of coupled pore-scale and continuum-scale regions to study biofilm growth in a transverse mixing zone. In the first decomposition, all reaction is confined to a pore-scale region extending the transverse mixing zone length. Only solute transport occurs in the surrounding continuum-scale regions. Relative to a fully pore-scale result, we find the multiscale model with this decomposition has a reduced run time and consistent result in terms of biofilm growth and solute utilization. In the second decomposition, reaction occurs in both an up-gradient pore-scale region and a down-gradient continuum-scale region. To quantify clogging, the continuum-scale model implements empirical relations between porosity and continuum-scale parameters, such as permeability and the transverse dispersion coefficient. Solutes are sufficiently mixed at the end of the pore-scale region, such that the initial reaction rate is accurately computed using averaged concentrations in the continuum-scale region. Relative to a fully pore-scale result, we find accuracy of biomass growth in the multiscale model with this decomposition improves as the interface between pore-scale and continuum-scale regions moves downgradient where transverse mixing is more fully developed. Also, this

  4. Modelling of Control Bars in Calculations of Boiling Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khlaifi, A.; Buiron, L.

    2004-01-01

    The core of a nuclear reactor is generally composed of a neat assemblies of fissile material from where neutrons were descended. In general, the energy of fission is extracted by a fluid serving to cool clusters. A reflector is arranged around the assemblies to reduce escaping of neutrons. This is made outside the reactor core. Different mechanisms of reactivity are generally necessary to control the chain reaction. Manoeuvring of Boiling Water Reactor takes place by controlling insertion of absorbent rods to various places of the core. If no blocked assembly calculations are known and mastered, blocked assembly neutronic calculation are delicate and often treated by case to case in present studies [1]. Answering the question how to model crossbar for the control of a boiling water reactor ? requires the choice of a representation level for every chain of variables, the physical model, and its representing equations, etc. The aim of this study is to select the best applicable parameter serving to calculate blocked assembly of a Boiling Water Reactor. This will be made through a range of representative configurations of these reactors and used absorbing environment, in order to illustrate strategies of modelling in the case of an industrial calculation. (authors)

  5. Parametric study of the Incompletely Stirred Reactor modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mobini, K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shahid Rajaee University, Lavizan, Tehran (Iran); Bilger, R.W. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia)

    2009-09-15

    The Incompletely Stirred Reactor (ISR) is a generalization of the widely-used Perfectly Stirred Reactor (PSR) model and allows for incomplete mixing within the reactor. Its formulation is based on the Conditional Moment Closure (CMC) method. This model is applicable to nonpremixed combustion with strong recirculation such as in a gas turbine combustor primary zone. The model uses the simplifying assumptions that the conditionally-averaged reactive-scalar concentrations are independent of position in the reactor: this results in ordinary differential equations in mixture fraction space. The simplicity of the model permits the use of very complex chemical mechanisms. The effects of the detailed chemistry can be found while still including the effects of micromixing. A parametric study is performed here on an ISR for combustion of methane at overall stoichiometric conditions to investigate the sensitivity of the model to different parameters. The focus here is on emissions of nitric oxide and carbon monoxide. It is shown that the most important parameters in the ISR model are reactor residence time, the chemical mechanism and the core-averaged Probability Density Function (PDF). Using several different shapes for the core-averaged PDF, it is shown that use of a bimodal PDF with a low minimum at stoichiometric mixture fraction and a large variance leads to lower nitric oxide formation. The 'rich-plus-lean' mixing or staged combustion strategy for combustion is thus supported. (author)

  6. Maggot excretions inhibit biofilm formation on biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; van de Veerdonk, Mariëlle C; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; Schreurs, Marco W J; Jukema, Gerrolt N

    2010-10-01

    Biofilm-associated infections in trauma surgery are difficult to treat with conventional therapies. Therefore, it is important to develop new treatment modalities. Maggots in captured bags, which are permeable for larval excretions/secretions, aid in healing severe, infected wounds, suspect for biofilm formation. Therefore we presumed maggot excretions/secretions would reduce biofilm formation. We studied biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterococcus faecalis, and Enterobacter cloacae on polyethylene, titanium, and stainless steel. We compared the quantities of biofilm formation between the bacterial species on the various biomaterials and the quantity of biofilm formation after various incubation times. Maggot excretions/secretions were added to existing biofilms to examine their effect. Comb-like models of the biomaterials, made to fit in a 96-well microtiter plate, were incubated with bacterial suspension. The formed biofilms were stained in crystal violet, which was eluted in ethanol. The optical density (at 595 nm) of the eluate was determined to quantify biofilm formation. Maggot excretions/secretions were pipetted in different concentrations to (nonstained) 7-day-old biofilms, incubated 24 hours, and finally measured. The strongest biofilms were formed by S. aureus and S. epidermidis on polyethylene and the weakest on titanium. The highest quantity of biofilm formation was reached within 7 days for both bacteria. The presence of excretions/secretions reduced biofilm formation on all biomaterials. A maximum of 92% of biofilm reduction was measured. Our observations suggest maggot excretions/secretions decrease biofilm formation and could provide a new treatment for biofilm formation on infected biomaterials.

  7. Fuel requirements for experimental devices in MTR reactors. A perturbation model for reactor core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeckmans de West-Meerbeeck, A.

    1991-01-01

    Irradiation in neutron absorbing devices, requiring high fast neutron fluxes in the core or high thermal fluxes in the reflector and flux traps, lead to higher density fuel and larger core dimensions. A perturbation model of the reactor core helps to estimate the fuel requirements. (orig.)

  8. Model Studies on the Effectiveness of MBBR Reactors for the Restoration of Small Water Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Agata; Mazur, Robert; Panek, Ewa; Chmist, Joanna

    2018-02-01

    The authors present the Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR) model with a quasi-continuous flow for small water reservoir restoration, characterized by high concentrations of organic pollutants. To determine the efficiency of wastewater treatment the laboratory analysis of physic-chemical parameters were conducted for the model on a semi-technical scale of 1:3. Wastewater treatment process was carried out in 24 h for 1 m3 for raw sewage. The startup period was 2 weeks for all biofilters (biological beds). Approximately 50% reduction in COD and BOD5 was obtained on average for the studied bioreactors. Significant improvements were achieved in theclarity of the treated wastewater, with the reduction of suspension by 60%. The oxygen profile has improved significantly in 7 to 9 hours of the process, and a diametric reduction in the oxidative reduction potential was recorded. A preliminary model of biological treatment effectiveness was determined based on the conducted studies. In final stages, the operation mode was set in real conditions of polluted water reservoirs.

  9. A mass-spring model unveils the morphogenesis of phototrophic Diatoma biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Celler, K.; Hödl, I.; Simone, A.; Battin, T.J.; Picioreanu, C.

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms often dominate planktonic communities in the ocean and phototrophic biofilms in streams and rivers, greatly contributing to global biogeochemical fluxes. In pelagic ecosystems, these microscopic algae can form chain-like microcolonies, which seem advantageous for nutrient uptake and protect

  10. The in vitro effect of fluoridated milk in a bacterial biofilm--enamel model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Wolfgang H; Forer, Stefan; Heesen, Joerg; Yudovich, Keren; Steinberg, Doron; Gaengler, Peter

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of milk and fluoridated milk on bacterially induced caries-like lesions. Extracted impacted human molars were cut in half and covered with a varnish leaving a 4*4 mm window. The samples were coated with biofilm of S. sobrinus and were further divided into three experimental groups of S. sobrinus, S. sobrinus and milk and S. sobrinus and fluoridated milk. As negative controls served teeth incubated in saline. Of twenty tooth halves serial ground sections were cut through the lesions and investigated with polarization light microscopy (PLM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDX element analysis. The PLM photographs were used for 3D reconstruction, volumetric assessment and determination of the extension of the lesion zones. Of eight tooth halves the biofilm on the enamel surface was studied with SEM and EDX element analysis. Volumetric assessment showed a statistically significant difference in the volume of the body of the lesion and the translucent zone between the milk group and fluoridated milk group. Quantitative element analysis demonstrated significant differences between sound enamel and the superficial layer in the fluoridated milk group. The biofilm on the enamel surface showed an increased Ca content in the milk group and fluoridated milk group. Milk as a common nutrient seems to play a complex role in in-vitro biofilm--enamel interactions stimulating bacterial demineralization on one hand, and, as effective fluoride carrier, inhibits caries-like demineralization.

  11. A novel model of chronic wounds: importance of redox imbalance and biofilm-forming bacteria for establishment of chronicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Dhall

    Full Text Available Chronic wounds have a large impact on health, affecting ∼6.5 M people and costing ∼$25B/year in the US alone. We previously discovered that a genetically modified mouse model displays impaired healing similar to problematic wounds in humans and that sometimes the wounds become chronic. Here we show how and why these impaired wounds become chronic, describe a way whereby we can drive impaired wounds to chronicity at will and propose that the same processes are involved in chronic wound development in humans. We hypothesize that exacerbated levels of oxidative stress are critical for initiation of chronicity. We show that, very early after injury, wounds with impaired healing contain elevated levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and, much like in humans, these levels increase with age. Moreover, the activity of anti-oxidant enzymes is not elevated, leading to buildup of oxidative stress in the wound environment. To induce chronicity, we exacerbated the redox imbalance by further inhibiting the antioxidant enzymes and by infecting the wounds with biofilm-forming bacteria isolated from the chronic wounds that developed naturally in these mice. These wounds do not re-epithelialize, the granulation tissue lacks vascularization and interstitial collagen fibers, they contain an antibiotic-resistant mixed bioflora with biofilm-forming capacity, and they stay open for several weeks. These findings are highly significant because they show for the first time that chronic wounds can be generated in an animal model effectively and consistently. The availability of such a model will significantly propel the field forward because it can be used to develop strategies to regain redox balance that may result in inhibition of biofilm formation and result in restoration of healthy wound tissue. Furthermore, the model can lead to the understanding of other fundamental mechanisms of chronic wound development that can potentially lead to novel therapies.

  12. Modelling of MOCVD reactor: new 3D approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, E; Lisik, Z; Niedzielski, P; Ruta, L; Turczynski, M; Wang, X; Waag, A

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents comparison of two different 3D models of vertical, rotating disc MOCVD reactor used for 3D GaN structure growth. The first one is based on the reactor symmetry, while the second, novel one incorporates only single line of showerhead nozzles. It is shown that both of them can be applied interchangeably regarding the phenomena taking place within the processing area. Moreover, the importance of boundary conditions regarding proper modelling of showerhead cooling and the significance of thermal radiation on temperature field within the modelled structure are presented and analysed. The last phenomenon is erroneously neglected in most of the hitherto studies.

  13. A two-point kinetic model for the PROTEUS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, H. van.

    1995-03-01

    A two-point reactor kinetic model for the PROTEUS-reactor is developed and the results are described in terms of frequency dependent reactivity transfer functions for the core and the reflector. It is shown that at higher frequencies space-dependent effects occur which imply failure of the one-point kinetic model. In the modulus of the transfer functions these effects become apparent above a radian frequency of about 100 s -1 , whereas for the phase behaviour the deviation from a point model already starts at a radian frequency of 10 s -1 . (orig.)

