WorldWideScience

Sample records for biofilm community established

  1. Establishing bacterial communities by 'word of mouth': LuxS and autoinducer 2 in biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardie, Kim Rachael; Heurlier, Karin

    2008-08-01

    Multicellular bacterial communities (biofilms) abound in nature, and their successful formation and survival is likely to require cell-cell communication--including quorum sensing--to co-ordinate appropriate gene expression. The only mode of quorum sensing that is shared by both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria involves the production of the signalling molecule autoinducer 2 by LuxS. A survey of the current literature reveals that luxS contributes to biofilm development in some bacteria. However, inconsistencies prevent biofilm development being attributed to the production of AI2 in all cases.

  2. Characterization of a filamentous biofilm community established in a cellulose-fed microbial fuel cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hotta Yasuaki

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial fuel cells (MFCs are devices that exploit microorganisms to generate electric power from organic matter. Despite the development of efficient MFC reactors, the microbiology of electricity generation remains to be sufficiently understood. Results A laboratory-scale two-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC was inoculated with rice paddy field soil and fed cellulose as the carbon and energy source. Electricity-generating microorganisms were enriched by subculturing biofilms that attached onto anode electrodes. An electric current of 0.2 mA was generated from the first enrichment culture, and ratios of the major metabolites (e.g., electric current, methane and acetate became stable after the forth enrichment. In order to investigate the electrogenic microbial community in the anode biofilm, it was morphologically analyzed by electron microscopy, and community members were phylogenetically identified by 16S rRNA gene clone-library analyses. Electron microscopy revealed that filamentous cells and rod-shaped cells with prosthecae-like filamentous appendages were abundantly present in the biofilm. Filamentous cells and appendages were interconnected via thin filaments. The clone library analyses frequently detected phylotypes affiliated with Clostridiales, Chloroflexi, Rhizobiales and Methanobacterium. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization revealed that the Rhizobiales population represented rod-shaped cells with filamentous appendages and constituted over 30% of the total population. Conclusion Bacteria affiliated with the Rhizobiales constituted the major population in the cellulose-fed MFC and exhibited unique morphology with filamentous appendages. They are considered to play important roles in the cellulose-degrading electrogenic community.

  3. Establishment and Early Succession of Bacterial Communities in Monochloramine-Treated Drinking Water Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monochloramine is increasingly used as a drinking water disinfectant because it forms lower levels of regulated disinfection by-products. While its use has been shown to increase nitrifying bacteria, little is known about the bacterial succession within biofilms in monochloramin...

  4. Artificial biofilms establish the role of matrix interactions in staphylococcal biofilm assembly and disassembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Elizabeth J.; Ganesan, Mahesh; Younger, John G.; Solomon, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that the microstructural and mechanical properties of bacterial biofilms can be created through colloidal self-assembly of cells and polymers, and thereby link the complex material properties of biofilms to well understood colloidal and polymeric behaviors. This finding is applied to soften and disassemble staphylococcal biofilms through pH changes. Bacterial biofilms are viscoelastic, structured communities of cells encapsulated in an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) comprised of polysaccharides, proteins, and DNA. Although the identity and abundance of EPS macromolecules are known, how these matrix materials interact with themselves and bacterial cells to generate biofilm morphology and mechanics is not understood. Here, we find that the colloidal self-assembly of Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A cells and polysaccharides into viscoelastic biofilms is driven by thermodynamic phase instability of EPS. pH conditions that induce phase instability of chitosan produce artificial S. epidermidis biofilms whose mechanics match natural S. epidermidis biofilms. Furthermore, pH-induced solubilization of the matrix triggers disassembly in both artificial and natural S. epidermidis biofilms. This pH-induced disassembly occurs in biofilms formed by five additional staphylococcal strains, including three clinical isolates. Our findings suggest that colloidal self-assembly of cells and matrix polymers produces biofilm viscoelasticity and that biofilm control strategies can exploit this mechanism. PMID:26272750

  5. Osmotic Compounds Enhance Antibiotic Efficacy against Acinetobacter baumannii Biofilm Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falghoush, Azeza; Beyenal, Haluk; Besser, Thomas E; Omsland, Anders; Call, Douglas R

    2017-10-01

    Biofilm-associated infections are a clinical challenge, in part because a hydrated matrix protects the bacterial community from antibiotics. Herein, we evaluated how different osmotic compounds (maltodextrin, sucrose, and polyethylene glycol [PEG]) enhance antibiotic efficacy against Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm communities. Established (24-h) test tube biofilms (strain ATCC 17978) were treated with osmotic compounds in the presence or absence of 10× the MIC of different antibiotics (50 μg/ml tobramycin, 20 μg/ml ciprofloxacin, 300 μg/ml chloramphenicol, 30 μg/ml nalidixic acid, or 100 μg/ml erythromycin). Combining antibiotics with hypertonic concentrations of the osmotic compounds for 24 h reduced the number of biofilm bacteria by 5 to 7 log ( P baumannii strains were similarly treated with 400-Da PEG and tobramycin, resulting in a mean 2.7-log reduction in recoverable bacteria compared with tobramycin treatment alone. Multivariate regression models with data from different osmotic compounds and nine antibiotics demonstrated that the benefit from combining hypertonic treatments with antibiotics is a function of antibiotic mass and lipophilicity ( r 2 > 0.82; P baumannii and Escherichia coli K-12. Augmenting topical antibiotic therapies with a low-mass hypertonic treatment may enhance the efficacy of antibiotics against wound biofilms, particularly when using low-mass hydrophilic antibiotics. IMPORTANCE Biofilms form a barrier that protects bacteria from environmental insults, including exposure to antibiotics. We demonstrated that multiple osmotic compounds can enhance antibiotic efficacy against Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm communities, but viscosity is a limiting factor, and the most effective compounds have lower molecular mass. The synergism between osmotic compounds and antibiotics is also dependent on the hydrophobicity and mass of the antibiotics. The statistical models presented herein provide a basis for predicting the optimal combination of

  6. Characterization of mixed-culture biofilms established in microbial fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Suling; Du, Fangzhou; Liu, Hong

    2012-01-01

    For the successful operation of a microbial fuel cell, it is important to characterize the biofilm on the anode. The behavior of MFCs during initial biofilm growth and characterization of anodic biofilm were studied using two-chamber MFCs with activated sludge as inoculum. After three times' replacement of the anodic growth medium, the biofilms were well developed, and a maximum closed circuit potential of 0.41 V and 0.37 V (1000 Ω resistor) was achieved using acetate and glucose, respectively. Electron microscopy revealed that there were rod-shaped cells 0.2–0.3 μm wide by 1.5–2.5 μm long in the anode biofilm in the acetate-fed MFC, and these cells were mainly arranged by monolayer. The biofilm in the glucose-fed MFC was made of cocci-shaped cells in chains and a thick matrix. Both using acetate and glucose, the anodic bacterial communities were different than those of the activated sludge. Cyclic voltammograms suggested that extracellular electron transfer in these MFCs was accomplished mainly by the biofilms on the anode and not by bacteria-produced mediators. -- Highlights: ► The mixed-culture biofilms established in MFCs were characterized. ► The possible electron transfer mechanism was presented. ► In these MFCs the anodic area should be much larger.

  7. Biofilms: Community Behavior by Bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    United we stand, divided we fall. This is a ... controls biofilm development, swarming motility and the produc- ... thought that the absence of overt gut flora upsets the balance .... there are several risks of integration which makes this strategy.

  8. Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Daniel; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2010-07-01

    The ability to form biofilms is a universal attribute of bacteria. Biofilms are multicellular communities held together by a self-produced extracellular matrix. The mechanisms that different bacteria employ to form biofilms vary, frequently depending on environmental conditions and specific strain attributes. In this review, we emphasize four well-studied model systems to give an overview of how several organisms form biofilms: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Using these bacteria as examples, we discuss the key features of biofilms as well as mechanisms by which extracellular signals trigger biofilm formation.

  9. Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    López, Daniel; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The ability to form biofilms is a universal attribute of bacteria. Biofilms are multicellular communities held together by a self-produced extracellular matrix. The mechanisms that different bacteria employ to form biofilms vary, frequently depending on environmental conditions and specific strain attributes. In this review, we emphasize four well-studied model systems to give an overview of how several organisms form biofilms: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, and ...

  10. Co-existence in multispecies biofilm communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Henriette Lyng

    of these emergent properties which are relevant to as diverse areas as clinical settings and natural systems. In this thesis, I have attempted to contribute to our knowledge on the multispecies interactions with a special focus on biofilm communities. I was especially interested in how co-existing species affect...... each other and in understanding the key mechanisms and interactions involved. In the introduction of this thesis the most important concepts of multi-species interactions and biofilm development are explained. After this the topic changes to the various ways of examining community interactions...... and production. The analysis was further extended in manuscript 3, in which the effect of social interac-tions on biofilm formation in multispecies co-cultures isolated from a diverse range of environments was examined. The question raised was whether the interspecific interactions of co-existing bacteria...

  11. Micro-scale intermixing: a requisite for stable and synergistic co-establishment in a four-species biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenzheng; Russel, Jakob; Burmølle, Mette; Sørensen, Søren J; Madsen, Jonas S

    2018-04-18

    Microorganisms frequently coexist in complex multispecies communities, where they distribute non-randomly, reflective of the social interactions that occur. It is therefore important to understand how social interactions and local spatial organization influences multispecies biofilm succession. Here the localization of species pairs was analyzed in three dimensions in a reproducible four-species biofilm model, to study the impact of spatial positioning of individual species on the temporal development of the community. We found, that as the biofilms developed, species pairs exhibited distinct intermixing patterns unique to the four-member biofilms. Higher biomass and more intermixing were found in four-species biofilms compared to biofilms with fewer species. Intriguingly, in local regions within the four member biofilms where Microbacterium oxydans was scant, both biomass and intermixing of all species were lowered, compared to regions where M. oxydans was present at typical densities. Our data suggest that Xanthomonas retroflexus and M. oxydans, both low abundant biofilm-members, intermixed continuously during the development of the four-species biofilm, hereby facilitating their own establishment. In turn, this seems to have promoted distinct spatial organization of Stenotrophomonas rhizophila and Paenibacillus amylolyticus enabling enhanced growth of all four species. Here local intermixing of bacteria advanced the temporal development of a multi-species biofilm.

  12. Biofilms and Oxidizing Biocides; Evaluation of Disinfection and Removal Effects by Using Established Microbial Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachikawa, Mariko

    2017-01-01

    The formation of bacterial biofilms and their disinfection and removal have been important subjects in the maintenance of water quality in areas such as public spas, swimming pools, food processing lines, industrial water systems, and in the hygienic control of medical devices, hospital procedures, etc. Presented here is an outline of biofilm formation, as well as studies on the disinfection and removal of biofilms by oxidizing biocides using established biofilms. These studies using established biofilms may increase the understanding of the variable response of biofilms to planktonic bacteria, and the unique aspects of oxidizing biocides in the disinfection and removal of biofilms.

  13. Microbial community stratification in Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactors for Completely Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Ruscalleda, Maël; Terada, Akihiko

    of bacterial granules or biofilms. In this sense, completely autotrophic nitrogen removal from high ammonium strength wastewater was achieved in a Membrane-Aereated Biofilm Reactor (MABR) in a single step. Here, a biofilm containing nitrifiers (Aerobic Ammonium and Nitrite Oxidizing Bacteria, AOB and NOB......, respectively) and Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidizing Bacteria (AnAOB) is grown on bubbleless aeration membranes to remove ammonium. Since oxygen permeates through the membrane-biofilm interface while ammonium diffuses into the biofilm from the biofilm-liquid interface, oxygen gradients can be established across...... the biofilm, allowing nitrogen removal in a single reactor by simultaneous activity of the mentioned biocatalysts. This work consists on the analysis of the microbial community existing in two laboratory-scale reactors operated for more than 300 days, which removed up to 5.5 g-N/m2/day. The system contained...

  14. Biofilm community succession: a neutral perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, Stephen; Sloan, William T

    2017-05-22

    Although biofilms represent one of the dominant forms of life in aqueous environments, our understanding of the assembly and development of their microbial communities remains relatively poor. In recent years, several studies have addressed this and have extended the concepts of succession theory in classical ecology into microbial systems. From these datasets, niche-based conceptual models have been developed explaining observed biodiversity patterns and their dynamics. These models have not, however, been formulated mathematically and so remain untested. Here, we further develop spatially resolved neutral community models and demonstrate that these can also explain these patterns and offer alternative explanations of microbial succession. The success of neutral models suggests that stochastic effects alone may have a much greater influence on microbial community succession than previously acknowledged. Furthermore, such models are much more readily parameterised and can be used as the foundation of more complex and realistic models of microbial community succession.

  15. Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Reduces Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Development on Glass Ionomer Cement and Disrupts Established Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashper, Stuart G; Catmull, Deanne V; Liu, Sze-Wei; Myroforidis, Helen; Zalizniak, Ilya; Palamara, Joseph E A; Huq, N Laila; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are dental restorative materials that are suitable for modification to help prevent dental plaque (biofilm) formation. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of incorporating casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) into a GIC on the colonisation and establishment of Streptococcus mutans biofilms and the effects of aqueous CPP-ACP on established S mutans biofilms. S. mutans biofilms were either established in flow cells before a single ten min exposure to 1% w/v CPP-ACP treatment or cultured in static wells or flow cells with either GIC or GIC containing 3% w/w CPP-ACP as the substratum. The biofilms were then visualised using confocal laser scanning microscopy after BacLight LIVE/DEAD staining. A significant decrease in biovolume and average thickness of S. mutans biofilms was observed in both static and flow cell assays when 3% CPP-ACP was incorporated into the GIC substratum. A single ten min treatment with aqueous 1% CPP-ACP resulted in a 58% decrease in biofilm biomass and thickness of established S. mutans biofilms grown in a flow cell. The treatment also significantly altered the structure of these biofilms compared with controls. The incorporation of 3% CPP-ACP into GIC significantly reduced S. mutans biofilm development indicating another potential anticariogenic mechanism of this material. Additionally aqueous CPP-ACP disrupted established S. mutans biofilms. The use of CPP-ACP containing GIC combined with regular CPP-ACP treatment may lower S. mutans challenge.

  16. Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Reduces Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Development on Glass Ionomer Cement and Disrupts Established Biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart G Dashper

    Full Text Available Glass ionomer cements (GIC are dental restorative materials that are suitable for modification to help prevent dental plaque (biofilm formation. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of incorporating casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP into a GIC on the colonisation and establishment of Streptococcus mutans biofilms and the effects of aqueous CPP-ACP on established S mutans biofilms. S. mutans biofilms were either established in flow cells before a single ten min exposure to 1% w/v CPP-ACP treatment or cultured in static wells or flow cells with either GIC or GIC containing 3% w/w CPP-ACP as the substratum. The biofilms were then visualised using confocal laser scanning microscopy after BacLight LIVE/DEAD staining. A significant decrease in biovolume and average thickness of S. mutans biofilms was observed in both static and flow cell assays when 3% CPP-ACP was incorporated into the GIC substratum. A single ten min treatment with aqueous 1% CPP-ACP resulted in a 58% decrease in biofilm biomass and thickness of established S. mutans biofilms grown in a flow cell. The treatment also significantly altered the structure of these biofilms compared with controls. The incorporation of 3% CPP-ACP into GIC significantly reduced S. mutans biofilm development indicating another potential anticariogenic mechanism of this material. Additionally aqueous CPP-ACP disrupted established S. mutans biofilms. The use of CPP-ACP containing GIC combined with regular CPP-ACP treatment may lower S. mutans challenge.

