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Sample records for biofilm matrix regulation

  1. Vibrio cholerae utilizes direct sRNA regulation in expression of a biofilm matrix protein.

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    Tianyan Song

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae biofilms contain exopolysaccharide and three matrix proteins RbmA, RbmC and Bap1. While much is known about exopolysaccharide regulation, little is known about the mechanisms by which the matrix protein components of biofilms are regulated. VrrA is a conserved, 140-nt sRNA of V. cholerae, whose expression is controlled by sigma factor σE. In this study, we demonstrate that VrrA negatively regulates rbmC translation by pairing to the 5' untranslated region of the rbmC transcript and that this regulation is not stringently dependent on the RNA chaperone protein Hfq. These results point to VrrA as a molecular link between the σE-regulon and biofilm formation in V. cholerae. In addition, VrrA represents the first example of direct regulation of sRNA on biofilm matrix component, by-passing global master regulators.

  2. Confocal Microscopy Imaging of the Biofilm Matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Meyer, Rikke Louise

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is an integral part of microbial biofilms and an important field of research. Confocal laser scanning microscopy is a valuable tool for the study of biofilms, and in particular of the biofilm matrix, as it allows real-time visualization of fully hydrated, living specimens...

  3. sarA negatively regulates Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation by modulating expression of 1 MDa extracellular matrix binding protein and autolysis‐dependent release of eDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christner, Martin; Heinze, Constanze; Busch, Michael;

    2012-01-01

    Biofilm formation is essential for Staphylococcus epidermidis pathogenicity in implant‐associated infections. Nonetheless, large proportions of invasive Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates fail to form a biofilm in vitro. We here tested the hypothesis that this apparent paradox is related...... virulence. Genetic analysis revealed that inactivation of sarA induced biofilm formation via overexpression of the giant 1 MDa extracellular matrix binding protein (Embp), serving as an intercellular adhesin. In addition to Embp, increased extracellular DNA (eDNA) release significantly contributed...

  4. The roles of biofilm matrix polysaccharide Psl in mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

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    Ma, Luyan; Wang, Shiwei; Wang, Di; Parsek, Matthew R; Wozniak, Daniel J

    2012-07-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes life-threatening, persistent infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Persistence is attributed to the ability of these bacteria to form structured communities (biofilms). Biofilms rely on an extracellular polymeric substances matrix to maintain structure. Psl exopolysaccharide is a key matrix component of nonmucoid biofilms, yet the role of Psl in mucoid biofilms is unknown. In this report, using a variety of mutants in a mucoid P. aeruginosa background, we found that deletion of Psl-encoding genes dramatically decreased their biofilm formation ability, indicating that Psl is also a critical matrix component of mucoid biofilms. Our data also suggest that the overproduction of alginate leads to mucoid biofilms, which occupy more space, whereas Psl-dependent biofilms are densely packed. These data suggest that Psl polysaccharide may have significant contributions in biofilm persistence in patients with CF and may be helpful for designing therapies for P. aeruginosa CF infection.

  5. Extracellular matrix structure governs invasion resistance in bacterial biofilms.

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    Nadell, Carey D; Drescher, Knut; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2015-08-01

    Many bacteria are highly adapted for life in communities, or biofilms. A defining feature of biofilms is the production of extracellular matrix that binds cells together. The biofilm matrix provides numerous fitness benefits, including protection from environmental stresses and enhanced nutrient availability. Here we investigate defense against biofilm invasion using the model bacterium Vibrio cholerae. We demonstrate that immotile cells, including those identical to the biofilm resident strain, are completely excluded from entry into resident biofilms. Motile cells can colonize and grow on the biofilm exterior, but are readily removed by shear forces. Protection from invasion into the biofilm interior is mediated by the secreted protein RbmA, which binds mother-daughter cell pairs to each other and to polysaccharide components of the matrix. RbmA, and the invasion protection it confers, strongly localize to the cell lineages that produce it.

  6. Novel entries in a fungal biofilm matrix encyclopedia

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    Virulence of Candida albicans is linked with its ability to form biofilms. Once established, biofilm infections are nearly impossible to eradicate. Biofilm cells live immersed in a self-produced matrix, a blend of extracellular biopolymers, many of which are uncharacterized. In this study, we conduc...

  7. Presence of extracellular DNA in the Candida albicans biofilm matrix and its contribution to biofilms.

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    Martins, Margarida; Uppuluri, Priya; Thomas, Derek P; Cleary, Ian A; Henriques, Mariana; Lopez-Ribot, José L; Oliveira, Rosário

    2010-05-01

    DNA has been described as a structural component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in bacterial biofilms. In Candida albicans, there is a scarce knowledge concerning the contribution of extracellular DNA (eDNA) to biofilm matrix and overall structure. This work examined the presence and quantified the amount of eDNA in C. albicans biofilm ECM and the effect of DNase treatment and the addition of exogenous DNA on C. albicans biofilm development as indicators of a role for eDNA in biofilm development. We were able to detect the accumulation of eDNA in biofilm ECM extracted from C. albicans biofilms formed under conditions of flow, although the quantity of eDNA detected differed according to growth conditions, in particular with regards to the medium used to grow the biofilms. Experiments with C. albicans biofilms formed statically using a microtiter plate model indicated that the addition of exogenous DNA (>160 ng/ml) increases biofilm biomass and, conversely, DNase treatment (>0.03 mg/ml) decreases biofilm biomass at later time points of biofilm development. We present evidence for the role of eDNA in C. albicans biofilm structure and formation, consistent with eDNA being a key element of the ECM in mature C. albicans biofilms and playing a predominant role in biofilm structural integrity and maintenance.

  8. Biofilm-specific extracellular matrix proteins of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

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    Wu, Siva; Baum, Marc M; Kerwin, James; Guerrero, Debbie; Webster, Simon; Schaudinn, Christoph; VanderVelde, David; Webster, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), a human respiratory tract pathogen, can form colony biofilms in vitro. Bacterial cells and the amorphous extracellular matrix (ECM) constituting the biofilm can be separated using sonication. The ECM from 24- and 96-h NTHi biofilms contained polysaccharides and proteinaceous components as detected by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy. More conventional chemical assays on the biofilm ECM confirmed the presence of these components and also DNA. Proteomics revealed eighteen proteins present in biofilm ECM that were not detected in planktonic bacteria. One ECM protein was unique to 24-h biofilms, two were found only in 96-h biofilms, and fifteen were present in the ECM of both 24- and 96-h NTHi biofilms. All proteins identified were either associated with bacterial membranes or cytoplasmic proteins. Immunocytochemistry showed two of the identified proteins, a DNA-directed RNA polymerase and the outer membrane protein OMP P2, associated with bacteria and biofilm ECM. Identification of biofilm-specific proteins present in immature biofilms is an important step in understanding the in vitro process of NTHi biofilm formation. The presence of a cytoplasmic protein and a membrane protein in the biofilm ECM of immature NTHi biofilms suggests that bacterial cell lysis may be a feature of early biofilm formation.

  9. Mechanisms of post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacterial biofilms

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    Viveka eVadyvaloo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Biofilms are characterized by a dense multicellular community of microorganisms that can be formed by the attachment of bacteria to an inert surface and to each other. The development of biofilm involves the initial attachment of planktonic bacteria to a surface, followed by replication, cell-to-cell adhesion to form microcolonies, maturation and detachment. Mature biofilms are embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix composed primarily of bacterial-derived exopolysaccharides, specialized proteins, adhesins and occasionally DNA. Because the synthesis and assembly of biofilm matrix components is an exceptionally complex process, the transition between its different phases requires the coordinate expression and simultaneous regulation of many genes by complex genetic networks involving all levels of gene regulation. The finely controlled intracellular level of the chemical second messenger molecule, cyclic-di-GMP is central to the post-transcriptional mechanisms governing the switch between the motile planktonic lifestyle and the sessile biofilm forming state in many bacteria. Several other post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are known to dictate biofilm development and assembly and these include RNA-binding proteins, small non-coding RNAs, toxin-antitoxin systems, riboswitches and RNases. Post-transcriptional regulation is therefore a powerful molecular mechanism employed by bacteria to rapidly adjust to the changing environment and to fine tune gene expression to the developmental needs of the cell. In this review, we discuss post-transcriptional mechanisms that influence the biofilm developmental cycle in a variety of pathogenic bacteria.

  10. Assembly and development of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix.

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    Luyan Ma

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Virtually all cells living in multicellular structures such as tissues and organs are encased in an extracellular matrix. One of the most important features of a biofilm is the extracellular polymeric substance that functions as a matrix, holding bacterial cells together. Yet very little is known about how the matrix forms or how matrix components encase bacteria during biofilm development. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms environmentally and clinically relevant biofilms and is a paradigm organism for the study of biofilms. The extracellular polymeric substance of P. aeruginosa biofilms is an ill-defined mix of polysaccharides, nucleic acids, and proteins. Here, we directly visualize the product of the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl exopolysaccharide at different stages of biofilm development. During attachment, Psl is anchored on the cell surface in a helical pattern. This promotes cell-cell interactions and assembly of a matrix, which holds bacteria in the biofilm and on the surface. Chemical dissociation of Psl from the bacterial surface disrupted the Psl matrix as well as the biofilm structure. During biofilm maturation, Psl accumulates on the periphery of 3-D-structured microcolonies, resulting in a Psl matrix-free cavity in the microcolony center. At the dispersion stage, swimming cells appear in this matrix cavity. Dead cells and extracellular DNA (eDNA are also concentrated in the Psl matrix-free area. Deletion of genes that control cell death and autolysis affects the formation of the matrix cavity and microcolony dispersion. These data provide a mechanism for how P. aeruginosa builds a matrix and subsequently a cavity to free a portion of cells for seeding dispersal. Direct visualization reveals that Psl is a key scaffolding matrix component and opens up avenues for therapeutics of biofilm-related complications.

  11. Giving structure to the biofilm matrix: an overview of individual strategies and emerging common themes.

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    Hobley, Laura; Harkins, Catriona; MacPhee, Cait E; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R

    2015-09-01

    Biofilms are communities of microbial cells that underpin diverse processes including sewage bioremediation, plant growth promotion, chronic infections and industrial biofouling. The cells resident in the biofilm are encased within a self-produced exopolymeric matrix that commonly comprises lipids, proteins that frequently exhibit amyloid-like properties, eDNA and exopolysaccharides. This matrix fulfils a variety of functions for the community, from providing structural rigidity and protection from the external environment to controlling gene regulation and nutrient adsorption. Critical to the development of novel strategies to control biofilm infections, or the capability to capitalize on the power of biofilm formation for industrial and biotechnological uses, is an in-depth knowledge of the biofilm matrix. This is with respect to the structure of the individual components, the nature of the interactions between the molecules and the three-dimensional spatial organization. We highlight recent advances in the understanding of the structural and functional role that carbohydrates and proteins play within the biofilm matrix to provide three-dimensional architectural integrity and functionality to the biofilm community. We highlight, where relevant, experimental techniques that are allowing the boundaries of our understanding of the biofilm matrix to be extended using Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio cholerae, and Bacillus subtilis as exemplars.

  12. Artificial biofilms establish the role of matrix interactions in staphylococcal biofilm assembly and disassembly.

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    Stewart, Elizabeth J; Ganesan, Mahesh; Younger, John G; Solomon, Michael J

    2015-08-14

    We demonstrate that the microstructural and mechanical properties of bacterial biofilms can be created through colloidal self-assembly of cells and polymers, and thereby link the complex material properties of biofilms to well understood colloidal and polymeric behaviors. This finding is applied to soften and disassemble staphylococcal biofilms through pH changes. Bacterial biofilms are viscoelastic, structured communities of cells encapsulated in an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) comprised of polysaccharides, proteins, and DNA. Although the identity and abundance of EPS macromolecules are known, how these matrix materials interact with themselves and bacterial cells to generate biofilm morphology and mechanics is not understood. Here, we find that the colloidal self-assembly of Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A cells and polysaccharides into viscoelastic biofilms is driven by thermodynamic phase instability of EPS. pH conditions that induce phase instability of chitosan produce artificial S. epidermidis biofilms whose mechanics match natural S. epidermidis biofilms. Furthermore, pH-induced solubilization of the matrix triggers disassembly in both artificial and natural S. epidermidis biofilms. This pH-induced disassembly occurs in biofilms formed by five additional staphylococcal strains, including three clinical isolates. Our findings suggest that colloidal self-assembly of cells and matrix polymers produces biofilm viscoelasticity and that biofilm control strategies can exploit this mechanism.

  13. Novel entries in a fungal biofilm matrix encyclopedia.

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    Zarnowski, Robert; Westler, William M; Lacmbouh, Ghislain Ade; Marita, Jane M; Bothe, Jameson R; Bernhardt, Jörg; Lounes-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa; Fontaine, Joël; Sanchez, Hiram; Hatfield, Ronald D; Ntambi, James M; Nett, Jeniel E; Mitchell, Aaron P; Andes, David R

    2014-08-05

    Virulence of Candida is linked with its ability to form biofilms. Once established, biofilm infections are nearly impossible to eradicate. Biofilm cells live immersed in a self-produced matrix, a blend of extracellular biopolymers, many of which are uncharacterized. In this study, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the matrix manufactured by Candida albicans both in vitro and in a clinical niche animal model. We further explore the function of matrix components, including the impact on drug resistance. We uncovered components from each of the macromolecular classes (55% protein, 25% carbohydrate, 15% lipid, and 5% nucleic acid) in the C. albicans biofilm matrix. Three individual polysaccharides were identified and were suggested to interact physically. Surprisingly, a previously identified polysaccharide of functional importance, β-1,3-glucan, comprised only a small portion of the total matrix carbohydrate. Newly described, more abundant polysaccharides included α-1,2 branched α-1,6-mannans (87%) associated with unbranched β-1,6-glucans (13%) in an apparent mannan-glucan complex (MGCx). Functional matrix proteomic analysis revealed 458 distinct activities. The matrix lipids consisted of neutral glycerolipids (89.1%), polar glycerolipids (10.4%), and sphingolipids (0.5%). Examination of matrix nucleic acid identified DNA, primarily noncoding sequences. Several of the in vitro matrix components, including proteins and each of the polysaccharides, were also present in the matrix of a clinically relevant in vivo biofilm. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis demonstrated interaction of aggregate matrix with the antifungal fluconazole, consistent with a role in drug impedance and contribution of multiple matrix components. Importance: This report is the first to decipher the complex and unique macromolecular composition of the Candida biofilm matrix, demonstrate the clinical relevance of matrix components, and show that multiple matrix components are needed

  14. Biofilm recruitment of Vibrio cholerae by matrix proteolysis.

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    Duperthuy, Marylise; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2015-11-01

    The appearance of bacterial biofilms involves secretion of polysaccharides and proteins that form an extracellular matrix embedding the bacteria. Proteases have also been observed, but their role has remained unclear. Smith and co-workers have now found that proteolysis can contribute to further recruitment of bacteria to Vibrio cholerae biofilms.

  15. Regulation of biofilm formation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

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    Simm, Roger; Ahmad, Irfan; Rhen, Mikael; Le Guyon, Soazig; Römling, Ute

    2014-01-01

    In animals, plants and the environment, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium forms the red dry and rough (rdar) biofilm characterized by extracellular matrix components curli and cellulose. With complex expression control by at least ten transcription factors, the bistably expressed orphan response regulator CsgD directs rdar morphotype development. CsgD expression is an integral part of the Hfq regulon and the complex cyclic diguanosine monophosphate signaling network partially controlled by the global RNA-binding protein CsrA. Cell wall turnover and the periplasmic redox status regulate csgD expression on a post-transcriptional level by unknown mechanisms. Furthermore, phosphorylation of CsgD is a potential inactivation and degradation signal in biofilm dissolution. Including complex incoherent feed-forward loops, regulation of biofilm formation versus motility and virulence is of recognized complexity.

  16. Streptococcus mutans-derived extracellular matrix in cariogenic oral biofilms.

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    Klein, Marlise I; Hwang, Geelsu; Santos, Paulo H S; Campanella, Osvaldo H; Koo, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are highly structured microbial communities that are enmeshed in a self-produced extracellular matrix. Within the complex oral microbiome, Streptococcus mutans is a major producer of extracellular polymeric substances including exopolysaccharides (EPS), eDNA, and lipoteichoic acid (LTA). EPS produced by S. mutans-derived exoenzymes promote local accumulation of microbes on the teeth, while forming a spatially heterogeneous and diffusion-limiting matrix that protects embedded bacteria. The EPS-rich matrix provides mechanical stability/cohesiveness and facilitates the creation of highly acidic microenvironments, which are critical for the pathogenesis of dental caries. In parallel, S. mutans also releases eDNA and LTA, which can contribute with matrix development. eDNA enhances EPS (glucan) synthesis locally, increasing the adhesion of S. mutans to saliva-coated apatitic surfaces and the assembly of highly cohesive biofilms. eDNA and other extracellular substances, acting in concert with EPS, may impact the functional properties of the matrix and the virulence of cariogenic biofilms. Enhanced understanding about the assembly principles of the matrix may lead to efficacious approaches to control biofilm-related diseases.

  17. Streptococcus mutans-derived extracellular matrix in cariogenic oral biofilms

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    Marlise eKlein

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are highly structured microbial communities that are enmeshed in a self-produced extracellular matrix. Within the complex oral microbiome, Streptococcus mutans is a major producer of extracellular polymeric substances including exopolysaccharides (EPS, eDNA and lipoteichoic acid (LTA. EPS produced by S. mutans-derived exoenzymes promote local accumulation of microbes on the teeth, while forming a spatially heterogeneous and diffusion-limiting matrix that protects embedded bacteria. The EPS-rich matrix provides mechanical stability/cohesiveness and facilitates the creation of highly acidic microenvironments, which are critical for the pathogenesis of dental caries. In parallel, S. mutans also releases eDNA and LTA, which can contribute with matrix development. eDNA enhances EPS (glucan synthesis locally, increasing the adhesion of S. mutans to saliva-coated apatitic surfaces and the assembly of highly cohesive biofilms. eDNA and other extracellular substances, acting in concert with EPS, may impact the functional properties of the matrix and the virulence of cariogenic biofilms. Enhanced understanding about the assembly principles of the matrix may lead to efficacious approaches to control biofilm-related diseases.

  18. Regulation of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm formation.

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    Gaddy, Jennifer A; Actis, Luis A

    2009-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative opportunistic nosocomial pathogen. This microorganism survives in hospital environments despite unfavorable conditions such as desiccation, nutrient starvation and antimicrobial treatments. It is hypothesized that its ability to persist in these environments, as well as its virulence, is a result of its capacity to form biofilms. A. baumannii forms biofilms on abiotic surfaces such as polystyrene and glass as well as biotic surfaces such as epithelial cells and fungal filaments. Pili assembly and production of the Bap surface-adhesion protein play a role in biofilm initiation and maturation after initial attachment to abiotic surfaces. Furthermore, the adhesion and biofilm phenotypes of some clinical isolates seem to be related to the presence of broad-spectrum antibiotic resistance. The regulation of the formation and development of these biofilms is as diverse as the surfaces on which this bacterium persists and as the cellular components that participate in this programmed multistep process. The regulatory processes associated with biofilm formation include sensing of bacterial cell density, the presence of different nutrients and the concentration of free cations available to bacterial cells. Some of these extracellular signals may be sensed by two-component regulatory systems such as BfmRS. This transcriptional regulatory system activates the expression of the usher-chaperone assembly system responsible for the production of pili, needed for cell attachment and biofilm formation on polystyrene surfaces. However, such a system is not required for biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces when cells are cultured in chemically defined media. Interestingly, the BfmRS system also controls cell morphology under particular culture conditions.

  19. SarA is a negative regulator of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Christer; Heinze, C.; Busch, M.

    2012-01-01

    Biofilm formation is essential for Staphylococcus epidermidis pathogenicity in implant-associated infections. Nonetheless, large proportions of invasive S. epidermidis isolates fail to show accumulative biofilm growth in vitro. We here tested the hypothesis that this apparent paradox is related...... to the existence of superimposed regulatory systems suppressing a multi-cellular biofilm life style in vitro. Transposon mutagenesis of clinical significant but biofilm-negative S. epidermidis 1585 was used to isolate a biofilm positive mutant carrying a Tn917 insertion in sarA,chief regulator of staphylococcal...... virulence. Genetic analysis revealed that inactivation of sarA induced biofilm formation via over-expression of the giant 1 MDa extracellular matrix binding protein (Embp), serving as an intercellular adhesin. In addition to Embp, increased extracellular DNA (eDNA) release significantly contributed...

  20. A Look inside the Listeria monocytogenes Biofilms Extracellular Matrix

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    Angelo Colagiorgi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen able to persist in food industry and is responsible for a severe illness called listeriosis. The ability of L. monocytogenes to persist in environments is due to its capacity to form biofilms that are a sessile community of microorganisms embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS’s. In this review, we summarized recent efforts performed in order to better characterize the polymeric substances that compose the extracellular matrix (ECM of L. monocytogenes biofilms. EPS extraction and analysis led to the identification of polysaccharides, proteins, extracellular DNA, and other molecules within the listerial ECM. All this knowledge will be useful for increasing food protection, suggesting effective strategies for the minimization of persistence of L. monocytogenes in food industry environments.

  1. Sub-inhibitory tigecycline concentrations induce extracellular matrix binding protein Embp dependent Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation and immune evasion.

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    Weiser, Julian; Henke, Hanae A; Hector, Nina; Both, Anna; Christner, Martin; Büttner, Henning; Kaplan, Jeffery B; Rohde, Holger

    2016-09-01

    Biofilm-associated Staphylococcus epidermidis implant infections are notoriously reluctant to antibiotic treatment. Here we studied the effect of sub-inhibitory concentrations of penicillin, oxacillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, linezolid and tigecycline on S. epidermidis 1585 biofilm formation, expression of extracellular matrix binding protein (Embp) and potential implications for S. epidermidis - macrophage interactions. Penicillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, and linezolid had no biofilm augmenting effect at any of the concentrations tested. In contrast, at sub-inhibitory concentrations tigecycline and oxacillin exhibited significant biofilm inducing activity. In S. epidermidis 1585, SarA is a negative regulator of giant 1 MDa Embp, and down regulation of sarA induces Embp-dependent assembly of a multi-layered biofilm architecture. Dot blot immune assays, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and qPCR showed that under biofilm inducing conditions, tigecycline augmented embp expression compared to the control grown without antibiotics. Conversely, expression of regulator sarA was suppressed, suggesting that tigecycline exerts its effects on embp expression through SarA. Tigecycline failed to induce biofilm formation in embp transposon mutant 1585-M135, proving that under these conditions Embp up-regulation is necessary for biofilm accumulation. As a functional consequence, tigecycline induced biofilm formation significantly impaired the up-take of S. epidermidis by mouse macrophage-like cell line J774A.1. Our data provide novel evidence for the molecular basis of antibiotic induced biofilm formation, a phenotype associated with inherently increased antimicrobial tolerance. While this could explain failure of antimicrobial therapies, persistence of S. epidermidis infections in the presence of sub-inhibitory antimicrobials is additionally propelled by biofilm-related impairment of macrophage-mediated pathogen eradication.

  2. Combining biofilm matrix measurements with biomass and viability assays in susceptibility assessments of antimicrobials against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

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    Skogman, Malena Elise; Vuorela, Pia Maarit; Fallarero, Adyary

    2012-09-01

    Despite that three types of assays (measuring biofilm viability, biomass, or matrix) are described to assess anti-biofilm activity, they are rarely used together. As infections can easily reappear if the matrix is not affected after antibiotic treatments, our goal was to explore the simultaneous effects of antibiotics on the viability, biomass and matrix of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms (ATCC 25923). Viability and biomass were quantified using resazurin and crystal violet staining sequentially in the same plate, while matrix staining was conducted with a wheat germ agglutinin-Alexa Fluor 488 fluorescent conjugate. Establishment of the detection limits and linearity ranges allowed concluding that all three methods were able to estimate biofilm formation in a similar fashion. In a susceptibility study with 18-h biofilms, two model compounds (penicillin G and ciprofloxacin) caused a reduction on the viability and biomass accompanied by an increase or not changed levels of the matrix, respectively. This response pattern was also proven for S. aureus Newman, S. epidermidis and E. coli biofilms. A classification of antibiotics based on five categories according to their effects on viability and matrix has been proposed earlier. Our data suggests a sixth group, represented by penicillin, causing decrease in bacterial viability but showing stimulatory effects on the matrix. Further, if effects on the matrix are not taken into account, the long-term chemotherapeutic effect of antibiotics can be jeopardized in spite of the positive effects on biofilms viability and biomass. Thus, measuring all these three endpoints simultaneously provide a more complete and accurate picture.

  3. A Candida biofilm-induced pathway for matrix glucan delivery: implications for drug resistance.

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    Heather T Taff

    Full Text Available Extracellular polysaccharides are key constituents of the biofilm matrix of many microorganisms. One critical carbohydrate component of Candida albicans biofilms, β-1,3 glucan, has been linked to biofilm protection from antifungal agents. In this study, we identify three glucan modification enzymes that function to deliver glucan from the cell to the extracellular matrix. These enzymes include two predicted glucan transferases and an exo-glucanase, encoded by BGL2, PHR1, and XOG1, respectively. We show that the enzymes are crucial for both delivery of β-1,3 glucan to the biofilm matrix and for accumulation of mature matrix biomass. The enzymes do not appear to impact cell wall glucan content of biofilm cells, nor are they necessary for filamentation or biofilm formation. We demonstrate that mutants lacking these genes exhibit enhanced susceptibility to the commonly used antifungal, fluconazole, during biofilm growth only. Transcriptional analysis and biofilm phenotypes of strains with multiple mutations suggest that these enzymes act in a complementary fashion to distribute matrix downstream of the primary β-1,3 glucan synthase encoded by FKS1. Furthermore, our observations suggest that this matrix delivery pathway works independently from the C. albicans ZAP1 matrix formation regulatory pathway. These glucan modification enzymes appear to play a biofilm-specific role in mediating the delivery and organization of mature biofilm matrix. We propose that the discovery of inhibitors for these enzymes would provide promising anti-biofilm therapeutics.

  4. New insights on molecular regulation of biofilm formation in plant-associated bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luisa F. Castiblanco; George W. Sundin

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are complex bacterial assemblages with a defined three-dimensional architecture, attached to solid surfaces, and surrounded by a self-produced matrix generally composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, lipids and extrac-ellular DNA. Biofilm formation has evolved as an adaptive strategy of bacteria to cope with harsh environmental conditions as well as to establish antagonistic or beneficial interactions with their host. Plant-associated bacteria attach and form biofilms on different tissues including leaves, stems, vasculature, seeds and roots. In this review, we examine the formation of biofilms from the plant-associated bacterial perspective and detail the recently-described mechanisms of genetic regulation used by these organisms to orchestrate biofilm formation on plant surfaces. In addition, we describe plant host signals that bacterial pathogens recognize to activate the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to multi-cellular behavior.

  5. Visualization of extracellular matrix components within sectioned Salmonella biofilms on the surface of human gallstones.

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    Joanna M Marshall

    Full Text Available Chronic carriage of Salmonella Typhi is mediated primarily through the formation of bacterial biofilms on the surface of cholesterol gallstones. Biofilms, by definition, involve the formation of a bacterial community encased within a protective macromolecular matrix. Previous work has demonstrated the composition of the biofilm matrix to be complex and highly variable in response to altered environmental conditions. Although known to play an important role in bacterial persistence in a variety of contexts, the Salmonella biofilm matrix remains largely uncharacterized under physiological conditions. Initial attempts to study matrix components and architecture of the biofilm matrix on gallstone surfaces were hindered by the auto-fluorescence of cholesterol. In this work we describe a method for sectioning and direct visualization of extracellular matrix components of the Salmonella biofilm on the surface of human cholesterol gallstones and provide a description of the major matrix components observed therein. Confocal micrographs revealed robust biofilm formation, characterized by abundant but highly heterogeneous expression of polysaccharides such as LPS, Vi and O-antigen capsule. CsgA was not observed in the biofilm matrix and flagellar expression was tightly restricted to the biofilm-cholesterol interface. Images also revealed the presence of preexisting Enterobacteriaceae encased within the structure of the gallstone. These results demonstrate the use and feasibility of this method while highlighting the importance of studying the native architecture of the gallstone biofilm. A better understanding of the contribution of individual matrix components to the overall biofilm structure will facilitate the development of more effective and specific methods to disrupt these bacterial communities.

  6. msaABCR operon positively regulates biofilm development by repressing proteases and autolysis in Staphylococcus aureus.

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    Sahukhal, Gyan S; Batte, Justin L; Elasri, Mohamed O

    2015-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen that causes nosocomial and community-acquired infections. One of the most important aspects of staphylococcal infections is biofilm development within the host, which renders the bacterium resistant to the host's immune response and antimicrobial agents. Biofilm development is very complex and involves several regulators that ensure cell survival on surfaces within the extracellular polymeric matrix. Previously, we identified the msaABCR operon as an additional positive regulator of biofilm formation. In this study, we define the regulatory pathway by which msaABCR controls biofilm formation. We demonstrate that the msaABCR operon is a negative regulator of proteases. The control of protease production mediates the processing of the major autolysin, Atl, and thus regulates the rate of autolysis. In the absence of the msaABCR operon, Atl is processed by proteases at a high rate, leading to increased cell death and a defect in biofilm maturation. We conclude that the msaABCR operon plays a key role in maintaining the balance between autolysis and growth within the staphylococcal biofilm.

  7. Rot is a key regulator of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation

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    Mootz, Joe M.; Benson, Meredith A.; Heim, Cortney E.; Crosby, Heidi A.; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S.; Dunman, Paul M.; Kielian, Tammy; Torres, Victor J.; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2015-01-01

    AUTHOR SUMMARY Staphylococcus aureus is a significant cause of chronic biofilm infections on medical implants. We investigated the biofilm regulatory cascade and discovered that the repressor of toxins (Rot) is part of this pathway. A USA300 community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strain deficient in Rot was unable to form a biofilm using multiple different assays, and we found rot mutants in other strain lineages were also biofilm deficient. By performing a global analysis of transcripts and protein production controlled by Rot, we observed that all the secreted protease genes were upregulated in a rot mutant, and we hypothesized that this regulation could be responsible for the biofilm phenotype. To investigate this question, we determined that Rot bound to the protease promoters, and we observed that activity levels of these enzymes, in particular the cysteine proteases, were increased in a rot mutant. By inactivating these proteases, biofilm capacity was restored to the mutant, demonstrating they are responsible for the biofilm negative phenotype. Finally, we tested the rot mutant in a mouse catheter model of biofilm infection and observed a significant reduction in biofilm burden. Thus S. aureus uses the transcription factor Rot to repress secreted protease levels in order to build a biofilm. PMID:25612137

  8. Biofilms of non-Candida albicans Candida species: quantification, structure and matrix composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Sónia; Henriques, Mariana; Martins, António; Oliveira, Rosário; Williams, David; Azeredo, Joana

    2009-11-01

    Most cases of candidiasis have been attributed to C. albicans, but recently, non- Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) species have been identified as common pathogens. The ability of Candida species to form biofilms has important clinical repercussions due to their increased resistance to antifungal therapy and the ability of yeast cells within the biofilms to withstand host immune defenses. Given this clinical importance of the biofilm growth form, the aim of this study was to characterize biofilms produced by three NCAC species, namely C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata. The biofilm forming ability of clinical isolates of C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata recovered from different sources, was evaluated by crystal violet staining. The structure and morphological characteristics of the biofilms were also assessed by scanning electron microscopy and the biofilm matrix composition analyzed for protein and carbohydrate content. All NCAC species were able to form biofilms although these were less extensive for C. glabrata compared with C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis. It was evident that C. parapsilosis biofilm production was highly strain dependent, a feature not evident with C. glabrata and C. tropicalis. Scanning electron microscopy revealed structural differences for biofilms with respect to cell morphology and spatial arrangement. Candida parapsilosis biofilm matrices had large amounts of carbohydrate with less protein. Conversely, matrices extracted from C. tropicalis biofilms had low amounts of carbohydrate and protein. Interestingly, C. glabrata biofilm matrix was high in both protein and carbohydrate content. The present work demonstrates that biofilm forming ability, structure and matrix composition are highly species dependent with additional strain variability occurring with C. parapsilosis.

  9. Biofilm assembly becomes crystal clear – filamentous bacteriophage organize the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix into a liquid crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, Patrick R.; Jennings, Laura K.; Michaels, Lia A.; Sweere, Johanna M.; Singh, Pradeep K.; Parks, William C.; Bollyky, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen associated with many types of chronic infection. At sites of chronic infection, such as the airways of people with cystic fibrosis (CF), P. aeruginosa forms biofilm-like aggregates. These are clusters of bacterial cells encased in a polymer-rich matrix that shields bacteria from environmental stresses and antibiotic treatment. When P. aeruginosa forms a biofilm, large amounts of filamentous Pf bacteriophage (phage) are produced. Unlike most phage that typically lyse and kill their bacterial hosts, filamentous phage of the genus Inovirus, which includes Pf phage, often do not, and instead are continuously extruded from the bacteria. Here, we discuss the implications of the accumulation of filamentous Pf phage in the biofilm matrix, where they interact with matrix polymers to organize the biofilm into a highly ordered liquid crystal. This structural configuration promotes bacterial adhesion, desiccation survival, and antibiotic tolerance – all features typically associated with biofilms. We propose that Pf phage make structural contributions to P. aeruginosa biofilms and that this constitutes a novel form of symbiosis between bacteria and bacteriophage.

  10. Biofilm assembly becomes crystal clear – filamentous bacteriophage organize the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix into a liquid crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick R. Secor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen associated with many types of chronic infection. At sites of chronic infection, such as the airways of people with cystic fibrosis (CF, P. aeruginosa forms biofilm-like aggregates. These are clusters of bacterial cells encased in a polymer-rich matrix that shields bacteria from environmental stresses and antibiotic treatment. When P. aeruginosa forms a biofilm, large amounts of filamentous Pf bacteriophage (phage are produced. Unlike most phage that typically lyse and kill their bacterial hosts, filamentous phage of the genus Inovirus, which includes Pf phage, often do not, and instead are continuously extruded from the bacteria. Here, we discuss the implications of the accumulation of filamentous Pf phage in the biofilm matrix, where they interact with matrix polymers to organize the biofilm into a highly ordered liquid crystal. This structural configuration promotes bacterial adhesion, desiccation survival, and antibiotic tolerance – all features typically associated with biofilms. We propose that Pf phage make structural contributions to P. aeruginosa biofilms and that this constitutes a novel form of symbiosis between bacteria and bacteriophage.

  11. Flow environment and matrix structure interact to determine spatial competition in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadell, Carey D; Ricaurte, Deirdre; Yan, Jing; Drescher, Knut; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2017-01-13

    Bacteria often live in biofilms, which are microbial communities surrounded by a secreted extracellular matrix. Here, we demonstrate that hydrodynamic flow and matrix organization interact to shape competitive dynamics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Irrespective of initial frequency, in competition with matrix mutants, wild-type cells always increase in relative abundance in planar microfluidic devices under simple flow regimes. By contrast, in microenvironments with complex, irregular flow profiles - which are common in natural environments - wild-type matrix-producing and isogenic non-producing strains can coexist. This result stems from local obstruction of flow by wild-type matrix producers, which generates regions of near-zero shear that allow matrix mutants to locally accumulate. Our findings connect the evolutionary stability of matrix production with the hydrodynamics and spatial structure of the surrounding environment, providing a potential explanation for the variation in biofilm matrix secretion observed among bacteria in natural environments.

  12. Extracellular matrix assembly in extreme acidic eukaryotic biofilms and their possible implications in heavy metal adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilera, Angeles [Centro de Astrobiologia (INTA-CSIC), Carretera de Ajalvir Km 4, Torrejon de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: aguileraba@inta.es; Souza-Egipsy, Virginia [Centro de Astrobiologia (INTA-CSIC), Carretera de Ajalvir Km 4, Torrejon de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain); San Martin-Uriz, Patxi [Centro de Biologia Molecular (UAM-CSIC), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Amils, Ricardo [Centro de Astrobiologia (INTA-CSIC), Carretera de Ajalvir Km 4, Torrejon de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain); Centro de Biologia Molecular (UAM-CSIC), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-30

    To evaluate the importance of the extracellular matrix in relation to heavy metal binding capacity in extreme acidic environments, the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) composition of 12 biofilms isolated from Rio Tinto (SW, Spain) was analyzed. Each biofilm was composed mainly by one or two species of eukaryotes, although other microorganisms were present. EPS ranged from 130 to 439 mg g{sup -1} biofilm dry weight, representing between 15% and the 40% of the total biofilm dry weight (DW). Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were found in the amount of total EPS extracted from biofilms dominated by the same organism at different sampling points. The amount of EPS varied among different biofilms collected from the same sampling location. Colloidal EPS ranged from 42 to 313 mg g{sup -1} dry weight; 10% to 30% of the total biofilm dry weight. Capsular EPS ranged from 50 to 318 mg g{sup -1} dry weight; 5% to 30% of the total biofilm dry weight. Seven of the 12 biofilms showed higher amounts of capsular than colloidal EPS (p < 0.05). Total amount of EPS decreased when total cell numbers and pH increased. There was a positive correlation between EPS concentration and heavy metal concentration in the water. Observations by low temperature scanning electron microscopy (LTSEM) revealed the mineral adsorption in the matrix of EPS and onto the cell walls. EPS in all biofilms were primarily composed of carbohydrates, heavy metals and humic acid, plus small quantities of proteins and DNA. After carbohydrates, heavy metals were the second main constituents of the extracellular matrix. Their total concentrations ranged from 3 to 32 mg g{sup -1} biofilm dry weight, reaching up to 16% of the total composition. In general, the heavy metal composition of the EPS extracted from the biofilms closely resembled the metal composition of the water from which the biofilms were collected.

  13. Biofilm Matrix Composition Affects the Susceptibility of Food Associated Staphylococci to Cleaning and Disinfection Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlund, Annette; Langsrud, Solveig; Heir, Even; Mikkelsen, Maria I.; Møretrø, Trond

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci are frequently isolated from food processing environments, and it has been speculated whether survival after cleaning and disinfection with benzalkonium chloride (BC)-containing disinfectants is due to biofilm formation, matrix composition, or BC efflux mechanisms. Out of 35 food associated staphylococci, eight produced biofilm in a microtiter plate assay and were identified as Staphylococcus capitis (2), S. cohnii, S. epidermidis, S. lentus (2), and S. saprophyticus (2). The eight biofilm producing strains were characterized using whole genome sequencing. Three of these strains contained the ica operon responsible for production of a polysaccharide matrix, and formed a biofilm which was detached upon exposure to the polysaccharide degrading enzyme Dispersin B, but not Proteinase K or trypsin. These strains were more tolerant to the lethal effect of BC both in suspension and biofilm than the remaining five biofilm producing strains. The five BC susceptible strains were characterized by lack of the ica operon, and their biofilms were detached by Proteinase K or trypsin, but not Dispersin B, indicating that proteins were major structural components of their biofilm matrix. Several novel cell wall anchored repeat domain proteins with domain structures similar to that of MSCRAMM adhesins were identified in the genomes of these strains, potentially representing novel mechanisms of ica-independent biofilm accumulation. Biofilms from all strains showed similar levels of detachment after exposure to alkaline chlorine, which is used for cleaning in the food industry. Strains with qac genes encoding BC efflux pumps could grow at higher concentrations of BC than strains without these genes, but no differences were observed at biocidal concentrations. In conclusion, the biofilm matrix of food associated staphylococci varies with respect to protein or polysaccharide nature, and this may affect the sensitivity toward a commonly used disinfectant. PMID:27375578

  14. Biofilm matrix composition affects the susceptibility of food associated staphylococci to cleaning and disinfection agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette eFagerlund

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococci are frequently isolated from food processing environments, and it has been speculated whether survival after cleaning and disinfection with benzalkonium chloride-containing disinfectants is due to biofilm formation, matrix composition or benzalkonium chloride efflux mechanisms. Out of 35 food associated staphylococci, eight produced biofilm in a microtiter plate assay and were identified as Staphylococcus capitis (2, S. cohnii, S. epidermidis, S. lentus (2, and S. saprophyticus (2. The eight biofilm producing strains were characterized using whole genome sequencing. Three of these strains contained the ica operon responsible for production of a polysaccharide matrix, and formed a biofilm which was detached upon exposure to the polysaccharide degrading enzyme Dispersin B, but not Proteinase K or trypsin. These strains were more tolerant to the lethal effect of benzalkonium chloride both in suspension and biofilm than the remaining five biofilm producing strains. The five benzalkonium chloride susceptible strains were characterized by lack of the ica operon, and their biofilms were detached by Proteinase K or trypsin, but not Dispersin B, indicating that proteins were major structural components of their biofilm matrix. Several novel cell wall anchored repeat domain proteins with domain structures similar to that of MSCRAMM adhesins were identified in the genomes of these strains, potentially representing novel mechanisms of ica-independent biofilm accumulation. Biofilms from all strains showed similar levels of detachment after exposure to alkaline chlorine, which is used for cleaning in the food industry. Strains with qac genes encoding benzalkonium chloride efflux pumps could grow at higher concentrations of benzalkonium chloride than strains without these genes, but no differences were observed at biocidal concentrations. In conclusion, the biofilm matrix of food associated staphylococci varies with respect to protein or

  15. Mechanisms and Regulation of Surface Interactions and Biofilm Formation in Agrobacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason E. Heindl

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available For many pathogenic bacteria surface attachment is a required first step during host interactions. Attachment can proceed to invasion of host tissue or cells or to establishment of a multicellular bacterial community known as a biofilm. The transition from a unicellular, often motile, state to a sessile, multicellular, biofilm-associated state is one of the most important developmental decisions for bacteria. Agrobacterium tumefaciens genetically transforms plant cells by transfer and integration of a segment of plasmid-encoded transferred DNA (T-DNA into the host genome, and has also been a valuable tool for plant geneticists. A. tumefaciens attaches to and forms a complex biofilm on a variety of biotic and abiotic substrates in vitro. Although rarely studied in situ, it is hypothesized that the biofilm state plays an important functional role in the ecology of this organism. Surface attachment, motility, and cell division are coordinated through a complex regulatory network that imparts an unexpected asymmetry to the A. tumefaciens life cycle. In this review we describe the mechanisms by which A. tumefaciens associates with surfaces, and regulation of this process. We focus on the transition between flagellar-based motility and surface attachment, and on the composition, production, and secretion of multiple extracellular components that contribute to the biofilm matrix. Biofilm formation by A. tumefaciens is linked with virulence both mechanistically and through shared regulatory molecules. We detail our current understanding of these and other regulatory schemes, as well as the internal and external (environmental cues mediating development of the biofilm state, including the second messenger cyclic-di-GMP, nutrient levels, and the role of the plant host in influencing attachment and biofilm formation. A. tumefaciens is an important model system contributing to our understanding of developmental transitions, bacterial cell biology, and

  16. The biofilm matrix destabilizers, EDTA and DNaseI, enhance the susceptibility of nontypeable Hemophilus influenzae biofilms to treatment with ampicillin and ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaliere, Rosalia; Ball, Jessica L; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B

    2014-08-01

    Nontypeable Hemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that causes chronic biofilm infections of the ears and airways. The biofilm matrix provides structural integrity to the biofilm and protects biofilm cells from antibiotic exposure by reducing penetration of antimicrobial compounds into the biofilm. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has been found to be a major matrix component of biofilms formed by many species of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including NTHi. Interestingly, the cation chelator ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (EDTA) has been shown to reduce the matrix strength of biofilms of several bacterial species as well as to have bactericidal activity against various pathogens. EDTA exerts its antimicrobial activity by chelating divalent cations necessary for growth and membrane stability and by destabilizing the matrix thus enhancing the detachment of bacterial cells from the biofilm. In this study, we have explored the role of divalent cations in NTHi biofilm development and stability. We have utilized in vitro static and continuous flow models of biofilm development by NTHi to demonstrate that magnesium cations enhance biofilm formation by NTHi. We found that the divalent cation chelator EDTA is effective at both preventing NTHi biofilm formation and at treating established NTHi biofilms. Furthermore, we found that the matrix destablilizers EDTA and DNaseI increase the susceptibility of NTHi biofilms to ampicillin and ciprofloxacin. Our observations indicate that DNaseI and EDTA enhance the efficacy of antibiotic treatment of NTHi biofilms. These observations may lead to new strategies that will improve the treatment options available to patients with chronic NTHi infections.

  17. Commensal Protection of Staphylococcus aureus against Antimicrobials by Candida albicans Biofilm Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Eric F.; Tsui, Christina; Kucharíková, Sona; Andes, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Biofilm-associated polymicrobial infections, particularly those involving fungi and bacteria, are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality and tend to be challenging to treat. Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus specifically are considered leading opportunistic fungal and bacterial pathogens, respectively, mainly due to their ability to form biofilms on catheters and indwelling medical devices. However, the impact of mixed-species biofilm growth on therapy remains largely understudied. In this study, we investigated the influence of C. albicans secreted cell wall polysaccharides on the response of S. aureus to antibacterial agents in biofilm. Results demonstrated significantly enhanced tolerance for S. aureus to drugs in the presence of C. albicans or its secreted cell wall polysaccharide material. Fluorescence confocal time-lapse microscopy revealed impairment of drug diffusion through the mixed biofilm matrix. Using C. albicans mutant strains with modulated cell wall polysaccharide expression, exogenous supplementation, and enzymatic degradation, the C. albicans-secreted β-1,3-glucan cell wall component was identified as the key matrix constituent providing the bacteria with enhanced drug tolerance. Further, antibody labeling demonstrated rapid coating of the bacteria by the C. albicans matrix material. Importantly, via its effect on the fungal biofilm matrix, the antifungal caspofungin sensitized the bacteria to the drugs. Understanding such symbiotic interactions with clinical relevance between microbial species in biofilms will greatly aid in overcoming the limitations of current therapies and in defining potential new targets for treating polymicrobial infections. PMID:27729510

  18. Commensal Protection of Staphylococcus aureus against Antimicrobials by Candida albicans Biofilm Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric F. Kong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm-associated polymicrobial infections, particularly those involving fungi and bacteria, are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality and tend to be challenging to treat. Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus specifically are considered leading opportunistic fungal and bacterial pathogens, respectively, mainly due to their ability to form biofilms on catheters and indwelling medical devices. However, the impact of mixed-species biofilm growth on therapy remains largely understudied. In this study, we investigated the influence of C. albicans secreted cell wall polysaccharides on the response of S. aureus to antibacterial agents in biofilm. Results demonstrated significantly enhanced tolerance for S. aureus to drugs in the presence of C. albicans or its secreted cell wall polysaccharide material. Fluorescence confocal time-lapse microscopy revealed impairment of drug diffusion through the mixed biofilm matrix. Using C. albicans mutant strains with modulated cell wall polysaccharide expression, exogenous supplementation, and enzymatic degradation, the C. albicans-secreted β-1,3-glucan cell wall component was identified as the key matrix constituent providing the bacteria with enhanced drug tolerance. Further, antibody labeling demonstrated rapid coating of the bacteria by the C. albicans matrix material. Importantly, via its effect on the fungal biofilm matrix, the antifungal caspofungin sensitized the bacteria to the drugs. Understanding such symbiotic interactions with clinical relevance between microbial species in biofilms will greatly aid in overcoming the limitations of current therapies and in defining potential new targets for treating polymicrobial infections.

  19. Extracellular DNA as matrix component in microbial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2010-01-01

    to various persistent infections in humans and animals, and to a variety of complications in industry, where solid–water interfaces occur. Knowledge about the molecular mechanisms involved in biofilm formation is necessary for creating strategies to control biofilms. Recent studies have shown...

  20. Biofilms produced by Burkholderia cenocepacia: influence of media and solid supports on composition of matrix exopolysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellizzoni, Elena; Ravalico, Fabio; Scaini, Denis; Delneri, Ambra; Rizzo, Roberto; Cescutti, Paola

    2016-02-01

    Bacteria usually grow forming biofilms, which are communities of cells embedded in a self-produced dynamic polymeric matrix, characterized by a complex three-dimensional structure. The matrix holds cells together and above a surface, and eventually releases them, resulting in colonization of other surfaces. Although exopolysaccharides (EPOLs) are important components of the matrix, determination of their structure is usually performed on samples produced in non-biofilm conditions, or indirectly through genetic studies. Among the Burkholderia cepacia complex species, Burkholderia cenocepacia is an important pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and is generally more aggressive than other species. In the present investigation, B. cenocepacia strain BTS2, a CF isolate, was grown in biofilm mode on glass slides and cellulose membranes, using five growth media, one of which mimics the nutritional content of CF sputum. The structure of the matrix EPOLs was determined by 1H-NMR spectroscopy, while visualization of the biofilms on glass slides was obtained by means of confocal laser microscopy, phase-contrast microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results confirmed that the type of EPOLs biosynthesized depends both on the medium used and on the type of support, and showed that mucoid conditions do not always lead to significant biofilm production, while bacteria in a non-mucoid state can still form biofilm containing EPOLs.

  1. The Catabolite Repressor Protein-Cyclic AMP Complex Regulates csgD and Biofilm Formation in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufnagel, David A; Evans, Margery L; Greene, Sarah E; Pinkner, Jerome S; Hultgren, Scott J; Chapman, Matthew R

    2016-12-15

    The extracellular matrix protects Escherichia coli from immune cells, oxidative stress, predation, and other environmental stresses. Production of the E. coli extracellular matrix is regulated by transcription factors that are tuned to environmental conditions. The biofilm master regulator protein CsgD upregulates curli and cellulose, the two major polymers in the extracellular matrix of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) biofilms. We found that cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates curli, cellulose, and UPEC biofilms through csgD The alarmone cAMP is produced by adenylate cyclase (CyaA), and deletion of cyaA resulted in reduced extracellular matrix production and biofilm formation. The catabolite repressor protein (CRP) positively regulated csgD transcription, leading to curli and cellulose production in the UPEC isolate, UTI89. Glucose, a known inhibitor of CyaA activity, blocked extracellular matrix formation when added to the growth medium. The mutant strains ΔcyaA and Δcrp did not produce rugose biofilms, pellicles, curli, cellulose, or CsgD. Three putative CRP binding sites were identified within the csgD-csgB intergenic region, and purified CRP could gel shift the csgD-csgB intergenic region. Additionally, we found that CRP binded upstream of kpsMT, which encodes machinery for K1 capsule production. Together our work shows that cAMP and CRP influence E. coli biofilms through transcriptional regulation of csgD IMPORTANCE The catabolite repressor protein (CRP)-cyclic AMP (cAMP) complex influences the transcription of ∼7% of genes on the Escherichia coli chromosome (D. Zheng, C. Constantinidou, J. L. Hobman, and S. D. Minchin, Nucleic Acids Res 32:5874-5893, 2004, https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkh908). Glucose inhibits E. coli biofilm formation, and ΔcyaA and Δcrp mutants show impaired biofilm formation (D. W. Jackson, J.W. Simecka, and T. Romeo, J Bacteriol 184:3406-3410, 2002, https://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.184.12.3406-3410.2002). We determined that the c

  2. Exopolysaccharide matrix of developed candida albicans biofilms after exposure to antifungal agents

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of fluconazole or nystatin exposure on developed Candida albicans biofilms regarding their exopolysaccharide matrix. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) against fluconazole or nystatin was determined for C. albicans reference strain (ATCC 90028). Poly(methlymethacrylate) resin (PMMA) specimens were fabricated according to the manufacturer's instructions and had their surface roughness measured. Biofilms were developed on specimens surfaces for 4...

  3. Biofilm Matrix Composition Affects the Susceptibility of Food Associated Staphylococci to Cleaning and Disinfection Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Annette eFagerlund; Solveig eLangsrud; Even eHeir; Maria Ingeborg Mikkelsen; Trond eMøretrø

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci are frequently isolated from food processing environments, and it has been speculated whether survival after cleaning and disinfection with benzalkonium chloride-containing disinfectants is due to biofilm formation, matrix composition or benzalkonium chloride efflux mechanisms. Out of 35 food associated staphylococci, eight produced biofilm in a microtiter plate assay and were identified as Staphylococcus capitis (2), S. cohnii, S. epidermidis, S. lentus (2), and S. saprophyticu...

  4. In Situ Molecular Imaging of the Biofilm and Its Matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yuanzhao; Zhou, Yufan; Yao, Juan; Szymanski, Craig; Fredrickson, James; Shi, Liang; Cao, Bin; Zhu, Zihua; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2016-11-15

    Molecular mapping of live biofilms at submicron resolution presents a grand challenge. Here, we present the first chemical mapping results of biofilm extracellular polymeric sub-stance (EPS) components in biofilms using correlative imaging be-tween super resolution florescence microscopy and liquid time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Shewanella oneidensis is used as a model organism. Heavy metal anions chro-mate (Cr2O72-) consisting of chromium Cr (VI) was a model envi-ronmental stressor used to treat the biofilms. Of particular interest, biologically relevant water clusters have been first observed in the biofilms. Characteristic fragments of biofilm matrix components such as proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids can be spatially im-aged. Furthermore, characteristic fatty acids (e.g., palmitic acid), quinolone signal, and riboflavin fragments are found to respond af-ter the biofilm is treated with Cr (VI), leading to biofilm dispersion. Significant changes in water clusters and quorum sensing signals indicative of intercellular communication in the aqueous environ-ment are observed, suggesting that they might result in fatty acid synthesis and inhibit riboflavin production. The Cr (VI) reduction seems to follow the Mtr pathway leading to Cr (III) formation. Our approach potentially opens a new avenue for mechanistic insight of microbial community processes and communications using in situ imaging mass spectrometry and superresolution optical micros-copy.

  5. Exopolysaccharide matrix of developed Candida albicans biofilms after exposure to antifungal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Wander José; Gonçalves, Letícia Machado; Seneviratne, Jayampath; Parahitiyawa, Nipuna; Samaranayake, Lakshman Perera; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of fluconazole or nystatin exposure on developed Candida albicans biofilms regarding their exopolysaccharide matrix. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) against fluconazole or nystatin was determined for C. albicans reference strain (ATCC 90028). Poly(methlymethacrylate) resin (PMMA) specimens were fabricated according to the manufacturer's instructions and had their surface roughness measured. Biofilms were developed on specimens surfaces for 48 h and after that were exposed during 24 h to fluconazole or nystatin prepared in a medium at MIC, 10 x MIC or 100 x MIC. Metabolic activity was evaluated using an XTT assay. Production of soluble and insoluble exopolysaccharide and intracellular polysaccharides was evaluated by the phenol-sulfuric method. Confocal laser scanning microscope was used to evaluate biofilm architecture and percentage of dead/live cells. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. The presence of fluconazole or nystatin at concentrations higher than MIC results in a great reduction of metabolic activity (p0.05). The exposure to nystatin also did not alter the exopolysaccharide matrix at all the tested concentrations (p>0.05). Biofilm architecture was not affected by either of the antifungal agents (p>0.05). Nystatin promoted higher proportion of dead cells (p<0.05). It may be concluded that fluconazole and nystatin above the MIC concentration reduced the metabolic activity of C. albicans biofilms; however, they were not able to alter the exopolysaccharide matrix and biofilm architecture.

  6. Characterization of extracellular polymeric matrix, and treatment of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilms with DNase I and proteinase K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan Mansoor Ali Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biofilms are organized communities of microorganisms embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix (EPM, often with great phylogenetic variety. Bacteria in the subgingival biofilm are key factors that cause periodontal diseases; among these are the Gram-negative bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The objectives of this study were to characterize the major components of the EPM and to test the effect of deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I and proteinase K. Methods: F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis bacterial cells were grown in dynamic and static biofilm models. The effects of DNase I and proteinase K enzymes on the major components of the EPM were tested during biofilm formation and on mature biofilm. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used in observing biofilm structure. Results: Proteins and carbohydrates were the major components of the biofilm matrix, and extracellular DNA (eDNA was also present. DNase I and proteinase K enzymes had little effect on biofilms in the conditions used. In the flow cell, F. nucleatum was able to grow in partially oxygenated conditions while P. gingivalis failed to form biofilm alone in similar conditions. F. nucleatum supported the growth of P. gingivalis when they were grown together as dual species biofilm. Conclusion: DNase I and proteinase K had little effect on the biofilm matrix in the conditions used. F. nucleatum formed biofilm easily and supported the growth of P. gingivalis, which preferred anaerobic conditions.

  7. Biofilms of vaginal Lactobacillus reuteri CRL 1324 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL 1332: kinetics of formation and matrix characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leccese Terraf, María Cecilia; Juárez Tomás, María Silvina; Rault, Lucie; Le Loir, Yves; Even, Sergine; Nader-Macías, María Elena Fátima

    2016-09-01

    Adhesion and biofilm formation are strain properties that reportedly contribute to the permanence of lactobacilli in the human vagina. The kinetics of biofilm formation and the chemical nature of the biofilm matrix formed by Lactobacillus reuteri CRL (Centro de Referencia para Lactobacilos Culture Collection) 1324 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL 1332, vaginal beneficial strains, were evaluated in this work. Crystal violet-stained microplate assay and techniques of epifluorescence, electron and confocal microscopy were applied. The highest density and complexity of biofilms of both vaginal lactobacilli were observed at 72 h of incubation. Protease, proteinase K, α-chymotrypsin and trypsin treatments efficiently detached L. reuteri CRL 1324 biofilm that was also partially affected by α-amylase. However, L. rhamnosus CRL 1332 biofilm was slightly affected by protease, proteinase K and α-amylase. Confocal microscopy revealed greater amount of polysaccharides in L. rhamnosus CRL 1332 biofilm matrix than in L. reuteri CRL 1324 biofilm matrix. The results indicate that proteins are one of the main components of the L. reuteri CRL 1324 biofilm, while the biofilm matrix of L. rhamnosus CRL 1332 is composed of carbohydrates and proteins. The results obtained support the knowledge, understanding and characterization of two biofilm-forming vaginal Lactobacillus strains.

  8. Cranberry Flavonoids Modulate Cariogenic Properties of Mixed-Species Biofilm through Exopolysaccharides-Matrix Disruption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyeop Kim

    Full Text Available The exopolysaccharides (EPS produced by Streptococcus mutans-derived glucosyltransferases (Gtfs are essential virulence factors associated with the initiation of cariogenic biofilms. EPS forms the core of the biofilm matrix-scaffold, providing mechanical stability while facilitating the creation of localized acidic microenvironments. Cranberry flavonoids, such as A-type proanthocyanidins (PACs and myricetin, have been shown to inhibit the activity of Gtfs and EPS-mediated bacterial adhesion without killing the organisms. Here, we investigated whether a combination of cranberry flavonoids disrupts EPS accumulation and S. mutans survival using a mixed-species biofilm model under cariogenic conditions. We also assessed the impact of cranberry flavonoids on mechanical stability and the in situ pH at the biofilm-apatite interface. Topical application of an optimized combination of PACs oligomers (100-300 μM with myricetin (2 mM twice daily was used to simulate treatment regimen experienced clinically. Treatments with cranberry flavonoids effectively reduced the insoluble EPS content (>80% reduction vs. vehicle-control; p<0.001, while hindering S. mutans outgrowth within mixed-species biofilms. As a result, the 3D architecture of cranberry-treated biofilms was severely compromised, showing a defective EPS-matrix and failure to develop microcolonies on the saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (sHA surface. Furthermore, topical applications of cranberry flavonoids significantly weaken the mechanical stability of the biofilms; nearly 90% of the biofilm was removed from sHA surface after exposure to a shear stress of 0.449 N/m2 (vs. 36% removal in vehicle-treated biofilms. Importantly, in situ pH measurements in cranberry-treated biofilms showed significantly higher pH values (5.2 ± 0.1 at the biofilm-apatite interface vs. vehicle-treated biofilms (4.6 ± 0.1. Altogether, the data provide important insights on how cranberry flavonoids treatments modulate

  9. Flow environment and matrix structure interact to determine spatial competition in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadell, Carey D; Ricaurte, Deirdre; Yan, Jing; Drescher, Knut; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria often live in biofilms, which are microbial communities surrounded by a secreted extracellular matrix. Here, we demonstrate that hydrodynamic flow and matrix organization interact to shape competitive dynamics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Irrespective of initial frequency, in competition with matrix mutants, wild-type cells always increase in relative abundance in planar microfluidic devices under simple flow regimes. By contrast, in microenvironments with complex, irregular flow profiles – which are common in natural environments – wild-type matrix-producing and isogenic non-producing strains can coexist. This result stems from local obstruction of flow by wild-type matrix producers, which generates regions of near-zero shear that allow matrix mutants to locally accumulate. Our findings connect the evolutionary stability of matrix production with the hydrodynamics and spatial structure of the surrounding environment, providing a potential explanation for the variation in biofilm matrix secretion observed among bacteria in natural environments. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21855.001 PMID:28084994

  10. Cranberry Flavonoids Modulate Cariogenic Properties of Mixed-Species Biofilm through Exopolysaccharides-Matrix Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongyeop; Hwang, Geelsu; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Yifei; Singh, Ajay P; Vorsa, Nicholi; Koo, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by Streptococcus mutans-derived glucosyltransferases (Gtfs) are essential virulence factors associated with the initiation of cariogenic biofilms. EPS forms the core of the biofilm matrix-scaffold, providing mechanical stability while facilitating the creation of localized acidic microenvironments. Cranberry flavonoids, such as A-type proanthocyanidins (PACs) and myricetin, have been shown to inhibit the activity of Gtfs and EPS-mediated bacterial adhesion without killing the organisms. Here, we investigated whether a combination of cranberry flavonoids disrupts EPS accumulation and S. mutans survival using a mixed-species biofilm model under cariogenic conditions. We also assessed the impact of cranberry flavonoids on mechanical stability and the in situ pH at the biofilm-apatite interface. Topical application of an optimized combination of PACs oligomers (100-300 μM) with myricetin (2 mM) twice daily was used to simulate treatment regimen experienced clinically. Treatments with cranberry flavonoids effectively reduced the insoluble EPS content (>80% reduction vs. vehicle-control; pbiofilms. As a result, the 3D architecture of cranberry-treated biofilms was severely compromised, showing a defective EPS-matrix and failure to develop microcolonies on the saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (sHA) surface. Furthermore, topical applications of cranberry flavonoids significantly weaken the mechanical stability of the biofilms; nearly 90% of the biofilm was removed from sHA surface after exposure to a shear stress of 0.449 N/m2 (vs. 36% removal in vehicle-treated biofilms). Importantly, in situ pH measurements in cranberry-treated biofilms showed significantly higher pH values (5.2 ± 0.1) at the biofilm-apatite interface vs. vehicle-treated biofilms (4.6 ± 0.1). Altogether, the data provide important insights on how cranberry flavonoids treatments modulate virulence properties by disrupting the biochemical and ecological changes

  11. Determining the biofilm penetrating ability of various biocides utilizing an artificial biofilm matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIlwaine, D.B.; Diemer, J.; Grab, L. [Union Carbide Corp., Bound Brook, NJ (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The efficacy of many commonly used biocides is often determined by laboratory evaluations against a variety of planktonic microorganisms. While these tests provide some information as to the performance of a biocide against a particular microorganism, they may not predict how well the biocide will perform under actual field conditions against the more problematic sissile form of the organisms. In order to address the issue of how well a biocide penetrates and kills the problematic microorganisms contained within a biofilm, an artificial biofilm system utilizing microorganisms embedded in alginate beads has been used to compare the efficacy of biocide treatments against both the planktonic and sessile form of the same organism. Pure cultures of Enterobacter aerogenes, as well as mixed field isolates, were used in the experiments. In addition, the alginate beads were prepared with actual system waters taken from a variety of industrial applications. In that way, all of the scale and corrosion inhibitors and other contaminants which are present in the actual system are also present in the model biofilm system. In all cases, the organisms contained within the artificial biofilm were significantly more difficult to kill than the corresponding planktonic microbes.

  12. Delmopinol-induced matrix removal facilitates photodynamic therapy and chlorhexidine methods for disinfecting mixed oral biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Stephen Christopher

    It is often observed that the slimy matrixes of various bacterial-formed biofilms can limit their disinfection. This investigation demonstrated that disinfection effectiveness by either photodynamic therapy (PDT) or chlorhexidine irrigation is significantly improved by collapse of that matrix using the non-bactericidal reagent delmopinol as part of the treatment sequence. Cyclic shear-producing conditions were used to grow 4-day, whole salivary and growth media biofilms on glow-discharge-treated polystyrene (N=46) and mini-germanium internal reflection prisms to serve in a periodontal crypt model of disinfection by either methylene-blue-mediated PDT or by chlorhexidine irrigation. Assays for bacterial viability, with and without treatments, were performed by alamarBlueRTM fluorescent methods, statistically applied (ANOVA, Tukey's HSD). Multiple Attenuated Internal Reflection Infrared (MAIR-IR) assays confirmed selective removal of the predominantly polysaccharide matrix materials by the delmopinol treatment, but not by equivalent water or chlorhexidine methods. Confocal-IR microscopy showed that the delmopinol reagent, alone, caused about one-third of each wet biofilm to be removed, while bacterial re-growth was confirmed by alamarBlueRTM assay. Chlorhexidine and PDT suppression of bacterial activity without regrowth was significantly improved with the added delmopinol treatment, and is likely to provide similarly beneficial results in the effective disinfection of diverse biofilms in many settings.

  13. Transcription Factors Efg1 and Bcr1 Regulate Biofilm Formation and Virulence during Candida albicans-Associated Denture Stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Junko; Yu, Alika; Fidel, Paul L; Noverr, Mairi C

    2016-01-01

    Denture stomatitis (DS) is characterized by inflammation of the oral mucosa in direct contact with dentures and affects a significant number of otherwise healthy denture wearers. The disease is caused by Candida albicans, which readily colonizes and form biofilms on denture materials. While evidence for biofilms on abiotic and biotic surfaces initiating Candida infections is accumulating, a role for biofilms in DS remains unclear. Using an established model of DS in immunocompetent animals, the purpose of this study was to determine the role of biofilm formation in mucosal damage during pathogenesis using C. albicans or mutants defective in morphogenesis (efg1-/-) or biofilm formation (bcr1-/-). For in vivo analyses, rats fitted with custom dentures, consisting of fixed and removable parts, were inoculated with wild-type C. albicans, mutants or reconstituted strains and monitored weekly for fungal burden (denture and palate), body weight and tissue damage (LDH) for up to 8 weeks. C. albicans wild-type and reconstituted mutants formed biofilms on dentures and palatal tissues under in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo conditions as indicated by microscopy demonstrating robust biofilm architecture and extracellular matrix (ECM). In contrast, both efg1-/- and bcr1-/- mutants exhibited poor biofilm growth with little to no ECM. In addition, quantification of fungal burden showed reduced colonization throughout the infection period on dentures and palates of rats inoculated with efg1-/-, but not bcr1-/-, compared to controls. Finally, rats inoculated with efg1-/- and bcr1-/- mutants had minimal palatal tissue damage/weight loss while those inoculated with wild-type or reconstituted mutants showed evidence of tissue damage and exhibited stunted weight gain. These data suggest that biofilm formation is associated with tissue damage during DS and that Efg1 and Bcr1, both central regulators of virulence in C. albicans, have pivotal roles in pathogenesis of DS.

  14. Transcription Factors Efg1 and Bcr1 Regulate Biofilm Formation and Virulence during Candida albicans-Associated Denture Stomatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Yano

    Full Text Available Denture stomatitis (DS is characterized by inflammation of the oral mucosa in direct contact with dentures and affects a significant number of otherwise healthy denture wearers. The disease is caused by Candida albicans, which readily colonizes and form biofilms on denture materials. While evidence for biofilms on abiotic and biotic surfaces initiating Candida infections is accumulating, a role for biofilms in DS remains unclear. Using an established model of DS in immunocompetent animals, the purpose of this study was to determine the role of biofilm formation in mucosal damage during pathogenesis using C. albicans or mutants defective in morphogenesis (efg1-/- or biofilm formation (bcr1-/-. For in vivo analyses, rats fitted with custom dentures, consisting of fixed and removable parts, were inoculated with wild-type C. albicans, mutants or reconstituted strains and monitored weekly for fungal burden (denture and palate, body weight and tissue damage (LDH for up to 8 weeks. C. albicans wild-type and reconstituted mutants formed biofilms on dentures and palatal tissues under in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo conditions as indicated by microscopy demonstrating robust biofilm architecture and extracellular matrix (ECM. In contrast, both efg1-/- and bcr1-/- mutants exhibited poor biofilm growth with little to no ECM. In addition, quantification of fungal burden showed reduced colonization throughout the infection period on dentures and palates of rats inoculated with efg1-/-, but not bcr1-/-, compared to controls. Finally, rats inoculated with efg1-/- and bcr1-/- mutants had minimal palatal tissue damage/weight loss while those inoculated with wild-type or reconstituted mutants showed evidence of tissue damage and exhibited stunted weight gain. These data suggest that biofilm formation is associated with tissue damage during DS and that Efg1 and Bcr1, both central regulators of virulence in C. albicans, have pivotal roles in pathogenesis of DS.