  14. Fission-product burnup chain model for research reactor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Do; Gil, Choong Sup; Lee, Jong Tai [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daeduk (Republic of Korea)

    1990-12-01

    A new fission-product burnup chain model was developed for use in research reactor analysis capable of predicting the burnup-dependent reactivity with high precision over a wide range of burnup. The new model consists of 63 nuclides treated explicitly and one fissile-independent pseudo-element. The effective absorption cross sections for the preudo-element and the preudo-element yield of actinide nuclides were evaluated in the this report. The model is capable of predicting the high burnup behavior of low-enriched uranium-fueled research reactors.(Author).

  15. Modelling of MOCVD Reactor: New 3D Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, E.; Lisik, Z.; Niedzielski, P.; Ruta, L.; Turczynski, M.; Wang, X.; Waag, A.

    2014-04-01

    The paper presents comparison of two different 3D models of vertical, rotating disc MOCVD reactor used for 3D GaN structure growth. The first one is based on the reactor symmetry, while the second, novel one incorporates only single line of showerhead nozzles. It is shown that both of them can be applied interchangeably regarding the phenomena taking place within the processing area. Moreover, the importance of boundary conditions regarding proper modelling of showerhead cooling and the significance of thermal radiation on temperature field within the modelled structure are presented and analysed. The last phenomenon is erroneously neglected in most of the hitherto studies.

  16. Reliability modeling of Clinch River breeder reactor electrical shutdown systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatz, R.A.; Duetsch, K.L.

    1974-01-01

    The initial simulation of the probabilistic properties of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) electrical shutdown systems is described. A model of the reliability (and availability) of the systems is presented utilizing Success State and continuous-time, discrete state Markov modeling techniques as significant elements of an overall reliability assessment process capable of demonstrating the achievement of program goals. This model is examined for its sensitivity to safe/unsafe failure rates, sybsystem redundant configurations, test and repair intervals, monitoring by reactor operators; and the control exercised over system reliability by design modifications and the selection of system operating characteristics. (U.S.)

  17. Modelling of temperature distribution and pulsations in fast reactor units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushakov, P.A.; Sorokin, A.P.

    1994-01-01

    Reasons for the occurrence of thermal stresses in reactor units have been analyzed. The main reasons for this analysis are: temperature non-uniformity at the output of reactor core and breeder and the ensuing temperature pulsation; temperature pulsations due to mixing of sodium jets of a different temperature; temperature nonuniformity and pulsations resulting from the part of loops (circuits) un-plug; temperature nonuniformity and fluctuations in transient and accidental shut down of reactor or transfer to cooling by natural circulation. The results of investigating the thermal hydraulic characteristics are obtained by modelling the processes mentioned above. Analysis carried out allows the main lines of investigation to be defined and conclusions can be drawn regarding the problem of temperature distribution and fluctuation in fast reactor units

  18. Comparative study of cost models for tokamak DEMO fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, Tetsutarou; Yamazaki, Kozo; Arimoto, Hideki; Ban, Kanae; Kondo, Takuya; Tobita, Kenji; Goto, Takuya

    2012-01-01

    Cost evaluation analysis of the tokamak-type demonstration reactor DEMO using the PEC (physics-engineering-cost) system code is underway to establish a cost evaluation model for the DEMO reactor design. As a reference case, a DEMO reactor with reference to the SSTR (steady state tokamak reactor) was designed using PEC code. The calculated total capital cost was in the same order of that proposed previously in cost evaluation studies for the SSTR. Design parameter scanning analysis and multi regression analysis illustrated the effect of parameters on the total capital cost. The capital cost was predicted to be inside the range of several thousands of M$s in this study. (author)

  19. Modified Mathematical Model For Neutralization System In Stirred Tank Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmmed Saadi Ibrehem

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A modified model for the neutralization process of Stirred Tank Reactors (CSTR reactor is presented in this study. The model accounts for the effect of strong acid [HCL] flowrate and strong base [NaOH] flowrate with the ionic concentrations of [Cl-] and [Na+] on the Ph of the system. In this work, the effect of important reactor parameters such as ionic concentrations and acid and base flowrates on the dynamic behavior of the CSTR is investigated and the behavior of mathematical model is compared with the reported models for the McAvoy model and Jutila model. Moreover, the results of the model are compared with the experimental data in terms of pH dynamic study. A good agreement is observed between our model prediction and the actual plant data. © 2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 1st March 2011, Revised: 28th March 2011; Accepted: 7th April 2011[How to Cite: A.S. Ibrehem. (2011. Modified Mathematical Model For Neutralization System In Stirred Tank Reactor. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6(1: 47-52. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.1.825.47-52][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.1.825.47-52 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/825 ] | View in 

  20. Towards an efficient multiphysics model for nuclear reactor dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obaidurrahman K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Availability of fast computer resources nowadays has facilitated more in-depth modeling of complex engineering systems which involve strong multiphysics interactions. This multiphysics modeling is an important necessity in nuclear reactor safety studies where efforts are being made worldwide to combine the knowledge from all associated disciplines at one place to accomplish the most realistic simulation of involved phenomenon. On these lines coupled modeling of nuclear reactor neutron kinetics, fuel heat transfer and coolant transport is a regular practice nowadays for transient analysis of reactor core. However optimization between modeling accuracy and computational economy has always been a challenging task to ensure the adequate degree of reliability in such extensive numerical exercises. Complex reactor core modeling involves estimation of evolving 3-D core thermal state, which in turn demands an expensive multichannel based detailed core thermal hydraulics model. A novel approach of power weighted coupling between core neutronics and thermal hydraulics presented in this work aims to reduce the bulk of core thermal calculations in core dynamics modeling to a significant extent without compromising accuracy of computation. Coupled core model has been validated against a series of international benchmarks. Accuracy and computational efficiency of the proposed multiphysics model has been demonstrated by analyzing a reactivity initiated transient.

  1. Kinetic Modeling of Synthetic Wastewater Treatment by the Moving-bed Sequential Continuous-inflow Reactor (MSCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Khani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available It was the objective of the present study to conduct a kinetic modeling of a Moving-bed Sequential Continuous-inflow Reactor (MSCR and to develop its best prediction model. For this purpose, a MSCR consisting of an aerobic-anoxic pilot 50 l in volume and an anaerobic pilot of 20 l were prepared. The MSCR was fed a variety of organic loads and operated at different hydraulic retention times (HRT using synthetic wastewater at input COD concentrations of 300 to 1000 mg/L with HRTs of 2 to 5 h. Based on the results and the best system operation conditions, the highest COD removal (98.6% was obtained at COD=500 mg/L. The three well-known first order, second order, and Stover-Kincannon models were utilized for the kinetic modeling of the reactor. Based on the kinetic analysis of organic removal, the Stover-Kincannon model was chosen for the kinetic modeling of the moving bed biofilm. Given its advantageous properties in the statisfactory prediction of organic removal at different organic loads, this model is recommended for the design and operation of MSCR systems.

  2. Different response to amine fluoride by Streptococcus mutans and polymicrobial biofilms in a novel high-throughput active attachment model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Exterkate, R.A.M.; Crielaard, W.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims: The antimicrobial resistance of microorganismsin biofilms and the polymicrobial interactions inthese biofilms that modulate resistance require novel strategies to evaluate the efficacy of caries-preventive compounds.The current study aimed to evaluate the effects of

  3. Experimental evolution in biofilm populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenackers, Hans P.; Parijs, Ilse; Foster, Kevin R.; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a major form of microbial life in which cells form dense surface associated communities that can persist for many generations. The long-life of biofilm communities means that they can be strongly shaped by evolutionary processes. Here, we review the experimental study of evolution in biofilm communities. We first provide an overview of the different experimental models used to study biofilm evolution and their associated advantages and disadvantages. We then illustrate the vast amount of diversification observed during biofilm evolution, and we discuss (i) potential ecological and evolutionary processes behind the observed diversification, (ii) recent insights into the genetics of adaptive diversification, (iii) the striking degree of parallelism between evolution experiments and real-life biofilms and (iv) potential consequences of diversification. In the second part, we discuss the insights provided by evolution experiments in how biofilm growth and structure can promote cooperative phenotypes. Overall, our analysis points to an important role of biofilm diversification and cooperation in bacterial survival and productivity. Deeper understanding of both processes is of key importance to design improved antimicrobial strategies and diagnostic techniques. PMID:26895713

  4. LPV model development and control of a solution copolymerization reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahme, S.; Abbas, H.M.S.; Meskin, N.; Tóth, R.; Mohammadpour, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, linear parameter-varying (LPV) control is considered for a solution copolymerization reactor, which takes into account the time-varying nature of the parameters of the process. The nonlinear model of the process is first converted to an exact LPV model representation in the

  5. Neutrino Mass Models: impact of non-zero reactor angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Stephen F.

    2011-01-01

    In this talk neutrino mass models are reviewed and the impact of a non-zero reactor angle and other deviations from tri-bi maximal mixing are discussed. We propose some benchmark models, where the only way to discriminate between them is by high precision neutrino oscillation experiments.

  6. Component vibration of VVER-reactors - diagnostics and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altstadt, E.; Scheffler, M.; Weiss, F.P.

    1994-01-01

    The model comprises the whole primary circuit, including steam generators, loops, coolant pumps, main isolating valves and certainly the reactor pressure vessel and its internals. It was developed using the finite-element-code ANSYS. The model has a modular structure, so that various operational and assembling states can easily be considered. (orig./DG)

  7. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of fluidized-bed polymerization reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokkam, Ram [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Polyethylene is one of the most widely used plastics, and over 60 million tons are produced worldwide every year. Polyethylene is obtained by the catalytic polymerization of ethylene in gas and liquid phase reactors. The gas phase processes are more advantageous, and use fluidized-bed reactors for production of polyethylene. Since they operate so close to the melting point of the polymer, agglomeration is an operational concern in all slurry and gas polymerization processes. Electrostatics and hot spot formation are the main factors that contribute to agglomeration in gas-phase processes. Electrostatic charges in gas phase polymerization fluidized bed reactors are known to influence the bed hydrodynamics, particle elutriation, bubble size, bubble shape etc. Accumulation of electrostatic charges in the fluidized-bed can lead to operational issues. In this work a first-principles electrostatic model is developed and coupled with a multi-fluid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to understand the effect of electrostatics on the dynamics of a fluidized-bed. The multi-fluid CFD model for gas-particle flow is based on the kinetic theory of granular flows closures. The electrostatic model is developed based on a fixed, size-dependent charge for each type of particle (catalyst, polymer, polymer fines) phase. The combined CFD model is first verified using simple test cases, validated with experiments and applied to a pilot-scale polymerization fluidized-bed reactor. The CFD model reproduced qualitative trends in particle segregation and entrainment due to electrostatic charges observed in experiments. For the scale up of fluidized bed reactor, filtered models are developed and implemented on pilot scale reactor.