  17. Metal concentrations in stream biofilm and sediments and their potential to explain biofilm microbial community structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancion, Pierre-Yves; Lear, Gavin; Dopheide, Andrew; Lewis, Gillian D.

    2013-01-01

    Concentrations of metals associated with sediments have traditionally been analysed to assess the extent of heavy metal contamination in freshwater environments. Stream biofilms present an alternative medium for this assessment which may be more relevant to the risk incurred by stream ecosystems as they are intensively grazed by aquatic organisms at a higher trophic level. Therefore, we investigated zinc, copper and lead concentrations in biofilms and sediments of 23 stream sites variously impacted by urbanisation. Simultaneously, biofilm bacterial and ciliate protozoan community structure was analysed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis and Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism, respectively. Statistical analysis revealed that biofilm associated metals explained a greater proportion of the variations observed in bacterial and ciliate communities than did sediment associated-metals. This study suggests that the analysis of metal concentrations in biofilms provide a good assessment of detrimental effects of metal contaminants on aquatic biota. - Highlights: ► Zn, Cu and Pb concentrations in biofilm and sediments from 23 streams were assessed. ► Bacteria and ciliate protozoa were simultaneously used as biological indicators. ► Zn and Cu were generally enriched in biofilm compared to sediments. ► Metals in biofilm provide a useful assessment of freshwater ecosystem contamination. ► Results highlight the likely ecological importance of biofilm associated metals. - Metal concentrations in stream biofilms provide a good assessment of the effects of trace metal contaminants on freshwater ecosystems.

  18. Psl Produced by Mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa Contributes to the Establishment of Biofilms and Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher J; Wozniak, Daniel J

    2017-06-20

    proposed that mucoid bacteria produce an additional polysaccharide, Psl, which is important for their establishment and maintenance of chronic infections. This work demonstrates that Psl enhances attachment of mucoid bacteria to lung surfaces and leads to inflammation and damage in the lung. Additionally, we find that 50% of mucoid bacteria isolated from patients with chronic infections rely on Psl for the structure of their biofilm communities, suggesting that treatments against Psl should be investigated to enhance the success of current therapies. Copyright © 2017 Jones and Wozniak.

  19. A novel approach for harnessing biofilm communities in moving bed biofilm reactors for industrial wastewater treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe A. Lemire

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs are an effective biotechnology for treating industrial wastewater. Biomass retention on moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR carriers (biofilm support materials, allows for the ease-of-operation and high treatment capacity of MBBR systems. Optimization of MBBR systems has largely focused on aspects of carrier design, while little attention has been paid to enhancing strategies for harnessing microbial biomass. Previously, our research group demonstrated that mixed-species biofilms can be harvested from an industrial wastewater inoculum [oil sands process water (OSPW] using the Calgary Biofilm Device (CBD. Moreover, the resultant biofilm communities had the capacity to degrade organic toxins (naphthenic acids—NAs that are found in OSPW. Therefore, we hypothesized that harnessing microbial communities from industrial wastewater, as biofilms, on MBBR carriers may be an effective method to bioremediate industrial wastewater.Here, we detail our methodology adapting the workflow employed for using the CBD, to generate inoculant carriers to seed an MBBR.In this study, OSPW-derived biofilm communities were successfully grown, and their efficacy evaluated, on commercially available MBBR carriers affixed within a modified CBD system. The resultant biofilms demonstrated the capacity to transfer biomass to recipient carriers within a scaled MBBR. Moreover, MBBR systems inoculated in this manner were fully active 2 days post-inoculation, and readily degraded a select population of NAs. Together, these findings suggest that harnessing microbial communities on carriers affixed within a modified CBD system may represent a facile and rapid method for obtaining functional inoculants for use in wastewater MBBR treatment systems.

  20. Impact of disinfection on drinking water biofilm bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Zilong; Dai, Yu; Xie, Shuguang; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Xiaojian

    2015-11-01

    Disinfectants are commonly applied to control the growth of microorganisms in drinking water distribution systems. However, the effect of disinfection on drinking water microbial community remains poorly understood. The present study investigated the impacts of different disinfectants (chlorine and chloramine) and dosages on biofilm bacterial community in bench-scale pipe section reactors. Illumina MiSeq sequencing illustrated that disinfection strategy could affect both bacterial diversity and community structure of drinking water biofilm. Proteobacteria tended to predominate in chloraminated drinking water biofilms, while Firmicutes in chlorinated and unchlorinated biofilms. The major proteobacterial groups were influenced by both disinfectant type and dosage. In addition, chloramination had a more profound impact on bacterial community than chlorination. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa extracellular products inhibit staphylococcal growth, and disrupt established biofilms produced by Staphylococcus epidermidis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Zhiqiang; Yang, Liang; Qu, Di

    2009-01-01

    Multiple bacterial species often coexist as communities, and compete for environmental resources. Here, we describe how an opportunistic pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, uses extracellular products to interact with the nosocomial pathogen Staphylococcus epidermidis. S. epidermidis biofilms and p...... of a novel strategy for controlling S. epidermidis biofilms....

  2. Physicochemical characteristics and microbial community evolution of biofilms during the start-up period in a moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Yan; Ren, Hong-Qiang; Geng, Jin-Ju; Xu, Ke; Huang, Hui; Ding, Li-Li

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate biofilm properties evolution coupled with different ages during the start-up period in a moving bed biofilm reactor system. Physicochemical characteristics including adhesion force, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), morphology as well as volatile solid and microbial community were studied. Results showed that the formation and development of biofilms exhibited four stages, including (I) initial attachment and young biofilm formation, (II) biofilms accumulation, (III) biofilm sloughing and updating, and (IV) biofilm maturation. During the whole start-up period, adhesion force was positively and significantly correlated with the contents of EPS, especially the content of polysaccharide. In addition, increased adhesion force and EPS were beneficial for biofilm retention. Gram-negative bacteria mainly including Sphaerotilus, Zoogloea and Haliscomenobacter were predominant in the initial stage. Actinobacteria was beneficial to resist sloughing. Furthermore, filamentous bacteria were dominant in maturation biofilm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bacteriophage Isolated from Sewage Eliminates and Prevents the Establishment of Escherichia Coli Biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Veloso Gonçalves Ribeiro

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Biofilm growth exerts a negative impact on industry and health, necessitating the development of strategies to control. The objective of this work was study the lytic activity of the phage isolated from the sewage network in the formation and degradation of Escherichia coli biofilms. Methods: E. coli cultures were incubated in 96-well polystyrene microplates under controlled conditions to evaluate the biofilm formation. The E. coli cultures and established biofilms were treated with the suspensions of the vB_EcoM-UFV017 (EcoM017 bacteriophage obtained from sewage for 24 hours. The E. coli bacterial density was measured using absorbance at 600 nm and the biofilms were measured by crystal violet staining. Polystyrene coupons were used as support for Scanning Electron Microscopy and Confocal Microscopy to evaluate biofilm formation. Results: The E. coli strains formed biofilms in polystyrene microplates after 48 hours’ incubation. The highest EcoM017 phage titer, in the prevention and degradation experiments, reduced the bacterial growth and the quantity of biofilm formed by E. coli in 90.0% and 87.5%, respectively. The minimum dose capable of reducing the biofilms of this bacterium was 101 PFU/mL after 24 hours. The preformed E. coli biofilm mass was reduced 79% post exposure to the phage in the degradation assay. Microscopic analysis confirmed the results obtained in the plates assays. Conclusion: The EcoM017 phage prevented biofilm formation and degraded the E. coli-established ones. The EcoM017 phage isolated from sewage can reduce bacterial attachment and lyse the E. coli associated biofilm cells, offering biotechnological potential applicability for this phage.

  4. Coexistence facilitates interspecific biofilm formation in complex microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Røder, Henriette Lyng; Russel, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Social interactions in which bacteria respond to one another by modifying their phenotype are central determinants of microbial communities. It is known that interspecific interactions influence the biofilm phenotype of bacteria; a phenotype that is central to the fitness of bacteria. However......, the underlying role of fundamental ecological factors, specifically coexistence and phylogenetic history, in biofilm formation remains unclear. This study examines how social interactions affect biofilm formation in multi-species co-cultures from five diverse environments. We found prevalence of increased...

  5. Establishing a laboratory model of dental unit waterlines bacterial biofilms using a CDC biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hye Young; Lee, Si Young

    2017-11-01

    In this study, a laboratory model to reproduce dental unit waterline (DUWL) biofilms was developed using a CDC biofilm reactor (CBR). Bacteria obtained from DUWLs were filtered and cultured in Reasoner's 2A (R2A) for 10 days, and were subsequently stored at -70°C. This stock was cultivated on R2A in batch mode. After culturing for five days, the bacteria were inoculated into the CBR. Biofilms were grown on polyurethane tubing for four days. Biofilm accumulation and thickness was 1.3 × 10 5  CFU cm -2 and 10-14 μm respectively, after four days. Bacteria in the biofilms included cocci and rods of short and medium lengths. In addition, 38 bacterial genera were detected in biofilms. In this study, the suitability and reproducibility of the CBR model for DUWL biofilm formation were demonstrated. The model provides a foundation for the development of bacterial control methods for DUWLs.

  6. Microbial diversity and putative opportunistic pathogens in dishwasher biofilm communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raghupathi, Prem Krishnan; Zupančič, Jerneja; Brejnrod, Asker Daniel

    2018-01-01

    impact the abundance of microbial groups, and investigated on the inter- and intra-kingdom interactions that shape these biofilms. The age, the usage frequency and hardness of incoming tap water of dishwashers had significant impact on bacterial and fungal composition. Representatives ofCandidaspp. were...... and interactions were vital in the process of biofilm formation, where mixed complexes of the two, bacteria and fungi, could provide a preliminary biogenic structure for the establishment of these biofilms.IMPORTANCEWorldwide demand for household appliances, such as dishwashers and washing machines, is increasing...

  7. Antibacterial effect of taurolidine (2%) on established dental plaque biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arweiler, Nicole Birgit; Auschill, Thorsten Mathias; Sculean, Anton

    2012-04-01

    Preliminary data have suggested that taurolidine may bear promising disinfectant properties for the therapy of bacterial infections. However, at present, the potential antibacterial effect of taurolidine on the supragingival plaque biofilm is unknown. To evaluate the antibacterial effect of taurolidine on the supragingival plaque biofilm using the vital fluorescence technique and to compare it with the effect of NaCl and chlorhexidine (CHX), 18 subjects had to refrain from all mechanical and chemical hygiene measures for 24 h. A voluminous supragingival plaque sample was taken from the buccal surfaces of the lower molars and wiped on an objective slide. The sample was then divided into three equal parts and mounted with one of the three test or control preparations (a) NaCl, (b) taurolidine 2% and (c) CHX 0.2%. After a reaction time of 2 min, the test solutions were sucked of. Subsequently, the plaque biofilm was stained with fluorescence dye and vitality of the plaque flora was evaluated under the fluorescence microscope (VF%). Plaque samples treated with NaCl showed a mean VF of 82.42 ± 6.04%. Taurolidine affected mean VF with 47.57 ± 16.60% significantly (p plaque biofilm which was, however, not as pronounced as that of CHX.

  8. Bacterial cell numbers and community structures of seawater biofilms depend on the attachment substratum

    KAUST Repository

    Yap, Scott A.

    2018-02-02

    Seawater is increasingly being used as a source for various industrial applications. For such applications, biofilm growth creates various problems including but not limited to pipe biocorrosion. In this study, it is hypothesized that the material type is preferred by certain bacterial populations in the seawater to attach and establish biofilms. By comparing differences in the total cell counts and microbial communities attached to high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polycarbonate, stainless steel (SS316) and titanium, the appropriate material can be used to minimize biofilm growth. All four materials have hydrophilic surfaces, but polycarbonate exhibits higher surface roughness. There were no significant differences in the cell numbers attached to polycarbonate, HDPE and titanium. Instead, there were significantly fewer cells attached to SS316. However, there was a higher relative abundance of genera associated with opportunistic pathogens on SS316. Copy numbers of genes representing Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae, both of which are sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), were approximately 10-fold higher in biofilms sampled from SS316. The enrichment of SRB in the biofilm associated with SS316 indicates that this material may be prone to biocorrosion. This study highlights the need for industries to consider the choice of material used in seawater applications to minimize microbial-associated problems.

  9. Bacterial cell numbers and community structures of seawater biofilms depend on the attachment substratum

    KAUST Repository

    Yap, Scott A.; Scarascia, Giantommaso; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2018-01-01

    Seawater is increasingly being used as a source for various industrial applications. For such applications, biofilm growth creates various problems including but not limited to pipe biocorrosion. In this study, it is hypothesized that the material type is preferred by certain bacterial populations in the seawater to attach and establish biofilms. By comparing differences in the total cell counts and microbial communities attached to high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polycarbonate, stainless steel (SS316) and titanium, the appropriate material can be used to minimize biofilm growth. All four materials have hydrophilic surfaces, but polycarbonate exhibits higher surface roughness. There were no significant differences in the cell numbers attached to polycarbonate, HDPE and titanium. Instead, there were significantly fewer cells attached to SS316. However, there was a higher relative abundance of genera associated with opportunistic pathogens on SS316. Copy numbers of genes representing Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae, both of which are sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), were approximately 10-fold higher in biofilms sampled from SS316. The enrichment of SRB in the biofilm associated with SS316 indicates that this material may be prone to biocorrosion. This study highlights the need for industries to consider the choice of material used in seawater applications to minimize microbial-associated problems.

  10. The Biofilm Community-Rebels with a Cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruni, A Wilson; Dou, Yuetan; Mishra, Arunima; Fletcher, Hansel M

    2015-03-01

    Oral Biofilms are one of the most complex and diverse ecosystem developed by successive colonization of more than 600 bacterial taxa. Development starts with the attachment of early colonizers such as Actinomyces species and oral streptococci on the acquired pellicle and tooth enamel. These bacteria not only adhere to tooth surface but also interact with each other and lay foundation for attachment of bridging colonizer such as Fusobacterium nucleatum followed by late colonizers including the red complex species: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola -the founders of periodontal disease. As the biofilm progresses from supragingival sites to subgingival sites, the environment changes from aerobic to anaerobic thus favoring the growth of mainly Gram-negative obligate anaerobes while restricting the growth of the early Gram-positive facultative aerobes. Microbes present at supragingival level are mainly related to gingivitis and root-caries whereas subgingival species advance the destruction of teeth supporting tissues and thus causing periodontitis. This review summarizes our present understanding and recent developments on the characteristic features of supra- and subgingival biofilms, interaction between different genera and species of bacteria constituting these biofilms and draws our attention to the role of some of the recently discovered members of the oral community.