  15. Scanning Transmission X-Ray, Laser Scanning, and Transmission Electron Microscopy Mapping of the Exopolymeric Matrix of Microbial Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence, J. R.; Swerhone, G. D. W.; Leppard, G. G.; T. Araki; Zhang, X.; West, M. M.; A. P. Hitchcock

    2003-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) were used to map the distribution of macromolecular subcomponents (e.g., polysaccharides, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids) of biofilm cells and matrix. The biofilms were developed from river water supplemented with methanol, and although they comprised a complex microbial community, the biofilms were dominated by heterotrophic bacteria. TEM provid...

  16. The Porphyromonas gingivalis ferric uptake regulator orthologue binds hemin and regulates hemin-responsive biofilm development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Butler

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative pathogen associated with the biofilm-mediated disease chronic periodontitis. P. gingivalis biofilm formation is dependent on environmental heme for which P. gingivalis has an obligate requirement as it is unable to synthesize protoporphyrin IX de novo, hence P. gingivalis transports iron and heme liberated from the human host. Homeostasis of a variety of transition metal ions is often mediated in Gram-negative bacteria at the transcriptional level by members of the Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur superfamily. P. gingivalis has a single predicted Fur superfamily orthologue which we have designated Har (heme associated regulator. Recombinant Har formed dimers in the presence of Zn2+ and bound one hemin molecule per monomer with high affinity (Kd of 0.23 µM. The binding of hemin resulted in conformational changes of Zn(IIHar and residue 97Cys was involved in hemin binding as part of a predicted -97C-98P-99L- hemin binding motif. The expression of 35 genes was down-regulated and 9 up-regulated in a Har mutant (ECR455 relative to wild-type. Twenty six of the down-regulated genes were previously found to be up-regulated in P. gingivalis grown as a biofilm and 11 were up-regulated under hemin limitation. A truncated Zn(IIHar bound the promoter region of dnaA (PGN_0001, one of the up-regulated genes in the ECR455 mutant. This binding decreased as hemin concentration increased which was consistent with gene expression being regulated by hemin availability. ECR455 formed significantly less biofilm than the wild-type and unlike wild-type biofilm formation was independent of hemin availability. P. gingivalis possesses a hemin-binding Fur orthologue that regulates hemin-dependent biofilm formation.

  17. A Rhizobium leguminosarum CHDL- (Cadherin-Like-) Lectin Participates in Assembly and Remodeling of the Biofilm Matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vozza, Nicolás F.; Abdian, Patricia L; Russo, Daniela M

    2016-01-01

    important advances were made in the identification of the genetic and extracellular factors required for biofilm formation, the mechanisms leading to biofilm matrix assembly, and the roles of extracellular proteins in these processes are still poorly understood. The symbiont Rhizobium leguminosarum requires...

  18. Biofilms from Klebsiella pneumoniae: Matrix Polysaccharide Structure and Interactions with Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benincasa, Monica; Lagatolla, Cristina; Dolzani, Lucilla; Milan, Annalisa; Pacor, Sabrina; Liut, Gianfranco; Tossi, Alessandro; Cescutti, Paola; Rizzo, Roberto

    2016-08-10

    Biofilm matrices of two Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates, KpTs101 and KpTs113, were investigated for their polysaccharide composition and protective effects against antimicrobial peptides. Both strains were good biofilm producers, with KpTs113 forming flocs with very low adhesive properties to supports. Matrix exopolysaccharides were isolated and their monosaccharide composition and glycosidic linkage types were defined. KpTs101 polysaccharide is neutral and composed only of galactose, in both pyranose and furanose ring configurations. Conversely, KpTs113 polysaccharide is anionic due to glucuronic acid units, and also contains glucose and mannose residues. The susceptibility of the two strains to two bovine cathelicidin antimicrobial peptides, BMAP-27 and Bac7(1-35), was assessed using both planktonic cultures and biofilms. Biofilm matrices exerted a relevant protection against both antimicrobials, which act with quite different mechanisms. Similar protection was also detected when antimicrobial peptides were tested against planktonic bacteria in the presence of the polysaccharides extracted from KpTs101 and KpTs113 biofilms, suggesting sequestering adduct formation with antimicrobials. Circular dichroism experiments on BMAP-27 in the presence of increasing amounts of either polysaccharide confirmed their ability to interact with the peptide and induce an α-helical conformation.

  19. Biofilms from Klebsiella pneumoniae: Matrix Polysaccharide Structure and Interactions with Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Benincasa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm matrices of two Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates, KpTs101 and KpTs113, were investigated for their polysaccharide composition and protective effects against antimicrobial peptides. Both strains were good biofilm producers, with KpTs113 forming flocs with very low adhesive properties to supports. Matrix exopolysaccharides were isolated and their monosaccharide composition and glycosidic linkage types were defined. KpTs101 polysaccharide is neutral and composed only of galactose, in both pyranose and furanose ring configurations. Conversely, KpTs113 polysaccharide is anionic due to glucuronic acid units, and also contains glucose and mannose residues. The susceptibility of the two strains to two bovine cathelicidin antimicrobial peptides, BMAP-27 and Bac7(1–35, was assessed using both planktonic cultures and biofilms. Biofilm matrices exerted a relevant protection against both antimicrobials, which act with quite different mechanisms. Similar protection was also detected when antimicrobial peptides were tested against planktonic bacteria in the presence of the polysaccharides extracted from KpTs101 and KpTs113 biofilms, suggesting sequestering adduct formation with antimicrobials. Circular dichroism experiments on BMAP-27 in the presence of increasing amounts of either polysaccharide confirmed their ability to interact with the peptide and induce an α-helical conformation.

  20. Facultative control of matrix production optimizes competitive fitness in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 biofilm models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Jonas S; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Squyres, Georgia R; Price-Whelan, Alexa; de Santiago Torio, Ana; Song, Angela; Cornell, William C; Sørensen, Søren J; Xavier, Joao B; Dietrich, Lars E P

    2015-12-01

    As biofilms grow, resident cells inevitably face the challenge of resource limitation. In the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, electron acceptor availability affects matrix production and, as a result, biofilm morphogenesis. The secreted matrix polysaccharide Pel is required for pellicle formation and for colony wrinkling, two activities that promote access to O2. We examined the exploitability and evolvability of Pel production at the air-liquid interface (during pellicle formation) and on solid surfaces (during colony formation). Although Pel contributes to the developmental response to electron acceptor limitation in both biofilm formation regimes, we found variation in the exploitability of its production and necessity for competitive fitness between the two systems. The wild type showed a competitive advantage against a non-Pel-producing mutant in pellicles but no advantage in colonies. Adaptation to the pellicle environment selected for mutants with a competitive advantage against the wild type in pellicles but also caused a severe disadvantage in colonies, even in wrinkled colony centers. Evolution in the colony center produced divergent phenotypes, while adaptation to the colony edge produced mutants with clear competitive advantages against the wild type in this O2-replete niche. In general, the structurally heterogeneous colony environment promoted more diversification than the more homogeneous pellicle. These results suggest that the role of Pel in community structure formation in response to electron acceptor limitation is unique to specific biofilm models and that the facultative control of Pel production is required for PA14 to maintain optimum benefit in different types of communities.

  1. The exopolysaccharide gene cluster Bcam1330-Bcam1341 is involved in Burkholderia cenocepacia biofilm formation, and its expression is regulated by c-di-GMP and Bcam1349

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazli, Mustafa; McCarthy, Yvonne; Givskov, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In Burkholderia cenocepacia, the second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) has previously been shown to positively regulate biofilm formation and the expression of cellulose and type-I fimbriae genes through binding to the transcriptional regulator Bcam1349. Here, we provide...... evidence that cellulose and type-I fimbriae are not involved in B. cenocepacia biofilm formation in flow chambers, and we identify a novel Bcam1349/c-di-GMP-regulated exopolysaccharide gene cluster which is essential for B. cenocepacia biofilm formation. Overproduction of Bcam1349 in trans promotes wrinkly...... matrix exopolysaccharide and to be essential for flow-chamber biofilm formation. We demonstrate that Bcam1349 binds to the promoter region of genes in the Bcam1330-Bcam1341 cluster and that this binding is enhanced by the presence of c-di-GMP. Furthermore, we demonstrate that overproduction of both c...

  2. Lipase biofilm deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronne, Antonio [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Industrial Production, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy); Bloisi, Francesco, E-mail: bloisi@na.infn.it [SPIN – CNR, Naples (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy); Calabria, Raffaela; Califano, Valeria [Istituto Motori – CNR, Naples (Italy); Depero, Laura E. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Brescia, Brescia (Italy); Fanelli, Esther [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Industrial Production, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy); Federici, Stefania [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Brescia, Brescia (Italy); Massoli, Patrizio [Istituto Motori – CNR, Naples (Italy); Vicari, Luciano R.M. [SPIN – CNR, Naples (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • A lipase film was deposited with Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation technique. • FTIR spectra show that laser irradiation do not damage lipase molecule. • Laser fluence controls the characteristics of complex structure generated by MAPLE. - Abstract: Lipase is an enzyme that finds application in biodiesel production and for detection of esters and triglycerides in biosensors. Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE), a technique derived from Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for deposition of undamaged biomolecules or polymers, is characterized by the use of a frozen target obtained from a solution/suspension of the guest material (to be deposited) in a volatile matrix (solvent). The presence of the solvent avoids or at least reduces the potential damage of guest molecules by laser radiation but only the guest material reaches the substrate in an essentially solvent-free deposition. MAPLE can be used for enzymes immobilization, essential for industrial application, allowing the development of continuous processes, an easier separation of products, the reuse of the catalyst and, in some cases, enhancing enzyme properties (pH, temperature stability, etc.) and catalytic activity in non-aqueous media. Here we show that MAPLE technique can be used to deposit undamaged lipase and that the complex structure (due to droplets generated during extraction from target) of the deposited material can be controlled by changing the laser beam fluence.

  3. Lipase biofilm deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronne, Antonio; Bloisi, Francesco; Calabria, Raffaela; Califano, Valeria; Depero, Laura E.; Fanelli, Esther; Federici, Stefania; Massoli, Patrizio; Vicari, Luciano R. M.

    2015-05-01

    Lipase is an enzyme that finds application in biodiesel production and for detection of esters and triglycerides in biosensors. Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE), a technique derived from Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for deposition of undamaged biomolecules or polymers, is characterized by the use of a frozen target obtained from a solution/suspension of the guest material (to be deposited) in a volatile matrix (solvent). The presence of the solvent avoids or at least reduces the potential damage of guest molecules by laser radiation but only the guest material reaches the substrate in an essentially solvent-free deposition. MAPLE can be used for enzymes immobilization, essential for industrial application, allowing the development of continuous processes, an easier separation of products, the reuse of the catalyst and, in some cases, enhancing enzyme properties (pH, temperature stability, etc.) and catalytic activity in non-aqueous media. Here we show that MAPLE technique can be used to deposit undamaged lipase and that the complex structure (due to droplets generated during extraction from target) of the deposited material can be controlled by changing the laser beam fluence.

  4. Influence of matrix and filler fraction on biofilm formation on the surface of experimental resin-based composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Andrei; Brambilla, Eugenio; Wastl, Daniel S; Giessibl, Franz J; Cazzaniga, Gloria; Schneider-Feyrer, Sibylle; Hahnel, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of resin matrix chemistry and filler fraction on biofilm formation on the surface of experimental resin-based composites (RBCs). Specimens were prepared from eight experimental RBC formulations differing in resin matrix blend (BisGMA/TEGDMA in a 7:3 wt% ratio or UDMA/aliphatic dimethacrylate in a 1:1 wt% ratio) and filler fraction (no fillers; 65 wt% dental glass with an average diameter of 7 or 0.7 µm or 65 wt% SiO2 with an average diameter of 20 nm). Surface roughness, surface free energy, and chemical surface composition were determined; surface topography was visualized using atomic force microscopy. Biofilm formation was simulated under continuous flow conditions for a 48 h period using a monospecies Streptococcus mutans and a multispecies biofilm model. In the monospecies biofilm model, the impact of the filler fraction overruled the influence of the resin matrix, indicating lowest biofilm formation on RBCs with nano-scaled filler particles and those manufactured from the neat resin blends. The multispecies model suggested a more pronounced effect of the resin matrix blend, as significantly higher biofilm formation was identified on RBCs with a UDMA/dimethacrylate matrix blend than on those including a BisGMA/TEGDMA matrix blend but analogous filler fractions. Although significant differences in surface properties between the various materials were identified, correlations between the surface properties and biofilm formation were poor, which highlights the relevance of surface topography and chemistry. These results may help to tailor novel RBC formulations which feature reduced biofilm formation on their surface.

  5. Quorum-sensing regulates biofilm formation in Vibrio scophthalmi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Aljaro Cristina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a previous study, we demonstrated that Vibrio scophthalmi, the most abundant Vibrio species among the marine aerobic or facultatively anaerobic bacteria inhabiting the intestinal tract of healthy cultured turbot (Scophthalmus maximus, contains at least two quorum-sensing circuits involving two types of signal molecules (a 3-hydroxy-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone and the universal autoinducer 2 encoded by luxS. The purpose of this study was to investigate the functions regulated by these quorum sensing circuits in this vibrio by constructing mutants for the genes involved in these circuits. Results The presence of a homologue to the Vibrio harveyi luxR gene encoding a main transcriptional regulator, whose expression is modulated by quorum–sensing signal molecules in other vibrios, was detected and sequenced. The V. scophthalmi LuxR protein displayed a maximum amino acid identity of 82% with SmcR, the LuxR homologue found in Vibrio vulnificus. luxR and luxS null mutants were constructed and their phenotype analysed. Both mutants displayed reduced biofilm formation in vitro as well as differences in membrane protein expression by mass-spectrometry analysis. Additionally, a recombinant strain of V. scophthalmi carrying the lactonase AiiA from Bacillus cereus, which causes hydrolysis of acyl homoserine lactones, was included in the study. Conclusions V. scophthalmi shares two quorum sensing circuits, including the main transcriptional regulator luxR, with some pathogenic vibrios such as V. harveyi and V. anguillarum. However, contrary to these pathogenic vibrios no virulence factors (such as protease production were found to be quorum sensing regulated in this bacterium. Noteworthy, biofilm formation was altered in luxS and luxR mutants. In these mutants a different expression profile of membrane proteins were observed with respect to the wild type strain suggesting that quorum sensing could play a role in the regulation of

  6. Matrix compliance and the regulation of cytokinesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savitha Sambandamoorthy

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Integrin-mediated cell adhesion to the ECM regulates many physiological processes in part by controlling cell proliferation. It is well established that many normal cells require integrin-mediated adhesion to enter S phase of the cell cycle. Recent evidence indicates that integrins also regulate cytokinesis. Mechanical properties of the ECM can dictate entry into S phase; however, it is not known whether they also can affect the successful completion of cell division. To address this issue, we modulated substrate compliance using fibronectin-coated acrylamide-based hydrogels. Soft and hard substrates were generated with approximate elastic moduli of 1600 and 34,000 Pascals (Pa respectively. Our results indicate that dermal fibroblasts successfully complete cytokinesis on hard substrates, whereas on soft substrates, a significant number fail and become binucleated. Cytokinesis failure occurs at a step following the formation of the intercellular bridge connecting presumptive daughter cells, suggesting a defect in abscission. Like dermal fibroblasts, mesenchymal stem cells require cell-matrix adhesion for successful cytokinesis. However, in contrast to dermal fibroblasts, they are able to complete cytokinesis on both hard and soft substrates. These results indicate that matrix stiffness regulates the successful completion of cytokinesis, and does so in a cell-type specific manner. To our knowledge, our study is the first to demonstrate that matrix stiffness can affect cytokinesis. Understanding the cell-type specific contribution of matrix compliance to the regulation of cytokinesis will provide new insights important for development, as well as tissue homeostasis and regeneration.

  7. Combating biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Hong;

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are complex microbial communities consisting of microcolonies embedded in a matrix of self-produced polymer substances. Biofilm cells show much greater resistance to environmental challenges including antimicrobial agents than their free-living counterparts. The biofilm mode of life...... is believed to significantly contribute to successful microbial survival in hostile environments. Conventional treatment, disinfection and cleaning strategies do not proficiently deal with biofilm-related problems, such as persistent infections and contamination of food production facilities. In this review......, strategies to control biofilms are discussed, including those of inhibition of microbial attachment, interference of biofilm structure development and differentiation, killing of biofilm cells and induction of biofilm dispersion....

  8. Matrix Metalloproteinases as Regulators of Periodontal Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Cavalla; Patricia, Hernández-Ríos; Timo, Sorsa; Claudia, Biguetti; Marcela, Hernández

    2017-01-01

    Periodontitis are infectious diseases characterized by immune-mediated destruction of periodontal supporting tissues and tooth loss. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are key proteases involved in destructive periodontal diseases. The study and interest in MMP has been fuelled by emerging evidence demonstrating the broad spectrum of molecules that can be cleaved by them and the myriad of biological processes that they can potentially regulate. The huge complexity of MMP functions within the ‘protease web’ is crucial for many physiologic and pathologic processes, including immunity, inflammation, bone resorption, and wound healing. Evidence points out that MMPs assemble in activation cascades and besides their classical extracellular matrix substrates, they cleave several signalling molecules—such as cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors, among others—regulating their biological functions and/or bioavailability during periodontal diseases. In this review, we provide an overview of emerging evidence of MMPs as regulators of periodontal inflammation. PMID:28218665

  9. Bap, a biofilm matrix protein of Staphylococcus aureus prevents cellular internalization through binding to GP96 host receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Jaione; Latasa, Cristina; Gil, Carmen; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Solano, Cristina; Penadés, José R; Lasa, Iñigo

    2012-01-01

    The biofilm matrix, composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, nucleic acids and lipids, plays a well-known role as a defence structure, protecting bacteria from the host immune system and antimicrobial therapy. However, little is known about its responsibility in the interaction of biofilm cells with host tissues. Staphylococcus aureus, a leading cause of biofilm-associated chronic infections, is able to develop a biofilm built on a proteinaceous Bap-mediated matrix. Here, we used the Bap protein as a model to investigate the role that components of the biofilm matrix play in the interaction of S. aureus with host cells. The results show that Bap promotes the adhesion but prevents the entry of S. aureus into epithelial cells. A broad analysis of potential interaction partners for Bap using ligand overlayer immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation with purified Bap and pull down with intact bacteria, identified a direct binding between Bap and Gp96/GRP94/Hsp90 protein. The interaction of Bap with Gp96 provokes a significant reduction in the capacity of S. aureus to invade epithelial cells by interfering with the fibronectin binding protein invasion pathway. Consistent with these results, Bap deficient bacteria displayed an enhanced capacity to invade mammary gland epithelial cells in a lactating mice mastitis model. Our observations begin to elucidate the mechanisms by which components of the biofilm matrix can facilitate the colonization of host tissues and the establishment of persistent infections.

  10. Biofilm Formation by Bacillus cereus Is Influenced by PlcR, a Pleiotropic Regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Somers, Eileen B.; Lereclus, Didier; Wong, Amy C. Lee

    2006-01-01

    The ΔplcR mutant of Bacillus cereus strain ATCC 14579 developed significantly more biofilm than the wild type and produced increased amounts of biosurfactant. Biosurfactant production is required for biofilm formation and may be directly or indirectly repressed by PlcR, a pleiotropic regulator. Coating polystyrene plates with surfactin, a biosurfactant from Bacillus subtilis, rescued the deficiency in biofilm formation by the wild type. PMID:16820512

  11. Essential roles and regulation of the Legionella pneumophila collagen-like adhesin during biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Mallegol

    Full Text Available Legionellosis is mostly caused by Legionella pneumophila (Lp and is defined by a severe respiratory illness with a case fatality rate ranging from 5 to 80%. In a previous study, we showed that a glycosaminoglycan (GAG-binding adhesin of Lp, named Lcl, is produced during legionellosis and is unique to the L. pneumophila species. Importantly, a mutant depleted in Lcl (Δlpg2644 is impaired in adhesion to GAGs and epithelial cells and in biofilm formation. Here, we examine the molecular function(s of Lcl and the transcriptional regulation of its encoding gene during different stages of the biofilm development. We show that the collagen repeats and the C-terminal domains of Lcl are crucial for the production of biofilm. We present evidence that Lcl is involved in the early step of surface attachment but also in intercellular interactions. Furthermore, we address the relationship between Lcl gene regulation during biofilm formation and quorum sensing (QS. In a static biofilm assay, we show that Lcl is differentially regulated during growth phases and biofilm formation. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional regulation of lpg2644, mediated by a prototype of QS signaling homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL, may play a role during the biofilm development. Thus, transcriptional down-regulation of lpg2644 may facilitate the dispersion of Lp to reinitiate biofilm colonization on a distal surface.

  12. Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis requires an endoribonuclease-containing multisubunit complex that controls mRNA levels for the matrix gene repressor SinR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLoughery, Aaron; Dengler, Vanina; Chai, Yunrong; Losick, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis is largely governed by a circuit in which the response regulator Spo0A turns on the gene for the anti-repressor SinI. SinI, in turn, binds to and inactivates SinR, a dedicated repressor of genes for matrix production. Mutants of the genes ylbF, ymcA and yaaT are blocked in biofilm formation, but the mechanism by which they act has been mysterious. A recent report attributed their role in biofilm formation to stimulating Spo0A activity. However, we detect no measurable effect on the transcription of sinI. Instead, we find that the block in biofilm formation is caused by an increase in the levels of SinR and of its mRNA. Evidence is presented that YlbF, YmcA and YaaT interact with, and control the activity of, RNase Y, which is known to destabilize sinR mRNA. We also show that the processing of another target of RNase Y, cggR-gapA mRNA, similarly depends on YlbF and YmcA. Our work suggests that sinR mRNA stability is an additional posttranscriptional control mechanism governing the switch to multicellularity and raises the possibility that YlbF, YmcA and YaaT broadly regulate mRNA stability as part of an RNase Y-containing, multi-subunit complex.

  13. The exopolysaccharide matrix modulates the interaction between 3D architecture and virulence of a mixed-species oral biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jin; Klein, Marlise I; Falsetta, Megan L; Lu, Bingwen; Delahunty, Claire M; Yates, John R; Heydorn, Arne; Koo, Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Virulent biofilms are responsible for a range of infections, including oral diseases. All biofilms harbor a microbial-derived extracellular-matrix. The exopolysaccharides (EPS) formed on tooth-pellicle and bacterial surfaces provide binding sites for microorganisms; eventually the accumulated EPS enmeshes microbial cells. The metabolic activity of the bacteria within this matrix leads to acidification of the milieu. We explored the mechanisms through which the Streptococcus mutans-produced EPS-matrix modulates the three-dimensional (3D) architecture and the population shifts during morphogenesis of biofilms on a saliva-coated-apatitic surface using a mixed-bacterial species system. Concomitantly, we examined whether the matrix influences the development of pH-microenvironments within intact-biofilms using a novel 3D in situ pH-mapping technique. Data reveal that the production of the EPS-matrix helps to create spatial heterogeneities by forming an intricate network of exopolysaccharide-enmeshed bacterial-islets (microcolonies) through localized cell-to-matrix interactions. This complex 3D architecture creates compartmentalized acidic and EPS-rich microenvironments throughout the biofilm, which triggers the dominance of pathogenic S. mutans within a mixed-species system. The establishment of a 3D-matrix and EPS-enmeshed microcolonies were largely mediated by the S. mutans gtfB/gtfC genes, expression of which was enhanced in the presence of Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus oralis. Acidic pockets were found only in the interiors of bacterial-islets that are protected by EPS, which impedes rapid neutralization by buffer (pH 7.0). As a result, regions of low pH (biofilm. Our results illustrate the critical interaction between matrix architecture and pH heterogeneity in the 3D environment. The formation of structured acidic-microenvironments in close proximity to the apatite-surface is an essential factor associated with virulence in cariogenic-biofilms. These

  14. The sinR ortholog PGN_0088 encodes a transcriptional regulator that inhibits polysaccharide synthesis in Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 biofilms.

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    Reiko Yamamoto

    Full Text Available Biofilm-forming cells are distinct from well characterized planktonic cells and aggregate in the extracellular matrix, the so-called extracellular polymeric substances (EPS. The sinR gene of Bacillus subtilis encodes a transcriptional regulator that is known to be involved in the biosynthesis of EPS in biofilms. Porphyromonas gingivalis inhabits the subgingival and extraradicular biofilm of humans and is one of the primary pathogens that cause progressive marginal and refractory apical periodontitis. Furthermore, P. gingivalis possesses PGN_0088, which encodes a putative ortholog of B. subtilis sinR. Here, we investigated the role of PGN_0088 (sinR on biofilm formation. P. gingivalis strains formed biofilms on saliva-coated glass surfaces in phosphate buffered saline. Quantitative analysis indicated that the biofilm of the sinR null mutant consisted of dense exopolysaccharide. Microscopic observations showed that the increased levels of exopolysaccharide produced by the sinR mutant changed the morphology of the EPS to a mesh-liked structure. Furthermore, physical analyses suggested that the enrichment of exopolysaccharide in the EPS enhanced the resistance of the biofilm to hydrodynamic shear force. The results presented here demonstrate sinR plays important roles in the ability of P. gingivalis strain ATCC 33277 to act as a negative mediator of exopolysaccharide accumulation and is indirectly associated with the structure of the EPS and the force of its adhesion to surfaces.

  15. Vibrio cholerae VpsT Regulates Matrix Production and Motility by Directly Sensing Cyclic di-GMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasteva, P.; Fong, J; Shikuma, N; Beyhan, S; Navarro, M; Yildiz, F; Sondermann, H

    2010-01-01

    Microorganisms can switch from a planktonic, free-swimming life-style to a sessile, colonial state, called a biofilm, which confers resistance to environmental stress. Conversion between the motile and biofilm life-styles has been attributed to increased levels of the prokaryotic second messenger cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), yet the signaling mechanisms mediating such a global switch are poorly understood. Here we show that the transcriptional regulator VpsT from Vibrio cholerae directly senses c-di-GMP to inversely control extracellular matrix production and motility, which identifies VpsT as a master regulator for biofilm formation. Rather than being regulated by phosphorylation, VpsT undergoes a change in oligomerization on c-di-GMP binding.

  16. New insights into Legionella pneumophila biofilm regulation by c-di-GMP signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pécastaings, Sophie; Allombert, Julie; Lajoie, Barbora; Doublet, Patricia; Roques, Christine; Vianney, Anne

    2016-09-01

    The waterborne pathogen Legionella pneumophila grows as a biofilm, freely or inside amoebae. Cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP), a bacterial second messenger frequently implicated in biofilm formation, is synthesized and degraded by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and phosphodiesterases (PDEs), respectively. To characterize the c-di-GMP-metabolizing enzymes involved in L. pneumophila biofilm regulation, the consequences on biofilm formation and the c-di-GMP concentration of each corresponding gene inactivation were assessed in the Lens strain. The results showed that one DGC and two PDEs enhance different aspects of biofilm formation, while two proteins with dual activity (DGC/PDE) inhibit biofilm growth. Surprisingly, only two mutants exhibited a change in global c-di-GMP concentration. This study highlights that specific c-di-GMP pathways control L. pneumophila biofilm formation, most likely via temporary and/or local modulation of c-di-GMP concentration. Furthermore, Lpl1054 DGC is required to enable the formation a dense biofilm in response to nitric oxide, a signal for biofilm dispersion in many other species.

  17. A Rhizobium leguminosarum CHDL- (Cadherin-Like-) Lectin Participates in Assembly and Remodeling of the Biofilm Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vozza, Nicolás F.; Abdian, Patricia L.; Russo, Daniela M.; Mongiardini, Elías J.; Lodeiro, Aníbal R.; Molin, Søren; Zorreguieta, Angeles

    2016-01-01

    In natural environments most bacteria live in multicellular structures called biofilms. These cell aggregates are enclosed in a self-produced polymeric extracellular matrix, which protects the cells, provides mechanical stability and mediates cellular cohesion and adhesion to surfaces. Although important advances were made in the identification of the genetic and extracellular factors required for biofilm formation, the mechanisms leading to biofilm matrix assembly, and the roles of extracellular proteins in these processes are still poorly understood. The symbiont Rhizobium leguminosarum requires the synthesis of the acidic exopolysaccharide and the PrsDE secretion system to develop a mature biofilm. PrsDE is responsible for the secretion of the Rap family of proteins that share one or two Ra/CHDL (cadherin-like-) domains. RapA2 is a calcium-dependent lectin with a cadherin-like β sheet structure that specifically recognizes the exopolysaccharide, either as a capsular polysaccharide (CPS) or in its released form [extracellular polysaccharide (EPS)]. In this study, using gain and loss of function approaches combined with phenotypic and microscopic studies we demonstrated that RapA lectins are involved in biofilm matrix development and cellular cohesion. While the absence of any RapA protein increased the compactness of bacterial aggregates, high levels of RapA1 expanded distances between cells and favored the production of a dense matrix network. Whereas endogenous RapA(s) are predominantly located at one bacterial pole, we found that under overproduction conditions, RapA1 surrounded the cell in a way that was reminiscent of the capsule. Accordingly, polysaccharide analyses showed that the RapA lectins promote CPS formation at the expense of lower EPS production. Besides, polysaccharide analysis suggests that RapA modulates the EPS size profile. Collectively, these results show that the interaction of RapA lectins with the polysaccharide is involved in rhizobial

  18. Quorum sensing-regulated chitin metabolism provides grazing resistance to Vibrio cholerae biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shuyang; Tay, Qi Xiang Martin; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Rice, Scott A; McDougald, Diane

    2015-08-01

    Association of Vibrio cholerae with chitinous surfaces of zooplankton is important for its persistence in marine environments, as it provides accessibility to nutrients and resistance to stresses. Predation by heterotrophic protists has a major impact on the survival of V. cholerae. V. cholerae forms biofilms as its main defensive strategy, and quorum sensing (QS) additionally regulates the production of antiprotozoal factors. The role of chitin and QS regulation in V. cholerae grazing resistance was investigated by exposing V. cholerae wild-type (WT) and QS mutant biofilms grown on chitin flakes to the bacteriotrophic, surface-feeding flagellate Rhynchomonas nasuta. V. cholerae formed more biofilm biomass on chitin flakes compared with nonchitinous surfaces. The growth of R. nasuta was inhibited by WT biofilms grown on chitin flakes, whereas the inhibition was attenuated in QS mutant biofilms. The chitin-dependent toxicity was also observed when the V. cholerae biofilms were developed under continuous flow or grown on a natural chitin source, the exoskeleton of Artemia. In addition, the antiprotozoal activity and ammonium concentration of V. cholerae biofilm supernatants were quantified. The ammonium levels (3.5 mM) detected in the supernatants of V. cholerae WT biofilms grown on chitin flakes were estimated to reduce the number of R. nasuta by >80% in add-back experiments, and the supernatant of QS mutant biofilms was less toxic owing to a decrease in ammonium production. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the majority of genes involved in chitin metabolism and chemotaxis were significantly downregulated in QS mutant biofilms when grown on chitin compared with the WT biofilms.

  19. Selective reactivity of monochloramine with extracellular matrix components affects the disinfection of biofilm and detached clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zheng; Lee, Woo Hyoung; Coburn, Kimberly M; Seo, Youngwoo

    2014-04-01

    The efficiency of monochloramine disinfection was dependent on the quantity and composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in biofilms, as monochloramine has a selective reactivity with proteins over polysaccharides. Biofilms with protein-based (Pseudomonas putida) and polysaccharide based EPS (Pseudomonas aeruginosa), as well as biofilms with varied amount of polysaccharide EPS (wild-type and mutant P. aeruginosa), were compared. The different reactivity of EPS components with monochloramine influenced disinfectant penetration, biofilm inactivation, as well as the viability of detached clusters. Monochloramine transport profiling measured by a chloramine-sensitive microelectrode revealed a broader diffusion boundary layer between bulk and biofilm surface in the P. putida biofilm compared to those of P. aeruginosa biofilms. The reaction with proteins in P. putida EPS multiplied both the time and the monochloramine mass required to achieve a full biofilm penetration. Cell viability in biofilms was also spatially influenced by monochloramine diffusion and reaction within biofilms, showing a lower survival in the surface section and a higher persistence in the middle section of the P. putida biofilm compared to the P. aeruginosa biofilms. While polysaccharide EPS promoted biofilm cell viability by obstructing monochloramine reactive sites on bacterial cells, protein EPS hindered monochloramine penetration by reacting with monochloramine and reduced its concentration within biofilms. Furthermore, the persistence of bacterial cells detached from biofilm (over 70% for P. putida and ∼40% for polysaccharide producing P. aeruginosa) suggested that currently recommended monochloramine residual levels may underestimate the risk of water quality deterioration caused by biofilm detachment.

  20. The Enterococcus faecium enterococcal biofilm regulator, EbrB, regulates the esp operon and is implicated in biofilm formation and intestinal colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top, Janetta; Paganelli, Fernanda L; Zhang, Xinglin; van Schaik, Willem; Leavis, Helen L; van Luit-Asbroek, Miranda; van der Poll, Tom; Leendertse, Masja; Bonten, Marc J M; Willems, Rob J L

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, Enterococcus faecium is one of the leading nosocomial pathogens worldwide. Strains causing clinical infections or hospital outbreaks are enriched in the enterococcal surface protein (Esp) encoding ICEEfm1 mobile genetic element. Previous studies showed that Esp is involved in biofilm formation, endocarditis and urinary tract infections. In this study, we characterized the role of the putative AraC type of regulator (locus tag EfmE1162_2351), which we renamed ebrB and which is, based on the currently available whole genome sequences, always located upstream of the esp gene, and studied its role in Esp surface exposure during growth. A markerless deletion mutant of ebrB resulted in reduced esp expression and complete abolishment of Esp surface exposure, while Esp cell-surface exposure was restored when this mutant was complemented with an intact copy of ebrB. This demonstrates a role for EbrB in esp expression. However, during growth, ebrB expression levels did not change over time, while an increase in esp expression at both RNA and protein level was observed during mid-log and late-log phase. These results indicate the existence of a secondary regulation system for esp, which might be an unknown quorum sensing system as the enhanced esp expression seems to be cell density dependent. Furthermore, we determined that esp is part of an operon of at least 3 genes putatively involved in biofilm formation. A semi-static biofilm model revealed reduced biofilm formation for the EbrB deficient mutant, while dynamics of biofilm formation using a flow cell system revealed delayed biofilm formation in the ebrB mutant. In a mouse intestinal colonization model the ebrB mutant was less able to colonize the gut compared to wild-type strain, especially in the small intestine. These data indicate that EbrB positively regulates the esp operon and is implicated in biofilm formation and intestinal colonization.

  1. The Enterococcus faecium enterococcal biofilm regulator, EbrB, regulates the esp operon and is implicated in biofilm formation and intestinal colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janetta Top

    Full Text Available Nowadays, Enterococcus faecium is one of the leading nosocomial pathogens worldwide. Strains causing clinical infections or hospital outbreaks are enriched in the enterococcal surface protein (Esp encoding ICEEfm1 mobile genetic element. Previous studies showed that Esp is involved in biofilm formation, endocarditis and urinary tract infections. In this study, we characterized the role of the putative AraC type of regulator (locus tag EfmE1162_2351, which we renamed ebrB and which is, based on the currently available whole genome sequences, always located upstream of the esp gene, and studied its role in Esp surface exposure during growth. A markerless deletion mutant of ebrB resulted in reduced esp expression and complete abolishment of Esp surface exposure, while Esp cell-surface exposure was restored when this mutant was complemented with an intact copy of ebrB. This demonstrates a role for EbrB in esp expression. However, during growth, ebrB expression levels did not change over time, while an increase in esp expression at both RNA and protein level was observed during mid-log and late-log phase. These results indicate the existence of a secondary regulation system for esp, which might be an unknown quorum sensing system as the enhanced esp expression seems to be cell density dependent. Furthermore, we determined that esp is part of an operon of at least 3 genes putatively involved in biofilm formation. A semi-static biofilm model revealed reduced biofilm formation for the EbrB deficient mutant, while dynamics of biofilm formation using a flow cell system revealed delayed biofilm formation in the ebrB mutant. In a mouse intestinal colonization model the ebrB mutant was less able to colonize the gut compared to wild-type strain, especially in the small intestine. These data indicate that EbrB positively regulates the esp operon and is implicated in biofilm formation and intestinal colonization.

  2. CRP-Mediated Carbon Catabolite Regulation of Yersinia pestis Biofilm Formation Is Enhanced by the Carbon Storage Regulator Protein, CsrA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willias, Stephan P; Chauhan, Sadhana; Lo, Chien-Chi; Chain, Patrick S G; Motin, Vladimir L

    2015-01-01

    The natural transmission of Yersinia pestis is reliant upon biofilm blockage of the flea vector. However, the environmentally-responsive adaptive regulators which facilitate Y. pestis biofilm production in accordance with the flea midgut milieu are not well understood. We seek to establish the impact of available carbon source metabolism and storage upon Y. pestis biofilm production. Our findings demonstrate that Y. pestis biofilm production is subject to carbon catabolite regulation in which the presence of glucose impairs biofilm production; whereas, the sole metabolism of alternate carbon sources promotes robust biofilm formation. This observation is facilitated by the cAMP receptor protein, CRP. In accordance with a stark growth defect, deletion of crp in both CO92 and KIM6+ Y. pestis strains significantly impaired biofilm production when solely utilizing alternate carbon sources. Media supplementation with cAMP, a small-molecule activator of CRP, did not significantly alter Y. pestis biofilm production. Furthermore, CRP did not alter mRNA abundance of previously-characterized hms biofilm synthesis and regulation factors. Therefore, our findings indicate CRP does not confer a direct stimulatory effect, but may indirectly promote Y. pestis biofilm production by facilitating the alternate carbon source expression profile. Additionally, we assessed the impact of the carbon storage regulator protein, CsrA, upon Y. pestis biofilm production. Contrary to what has been described for E. coli, Y. pestis biofilm formation was found to be enhanced by CsrA. Regardless of media composition and available carbon source, deletion of csrA significantly impaired Y. pestis biofilm production. CsrA was found to promote Y. pestis biofilm production independent of glycogen regulation. Loss of csrA did not significantly alter relative hmsH, hmsP, or hmsT mRNA abundance. However, deletion of hmsP in the csrA-deficient mutant enabled excessive biofilm production, suggesting Csr

  3. Repression by H-NS of genes required for the biosynthesis of the Vibrio cholerae biofilm matrix is modulated by the second messenger cyclic diguanylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Julio C; Wang, Hongxia; Silva, Anisia J; Benitez, Jorge A

    2015-08-01

    Expression of Vibrio cholerae genes required for the biosynthesis of exopolysacchide (vps) and protein (rbm) components of the biofilm matrix is enhanced by cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP). In a previous study, we reported that the histone-like nucleoid structuring (H-NS) protein represses the transcription of vpsA, vpsL and vpsT. Here we demonstrate that the regulator VpsT can disrupt repressive H-NS nucleoprotein complexes at the vpsA and vpsL promoters in the presence of c-di-GMP, while H-NS could disrupt the VpsT-promoter complexes in the absence of c-di-GMP. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-Seq showed a remarkable trend for H-NS to cluster at loci involved in biofilm development such as the rbmABCDEF genes. We show that the antagonistic relationship between VpsT and H-NS regulates the expression of the rbmABCDEF cluster. Epistasis analysis demonstrated that VpsT functions as an antirepressor at the rbmA/F, vpsU and vpsA/L promoters. Deletion of vpsT increased H-NS occupancy at these promoters while increasing the c-di-GMP pool had the opposite effect and included the vpsT promoter. The negative effect of c-di-GMP on H-NS occupancy at the vpsT promoter required the regulator VpsR. These results demonstrate that c-di-GMP activates the transcription of genes required for the biosynthesis of the biofilm matrix by triggering a coordinated VpsR- and VpsT-dependent H-NS antirepression cascade.

  4. Cross-regulation by CrcZ RNA controls anoxic biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusic, Petra; Tata, Muralidhar; Wolfinger, Michael T.; Sonnleitner, Elisabeth; Häussler, Susanne; Bläsi, Udo

    2016-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) can thrive in anaerobic biofilms in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Here, we show that CrcZ is the most abundant PA14 RNA bound to the global regulator Hfq in anoxic biofilms grown in cystic fibrosis sputum medium. Hfq was crucial for anoxic biofilm formation. This observation complied with an RNAseq based transcriptome analysis and follow up studies that implicated Hfq in regulation of a central step preceding denitrification. CrcZ is known to act as a decoy that sequesters Hfq during relief of carbon catabolite repression, which in turn alleviates Hfq-mediated translational repression of catabolic genes. We therefore inferred that CrcZ indirectly impacts on biofilm formation by competing for Hfq. This hypothesis was supported by the findings that over-production of CrcZ mirrored the biofilm phenotype of the hfq deletion mutant, and that deletion of the crcZ gene augmented biofilm formation. To our knowledge, this is the first example where competition for Hfq by CrcZ cross-regulates an Hfq-dependent physiological process unrelated to carbon metabolism.

  5. Abiotic surface sensing and biofilm-dependent regulation of gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent-Combaret, C; Vidal, O; Dorel, C; Lejeune, P

    1999-10-01

    To get further information on bacterial surface sensing and biofilm-dependent regulation of gene expression in Escherichia coli K-12, random insertion mutagenesis with Mu dX, a mini-Mu carrying the promoterless lacZ gene, was performed with an ompR234 adherent strain, and a simple screen was developed to assess changes in gene expression in biofilm cells versus planktonic cells. This screen revealed that major changes in the pattern of gene expression occur during biofilm development: the transcription of 38% of the genes was affected within biofilms. Different cell functions were more expressed in sessile bacteria: the OmpC porin, the high-affinity transport system of glycine betaine (encoded by the proU operon), the colanic acid exopolysaccharide (wca locus, formerly called cps), tripeptidase T (pepT), and the nickel high-affinity transport system (nikA). On the other hand, the syntheses of flagellin (fliC) and of a putative protein of 92 amino acids (f92) were both reduced in biofilms. Such a genetic reprogramming of gene expression in biofilms seems to result from changes in multiple environmental physicochemical conditions. In this work, we show that bacteria within biofilms encounter higher-osmolarity conditions, greater oxygen limitation, and higher cell density than in the liquid phase.

  6. Burkholderia contaminans Biofilm Regulating Operon and Its Distribution in Bacterial Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronina, Olga L; Kunda, Marina S; Ryzhova, Natalia N; Aksenova, Ekaterina I; Semenov, Andrey N; Romanova, Yulia M; Gintsburg, Alexandr L

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Burkholderia spp. is a principal cause of lung chronic infections in cystic fibrosis patients. A "lacking biofilm production" (LBP) strain B. contaminans GIMC4587:Bct370-19 has been obtained by insertion modification of clinical strain with plasposon mutagenesis. It has an interrupted transcriptional response regulator (RR) gene. The focus of our investigation was a two-component signal transduction system determination, including this RR. B. contaminans clinical and LBP strains were analyzed by whole genome sequencing and bioinformatics resources. A four-component operon (BiofilmReg) has a key role in biofilm formation. The relative location (i.e., by being separated by another gene) of RR and histidine kinase genes is unique in BiofilmReg. Orthologs were found in other members of the Burkholderiales order. Phylogenetic analysis of strains containing BiofilmReg operons demonstrated evidence for earlier inheritance of a three-component operon. During further evolution one lineage acquired a fourth gene, whereas others lost the third component of the operon. Mutations in sensor domains have created biodiversity which is advantageous for adaptation to various ecological niches. Different species Burkholderia and Achromobacter strains all demonstrated similar BiofilmReg operon structure. Therefore, there may be an opportunity to develop a common drug which is effective for treating all these causative agents.

  7. Lung extracellular matrix and redox regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Walter H; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; Roman, Jesse

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis affects millions worldwide and, even though there has been a significant investment in understanding the processes involved in wound healing and maladaptive repair, a complete understanding of the mechanisms responsible for lung fibrogenesis eludes us, and interventions capable of reversing or halting disease progression are not available. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the excessive expression and uncontrolled deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins resulting in erosion of the tissue structure. Initially considered an 'end-stage' process elicited after injury, these events are now considered pathogenic and are believed to contribute to the course of the disease. By interacting with integrins capable of signal transduction and by influencing tissue mechanics, ECM proteins modulate processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to differentiation and growth factor expression. In doing so, ECM proteins help orchestrate complex developmental processes and maintain tissue homeostasis. However, poorly controlled deposition of ECM proteins promotes inflammation, fibroproliferation, and aberrant differentiation of cells, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, atherosclerosis and cancer. Considering their vital functions, ECM proteins are the target of investigation, and oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions have emerged as important regulators of the ECM. Oxidative stress invariably accompanies lung disease and promotes ECM expression directly or through the overproduction of pro-fibrotic growth factors, while affecting integrin binding and activation. In vitro and in vivo investigations point to redox reactions as targets for intervention in pulmonary fibrosis and related disorders, but studies in humans have been disappointing probably due to the narrow impact of the interventions tested, and our poor understanding of the factors that regulate these complex reactions. This review is not meant to

  8. Lung extracellular matrix and redox regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter H. Watson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary fibrosis affects millions worldwide and, even though there has been a significant investment in understanding the processes involved in wound healing and maladaptive repair, a complete understanding of the mechanisms responsible for lung fibrogenesis eludes us, and interventions capable of reversing or halting disease progression are not available. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the excessive expression and uncontrolled deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins resulting in erosion of the tissue structure. Initially considered an ‘end-stage’ process elicited after injury, these events are now considered pathogenic and are believed to contribute to the course of the disease. By interacting with integrins capable of signal transduction and by influencing tissue mechanics, ECM proteins modulate processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to differentiation and growth factor expression. In doing so, ECM proteins help orchestrate complex developmental processes and maintain tissue homeostasis. However, poorly controlled deposition of ECM proteins promotes inflammation, fibroproliferation, and aberrant differentiation of cells, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, atherosclerosis and cancer. Considering their vital functions, ECM proteins are the target of investigation, and oxidation–reduction (redox reactions have emerged as important regulators of the ECM. Oxidative stress invariably accompanies lung disease and promotes ECM expression directly or through the overproduction of pro-fibrotic growth factors, while affecting integrin binding and activation. In vitro and in vivo investigations point to redox reactions as targets for intervention in pulmonary fibrosis and related disorders, but studies in humans have been disappointing probably due to the narrow impact of the interventions tested, and our poor understanding of the factors that regulate these complex reactions. This

  9. The MerR-like regulator BrlR confers biofilm tolerance by activating multidrug efflux pumps in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Julie; Schurr, Michael J; Sauer, Karin

    2013-08-01

    A defining characteristic of biofilms is antibiotic tolerance that can be up to 1,000-fold greater than that of planktonic cells. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, biofilm tolerance to antimicrobial agents requires the biofilm-specific MerR-type transcriptional regulator BrlR. However, the mechanism by which BrlR mediates biofilm tolerance has not been elucidated. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling indicated that brlR was required for maximal expression of genes associated with antibiotic resistance, in particular those encoding the multidrug efflux pumps MexAB-OprM and MexEF-OprN. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis revealed a direct regulation of these genes by BrlR, with DNA binding assays confirming BrlR binding to the promoter regions of the mexAB-oprM and mexEF-oprN operons. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis further indicated BrlR to be an activator of mexAB-oprM and mexEF-oprN gene expression. Moreover, immunoblot analysis confirmed increased MexA abundance in cells overexpressing brlR. Inactivation of both efflux pumps rendered biofilms significantly more susceptible to five different classes of antibiotics by affecting MIC but not the recalcitrance of biofilms to killing by bactericidal agents. Overexpression of either efflux pump in a ΔbrlR strain partly restored tolerance of ΔbrlR biofilms to antibiotics. Expression of brlR in mutant biofilms lacking both efflux pumps partly restored antimicrobial tolerance of biofilms to wild-type levels. Our results indicate that BrlR acts as an activator of multidrug efflux pumps to confer tolerance to P. aeruginosa biofilms and to resist the action of antimicrobial agents.

  10. Beneficial biofilms

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    Sara R Robertson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Surface-adherent biofilm growth is a common trait of bacteria and other microorganisms in nature. Within biofilms, organisms are present in high density and are enmeshed in an organic matrix containing polysaccharides and other molecules. The close proximity of organisms within biofilms facilitates microbial interactions and signaling, including many metabolic processes in which consortia rather than individual organisms participate. Biofilm growth also enables microorganisms to withstand chemical and biological stresses. Here, we review some current literature and document representative beneficial aspects of biofilms using examples from wastewater treatment, microbial fuel cells, biological repair (biocementation of stonework, and biofilm protection against Candida albicans infections. Finally, we address a chemical ecology strategy whereby desired microbial succession and beneficial biofilm formation can be encouraged via manipulation of culture conditions and bacterial signaling.

  11. Contact-dependent regulation of a Tannerella forsythia virulence factor, BspA, in biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Satoru; Kuramitsu, Howard K; Sharma, Ashu

    2005-08-15

    Tannerella forsythia is one of the periodontal organisms implicated in the development of periodontal diseases. The surface associated and secreted protein, BspA (encoded by the bspA gene), of this bacterium is an important virulence factor. The present study was carried out to examine the regulation of the bspA gene during biofilm growth and contact stimuli encountered in interbacterial interactions. The expression levels of the bspA transcript were determined by real-time RT-PCR approach. The levels of bspA transcript were found to be significantly reduced as a result of contact stimulus and in biofilm cells relative to planktonic cells. The results of our study suggest that the likely downregulation of the BspA protein in biofilms and following contact may have implications in pathogenesis as a plausible mechanism of evasion of host immune responses.

  12. The c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase BifA regulates biofilm development in Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Fernández, Alicia; López-Sánchez, Aroa; Calero, Patricia; Govantes, Fernando

    2015-02-01

    We previously showed the isolation of biofilmpersistent Pseudomonas putida mutants that fail to undergo biofilm dispersal upon entry in stationary phase. Two such mutants were found to bear insertions in PP0914, encoding a GGDEF/EAL domain protein with high similarity to Pseudomon asaeruginosa BifA. Here we show the phenotypic characterization of a ΔbifA mutant in P. putida KT2442.This mutant displayed increased biofilm and pellicle formation, cell aggregation in liquid medium and decreased starvation-induced biofilm dispersal relative to the wild type. Unlike its P. aeruginosa counterpart, P. putida BifA did not affect swarming motility. The hyperadherent phenotype of the ΔbifA mutant correlates with a general increase in cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) levels, Congo Red-binding exopolyaccharide production and transcription of the adhesin-encoding lapA gene. Integrity of the EAL motif and a modified GGDEF motif (altered to GGDQF)were crucial for BifA activity, and c-di-GMP depletion by overexpression of a heterologous c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase in the ΔbifA mutant restored wild-type biofilm dispersal and lapA expression.Our results indicate that BifA is a phosphodiesterase involved in the regulation of the c-di-GMP pool and required for the generation of the low c-di-GMP signal that triggers starvation-induced biofilm dispersal.

  13. Iron-regulated biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus Newman requires ica and the secreted protein Emp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Miranda; Cockayne, Alan; Morrissey, Julie A

    2008-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation is induced in iron-restricted growth conditions in vitro. In this study, we showed that Emp and Eap play important roles in low-iron-induced biofilm formation of S. aureus Newman. Eap and Emp are secreted proteins which are non-covalently attached to the S. aureus cell surface and have previously been implicated in a number of aspects of S. aureus pathogenesis. We showed here that the transcription of these important virulence factors is induced by growth in low-iron medium, reflective of the in vivo environment. Our results show that iron regulation of Eap and Emp is Fur independent. However, Fur is required for full induction of eap and emp expression in low-iron conditions. In this study, we demonstrated that in addition to Fur, low-iron-induced biofilm formation requires Sae, Agr, and SarA. In iron-restricted growth conditions, Sae and Agr are essential for Emp and Eap expression and hence for biofilm formation, whereas SarA appears to have a less-significant role. We also showed that expression of the ica operon is required for biofilm formation in iron-restricted growth conditions. We demonstrated that in fact, ica is required for the expression of the important multifunctional virulence determinants eap and emp.

  14. An update on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, tolerance, and dispersal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Morten; Yang, Liang; Pamp, Sünje Johanna

    2010-01-01

    . aeruginosa biofilms. The second messenger, c-di-GMP, is established as an important regulator of the synthesis of polysaccharide and protein components of the biofilm matrix. Extracellular DNA is shown to be an essential component of the biofilm matrix. It has become apparent that biofilm formation involves......We review the recent advances in the understanding of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm lifestyle from studies using in vitro laboratory setups such as flow chambers and microtiter trays. Recent work sheds light on the role of nutrients, motility, and quorum sensing in structure formation in P...... interactions between different subpopulations. The molecular mechanisms underlying the tolerance of biofilm bacteria to antimicrobial agents are beginning to be unraveled, and new knowledge has been obtained regarding the environmental cues and regulatory mechanisms involved in biofilm dispersal....

  15. CRP-Mediated Carbon Catabolite Regulation of Yersinia pestis Biofilm Formation Is Enhanced by the Carbon Storage Regulator Protein, CsrA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan P Willias

    Full Text Available The natural transmission of Yersinia pestis is reliant upon biofilm blockage of the flea vector. However, the environmentally-responsive adaptive regulators which facilitate Y. pestis biofilm production in accordance with the flea midgut milieu are not well understood. We seek to establish the impact of available carbon source metabolism and storage upon Y. pestis biofilm production. Our findings demonstrate that Y. pestis biofilm production is subject to carbon catabolite regulation in which the presence of glucose impairs biofilm production; whereas, the sole metabolism of alternate carbon sources promotes robust biofilm formation. This observation is facilitated by the cAMP receptor protein, CRP. In accordance with a stark growth defect, deletion of crp in both CO92 and KIM6+ Y. pestis strains significantly impaired biofilm production when solely utilizing alternate carbon sources. Media supplementation with cAMP, a small-molecule activator of CRP, did not significantly alter Y. pestis biofilm production. Furthermore, CRP did not alter mRNA abundance of previously-characterized hms biofilm synthesis and regulation factors. Therefore, our findings indicate CRP does not confer a direct stimulatory effect, but may indirectly promote Y. pestis biofilm production by facilitating the alternate carbon source expression profile. Additionally, we assessed the impact of the carbon storage regulator protein, CsrA, upon Y. pestis biofilm production. Contrary to what has been described for E. coli, Y. pestis biofilm formation was found to be enhanced by CsrA. Regardless of media composition and available carbon source, deletion of csrA significantly impaired Y. pestis biofilm production. CsrA was found to promote Y. pestis biofilm production independent of glycogen regulation. Loss of csrA did not significantly alter relative hmsH, hmsP, or hmsT mRNA abundance. However, deletion of hmsP in the csrA-deficient mutant enabled excessive biofilm production

  16. DNA builds and strengthens the extracellular matrix in Myxococcus xanthus biofilms by interacting with exopolysaccharides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hu

    Full Text Available One intriguing discovery in modern microbiology is the extensive presence of extracellular DNA (eDNA within biofilms of various bacterial species. Although several biological functions have been suggested for eDNA, including involvement in biofilm formation, the detailed mechanism of eDNA integration into biofilm architecture is still poorly understood. In the biofilms formed by Myxococcus xanthus, a Gram-negative soil bacterium with complex morphogenesis and social behaviors, DNA was found within both extracted and native extracellular matrices (ECM. Further examination revealed that these eDNA molecules formed well organized structures that were similar in appearance to the organization of exopolysaccharides (EPS in ECM. Biochemical and image analyses confirmed that eDNA bound to and colocalized with EPS within the ECM of starvation biofilms and fruiting bodies. In addition, ECM containing eDNA exhibited greater physical strength and biological stress resistance compared to DNase I treated ECM. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that DNA interacts with EPS and strengthens biofilm structures in M. xanthus.

  17. Characterization of smart auto-degradative hydrogel matrix containing alginate lyase to enhance levofloxacin delivery against bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islan, German A; Dini, Cecilia; Bartel, Laura C; Bolzán, Alejandro D; Castro, Guillermo R

    2015-12-30

    The aim of the present work is the characterization of smart auto-degradable microspheres composed of calcium alginate/high methoxylated pectin containing an alginate lyase (AL) from Sphingobacterium multivorum and levofloxacin. Microspheres were prepared by ionotropic gelation containing AL in its inactive form at pH 4.0. Incubation of microspheres in Tris-HCl and PBS buffers at pH 7.40 allowed to establish the effect of ion-chelating phosphate on matrix erodability and suggested an intrinsically activation of AL by turning the pH close to neutrality. Scanning electron and optical microscopies revealed the presence of holes and surface changes in AL containing microspheres. Furthermore, texturometric parameters, DSC profiles and swelling properties were showing strong changes in microspheres properties. Encapsulation of levofloxacin into microspheres containing AL showed 70% efficiency and 35% enhancement of antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm. Levofloxacin release from microspheres was not changed at acidic pH, but was modified at neutral pH in presence of AL. Advantageously, only gel matrix debris were detectable after overnight incubation, indicating an autodegradative gel process activated by the pH. Absence of matrix cytotoxicity and a reduction of the levofloxacin toxicity after encapsulation were observed in mammalian CHO-K1 cell cultures. These properties make the system a potent and versatile tool for antibiotic oral delivery targeted to intestine, enhancing the drug bioavailability to eradicate bacterial biofilm and avoiding possible intestinal obstructions.

  18. Versatility of Biofilm Matrix Molecules in Staphylococcus epidermidis Clinical Isolates and Importance of Polysaccharide Intercellular Adhesin Expression during High Shear Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Carolyn R.; Hoang, Tra-My N.; Sudbeck, Craig M.; Alawi, Malik; Tolo, Isaiah E.; Robinson, D. Ashley; Horswill, Alexander R.; Rohde, Holger

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus epidermidis is a leading cause of hospital-associated infections, including those of intravascular catheters, cerebrospinal fluid shunts, and orthopedic implants. Multiple biofilm matrix molecules with heterogeneous characteristics have been identified, including proteinaceous, polysaccharide, and nucleic acid factors. Two of the best-studied components in S. epidermidis include accumulation-associated protein (Aap) and polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA), produced by the enzymatic products of the icaADBC operon. Biofilm composition varies by strain as well as environmental conditions, and strains producing PIA-mediated biofilms are more robust. Clinically, biofilm-mediated infections occur in a variety of anatomical sites with diverse physiological properties. To test the hypothesis that matrix composition exhibits niche specificity, biofilm-related genetic and physical properties were compared between S. epidermidis strains isolated from high-shear and low-shear environments. Among a collection of 105 clinical strains, significantly more isolates from high-shear environments carried the icaADBC operon than did those from low-shear settings (43.9% versus 22.9%, P 0.05). Additionally, a significantly greater number of high-shear isolates were capable of forming biofilm in vitro in a microtiter assay (82.5% versus 45.8%, P biofilm mechanisms. Sequencing of selected variants identified substitutions capable of enhancing biofilm formation in multiple genes, further highlighting the heterogeneity of S. epidermidis biofilm molecules and mechanisms. IMPORTANCE Staphylococcus epidermidis is a leading cause of infections related to biomaterials, mostly due to their ability to form biofilm. Biofilm accumulation mechanisms vary, including those that are dependent on specific proteins, environmental DNA (eDNA), or polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA). We found that those isolates obtained from high-shear environments, such as the lumen

  19. Regulation of type 1 fimbriae synthesis and biofilm formation by the transcriptional regulator LrhA of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumer, Caroline; Kleefeld, Alexandra; Lehnen, Daniela; Heintz, Margit; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Nagy, Gábor; Michaelis, Kai; Emödy, Levente; Polen, Tino; Rachel, Reinhard; Wendisch, Volker F; Unden, Gottfried

    2005-10-01

    Type 1 fimbriae of Escherichia coli facilitate attachment to the host mucosa and promote biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. The transcriptional regulator LrhA, which is known as a repressor of flagellar, motility and chemotaxis genes, regulates biofilm formation and expression of type 1 fimbriae. Whole-genome expression profiling revealed that inactivation of lrhA results in an increased expression of structural components of type 1 fimbriae. In vitro, LrhA bound to the promoter regions of the two fim recombinases (FimB and FimE) that catalyse the inversion of the fimA promoter, and to the invertible element itself. Translational lacZ fusions with these genes and quantification of fimE transcript levels by real-time PCR showed that LrhA influences type 1 fimbrial phase variation, primarily via activation of FimE, which is required for the ON-to-OFF transition of the fim switch. Enhanced type 1 fimbrial expression as a result of lrhA disruption was confirmed by mannose-sensitive agglutination of yeast cells. Biofilm formation was stimulated by lrhA inactivation and completely suppressed upon LrhA overproduction. The effects of LrhA on biofilm formation were exerted via the changed levels of surface molecules, most probably both flagella and type 1 fimbriae. Together, the data show a role for LrhA as a repressor of type 1 fimbrial expression, and thus as a regulator of the initial stages of biofilm development and, presumably, bacterial adherence to epithelial host cells also.

  20. Communication between a Matrix Converter Modulator and a Superset Regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pošta

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the modulator of a matrix converter and its communication with the superset regulator. A switching algorithm is briefly introduced. The input voltage measurement method is presented. In the last part of the paper, the testing of communication between the superset regulator and the modulator in FPGA technology are also presented. 

  1. Beta- lactam antibiotics stimulate biofilm formation in non-typeable haemophilus influenzae by up-regulating carbohydrate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Siva; Li, Xiaojin; Gunawardana, Manjula; Maguire, Kathleen; Guerrero-Given, Debbie; Schaudinn, Christoph; Wang, Charles; Baum, Marc M; Webster, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a common acute otitis media pathogen, with an incidence that is increased by previous antibiotic treatment. NTHi is also an emerging causative agent of other chronic infections in humans, some linked to morbidity, and all of which impose substantial treatment costs. In this study we explore the possibility that antibiotic exposure may stimulate biofilm formation by NTHi bacteria. We discovered that sub-inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotic (i.e., amounts that partially inhibit bacterial growth) stimulated the biofilm-forming ability of NTHi strains, an effect that was strain and antibiotic dependent. When exposed to sub-inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotics NTHi strains produced tightly packed biofilms with decreased numbers of culturable bacteria but increased biomass. The ratio of protein per unit weight of biofilm decreased as a result of antibiotic exposure. Antibiotic-stimulated biofilms had altered ultrastructure, and genes involved in glycogen production and transporter function were up regulated in response to antibiotic exposure. Down-regulated genes were linked to multiple metabolic processes but not those involved in stress response. Antibiotic-stimulated biofilm bacteria were more resistant to a lethal dose (10 µg/mL) of cefuroxime. Our results suggest that beta-lactam antibiotic exposure may act as a signaling molecule that promotes transformation into the biofilm phenotype. Loss of viable bacteria, increase in biofilm biomass and decreased protein production coupled with a concomitant up-regulation of genes involved with glycogen production might result in a biofilm of sessile, metabolically inactive bacteria sustained by stored glycogen. These biofilms may protect surviving bacteria from subsequent antibiotic challenges, and act as a reservoir of viable bacteria once antibiotic exposure has ended.

  2. Beta- lactam antibiotics stimulate biofilm formation in non-typeable haemophilus influenzae by up-regulating carbohydrate metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siva Wu

    Full Text Available Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi is a common acute otitis media pathogen, with an incidence that is increased by previous antibiotic treatment. NTHi is also an emerging causative agent of other chronic infections in humans, some linked to morbidity, and all of which impose substantial treatment costs. In this study we explore the possibility that antibiotic exposure may stimulate biofilm formation by NTHi bacteria. We discovered that sub-inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotic (i.e., amounts that partially inhibit bacterial growth stimulated the biofilm-forming ability of NTHi strains, an effect that was strain and antibiotic dependent. When exposed to sub-inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotics NTHi strains produced tightly packed biofilms with decreased numbers of culturable bacteria but increased biomass. The ratio of protein per unit weight of biofilm decreased as a result of antibiotic exposure. Antibiotic-stimulated biofilms had altered ultrastructure, and genes involved in glycogen production and transporter function were up regulated in response to antibiotic exposure. Down-regulated genes were linked to multiple metabolic processes but not those involved in stress response. Antibiotic-stimulated biofilm bacteria were more resistant to a lethal dose (10 µg/mL of cefuroxime. Our results suggest that beta-lactam antibiotic exposure may act as a signaling molecule that promotes transformation into the biofilm phenotype. Loss of viable bacteria, increase in biofilm biomass and decreased protein production coupled with a concomitant up-regulation of genes involved with glycogen production might result in a biofilm of sessile, metabolically inactive bacteria sustained by stored glycogen. These biofilms may protect surviving bacteria from subsequent antibiotic challenges, and act as a reservoir of viable bacteria once antibiotic exposure has ended.

  3. Sustained prevention of biofilm formation on a novel silicone matrix suitable for medical devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Søren Langer; Merete H., Vestergaard,; Jensen, Minna Grønning;

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial colonization and biofilm formation on medical devices constitute major challenges in clinical long-term use of e.g. catheters due to the risk of (re)infection of patients, which would result in additional use of antibiotics risking bacterial resistance development. The aim of the present...... in the range of 1–20 mg/mL. Devices containing 25% (w/w) hydrogel and loaded with ciprofloxacin displayed a strong antibacterial effect against Staphylococcus aureus bacterial colonization and subsequent biofilm formation on the device material was inhibited for 29 days. In conclusion, the hydrogel...

  4. Regulation of NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome gene expression levels in gingival fibroblasts by oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostanci, Nagihan; Meier, Andre; Guggenheim, Bernhard; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2011-01-01

    Periodontal disease is an inflammatory condition that destroys the tooth-supporting tissues. The inflammation is initiated by oral bacteria in the form of multi-species biofilms, and is dominated by cytokines of the IL-1 family. IL-1 activation and processing is regulated by Caspase-1, within intracellular protein complexes, known as "inflammasomes". The present study employed culture supernatants of in vitro supragingival and subgingival biofilms, to challenge human GF cultures for 6h. The gene expression of inflammasome complex components was investigated by TaqMan qPCR. NLRP1 expression was not affected, whereas NLRP2 was not expressed. Supragingival biofilm challenge increased the expression of Caspase-1, the adaptor ASC, AIM2, as well as IL-1β and IL-18, but did not affect NLRP3 expression. Subgingival biofilm challenge enhanced Caspase-1, ASC, AIM2, IL-1β and IL-18 gene expression at lower concentrations, followed by their down-regulation at higher concentrations, which was also evident for NLRP3 expression. Hence, supragingival and subgingival biofilms differentially regulate the gene expressions of NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasomes and their down-stream IL-1 targets. Increased inflammasome transcription in response to supragingival biofilms is commensurate with early inflammatory events in periodontal disease, whereas decreased transcription in response to subgingival biofilms corroborates the dampening of host immune responses, in favour of pathogen survival and persistence.

  5. Prevalence of Adhesion and Regulation of Biofilm-Related Genes in Different Clones of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Sahab Atshan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical information about genotypically different clones of biofilm-producing Staphylococcus aureus is largely unknown. We examined whether different clones of methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MSSA and MRSA differ with respect to staphylococcal microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs in biofilm formation. The study used 60 different types of spa and determined the phenotypes, the prevalence of the 13 MSCRAMM, and biofilm genes for each clone. The current investigation was carried out using a modified Congo red agar (MCRA, a microtiter plate assay (MPA, polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Clones belonging to the same spa type were found to have similar properties in adheringto thepolystyrene microtiter plate surface. However, their ability to produce slime on MCRA medium was different. PCR experiments showed that 60 clones of MSSA and MRSA were positive for 5 genes (out of 9 MSCRAMM genes. icaADBC genes were found to be present in all the 60 clones tested indicating a high prevalence, and these genes were equally distributed among the clones associated with MSSA and those with MRSA. The prevalence of other MSCRAMM genes among MSSA and MRSA clones was found to be variable. MRSA and MSSA gene expression (MSCRAMM and icaADBC was confirmed by RT-PCR.