  8. Modeling and simulation of CANDU reactor and its regulating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javidnia, Hooman

    Analytical computer codes are indispensable tools in design, optimization, and control of nuclear power plants. Numerous codes have been developed to perform different types of analyses related to the nuclear power plants. A large number of these codes are designed to perform safety analyses. In the context of safety analyses, the control system is often neglected. Although there are good reasons for such a decision, that does not mean that the study of control systems in the nuclear power plants should be neglected altogether. In this thesis, a proof of concept code is developed as a tool that can be used in the design. optimization. and operation stages of the control system. The main objective in the design of this computer code is providing a tool that is easy to use by its target audience and is capable of producing high fidelity results that can be trusted to design the control system and optimize its performance. Since the overall plant control system covers a very wide range of processes, in this thesis the focus has been on one particular module of the the overall plant control system, namely, the reactor regulating system. The center of the reactor regulating system is the CANDU reactor. A nodal model for the reactor is used to represent the spatial neutronic kinetics of the core. The nodal model produces better results compared to the point kinetics model which is often used in the design and analysis of control system for nuclear reactors. The model can capture the spatial effects to some extent. although it is not as detailed as the finite difference methods. The criteria for choosing a nodal model of the core are: (1) the model should provide more detail than point kinetics and capture spatial effects, (2) it should not be too complex or overly detailed to slow down the simulation and provide details that are extraneous or unnecessary for a control engineer. Other than the reactor itself, there are auxiliary models that describe dynamics of different

  9. OligoG CF-5/20 disruption of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm in a murine lung infection model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Hengzhuang; Song, Zhijun; Ciofu, Oana

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm growth is a universal survival strategy for bacteria, providing an effective and resilient approach for survival in an otherwise hostile environment. In the context of an infection, a biofilm provides resistance and tolerance to host immune defenses and antibiotics, allowing the biofilm p...

  10. Monte Carlo Modeling Electronuclear Processes in Cascade Subcritical Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Bznuni, S A; Zhamkochyan, V M; Polyanskii, A A; Sosnin, A N; Khudaverdian, A G

    2000-01-01

    Accelerator driven subcritical cascade reactor composed of the main thermal neutron reactor constructed analogous to the core of the VVER-1000 reactor and a booster-reactor, which is constructed similar to the core of the BN-350 fast breeder reactor, is taken as a model example. It is shown by means of Monte Carlo calculations that such system is a safe energy source (k_{eff}=0.94-0.98) and it is capable of transmuting produced radioactive wastes (neutron flux density in the thermal zone is PHI^{max} (r,z)=10^{14} n/(cm^{-2} s^{-1}), neutron flux in the fast zone is respectively equal PHI^{max} (r,z)=2.25 cdot 10^{15} n/(cm^{-2} s^{-1}) if the beam current of the proton accelerator is k_{eff}=0.98 and I=5.3 mA). Suggested configuration of the "cascade" reactor system essentially reduces the requirements on the proton accelerator current.

  11. Bactericidal and Anti-biofilm Effects of Polyhexamethylene Biguanide in Models of Intracellular and Biofilm of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Bovine Mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor F. Kamaruzzaman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus infection is a common cause of mastitis, reducing milk yield, affecting animal welfare and causing huge economic losses within the dairy industry. In addition to the problem of acquired drug resistance, bacterial invasion into udder cells and the formation of surface biofilms are believed to reduce antibiotic efficacy, leading to treatment failure. Here, we investigated the antimicrobial activities of enrofloxacin, an antibiotic that is commonly used in mastitis therapy and polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB, an antimicrobial polymer. The antimicrobial activities were tested against intracellular S. aureus in infected Mac-T cells (host cells. Also, fluorescein-tagged PHMB was used to study PHMB uptake and localization with S. aureus within the infected Mac-T cells. Anti-biofilm activities were tested by treating S. aureus biofilms and measuring effects on biofilm mass in vitro. Enrofloxacin and PHMB at 15 mg/L killed between 42 to 92 and 99.9% of intracellular S. aureus, respectively. PHMB-FITC entered and colocalized with the intracellular S. aureus, suggesting direct interaction of the drug with the bacteria inside the host cells. Enrofloxacin and PHMB at 15 mg/L reduced between 10 to 27% and 28 to 37% of biofilms’ mass, respectively. The half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50 obtained from a cytotoxicity assay were 345 ± 91 and 21 ± 2 mg/L for enrofloxacin and PHMB, respectively; therefore, both compounds were tolerated by the host cells at high concentrations. These findings suggest that both antimicrobials are effective against intracellular S. aureus and can disrupt biofilm structures, with PHMB being more potent against intracellular S. aureus, highlighting the potential application of PHMB in mastitis therapy.

  12. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Masahiro; Kasai, Shigeo.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a lmfbr type reactor wherein effusion of coolants through a loop contact portion is reduced even when fuel assemblies float up, and misloading of reactor core constituting elements is prevented thereby improving the reactor safety. Constitution: The reactor core constituents are secured in the reactor by utilizing the differential pressure between the high-pressure cooling chamber and low-pressure cooling chamber. A resistance port is formed at the upper part of a connecting pipe, and which is connect the low-pressure cooling chamber and the lower surface of the reactor core constituent. This resistance part is formed such that the internal sectional area of the connecting pipe is made larger stepwise toward the upper part, and the cylinder is formed larger so that it profiles the inner surface of the connecting pipe. (Aizawa, K.)

  13. Modeling irradiation embrittlement in reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odette, G.R.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. In chapter 10, numerical modeling of irradiation embrittlement in reactor vessel steels are introduced. Physically-based models are developed and their role in advancing the state-of-the-art of predicting irradiation embrittlement of RPV steels is stressed

  14. A modular approach to lead-cooled reactors modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casamassima, V. [CESI RICERCA, via Rubattino 54, I-20134 Milano (Italy)], E-mail: casamassima@cesiricerca.it; Guagliardi, A. [CESI RICERCA, via Rubattino 54, I-20134 Milano (Italy)], E-mail: guagliardi@cesiricerca.it

    2008-06-15

    After an overview of the lego plant simulation tools (LegoPST), the paper gives some details about the ongoing LegoPST extension for modelling lead fast reactor plants. It refers to a simple mathematical model of the liquid lead channel dynamic process and shows the preliminary results of its application in dynamic simulation of the BREST 300 liquid lead steam generator. Steady state results agree with reference data [IAEA-TECDOC 1531, Fast Reactor Database, 2006 Update] both for water and lead.

  15. A modular approach to lead-cooled reactors modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casamassima, V.; Guagliardi, A.

    2008-01-01

    After an overview of the lego plant simulation tools (LegoPST), the paper gives some details about the ongoing LegoPST extension for modelling lead fast reactor plants. It refers to a simple mathematical model of the liquid lead channel dynamic process and shows the preliminary results of its application in dynamic simulation of the BREST 300 liquid lead steam generator. Steady state results agree with reference data [IAEA-TECDOC 1531, Fast Reactor Database, 2006 Update] both for water and lead

  16. Calibration of a lactic-acid model for simulating biofilm-induced degradation of the dentin-composite interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Laikuan; Li, Yuping; Carrera, Carola A; Chen, Yung-Chung; Li, Mingyu; Fok, Alex

    2017-11-01

    To verify and calibrate a chemical model for simulating the degradation of the dentin-composite interface induced by multi-species oral biofilms in vitro. Dentin-composite disks (5-mm dia.×2-mm thick) were made from bovine incisor roots and filled with either Z100™ (Z100) or Filtek™ LS (LS) composite. The disks, which were covered with nail varnish, but with one of the dentin-composite margins exposed, were immersed in lactic acid solution at pH 4.5 for up to 48h. Diametral compression was performed to measure the reduction in bond strength of the dentin-composite disks following acid challenge. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine decalcification of dentin and fracture modes of the disks. To better understand the degradation process, micro-computed tomography, in combination with a radiopaque dye (AgNO 3 ), was used to assess interfacial leakage in 3D longitudinally, while SEM was used to determine the path of leakage. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze the results, with the level of statistical significance set at pcomposite interface, instead. The degree of dentin demineralization, the reduction in debonding load and the modes of failure observed were very similar to those induced by multi-species oral biofilms found in the previous work. Leakage of AgNO 3 occurred mainly along the hybrid layer. The specimens filled with Z100 had a thicker hybrid layer (∼6.5μm), which exhibited more interfacial leakage than those filled with LS. The chemical model with lactic acid used in this study can induce degradation to the dentin-composite interface similar to those produced by multi-species biofilms. With appropriate calibration, this could provide an effective in vitro method for ageing composite restorations in assessing their potential clinical performance. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  17. System modeling and reactor design studies of the Advanced Thermionic Initiative space nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.H.; Abdul-Hamid, S.; Klein, A.C.

    1996-01-01

    In-core thermionic space reactor design concepts that operate at a nominal power output range of 20 to 50 kW(electric) are described. Details of the neutronic, thermionic, thermal hydraulics, and shielding performance are presented. Because of the strong absorption of thermal neutrons by natural tungsten and the large amount of natural tungsten within the reactor core, two designs are considered. An overall system design code has been developed at Oregon State University to model advanced in-core thermionic energy conversion-based nuclear reactor systems for space applications. The results show that the driverless single-cell Advanced Thermionic Initiative (ATI) configuration, which does not have driver fuel rods, proved to be more efficient than the driven core, which has driver rods. The results also show that the inclusion of the true axial and radial power distribution decrease the overall conversion efficiency. The flattening of the radial power distribution by three different methods would lead to a higher efficiency. The results show that only one TFE works at the optimum emitter temperature; all other TFEs are off the optimum performance and result in a 40% decrease of the efficiency of the overall system. The true axial profile is significantly different as there is a considerable amount of neutron leakage out of the top and bottom of the reactor. The analysis reveals that the axial power profile actually has a chopped cosine shape. For this axial profile, the reactor core overall efficiency for the driverless ATI reactor version is found to be 5.84% with a total electrical power of 21.92 kW(electric). By considering the true axial power profile instead of the uniform power profile, each TFE loses ∼80 W(electric)

  18. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Masaomi; Kashimura, Kazuo; Inoue, Kazuyuki; Nishioka, Kazuya.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the construction of a reactor containment building, whereby the inspections of the outer wall of a reactor container after the completion of the construction of the reactor building can be easily carried out. Constitution: In a reactor accommodated in a container encircled by a building wall, a space is provided between the container and the building wall encircling the container, and a metal wall is provided in the space so that it is fitted in the building wall in an attachable or detatchable manner. (Aizawa, K.)