  11. Water-limiting conditions alter the structure and biofilm-forming ability of bacterial multispecies communities in the alfalfa rhizosphere.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Bogino

    Full Text Available Biofilms are microbial communities that adhere to biotic or abiotic surfaces and are enclosed in a protective matrix of extracellular compounds. An important advantage of the biofilm lifestyle for soil bacteria (rhizobacteria is protection against water deprivation (desiccation or osmotic effect. The rhizosphere is a crucial microhabitat for ecological, interactive, and agricultural production processes. The composition and functions of bacterial biofilms in soil microniches are poorly understood. We studied multibacterial communities established as biofilm-like structures in the rhizosphere of Medicago sativa (alfalfa exposed to 3 experimental conditions of water limitation. The whole biofilm-forming ability (WBFA for rhizospheric communities exposed to desiccation was higher than that of communities exposed to saline or nonstressful conditions. A culture-dependent ribotyping analysis indicated that communities exposed to desiccation or saline conditions were more diverse than those under the nonstressful condition. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of selected strains showed that the rhizospheric communities consisted primarily of members of the Actinobacteria and α- and γ-Proteobacteria, regardless of the water-limiting condition. Our findings contribute to improved understanding of the effects of environmental stress factors on plant-bacteria interaction processes and have potential application to agricultural management practices.

  12. Functional recovery of biofilm bacterial communities after copper exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boivin, Marie-Elene Y.; Massieux, Boris; Breure, Anton M.; Greve, Gerdit D.; Rutgers, Michiel; Admiraal, Wim

    2006-01-01

    Potential of bacterial communities in biofilms to recover after copper exposure was investigated. Biofilms grown outdoor in shallow water on glass dishes were exposed in the laboratory to 0.6, 2.1, 6.8 μmol/l copper amended surface water and a reference and subsequently to un-amended surface water. Transitions of bacterial communities were characterised with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and community-level physiological profiles (CLPP). Exposure to 6.8 μmol/l copper provoked distinct changes in DGGE profiles of bacterial consortia, which did not reverse upon copper depuration. Exposure to 2.1 and 6.8 μmol/l copper was found to induce marked changes in CLPP of bacterial communities that proved to be reversible during copper depuration. Furthermore, copper exposure induced the development of copper-tolerance, which was partially lost during depuration. It is concluded that bacterial communities exposed to copper contaminated water for a period of 26 days are capable to restore their metabolic attributes after introduction of unpolluted water in aquaria for 28 days. - Genetically different bacterial communities can have similar functions and tolerance to copper

  13. Membrane biofouling characterization: effects of sample preparation procedures on biofilm structure and the microbial community

    KAUST Repository

    Xue, Zheng

    2014-07-15

    Ensuring the quality and reproducibility of results from biofilm structure and microbial community analysis is essential to membrane biofouling studies. This study evaluated the impacts of three sample preparation factors (ie number of buffer rinses, storage time at 4°C, and DNA extraction method) on the downstream analysis of nitrifying biofilms grown on ultrafiltration membranes. Both rinse and storage affected biofilm structure, as suggested by their strong correlation with total biovolume, biofilm thickness, roughness and the spatial distribution of EPS. Significant variations in DNA yields and microbial community diversity were also observed among samples treated by different rinses, storage and DNA extraction methods. For the tested biofilms, two rinses, no storage and DNA extraction with both mechanical and chemical cell lysis from attached biofilm were the optimal sample preparation procedures for obtaining accurate information about biofilm structure, EPS distribution and the microbial community. © 2014 © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  14. Comparative responses of river biofilms at the community level to common organic solvent and herbicide exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paule, A; Roubeix, V; Swerhone, G D W; Roy, J; Lauga, B; Duran, R; Delmas, F; Paul, E; Rols, J L; Lawrence, J R

    2016-03-01

    Residual pesticides applied to crops migrate from agricultural lands to surface and ground waters. River biofilms are the first aquatic non-target organisms which interact with pesticides. Therefore, ecotoxicological experiments were performed at laboratory scale under controlled conditions to investigate the community-level responses of river biofilms to a chloroacetanilide herbicide (alachlor) and organic solvent (methanol) exposure through the development referenced to control. Triplicate rotating annular bioreactors, inoculated with river water, were used to cultivate river biofilms under the influence of 1 and 10 μg L(-1) of alachlor and 25 mg L(-1) of methanol. For this purpose, functional (thymidine incorporation and carbon utilization spectra) and structural responses of microbial communities were assessed after 5 weeks of development. Structural aspects included biomass (chlorophyll a, confocal laser scanning microscopy) and composition (fluor-conjugated lectin binding, molecular fingerprinting, and diatom species composition). The addition of alachlor resulted in a significant reduction of bacterial biomass at 1 μg L(-1), whereas at 10 μg L(-1), it induced a significant reduction of exopolymer lectin binding, algal, bacterial, and cyanobacterial biomass. However, there were no changes in biofilm thickness or thymidine incorporation. No significant difference between the bacterial community structures of control and alachlor-treated biofilms was revealed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses. However, the methanol-treated bacterial communities appeared different from control and alachlor-treated communities. Moreover, methanol treatment resulted in an increase of bacterial biomass and thymidine incorporation as well. Changes in dominant lectin binding suggested changes in the exopolymeric substances and community composition. Chlorophyll a and cyanobacterial biomass were also altered by methanol. This study suggested

  15. Use of the MicroRespTM method to assess pollution-induced community tolerance to metals for lotic biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tlili, Ahmed; Marechal, Marjorie; Montuelle, Bernard; Volat, Bernadette; Dorigo, Ursula; Berard, Annette

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the ecological status of aquatic ecosystems and the impact of anthropogenic contamination requires correlating exposure to toxicants with impact on biological communities. Several tools exist for assessing the ecotoxicity of substances, but there is still a need for new tools that are ecologically relevant and easy to use. We have developed a protocol based on the substrate-induced respiration of a river biofilm community, using the MicroResp TM technique, in a pollution-induced community tolerance approach. The results show that MicroResp TM can be used in bioassays to assess the toxicity toward biofilm communities of a wide range of metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Ag, Ni, Fe, Co, Al and As). Moreover, a community-level physiological profile based on the mineralization of different carbon substrates was established. Finally, the utility of MicroResp TM was confirmed in an in-situ study showing gradient of tolerance to copper correlated to a contamination gradient of this metal in a small river. - A modified MicroResp TM technique as a tool for measuring induced tolerance to heavy metals of a microbial biofilm community. - Research highlights: → MicroResp TM allows to plot dose-response curves with various tested metals. → Induced-tolerance to copper of heterotrophic biofilm community was successfully measured. → No co-tolerance detected between copper, silver and cadmium by using MicroResp TM . → MicroResp TM allows assessment of change in catabolic diversity in microbial community.

  16. Biodegradation of carbamate pesticides by natural river biofilms in different seasons and their effects on biofilm community structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tien, Chien-Jung; Lin, Mon-Chu; Chiu, Wan-Hsin; Chen, Colin S.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of natural river biofilms from different seasons to degrade the carbamate pesticides methomyl, carbaryl and carbofuran in single and multiple pesticide systems, and the effects of these pesticides on algal and bacterial communities within biofilms. Spring biofilms had the lowest biomass of algae and bacteria but showed the highest methomyl degradation (>99%) and dissipation rates, suggesting that they might contain microorganisms with high methomyl degradation abilities. Degradation of carbofuran (54.1–59.5%) by biofilms in four seasons was similar, but low degradation of carbaryl (0–27.5%) was observed. The coexistence of other pesticides was found to cause certain effects on pesticide degradation and primarily resulted in lower diversity of diatoms and bacteria than when using a single pesticide. The tolerant diatoms and bacteria potentially having the ability to degrade test pesticides were identified. River biofilms could be suitable biomaterials or used to isolate degraders for bioremediating pesticide-contaminated water. -- Highlights: •Natural river biofilms showed high ability to degrade methomyl and carbofuran. •The presence of other pesticides caused certain effects on pesticide degradation. •Carbamate pesticides caused adverse effects on communities of diatoms and bacteria. •The tolerant diatoms and bacteria were found as potential pesticide-degraders. -- Biodegradation of carbamate pesticides by river biofilms

  17. Characterisation of the physical composition and microbial community structure of biofilms within a model full-scale drinking water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Katherine E; Collins, Richard; Green, Nicola H; Sharpe, Rebecca L; Douterelo, Isabel; Osborn, A Mark; Boxall, Joby B

    2015-01-01

    Within drinking water distribution systems (DWDS), microorganisms form multi-species biofilms on internal pipe surfaces. A matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) is produced by the attached community and provides structure and stability for the biofilm. If the EPS adhesive strength deteriorates or is overcome by external shear forces, biofilm is mobilised into the water potentially leading to degradation of water quality. However, little is known about the EPS within DWDS biofilms or how this is influenced by community composition or environmental parameters, because of the complications in obtaining biofilm samples and the difficulties in analysing EPS. Additionally, although biofilms may contain various microbial groups, research commonly focuses solely upon bacteria. This research applies an EPS analysis method based upon fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in combination with digital image analysis (DIA), to concurrently characterize cells and EPS (carbohydrates and proteins) within drinking water biofilms from a full-scale DWDS experimental pipe loop facility with representative hydraulic conditions. Application of the EPS analysis method, alongside DNA fingerprinting of bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities, was demonstrated for biofilms sampled from different positions around the pipeline, after 28 days growth within the DWDS experimental facility. The volume of EPS was 4.9 times greater than that of the cells within biofilms, with carbohydrates present as the dominant component. Additionally, the greatest proportion of EPS was located above that of the cells. Fungi and archaea were established as important components of the biofilm community, although bacteria were more diverse. Moreover, biofilms from different positions were similar with respect to community structure and the quantity, composition and three-dimensional distribution of cells and EPS, indicating that active colonisation of the pipe wall is an important

  18. Characterisation of the Physical Composition and Microbial Community Structure of Biofilms within a Model Full-Scale Drinking Water Distribution System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Katherine E.; Collins, Richard; Green, Nicola H.; Sharpe, Rebecca L.; Douterelo, Isabel; Osborn, A. Mark; Boxall, Joby B.

    2015-01-01

    Within drinking water distribution systems (DWDS), microorganisms form multi-species biofilms on internal pipe surfaces. A matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) is produced by the attached community and provides structure and stability for the biofilm. If the EPS adhesive strength deteriorates or is overcome by external shear forces, biofilm is mobilised into the water potentially leading to degradation of water quality. However, little is known about the EPS within DWDS biofilms or how this is influenced by community composition or environmental parameters, because of the complications in obtaining biofilm samples and the difficulties in analysing EPS. Additionally, although biofilms may contain various microbial groups, research commonly focuses solely upon bacteria. This research applies an EPS analysis method based upon fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in combination with digital image analysis (DIA), to concurrently characterize cells and EPS (carbohydrates and proteins) within drinking water biofilms from a full-scale DWDS experimental pipe loop facility with representative hydraulic conditions. Application of the EPS analysis method, alongside DNA fingerprinting of bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities, was demonstrated for biofilms sampled from different positions around the pipeline, after 28 days growth within the DWDS experimental facility. The volume of EPS was 4.9 times greater than that of the cells within biofilms, with carbohydrates present as the dominant component. Additionally, the greatest proportion of EPS was located above that of the cells. Fungi and archaea were established as important components of the biofilm community, although bacteria were more diverse. Moreover, biofilms from different positions were similar with respect to community structure and the quantity, composition and three-dimensional distribution of cells and EPS, indicating that active colonisation of the pipe wall is an important

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 exopolysaccharides are important for mixed species biofilm community development and stress tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan ePeriasamy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 produces three polysaccharides, alginate, Psl and Pel that play distinct roles in attachment and biofilm formation for monospecies biofilms. Considerably less is known about their role in the development of mixed species biofilm communities. This study has investigated the roles of alginate, Psl and Pel during biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa in a defined and experimentally informative mixed species biofilm community, consisting of P. aeruginosa, Pseudomonas protegens and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Loss of the Psl polysaccharide had the biggest impact on the integration of P. aeruginosa in the mixed species biofilms, where the percent composition of the psl mutant was significantly lower (0.06% than its wild-type parent (2.44%. In contrast, loss of the Pel polysaccharide had no impact on mixed species biofilm development. Loss of alginate or its overproduction resulted in P. aeruginosa representing 8.4% and 18.11%, respectively, of the mixed species biofilm. Dual species biofilms of P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae were not affected by loss of alginate, Pel or Psl, while the mucoid P. aeruginosa strain achieved a greater biomass than its parent strain. When P. aeruginosa was grown with P. protegens, loss of the Pel or alginate polysaccharides resulted in biofilms that were not significantly different from biofilms formed by the wild-type PAO1. In contrast, overproduction of alginate resulted in biofilms that were comprised of 35-40% of P. aeruginosa, which was significantly higher than the wild-type (5-20%. Loss of the Psl polysaccharide significantly reduced the percentage composition of P. aeruginosa in dual species biofilms with P. protegens (<1%. Loss of the Psl polysaccharide significantly disrupted the communal stress resistance of the three species biofilms. Thus, the polysaccharide composition of an individual species significantly impacts mixed species biofilm development and the emergent properties of such

  20. Establishing community trust at radioactively contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, E.

    1999-01-01

    Establishing community trust is an essential element in the successful remediation of a radioactively contaminated site. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 2 has been involved in the clean up of numerous radioactively contaminated Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA), and Formerly Utilized Site Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites in New Jersey and New York. Each site presented a unique challenge which centered around establishing and, often, re-establishing the trust of the surrounding community. Thanks to the United States government's history regarding the use of radioactive materials, people question whether governmental regulators could possibly have the public's best interests in mind when it comes to addressing radioactively contaminated sites. It has been our experience that EPA can use its position as guardian of the environment to help establish public confidence in remedial actions. The EPA can even use its position to lend credibility to remedial activities in situations where it is not directly responsible for the clean-up. Some ways that we have found to instill community confidence are: establishing radioanalytical cross-check programs using EPA's National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory to provide analytical quality assurance; and establishing an environmental radiation monitoring program for the contaminated site and surrounding community. (author)

  1. Biofilm bacterial communities in urban drinking water distribution systems transporting waters with different purification strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huiting; Zhang, Jingxu; Mi, Zilong; Xie, Shuguang; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Xiaojian

    2015-02-01

    Biofilm formation in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) has many adverse consequences. Knowledge of microbial community structure of DWDS biofilm can aid in the design of an effective control strategy. However, biofilm bacterial community in real DWDS and the impact of drinking water purification strategy remain unclear. The present study investigated the composition and diversity of biofilm bacterial community in real DWDSs transporting waters with different purification strategies (conventional treatment and integrated treatment). High-throughput Illumina MiSeq sequencing analysis illustrated a large shift in the diversity and structure of biofilm bacterial community in real DWDS. Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Nitrospirae, and Cyanobacteria were the major components of biofilm bacterial community. Proteobacteria (mainly Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria) predominated in each DWDS biofilm, but the compositions of the dominant proteobacterial classes and genera and their proportions varied among biofilm samples. Drinking water purification strategy could shape DWDS biofilm bacterial community. Moreover, Pearson's correlation analysis indicated that Actinobacteria was positively correlated with the levels of total alkalinity and dissolved organic carbon in tap water, while Firmicutes had a significant positive correlation with nitrite nitrogen.