  6. Cold Plasma Inactivation of Bacterial Biofilms and Reduction of Quorum Sensing Regulated Virulence Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Ziuzina

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this work were to investigate the effect of atmospheric cold plasma (ACP against a range of microbial biofilms commonly implicated in foodborne and healthcare associated human infections and against P. aeruginosa quorum sensing (QS-regulated virulence factors, such as pyocyanin, elastase (Las B and biofilm formation capacity post-ACP treatment. The effect of processing factors, namely treatment time and mode of plasma exposure on antimicrobial activity of ACP were also examined. Antibiofilm activity was assessed for E. coli, L. monocytogenes and S. aureus in terms of reduction of culturability and retention of metabolic activity using colony count and XTT assays, respectively. All samples were treated 'inpack' using sealed polypropylene containers with a high voltage dielectric barrier discharge ACP generated at 80 kV for 0, 60, 120 and 300 s and a post treatment storage time of 24 h. According to colony counts, ACP treatment for 60 s reduced populations of E. coli to undetectable levels, whereas 300 s was necessary to significantly reduce populations of L. monocytogenes and S. aureus biofilms. The results obtained from XTT assay indicated possible induction of viable but non culturable state of bacteria. With respect to P. aeruginosa QS-related virulence factors, the production of pyocyanin was significantly inhibited after short treatment times, but reduction of elastase was notable only after 300 s and no reduction in actual biofilm formation was achieved post-ACP treatment. Importantly, reduction of virulence factors was associated with reduction of the cytotoxic effects of the bacterial supernatant on CHO-K1 cells, regardless of mode and duration of treatment. The results of this study point to ACP technology as an effective strategy for inactivation of established biofilms and may play an important role in attenuation of virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Further investigation is warranted to propose direct evidence

  7. Protein-based biofilm matrices in Staphylococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro eSpeziale

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis are the most important etiological agents of biofilm associated-infections on indwelling medical devices. Biofilm infections may also develop independently of indwelling devices, e.g. in native valve endocarditis, bone tissue and open wounds. After attachment to tissue or indwelling medical devices that have been conditioned with host plasma proteins, staphylococcal biofilms grow and produce a specific environment which provides the conditions for cell-cell interaction and formation of multicellular communities. Bacteria living in biofilms express a variety of macromolecules, including exopolysaccharides, proteins, extracellular eDNA and other polymers. The S. aureus surface protein C and G (SasC and SasG, clumping factor B (ClfB, serine aspartate repeat protein (SdrC, the biofilm-associated protein (Bap and the fibronectin/fibrinogen-binding proteins (FnBPA and FnBPB are individually implicated in biofilm matrix formation. In S. epidermidis, a protein named accumulation-associated protein (Aap contributes to both the primary attachment phase and the establishment of intercellular connections by forming fibrils on the cell surface. In S. epidermidis proteinaceous biofilm formation can also be mediated by the extracellular matrix binding protein (Embp and S. epidermidis surface protein C (SesC. Additionally, multifunctional proteins such as extracellular adherence protein (Eap and extracellular matrix protein binding protein (Emp of S. aureus and the iron-regulated surface determinant protein C (IsdC of S. lugdunensis can promote biofilm formation in iron-depleted conditions. This multitude of proteins intervene at different stages of biofilm formation with certain proteins contributing to biofilm accumulation and others mediating primary attachment to surfaces. This review examines the contribution of proteins to biofilm formation in staphylococci. The potential to develop vaccines to prevent

  8. Growth regulation of Legionella Pneumophila in biofilms and amoebae; Wachstumsregulation von Legionella Pneumophila in Biofilmen und Amoeben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilbi, H.

    2006-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of studies made on the regulation of the growth of Legionella Pneumophila bacteria in biofilms and amoebae. In a first project, the formation of biofilms by Legionella Pneumophila bacteria was analysed in static and dynamic systems using a complex growth medium. Under static and dynamic clinical and environmental conditions, the adherence of the biofilms on polystyrene tissue was studied. This was also examined under dynamic flow conditions. In a second part of the project, the regulation of growth of Legionella Pneumophila in amoebae was examined in that changes were made to the genome of the bacteria. The importance of the work for the de-activation of Legionella Pneumophila bacteria in biofilms is noted in the conclusions of the report.

  9. Extracellular Polysaccharides Matrix - An Often Forgotten Virulence Factor in Oral Biofilm Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyun Koo; Jin Xiao; Marlise I. Klein

    2009-01-01

    @@ Oral diseases related to dental biofilms continue to afflict the majority of the world's population. Among them, dental caries continues to be the single most prevalent and costly oral infectious disease (Marsh, 2003; Dye et al., 2007). Dental caries results from the interaction of specific bacteria with constituents of the diet within a dental biofilm known as plaque (Bowen, 2002). Sucrose is considered to be the "arch criminal" from the dietary aspect because it serves as a substrate for synthesis of extracellular (EPS) and intracellular (IPS) polysaccharides in dental biofilm and is also fermentable (Bowen, 2002). However, it is important to emphasize that additional sugars and starch can certainly contribute to the pathogenesis (Bowen et al., 1980; Firestone et al., 1982; Thurnheer et al., 2008). Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), a member of the oral microbial community, is generally regarded as the primary microbial culprit although additional microorganisms may be involved (Hamada and Slade, 1980; Loesche, 1986; Beighton, 2005). This bacterium (i) effectively utilizes dietary sucrose (and possibly starch) to synthesize large amounts of EPS through glucosyltransferases (Gtfs) and a fructosyltransferase (Ftfs), (ii) adheres tenaciously to glucan-coated surfaces, and (iii) is also acidogenic and acid-tolerant, which are critical virulence properties involved in the pathogenesis of dental caries.

  10. Role of a GntR-family response regulator LbrA in Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Wassinger

    Full Text Available The formation of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms contributes to persistent contamination in food processing facilities. A microarray comparison of L. monocytogenes between the transcriptome of the strong biofilm forming strain (Bfm(s Scott A and the weak biofilm forming (Bfm(w strain F2365 was conducted to identify genes potentially involved in biofilm formation. Among 951 genes with significant difference in expression between the two strains, a GntR-family response regulator encoding gene (LMOf2365_0414, designated lbrA, was found to be highly expressed in Scott A relative to F2365. A Scott A lbrA-deletion mutant, designated AW3, formed biofilm to a much lesser extent as compared to the parent strain by a rapid attachment assay and scanning electron microscopy. Complementation with lbrA from Scott A restored the Bfm(s phenotype in the AW3 derivative. A second microarray assessment using the lbrA deletion mutant AW3 and the wild type Scott A revealed a total of 304 genes with expression significantly different between the two strains, indicating the potential regulatory role of LbrA in L. monocytogenes. A cloned copy of Scott A lbrA was unable to confer enhanced biofilm forming potential in F2365, suggesting that additional factors contributed to weak biofilm formation by F2365.

  11. Antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms: towards the development of novel anti-biofilm therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Patrick K; Yeung, Amy T Y; Hancock, Robert E W

    2014-12-10

    The growth of bacteria as structured aggregates termed biofilms leads to their protection from harsh environmental conditions such as physical and chemical stresses, shearing forces, and limited nutrient availability. Because of this highly adapted ability to survive adverse environmental conditions, bacterial biofilms are recalcitrant to antibiotic therapies and immune clearance. This is particularly problematic in hospital settings where biofilms are a frequent cause of chronic and device-related infections and constitute a significant burden on the health-care system. The major therapeutic strategy against infections is the use of antibiotics, which, due to adaptive resistance, are often insufficient to clear biofilm infections. Thus, novel biofilm-specific therapies are required. Specific features of biofilm development, such as surface adherence, extracellular matrix formation, quorum sensing, and highly regulated biofilm maturation and dispersal are currently being studied as targets to be exploited in the development of novel biofilm-specific treatments. Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa for illustrative purposes, this review highlights the antibiotic resistance mechanisms of biofilms, and discusses current research into novel biofilm-specific therapies.

  12. Staphylococcus aureus sarA regulates inflammation and colonization during central nervous system biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica N Snowden

    Full Text Available Infection is a frequent and serious complication following the treatment of hydrocephalus with CSF shunts, with limited therapeutic options because of biofilm formation along the catheter surface. Here we evaluated the possibility that the sarA regulatory locus engenders S. aureus more resistant to immune recognition in the central nervous system (CNS based on its reported ability to regulate biofilm formation. We utilized our established model of CNS catheter-associated infection, similar to CSF shunt infections seen in humans, to compare the kinetics of bacterial titers, cytokine production and inflammatory cell influx elicited by wild type S. aureus versus an isogenic sarA mutant. The sarA mutant was more rapidly cleared from infected catheters compared to its isogenic wild type strain. Consistent with this finding, several pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-17, CXCL1, and IL-1β were significantly increased in the brain following infection with the sarA mutant versus wild type S. aureus, in agreement with the fact that the sarA mutant displayed impaired biofilm growth and favored a planktonic state. Neutrophil influx into the infected hemisphere was also increased in the animals infected with the sarA mutant compared to wild type bacteria. These changes were not attributable to extracellular protease activity, which is increased in the context of SarA mutation, since similar responses were observed between sarA and a sarA/protease mutant. Overall, these results demonstrate that sarA plays an important role in attenuating the inflammatory response during staphylococcal biofilm infection in the CNS via a mechanism that remains to be determined.

  13. Differential Regulation of c-di-GMP Metabolic Enzymes by Environmental Signals Modulates Biofilm Formation in Yersinia pestis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Gai-Xian; Fan, Sai; Guo, Xiao-Peng; Chen, Shiyun; Sun, Yi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is essential for Yersinia pestis biofilm formation, which is important for flea-borne blockage-dependent plague transmission. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), HmsT and HmsD and one phosphodiesterase (PDE), HmsP are responsible for the synthesis and degradation of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Here, we systematically analyzed the effect of various environmental signals on regulation of the biofilm phenotype, the c-di-GMP levels, and expression of HmsT, HmsD, and HmsP in Y. pestis. Biofilm formation was higher in the presence of non-lethal high concentration of CaCl2, MgCl2, CuSO4, sucrose, sodium dodecyl sulfate, or dithiothreitol, and was lower in the presence of FeCl2 or NaCl. In addition, we found that HmsD plays a major role in biofilm formation in acidic or redox environments. These environmental signals differentially regulated expression of HmsT, HmsP and HmsD, resulting in changes in the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Our results suggest that bacteria can sense various environmental signals, and differentially regulate activity of DGCs and PDEs to coordinately regulate and adapt metabolism of c-di-GMP and biofilm formation to changing environments. PMID:27375563

  14. Differential Regulation of c-di-GMP Metabolic Enzymes by Environmental Signals Modulates Biofilm Formation in Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Gai-Xian; Fan, Sai; Guo, Xiao-Peng; Chen, Shiyun; Sun, Yi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is essential for Yersinia pestis biofilm formation, which is important for flea-borne blockage-dependent plague transmission. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), HmsT and HmsD and one phosphodiesterase (PDE), HmsP are responsible for the synthesis and degradation of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Here, we systematically analyzed the effect of various environmental signals on regulation of the biofilm phenotype, the c-di-GMP levels, and expression of HmsT, HmsD, and HmsP in Y. pestis. Biofilm formation was higher in the presence of non-lethal high concentration of CaCl2, MgCl2, CuSO4, sucrose, sodium dodecyl sulfate, or dithiothreitol, and was lower in the presence of FeCl2 or NaCl. In addition, we found that HmsD plays a major role in biofilm formation in acidic or redox environments. These environmental signals differentially regulated expression of HmsT, HmsP and HmsD, resulting in changes in the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Our results suggest that bacteria can sense various environmental signals, and differentially regulate activity of DGCs and PDEs to coordinately regulate and adapt metabolism of c-di-GMP and biofilm formation to changing environments.

  15. Differential regulation of c-di-GMP metabolic enzymes by environmental signals modulates biofilm formation in Yersinia pestis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gai-Xian eRen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP is essential for Yersinia pestis biofilm formation, which is important for flea-borne blockage-dependent plague transmission. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs, HmsT and HmsD and one phosphodiesterase (PDE, HmsP are responsible for the synthesis and degradation of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Here, we systematically analyzed the effect of various environmental signals on regulation of the biofilm phenotype, the c-di-GMP levels, and expression of HmsT, HmsD and HmsP in Y. pestis. Biofilm formation was higher in the presence of nonlethal high concentration of CaCl2, MgCl2, CuSO4, sucrose, sodium dodecyl sulfonate, or dithiothreitol, and was lower in the presence of FeCl2 or NaCl. In addition, we found that HmsD plays a major role in biofilm formation in acidic or redox environments. These environmental signals differentially regulated expression of HmsT, HmsP and HmsD, resulting in changes in the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Our results suggest that bacteria can sense various environmental signals, and differentially regulates their DGCs and PDEs to coordinately regulate and adapt metabolism of c-di-GMP and biofilm formation to changing environments.

  16. A novel two-component response regulator links rpf with biofilm formation and virulence of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Pi Huang

    Full Text Available Citrus bacterial canker caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri is a serious disease that impacts citrus production worldwide, and X. axonopodis pv. citri is listed as a quarantine pest in certain countries. Biofilm formation is important for the successful development of a pathogenic relationship between various bacteria and their host(s. To understand the mechanisms of biofilm formation by X. axonopodis pv. citri strain XW19, the strain was subjected to transposon mutagenesis. One mutant with a mutation in a two-component response regulator gene that was deficient in biofilm formation on a polystyrene microplate was selected for further study. The protein was designated as BfdR for biofilm formation defective regulator. BfdR from strain XW19 shares 100% amino acid sequence identity with XAC1284 of X. axonopodis pv. citri strain 306 and 30-100% identity with two-component response regulators in various pathogens and environmental microorganisms. The bfdR mutant strain exhibited significantly decreased biofilm formation on the leaf surfaces of Mexican lime compared with the wild type strain. The bfdR mutant was also compromised in its ability to cause canker lesions. The wild-type phenotype was restored by providing pbfdR in trans in the bfdR mutant. Our data indicated that BfdR did not regulate the production of virulence-related extracellular enzymes including amylase, lipase, protease, and lecithinase or the expression of hrpG, rfbC, and katE; however, BfdR controlled the expression of rpfF in XVM2 medium, which mimics cytoplasmic fluids in planta. In conclusion, biofilm formation on leaf surfaces of citrus is important for canker development in X. axonopodis pv. citri XW19. The process is controlled by the two-component response regulator BfdR via regulation of rpfF, which is required for the biosynthesis of a diffusible signal factor.

  17. Biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade we have gained much knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that are involved in initiation and termination of biofilm formation. In many bacteria, these processes appear to occur in response to specific environmental cues and result in, respectively, induction or terminat......During the past decade we have gained much knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that are involved in initiation and termination of biofilm formation. In many bacteria, these processes appear to occur in response to specific environmental cues and result in, respectively, induction...... or termination of biofilm matrix production via the second messenger molecule c-di-GMP. In between initiation and termination of biofilm formation we have defined specific biofilm stages, but the currently available evidence suggests that these transitions are mainly governed by adaptive responses......, and not by specific genetic programs. It appears that biofilm formation can occur through multiple pathways and that the spatial structure of the biofilms is species dependent as well as dependent on environmental conditions. Bacterial subpopulations, e.g., motile and nonmotile subpopulations, can develop...

  18. A novel technique using potassium permanganate and reflectance confocal microscopy to image biofilm extracellular polymeric matrix reveals non-eDNA networks in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearingen, Matthew C; Mehta, Ajeet; Mehta, Amar; Nistico, Laura; Hill, Preston J; Falzarano, Anthony R; Wozniak, Daniel J; Hall-Stoodley, Luanne; Stoodley, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Biofilms are etiologically important in the development of chronic medical and dental infections. The biofilm extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) determines biofilm structure and allows bacteria in biofilms to adapt to changes in mechanical loads such as fluid shear. However, EPS components are difficult to visualize microscopically because of their low density and molecular complexity. Here, we tested potassium permanganate, KMnO4, for use as a non-specific EPS contrast-enhancing stain using confocal laser scanning microscopy in reflectance mode. We demonstrate that KMnO4 reacted with EPS components of various strains of Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus, yielding brown MnO2 precipitate deposition on the EPS, which was quantifiable using data from the laser reflection detector. Furthermore, the MnO2 signal could be quantified in combination with fluorescent nucleic acid staining. COMSTAT image analysis indicated that KMnO4 staining increased the estimated biovolume over that determined by nucleic acid staining alone for all strains tested, and revealed non-eDNA EPS networks in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm. In vitro and in vivo testing indicated that KMnO4 reacted with poly-N-acetylglucosamine and Pseudomonas Pel polysaccharide, but did not react strongly with DNA or alginate. KMnO4 staining may have application as a research tool and for diagnostic potential for biofilms in clinical samples.

  19. Regulation of Osteoblast Survival by the Extracellular Matrix and Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus. Ruth K.; Almeida, Eduardo A. C.; Searby, Nancy D.; Bowley, Susan M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Spaceflight adversely affects the skeleton, posing a substantial risk to astronaut's health during long duration missions. The reduced bone mass observed in growing animals following spaceflight is due at least in part to inadequate bone formation by osteoblasts. Thus, it is of central importance to identify basic cellular mechanisms underlying normal bone formation. The fundamental ideas underlying our research are that interactions between extracellular matrix proteins, integrin adhesion receptors, cytoplasmic signaling and cytoskeletal proteins are key ingredients for the proper functioning of osteoblasts, and that gravity impacts these interactions. As an in vitro model system we used primary fetal rat calvarial cells which faithfully recapitulate osteoblast differentiation characteristically observed in vivo. We showed that specific integrin receptors ((alpha)3(beta)1), ((alpha)5(beta)1), ((alpha)8(betal)1) and extracellular matrix proteins (fibronectin, laminin) were needed for the differentiation of immature osteoblasts. In the course of maturation, cultured osteoblasts switched from depending on fibronectin and laminin for differentiation to depending on these proteins for their very survival. Furthermore, we found that manipulating the gravity vector using ground-based models resulted in activation of key intracellular survival signals generated by integrin/extracellular matrix interactions. We are currently testing the in vivo relevance of some of these observations using targeted transgenic technology. In conclusion, mechanical factors including gravity may participate in regulating survival via cellular interactions with the extracellular matrix. This leads us to speculate that microgravity adversely affects the survival of osteoblasts and contributes to spaceflight-induced osteoporosis.

  20. Two group A streptococcal peptide pheromones act through opposing Rgg regulators to control biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jennifer C; LaSarre, Breah; Jimenez, Juan C; Aggarwal, Chaitanya; Federle, Michael J

    2011-08-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus, GAS) is an important human commensal that occasionally causes localized infections and less frequently causes severe invasive disease with high mortality rates. How GAS regulates expression of factors used to colonize the host and avoid immune responses remains poorly understood. Intercellular communication is an important means by which bacteria coordinate gene expression to defend against host assaults and competing bacteria, yet no conserved cell-to-cell signaling system has been elucidated in GAS. Encoded within the GAS genome are four rgg-like genes, two of which (rgg2 and rgg3) have no previously described function. We tested the hypothesis that rgg2 or rgg3 rely on extracellular peptides to control target-gene regulation. We found that Rgg2 and Rgg3 together tightly regulate two linked genes encoding new peptide pheromones. Rgg2 activates transcription of and is required for full induction of the pheromone genes, while Rgg3 plays an antagonistic role and represses pheromone expression. The active pheromone signals, termed SHP2 and SHP3, are short and hydrophobic (DI[I/L]IIVGG), and, though highly similar in sequence, their ability to disrupt Rgg3-DNA complexes were observed to be different, indicating that specificity and differential activation of promoters are characteristics of the Rgg2/3 regulatory circuit. SHP-pheromone signaling requires an intact oligopeptide permease (opp) and a metalloprotease (eep), supporting the model that pro-peptides are secreted, processed to the mature form, and subsequently imported to the cytoplasm to interact directly with the Rgg receptors. At least one consequence of pheromone stimulation of the Rgg2/3 pathway is increased biogenesis of biofilms, which counteracts negative regulation of biofilms by RopB (Rgg1). These data provide the first demonstration that Rgg-dependent quorum sensing functions in GAS and substantiate the role that Rggs play as peptide receptors across the

  1. Two group A streptococcal peptide pheromones act through opposing Rgg regulators to control biofilm development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C Chang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus, GAS is an important human commensal that occasionally causes localized infections and less frequently causes severe invasive disease with high mortality rates. How GAS regulates expression of factors used to colonize the host and avoid immune responses remains poorly understood. Intercellular communication is an important means by which bacteria coordinate gene expression to defend against host assaults and competing bacteria, yet no conserved cell-to-cell signaling system has been elucidated in GAS. Encoded within the GAS genome are four rgg-like genes, two of which (rgg2 and rgg3 have no previously described function. We tested the hypothesis that rgg2 or rgg3 rely on extracellular peptides to control target-gene regulation. We found that Rgg2 and Rgg3 together tightly regulate two linked genes encoding new peptide pheromones. Rgg2 activates transcription of and is required for full induction of the pheromone genes, while Rgg3 plays an antagonistic role and represses pheromone expression. The active pheromone signals, termed SHP2 and SHP3, are short and hydrophobic (DI[I/L]IIVGG, and, though highly similar in sequence, their ability to disrupt Rgg3-DNA complexes were observed to be different, indicating that specificity and differential activation of promoters are characteristics of the Rgg2/3 regulatory circuit. SHP-pheromone signaling requires an intact oligopeptide permease (opp and a metalloprotease (eep, supporting the model that pro-peptides are secreted, processed to the mature form, and subsequently imported to the cytoplasm to interact directly with the Rgg receptors. At least one consequence of pheromone stimulation of the Rgg2/3 pathway is increased biogenesis of biofilms, which counteracts negative regulation of biofilms by RopB (Rgg1. These data provide the first demonstration that Rgg-dependent quorum sensing functions in GAS and substantiate the role that Rggs play as peptide

  2. Mechanism of regulation of stem cell differentiation by matrix stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hongwei; Li, Lisha; Sun, Meiyu; Zhang, Yin; Chen, Li; Rong, Yue; Li, Yulin

    2015-05-27

    Stem cell behaviors are regulated by multiple microenvironmental cues. As an external signal, mechanical stiffness of the extracellular matrix is capable of governing stem cell fate determination, but how this biophysical cue is translated into intracellular signaling remains elusive. Here, we elucidate mechanisms by which stem cells respond to microenvironmental stiffness through the dynamics of the cytoskeletal network, leading to changes in gene expression via biophysical transduction signaling pathways in two-dimensional culture. Furthermore, a putative rapid shift from original mechanosensing to de novo cell-derived matrix sensing in more physiologically relevant three-dimensional culture is pointed out. A comprehensive understanding of stem cell responses to this stimulus is essential for designing biomaterials that mimic the physiological environment and advancing stem cell-based clinical applications for tissue engineering.

  3. Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria can attach to any surface in contact with water and proliferate into complex communities enclosed in an adhesive matrix, these communities are called biofilms. The matrix makes the biofilm difficult to remove by physical means, and bacteria in biofilm can survive treatment with many...... to changing the surface hydrophobicity. The influence of surface topography in the biomolecule of great importance for bacterial adhesion...

  4. The regulation of matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ian M; Swingler, Tracey E; Sampieri, Clara L; Edwards, Dylan R

    2008-01-01

    The matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) are a family of 23 enzymes in man. These enzymes were originally described as cleaving extracellular matrix (ECM) substrates with a predominant role in ECM homeostasis, but it is now clear that they have much wider functionality. Control over MMP and/or tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) activity in vivo occurs at different levels and involves factors such as regulation of gene expression, activation of zymogens and inhibition of active enzymes by specific inhibitors. Whilst these enzymes and inhibitors have clear roles in physiological tissue turnover and homeostasis, if control of their expression or activity is lost, they contribute to a number of pathologies including e.g. cancer, arthritis and cardiovascular disease. The expression of many MMPs and TIMPs is regulated at the level of transcription by a variety of growth factors, cytokines and chemokines, though post-transcriptional pathways may contribute to this regulation in specific cases. The contribution of epigenetic modifications has also been uncovered in recent years. The promoter regions of many of these genes have been, at least partly, characterised including the role of identified single nucleotide polymorphisms. This article aims to review current knowledge across these gene families and use a bioinformatic approach to fill the gaps where no functional data are available.

  5. Extracellular Matrix Stiffness Regulates Osteogenic Differentiation through MAPK Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jun-Ha; Byun, Mi Ran; Kim, A Rum; Kim, Kyung Min; Cho, Hang Jun; Lee, Yo Han; Kim, Juwon; Jeong, Mi Gyeong; Hwang, Eun Sook; Hong, Jeong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation is regulated by the extracellular matrix (ECM) through activation of intracellular signaling mediators. The stiffness of the ECM was shown to be an important regulatory factor for MSC differentiation, and transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) was identified as an effector protein for MSC differentiation. However, the detailed underlying mechanism regarding the role of ECM stiffness and TAZ in MSC differentiation is not yet fully understood. In this report, we showed that ECM stiffness regulates MSC fate through ERK or JNK activation. Specifically, a stiff hydrogel matrix stimulates osteogenic differentiation concomitant with increased nuclear localization of TAZ, but inhibits adipogenic differentiation. ERK and JNK activity was significantly increased in cells cultured on a stiff hydrogel. TAZ activation was induced by ERK or JNK activation on a stiff hydrogel because exposure to an ERK or JNK inhibitor significantly decreased the nuclear localization of TAZ, indicating that ECM stiffness-induced ERK or JNK activation is important for TAZ-driven osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that ECM stiffness regulates MSC differentiation through ERK or JNK activation.

  6. Extracellular Matrix Stiffness Regulates Osteogenic Differentiation through MAPK Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ha Hwang

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC differentiation is regulated by the extracellular matrix (ECM through activation of intracellular signaling mediators. The stiffness of the ECM was shown to be an important regulatory factor for MSC differentiation, and transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ was identified as an effector protein for MSC differentiation. However, the detailed underlying mechanism regarding the role of ECM stiffness and TAZ in MSC differentiation is not yet fully understood. In this report, we showed that ECM stiffness regulates MSC fate through ERK or JNK activation. Specifically, a stiff hydrogel matrix stimulates osteogenic differentiation concomitant with increased nuclear localization of TAZ, but inhibits adipogenic differentiation. ERK and JNK activity was significantly increased in cells cultured on a stiff hydrogel. TAZ activation was induced by ERK or JNK activation on a stiff hydrogel because exposure to an ERK or JNK inhibitor significantly decreased the nuclear localization of TAZ, indicating that ECM stiffness-induced ERK or JNK activation is important for TAZ-driven osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that ECM stiffness regulates MSC differentiation through ERK or JNK activation.

  7. Proteins with GGDEF and EAL domains regulate Pseudomonas putida biofilm formation and dispersal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjermansen, Morten; Ragas, Paula Cornelia; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2006-01-01

    H protein, which contains an EAL domain, strongly inhibited biofilm formation. Induction of YhjH expression in P. putida cells situated in established biofilms led to rapid dispersion of the biofilms. These results support the emerging theme that GGDEF-domain and EAL-domain proteins are involved...

  8. Cellular contractility and extracellular matrix stiffness regulate matrix metalloproteinase activity in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haage, Amanda; Schneider, Ian C

    2014-08-01

    The pathogenesis of cancer is often driven by local invasion and metastasis. Recently, mechanical properties of the tumor microenvironment have been identified as potent regulators of invasion and metastasis, while matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are classically known as significant enhancers of cancer cell migration and invasion. Here we have been able to sensitively measure MMP activity changes in response to specific extracellular matrix (ECM) environments and cell contractility states. Cells of a pancreatic cancer cell line, Panc-1, up-regulate MMP activities between 3- and 10-fold with increased cell contractility. Conversely, they down-regulate MMP activities when contractility is blocked to levels seen with pan-MMP activity inhibitors. Similar, albeit attenuated, responses are seen in other pancreatic cancer cell lines, BxPC-3 and AsPC-1. In addition, MMP activity was modulated by substrate stiffness, collagen gel concentration, and the degree of collagen cross-linking, when cells were plated on collagen gels ranging from 0.5 to 5 mg/ml that span the physiological range of substrate stiffness (50-2000 Pa). Panc-1 cells showed enhanced MMP activity on stiffer substrates, whereas BxPC-3 and AsPC-1 cells showed diminished MMP activity. In addition, eliminating heparan sulfate proteoglycans using heparinase completely abrogated the mechanical induction of MMP activity. These results demonstrate the first functional link between MMP activity, contractility, and ECM stiffness and provide an explanation as to why stiffer environments result in enhanced cell migration and invasion.

  9. Complex regulatory network controls initial adhesion and biofilm formation in Escherichia coli via regulation of the csgD gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent-Combaret, C; Brombacher, E; Vidal, O; Ambert, A; Lejeune, P; Landini, P; Dorel, C

    2001-12-01

    The Escherichia coli OmpR/EnvZ two-component regulatory system, which senses environmental osmolarity, also regulates biofilm formation. Up mutations in the ompR gene, such as the ompR234 mutation, stimulate laboratory strains of E. coli to grow as a biofilm community rather than in a planktonic state. In this report, we show that the OmpR234 protein promotes biofilm formation by binding the csgD promoter region and stimulating its transcription. The csgD gene encodes the transcription regulator CsgD, which in turn activates transcription of the csgBA operon encoding curli, extracellular structures involved in bacterial adhesion. Consistent with the role of the ompR gene as part of an osmolarity-sensing regulatory system, we also show that the formation of biofilm by E. coli is inhibited by increasing osmolarity in the growth medium. The ompR234 mutation counteracts adhesion inhibition by high medium osmolarity; we provide evidence that the ompR234 mutation promotes biofilm formation by strongly increasing the initial adhesion of bacteria to an abiotic surface. This increase in initial adhesion is stationary phase dependent, but it is negatively regulated by the stationary-phase-specific sigma factor RpoS. We propose that this negative regulation takes place via rpoS-dependent transcription of the transcription regulator cpxR; cpxR-mediated repression of csgB and csgD promoters is also triggered by osmolarity and by curli overproduction, in a feedback regulation loop.

  10. 粪肠球菌生物膜细胞外聚合物的研究进展%Research progress on extracelluar matrix in Enterococcus faecalis biofilm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎卫兰

    2011-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a predominant organism that plays a major role in the etiology of persistent periradicular lesions after root canal treatment by forming biofilms. The matrix, which holds bacterial biofihns together, is a complex mixture of macromolecules including expolysaccharides, nucleic acid and protein. Extracelluar matrix contributes significantly to bacterial adhesion, biofilm structure and information exchanging between bacte-rias. This review mainly focused on the bioflim structure, extracelluar matrix and ways to eliminate the Enterococcus faecalis biofilm.%粪肠球菌是根管治疗后再感染的主要致病菌,常以生物膜的形式存在。包绕在细菌周围或黏附在细菌表面的糖类、核酸和分泌蛋白对粪肠球菌的初始黏附、生物膜空间结构和细菌间信息交流等起重要的作用。本文就粪肠球菌生物膜及其细胞外聚合物组分和去除方法作一综述。

  11. Regulation of ovarian function by the matrix metalloproteinase system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ In most organs of mammals, cyclic remodelling of tissues after morphogenesis is minimal; however, repro-ductive tissues of female animals including endometrium, mammary gland, ovarian follicle and corpus luteum un-dergo growth, maturation and involution at various stages in the reproductive cycle or lifespan of the animal. Recon-struction of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is required for the dynamic tissue reorganization characteristic of these tissues. The ECM consists of proteinaceous and nonpro-teinaceous molecules that provide the tissue-specific, ex-tracellular architecture to which cells attach. Furthermore, interaction of cellular receptors with proteins of the ECM can regulate cellular structure, second messenger genera-tion and gene expression. Maintenance of ECM homeo-stasis depends largely on coordinated action of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of met-alloproteinases (TIMPs)-- an important proteinase sys-tem responsible for degradating and remodelling of ECM[1]. MMPs/TIMPs have been recognized as the cru-cial role players in regulating follicular and luteal function for their extensive involvements in the cyclic changes of dynamic ovarian tissues. In recent years, literature that MMP system has important roles in ovary is accumulating. The focus of this review is on the effects of MMPs and their inhibitors, TIMPs on follicular growth, atresia, ovu-lation, luteal development, and luteolysis. Emphasis has been given to the recent progress in the new field when-ever possible.

  12. Matrix rigidity regulates cancer cell growth and cellular phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Tilghman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix have an important role in cell growth and differentiation. However, it is unclear as to what extent cancer cells respond to changes in the mechanical properties (rigidity/stiffness of the microenvironment and how this response varies among cancer cell lines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we used a recently developed 96-well plate system that arrays extracellular matrix-conjugated polyacrylamide gels that increase in stiffness by at least 50-fold across the plate. This plate was used to determine how changes in the rigidity of the extracellular matrix modulate the biological properties of tumor cells. The cell lines tested fall into one of two categories based on their proliferation on substrates of differing stiffness: "rigidity dependent" (those which show an increase in cell growth as extracellular rigidity is increased, and "rigidity independent" (those which grow equally on both soft and stiff substrates. Cells which grew poorly on soft gels also showed decreased spreading and migration under these conditions. More importantly, seeding the cell lines into the lungs of nude mice revealed that the ability of cells to grow on soft gels in vitro correlated with their ability to grow in a soft tissue environment in vivo. The lung carcinoma line A549 responded to culture on soft gels by expressing the differentiated epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expression of the mesenchymal transcription factor Slug. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations suggest that the mechanical properties of the matrix environment play a significant role in regulating the proliferation and the morphological properties of cancer cells. Further, the multiwell format of the soft-plate assay is a useful and effective adjunct to established 3-dimensional cell culture models.

  13. The CRP/FNR family protein Bcam1349 is a c-di-GMP effector that regulates biofilm formation in the respiratory pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazli, Mustafa; O'Connell, Aileen; Nilsson, Martin

    2011-01-01

    to control a wide range of functions in bacteria, but little is known about these regulatory mechanisms in B. cenocepacia. Here we investigated the role that c-di-GMP plays in the regulation of biofilm formation and virulence in B. cenocepacia. Elevated intracellular levels of c-di-GMP promoted wrinkly...... colony, pellicle and biofilm formation in B. cenocepacia. A screen for transposon mutants unable to respond to elevated levels of c-di-GMP led to the identification of the mutant bcam1349 that did not display increased biofilm and pellicle formation with excessive c-di-GMP levels, and displayed a biofilm...... larvae infection model. Taken together, these findings suggest that the Bcam1349 protein is a transcriptional regulator that binds c-di-GMP and regulates biofilm formation and virulence in B. cenocepacia in response to the level of c-di-GMP....

  14. Hsp90 governs dispersion and drug resistance of fungal biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Robbins

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Fungal biofilms are a major cause of human mortality and are recalcitrant to most treatments due to intrinsic drug resistance. These complex communities of multiple cell types form on indwelling medical devices and their eradication often requires surgical removal of infected devices. Here we implicate the molecular chaperone Hsp90 as a key regulator of biofilm dispersion and drug resistance. We previously established that in the leading human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, Hsp90 enables the emergence and maintenance of drug resistance in planktonic conditions by stabilizing the protein phosphatase calcineurin and MAPK Mkc1. Hsp90 also regulates temperature-dependent C. albicans morphogenesis through repression of cAMP-PKA signalling. Here we demonstrate that genetic depletion of Hsp90 reduced C. albicans biofilm growth and maturation in vitro and impaired dispersal of biofilm cells. Further, compromising Hsp90 function in vitro abrogated resistance of C. albicans biofilms to the most widely deployed class of antifungal drugs, the azoles. Depletion of Hsp90 led to reduction of calcineurin and Mkc1 in planktonic but not biofilm conditions, suggesting that Hsp90 regulates drug resistance through different mechanisms in these distinct cellular states. Reduction of Hsp90 levels led to a marked decrease in matrix glucan levels, providing a compelling mechanism through which Hsp90 might regulate biofilm azole resistance. Impairment of Hsp90 function genetically or pharmacologically transformed fluconazole from ineffectual to highly effective in eradicating biofilms in a rat venous catheter infection model. Finally, inhibition of Hsp90 reduced resistance of biofilms of the most lethal mould, Aspergillus fumigatus, to the newest class of antifungals to reach the clinic, the echinocandins. Thus, we establish a novel mechanism regulating biofilm drug resistance and dispersion and that targeting Hsp90 provides a much-needed strategy for improving

  15. Role of the Emp Pilus Subunits of Enterococcus faecium in Biofilm Formation, Adherence to Host Extracellular Matrix Components, and Experimental Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montealegre, Maria Camila; Singh, Kavindra V; Somarajan, Sudha R; Yadav, Puja; Chang, Chungyu; Spencer, Robert; Sillanpää, Jouko; Ton-That, Hung; Murray, Barbara E

    2016-05-01

    Enterococcus faecium is an important cause of hospital-associated infections, including urinary tract infections (UTIs), bacteremia, and infective endocarditis. Pili have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of Gram-positive bacteria, including E. faecium We previously demonstrated that a nonpiliated ΔempABC::cat derivative of E. faecium TX82 was attenuated in biofilm formation and in a UTI model. Here, we studied the contributions of the individual pilus subunits EmpA, EmpB, and EmpC to pilus architecture, biofilm formation, adherence to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, and infection. We identified EmpA as the tip of the pili and found that deletion of empA reduced biofilm formation to the same level as deletion of the empABC operon, a phenotype that was restored by reconstituting in situ the empA gene. Deletion of empB also caused a reduction in biofilm, while EmpC was found to be dispensable. Significant reductions in adherence to fibrinogen and collagen type I were observed with deletion of empA and empB, while deletion of empC had no adherence defect. Furthermore, we showed that each deletion mutant was significantly attenuated in comparison to the isogenic parental strain, TX82, in a mixed-inoculum UTI model (P Emp pilins are important for E. faecium to cause infection in the urinary tract.

  16. Integration of Posttranscriptional Gene Networks into Metabolic Adaptation and Biofilm Maturation in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyoti Verma-Gaur

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Candida albicans is a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen. Although both commensalism and pathogenesis depend on metabolic adaptation, the regulatory pathways that mediate metabolic processes in C. albicans are incompletely defined. For example, metabolic change is a major feature that distinguishes community growth of C. albicans in biofilms compared to suspension cultures, but how metabolic adaptation is functionally interfaced with the structural and gene regulatory changes that drive biofilm maturation remains to be fully understood. We show here that the RNA binding protein Puf3 regulates a posttranscriptional mRNA network in C. albicans that impacts on mitochondrial biogenesis, and provide the first functional data suggesting evolutionary rewiring of posttranscriptional gene regulation between the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. albicans. A proportion of the Puf3 mRNA network is differentially expressed in biofilms, and by using a mutant in the mRNA deadenylase CCR4 (the enzyme recruited to mRNAs by Puf3 to control transcript stability we show that posttranscriptional regulation is important for mitochondrial regulation in biofilms. Inactivation of CCR4 or dis-regulation of mitochondrial activity led to altered biofilm structure and over-production of extracellular matrix material. The extracellular matrix is critical for antifungal resistance and immune evasion, and yet of all biofilm maturation pathways extracellular matrix biogenesis is the least understood. We propose a model in which the hypoxic biofilm environment is sensed by regulators such as Ccr4 to orchestrate metabolic adaptation, as well as the regulation of extracellular matrix production by impacting on the expression of matrix-related cell wall genes. Therefore metabolic changes in biofilms might be intimately linked to a key biofilm maturation mechanism that ultimately results in untreatable fungal disease.

  17. A semi-quantitative approach to assess biofilm formation using wrinkled colony development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Valerie A; Morris, Andrew R; Visick, Karen L

    2012-06-07

    Biofilms, or surface-attached communities of cells encapsulated in an extracellular matrix, represent a common lifestyle for many bacteria. Within a biofilm, bacterial cells often exhibit altered physiology, including enhanced resistance to antibiotics and other environmental stresses. Additionally, biofilms can play important roles in host-microbe interactions. Biofilms develop when bacteria transition from individual, planktonic cells to form complex, multi-cellular communities. In the laboratory, biofilms are studied by assessing the development of specific biofilm phenotypes. A common biofilm phenotype involves the formation of wrinkled or rugose bacterial colonies on solid agar media. Wrinkled colony formation provides a particularly simple and useful means to identify and characterize bacterial strains exhibiting altered biofilm phenotypes, and to investigate environmental conditions that impact biofilm formation. Wrinkled colony formation serves as an indicator of biofilm formation in a variety of bacteria, including both Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus subtilis, and Gram-negative bacteria, such as Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Vibrio fischeri. The marine bacterium V. fischeri has become a model for biofilm formation due to the critical role of biofilms during host colonization: biofilms produced by V. fischeri promote its colonization of the Hawaiian bobtail squid Euprymna scolopes. Importantly, biofilm phenotypes observed in vitro correlate with the ability of V. fischeri cells to effectively colonize host animals: strains impaired for biofilm formation in vitro possess a colonization defect, while strains exhibiting increased biofilm phenotypes are enhanced for colonization. V. fischeri therefore provides a simple model system to assess the mechanisms by which bacteria regulate biofilm formation and how biofilms impact host colonization. In this report, we describe a semi-quantitative method to assess

  18. Substrate stiffness regulates extracellular matrix deposition by alveolar epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Eisenberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jessica L Eisenberg1,2, Asmahan Safi3, Xiaoding Wei3, Horacio D Espinosa3, GR Scott Budinger2, Desire Takawira1, Susan B Hopkinson1, Jonathan CR Jones1,21Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, 2Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA; 3Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USAAim: The aim of the study was to address whether a stiff substrate, a model for pulmonary fibrosis, is responsible for inducing changes in the phenotype of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC in the lung, including their deposition and organization of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins.Methods: Freshly isolated lung AEC from male Sprague Dawley rats were seeded onto polyacrylamide gel substrates of varying stiffness and analyzed for expression and organization of adhesion, cytoskeletal, differentiation, and ECM components by Western immunoblotting and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy.Results: We observed that substrate stiffness influences cell morphology and the organization of focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton. Surprisingly, however, we found that substrate stiffness has no influence on the differentiation of type II into type I AEC, nor does increased substrate stiffness lead to an epithelial–mesenchymal transition. In contrast, our data indicate that substrate stiffness regulates the expression of the α3 laminin subunit by AEC and the organization of both fibronectin and laminin in their ECM.Conclusions: An increase in substrate stiffness leads to enhanced laminin and fibronectin assembly into fibrils, which likely contributes to the disease phenotype in the fibrotic lung.Keywords: alveolar epithelial cells, fibrosis, extracellular matrix, substrate stiffness

  19. The NDR/LATS kinase Cbk1 controls the activity of the transcriptional regulator Bcr1 during biofilm formation in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Gutiérrez-Escribano

    Full Text Available In nature, many microorganisms form specialized complex, multicellular, surface-attached communities called biofilms. These communities play critical roles in microbial pathogenesis. The fungal pathogen Candida albicans is associated with catheter-based infections due to its ability to establish biofilms. The transcription factor Bcr1 is a master regulator of C. albicans biofilm development, although the full extent of its regulation remains unknown. Here, we report that Bcr1 is a phosphoprotein that physically interacts with the NDR kinase Cbk1 and undergoes Cbk1-dependent phosphorylation. Mutating the two putative Cbk1 phosphoacceptor residues in Bcr1 to alanine markedly impaired Bcr1 function during biofilm formation and virulence in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis. Cells lacking Cbk1, or any of its upstream activators, also had reduced biofilm development. Notably, mutating the two putative Cbk1 phosphoacceptor residues in Bcr1 to glutamate in cbk1Δ cells upregulated the transcription of Bcr1-dependent genes and partially rescued the biofilm defects of a cbk1Δ strain. Therefore, our data uncovered a novel role of the NDR/LATS kinase Cbk1 in the regulation of biofilm development through the control of Bcr1.

  20. The two-component signal transduction system ArlRS regulates Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation in an ica-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wu

    Full Text Available Due to its ability to form biofilms on medical devices, Staphylococcus epidermidis has emerged as a major pathogen of nosocomial infections. In this study, we investigated the role of the two-component signal transduction system ArlRS in regulating S. epidermidis biofilm formation. An ArlRS-deficient mutant, WW06, was constructed using S. epidermidis strain 1457 as a parental strain. Although the growth curve of WW06 was similar to that of SE1457, the mutant strain was unable to form biofilms in vitro. In a rabbit subcutaneous infection model, sterile disks made of polymeric materials were implanted subcutaneously followed with inoculation of WW06 or SE1457. The viable bacteria cells of WW06 recovered from biofilms on the embedded disks were much lower than that of SE1457. Complementation of arlRS genes expression from plasmid in WW06 restored biofilm-forming phenotype both in vivo and in vitro. WW06 maintained the ability to undergo initial attachment. Transcription levels of several genes involved in biofilm formation, including icaADBC, sigB, and sarA, were decreased in WW06, compared to SE1457; and icaR expression was increased in WW06, detected by real-time reverse-transcription PCR. The biofilm-forming phenotype was restored by overexpressing icaADBC in WW06 but not by overexpressing sigB, indicating that ArlRS regulates biofilm formation through the regulation of icaADBC. Gel shift assay showed that ArlR can bind to the promoter region of the ica operon. In conclusion, ArlRS regulates S. epidermidis biofilm formation in an ica-dependent manner, distinct from its role in S. aureus.

  1. Substrate stiffness regulates extracellular matrix deposition by alveolar epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Jessica L; Safi, Asmahan; Wei, Xiaoding; Espinosa, Horacio D; Budinger, GR Scott; Takawira, Desire; Hopkinson, Susan B; Jones, Jonathan CR

    2012-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to address whether a stiff substrate, a model for pulmonary fibrosis, is responsible for inducing changes in the phenotype of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) in the lung, including their deposition and organization of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Methods Freshly isolated lung AEC from male Sprague Dawley rats were seeded onto polyacrylamide gel substrates of varying stiffness and analyzed for expression and organization of adhesion, cytoskeletal, differentiation, and ECM components by Western immunoblotting and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Results We observed that substrate stiffness influences cell morphology and the organization of focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton. Surprisingly, however, we found that substrate stiffness has no influence on the differentiation of type II into type I AEC, nor does increased substrate stiffness lead to an epithelial–mesenchymal transition. In contrast, our data indicate that substrate stiffness regulates the expression of the α3 laminin subunit by AEC and the organization of both fibronectin and laminin in their ECM. Conclusions An increase in substrate stiffness leads to enhanced laminin and fibronectin assembly into fibrils, which likely contributes to the disease phenotype in the fibrotic lung. PMID:23204878

  2. Nuclease modulates biofilm formation in community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan R Kiedrowski

    Full Text Available Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA is an emerging contributor to biofilm-related infections. We recently reported that strains lacking sigma factor B (sigB in the USA300 lineage of CA-MRSA are unable to develop a biofilm. Interestingly, when spent media from a USA300 sigB mutant was incubated with other S. aureus strains, biofilm formation was inhibited. Following fractionation and mass spectrometry analysis, the major anti-biofilm factor identified in the spent media was secreted thermonuclease (Nuc. Considering reports that extracellular DNA (eDNA is an important component of the biofilm matrix, we investigated the regulation and role of Nuc in USA300. The expression of the nuc gene was increased in a sigB mutant, repressed by glucose supplementation, and was unaffected by the agr quorum-sensing system. A FRET assay for Nuc activity was developed and confirmed the regulatory results. A USA300 nuc mutant was constructed and displayed an enhanced biofilm-forming capacity, and the nuc mutant also accumulated more high molecular weight eDNA than the WT and regulatory mutant strains. Inactivation of nuc in the USA300 sigB mutant background partially repaired the sigB biofilm-negative phenotype, suggesting that nuc expression contributes to the inability of the mutant to form biofilm. To test the generality of the nuc mutant biofilm phenotypes, the mutation was introduced into other S. aureus genetic backgrounds and similar increases in biofilm formation were observed. Finally, using multiple S. aureus strains and regulatory mutants, an inverse correlation between Nuc activity and biofilm formation was demonstrated. Altogether, our findings confirm the important role for eDNA in the S. aureus biofilm matrix and indicates Nuc is a regulator of biofilm formation.

  3. Raffinose, a plant galactoside, inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation via binding to LecA and decreasing cellular cyclic diguanylate levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han-Shin; Cha, Eunji; Kim, Yunhye; Jeon, Young Ho; Olson, Betty H.; Byun, Youngjoo; Park, Hee-Deung

    2016-05-01

    Biofilm formation on biotic or abiotic surfaces has unwanted consequences in medical, clinical, and industrial settings. Treatments with antibiotics or biocides are often ineffective in eradicating biofilms. Promising alternatives to conventional agents are biofilm-inhibiting compounds regulating biofilm development without toxicity to growth. Here, we screened a biofilm inhibitor, raffinose, derived from ginger. Raffinose, a galactotrisaccharide, showed efficient biofilm inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa without impairing its growth. Raffinose also affected various phenotypes such as colony morphology, matrix formation, and swarming motility. Binding of raffinose to a carbohydrate-binding protein called LecA was the cause of biofilm inhibition and altered phenotypes. Furthermore, raffinose reduced the concentration of the second messenger, cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP), by increased activity of a c-di-GMP specific phosphodiesterase. The ability of raffinose to inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and its molecular mechanism opens new possibilities for pharmacological and industrial applications.

  4. Influence of clove oil on certain quorum-sensing-regulated functions and biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aeromonas hydrophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fohad Mabood Husain; Iqbal Ahmad; Mohammad Asif; Qudsia Tahseen

    2013-12-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) plays an important role in virulence, biofilm formation and survival of many pathogenic bacteria including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This signalling pathway is considered as novel and promising target for anti-infective agents. In the present investigation, effect of the Sub-MICs of clove oil on QS regulated virulence factors and biofilm formation was evaluated against P. aeruginosa PAO1 and Aeromonas hydrophila WAF-38 strain. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of the clove oil demonstrated statistically significant reduction of las- and rhl-regulated virulence factors such as LasB, total protease, chitinase and pyocyanin production, swimming motility and exopolysaccharide production. The biofilm forming capability of PAO1 and A. hydrophila WAF-38 was also reduced in a concentration-dependent manner at all tested sub-MIC values. Further, the PAO1-preinfected Caenorhabditis elegans displayed an enhanced survival when treated with 1.6% v/v of clove oil. The above findings highlight the promising anti-QS-dependent therapeutic function of clove oil against P. aeruginosa.

  5. Differential RNA-seq of Vibrio cholerae identifies the VqmR small RNA as a regulator of biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenfort, Kai; Förstner, Konrad U; Cong, Jian-Ping; Sharma, Cynthia M; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2015-02-17

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a process of cell-to-cell communication that enables bacteria to transition between individual and collective lifestyles. QS controls virulence and biofilm formation in Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera disease. Differential RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) of wild-type V. cholerae and a locked low-cell-density QS-mutant strain identified 7,240 transcriptional start sites with ∼ 47% initiated in the antisense direction. A total of 107 of the transcripts do not appear to encode proteins, suggesting they specify regulatory RNAs. We focused on one such transcript that we name VqmR. vqmR is located upstream of the vqmA gene encoding a DNA-binding transcription factor. Mutagenesis and microarray analyses demonstrate that VqmA activates vqmR transcription, that vqmR encodes a regulatory RNA, and VqmR directly controls at least eight mRNA targets including the rtx (repeats in toxin) toxin genes and the vpsT transcriptional regulator of biofilm production. We show that VqmR inhibits biofilm formation through repression of vpsT. Together, these data provide to our knowledege the first global annotation of the transcriptional start sites in V. cholerae and highlight the importance of posttranscriptional regulation for collective behaviors in this human pathogen.

  6. Quorum-sensing systems LuxS/autoinducer 2 and Com regulate Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilms in a bioreactor with living cultures of human respiratory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Jorge E; Howery, Kristen E; Ludewick, Herbert P; Nava, Porfirio; Klugman, Keith P

    2013-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae forms organized biofilms in the human upper respiratory tract that may play an essential role in both persistence and acute respiratory infection. However, the production and regulation of biofilms on human cells is not yet fully understood. In this work, we developed a bioreactor with living cultures of human respiratory epithelial cells (HREC) and a continuous flow of nutrients, mimicking the microenvironment of the human respiratory epithelium, to study the production and regulation of S. pneumoniae biofilms (SPB). SPB were also produced under static conditions on immobilized HREC. Our experiments demonstrated that the biomass of SPB increased significantly when grown on HREC compared to the amount on abiotic surfaces. Additionally, pneumococcal strains produced more early biofilms on lung cells than on pharyngeal cells. Utilizing the bioreactor or immobilized human cells, the production of early SPB was found to be regulated by two quorum-sensing systems, Com and LuxS/AI-2, since a mutation in either comC or luxS rendered the pneumococcus unable to produce early biofilms on HREC. Interestingly, while LuxS/autoinducer 2 (AI-2) regulated biofilms on both HREC and abiotic surfaces, Com control was specific for those structures produced on HREC. The biofilm phenotypes of strain D39-derivative ΔcomC and ΔluxS QS mutants were reversed by genetic complementation. Of note, SPB formed on immobilized HREC and incubated under static conditions were completely lysed 24 h postinoculation. Biofilm lysis was also regulated by the Com and LuxS/AI-2 quorum-sensing systems.

  7. Beneficial Regulation of Matrix Metalloproteinases for Skin Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Neena; Auler, Susan; Hugo, Raul; Gonzalez, Salvador

    2011-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are essential to the remodeling of the extracellular matrix. While their upregulation facilitates aging and cancer, they are essential to epidermal differentiation and the prevention of wound scars. The pharmaceutical industry is active in identifying products that inhibit MMPs to prevent or treat aging and cancer and products that stimulate MMPs to prevent epidermal hyperproliferative diseases and wound scars. PMID:21423679

  8. Alternative mating type configurations (a/α versus a/a or α/α of Candida albicans result in alternative biofilms regulated by different pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Yi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Similar multicellular structures can evolve within the same organism that may have different evolutionary histories, be controlled by different regulatory pathways, and play similar but nonidentical roles. In the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, a quite extraordinary example of this has occurred. Depending upon the configuration of the mating type locus (a/α versus a/a or α/α, C. albicans forms alternative biofilms that appear similar morphologically, but exhibit dramatically different characteristics and are regulated by distinctly different signal transduction pathways. Biofilms formed by a/α cells are impermeable to molecules in the size range of 300 Da to 140 kDa, are poorly penetrated by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs, and are resistant to antifungals. In contrast, a/a or α/α biofilms are permeable to molecules in this size range, are readily penetrated by PMNs, and are susceptible to antifungals. By mutational analyses, a/α biofilms are demonstrated to be regulated by the Ras1/cAMP pathway that includes Ras1→Cdc35→cAMP(Pde2-|→Tpk2(Tpk1→Efg1→Tec1→Bcr1, and a/a biofilms by the MAP kinase pathway that includes Mfα→Ste2→ (Ste4, Ste18, Cag1→Ste11→Hst7→Cek2(Cek1→Tec1. These observations suggest the hypothesis that while the upstream portion of the newly evolved pathway regulating a/a and α/α cell biofilms was derived intact from the upstream portion of the conserved pheromone-regulated pathway for mating, the downstream portion was derived through modification of the downstream portion of the conserved pathway for a/α biofilm formation. C. albicans therefore forms two alternative biofilms depending upon mating configuration.

  9. Effects of Iron on DNA Release and Biofilm Development by Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Barken, Kim Bundvig; Skindersø, Mette Elena;

    2007-01-01

    Extracellular DNA is one of the major matrix components in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. It functions as an intercellular connector and plays a role in stabilization of the biofilms. Evidence that DNA release in P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms is controlled by the las-rhl and pqs quorum......-sensing systems has been previously presented. This paper provides evidence that DNA release in P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms is also under iron regulation. Experiments involving cultivation of P. aeruginosa in microtitre trays suggested that pqs expression, DNA release and biofilm formation were favoured in media...... with low iron concentrations (5 mu M FeCIA and decreased with increasing iron concentrations. Experiments involving cultivation of P. aeruginosa in a flow-chamber system suggested that a high level of iron (1100 mu M FeCl3) in the medium suppressed DNA release, structural biofilm development...

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria in natural, industrial and clinical settings predominantly live in biofilms, i.e., sessile structured microbial communities encased in self-produced extracellular matrix material. One of the most important characteristics of microbial biofilms is that the resident bacteria display...... a remarkable increased tolerance toward antimicrobial attack. Biofilms formed by opportunistic pathogenic bacteria are involved in devastating persistent medical device-associated infections, and chronic infections in individuals who are immune-compromised or otherwise impaired in the host defense. Because...... the use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  11. Effects of CO2 laser irradiation on matrix-rich biofilm development formation–an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Raquel Zancopé

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background A carbon dioxide (CO2 laser has been used to morphologically and chemically modify the dental enamel surface as well as to make it more resistant to demineralization. Despite a variety of experiments demonstrating the inhibitory effect of a CO2 laser in reduce enamel demineralization, little is known about the effect of surface irradiated on bacterial growth. Thus, this in vitro study was preformed to evaluate the biofilm formation on enamel previously irradiated with a CO2 laser (λ = 10.6 µM. Methods For this in vitro study, 96 specimens of bovine enamel were employed, which were divided into two groups (n = 48: 1 Control-non-irradiated surface and 2 Irradiated enamel surface. Biofilms were grown on the enamel specimens by one, three and five days under intermittent cariogenic condition in the irradiated and non-irradiated surface. In each assessment time, the biofilm were evaluated by dry weigh, counting the number of viable colonies and, in fifth day, were evaluated by polysaccharides analysis, quantitative real time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR as well as by contact angle. In addition, the morphology of biofilms was characterized by fluorescence microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM. Initially, the assumptions of equal variances and normal distribution of errors were conferred and the results are analyzed statistically by t-test and Mann Whitney test. Results The mean of log CFU/mL obtained for the one-day biofilm evaluation showed that there is statistical difference between the experimental groups. When biofilms were exposed to the CO2 laser, CFU/mL and CFU/dry weight in three day was reduced significantly compared with control group. The difference in the genes expression (Glucosyltransferases (gtfB and Glucan-binding protein (gbpB and polysaccharides was not statically significant. Contact angle was increased relative to control when the surface was irradiated with the CO2 laser. Similar

  12. Type III methyltransferase M.NgoAX from Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 regulates biofilm formation and human cell invasion

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    Agnieszka eKwiatek

    2015-12-01

    , but more easily penetrate inside the host cells. All these data suggest that the NgoAX methyltransferase, may be implicated in N. gonorrhoeae pathogenicity, involving regulation of biofilm formation, adhesion to host cells and epithelial cell invasion.

  13. Molecular Control of Vascular Tube Morphogenesis and Stabilization: Regulation by Extracellular Matrix, Matrix Metalloproteinases, and Endothelial Cell-Pericyte Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, George E.; Stratman, Amber N.; Sacharidou, Anastasia

    Recent studies have revealed a critical role for both extracellular matrices and matrix metalloproteinases in the molecular control of vascular morphogenesis and stabilization in three-dimensional (3D) tissue environments. Key interactions involve endothelial cells (ECs) and pericytes, which coassemble to affect vessel formation, remodeling, and stabilization events during development and postnatal life. EC-pericyte interactions control extracellular matrix remodeling events including vascular basement membrane matrix assembly, a necessary step for endothelial tube maturation and stabilization. ECs form tube networks in 3D extracellular matrices in a manner dependent on integrins, membrane-type metalloproteinases, and the Rho GTPases, Cdc42 and Rac1. Recent work has defined an EC lumen signaling complex of proteins composed of these proteins that controls 3D matrix-specific signaling events required for these processes. The EC tube formation process results in the creation of a network of proteolytically generated vascular guidance tunnels. These tunnels are physical matrix spaces that regulate vascular tube remodeling and represent matrix conduits into which pericytes are recruited to allow dynamic cell-cell interactions with ECs. These dynamic EC-pericyte interactions induce vascular basement membrane matrix deposition, leading to vessel maturation and stabilization.

  14. Beneficial Regulation of Matrix Metalloproteinases for Skin Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neena Philips

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are essential to the remodeling of the extracellular matrix. While their upregulation facilitates aging and cancer, they are essential to epidermal differentiation and the prevention of wound scars. The pharmaceutical industry is active in identifying products that inhibit MMPs to prevent or treat aging and cancer and products that stimulate MMPs to prevent epidermal hyperproliferative diseases and wound scars.

  15. Regulation of pituitary hormones and cell proliferation by components of the extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Paez-Pereda

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix is a three-dimensional network of proteins, glycosaminoglycans and other macromolecules. It has a structural support function as well as a role in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. The extracellular matrix conveys signals through membrane receptors called integrins and plays an important role in pituitary physiology and tumorigenesis. There is a differential expression of extracellular matrix components and integrins during the pituitary development in the embryo and during tumorigenesis in the adult. Different extracellular matrix components regulate adrenocorticotropin at the level of the proopiomelanocortin gene transcription. The extracellular matrix also controls the proliferation of adrenocorticotropin-secreting tumor cells. On the other hand, laminin regulates the production of prolactin. Laminin has a dynamic pattern of expression during prolactinoma development with lower levels in the early pituitary hyperplasia and a strong reduction in fully grown prolactinomas. Therefore, the expression of extracellular matrix components plays a role in pituitary tumorigenesis. On the other hand, the remodeling of the extracellular matrix affects pituitary cell proliferation. Matrix metalloproteinase activity is very high in all types of human pituitary adenomas. Matrix metalloproteinase secreted by pituitary cells can release growth factors from the extracellular matrix that, in turn, control pituitary cell proliferation and hormone secretion. In summary, the differential expression of extracellular matrix components, integrins and matrix metalloproteinase contributes to the control of pituitary hormone production and cell proliferation during tumorigenesis.

  16. A putative ABC transporter is involved in negative regulation of biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xinna; Long, Fei; Chen, Yonghui

    2008-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes may persist for long periods in food processing environments. In some instances, this may be due to aggregation or biofilm formation. To investigate the mechanism controlling biofilm formation in the food-borne pathogen L. monocytogenes, we characterized LM-49, a mutant...... with enhanced ability of biofilm-formation generated via transposon Tn917 mutagenesis of L. monocytogenes 4b G. In this mutant, a Tn917 insertion has disrupted the coding region of the gene encoding a putative ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter permease identical to Lmof2365_1771 (a putative ABC......-transporter permease) presented in the sequenced strain L. monocytogenes str. 4b F2365. This disrupted gene, denoted lm.G_1771, encoded a protein with 10 transmembrane helixes. The revertant, LM-49RE, was obtained by replacing lm.G_1771::Tn917 with lm.G_1771 via homologous recombination. We found that LM-49RE formed...

  17. The redox-sensing regulator Rex modulates central carbon metabolism, stress tolerance response and biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob P Bitoun

    Full Text Available The Rex repressor has been implicated in regulation of central carbon and energy metabolism in gram-positive bacteria. We have previously shown that Streptococcus mutans, the primary causative agent of dental caries, alters its transcriptome upon Rex-deficiency and renders S. mutans to have increased susceptibility to oxidative stress, aberrations in glucan production, and poor biofilm formation. In this study, we showed that rex in S. mutans is co-transcribed as an operon with downstream guaA, encoding a putative glutamine amidotransferase. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that recombinant Rex bound promoters of target genes avidly and specifically, including those down-regulated in response to Rex-deficiency, and that the ability of recombinant Rex to bind to selected promoters was modulated by NADH and NAD(+. Results suggest that Rex in S. mutans can function as an activator in response to intracellular NADH/NAD(+ level, although the exact binding site for activator Rex remains unclear. Consistent with a role in oxidative stress tolerance, hydrogen peroxide challenge assays showed that the Rex-deficient mutant, TW239, and the Rex/GuaA double mutant, JB314, were more susceptible to hydrogen peroxide killing than the wildtype, UA159. Relative to UA159, JB314 displayed major defects in biofilm formation, with a decrease of more than 50-fold in biomass after 48-hours. Collectively, these results further suggest that Rex in S. mutans regulates fermentation pathways, oxidative stress tolerance, and biofilm formation in response to intracellular NADH/NAD(+ level. Current effort is being directed to further investigation of the role of GuaA in S. mutans cellular physiology.

  18. HD-GYP domain proteins regulate biofilm formation and virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryan, Robert P.; Lucey, Jean; O'Donovan, Karen

    2009-01-01

    2572 had a negative influence on swarming that was cryptic and was revealed only after removal of an uncharacterized C-terminal domain. Mutation of PA4108, PA4781 and PA2572 had distinct effects on biofilm formation and architecture of P. aeruginosa. All three proteins contributed to virulence of P...... residues (YN-GYP). Here we have investigated the role of these proteins in biofilm formation, virulence factor synthesis and virulence of P. aeruginosa. Mutation of PA4108 and PA4781 led to an increase in the level of cyclic-di-GMP in P. aeruginosa, consistent with the predicted activity of the encoded...

  19. Ciliates as engineers of phototrophic biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerman, Ellen J.; van der Geest, Harm G.; van der Meulen, Myra D.; Manders, Erik M. M.; van de Koppel, Johan; Herman, Peter M. J.; Admiraal, Wim

    2011-01-01

    1. Phototrophic biofilms consist of a matrix of phototrophs, non-photosynthetic bacteria and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which is spatially structured. Despite widespread exploitation of algae and bacteria within phototrophic biofilms, for example by protozoans, the 'engineering' effect

  20. Molecular Determinants of Staphylococcal Biofilm Dispersal and Structuring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Y Le

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococci are frequently implicated in human infections, and continue to pose a therapeutic dilemma due to their ability to form deeply seated microbial communities, known as biofilms, on the surfaces of implanted medical devices and host tissues. Biofilm development has been proposed to occur in three stages: 1 attachment, 2 proliferation/structuring, and 3 detachment/dispersal. Although research within the last several decades has implicated multiple molecules in the roles as effectors of staphylococcal biofilm proliferation/structuring and detachment/dispersal, to date, only phenol soluble modulins (PSMs have been consistently demonstrated to serve in this role under both in-vitro and in-vivo settings. PSMs are regulated directly through a density-dependent manner by the accessory gene regulator (Agr system. They disrupt the non-covalent forces holding the biofilm extracellular matrix together, which is necessary for the formation of channels, a process essential for the delivery of nutrients to deeper biofilm layers, and for dispersal/dissemination of clusters of biofilm to distal organs in acute infection. Given their relevance in both acute and chronic biofilm-associated infections, the Agr system and the psm genes hold promise as potential therapeutic targets.

  1. Vibrio cholerae biofilm growth program and architecture revealed by single-cell live imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jing; Sharo, Andrew G; Stone, Howard A; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2016-09-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated bacterial communities that are crucial in nature and during infection. Despite extensive work to identify biofilm components and to discover how they are regulated, little is known about biofilm structure at the level of individual cells. Here, we use state-of-the-art microscopy techniques to enable live single-cell resolution imaging of a Vibrio cholerae biofilm as it develops from one single founder cell to a mature biofilm of 10,000 cells, and to discover the forces underpinning the architectural evolution. Mutagenesis, matrix labeling, and simulations demonstrate that surface adhesion-mediated compression causes V. cholerae biofilms to transition from a 2D branched morphology to a dense, ordered 3D cluster. We discover that directional proliferation of rod-shaped bacteria plays a dominant role in shaping the biofilm architecture in V. cholerae biofilms, and this growth pattern is controlled by a single gene, rbmA Competition analyses reveal that the dense growth mode has the advantage of providing the biofilm with superior mechanical properties. Our single-cell technology can broadly link genes to biofilm fine structure and provides a route to assessing cell-to-cell heterogeneity in response to external stimuli.

  2. Microtubules regulate GEF-H1 in response to extracellular matrix stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Jessica N.; Ponik, Suzanne M.; Garcia-Mendoza, Maria G.; Pehlke, Carolyn A.; Inman, David R.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Keely, Patricia J.