  19. Membrane fouling mechanism of biofilm-membrane bioreactor (BF-MBR): Pore blocking model and membrane cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Wenxiang; Tang, Bing; Ding, Jie; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Zhien

    2018-02-01

    Biofilm membrane bioreactor (BF-MBR) is considered as an important wastewater treatment technology that incorporates advantages of both biofilm and MBR process, as well as can alleviate membrane fouling, with respect to the conventional activated sludge MBR. But, to be efficient, it necessitates the establishment of proper methods for the assessment of membrane fouling. Four Hermia membrane blocking models were adopted to quantify and evaluate the membrane fouling of BF-MBR. The experiments were conducted with various operational conditions, including membrane types, agitation speeds and transmembrane pressure (TMP). Good agreement between cake formation model and experimental data was found, confirming the validity of the Hermia models for assessing the membrane fouling of BF-MBR and that cake layer deposits on membrane. Moreover, the influences of membrane types, agitation speeds and transmembrane pressure on the Hermia pore blocking coefficient of cake layer were investigated. In addition, the permeability recovery after membrane cleaning at various operational conditions was studied. This work confirms that, unlike conventional activated sludge MBR, BF-MBR possesses a low degree of membrane fouling and a higher membrane permeability recovery after cleaning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of biomass from integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS), moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) and membrane bioreactor (MBR) treating recalcitrant organics: Importance of attached biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chunkai; Shi, Yijing; Xue, Jinkai; Zhang, Yanyan; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed; Liu, Yang

    2017-03-15

    This study compared microbial characteristics and oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) treatment performance of five types of microbial biomass (MBBR-biofilm, IFAS-biofilm, IFAS-floc, MBR-aerobic-floc, and MBR-anoxic-floc) cultivated from three types of bioreactors (MBBR, IFAS, and MBR) in batch experiments. Chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonium, acid extractable fraction (AEF), and naphthenic acids (NAs) removals efficiencies were distinctly different between suspended and attached bacterial aggregates and between aerobic and anoxic suspended flocs. MBR-aerobic-floc and MBR-anoxic-floc demonstrated COD removal efficiencies higher than microbial aggregates obtained from MBBR and IFAS, MBBR and IFAS biofilm had higher AEF removal efficiencies than those obtained using flocs. MBBR-biofilm demonstrated the most efficient NAs removal from OSPW. NAs degradation efficiency was highly dependent on the carbon number and NA cyclization number according to UPLC/HRMS analysis. Mono- and di-oxidized NAs were the dominant oxy-NA species in OSPW samples. Microbial analysis with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) indicated that the bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundance was significantly higher in the batch bioreactors with suspended flocs than in those with biofilm, the NSR gene abundance in the MBR-anoxic bioreactor was significantly lower than that in aerobic batch bioreactors, and denitrifiers were more abundant in the suspended phase of the activated sludge flocs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Biofilm Induced Tolerance Towards Antimicrobial Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Anders; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Zampaloni, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    Increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents is thought to be an important feature of microbes growing in biofilms. We address the question of how biofilm organization affects antibiotic susceptibility. We established Escherichia coli biofilms with differential structural organization due...... to the presence of IncF plasmids expressing altered forms of the transfer pili in two different biofilm model systems. The mature biofilms were subsequently treated with two antibiotics with different molecular targets, the peptide antibiotic colistin and the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin. The dynamics...... of microbial killing were monitored by viable count determination, and confocal laser microscopy. Strains forming structurally organized biofilms show an increased bacterial survival when challenged with colistin, compared to strains forming unstructured biofilms. The increased survival is due to genetically...

  2. The Effect of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy With Antiseptic Instillation on Biofilm Formation in a Porcine Model of Infected Spinal Instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Devinder P; Gowda, Arvind U; Chopra, Karan; Tholen, Michael; Chang, Sarah; Mavrophilipos, Vasilios; Semsarzadeh, Nina; Rasko, Yvonne; Holton Iii, Luther

    2017-06-01

    This study evaluates the effect of negative pressure wound therapy with antiseptic instillation (NPWTi) in the clearance of infection and biofilm formation in an in vivo model of infected spinal implants compared to traditional treatment modalities. Five pigs underwent titanium rod implantation of their spinous processes followed by injection of 1 x 106 CFUs/100μL of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus through the fascia at each site. At 1 week postoperatively, an experimental arm of 3 pigs received NPWTi, and a control arm of 2 pigs received wet-to-dry dressings. The persistence of local infection in the experimental group was compared to the control group using tissue cultures. Biofilm development on spinal implants was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. Mean bacterial count showed a statistical difference between the experimental and the control groups (P < .05). Scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of uniform biofilm formation across the surface of control group instrumentation, whereas the experimental group showed interrupted areas between biofilm formations. The authors concluded that NPWTi is associated with decreased bacterial load and biofilm formation compared to wet-to-dry dressings in an in vivo porcine model of infected spinal instrumentation.

  3. Startup pattern and performance enhancement of pilot-scale biofilm process for raw water pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang-Feng; Feng, Li-Juan; Yang, Qi; Zhu, Liang; Xu, Jian; Xu, Xiang-Yang

    2014-11-01

    The quality of raw water is getting worse in developing countries because of the inadequate treatment of municipal sewage, industrial wastewater and agricultural runoff. Aiming at the biofilm enrichment and pollutant removal, two pilot-scale biofilm reactors were built with different biological carriers. Results showed that compared with the blank carrier, the biofilm was easily enriched on the biofilm precoated carrier and less nitrite accumulation occurred. The removal efficiencies of NH4(+)-N, DOC and UV254 increased under the aeration condition, and a optimum DO level for the adequate nitrification was 1.0-2.6mgL(-1) with the suitable temperature range of 21-22°C. Study on the trihalomethane prediction model indicated that the presentence of algae increased the risk of disinfection by-products production, which could be effectively controlled via manual algae removing and light shading. In this study, the performance of biofilm pretreatment process could be enhanced under the optimized condition of DO level and biofilm carrier. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. RT-PCR detection of Candida albicans ALS gene expression in the reconstituted human epithelium (RHE) model of oral candidiasis and in model biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Clayton B; Cheng, Georgina; Chandra, Jyotsna; Mukherjee, Pranab; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A; Hoyer, Lois L

    2004-02-01

    An RT-PCR assay was developed to analyse expression patterns of genes in the Candida albicans ALS (agglutinin-like sequence) family. Inoculation of a reconstituted human buccal epithelium (RHE) model of mucocutaneous candidiasis with strain SC5314 showed destruction of the epithelial layer by C. albicans and also formation of an upper fungal layer that had characteristics similar to a biofilm. RT-PCR analysis of total RNA samples extracted from C. albicans-inoculated buccal RHE showed that ALS1, ALS2, ALS3, ALS4, ALS5 and ALS9 were consistently detected over time as destruction of the RHE progressed. Detection of transcripts from ALS7, and particularly from ALS6, was more sporadic, but not associated with a strictly temporal pattern. The expression pattern of ALS genes in C. albicans cultures used to inoculate the RHE was similar to that observed in the RHE model, suggesting that contact of C. albicans with buccal RHE does little to alter ALS gene expression. RT-PCR analysis of RNA samples extracted from model denture and catheter biofilms showed similar gene expression patterns to the buccal RHE specimens. Results from the RT-PCR analysis of biofilm RNA specimens were consistent between various C. albicans strains during biofilm development and were comparable to gene expression patterns in planktonic cells. The RT-PCR assay described here will be useful for analysis of human clinical specimens and samples from other disease models. The method will provide further insight into the role of ALS genes and their encoded proteins in the diverse interactions between C. albicans and its host.

  5. Properties of autoregressive model in reactor noise analysis, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Sumasu; Kishida, Kuniharu; Bekki, Keisuke.

    1987-01-01

    Under appropriate conditions, stochastic processes are described by the ARMA model, however, the AR model is popularly used in reactor noise analysis. Hence, the properties of AR model as an approximate representation of the ARMA model should be made clear. Here, convergence of AR-parameters and PSD of AR model were studied through numerical analysis on specific examples such as the neutron noise in subcritical reactors, and it was found that : (1) The convergence of AR-parameters and AR model PSD is governed by the ''zero nearest to the unit circle in the complex plane'' (μ -1 ,|μ| M . (3) The AR model of the neutron noise of subcritical reactors needs a large model order because of an ARMA-zero very close to unity corresponding to the decay constant of the 6-th group of delayed neutron precursors. (4) In applying AR model for system identification, much attention has to be paid to a priori unknown error as an approximate representation of the ARMA model in addition to the statistical errors. (author)

  6. Modeling and simulation of pressurized water reactor power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.J.

    1983-01-01

    Two kinds of balance of plant (BOP) models of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) system are developed in this work - the detailed BOP model and the simple BOP model. The detailed model is used to simulate the normal operational performance of a whole BOP system. The simple model is used to combine with the NSSS model for a whole plant simulation. The trends of the steady state values of the detailed model are correct and the dynamic responses are reasonable. The simple BOP model approach starts the modelling work from the overall point of view. The response of the normalized turbine power and the feedwater inlet temperature to the steam generator of the simple model are compared with those of the detailed model. Both the steady state values and the dynamic responses are close to those of the detailed model. The simple BOP model is found adequate to represent the main performance of the BOP system. The simple balance of plant model was coupled with a NSSS model for a whole plant simulation. The NSSS model consists of the reactor core model, the steam generator model, and the coolant temperature control system. A closed loop whole plant simulation for an electric load perturbation was performed. The results are plausible. The coupling effect between the NSSS system and the BOP system was analyzed. The feedback of the BOP system has little effect on the steam generator performance, while the performance of the BOP system is strongly affected by the steam flow rate from the NSSS

  7. One-dimensional reactor kinetics model for RETRAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gose, G.C.; Peterson, C.E.; Ellis, N.L.; McClure, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes a one-dimensional spatial neutron kinetics model that was developed for the RETRAN code. The RETRAN -01 code has a point kinetics model to describe the reactor core behavior during thermal-hydraulic transients. A one-dimensional neutronics model has been developed for RETRAN-02. The ability to account for flux shape changes will permit an improved representation of the thermal and hydraulic feedback effects for many operational transients. 19 refs

  8. Fuzzy model-based control of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Den Durpel, L.; Ruan, D.

    1994-01-01

    The fuzzy model-based control of a nuclear power reactor is an emerging research topic world-wide. SCK-CEN is dealing with this research in a preliminary stage, including two aspects, namely fuzzy control and fuzzy modelling. The aim is to combine both methodologies in contrast to conventional model-based PID control techniques, and to state advantages of including fuzzy parameters as safety and operator feedback. This paper summarizes the general scheme of this new research project

  9. Component and system simulation models for High Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sozer, A.

    1989-08-01

    Component models for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) have been developed. The models are HFIR core, heat exchangers, pressurizer pumps, circulation pumps, letdown valves, primary head tank, generic transport delay (pipes), system pressure, loop pressure-flow balance, and decay heat. The models were written in FORTRAN and can be run on different computers, including IBM PCs, as they do not use any specific simulation languages such as ACSL or CSMP. 14 refs., 13 figs