  2. Microbial Biofilm Community Variation in Flowing Habitats: Potential Utility as Bioindicators of Postmortem Submersion Intervals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Lang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are a ubiquitous formation of microbial communities found on surfaces in aqueous environments. These structures have been investigated as biomonitoring indicators for stream heath, and here were used for the potential use in forensic sciences. Biofilm successional development has been proposed as a method to determine the postmortem submersion interval (PMSI of remains because there are no standard methods for estimating the PMSI and biofilms are ubiquitous in aquatic habitats. We sought to compare the development of epinecrotic (biofilms on Sus scrofa domesticus carcasses and epilithic (biofilms on unglazed ceramic tiles communities in two small streams using bacterial automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis. Epinecrotic communities were significantly different from epilithic communities even though environmental factors associated with each stream location also had a significant influence on biofilm structure. All communities at both locations exhibited significant succession suggesting that changing communities throughout time is a general characteristic of stream biofilm communities. The implications resulting from this work are that epinecrotic communities have distinctive shifts at the first and second weeks, and therefore the potential to be used in forensic applications by associating successional changes with submersion time to estimate a PMSI. The influence of environmental factors, however, indicates the lack of a successional pattern with the same organisms and a focus on functional diversity may be more applicable in a forensic context.

  3. Start-up and bacterial community compositions of partial nitrification in moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Mao, Yan-Jun; Shi, Yan-Ping; Quan, Xie

    2017-03-01

    Partial nitrification (PN) has been considered as one of the promising processes for pretreatment of ammonium-rich wastewater. In this study, a kind of novel carriers with enhanced hydrophilicity and electrophilicity was implemented in a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) to start up PN process. Results indicated that biofilm formation rate was higher on modified carriers. In comparison with the reactor filled with traditional carriers (start-up period of 21 days), it took only 14 days to start up PN successfully with ammonia removal efficiency and nitrite accumulation rate of 90 and 91%, respectively, in the reactor filled with modified carriers. Evident changes of spatial distributions and community structures had been detected during the start-up. Free-floating cells existed in planktonic sludge, while these microorganisms trended to form flocs in the biofilm. High-throughput pyrosequencing results indicated that Nitrosomonas was the predominant ammonia-oxidizing bacterium (AOB) in the PN system, while Comamonas might also play a vital role for nitrogen oxidation. Additionally, some other bacteria such as Ferruginibacter, Ottowia, Saprospiraceae, and Rhizobacter were selected to establish stable footholds. This study would be potentially significant for better understanding the microbial features and developing efficient strategies accordingly for MBBR-based PN operation.

  4. A novel approach for harnessing biofilm communities in moving bed biofilm reactors for industrial wastewater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Joe A. Lemire; Marc A. Demeter; Iain George; Howard Ceri; Raymond J. Turner

    2015-01-01

    Moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) are an effective biotechnology for treating industrial wastewater. Biomass retention on moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) carriers (biofilm support materials), allows for the ease-of-operation and high treatment capacity of MBBR systems. Optimization of MBBR systems has largely focused on aspects of carrier design, while little attention has been paid to enhancing strategies for harnessing microbial biomass. Previously, our research group demonstrated that ...

  5. Adaptation of copper community tolerance levels after biofilm transplantation in an urban river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechner, Lise C; Versace, François; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine; Tusseau-Vuillemin, Marie-Hélène

    2012-01-15

    The Water Framework Directive requires the development of biological tools which can act as early-warning indicators of a sudden increase (accidental pollution) or decrease (recovery due to prevention) of the chemical status of aquatic systems. River biofilms, which respond quickly to modifications of environmental parameters and also play a key part in the functioning of aquatic ecosystems, are therefore good candidates to monitor an increase or a decrease of water pollution. In the present study, we investigated the biological response of biofilms transplanted either upstream (recovery) or downstream (deterioration of exposure levels) the urban area of Paris (France). Both modifications of Cu community tolerance levels and of global bacterial and eukaryotic community structure using automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) fingerprints were examined 15 and 30 days after the transplantation. Cu tolerance levels of the heterotrophic component of biofilms were assessed using a short-term toxicity test based on β-glucosidase (heterotrophic) activity. Cu tolerance increased for biofilms transplanted upstream to downstream Paris (5-fold increase on day 30) and conversely decreased for biofilms transplanted downstream to upstream (8-fold decrease on day 30). ARISA fingerprints revealed that bacterial and eukaryotic community structures of transplanted biofilms were closer to the structures of biofilms from the transplantation sites (or sites with similar contamination levels) than to biofilms from their sites of origin. Statistical analysis of the data confirmed that the key factor explaining biofilm Cu tolerance levels is the sampling site and not the site of origin. It also showed that Cu tolerance levels are related to the global urban contamination (both metals and nutrients). The study shows that biofilms adapt fast to modifications of their surroundings. In particular, community tolerance varies quickly and reflects the new exposure levels only 15

  6. Diversity and functions of bacterial community in drinking water biofilms revealed by high-throughput sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yuanqing; Mao, Yanping; Wang, Zhiping; Zhang, Tong

    2015-06-01

    The development of biofilms in drinking water (DW) systems may cause various problems to water quality. To investigate the community structure of biofilms on different pipe materials and the global/specific metabolic functions of DW biofilms, PCR-based 454 pyrosequencing data for 16S rRNA genes and Illumina metagenomic data were generated and analysed. Considerable differences in bacterial diversity and taxonomic structure were identified between biofilms formed on stainless steel and biofilms formed on plastics, indicating that the metallic materials facilitate the formation of higher diversity biofilms. Moreover, variations in several dominant genera were observed during biofilm formation. Based on PCA analysis, the global functions in the DW biofilms were similar to other DW metagenomes. Beyond the global functions, the occurrences and abundances of specific protective genes involved in the glutathione metabolism, the SoxRS system, the OxyR system, RpoS regulated genes, and the production/degradation of extracellular polymeric substances were also evaluated. A near-complete and low-contamination draft genome was constructed from the metagenome of the DW biofilm, based on the coverage and tetranucleotide frequencies, and identified as a Bradyrhizobiaceae-like bacterium according to a phylogenetic analysis. Our findings provide new insight into DW biofilms, especially in terms of their metabolic functions.

  7. Combating biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are complex microbial communities consisting of microcolonies embedded in a matrix of self-produced polymer substances. Biofilm cells show much greater resistance to environmental challenges including antimicrobial agents than their free-living counterparts. The biofilm mode of life...... is believed to significantly contribute to successful microbial survival in hostile environments. Conventional treatment, disinfection and cleaning strategies do not proficiently deal with biofilm-related problems, such as persistent infections and contamination of food production facilities. In this review......, strategies to control biofilms are discussed, including those of inhibition of microbial attachment, interference of biofilm structure development and differentiation, killing of biofilm cells and induction of biofilm dispersion....

  8. Membrane biofilm communities in full-scale membrane bioreactors are not randomly assembled and consist of a core microbiome

    KAUST Repository

    Matar, Gerald Kamil

    2017-06-21

    Finding efficient biofouling control strategies requires a better understanding of the microbial ecology of membrane biofilm communities in membrane bioreactors (MBRs). Studies that characterized the membrane biofilm communities in lab-and pilot-scale MBRs are numerous, yet similar studies in full-scale MBRs are limited. Also, most of these studies have characterized the mature biofilm communities with very few studies addressing early biofilm communities. In this study, five full-scale MBRs located in Seattle (Washington, U.S.A.) were selected to address two questions concerning membrane biofilm communities (early and mature): (i) Is the assembly of biofilm communities (early and mature) the result of random immigration of species from the source community (i.e. activated sludge)? and (ii) Is there a core membrane biofilm community in full-scale MBRs? Membrane biofilm (early and mature) and activated sludge (AS) samples were collected from the five MBRs, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing was applied to investigate the bacterial communities of AS and membrane biofilms (early and mature). Alpha and beta diversity measures revealed clear differences in the bacterial community structure between the AS and biofilm (early and mature) samples in the five full-scale MBRs. These differences were mainly due to the presence of large number of unique but rare operational taxonomic units (∼13% of total reads in each MBR) in each sample. In contrast, a high percentage (∼87% of total reads in each MBR) of sequence reads was shared between AS and biofilm samples in each MBR, and these shared sequence reads mainly belong to the dominant taxa in these samples. Despite the large fraction of shared sequence reads between AS and biofilm samples, simulated biofilm communities from random sampling of the respective AS community revealed that biofilm communities differed significantly from the random assemblages (P < 0.001 for each MBR), indicating that the biofilm communities (early

  9. Nitrification at different salinities: Biofilm community composition and physiological plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Silva, Blanca M; Jonassen, Kjell Rune; Bakke, Ingrid; Østgaard, Kjetill; Vadstein, Olav

    2016-05-15

    This paper describes an experimental study of microbial communities of three moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBR) inoculated with nitrifying cultures originated from environments with different salinity; freshwater, brackish (20‰) and seawater. All reactors were run until they operated at a conversion efficiency of >96%. The microbial communities were profiled using 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Statistical analysis was used to investigate the differences in microbial community structure and distribution of the nitrifying populations with different salinity environments. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis (NMDS) and the PERMANOVA test based on Bray-Curtis similarities revealed significantly different community structure in the three reactors. The brackish reactor showed lower diversity index than fresh and seawater reactors. Venn diagram showed that 60 and 78% of the total operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) guild, respectively, were unique OTUs for a given reactor. Similarity Percentages (SIMPER) analysis showed that two-thirds of the total difference in community structure between the reactors was explained by 10 OTUs, indicating that only a small number of OTUs play a numerically dominant role in the nitrification process. Acute toxicity of salt stress on ammonium and nitrite oxidizing activities showed distinctly different patterns, reaching 97% inhibition of the freshwater reactor for ammonium oxidation rate. In the brackish culture, inhibition was only observed at maximal level of salinity, 32‰. In the fully adapted seawater culture, higher activities were observed at 32‰ than at any of the lower salinities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Biofilm Community Dynamics in Bench-Scale Annular Reactors Simulating Arrestment of Chloraminated Drinking Water Nitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annular reactors (ARs) were used to study biofilm community succession and provide an ecological insight during nitrification arrestment through simultaneously increasing monochloramine (NH2Cl) and chlorine to nitrogen mass ratios, resulting in four operational periods (I to IV)....

  11. Membrane biofouling characterization: effects of sample preparation procedures on biofilm structure and the microbial community

    KAUST Repository

    Xue, Zheng; Lu, Huijie; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2014-01-01

    Ensuring the quality and reproducibility of results from biofilm structure and microbial community analysis is essential to membrane biofouling studies. This study evaluated the impacts of three sample preparation factors (ie number of buffer rinses

  12. In situ environment rather than substrate type dictates microbial community structure of biofilms in a cold seep system

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, O.O.; Wang, Y.; Tian, R.; Zhang, W.; Shek, C.S.; Bougouffa, Salim; Al-Suwailem, A.; Batang, Z.B.; Xu, W.; Wang, G.C.; Zhang, Xixiang; Lafi, F.F.; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Qian, P.-Y.

    2014-01-01

    Using microscopic and molecular techniques combined with computational analysis, this study examined the structure and composition of microbial communities in biofilms that formed on different artificial substrates in a brine pool and on a seep vent of a cold seep in the Red Sea to test our hypothesis that initiation of the biofilm formation and spreading mode of microbial structures differs between the cold seep and the other aquatic environments. Biofilms on different substrates at two deployment sites differed morphologically, with the vent biofilms having higher microbial abundance and better structural features than the pool biofilms. Microbes in the pool biofilms were more taxonomically diverse and mainly composed of various sulfate-reducing bacteria whereas the vent biofilms were exclusively dominated by sulfur-oxidizing Thiomicrospira. These results suggest that the redox environments at the deployment sites might have exerted a strong selection on microbes in the biofilms at two sites whereas the types of substrates had limited effects on the biofilm development.

  13. In situ environment rather than substrate type dictates microbial community structure of biofilms in a cold seep system

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, O.O.

    2014-01-08

    Using microscopic and molecular techniques combined with computational analysis, this study examined the structure and composition of microbial communities in biofilms that formed on different artificial substrates in a brine pool and on a seep vent of a cold seep in the Red Sea to test our hypothesis that initiation of the biofilm formation and spreading mode of microbial structures differs between the cold seep and the other aquatic environments. Biofilms on different substrates at two deployment sites differed morphologically, with the vent biofilms having higher microbial abundance and better structural features than the pool biofilms. Microbes in the pool biofilms were more taxonomically diverse and mainly composed of various sulfate-reducing bacteria whereas the vent biofilms were exclusively dominated by sulfur-oxidizing Thiomicrospira. These results suggest that the redox environments at the deployment sites might have exerted a strong selection on microbes in the biofilms at two sites whereas the types of substrates had limited effects on the biofilm development.

  14. Evaluation of microbial biofilm communities from an Alberta oil sands tailings pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golby, Susanne; Ceri, Howard; Gieg, Lisa M; Chatterjee, Indranil; Marques, Lyriam L R; Turner, Raymond J

    2012-01-01

    Bitumen extraction from the oil sands of Alberta has resulted in millions of cubic meters of waste stored on-site in tailings ponds. Unique microbial ecology is expected in these ponds, which may be key to their bioremediation potential. We considered that direct culturing of microbes from a tailings sample as biofilms could lead to the recovery of microbial communities that provide good representation of the ecology of the tailings. Culturing of mixed species biofilms in vitro using the Calgary Biofilm Device (CBD) under aerobic, microaerobic, and anaerobic growth conditions was successful both with and without the addition of various growth nutrients. Denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA gene pyrotag sequencing revealed that unique mixed biofilm communities were recovered under each incubation condition, with the dominant species belonging to Pseudomonas, Thauera, Hydrogenophaga, Rhodoferax, and Acidovorax. This work used an approach that allowed organisms to grow as a biofilm directly from a sample collected of their environment, and the biofilms cultivated in vitro were representative of the endogenous environmental community. For the first time, representative environmental mixed species biofilms have been isolated and grown under laboratory conditions from an oil sands tailings pond environment and a description of their composition is provided.