    2012-01-01

    Breast epithelial cells sense the stiffness of the extracellular matrix through Rho-mediated contractility. In turn, matrix stiffness regulates RhoA activity. However, the upstream signaling mechanisms are poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that the Rho exchange factor GEF-H1 mediates RhoA activation in response to extracellular matrix stiffness. We demonstrate the novel finding that microtubule stability is diminished by a stiff three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix, which leads to the activation of GEF-H1. Surprisingly, activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway did not contribute to stiffness-induced GEF-H1 activation. Loss of GEF-H1 decreases cell contraction of and invasion through 3D matrices. These data support a model in which matrix stiffness regulates RhoA through microtubule destabilization and the subsequent release and activation of GEF-H1. PMID:22593214

  3. Discovery of an operon that participates in agmatine metabolism and regulates biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Bryan J; Du, Rui-Hong; Calcutt, M Wade; Abdolrasulnia, Rasul; Christman, Brian W; Blackwell, Timothy S

    2010-04-01

    Agmatine is the decarboxylation product of arginine and a number of bacteria have devoted enzymatic pathways for its metabolism. Pseudomonas aeruginosa harbours the aguBA operon that metabolizes agmatine to putrescine, which can be subsequently converted into other polyamines or shunted into the TCA cycle for energy production. We discovered an alternate agmatine operon in the P. aeruginosa strain PA14 named agu2ABCA' that contains two genes for agmatine deiminases (agu2A and agu2A'). This operon was found to be present in 25% of clinical P. aeruginosa isolates. Agu2A' contains a twin-arginine translocation signal at its N-terminus and site-directed mutagenesis and cell fractionation experiments confirmed this protein is secreted to the periplasm. Analysis of the agu2ABCA' promoter demonstrates that agmatine induces expression of the operon during the stationary phase of growth and during biofilm growth and agu2ABCA' provides only weak complementation of aguBA, which is induced during log phase. Biofilm assays of mutants of all three agmatine deiminase genes in PA14 revealed that deletion of agu2ABCA', specifically its secreted product Agu2A', reduces biofilm production of PA14 following addition of exogenous agmatine. Together, these findings reveal a novel role for the agu2ABCA' operon in the biofilm development of P. aeruginosa.

  4. GlgS, described previously as a glycogen synthesis control protein, negatively regulates motility and biofilm formation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimpour, Mehdi; Montero, Manuel; Almagro, Goizeder; Viale, Alejandro M; Sevilla, Ángel; Cánovas, Manuel; Muñoz, Francisco J; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Bahaji, Abdellatif; Eydallin, Gustavo; Dose, Hitomi; Takeuchi, Rikiya; Mori, Hirotada; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2013-06-15

    Escherichia coli glycogen metabolism involves the regulation of glgBXCAP operon expression and allosteric control of the GlgC [ADPG (ADP-glucose) pyrophosphorylase]-mediated catalysis of ATP and G1P (glucose-1-phosphate) to ADPG linked to glycogen biosynthesis. E. coli glycogen metabolism is also affected by glgS. Though the precise function of the protein it encodes is unknown, its deficiency causes both reduced glycogen content and enhanced levels of the GlgC-negative allosteric regulator AMP. The transcriptomic analyses carried out in the present study revealed that, compared with their isogenic BW25113 wild-type strain, glgS-null (ΔglgS) mutants have increased expression of the operons involved in the synthesis of type 1 fimbriae adhesins, flagella and nucleotides. In agreement, ΔglgS cells were hyperflagellated and hyperfimbriated, and displayed elevated swarming motility; these phenotypes all reverted to the wild-type by ectopic glgS expression. Also, ΔglgS cells accumulated high colanic acid content and displayed increased ability to form biofilms on polystyrene surfaces. F-driven conjugation based on large-scale interaction studies of glgS with all the non-essential genes of E. coli showed that deletion of purine biosynthesis genes complement the glycogen-deficient, high motility and high biofilm content phenotypes of ΔglgS cells. Overall the results of the present study indicate that glycogen deficiency in ΔglgS cells can be ascribed to high flagellar propulsion and high exopolysaccharide and purine nucleotides biosynthetic activities competing with GlgC for the same ATP and G1P pools. Supporting this proposal, glycogen-less ΔglgC cells displayed an elevated swarming motility, and accumulated high levels of colanic acid and biofilm. Furthermore, glgC overexpression reverted the glycogen-deficient, high swarming motility, high colanic acid and high biofilm content phenotypes of ΔglgS cells to the wild-type. As on the basis of the present study Glg

  5. [Nitrogen oxide is involved in the regulation of the Fe-S cluster assembly in proteins and the formation of biofilms by Escherichia coli cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'eva, S V; Streltsova, D A; Starostina, I A; Sanina, N A

    2013-01-01

    The functions of nitrogen oxide (NO) in the regulation of the reversible processes of Fe-S cluster assembly in proteins and the formation of Escherichia coli biofilms have been investigated. S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and crystalline nitrosyl complexes of iron with sulfur-containing aliphatic ligands cisaconite (CisA) and penaconite have been used as NO donors for the first time. Wild-type E. coli cells of the strain MC4100, mutants deltaiscA and deltasufA, and the double paralog mutant deltaiscA/sufA with deletions in the alternative pathways of Fe2+ supply for cluster assembly (all derived from the above-named strain) were used in this study. Plankton growth of bacterial cultures, the mass of mature biofilms, and the expression of the SoxRS[2Fe-2S] regulon have been investigated and shown to depend on strain genotype, the process of Fe-S cluster assembly in iron-sulfur proteins, NO donor structure, and the presence of Fe2+ chelator ferene in the incubation medium. The antibiotic ciprofloxacine (CF) was used as an inhibitor of E. coli biofilm formation in the positive control. NO donors regulating Fe-S cluster assembly in E. coli have been shown to control plankton growth of the cultures and the process of mature biofilm formation; toxic doses of NO caused a dramatic (3- to 4-fold) stimulation of cell entry into biofilms as a response to nitrosative stress; NO donors CisA and GSNO in physiological concentrations suppressed the formation of mature biofilms, and the activity of these compounds was comparable to that of CE Regulation of both Fe-S cluster assembly in iron-sulfur proteins and biofilm formation by NO is indicative of the connection between these processes in E. coli.

  6. Biofilm Risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirtanen, Gun Linnea; Salo, Satu

    2016-01-01

    This chapter on biofilm risks deals with biofilm formation of pathogenic microbes, sampling and detection methods, biofilm removal, and prevention of biofilm formation. Several common pathogens produce sticky and/or slimy structures in which the cells are embedded, that is, biofilms, on various s...

  7. Macromolecular fingerprinting of sulfolobus species in biofilm: a transcriptomic and proteomic approach combined with spectroscopic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerdt, Andrea; Orell, Alvaro; Pham, Trong Khoa; Mukherjee, Joy; Wlodkowski, Alexander; Karunakaran, Esther; Biggs, Catherine A; Wright, Phillip C; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2011-09-02

    Microorganisms in nature often live in surface-associated sessile communities, encased in a self-produced matrix, referred to as biofilms. Biofilms have been well studied in bacteria but in a limited way for archaea. We have recently characterized biofilm formation in three closely related hyperthermophilic crenarchaeotes: Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, S. solfataricus, and S. tokodaii. These strains form different communities ranging from simple carpet structures in S. solfataricus to high density tower-like structures in S. acidocaldarius under static condition. Here, we combine spectroscopic, proteomic, and transcriptomic analyses to describe physiological and regulatory features associated with biofilms. Spectroscopic analysis reveals that in comparison to planktonic life-style, biofilm life-style has distinctive influence on the physiology of each Sulfolobus spp. Proteomic and transcriptomic data show that biofilm-forming life-style is strain specific (eg ca. 15% of the S. acidocaldarius genes were differently expressed, S. solfataricus and S. tokodaii had ~3.4 and ~1%, respectively). The -omic data showed that regulated ORFs were widely distributed in basic cellular functions, including surface modifications. Several regulated genes are common to biofilm-forming cells in all three species. One of the most striking common response genes include putative Lrs14-like transcriptional regulators, indicating their possible roles as a key regulatory factor in biofilm development.

  8. Set potential regulation reveals additional oxidation peaks of Geobacter sulfurreducens anodic biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Xiuping

    2012-08-01

    Higher current densities produced in microbial fuel cells and other bioelectrochemical systems are associated with the presence of various Geobacter species. A number of electron transfer components are involved in extracellular electron transfer by the model exoelectrogen, Geobacter sulfurreducens. It has previously been shown that 5 main oxidation peaks can be identified in cyclic voltammetry scans. It is shown here that 7 separate oxidation peaks emerged over relatively long periods of time when a larger range of set potentials was used to acclimate electroactive biofilms. The potentials of oxidation peaks obtained with G. sulfurreducens biofilms acclimated at 0.60 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) were different from those that developed at - 0.46 V, and both of their peaks were different from those obtained for biofilms incubated at - 0.30 V, 0 V, and 0.30 V. These results expand the known range of potentials for which G. sulfurreducens produces identifiable oxidation peaks that could be important for extracellular electron transfer. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Proteoglycans, key regulators of cell-matrix dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Liliana

    2014-04-01

    In this special issue of Matrix Biology centered on proteoglycan biology we have assembled a blend of articles focused on the state-of-the-art of proteoglycanology. The field has greatly expanded in the past three decades and now encompasses all the areas of biology. This special issue is divided into five chapters describing hyaluronan metabolism, biosynthetic and catabolic pathways of proteoglycans and their roles in inflammation, cancer, repair and development. We hope that the new original work and the reviews from recognized leaders will stimulate investigations in this exciting and fertile field of research.

  10. Bacterial dynamics in a microphytobenthic biofilm: A tidal mesocosm approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agogué, Hélène; Mallet, Clarisse; Orvain, Francis; De Crignis, Margot; Mornet, Françoise; Dupuy, Christine

    2014-09-01

    In intertidal mudflats, during low tide exposure, microphytobenthos (MPB) migrate vertically through the surface sediment and form, with the heterotrophic bacteria, a transient biofilm. Inside this biofilm, multiple interactions exist between MPB and bacteria. These micro-organisms secrete a wide range of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which are major components of the biofilm matrix. In this study, we used a tidal mesocosm experiment in order to decipher the interactions of the MPB-EPS-bacteria complex within the biofilm. We tried to determine if the EPS could control bacterial activities and/or production and/or richness according to the age of the biofilm and to the immersion/emersion period. The dynamics of biomasses of MPB and prokaryotes, the bacterial production, the hydrolysis of predominating organic constituents in the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool (i.e., carbohydrates and polypeptides), and the bacterial structure were studied in relation to the different EPS fractions (carbohydrates and proteins: colloidal and bound) dynamics during 8 days. Our experiment had emphasized the influence of the environmental conditions (light, immersion/emersion) on the interactions within the biofilm and also on the effects on biofilm aging. Bacterial production was always inhibited by the bound EPS-carbohydrate, especially during low tide. Our results suggest that the concentration and composition of EPS had a major role in the bacterial/MPB interactions: these interactions can be either positive or negative in order to regulate the productive phases of MPB and bacteria.

  11. Mechanistic insights into c-di-GMP-dependent control of the biofilm regulator FleQ from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Bruno Y; Krasteva, Petya V; Baraquet, Claudine; Harwood, Caroline S; Sondermann, Holger; Navarro, Marcos V A S

    2016-01-12

    Bacterial biofilm formation during chronic infections confers increased fitness, antibiotic tolerance, and cytotoxicity. In many pathogens, the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to collaborative, sessile biofilms represents a regulated process orchestrated by the intracellular second-messenger c-di-GMP. A main effector for c-di-GMP signaling in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the transcription regulator FleQ. FleQ is a bacterial enhancer-binding protein (bEBP) with a central AAA+ ATPase σ(54)-interaction domain, flanked by a C-terminal helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif and a divergent N-terminal receiver domain. Together with a second ATPase, FleN, FleQ regulates the expression of flagellar and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis genes in response to cellular c-di-GMP. Here we report structural and functional data that reveal an unexpected mode of c-di-GMP recognition that is associated with major conformational rearrangements in FleQ. Crystal structures of FleQ's AAA+ ATPase domain in its apo-state or bound to ADP or ATP-γ-S show conformations reminiscent of the activated ring-shaped assemblies of other bEBPs. As revealed by the structure of c-di-GMP-complexed FleQ, the second messenger interacts with the AAA+ ATPase domain at a site distinct from the ATP binding pocket. c-di-GMP interaction leads to active site obstruction, hexameric ring destabilization, and discrete quaternary structure transitions. Solution and cell-based studies confirm coupling of the ATPase active site and c-di-GMP binding, as well as the functional significance of crystallographic interprotomer interfaces. Taken together, our data offer unprecedented insight into conserved regulatory mechanisms of gene expression under direct c-di-GMP control via FleQ and FleQ-like bEBPs.

  12. Independent regulation of tumor cell migration by matrix stiffness and confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Amit; Kumar, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Tumor invasion and metastasis are strongly regulated by biophysical interactions between tumor cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). While the influence of ECM stiffness on cell migration, adhesion, and contractility has been extensively studied in 2D culture, extension of this concept to 3D cultures that more closely resemble tissue has proven challenging, because perturbations that change matrix stiffness often concurrently change cellular confinement. This coupling is particularly problematic given that matrix-imposed steric barriers can regulate invasion speed independent of mechanics. Here we introduce a matrix platform based on microfabrication of channels of defined wall stiffness and geometry that allows independent variation of ECM stiffness and channel width. For a given ECM stiffness, cells confined to narrow channels surprisingly migrate faster than cells in wide channels or on unconstrained 2D surfaces, which we attribute to increased polarization of cell-ECM traction forces. Confinement also enables cells to migrate increasingly rapidly as ECM stiffness rises, in contrast with the biphasic relationship observed on unconfined ECMs. Inhibition of nonmuscle myosin II dissipates this traction polarization and renders the relationship between migration speed and ECM stiffness comparatively insensitive to matrix confinement. We test these hypotheses in silico by devising a multiscale mathematical model that relates cellular force generation to ECM stiffness and geometry, which we show is capable of recapitulating key experimental trends. These studies represent a paradigm for investigating matrix regulation of invasion and demonstrate that matrix confinement alters the relationship between cell migration speed and ECM stiffness. PMID:22689955

  13. Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 RpoN (Sigma 54) is a Pleiotropic Regulator of Growth, Carbohydrate, Metabolism, Motility, Biofilm Formation and Toxin Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayrapetyan, H.; Tempelaars, M.H.; Nierop Groot, M.N.; Abee, T.

    2015-01-01

    Sigma 54 is a transcriptional regulator predicted to play a role in physical interaction of bacteria with their environment, including virulence and biofilm formation. In order to study the role of Sigma 54 in Bacillus cereus, a comparative transcriptome and phenotypic study was performed using B. c

  14. 食源性金黄色葡萄球菌的生物被膜形成能力及其基质组成研究%Formation ability and matrix composition of food-borne Staphylococcus aureus biofilm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石文琪; 桑亚新; 于宏伟; 孙纪录

    2015-01-01

    为了控制食品生产环境中金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜污染,对分离自河北省不同食物样品的33株金黄色葡萄球菌的生物被膜形成能力及其基质组成进行了研究。首先,使用微效价板培养生物被膜,结果表明,在培养24和48 h后,分别有13和16个菌株形成了强弱不同的生物被膜,其中,生牛乳来源的菌株产生物被膜能力较强。然后,分别使用蛋白酶K和DNase Ⅰ处理不同菌株的生物被膜,结果表明,在所有菌株的生物被膜基质中,都含有蛋白质和DNA组分,但是在大多数菌株的生物被膜基质中,蛋白质是一种重要的组分,而DNA不是一种主要组分。%In order to make scientific strategies to control the pollution of Staphylococcus au‐reus biofilm in the environment of food production ,the biofilm formation ability and matrix composition of 33 S .aureus isolates from food samples of Hebei province were studied .First‐ly ,the strains were cultivated in microtiter plates to form biofilms ,and it was found that 13 and 16 strains formed biofilms after cultivation for 24 h and 48 h ,respectively .Among them , the strains from raw milk had stronger biofilm forming ability .Then ,the preformed biofilms were treated with proteinase K and DNase I ,respectively .The results showed that there were protein and DNA components in the biofilm matrix of all the strains .However ,protein was an important component but DNA was not a major component in the biofilm matrix of most strains .

  15. The LuxS based quorum sensing governs lactose induced biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle eDuanis-Assaf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus species present a major concern in the dairy industry as they can form biofilms in pipelines and on surfaces of equipment and machinery used in the entire line of production. These biofilms represent a continuous hygienic problem and can lead to serious economic losses due to food spoilage and equipment impairment. Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis is apparently dependent on LuxS quorum sensing (QS by Autoinducer-2 (AI-2. However, the link between sensing environmental cues and AI-2 induced biofilm formation remains largely unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of lactose, the primary sugar in milk, on biofilm formation by B. subtilis and its possible link to QS processes. Our phenotypic analysis shows that lactose induces formation of biofilm bundles as well as formation of colony type biofilms. Furthermore, using reporter strain assays, we observed an increase in AI-2 production by B. subtilis in response to lactose in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, we found that expression of eps and tapA operons, responsible for extracellular matrix synthesis in B. subtilis, were notably up-regulated in response to lactose. Importantly, we also observed that LuxS is essential for B. subtilis biofilm formation in the presence of lactose. Overall, our results suggest that lactose may induce biofilm formation by B. subtilis through the LuxS pathway.

  16. Biofilm Formation in Staphylococcus Aureus and its Relation to Phenotypic and Genotypic Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasannejad Bibalan, M. (MSc

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Biofilm is a complex microbial community embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix. We aimed to study the extent of biofilm formation by S. Areas isolates and its relation to some phenotypic and genotypic criteria. Material and Methods: One hundred-fifty strains of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from Gorgan were studied. Microtiter plate assay method was used for investigation of biofilm formation.The biofilm formation of strains were recorded and its relation to accessory gene regulator (agr and antibiotic resistance were assessed by X2 test. Results: Eighty-four isolates (56% were able to form biofilm. The strength of biofilm formation in agr group I was more than that of other groups. The biofilm formation among S. Areas isolated from the wound and urine (both with 75 % had the highest capability. Methicillin-resistant isolates had a greater ability to biofilm formation. Conclusion: Methicillin resistant isolates had a greater ability to biofilm formation. Given the importance and treatment related problems of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA especially Community Acquired-Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (CA-MRSA, it is a necessity to control or remove the biofilm formation alongside antibiotic treatment.

  17. Current understanding of multi-species biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Direct observation of a wide range of natural microorganisms has revealed the fact that the majority of microbes persist as surface-attached communities surrounded by matrix materials, called biofilms. Biofilms can be formed by a single bacterial strain. However, most natural biofilms are actuall...

  18. Extracellular DNA in oral microbial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubovics, Nicholas S; Burgess, J Grant

    2015-07-01

    The extracellular matrix of microbial biofilms is critical for surface adhesion and nutrient homeostasis. Evidence is accumulating that extracellular DNA plays a number of important roles in biofilm integrity and formation on hard and soft tissues in the oral cavity. Here, we summarise recent developments in the field and consider the potential of targeting DNA for oral biofilm control.

  19. New Weapons to Fight Old Enemies: Novel Strategies for the (Bio)control of Bacterial Biofilms in the Food Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Laura M; Cotter, Paul D; Hill, Colin; Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities characterized by their adhesion to solid surfaces and the production of a matrix of exopolymeric substances, consisting of polysaccharides, proteins, DNA and lipids, which surround the microorganisms lending structural integrity and a unique biochemical profile to the biofilm. Biofilm formation enhances the ability of the producer/s to persist in a given environment. Pathogenic and spoilage bacterial species capable of forming biofilms are a significant problem for the healthcare and food industries, as their biofilm-forming ability protects them from common cleaning processes and allows them to remain in the environment post-sanitation. In the food industry, persistent bacteria colonize the inside of mixing tanks, vats and tubing, compromising food safety and quality. Strategies to overcome bacterial persistence through inhibition of biofilm formation or removal of mature biofilms are therefore necessary. Current biofilm control strategies employed in the food industry (cleaning and disinfection, material selection and surface preconditioning, plasma treatment, ultrasonication, etc.), although effective to a certain point, fall short of biofilm control. Efforts have been explored, mainly with a view to their application in pharmaceutical and healthcare settings, which focus on targeting molecular determinants regulating biofilm formation. Their application to the food industry would greatly aid efforts to eradicate undesirable bacteria from food processing environments and, ultimately, from food products. These approaches, in contrast to bactericidal approaches, exert less selective pressure which in turn would reduce the likelihood of resistance development. A particularly interesting strategy targets quorum sensing systems, which regulate gene expression in response to fluctuations in cell-population density governing essential cellular processes including biofilm formation. This review article discusses the problems associated

  20. New Weapons to Fight Old Enemies: Novel Strategies for the (Bio)control of Bacterial Biofilms in the Food Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Laura M.; Cotter, Paul D.; Hill, Colin; Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities characterized by their adhesion to solid surfaces and the production of a matrix of exopolymeric substances, consisting of polysaccharides, proteins, DNA and lipids, which surround the microorganisms lending structural integrity and a unique biochemical profile to the biofilm. Biofilm formation enhances the ability of the producer/s to persist in a given environment. Pathogenic and spoilage bacterial species capable of forming biofilms are a significant problem for the healthcare and food industries, as their biofilm-forming ability protects them from common cleaning processes and allows them to remain in the environment post-sanitation. In the food industry, persistent bacteria colonize the inside of mixing tanks, vats and tubing, compromising food safety and quality. Strategies to overcome bacterial persistence through inhibition of biofilm formation or removal of mature biofilms are therefore necessary. Current biofilm control strategies employed in the food industry (cleaning and disinfection, material selection and surface preconditioning, plasma treatment, ultrasonication, etc.), although effective to a certain point, fall short of biofilm control. Efforts have been explored, mainly with a view to their application in pharmaceutical and healthcare settings, which focus on targeting molecular determinants regulating biofilm formation. Their application to the food industry would greatly aid efforts to eradicate undesirable bacteria from food processing environments and, ultimately, from food products. These approaches, in contrast to bactericidal approaches, exert less selective pressure which in turn would reduce the likelihood of resistance development. A particularly interesting strategy targets quorum sensing systems, which regulate gene expression in response to fluctuations in cell-population density governing essential cellular processes including biofilm formation. This review article discusses the problems associated

  1. New weapons to fight old enemies: novel strategies for the (biocontrol of bacterial biofilms in the food industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Maria Coughlan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are microbial communities characterized by their adhesion to solid surfaces and the production of a matrix of exopolymeric substances (EPS, consisting of polysaccharides, proteins, DNA and lipids, which surround the microorganisms lending structural integrity and a unique biochemical profile to the biofilm. Biofilm formation enhances the ability of the producer/s to persist in a given environment. Pathogenic and spoilage bacterial species capable of forming biofilms are a significant problem for the healthcare and food industries, as their biofilm-forming ability protects them from common cleaning processes and allows them to remain in the environment post-sanitation. In the food industry, persistent bacteria colonize the inside of mixing tanks, vats and tubing, compromising food safety and quality. Strategies to overcome bacterial persistence through inhibition of biofilm formation or removal of mature biofilms are therefore necessary. Current biofilm control strategies employed in the food industry (cleaning and disinfection, material selection and surface preconditioning, plasma treatment, ultrasonication, etc., although effective to a certain point, fall short of biofilm control. Efforts have been explored, mainly with a view to their application in pharmaceutical and healthcare settings, which focus on targeting molecular determinants regulating biofilm formation. Their application to the food industry would greatly aid efforts to eradicate undesirable bacteria from food processing environments and, ultimately, from food products. These approaches, in contrast to bactericidal approaches, exert less selective pressure which in turn would reduce the likelihood of resistance development. A particularly interesting strategy targets quorum sensing systems, which regulate gene expression in response to fluctuations in cell-population density governing essential cellular processes including biofilm formation. This review article discusses

  2. Chronic lung infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm is cured by L-Methionine in combination with antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanadhas, Divya Prakash; Elango, Monalisha; Datey, Akshay; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2015-11-02

    Bacterial biofilms are associated with 80-90% of infections. Within the biofilm, bacteria are refractile to antibiotics, requiring concentrations >1,000 times the minimum inhibitory concentration. Proteins, carbohydrates and DNA are the major components of biofilm matrix. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) biofilms, which are majorly associated with chronic lung infection, contain extracellular DNA (eDNA) as a major component. Herein, we report for the first time that L-Methionine (L-Met) at 0.5 μM inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) biofilm formation and disassembles established PA biofilm by inducing DNase expression. Four DNase genes (sbcB, endA, eddB and recJ) were highly up-regulated upon L-Met treatment along with increased DNase activity in the culture supernatant. Since eDNA plays a major role in establishing and maintaining the PA biofilm, DNase activity is effective in disrupting the biofilm. Upon treatment with L-Met, the otherwise recalcitrant PA biofilm now shows susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. This was reflected in vivo, in the murine chronic PA lung infection model. Mice treated with L-Met responded better to antibiotic treatment, leading to enhanced survival as compared to mice treated with ciprofloxacin alone. These results clearly demonstrate that L-Met can be used along with antibiotic as an effective therapeutic against chronic PA biofilm infection.

  3. Transcriptomic analysis of the process of biofilm formation in Rhizobium etli CFN42.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Pérez, Agustín; Vargas, María Del Carmen; Hernández, Magdalena; Aguirre-von-Wobeser, Eneas; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Encarnacion, Sergio

    2016-11-01

    Organisms belonging to the genus Rhizobium colonize leguminous plant roots and establish a mutually beneficial symbiosis. Biofilms are structured ecosystems in which microbes are embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances, and their development is a multistep process. The biofilm formation processes of R. etli CFN42 were analyzed at an early (24-h incubation) and mature stage (72 h), comparing cells in the biofilm with cells remaining in the planktonic stage. A genome-wide microarray analysis identified 498 differentially regulated genes, implying that expression of ~8.3 % of the total R. etli gene content was altered during biofilm formation. In biofilms-attached cells, genes encoding proteins with diverse functions were overexpressed including genes involved in membrane synthesis, transport and chemotaxis, repression of flagellin synthesis, as well as surface components (particularly exopolysaccharides and lipopolysaccharides), in combination with the presence of activators or stimulators of N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthesis This suggests that R. etli is able to sense surrounding environmental conditions and accordingly regulate the transition from planktonic and biofilm growth. In contrast, planktonic cells differentially expressed genes associated with transport, motility (flagellar and twitching) and inhibition of exopolysaccharide synthesis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of nodulation and nitrogen assimilation-related genes being involved in biofilm formation in R. etli. These results contribute to the understanding of the physiological changes involved in biofilm formation by bacteria.

  4. Genome-wide mutagenesis of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri reveals novel genetic determinants and regulation mechanisms of biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyun Li

    Full Text Available Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac causes citrus canker disease, a major threat to citrus production worldwide. Accumulating evidence suggests that the formation of biofilms on citrus leaves plays an important role in the epiphytic survival of this pathogen prior to the development of canker disease. However, the process of Xac biofilm formation is poorly understood. Here, we report a genome-scale study of Xac biofilm formation in which we identified 92 genes, including 33 novel genes involved in biofilm formation and 7 previously characterized genes, colR, fhaB, fliC, galU, gumD, wxacO, and rbfC, known to be important for Xac biofilm formation. In addition, 52 other genes with defined or putative functions in biofilm formation were identified, even though they had not previously reported been to be associated with biofilm formation. The 92 genes were isolated from 292 biofilm-defective mutants following a screen of a transposon insertion library containing 22,000 Xac strain 306 mutants. Further analyses indicated that 16 of the novel genes are involved in the production of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS and/or lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 7 genes are involved in signaling and regulatory pathways, and 5 genes have unknown roles in biofilm formation. Furthermore, two novel genes, XAC0482, encoding a haloacid dehalogenase-like phosphatase, and XAC0494 (designated as rbfS, encoding a two-component sensor protein, were confirmed to be biofilm-related genes through complementation assays. Our data demonstrate that the formation of mature biofilm requires EPS, LPS, both flagellum-dependent and flagellum-independent cell motility, secreted proteins and extracellular DNA. Additionally, multiple signaling pathways are involved in Xac biofilm formation. This work is the first report on a genome-wide scale of the genetic processes of biofilm formation in plant pathogenic bacteria. The report provides significant new information about the genetic

  5. Microbial ecology of phototrophic biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeselers, G.

    2007-01-01

    Biofilms are layered structures of microbial cells and an extracellular matrix of polymeric substances, associated with surfaces and interfaces. Biofilms trap nutrients for growth of the enclosed microbial community and help prevent detachment of cells from surfaces in flowing systems. Phototrophic

  6. Regulation of biofilm formation and cellular buoyancy through modulating intracellular cyclic di-GMP levels in engineered cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostoni, Marco; Waters, Christopher M; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2016-02-01

    The second messenger cyclic dimeric (3'→5') GMP (cyclic di-GMP or c-di-GMP) has been implicated in the transition between motile and sessile lifestyles in bacteria. In this study, we demonstrate that biofilm formation, cellular aggregation or flocculation, and cellular buoyancy are under the control of c-di-GMP in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (Synechocystis) and Fremyella diplosiphon. Synechocystis is a unicellular cyanobacterium and displays lower levels of c-di-GMP; F. diplosiphon is filamentous and displays higher intracellular c-di-GMP levels. We transformed Synechocystis and F. diplosiphon with a plasmid for constitutive expression of genes encoding diguanylate cylase (DGC) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) proteins from Vibrio cholerae or Escherichia coli, respectively. These engineered strains allowed us to modulate intracellular c-di-GMP levels. Biofilm formation and cellular deposition were induced in the DGC-expressing Synechocystis strain which exhibited high intracellular levels of c-di-GMP; whereas strains expressing PDE in Synechocystis and F. diplosiphon to drive low intracellular levels of c-di-GMP exhibited enhanced cellular buoyancy. In addition, the PDE-expressing F. diplosiphon strain showed elevated chlorophyll levels. These results imply roles for coordinating c-di-GMP homeostasis in regulating native cyanobacterial phenotypes. Engineering exogenous DGC or PDE proteins to regulate intracellular c-di-GMP levels represents an effective tool for uncovering cryptic phenotypes or modulating phenotypes in cyanobacteria for practical applications in biotechnology applicable in photobioreactors and in green biotechnologies, such as energy-efficient harvesting of cellular biomass or the treatment of metal-containing wastewaters.

  7. Local fluid transfer regulation in heart extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Maria P; Morykwas, Michael J; Jordan, James E; Wang, Rui; Argenta, Louis C

    2016-06-01

    The interstitial myocardial matrix is a complex and dynamic structure that adapts to local fluctuations in pressure and actively contributes to the heart's fluid exchange and hydration. However, classical physiologic models tend to treat it as a passive conduit for water and solute, perhaps because local interstitial regulatory mechanisms are not easily accessible to experiment in vivo. Here, we examined the interstitial contribution to the fluid-driving pressure ex vivo. Interstitial hydration potentials were determined from influx/efflux rates measured in explants from healthy and ischemia-reperfusion-injured pigs during colloid osmotic pressure titrations. Adaptive responses were further explored by isolating myocardial fibroblasts and measuring their contractile responses to water activity changes in vitro. Results show hydration potentials between 5 and 60 mmHg in healthy myocardia and shifts in excess of 200 mmHg in edematous myocardia after ischemia-reperfusion injury. Further, rates of fluid transfer were temperature-dependent, and in collagen gel contraction assays, myocardial fibroblasts tended to preserve the micro-environment's hydration volume by slowing fluid efflux rates at pressures above 40 mmHg. Our studies quantify components of the fluid-driving forces in the heart interstitium that the classical Starling's equation does not explicitly consider. Measured hydration potentials in healthy myocardia and shifts with edema are larger than predicted from the known values of hydrostatic and colloid osmotic interstitial fluid pressures. Together with fibroblast responses in vitro, they are consistent with regulatory mechanisms that add local biological controls to classic fluid-balance models.

  8. Biofilm-specific antibiotic tolerance and resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, I

    2015-05-01

    Biofilms are heterogeneous structures composed of bacterial cells surrounded by a matrix and attached to solid surfaces. The bacteria here are 100 to 1,000 times more tolerant to antimicrobials than corresponding planktonic cells. Biofilms can be difficult to eradicate when they cause biofilm-related diseases, e.g., implant infections, cystic fibrosis, urinary tract infections, and periodontal diseases. A number of phenotypic features of the biofilm can be involved in biofilm-specific tolerance and resistance. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved. The current review deals with both phenotypic and molecular mechanisms of biofilm-specific antibiotic tolerance and resistance.

  9. Matrix Stiffness Regulates Endothelial Cell Proliferation through Septin 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yi-Ting; Hur, Sung Sik; Chang, Joann; Wang, Kuei-Chun; Chiu, Jeng-Jiann; Li, Yi-Shuan; Chien, Shu

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial proliferation, which is an important process in vascular homeostasis, can be regulated by the extracellular microenvironment. In this study we demonstrated that proliferation of endothelial cells (ECs) was enhanced on hydrogels with high stiffness (HSG, 21.5 kPa) in comparison to those with low stiffness (LSG, 1.72 kPa). ECs on HSG showed markedly prominent stress fibers and a higher RhoA activity than ECs on LSG. Blockade of RhoA attenuated stress fiber formation and proliferation of ECs on HSG, but had little effect on ECs on LSG; enhancement of RhoA had opposite effects. The phosphorylations of Src and Vav2, which are positive RhoA upstream effectors, were higher in ECs on HSG. The inhibition of Src/Vav2 attenuated the HSG-mediated RhoA activation and EC proliferation but exhibited nominal effects on ECs on LSG. Septin 9 (SEPT9), the negative upstream effector for RhoA, was significantly higher in ECs on LSG. The inhibition of SEPT9 increased RhoA activation, Src/Vav2 phosphorylations, and EC proliferation on LSG, but showed minor effects on ECs on HSG. We further demonstrated that the inactivation of integrin αvβ3 caused an increase of SEPT9 expression in ECs on HSG to attenuate Src/Vav2 phosphorylations and inhibit RhoA-dependent EC proliferation. These results demonstrate that the SEPT9/Src/Vav2/RhoA pathway constitutes an important molecular mechanism for the mechanical regulation of EC proliferation. PMID:23118862

  10. Matrix stiffness regulates endothelial cell proliferation through septin 9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ting Yeh

    Full Text Available Endothelial proliferation, which is an important process in vascular homeostasis, can be regulated by the extracellular microenvironment. In this study we demonstrated that proliferation of endothelial cells (ECs was enhanced on hydrogels with high stiffness (HSG, 21.5 kPa in comparison to those with low stiffness (LSG, 1.72 kPa. ECs on HSG showed markedly prominent stress fibers and a higher RhoA activity than ECs on LSG. Blockade of RhoA attenuated stress fiber formation and proliferation of ECs on HSG, but had little effect on ECs on LSG; enhancement of RhoA had opposite effects. The phosphorylations of Src and Vav2, which are positive RhoA upstream effectors, were higher in ECs on HSG. The inhibition of Src/Vav2 attenuated the HSG-mediated RhoA activation and EC proliferation but exhibited nominal effects on ECs on LSG. Septin 9 (SEPT9, the negative upstream effector for RhoA, was significantly higher in ECs on LSG. The inhibition of SEPT9 increased RhoA activation, Src/Vav2 phosphorylations, and EC proliferation on LSG, but showed minor effects on ECs on HSG. We further demonstrated that the inactivation of integrin α(vβ(3 caused an increase of SEPT9 expression in ECs on HSG to attenuate Src/Vav2 phosphorylations and inhibit RhoA-dependent EC proliferation. These results demonstrate that the SEPT9/Src/Vav2/RhoA pathway constitutes an important molecular mechanism for the mechanical regulation of EC proliferation.

  11. Anti-Biofilm Activities from Marine Cold Adapted Bacteria Against Staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Rosanna; Selan, Laura; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Tilotta, Marco; Sannino, Filomena; Feller, Georges; Tutino, Maria L; Artini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilms have great negative impacts on the world's economy and pose serious problems to industry, public health and medicine. The interest in the development of new approaches for the prevention and treatment of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation has increased. Since, bacterial pathogens living in biofilm induce persistent chronic infections due to the resistance to antibiotics and host immune system. A viable approach should target adhesive properties without affecting bacterial vitality in order to avoid the appearance of resistant mutants. Many bacteria secrete anti-biofilm molecules that function in regulating biofilm architecture or mediating the release of cells from it during the dispersal stage of biofilm life cycle. Cold-adapted marine bacteria represent an untapped reservoir of biodiversity able to synthesize a broad range of bioactive compounds, including anti-biofilm molecules. The anti-biofilm activity of cell-free supernatants derived from sessile and planktonic cultures of cold-adapted bacteria belonging to Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter, and Psychromonas species were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Reported results demonstrate that we have selected supernatants, from cold-adapted marine bacteria, containing non-biocidal agents able to destabilize biofilm matrix of all tested pathogens without killing cells. A preliminary physico-chemical characterization of supernatants was also performed, and these analyses highlighted the presence of molecules of different nature that act by inhibiting biofilm formation. Some of them are also able to impair the initial attachment of the bacterial cells to the surface, thus likely containing molecules acting as anti-biofilm surfactant molecules. The described ability of cold-adapted bacteria to produce effective anti-biofilm molecules paves the way to further characterization of the most promising molecules and to test their

  12. Anti-biofilm activities from marine cold adapted bacteria against staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna ePapa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biofilms have great negative impacts on the world’s economy and pose serious problems to industry, public health and medicine. The interest in the development of new approaches for the prevention and treatment of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation has increased. Since, bacterial pathogens living in biofilm induce persistent chronic infections due to the resistance to antibiotics and host immune system. A viable approach should target adhesive properties without affecting bacterial vitality in order to avoid the appearance of resistant mutants. Many bacteria secrete anti-biofilm molecules that function in regulating biofilm architecture or mediating the release of cells from it during the dispersal stage of biofilm life cycle. Cold-adapted marine bacteria represent an untapped reservoir of biodiversity able to synthesize a broad range of bioactive compounds, including anti-biofilm molecules.The anti-biofilm activity of cell-free supernatants derived from sessile and planktonic cultures of cold-adapted bacteria belonging to Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter and Psychromonas species were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Reported results demonstrate that we have selected supernatants, from cold-adapted marine bacteria, containing non-biocidal agents able to destabilize biofilm matrix of all tested pathogens without killing cells. A preliminary physico-chemical characterization of supernatants was also performed, and these analyses highlighted the presence of molecules of different nature that act by inhibiting biofilm formation. Some of them are also able to impair the initial attachment of the bacterial cells to the surface, thus likely containing molecules acting as anti-biofilm surfactant molecules.The described ability of cold-adapted bacteria to produce effective anti-biofilm molecules paves the way to further characterization of the most promising molecules

  13. The Small Molecule DAM Inhibitor, Pyrimidinedione, Disrupts Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Growth In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Mukesh Kumar; Go, Yoon Young; Chae, Sung-Won; Song, Jae-Jun

    2015-01-01

    and attached to the bottom of the plate when cells were grown in the presence of pyrimidinedione. Scanning electron microscopy analysis demonstrated the absence of an extracellular polysaccharide matrix in pyrimidinedione-grown biofilms compared to control-biofilms. Pyrimidinedione also significantly inhibited MRSA, MSSA, and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm growth in vitro. Furthermore, pyrimidinedione does not exhibit eukaryotic cell toxicity. In a microarray analysis, 56 genes were significantly up-regulated and 204 genes were significantly down-regulated. Genes involved in galactose metabolism were exclusively up-regulated in pyrimidinedione-grown biofilms. Genes related to DNA replication, cell division and the cell cycle, pathogenesis, phosphate-specific transport, signal transduction, fatty acid biosynthesis, protein folding, homeostasis, competence, and biofilm formation were down regulated in pyrimidinedione-grown biofilms. This study demonstrated that the small molecule Dam inhibitor, pyrimidinedione, inhibits pneumococcal biofilm growth in vitro at concentrations that do not inhibit planktonic cell growth and down regulates important metabolic-, virulence-, competence-, and biofilm-related genes. The identification of a small molecule (pyrimidinedione) with S. pneumoniae biofilm-inhibiting capabilities has potential for the development of new compounds that prevent biofilm formation.

  14. The Small Molecule DAM Inhibitor, Pyrimidinedione, Disrupts Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Growth In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar Yadav

    -clumps were scattered and attached to the bottom of the plate when cells were grown in the presence of pyrimidinedione. Scanning electron microscopy analysis demonstrated the absence of an extracellular polysaccharide matrix in pyrimidinedione-grown biofilms compared to control-biofilms. Pyrimidinedione also significantly inhibited MRSA, MSSA, and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm growth in vitro. Furthermore, pyrimidinedione does not exhibit eukaryotic cell toxicity. In a microarray analysis, 56 genes were significantly up-regulated and 204 genes were significantly down-regulated. Genes involved in galactose metabolism were exclusively up-regulated in pyrimidinedione-grown biofilms. Genes related to DNA replication, cell division and the cell cycle, pathogenesis, phosphate-specific transport, signal transduction, fatty acid biosynthesis, protein folding, homeostasis, competence, and biofilm formation were down regulated in pyrimidinedione-grown biofilms. This study demonstrated that the small molecule Dam inhibitor, pyrimidinedione, inhibits pneumococcal biofilm growth in vitro at concentrations that do not inhibit planktonic cell growth and down regulates important metabolic-, virulence-, competence-, and biofilm-related genes. The identification of a small molecule (pyrimidinedione with S. pneumoniae biofilm-inhibiting capabilities has potential for the development of new compounds that prevent biofilm formation.

  15. The ``Swiss cheese'' instability of bacterial biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hongchul; Rusconi, Roberto; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    Bacteria often adhere to surfaces, where they develop polymer-encased communities (biofilms) that display dramatic resistance to antibiotic treatment. A better understanding of cell detachment from biofilms may lead to novel strategies for biofilm disruption. Here we describe a new detachment mode, whereby a biofilm develops a nearly regular array of ~50-100 μm holes. Using surface-treated microfluidic devices, we create biofilms of controlled shape and size. After the passage of an air plug, the break-up of the residual thin liquid film scrapes and rearranges bacteria on the surface, such that a ``Swiss cheese'' pattern is left in the residual biofilm. Fluorescent staining of the polymeric matrix (EPS) reveals that resistance to cell dislodgement correlates with local biofilm age, early settlers having had more time to hunker down. Because few survivors suffice to regrow a biofilm, these results point at the importance of considering microscale heterogeneity in assessing the effectiveness of biofilm removal strategies.

  16. Bacteriophages and Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Harper

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are an extremely common adaptation, allowing bacteria to colonize hostile environments. They present unique problems for antibiotics and biocides, both due to the nature of the extracellular matrix and to the presence within the biofilm of metabolically inactive persister cells. Such chemicals can be highly effective against planktonic bacterial cells, while being essentially ineffective against biofilms. By contrast, bacteriophages seem to have a greater ability to target this common form of bacterial growth. The high numbers of bacteria present within biofilms actually facilitate the action of bacteriophages by allowing rapid and efficient infection of the host and consequent amplification of the bacteriophage. Bacteriophages also have a number of properties that make biofilms susceptible to their action. They are known to produce (or to be able to induce enzymes that degrade the extracellular matrix. They are also able to infect persister cells, remaining dormant within them, but re-activating when they become metabolically active. Some cultured biofilms also seem better able to support the replication of bacteriophages than comparable planktonic systems. It is perhaps unsurprising that bacteriophages, as the natural predators of bacteria, have the ability to target this common form of bacterial life.

  17. The SOS Response Master Regulator LexA Is Associated with Sporulation, Motility and Biofilm Formation in Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Beata M; Cartman, Stephen T; Minton, Nigel P; Butala, Matej; Rupnik, Maja

    2015-01-01

    The LexA regulated SOS network is a bacterial response to DNA damage of metabolic or environmental origin. In Clostridium difficile, a nosocomial pathogen causing a range of intestinal diseases, the in-silico deduced LexA network included the core SOS genes involved in the DNA repair and genes involved in various other biological functions that vary among different ribotypes. Here we describe the construction and characterization of a lexA ClosTron mutant in C. difficile R20291 strain. The mutation of lexA caused inhibition of cell division resulting in a filamentous phenotype. The lexA mutant also showed decreased sporulation, a reduction in swimming motility, greater sensitivity to metronidazole, and increased biofilm formation. Changes in the regulation of toxin A, but not toxin B, were observed in the lexA mutant in the presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of levofloxacin. C. difficile LexA is, therefore, not only a regulator of DNA damage but also controls many biological functions associated with virulence.

  18. Environmental factors that shape biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyofuku, Masanori; Inaba, Tomohiro; Kiyokawa, Tatsunori; Obana, Nozomu; Yawata, Yutaka; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Cells respond to the environment and alter gene expression. Recent studies have revealed the social aspects of bacterial life, such as biofilm formation. Biofilm formation is largely affected by the environment, and the mechanisms by which the gene expression of individual cells affects biofilm development have attracted interest. Environmental factors determine the cell's decision to form or leave a biofilm. In addition, the biofilm structure largely depends on the environment, implying that biofilms are shaped to adapt to local conditions. Second messengers such as cAMP and c-di-GMP are key factors that link environmental factors with gene regulation. Cell-to-cell communication is also an important factor in shaping the biofilm. In this short review, we will introduce the basics of biofilm formation and further discuss environmental factors that shape biofilm formation. Finally, the state-of-the-art tools that allow us investigate biofilms under various conditions are discussed.

  19. Biofilm in wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpaul, Kumal

    2015-03-01

    A biofilm can be described as a microbial colony encased in a polysaccharide matrix which can become attached to a wound surface. This can affect the healing potential of chronic wounds due to the production of destructive enzymes and toxins which can promote a chronic inflammatory state within the wound. Biofilms can be polymicrobial and can result in delayed wound healing and chronic wound infection resistant to antibiotics, leading to prolonged hospitalisation for some patients. There appears to be a correlation between biofilms and non-healing in chronic wounds. It is suggested that biofilms are a major player in the chronicity of wounds. They are a complex concept to diagnose and management needs to be multifactorial.

  20. A proteinaceous organic matrix regulates carbonate mineral production in the marine teleost intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Kevin L.; Lemoine, Christophe M. R.; Pelin, Adrian; Corradi, Nicolas; Warren, Wesley C.; Grosell, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Marine teleost fish produce CaCO3 in their intestine as part of their osmoregulatory strategy. This precipitation is critical for rehydration and survival of the largest vertebrate group on earth, yet the molecular mechanisms that regulate this reaction are unknown. Here, we isolate and characterize an organic matrix associated with the intestinal precipitates produced by Gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta). Toadfish precipitates were purified using two different methods, and the associated organic matrix was extracted. Greater than 150 proteins were identified in the isolated matrix by mass spectrometry and subsequent database searching using an O. beta transcriptomic sequence library produced here. Many of the identified proteins were enriched in the matrix compared to the intestinal fluid, and three showed no substantial homology to any previously characterized protein in the NCBI database. To test the functionality of the isolated matrix, a micro-modified in vitro calcification assay was designed, which revealed that low concentrations of isolated matrix substantially promoted CaCO3 production, where high concentrations showed an inhibitory effect. High concentrations of matrix also decreased the incorporation of magnesium into the forming mineral, potentially providing an explanation for the variability in magnesium content observed in precipitates produced by different fish species.

  1. A proteinaceous organic matrix regulates carbonate mineral production in the marine teleost intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Kevin L.; LeMoine, Christophe M. R.; Pelin, Adrian; Corradi, Nicolas; Warren, Wesley C.; Grosell, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Marine teleost fish produce CaCO3 in their intestine as part of their osmoregulatory strategy. This precipitation is critical for rehydration and survival of the largest vertebrate group on earth, yet the molecular mechanisms that regulate this reaction are unknown. Here, we isolate and characterize an organic matrix associated with the intestinal precipitates produced by Gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta). Toadfish precipitates were purified using two different methods, and the associated organic matrix was extracted. Greater than 150 proteins were identified in the isolated matrix by mass spectrometry and subsequent database searching using an O. beta transcriptomic sequence library produced here. Many of the identified proteins were enriched in the matrix compared to the intestinal fluid, and three showed no substantial homology to any previously characterized protein in the NCBI database. To test the functionality of the isolated matrix, a micro-modified in vitro calcification assay was designed, which revealed that low concentrations of isolated matrix substantially promoted CaCO3 production, where high concentrations showed an inhibitory effect. High concentrations of matrix also decreased the incorporation of magnesium into the forming mineral, potentially providing an explanation for the variability in magnesium content observed in precipitates produced by different fish species. PMID:27694946

  2. Proteomic regulation during Legionella pneumophila biofilm development: decrease of virulence factors and enhancement of response to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemiri, Arbia; Lecheheb, Sandra Ahmed; Chi Song, Philippe Chan; Jouenne, Thierry; Cosette, Pascal

    2014-06-01

    Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila) is a Gram-negative bacterium, which can be found worldwide in aquatic environments. It tends to persist because it is often protected within biofilms or amoebae. L. pneumophila biofilms have a major impact on water systems, making the understanding of the bacterial physiological adaptation in biofilms a fundamental step towards their eradication. In this study, we report for the first time the influence of the biofilm mode of growth on the proteome of L. pneumophila. We compared the protein patterns of microorganisms grown as suspensions, cultured as colonies on agar plates or recovered with biofilms formed on stainless steel coupons. Statistical analyses of the protein expression data set confirmed the biofilm phenotype specificity which had been previously observed. It also identified dozens of proteins whose abundance was modified in biofilms. Proteins corresponding to virulence factors (macrophage infectivity potentiator protein, secreted proteases) were largely repressed in adherent cells. In contrast, a peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (Lpg2043) and a peroxynitrite reductase (Lpg2965) were accumulated by biofilm cells. Remarkably, hypothetical proteins, that appear to be unique to the Legionella genus (Lpg0563, Lpg1111 and Lpg1809), were over-expressed by sessile bacteria.

  3. Rapid identification of bacterial biofilms and biofilm wound models using a multichannel nanosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoning; Kong, Hao; Mout, Rubul; Saha, Krishnendu; Moyano, Daniel F; Robinson, Sandra M; Rana, Subinoy; Zhang, Xinrong; Riley, Margaret A; Rotello, Vincent M

    2014-12-23

    Identification of infectious bacteria responsible for biofilm-associated infections is challenging due to the complex and heterogeneous biofilm matrix. To address this issue and minimize the impact of heterogeneity on biofilm identification, we developed a gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based multichannel sensor to detect and identify biofilms based on their physicochemical properties. Our results showed that the sensor can discriminate six bacterial biofilms including two composed of uropathogenic bacteria. The capability of the sensor was further demonstrated through discrimination of biofilms in a mixed bacteria/mammalian cell in vitro wound model.

  4. Matrix rigidity differentially regulates invadopodia activity through ROCK1 and ROCK2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrell, Rachel J; Parekh, Aron

    2016-04-01

    ROCK activity increases due to ECM rigidity in the tumor microenvironment and promotes a malignant phenotype via actomyosin contractility. Invasive migration is facilitated by actin-rich adhesive protrusions known as invadopodia that degrade the ECM. Invadopodia activity is dependent on matrix rigidity and contractile forces suggesting that mechanical factors may regulate these subcellular structures through ROCK-dependent actomyosin contractility. However, emerging evidence indicates that the ROCK1 and ROCK2 isoforms perform different functions in cells suggesting that alternative mechanisms may potentially regulate rigidity-dependent invadopodia activity. In this study, we found that matrix rigidity drives ROCK signaling in cancer cells but that ROCK1 and ROCK2 differentially regulate invadopodia activity through separate signaling pathways via contractile (NM II) and non-contractile (LIMK) mechanisms. These data suggest that the mechanical rigidity of the tumor microenvironment may drive ROCK signaling through distinct pathways to enhance the invasive migration required for cancer progression and metastasis.

  5. Effects of Subinhibitory Concentrations of Ceftaroline on Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Mirones, Cristina; Acosta, Felix; Icardo, Jose M.; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ramos-Vivas, José

    2016-01-01

    Ceftaroline (CPT) is a novel cephalosporin with in vitro activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Ceftaroline exhibits a level of binding affinity for PBPs in S. aureus including PBP2a of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The aims of this study were to investigate the morphological, physiological and molecular responses of MRSA clinical strains and MRSA biofilms to sub-MICs (1/4 and 1/16 MIC) of ceftaroline by using transmission, scanning and confocal microscopy. We have also used quantitative Real-Time PCR to study the effect of sub-MICs of ceftaroline on the expression of the staphylococcal icaA, agrA, sarA and sasF genes in MRSA biofilms. In one set of experiments, ceftaroline was able to inhibit biofilm formation in all strains tested at MIC, however, a strain dependent behavior in presence of sub-MICs of ceftaroline was shown. In a second set of experiments, destruction of preformed biofilms by addition of ceftaroline was evaluated. Ceftaroline was able to inhibit biofilm formation at MIC in all strains tested but not at the sub-MICs. Destruction of preformed biofilms was strain dependent because the biofilm formed by a matrix-producing strain was resistant to a challenge with ceftaroline at MIC, whereas in other strains the biofilm was sensitive. At sub-MICs, the impact of ceftaroline on expression of virulence genes was strain-dependent at 1/4 MIC and no correlation between ceftaroline-enhanced biofilm formation and gene regulation was established at 1/16 MIC. Our findings suggest that sub-MICs of ceftaroline enhance bacterial attachment and biofilm formation by some, but not all, MRSA strains and, therefore, stress the importance of maintaining effective bactericidal concentrations of ceftaroline to fight biofilm-MRSA related infections. PMID:26800524

  6. Inhibition of Salmonella enterica biofilm formation using small-molecule adenosine mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Jacob A; Marshall, Joanna M; Bhatiya, Aditi; Eguale, Tadesse; Kwiek, Jesse J; Gunn, John S

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms have been widely implicated in chronic infections and environmental persistence of Salmonella enterica, facilitating enhanced colonization of surfaces and increasing the ability of the bacteria to be transmitted to new hosts. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi biofilm formation on gallstones from humans and mice enhances gallbladder colonization and bacterial shedding, while Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium biofilms facilitate long-term persistence in a number of environments important to food, medical, and farming industries. Salmonella regulates expression of many virulence- and biofilm-related processes using kinase-driven pathways. Kinases play pivotal roles in phosphorylation and energy transfer in cellular processes and possess an ATP-binding pocket required for their functions. Many other cellular proteins also require ATP for their activity. Here we test the hypothesis that pharmacological interference with ATP-requiring enzymes utilizing adenosine mimetic compounds would decrease or inhibit bacterial biofilm formation. Through the screening of a 3,000-member ATP mimetic library, we identified a single compound (compound 7955004) capable of significantly reducing biofilm formation by S. Typhimurium and S. Typhi. The compound was not bactericidal or bacteriostatic toward S. Typhimurium or cytotoxic to mammalian cells. An ATP-Sepharose affinity matrix technique was used to discover potential protein-binding targets of the compound and identified GroEL and DeoD. Compound 7955004 was screened against other known biofilm-forming bacterial species and was found to potently inhibit biofilms of Acinetobacter baumannii as well. The identification of a lead compound with biofilm-inhibiting capabilities toward Salmonella provides a potential new avenue of therapeutic intervention against Salmonella biofilm formation, with applicability to biofilms of other bacterial pathogens.

  7. An Oxygen-Sensing Two-Component System in the Burkholderia cepacia Complex Regulates Biofilm, Intracellular Invasion, and Pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Tiffany L.; Boisvert, Nicole M.; Priebe, Gregory P.

    2017-01-01

    Burkholderia dolosa is a member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), which is a group of bacteria that cause chronic lung infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and can be associated with outbreaks carrying high morbidity and mortality. While investigating the genomic diversity of B. dolosa strains collected from an outbreak among CF patients, we previously identified fixL as a gene showing signs of strong positive selection. This gene has homology to fixL of the rhizobial FixL/FixJ two-component system. The goals of this study were to determine the functions of FixLJ and their role in virulence in B. dolosa. We generated a fixLJ deletion mutant and complemented controls in B. dolosa strain AU0158. Using a fixK-lacZ reporter we found that FixLJ was activated in low oxygen in multiple BCC species. In a murine pneumonia model, the B. dolosa fixLJ deletion mutant was cleared faster from the lungs and spleen than wild-type B. dolosa strain AU0158 at 7 days post infection. Interestingly, the fixLJ deletion mutant made more biofilm, albeit with altered structure, but was less motile than strain AU0158. Using RNA-seq with in vitro grown bacteria, we found ~11% of the genome was differentially expressed in the fixLJ deletion mutant relative to strain AU0158. Multiple flagella-associated genes were down-regulated in the fixLJ deletion mutant, so we also evaluated virulence of a fliC deletion mutant, which lacks a flagellum. We saw no difference in the ability of the fliC deletion mutant to persist in the murine model relative to strain AU0158, suggesting factors other than flagella caused the phenotype of decreased persistence. We found the fixLJ deletion mutant to be less invasive in human lung epithelial and macrophage-like cells. In conclusion, B. dolosa fixLJ is a global regulator that controls biofilm formation, motility, intracellular invasion/persistence, and virulence. PMID:28046077

  8. Als1 and Als3 regulate the intracellular uptake of copper ions when Candida albicans biofilms are exposed to metallic copper surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Sha; Chang, Wenqiang; Li, Chen; Lou, Hongxiang

    2016-05-01

    Copper surfaces possess efficient antimicrobial effect. Here, we reported that copper surfaces could inactivate Candida albicans biofilms within 40 min. The intracellular reactive oxygen species in C. albicans biofilms were immediately stimulated during the contact of copper surfaces, which might be an important factor for killing the mature biofilms. Copper release assay demonstrated that the copper ions automatically released from the surface of 1 mm thick copper coupons with over 99.9% purity are not the key determinant for the copper-mediated killing action. The susceptibility test to copper surfaces by using C. albicans mutant strains, which were involved in efflux pumps, adhesins, biofilms formation or osmotic stress response showed that als1/als1 and als3/als3 displayed higher resistance to the copper surface contact than other mutants did. The intracellular concentration of copper ions was lower in als1/als1 and als3/als3 than that in wild-type strain. Transcriptional analysis revealed that the expression of copper transporter-related gene, CRP1, was significantly increased in als1/als1, als3/als3, suggesting a potential role of ALS1 and ALS3 in absorbing ions by regulating the expression of CRP1 This study provides a potential application in treating pathogenic fungi by using copper surfaces and uncovers the roles of ALS1 and ALS3 in absorbing copper ions for C. albicans.

  9. Extracellular Matrix components regulate cellular polarity and tissue structure in the developing and mature Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Varshney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While genetic networks and other intrinsic mechanisms regulate much of retinal development, interactions with the extracellular environment shape these networks and modify their output. The present review has focused on the role of one family of extracellular matrix molecules and their signaling pathways in retinal development. In addition to their effects on the developing retina, laminins play a role in maintaining Müller cell polarity and compartmentalization, thereby contributing to retinal homeostasis. This article which is intended for the clinical audience, reviews the fundamentals of retinal development, extracellular matrix organization and the role of laminins in retinal development. The role of laminin in cortical development is also briefly discussed.

  10. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa transcriptome in planktonic cultures and static biofilms using RNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Dötsch

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated how gene expression differs in mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms as opposed to planktonic cells by the use of RNA sequencing technology that gives rise to both quantitative and qualitative information on the transcriptome. Although a large proportion of genes were consistently regulated in both the stationary phase and biofilm cultures as opposed to the late exponential growth phase cultures, the global biofilm gene expression pattern was clearly distinct indicating that biofilms are not just surface attached cells in stationary phase. A large amount of the genes found to be biofilm specific were involved in adaptation to microaerophilic growth conditions, repression of type three secretion and production of extracellular matrix components. Additionally, we found many small RNAs to be differentially regulated most of them similarly in stationary phase cultures and biofilms. A qualitative analysis of the RNA-seq data revealed more than 3000 putative transcriptional start sites (TSS. By the use of rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5'-RACE we confirmed the presence of three different TSS associated with the pqsABCDE operon, two in the promoter of pqsA and one upstream of the second gene, pqsB. Taken together, this study reports the first transcriptome study on P. aeruginosa that employs RNA sequencing technology and provides insights into the quantitative and qualitative transcriptome including the expression of small RNAs in P. aeruginosa biofilms.

  11. Permeabilizing biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukos, Nikolaos S.; Lee, Shun; Doukas,; Apostolos G.

    2008-02-19

    Methods for permeabilizing biofilms using stress waves are described. The methods involve applying one or more stress waves to a biofilm, e.g., on a surface of a device or food item, or on a tissue surface in a patient, and then inducing stress waves to create transient increases in the permeability of the biofilm. The increased permeability facilitates delivery of compounds, such as antimicrobial or therapeutic agents into and through the biofilm.

  12. Candida Biofilms: Development, Architecture, and Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Jyotsna; Mukherjee, Pranab K

    2015-08-01

    Intravascular device-related infections are often associated with biofilms (microbial communities encased within a polysaccharide-rich extracellular matrix) formed by pathogens on the surfaces of these devices. Candida species are the most common fungi isolated from catheter-, denture-, and voice prosthesis-associated infections and also are commonly isolated from contact lens-related infections (e.g., fungal keratitis). These biofilms exhibit decreased susceptibility to most antimicrobial agents, which contributes to the persistence of infection. Recent technological advances have facilitated the development of novel approaches to investigate the formation of biofilms and identify specific markers for biofilms. These studies have provided extensive knowledge of the effect of different variables, including growth time, nutrients, and physiological conditions, on biofilm formation, morphology, and architecture. In this article, we will focus on fungal biofilms (mainly Candida biofilms) and provide an update on the development, architecture, and resistance mechanisms of biofilms.

  13. Identification of novel regulators of osteoblast matrix mineralization by time series transcriptional profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staines, Katherine Ann; Zhu, Dongxing; Farquharson, Colin; MacRae, Vicky Elizabeth

    2014-05-01

    Bone mineralization is a carefully orchestrated process, regulated by a number of promoters and inhibitors that function to ensure effective hydroxyapatite formation. Here we sought to identify new regulators of this process through a time series microarray analysis of mineralising primary osteoblast cultures over a 27 day culture period. To our knowledge this is the first microarray study investigating murine calvarial osteoblasts cultured under conditions that permit both physiological extracellular matrix mineralization through the formation of discrete nodules and the terminal differentiation of osteoblasts into osteocytes. RT-qPCR was used to validate and expand the microarray findings. We demonstrate the significant up-regulation of >6,000 genes during the osteoblast mineralization process, the highest-ranked differentially expressed genes of which were those dominated by members of the PPAR-γ signalling pathway, namely Adipoq, Cd36 and Fabp4. Furthermore, we show that the inhibition of this signalling pathway promotes matrix mineralisation in these primary osteoblast cultures. We also identify Cilp, Phex, Trb3, Sox11, and Psat1 as novel regulators of matrix mineralization. Further studies examining the precise function of the identified genes and their interactions will advance our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning biomineralization.

  14. Activation of phagocytic cells by Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms: effects of extracellular matrix proteins and the bacterial stress protein GroEL on netosis and MRP-14 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapunt, Ulrike; Gaida, Matthias M; Meyle, Eva; Prior, Birgit; Hänsch, Gertrud M

    2016-07-01

    The recognition and phagocytosis of free-swimming (planktonic) bacteria by polymorphonuclear neutrophils have been investigated in depth. However, less is known about the neutrophil response towards bacterial biofilms. Our previous work demonstrated that neutrophils recognize activating entities within the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of biofilms (the bacterial heat shock protein GroEL) and that this process does not require opsonization. Aim of this study was to evaluate the release of DNA by neutrophils in response to biofilms, as well as the release of the inflammatory cytokine MRP-14. Neutrophils were stimulated with Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms, planktonic bacteria, extracted EPS and GroEL. Release of DNA and of MRP-14 was evaluated. Furthermore, tissue samples from patients suffering from biofilm infections were collected and evaluated by histology. MRP-14 concentration in blood samples was measured. We were able to show that biofilms, the EPS and GroEL induce DNA release. MRP-14 was only released after stimulation with EPS, not GroEL. Histology of tissue samples revealed MRP-14 positive cells in association with neutrophil infiltration and MRP-14 concentration was elevated in blood samples of patients suffering from biofilm infections. Our data demonstrate that neutrophil-activating entities are present in the EPS and that GroEL induces DNA release by neutrophils.

  15. Metabolism links bacterial biofilms and colon carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Caroline H; Dejea, Christine M; Edler, David; Hoang, Linh T; Santidrian, Antonio F; Felding, Brunhilde H; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Cho, Kevin; Wick, Elizabeth C; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; Uritboonthai, Winnie; Goetz, Laura; Casero, Robert A; Pardoll, Drew M; White, James R; Patti, Gary J; Sears, Cynthia L; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-06-02

    Bacterial biofilms in the colon alter the host tissue microenvironment. A role for biofilms in colon cancer metabolism has been suggested but to date has not been evaluated. Using metabolomics, we investigated the metabolic influence that microbial biofilms have on colon tissues and the related occurrence of cancer. Patient-matched colon cancers and histologically normal tissues, with or without biofilms, were examined. We show the upregulation of polyamine metabolites in tissues from cancer hosts with significant enhancement of N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine in both biofilm-positive cancer and normal tissues. Antibiotic treatment, which cleared biofilms, decreased N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine levels to those seen in biofilm-negative tissues, indicating that host cancer and bacterial biofilm structures contribute to the polyamine metabolite pool. These results show that colonic mucosal biofilms alter the cancer metabolome to produce a regulator of cellular proliferation and colon cancer growth potentially affecting cancer development and progression.

  16. Metabolism links bacterial biofilms and colon carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Caroline H.; Dejea, Christine M.; Edler, David; Hoang, Linh T.; Santidrian, Antonio F.; Felding, Brunhilde H.; Cho, Kevin; Wick, Elizabeth C.; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M.; Uritboonthai, Winnie; Goetz, Laura; Casero, Robert A.; Pardoll, Drew M.; White, James R.; Patti, Gary J.; Sears, Cynthia L.; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial biofilms in the colon alter the host tissue microenvironment. A role for biofilms in colon cancer metabolism has been suggested but to date has not been evaluated. Using metabolomics, we investigated the metabolic influence that microbial biofilms have on colon tissues and the related occurrence of cancer. Patient-matched colon cancers and histologically normal tissues, with or without biofilms, were examined. We show the upregulation of polyamine metabolites in tissues from cancer hosts with significant enhancement of N1, N12-diacetylspermine in both biofilm positive cancer and normal tissues. Antibiotic treatment, which cleared biofilms, decreased N1, N12-diacetylspermine levels to those seen in biofilm negative tissues, indicating that host cancer and bacterial biofilm structures contribute to the polyamine metabolite pool. These results show that colonic mucosal biofilms alter the cancer metabolome, to produce a regulator of cellular proliferation and colon cancer growth potentially affecting cancer development and progression. PMID:25959674

  17. The Host’s Reply to Candida Biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeniel E. Nett

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Candida spp. are among the most common nosocomial fungal pathogens and are notorious for their propensity toward biofilm formation. When growing on a medical device or mucosal surface, these organisms reside as communities embedded in a protective matrix, resisting host defenses. The host responds to Candida biofilm by depositing a variety of proteins that become incorporated into the biofilm matrix. Compared to free-floating Candida, leukocytes are less effective against Candida within a biofilm. This review highlights recent advances describing the host’s response to Candida biofilms using ex vivo and in vivo models of mucosal and device-associated biofilm infections.

  18. The curli biosynthesis regulator CsgD co-ordinates the expression of both positive and negative determinants for biofilm formation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brombacher, Eva; Dorel, Corinne; Zehnder, Alexander J B; Landini, Paolo

    2003-10-01

    Production of curli, extracellular structures important for biofilm formation, is positively regulated by OmpR, which constitutes with the EnvZ protein an osmolarity-sensing two-component regulatory system. The expression of curli is cryptic in most Escherichia coli laboratory strains such as MG1655, due to the lack of csgD expression. The csgD gene encodes a transcription activator of the curli-subunit-encoding csgBA operon. The ompR234 up-mutation can restore csgD expression, resulting in curli production and increased biofilm formation. In this report, it is shown that ompR234-dependent csgD expression, in addition to csgBA activation during stationary phase of growth, stimulates expression of the yaiC gene and negatively regulates at least two other genes, pepD and yagS. The promoter regions of these four genes share a conserved 11 bp sequence (CGGGKGAKNKA), necessary for csgBA and yaiC regulation by CsgD. While at both the csgBA and yaiC promoters the sequence is located upstream of the promoter elements, in both yagS and pepD it overlaps either the putative -10 sequence or the transcription start point, suggesting that CsgD can function as both an activator and a repressor. Adhesion experiments show that csgD-independent expression of both yagS and pepD from a multicopy plasmid negatively affects biofilm formation, which, in contrast, is stimulated by yaiC expression. Thus it is proposed that CsgD stimulates biofilm formation in E. coli by contemporary activation of adhesion positive determinants (the curli-encoding csg operons and the product of the yaiC gene) and repression of negative effectors such as yagS and pepD.