  10. Study on modeling technology in digital reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaoping; Luo Yuetong; Tong Lili

    2004-01-01

    Modeling is the kernel part of a digital reactor system. As an extensible platform for reactor conceptual design, it is very important to study modeling technology and develop some kind of tools to speed up preparation of all classical computing models. This paper introduces the background of the project and basic conception of digital reactor. MCAM is taken as an example for modeling and its related technologies used are given. It is an interface program for MCNP geometry model developed by FDS team (ASIPP and HUT), and designed to run on windows system. MCAM aims at utilizing CAD technology to facilitate creation of MCNP geometry model. There have been two ways for MCAM to utilize CAD technology: (1) Making use of user interface technology in aid of generation of MCNP geometry model; (2) Making use of existing 3D CAD model to accelerate creation of MCNP geometry model. This paper gives an overview of MCAM's major function. At last, several examples are given to demonstrate MCAM's various capabilities. (authors)

  11. A fast and flexible reactor physics model for simulating neutron spectra and depletion in fast reactors - 202

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recktenwald, G.D.; Bronk, L.A.; Deinert, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    Determining the time dependent concentration of isotopes within a nuclear reactor core is central to the analysis of nuclear fuel cycles. We present a fast, flexible tool for determining the time dependent neutron spectrum within fast reactors. The code (VBUDS: visualization, burnup, depletion and spectra) uses a two region, multigroup collision probability model to simulate the energy dependent neutron flux and tracks the buildup and burnout of 24 actinides, as well as fission products. While originally developed for LWR simulations, the model is shown to produce fast reactor spectra that show high degree of fidelity to available fast reactor benchmarks. (authors)

  12. Reactor noise diagnostics based on multivariate autoregressive modeling: Application to LOFT [Loss-of-Fluid-Test] reactor process noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloeckler, O.; Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    Multivariate noise analysis of power reactor operating signals is useful for plant diagnostics, for isolating process and sensor anomalies, and for automated plant monitoring. In order to develop a reliable procedure, the previously established techniques for empirical modeling of fluctuation signals in power reactors have been improved. Application of the complete algorithm to operational data from the Loss-of-Fluid-Test (LOFT) Reactor showed that earlier conjectures (based on physical modeling) regarding the perturbation sources in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) affecting coolant temperature and neutron power fluctuations can be systematically explained. This advanced methodology has important implication regarding plant diagnostics, and system or sensor anomaly isolation. 6 refs., 24 figs

  13. Identification of the reduced order models of a BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez S, A.

    2004-01-01

    The present work has as objective to analyze the relative stability of a BWR type reactor. It is analyzed that so adaptive it turns out to identify the parameters of a model of reduced order so that this it reproduces a condition of given uncertainty. This will take of a real fact happened in the La Salle plant under certain operation conditions of power and flow of coolant. The parametric identification is carried out by means of an algorithm of recursive least square and an Output Error model (Output Error), measuring the output power of the reactor when the instability is present, and considering that it is produced by a change in the reactivity of the system in the same way that a sign of type step. Also it is carried out an analytic comparison of the relative stability, analyzing two types of answers: the original answer of the uncertainty of the reactor vs. the obtained response identifying the parameters of the model of reduced order, reaching the conclusion that it is very viable to adapt a model of reduced order to study the stability of a reactor, under the only condition to consider that the dynamics of the reactivity is of step type. (Author)

  14. Approach to decision modeling for an ignition test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howland, H.R.; Varljen, T.C.

    1977-01-01

    A comparison matrix decision model is applied to candidates for a D-T ignition tokamak (TNS), including assessment of semi-quantifiable or judgemental factors as well as quantitative ones. The results show that TNS is mission-sensitive with a choice implied between near-term achievability and reactor technology

  15. Modeling of heat transfer in wall-cooled tubular reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, G.W.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1999-01-01

    In a pilot scale wall-cooled tubular reactor, temperature profiles have been measured with and without reaction. As a model reaction oxidation of carbon monoxide in air over a copper chromite catalyst has been used. The kinetics of this reaction have been determined separately in two kinetic

  16. Reactor accident calculation models in use in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveten, U.

    1984-01-01

    The report relates to a subproject under a Nordic project called ''Large reactor accidents - consequences and mitigating actions''. In the first part of the report short descriptions of the various models are given. A systematic list by subject is then given. In the main body of the report chapter and subchapter headings are by subject. (Auth.)

  17. Improved Nuclear Reactor and Shield Mass Model for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    New technologies are being developed to explore the distant reaches of the solar system. Beyond Mars, solar energy is inadequate to power advanced scientific instruments. One technology that can meet the energy requirements is the space nuclear reactor. The nuclear reactor is used as a heat source for which a heat-to-electricity conversion system is needed. Examples of such conversion systems are the Brayton, Rankine, and Stirling cycles. Since launch cost is proportional to the amount of mass to lift, mass is always a concern in designing spacecraft. Estimations of system masses are an important part in determining the feasibility of a design. I worked under Michael Barrett in the Thermal Energy Conversion Branch of the Power & Electric Propulsion Division. An in-house Closed Cycle Engine Program (CCEP) is used for the design and performance analysis of closed-Brayton-cycle energy conversion systems for space applications. This program also calculates the system mass including the heat source. CCEP uses the subroutine RSMASS, which has been updated to RSMASS-D, to estimate the mass of the reactor. RSMASS was developed in 1986 at Sandia National Laboratories to quickly estimate the mass of multi-megawatt nuclear reactors for space applications. In response to an emphasis for lower power reactors, RSMASS-D was developed in 1997 and is based off of the SP-100 liquid metal cooled reactor. The subroutine calculates the mass of reactor components such as the safety systems, instrumentation and control, radiation shield, structure, reflector, and core. The major improvements in RSMASS-D are that it uses higher fidelity calculations, is easier to use, and automatically optimizes the systems mass. RSMASS-D is accurate within 15% of actual data while RSMASS is only accurate within 50%. My goal this summer was to learn FORTRAN 77 programming language and update the CCEP program with the RSMASS-D model.

  18. Consequence model of the German reactor safety study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, A.; Aldrich, D.; Burkart, K.; Horsch, F.; Hubschmann, W.; Schueckler, M.; Vogt, S.

    1979-01-01

    The consequency model developed for phase A of the German Reactor Safety Study (RSS) is similar in many respects to its counterpart in WASH-1400. As in that previous study, the model describes the atmosphere dispersion and transport of radioactive material released from the containment during a postulated reactor accident, and predicts its interaction with and influence on man. Differences do exist between the two models however, for the following reasons: (1) to more adequately reflect central European conditions, (2) to include improved submodels, and (3) to apply additional data and knowledge that have become available since publication of WASH-1400. The consequence model as used in phase A of the German RSS is described, highlighting differences between it and the U.S. model

  19. Vibration tests on some models of PEC reactor core elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonacina, G.; Castoldi, A.; Zola, M.; Cecchini, F.; Martelli, A.; Vincenzi, D.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the aims of the experimental tests carried out at ISMES, within an agreement with the Department of Fast Reactors of ENEA, on some models of the elements of PEC Fast Nuclear Reactor Core in the frame of the activities for the seismic verification of the PEC core. The seismic verification is briefly described with particular attention to the problems arising from the shocks among the various elements during an earthquake, as well as the computer code used, the purpose and the techniques used to perform tests, some results and the first comparison between the theory and the experimental data

  20. Neural network modeling of chaotic dynamics in nuclear reactor flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welstead, S.T.

    1992-01-01

    Neural networks have many scientific applications in areas such as pattern classification and time series prediction. The universal approximation property of these networks, however, can also be exploited to provide researchers with tool for modeling observed nonlinear phenomena. It has been shown that multilayer feed forward networks can capture important global nonlinear properties, such as chaotic dynamics, merely by training the network on a finite set of observed data. The network itself then provides a model of the process that generated the data. Characterizations such as the existence and general shape of a strange attractor and the sign of the largest Lyapunov exponent can then be extracted from the neural network model. In this paper, the author applies this idea to data generated from a nonlinear process that is representative of convective flows that can arise in nuclear reactor applications. Such flows play a role in forced convection heat removal from pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors, and decay heat removal from liquid-metal-cooled reactors, either by natural convection or by thermosyphons

  1. Simulation of MILD combustion using Perfectly Stirred Reactor model

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Z.

    2016-07-06

    A simple model based on a Perfectly Stirred Reactor (PSR) is proposed for moderate or intense low-oxygen dilution (MILD) combustion. The PSR calculation is performed covering the entire flammability range and the tabulated chemistry approach is used with a presumed joint probability density function (PDF). The jet, in hot and diluted coflow experimental set-up under MILD conditions, is simulated using this reactor model for two oxygen dilution levels. The computed results for mean temperature, major and minor species mass fractions are compared with the experimental data and simulation results obtained recently using a multi-environment transported PDF approach. Overall, a good agreement is observed at three different axial locations for these comparisons despite the over-predicted peak value of CO formation. This suggests that MILD combustion can be effectively modelled by the proposed PSR model with lower computational cost.

  2. Crystal Plasticity Model of Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement in GRIZZLY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Biner, Suleyman Bulent [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is of utmost importance to ensure safe operation of nuclear reactors under extended lifetime. Microstructure-scale models at various length and time scales, coupled concurrently or through homogenization methods, can play a crucial role in understanding and quantifying irradiation-induced defect production, growth and their influence on mechanical behavior of RPV steels. A multi-scale approach, involving atomistic, meso- and engineering-scale models, is currently being pursued within the GRIZZLY project to understand and quantify irradiation-induced embrittlement of RPV steels. Within this framework, a dislocation-density based crystal plasticity model has been developed in GRIZZLY that captures the effect of irradiation-induced defects on the flow stress behavior and is presented in this report. The present formulation accounts for the interaction between self-interstitial loops and matrix dislocations. The model predictions have been validated with experiments and dislocation dynamics simulation.

  3. Crystal Plasticity Model of Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement in GRIZZLY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Biner, Suleyman Bulent; Zhang, Yongfeng; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting

    2015-01-01

    The integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is of utmost importance to ensure safe operation of nuclear reactors under extended lifetime. Microstructure-scale models at various length and time scales, coupled concurrently or through homogenization methods, can play a crucial role in understanding and quantifying irradiation-induced defect production, growth and their influence on mechanical behavior of RPV steels. A multi-scale approach, involving atomistic, meso- and engineering-scale models, is currently being pursued within the GRIZZLY project to understand and quantify irradiation-induced embrittlement of RPV steels. Within this framework, a dislocation-density based crystal plasticity model has been developed in GRIZZLY that captures the effect of irradiation-induced defects on the flow stress behavior and is presented in this report. The present formulation accounts for the interaction between self-interstitial loops and matrix dislocations. The model predictions have been validated with experiments and dislocation dynamics simulation.

  4. Thermohydraulic modeling and simulation of breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, A.K.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.; Curtis, R.T.; Hetrick, D.L.; Girijashankar, P.V.