  15. Influence of phosphorus availability on the community structure and physiology of cultured biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuangshuang; Wang, Chun; Qin, Hongjie; Li, Yinxia; Zheng, Jiaoli; Peng, Chengrong; Li, Dunhai

    2016-04-01

    Biofilms have important effects on nutrient cycling in aquatic ecosystems. However, publications about the community structure and functions under laboratory conditions are rare. This study focused on the developmental and physiological properties of cultured biofilms under various phosphorus concentrations performed in a closely controlled continuous flow incubator. The results showed that the biomass (Chl a) and photosynthesis of algae were inhibited under P-limitation conditions, while the phosphatase activity and P assimilation rate were promoted. The algal community structure of biofilms was more likely related to the colonization stage than with the phosphorus availability. Cyanobacteria were more competitive than other algae in biofilms, particularly when cultured under low P levels. A dominance shift occurred from non-filamentous algae in the early stage to filamentous algae in the mid and late stages under P concentrations of 0.01, 0.1 and 0.6 mg/L. However, the total N content, dry weight biomass and bacterial community structure of biofilms were unaffected by phosphorus availability. This may be attributed to the low respiration rate, high accumulation of extracellular polymeric substances and high alkaline phosphatase activity in biofilms when phosphorus availability was low. The bacterial community structure differed over time, while there was little difference between the four treatments, which indicated that it was mainly affected by the colonization stage of the biofilms rather than the phosphorus availability. Altogether, these results suggested that the development of biofilms was influenced by the phosphorus availability and/or the colonization stage and hence determined the role that biofilms play in the overlying water. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Adaptation of intertidal biofilm communities is driven by metal ion and oxidative stresses

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Weipeng; Wang, Yong; Lee, On On; Tian, Renmao; Cao, Huiluo; Gao, Zhaoming; Li, Yongxin; Yu, Li; Xu, Ying; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Marine organisms in intertidal zones are subjected to periodical fluctuations and wave activities. To understand how microbes in intertidal biofilms adapt to the stresses, the microbial metagenomes of biofilms from intertidal and subtidal zones were compared. The genes responsible for resistance to metal ion and oxidative stresses were enriched in both 6-day and 12-day intertidal biofilms, including genes associated with secondary metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, signal transduction and extracellular polymeric substance metabolism. In addition, these genes were more enriched in 12-day than 6-day intertidal biofilms. We hypothesize that a complex signaling network is used for stress tolerance and propose a model illustrating the relationships between these functions and environmental metal ion concentrations and oxidative stresses. These findings show that bacteria use diverse mechanisms to adapt to intertidal zones and indicate that the community structures of intertidal biofilms are modulated by metal ion and oxidative stresses.

  17. Adaptation of intertidal biofilm communities is driven by metal ion and oxidative stresses

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Weipeng

    2013-11-11

    Marine organisms in intertidal zones are subjected to periodical fluctuations and wave activities. To understand how microbes in intertidal biofilms adapt to the stresses, the microbial metagenomes of biofilms from intertidal and subtidal zones were compared. The genes responsible for resistance to metal ion and oxidative stresses were enriched in both 6-day and 12-day intertidal biofilms, including genes associated with secondary metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, signal transduction and extracellular polymeric substance metabolism. In addition, these genes were more enriched in 12-day than 6-day intertidal biofilms. We hypothesize that a complex signaling network is used for stress tolerance and propose a model illustrating the relationships between these functions and environmental metal ion concentrations and oxidative stresses. These findings show that bacteria use diverse mechanisms to adapt to intertidal zones and indicate that the community structures of intertidal biofilms are modulated by metal ion and oxidative stresses.

  18. Molecular Techniques Revealed Highly Diverse Microbial Communities in Natural Marine Biofilms on Polystyrene Dishes for Invertebrate Larval Settlement

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, On On

    2014-01-09

    Biofilm microbial communities play an important role in the larval settlement response of marine invertebrates. However, the underlying mechanism has yet to be resolved, mainly because of the uncertainties in characterizing members in the communities using traditional 16S rRNA gene-based molecular methods and in identifying the chemical signals involved. In this study, pyrosequencing was used to characterize the bacterial communities in intertidal and subtidal marine biofilms developed during two seasons. We revealed highly diverse biofilm bacterial communities that varied with season and tidal level. Over 3,000 operational taxonomic units with estimates of up to 8,000 species were recovered in a biofilm sample, which is by far the highest number recorded in subtropical marine biofilms. Nineteen phyla were found, of which Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria were the most dominant one in the intertidal and subtidal biofilms, respectively. Apart from these, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Planctomycetes were the major groups recovered in both intertidal and subtidal biofilms, although their relative abundance varied among samples. Full-length 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed for the four biofilm samples and showed similar bacterial compositions at the phylum level to those revealed by pyrosequencing. Laboratory assays confirmed that cyrids of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite preferred to settle on the intertidal rather than subtidal biofilms. This preference was independent of the biofilm bacterial density or biomass but was probably related to the biofilm community structure, particularly, the Proteobacterial and Cyanobacterial groups. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  19. A meta-proteomics approach to study the interspecies interactions affecting microbial biofilm development in a model community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herschend, Jakob; Damholt, Zacharias Brimnes Visby; Marquard, Andrea Marion

    2017-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are omnipresent in nature and relevant to a broad spectrum of industries ranging from bioremediation and food production to biomedical applications. To date little is understood about how multi-species biofilm communities develop and function on a molecular level, due...... of fermentation and nitrogen pathways in Paenibacillus amylolyticus and Xanthomonas retroflexus may, however, indicate that competition for limited resources also affects community development. Overall our results demonstrate the multitude of pathways involved in biofilm formation in mixed communities....

  20. Interaction between local hydrodynamics and algal community in epilithic biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graba, Myriam; Sauvage, Sabine; Moulin, Frédéric Y; Urrea, Gemma; Sabater, Sergi; Sanchez-Pérez, José Miguel

    2013-05-01

    Interactions between epilithic biofilm and local hydrodynamics were investigated in an experimental flume. Epilithic biofilm from a natural river was grown over a 41-day period in three sections with different flow velocities (0.10, 0.25 and 0.40 m s(-1) noted LV, IV and HV respectively). Friction velocities u* and boundary layer parameters were inferred from PIV measurement in the three sections and related to the biofilm structure. The results show that there were no significant differences in Dry Mass and Ash-Free Dry Mass (g m(-2)) at the end of experiment, but velocity is a selective factor in algal composition and the biofilms' morphology differed according to differences in water velocity. A hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis (Bray-Curtis distances) and an Indicator Species Analysis (IndVal) showed that the indicator taxa were Fragilaria capucina var. mesolepta in the low-velocity (u*. = 0.010-0.012 m s(-1)), Navicula atomus, Navicula capitatoradiata and Nitzschia frustulum in the intermediate-velocity (u*. = 0.023-0.030 m s(-1)) and Amphora pediculus, Cymbella proxima, Fragilaria capucina var. vaucheriae and Surirella angusta in the high-velocity (u*. = 0.033-0.050 m s(-1)) sections. A sloughing test was performed on 40-day-old biofilms in order to study the resistance of epilithic biofilms to higher hydrodynamic regimes. The results showed an inverse relationship between the proportion of detached biomass and the average value of friction velocity during growth. Therefore, water velocity during epilithic biofilm growth conditioned the structure and algal composition of biofilm, as well as its response (ability to resist) to higher shear stresses. This result should be considered in modelling epilithic biofilm dynamics in streams subject to a variable hydrodynamics regime. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Temporal Variations in the Abundance and Composition of Biofilm Communities Colonizing Drinking Water Distribution Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John J.; Minalt, Nicole; Culotti, Alessandro; Pryor, Marsha; Packman, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Pipes that transport drinking water through municipal drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) are challenging habitats for microorganisms. Distribution networks are dark, oligotrophic and contain disinfectants; yet microbes frequently form biofilms attached to interior surfaces of DWDS pipes. Relatively little is known about the species composition and ecology of these biofilms due to challenges associated with sample acquisition from actual DWDS. We report the analysis of biofilms from five pipe samples collected from the same region of a DWDS in Florida, USA, over an 18 month period between February 2011 and August 2012. The bacterial abundance and composition of biofilm communities within the pipes were analyzed by heterotrophic plate counts and tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, respectively. Bacterial numbers varied significantly based on sampling date and were positively correlated with water temperature and the concentration of nitrate. However, there was no significant relationship between the concentration of disinfectant in the drinking water (monochloramine) and the abundance of bacteria within the biofilms. Pyrosequencing analysis identified a total of 677 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (3% distance) within the biofilms but indicated that community diversity was low and varied between sampling dates. Biofilms were dominated by a few taxa, specifically Methylomonas, Acinetobacter, Mycobacterium, and Xanthomonadaceae, and the dominant taxa within the biofilms varied dramatically between sampling times. The drinking water characteristics most strongly correlated with bacterial community composition were concentrations of nitrate, ammonium, total chlorine and monochloramine, as well as alkalinity and hardness. Biofilms from the sampling date with the highest nitrate concentration were the most abundant and diverse and were dominated by Acinetobacter. PMID:24858562

  2. Impact of nutrient composition on a degradative biofilm community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Korber, Darren R.; Wolfaardt, Gideon M.

    1997-01-01

    (Trypticase soy broth), the biofilms underwent an architectural change which included the loss of mound structures and the formation of a more homogeneous biofilm. Neutrally charged fluorescent dextrans, which upon hydration become cationic, were observed to bind to mounds, as well as to the basal cell layer......, in 14-day biofilms. In contrast, polyanionic dextrans bound only to the basal cell layer, indicating that this material incorporated sites with both positive and negative charge. The results from this study indicate that nutrient composition has a significant impact on both the architecture...

  3. De novo biofilm community assembly from tap water source communities favors Nitrotoga over Nitrospira under elevated nitrite surface loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinnunen, Marta; Dechesne, Arnaud; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    -through biofilm system to continuous immigration from a tap water metacommunity while applying different nitrite surface loading rates. After 63 days of operation, we extracted biofilms and analyzed the community composition via Illumina MiSeq targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Previous studies have shown...... that Nitrospira is the dominant nitrite oxidizing genus in low nitrite environments. Hence, we postulated that by elevating the nitrite surface loading we would select for NOB with lower nitrite affinity than Nitrospira. We observed different dominant NOB species under different loading rates. While...... in the metacommunity, Nitrotoga and Nitrospira were found at near equal abundances, in the biofilm community, elevated nitrite loading strongly selected for Nitrotoga over Nitrospira. The biofilms were also significantly different in their alpha-diversity (pdiversity, and the evenness and richness...

  4. Effect of engineered environment on microbial community structure in biofilter and biofilm on reverse osmosis membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sanghyun; Cho, Kyungjin; Jeong, Dawoon; Lee, Seockheon; Leiknes, TorOve; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu; Bae, Hyokwan

    2017-11-01

    Four dual media filters (DMFs) were operated in a biofiltration mode with different engineered environments (DMF I and II: coagulation with/without acidification and DMF III and IV: without/with chlorination). Designed biofilm enrichment reactors (BERs) containing the removable reverse osmosis (RO) coupons, were connected at the end of the DMFs in parallel to analyze the biofilm on the RO membrane by DMF effluents. Filtration performances were evaluated in terms of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and assimilable organic carbon (AOC). Organic foulants on the RO membrane were also quantified and fractionized. The bacterial community structures in liquid (seawater and effluent) and biofilm (DMF and RO) samples were analyzed using 454-pyrosequencing. The DMF IV fed with the chlorinated seawater demonstrated the highest reductions of DOC including LMW-N as well as AOC among the other DMFs. The DMF IV was also effective in reducing organic foulants on the RO membrane surface. The bacterial community structure was grouped according to the sample phase (i.e., liquid and biofilm samples), sampling location (i.e., DMF and RO samples), and chlorination (chlorinated and non-chlorinated samples). In particular, the biofilm community in the DMF IV differed from the other DMF treatments, suggesting that chlorination exerted as stronger selective pressure than pH adjustment or coagulation on the biofilm community. In the DMF IV, several chemoorganotrophic chlorine-resistant biofilm-forming bacteria such as Hyphomonas, Erythrobacter, and Sphingomonas were predominant, and they may enhance organic carbon degradation efficiency. Diverse halophilic or halotolerant organic degraders were also found in other DMFs (i.e., DMF I, II, and III). Various kinds of dominant biofilm-forming bacteria were also investigated in RO membrane samples; the results provided possible candidates that cause biofouling when DMF process is applied as the pretreatment option for the RO process. Copyright

  5. Effect of engineered environment on microbial community structure in biofilter and biofilm on reverse osmosis membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Sanghyun

    2017-07-25

    Four dual media filters (DMFs) were operated in a biofiltration mode with different engineered environments (DMF I and II: coagulation with/without acidification and DMF III and IV: without/with chlorination). Designed biofilm enrichment reactors (BERs) containing the removable reverse osmosis (RO) coupons, were connected at the end of the DMFs in parallel to analyze the biofilm on the RO membrane by DMF effluents. Filtration performances were evaluated in terms of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and assimilable organic carbon (AOC). Organic foulants on the RO membrane were also quantified and fractionized. The bacterial community structures in liquid (seawater and effluent) and biofilm (DMF and RO) samples were analyzed using 454-pyrosequencing. The DMF IV fed with the chlorinated seawater demonstrated the highest reductions of DOC including LMW-N as well as AOC among the other DMFs. The DMF IV was also effective in reducing organic foulants on the RO membrane surface. The bacterial community structure was grouped according to the sample phase (i.e., liquid and biofilm samples), sampling location (i.e., DMF and RO samples), and chlorination (chlorinated and non-chlorinated samples). In particular, the biofilm community in the DMF IV differed from the other DMF treatments, suggesting that chlorination exerted as stronger selective pressure than pH adjustment or coagulation on the biofilm community. In the DMF IV, several chemoorganotrophic chlorine-resistant biofilm-forming bacteria such as Hyphomonas, Erythrobacter, and Sphingomonas were predominant, and they may enhance organic carbon degradation efficiency. Diverse halophilic or halotolerant organic degraders were also found in other DMFs (i.e., DMF I, II, and III). Various kinds of dominant biofilm-forming bacteria were also investigated in RO membrane samples; the results provided possible candidates that cause biofouling when DMF process is applied as the pretreatment option for the RO process.