  19. Regulation of biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by quorum sensing%群体感应对铜绿假单胞菌生物被膜形成的调控

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄媛媛; 宋水山

    2011-01-01

    生物被膜是一种与浮游细胞相对应的生长方式,由细菌和自身分泌的包外基质组成.铜绿假单胞菌是研究这一生长方式的模式生物.在过去十年,对铜绿假单胞菌生物被膜的研究已取得显著进展.群体感应(QS)的细胞沟通机制在铜绿假单胞菌生物被膜形成中发挥着重要作用.介绍生物被膜的特点,并重点讨论了QS和生物被膜之间的关系.%Compared with planktonic cells, bacterial biofilm is a kind of particular colonial life style which consists of bacteria and their extracellular matrix. Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a model organism for studying biofilm formation. Over the past decade, significant strides have been made towards understanding biofilm development in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Quorum sensing (QS)has been found to play a role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation. This paper introduced the biofilm characteristics,focusing on the relationship between QS and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm.

  20. Fibronectin matrix polymerization regulates smooth muscle cell phenotype through a Rac1 dependent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Shi

    Full Text Available Smooth muscle cells are maintained in a differentiated state in the vessel wall, but can be modulated to a synthetic phenotype following injury. Smooth muscle phenotypic modulation is thought to play an important role in the pathology of vascular occlusive diseases. Phenotypically modulated smooth muscle cells exhibit increased proliferative and migratory properties that accompany the downregulation of smooth muscle cell marker proteins. Extracellular matrix proteins, including fibronectin, can regulate the smooth muscle phenotype when used as adhesive substrates. However, cells produce and organize a 3-dimensional fibrillar extracellular matrix, which can affect cell behavior in distinct ways from the protomeric 2-dimensional matrix proteins that are used as adhesive substrates. We previously showed that the deposition/polymerization of fibronectin into the extracellular matrix can regulate the deposition and organization of other extracellular matrix molecules in vitro. Further, our published data show that the presence of a fibronectin polymerization inhibitor results in increased expression of smooth muscle cell differentiation proteins and inhibits vascular remodeling in vivo. In this manuscript, we used an in vitro cell culture system to determine the mechanism by which fibronectin polymerization affects smooth muscle phenotypic modulation. Our data show that fibronectin polymerization decreases the mRNA levels of multiple smooth muscle differentiation genes, and downregulates the levels of smooth muscle α-actin and calponin proteins by a Rac1-dependent mechanism. The expression of smooth muscle genes is transcriptionally regulated by fibronectin polymerization, as evidenced by the increased activity of luciferase reporter constructs in the presence of a fibronectin polymerization inhibitor. Fibronectin polymerization also promotes smooth muscle cell growth, and decreases the levels of actin stress fibers. These data define a Rac1

  1. Pattern formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parsek, Matthew R.; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria are capable of forming elaborate multicellular communities called biofilms. Pattern formation in biofilms depends on cell proliferation and cellular migration in response to the available nutrients and other external cues, as well as on self-generated intercellular signal molecules...... and the production of an extracellular matrix that serves as a structural 'scaffolding' for the biofilm cells. Pattern formation in biofilms allows cells to position themselves favorably within nutrient gradients and enables buildup and maintenance of physiologically distinct subpopulations, which facilitates...... survival of one or more subpopulations upon environmental insult, and therefore plays an important role in the innate tolerance displayed by biofilms toward adverse conditions....

  2. Anthranilate deteriorates the structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and antagonizes the biofilm-enhancing indole effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Park, Ha-Young; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2015-04-01

    Anthranilate and indole are alternative degradation products of tryptophan, depending on the bacterial species. While indole enhances the biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we found that anthranilate, the tryptophan degradation product of P. aeruginosa, had an opposite effect on P. aeruginosa biofilm formation, in which anthranilate deteriorated the mushroom structure of biofilm. The anthranilate effect on biofilm formation was differentially exerted depending on the developmental stage and the presence of shear force. Anthranilate slightly accelerated the initial attachment of P. aeruginosa at the early stage of biofilm development and appeared to build more biofilm without shear force. But anthranilate weakened the biofilm structure in the late stage, deteriorating the mushroom structure of biofilms with shear force to make a flat biofilm. To investigate the interplay of anthranilate with indole in biofilm formation, biofilms were cotreated with anthranilate and indole, and the results showed that anthranilate antagonized the biofilm-enhancing effect of indole. Anthranilate was able to deteriorate the preformed biofilm. The effect of anthranilate and indole on biofilm formation was quorum sensing independent. AntR, a regulator of anthranilate-degrading metabolism was synergistically activated by cotreatment with anthranilate and indole, suggesting that indole might enhance biofilm formation by facilitating the degradation of anthranilate. Anthranilate slightly but significantly affected the cyclic diguaniylate (c-di-GMP) level and transcription of major extracellular polysaccharide (Psl, Pel, and alginate) operons. These results suggest that anthranilate may be a promising antibiofilm agent and antagonize the effect of indole on P. aeruginosa biofilm formation.

  3. Role of three-dimensional matrix stiffness in regulating the chemoresistance of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Liu, Yang; Xie, Hong-Guo; Zhao, Shan; Xu, Xiao-Xi; Fan, Li-Xin; Guo, Xin; Lu, Ting; Sun, Guang-Wei; Ma, Xiao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was the most common primary liver cancer, and its resistance to anti-tumor drugs often caused the death of patients suffering with HCC. Matrix stiffness was reported to be closely related to tumor chemoresistance; however, the relationship between HCC drug resistance and three-dimensional (3D) matrix stiffness is still unclear at present. In this study, alginate gel (ALG) beads with controllable matrix stiffness were used to mimic tumor tissue rigidity, and the role of 3D matrix stiffness in regulating the chemoresistance of HCC cells was investigated by using these ALG beads. It was found that HCC cells in ALG beads with 105 kPa stiffness had highest resistance to paclitaxel, 5-FU, and cisplatin. Although the mechanism was still uncovered, ABC transporters and endoplasmic reticulum stress-related molecules were highly expressed in ALG bead-encapsulated HCC cells compared with two-dimensional-cultured cells, which suggested a very complex mechanism underlying HCC drug resistance in 3D culture conditions. In addition, to mimic the specific stiffness of HCC tumor tissue, or other tumor tissues in vivo, response surface methodology (RSM) was used to build up a prediction mathematical model so that ALG beads with desired matrix stiffness could be prepared by simply changing three factors: molecular weight, G content, and alginate concentration.

  4. Streptococcus suis small RNA rss04 contributes to the induction of meningitis by regulating capsule synthesis and by inducing biofilm formation in a mouse infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Genhui; Tang, Huanyu; Zhang, Shouming; Ren, Haiyan; Dai, Jiao; Lai, Liying; Lu, Chengping; Yao, Huochun; Fan, Hongjie; Wu, Zongfu

    2017-02-01

    Streptococcus suis (SS) is an important pathogen for pigs, and it is also considered as a zoonotic agent for humans. Meningitis is one of the most common features of the infection caused by SS, but little is known about the mechanisms of SS meningitis. Recent studies have revealed that small RNAs (sRNAs) have emerged as key regulators of the virulence in several bacteria. In the previous study, we reported that SS sRNA rss04 was up-regulated in pig cerebrospinal fluid and contributes to SS virulence in a zebrafish infection model. Here, we show that rss04 facilitates SS invasion of mouse brain and lung in vivo. Label-free quantitation mass spectrometry analysis revealed that rss04 regulates transcriptional regulator CcpA and several virulence factors including LuxS. Transmission electron microscope and Dot-blot analyses indicated that rss04 represses capsular polysaccharide (CPS) production, which in turn facilitates SS adherence and invasion of mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells bEnd.3 in vitro and activates the mRNA expression of TLR2, CCL2, IL-6 and TNF-α in mouse brain in vivo at 12h post-infection. In addition, rss04 positively regulates SS biofilm formation. Survival analysis of infected mice showed that biofilm state in brain contributes to SS virulence by intracranial subarachnoidal route of infection. Together, our data reveal that SS sRNA rss04 contributes to the induction of meningitis by regulating the CPS synthesis and by inducing biofilm formation, thereby increasing the virulence in a mouse infection model. To our knowledge, rss04 represents the first bacterial sRNA that plays definitive roles in bacterial meningitis.

  5. Regulation of Non-Infectious Lung Injury, Inflammation, and Repair by the Extracellular Matrix Glycosaminoglycan Hyaluronan

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Dianhua; Liang, Jiurong; Noble, Paul W

    2010-01-01

    An important hallmark of tissue remodeling is the dynamic turnover of extracellular matrix (ECM). ECM performs a variety of functions in tissue repair including scaffold formation, modulation of fluid dynamics, and regulating cell behavior. During non-infectious tissue injury ECM degradation products are generated that acquire signaling functions not attributable to the native precursor molecules. Hyaluronan (HA) is a non-sulfated glycosaminoglycan which is produced in great abundance followi...

  6. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms: recent developments in biofilm dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Jessica L; Horswill, Alexander R

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections and represents a significant burden on the healthcare system. S. aureus attachment to medical implants and host tissue, and the establishment of a mature biofilm, play an important role in the persistence of chronic infections. The formation of a biofilm, and encasement of cells in a polymer-based matrix, decreases the susceptibility to antimicrobials and immune defenses, making these infections difficult to eradicate. During infection, dispersal of cells from the biofilm can result in spread to secondary sites and worsening of the infection. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the pathways behind biofilm dispersal in S. aureus, with a focus on enzymatic and newly described broad-spectrum dispersal mechanisms. Additionally, we explore potential applications of dispersal in the treatment of biofilm-mediated infections.

  7. The master regulator for biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis governs the expression of an operon encoding secreted proteins required for the assembly of complex multicellular communities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branda, Steven S. (Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA); Losick, Richard (Harvard University, Cambridge, MA); Kolter, Roberto (Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA); Kearns, Daniel B. (Harvard University, Cambridge, MA); Chu, Frances (Harvard University, Cambridge, MA)

    2005-08-01

    Wild strains of Bacillus subtilis are capable of forming architecturally complex communities of cells known as biofilms. Critical to biofilm formation is the eps operon, which is believed to be responsible for the biosynthesis of an exopolysaccharide that binds chains of cells together in bundles. We report that transcription of eps is under the negative regulation of SinR, a repressor that was found to bind to multiple sites in the regulatory region of the operon. Mutations in sinR bypassed the requirement in biofilm formation of two genes of unknown function, ylbF and ymcA, and sinI, which is known to encode an antagonist of SinR. We propose that these genes are members of a pathway that is responsible for counteracting SinR-mediated repression. We further propose that SinR is a master regulator that governs the transition between a planktonic state in which the bacteria swim as single cells in liquid or swarm in small groups over surfaces, and a sessile state in which the bacteria adhere to each other to form bundled chains and assemble into multicellular communities.

  8. C-di-GMP regulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa stress response to tellurite during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Rybtke, Morten Levin

    2015-01-01

    increased P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and resistance to TeO3(2-). P. aeruginosa ΔsadCΔsiaD and PAO1/p(lac)-yhjH mutants with low intracellular c-di-GMP content were more sensitive to TeO3(2-) exposure and had low relative fitness compared to the wild-type PAO1 planktonic and biofilm cultures exposed...... to TeO3(2-). Our study provided evidence that c-di-GMP level can play an important role in mediating stress response in microbial communities during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth.......Stress response plays an important role on microbial adaptation under hostile environmental conditions. It is generally unclear how the signaling transduction pathway mediates a stress response in planktonic and biofilm modes of microbial communities simultaneously. Here, we showed that metalloid...

  9. Poly-γ-Glutamic Acids Contribute to Biofilm Formation and Plant Root Colonization in Selected Environmental Isolates of Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yiyang; Yan, Fang; Chen, Yun; Jin, Christopher; Guo, Jian-Hua; Chai, Yunrong

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is long known to produce poly-γ-glutamic acids (γ-PGA) as one of the major secreted polymeric substances. In B. subtilis, the regulation of γ-PGA production and its physiological role are still unclear. B. subtilis is also capable of forming structurally complex multicellular communities, or biofilms, in which an extracellular matrix consisting of secreted proteins and polysaccharides holds individual cells together. Biofilms were shown to facilitate B. subtilis-plant interactions. In this study, we show that different environmental isolates of B. subtilis, all capable of forming biofilms, vary significantly in γ-PGA production. This is possibly due to differential regulation of γ-PGA biosynthesis genes. In many of those environmental isolates, γ-PGA seems to contribute to robustness and complex morphology of the colony biofilms, suggesting a role of γ-PGA in biofilm formation. Our evidence further shows that in selected B. subtilis strains, γ-PGA also plays a role in root colonization by the bacteria, pinpointing a possible function of γ-PGA in B. subtilis-plant interactions. Finally, we found that several pathways co-regulate both γ-PGA biosynthesis genes and genes for the biofilm matrix in B. subtilis, but in an opposing fashion. We discussed potential biological significance of that.

  10. Combining Biofilm-Controlling Compounds and Antibiotics as a Promising New Way to Control Biofilm Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Bergamo Estrela

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria grow on surfaces forming biofilms. In this structure, they are well protected and often high dosages of antibiotics cannot clear infectious biofilms. The formation and stabilization of biofilms are mediated by diffusible autoinducers (e.g. N-acyl homoserine lactones, small peptides, furanosyl borate diester. Metabolites interfering with this process have been identified in plants, animals and microbes, and synthetic analogues are known. Additionally, this seems to be not the only way to control biofilms. Enzymes capable of cleaving essential components of the biofilm matrix, e.g. polysaccharides or extracellular DNA, and thus weakening the biofilm architecture have been identified. Bacteria also have mechanisms to dissolve their biofilms and return to planktonic lifestyle. Only a few compounds responsible for the signalling of these processes are known, but they may open a completely novel line of biofilm control. All these approaches lead to the destruction of the biofilm but not the killing of the pathogens. Therefore, a combination of biofilm-destroying compounds and antibiotics to handle biofilm infections is proposed. In this article, different approaches to combine biofilm-controlling compounds and antibiotics to fight biofilm infections are discussed, as well as the balance between biofilm formation and virulence.

  11. αII-spectrin regulates invadosome stability and extracellular matrix degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Ponceau

    Full Text Available Invadosomes are actin-rich adhesion structures involved in tissue invasion and extracellular matrix (ECM remodelling. αII-Spectrin, an ubiquitous scaffolding component of the membrane skeleton and a partner of actin regulators (ABI1, VASP and WASL, accumulates highly and specifically in the invadosomes of multiple cell types, such as mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs expressing SrcY527F, the constitutively active form of Src or activated HMEC-1 endothelial cells. FRAP and live-imaging analysis revealed that αII-spectrin is a highly dynamic component of invadosomes as actin present in the structures core. Knockdown of αII-spectrin expression destabilizes invadosomes and reduces the ability of the remaining invadosomes to digest the ECM and to promote invasion. The ECM degradation defect observed in spectrin-depleted-cells is associated with highly dynamic and unstable invadosome rings. Moreover, FRAP measurement showed the specific involvement of αII-spectrin in the regulation of the mobile/immobile β3-integrin ratio in invadosomes. Our findings suggest that spectrin could regulate invadosome function and maturation by modulating integrin mobility in the membrane, allowing the normal processes of adhesion, invasion and matrix degradation. Altogether, these data highlight a new function for spectrins in the stability of invadosomes and the coupling between actin regulation and ECM degradation.

  12. Vibrio cholerae Biofilms and Cholera Pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisia J Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae can switch between motile and biofilm lifestyles. The last decades have been marked by a remarkable increase in our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function of biofilms formed under laboratory conditions. Evidence has grown suggesting that V. cholerae can form biofilm-like aggregates during infection that could play a critical role in pathogenesis and disease transmission. However, the structure and regulation of biofilms formed during infection, as well as their role in intestinal colonization and virulence, remains poorly understood. Here, we review (i the evidence for biofilm formation during infection, (ii the coordinate regulation of biofilm and virulence gene expression, and (iii the host signals that favor V. cholerae transitions between alternative lifestyles during intestinal colonization, and (iv we discuss a model for the role of V. cholerae biofilms in pathogenicity.

  13. Molecular Basis for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Biofilm Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kaj Scherz

    of translation of FLO11. In conclusion, I have conducted the first global study of the genetic program for yeast biofilm formation on polystyrene. This work provide several target genes as good basis for further research of biofilm, that I believe can contribute to fields such as cell biology, genetics, system......In this study, I sought to identify genes regulating the global molecular program for development of sessile multicellular communities, also known as biofilm, of the eukaryotic microorganism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast). Yeast biofilm has a clinical interest, as biofilms can cause chronic......, but only a small subset is previously described as regulators of FLO11. These results reveal that the regulation of biofilm formation and FLO11 is even more complex than what has previously been described. I find that the molecular program for biofilm formation shares many essential components with two...

  14. Biofilm architecture in a novel pressurized biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Xia, Siqing; Duan, Liang; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

    2015-01-01

    A novel pure-oxygen pressurized biofilm reactor was operated at different organic loading, mechanical shear and hydrodynamic conditions to understand the relationships between biofilm architecture and its operation. The ultimate goal was to improve the performance of the biofilm reactor. The biofilm was labeled with seven stains and observed with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Unusual biofilm architecture of a ribbon embedded between two surfaces with very few points of attachment was observed. As organic loading increased, the biofilm morphology changed from a moderately rough layer into a locally smoother biomass with significant bulging protuberances, although the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency remained unchanged at about 75%. At higher organic loadings, biofilms contained a larger fraction of active cells distributed uniformly within a proteinaceous matrix with decreasing polysaccharide content. Higher hydrodynamic shear in combination with high organic loading resulted in the collapse of biofilm structure and a substantial decrease in reactor performance (a COD removal of 16%). Moreover, the important role of proteins for the spatial distribution of active cells was demonstrated quantitatively.

  15. Haemodynamic and extracellular matrix cues regulate the mechanical phenotype and stiffness of aortic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Caitlin; Osborne, Lukas D; Guilluy, Christophe; Chen, Zhongming; O'Brien, E Tim; Reader, John S; Burridge, Keith; Superfine, Richard; Tzima, Ellie

    2014-06-11

    Endothelial cells (ECs) lining blood vessels express many mechanosensors, including platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), that convert mechanical force into biochemical signals. While it is accepted that mechanical stresses and the mechanical properties of ECs regulate vessel health, the relationship between force and biological response remains elusive. Here we show that ECs integrate mechanical forces and extracellular matrix (ECM) cues to modulate their own mechanical properties. We demonstrate that the ECM influences EC response to tension on PECAM-1. ECs adherent on collagen display divergent stiffening and focal adhesion growth compared with ECs on fibronectin. This is because of protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent serine phosphorylation and inactivation of RhoA. PKA signalling regulates focal adhesion dynamics and EC compliance in response to shear stress in vitro and in vivo. Our study identifies an ECM-specific, mechanosensitive signalling pathway that regulates EC compliance and may serve as an atheroprotective mechanism that maintains blood vessel integrity in vivo.

  16. Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Moser, Claus Ernst

    A still increasing interest and emphasis on the sessile bacterial lifestyle biofilms has been seen since it was realized that the vast majority of the total microbial biomass exists as biofilms. Aggregation of bacteria was first described by Leeuwenhoek in 1677, but only recently recognized...... as being important in chronic infection. In 1993 the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) recognized that the biofilm mode of growth was relevant to microbiology. This book covers both the evidence for biofilms in many chronic bacterial infections as well as the problems facing these infections...... such as diagnostics, pathogenesis, treatment regimes and in vitro and in vivo models for studying biofilms. This is the first scientific book on biofilm infections, chapters written by the world leading scientist and clinicians. The intended audience of this book is scientists, teachers at university level as well...

  17. Regulation and use of the extracellular matrix by Trypanosoma cruzi during early infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pius N. Nde

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, which was once thought to be confined to endemic regions of Latin America, has now gone global becoming a new worldwide challenge. For more than a century since its discovery, it has remained neglected with no effective drugs or vaccines. The mechanisms by which Trypanosoma cruzi regulates and uses the extracellular matrix to invade cells and cause disease are just beginning to be understood. Here we critically review and discuss the regulation of the extracellular matrix (ECM interactome by T. cruzi, the use of the ECM by T. cruzi and analyze the molecular ECM/T. cruzi interphase during the early process of infection. It has been shown that invasive trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi use and modulate components of the ECM during the initial process of infection. Infective trypomastigotes up-regulate the expression of laminin γ-1 (LAMC1 and thrombospondin (THBS1 to facilitate the recruitment of trypomastigotes to enhance cellular infection. Silencing the expression of LAMC1 and THBS1 by stable RNAi dramatically reduces trypanosome infection. T. cruzi gp83, a ligand that mediates the attachment of trypanosomes to cells to initiate infection, up-regulates LAMC1 expression to enhance cellular infection. Infective trypomastigotes use Tc85 to interact with laminin, p45 mucin to interact with LAMC1 through galectin-3 (LGALS3, a human lectin, and calreticulin (TcCRT to interact with TSB1 to enhance cellular infection. Silencing the expression of LGALS3 also reduces cellular infection. Despite the role of the ECM in T. cruzi infection, almost nothing is known about the ECM interactome networks operating in the process of T. cruzi infection and its ligands. Here, we present the first elucidation of the human ECM interactome network regulated by T. cruzi and its gp83 ligand that facilitates cellular infection. The elucidation of the human ECM interactome regulated by T. cruzi and the dissection of the molecular ECM/T. cruzi interphase using

  18. The OxyR homologue in Tannerella forsythia regulates expression of oxidative stress responses and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Kiyonobu; Mishima, Elina; Inagaki, Satoru; Sharma, Ashu

    2009-06-01

    Tannerella forsythia is an anaerobic periodontal pathogen that encounters constant oxidative stress in the human oral cavity due to exposure to air and reactive oxidative species from coexisting dental plaque bacteria as well as leukocytes. In this study, we sought to characterize a T. forsythia ORF with close similarity to bacterial oxidative stress response sensor protein OxyR. To analyse the role of this OxyR homologue, a gene deletion mutant was constructed and characterized. Aerotolerance, survival after hydrogen peroxide challenge and transcription levels of known bacterial antioxidant genes were then determined. Since an association between oxidative stress and biofilm formation has been observed in bacterial systems, we also investigated the role of the OxyR protein in biofilm development by T. forsythia. Our results showed that aerotolerance, sensitivity to peroxide challenge and the expression of oxidative stress response genes were significantly reduced in the mutant as compared with the wild-type strain. Moreover, the results of biofilm analyses showed that, as compared with the wild-type strain, the oxyR mutant showed significantly less autoaggregation and a reduced ability to form mixed biofilms with Fusobacterium nucleatum. In conclusion, a gene annotated in the T. forsythia genome as an oxyR homologue was characterized. Our studies showed that the oxyR homologue in T. forsythia constitutively activates antioxidant genes involved in resistance to peroxides as well as oxygen stress (aerotolerance). In addition, the oxyR deletion attenuates biofilm formation in T. forsythia.

  19. Extracellular matrix proteins regulate epithelial-mesenchymal transition in mammary epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qike K.; Lee, KangAe; Radisky, Derek C.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2013-01-01

    Mouse mammary epithelial cells undergo transdifferentiation via epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) upon treatment with matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3). In rigid microenvironments, MMP3 upregulates expression of Rac1b, which translocates to the cell membrane to promote induction of reactive oxygen species and EMT. Here we examine the role of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in this process. Our data show that the basement membrane protein laminin suppresses the EMT response in MMP3-treated cells, whereas fibronectin promotes EMT. These ECM proteins regulate EMT via interactions with their specific integrin receptors. α6-integrin sequesters Rac1b from the membrane and is required for inhibition of EMT by laminin. In contrast, α5-integrin maintains Rac1b at the membrane and is required for the promotion of EMT by fibronectin. Understanding the regulatory role of the ECM will provide insight into mechanisms underlying normal and pathological development of the mammary gland. PMID:23660532

  20. The composition and compression of biofilms developed on ultrafiltration membranes determine hydraulic biofilm resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derlon, Nicolas; Grütter, Alexander; Brandenberger, Fabienne; Sutter, Anja; Kuhlicke, Ute; Neu, Thomas R; Morgenroth, Eberhard

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed at identifying how to improve the level of permeate flux stabilisation during gravity-driven membrane filtration without control of biofilm formation. The focus was therefore on understanding (i) how the different fractions of the biofilms (inorganics particles, bacterial cells, EPS matrix) influence its hydraulic resistance and (ii) how the compression of biofilms impacts its hydraulic resistance, i.e., can water head be increased to increase the level of permeate flux stabilisation. Biofilms were developed on ultrafiltration membranes at 88 and 284 cm water heads with dead-end filtration for around 50 days. A larger water head resulted in a smaller biofilm permeability (150 and 50 L m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1) for biofilms grown at 88 cm and 284 cm water head, respectively). Biofilms were mainly composed of EPS (>90% in volume). The comparison of the hydraulic resistances of biofilms to model fouling layers indicated that most of the hydraulic resistance is due to the EPS matrix. The compressibility of the biofilm was also evaluated by subjecting the biofilms to short-term (few minutes) and long-term variations of transmembrane pressures (TMP). A sudden change of TMP resulted in an instantaneous and reversible change of biofilm hydraulic resistance. A long-term change of TMP induced a slow change in the biofilm hydraulic resistance. Our results demonstrate that the response of biofilms to a TMP change has two components: an immediate variation of resistance (due to compression/relaxation) and a long-term response (linked to biofilm adaptation/growth). Our results provide relevant information about the relationship between the operating conditions in terms of TMP, the biofilm structure and composition and the resulting biofilm hydraulic resistance. These findings have practical implications for a broad range of membrane systems.

  1. Planar cell polarity genes regulate polarized extracellular matrix deposition during frog gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Toshiyasu; Davidson, Lance; Asashima, Makoto; Keller, Ray

    2005-04-26

    The noncanonical wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway [1] regulates the mediolaterally (planarly) polarized cell protrusive activity and intercalation that drives the convergent extension movements of vertebrate gastrulation [2], yet the underlying mechanism is unknown. We report that perturbing expression of Xenopus PCP genes, Strabismus (Xstbm), Frizzled (Xfz7), and Prickle (Xpk), disrupts radially polarized fibronectin fibril assembly on mesodermal tissue surfaces, mediolaterally polarized motility, and intercalation. Polarized motility is restored in Xpk-perturbed explants but not in Xstbm- or Xfz7-perturbed explants cultured on fibronectin surfaces. The PCP complex, including Xpk, first regulates polarized surface assembly of the fibronectin matrix, which is necessary for mediolaterally polarized motility, and then, without Xpk, has an additional and necessary function in polarizing motility. These results show that the PCP complex regulates several cell polarities (radial, planar) and several processes (matrix deposition, motility), by indirect and direct mechanisms, and acts in several modes, either with all or a subset of its components, during vertebrate morphogenesis.

  2. Temporal expression of agrB, cidA, and alsS in the early development of Staphylococcus aureus UAMS-1 biofilm formation and the structural role of extracellular DNA and carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Rossella; Nistico, Laura; Sambanthamoorthy, Karthik; Longwell, Mark; Iannitelli, Antonio; Cellini, Luigina; Di Stefano, Antonio; Hall Stoodley, Luanne; Stoodley, Paul

    2014-04-01

    Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is an important component of the extracellular polymeric substance matrix and is important in the establishment and persistence of Staphylococcus aureus UAMS-1 biofilms. The aim of the study was to determine the temporal expression of genes involved in early biofilm formation and eDNA production. We used qPCR to investigate expression of agrB, which is associated with secreted virulence factors and biofilm dispersal, cidA, which is associated with biofilm adherence and genomic DNA release, and alsS, which is associated with cell lysis, eDNA release and acid tolerance. The contribution of eDNA to the stability of the biofilm matrix was assessed by digesting with DNase I (Pulmozyme) and quantifying structure by confocal microscopy and comstat image analysis. AgrB expression initially increased at 24 h but then dramatically decreased at 72 h in an inverse relationship to biomass, supporting its role in regulating biofilm dispersal. cidA and alsS expression steadily increased over 72 h, suggesting that eDNA was an important component of early biofilm development. DNase I had no effect on biomass, but did cause the biofilms to become more heterogeneous. Carbohydrates in the matrix appeared to play an important role in structural stability.

  3. Hepatocyte produced matrix metalloproteinases are regulated by CD147 in liver fibrogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R Calabro

    Full Text Available The classical paradigm of liver injury asserts that hepatic stellate cells (HSC produce, remodel and turnover the abnormal extracellular matrix (ECM of fibrosis via matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. In extrahepatic tissues MMP production is regulated by a number of mechanisms including expression of the glycoprotein CD147. Previously, we have shown that CD147 is expressed on hepatocytes but not within the fibrotic septa in cirrhosis [1]. Therefore, we investigated if hepatocytes produce MMPs, regulated by CD147, which are capable of remodelling fibrotic ECM independent of the HSC.Non-diseased, fibrotic and cirrhotic livers were examined for MMP activity and markers of fibrosis in humans and mice. CD147 expression and MMP activity were co-localised by in-situ zymography. The role of CD147 was studied in-vitro with siRNA to CD147 in hepatocytes and in-vivo in mice with CCl4 induced liver injury using ãCD147 antibody intervention.In liver fibrosis in both human and mouse tissue MMP expression and activity (MMP-2, -9, -13 and -14 increased with progressive injury and localised to hepatocytes. Additionally, as expected, MMPs were abundantly expressed by activated HSC. Further, with progressive fibrosis there was expression of CD147, which localised to hepatocytes but not to HSC. Functionally significant in-vitro regulation of hepatocyte MMP production by CD147 was demonstrated using siRNA to CD147 that decreased hepatocyte MMP-2 and -9 expression/activity. Further, in-vivo α-CD147 antibody intervention decreased liver MMP-2, -9, -13, -14, TGF-β and α-SMA expression in CCl4 treated mice compared to controls.We have shown that hepatocytes produce active MMPs and that the glycoprotein CD147 regulates hepatocyte MMP expression. Targeting CD147 regulates hepatocyte MMP production both in-vitro and in-vivo, with the net result being reduced fibrotic matrix turnover in-vivo. Therefore, CD147 regulation of hepatocyte MMP is a novel pathway that could be

  4. A cathelicidin-2-derived peptide effectively impairs Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molhoek, E.M.; Dijk, A. van; Veldhuizen, E.J.A.; Haagsman, H.P.; Bikker, F.J.

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a major cause of nosocomial infections owing to its ability to form biofilms on the surface of medical devices. Biofilms are surface-adhered bacterial communities. In mature biofilms these communities are encased in an extracellular matrix composed of bacterial polysacc

  5. Identification of flgZ as a flagellar gene encoding a PilZ domain protein that regulates swimming motility and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Navazo, Ana; Barahona, Emma; Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; González de Heredia, Elena; Baena, Irene; Martín-Martín, Irene; Rivilla, Rafael; Martín, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase enzymatic activities control c-di-GMP levels modulating planktonic versus sessile lifestyle behavior in bacteria. The PilZ domain is described as a sensor of c-di-GMP intracellular levels and the proteins containing a PilZ domain represent the best studied class of c-di-GMP receptors forming part of the c-di-GMP signaling cascade. In P. fluorescens F113 we have found two diguanylate cyclases (WspR, SadC) and one phosphodiesterase (BifA) implicated in regulation of swimming motility and biofilm formation. Here we identify a flgZ gene located in a flagellar operon encoding a protein that contains a PilZ domain. Moreover, we show that FlgZ subcellular localization depends on the c-di-GMP intracellular levels. The overexpression analysis of flgZ in P. fluorescens F113 and P. putida KT2440 backgrounds reveal a participation of FlgZ in Pseudomonas swimming motility regulation. Besides, the epistasis of flgZ over wspR and bifA clearly shows that c-di-GMP intracellular levels produced by the enzymatic activity of the diguanylate cyclase WspR and the phosphodiesterase BifA regulates biofilm formation through FlgZ.

  6. Effect of Negative Pressure on Proliferation, Virulence Factor Secretion, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence-Regulated Gene Expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Qi Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the effect of negative pressure conditions induced by NPWT on P. aeruginosa. Methods. P. aeruginosa was cultured in a Luria–Bertani medium at negative pressure of −125 mmHg for 24 h in the experimental group and at atmospheric pressure in the control group. The diameters of the colonies of P. aeruginosa were measured after 24 h. ELISA kit, orcinol method, and elastin-Congo red assay were used to quantify the virulence factors. Biofilm formation was observed by staining with Alexa Fluor® 647 conjugate of concanavalin A (Con A. Virulence-regulated genes were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Results. As compared with the control group, growth of P. aeruginosa was inhibited by negative pressure. The colony size under negative pressure was significantly smaller in the experimental group than that in the controls (p<0.01. Besides, reductions in the total amount of virulence factors were observed in the negative pressure group, including exotoxin A, rhamnolipid, and elastase. RT-PCR results revealed a significant inhibition in the expression level of virulence-regulated genes. Conclusion. Negative pressure could significantly inhibit the growth of P. aeruginosa. It led to a decrease in the virulence factor secretion, biofilm formation, and a reduction in the expression level of virulence-regulated genes.

  7. Identification of flgZ as a flagellar gene encoding a PilZ domain protein that regulates swimming motility and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Martínez-Granero

    Full Text Available Diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase enzymatic activities control c-di-GMP levels modulating planktonic versus sessile lifestyle behavior in bacteria. The PilZ domain is described as a sensor of c-di-GMP intracellular levels and the proteins containing a PilZ domain represent the best studied class of c-di-GMP receptors forming part of the c-di-GMP signaling cascade. In P. fluorescens F113 we have found two diguanylate cyclases (WspR, SadC and one phosphodiesterase (BifA implicated in regulation of swimming motility and biofilm formation. Here we identify a flgZ gene located in a flagellar operon encoding a protein that contains a PilZ domain. Moreover, we show that FlgZ subcellular localization depends on the c-di-GMP intracellular levels. The overexpression analysis of flgZ in P. fluorescens F113 and P. putida KT2440 backgrounds reveal a participation of FlgZ in Pseudomonas swimming motility regulation. Besides, the epistasis of flgZ over wspR and bifA clearly shows that c-di-GMP intracellular levels produced by the enzymatic activity of the diguanylate cyclase WspR and the phosphodiesterase BifA regulates biofilm formation through FlgZ.

  8. Salmonella biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castelijn, G.A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Salmonellaspp. is a problem in the food industry, since biofilms may act as a persistent source of product contamination. Therefore the aim of this study was to obtain more insight in the processes involved and the factors contributing to Salmonellabiofilm formation. A collectio

  9. A role for matrix stiffness in the regulation of cardiac side population cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yiling; Bayomy, Ahmad F; Gomez, Marcus V; Bauer, Michael; Du, Ping; Yang, Yanfei; Zhang, Xin; Liao, Ronglih

    2015-05-01

    The mechanical properties of the local microenvironment may have important influence on the fate and function of adult tissue progenitor cells, altering the regenerative process. This is particularly critical following a myocardial infarction, in which the normal, compliant myocardial tissue is replaced with fibrotic, stiff scar tissue. In this study, we examined the effects of matrix stiffness on adult cardiac side population (CSP) progenitor cell behavior. Ovine and murine CSP cells were isolated and cultured on polydimethylsiloxane substrates, replicating the elastic moduli of normal and fibrotic myocardium. Proliferation capacity and cell cycling were increased in CSP cells cultured on the stiff substrate with an associated reduction in cardiomyogeneic differentiation and accelerated cell ageing. In addition, culture on stiff substrate stimulated upregulation of extracellular matrix and adhesion proteins gene expression in CSP cells. Collectively, we demonstrate that microenvironment properties, including matrix stiffness, play a critical role in regulating progenitor cell functions of endogenous resident CSP cells. Understanding the effects of the tissue microenvironment on resident cardiac progenitor cells is a critical step toward achieving functional cardiac regeneration.

  10. Ciliates as engineers of phototrophic biofilms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerman, E.J.; Geest, H.G.; Meulen, M.D.; Manders, E.M.M.; Van de Koppel, J.; Herman, P.M.J.; Admiraal, W.

    2011-01-01

    1.Phototrophic biofilms consist of a matrix of phototrophs, non-photosynthetic bacteria and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which is spatially structured. Despite widespread exploitation of algae and bacteria within phototrophic biofilms, for example by protozoans, the ‘engineering’ effects

  11. Ciliates as engineers of phototrophic biofilms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerman, E.J.; van der Geest, H.G.; van der Meulen, M.D; Manders, E.M.M.; van de Koppel, J.; Herman, P.M.J.; Admiraal, W.

    2011-01-01

    1. Phototrophic biofilms consist of a matrix of phototrophs, non-photosynthetic bacteria and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which is spatially structured. Despite widespread exploitation of algae and bacteria within phototrophic biofilms, for example by protozoans, the ‘engineering’ effect

  12. Regulation of proximal tubular cell differentiation and proliferation in primary culture by matrix stiffness and ECM components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wan-Chun; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Tang, Ming-Jer

    2014-09-15

    To explore whether matrix stiffness affects cell differentiation, proliferation, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in primary cultures of mouse proximal tubular epithelial cells (mPTECs), we used a soft matrix made from monomeric collagen type I-coated polyacrylamide gel or matrigel (MG). Both kinds of soft matrix benefited primary mPTECs to retain tubular-like morphology with differentiation and growth arrest and to evade TGF-β1-induced EMT. However, the potent effect of MG on mPTEC differentiation was suppressed by glutaraldehyde-induced cross-linking and subsequently stiffening MG or by an increasing ratio of collagen in the soft mixed gel. Culture media supplemented with MG also helped mPTECs to retain tubular-like morphology and a differentiated phenotype on stiff culture dishes as soft MG did. We further found that the protein level and activity of ERK were scaled with the matrix stiffness. U-0126, a MEK inhibitor, abolished the stiff matrix-induced dedifferentiation and proliferation. These data suggest that the ERK signaling pathway plays a vital role in matrix stiffness-regulated cell growth and differentiation. Taken together, both compliant property and specific MG signals from the matrix are required for the regulation of epithelial differentiation and proliferation. This study provides a basic understanding of how physical and chemical cues derived from the extracellular matrix regulate the physiological function of proximal tubules and the pathological development of renal fibrosis.

  13. Mechanistic insights into c-di-GMP–dependent control of the biofilm regulator FleQ from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuyama, Bruno Y.; Krasteva, Petya V.; Baraquet, Claudine; Harwood, Caroline S.; Sondermann, Holger; Navarro, Marcos V.A. S. (UWASH); (U. Sao Paulo); (Cornell); (CNRS-UMR)

    2016-07-05

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen that can cause fatal chronic infections, relies on the intracellular second-messenger c-di-GMP to form robust multicellular biofilms during host tissue colonization. c-di-GMP is sensed directly by the transcription regulator FleQ, which inversely regulates flagellar motility and exopolysaccharide secretion to secure a planktonic to sessile life-form transition. FleQ belongs to the diverse family of AAA+ ATPase enhancer-binding proteins, but how its noncanonical function on transcriptional regulation is controlled by c-di-GMP remains enigmatic. Here, we report structural and functional data that identify an unusual mode of c-di-GMP recognition accompanied by a major quaternary structure reorganization. Our analyses offer a consensus to previous studies and unique insights into the mechanism of action of FleQ and FleQ-like proteins.

  14. Fremmedlegemeinfektioner--nyt om biofilm og quorum sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Ciofu, Oana

    2007-01-01

    Biofilms are structured consortia of bacteria embedded in self-produced polymer matrix. Biofilms are resistant to antibiotics, disinfectives and phagocytosis. The persistence of foreign body infections is due to biofilms. Chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis patients is a biofilm....... Bacteria in biofilms communicate by means of quorum sensing which activates genes for virulence factors. Biofilms can be prevented by antibiotic prophylaxis or early therapy or by quorum sensing inhibitors which make them susceptible to antibiotics and phagocytosis. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Nov-26...

  15. Staphylokinase Control of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation and Detachment Through Host Plasminogen Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiecinski, Jakub; Peetermans, Marijke; Liesenborghs, Laurens; Na, Manli; Björnsdottir, Halla; Zhu, Xuefeng; Jacobsson, Gunnar; Johansson, Bengt R; Geoghegan, Joan A; Foster, Timothy J; Josefsson, Elisabet; Bylund, Johan; Verhamme, Peter; Jin, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilms, a leading cause of persistent infections, are highly resistant to immune defenses and antimicrobial therapies. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of fibrin and staphylokinase (Sak) to biofilm formation. In both clinical S. aureus isolates and laboratory strains, high Sak-producing strains formed less biofilm than strains that lacked Sak, suggesting that Sak prevents biofilm formation. In addition, Sak induced detachment of mature biofilms. This effect depended on plasminogen activation by Sak. Host-derived fibrin, the main substrate cleaved by Sak-activated plasminogen, was a major component of biofilm matrix, and dissolution of this fibrin scaffold greatly increased susceptibility of biofilms to antibiotics and neutrophil phagocytosis. Sak also attenuated biofilm-associated catheter infections in mouse models. In conclusion, our results reveal a novel role for Sak-induced plasminogen activation that prevents S. aureus biofilm formation and induces detachment of existing biofilms through proteolytic cleavage of biofilm matrix components.

  16. C-di-GMP regulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa stress response to tellurite during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Song Lin; Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Rybtke, Morten; Yuan, Mingjun; Andersen, Jens Bo; Nielsen, Thomas E; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Cao, Bin; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Stress response plays an important role on microbial adaptation under hostile environmental conditions. It is generally unclear how the signaling transduction pathway mediates a stress response in planktonic and biofilm modes of microbial communities simultaneously. Here, we showed that metalloid tellurite (TeO3(2-)) exposure induced the intracellular content of the secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), SadC and SiaD, were responsible for the increased intracellular content of c-di-GMP. Enhanced c-di-GMP levels by TeO3(2-) further increased P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and resistance to TeO3(2-). P. aeruginosa ΔsadCΔsiaD and PAO1/p(lac)-yhjH mutants with low intracellular c-di-GMP content were more sensitive to TeO3(2-) exposure and had low relative fitness compared to the wild-type PAO1 planktonic and biofilm cultures exposed to TeO3(2-). Our study provided evidence that c-di-GMP level can play an important role in mediating stress response in microbial communities during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael Christian;

    2014-01-01

    biofilms, which protect the aggregated, biopolymer-embedded bacteria from the detrimental actions of antibiotic treatments and host immunity. A key component in the protection against innate immunity is rhamnolipid, which is a quorum sensing (QS)-regulated virulence factor. QS is a cell-to-cell signaling...... mechanism used to coordinate expression of virulence and protection of aggregated biofilm cells. Rhamnolipids are known for their ability to cause hemolysis and have been shown to cause lysis of several cellular components of the human immune system, for example, macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes...

  18. Regulation of PDGFC signalling and extracellular matrix composition by FREM1 in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenny Wiradjaja

    2013-11-01

    Fras1-related extracellular matrix protein 1 (FREM1 is required for epidermal adhesion during embryogenesis, and mice lacking the gene develop fetal skin blisters and a range of other developmental defects. Mutations in members of the FRAS/FREM gene family cause diseases of the Fraser syndrome spectrum. Embryonic epidermal blistering is also observed in mice lacking PdgfC and its receptor, PDGFRα. In this article, we show that FREM1 binds to PDGFC and that this interaction regulates signalling downstream of PDGFRα. Fibroblasts from Frem1-mutant mice respond to PDGFC stimulation, but with a shorter duration and amplitude than do wild-type cells. Significantly, PDGFC-stimulated expression of the metalloproteinase inhibitor Timp1 is reduced in cells with Frem1 mutations, leading to reduced basement membrane collagen I deposition. These results show that the physical interaction of FREM1 with PDGFC can regulate remodelling of the extracellular matrix downstream of PDGFRα. We propose that loss of FREM1 function promotes epidermal blistering in Fraser syndrome as a consequence of reduced PDGFC activity, in addition to its stabilising role in the basement membrane.

  19. Matrix Metalloproteinases: Inflammatory Regulators of Cell Behaviors in Vascular Formation and Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qishan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal angiogenesis and vascular remodeling contribute to pathogenesis of a number of disorders such as tumor, arthritis, atherosclerosis, restenosis, hypertension, and neurodegeneration. During angiogenesis and vascular remodeling, behaviors of stem/progenitor cells, endothelial cells (ECs, and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs and its interaction with extracellular matrix (ECM play a critical role in the processes. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, well-known inflammatory mediators are a family of zinc-dependent proteolytic enzymes that degrade various components of ECM and non-ECM molecules mediating tissue remodeling in both physiological and pathological processes. MMPs including MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-7, MMP-8, MMP-9, MMP-12, and MT1-MMP, are stimulated and activated by various stimuli in vascular tissues. Once activated, MMPs degrade ECM proteins or other related signal molecules to promote recruitment of stem/progenitor cells and facilitate migration and invasion of ECs and VSMCs. Moreover, vascular cell proliferation and apoptosis can also be regulated by MMPs via proteolytically cleaving and modulating bioactive molecules and relevant signaling pathways. Regarding the importance of vascular cells in abnormal angiogenesis and vascular remodeling, regulation of vascular cell behaviors through modulating expression and activation of MMPs shows therapeutic potential.

  20. Up-regulated extracellular matrix components and inflammatory chemokines may impair the regeneration of cholestatic liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Li, Tao-Sheng; Soyama, Akihiko; Tanaka, Takayuki; Yan, Chen; Sakai, Yusuke; Hidaka, Masaaki; Kinoshita, Ayaka; Natsuda, Koji; Fujii, Mio; Kugiyama, Tota; Baimakhanov, Zhassulan; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Gu, Weili; Eguchi, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Although the healthy liver is known to have high regenerative potential, poor liver regeneration under pathological conditions remains a substantial problem. We investigated the key molecules that impair the regeneration of cholestatic liver. C57BL/6 mice were randomly subjected to partial hepatectomy and bile duct ligation (PH+BDL group, n = 16), partial hepatectomy only (PH group, n = 16), or sham operation (Sham group, n = 16). The liver sizes and histological findings were similar in the PH and sham groups 14 days after operation. However, compared with those in the sham group, the livers in mice in the PH+BDL group had a smaller size, a lower cell proliferative activity, and more fibrotic tissue 14 days after the operation, suggesting the insufficient regeneration of the cholestatic liver. Pathway-focused array analysis showed that many genes were up- or down-regulated over 1.5-fold in both PH+BDL and PH groups at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after treatment. Interestingly, more genes that were functionally related to the extracellular matrix and inflammatory chemokines were found in the PH+BDL group than in the PH group at 7 and 14 days after treatment. Our data suggest that up-regulated extracellular matrix components and inflammatory chemokines may impair the regeneration of cholestatic liver.

  1. MrkH, a novel c-di-GMP-dependent transcriptional activator, controls Klebsiella pneumoniae biofilm formation by regulating type 3 fimbriae expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J Wilksch

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly amongst hospitalized individuals. The principle mechanism for pathogenesis in hospital environments involves the formation of biofilms, primarily on implanted medical devices. In this study, we constructed a transposon mutant library in a clinical isolate, K. pneumoniae AJ218, to identify the genes and pathways implicated in biofilm formation. Three mutants severely defective in biofilm formation contained insertions within the mrkABCDF genes encoding the main structural subunit and assembly machinery for type 3 fimbriae. Two other mutants carried insertions within the yfiN and mrkJ genes, which encode GGDEF domain- and EAL domain-containing c-di-GMP turnover enzymes, respectively. The remaining two isolates contained insertions that inactivated the mrkH and mrkI genes, which encode for novel proteins with a c-di-GMP-binding PilZ domain and a LuxR-type transcriptional regulator, respectively. Biochemical and functional assays indicated that the effects of these factors on biofilm formation accompany concomitant changes in type 3 fimbriae expression. We mapped the transcriptional start site of mrkA, demonstrated that MrkH directly activates transcription of the mrkA promoter and showed that MrkH binds strongly to the mrkA regulatory region only in the presence of c-di-GMP. Furthermore, a point mutation in the putative c-di-GMP-binding domain of MrkH completely abolished its function as a transcriptional activator. In vivo analysis of the yfiN and mrkJ genes strongly indicated their c-di-GMP-specific function as diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase, respectively. In addition, in vitro assays showed that purified MrkJ protein has strong c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity. These results demonstrate for the first time that c-di-GMP can function as an effector to stimulate the activity of a transcriptional activator, and explain how type 3 fimbriae

  2. Matrix stiffness regulation of integrin-mediated mechanotransduction during osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yu-Ru V; Tseng, Kuo-Fung; Lai, Hsiu-Yu; Lin, Chi-Hung; Lee, Oscar K

    2011-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured on extracellular matrices with different stiffness have been shown to possess diverse lineage commitment owing to the extracellular mechanical stimuli sensed by the cells. The aim of this study was to further delineate how matrix stiffness affects intracellular signaling through the mechanotransducers Rho kinase (ROCK) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and subsequently regulates the osteogenic phenotype of MSCs. MSCs were cultured in osteogenic medium on tunable polyacrylamide hydrogels coated with type I collagen with elasticities corresponding to Young's modulus of 7.0 ± 1.2 and 42.1 ± 3.2 kPa. Osteogenic differentiation was increased on stiffer matrices, as evident by type I collagen, osteocalcin, and Runx2 gene expressions and alizarin red S staining for mineralization. Western blot analysis demonstrated an increase in kinase activities of ROCK, FAK, and ERK1/2 on stiffer matrices. Inhibition of FAK, an important mediator of osteogenic differentiation, and inhibition of ROCK, a known mechanotransducer of matrix stiffness during osteogenesis, resulted in decreased expression of osteogenic markers during osteogenic induction. In addition, FAK affects osteogenic differentiation through ERK1/2, whereas ROCK regulates both FAK and ERK1/2. Furthermore, α(2)-integrin was upregulated on stiffer matrices during osteogenic induction, and its knockdown by siRNA downregulated the osteogenic phenotype through ROCK, FAK, and ERK1/2. Taken together, our results provide evidence that the matrix rigidity affects the osteogenic outcome of MSCs through mechanotransduction events that are mediated by α(2)-integrin.

  3. Planar cell polarity proteins differentially regulate extracellular matrix organization and assembly during zebrafish gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohn, Michael R; Mundell, Nathan A; Sawyer, Leah M; Dunlap, Julie A; Jessen, Jason R

    2013-11-01

    Zebrafish gastrulation cell movements occur in the context of dynamic changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) organization and require the concerted action of planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins that regulate cell elongation and mediolateral alignment. Data obtained using Xenopus laevis gastrulae have shown that integrin-fibronectin interactions underlie the formation of polarized cell protrusions necessary for PCP and have implicated PCP proteins themselves as regulators of ECM. By contrast, the relationship between establishment of PCP and ECM assembly/remodeling during zebrafish gastrulation is unclear. We previously showed that zebrafish embryos carrying a null mutation in the four-pass transmembrane PCP protein vang-like 2 (vangl2) exhibit increased matrix metalloproteinase activity and decreased immunolabeling of fibronectin. These data implicated for the first time a core PCP protein in the regulation of pericellular proteolysis of ECM substrates and raised the question of whether other zebrafish PCP proteins also impact ECM organization. In Drosophila melanogaster, the cytoplasmic PCP protein Prickle binds Van Gogh and regulates its function. Here we report that similar to vangl2, loss of zebrafish prickle1a decreases fibronectin protein levels in gastrula embryos. We further show that Prickle1a physically binds Vangl2 and regulates both the subcellular distribution and total protein level of Vangl2. These data suggest that the ability of Prickle1a to impact fibronectin organization is at least partly due to effects on Vangl2. In contrast to loss of either Vangl2 or Prickle1a function, we find that glypican4 (a Wnt co-receptor) and frizzled7 mutant gastrula embryos with disrupted non-canonical Wnt signaling exhibit the opposite phenotype, namely increased fibronectin assembly. Our data show that glypican4 mutants do not have decreased proteolysis of ECM substrates, but instead have increased cell surface cadherin protein expression and increased intercellular

  4. Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 RpoN (Sigma 54 Is a Pleiotropic Regulator of Growth, Carbohydrate Metabolism, Motility, Biofilm Formation and Toxin Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasmik Hayrapetyan

    Full Text Available Sigma 54 is a transcriptional regulator predicted to play a role in physical interaction of bacteria with their environment, including virulence and biofilm formation. In order to study the role of Sigma 54 in Bacillus cereus, a comparative transcriptome and phenotypic study was performed using B. cereus ATCC 14579 WT, a markerless rpoN deletion mutant, and its complemented strain. The mutant was impaired in many different cellular functions including low temperature and anaerobic growth, carbohydrate metabolism, sporulation and toxin production. Additionally, the mutant showed lack of motility and biofilm formation at air-liquid interphase, and this correlated with absence of flagella, as flagella staining showed only WT and complemented strain to be highly flagellated. Comparative transcriptome analysis of cells harvested at selected time points during growth in aerated and static conditions in BHI revealed large differences in gene expression associated with loss of phenotypes, including significant down regulation of genes in the mutant encoding enzymes involved in degradation of branched chain amino acids, carbohydrate transport and metabolism, flagella synthesis and virulence factors. Our study provides evidence for a pleiotropic role of Sigma 54 in B. cereus supporting its adaptive response and survival in a range of conditions and environments.

  5. The Acinetobacter baumannii Two-Component System AdeRS Regulates Genes Required for Multidrug Efflux, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence in a Strain-Specific Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace E. Richmond

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii is able to persist in the environment and is often multidrug resistant (MDR, causing difficulties in the treatment of infections. Here, we show that the two-component system AdeRS, which regulates the production of the AdeABC multidrug resistance efflux pump, is required for the formation of a protective biofilm in an ex vivo porcine mucosal model, which mimics a natural infection of the human epithelium. Interestingly, deletion of adeB impacted only on the ability of strain AYE to form a biofilm on plastic and only on the virulence of strain Singapore 1 for Galleria mellonella. RNA-Seq revealed that loss of AdeRS or AdeB significantly altered the transcriptional landscape, resulting in the changed expression of many genes, notably those associated with antimicrobial resistance and virulence interactions. For example, A. baumannii lacking AdeRS displayed decreased expression of adeABC, pil genes, com genes, and a pgaC-like gene, whereas loss of AdeB resulted in increased expression of pil and com genes and decreased expression of ferric acinetobactin transport system genes. These data define the scope of AdeRS-mediated regulation, show that changes in the production of AdeABC mediate important phenotypes controlled by AdeRS, and suggest that AdeABC is a viable target for antimicrobial drug and antibiofilm discovery.

  6. The Acinetobacter baumannii Two-Component System AdeRS Regulates Genes Required for Multidrug Efflux, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence in a Strain-Specific Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Grace E.; Evans, Laura P.; Anderson, Michele J.; Wand, Matthew E.; Bonney, Laura C.; Ivens, Alasdair; Chua, Kim Lee; Webber, Mark A.; Sutton, J. Mark; Peterson, Marnie L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii is able to persist in the environment and is often multidrug resistant (MDR), causing difficulties in the treatment of infections. Here, we show that the two-component system AdeRS, which regulates the production of the AdeABC multidrug resistance efflux pump, is required for the formation of a protective biofilm in an ex vivo porcine mucosal model, which mimics a natural infection of the human epithelium. Interestingly, deletion of adeB impacted only on the ability of strain AYE to form a biofilm on plastic and only on the virulence of strain Singapore 1 for Galleria mellonella. RNA-Seq revealed that loss of AdeRS or AdeB significantly altered the transcriptional landscape, resulting in the changed expression of many genes, notably those associated with antimicrobial resistance and virulence interactions. For example, A. baumannii lacking AdeRS displayed decreased expression of adeABC, pil genes, com genes, and a pgaC-like gene, whereas loss of AdeB resulted in increased expression of pil and com genes and decreased expression of ferric acinetobactin transport system genes. These data define the scope of AdeRS-mediated regulation, show that changes in the production of AdeABC mediate important phenotypes controlled by AdeRS, and suggest that AdeABC is a viable target for antimicrobial drug and antibiofilm discovery. PMID:27094331

  7. Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 RpoN (Sigma 54) Is a Pleiotropic Regulator of Growth, Carbohydrate Metabolism, Motility, Biofilm Formation and Toxin Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayrapetyan, Hasmik; Tempelaars, Marcel; Nierop Groot, Masja; Abee, Tjakko

    2015-01-01

    Sigma 54 is a transcriptional regulator predicted to play a role in physical interaction of bacteria with their environment, including virulence and biofilm formation. In order to study the role of Sigma 54 in Bacillus cereus, a comparative transcriptome and phenotypic study was performed using B. cereus ATCC 14579 WT, a markerless rpoN deletion mutant, and its complemented strain. The mutant was impaired in many different cellular functions including low temperature and anaerobic growth, carbohydrate metabolism, sporulation and toxin production. Additionally, the mutant showed lack of motility and biofilm formation at air-liquid interphase, and this correlated with absence of flagella, as flagella staining showed only WT and complemented strain to be highly flagellated. Comparative transcriptome analysis of cells harvested at selected time points during growth in aerated and static conditions in BHI revealed large differences in gene expression associated with loss of phenotypes, including significant down regulation of genes in the mutant encoding enzymes involved in degradation of branched chain amino acids, carbohydrate transport and metabolism, flagella synthesis and virulence factors. Our study provides evidence for a pleiotropic role of Sigma 54 in B. cereus supporting its adaptive response and survival in a range of conditions and environments.

  8. Trigonella foenum-graceum (Seed Extract Interferes with Quorum Sensing Regulated Traits and Biofilm Formation in the Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aeromonas hydrophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fohad Mabood Husain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trigonella foenum-graecum L. (Fenugreek is an important plant of the Leguminosae family known to have medicinal properties. However, fraction based antiquorum sensing and antibiofilm activities have not been reported from this plant. In the present study T. foenum-graecum seed extract was sequentially fractionated and sub-MICs were tested for above activities. The methanol fraction of the extract demonstrated significant inhibition of AHL regulated virulence factors: protease, LasB elastase, pyocyanin production, chitinase, EPS, and swarming motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PAF79. Further, QS dependent virulence factor in the aquatic pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila WAF38 was also reduced. Application of T. foenum-graecum seed extract to PAO1, PAF79, and WAF38 decreased the biofilm forming abilities of the pathogens by significant levels. The extract also exhibited reduced AHL levels and subsequent downregulation of lasB gene. In vivo study showed an enhanced survival of PAO1-preinfected C. elegans after treatment with extract at 1 mg/mL. Further, the major compound detected by GC-MS, caffeine, reduced the production of QS regulated virulence factors and biofilm at 200 µg/mL concentration indicating its role in the activity of the methanol extract. The results of the present study reveal the potential anti-QS and antibiofilm property of T. foenum-graceum extract and caffeine.

  9. Intrigues of biofilm: A perspective in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullahi, Umar Faruk; Igwenagu, Ephraim; Mu'azu, Anas; Aliyu, Sani; Umar, Maryam Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm has a tremendous impact in the field of veterinary medicine, especially the livestock industry, leading to a serious economic loss. Over the years, little attention has been given to biofilm in animals with most of the research geared toward human biofilm diseases. The greatest challenge posed by biofilm is in its incredible ability to resist most of the currently existing antibiotics. This mystery can best be demystified through understanding the mechanism of the quorum sensing which regulate the pathophysiology of biofilm. Ability of biofilm formation in a variety of inanimate surfaces such as animal food contact surfaces is responsible for a host of biofilm diseases affecting animals and humans. In this review, we highlighted some of the challenges of biofilm in livestock and food industries. Also highlighted are; mechanisms of biofilm development, best diagnostic approach and possible novel therapeutic measures needed to combat the menace of biofilm in veterinary medicine.

  10. Dynamic remodeling of microbial biofilms by functionally distinct exopolysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Su Chuen; Kundukad, Binu; Seviour, Thomas; van der Maarel, Johan R C; Yang, Liang; Rice, Scott A; Doyle, Patrick; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2014-08-05

    Biofilms are densely populated communities of microbial cells protected and held together by a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. The structure and rheological properties of the matrix at the microscale influence the retention and transport of molecules and cells in the biofilm, thereby dictating population and community behavior. Despite its importance, quantitative descriptions of the matrix microstructure and microrheology are limited. Here, particle-tracking microrheology in combination with genetic approaches was used to spatially and temporally study the rheological contributions of the major exopolysaccharides Pel and Psl in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Psl increased the elasticity and effective cross-linking within the matrix, which strengthened its scaffold and appeared to facilitate the formation of microcolonies. Conversely, Pel reduced effective cross-linking within the matrix. Without Psl, the matrix becomes more viscous, which facilitates biofilm spreading. The wild-type biofilm decreased in effective cross-linking over time, which would be advantageous for the spreading and colonization of new surfaces. This suggests that there are regulatory mechanisms to control production of the exopolysaccharides that serve to remodel the matrix of developing biofilms. The exopolysaccharides were also found to have profound effects on the spatial organization and integration of P. aeruginosa in a mixed-species biofilm model of P. aeruginosa-Staphylococcus aureus. Pel was required for close association of the two species in mixed-species microcolonies. In contrast, Psl was important for P. aeruginosa to form single-species biofilms on top of S. aureus biofilms. Our results demonstrate that Pel and Psl have distinct physical properties and functional roles during biofilm formation. Importance: Most bacteria grow as biofilms in the environment or in association with eukaryotic hosts. Removal of biofilms that form on surfaces is a challenge in clinical

  11. Nanotechnology: Role in dental biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhardwaj Sonia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are surface- adherent populations of microorganisms consisting of cells, water and extracellular matrix material Nanotechnology is promising field of science which can guide our understanding of the role of interspecies interaction in the development of biofilm. Streptococcus mutans with other species of bacteria has been known to form dental biofilm. The correlation between genetically modified bacteria Streptococcus mutans and nanoscale morphology has been assessed using AFMi.e atomic force microscopy. Nanotechnology application includes 16 O/ 18 O reverse proteolytic labeling,use of quantum dots for labeling of bacterial cells, selective removal of cariogenic bacteria while preserving the normal oral flora and silver antimicrobial nanotechnology against pathogens associated with biofilms. The future comprises a mouthwash full of smart nanomachines which can allow the harmless flora of mouth to flourish in a healthy ecosystem

  12. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 and membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase co-regulate axonal outgrowth of mouse retinal ganglion cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaublomme, Djoere; Buyens, Tom; De Groef, Lies

    2014-01-01

    regenerative therapies, an improved understanding of axonal outgrowth and the various molecules influencing it, is highly needed. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) constitute a family of zinc-dependent proteases that were sporadically reported to influence axon outgrowth. Using an ex vivo retinal explant model...

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The persistence of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is due to biofilm-growing mucoid (alginate-producing) strains. A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria, embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein...... and DNA. In CF lungs, the polysaccharide alginate is the major part of the P. aeruginosa biofilm matrix. Bacterial biofilms cause chronic infections because they show increased tolerance to antibiotics and resist phagocytosis, as well as other components of the innate and the adaptive immune system....... As a consequence, a pronounced antibody response develops, leading to immune complex-mediated chronic inflammation, dominated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The chronic inflammation is the major cause of the lung tissue damage in CF. Biofilm growth in CF lungs is associated with an increased frequency...

  14. Peroxide resistance in Escherichia coli serotype O157 : H7 biofilms is regulated by both RpoS-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlich, Gaylen A; Chen, Chin-Yi; Cottrell, Bryan J; Irwin, Peter L; Phillips, John G

    2012-09-01

    In many Escherichia coli serotype O157 : H7 strains, defences against peroxide damage include the peroxiredoxin AhpCF and three catalases: KatG (catalase/peroxidase), KatE (catalase) and the plasmid-encoded KatP (catalase/peroxidase). AhpC and KatG basal expression is maintained by RpoS, and AhpC, KatG and KatP are all induced by OxyR/σ(70) in exponential phase. KatE is regulated by RpoS during stationary growth and is independent of OxyR. In a previous study we used mutant strains of ATCC 43895 (EDL933) with deletions of katG, ahpC, katE and katP in all possible combinations to characterize peroxide resistance during both exponential and 18-24 h growth in Luria-Bertani broth at 37 °C. In this study, we used triple deletion strains that isolated each catalase/peroxidase gene to investigate their role in the peroxide resistance of biofilm-forming variant 43895OR in 48 and 72 h biofilms. We also used quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR and translational lacZ fusions to study gene expression. Peroxide resistance was greater (Pperoxide protection had both rpoS-dependent and rpoS-independent components, but katP protection was independent of rpoS. H(2)O(2) challenge induced (Pperoxide induction of the OxyR-dependent resistance genes may contribute to the RpoS-independent protection in Shiga toxin-producing E. coli biofilms.

  15. DNase I and proteinase K impair Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation and induce dispersal of pre-existing biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Uyen T; Burrows, Lori L

    2014-09-18

    Current sanitation methods in the food industry are not always sufficient for prevention or dispersal of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms. Here, we determined if prevention of adherence or dispersal of existing biofilms could occur if biofilm matrix components were disrupted enzymatically. Addition of DNase during biofilm formation reduced attachment (biofilms with 100μg/ml of DNase for 24h induced incomplete biofilm dispersal, with biofilm remaining compared to control. In contrast, addition of proteinase K completely inhibited biofilm formation, and 72h biofilms-including those grown under stimulatory conditions-were completely dispersed with 100μg/ml proteinase K. Generally-regarded-as-safe proteases bromelain and papain were less effective dispersants than proteinase K. In a time course assay, complete dispersal of L. monocytogenes biofilms from both polystyrene and type 304H food-grade stainless steel occurred within 5min at proteinase K concentrations above 25μg/ml. These data confirm that both DNA and proteins are required for L. monocytogenes biofilm development and maintenance, and that these components of the biofilm matrix can be targeted for effective prevention and removal of biofilms.

  16. C-di-GMP regulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa stress response to tellurite during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Rybtke, Morten Levin;

    2015-01-01

    tellurite (TeO3(2-)) exposure induced the intracellular content of the secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), SadC and SiaD, were responsible for the increased intracellular content of c-di-GMP. Enhanced c-di-GMP levels by TeO3(2-) further...... increased P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and resistance to TeO3(2-). P. aeruginosa ΔsadCΔsiaD and PAO1/p(lac)-yhjH mutants with low intracellular c-di-GMP content were more sensitive to TeO3(2-) exposure and had low relative fitness compared to the wild-type PAO1 planktonic and biofilm cultures exposed...... to TeO3(2-). Our study provided evidence that c-di-GMP level can play an important role in mediating stress response in microbial communities during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth....

  17. Antibiotic resistance of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoiby, N.; Bjarnsholt, T.; Givskov, M.

    2010-01-01

    and other components of the body's defence system. The persistence of, for example, staphylococcal infections related to foreign bodies is due to biofilm formation. Likewise, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis patients is caused by biofilm-growing mucoid strains...... to antibiotics. Biofilm growth is associated with an increased level of mutations as well as with quorum-sensing-regulated mechanisms. Conventional resistance mechanisms such as chromosomal beta-lactamase, upregulated efflux pumps and mutations in antibiotic target molecules in bacteria also contribute...

  18. Deacylation on the matrix side of the mitochondrial inner membrane regulates cardiolipin remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baile, Matthew G; Whited, Kevin; Claypool, Steven M

    2013-06-01

    The mitochondrial-specific lipid cardiolipin (CL) is required for numerous processes therein. After its synthesis on the matrix-facing leaflet of the inner membrane (IM), CL undergoes acyl chain remodeling to achieve its final form. In yeast, this process is completed by the transacylase tafazzin, which associates with intermembrane space (IMS)-facing membrane leaflets. Mutations in TAZ1 result in the X-linked cardiomyopathy Barth syndrome. Amazingly, despite this clear pathophysiological association, the physiological importance of CL remodeling is unresolved. In this paper, we show that the lipase initiating CL remodeling, Cld1p, is associated with the matrix-facing leaflet of the mitochondrial IM. Thus monolysocardiolipin generated by Cld1p must be transported to IMS-facing membrane leaflets to gain access to tafazzin, identifying a previously unknown step required for CL remodeling. Additionally, we show that Cld1p is the major site of regulation in CL remodeling; and that, like CL biosynthesis, CL remodeling is augmented in growth conditions requiring mitochondrially produced energy. However, unlike CL biosynthesis, dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential stimulates CL remodeling, identifying a novel feedback mechanism linking CL remodeling to oxidative phosphorylation capacity.

  19. Extracellular matrix regulation of inflammation in the healthy and injured spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudet, Andrew D; Popovich, Phillip G

    2014-08-01

    Throughout the body, the extracellular matrix (ECM) provides structure and organization to tissues and also helps regulate cell migration and intercellular communication. In the injured spinal cord (or brain), changes in the composition and structure of the ECM undoubtedly contribute to regeneration failure. Less appreciated is how the native and injured ECM influences intraspinal inflammation and, conversely, how neuroinflammation affects the synthesis and deposition of ECM after CNS injury. In all tissues, inflammation can be initiated and propagated by ECM disruption. Molecules of ECM newly liberated by injury or inflammation include hyaluronan fragments, tenascins, and sulfated proteoglycans. These act as "damage-associated molecular patterns" or "alarmins", i.e., endogenous proteins that trigger and subsequently amplify inflammation. Activated inflammatory cells, in turn, further damage the ECM by releasing degradative enzymes including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). After spinal cord injury (SCI), destabilization or alteration of the structural and chemical compositions of the ECM affects migration, communication, and survival of all cells - neural and non-neural - that are critical for spinal cord repair. By stabilizing ECM structure or modifying their ability to trigger the degradative effects of inflammation, it may be possible to create an environment that is more conducive to tissue repair and axon plasticity after SCI.