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with the modeling and simulation of system-wide transients in LMFBRs. Unprotected events (i.e., the presumption of failure of the plant protection system) leading to core-melt are not considered in this paper. The existing computational capabilities in the area of protected transients in the US are noted. Various physical and numerical approximations that are made in these codes are discussed. Finally, the future direction in the area of model verification and improvements is discussed

  5. Bacterial and archael 16S rRNA sequences and taxonomic summary tables for biofilm samples from the bio-reactors

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A biofilm anode acclimated with acetate, acetate+methane, and methane growth media for over three years produced a steady current density of 1.6-2.3 mA/m^2 in a...

  6. A fungal biofilm reactor based on metal structured packing improves the quality of a Gla::GFP fusion protein produced by Aspergillus oryzae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zune, Q.; Delepierre, A.; Gofflot, S.; Bauwens, J.; Twizere, J.C.; Punt, P.J.; Francis, F.; Toye, D.; Bawin, T.; Delvigne, F.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal biofilm is known to promote the excretion of secondary metabolites in accordance with solid-staterelated physiological mechanisms. This work is based on the comparative analysis of classical submerged fermentation with a fungal biofilmreactor for the production of a Gla::green fluorescent

  7. Flooding Experiments and Modeling for Improved Reactor Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solmos, M.; Hogan, K.J.; VIerow, K.

    2008-01-01

    Countercurrent two-phase flow and 'flooding' phenomena in light water reactor systems are being investigated experimentally and analytically to improve reactor safety of current and future reactors. The aspects that will be better clarified are the effects of condensation and tube inclination on flooding in large diameter tubes. The current project aims to improve the level of understanding of flooding mechanisms and to develop an analysis model for more accurate evaluations of flooding in the pressurizer surge line of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Interest in flooding has recently increased because Countercurrent Flow Limitation (CCFL) in the AP600 pressurizer surge line can affect the vessel refill rate following a small break LOCA and because analysis of hypothetical severe accidents with the current flooding models in reactor safety codes shows that these models represent the largest uncertainty in analysis of steam generator tube creep rupture. During a hypothetical station blackout without auxiliary feedwater recovery, should the hot leg become voided, the pressurizer liquid will drain to the hot leg and flooding may occur in the surge line. The flooding model heavily influences the pressurizer emptying rate and the potential for surge line structural failure due to overheating and creep rupture. The air-water test results in vertical tubes are presented in this paper along with a semi-empirical correlation for the onset of flooding. The unique aspects of the study include careful experimentation on large-diameter tubes and an integrated program in which air-water testing provides benchmark knowledge and visualization data from which to conduct steam-water testing

  8. Linear Dynamics Model for Steam Cooled Fast Power Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmer, H

    1968-04-15

    A linear analytical dynamic model is developed for steam cooled fast power reactors. All main components of such a plant are investigated on a general though relatively simple basis. The model is distributed in those parts concerning the core but lumped as to the external plant components. Coolant is considered as compressible and treated by the actual steam law. Combined use of analogue and digital computer seems most attractive.

  9. Computer modelling of radioactive source terms at a tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meide, A.

    1984-12-01

    The Monte Carlo code MCNP has been used to create a simple three-dimensional mathematical model representing 1/12 of a tokamak fusion reactor for studies of the exposure rate level from neutrons as well as gamma rays from the activated materials, and for later estimates of the consequences to the environment, public, and operating personnel. The model is based on the recommendations from the NET/INTOR workshops. (author)

  10. Validation of the dynamic model for a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwingelstein, Gilles.

    1979-01-01

    Dynamic model validation is a necessary procedure to assure that the developed empirical or physical models are satisfactorily representing the dynamic behavior of the actual plant during normal or abnormal transients. For small transients, physical models which represent isolated core, isolated steam generator and the overall pressurized water reactor are described. Using data collected during the step power changes that occured during the startup procedures, comparisons of experimental and actual transients are given at 30% and 100% of full power. The agreement between the transients derived from the model and those recorded on the plant indicates that the developed models are well suited for use for functional or control studies

  11. Hydraulic resistance of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Dreszer, C.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.; Paulitsch-Fuchs, Astrid H.; Zwijnenburg, Arie; Kruithof, Joop C.; Flemming, Hans Curt

    2013-01-01

    resistance is very low compared to the expected biofilm resistance and, thus, biofilm resistance can be determined accurately. Transmembrane pressure drop was monitored. As biofilm parameters, thickness, total cell number, TOC, and extracellular polymeric

  12. MODELING THE ELECTROLYTIC DECHLORINATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN A GRANULAR GRAPHITE-PACKED REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    A comprehensive reactor model was developed for the electrolytic dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) at a granular-graphite cathode. The reactor model describes the dynamic processes of TCE dechlorination and adsorption, and the formation and dechlorination of all the major...

  13. Mammary Gland Pathology Subsequent to Acute Infection with Strong versus Weak Biofilm Forming Staphylococcus aureus Bovine Mastitis Isolates: A Pilot Study Using Non-Invasive Mouse Mastitis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi-Tiwari, Jully; Williams, Vincent; Waryah, Charlene Babra; Costantino, Paul; Al-Salami, Hani; Mathavan, Sangeetha; Wells, Kelsi; Tiwari, Harish Kumar; Hegde, Nagendra; Isloor, Shrikrishna; Al-Sallami, Hesham; Mukkur, Trilochan

    2017-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus is an important virulence attribute because of its potential to induce persistent antibiotic resistance, retard phagocytosis and either attenuate or promote inflammation, depending upon the disease syndrome, in vivo. This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential significance of strength of biofilm formation by clinical bovine mastitis-associated S. aureus in mammary tissue damage by using a mouse mastitis model. Two S. aureus strains of the same capsular phenotype with different biofilm forming strengths were used to non-invasively infect mammary glands of lactating mice. Biofilm forming potential of these strains were determined by tissue culture plate method, ica typing and virulence gene profile per detection by PCR. Delivery of the infectious dose of S. aureus was directly through the teat lactiferous duct without invasive scraping of the teat surface. Both bacteriological and histological methods were used for analysis of mammary gland pathology of mice post-infection. Histopathological analysis of the infected mammary glands revealed that mice inoculated with the strong biofilm forming S. aureus strain produced marked acute mastitic lesions, showing profuse infiltration predominantly with neutrophils, with evidence of necrosis in the affected mammary glands. In contrast, the damage was significantly less severe in mammary glands of mice infected with the weak biofilm-forming S. aureus strain. Although both IL-1β and TNF-α inflammatory biomarkers were produced in infected mice, level of TNF-α produced was significantly higher (pmastitis model, and offers an opportunity for the development of novel strategies for reduction of mammary tissue damage, with or without use of antimicrobials and/or anti-inflammatory compounds for the treatment of bovine mastitis.

  14. Integrated fuel-cycle models for fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, K.O.; Maudlin, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    Breeder-reactor fuel-cycle analysis can be divided into four different areas or categories. The first category concerns questions about the spatial variation of the fuel composition for single loading intervals. Questions of the variations in the fuel composition over several cycles represent a second category. Third, there is a need for a determination of the breeding capability of the reactor. The fourth category concerns the investigation of breeding and long-term fuel logistics. Two fuel-cycle models used to answer questions in the third and fourth area are presented. The space- and time-dependent actinide balance, coupled with criticality and fuel-management constraints, is the basis for both the Discontinuous Integrated Fuel-Cycle Model and the Continuous Integrated Fuel-Cycle Model. The results of the continuous model are compared with results obtained from detailed two-dimensional space and multigroup depletion calculations. The continuous model yields nearly the same results as the detailed calculation, and this is with a comparatively insignificant fraction of the computational effort needed for the detailed calculation. Thus, the integrated model presented is an accurate tool for answering questions concerning reactor breeding capability and long-term fuel logistics. (author)

  15. Reactor kinetics revisited: a coefficient based model (CBM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratemi, W.M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a nuclear reactor kinetics model based on Guelph expansion coefficients calculation ( Coefficients Based Model, CBM), for n groups of delayed neutrons is developed. The accompanying characteristic equation is a polynomial form of the Inhour equation with the same coefficients of the CBM- kinetics model. Those coefficients depend on Universal abc- values which are dependent on the type of the fuel fueling a nuclear reactor. Furthermore, such coefficients are linearly dependent on the inserted reactivity. In this paper, the Universal abc- values have been presented symbolically, for the first time, as well as with their numerical values for U-235 fueled reactors for one, two, three, and six groups of delayed neutrons. Simulation studies for constant and variable reactivity insertions are made for the CBM kinetics model, and a comparison of results, with numerical solutions of classical kinetics models for one, two, three, and six groups of delayed neutrons are presented. The results show good agreements, especially for single step insertion of reactivity, with the advantage of the CBM- solution of not encountering the stiffness problem accompanying the numerical solutions of the classical kinetics model. (author)

  16. Studies on modelling of bubble driven flows in chemical reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grevskott, Sverre

    1997-12-31

    Multiphase reactors are widely used in the process industry, especially in the petrochemical industry. They very often are characterized by very good thermal control and high heat transfer coefficients against heating and cooling surfaces. This thesis first reviews recent advances in bubble column modelling, focusing on the fundamental flow equations, drag forces, transversal forces and added mass forces. The mathematical equations for the bubble column reactor are developed, using an Eulerian description for the continuous and dispersed phase in tensor notation. Conservation equations for mass, momentum, energy and chemical species are given, and the k-{epsilon} and Rice-Geary models for turbulence are described. The different algebraic solvers used in the model are described, as are relaxation procedures. Simulation results are presented and compared with experimental values. Attention is focused on the modelling of void fractions and gas velocities in the column. The energy conservation equation has been included in the bubble column model in order to model temperature distributions in a heated reactor. The conservation equation of chemical species has been included to simulate absorption of CO{sub 2}. Simulated axial and radial mass fraction profiles for CO{sub 2} in the gas phase are compared with measured values. Simulations of the dynamic behaviour of the column are also presented. 189 refs., 124 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Enhancement of Biofilm Formation on Pyrite by Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bioleaching is the mobilization of metal cations from insoluble ores by microorganisms. Biofilms can enhance this process. Since Sulfobacillus often appears in leaching heaps or reactors, this genus has aroused attention. In this study, biofilm formation and subsequent pyrite dissolution by the Gram-positive, moderately thermophilic acidophile Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans were investigated. Five strategies, including adjusting initial pH, supplementing an extra energy source or ferric ions, as well as exchanging exhausted medium with fresh medium, were tested for enhancement of its biofilm formation. The results show that regularly exchanging exhausted medium leads to a continuous biofilm development on pyrite. By this way, multiply layered biofilms were observed on pyrite slices, while only monolayer biofilms were visible on pyrite grains. In addition, biofilms were proven to be responsible for pyrite leaching in the early stages.