  6. Effects of organic pollution on biological communities of marine biofilm on hard substrata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz-Lázaro, C.; Fodelianakis, S.; Guerrero-Meseguer, L.; Marín, A.; Karakassis, I.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effect of organic enrichment on diatom and bacterial assemblages of marine epilithic biofilms on two locations in the Mediterranean, one situated in Spain and the other in Greece. Total organic carbon, total organic nitrogen, stable isotopes (δ 13 C and δ 15 N) and chlorophyll a indicated significant incorporation of organic wastes, increased primary production and trophic niche modifications on the biofilms close to the organic enrichment source. In Spain, where the organic load was higher than in Greece, diatom and, to some extent, bacterial assemblages varied following the organic enrichment gradient. The taxonomic richness of diatom and bacterial communities was not influenced by organic enrichment. Classical community parameters showed consistent patterns to organic pollution in both locations, whereas community assemblages were only influenced when organic pollution was greatest. The successional patterns of these communities were similar to other epilithic communities. The modification of community assemblages induced by organic pollution may affect ecological functions. - Highlights: • We examined the effect of organic enrichment on assemblages of marine biofilms. • Classical community parameters showed consistent patterns to organic pollution. • Diatom and bacterial assemblages were affected under high level of organic enrichment. • Successional patterns were similar to other communities inhabiting hard substrata. • Assemblage modifications induced by organic pollution may affect ecological functions. - Organic pollution modifies the assemblages of biofilm communities which may affect important ecological functions

  7. The effect of arginine on oral biofilm communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, M M; Browngardt, C; Xiaohui, X; Klepac-Ceraj, V; Paster, B J; Burne, R A

    2014-02-01

    Alkali production by oral bacteria via the arginine deiminase system (ADS) increases the pH of oral biofilms and reduces the risk for development of carious lesions. This study tested the hypothesis that increased availability of arginine in the oral environment through an exogenous source enhances the ADS activity levels in saliva and dental plaque. Saliva and supra-gingival plaque samples were collected from 19 caries-free (CF) individuals (DMFT = 0) and 19 caries-active (CA) individuals (DMFT ≥ 2) before and after treatment, which comprised the use of a fluoride-free toothpaste containing 1.5% arginine, or a regular fluoride-containing toothpaste twice daily for 4 weeks. ADS activity was measured by quantification of ammonia produced from arginine by oral samples at baseline, after washout period, 4 weeks of treatment, and 2 weeks post-treatment. Higher ADS activity levels were observed in plaque samples from CF compared to those of CA individuals (P = 0.048) at baseline. The use of the arginine toothpaste significantly increased ADS activity in plaque of CA individuals (P = 0.026). The plaque microbial profiles of CA treated with the arginine toothpaste showed a shift in bacterial composition to a healthier community, more similar to that of CF individuals. Thus, an anti-caries effect may be expected from arginine-containing formulations due in large part to the enhancement of ADS activity levels and potential favorable modification to the composition of the oral microbiome. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Microbial community composition and dynamics of moving bed biofilm reactor systems treating municipal sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Kristi; Turner, Susan J

    2012-02-01

    Moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems are increasingly used for municipal and industrial wastewater treatment, yet in contrast to activated sludge (AS) systems, little is known about their constituent microbial communities. This study investigated the community composition of two municipal MBBR wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Wellington, New Zealand. Monthly samples comprising biofilm and suspended biomass were collected over a 12-month period. Bacterial and archaeal community composition was determined using a full-cycle community approach, including analysis of 16S rRNA gene libraries, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA). Differences in microbial community structure and abundance were observed between the two WWTPs and between biofilm and suspended biomass. Biofilms from both plants were dominated by Clostridia and sulfate-reducing members of the Deltaproteobacteria (SRBs). FISH analyses indicated morphological differences in the Deltaproteobacteria detected at the two plants and also revealed distinctive clustering between SRBs and members of the Methanosarcinales, which were the only Archaea detected and were present in low abundance (<5%). Biovolume estimates of the SRBs were higher in biofilm samples from one of the WWTPs which receives both domestic and industrial waste and is influenced by seawater infiltration. The suspended communities from both plants were diverse and dominated by aerobic members of the Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. This study represents the first detailed analysis of microbial communities in full-scale MBBR systems and indicates that this process selects for distinctive biofilm and planktonic communities, both of which differ from those found in conventional AS systems.

  9. Biofilm formation and microbial community analysis of the simulated river bioreactor for contaminated source water remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiang-Yang; Feng, Li-Juan; Zhu, Liang; Xu, Jing; Ding, Wei; Qi, Han-Ying

    2012-06-01

    The start-up pattern of biofilm remediation system affects the biofilm characteristics and operating performances. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performances of the contaminated source water remediation systems with different start-up patterns in view of the pollutants removal performances and microbial community succession. The operating performances of four lab-scale simulated river biofilm reactors were examined which employed different start-up methods (natural enrichment and artificial enhancement via discharging sediment with influent velocity gradient increase) and different bio-fillers (Elastic filler and AquaMats® ecobase). At the same time, the microbial communities of the bioreactors in different phases were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and sequencing. The pollutants removal performances became stable in the four reactors after 2 months' operation, with ammonia nitrogen and permanganate index (COD(Mn)) removal efficiencies of 84.41-94.21% and 69.66-76.60%, respectively. The biomass of mature biofilm was higher in the bioreactors by artificial enhancement than that by natural enrichment. Microbial community analysis indicated that elastic filler could enrich mature biofilm faster than AquaMats®. The heterotrophic bacteria diversity of biofilm decreased by artificial enhancement, which favored the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) developing on the bio-fillers. Furthermore, Nitrosomonas- and Nitrosospira-like AOB coexisted in the biofilm, and Pseudomonas sp., Sphaerotilus sp., Janthinobacterium sp., Corynebacterium aurimucosum were dominant in the oligotrophic niche. Artificial enhancement via the combination of sediment discharging and influent velocity gradient increasing could enhance the biofilm formation and autotrophic AOB enrichment in oligotrophic niche.

  10. Two-component system VicRK regulates functions associated with establishment of Streptococcus sanguinis in biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Julianna J; Stipp, Rafael N; Harth-Chu, Erika N; Camargo, Tarsila M; Höfling, José F; Mattos-Graner, Renata O

    2014-12-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is a commensal pioneer colonizer of teeth and an opportunistic pathogen of infectious endocarditis. The establishment of S. sanguinis in host sites likely requires dynamic fitting of the cell wall in response to local stimuli. In this study, we investigated the two-component system (TCS) VicRK in S. sanguinis (VicRKSs), which regulates genes of cell wall biogenesis, biofilm formation, and virulence in opportunistic pathogens. A vicK knockout mutant obtained from strain SK36 (SKvic) showed slight reductions in aerobic growth and resistance to oxidative stress but an impaired ability to form biofilms, a phenotype restored in the complemented mutant. The biofilm-defective phenotype was associated with reduced amounts of extracellular DNA during aerobic growth, with reduced production of H2O2, a metabolic product associated with DNA release, and with inhibitory capacity of S. sanguinis competitor species. No changes in autolysis or cell surface hydrophobicity were detected in SKvic. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), and promoter sequence analyses revealed that VicR directly regulates genes encoding murein hydrolases (SSA_0094, cwdP, and gbpB) and spxB, which encodes pyruvate oxidase for H2O2 production. Genes previously associated with spxB expression (spxR, ccpA, ackA, and tpK) were not transcriptionally affected in SKvic. RT-qPCR analyses of S. sanguinis biofilm cells further showed upregulation of VicRK targets (spxB, gbpB, and SSA_0094) and other genes for biofilm formation (gtfP and comE) compared to expression in planktonic cells. This study provides evidence that VicRKSs regulates functions crucial for S. sanguinis establishment in biofilms and identifies novel VicRK targets potentially involved in hydrolytic activities of the cell wall required for these functions. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Studying bacterial multispecies biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Henriette Lyng; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Burmølle, Mette

    2016-01-01

    The high prevalence and significance of multispecies biofilms have now been demonstrated in various bacterial habitats with medical, industrial, and ecological relevance. It is highly evident that several species of bacteria coexist and interact in biofilms, which highlights the need for evaluating...... the approaches used to study these complex communities. This review focuses on the establishment of multispecies biofilms in vitro, interspecies interactions in microhabitats, and how to select communities for evaluation. Studies have used different experimental approaches; here we evaluate the benefits...... and drawbacks of varying the degree of complexity. This review aims to facilitate multispecies biofilm research in order to expand the current limited knowledge on interspecies interactions. Recent technological advances have enabled total diversity analysis of highly complex and diverse microbial communities...

  12. Unsaturated Fatty Acid, cis-2-Decenoic Acid, in Combination with Disinfectants or Antibiotics Removes Pre-Established Biofilms Formed by Food-Related Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehr, Shayesteh; Rahmani-Badi, Azadeh; Babaie-Naiej, Hamta; Soudi, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm formation by food-related bacteria and food-related pathogenesis are significant problems in the food industry. Even though much disinfection and mechanical procedure exist for removal of biofilms, they may fail to eliminate pre-established biofilms. cis-2 decenoic acid (CDA), an unsaturated fatty acid messenger produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is reportedly capable of inducing the dispersion of established biofilms by multiple types of microorganisms. However, whether CDA has potential to boost the actions of certain antimicrobials is unknown. Here, the activity of CDA as an inducer of pre-established biofilms dispersal, formed by four main food pathogens; Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella enterica and E. coli, was measured using both semi-batch and continuous cultures bioassays. To assess the ability of CDA combined biocides treatments to remove pre-established biofilms formed on stainless steel discs, CFU counts were performed for both treated and untreated cultures. Eradication of the biofilms by CDA combined antibiotics was evaluated using crystal violet staining. The effect of CDA combined treatments (antibiotics and disinfectants) on biofilm surface area and bacteria viability was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy, digital image analysis and LIVE/DEAD staining. MICs were also determined to assess the probable inhibitory effects of CDA combined treatments on the growth of tested microorganisms' planktonic cells. Treatment of pre-established biofilms with only 310 nM CDA resulted in at least two-fold increase in the number of planktonic cells in all cultures. While antibiotics or disinfectants alone exerted a trivial effect on CFU counts and percentage of surface area covered by the biofilms, combinational treatments with both 310 nM CDA and antibiotics or disinfectants led to approximate 80% reduction in biofilm biomass. These data suggests that combined treatments with CDA would pave the way toward developing new strategies

  13. Unsaturated fatty acid, cis-2-decenoic acid, in combination with disinfectants or antibiotics removes pre-established biofilms formed by food-related bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayesteh Sepehr

    Full Text Available Biofilm formation by food-related bacteria and food-related pathogenesis are significant problems in the food industry. Even though much disinfection and mechanical procedure exist for removal of biofilms, they may fail to eliminate pre-established biofilms. cis-2 decenoic acid (CDA, an unsaturated fatty acid messenger produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is reportedly capable of inducing the dispersion of established biofilms by multiple types of microorganisms. However, whether CDA has potential to boost the actions of certain antimicrobials is unknown. Here, the activity of CDA as an inducer of pre-established biofilms dispersal, formed by four main food pathogens; Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella enterica and E. coli, was measured using both semi-batch and continuous cultures bioassays. To assess the ability of CDA combined biocides treatments to remove pre-established biofilms formed on stainless steel discs, CFU counts were performed for both treated and untreated cultures. Eradication of the biofilms by CDA combined antibiotics was evaluated using crystal violet staining. The effect of CDA combined treatments (antibiotics and disinfectants on biofilm surface area and bacteria viability was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy, digital image analysis and LIVE/DEAD staining. MICs were also determined to assess the probable inhibitory effects of CDA combined treatments on the growth of tested microorganisms' planktonic cells. Treatment of pre-established biofilms with only 310 nM CDA resulted in at least two-fold increase in the number of planktonic cells in all cultures. While antibiotics or disinfectants alone exerted a trivial effect on CFU counts and percentage of surface area covered by the biofilms, combinational treatments with both 310 nM CDA and antibiotics or disinfectants led to approximate 80% reduction in biofilm biomass. These data suggests that combined treatments with CDA would pave the way toward

  14. Molecular Characterisation and Co-cultivation of Bacterial Biofilm Communities Associated with the Mat-Forming Diatom Didymosphenia geminata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, Josephin; Kuhajek, Jeanne M; Goodwin, Eric; Wood, Susanna A

    2016-10-01

    Didymosphenia geminata (Lyngbye) M. Schmidt is a stalked freshwater diatom that is expanding its range globally. In some rivers, D. geminata forms thick and expansive polysaccharide-dominated mats. Like other stalked diatoms, D. geminata cells attach to the substratum with a pad of adhesive extracellular polymeric substance. Research on D. geminata and other diatoms suggests that bacterial biofilm composition may contribute to successful attachment. The aim of this study was to investigate the composition and role of bacterial biofilm communities in D. geminata attachment and survival. Bacterial biofilms were collected at four sites in the main stem of a river (containing D. geminata) and in four tributaries (free of D. geminata). Samples were characterised using automated rRNA intergenic spacer analysis and high-throughput sequencing (HTS). Mat-associated bacteria were isolated and their effect on the early establishment of D. geminata cells assessed using co-culturing experiments. ARISA and HTS data showed differences in bacterial communities between samples with and without D. geminata at two of the four sites. Samples with D. geminata had a higher relative abundance of Sphingobacteria (p geminata reduced survival (p geminata. Attachment was enhanced by Micrococcus sp. and Pseudomonas sp. (p geminata, and may partly explain observed distribution patterns.

  15. Characteristics of microbial community involved in early biofilms formation under the influence of wastewater treatment plant effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yuke; Li, Jie; Lu, Junling; Xiao, Lin; Yang, Liuyan

    2018-04-01

    Effluents from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) containing microorganisms and residual nutrients can influence the biofilm formation. Although the process and mechanism of bacterial biofilm formation have been well characterized, little is known about the characteristics and interaction of bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes in the early colonization, especially under the influence of WWTP effluent. The aim of this study was to characterize the important bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic species in the early stage of biofilm formation downstream of the WWTP outlet. Water and biofilm samples were collected 24 and 48hr after the deposition of bio-cords in the stream. Illumina Miseq sequencing of the 16S and 18S rDNA showed that, among the three domains, the bacterial biofilm community had the largest alpha and beta diversity. The early bacterial colonizers appeared to be "biofilm-specific", with only a few dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) shared between the biofilm and the ambient water environment. Alpha-proteobacteria and Ciliophora tended to dominate the bacterial and eukaryotic communities, respectively, of the early biofilm already at 24hr, whereas archaea played only a minor role during the early stage of colonization. The network analysis showed that the three domains of microbial community connected highly during the early colonization and it might be a characteristic of the microbial communities in the biofilm formation process where co-occurrence relationships could drive coexistence and diversity maintenance within the microbial communities. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. STABILITY AND CHANGE IN ESTUARINE BIOFILM BACTERIAL COMMUNITY DIVERSITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofilms develop on all surfaces in aquatic environments and are defined as matrix-enclosed microbial populations adherent to each other and/or surfaces (1, 31). A substantial part of the microbial activity in nature is associated with surfaces (12). Surface association (biofou...