  20. Peroxidase Enzymes Regulate Collagen Biosynthesis and Matrix Mineralization by Cultured Human Osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Shoubridge, Alexandra J; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Liapis, Vasilios; Zysk, Aneta; Zinonos, Irene; Hay, Shelley; Atkins, Gerald J; Findlay, David M; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The early recruitment of inflammatory cells to sites of bone fracture and trauma is a critical determinant in successful fracture healing. Released by infiltrating inflammatory cells, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) are heme-containing enzymes, whose functional involvement in bone repair has mainly been studied in the context of providing a mechanism for oxidative defense against invading microorganisms. We report here novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes have the capacity to stimulate osteoblastic cells to secrete collagen I protein and generate a mineralized extracellular matrix in vitro. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured osteoblasts show that peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl hydroxylase-dependent manner, which does not require ascorbic acid. Our studies demonstrate that osteoblasts rapidly bind and internalize both MPO and EPO, and the catalytic activity of these peroxidase enzymes is essential to support collagen I biosynthesis and subsequent release of collagen by osteoblasts. We show that EPO is capable of regulating osteogenic gene expression and matrix mineralization in culture, suggesting that peroxidase enzymes may play an important role not only in normal bone repair, but also in the progression of pathological states where infiltrating inflammatory cells are known to deposit peroxidases.

  1. Regulation of extracellular matrix organization by BMP signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbie D Schultz

    Full Text Available In mammals, Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP pathway signaling is important for the growth and homeostasis of extracellular matrix, including basement membrane remodeling, scarring, and bone growth. A conserved BMP member in Caenorhabditis elegans, DBL-1, regulates body length in a dose-sensitive manner. Loss of DBL-1 pathway signaling also results in increased anesthetic sensitivity. However, the physiological basis of these pleiotropic phenotypes is largely unknown. We created a DBL-1 over-expressing strain and show that sensitivity to anesthetics is inversely related to the dose of DBL-1. Using pharmacological, genetic analyses, and a novel dye permeability assay for live, microwave-treated animals, we confirm that DBL-1 is required for the barrier function of the cuticle, a specialized extracellular matrix. We show that DBL-1 signaling is required to prevent animals from forming tail-entangled aggregates in liquid. Stripping lipids off the surface of wild-type animals recapitulates this phenotype. Finally, we find that DBL-1 signaling affects ultrastructure of the nematode cuticle in a dose-dependent manner, as surface lipid content and cuticular organization are disrupted in animals with genetically altered DBL-1 levels. We propose that the lipid layer coating the nematode cuticle normally prevents tail entanglement, and that reduction of this layer by loss of DBL-1 signaling promotes aggregation. This work provides a physiological mechanism that unites the DBL-1 signaling pathway roles of not only body size regulation and drug responsiveness, but also the novel Hoechst 33342 staining and aggregation phenotypes, through barrier function, content, and organization of the cuticle.

  2. CADM1 controls actin cytoskeleton assembly and regulates extracellular matrix adhesion in human mast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P Moiseeva

    Full Text Available CADM1 is a major receptor for the adhesion of mast cells (MCs to fibroblasts, human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs and neurons. It also regulates E-cadherin and alpha6beta4 integrin in other cell types. Here we investigated a role for CADM1 in MC adhesion to both cells and extracellular matrix (ECM. Downregulation of CADM1 in the human MC line HMC-1 resulted not only in reduced adhesion to HASMCs, but also reduced adhesion to their ECM. Time-course studies in the presence of EDTA to inhibit integrins demonstrated that CADM1 provided fast initial adhesion to HASMCs and assisted with slower adhesion to ECM. CADM1 downregulation, but not antibody-dependent CADM1 inhibition, reduced MC adhesion to ECM, suggesting indirect regulation of ECM adhesion. To investigate potential mechanisms, phosphotyrosine signalling and polymerisation of actin filaments, essential for integrin-mediated adhesion, were examined. Modulation of CADM1 expression positively correlated with surface KIT levels and polymerisation of cortical F-actin in HMC-1 cells. It also influenced phosphotyrosine signalling and KIT tyrosine autophosphorylation. CADM1 accounted for 46% of surface KIT levels and 31% of F-actin in HMC-1 cells. CADM1 downregulation resulted in elongation of cortical actin filaments in both HMC-1 cells and human lung MCs and increased cell rigidity of HMC-1 cells. Collectively these data suggest that CADM1 is a key adhesion receptor, which regulates MC net adhesion, both directly through CADM1-dependent adhesion, and indirectly through the regulation of other adhesion receptors. The latter is likely to occur via docking of KIT and polymerisation of cortical F-actin. Here we propose a stepwise model of adhesion with CADM1 as a driving force for net MC adhesion.

  3. Identification of GPR65, a novel regulator of matrix metalloproteinases using high through-put screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Hongbo; Chen, Xiaohong; Huang, Junwei [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Key Laboratory of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing (China); Deng, Weiwei [Functional Genomics Group, Chinese National Human Genome Center (CHGB) at Beijing (China); Zhong, Qi [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Key Laboratory of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing (China); Yue, Changli [Department of Pathology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Wang, Pingzhang, E-mail: wangpzh@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Peking University Center for Human Disease Genomics, Key Laboratory of Medical Immunology, Ministry of Health (China); Functional Genomics Group, Chinese National Human Genome Center (CHGB) at Beijing (China); Huang, Zhigang, E-mail: enthuangzhigang@sohu.com [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Key Laboratory of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing (China)

    2013-06-21

    Highlights: •A novel mechanism of MMP3 regulation by proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors was defined. •GPR65 was identified to induce the MMP3 expression. •GPR65 mediated MMP induction under acidic conditions. •AP-1 binding site in MMP3 promoter was crucial for MMP3 induction. •GPR65 overexpression can accelerate the invision of A549 cells. -- Abstract: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are over-expressed in nearly all cancers. To study novel regulatory factors of MMP expression in head and neck cancer (HNC), we screened a total of 636 candidate genes encoding putative human transmembrane proteins using MMP promoter reporter in a dual luciferase assay system. Three genes GPR65, AXL and TNFRSF10B dramatically activated the induction of MMP3 expression. The induction of MMP expression by GPR65 was further confirmed in A549 and/or FaDu cells. GPR65 mediated MMP induction under acidic conditions. The AP-1 binding site in MMP3 promoter was crucial for MMP3 induction. Moreover, the A549 cells infected by recombinant adenovirus of GPR65 showed accelerated cell invasion. In conclusion, we validate that GPR65 is vital regulatory genes upstream of MMP3, and define a novel mechanism of MMP3 regulation by proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors.

  4. Extracellular Matrix-Regulated Gene Expression RequiresCooperation of SWI/SNF and Transcription Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ren; Spencer, Virginia A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-05-25

    Extracellular cues play crucial roles in the transcriptional regulation of tissue-specific genes, but whether and how these signals lead to chromatin remodeling is not understood and subject to debate. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and mammary-specific genes as models, we show here that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and prolactin cooperate to induce histone acetylation and binding of transcription factors and the SWI/SNF complex to the {beta}- and ?-casein promoters. Introduction of a dominant negative Brg1, an ATPase subunit of SWI/SNF complex, significantly reduced both {beta}- and ?-casein expression, suggesting that SWI/SNF-dependent chromatin remodeling is required for transcription of mammary-specific genes. ChIP analyses demonstrated that the ATPase activity of SWI/SNF is necessary for recruitment of RNA transcriptional machinery, but not for binding of transcription factors or for histone acetylation. Coimmunoprecipitation analyses showed that the SWI/SNF complex is associated with STAT5, C/EBP{beta}, and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Thus, ECM- and prolactin-regulated transcription of the mammary-specific casein genes requires the concerted action of chromatin remodeling enzymes and transcription factors.

  5. Dynamic interactions of neutrophils and biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefine Hirschfeld

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The majority of microbial infections in humans are biofilm-associated and difficult to treat, as biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and protect themselves from external threats in various ways. Biofilms are tenaciously attached to surfaces and impede the ability of host defense molecules and cells to penetrate them. On the other hand, some biofilms are beneficial for the host and contain protective microorganisms. Microbes in biofilms express pathogen-associated molecular patterns and epitopes that can be recognized by innate immune cells and opsonins, leading to activation of neutrophils and other leukocytes. Neutrophils are part of the first line of defense and have multiple antimicrobial strategies allowing them to attack pathogenic biofilms. Objective/design: In this paper, interaction modes of neutrophils with biofilms are reviewed. Antimicrobial strategies of neutrophils and the counteractions of the biofilm communities, with special attention to oral biofilms, are presented. Moreover, possible adverse effects of neutrophil activity and their biofilm-promoting side effects are discussed. Results/conclusion: Biofilms are partially, but not entirely, protected against neutrophil assault, which include the processes of phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. However, virulence factors of microorganisms, microbial composition, and properties of the extracellular matrix determine whether a biofilm and subsequent microbial spread can be controlled by neutrophils and other host defense factors. Besides, neutrophils may inadvertently contribute to the physical and ecological stability of biofilms by promoting selection of more resistant strains. Moreover, neutrophil enzymes can degrade collagen and other proteins and, as a result, cause harm to the host tissues. These parameters could be crucial factors in the onset of periodontal inflammation and the subsequent tissue breakdown.

  6. Wound biofilms: lessons learned from oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancl, Kimberly A; Kirsner, Robert S; Ajdic, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many chronic infections. Oral biofilms, more commonly known as dental plaque, are a primary cause of oral diseases including caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis. Oral biofilms are commonly studied as model biofilm systems as they are easily accessible; thus, biofilm research in oral diseases is advanced with details of biofilm formation and bacterial interactions being well elucidated. In contrast, wound research has relatively recently directed attention to the role biofilms have in chronic wounds. This review discusses the biofilms in periodontal disease and chronic wounds with comparisons focusing on biofilm detection, biofilm formation, the immune response to biofilms, bacterial interaction, and quorum sensing. Current treatment modalities used by both fields and future therapies are also discussed.

  7. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of penicillin G induce biofilm formation by field isolates of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathroubi, S; Fontaine-Gosselin, S-È; Tremblay, Y D N; Labrie, J; Jacques, M

    2015-09-30

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium and causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia. This is a highly contagious disease that causes important economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. Penicillins are extensively used in swine production and these antibiotics are associated with high systemic clearance and low oral bioavailability. This may expose A. pleuropneumoniae to sub-inhibitory concentrations of penicillin G when the antibiotic is administered orally. Our goal was to evaluate the effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of penicillin G on the biofilm formation of A. pleuropneumoniae. Biofilm production of 13 field isolates from serotypes 1, 5a, 7 and 15 was tested in the presence of sub-MIC of penicillin G using a polystyrene microtiter plate assay. Using microscopy techniques and enzymatic digestion, biofilm architecture and composition were also characterized after exposure to sub-MIC of penicillin G. Sub-MIC of penicillin G significantly induced biofilm formation of nine isolates. The penicillin G-induced biofilms contained more poly-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (PGA), extracellular DNA and proteins when compared to control biofilms grown without penicillin G. Additionally, penicillin G-induced biofilms were sensitive to DNase which was not observed with the untreated controls. Furthermore, sub-MIC of penicillin G up-regulated the expression of pgaA, which encodes a protein involved in PGA synthesis, and the genes encoding the envelope-stress sensing two-component regulatory system CpxRA. In conclusion, sub-MICs of penicillin G significantly induce biofilm formation and this is likely the result of a cell envelope stress sensed by the CpxRA system resulting in an increased production of PGA and other matrix components.

  8. Evidence for ubiquitin-regulated nuclear and subnuclear trafficking among Paramyxovirinae matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentecost, Mickey; Vashisht, Ajay A; Lester, Talia; Voros, Tim; Beaty, Shannon M; Park, Arnold; Wang, Yao E; Yun, Tatyana E; Freiberg, Alexander N; Wohlschlegel, James A; Lee, Benhur

    2015-03-01

    The paramyxovirus matrix (M) protein is a molecular scaffold required for viral morphogenesis and budding at the plasma membrane. Transient nuclear residence of some M proteins hints at non-structural roles. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms that regulate the nuclear sojourn. Previously, we found that the nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of Nipah virus M (NiV-M) is a prerequisite for budding, and is regulated by a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLSbp), a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES), and monoubiquitination of the K258 residue within the NLSbp itself (NLSbp-lysine). To define whether the sequence determinants of nuclear trafficking identified in NiV-M are common among other Paramyxovirinae M proteins, we generated the homologous NES and NLSbp-lysine mutations in M proteins from the five major Paramyxovirinae genera. Using quantitative 3D confocal microscopy, we determined that the NES and NLSbp-lysine are required for the efficient nuclear export of the M proteins of Nipah virus, Hendra virus, Sendai virus, and Mumps virus. Pharmacological depletion of free ubiquitin or mutation of the conserved NLSbp-lysine to an arginine, which inhibits M ubiquitination, also results in nuclear and nucleolar retention of these M proteins. Recombinant Sendai virus (rSeV-eGFP) bearing the NES or NLSbp-lysine M mutants rescued at similar efficiencies to wild type. However, foci of cells expressing the M mutants displayed marked fusogenicity in contrast to wild type, and infection did not spread. Recombinant Mumps virus (rMuV-eGFP) bearing the homologous mutations showed similar defects in viral morphogenesis. Finally, shotgun proteomics experiments indicated that the interactomes of Paramyxovirinae M proteins are significantly enriched for components of the nuclear pore complex, nuclear transport receptors, and nucleolar proteins. We then synthesize our functional and proteomics data to propose a working model for the ubiquitin-regulated nuclear

  9. A personal history of research on microbial biofilms and biofilm infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høiby, Niels

    2014-04-01

    The observation of aggregated microorganisms surrounded by a self-produced matrix adhering to surfaces or located in tissues or secretions is as old as microbiology, with both Leeuwenhoek and Pasteur describing the phenomenon. In environmental and technical microbiology, biofilms were already shown 80-90 years ago to be important for biofouling on submerged surfaces, e.g. ships. The concept of biofilm infections and their importance in medicine is, however, biofilm was introduced into medicine in 1985 by Costerton. In the following decades, it became obvious that biofilm infections are widespread in medicine, and their importance is now generally accepted.

  10. Progesterone and gravidity differentially regulate expression of extracellular matrix components in the pregnant rat myometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shynlova, Oksana; Mitchell, Jennifer A; Tsampalieros, Anne; Langille, B Lowell; Lye, Stephen J

    2004-04-01

    Myometrial growth and remodeling during pregnancy depends on increased synthesis of interstitial matrix proteins. We hypothesize that the presence of mechanical tension in a specific hormonal environment regulates the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) components in the uterus. Myometrial tissue was collected from pregnant rats on Gestational Days 0, 12, 15, 17, 19, 21, 22, 23 (labor), and 1 day postpartum and ECM expression was analyzed by Northern blotting. Expression of fibronectin, laminin beta2, and collagen IV mRNA was low during early gestation but increased dramatically on Day 23 during labor. Expression of fibrillar collagens (type I and III) peaked Day 19 and decreased near term. In contrast, elastin mRNA remained elevated from midgestation onward. Injection of progesterone (P4) on Days 20-23 (to maintain elevated plasma P4 levels) delayed the onset of labor, caused dramatic reductions in the levels of fibronectin and laminin mRNA, and prevented the fall of collagen III mRNA levels on Day 23. Treatment of pregnant rats with the progesterone receptor antagonist RU486 on Day 19 induced preterm labor on Day 20 and a premature increase in mRNA levels of collagen IV, fibronectin, and laminin. Analysis of the uterine tissue from unilaterally pregnant rats revealed that most of the changes in ECM gene expression occurred specifically in the gravid horn. Our results show a decrease in expression of fibrillar collagens and a coordinated temporal increase in expression of components of the basement membrane near term associated with decreased P4 and increased mechanical tension. These ECM changes contribute to myometrial growth and remodeling during late pregnancy and the preparation for the synchronized contractions of labor.

  11. Transforming potential and matrix stiffness co-regulate confinement sensitivity of tumor cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Amit

    2013-01-01

    It is now well established that tumor cell invasion through tissue is strongly regulated by the microstructural and mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, it remains unclear how these physical microenvironmental inputs are jointly processed with oncogenic lesions to drive invasion. In this study, we address this open question by combining a microfabricated polyacrylamide channel (μPAC) platform that enables independent control of ECM stiffness and confinement with an isogenically-matched breast tumor progression series in which the oncogenes ErbB2 and 14-3-3ζ are overexpressed independently or in tandem. We find that increasing channel confinement and overexpressing ErbB2 both promote cell migration to a similar degree when other parameters are kept constant. In contrast, 14-3-3ζ overexpression slows migration speed, and does so in a fashion that dwarfs effects of ECM confinement and stiffness. We also find that ECM stiffness dramatically enhances cell motility when combined with ErbB2 overexpression, demonstrating that biophysical cues and cell-intrinsic parameters promote cell invasion in an integrative manner. Morphometric analysis of cells inside the μPAC platform reveals that the rapid cell migration induced by narrow channels and ErbB2 overexpression both are accompanied by increased cell polarization. Disruption of this polarization by pharmacological inhibition of Rac GTPase phenocopies 14-3-3ζ overexpression by reducing cell polarization and slowing migration. By systematically measuring migration speed as a function of matrix stiffness and confinement, we also quantify for the first time the sensitivity of migration speed to microchannel properties and transforming potential. These results demonstrate that oncogenic lesions and ECM biophysical properties can synergistically interact to drive invasive migration, and that both inputs may act through common molecular mechanisms to enhance migration speed. PMID:23832051

  12. Changes in extracellular matrix composition regulate cyclooxygenase-2 expression in human mesangial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alique, Matilde; Calleros, Laura; Luengo, Alicia; Griera, Mercedes; Iñiguez, Miguel Ángel; Punzón, Carmen; Fresno, Manuel; Rodríguez-Puyol, Manuel; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego

    2011-04-01

    Glomerular diseases are characterized by a sustained synthesis and accumulation of abnormal extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen type I. The extracellular matrix transmits information to cells through interactions with membrane components, which directly activate many intracellular signaling events. Moreover, accumulating evidence suggests that eicosanoids derived from cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 participate in a number of pathological processes in immune-mediated renal diseases, and it is known that protein kinase B (AKT) may act through different transcription factors in the regulation of the COX-2 promoter. The present results show that progressive accumulation of collagen I in the extracellular medium induces a significant increase of COX-2 expression in human mesangial cells, resulting in an enhancement in PGE(2) production. COX-2 overexpression is due to increased COX-2 mRNA levels. The study of the mechanism implicated in COX-2 upregulation by collagen I showed focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation. Furthermore, we observed that the activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway by collagen I and collagen I-induced COX-2 overexpression was abolished by PI3K and AKT inhibitors. Additionally, we showed that the cAMP response element (CRE) transcription factor is implicated. Finally, we studied COX-2 expression in an animal model, N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hypertensive rats. In renal tissue and vascular walls, COX-2 and collagen type I content were upregulated. In summary, our results provide evidence that collagen type I increases COX-2 expression via the FAK/PI3K/AKT/cAMP response element binding protein signaling pathway.

  13. Characterization of starvation-induced dispersion in Pseudomonas putida biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjermansen, Morten; Ragas, Paula Cornelia; Sternberg, Claus;

    2005-01-01

    that they must be able to regulate their ability to form biofilm and to dissolve biofilm. We present an investigation of a biofilm dissolution process occurring in flow-chamber-grown Pseudomonas putida biofilms. Local starvation-induced biofilm dissolution appears to be an integrated part of P. putida biofilm...... development that causes characteristic structural rearrangements. Rapid global dissolution of entire P. putida biofilms was shown to occur in response to carbon starvation. Genetic analysis suggested that the adjacent P. putida genes PP0164 and PP0165 play a role in P. putida biofilm formation and dissolution....... PP0164 encodes a putative periplasmic protein of previously unknown function, and PP0164 mutant bacteria are sticky, and unable to reduce their adhesiveness and dissolve their biofilm in response to carbon starvation. PP0165 encodes a putative transmembrane protein containing GGDEF and EAL domains...

  14. Matrix metalloproteinases in inflammatory bowel disease : expression, regulation and clinical relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Martin Jan-Willem

    2009-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is characterized by chronic, patchy, transmural inflammation of the entire gastrointestinal tract, while ulcerative colitis (UC) is manifested by chronic, continuous, superficial inflammation of the colon. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) constitute a family of matrix degrading

  15. The pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway modulates production of biofilm determinants in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Garavaglia

    Full Text Available Bacteria are often found in multicellular communities known as biofilms, which constitute a resistance form against environmental stresses. Extracellular adhesion and cell aggregation factors, responsible for bacterial biofilm formation and maintenance, are tightly regulated in response to physiological and environmental cues. We show that, in Escherichia coli, inactivation of genes belonging to the de novo uridine monophosphate (UMP biosynthetic pathway impairs production of curli fibers and cellulose, important components of the bacterial biofilm matrix, by inhibiting transcription of the csgDEFG operon, thus preventing production of the biofilm master regulator CsgD protein. Supplementing growth media with exogenous uracil, which can be converted to UMP through the pyrimidine nucleotide salvage pathway, restores csgDEFG transcription and curli production. In addition, however, exogenous uracil triggers cellulose production, particularly in strains defective in either carB or pyrB genes, which encode enzymes catalyzing the first steps of de novo UMP biosynthesis. Our results indicate the existence of tight and complex links between pyrimidine metabolism and curli/cellulose production: transcription of the csgDEFG operon responds to pyrimidine nucleotide availability, while cellulose production is triggered by exogenous uracil in the absence of active de novo UMP biosynthesis. We speculate that perturbations in the UMP biosynthetic pathways allow the bacterial cell to sense signals such as starvation, nucleic acids degradation, and availability of exogenous pyrimidines, and to adapt the production of the extracellular matrix to the changing environmental conditions.

  16. The Composition and Metabolic Phenotype of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Apicella

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available N. gonorrhoeae has been shown to form biofilms during cervical infection. Thus, biofilm formation may play an important role in the infection of women. The ability of N. gonorrhoeae to form membrane blebs is crucial to biofilm formation. Blebs contain DNA and outer membrane structures, which have been shown to be major constituents of the biofilm matrix. The organism expresses a DNA thermonuclease that is involved in remodeling of the biofilm matrix. Comparison of the transcriptional profiles of gonococcal biofilms and planktonic runoff indicate that genes involved in anaerobic metabolism and oxidative stress tolerance are more highly expressed in biofilm. The expression of aniA, ccp, and norB, which encode nitrite reductase, cytochrome c peroxidase, and nitric oxide reductase respectively, is required for mature biofilm formation over glass and human cervical cells. In addition, anaerobic respiration occurs in the substratum of gonococcal biofilms and disruption of the norB gene required for anaerobic respiration, results in a severe biofilm attenuation phenotype. It has been demonstrated that accumulation of nitric oxide (NO contributes to the phenotype of a norB mutant and can retard biofilm formation. However, NO can also enhance biofilm formation, and this is largely dependent on the concentration and donation rate or steady state kinetics of NO. The majority of the genes involved in gonococcal oxidative stress tolerance are also required for normal biofilm formation, as mutations in the following genes result in attenuated biofilm formation over cervical cells and/or glass: oxyR, gor, prx, mntABC, trxB, and estD. Overall, biofilm formation appears to be an adaptation for coping with the environmental stresses present in the female genitourinary tract. Therefore, this review will discuss the studies, which describe the composition and metabolic phenotype of gonococcal biofilms.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms Biofilms in Acute InfectionIndependent of Cell-to-Cell Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaber, J. Andy; Triffo, W.J.; Suh, Sang J.; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Hastert, Mary C.; Griswold, John A.; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2006-09-20

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 hours of infection in thermally-injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections. P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burned tissue surrounding blood vessels and adipose cells. Although quorum sensing (QS), a bacterial signaling mechanism, coordinates differentiation of biofilms in vitro, wild type and QS-deficient P. aeruginosa formed similar biofilms in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on specific host tissues independent of QS.

  18. Linking nitrifying biofilm characteristics and nitrification performance in moving-bed biofilm reactors for polluted raw water pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuangfu; Wang, Yayi; He, Weitao; Xing, Meiyan; Wu, Min; Yang, Jian; Gao, Naiyun; Sheng, Guangyao; Yin, Daqiang; Liu, Shanhu

    2013-10-01

    Biofilm physiology was characterized by four biofilm constituents, i.e., polysaccharides, proteins (PN), humic-like substances and phospholipids (PL), for the first time to explore the relationships between biofilm characteristics and nitrification performance in moving-bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) designed for pretreatment of polluted raw surface water for potable supply. The biofilm compositions depended highly on the balance of microbial decay and nitrification processes. The increased ammonia loading greatly regulated the community structure, promoting the dominance of nitrifiers and their proportions in the nitrifying biofilm. Nitrification rate and activity correlated linearly with the fractions of volatile solids (VS), PN and PL, which were related to nitrification processes in the biofilm. The specific biofilm activity demonstrated an exponential-asymptotic relationship with ratios of PN/VS and PL/VS. Thus, analyzing biofilm characteristics can be valid for estimating nitrification performance in MBBRs, and may offer engineers with basis to optimize MBBR design and operation.

  19. Aspartate inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hang; Wang, Mengyue; Yu, Junping; Wei, Hongping

    2015-04-01

    Biofilm formation renders Staphylococcus aureus highly resistant to conventional antibiotics and host defenses. Four D-amino acids (D-Leu, D-Met, D-Trp and D-Tyr) have been reported to be able to inhibit biofilm formation and disassemble established S. aureus biofilms. We report here for the first time that both D- and L-isoforms of aspartate (Asp) inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation on tissue culture plates. Similar biofilm inhibition effects were also observed against other staphylococcal strains, including S. saprophyticus, S. equorum, S. chromogenes and S. haemolyticus. It was found that Asp at high concentrations (>10 mM) inhibited the growth of planktonic N315 cells, but at subinhibitory concentrations decreased the cellular metabolic activity without influencing cell growth. The decreased cellular metabolic activity might be the reason for the production of less protein and DNA in the matrix of the biofilms formed in the presence of Asp. However, varied inhibition efficacies of Asp were observed for biofilms formed by clinical staphylococcal isolates. There might be mechanisms other than decreasing the metabolic activity, e.g. the biofilm phenotypes, affecting biofilm formation in the presence of Asp.

  20. [Progress in study of oral biofilm dispersal-inducing agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhu; Jingmei, Yang; Dingyu, Duan; Yi, Xu

    2014-12-01

    Communities of bacteria wrapped in self-generated extracellular polymeric matrix and attached to a solid surface are known as biofilm. Biofilm formation and development can be divided into three stages: adhesion of cells to a surface, reproduction of the cells, and dispersion of cells. The procedure, which surface-attached biofilm disperses bacterial cells into the environment to colonize new sites, is defined as biofilm dispersal. Biofilm dispersal is an essential stage of biofilm life cycle. It plays an important role in the transmission of bacteria. For many pathogenic bacteria, biofilm dispersal can transform bacteria in biofilm into planktonic state and promote the spread of infection. The formation of biofilm may increase the resistance of bacteria to antimicrobial agent and host defence response compared with planktonic cells. In the oral cavity, oral microorganism can attach to the surface of oral tissue and prosthesis to form biofilm. Dental caries and periodontal disease are oral chronic infections diseases of the oral tissue. The occurrence of them has a close relationship with biofilm. The mechanism of dispersal is a hot topic in recent years. Some agents which promote dispersal might be a therapeutic potential against biofilm infections. The clinical implication of dispersal agents and potential application are promising. This article reviews the dispersal-inducing agents of oral biofilms.

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing in biofilm-growing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macià, M D; Rojo-Molinero, E; Oliver, A

    2014-10-01

    Biofilms are organized bacterial communities embedded in an extracellular polymeric matrix attached to living or abiotic surfaces. The development of biofilms is currently recognized as one of the most relevant drivers of persistent infections. Among them, chronic respiratory infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients is probably the most intensively studied. The lack of correlation between conventional susceptibility test results and therapeutic success in chronic infections is probably a consequence of the use of planktonically growing instead of biofilm-growing bacteria. Therefore, several in vitro models to evaluate antimicrobial activity on biofilms have been implemented over the last decade. Microtitre plate-based assays, the Calgary device, substratum suspending reactors and the flow cell system are some of the most used in vitro biofilm models for susceptibility studies. Likewise, new pharmacodynamic parameters, including minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration, minimal biofilm-eradication concentration, biofilm bactericidal concentration, and biofilm-prevention concentration, have been defined in recent years to quantify antibiotic activity in biofilms. Using these parameters, several studies have shown very significant quantitative and qualitative differences for the effects of most antibiotics when acting on planktonic or biofilm bacteria. Nevertheless, standardization of the procedures, parameters and breakpoints, by official agencies, is needed before they are implemented in clinical microbiology laboratories for routine susceptibility testing. Research efforts should also be directed to obtaining a deeper understanding of biofilm resistance mechanisms, the evaluation of optimal pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models for biofilm growth, and correlation with clinical outcome.

  2. Differential growth of wrinkled biofilms

    CERN Document Server

    Espeso, D R; Einarsson, B

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are antibiotic-resistant bacterial aggregates that grow on moist surfaces and can trigger hospital-acquired infections. They provide a classical example in biology where the dynamics of cellular communities may be observed and studied. Gene expression regulates cell division and differentiation, which affect the biofilm architecture. Mechanical and chemical processes shape the resulting structure. We gain insight into the interplay between cellular and mechanical processes during biofilm development on air-agar interfaces by means of a hybrid model. Cellular behavior is governed by stochastic rules informed by a cascade of concentration fields for nutrients, waste and autoinducers. Cellular differentiation and death alter the structure and the mechanical properties of the biofilm, which is deformed according to Foppl-Von Karman equations informed by cellular processes and the interaction with the substratum. Stiffness gradients due to growth and swelling produce wrinkle branching. We are able to repr...

  3. Aging biofilm from a full-scale moving bed biofilm reactor: characterization and enzymatic treatment study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui; Ren, Hongqiang; Ding, Lili; Geng, Jinju; Xu, Ke; Zhang, Yan

    2014-02-01

    Effective removal of aging biofilm deserves to receive more attention. This study aimed to characterized aging biofilm from a full-scale moving bed biofilm reactor treating pharmaceutical wastewater and evaluate the hydrolysis effects of biofilm by different enzymatic treatments. Results from FTIR and biochemical composition analyses showed that it was a predominately organic-based biofilm with the ratio of total protein (PN) to polysaccharide (PS) of 20.17. A reticular structure of extracellular polymeric matrix (EPM) with filamentous bacteria as the skeleton was observed on the basal layer through SEM-EDS test. Among the four commercial proteases and amylases from Genencor®, proteases were shown to have better performances than amylases either on the removal of MLSS and PN/MLSS or on DOC (i.e., dissolved organic carbon)/MLSS raising of biofilm pellets. Difference of dynamic fluorescence characteristics of dissolved organic matters after treated by the two proteases indicated distinguishing mechanisms of the treating process.

  4. Direct Comparison of Physical Properties of Bacillus subtilis NCIB 3610 and B-1 Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesel, Sara; Grumbein, Stefan; Gümperlein, Ina; Tallawi, Marwa; Marel, Anna-Kristina; Lieleg, Oliver; Opitz, Madeleine

    2016-04-01

    Many bacteria form surface-attached communities known as biofilms. Due to the extreme resistance of these bacterial biofilms to antibiotics and mechanical stresses, biofilms are of growing interest not only in microbiology but also in medicine and industry. Previous studies have determined the extracellular polymeric substances present in the matrix of biofilms formed by Bacillus subtilis NCIB 3610. However, studies on the physical properties of biofilms formed by this strain are just emerging. In particular, quantitative data on the contributions of biofilm matrix biopolymers to these physical properties are lacking. Here, we quantitatively investigated three physical properties of B. subtilis NCIB 3610 biofilms: the surface roughness and stiffness and the bulk viscoelasticity of these biofilms. We show how specific biomolecules constituting the biofilm matrix formed by this strain contribute to those biofilm properties. In particular, we demonstrate that the surface roughness and surface elasticity of 1-day-old NCIB 3610 biofilms are strongly affected by the surface layer protein BslA. For a second strain,B. subtilis B-1, which forms biofilms containing mainly γ-polyglutamate, we found significantly different physical biofilm properties that are also differently affected by the commonly used antibacterial agent ethanol. We show that B-1 biofilms are protected from ethanol-induced changes in the biofilm's stiffness and that this protective effect can be transferred to NCIB 3610 biofilms by the sole addition of γ-polyglutamate to growing NCIB 3610 biofilms. Together, our results demonstrate the importance of specific biofilm matrix components for the distinct physical properties of B. subtilis biofilms.

  5. Intracellular matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) regulates human platelet activation via hydrolysis of talin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soslau, Gerald; Mason, Christopher; Lynch, Stephen; Benjamin, James; Ashak, Dani; Prakash, Jamunabai M; Moore, Andrew; Bagsiyao, Pamela; Albert, Trevine; Mathew, Lynn M; Jost, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity is generally associated with normal or pathological extracellular processes such as tissue remodelling in growth and development or in tumor metastasis and angiogenesis. Platelets contain at least three MMPs, 1, 2 and 9 that have been reported to stimulate or inhibit agonist-induced platelet aggregation via extracellular signals. The non-selective Zn+2 chelating MMP inhibitor, 1,10-phenanthroline, and the serine protease inhibitor, AEBSF, were found to inhibit all tested agonist-induced platelet aggregation reactions. In vitro analysis demonstrated that 1,10-phenanthroline completely inhibited MMP-1,2,and 9 but had little to no effect on calpain activity while the converse was true with AEBSF. We now demonstrate that MMP-2 functions intracellularly to regulate agonist-induced platelet aggregations via the hydrolytic activation of talin, the presumed final activating factor of glycoprotein (GP)IIb/IIIa integrin (the inside-out signal). Once activated GPIIb/IIIa binds the dimeric fibrinogen molecule required for platelet aggregation. The active intracellular MMP-2 molecule is complexed with JAK 2/STAT 3, as demonstrated by the fact that all three proteins are co-immunoprecipitated with either anti-JAK 2, or anti-STAT 3 antibodies and by immunofluorescence studies. The MMP-2 platelet activation pathway can be synergistically inhibited with the non-selective MMP inhibitor, 1,10-phenanthroline, plus a JAK 2 inhibitor. This activation pathway is distinct from the previously reported calpain-talin activating pathway. The identification of a new central pathway for platelet aggregation presents new potential targets for drug regulation and furthers our understanding of the complexity of platelet activation mechanisms.

  6. Up-regulated expression of extracellular matrix remodeling genes in phagocytically challenged trabecular meshwork cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine M Porter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cells in the trabecular meshwork (TM, the tissue responsible for draining aqueous humor out of the eye, are known to be highly phagocytic. Phagocytic function in TM cells is thought to play an important role in the normal functioning of the outflow pathway. Dysfunction of phagocytosis could lead to abnormalities of outflow resistance and increased intraocular pressure (IOP. However, the molecular mechanisms triggered by phagocytosis in TM cells are completely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gene expression profile analysis of human TM cells phagocytically challenged to E. coli or pigment under physiological and oxidative stress environment were performed using Affymetrix U133 plus 2.0 array and analyzed with Genespring GX. Despite the differential biological response elicited by E. coli and pigment particles, a number of genes, including MMP1, MMP3, TNFSF11, DIO2, KYNU, and KCCN2 showed differential expression with both phagocytic ligands in all conditions. Data was confirmed by qPCR in both human and porcine TM cells. Metacore pathway analysis and the usage of recombinant adenovirus encoding the dominant negative mutant of IkB identified NF-κB as a transcription factor mediating the up-regulation of at least MMP1 and MMP3 in TM cells with phagocytosis. In-gel zymography demonstrated increased collagenolytic and caseinolytic activities in the culture media of TM cells challenge to E. coli. In addition, collagenolytic I activity was further confirmed using the self-quenched fluorescent substrate DQ-Collagen I. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Here we report for the first time the differential gene expression profile of TM cells phagocytically challenged with either E. coli or pigment. Our data indicate a potential role of phagocytosis in outflow pathway tissue homeostasis through the up-regulation and/or proteolytic activation of extracellular matrix remodeling genes.

  7. Structure, function and regulation of versican: the most abundant type of proteoglycan in the extracellular matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fattah Sotoodehnejadnematalahi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the main members of the large aggregating proteoglycans (PGs family is versican which is able to bind to hyaluronate. Versican is a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan and is a key ingredient of the extracellular matrix.  Due to its widespread expression in the body, versican is involved in cell adhesion, proliferation and migration. Induced expression of versican is often observed in tissues such as breast, brain, ovary, gastrointestinal tract, prostate, and melanoma. In addition, versican has important role in development. For example, versican conducts the embryonic cell migration which is essential in the formation of the heart and outlining the path for neural crest cell migration. Several studies in the past decade up to now have shown that versican produced by mononuclear cells has an important role in wound healing and blood vessel formation and suggested that it promotes tumorigenesis and angiogenesis. In this mini-review, we summarise and discuss the role of versican in healthy and pathological tissues and suggest the possible function of transcription factors and signalling pathway in regulation of versican.

  8. HIV-1 matrix dependent membrane targeting is regulated by Gag mRNA trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jin

    Full Text Available Retroviral Gag polyproteins are necessary and sufficient for virus budding. Productive HIV-1 Gag assembly takes place at the plasma membrane. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which thousands of Gag molecules are targeted to the plasma membrane. Using a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC assay, we recently reported that the cellular sites and efficiency of HIV-1 Gag assembly depend on the precise pathway of Gag mRNA export from the nucleus, known to be mediated by Rev. Here we describe an assembly deficiency in human cells for HIV Gag whose expression depends on hepatitis B virus (HBV post-transcriptional regulatory element (PRE mediated-mRNA nuclear export. PRE-dependent HIV Gag expressed well in human cells, but assembled with slower kinetics, accumulated intracellularly, and failed to associate with a lipid raft compartment where the wild-type Rev-dependent HIV-1 Gag efficiently assembles. Surprisingly, assembly and budding of PRE-dependent HIV Gag in human cells could be rescued in trans by co-expression of Rev-dependent Gag that provides correct membrane targeting signals, or in cis by replacing HIV matrix (MA with other membrane targeting domains. Taken together, our results demonstrate deficient membrane targeting of PRE-dependent HIV-1 Gag and suggest that HIV MA function is regulated by the trafficking pathway of the encoding mRNA.

  9. Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans: extracellular matrix proteins that regulate immunity of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haylock-Jacobs, Sarah; Keough, Michael B; Lau, Lorraine; Yong, V Wee

    2011-10-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex network of scaffolding molecules that also plays an important role in cell signalling, migration and tissue structure. In the central nervous system (CNS), the ECM is integral to the efficient development/guidance and survival of neurons and axons. However, changes in distribution of the ECM in the CNS may significantly enhance pathology in CNS disease or following injury. One group of ECM proteins that is important for CNS homeostasis is the chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs). Up-regulation of these molecules has been demonstrated to be both desirable and detrimental following CNS injury. Taking cues from arthritis, where there is a strong anti-CSPG immune response, there is evidence that suggests that CSPGs may influence immunity during CNS pathological conditions. This review focuses on the role of CSPGs in CNS pathologies as well as in immunity, both from a viewpoint of how they may inhibit repair and exacerbate damage in the CNS, and how they are involved in activation and function of peripheral immune cells, particularly in multiple sclerosis. Lastly, we address how CSPGs may be manipulated to improve disease outcomes.

  10. Nitric oxide regulates cell behavior on an interactive cell-derived extracellular matrix scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Qi; Zhang, Lijun; Redman, Travis; Qi, Shaohai; Zhao, Feng

    2015-12-01

    During tissue injury and wound healing process, there are dynamic reciprocal interactions among cells, extracellular matrix (ECM), and mediating molecules which are crucial for functional tissue repair. Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the key mediating molecules that can positively regulate various biological activities involved in wound healing. Various ECM components serve as binding sites for cells and mediating molecules, and the interactions further stimulate cellular activities. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can migrate to the wound site and contribute to tissue regeneration through differentiation and paracrine signaling. The objective of this work was to investigate the regulatory effect of NO on hMSCs in an interactive ECM-rich microenvironment. In order to mimic the in vivo stromal environment in wound site, a cell-derived ECM scaffold that was able to release NO within the range of in vivo wound fluid NO level was fabricated. Results showed that the micro-molar level of NO released from the ECM scaffold had an inhibitory effect on cellular activities of hMSCs. The NO impaired cell growth, altered cell morphology, disrupted the F-actin organization, also decreased the expression of focal adhesion related molecules integrin α5 and paxillin. These results may contribute to the elucidation of how NO acts on hMSCs in wound healing process.

  11. [Biofilms and their significance in medical microbiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernohorská, L; Votava, M

    2002-11-01

    Microorganisms are able to adhere to various surfaces and to form there a three-dimensional structure known as biofilm. In biofilms, microbial cells show characteristics and behaviours different from those of plankton cells. Intercellular signalizations of the quorum-sensing type regulate interaction between members of the biofilm. Bacteria embedded in the biofilm can escape and form well known planktonic forms, that are obviously only a part of the bacterial life cycle. Bacteria adhere also to medically important surfaces such as catheters, either urinary or intravenous ones, artificial heart valves, orthopedic implants and so on and contribute to device-related infections like cystitis, catheter-related sepsis, endocarditis etc. Once a biofilm has been established on a surface, the bacteria harboured inside are less exposed to the host's immune response and less susceptible to antibiotics. As an important cause of nosocomial infections the biofilm must remain in the centre of the microbiologist's attention.

  12. Pancreatic amylase is an environmental signal for regulation of biofilm formation and host interaction in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jowiya, Waheed; Brunner, Katja; Abouelhadid, Sherif; Hussain, Haitham A; Nair, Sean P; Sadiq, Sohaib; Williams, Lisa K; Trantham, Emma K; Stephenson, Holly; Wren, Brendan W; Bajaj-Elliott, Mona; Cogan, Tristan A; Laws, Andrew P; Wade, Jim; Dorrell, Nick; Allan, Elaine

    2015-12-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a commensal bacterium in the intestines of animals and birds and a major cause of food-borne gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. Here we show that exposure to pancreatic amylase leads to secretion of an α-dextran by C. jejuni and that a secreted protease, Cj0511, is required. Exposure of C. jejuni to pancreatic amylase promotes biofilm formation in vitro, increases interaction with human epithelial cell lines, increases virulence in the Galleria mellonella infection model, and promotes colonization of the chicken ileum. We also show that exposure to pancreatic amylase protects C. jejuni from stress conditions in vitro, suggesting that the induced α-dextran may be important during transmission between hosts. This is the first evidence that pancreatic amylase functions as an interkingdom signal in an enteric microorganism.

  13. Evidence for ubiquitin-regulated nuclear and subnuclear trafficking among Paramyxovirinae matrix proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickey Pentecost

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paramyxovirus matrix (M protein is a molecular scaffold required for viral morphogenesis and budding at the plasma membrane. Transient nuclear residence of some M proteins hints at non-structural roles. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms that regulate the nuclear sojourn. Previously, we found that the nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of Nipah virus M (NiV-M is a prerequisite for budding, and is regulated by a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLSbp, a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES, and monoubiquitination of the K258 residue within the NLSbp itself (NLSbp-lysine. To define whether the sequence determinants of nuclear trafficking identified in NiV-M are common among other Paramyxovirinae M proteins, we generated the homologous NES and NLSbp-lysine mutations in M proteins from the five major Paramyxovirinae genera. Using quantitative 3D confocal microscopy, we determined that the NES and NLSbp-lysine are required for the efficient nuclear export of the M proteins of Nipah virus, Hendra virus, Sendai virus, and Mumps virus. Pharmacological depletion of free ubiquitin or mutation of the conserved NLSbp-lysine to an arginine, which inhibits M ubiquitination, also results in nuclear and nucleolar retention of these M proteins. Recombinant Sendai virus (rSeV-eGFP bearing the NES or NLSbp-lysine M mutants rescued at similar efficiencies to wild type. However, foci of cells expressing the M mutants displayed marked fusogenicity in contrast to wild type, and infection did not spread. Recombinant Mumps virus (rMuV-eGFP bearing the homologous mutations showed similar defects in viral morphogenesis. Finally, shotgun proteomics experiments indicated that the interactomes of Paramyxovirinae M proteins are significantly enriched for components of the nuclear pore complex, nuclear transport receptors, and nucleolar proteins. We then synthesize our functional and proteomics data to propose a working model for the ubiquitin-regulated

  14. Substrate stiffness-regulated matrix metalloproteinase output in myocardial cells and cardiac fibroblasts: implications for myocardial fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing; Zhang, Quanyou; Zhu, Ting; Zhang, Yanyan; Liu, Bailin; Xu, Jianwen; Zhao, Hucheng

    2014-06-01

    Cardiac fibrosis, an important pathological feature of structural remodeling, contributes to ventricular stiffness, diastolic dysfunction, arrhythmia and may even lead to sudden death. Matrix stiffness, one of the many mechanical factors acting on cells, is increasingly appreciated as an important mediator of myocardial cell behavior. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates were fabricated with different stiffnesses to mimic physiological and pathological heart tissues, and the way in which the elastic modulus of the substrate regulated matrix-degrading gelatinases in myocardial cells and cardiac fibroblasts was explored. Initially, an increase in cell spreading area was observed, concomitant with the increase in PDMS stiffness in both cells. Later, it was demonstrated that the MMP-2 gene expression and protein activity in myocardial cells and cardiac fibroblasts can be enhanced with an increase in PDMS substrate stiffness and, moreover, such gene- and protein-related increases had a significant linear correlation with the elastic modulus. In comparison, the MMP-9 gene and protein expressions were up-regulated in cardiac fibroblasts only, not in myocardial cells. These results implied that myocardial cells and cardiac fibroblasts in the myocardium could sense the stiffness in pathological fibrosis and showed a differential but positive response in the expression of matrix-degrading gelatinases when exposed to an increased stiffening of the matrix in the microenvironment. The phenomenon of cells sensing pathological matrix stiffness can help to increase understanding of the mechanism underlying myocardial fibrosis and may ultimately lead to planning cure strategies.

  15. Mesoscale Elucidation of Biofilm Shear Behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Barai, Pallab; Mukherjee, Partha P

    2015-01-01

    Formation of bacterial colonies as biofilm on the surface/interface of various objects has the potential to impact not only human health and disease but also energy and environmental considerations. Biofilms can be regarded as soft materials, and comprehension of their shear response to external forces is a key element to the fundamental understanding. A mesoscale model has been presented in this article based on digitization of a biofilm microstructure. Its response under externally applied shear load is analyzed. Strain stiffening type behavior is readily observed under high strain loads due to the unfolding of chains within soft polymeric substrate. Sustained shear loading of the biofilm network results in strain localization along the diagonal direction. Rupture of the soft polymeric matrix can potentially reduce the intercellular interaction between the bacterial cells. Evolution of stiffness within the biofilm network under shear reveals two regions: a) initial increase in stiffness due to strain stiffe...

  16. The Physics of Biofilms -- An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Mazza, Marco G

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are complex, self-organized consortia of microorganisms that produce a functional, protective matrix of biomolecules. Physically, the structure of a biofilm can be described as an entangled polymer network which grows and changes under the effect of gradients of nutrients, cell differentiation, quorum sensing, bacterial motion, and interaction with the environment. Its development is complex, and constantly adapting to environmental stimuli. Here, we review the fundamental physical processes the govern the inception, growth and development of a biofilm. Two important mechanisms guide the initial phase in a biofilm life cycle: (\\emph{i}) the cell motility near or at a solid interface, and (\\emph{ii}) the cellular adhesion. Both processes are crucial for initiating the colony and for ensuring its stability. A mature biofilm behaves as a viscoelastic fluid with a complex, history-dependent dynamics. We discuss progress and challenges in the determination of its physical properties. Experimental and theo...

  17. Regulation of complement by cartilage oligomeric matrix protein allows for a novel molecular diagnostic principle in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Happonen, Kaisa E; Saxne, Tore; Aspberg, Anders;

    2010-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a structural component of cartilage, where it catalyzes collagen fibrillogenesis. Elevated amounts of COMP are found in serum during increased turnover of cartilage associated with active joint disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthr......Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a structural component of cartilage, where it catalyzes collagen fibrillogenesis. Elevated amounts of COMP are found in serum during increased turnover of cartilage associated with active joint disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA......) and osteoarthritis (OA). This study was undertaken to investigate the ability of COMP to regulate complement, a capacity that has previously been shown for some other cartilage proteins....

  18. Regulated expression of matrix metalloproteinases, inflammatory mediators, and endometrial matrix remodeling by 17beta-estradiol in the immature rat uterus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caruso Joseph A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Administration of a single physiological dose of 17beta-estradiol (E2:40 microg/kg to the ovariectomized immature rat rapidly induces uterine growth and remodeling. The response is characterized by changes in endometrial stromal architecture during an inflammatory-like response that likely involves activated matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs. While estrogen is known as an inducer of endometrial growth, its role in specific expression of MMP family members in vivo is poorly characterized. E2-induced changes in MMP-2, -3, -7, and -9 mRNA and protein expression were analyzed to survey regulation along an extended time course 0-72 hours post-treatment. Because E2 effects inflammatory-like changes that may alter MMP expression, we assessed changes in tissue levels of TNF-alpha and MCP-1, and we utilized dexamethasone (600 microg/kg to better understand the role of inflammation on matrix remodeling. Methods Ovariectomized 21 day-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were administered E2 and uterine tissues were extracted and prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM, mRNA extraction and real-time RT-PCR, protein extraction and Western blot, or gelatin zymography. In inhibitor studies, pretreatment compounds were administered prior to E2 and tissues were harvested at 4 hours post-hormone challenge. Results Using a novel TEM method to quantitatively assess changes in stromal collagen density, we show that E2-induced matrix remodeling is rapid in onset ( Conclusion The data demonstrate that E2-regulated endometrial remodeling is rapid in onset (

  19. Cellulose production, activated by cyclic di-GMP through BcsA and BcsZ, is a virulence factor and an essential determinant of the three-dimensional architectures of biofilms formed by Erwinia amylovora Ea1189.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiblanco, Luisa F; Sundin, George W

    2016-10-18

    Bacterial biofilms are multicellular aggregates encased in an extracellular matrix mainly composed of exopolysaccharides (EPSs), protein and nucleic acids, which determines the architecture of the biofilm. Erwinia amylovora Ea1189 forms a biofilm inside the xylem of its host, which results in vessel plugging and water transport impairment. The production of the EPSs amylovoran and levan is critical for the formation of a mature biofilm. In addition, cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) has been reported to positively regulate amylovoran biosynthesis and biofilm formation in E. amylovora Ea1189. In this study, we demonstrate that cellulose is synthesized by E. amylovora Ea1189 and is a major modulator of the three-dimensional characteristics of biofilms formed by this bacterium, and also contributes to virulence during systemic host invasion. In addition, we demonstrate that the activation of cellulose biosynthesis in E. amylovora is a c-di-GMP-dependent process, through allosteric binding to the cellulose catalytic subunit BcsA. We also report that the endoglucanase BcsZ is a key player in c-di-GMP activation of cellulose biosynthesis. Our results provide evidence of the complex composition of the extracellular matrix produced by E. amylovora and the implications of cellulose biosynthesis in shaping the architecture of the biofilm and in the expression of one of the main virulence phenotypes of this pathogen.

  20. Extracellular DNA Acidifies Biofilms and Induces Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilton, Mike; Charron-Mazenod, Laetitia; Moore, Richard; Lewenza, Shawn

    2015-11-09

    Biofilms consist of surface-adhered bacterial communities encased in an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, exopolysaccharides, and proteins. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has a structural role in the formation of biofilms, can bind and shield biofilms from aminoglycosides, and induces antimicrobial peptide resistance mechanisms. Here, we provide evidence that eDNA is responsible for the acidification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa planktonic cultures and biofilms. Further, we show that acidic pH and acidification via eDNA constitute a signal that is perceived by P. aeruginosa to induce the expression of genes regulated by the PhoPQ and PmrAB two-component regulatory systems. Planktonic P. aeruginosa cultured in exogenous 0.2% DNA or under acidic conditions demonstrates a 2- to 8-fold increase in aminoglycoside resistance. This resistance phenotype requires the aminoarabinose modification of lipid A and the production of spermidine on the bacterial outer membrane, which likely reduce the entry of aminoglycosides. Interestingly, the additions of the basic amino acid L-arginine and sodium bicarbonate neutralize the pH and restore P. aeruginosa susceptibility to aminoglycosides, even in the presence of eDNA. These data illustrate that the accumulation of eDNA in biofilms and infection sites can acidify the local environment and that acidic pH promotes the P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance phenotype.

  1. Doxycycline blocks gastric ulcer by regulating matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity and oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laishram Pradeepkumar Singh; Amartya Mishra; Debjit Saha; Snehasikta Swarnakar

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effect of doxycycline on the activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and oxidative stress in gastric tissues of rats following gastric injury. METHODS: Gastric ulcers were generated in rats by administration of 70% ethanol, and activity of doxycycline was tested by administration 30 min prior to ethanol. Similarly, the effect of doxycycline was tested in an indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer model. The activities and expression of MMPs were examined by zymography and Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Gastric injury in rats as judged by elevated ulcer indices following exposure to ulcerogen, either indomethacin or ethanol, was reversed significantly by doxycycline. Indomethacin-induced ulcerated gastric tissues exhibited about 12-fold higher proMMP-9 activity and about 5-fold higher proMMP-3 activity as compared to control tissues. Similarly, ethanol induced about 22-fold and about 6-fold higher proMMP-9 and proMMP-3 activities, respectively, in rat gastric tissues. Both proMMP-9 and MMP-3 activities were markedly decreased by doxycycline in ulcerogen treated rat gastric tissues. In contrast, the reduced MMP-2 activity in ulcerated tissues was increased by doxycycline during ulcer prevention. On the other hand, doxycycline inhibited significantly proMMP-9, -2 and -3 activities in vitro . In addition, doxycycline reduced oxidative load in gastric tissues and scavenged H2O2 in vitro . Our results suggest a novel regulatory role of doxycycline on MMP-2 activity in addition to inhibitory action on MMP-9 and MMP-3 during prevention of gastric ulcers. CONCLUSION: This is the first demonstration of dual action of doxycycline, that is, regulation of MMP activity and reduction of oxidative stress in arresting gastric injury.

  2. Extracellular DNA facilitates the formation of functional amyloids in Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Kelly; Ganesan, Mahesh; Payne, David E; Solomon, Michael J; Boles, Blaise R

    2016-01-01

    Persistent staphylococcal infections often involve surface-associated communities called biofilms. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm development is mediated by the co-ordinated production of the biofilm matrix, which can be composed of polysaccharides, extracellular DNA (eDNA) and proteins including amyloid fibers. The nature of the interactions between matrix components, and how these interactions contribute to the formation of matrix, remain unclear. Here we show that the presence of eDNA in S. aureus biofilms promotes the formation of amyloid fibers. Conditions or mutants that do not generate eDNA result in lack of amyloids during biofilm growth despite the amyloidogeneic subunits, phenol soluble modulin peptides, being produced. In vitro studies revealed that the presence of DNA promotes amyloid formation by PSM peptides. Thus, this work exposes a previously unacknowledged interaction between biofilm matrix components that furthers our understanding of functional amyloid formation and S. aureus biofilm biology.

  3. The nuclear matrix and the regulation of chromatin organization and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davie, J R

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear DNA is organized into loop domains, with the base of the loop being bound to the nuclear matrix. Loops with transcriptionally active and/or potentially active genes have a DNase I-sensitive chromatin structure, while repressed chromatin loops have a condensed configuration that is essentially invisible to the transcription machinery. Core histone acetylation and torsional stress appear to be responsible for the generation and/or maintenance of the open potentially active chromatin loops. The transcriptionally active region of the loop makes several dynamic attachments with the nuclear matrix and is associated with core histones that are dynamically acetylated. Histone acetyltransferase and deacetylase, which catalyze this rapid acetylation and deacetylation, are bound to the nuclear matrix. Several transcription factors are components of the nuclear matrix. Histone acetyltransferase, deacetylase, and transcription factors may contribute to the dynamic attachment of the active chromatin domains with the nuclear matrix at sites of ongoing transcription.

  4. Coordinate regulation of fibronectin matrix assembly by the plasminogen activator system and vitronectin in human osteosarcoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKeown-Longo Paula J

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasminogen activators are known to play a key role in the remodeling of bone matrix which occurs during tumor progression, bone metastasis and bone growth. Dysfunctional remodeling of bone matrix gives rise to the osteoblastic and osteolytic lesions seen in association with metastatic cancers. The molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of these lesions are not well understood. Studies were undertaken to address the role of the plasminogen activator system in the regulation of fibronectin matrix assembly in the osteoblast-like cell line, MG-63. Results Treatment of MG-63 cells with P25, a peptide ligand for uPAR, resulted in an increase in assembly of fibronectin matrix which was associated with an increase in the number of activated β1 integrins on the cell surface. Overexpression of uPAR in MG-63 cells increased the effect of P25 on fibronectin matrix assembly and β1 integrin activation. P25 had no effect on uPAR null fibroblasts, confirming a role for uPAR in this process. The addition of plasminogen activator inhibitor Type I (PAI-1 to cells increased the P25-induced fibronectin polymerization, as well as the number of activated integrins. This positive regulation of PAI-1 on fibronectin assembly was independent of PAI-1's anti-proteinase activity, but acted through PAI-1 binding to the somatomedin B domain of vitronectin. Conclusion These results indicate that vitronectin modulates fibronectin matrix assembly in osteosarcoma cells through a novel mechanism involving cross-talk through the plasminogen activator system.

  5. Campylobacter jejuni CsrA complements an Escherichia coli csrA mutation for the regulation of biofilm formation, motility and cellular morphology but not glycogen accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fields Joshua A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although Campylobacter jejuni is consistently ranked as one of the leading causes of bacterial diarrhea worldwide, the mechanisms by which C. jejuni causes disease and how they are regulated have yet to be clearly defined. The global regulator, CsrA, has been well characterized in several bacterial genera and is known to regulate a number of independent pathways via a post transcriptional mechanism, but remains relatively uncharacterized in the genus Campylobacter. Previously, we reported data illustrating the requirement for CsrA in several virulence related phenotypes of C. jejuni strain 81–176, indicating that the Csr pathway is important for Campylobacter pathogenesis. Results We compared the Escherichia coli and C. jejuni orthologs of CsrA and characterized the ability of the C. jejuni CsrA protein to functionally complement an E. coli csrA mutant. Phylogenetic comparison of E. coli CsrA to orthologs from several pathogenic bacteria demonstrated variability in C. jejuni CsrA relative to the known RNA binding domains of E. coli CsrA and in several amino acids reported to be involved in E. coli CsrA-mediated gene regulation. When expressed in an E. coli csrA mutant, C. jejuni CsrA succeeded in recovering defects in motility, biofilm formation, and cellular morphology; however, it failed to return excess glycogen accumulation to wild type levels. Conclusions These findings suggest that C. jejuni CsrA is capable of efficiently binding some E. coli CsrA binding sites, but not others, and provide insight into the biochemistry of C. jejuni CsrA.

  6. MiR-15a-5p regulates viability and matrix degradation of human osteoarthritis chondrocytes via targeting VEGFA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongwei; Tian, Yun

    2017-01-16

    Previous studies demonstrated that miR-15a-5p was probably associated with human hepatocellular carcinoma, while the function of miR-15a-5p in OA (Osteoarthritis) still remains unknown. Here, we uncovered the potential role of miR-15a-5p on OA pathogenesis and confirmed its predicted target VEGFA (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A). Measured by RT-PCR, miR-15a-5p expression increased remarkably while VEGFA expression was significantly decreased in OA chondrocytes compared with normal conditions. According to Luciferase activity assay, miR-15a-5p directly targeted the 3'-UTR of VEGFA to inhibit its expression. Functional analysis including CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry revealed that overexpression of VEGFA or inhibition of miR-15a-5p promoted cell proliferation, suppressed cell apoptosis and reduced matrix degradation in OA chondrocytes. Moreover, rescue assays carried out with both expression of VEGFA and miR-15a-5p demonstrated that miR-15a-5p contributes to cell apoptosis and matrix degradation via inhibiting VEGFA. We further provided evidence that multiple proteins related to matrix synthesis were regulated by miR-15a-5p and VEGFA using Western blot and ELISA assays. Taken together, our findings elucidated an underlying mechanism by which miR-15a-5p regulates viability and matrix degradation of OA and indicated a new target for OA diagnosis and therapy.

  7. Spore formation and toxin production in Clostridium difficile biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenyuk, Ekaterina G; Laning, Michelle L; Foley, Jennifer; Johnston, Pehga F; Knight, Katherine L; Gerding, Dale N; Driks, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The ability to grow as a biofilm can facilitate survival of bacteria in the environment and promote infection. To better characterize biofilm formation in the pathogen Clostridium difficile, we established a colony biofilm culture method for this organism on a polycarbonate filter, and analyzed the matrix and the cells in biofilms from a variety of clinical isolates over several days of biofilm culture. We found that biofilms readily formed in all strains analyzed, and that spores were abundant within about 6 days. We also found that extracellular DNA (eDNA), polysaccharide and protein was readily detected in the matrix of all strains, including the major toxins A and/or B, in toxigenic strains. All the strains we analyzed formed spores. Apart from strains 630 and VPI10463, which sporulated in the biofilm at relatively low frequencies, the frequencies of biofilm sporulation varied between 46 and 65%, suggesting that variations in sporulation levels among strains is unlikely to be a major factor in variation in the severity of disease. Spores in biofilms also had reduced germination efficiency compared to spores obtained by a conventional sporulation protocol. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that in 3 day-old biofilms, the outermost structure of the spore is a lightly staining coat. However, after 6 days, material that resembles cell debris in the matrix surrounds the spore, and darkly staining granules are closely associated with the spores surface. In 14 day-old biofilms, relatively few spores are surrounded by the apparent cell debris, and the surface-associated granules are present at higher density at the coat surface. Finally, we showed that biofilm cells possess 100-fold greater resistance to the antibiotic metronidazole then do cells cultured in liquid media. Taken together, our data suggest that C. difficile cells and spores in biofilms have specialized properties that may facilitate infection.

  8. Spore formation and toxin production in Clostridium difficile biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina G Semenyuk

    Full Text Available The ability to grow as a biofilm can facilitate survival of bacteria in the environment and promote infection. To better characterize biofilm formation in the pathogen Clostridium difficile, we established a colony biofilm culture method for this organism on a polycarbonate filter, and analyzed the matrix and the cells in biofilms from a variety of clinical isolates over several days of biofilm culture. We found that biofilms readily formed in all strains analyzed, and that spores were abundant within about 6 days. We also found that extracellular DNA (eDNA, polysaccharide and protein was readily detected in the matrix of all strains, including the major toxins A and/or B, in toxigenic strains. All the strains we analyzed formed spores. Apart from strains 630 and VPI10463, which sporulated in the biofilm at relatively low frequencies, the frequencies of biofilm sporulation varied between 46 and 65%, suggesting that variations in sporulation levels among strains is unlikely to be a major factor in variation in the severity of disease. Spores in biofilms also had reduced germination efficiency compared to spores obtained by a conventional sporulation protocol. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that in 3 day-old biofilms, the outermost structure of the spore is a lightly staining coat. However, after 6 days, material that resembles cell debris in the matrix surrounds the spore, and darkly staining granules are closely associated with the spores surface. In 14 day-old biofilms, relatively few spores are surrounded by the apparent cell debris, and the surface-associated granules are present at higher density at the coat surface. Finally, we showed that biofilm cells possess 100-fold greater resistance to the antibiotic metronidazole then do cells cultured in liquid media. Taken together, our data suggest that C. difficile cells and spores in biofilms have specialized properties that may facilitate infection.

  9. Biocorrosion: towards understanding interactions between biofilms and metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beech, Iwona B; Sunner, Jan

    2004-06-01

    The term microbially influenced corrosion, or biocorrosion, refers to the accelerated deterioration of metals owing to the presence of biofilms on their surfaces. The detailed mechanisms of biocorrosion are still poorly understood. Recent investigations into biocorrosion have focused on the influence of biomineralization processes taking place on metallic surfaces and the impact of extracellular enzymes, active within the biofilm matrix, on electrochemical reactions at the biofilm-metal interface.

  10. Fibronectin Matrix Remodeling in the Regulation of the Inflammatory Response within the Lung: An Early Step in Lung Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    the Inflammatory Response within the Lung: An Early Step in Lung Cancer Progression PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Paula J. McKeown-Longo, Ph.D...2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Fibronectin Matrix Remodeling in the Regulation of the 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0755 Inflammatory Response within...hypothesis that force dependent unfolding of fibronectin in the tumor stroma drives an inflammatory response within the lung tumor microenvironment

  11. Efficacy of Regulated 12-Session Matrix Model on restraining methamphetamine-dependence: Biological evidence and self-reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Amiri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Substance abuse is accompanied by a wide range of psychological, social, and economic adverse outcomes and damages. Methamphetamine (abuse is dangerous because of its wide range adverse outcomes and hazardous sustaining side effects. Moreover, Methamphetamine-dependence is usually treatment-resistant. This study evaluated the Regulated 12-Session Matrix Model in treatment of outpatient ethamphetamine-dependent individuals. Method: 24 individuals were chosen according to inclusion/exclusion criteria of the study and randomly assigned to equal experimental (age range 19-41; mean age: 46.9 and control groups (age range: 21-42; mean age: 27.8. Experimental group members partook Regulated 12-Session Matrix Model once a week in 12 consecutive weeks, while control group members remained at waitlist. Results:Independent t-test in 12th week showed that experimental group had lower methamphetamine use, comparing to control group (p<.05.Phillai’s Trace, Wilk’sLambda,Hotelling-Lawley's trace, and Roy's largest root showed that there are significant association between experimental and control groups in reduction of methamphetamine-use lapse (p<.05.Within-subject F ratio revealed that “methamphetamine use” was significantly reduced in experimental group after clinical intervention (p<.001. Urine test showed significant difference in results of negative responses by the end of intervention (p<.05 in experimental group, compared to control group, which was also significant from the results of both groups in pre-test (p<.001. Discussion and conclusion: Efficacy of Regulated 12-Session Matrix Model in craving control and reduction of lapse and substance (abuse in methamphetamine-dependent patients was approved with self-reports and biological indicators. Regulated 12-Session Matrix Model has been proved to be beneficial in methamphetaminedependencetreatment in Iran and other alike cultural and social atmospheres. Limitations and future

  12. Comparative transcriptome analysis of the biocontrol strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 as response to biofilm formation analyzed by RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröber, Magdalena; Verwaaijen, Bart; Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas

    2016-08-10

    biofilm matrix including exopolysaccharide genes (eps) and the yqxM-tasA-sipW operon encoding amyloid fiber synthesis were up-regulated in the B. amyloliquefaciens FZB42 biofilm. On the other hand, highly down-regulated genes in biofilms are associated with synthesis, assembly and regulation of the flagellar apparatus, the degradation of aromatic compounds and the export of copper. The obtained transcriptional profile for B. amyloliquefaciens biofilm cells uncovered genes involved in its development and enabled the assessment that synthesis of secondary metabolites among other factors may contribute to the biocontrol properties of the strain.

  13. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for In-Situ Biofilm Surface Characterization during Free Chlorine and Monochloramine Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinking water distribution system biofilm are attached to pipe walls and found in sediments. These biofilms are complex and contain a variety of microorganisms embedded in a matrix with extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), providing protection from disinfection. Without pro...

  14. Poly (Acetyl, Arginyl) Glucosamine as a Biofilm-reducing Water Line Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteria can attach and form biofilms on a surface hindering removal by common disinfectants. Some bacteria are better than others at forming this biofilm but once it is formed many pathogens can reside in the matrix. Salmonella spp. have been shown to have some biofilm forming capabilities but will...