  18. Biomimetic 3D in vitro model of biofilm triggered osteomyelitis for investigating hematopoiesis during bone marrow infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raic, Annamarija; Riedel, Sophie; Kemmling, Elena; Bieback, Karen; Overhage, Joerg; Lee-Thedieck, Cornelia

    2018-04-18

    In this work, we define the requirements for a human-based osteomyelitis model which overcomes the limitations of state of the art animal models. Osteomyelitis is a severe and difficult to treat infection of the bone that develops rapidly, making it difficult to study in humans. We have developed a 3D in vitro model of the bone marrow, comprising a macroporous material, human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). Inclusion of biofilms grown on an implant into the model system allowed us to study the effects of postoperative osteomyelitis-inducing bacteria on the bone marrow. The bacteria influenced the myeloid differentiation of HSPCs as well as MSC cytokine expression and the MSC ability to support HSPC maintenance. In conclusion, we provide a new 3D in vitro model which meets all the requirements for investigating the impact of osteomyelitis. Implant associated-osteomyelitis is a persistent bacterial infection of the bone which occurs in many implant patients and can result in functional impairments or even entire loss of the extremity. Nevertheless, surprisingly little is known on the triangle interaction between implant material, bacterial biofilm and affected bone tissue. Closing this gap of knowledge would be crucial for the fundamental understanding of the disease and the development of novel treatment strategies. For this purpose, we developed the first biomaterial-based system that is able to mimic implant-associated osteomyelitis outside of the body, thus, opening the avenue to study this fatal disease in the laboratory. Copyright © 2018 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Quantitative real-time PCR combined with propidium monoazide for the selective quantification of viable periodontal pathogens in an in vitro subgingival biofilm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, M C; Marín, M J; Figuero, E; Llama-Palacios, A; León, R; Blanc, V; Herrera, D; Sanz, M

    2014-02-01

    Differentiation of live and dead cells is an important challenge when using molecular diagnosis for microbial identification. This is particularly relevant when bacteria have been exposed to antimicrobial agents. The objective of this study was to test a method using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) combined with propidium monoazide (PMA), developed for the selective quantification of viable P. gingivalis, A. actinomycetemcomitans, F. nucleatum and total bacteria in an in vitro biofilm model after antimicrobial treatment. PMA-qPCR method was tested in an in vitro biofilm model, using isopropyl alcohol as the antimicrobial agent. Matured biofilms were exposed for 1, 5, 10 and 30 min to isopropyl alcohol by immersion. Biofilms were disrupted and PMA added (final concentration of 100 μm). After DNA isolation, qPCR was carried out using specific primers and probes for the target bacteria. The differentiation of live and dead cells was tested by analysis of variance. When PMA was used in the presence of viable target bacterial cells, no statistically significant inhibition of qPCR amplification was detected (p > 0.05 in all cases). Conversely, after immersion in isopropyl alcohol of the biofilm, PMA resulted in a significant total reduction of qPCR amplification of about 4 log10 . P. gingivalis showed a vitality reduction in the biofilm of 3 log10 , while A. actinomycetemcomitans and F. nucleatum showed a 2 log10 reduction. These results demonstrate the efficiency of PMA for differentiating viable and dead P. gingivalis, A. actinomycetemcomitans and F. nucleatum cells, as well as total bacteria, in an in vitro biofilm model, after being exposed to an antimicrobial agent. Hence, this PMA-qPCR method may be useful for studying the effect of antimicrobial agents aimed at oral biofilms. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Fault detection in IRIS reactor secondary loop using inferential models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perillo, Sergio R.P.; Upadhyaya, Belle R.; Hines, J. Wesley

    2013-01-01

    The development of fault detection algorithms is well-suited for remote deployment of small and medium reactors, such as the IRIS, and the development of new small modular reactors (SMR). However, an extensive number of tests are still to be performed for new engineering aspects and components that are not yet proven technology in the current PWRs, and present some technological challenges for its deployment since many of its features cannot be proven until a prototype plant is built. In this work, an IRIS plant simulation platform was developed using a Simulink® model. The dynamic simulation was utilized in obtaining inferential models that were used to detect faults artificially added to the secondary system simulations. The implementation of data-driven models and the results are discussed. (author)

  1. A meta-proteomics approach to study the interspecies interactions affecting microbial biofilm development in a model community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herschend, Jakob; Damholt, Zacharias Brimnes Visby; Marquard, Andrea Marion

    2017-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are omnipresent in nature and relevant to a broad spectrum of industries ranging from bioremediation and food production to biomedical applications. To date little is understood about how multi-species biofilm communities develop and function on a molecular level, due...... of fermentation and nitrogen pathways in Paenibacillus amylolyticus and Xanthomonas retroflexus may, however, indicate that competition for limited resources also affects community development. Overall our results demonstrate the multitude of pathways involved in biofilm formation in mixed communities....

  2. A model to predict moisture conditions in concrete reactor containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahs, M.; Nilsson, L.O.; Poyet, S.; L'Hostis, V.

    2015-01-01

    Moisture has an impact in many of the degradation mechanisms that appear in the structures of a nuclear power plant. Moisture conditions in a reactor containment wall have been simulated by using a hygro-thermal model of drying concrete. Methods to estimate the temperature dependency of the sorption isotherms and moisture transport properties is suggested and applied in the model. This temperature dependency is included as there is a temperature gradient present through the containment wall. The hygro-thermal model was applied on a full scale 3D model of a real reactor containment building and the concrete relative humidity has been computed at 4 different moments: 1, 10, 20 and 30 years. The results show that the major part of the concrete is not dried at all even after 30 years of operation. It is also clear that the temperature distribution inside the whole concrete volume is affected by the variable boundary conditions. It was concluded that the suggested hygro-thermal model was appropriate to use as a method to estimate the existing conditions in a PWR reactor containment wall

  3. Modelling perspectives on radiation chemistry in BWR reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, Eishi

    1991-01-01

    Development of a full-system boiling water reactor core model started in 1982. The model included a two-region reactor core, one with and one without boiling. Key design parameters consider variable dose rates in a three-layer liquid downcomer. Dose rates in the core and downcomer include both generation and recombination reactions of species. Agreement is good between calculations and experimental data of oxygen concentration as a function of hydrogen concentration for different bubble sizes. Oxygen concentration is reduced in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) by increasing bubble size. The multilayer model follows the oxygen data better than a single-layered model at high concentrations of hydrogen. Key reactions are reduced to five radiolysis reactions and four decomposition reactions for hydrogen peroxide. Calculations by the DOT 3 code showed dose rates from neutrons and gamma rays in various parts of the core. Concentrations of oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, and hydrogen were calculated by the model as a function of time from core inlet. Similar calculations for NWC and HWC were made as a function of height from core inlet both in the boiling channel an the bypass channel. Finally the model was applied to calculate the oxygen plus half the hydrogen peroxide concentrations as a function of hydrogen concentration to compare with data from five plants. Power density distribution with core height was given for an early stage and an end stage of a cycle. Increases of dose rates in the turbine for seven plants were shown as a function of increased hydrogen concentration in the reactor water

  4. VIPRE modeling of VVER-1000 reactor core for DNB analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Y.; Nguyen, Q. [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Cizek, J. [Nuclear Research Institute, Prague, (Czech Republic)

    1995-09-01

    Based on the one-pass modeling approach, the hot channels and the VVER-1000 reactor core can be modeled in 30 channels for DNB analyses using the VIPRE-01/MOD02 (VIPRE) code (VIPRE is owned by Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, California). The VIPRE one-pass model does not compromise any accuracy in the hot channel local fluid conditions. Extensive qualifications include sensitivity studies of radial noding and crossflow parameters and comparisons with the results from THINC and CALOPEA subchannel codes. The qualifications confirm that the VIPRE code with the Westinghouse modeling method provides good computational performance and accuracy for VVER-1000 DNB analyses.

  5. Silver-Palladium Surfaces Inhibit Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Schroll, Casper; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2009-01-01

    Undesired biofilm formation is a major concern in many areas. In the present study, we investigated biofilm-inhibiting properties of a silver-palladium surface that kills bacteria by generating microelectric fields and electrochemical redox processes. For evaluation of the biofilm inhibition...... efficacy and study of the biofilm inhibition mechanism, the silver-sensitive Escherichia coli J53 and the silver-resistant E. coli J53[pMG101] strains were used as model organisms, and batch and flow chamber setups were used as model systems. In the case of the silver-sensitive strain, the silver......-palladium surfaces killed the bacteria and prevented biofilm formation under conditions of low or high bacterial load. In the case of the silver-resistant strain, the silver-palladium surfaces killed surface-associated bacteria and prevented biofilm formation under conditions of low bacterial load, whereas under...

  6. Sodium fast reactor gaps analysis of computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbajo, Juan (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Ludewig, Hans (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken, Japan); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d' %C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache %3CU%2B2013%3E CEA, France)

    2011-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of an expert-opinion elicitation activity designed to qualitatively assess the status and capabilities of currently available computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety calculations of advanced sodium fast reactors, and identify important gaps. The twelve-member panel consisted of representatives from five U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, and BNL), the University of Wisconsin, the KAERI, the JAEA, and the CEA. The major portion of this elicitation activity occurred during a two-day meeting held on Aug. 10-11, 2010 at Argonne National Laboratory. There were two primary objectives of this work: (1) Identify computer codes currently available for SFR accident analysis and reactor safety calculations; and (2) Assess the status and capability of current US computer codes to adequately model the required accident scenarios and associated phenomena, and identify important gaps. During the review, panel members identified over 60 computer codes that are currently available in the international community to perform different aspects of SFR safety analysis for various event scenarios and accident categories. A brief description of each of these codes together with references (when available) is provided. An adaptation of the Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) for computational modeling and simulation is described for use in this work. The panel's assessment of the available US codes is presented in the form of nine tables, organized into groups of three for each of three risk categories considered: anticipated operational occurrences (AOOs), design basis accidents (DBA), and beyond design basis accidents (BDBA). A set of summary conclusions are drawn from the results obtained. At the highest level, the panel judged that current US code capabilities are adequate for licensing given reasonable margins, but expressed concern that US code development activities had stagnated and that the

  7. Mathematical modeling of water radiolysis in the Syrian MNSR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soukieh, M.

    2009-11-01

    Because it is difficult to measure the concentration of the radiolytic species in reactors under operating conduction, they must be estimated by computer simulation techniques. This study discusses the mathematical modeling of water radiolysis modeling of the MNSR nuclear reactor cooling water. The mathematical model comprising of 13 differential equations describe 55 chemical reactions of radiolytic species e - a q H + , OH - , H, H 2 , OH, HO 2 , O 2 , HO - 2 , O - , O - 2 , O - 3 . The mathematical model have been tested and it shows a good agreement of the computed values in this work with the results cited in references [1,18] in case of only γray irradiation of pure water with dose rate of 1.18x10 19 eV/L s. The neutron fluxes and dose rates at the interface of cladding-water for the different fuel rings in the MNSR core are determined using MCNP-4C code. In addition, the time dependent of the radiolytic specie concentrations were estimated for max. and min. dose rates and at temperature of 20 degree centigrade in the MNSR. The radiolytic specie concentrations reach the steady sate after about 200-400 s. The radiolytic specie concentrations order of H 2 , O 2 , H 2 O 2 were about ppb. Also this study shows the possibility of suppressed the water radiolysis reactions by adding hydrogen to the MNSR reactor cooling water. (author)

  8. Reactor scale modeling of multi-walled carbon nanotube growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardo, Jeffrey J.; Chiu, Wilson K.S.