  17. Progressive biogeochemical transformation of placer gold particles drives compositional changes in associated biofilm communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Maria Angelica; Standish, Christopher D; Shuster, Jeremiah; Bissett, Andrew; Reith, Frank

    2018-05-03

    Biofilms on placer gold (Au)-particle surfaces drive Au solubilization and re-concentration thereby progressively transforming the particles. Gold solubilization induces Au-toxicity; however, Au-detoxifying community members ameliorates Au-toxicity by precipitating soluble Au to metallic Au. We hypothesize that Au-dissolution and re-concentration (precipitation) places selective pressures on associated microbial communities, leading to compositional changes and subsequent Au-particle transformation. We analyzed Au-particles from eight United Kingdom sites using next generation sequencing, electron microscopy and micro-analyses. Gold particles contained biofilms composed of prokaryotic cells and extracellular polymeric substances intermixed with (bio)minerals. Across all sites communities were dominated by Proteobacteria (689, 97% Operational Taxonomic Units, 59.3% of total reads), with β-Proteobacteria being the most abundant. A wide range of Au-morphotypes including nanoparticles, micro-crystals, sheet-like Au and secondary rims, indicated that dissolution and re-precipitation occurred, and from this transformation indices were calculated. Multivariate statistical analyses showed a significant relationship between the extent of Au-particle transformation and biofilm community composition, with putative metal-resistant Au-cycling taxa linked to progressive Au transformation. These included the genera Pseudomonas, Leptothrix and Acinetobacter. Additionally, putative exoelectrogenic genera Rhodoferax and Geobacter were highly abundant. In conclusion, biogeochemical Au-cycling and Au-particle transformation occurred at all sites and exerted a strong influence on biofilm community composition.

  18. Economic Imperative of Global Community Establishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyneka Tatyana

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern global society is becoming increasingly controversial. Under such conditions, the question of prospects for life of megasociety, which demands theoretical and methodological research from the economic science, as well as a thorough analysis of empiricists, becomes of special relevance. The publication presents the concept of systemic transformation of the global economy and global community. The following is defined: subsystems (spheres of transformed community system (economic, political, social, spiritual; objects of transformation, the change of which is essential for the acquisition of a new quality by the system; causes and determinants of system transformation. Based on this, it is proved that the system of world community harmonized in its internal composition is integrity, each of its subsystems corresponds to the imperative of humanism. If this equirement is fulfilled, the world community will be able to move to a higher level of civilization development. In the process of studying transformation of the global society, a methodology has been used to identify these changes in the mega-society and describe them with a model. Choosing the defining parameters of the model allowed to answer the following questions: what is the purpose of humanity, radically changing its life; what are the structural transformations; in what way will community evolve; how the relations in such a society will be institutionalized. On the basis of the applied theory and methodology, the following is substantiated: The purpose of social dynamics is the comprehensive development of man and the creation of a society based on the principles of noosphere; changes in the structure of social system occur simultaneously with changes in subsystems and are subject to the imperative of continuous enrichment of the potential of society development; innovation as a basis for social reproduction in all its spheres is a way of society evolving; the systematic

  19. Influence of an oyster reef on development of the microbial heterotrophic community of an estuarine biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocker, Andreas; Lepo, Joe E; Snyder, Richard A

    2004-11-01

    We characterized microbial biofilm communities developed over two very closely located but distinct benthic habitats in the Pensacola Bay estuary using two complementary cultivation-independent molecular techniques. Biofilms were grown for 7 days on glass slides held in racks 10 to 15 cm over an oyster reef and an adjacent muddy sand bottom. Total biomass and optical densities of dried biofilms showed dramatic differences for oyster reef versus non-oyster reef biofilms. This study assessed whether the observed spatial variation was reflected in the heterotrophic prokaryotic species composition. Genomic biofilm DNA from both locations was isolated and served as a template to amplify 16S rRNA genes with universal eubacterial primers. Fluorescently labeled PCR products were analyzed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, creating a genetic fingerprint of the composition of the microbial communities. Unlabeled PCR products were cloned in order to construct a clone library of 16S rRNA genes. Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis was used to screen and define ribotypes. Partial sequences from unique ribotypes were compared with existing database entries to identify species and to construct phylogenetic trees representative of community structures. A pronounced difference in species richness and evenness was observed at the two sites. The biofilm community structure from the oyster reef setting had greater evenness and species richness than the one from the muddy sand bottom. The vast majority of the bacteria in the oyster reef biofilm were related to members of the gamma- and delta-subdivisions of Proteobacteria, the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium -Bacteroides cluster, and the phyla Planctomyces and Holophaga-Acidobacterium. The same groups were also present in the biofilm harvested at the muddy sand bottom, with the difference that nearly half of the community consisted of representatives of the Planctomyces phylum. Total species richness was estimated

  20. PO43- dependence of the tolerance of autotrophic and heterotrophic biofilm communities to copper and diuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlili, Ahmed; Bérard, Annette; Roulier, Jean-Louis; Volat, Bernadette; Montuelle, Bernard

    2010-06-10

    Pollution-induced community tolerance (PICT) concept is based on the assumption that the toxicant exerts selection pressure on the biological communities when exposure reaches a critical level for a sufficient period of time and therefore sensitive species are eliminated. However, induced tolerance of microbial biofilm communities cannot be attributed solely to the presence of toxicants in rivers but also to various environmental factors, such as amount of nutrients. An experimental study was undertaken to highlight the potential impact of a phosphorus gradient on the sensitivity of periphytic microbial community to Cu and diuron. Biofilms were exposed to real-world levels of chronic environmental contamination of toxicants with a phosphorus gradient. Biofilm sensitivity to Cu and diuron was assessed by performing short-term inhibition tests based on photosynthetic efficiency to target photoautotrophs, extracellular enzyme activity (beta-glucosidase and leucine-aminopeptidase) and substrate-induced respiration activity to target heterotrophs. The impact of P-gradient associated to pollution was evaluated by measuring pesticide concentrations in biofilms, biomass parameters (chla, AFDW), bacterial cell density, photosynthetic efficiency and community structure (using 18S and 16S rDNA gene analysis to target eukaryotes and DGGE and HPLC pigment analysis to target bacteria and photoautotrophs). The obtained results show that depending on the studied toxicant and the used structural or functional parameter, the effect of the phosphorus gradient was variable. This highlights the importance of using a range of parameters that target all the biological communities in the biofilm. The PICT method can be regarded as a good tool for assessing anthropogenic environmental contamination, but it is necessary to dissociate the real impact of toxicants from environmental factors.

  1. Community structure and seasonal dynamics of diatom biofilms and associated grazers in intertidal mudflats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahan, E.; Sabbe, K.; Creach, V.; Hernandez-Raquet, G.; Vyverman, W.; Stal, L.J.; Muyzer, G.

    2007-01-01

    The composition and seasonal dynamics of biofilm-associated eukaryotic communities were analysed at the metre and kilometre scale along a salinity gradient in the Westerschelde estuary (The Netherlands), using microscopy and a genetic fingerprinting technique (PCR-DGGE). Microphytobenthic biomass,

  2. Biofilm community diversity after exposure to 0·4% stannous fluoride gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, C; Rasmussen, K; Selberg, T; Stevens, J; Jones, R S

    2014-12-01

    To test the effect of 0·4% stannous fluoride (SnF2 ) glycerine-based gels on specific portions of the bacterial community in both a clinical observational study and in vitro multispecies plaque-derived (MSPD) biofilm model. Potential changes to specific portions of the bacterial community were determined through the Human Oral Microbial Identification Microarray (HOMIM). Both the observational clinical study and the biofilm model showed that short-term use of 0·4% SnF2 gel has little effect on the bacterial community depicted by hierarchical cluster analysis. The amount of plaque accumulation on a subject's teeth, which was measured by plaque index scores, failed to show statistical significant changes over the two baselines or after treatment (P = 0·9928). The in vitro results were similar when examining the effect of 0·4% SnF2 gels on biofilm adherence through a crystal violet assay (P = 0·1157). The bacteria within the dental biofilms showed resilience in maintaining the overall community diversity after exposure to 0·4% SnF2 topical gels. The study supports that the immediate benefits of using 0·4% SnF2 gels in children may be strictly from fluoride ions inhibiting tooth demineralization rather than delivering substantial antimicrobial effects. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Collaboration: the Key to Establishing Community Networks in Regional Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wal Taylor

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the promise of community involvement, cohesion and empowerment offered by local community networks (CN using Internet Technologies, few communities in regional Australia have been able to demonstrate sustainable and vibrant CN which demonstrate increased social, cultural or self-reliance capital. The Faculty of Informatics and Communication at Central Queensland University (CQU and a local council have established a formal alliance to establish the COIN (Community Informatics projects to research issues around this topic. This paper presents the initial findings from this work and draws conclusions for possible comparison with other international experience. The research focuses attention on community understanding and cohesion, local government priorities in a community with relatively low diffusion of the Internet and the competing demands in a regional university between traditional service provision in an increasingly competitive market and the needs of establishing outreach research for altruistic, industry establishment and commercial rationale.

  4. Amide side chain amphiphilic polymers disrupt surface established bacterial bio-films and protect mice from chronic Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Samaddar, Sandip; Ghosh, Chandradhish; Paramanandham, Krishnamoorthy; Shome, Bibek R; Haldar, Jayanta

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms represent the root-cause of chronic or persistent infections in humans. Gram-negative bacterial infections due to nosocomial and opportunistic pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii are more difficult to treat because of their inherent and rapidly acquiring resistance to antibiotics. Due to biofilm formation, A. baumannii has been noted for its apparent ability to survive on artificial surfaces for an extended period of time, therefore allowing it to persist in the hospital environment. Here we report, maleic anhydride based novel cationic polymers appended with amide side chains that disrupt surface established multi-drug resistant A. baumannii biofilms. More importantly, these polymers significantly (p polymers also show potent antibacterial efficacy against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin resistant Enterococci (VRE) and multi-drug resistant clinical isolates of A. baumannii with minimal toxicity to mammalian cells. We observe that optimal hydrophobicity dependent on the side chain chemical structure of these polymers dictate the selective toxicity to bacteria. Polymers interact with the bacterial cell membranes by causing membrane depolarization, permeabilization and energy depletion. Bacteria develop rapid resistance to erythromycin and colistin whereas no detectable development of resistance occurs against these polymers even after several passages. These results suggest the potential use of these polymeric biomaterials in disinfecting biomedical device surfaces after the infection has become established and also for the topical treatment of chronic bacterial infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Seasonal effects of cadmium accumulation in periphytic diatom communities of freshwater biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thi Thuy Duong; Morin, Soizic; Herlory, Olivier; Feurtet-Mazel, Agnes; Coste, Michel; Boudou, Alain

    2008-01-01

    The relationships between diatom species and cadmium (Cd) accumulated in biofilms of the Riou-Mort River (SW, France) were studied in July 2004 and March 2005. Biofilms were sampled from artificial substrates immersed along a metallic pollution gradient during 20 days. Dynamics of diatom communities and cadmium accumulation were followed by collecting samples after 4, 7, 14 and 20 days of biofilm colonization. Cd accumulation in biofilms during experiment was significantly higher in Cd polluted station (Joanis) than in reference station (Firmi) for both seasons. Periphytic diatom composition varied between sites and seasons. At Firmi station, seasonal dynamics of diatom communities were stable with the dominance of Cyclotella meneghiniana and Melosira varians in July and Surirellabrebissonnii and Navicula gregaria in March. At Joanis station, diatom communities mainly responded to high levels of metal by a high proportion of small, adnate species. Positive correlations between Eolimna minima, Nitzschia palea, Encyonema minutum, Surirella angusta, and Gomphonema parvulum and cadmium accumulation were observed, indicating that these species are tolerant to high levels of cadmium. On the other hand, negative correlations of C. meneghiniana, N. gregaria, Navicula lanceolata, M. varians and Nitzschia dissipata with cadmium qualify them as sensitive diatom species. Periphytic diatom composition through the presence of specific species highlight metal tolerant indicator diatom groups which will be meaningful for biomonitoring pollution in natural aquatic systems

  6. Antibiotic Discovery: Combatting Bacterial Resistance in Cells and in Biofilm Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahit Penesyan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial resistance is a rapidly escalating threat to public health as our arsenal of effective antibiotics dwindles. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new antibiotics. Drug discovery has historically focused on bacteria growing in planktonic cultures. Many antibiotics were originally developed to target individual bacterial cells, being assessed in vitro against microorganisms in a planktonic mode of life. However, towards the end of the 20th century it became clear that many bacteria live as complex communities called biofilms in their natural habitat, and this includes habitats within a human host. The biofilm mode of life provides advantages to microorganisms, such as enhanced resistance towards environmental stresses, including antibiotic challenge. The community level resistance provided by biofilms is distinct from resistance mechanisms that operate at a cellular level, and cannot be overlooked in the development of novel strategies to combat infectious diseases. The review compares mechanisms of antibiotic resistance at cellular and community levels in the light of past and present antibiotic discovery efforts. Future perspectives on novel strategies for treatment of biofilm-related infectious diseases are explored.

  7. Seasonal effects of cadmium accumulation in periphytic diatom communities of freshwater biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thi Thuy Duong [Institute of Environmental Technology, Vietnamese Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France)], E-mail: duongthuy0712@yahoo.com; Morin, Soizic [Cemagref, UR REBX, 50 avenue de Verdun, F-33612 Cestas cedex (France); Herlory, Olivier [Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France); Feurtet-Mazel, Agnes [Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France)], E-mail: a.feurtet-mazel@epoc.u-bordeaux1.fr; Coste, Michel [Cemagref, UR REBX, 50 avenue de Verdun, F-33612 Cestas cedex (France); Boudou, Alain [Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France)

    2008-10-20

    The relationships between diatom species and cadmium (Cd) accumulated in biofilms of the Riou-Mort River (SW, France) were studied in July 2004 and March 2005. Biofilms were sampled from artificial substrates immersed along a metallic pollution gradient during 20 days. Dynamics of diatom communities and cadmium accumulation were followed by collecting samples after 4, 7, 14 and 20 days of biofilm colonization. Cd accumulation in biofilms during experiment was significantly higher in Cd polluted station (Joanis) than in reference station (Firmi) for both seasons. Periphytic diatom composition varied between sites and seasons. At Firmi station, seasonal dynamics of diatom communities were stable with the dominance of Cyclotella meneghiniana and Melosira varians in July and Surirellabrebissonnii and Navicula gregaria in March. At Joanis station, diatom communities mainly responded to high levels of metal by a high proportion of small, adnate species. Positive correlations between Eolimna minima, Nitzschia palea, Encyonema minutum, Surirella angusta, and Gomphonema parvulum and cadmium accumulation were observed, indicating that these species are tolerant to high levels of cadmium. On the other hand, negative correlations of C. meneghiniana, N. gregaria, Navicula lanceolata, M. varians and Nitzschia dissipata with cadmium qualify them as sensitive diatom species. Periphytic diatom composition through the presence of specific species highlight metal tolerant indicator diatom groups which will be meaningful for biomonitoring pollution in natural aquatic systems.