  15. In vitro colonization of the muscle extracellular matrix components by Escherichia coli O157:H7: the influence of growth medium, temperature and pH on initial adhesion and induction of biofilm formation by collagens I and III.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Chagnot

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC O157:H7 are responsible for repeated food-poisoning cases often caused by contaminated burgers. EHEC infection is predominantly a pediatric illness, which can lead to life-threatening diseases. Ruminants are the main natural reservoir for EHEC and food contamination almost always originates from faecal contamination. In beef meat products, primary bacterial contamination occurs at the dehiding stage of slaughtering. The extracellular matrix (ECM is the most exposed part of the skeletal muscles in beef carcasses. Investigating the adhesion to the main muscle fibrous ECM proteins, insoluble fibronectin, collagen I, III and IV, laminin-α2 and elastin, results demonstrated that the preceding growth conditions had a great influence on subsequent bacterial attachment. In the tested experimental conditions, maximal adhesion to fibril-forming collagens I or III occurred at 25°C and pH 7. Once initially adhered, exposure to lower temperatures, as applied to meat during cutting and storage, or acidification, as in the course of post-mortem physiological modifications of muscle, had no effect on detachment, except at pHu. In addition, dense biofilm formation occurred on immobilized collagen I or III and was induced in growth medium supplemented with collagen I in solution. From this first comprehensive investigation of EHEC adhesion to ECM proteins with respect to muscle biology and meat processing, new research directions for the development of innovative practices to minimize the risk of meat contamination are further discussed.

  16. Neurokinin-1 receptor directly mediates glioma cell migration by up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Lingyun; Kang, Yawei; Zhou, Ying; Zeng, Qian; Song, Hongjing; Wang, Rui

    2013-01-04

    Neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) occurs naturally on human glioblastomas. Its activation mediates glioma cell proliferation. However, it is unknown whether NK1R is directly involved in tumor cell migration. In this study, we found human hemokinin-1 (hHK-1), via NK1R, dose-dependently promoted the migration of U-251 and U-87 cells. In addition, we showed that hHK-1 enhanced the activity of MMP-2 and the expression of MMP-2 and MT1-matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), which were responsible for cell migration, because neutralizing the MMPs with antibodies decreased cell migration. The involved mechanisms were then investigated. In U-251, hHK-1 induced significant calcium efflux; phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 reduced the calcium mobilization, the up-regulation of MMP-2 and MT1-MMP, and the cell migration induced by hHK-1, which meant the migration effect of NK1R was mainly mediated through the G(q)-PLC pathway. We further demonstrated that hHK-1 boosted rapid phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, and Akt; inhibition of ERK and Akt effectively reduced MMP-2 induction by hHK-1. Meanwhile, inhibition of ERK, JNK, and Akt reduced the MT1-MMP induction. hHK-1 stimulated significant phosphorylation of p65 and c-JUN in U-251. Reporter gene assays indicated hHK-1 enhanced both AP-1 and NF-κB activity; inhibition of ERK, JNK, and Akt dose-dependently suppressed the NF-κB activity; only the inhibition of ERK significantly suppressed the AP-1 activity. Treatment with specific inhibitors for AP-1 or NF-κB strongly blocked the MMP up-regulation by hHK-1. Taken together, our data suggested NK1R was a potential regulator of human glioma cell migration by the up-regulation of MMP-2 and MT1-MMP.

  17. Extracellular DNA is essential for maintaining Bordetella biofilm integrity on abiotic surfaces and in the upper respiratory tract of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt S Conover

    Full Text Available Bacteria form complex and highly elaborate surface adherent communities known as biofilms which are held together by a self-produced extracellular matrix. We have previously shown that by adopting a biofilm mode of existence in vivo, the gram negative bacterial pathogens Bordetella bronchiseptica and Bordetella pertussis are able to efficiently colonize and persist in the mammalian respiratory tract. In general, the bacterial biofilm matrix includes polysaccharides, proteins and extracellular DNA (eDNA. In this report, we investigated the function of DNA in Bordetella biofilm development. We show that DNA is a significant component of Bordetella biofilm matrix. Addition of DNase I at the initiation of biofilm growth inhibited biofilm formation. Treatment of pre-established mature biofilms formed under both static and flow conditions with DNase I led to a disruption of the biofilm biomass. We next investigated whether eDNA played a role in biofilms formed in the mouse respiratory tract. DNase I treatment of nasal biofilms caused considerable dissolution of the biofilm biomass. In conclusion, these results suggest that eDNA is a crucial structural matrix component of both in vitro and in vivo formed Bordetella biofilms. This is the first evidence for the ability of DNase I to disrupt bacterial biofilms formed on host organs.

  18. Characterisation of Lactobacillus plantarum single and multi-strain biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernández Ramírez, Mónica D.

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms consist of microorganisms attached to a surface and embedded in a protective matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Within a biofilm, micro-organisms are protected from harsh environmental conditions including those resulting from cleaning and disinfecting agents leading to food

  19. Biofilm formation and dispersal in Gram-positive bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abee, T.; Kovacs, A.T.; Kuipers, O.P.; Veen, van der S.

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms are structured communities of bacteria, which are adhered to a surface and embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Since biofilms are very resistant to antimicrobial agents, they are at the basis of a range of problems, including quality and safety issues i

  20. Interplay of Matrix Stiffness and Cell-Cell Contact in Regulating Differentiation of Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Kai; Cao, Luping; Li, Shiyu; Yu, Lin; Ding, Jiandong

    2016-08-31

    Stem cells are capable of sensing and responding to the mechanical properties of extracellular matrixes (ECMs). It is well-known that, while osteogenesis is promoted on the stiff matrixes, adipogenesis is enhanced on the soft ones. Herein, we report an "abnormal" tendency of matrix-stiffness-directed stem cell differentiation. Well-defined nanoarrays of cell-adhesive arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) peptides were modified onto the surfaces of persistently nonfouling poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels to achieve controlled specific cell adhesion and simultaneously eliminate nonspecific protein adsorption. Mesenchymal stem cells were cultivated on the RGD-nanopatterned PEG hydrogels with the same RGD nanospacing but different hydrogel stiffnesses and incubated in the induction medium to examine the effect of matrix stiffness on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation extents. When stem cells were kept at a low density during the induction period, the differentiation tendency was consistent with the previous reports in the literature; however, both lineage commitments were favored on the stiff matrices at a high cell density. We interpreted such a complicated stiffness effect at a high cell density in two-dimensional culture as the interplay of matrix stiffness and cell-cell contact. As a result, this study strengthens the essence of the stiffness effect and highlights the combinatory effects of ECM cues and cell cues on stem cell differentiation.

  1. Extracellular DNA contributes to dental biofilm formation: an ex vivo study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Meyer, Rikke Louise; Dige, Irene;

    The extracellular matrix of dental biofilms plays an important role during caries development. It increases the mechanical stability of the biofilm, it prevents desiccation, it serves as a reservoir for nutrients and it contributes to the long-term preservation of acidic microenvironments. Research...... on the biofilm matrix in the field of dentistry has focused mainly on the synthesis, structure and function of extracellular polysaccharides. In recent years, studies conducted on biofilms from other habitats have shown that the presence of extracellular DNA contributes to biofilm formation and stability...

  2. miR-132 Regulates Dendritic Spine Structure by Direct Targeting of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasińska, Magdalena; Miłek, Jacek; Cymerman, Iwona A; Łęski, Szymon; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Dziembowska, Magdalena

    2016-09-01

    Mir-132 is a neuronal activity-regulated microRNA that controls the morphology of dendritic spines and neuronal transmission. Similar activities have recently been attributed to matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), an extrasynaptic protease. In the present study, we provide evidence that miR-132 directly regulates MMP-9 mRNA in neurons to modulate synaptic plasticity. With the use of luciferase reporter system, we show that miR-132 binds to the 3'UTR of MMP-9 mRNA to regulate its expression in neurons. The overexpression of miR-132 in neurons reduces the level of endogenous MMP-9 protein secretion. In synaptoneurosomes, metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-induced signaling stimulates the dissociation of miR-132 from polyribosomal fractions and shifts it towards the messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP)-containing fraction. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the overexpression of miR-132 in the cultured hippocampal neurons from Fmr1 KO mice that have increased synaptic MMP-9 level provokes enlargement of the dendritic spine heads, a process previously implicated in enhanced synaptic plasticity. We propose that activity-dependent miR-132 regulates structural plasticity of dendritic spines through matrix metalloproteinase 9.

  3. Response of extracellular matrix regulators in mouse lung after exposure to photons, protons and simulated solar particle event protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jian; Pecaut, Michael J; Coutrakon, George B; Slater, James M; Gridley, Daila S

    2009-07-01

    This study compared the effects of photons (gamma rays), protons and simulated solar particle event protons (sSPE) on the expression of profibrotic factors/extracellular matrix (ECM) regulators in lung tissue after whole-body irradiation. TGF-beta1, matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9 (MMP-2, -9), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 and 2 (TIMP-1, -2) were assessed on days 4 and 21 in lungs from C57BL/6 mice exposed to 0 Gy or 2 Gy photons (0.7 Gy/min), protons (0.9 Gy/min) and sSPE (0.056 Gy/h). RT-PCR, histological and immunohistochemical techniques were used. The most striking changes included (1) up-regulation of TGF-beta1 by photons and sSPE, but not protons, at both times, (2) MMP-2 enhancement by photons and sSPEs, (3) TIMP-1 up-regulation by photons at both times, and (4) more collagen accumulation after exposure to either photons or sSPE than after exposure to protons. The findings demonstrate that expression of important ECM regulators was highly dependent upon the radiation regimen as well as the time after exposure. The data further suggest that irradiation during an SPE may increase an astronaut's risk for pulmonary complications. The greater perturbations after photon exposure compared to proton exposure have clinical implications and warrant further investigation.

  4. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) as regulators of tumor-host interaction in a spontaneous metastasis model in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donadio, Ana Carolina; Remedi, María Mónica; Susperreguy, Sebastián; Frede, Silvia; Gilardoni, Mónica Beatriz; Tang, Yi; Pellizas, Claudia Gabriela; Yan, Li

    2008-12-01

    EMMPRIN has a role in invasion and metastasis through the induction of MMPs and the consequent modulation of cell-substrate and cell-cell adhesion processes. The present study evaluates the expression of EMMPRIN protein and MMP-2/9 activity in tumor and parenchymal cells in a spontaneous metastasis model in rats. Moreover, we explore the regulation of EMMPRIN and MMP-9 by tumor-epithelial cell interactions in vitro. By zymography, we observed an increased proMMP-9 expression in both metastasized liver and spleen samples from tumor bearing rats. Immunohistochemical studies showed EMMPRIN-positive tumor cells in tumor biopsies as well as in spleen and liver samples from tumor bearing rats. Interestingly, a significant increase in EMMPRIN expression in hepatic cells was also detected. The regulation of EMMPRIN expression in tumor and liver cells in response to tumor-host interaction was investigated in vitro through a tumor cell line culture on extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules or in co-culture with normal rat liver cells (BRL3A cells). No significant changes in EMMPRIN expression were detected in tumor cells cultured on ECM molecules. On the other hand, EMMPRIN protein and MMP-9 mRNA expression were induced in BRL3A cells. The increase in EMMPRIN expression in BRL3A cells was inhibited by an anti-EMMPRIN antibody. These results reinforce the main role of EMMPRIN mediating tumor-host interactions that may evolve new opportunities for therapeutic interventions.

  5. The in vivo biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, Maria; Alhede, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria can grow and proliferate either as single, independent cells or organized in aggregates commonly referred to as biofilms. When bacteria succeed in forming a biofilm within the human host, the infection often becomes very resistant to treatment and can develop into a chronic state. Biofilms...... have been studied for decades using various in vitro models, but it remains debatable whether such in vitro biofilms actually resemble in vivo biofilms in chronic infections. In vivo biofilms share several structural characteristics that differ from most in vitro biofilms. Additionally, the in vivo...... experimental time span and presence of host defenses differ from chronic infections and the chemical microenvironment of both in vivo and in vitro biofilms is seldom taken into account. In this review, we discuss why the current in vitro models of biofilms might be limited for describing infectious biofilms...

  6. Srv mediated dispersal of streptococcal biofilms through SpeB is observed in CovRS+ strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristie L Connolly

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS is a human specific pathogen capable of causing both mild infections and severe invasive disease. We and others have shown that GAS is able to form biofilms during infection. That is to say, they form a three-dimensional, surface attached structure consisting of bacteria and a multi-component extracellular matrix. The mechanisms involved in regulation and dispersal of these GAS structures are still unclear. Recently we have reported that in the absence of the transcriptional regulator Srv in the MGAS5005 background, the cysteine protease SpeB is constitutively produced, leading to increased tissue damage and decreased biofilm formation during a subcutaneous infection in a mouse model. This was interesting because MGAS5005 has a naturally occurring mutation that inactivates the sensor kinase domain of the two component regulatory system CovRS. Others have previously shown that strains lacking covS are associated with decreased SpeB production due to CovR repression of speB expression. Thus, our results suggest the inactivation of srv can bypass CovR repression and lead to constitutive SpeB production. We hypothesized that Srv control of SpeB production may be a mechanism to regulate biofilm dispersal and provide a mechanism by which mild infection can transition to severe disease through biofilm dispersal. The question remained however, is this mechanism conserved among GAS strains or restricted to the unique genetic makeup of MGAS5005. Here we show that Srv mediated control of SpeB and biofilm dispersal is conserved in the invasive clinical isolates RGAS053 (serotype M1 and MGAS315 (serotype M3, both of which have covS intact. This work provides additional evidence that Srv regulated control of SpeB may mediate biofilm formation and dispersal in diverse strain backgrounds.

  7. A novel assay of biofilm antifungal activity reveals that amphotericin B and caspofungin lyse Candida albicans cells in biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiDone, Louis; Oga, Duana; Krysan, Damian J

    2011-08-01

    The ability of Candida albicans to form drug-resistant biofilms is an important factor in its contribution to human disease. Assays to identify and characterize molecules with activity against fungal biofilms are crucial for the development of drugs with improved anti-biofilm activity. Here we report the application of an adenylate kinase (AK)-based cytotoxicity assay of fungal cell lysis to the characterization of agents active against C. albicans biofilms. We have developed three protocols for the AK assay. The first measures AK activity in the supernatants of biofilms treated with antifungal drugs and can be performed in parallel with a standard 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulphophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-caboxanilide-based biofilm susceptibility assay; a second, more sensitive protocol measures the AK activity present within the biofilm matrix; and a third procedure allows the direct visualization of lytic activity toward biofilms formed on catheter material. Amphotericin B and caspofungin, the two most effective anti-biofilm drugs currently used to treat fungal infections, both directly lyse planktonic C. albicans cells in vitro, leading to the release of AK into the culture medium. These studies serve to validate the AK-based lysis assay as a useful addition to the methods for the characterization of antifungal agents active toward biofilms and provide insights into the mode of action of amphotericin B and caspofungin against C. albicans biofilms.

  8. The Vibrio cholerae Pst2 phosphate transport system is upregulated in biofilms and contributes to biofilm-induced hyperinfectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudrak, Benjamin; Tamayo, Rita

    2012-05-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the deadly diarrheal disease cholera. As part of its life cycle, V. cholerae persists in marine environments, where it forms surface-attached communities commonly described as biofilms. Evidence indicates that these biofilms constitute the infectious form of the pathogen during outbreaks. Previous work has shown that biofilm-derived V. cholerae cells, even when fully dispersed from the biofilm matrix, are vastly more infectious than planktonic (free-living) cells. Here, we sought to identify factors that contribute to biofilm-induced hyperinfectivity in V. cholerae, and we present evidence for one aspect of the molecular basis of this phenotype. We identified proteins upregulated during growth in biofilms and determined their contributions to the hyperinfectivity phenotype. We found that PstS2, the periplasmic component of the Pst2 phosphate uptake system, was enriched in biofilms. Another gene in the pst2 locus was transcriptionally upregulated in biofilms. Using the infant mouse model, we found that mutation of two pst2 components resulted in impaired colonization. Importantly, deletion of the Pst2 inner membrane complex caused a greater colonization defect after growth in a biofilm compared to shaking culture. Based on these data, we propose that V. cholerae cells in biofilms upregulate the Pst2 system and therefore gain an advantage upon entry into the host. Further characterization of factors contributing to biofilm-induced hyperinfectivity in V. cholerae will improve our understanding of the transmission of the bacteria from natural aquatic habitats to the human host.

  9. The role of porous matrix in water flow regulation within a karst unsaturated zone: an integrated hydrogeophysical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrière, Simon D.; Chalikakis, Konstantinos; Danquigny, Charles; Davi, Hendrik; Mazzilli, Naomi; Ollivier, Chloé; Emblanch, Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Some portions of the porous rock matrix in the karst unsaturated zone (UZ) can contain large volumes of water and play a major role in water flow regulation. The essential results are presented of a local-scale study conducted in 2011 and 2012 above the Low Noise Underground Laboratory (LSBB - Laboratoire Souterrain à Bas Bruit) at Rustrel, southeastern France. Previous research revealed the geological structure and water-related features of the study site and illustrated the feasibility of specific hydrogeophysical measurements. In this study, the focus is on hydrodynamics at the seasonal and event timescales. Magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) measured a high water content (more than 10 %) in a large volume of rock. This large volume of water cannot be stored in fractures and conduits within the UZ. MRS was also used to measure the seasonal variation of water stored in the karst UZ. A process-based model was developed to simulate the effect of vegetation on groundwater recharge dynamics. In addition, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) monitoring was used to assess preferential water pathways during a rain event. This study demonstrates the major influence of water flow within the porous rock matrix on the UZ hydrogeological functioning at both the local (LSBB) and regional (Fontaine de Vaucluse) scales. By taking into account the role of the porous matrix in water flow regulation, these findings may significantly improve karst groundwater hydrodynamic modelling, exploitation, and sustainable management.

  10. The role of porous matrix in water flow regulation within a karst unsaturated zone: an integrated hydrogeophysical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrière, Simon D.; Chalikakis, Konstantinos; Danquigny, Charles; Davi, Hendrik; Mazzilli, Naomi; Ollivier, Chloé; Emblanch, Christophe

    2016-11-01

    Some portions of the porous rock matrix in the karst unsaturated zone (UZ) can contain large volumes of water and play a major role in water flow regulation. The essential results are presented of a local-scale study conducted in 2011 and 2012 above the Low Noise Underground Laboratory (LSBB - Laboratoire Souterrain à Bas Bruit) at Rustrel, southeastern France. Previous research revealed the geological structure and water-related features of the study site and illustrated the feasibility of specific hydrogeophysical measurements. In this study, the focus is on hydrodynamics at the seasonal and event timescales. Magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) measured a high water content (more than 10 %) in a large volume of rock. This large volume of water cannot be stored in fractures and conduits within the UZ. MRS was also used to measure the seasonal variation of water stored in the karst UZ. A process-based model was developed to simulate the effect of vegetation on groundwater recharge dynamics. In addition, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) monitoring was used to assess preferential water pathways during a rain event. This study demonstrates the major influence of water flow within the porous rock matrix on the UZ hydrogeological functioning at both the local (LSBB) and regional (Fontaine de Vaucluse) scales. By taking into account the role of the porous matrix in water flow regulation, these findings may significantly improve karst groundwater hydrodynamic modelling, exploitation, and sustainable management.

  11. Putative Role of β-1,3 Glucans in Candida albicans Biofilm Resistance▿

    OpenAIRE

    Nett, Jeniel; Lincoln, Leslie; Marchillo, Karen; Massey, Randall; Holoyda, Kathleen; Hoff, Brian; VanHandel, Michelle; Andes, David

    2006-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities, embedded in a polymeric matrix, growing attached to a surface. Nearly all device-associated infections involve growth in the biofilm life style. Biofilm communities have characteristic architecture and distinct phenotypic properties. The most clinically important phenotype involves extraordinary resistance to antimicrobial therapy, making biofilm infections very difficulty to cure without device removal. The current studies examine drug resistance in Candid...

  12. Transcriptional regulator PerA influences biofilm-associated, platelet binding, and metabolic gene expression in Enterococcus faecalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M Maddox

    Full Text Available Enterococcus faecalis is an opportunistic pathogen and a leading cause of nosocomial infections, traits facilitated by the ability to quickly acquire and transfer virulence determinants. A 150 kb pathogenicity island (PAI comprised of genes contributing to virulence is found in many enterococcal isolates and is known to undergo horizontal transfer. We have shown that the PAI-encoded transcriptional regulator PerA contributes to pathogenicity in the mouse peritonitis infection model. In this study, we used whole-genome microarrays to determine the PerA regulon. The PerA regulon is extensive, as transcriptional analysis showed 151 differentially regulated genes. Our findings reveal that PerA coordinately regulates genes important for metabolism, amino acid degradation, and pathogenicity. Further transcriptional analysis revealed that PerA is influenced by bicarbonate. Additionally, PerA influences the ability of E. faecalis to bind to human platelets. Our results suggest that PerA is a global transcriptional regulator that coordinately regulates genes responsible for enterococcal pathogenicity.

  13. Classical macrophage activation up-regulates several matrix metalloproteinases through mitogen activated protein kinases and nuclear factor-κB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chun Huang

    Full Text Available Remodelling of the extracellular matrix (ECM and cell surface by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs is an important function of monocytes and macrophages. Recent work has emphasised the diverse roles of classically and alternatively activated macrophages but the consequent regulation of MMPs and their inhibitors has not been studied comprehensively. Classical activation of macrophages derived in vitro from un-fractionated CD16(+/- or negatively-selected CD16(- macrophages up-regulated MMP-1, -3, -7, -10, -12, -14 and -25 and decreased TIMP-3 steady-state mRNA levels. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide, IL-1 and TNFα were more effective than interferonγ except for the effects on MMP-25, and TIMP-3. By contrast, alternative activation decreased MMP-2, -8 and -19 but increased MMP -11, -12, -25 and TIMP-3 steady-state mRNA levels. Up-regulation of MMPs during classical activation depended on mitogen activated protein kinases, phosphoinositide-3-kinase and inhibitor of κB kinase-2. Effects of interferonγ depended on janus kinase-2. Where investigated, similar effects were seen on protein concentrations and collagenase activity. Moreover, activity of MMP-1 and -10 co-localised with markers of classical activation in human atherosclerotic plaques in vivo. In conclusion, classical macrophage activation selectively up-regulates several MMPs in vitro and in vivo and down-regulates TIMP-3, whereas alternative activation up-regulates a distinct group of MMPs and TIMP-3. The signalling pathways defined here suggest targets for selective modulation of MMP activity.

  14. Biofilms in Infections of the Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo J. M. Bispo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to form biofilms in a variety of environments is a common trait of bacteria, and may represent one of the earliest defenses against predation. Biofilms are multicellular communities usually held together by a polymeric matrix, ranging from capsular material to cell lysate. In a structure that imposes diffusion limits, environmental microgradients arise to which individual bacteria adapt their physiologies, resulting in the gamut of physiological diversity. Additionally, the proximity of cells within the biofilm creates the opportunity for coordinated behaviors through cell–cell communication using diffusible signals, the most well documented being quorum sensing. Biofilms form on abiotic or biotic surfaces, and because of that are associated with a large proportion of human infections. Biofilm formation imposes a limitation on the uses and design of ocular devices, such as intraocular lenses, posterior contact lenses, scleral buckles, conjunctival plugs, lacrimal intubation devices and orbital implants. In the absence of abiotic materials, biofilms have been observed on the capsule, and in the corneal stroma. As the evidence for the involvement of microbial biofilms in many ocular infections has become compelling, developing new strategies to prevent their formation or to eradicate them at the site of infection, has become a priority.

  15. Matrix-Stiffness-Regulated Inverse Expression of Krüppel-Like Factor 5 and Krüppel-Like Factor 4 in the Pathogenesis of Renal Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wan-Chun; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Tang, Ming-Jer

    2015-09-01

    The proliferation of mouse proximal tubular epithelial cells in ex vivo culture depends on matrix stiffness. Combined analysis of the microarray and experimental data revealed that Krüppel-like factor (Klf)5 was the most up-regulated transcription factor accompanied by the down-regulation of Klf4 when cells were on stiff matrix. These changes were reversed by soft matrix via extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inactivation. Knockdown of Klf5 or forced expression of Klf4 inhibited stiff matrix-induced cell spreading and proliferation, suggesting that Klf5/Klf4 act as positive and negative regulators, respectively. Moreover, stiff matrix-activated ERK increased the protein level and nuclear translocation of mechanosensitive Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1), which is reported to prevent Klf5 degradation. Finally, in vivo model of unilateral ureteral obstruction revealed that matrix stiffness-regulated Klf5/Klf4 is related to the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis. In the dilated tubules of obstructed kidney, ERK/YAP1/Klf5/cyclin D1 axis was up-regulated and Klf4 was down-regulated. Inhibition of collagen crosslinking by lysyl oxidase inhibitor alleviated unilateral ureteral obstruction-induced tubular dilatation and proliferation, preserved Klf4, and suppressed the ERK/YAP1/Klf5/cyclin D1 axis. This study unravels a novel mechanism how matrix stiffness regulates cellular proliferation and highlights the importance of matrix stiffness-modulated Klf5/Klf4 in the regulation of renal physiologic functions and fibrosis progression.

  16. Functional bacterial amyloid increases Pseudomonas biofilm hydrophobicity and stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Vad, Brian Stougaard; Dueholm, Morten Simonsen

    2015-01-01

    The success of Pseudomonas species as opportunistic pathogens derives in great part from their ability to form stable biofilms that offer protection against chemical and mechanical attack. The extracellular matrix of biofilms contains numerous biomolecules, and it has recently been discovered...... that in Pseudomonas one of the components includes β-sheet rich amyloid fibrils (functional amyloid) produced by the fap operon. However, the role of the functional amyloid within the biofilm has not yet been investigated in detail. Here we investigate how the fap-based amyloid produced by Pseudomonas affects biofilm...

  17. Picroside Ⅱ down-regulates matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Li; Xinying Xu; Zhen Li; Yunliang Guo; Qin Li; Xiaodan Li; Zhen Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Studies have shown that Picroside Ⅱ attenuates inflammatory reactions following brain ischemia through the inhibition of the TLR-4-NF-κB signal transduction pathway,and ameliorates cerebral edema through the reduction of aquaporin-4 expression.Matrix metalloproteinase-9(MMP-9),located downstream of the TLR-4-NF-κB signal transduction pathway,can degrade the neurovascular matrix,damage the blood-brain barrier to induce cerebral edema,and directly result in neuronal apoptosis and brain injury.Therefore,the present study further observed MMP-9expression in the brain tissues of rats with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury following Picroside Ⅱtreatment.Results demonstrated that Picroside Ⅱ significantly reduced MMP-9 expression in ischemic brain tissues,as well as neuronal apoptosis and brain infarct volume,suggesting PicrosideⅡ exhibits neuroprotection by down-regulating MMP-9 expression and inhibiting cell apoptosis.

  18. Biofilms: The Stronghold of Legionella pneumophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mena Abdel-Nour

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Legionellosis is mostly caused by Legionella pneumophila and is defined as a severe respiratory illness with a case fatality rate ranging from 5% to 80%. L. pneumophila is ubiquitous in natural and anthropogenic water systems. L. pneumophila is transmitted by inhalation of contaminated aerosols produced by a variety of devices. While L. pneumophila replicates within environmental protozoa, colonization and persistence in its natural environment are also mediated by biofilm formation and colonization within multispecies microbial communities. There is now evidence that some legionellosis outbreaks are correlated with the presence of biofilms. Thus, preventing biofilm formation appears as one of the strategies to reduce water system contamination. However, we lack information about the chemical and biophysical conditions, as well as the molecular mechanisms that allow the production of biofilms by L. pneumophila. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of biofilm formation by L. pneumophila and the roles of other microbial species in L. pneumophila biofilm colonization. In addition, we discuss the protective roles of biofilms against current L. pneumophila sanitation strategies along with the initial data available on the regulation of L. pneumophila biofilm formation.

  19. Transferrin Impacts Bacillus thuringiensis Biofilm Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Garner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the impact of transferrin on Bacillus thuringiensis biofilms. Three commercial strains, an environmental strain (33679, the type strain (10792, and an isolate from a diseased insect (700872, were cultured in iron restricted minimal medium. All strains produced biofilm when grown in vinyl plates at 30°C. B. thuringiensis 33679 had a biofilm biomass more than twice the concentration exhibited by the other strains. The addition of transferrin resulted in slightly increased growth yields for 2 of the 3 strains tested, including 33679. In contrast, the addition of 50 μg/mL of transferrin resulted in an 80% decrease in biofilm levels for strain 33679. When the growth temperature was increased to 37°C, the addition of 50 μg/mL of transferrin increased culture turbidity for only strain 33679. Biofilm levels were again decreased in strain 33679 at 37°C. Growth of B. thuringiensis cultures in polystyrene resulted in a decrease in overall growth yields at 30°C, with biofilm levels significantly decreased for 33679 in the presence of transferrin. These findings demonstrate that transferrin impacts biofilm formation in select strains of B. thuringiensis. Identification of these differences in biofilm regulation may be beneficial in elucidating potential virulence mechanisms among the differing strains.

  20. Bacterial adhesion and biofilms on surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Trevor Roger Garrett; Manmohan Bhakoo; Zhibing Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion has become a significant problem in industry and in the domicile,and much research has been done for deeper understanding of the processes involved.A generic biological model of bacterial adhesion and population growth called the bacterial biofilm growth cycle,has been described and modified many times.The biofilm growth cycle encompasses bacterial adhesion at all levels,starting with the initial physical attraction of bacteria to a substrate,and ending with the eventual liberation of cell dusters from the biofilm matrix.When describing bacterial adhesion one is simply describing one or more stages of biofilm development,neglecting the fact that the population may not reach maturity.This article provides an overview of bacterial adhesion.cites examples of how bac-terial adhesion affects industry and summarises methods and instrumentation used to improve our understanding of the adhesive prop-erties of bacteria.

  1. Host intestinal signal-promoted biofilm dispersal induces Vibrio cholerae colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Amanda J; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae causes human infection through ingestion of contaminated food and water, leading to the devastating diarrheal disease cholera. V. cholerae forms matrix-encased aggregates, known as biofilms, in the native aquatic environment. While the formation of V. cholerae biofilms has been well studied, little is known about the dispersal from biofilms, particularly upon entry into the host. In this study, we found that the exposure of mature biofilms to physiologic levels of the bile salt taurocholate, a host signal for the virulence gene induction of V. cholerae, induces an increase in the number of detached cells with a concomitant decrease in biofilm mass. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs of biofilms exposed to taurocholate revealed an altered, perhaps degraded, appearance of the biofilm matrix. The inhibition of protein synthesis did not alter rates of detachment, suggesting that V. cholerae undergoes a passive dispersal. Cell-free media from taurocholate-exposed biofilms contains a larger amount of free polysaccharide, suggesting an abiotic degradation of biofilm matrix by taurocholate. Furthermore, we found that V. cholerae is only able to induce virulence in response to taurocholate after exit from the biofilm. Thus, we propose a model in which V. cholerae ingested as a biofilm has coopted the host-derived bile salt signal to detach from the biofilm and go on to activate virulence.

  2. Skip Regulates TGF-β1-Induced Extracellular Matrix Degrading Proteases Expression in Human PC-3 Prostate Cancer Cells

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    Victor Villar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine whether Ski-interacting protein (SKIP regulates TGF-β1-stimulated expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, and uPA Inhibitor (PAI-1 in the androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell model. Materials and Methods. PC-3 prostate cancer cell line was used. The role of SKIP was evaluated using synthetic small interference RNA (siRNA compounds. The expression of uPA, MMP-9, and PAI-1 was evaluated by zymography assays, RT-PCR, and promoter transactivation analysis. Results. In PC-3 cells TGF-β1 treatment stimulated uPA, PAI-1, and MMP-9 expressions. The knockdown of SKIP in PC-3 cells enhanced the basal level of uPA, and TGF-β1 treatment inhibited uPA production. Both PAI-1 and MMP-9 production levels were increased in response to TGF-β1. The ectopic expression of SKIP inhibited both TGF-β1-induced uPA and MMP-9 promoter transactivation, while PAI-1 promoter response to the factor was unaffected. Conclusions. SKIP regulates the expression of uPA, PAI-1, and MMP-9 stimulated by TGF-β1 in PC-3 cells. Thus, SKIP is implicated in the regulation of extracellular matrix degradation and can therefore be suggested as a novel therapeutic target in prostate cancer treatment.

  3. 3D Chlorine and Monochloramine Penetration and Nitrifying Biofilm Activity and Viability: Periodic Chlorine Switch Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofilm formation in drinking water distribution systems has been associated with water quality degradation and may result in non-compliance with existing regulations. United States water utilities report biofilm survival and regrowth despite disinfectant presence, and systems t...

  4. Enhanced uranium immobilization and reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cologgi, Dena L; Speers, Allison M; Bullard, Blair A; Kelly, Shelly D; Reguera, Gemma

    2014-11-01

    Biofilms formed by dissimilatory metal reducers are of interest to develop permeable biobarriers for the immobilization of soluble contaminants such as uranium. Here we show that biofilms of the model uranium-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens immobilized substantially more U(VI) than planktonic cells and did so for longer periods of time, reductively precipitating it to a mononuclear U(IV) phase involving carbon ligands. The biofilms also tolerated high and otherwise toxic concentrations (up to 5 mM) of uranium, consistent with a respiratory strategy that also protected the cells from uranium toxicity. The enhanced ability of the biofilms to immobilize uranium correlated only partially with the biofilm biomass and thickness and depended greatly on the area of the biofilm exposed to the soluble contaminant. In contrast, uranium reduction depended on the expression of Geobacter conductive pili and, to a lesser extent, on the presence of the c cytochrome OmcZ in the biofilm matrix. The results support a model in which the electroactive biofilm matrix immobilizes and reduces the uranium in the top stratum. This mechanism prevents the permeation and mineralization of uranium in the cell envelope, thereby preserving essential cellular functions and enhancing the catalytic capacity of Geobacter cells to reduce uranium. Hence, the biofilms provide cells with a physically and chemically protected environment for the sustained immobilization and reduction of uranium that is of interest for the development of improved strategies for the in situ bioremediation of environments impacted by uranium contamination.

  5. Prophage spontaneous activation promotes DNA release enhancing biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

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    Margarida Carrolo

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus is able to form biofilms in vivo and previous studies propose that pneumococcal biofilms play a relevant role both in colonization and infection. Additionally, pneumococci recovered from human infections are characterized by a high prevalence of lysogenic bacteriophages (phages residing quiescently in their host chromosome. We investigated a possible link between lysogeny and biofilm formation. Considering that extracellular DNA (eDNA is a key factor in the biofilm matrix, we reasoned that prophage spontaneous activation with the consequent bacterial host lysis could provide a source of eDNA, enhancing pneumococcal biofilm development. Monitoring biofilm growth of lysogenic and non-lysogenic pneumococcal strains indicated that phage-infected bacteria are more proficient at forming biofilms, that is their biofilms are characterized by a higher biomass and cell viability. The presence of phage particles throughout the lysogenic strains biofilm development implicated prophage spontaneous induction in this effect. Analysis of lysogens deficient for phage lysin and the bacterial major autolysin revealed that the absence of either lytic activity impaired biofilm development and the addition of DNA restored the ability of mutant strains to form robust biofilms. These findings establish that limited phage-mediated host lysis of a fraction of the bacterial population, due to spontaneous phage induction, constitutes an important source of eDNA for the S. pneumoniae biofilm matrix and that this localized release of eDNA favors biofilm formation by the remaining bacterial population.

  6. Class I to III histone deacetylases differentially regulate inflammation-induced matrix metalloproteinase 9 expression in primary amnion cells.

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    Poljak, Marin; Lim, Ratana; Barker, Gillian; Lappas, Martha

    2014-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9 plays an important role in the degradation of the extracellular matrix in fetal membranes, and pathological activation of MMP-9 can lead to preterm birth. In nongestational tissues, modulation of histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulates MMP-9 expression. The aim of this study was to determine whether class I to III HDACs regulate MMP-9 expression and activity in primary amnion cells. Class I and II HDAC regulation of MMP-9 was assessed using the general class I and II HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) trichostatin A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), the class I HDACi MS-275, and the class II HDACi MC1568. Class III HDAC regulation of MMP-9 was assessed using the SIRT1 activators resveratrol and SRT1720 as well as SIRT1 small interfering RNA (siRNA). Primary amnion epithelial cells were incubated with 1 ng/mL interleukin (IL) 1β in the absence or presence of 0.3 μmol/L TSA, 5 μmol/L SAHA, 2.5 μmol/L MS-275, 2.5 μmol/L MC1568, 50 μmol/L resveratrol, or 10 μmol/L SRT1720 for 20 hours. We found that the class I and II HDACi TSA and SAHA and the class II HDACi MC1568 significantly decreased IL-β-induced MMP-9 gene and pro-MMP-9 expression in primary amnion cells. There was, however, no effect of the class I HDACi MS-275 on IL-β-induced MMP-9 expression. On the other hand, inhibition of class III HDAC SIRT1 using siRNA significantly augmented IL-1β-induced MMP-9, and SIRT1 activation using resveratrol and SRT1720 inhibited IL-1β-induced MMP-9 expression. In summary, class I to III HDACs differentially regulate inflammation-induced MMP-9 expression in primary amnion cells.

  7. Extracellular matrix stiffness and composition jointly regulate the induction of malignant phenotypes in mammary epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Koshy, Sandeep T.; Branco da Cunha, Cristiana; Shin, Jae-Won; Verbeke, Catia S.; Allison, Kimberly H.; Mooney, David J.

    2014-10-01

    In vitro models of normal mammary epithelium have correlated increased extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness with malignant phenotypes. However, the role of increased stiffness in this transformation remains unclear because of difficulties in controlling ECM stiffness, composition and architecture independently. Here we demonstrate that interpenetrating networks of reconstituted basement membrane matrix and alginate can be used to modulate ECM stiffness independently of composition and architecture. We find that, in normal mammary epithelial cells, increasing ECM stiffness alone induces malignant phenotypes but that the effect is completely abrogated when accompanied by an increase in basement-membrane ligands. We also find that the combination of stiffness and composition is sensed through β4 integrin, Rac1, and the PI3K pathway, and suggest a mechanism in which an increase in ECM stiffness, without an increase in basement membrane ligands, prevents normal α6β4 integrin clustering into hemidesmosomes.

  8. Fur is a repressor of biofilm formation in Yersinia pestis.

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    Fengjun Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Yersinia pestis synthesizes the attached biofilms in the flea proventriculus, which is important for the transmission of this pathogen by fleas. The hmsHFRS operons is responsible for the synthesis of exopolysaccharide (the major component of biofilm matrix, which is activated by the signaling molecule 3', 5'-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP synthesized by the only two diguanylate cyclases HmsT, and YPO0449 (located in a putative operonYPO0450-0448. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The phenotypic assays indicated that the transcriptional regulator Fur inhibited the Y. pestis biofilm production in vitro and on nematode. Two distinct Fur box-like sequences were predicted within the promoter-proximal region of hmsT, suggesting that hmsT might be a direct Fur target. The subsequent primer extension, LacZ fusion, electrophoretic mobility shift, and DNase I footprinting assays disclosed that Fur specifically bound to the hmsT promoter-proximal region for repressing the hmsT transcription. In contrast, Fur had no regulatory effect on hmsHFRS and YPO0450-0448 at the transcriptional level. The detection of intracellular c-di-GMP levels revealed that Fur inhibited the c-di-GMP production. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Y. pestis Fur inhibits the c-di-GMP production through directly repressing the transcription of hmsT, and thus it acts as a repressor of biofilm formation. Since the relevant genetic contents for fur, hmsT, hmsHFRS, and YPO0450-0448 are extremely conserved between Y. pestis and typical Y. pseudotuberculosis, the above regulatory mechanisms can be applied to Y. pseudotuberculosis.

  9. Biofilm mediated decontamination of pollutants from the environment

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    Arindam Mitra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we highlight beneficial use of microbial biofilms in remediation of environmental pollutants by bioremediation. Bioremediation is an environment friendly, cost effective, sustainable technology that utilizes microbes to decontaminate and degrade a wide variety of pollutants into less harmful products. Relative to free-floating planktonic cells, microbes existing in biofilm mode are advantageous for bioremediation because of greater tolerance to pollutants, environmental stress and ability to degrade varied harsh pollutants via diverse catabolic pathways. In biofilm mode, microbes are immobilized in a self-synthesized matrix which offers protection from stress, contaminants and predatory protozoa. Contaminants ranging from heavy metals, petroleum, explosives, pesticides have been remediated using microbial consortia of biofilms. In the industry, biofilm based bioremediation is used to decontaminate polluted soil and groundwater. Here we discuss conventional and newer strategies utilizing biofilms in environmental remediation.

  10. Microscopic monitoring of extracellular pH in dental biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Garcia, Javier; Greve, Matilde

    pH in dental biofilm is a key virulence factor for the development of caries lesions. The complex three-dimensional architecture of dental biofilms leads to steep gradients of nutrients and metabolites, including organic acids, across the biofilm. For decades, measuring pH in dental biofilm has...... been limited to monitoring bulk pH with electrodes. Although pH microelectrodes with a better spatial resolution have been developed, they do not permit to monitor horizontal pH gradients in real-time. Quantitative fluorescent microscopic techniques, such as fluorescence lifetime imaging or pH...... ratiometry, can be employed to map the pH landscape in dental biofilm with more detail. However, when pH sensitive fluorescent probes are used to visualize pH in biofilms, it is crucial to differentiate between extracellular and intracellular pH. Intracellular microbial pH and pH in the extracellular matrix...

  11. Mechanics governs single-cell signaling and multi-cell robustness in biofilm infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Vernita

    In biofilms, bacteria and other microbes are embedded in extracellular polymers (EPS). Multiple types of EPS can be produced by a single bacterial strain - the reasons for this redundancy are not well-understood. Our work suggests that different polymers may confer distinct mechanical benefits. Our model organism is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic human pathogen that forms chronic biofilm infections associated with increased antibiotic resistance and evasion of the immune defense. Biofilms initiate when bacteria attach to a surface, sense the surface, and change their gene expression. Changes in gene expression are regulated by a chemical signal, cyclic-di-GMP. We find that one EPS material, called ``PEL,'' enhances surface sensing by increasing mechanical coupling of single bacteria to the surface. Measurements of bacterial motility suggest that PEL may increase frictional interactions between the surface and the bacteria. Consistent with this, we show that bacteria increase cyclic-di-GMP signaling in response to mechanical shear stress. Mechanosensing has long been known to be important to the function of cells in higher eukaryotes, but this is one of only a handful of studies showing that bacteria can sense and respond to mechanical forces. For the mature biofilm, the embedding polymer matrix can protect bacteria both chemically and mechanically. P. aeruginosa infections in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung often last for decades, ample time for the infecting strain(s) to evolve. Production of another EPS material, alginate, is well-known to tend to increase over time in CF infections. Alginate chemically protects biofilms, but also makes them softer and weaker. Recently, it is being increasingly recognized that bacteria in chronic CF infections also evolve to increase PSL production. We use oscillatory bulk rheology to determine the unique contributions of EPS materials to biofilm mechanics. Unlike alginate, increased PSL stiffens biofilms. Increasing both

  12. Role of Extracellular DNA during Biofilm Formation by Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Morten; Lappann, Martin; Knøchel, S

    2010-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that is capable of living in harsh environments. It is believed to do this by forming biofilms, which are surface-associated multicellular structures encased in a self-produced matrix. In this paper we show that in L. monocytogenes extracellular DNA...... (eDNA) may be the only central component of the biofilm matrix and that it is necessary for both initial attachment and early biofilm formation for 41 L. monocytogenes strains that were tested. DNase I treatment resulted in dispersal of biofilms, not only in microtiter tray assays but also in flow...... cell biofilm assays. However, it was also demonstrated that in a culture without eDNA, neither Listeria genomic DNA nor salmon sperm DNA by itself could restore the capacity to adhere. A search for additional necessary components revealed that peptidoglycan (PG), specifically N-acetylglucosamine (NAG...

  13. Diversification of gene expression during formation of static submerged biofilms by Escherichia coli

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    Olga Besharova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria primarily exist in nature as structured multicellular communities, so called biofilms. Biofilm formation is a highly regulated process that includes the transition from the motile planktonic to sessile biofilm lifestyle. Cellular differentiation within a biofilm is a commonly accepted concept but it remains largely unclear when, where and how exactly such differentiation arises. Here we used fluorescent transcriptional reporters to quantitatively analyze spatio-temporal expression patterns of several groups of genes during the formation of submerged Escherichia coli biofilms in an open static system. We first confirm that formation of such submerged biofilms as well as pellicles at the liquid-air interface requires the major matrix component, curli, and flagella-mediated motility. We further demonstrate that in this system, diversification of gene expression leads to emergence of at least three distinct subpopulations of E. coli, which differ in their levels of curli and flagella expression, and in the activity of the stationary phase sigma factor σS. Our study reveals mutually exclusive expression of curli fibers and flagella at the single cell level, with high curli levels being confined to dense cell aggregates/microcolonies and flagella expression showing an opposite expression pattern. Interestingly, despite the known σS-dependence of curli induction, there was only a partial correlation between the σS activity and curli expression, with subpopulations of cells having high σS activity but low curli expression and vice versa. Finally, consistent with different physiology of the observed subpopulations, we show striking differences between the growth rates of cells within and outside of aggregates.

  14. Diversification of Gene Expression during Formation of Static Submerged Biofilms by Escherichia coli

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    Besharova, Olga; Suchanek, Verena M.; Hartmann, Raimo; Drescher, Knut; Sourjik, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Many bacteria primarily exist in nature as structured multicellular communities, so called biofilms. Biofilm formation is a highly regulated process that includes the transition from the motile planktonic to sessile biofilm lifestyle. Cellular differentiation within a biofilm is a commonly accepted concept but it remains largely unclear when, where and how exactly such differentiation arises. Here we used fluorescent transcriptional reporters to quantitatively analyze spatio-temporal expression patterns of several groups of genes during the formation of submerged Escherichia coli biofilms in an open static system. We first confirm that formation of such submerged biofilms as well as pellicles at the liquid-air interface requires the major matrix component, curli, and flagella-mediated motility. We further demonstrate that in this system, diversification of gene expression leads to emergence of at least three distinct subpopulations of E. coli, which differ in their levels of curli and flagella expression, and in the activity of the stationary phase sigma factor σS. Our study reveals mutually exclusive expression of curli fibers and flagella at the single cell level, with high curli levels being confined to dense cell aggregates/microcolonies and flagella expression showing an opposite expression pattern. Interestingly, despite the known σS-dependence of curli induction, there was only a partial correlation between the σS activity and curli expression, with subpopulations of cells having high σS activity but low curli expression and vice versa. Finally, consistent with different physiology of the observed subpopulations, we show striking differences between the growth rates of cells within and outside of aggregates. PMID:27761132

  15. Implications of Biofilm Formation on Urological Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadieux, Peter A.; Wignall, Geoffrey R.; Carriveau, Rupp; Denstedt, John D.

    2008-09-01

    Despite millions of dollars and several decades of research targeted at their prevention and eradication, biofilm-associated infections remain the major cause of urological device failure. Numerous strategies have been aimed at improving device design, biomaterial composition, surface properties and drug delivery, but have been largely circumvented by microbes and their plethora of attachment, host evasion, antimicrobial resistance, and dissemination strategies. This is not entirely surprising since natural biofilm formation has been going on for millions of years and remains a major part of microorganism survival and evolution. Thus, the fact that biofilms develop on and in the biomaterials and tissues of humans is really an extension of this natural tendency and greatly explains why they are so difficult for us to combat. Firstly, biofilm structure and composition inherently provide a protective environment for microorganisms, shielding them from the shear stress of urine flow, immune cell attack and some antimicrobials. Secondly, many biofilm organisms enter a metabolically dormant state that renders them tolerant to those antibiotics and host factors able to penetrate the biofilm matrix. Lastly, the majority of organisms that cause biofilm-associated urinary tract infections originate from our own oral cavity, skin, gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts and therefore have already adapted to many of our host defenses. Ultimately, while biofilms continue to hold an advantage with respect to recurrent infections and biomaterial usage within the urinary tract, significant progress has been made in understanding these dynamic microbial communities and novel approaches offer promise for their prevention and eradication. These include novel device designs, antimicrobials, anti-adhesive coatings, biodegradable polymers and biofilm-disrupting compounds and therapies.

  16. Biofilm Formation of Pasteurella Multocida on Bentonite Clay

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    Ramachandranpillai Rajagopal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Biofilms are structural communities of bacterial cells enshrined in a self produced polymeric matrix. The studies on biofilm formation of Pasteurella multocida have become imperative since it is a respiratory pathogen and its biofilm mode could possibly be one of its virulence factors for survival inside a host. The present study describes a biofilm assay for P. multocida on inert hydrophilic material called bentonite clay.Materials and methods: The potential of the organism to form in vitro biofilm was assessed by growing the organism under nutrient restriction along with the inert substrate bentonite clay, which will provide a surface for attachment. For quantification of biofilm, plate count by the spread plate method was employed. Capsule production of the attached bacteria was demonstrated by light microscopic examination following Maneval staining and capsular polysaccharide estimation was done using standard procedures.Results and Conclusion: The biofilm formation peaked on the third day of incubation (1.54 ×106 cfu/g of bentonite clay while the planktonic cells were found to be at a maximum on day one post inoculation (8.10 ×108 cfu/ml of the broth. Maneval staining of late logarithmic phase biofilm cultures revealed large aggregates of bacterial cells, bacteria appearing as chains or as a meshwork. The capsular polysaccharide estimation of biofilm cells revealed a 3.25 times increase over the planktonic bacteria. The biofilm cells cultured on solid media also produced some exclusive colony morphotypes

  17. Anti-Biofilm Compounds Derived from Marine Sponges

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    Christian Melander

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial biofilms are surface-attached communities of microorganisms that are protected by an extracellular matrix of biomolecules. In the biofilm state, bacteria are significantly more resistant to external assault, including attack by antibiotics. In their native environment, bacterial biofilms underpin costly biofouling that wreaks havoc on shipping, utilities, and offshore industry. Within a host environment, they are insensitive to antiseptics and basic host immune responses. It is estimated that up to 80% of all microbial infections are biofilm-based. Biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are of particular concern, since once the device is colonized, infection is almost impossible to eliminate. Given the prominence of biofilms in infectious diseases, there is a notable effort towards developing small, synthetically available molecules that will modulate bacterial biofilm development and maintenance. Here, we highlight the development of small molecules that inhibit and/or disperse bacterial biofilms specifically through non-microbicidal mechanisms. Importantly, we discuss several sets of compounds derived from marine sponges that we are developing in our labs to address the persistent biofilm problem. We will discuss: discovery/synthesis of natural products and their analogues—including our marine sponge-derived compounds and initial adjuvant activity and toxicological screening of our novel anti-biofilm compounds.

  18. Esp-independent biofilm formation by Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristich, Christopher J; Li, Yung-Hua; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G; Dunny, Gary M

    2004-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a gram-positive opportunistic pathogen known to form biofilms in vitro. In addition, this organism is often isolated from biofilms on the surfaces of various indwelling medical devices. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating biofilm formation in these clinical isolates are largely unknown. Recent work has suggested that a specific cell surface protein (Esp) of E. faecalis is critical for biofilm formation by this organism. However, in the same study, esp-deficient strains of E. faecalis were found to be capable of biofilm formation. To test the hypothesis that Esp is dispensable for biofilm formation by E. faecalis, we used microtiter plate assays and a chemostat-based biofilm fermentor assay to examine biofilm formation by genetically well-defined, non-Esp-expressing strains. Our results demonstrate that in vitro biofilm formation occurs, not only in the absence of esp, but also in the absence of the entire pathogenicity island that harbors the esp coding sequence. Using scanning electron microscopy to evaluate biofilms of E. faecalis OG1RF grown in the fermentor system, biofilm development was observed to progress through multiple stages, including attachment of individual cells to the substratum, microcolony formation, and maturation into complex multilayered structures apparently containing water channels. Microtiter plate biofilm analyses indicated that biofilm formation or maintenance was modulated by environmental conditions. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that expression of a secreted metalloprotease, GelE, enhances biofilm formation by E. faecalis. In summary, E. faecalis forms complex biofilms by a process that is sensitive to environmental conditions and does not require the Esp surface protein.

  19. Characterization of temporal protein production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southey-Pillig, Christopher J; Davies, David G; Sauer, Karin

    2005-12-01

    Phenotypic and genetic evidence supporting the notion of biofilm formation as a developmental process is growing. In the present work, we provide additional support for this hypothesis by identifying the onset of accumulation of biofilm-stage specific proteins during Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm maturation and by tracking the abundance of these proteins in planktonic and three biofilm developmental stages. The onset of protein production was found to correlate with the progression of biofilms in developmental stages. Protein identification revealed that proteins with similar function grouped within similar protein abundance patterns. Metabolic and housekeeping proteins were found to group within a pattern separate from virulence, antibiotic resistance, and quorum-sensing-related proteins. The latter were produced in a progressive manner, indicating that attendant features that are characteristic of biofilms such as antibiotic resistance and virulence may be part of the biofilm developmental process. Mutations in genes for selected proteins from several protein production patterns were made, and the impact of these mutations on biofilm development was evaluated. The proteins cytochrome c oxidase, a probable chemotaxis transducer, a two-component response regulator, and MexH were produced only in mature and late-stage biofilms. Mutations in the genes encoding these proteins did not confer defects in growth, initial attachment, early biofilm formation, or twitching motility but were observed to arrest biofilm development at the stage of cell cluster formation we call the maturation-1 stage. The results indicated that expression of theses genes was required for the progression of biofilms into three-dimensional structures on abiotic surfaces and the completion of the biofilm developmental cycle. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis confirmed the detectable change in expression of the respective genes ccoO, PA4101, and PA4208. We propose a possible mechanism for the

  20. Biofilm Fixed Film Systems

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    Dipesh Das

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The work reviewed here was published between 2008 and 2010 and describes research that involved aerobic and anoxic biofilm treatment of water pollutants. Biofilm denitrification systems are covered when appropriate. References catalogued here are divided on the basis of fundamental research area or reactor types. Fundamental research into biofilms is presented in two sections, Biofilm Measurement and Characterization and Growth and Modeling. The reactor types covered are: trickling filters, rotating biological contactors, fluidized bed bioreactors, submerged bed biofilm reactors, biological granular activated carbon, membrane bioreactors, and immobilized cell reactors. Innovative reactors, not easily classified, are then presented, followed by a section on biofilms on sand, soil and sediment.

  1. Exercise-induced regulation of matrix metalloproteinases in the skeletal muscle of subjects with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheede-Bergdahl, Celena; Bergdahl, Andreas; Schjerling, Peter

    2014-01-01

    is maintained in the skeletal muscle of patients with uncomplicated type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Subjects [12 T2DM, 9 healthy control subjects (CON)] underwent 8 weeks of physical training. Messenger RNA (mRNA) was measured at baseline, during and after 8 weeks of training. Protein was measured pre- and post......-training. At baseline, there were no effects of diabetes on MMP or TIMP mRNA or protein. mRNA and protein response to training was similar in both groups, except active MMP-2 protein was elevated post training in T2DM only. Our results indicate that exercise-induced stimulation of MMPs is preserved in skeletal muscle......Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMP) play a critical role during vascular remodelling, in both health and disease. Impaired MMP regulation is associated with many diabetes-related complications. This study examined whether exercise-induced regulation of MMPs...

  2. Yes-associated protein regulates the growth of human non-small cell lung cancer in response to matrix stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yonggang; Zhong, Weiliang; Ma, Ge; Zhang, Baoxiang; Tian, Hui

    2015-06-01

    The Yes‑associated protein (YAP) transcriptional coactivator is recognized as a crucial regulator of human cancer. However, its involvement in human non‑small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in response to physical cues remains unclear. In this study, substrates with different rigidity were generated in order to evaluate the role of YAP, and its upstream regulators in the Hippo pathway, in the regulation of growth of an NSCLC cell line within particular environments. It was shown that the expression of the YAP protein in SPCA-1 NSCLC cells was significantly increased when cultured on a stiff substrate compared to a soft substrate. However, the expression of phospho‑YAP protein and large tumor suppressor kinase 1 (LATS1) were markedly decreased after culturing on the stiff substrate. Phosphorylation of YAP by LATS1 leads to cytoplasmic retention of YAP, which inhibits its function as a nuclear transcription coactivator. The study also found that the stiff substrate promoted the growth of NSCLC cells in vitro, and an increase in the transcription levels of Survivin, connective tissue growth factor, amphiregulin and Ki67, as well as a decrease in the expression level of YAP in the cytoplasm, and adecrease in p-YAP. In conclusion, the findings showed that the stiffness of the subcellular matrix altered the behavior of NSCLC cells, and that YAP regulated the growth of NSCLC cells in response to matrix stiffness, thereby suggesting a role for the Hippo‑YAP pathway in the response of NSCLC cell growth to specific microenvironments.

  3. Role of Rhizobium endoglucanase CelC2 in cellulose biosynthesis and biofilm formation on plant roots and abiotic surfaces

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    Robledo M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The synthesis of cellulose is among the most important but poorly understood biochemical processes, especially in bacteria, due to its complexity and high degree of regulation. In this study, we analyzed both the production of cellulose by all known members of the Rhizobiaceae and the diversity of Rhizobium celABC operon predicted to be involved in cellulose biosynthesis. We also investigated the involvement in cellulose production and biofilm formation of celC gene encoding an endoglucanase (CelC2 that is required for canonical symbiotic root hair infection by Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii. Results ANU843 celC mutants lacking (ANU843ΔC2 or overproducing cellulase (ANU843C2+ produced greatly increased or reduced amounts of external cellulose micro fibrils, respectively. Calcofluor-stained cellulose micro fibrils were considerably longer when formed by ANU843ΔC2 bacteria rather than by the wild-type strain, in correlation with a significant increase in their flocculation in batch culture. In contrast, neither calcofluor-stained extracellular micro fibrils nor flocculation was detectable in ANU843C2+ cells. To clarify the role of cellulose synthesis in Rhizobium cell aggregation and attachment, we analyzed the ability of these mutants to produce biofilms on different surfaces. Alteration of wild-type CelC2 levels resulted in a reduced ability of bacteria to form biofilms both in abiotic surfaces and in planta. Conclusions Our results support a key role of the CelC2 cellulase in cellulose biosynthesis by modulating the length of the cellulose fibrils that mediate firm adhesion among Rhizobium bacteria leading to biofilm formation. Rhizobium cellulose is an essential component of the biofilm polysaccharidic matrix architecture and either an excess or a defect of this “building material” seem to collapse the biofilm structure. These results position cellulose hydrolytic enzymes as excellent anti-biofilm candidates.

  4. Matrix Metalloproteinases as Regulators of Vein Structure and Function: Implications in Chronic Venous Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacColl, Elisabeth; Khalil, Raouf A

    2015-12-01

    Lower-extremity veins have efficient wall structure and function and competent valves that permit upward movement of deoxygenated blood toward the heart against hydrostatic venous pressure. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an important role in maintaining vein wall structure and function. MMPs are zinc-binding endopeptidases secreted as inactive pro-MMPs by fibroblasts, vascular smooth muscle (VSM), and leukocytes. Pro-MMPs are activated by various activators including other MMPs and proteinases. MMPs cause degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins such as collagen and elastin, and could have additional effects on the endothelium, as well as VSM cell migration, proliferation, Ca(2+) signaling, and contraction. Increased lower-extremity hydrostatic venous pressure is thought to induce hypoxia-inducible factors and other MMP inducers/activators such as extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, prostanoids, chymase, and hormones, leading to increased MMP expression/activity, ECM degradation, VSM relaxation, and venous dilation. Leukocyte infiltration and inflammation of the vein wall cause further increases in MMPs, vein wall dilation, valve degradation, and different clinical stages of chronic venous disease (CVD), including varicose veins (VVs). VVs are characterized by ECM imbalance, incompetent valves, venous reflux, wall dilation, and tortuosity. VVs often show increased MMP levels, but may show no change or decreased levels, depending on the VV region (atrophic regions with little ECM versus hypertrophic regions with abundant ECM) and MMP form (inactive pro-MMP versus active MMP). Management of VVs includes compression stockings, venotonics, and surgical obliteration or removal. Because these approaches do not treat the causes of VVs, alternative methods are being developed. In addition to endogenous tissue inhibitors of MMPs, synthetic MMP inhibitors have been developed, and their effects in the treatment of VVs need to be examined.

  5. Substratum Stiffness and Latrunculin B Regulate Matrix Gene and Protein Expression in Human Trabecular Meshwork Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomasy, Sara M.; Wood, Joshua A.; Kass, Philip H.; Murphy, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the impact of substratum stiffness and latrunculin-B (Lat-B), on the expression of several matrix proteins that are associated with glaucoma. Methods. Human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cells were cultured on hydrogels possessing stiffness values mimicking those found in normal (5 kPa) and glaucomatous meshworks (75 kPa), or tissue culture polystyrene (TCP; >1 GPa). Cells were treated with 2.0 μM Lat-B in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or DMSO alone. RT-PCR was used to determine the impact of substratum stiffness and/or Lat-B treatment on the expression of secreted protein, acidic, cysteine rich (SPARC), myocilin, angiopoietin-like factor (ANGPTL)-7, and transglutaminase (TGM)-2. Immunofluorescence was used to assess changes in protein expression. Results. SPARC and myocilin mRNA expression were dramatically increased on the 75 kPa hydrogels and decreased on the 5 kPa hydrogels in comparison to TCP. In contrast, ANGPTL-7 mRNA and TGM-2 mRNA was decreased on the 75 kPa and 5 kPa hydrogels, respectively, in comparison with TCP. Treatment with Lat-B dramatically downregulated both SPARC and myocilin on 75 kPa hydrogels. In contrast, cells grown on TCP produced greater or similar amounts of SPARC and myocilin mRNA after Lat-B treatment. SPARC and myocilin protein expression paralleled changes in mRNA expression. Conclusions. Substratum stiffness impacts HTM matrix gene and protein expression and modulates the impact of Lat-B treatment on the expression of these matrix proteins. Integrating the use of biologically relevant substratum stiffness in the conduction of in vitro experiments gives important insights into HTM cell response to drugs that may more accurately predict responses observed in vivo. PMID:22247475

  6. Characteristics of biofilm attaching to carriers in moving bed biofilm reactor used to treat vitamin C wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-bing; Xu, Ke; Wang, Zhao; Ding, Li-li; Ren, Hong-qiang

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate characteristics of biofilm attaching firmly to carriers in the moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) used for vitamin C wastewater treatment, experiments were undertaken with instrumental analysis methods. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs of MBBR biofilms revealed that there were rod-shaped microbes and cocci in the biofilm, and microbes were embedded within medium substances and the biofilm matrix adhered firmly to carriers, leading to the formation of a smooth compacted surface at the base of the biofilm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis revealed that extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) layer surrounded cell, sequestered inorganics to form a mixed structure, which ensured firm attachment of the biofilm to the carrier. X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments and thermogravimetry analysis revealed that (i) the biofilm contained many inorganic substances, about 70.5%, and the inorganic substances contained multiple classes of inorganic with a high boiling point; (ii) inorganic elements such as calcium and phosphorous were selectively absorbed and accumulated in the biofilm as insoluble compounds with amorphous phases, rendering the biofilm highly resistant to detachment. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed carbohydrates were the main EPS.

  7. Drinking water biofilm cohesiveness changes under chlorination or hydrodynamic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, L; Bertrand, I; Abe, Y; Angel, E; Block, J C; Skali-Lami, S; Francius, G

    2014-05-15

    Attempts at removal of drinking water biofilms rely on various preventive and curative strategies such as nutrient reduction in drinking water, disinfection or water flushing, which have demonstrated limited efficiency. The main reason for these failures is the cohesiveness of the biofilm driven by the physico-chemical properties of its exopolymeric matrix (EPS). Effective cleaning procedures should break up the matrix and/or change the elastic properties of bacterial biofilms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the change in the cohesive strength of two-month-old drinking water biofilms under increasing hydrodynamic shear stress τw (from ∼0.2 to ∼10 Pa) and shock chlorination (applied concentration at T0: 10 mg Cl2/L; 60 min contact time). Biofilm erosion (cell loss per unit surface area) and cohesiveness (changes in the detachment shear stress and cluster volumes measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM)) were studied. When rapidly increasing the hydrodynamic constraint, biofilm removal was found to be dependent on a dual process of erosion and coalescence of the biofilm clusters. Indeed, 56% of the biofilm cells were removed with, concomitantly, a decrease in the number of the 50-300 μm(3) clusters and an increase in the number of the smaller (i.e., 600 μm(3)) ones. Moreover, AFM evidenced the strengthening of the biofilm structure along with the doubling of the number of contact points, NC, per cluster volume unit following the hydrodynamic disturbance. This suggests that the compactness of the biofilm exopolymers increases with hydrodynamic stress. Shock chlorination removed cells (-75%) from the biofilm while reducing the volume of biofilm clusters. Oxidation stress resulted in a decrease in the cohesive strength profile of the remaining drinking water biofilms linked to a reduction in the number of contact points within the biofilm network structure in particular for the largest biofilm cluster volumes (>200 μm(3)). Changes in the cohesive

  8. Estrogen receptor beta participate in the regulation of metabolizm of extracellular matrix in estrogen alpha negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Kuźmicki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The biology of breast cancer is closely releted to sex steroid hormones. Estrogen receptor beta is overexpressed in around 70% breast cancer cases, referrd to as "ER positive". Estrogens bind to estrogen receptor and stimulate the transcription of genes involved in control of cell proliferation. Moreover, estrogens may induce growth factors and components of extracellular matrix and interact with them in a complex manner. Extracellular matrix and integrins play an important role in cell functions and their aberrant expressions are implicated in breast cancer development, invasion and metastasis. ER beta is certainly associated with more differentiated tumors, while evidence of role of ER beta is controversial. The highly invasive breast cancer ER beta negative cell line MDA-MB 231 can be the model of exam the role of ER beta in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the role of activation of ER beta on the metabolism of the extracellular matrix and the expression of beta-1 integrin in the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB 231. The cells were exposed on the estradiol, tamoxifen, raloxifen and genisteina in dose dependent concentrations. To determine the relative rate of collagen syntesis we measured the time-dependent reduction of collagen-bound radioactivity after pulse-chase labeling with [3 H] prolina by Peterkofsky methods. The expression of beta-1 integrin was determine by Western blot analysis. The activity of MMP2 and 9 were measured using gelatin zymography with an image analysis system. Our data suggest on the role of estrogen receptor beta on the metabolism of extracellular matrix in the breast cancer line MDA - MB 231. Estradiol and SERMs regulate the expression of ECM proteins: collagen, integrins and enhance activity of metaloproteinases 2 and 9.

  9. Estrogen receptor beta participate in the regulation of metabolizm of extracellular matrix in estrogen alpha negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leśniewska, Monika; Miltyk, Wojciech; Swiatecka, Jolanta; Tomaszewska, Małgorzata; Kuźmicki, Mariusz; Pałka, Jerzy; Wołczyński, Sławomir

    2009-01-01

    The biology of breast cancer is closely releted to sex steroid hormones. Estrogen receptor beta is overexpressed in around 70% breast cancer cases, referrd to as "ER positive". Estrogens bind to estrogen receptor and stimulate the transcription of genes involved in control of cell proliferation. Moreover, estrogens may induce growth factors and components of extracellular matrix and interact with them in a complex manner. Extracellular matrix and integrins play an important role in cell functions and their aberrant expressions are implicated in breast cancer development, invasion and metastasis. ER beta is certainly associated with more differentiated tumors, while evidence of role of ER beta is controversial. The highly invasive breast cancer ER beta negative cell line MDA-MB 231 can be the model of exam the role of ER beta in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the role of activation of ER beta on the metabolism of the extracellular matrix and the expression of beta-1 integrin in the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB 231. The cells were exposed on the estradiol, tamoxifen, raloxifen and genisteina in dose dependent concentrations. To determine the relative rate of collagen syntesis we measured the time-dependent reduction of collagen-bound radioactivity after pulse-chase labeling with [3 H] prolina by Peterkofsky methods. The expression of beta-1 integrin was determine by Western blot analysis. The activity of MMP2 and 9 were measured using gelatin zymography with an image analysis system. Our data suggest on the role of estrogen receptor beta on the metabolism of extracellular matrix in the breast cancer line MDA - MB 231. Estradiol and SERMs regulate the expression of ECM proteins: collagen, integrins and enhance activity of metaloproteinases 2 and 9.