    2011-01-01

    As the mechanisms of carbon nanotube (CNT) growth becomes known, it becomes important to understand how to implement this knowledge into reactor scale models to optimize CNT growth. In past work, we have reported fundamental mechanisms and competing deposition regimes that dictate single wall carbon nanotube growth. In this study, we will further explore the growth of carbon nanotubes with multiple walls. A tube flow chemical vapor deposition reactor is simulated using the commercial software package COMSOL, and considered the growth of single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. It was found that the limiting reaction processes for multi-walled carbon nanotubes change at different temperatures than the single walled carbon nanotubes and it was shown that the reactions directly governing CNT growth are a limiting process over certain parameters. This work shows that the optimum conditions for CNT growth are dependent on temperature, chemical concentration, and the number of nanotube walls. Optimal reactor conditions have been identified as defined by (1) a critical inlet methane concentration that results in hydrogen abstraction limited versus hydrocarbon adsorption limited reaction kinetic regime, and (2) activation energy of reaction for a given reactor temperature and inlet methane concentration. Successful optimization of a CNT growth processes requires taking all of those variables into account.

  9. Development of an automated core model for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosteller, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to develop an automated package of computer codes that can model the steady-state behavior of nuclear-reactor cores of various designs. As an added benefit, data produced for steady-state analysis also can be used as input to the TRAC transient-analysis code for subsequent safety analysis of the reactor at any point in its operating lifetime. The basic capability to perform steady-state reactor-core analysis already existed in the combination of the HELIOS lattice-physics code and the NESTLE advanced nodal code. In this project, the automated package was completed by (1) obtaining cross-section libraries for HELIOS, (2) validating HELIOS by comparing its predictions to results from critical experiments and from the MCNP Monte Carlo code, (3) validating NESTLE by comparing its predictions to results from numerical benchmarks and to measured data from operating reactors, and (4) developing a linkage code to transform HELIOS output into NESTLE input

  10. Nanoindentation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baniasadi, Mahmoud; Xu, Zhe; Du, Yingjie; Lu, Hongbing; Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Gandee, Leah; Zimmern, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a source of many chronic infections. Biofilms and their inherent resistance to antibiotics are attributable to a range of health issues including affecting prosthetic implants, hospital-acquired infections, and wound infection. Mechanical properties of biofilm, in particular, at micro- and nano-scales, are governed by microstructures and porosity of the biofilm, which in turn may contribute to their inherent antibiotic resistance. We utilize atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation and finite element simulation to investigate the nanoscale mechanical properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm. This biofilm was derived from human samples and represents a medically relevant model. (paper)

  11. Parameter identification in a nonlinear nuclear reactor model using quasilinearization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreto, J.M.; Martins Neto, A.F.; Tanomaru, N.

    1980-09-01

    Parameter identification in a nonlinear, lumped parameter, nuclear reactor model is carried out using discrete output power measurements during the transient caused by an external reactivity change. In order to minimize the difference between the model and the reactor power responses, the parameter promt neutron generation time and a parameter in fuel temperature reactivity coefficient equation are adjusted using quasilinearization. The influences of the external reactivity disturbance, the number and frequency of measurements and the measurement noise level on the method accuracy and rate of convergence are analysed through simulation. Procedures for the design of the identification experiments are suggested. The method proved to be very effective for low level noise measurements. (Author) [pt

  12. Nuclear reactor fuel rod behavior modelling and current trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colak, Ue.

    2001-01-01

    Safety assessment of nuclear reactors is carried out by simulating the events to taking place in nuclear reactors by realistic computer codes. Such codes are developed in a way that each event is represented by differential equations derived based on physical laws. Nuclear fuel is an important barrier against radioactive fission gas release. The release of radioactivity to environment is the main concern and this can be avoided by preserving the integrity of fuel rod. Therefore, safety analyses should cover an assessment of fuel rod behavior with certain extent. In this study, common approaches for fuel behavior modeling are discussed. Methods utilized by widely accepted computer codes are reviewed. Shortcomings of these methods are explained. Current research topics to improve code reliability and problems encountered in fuel rod behavior modeling are presented

  13. WWER reactor fuel performance, modelling and experimental support. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanova, S.; Chantoin, P.; Kolev, I.

    1994-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of 36 papers presented at the International Seminar on WWER Reactor Fuel Performance, Modelling and Experimental Support, organised by the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (BG), in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Seminar was attended by 76 participants from 16 countries, including representatives of all major Russian plants and institutions responsible for WWER reactor fuel manufacturing, design and research. The reports are grouped in four chapters: 1) WWER Fuel Performance and Economics: Status and Improvement Prospects: 2) WWER Fuel Behaviour Modelling and Experimental Support; 3) Licensing of WWER Fuel and Fuel Analysis Codes; 4) Spent Fuel of WWER Plants. The reports from the corresponding four panel discussion sessions are also included. All individual papers are recorded in INIS as separate items

  14. Scale modeling flow-induced vibrations of reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulcahy, T.M.

    1982-06-01

    Similitude relationships currently employed in the design of flow-induced vibration scale-model tests of nuclear reactor components are reviewed. Emphasis is given to understanding the origins of the similitude parameters as a basis for discussion of the inevitable distortions which occur in design verification testing of entire reactor systems and in feature testing of individual component designs for the existence of detrimental flow-induced vibration mechanisms. Distortions of similitude parameters made in current test practice are enumerated and selected example tests are described. Also, limitations in the use of specific distortions in model designs are evaluated based on the current understanding of flow-induced vibration mechanisms and structural response

  15. Computer modeling of flow induced in-reactor vibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turula, P.; Mulcahy, T.M.

    1977-01-01

    An assessment of the reliability of finite element method computer models, as applied to the computation of flow induced vibration response of components used in nuclear reactors, is presented. The prototype under consideration was the Fast Flux Test Facility reactor being constructed for US-ERDA. Data were available from an extensive test program which used a scale model simulating the hydraulic and structural characteristics of the prototype components, subjected to scaled prototypic flow conditions as well as to laboratory shaker excitations. Corresponding analytical solutions of the component vibration problems were obtained using the NASTRAN computer code. Modal analyses and response analyses were performed. The effect of the surrounding fluid was accounted for. Several possible forcing function definitions were considered. Results indicate that modal computations agree well with experimental data. Response amplitude comparisons are good only under conditions favorable to a clear definition of the structural and hydraulic properties affecting the component motion. 20 refs

  16. WWER reactor fuel performance, modelling and experimental support. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanova, S; Chantoin, P; Kolev, I [eds.

    1994-12-31

    This publication is a compilation of 36 papers presented at the International Seminar on WWER Reactor Fuel Performance, Modelling and Experimental Support, organised by the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (BG), in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Seminar was attended by 76 participants from 16 countries, including representatives of all major Russian plants and institutions responsible for WWER reactor fuel manufacturing, design and research. The reports are grouped in four chapters: (1) WWER Fuel Performance and Economics: Status and Improvement Prospects: (2) WWER Fuel Behaviour Modelling and Experimental Support; (3) Licensing of WWER Fuel and Fuel Analysis Codes; (4) Spent Fuel of WWER Plants. The reports from the corresponding four panel discussion sessions are also included. All individual papers are recorded in INIS as separate items.

  17. System model for analysis of the mirror fusion-fission reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, D.J.; Carlson, G.A.

    1977-01-01

    This report describes a system model for the mirror fusion-fission reactor. In this model we include a reactor description as well as analyses of capital cost and blanket fuel management. In addition, we provide an economic analysis evaluating the cost of producing the two hybrid products, fissile fuel and electricity. We also furnish the results of a limited parametric analysis of the modeled reactor, illustrating the technological and economic implications of varying some important reactor design parameters

  18. Modeling and performance of the MHTGR [Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor] reactor cavity cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, J.C.

    1990-04-01

    The Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) of the Modular High- Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) proposed by the U.S. Department of Energy is designed to remove the nuclear afterheat passively in the event that neither the heat transport system nor the shutdown cooling circulator subsystem is available. A computer dynamic simulation for the physical and mathematical modeling of and RCCS is described here. Two conclusions can be made form computations performed under the assumption of a uniform reactor vessel temperature. First, the heat transferred across the annulus from the reactor vessel and then to ambient conditions is very dependent on the surface emissivities of the reactor vessel and RCCS panels. These emissivities should be periodically checked to ensure the safety function of the RCCS. Second, the heat transfer from the reactor vessel is reduced by a maximum of 10% by the presence of steam at 1 atm in the reactor cavity annulus for an assumed constant in the transmission of radiant energy across the annulus can be expected to result in an increase in the reactor vessel temperature for the MHTGR. Further investigation of participating radiation media, including small particles, in the reactor cavity annulus is warranted. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  19. Plasticity of Candida albicans Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Karla J.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Candida albicans, the most pervasive fungal pathogen that colonizes humans, forms biofilms that are architecturally complex. They consist of a basal yeast cell polylayer and an upper region of hyphae encapsulated in extracellular matrix. However, biofilms formed in vitro vary as a result of the different conditions employed in models, the methods used to assess biofilm formation, strain differences, and, in a most dramatic fashion, the configuration of the mating type locus (MTL). Therefore, integrating data from different studies can lead to problems of interpretation if such variability is not taken into account. Here we review the conditions and factors that cause biofilm variation, with the goal of engendering awareness that more attention must be paid to the strains employed, the methods used to assess biofilm development, every aspect of the model employed, and the configuration of the MTL locus. We end by posing a set of questions that may be asked in comparing the results of different studies and developing protocols for new ones. This review should engender the notion that not all biofilms are created equal. PMID:27250770

  20. Possible complication regarding phosphorus removal with a continuous flow biofilm system: Diffusion limitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkentoft, C.M.; Arnz, P.; Henze, Mogens

    2001-01-01

    Diffusion limitation of phosphate possibly constitutes a serious problem regarding the use of a biofilm reactor for enhanced biological phosphorus removal. A lab-scale reactor for simultaneous removal of phosphorus and nitrate was operated in a continuous alternating mode of operation. For a steady.......4 ± 0.4% (equal to 24 ± 4 mg P/g TS). A simplified computer model indicated the reason to be phosphate diffusion limitation and the model revealed a delicate balance between the obtainable phosphorus contents of the biomass and operating parameters, such as backwash interval, biofilm thickness after...... backwash, and phase lengths. The aspect of diffusion is considered of crucial importance when evaluating the performance of a biofilter for phosphate removal. © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 76: 77–85, 2001....