  10. Exposure of E. coli to DNA-methylating agents impairs biofilm formation and invasion of eukaryotic cells via down regulation of the N-acetylneuraminate lyase NanA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela eDi Pasquale

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation damage can be induced by endogenous and exogenous chemical agents, which has led every living organism to develop suitable response strategies. We investigated protein expression profiles of Escherichia coli upon exposure to the alkylating agent methyl-methane sulfonate (MMS by differential proteomics. Quantitative proteomic data showed a massive downregulation of enzymes belonging to the glycolytic pathway and fatty acids degradation, strongly suggesting a decrease of energy production. A strong reduction in the expression of the N-acetylneuraminate lyases (NanA involved in the sialic acid metabolism was also observed. Using a null NanA mutant and DANA, a substrate analogue acting as competitive inhibitor, we demonstrated that down regulation of NanA affects biofilm formation and adhesion properties of E. coli MV1161. Exposure to alkylating agents also decreased biofilm formation and bacterial adhesion to Caco-2 eukaryotic cell line by the adherent invasive E. coli (AIEC strain LF82. Our data showed that methylation stress impairs E. coli adhesion properties and suggest a possible role of NanA in biofilm formation and bacteria host interactions.

  11. Exposure of E. coli to DNA-Methylating Agents Impairs Biofilm Formation and Invasion of Eukaryotic Cells via Down Regulation of the N-Acetylneuraminate Lyase NanA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pasquale, Pamela; Caterino, Marianna; Di Somma, Angela; Squillace, Marta; Rossi, Elio; Landini, Paolo; Iebba, Valerio; Schippa, Serena; Papa, Rosanna; Selan, Laura; Artini, Marco; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Palamara, Annateresa; Duilio, Angela

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation damage can be induced by endogenous and exogenous chemical agents, which has led every living organism to develop suitable response strategies. We investigated protein expression profiles of Escherichia coli upon exposure to the alkylating agent methyl-methane sulfonate (MMS) by differential proteomics. Quantitative proteomic data showed a massive downregulation of enzymes belonging to the glycolytic pathway and fatty acids degradation, strongly suggesting a decrease of energy production. A strong reduction in the expression of the N-acetylneuraminate lyases (NanA) involved in the sialic acid metabolism was also observed. Using a null NanA mutant and DANA, a substrate analog acting as competitive inhibitor, we demonstrated that down regulation of NanA affects biofilm formation and adhesion properties of E. coli MV1161. Exposure to alkylating agents also decreased biofilm formation and bacterial adhesion to Caco-2 eukaryotic cell line by the adherent invasive E. coli (AIEC) strain LF82. Our data showed that methylation stress impairs E. coli adhesion properties and suggest a possible role of NanA in biofilm formation and bacteria host interactions.

  12. Exposure of E. coli to DNA-Methylating Agents Impairs Biofilm Formation and Invasion of Eukaryotic Cells via Down Regulation of the N-Acetylneuraminate Lyase NanA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pasquale, Pamela; Caterino, Marianna; Di Somma, Angela; Squillace, Marta; Rossi, Elio; Landini, Paolo; Iebba, Valerio; Schippa, Serena; Papa, Rosanna; Selan, Laura; Artini, Marco; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Duilio, Angela

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation damage can be induced by endogenous and exogenous chemical agents, which has led every living organism to develop suitable response strategies. We investigated protein expression profiles of Escherichia coli upon exposure to the alkylating agent methyl-methane sulfonate (MMS) by differential proteomics. Quantitative proteomic data showed a massive downregulation of enzymes belonging to the glycolytic pathway and fatty acids degradation, strongly suggesting a decrease of energy production. A strong reduction in the expression of the N-acetylneuraminate lyases (NanA) involved in the sialic acid metabolism was also observed. Using a null NanA mutant and DANA, a substrate analog acting as competitive inhibitor, we demonstrated that down regulation of NanA affects biofilm formation and adhesion properties of E. coli MV1161. Exposure to alkylating agents also decreased biofilm formation and bacterial adhesion to Caco-2 eukaryotic cell line by the adherent invasive E. coli (AIEC) strain LF82. Our data showed that methylation stress impairs E. coli adhesion properties and suggest a possible role of NanA in biofilm formation and bacteria host interactions. PMID:26904018

  13. Mycobacterium avium Possesses Extracellular DNA that Contributes to Biofilm Formation, Structural Integrity, and Tolerance to Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Sasha J; Babrak, Lmar M; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis is an opportunistic pathogen that is associated with biofilm-related infections of the respiratory tract and is difficult to treat. In recent years, extracellular DNA (eDNA) has been found to be a major component of bacterial biofilms, including many pathogens involved in biofilm-associated infections. To date, eDNA has not been described as a component of mycobacterial biofilms. In this study, we identified and characterized eDNA in a high biofilm-producing strain of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH). In addition, we surveyed for presence of eDNA in various MAH strains and other nontuberculous mycobacteria. Biofilms of MAH A5 (high biofilm-producing strain) and MAH 104 (reference strain) were established at 22°C and 37°C on abiotic surfaces. Acellular biofilm matrix and supernatant from MAH A5 7 day-old biofilms both possess abundant eDNA, however very little eDNA was found in MAH 104 biofilms. A survey of MAH clinical isolates and other clinically relevant nontuberculous mycobacterial species revealed many species and strains that also produce eDNA. RAPD analysis demonstrated that eDNA resembles genomic DNA. Treatment with DNase I reduced the biomass of MAH A5 biofilms when added upon biofilm formation or to an already established biofilm both on abiotic surfaces and on top of human pharyngeal epithelial cells. Furthermore, co-treatment of an established biofilm with DNase 1 and either moxifloxacin or clarithromycin significantly increased the susceptibility of the bacteria within the biofilm to these clinically used antimicrobials. Collectively, our results describe an additional matrix component of mycobacterial biofilms and a potential new target to help treat biofilm-associated nontuberculous mycobacterial infections.

  14. Matrix-Dependent Regulation of AKT in Hepsin-Overexpressing PC3 Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M Wittig-Blaich

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The serine-protease hepsin is one of the most prominently overexpressed genes in human prostate carcinoma. Forced expression of the enzyme in mice prostates is associated with matrix degradation, invasive growth, and prostate cancer progression. Conversely, hepsin overexpression in metastatic prostate cancer cell lines was reported to induce cell cycle arrest and reduction of invasive growth in vitro. We used a system for doxycycline (dox-inducible target gene expression in metastasis-derived PC3 cells to analyze the effects of hepsin in a quantitative manner. Loss of viability and adhesion correlated with hepsin expression levels during anchorage-dependent but not anchorage-independent growth. Full expression of hepsin led to cell death and detachment and was specifically associated with reduced phosphorylation of AKT at Ser473, which was restored by growth on matrix derived from RWPE1 normal prostatic epithelial cells. In the chorioallantoic membrane xenograft model, hepsin overexpression in PC3 cells reduced the viability of tumors but did not suppress invasive growth. The data presented here provide evidence that elevated levels of hepsin interfere with cell adhesion and viability in the background of prostate cancer as well as other tissue types, the details of which depend on the microenvironment provided. Our findings suggest that overexpression of the enzyme in prostate carcinogenesis must be spatially and temporally restricted for the efficient development of tumors and metastases.

  15. Matrix-Dependent Regulation of AKT in Hepsin-Overexpressing PC3 Prostate Cancer Cells12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittig-Blaich, Stephanie M; Kacprzyk, Lukasz A; Eismann, Thorsten; Bewerunge-Hudler, Melanie; Kruse, Petra; Winkler, Eva; Strauss, Wolfgang S L; Hibst, Raimund; Steiner, Rudolf; Schrader, Mark; Mertens, Daniel; Sültmann, Holger; Wittig, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    The serine-protease hepsin is one of the most prominently overexpressed genes in human prostate carcinoma. Forced expression of the enzyme in mice prostates is associated with matrix degradation, invasive growth, and prostate cancer progression. Conversely, hepsin overexpression in metastatic prostate cancer cell lines was reported to induce cell cycle arrest and reduction of invasive growth in vitro. We used a system for doxycycline (dox)-inducible target gene expression in metastasis-derived PC3 cells to analyze the effects of hepsin in a quantitative manner. Loss of viability and adhesion correlated with hepsin expression levels during anchorage-dependent but not anchorage-independent growth. Full expression of hepsin led to cell death and detachment and was specifically associated with reduced phosphorylation of AKT at Ser473, which was restored by growth on matrix derived from RWPE1 normal prostatic epithelial cells. In the chorioallantoic membrane xenograft model, hepsin overexpression in PC3 cells reduced the viability of tumors but did not suppress invasive growth. The data presented here provide evidence that elevated levels of hepsin interfere with cell adhesion and viability in the background of prostate cancer as well as other tissue types, the details of which depend on the microenvironment provided. Our findings suggest that overexpression of the enzyme in prostate carcinogenesis must be spatially and temporally restricted for the efficient development of tumors and metastases. PMID:21750652

  16. From a thin film model for passive suspensions towards the description of osmotic biofilm spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Trinschek, Sarah; Thiele, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are ubiquitous macro-colonies of bacteria that develop at various interfaces (solid-liquid, solid-gas or liquid-gas). The formation of biofilms starts with the attachment of individual bacteria to an interface, where they proliferate and produce a slimy polymeric matrix - two processes that result in colony growth and spreading. Recent experiments on the growth of biofilms on agar substrates under air have shown that for certain bacterial strains, the production of the extracellular matrix and the resulting osmotic influx of nutrient-rich water from the agar into the biofilm are more crucial for the spreading behaviour of a biofilm than the motility of individual bacteria. We present a model which describes the biofilm evolution and the advancing biofilm edge for this spreading mechanism. The model is based on a gradient dynamics formulation for thin films of biologically passive liquid mixtures and suspensions, supplemented by bioactive processes which play a decisive role in the osmotic spreading o...

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten; Hultqvist, Louise Dahl; Givskov, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Studies of biopsies from infectious sites, explanted tissue and medical devises have provided evidence that biofilms are the underlying cause of a variety of tissue-associated and implant-associated recalcitrant human infections. With a need for novel anti-biofilm treatment strategies, research...... in biofilm infection microbiology, biofilm formation mechanisms and biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance has become an important area in microbiology. Substantial knowledge about biofilm formation mechanisms, biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance and immune evasion mechanisms has been obtained...... through work with biofilms grown in in vitro experimental setups, and the relevance of this information in the context of chronic infections is being investigated by the use of animal models of infection. Because our current in vitro experimental setups and animal models have limitations, new advanced...

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exhibits Deficient Biofilm Formation in the Absence of Class II and III Ribonucleotide Reductases Due to Hindered Anaerobic Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Anna; Pedraz, Lucas; Astola, Josep; Torrents, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lung infections by the ubiquitous and extremely adaptable opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa correlate with the formation of a biofilm, where bacteria grow in association with an extracellular matrix and display a wide range of changes in gene expression and metabolism. This leads to increased resistance to physical stress and antibiotic therapies, while enhancing cell-to-cell communication. Oxygen diffusion through the complex biofilm structure generates an oxygen concentration gradient, leading to the appearance of anaerobic microenvironments. Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) are a family of highly sophisticated enzymes responsible for the synthesis of the deoxyribonucleotides, and they constitute the only de novo pathway for the formation of the building blocks needed for DNA synthesis and repair. P. aeruginosa is one of the few bacteria encoding all three known RNR classes (Ia, II, and III). Class Ia RNRs are oxygen dependent, class II are oxygen independent, and class III are oxygen sensitive. A tight control of RNR activity is essential for anaerobic growth and therefore for biofilm development. In this work we explored the role of the different RNR classes in biofilm formation under aerobic and anaerobic initial conditions and using static and continuous-flow biofilm models. We demonstrated the importance of class II and III RNR for proper cell division in biofilm development and maturation. We also determined that these classes are transcriptionally induced during biofilm formation and under anaerobic conditions. The molecular mechanism of their anaerobic regulation was also studied, finding that the Anr/Dnr system is responsible for class II RNR induction. These data can be integrated with previous knowledge about biofilms in a model where these structures are understood as a set of layers determined by oxygen concentration and contain cells with different RNR expression profiles, bringing us a step closer to the understanding of this

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits deficient biofilm formation in the absence of class II and III ribonucleotide reductases due to hindered anaerobic growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eCrespo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lung infections by the ubiquitous and extremely adaptable opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa correlate with the formation of a biofilm, where bacteria grow in association with an extracellular matrix and display a wide range of changes in gene expression and metabolism. This leads to increased resistance to physical stress and antibiotic therapies, while enhancing cell-to-cell communication. Oxygen diffusion through the complex biofilm structure generates an oxygen concentration gradient, leading to the appearance of anaerobic microenvironments.Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs are a family of highly sophisticated enzymes responsible for the synthesis of the deoxyribonucleotides, and they constitute the only de novo pathway for the formation of the building blocks needed for DNA synthesis and repair. P. aeruginosa is one of the few bacteria encoding all three known RNR classes (Ia, II and III. Class Ia RNRs are oxygen dependent, class II are oxygen independent, and class III are oxygen sensitive. A tight control of RNR activity is essential for anaerobic growth and therefore for biofilm development.In this work we explored the role of the different RNR classes in biofilm formation under aerobic and anaerobic initial conditions and using static and continuous-flow biofilm models. We demonstrated the importance of class II and III RNR for proper cell division in biofilm development and maturation. We also determined that these classes are transcriptionally induced during biofilm formation and under anaerobic conditions. The molecular mechanism of their anaerobic regulation was also studied, finding that the Anr/Dnr system is responsible for class II RNR induction. These data can be integrated with previous knowledge about biofilms in a model where these structures are understood as a set of layers determined by oxygen concentration and contain cells with different RNR expression profiles, bringing us a step closer to the

  20. Role of the nuclease of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in dispersal of organisms from biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Christine; Chande, Aroon; Gakhar, Lokesh; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Jurcisek, Joseph A; Ketterer, Margaret; Shao, Jian; Gotoh, Kenji; Foster, Eric; Hunt, Jason; O'Brien, Erin; Apicella, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) forms biofilms in the middle ear during human infection. The biofilm matrix of NTHI contains extracellular DNA. We show that NTHI possesses a potent nuclease, which is a homolog of the thermonuclease of Staphylococcus aureus. Using a biofilm dispersal assay, studies showed a biofilm dispersal pattern in the parent strain, no evidence of dispersal in the nuclease mutant, and a partial return of dispersion in the complemented mutant. Quantitative PCR of mRNA from biofilms from a 24-h continuous flow system demonstrated a significantly increased expression of the nuclease from planktonic organisms compared to those in the biofilm phase of growth (P < 0.042). Microscopic analysis of biofilms grown in vitro showed that in the nuclease mutant the nucleic acid matrix was increased compared to the wild-type and complemented strains. Organisms were typically found in large aggregates, unlike the wild-type and complement biofilms in which the organisms were evenly dispersed throughout the biofilm. At 48 h, the majority of the organisms in the mutant biofilm were dead. The nuclease mutant formed a biofilm in the chinchilla model of otitis media and demonstrated a propensity to also form similar large aggregates of organisms. These studies indicate that NTHI nuclease is involved in biofilm remodeling and organism dispersal.

  1. Alternating Current Influences Anaerobic Electroactive Biofilm Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Zhou, Lean; Lu, Lu; Lobo, Fernanda Leite; Li, Nan; Wang, Heming; Park, Jaedo; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2016-09-06

    Alternating current (AC) is known to inactivate microbial growth in suspension, but how AC influences anaerobic biofilm activities has not been systematically investigated. Using a Geobacter dominated anaerobic biofilm growing on the electrodes of microbial electrochemical reactors, we found that high frequency AC ranging from 1 MHz to 1 kHz (amplitude of 5 V, 30 min) showed only temporary inhibition to the biofilm activity. However, lower frequency (100 Hz, 1.2 or 5 V) treatment led to 47 ± 19% permanent decrease in limiting current on the same biofilm, which is attributed to the action of electrohydrodynamic force that caused biofilm damage and loss of intercellular electron transfer network. Confocal microscopy images show such inactivation mainly occurred at the interface between the biofilm and the electrode. Reducing the frequency further to 1 Hz led to water electrolysis, which generated gas bubbles that flushed all attached cells out of the electrode. These findings provide new references on understanding and regulating biofilm growth, which has broader implications in biofouling control, anaerobic waste treatment, energy and product recovery, and general understanding of microbial ecology and physiology.

  2. Matrix metalloproteinases 15 and 19 are stromal regulators of colorectal cancer development from the early stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, Paola; Mariani, Francesco; Marzona, Laura; Benincasa, Marta; Ponz de Leon, Maurizio; Palumbo, Carla; Roncucci, Luca

    2012-07-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been well characterized for their ability to degrade extracellular matrix proteins and, thus, they have been studied to elucidate their involvement in both tumor development and progression. In the present study, attention was focused on MMP-15 and MMP-19, two less known members of the MMP family. The expression profile of MMP-15 and -19 was assayed in samples of normal colorectal mucosa, microadenomas and cancer using confocal analysis, western blotting and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Both qRT-PCR and western blotting showed that MMP-15 and MMP-19 appeared to be upregulated during colorectal tumorigenesis, with different expression patterns: MMP-15 expression level increases from normal mucosa to microadenomas, with a reduced level in cancer with respect to microadenomas; the semiquantitative immunofluorescence analysis showed a stromal localization of this protein in the early phases of neoplastic transformation. Increasing amount of MMP-19 mRNA and protein levels were observed in the progression of colonic lesions; MMP-19 staining increased in the normal mucosa-microadenoma-carcinoma sequence. Such different expression patterns, are probably due to the different roles played in colorectal tumorigenesis by these two molecules. Conflicting data on the role of these proteins in tumor progression have been reported, thus, an improved understanding of the biological roles of MMPs, in particular the lesser known members such as MMP-15 and 19, in colorectal cancer may lead to a re-evaluation of the use of MMP inhibitors and suggests the need of integrated translational studies on MMP expression patterns.

  3. Escherichia coli biofilms: Accepting the therapeutic challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trupti Bajpai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary tract infections (UTI′s are a major public health concern globally. Recurrent UTI′s that are predominantly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli′s forms biofilm that is an intracellular, structured bacterial community, enclosed in a self-produced matrix, adherent to an inert, or living surface. Biofilm physiology is characterized by increased tolerance to stress, antibiotics, and immunological defenses, which is at the origin of their resilience in most medical and industrial settings. Materials and Methods: The present prospective study was carried out from December 2013 to May 2014 in the Department of Microbiology of a Teaching Tertiary Care hospital located in central India. A total of 100 consecutive, nonrepetitive E. coli isolates were subjected to biofilm formation study by Christensen′s tube adherence method. All the isolates were also subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method in accordance with the Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute 2013 guidelines. Results and Discussion: Out of the 100 E. coli isolates studied, 62 (62% were positive for biofilm formation. High percentage of resistance was detected in isolates among the male inpatient group. Overall drug resistance was found to be very high among both biofilm as well as nonbiofilm forming isolates indicating excessive drug resistance among both community and hospital organisms. Conclusion: A greater understanding of the nature of biofilm organisms in chronic UTI′s would help in the development of novel and more effective treatments for these problematic diseases.

  4. Biofilms: A microbial home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandki, Rita; Banthia, Priyank; Banthia, Ruchi

    2011-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are mainly implicated in etiopathogenesis of caries and periodontal disease. Owing to its properties, these pose great challenges. Continuous and regular disruption of these biofilms is imperative for prevention and management of oral diseases. This essay provides a detailed insight into properties, mechanisms of etiopathogenesis, detection and removal of these microbial biofilms. PMID:21976832

  5. Biofilms: A microbial home

    OpenAIRE

    Chandki, Rita; Banthia, Priyank; Banthia, Ruchi

    2011-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are mainly implicated in etiopathogenesis of caries and periodontal disease. Owing to its properties, these pose great challenges. Continuous and regular disruption of these biofilms is imperative for prevention and management of oral diseases. This essay provides a detailed insight into properties, mechanisms of etiopathogenesis, detection and removal of these microbial biofilms.

  6. The Biofilm Challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Maria; Alhede, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The concept of biofilms has emerged in the clinical setting during the last decade. Infections involving biofilms have been documented in all parts of the human body, and it is currently believed that the presence of biofilm-forming bacteria is equivalent to chronic infection. A quick Pubmed search...

  7. Characterization of Pleurotus ostreatus biofilms by using the calgary biofilm device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesciaroli, Lorena; Petruccioli, Maurizio; Fedi, Stefano; Firrincieli, Andrea; Federici, Federico; D'Annibale, Alessandro

    2013-10-01

    The adequacy of the Calgary biofilm device, often referred to as the MBEC system, as a high-throughput approach to the production and subsequent characterization of Pleurotus ostreatus biofilms was assessed. The hydroxyapatite-coating of pegs was necessary to enable biofilm attachment, and the standardization of vegetative inocula ensured a uniform distribution of P. ostreatus biofilms, which is necessary for high-throughput evaluations of several antimicrobials and exposure conditions. Scanning electron microscopy showed surface-associated growth, the occurrence of a complex aggregated growth organized in multilayers or hyphal bundles, and the encasement of hyphae within an extracellular matrix (ECM), the extent of which increased with time. Chemical analyses showed that biofilms differed from free-floating cultures for their higher contents of total sugars (TS) and ECM, with the latter being mainly composed of TS and, to a lesser extent, protein. Confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis of 4-day-old biofilms showed the presence of interspersed interstitial voids and water channels in the mycelial network, the density and compactness of which increased after a 7-day incubation, with the novel occurrence of ECM aggregates with an α-glucan moiety. In 4- and 7-day-old biofilms, tolerance to cadmium was increased by factors of 3.2 and 11.1, respectively, compared to coeval free-floating counterparts.

  8. Disturbance of the bacterial cell wall specifically interferes with biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Tabitha; Oppenheimer-Shaanan, Yaara; Savidor, Alon; Bloom-Ackermann, Zohar; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana

    2015-12-01

    In nature, bacteria communicate via chemical cues and establish complex communities referred to as biofilms, wherein cells are held together by an extracellular matrix. Much research is focusing on small molecules that manipulate and prevent biofilm assembly by modifying cellular signalling pathways. However, the bacterial cell envelope, presenting the interface between bacterial cells and their surroundings, is largely overlooked. In our study, we identified specific targets within the biosynthesis pathways of the different cell wall components (peptidoglycan, wall teichoic acids and teichuronic acids) hampering biofilm formation and the anchoring of the extracellular matrix with a minimal effect on planktonic growth. In addition, we provide convincing evidence that biofilm hampering by transglycosylation inhibitors and D-Leucine triggers a highly specific response without changing the overall protein levels within the biofilm cells or the overall levels of the extracellular matrix components. The presented results emphasize the central role of the Gram-positive cell wall in biofilm development, resistance and sustainment.

  9. Biofilms, a new approach to the microbiology of dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Cate, Jacob M

    2006-09-01

    Dental plaque has the properties of a biofilm, similar to other biofilms found in the body and the environment. Modern molecular biological techniques have identified about 1000 different bacterial species in the dental biofilm, twice as many as can be cultured. Oral biofilms are very heterogeneous in structure. Dense mushroom-like structures originate from the enamel surface, interspersed with bacteria-free channels used as diffusion pathways. The channels are probably filled with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) matrix produced by the bacteria. Bacteria in biofilms communicate through signaling molecules, and use this "quorum-sensing" system to optimize their virulence factors and survival. Bacteria in a biofilm have a physiology different from that of planktonic cells. They generally live under nutrient limitation and often in a dormant state. Such "sleepy" bacteria respond differently to antibiotics and antimicrobials, because these agents were generally selected in experiments with metabolically active bacteria. This is one of the explanations as to why antibiotics and antimicrobials are not as successful in the clinic as could be expected from laboratory studies. In addition, it has been found that many therapeutic agents bind to the biofilm EPS matrix before they even reach the bacteria, and are thereby inactivated. Taken together, these fundings highlight why the study of bacteria in the oral cavity is now taken on by studying the biofilms rather than individual species.

  10. Incoherencies at the regulation of the constitutional matrix; Incoerencias na regulamentacao da matriz constitucional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This paper shows the incoherencies existent in the brazilian national legislation in the section of electric power enterprises attributes. The regulation of the article number 175 of the Brazilian Federal Constitution, which related the private capitals participation in the public utilities concession was very controversial. This paper also shows the contents of the many Law Projects proposed by the brazilian parliaments in order to clear this aspect of the legislation 3 figs.

  11. Defining the role of mesenchymal stromal cells on the regulation of matrix metalloproteinases in skeletal muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sassoli, Chiara; Nosi, Daniele; Tani, Alessia; Chellini, Flaminia [Dept. of Experimental and Clinical Medicine—Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla, 3, 50134, Florence (Italy); Mazzanti, Benedetta [Dept. of Experimental and Clinical Medicine—Section of Haematology, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla, 3, 50134, Florence (Italy); Quercioli, Franco [CNR-National Institute of Optics (INO), Largo Enrico Fermi 6, 50125 Arcetri-Florence (Italy); Zecchi-Orlandini, Sandra [Dept. of Experimental and Clinical Medicine—Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla, 3, 50134, Florence (Italy); Formigli, Lucia, E-mail: formigli@unifi.it [Dept. of Experimental and Clinical Medicine—Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla, 3, 50134, Florence (Italy)

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies indicate that mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) transplantation improves healing of injured and diseased skeletal muscle, although the mechanisms of benefit are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated whether MSCs and/or their trophic factors were able to regulate matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity in different cells of the muscle tissue. MSCs in co-culture with C2C12 cells or their conditioned medium (MSC-CM) up-regulated MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and function in the myoblastic cells; these effects were concomitant with the down-regulation of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1 and -2 and with increased cell motility. In the single muscle fiber experiments, MSC-CM administration increased MMP-2/9 expression in Pax-7{sup +} satellite cells and stimulated their mobilization, differentiation and fusion. The anti-fibrotic properties of MSC-CM involved also the regulation of MMPs by skeletal fibroblasts and the inhibition of their differentiation into myofibroblasts. The treatment with SB-3CT, a potent MMP inhibitor, prevented in these cells, the decrease of α-smooth actin and type-I collagen expression induced by MSC-CM, suggesting that MSC-CM could attenuate the fibrogenic response through mechanisms mediated by MMPs. Our results indicate that growth factors and cytokines released by these cells may modulate the fibrotic response and improve the endogenous mechanisms of muscle repair/regeneration. - Highlights: • MSC-CM contains paracrine factors that up-regulate MMP expression and function in different skeletal muscle cells. • MSC-CM promotes myoblast and satellite cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. • MSC-CM negatively interferes with fibroblast-myoblast transition in primary skeletal fibroblasts. • Paracrine factors from MSCs modulate the fibrotic response and improve the endogenous mechanisms of muscle regeneration.

  12. A Novel Role for Matrix Metalloproteinases In Regulating Mammary Stem Cell Function via the Wnt Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessenbrock, Kai; Dijkgraaf, Gerrit J. P.; Lawson, Devon A.; Littlepage, Laurie E.; Shahi, Payam; Pieper, Ursula; Werb, Zena

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The microenvironment provides cues that control the behavior of epithelial stem and progenitor cells. Here, we identify matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) as a novel regulator of Wnt signaling and mammary stem cell (MaSC) activity. We show that MMP3 overexpression promotes hyperplastic epithelial growth, surprisingly, in a non-proteolytic manner via its hemopexin (HPX) domain. We demonstrate that MMP3-HPX specifically binds and inactivates Wnt5b, a non-canonical Wnt ligand that inhibits canonical Wnt signaling and mammary epithelial outgrowth in vivo. Indeed, transplants overexpressing MMP3 display increased canonical Wnt signaling, demonstrating that MMP3 is an extracellular regulator of the Wnt signaling pathway. MMP3-deficient mice exhibit decreased MaSC populations and diminished mammary reconstituting activity, while MMP3 overexpression elevates MaSC function indicating that MMP3 is necessary for the maintenance of MaSCs. Our study reveals a novel mechanism by a microenvironmental protease that regulates Wnt signaling and impacts adult epithelial stem cell function. PMID:23871604

  13. Role of Microvascular Tone and Extracellular Matrix Contraction in the Regulation of Interstitial Fluid: Implications for Aortic Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallat, Ziad; Tedgui, Alain; Henrion, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    The pathophysiology of aortic dissection is poorly understood, and its risk is resistant to medical treatment. Most studies have focused on a proposed pathogenic role of transforming growth factor-β in Marfan disease and related thoracic aortic aneurysms and aortic dissections. However, clinical testing of this concept using angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists to block transforming growth factor-β signaling fell short of promise. Genetic mutations that predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and aortic dissections affect components of the extracellular matrix and proteins involved in cellular force generation. Thus, a role for dysfunctional mechanosensing in abnormal aortic wall remodeling is emerging. However, how abnormal mechanosensing leads to aortic dissection remains a mystery. Here, we review current knowledge about the regulation of interstitial fluid dynamics and myogenic tone and propose that alteration in contractile force reduces vascular tone in the microcirculation (here, aortic vasa vasorum) and leads to elevations of blood flow, transmural pressure, and fluid flux into the surrounding aortic media. Furthermore, reduced contractile force in medial smooth muscle cells coupled with alteration of structural components of the extracellular matrix limits extracellular matrix contraction, further promoting the formation of intramural edema, a critical step in the initiation of aortic dissection. The concept is supported by several pathophysiological and clinical observations. A direct implication of this concept is that drugs that lower blood pressure and limit interstitial fluid accumulation while preserving or increasing microvascular tone would limit the risk of dissection. In contrast, drugs that substantially lower microvascular tone would be ineffective or may accelerate the disease and precipitate aortic dissection.

  14. Matrix Producing Cells in Chronic Kidney Disease: Origin, Regulation, and Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramann, Rafael; Dirocco, Derek P; Maarouf, Omar H; Humphreys, Benjamin D

    2013-12-01

    Chronic injury to the kidney causes kidney fibrosis with irreversible loss of functional renal parenchyma and leads to the clinical syndromes of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Regardless of the type of initial injury, kidney disease progression follows the same pathophysiologic processes characterized by interstitial fibrosis, capillary rarefaction and tubular atrophy. Myofibroblasts play a pivotal role in fibrosis by driving excessive extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. Targeting these cells in order to prevent the progression of CKD is a promising therapeutic strategy, however, the cellular source of these cells is still controversial. In recent years, a growing amount of evidence points to resident mesenchymal cells such as pericytes and perivascular fibroblasts, which form extensive networks around the renal vasculature, as major contributors to the pool of myofibroblasts in renal fibrogenesis. Identifying the cellular origin of myofibroblasts and the key regulatory pathways that drive myofibroblast proliferation and transdifferentiation as well as capillary rarefaction is the first step to developing novel anti-fibrotic therapeutics to slow or even reverse CKD progression and ultimately reduce the prevalence of ESRD. This review will summarize recent findings concerning the cellular source of myofibroblasts and highlight recent discoveries concerning the key regulatory signaling pathways that drive their expansion and progression in CKD.

  15. CD44 alternative splicing in gastric cancer cells is regulated by culture dimensionality and matrix stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco da Cunha, Cristiana; Klumpers, Darinka D; Koshy, Sandeep T; Weaver, James C; Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Seruca, Raquel; Carneiro, Fátima; Granja, Pedro L; Mooney, David J

    2016-08-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) cultures often fail to mimic key architectural and physical features of the tumor microenvironment. Advances in biomaterial engineering allow the design of three-dimensional (3D) cultures within hydrogels that mimic important tumor-like features, unraveling cancer cell behaviors that would not have been observed in traditional 2D plastic surfaces. This study determined how 3D cultures impact CD44 alternative splicing in gastric cancer (GC) cells. In 3D cultures, GC cells lost expression of the standard CD44 isoform (CD44s), while gaining CD44 variant 6 (CD44v6) expression. This splicing switch was reversible, accelerated by nutrient shortage and delayed at lower initial cell densities, suggesting an environmental stress-induced response. It was further shown to be dependent on the hydrogel matrix mechanical properties and accompanied by the upregulation of genes involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), metabolism and angiogenesis. The 3D cultures reported here revealed the same CD44 alternative splicing pattern previously observed in human premalignant and malignant gastric lesions. These findings indicate that fundamental features of 3D cultures - such as soluble factors diffusion and mechanical cues - influence CD44 expression in GC cells. Moreover, this study provides a new model system to study CD44 dysfunction, whose role in cancer has been in the spotlight for decades.

  16. Mechanosensitive microRNA-181b Regulates Aortic Valve Endothelial Matrix Degradation by Targeting TIMP3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Jack M; Fernandez Esmerats, Joan; Khambouneheuang, Lucky; Kumar, Sandeep; Simmons, Rachel; Jo, Hanjoong

    2017-02-24

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a major cause of morbidity in the aging population, but the underlying mechanisms of its progression remain poorly understood. Aortic valve calcification preferentially occurs on the fibrosa, which is subjected to disturbed flow. The side-specific progression of the disease is characterized by inflammation, calcific lesions, and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. Here, we explored the role of mechanosensitive microRNA-181b and its downstream targets in human aortic valve endothelial cells (HAVECs). Mechanistically, miR-181b is upregulated in OS and fibrosa, and it targets TIMP3, SIRT1, and GATA6, correlated with increased gelatinase/MMP activity. Overexpression of miR-181b led to decreased TIMP3 and exacerbated MMP activity as shown by gelatinase assay, and miR-181b inhibition decreased gelatinase activity through the repression of TIMP3 levels. Luciferase assay showed specific binding of miR-181b to the TIMP3 gene. Overexpression of miR-181b in HAVECs subjected to either LS or OS increased MMP activity, and miR-181b inhibition abrogated shear-sensitive MMP activity. These studies suggest that targeting this shear-dependent miRNA may provide a novel noninvasive treatment for CAVD.

  17. Differential effects of planktonic and biofilm MRSA on human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirker, Kelly R; James, Garth A; Fleckman, Philip; Olerud, John E; Stewart, Philip S

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria colonizing chronic wounds often exist as biofilms, yet their role in chronic wound pathogenesis remains unclear. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms induce apoptosis in dermal keratinocytes, and given that chronic wound biofilms also colonize dermal tissue, it is important to investigate the effects of bacterial biofilms on dermal fibroblasts. The effects of a predominant wound pathogen, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, on normal, human, dermal fibroblasts were examined in vitro. Cell-culture medium was conditioned with equivalent numbers of either planktonic or biofilm methicillin-resistant S. aureus and then fed to fibroblast cultures. Fibroblast response was evaluated using scratch, viability, and apoptosis assays. The results suggested that fibroblasts experience the same fate when exposed to the soluble products of either planktonic or biofilm methicillin-resistant S. aureus, namely limited migration followed by death. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays demonstrated that fibroblast production of cytokines, growth factors, and proteases were differentially affected by planktonic and biofilm-conditioned medium. Planktonic-conditioned medium induced more interleukin-6, interleukin-8, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor-β1, heparin-bound epidermal growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase-1, and metalloproteinase-3 production in fibroblasts than the biofilm-conditioned medium. Biofilm-conditioned medium induced more tumor necrosis factor-α production in fibroblasts compared with planktonic-conditioned medium, and suppressed metalloproteinase-3 production compared with controls.

  18. In vitro study of biofilm growth on biologic prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellows, Charles; Smith, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Biologic prosthetics are increasingly used for the repair of abdominal wall hernia defects but can become infected as a result of peri- or early post-operative bacterial contamination. Data evaluating biofilm formation on biologic prosthetics is lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different biologic prosthetics on the growth behavior of two different bacterial species and their ability to form biofilms. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or Pseudomrnonas aeruginosa were incubated on disks of two biologic prosthetics-human acellular dermis (ADM), and porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS). The bacteria were allowed to attach to the prosthetics and propagate into mature biofilms for 24 hours at 370C. Images of biofilms were obtained using confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The number of viable cells and the biofilm biomass were quantified by colony forming units (CFUs) and crystal violet staining respectively. Analysis of variance was performed to compare the mean values for the different prosthetics. Each biologic matrix had a distinct surface characteristic. SEM visualized mature biofilms characterized by highly organized multi-cellular structures on surface of both biologic prosthetics. Quantification of bacterial growth over time showed that ADM had the lowest CFUs and biofilm biomass at 24 hours post-inoculation compared to SIS for both bacterial strains. MRSA and P. aeruginosa can form mature biofilms on biologic prosthetics but the relative abundance of the biofilm varies on different prosthetic constructs. Biologic material composition and manufacturing methods may influence bacterial adherence.

  19. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of oxygen in dental biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritsen, Hans C.; de Grauw, Cees J.

    2000-12-01

    Dental biofilm consists of micro-colonies of bacteria embedded in a matrix of polysaccharides and salivary proteins. pH and oxygen concentration are of great importance in dental biofilm. Both can be measured using fluorescence techniques. The imaging of dental biofilm is complicated by the thickness of the biofilms that can be up to several hundred micrometers thick. Here, we employed a combination of two-photon excitation microscopy with fluorescence lifetime imaging to quantify the oxygen concentration in dental biofilm. Collisional quenching of fluorescent probes by molecular oxygen leads to a reduction of the fluorescence lifetime of the probe. We employed this mechanism to measure the oxygen concentration distribution in dental biofilm by means of fluorescence lifetime imaging. Here, TRIS Ruthenium chloride hydrate was used as an oxygen probe. A calibration procedure on buffers was use to measure the lifetime response of this Ruthenium probe. The results are in agreement with the Stern-Volmer equation. A linear relation was found between the ratio of the unquenched and the quenched lifetime and the oxygen concentration. The biofilm fluorescence lifetime imaging results show a strong oxygen gradient at the buffer - biofilm interface and the average oxygen concentration in the biofilm amounted to 50 μM.

  20. Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 Biofilms Inhibit the Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fang; Yi, Li; Yu, Ningwei; Wang, Guangyu; Ma, Zhe; Lin, Huixing; Fan, Hongjie

    2017-01-01

    Invasive infections caused by Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2) has emerged as a clinical problem in recent years. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are an important mechanism for the trapping and killing of pathogens that are resistant to phagocytosis. Biofilm formation can protect bacteria from being killed by phagocytes. Until now, there have only been a few studies that focused on the interactions between bacterial biofilms and NETs. SS2 in both a biofilm state and a planktonic cell state were incubated with phagocytes and NETs, and bacterial survival was assessed. DNase I and cytochalasin B were used to degrade NET DNA or suppress phagocytosis, respectively. Extracellular DNA was stained with impermeable fluorescent dye to quantify NET formation. Biofilm formation increased up to 6-fold in the presence of neutrophils, and biofilms were identified in murine tissue. Both planktonic and biofilm cells induced neutrophils chemotaxis to the infection site, with neutrophils increasing by 85.1 and 73.8%, respectively. The bacteria in biofilms were not phagocytized. The bactericidal efficacy of NETs on the biofilms and planktonic cells were equal; however, the biofilm extracellular matrix can inhibit NET release. Although biofilms inhibit NETs release, NETs appear to be an important mechanism to eliminate SS2 biofilms. This knowledge advances the understanding of biofilms and may aid in the development of treatments for persistent infections with a biofilm component. PMID:28373968

  1. Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus isolates from skin and soft tissue infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiecinski, Jakub; Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Jin, Tao

    2015-05-01

    Many diseases caused by Staphylococcus aureus are associated with biofilm formation. However, the ability of S. aureus isolates from skin and soft tissue infections to form biofilms has not yet been investigated. We tested 160 isolates from patients with various skin infections for biofilm-forming capacity in different growth media. All the isolates formed biofilms, the extent of which depended on the type of growth medium. The thickest biofilms were formed when both plasma and glucose were present in the broth; in this case, S. aureus incorporated host fibrin into the biofilm's matrix. There were no differences in the biofilm formation between isolates from different types of skin infections, except for a particularly good biofilm formation by isolates from diabetic wounds and a weaker biofilm formation by isolates from impetigo. In conclusion, biofilm formation is a universal behavior of S. aureus isolates from skin infections. In some cases, such as in diabetic wounds, a particularly strong biofilm formation most likely contributes to the chronic and recurrent character of the infection. Additionally, as S. aureus apparently uses host fibrin as part of the biofilm structure, we suggest that plasma should be included more frequently in in vitro biofilm studies.

  2. Proteolytic regulation of synaptic plasticity in the mouse primary visual cortex: analysis of matrix metalloproteinase 9 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Emily A; Russo, Amanda S; Jackson, Cory D; Lamantia, Cassandra E; Majewska, Ania K

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is known to play important roles in regulating neuronal recovery from injury. The ECM can also impact physiological synaptic plasticity, although this process is less well understood. To understand the impact of the ECM on synaptic function and remodeling in vivo, we examined ECM composition and proteolysis in a well-established model of experience-dependent plasticity in the visual cortex. We describe a rapid change in ECM protein composition during Ocular Dominance Plasticity (ODP) in adolescent mice, and a loss of ECM remodeling in mice that lack the extracellular protease, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9). Loss of MMP9 also attenuated functional ODP following monocular deprivation (MD) and reduced excitatory synapse density and spine density in sensory cortex. While we observed no change in the morphology of existing dendritic spines, spine dynamics were altered, and MMP9 knock-out (KO) mice showed increased turnover of dendritic spines over a period of 2 days. We also analyzed the effects of MMP9 loss on microglia, as these cells are involved in extracellular remodeling and have been recently shown to be important for synaptic plasticity. MMP9 KO mice exhibited very limited changes in microglial morphology. Ultrastructural analysis, however, showed that the extracellular space surrounding microglia was increased, with concomitant increases in microglial inclusions, suggesting possible changes in microglial function in the absence of MMP9. Taken together, our results show that MMP9 contributes to ECM degradation, synaptic dynamics and sensory-evoked plasticity in the mouse visual cortex.

  3. MicroBQs: a centralized database for use in studying bacterial biofilms and quorum sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofilm formation in many bacterial species may be negatively or positively regulated by cell-to-cell signaling systems referred to as quorum sensing (QS). To assist in understanding research related to biofilms, QS, and the role of QS in biofilm formation, a comprehensive, centralized database, kn...

  4. Transmembrane neural cell-adhesion molecule (NCAM), but not glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored NCAM, down-regulates secretion of matrix metalloproteinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvardsen, K; Chen, W; Rucklidge, G;

    1993-01-01

    During embryogenesis interactions between cells and extracellular matrix play a central role in the modulation of cell motility, growth, and differentiation. Modulation of matrix structure is therefore crucial during development; extracellular matrix ligands, their receptors, extracellular...... proteinases, and proteinase inhibitors all participate in the construction, maintenance, and remodeling of extracellular matrix by cells. The neural cell-adhesion molecule (NCAM)-negative rat glioma cell line BT4Cn secretes substantial amounts of metalloproteinases, as compared with its NCAM-positive mother...... cell line BT4C. We have transfected the BT4Cn cell line with cDNAs encoding the human NCAM-B and -C isoforms. We report here that the expression of transmembrane NCAM-B, but not of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-linked NCAM-C, induces a down-regulation of 92-kDa gelatinase (matrix metalloproteinase 9...

  5. Rest-mediated regulation of extracellular matrix is crucial for neural development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuh-Man Sun

    Full Text Available Neural development from blastocysts is strictly controlled by intricate transcriptional programmes that initiate the down-regulation of pluripotent genes, Oct4, Nanog and Rex1 in blastocysts followed by up-regulation of lineage-specific genes as neural development proceeds. Here, we demonstrate that the expression pattern of the transcription factor Rest mirrors those of pluripotent genes during neural development from embryonic stem (ES cells and an early abrogation of Rest in ES cells using a combination of gene targeting and RNAi approaches causes defects in this process. Specifically, Rest ablation does not alter ES cell pluripotency, but impedes the production of Nestin(+ neural stem cells, neural progenitor cells and neurons, and results in defective adhesion, decrease in cell proliferation, increase in cell death and neuronal phenotypic defects typified by a reduction in migration and neurite elaboration. We also show that these Rest-null phenotypes are due to the dysregulation of its direct or indirect target genes, Lama1, Lamb1, Lamc1 and Lama2 and that these aberrant phenotypes can be rescued by laminins.

  6. An expanded regulatory network temporally controls Candida albicans biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Emily P; Bui, Catherine K; Nett, Jeniel E; Hartooni, Nairi; Mui, Michael C; Andes, David R; Nobile, Clarissa J; Johnson, Alexander D

    2015-06-01

    Candida albicans biofilms are composed of highly adherent and densely arranged cells with properties distinct from those of free-floating (planktonic) cells. These biofilms are a significant medical problem because they commonly form on implanted medical devices, are drug resistant and are difficult to remove. C. albicans biofilms are not static structures; rather they are dynamic and develop over time. Here we characterize gene expression in biofilms during their development, and by comparing them to multiple planktonic reference states, we identify patterns of gene expression relevant to biofilm formation. In particular, we document time-dependent changes in genes involved in adhesion and metabolism, both of which are at the core of biofilm development. Additionally, we identify three new regulators of biofilm formation, Flo8, Gal4, and Rfx2, which play distinct roles during biofilm development over time. Flo8 is required for biofilm formation at all time points, and Gal4 and Rfx2 are needed for proper biofilm formation at intermediate time points.

  7. Development of a high-throughput Candida albicans biofilm chip.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Srinivasan

    Full Text Available We have developed a high-density microarray platform consisting of nano-biofilms of Candida albicans. A robotic microarrayer was used to print yeast cells of C. albicans encapsulated in a collagen matrix at a volume as low as 50 nL onto surface-modified microscope slides. Upon incubation, the cells grow into fully formed "nano-biofilms". The morphological and architectural complexity of these biofilms were evaluated by scanning electron and confocal scanning laser microscopy. The extent of biofilm formation was determined using a microarray scanner from changes in fluorescence intensities due to FUN 1 metabolic processing. This staining technique was also adapted for antifungal susceptibility testing, which demonstrated that, similar to regular biofilms, cells within the on-chip biofilms displayed elevated levels of resistance against antifungal agents (fluconazole and amphotericin B. Thus, results from structural analyses and antifungal susceptibility testing indicated that despite miniaturization, these biofilms display the typical phenotypic properties associated with the biofilm mode of growth. In its final format, the C. albicans biofilm chip (CaBChip is composed of 768 equivalent and spatially distinct nano-biofilms on a single slide; multiple chips can be printed and processed simultaneously. Compared to current methods for the formation of microbial biofilms, namely the 96-well microtiter plate model, this fungal biofilm chip has advantages in terms of miniaturization and automation, which combine to cut reagent use and analysis time, minimize labor intensive steps, and dramatically reduce assay costs. Such a chip should accelerate the antifungal drug discovery process by enabling rapid, convenient and inexpensive screening of hundreds-to-thousands of compounds simultaneously.

  8. Development of a high-throughput Candida albicans biofilm chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Anand; Uppuluri, Priya; Lopez-Ribot, Jose; Ramasubramanian, Anand K

    2011-04-22

    We have developed a high-density microarray platform consisting of nano-biofilms of Candida albicans. A robotic microarrayer was used to print yeast cells of C. albicans encapsulated in a collagen matrix at a volume as low as 50 nL onto surface-modified microscope slides. Upon incubation, the cells grow into fully formed "nano-biofilms". The morphological and architectural complexity of these biofilms were evaluated by scanning electron and confocal scanning laser microscopy. The extent of biofilm formation was determined using a microarray scanner from changes in fluorescence intensities due to FUN 1 metabolic processing. This staining technique was also adapted for antifungal susceptibility testing, which demonstrated that, similar to regular biofilms, cells within the on-chip biofilms displayed elevated levels of resistance against antifungal agents (fluconazole and amphotericin B). Thus, results from structural analyses and antifungal susceptibility testing indicated that despite miniaturization, these biofilms display the typical phenotypic properties associated with the biofilm mode of growth. In its final format, the C. albicans biofilm chip (CaBChip) is composed of 768 equivalent and spatially distinct nano-biofilms on a single slide; multiple chips can be printed and processed simultaneously. Compared to current methods for the formation of microbial biofilms, namely the 96-well microtiter plate model, this fungal biofilm chip has advantages in terms of miniaturization and automation, which combine to cut reagent use and analysis time, minimize labor intensive steps, and dramatically reduce assay costs. Such a chip should accelerate the antifungal drug discovery process by enabling rapid, convenient and inexpensive screening of hundreds-to-thousands of compounds simultaneously.

  9. IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31

    This project addressed four major areas of investigation: i) characterization of formation of Cellulomonas uda biofilms on cellulose; ii) characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; iii) characterization of Thermobifida fusca biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; and iii) description of the architecture of mature C. uda, C. phytofermentans, and T. fusca biofilms. This research is aimed at advancing understanding of biofilm formation and other complex processes involved in the degradation of the abundant cellulosic biomass, and the biology of the microbes involved. Information obtained from these studies is invaluable in the development of practical applications, such as the single-step bioconversion of cellulose-containing residues to fuels and other bioproducts. Our results have clearly shown that cellulose-decomposing microbes rapidly colonize cellulose and form complex structures typical of biofilms. Furthermore, our observations suggest that, as cells multiply on nutritive surfaces during biofilms formation, dramatic cell morphological changes occur. We speculated that morphological changes, which involve a transition from rod-shaped cells to more rounded forms, might be more apparent in a filamentous microbe. In order to test this hypothesis, we included in our research a study of biofilm formation by T. fusca, a thermophilic cellulolytic actinomycete commonly found in compost. The cellulase system of T. fusca has been extensively detailed through the work of David Wilson and colleagues at Cornell, and also, genome sequence of a T. fusca strain has been determine by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Thus, T. fusca is an excellent subject for studies of biofilm development and its potential impacts on cellulose degradation. We also completed a study of the chitinase system of C. uda. This work provided essential background information for understanding how C. uda

  10. Why are biofilms important to industrial sanitation systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofilm research in the environment of the poultry production and processing industries and other wet processing industries is important for food safety and security. Sites of occurrence and causes of biofilm formation in these environments are specific for each product type. Regulations and testin...

  11. Effect of proteases on biofilm formation of the plastic-degrading actinomycete Rhodococcus ruber C208.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilan, Irit; Sivan, Alex

    2013-05-01

    In most habitats, the vast majority of microbial populations form biofilms on solid surfaces, whether natural or artificial. These biofilms provide either increased physical support and/or a source of nutrients. Further modifications and development of biofilms are regulated by signal molecules secreted by the cells. Because synthetic polymers are not soluble in aqueous solutions, biofilm-producing bacteria may biodegrade such materials more efficiently than planktonic strains. Bacterial biofilms comprise bacterial cells embedded in self-secreted extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Revealing the roles of each component of the EPS will enable further insight into biofilm development and the EPS structure-function relationship. A strain of Rhodococcus ruber (C208) displayed high hydrophobicity and formed a dense biofilm on the surface of polyethylene films while utilizing the polyolefin as carbon and energy sources. This study investigated the effects of several proteases on C208 biofilm formation and stability. The proteolysis of C208 biofilm gave conflicting results. Trypsin significantly reduced biofilm formation, and the resultant biofilm appeared monolayered. In contrast, proteinase K enhanced biofilm formation, which was robust and multilayered. Presumably, proteinase K degraded self-secreted proteases or quorum-sensing peptides, which may be involved in biofilm detachment processes, leading to a multilayered, nondispersed biofilm.

  12. Hydrodynamic dispersion within porous biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Davit, Y.

    2013-01-23

    Many microorganisms live within surface-associated consortia, termed biofilms, that can form intricate porous structures interspersed with a network of fluid channels. In such systems, transport phenomena, including flow and advection, regulate various aspects of cell behavior by controlling nutrient supply, evacuation of waste products, and permeation of antimicrobial agents. This study presents multiscale analysis of solute transport in these porous biofilms. We start our analysis with a channel-scale description of mass transport and use the method of volume averaging to derive a set of homogenized equations at the biofilm-scale in the case where the width of the channels is significantly smaller than the thickness of the biofilm. We show that solute transport may be described via two coupled partial differential equations or telegrapher\\'s equations for the averaged concentrations. These models are particularly relevant for chemicals, such as some antimicrobial agents, that penetrate cell clusters very slowly. In most cases, especially for nutrients, solute penetration is faster, and transport can be described via an advection-dispersion equation. In this simpler case, the effective diffusion is characterized by a second-order tensor whose components depend on (1) the topology of the channels\\' network; (2) the solute\\'s diffusion coefficients in the fluid and the cell clusters; (3) hydrodynamic dispersion effects; and (4) an additional dispersion term intrinsic to the two-phase configuration. Although solute transport in biofilms is commonly thought to be diffusion dominated, this analysis shows that hydrodynamic dispersion effects may significantly contribute to transport. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  13. Streptococcus mutans protein synthesis during mixed-species biofilm development by high-throughput quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Marlise I; Xiao, Jin; Lu, Bingwen; Delahunty, Claire M; Yates, John R; Koo, Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms formed on tooth surfaces are comprised of mixed microbiota enmeshed in an extracellular matrix. Oral biofilms are constantly exposed to environmental changes, which influence the microbial composition, matrix formation and expression of virulence. Streptococcus mutans and sucrose are key modulators associated with the evolution of virulent-cariogenic biofilms. In this study, we used a high-throughput quantitative proteomics approach to examine how S. mutans produces relevant proteins that facilitate its establishment and optimal survival during mixed-species biofilms development induced by sucrose. Biofilms of S. mutans, alone or mixed with Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus oralis, were initially formed onto saliva-coated hydroxyapatite surface under carbohydrate-limiting condition. Sucrose (1%, w/v) was then introduced to cause environmental changes, and to induce biofilm accumulation. Multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT) approach detected up to 60% of proteins encoded by S. mutans within biofilms. Specific proteins associated with exopolysaccharide matrix assembly, metabolic and stress adaptation processes were highly abundant as the biofilm transit from earlier to later developmental stages following sucrose introduction. Our results indicate that S. mutans within a mixed-species biofilm community increases the expression of specific genes associated with glucan synthesis and remodeling (gtfBC, dexA) and glucan-binding (gbpB) during this transition (Pspecies biofilms (vs. single-species biofilms) demonstrating fundamental differences in the matrix assembly, survival and biofilm maintenance in the presence of other organisms. Our data provide insights about how S. mutans optimizes its metabolism and adapts/survives within the mixed-species community in response to a dynamically changing environment. This reflects the intricate physiological processes linked to expression of virulence by this bacterium within complex biofilms.

  14. Modulation of eDNA release and degradation affects Staphylococcus aureus biofilm maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan E Mann

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated a role for Staphylococcus aureus cidA-mediated cell lysis and genomic DNA release in biofilm adherence. The current study extends these findings by examining both temporal and additional genetic factors involved in the control of genomic DNA release and degradation during biofilm maturation. Cell lysis and DNA release were found to be critical for biofilm attachment during the initial stages of development and the released DNA (eDNA remained an important matrix component during biofilm maturation. This study also revealed that an lrgAB mutant exhibits increased biofilm adherence and matrix-associated eDNA consistent with its proposed role as an inhibitor of cidA-mediated lysis. In flow-cell assays, both cid and lrg mutations had dramatic effects on biofilm maturation and tower formation. Finally, staphylococcal thermonuclease was shown to be involved in biofilm development as a nuc mutant formed a thicker biofilm containing increased levels of matrix-associated eDNA. Together, these findings suggest a model in which the opposing activities of the cid and lrg gene products control cell lysis and genomic DNA release during biofilm development, while staphylococcal thermonuclease functions to degrade the eDNA, possibly as a means to promote biofilm dispersal.

  15. Destruction of Bacterial Biofilms Using Gas Discharge Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramzon, Nina

    2005-03-01

    Biofilms are bacterial communities embedded in an exopolysaccharidic matrix with a complex architectural structure. Bacteria in biofilms show different properties from those in free life thus, conventional methods of killing bacteria are often ineffective with biofilms. The use of plasmas potentially offers an alternative to conventional sterilization methods since plasmas contain a mixture of charged particles, chemically reactive species, and UV radiation. 4 and 7 day-old biofilms were produced using two bacterial species: Rhizobium gallicum and Chromobacterium violaceum. Gas discharge plasma was produced by using an AtomfloTM reactor (Surfx Technologies) and bacterial biofilms were exposed to it for different periods of time. Our results show that a 10-minute plasma treatment was able to kill 100% of the cells in most cases. Optical emission spectroscopy was used to study plasma composition which is then correlated with the effectiveness of killing. These results indicate the potentiality of plasma as an alternative sterilization method. Supported by CSuperb.

  16. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilm and planktonic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lissel J Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porphyromonas gingivalis in subgingival dental plaque, as part of a mature biofilm, has been strongly implicated in the onset and progression of chronic periodontitis. In this study using DNA microarray we compared the global gene expression of a P. gingivalis biofilm with that of its planktonic counterpart grown in the same continuous culture. Results Approximately 18% (377 genes, at 1.5 fold or more, P-value P. gingivalis genome was differentially expressed when the bacterium was grown as a biofilm. Genes that were down-regulated in biofilm cells, relative to planktonic cells, included those involved in cell envelope biogenesis, DNA replication, energy production and biosynthesis of cofactors, prosthetic groups and carriers. A number of genes encoding transport and binding proteins were up-regulated in P. gingivalis biofilm cells. Several genes predicted to encode proteins involved in signal transduction and transcriptional regulation were differentially regulated and may be important in the regulation of biofilm growth. Conclusion This study analyzing global gene expression provides insight into the adaptive response of P. gingivalis to biofilm growth, in particular showing a down regulation of genes involved in growth and metabolic activity.

  17. Cathepsin B is up-regulated and mediates extracellular matrix degradation in trabecular meshwork cells following phagocytic challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Porter

    Full Text Available Cells in the trabecular meshwork (TM, a tissue responsible for draining aqueous humor out of the eye, are known to be highly phagocytic. Phagocytic activity in TM cells is thought to play an important role in outflow pathway physiology. However, the molecular mechanisms triggered by phagocytosis in TM cells are unknown. Here we investigated the effects of chronic phagocytic stress on lysosomal function using different phagocytic ligands (E. coli, carboxylated beads, collagen I-coated beads, and pigment. Lysotracker red co-localization and electron micrographs showed the maturation of E. coli- and collagen I-coated beads-containing phagosomes into phagolysosomes. Maturation of phagosomes into phagolysosomes was not observed with carboxylated beads or pigment particles. In addition, phagocytosis of E. coli and collagen I-coated beads led to increased lysosomal mass, and the specific up-regulation and activity of cathepsin B (CTSB. Higher levels of membrane-bound and secreted CTSB were also detected. Moreover, in vivo zymography showed the intralysosomal degradation of ECM components associated with active CTSB, as well as an overall increased gelatinolytic activity in phagocytically challenged TM cells. This increased gelatinolytic activity with phagocytosis was partially blocked with an intracellular CTSB inhibitor. Altogether, these results suggest a potential role of phagocytosis in outflow pathway tissue homeostasis through the up-regulation and/or proteolytic activation of extracellular matrix remodeling genes.

  18. HSP70 increases extracellular matrix production by human vascular smooth muscle through TGF-β1 up-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ramos, Marta; Calleros, Laura; López-Ongil, Susana; Raoch, Viviana; Griera, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Puyol, Manuel; de Frutos, Sergio; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego

    2013-02-01

    The circulating levels of heat shock proteins (HSP) are increased in cardiovascular diseases; however, the implication of this for the fibrotic process typical of such diseases remains unclear. HSP70 can interact with the vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC), the major producer of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, through the Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4). The transforming growth factor type-β1 (TGF-β1) is a well known vascular pro-fibrotic cytokine that is regulated in part by AP-1-dependent transcriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that extracellular HSP70 could interact with SMCs, inducing TGF-β1 synthesis and subsequent changes in the vascular ECM. We demonstrate that extracellular HSP70 binds to human aorta SMC TLR4, which up-regulates the AP-1-dependent transcriptional activity of the TGF-β1 promoter. This is achieved through the mitogen activated protein kinases JNK and ERK, as demonstrated by the use of specific blockers and the knockdown of TLR4 with specific small interfering RNAs. The TGF-β1 upregulation increase the expression of the ECM proteins type I collagen and fibronectin. This novel observation may elucidate the mechanisms by which HSP70 contributes in the inflammation and fibrosis present in atherosclerosis and other fibrosis-related diseases.

  19. Insights into the Mechanisms Involved in the Expression and Regulation of Extracellular Matrix Proteins in Diabetic Nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, C; Sun, L; Xiao, L; Han, Y; Fu, X; Xiong, X; Xu, X; Liu, Y; Yang, S; Liu, F; Kanwar, Y S

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic Nephropathy (DN) is believed to be a major microvascular complication of diabetes. The hallmark of DN includes deposition of Extracellular Matrix (ECM) proteins, such as, collagen, laminin and fibronectin in the mesangium and renal tubulo-interstitium of the glomerulus and basement membranes. Such an increased expression of ECM leads to glomerular and tubular basement membranes thickening and increase of mesangial matrix, ultimately resulting in glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. The characteristic morphologic glomerular mesangial lesion has been described as Kimmelstiel-Wilson nodule, and the process at times is referred to as diabetic nodular glomerulosclerosis. Thus, the accumulation of ECM proteins plays a critical role in the development of DN. The relevant mechanism(s) involved in the increased ECM expression and their regulation in the kidney in diabetic state has been extensively investigated and documented in the literature. Nevertheless, there are certain other mechanisms that may yet be conclusively defined. Recent studies demonstrated that some of the new signaling pathways or molecules including, Notch, Wnt, mTOR, TLRs and small GTPase may play a pivotal role in the modulation of ECM regulation and expression in DN. Such modulation could be operational for instance Notch through Notch1/Jagged1 signaling, Wnt by Wnt/β- catenin pathway and mTOR via PI3-K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways. All these pathways may be critical in the modulation of ECM expression and tubulo-interstitial fibrosis. In addition, TLRs, mainly the TLR2 and TLR4, by TLR2- dependent and TGF-β-dependent conduits, may modulate ECM expression and generate a fibrogenic response. Small GTPase like Rho, Ras and Rab family by targeting relevant genes may also influence the accumulation of ECM proteins and renal fibrosis in hyperglycemic states. This review summarizes the recent information about the role and mechanisms by which these molecules and signaling pathways

  20. Application of biofilm bioreactors in white biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffler, K; Lakatos, M; Schlegel, C; Strieth, D; Kuhne, S; Ulber, R

    2014-01-01

    The production of valuable compounds in industrial biotechnology is commonly done by cultivation of suspended cells or use of (immobilized) enzymes rather than using microorganisms in an immobilized state. Within the field of wastewater as well as odor treatment the application of immobilized cells is a proven technique. The cells are entrapped in a matrix of extracellular polymeric compounds produced by themselves. The surface-associated agglomerate of encapsulated cells is termed biofilm. In comparison to common immobilization techniques, toxic effects of compounds used for cell entrapment may be neglected. Although the economic impact of biofilm processes used for the production of valuable compounds is negligible, many prospective approaches were examined in the laboratory and on a pilot scale. This review gives an overview of biofilm reactors applied to the production of valuable compounds. Moreover, the characteristics of the utilized materials are discussed with respect to support of surface-attached microbial growth.

  1. Insights into xanthomonas axonopodis pv. Citri biofilm through proteomics

    KAUST Repository

    Zimaro, Tamara

    2013-08-07

    Background: Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. Citri (X. a. pv. Citri) causes citrus canker that can result in defoliation and premature fruit drop with significant production losses worldwide. Biofilm formation is an important process in bacterial pathogens and several lines of evidence suggest that in X. a. pv. Citri this process is a requirement to achieve maximal virulence since it has a major role in host interactions. In this study, proteomics was used to gain further insights into the functions of biofilms. Results: In order to identify differentially expressed proteins, a comparative proteomic study using 2D difference gel electrophoresis was carried out on X. a. pv. Citri mature biofilm and planktonic cells. The biofilm proteome showed major variations in the composition of outer membrane proteins and receptor or transport proteins. Among them, several porins and TonB-dependent receptor were differentially regulated in the biofilm compared to the planktonic cells, indicating that these proteins may serve in maintaining specific membrane-associated functions including signaling and cellular homeostasis. In biofilms, UDP-glucose dehydrogenase with a major role in exopolysaccharide production and the non-fimbrial adhesin YapH involved in adherence were over-expressed, while a polynucleotide phosphorylase that was demonstrated to negatively control biofilm formation in E. coli was down-regulated. In addition, several proteins involved in protein synthesis, folding and stabilization were up-regulated in biofilms. Interestingly, some proteins related to energy production, such as ATP-synthase were down-regulated in biofilms. Moreover, a number of enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle were differentially expressed. In addition, X. a. pv. Citri biofilms also showed down-regulation of several antioxidant enzymes. The respective gene expression patterns of several identified proteins in both X. a. pv. Citri mature biofilm and planktonic cells were evaluated by

  2. Biofilm formation in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Francesca; Vuotto, Claudia; Donelli, Gianfranco

    2014-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has received much attention in recent years because of its increasing involvement in a number of severe infections and outbreaks occurring in clinical settings, and presumably related to its ability to survive and persist in hospital environments. The treatment of infections caused by A. baumannii nosocomial strains has become increasingly problematic, due to their intrinsic and/or acquired resistance to multiple classes of antibiotics. Furthermore, the demonstrated ability of nosocomial strains to grow as biofilm is believed to play a significant role in their persistence and antibiotic resistance. This review summarises current knowledge on A. baumannii biofilm formation and its clinical significance, as well as the related genetic determinants and the regulation of this process.

  3. SinR controls enterotoxin expression in Bacillus thuringiensis biofilms.

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    Annette Fagerlund

    Full Text Available The entomopathogen Bacillus thuringiensis produces dense biofilms under various conditions. Here, we report that the transition phase regulators Spo0A, AbrB and SinR control biofilm formation and swimming motility in B. thuringiensis, just as they control biofilm formation and swarming motility in the closely related saprophyte species B. subtilis. However, microarray analysis indicated that in B. thuringiensis, in contrast to B. subtilis, SinR does not control an eps operon involved in exopolysaccharides production, but regulates genes involved in the biosynthesis of the lipopeptide kurstakin. This lipopeptide is required for biofilm formation and was previously shown to be important for survival in the host cadaver (necrotrophism. Microarray analysis also revealed that the SinR regulon contains genes coding for the Hbl enterotoxin. Transcriptional fusion assays, Western blots and hemolysis assays confirmed that SinR controls Hbl expression, together with PlcR, the main virulence regulator in B. thuringiensis. We show that Hbl is expressed in a sustained way in a small subpopulation of the biofilm, whereas almost all the planktonic population transiently expresses Hbl. The gene coding for SinI, an antagonist of SinR, is expressed in the same biofilm subpopulation as hbl, suggesting that hbl transcription heterogeneity is SinI-dependent. B. thuringiensis and B. cereus are enteric bacteria which possibly form biofilms lining the host intestinal epithelium. Toxins produced in biofilms could therefore be delivered directly to the target tissue.

  4. Characterization of PPMUCL1/2/3, three members of a new oomycete-specific mucin-like protein family residing in Phytophthora parasitica biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larousse, Marie; Govetto, Benjamin; Séassau, Aurélie; Etienne, Catherine; Industri, Benoit; Theodorakopoulos, Nicolas; Deleury, Emeline; Ponchet, Michel; Panabières, Franck; Galiana, Eric

    2014-05-01

    The plant pathogen Phytophthora parasitica forms a biofilm on the host surface. The biofilm transcriptome is characterized by the expression of PPMUCL1/2/3 (PHYTOPHTHORA PARASITICA MUCIN-LIKE) genes, which we report here to be members of a new, large mucin-like gene family restricted to the oomycete lineage. These genes encode secreted proteins organized into two domains. The NH2-terminal domain is highly conserved, but of unknown function. The second domain is a mucin-like domain enriched in threonine and serine residues, with a large number of putative O-glycosylation sites and a repeated motif defining 15 subgroups among the 315 members of the family. The second domain was found to be glycosylated in the recombinant rPPMUCL1 and rPPMUCL2 proteins. An analysis of PPMUCL1/2/3 gene expression indicated that these genes were expressed in a specific and coordinated manner in the biofilm. A novel cis-motif (R) bound to nuclear proteins, suggesting a possible role in PPMUCL1/2/3 gene regulation. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the PPMUCL1/2 proteins were secreted and accumulated on the surface of the biofilm. Our data demonstrate that PPMUCL1/2/3 belong to a new oomycete-specific family of mucin-like proteins playing a structural role in the biofilm extracellular matrix.

  5. PPARdelta promotes wound healing by up-regulating TGF-beta1-dependent or -independent expression of extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Sun Ah; Kim, Hyo Jung; Kim, Hyun Joon; Kang, Eun Sil; Eun, So Young;