  8. Syntrophic microbial communities on straw as biofilm carrier increase the methane yield of a biowaste-digesting biogas reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank R. Bengelsdorf

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Biogas from biowaste can be an important source of renewable energy, but the fermentation process of low-structure waste is often unstable. The present study uses a full-scale biogas reactor to test the hypothesis that straw as an additional biofilm carrier will increase methane yield; and this effect is mirrored in a specific microbial community attached to the straw. Better reactor performance after addition of straw, at simultaneously higher organic loading rate and specific methane yield confirmed the hypothesis. The microbial communities on straw as a biofilm carrier and of the liquid reactor content were investigated using 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing by means of 454 pyrosequencing technology. The results revealed high diversity of the bacterial communities in the liquid reactor content as well as the biofilms on the straw. The most abundant archaea in all samples belonged to the genera Methanoculleus and Methanosarcina. Addition of straw resulted in a significantly different microbial community attached to the biofilm carrier. The bacterium Candidatus Cloacamonas acidaminovorans and methanogenic archaea of the genus Methanoculleus dominated the biofilm on straw. Syntrophic interactions between the hydrogenotrophic Methanoculleus sp. and members of the hydrogen-producing bacterial community within biofilms may explain the improved methane yield. Thus, straw addition can be used to improve and to stabilize the anaerobic process in substrates lacking biofilm-supporting structures.

  9. Molecular Analysis of Bacterial Communities in Biofilms of a Drinking Water Clearwell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minglu; Liu, Wenjun; Nie, Xuebiao; Li, Cuiping; Gu, Junnong; Zhang, Can

    2012-01-01

    Microbial community structures in biofilms of a clearwell in a drinking water supply system in Beijing, China were examined by clone library, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and 454 pyrosequencing of the amplified 16S rRNA gene. Six biofilm samples (designated R1–R6) collected from six locations (upper and lower sites of the inlet, middle and outlet) of the clearwell revealed similar bacterial patterns by T-RFLP analysis. With respect to the dominant groups, the phylotypes detected by clone library and T-RFLP generally matched each other. A total of 9,543 reads were obtained from samples located at the lower inlet and the lower outlet sites by pyrosequencing. The bacterial diversity of the two samples was compared at phylum and genus levels. Alphaproteobacteria dominated the communities in both samples and the genus of Sphingomonas constituted 75.1%–99.6% of this phylum. A high level of Sphingomonas sp. was first observed in the drinking water biofilms with 0.6–1.0 mg L−1 of chlorine residual. Disinfectant-resistant microorganisms deserve special attention in drinking water management. This study provides novel insights into the microbial populations in drinking water systems and highlights the important role of Sphingomonas species in biofilm formation. PMID:23059725

  10. Responses of bacterial community structure and denitrifying bacteria in biofilm to submerged macrophytes and nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songhe; Pang, Si; Wang, Peifang; Wang, Chao; Guo, Chuan; Addo, Felix Gyawu; Li, Yi

    2016-10-01

    Submerged macrophytes play important roles in constructed wetlands and natural water bodies, as these organisms remove nutrients and provide large surfaces for biofilms, which are beneficial for nitrogen removal, particularly from submerged macrophyte-dominated water columns. However, information on the responses of biofilms to submerged macrophytes and nitrogen molecules is limited. In the present study, bacterial community structure and denitrifiers were investigated in biofilms on the leaves of four submerged macrophytes and artificial plants exposed to two nitrate concentrations. The biofilm cells were evenly distributed on artificial plants but appeared in microcolonies on the surfaces of submerged macrophytes. Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum in all samples, accounting for 27.3-64.8% of the high-quality bacterial reads, followed by Chloroflexi (3.7-25.4%), Firmicutes (3.0-20.1%), Acidobacteria (2.7-15.7%), Actinobacteria (2.2-8.7%), Bacteroidetes (0.5-9.7%), and Verrucomicrobia (2.4-5.2%). Cluster analysis showed that bacterial community structure can be significantly different on macrophytes versus from those on artificial plants. Redundancy analysis showed that electrical conductivity and nitrate concentration were positively correlated with Shannon index and operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness (log10 transformed) but somewhat negatively correlated with microbial density. The relative abundances of five denitrifying genes were positively correlated with nitrate concentration and electrical conductivity but negatively correlated with dissolved oxygen.

  11. A meta-proteomics approach to study the interspecies interactions affecting microbial biofilm development in a model community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herschend, Jakob; Damholt, Zacharias Brimnes Visby; Marquard, Andrea Marion

    2017-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are omnipresent in nature and relevant to a broad spectrum of industries ranging from bioremediation and food production to biomedical applications. To date little is understood about how multi-species biofilm communities develop and function on a molecular level, due to the co......Microbial biofilms are omnipresent in nature and relevant to a broad spectrum of industries ranging from bioremediation and food production to biomedical applications. To date little is understood about how multi-species biofilm communities develop and function on a molecular level, due...... to the complexity of these biological systems. Here we apply a meta-proteomics approach to investigate the mechanisms influencing biofilm formation in a model consortium of four bacterial soil isolates; Stenotrophomonas rhizophila, Xanthomonas retroflexus, Microbacterium oxydans and Paenibacillus amylolyticus...

  12. Sunlight-exposed biofilm microbial communities are naturally resistant to chernobyl ionizing-radiation levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragon, Marie; Restoux, Gwendal; Moreira, David; Møller, Anders Pape; López-García, Purificación

    2011-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident represents a long-term experiment on the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation at the ecosystem level. Though studies of these effects on plants and animals are abundant, the study of how Chernobyl radiation levels affect prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities is practically non-existent, except for a few reports on human pathogens or soil microorganisms. Environments enduring extreme desiccation and UV radiation, such as sunlight exposed biofilms could in principle select for organisms highly resistant to ionizing radiation as well. To test this hypothesis, we explored the diversity of microorganisms belonging to the three domains of life by cultivation-independent approaches in biofilms developing on concrete walls or pillars in the Chernobyl area exposed to different levels of radiation, and we compared them with a similar biofilm from a non-irradiated site in Northern Ireland. Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria and Deinococcales were the most consistently detected bacterial groups, whereas green algae (Chlorophyta) and ascomycete fungi (Ascomycota) dominated within the eukaryotes. Close relatives to the most radio-resistant organisms known, including Rubrobacter species, Deinococcales and melanized ascomycete fungi were always detected. The diversity of bacteria and eukaryotes found in the most highly irradiated samples was comparable to that of less irradiated Chernobyl sites and Northern Ireland. However, the study of mutation frequencies in non-coding ITS regions versus SSU rRNA genes in members of a same actinobacterial operational taxonomic unit (OTU) present in Chernobyl samples and Northern Ireland showed a positive correlation between increased radiation and mutation rates. Our results show that biofilm microbial communities in the most irradiated samples are comparable to non-irradiated samples in terms of general diversity patterns, despite increased mutation levels at the single

  13. Dynamics of development and dispersal in sessile microbial communities: examples from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida model biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, M.; Gjermansen, Morten; Kreft, J.-U.

    2006-01-01

    Surface-associated microbial communities in many cases display dynamic developmental patterns. Model biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida in laboratory flow-chamber setups represent examples of such behaviour. Dependent on the experimental conditions the bacteria...

  14. Molecular Techniques Revealed Highly Diverse Microbial Communities in Natural Marine Biofilms on Polystyrene Dishes for Invertebrate Larval Settlement

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, On On; Chung, Hong Chun; Yang, Jiangke; Wang, Yong; Dash, Swagatika; Wang, Hao; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm microbial communities play an important role in the larval settlement response of marine invertebrates. However, the underlying mechanism has yet to be resolved, mainly because of the uncertainties in characterizing members

  15. A Tad pilus promotes the establishment and resistance of Vibrio vulnificus biofilms to mechanical clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Meng; Rowe-Magnus, Dean Allistair

    2018-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is autochthonous to estuaries and warm coastal waters. Infection occurs via open wounds or ingestion, where its asymptomatic colonization of seafood, most infamously oysters, provides a gateway into the human food chain. Colonization begins with initial surface contact, which is often mediated by bacterial surface appendages called pili. Type IV Tad pili are widely distributed in the Vibrionaceae, but evidence for a physiological role for these structures is scant. The V. vulnificus genome codes for three distinct tad loci. Recently, a positive correlation was demonstrated between the expression of tad-3 and the phenotypes of a V. vulnificus descendent (NT) that exhibited increased biofilm formation, auto-aggregation, and oyster colonization relative to its parent. However, the mechanism by which tad pilus expression promoted these phenotypes was not determined. Here, we show that deletion of the tad pilin gene ( flp ) altered the near-surface motility profile of NT cells from high curvature, orbital retracing patterns characteristic of cells actively probing the surface to low curvature traces indicative of wandering and diminished bacteria-surface interactions. The NT flp pilin mutant also exhibited decreased initial surface attachment, attenuated auto-aggregation and formed fragile biofilms that disintegrated under hydrodynamic flow. Thus, the tad-3 locus, designated iam , promoted i nitial surface attachment, a uto-aggregation and resistance to m echanical clearance of V. vulnificus biofilms. The prevalence of tad loci in the Vibrionaceae suggests that they may play equally important roles in other family members.

  16. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms: recent developments in biofilm dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Jessica L; Horswill, Alexander R

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections and represents a significant burden on the healthcare system. S. aureus attachment to medical implants and host tissue, and the establishment of a mature biofilm, play an important role in the persistence of chronic infections. The formation of a biofilm, and encasement of cells in a polymer-based matrix, decreases the susceptibility to antimicrobials and immune defenses, making these infections difficult to eradicate. During infection, dispersal of cells from the biofilm can result in spread to secondary sites and worsening of the infection. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the pathways behind biofilm dispersal in S. aureus, with a focus on enzymatic and newly described broad-spectrum dispersal mechanisms. Additionally, we explore potential applications of dispersal in the treatment of biofilm-mediated infections.

  17. Biofilm inhibitors that target amyloid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Diego; Sanabria-Valentín, Edgardo; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2013-01-24

    Bacteria establish stable communities, known as biofilms, that are resistant to antimicrobials. Biofilm robustness is due to the presence of an extracellular matrix, which for several species-among them Bacillus subtilis-includes amyloid-like protein fibers. In this work, we show that B. subtilis biofilms can be a simple and reliable tool for screening of molecules with antiamyloid activity. We identified two molecules, AA-861 and parthenolide, which efficiently inhibited biofilms by preventing the formation of amyloid-like fibers. Parthenolide also disrupted pre-established biofilms. These molecules also impeded the formation of biofilms of other bacterial species that secrete amyloid proteins, such as Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli. Furthermore, the identified molecules decreased the conversion of the yeast protein New1 to the prion state in a heterologous host, indicating the broad range of activity of the molecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Metagenomic Sequencing of Marine Periphyton: Taxonomic and Functional Insights into Biofilm Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal eSanli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Periphyton communities are complex phototrophic, multispecies biofilms that develop on surfaces in aquatic environments. These communities harbor a large diversity of organisms comprising viruses, bacteria, algae, fungi, protozoans and metazoans. However, thus far the total biodiversity of periphyton has not been described. In this study, we use metagenomics to characterize periphyton communities from the marine environment of the Swedish west coast. Although we found approximately ten times more eukaryotic rRNA marker gene sequences compared to prokaryotic, the whole metagenome-based similarity searches showed that bacteria constitute the most abundant phyla in these biofilms. We show that marine periphyton encompass a range of heterotrophic and phototrophic organisms. Heterotrophic bacteria, including the majority of proteobacterial clades and Bacteroidetes, and eukaryotic macro-invertebrates were found to dominate periphyton. The phototrophic groups comprise Cyanobacteria and the alpha-proteobacterial genus Roseobacter, followed by different micro- and macro-algae. We also assess the metabolic pathways that predispose these communities to an attached lifestyle. Functional indicators of the biofilm form of life in periphyton involve genes coding for enzymes that catalyze the production and degradation of extracellular polymeric substances, mainly in the form of complex sugars such as starch and glycogen-like meshes together with chitin. Genes for 278 different transporter proteins were detected in the metagenome, constituting the most abundant protein complexes. Finally, genes encoding enzymes that participate in anaerobic pathways, such as denitrification and methanogenesis, were detected suggesting the presence of anaerobic or low-oxygen micro-zones within the biofilms.

  19. Why firm-established user communities work for innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Lars Bo; Frederiksen, Lars

    Studies of the sources of innovations have recognized that many innovations are developedby users. However, the fact that firms employ communities of users to strengthen their innovationprocess has not yet received much attention. In firm-established user communities users freely revealinnovation...... by selling them to all users. We study the key personal attributes of the individuals responsiblefor innovations and the creation of value in this organizational context, namely the innovative users, toexplain why firm-established user communities work. Analyzing data derived from a web...

  20. Why firm-established user communities work for innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Lars Bo; Frederiksen, Lars

    2004-01-01

    Studies of the sources of innovations have recognized that many innovations are developedby users. However, the fact that firms employ communities of users to strengthen their innovationprocess has not yet received much attention. In firm-established user communities users freely revealinnovation...... by selling them to all users. We study the key personal attributes of the individuals responsiblefor innovations and the creation of value in this organizational context, namely the innovative users, toexplain why firm-established user communities work. Analyzing data derived from a web...

  1. Virulence factors in Proteus bacteria from biofilm communities of catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hola, Veronika; Peroutkova, Tereza; Ruzicka, Filip

    2012-07-01

    More than 40% of nosocomial infections are those of the urinary tract, most of these occurring in catheterized patients. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters results not only in infection, but also various complications, such as blockage of catheters with crystalline deposits of bacterial origin, generation of gravels and pyelonephritis. The diversity of the biofilm microbial community increases with duration of catheter emplacement. One of the most important pathogens in this regard is Proteus mirabilis. The aims of this study were to identify and assess particular virulence factors present in catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) isolates, their correlation and linkages: three types of motility (swarming, swimming and twitching), the ability to swarm over urinary catheters, biofilm production in two types of media, urease production and adherence of bacterial cells to various types of urinary tract catheters. We examined 102 CAUTI isolates and 50 isolates taken from stool samples of healthy people. Among the microorganisms isolated from urinary catheters, significant differences were found in biofilm-forming ability and the swarming motility. In comparison with the control group, the microorganisms isolated from urinary catheters showed a wider spectrum of virulence factors. The virulence factors (twitching motility, swimming motility, swarming over various types of catheters and biofilm formation) were also more intensively expressed. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The microbial community of a biofilm contact reactor for the treatment of winery wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, D M; Botes, M; Cloete, T E

    2018-02-01

    To utilize a three-tiered approach to provide insight into the microbial community structure, the spatial distribution and the metabolic capabilities of organisms of a biofilm in the two towers of a high-rate biological contact reactor treating winery wastewater. Next-generation sequencing indicated that bacteria primarily responsible for the removal of carbohydrates, sugars and alcohol were more abundant in tower 1 than tower 2 while nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria were more abundant in tower 2. Yeast populations differed in each tower. Fluorescent in situ hybridization coupled with confocal microscopy showed distribution of organisms confirming an oxygen gradient across the biofilm depth. The Biolog system (ECO plates) specified the different carbon-metabolizing profiles of the two biofilms. The three-tiered approach confirmed that the addition of a second subunit to the bioreactor, expanded the treatment capacity by augmenting the microbial and metabolic diversity of the system, improving the treatment scope of the system. A three-tiered biofilm analysis provided data required to optimize the design of a bioreactor to provide favourable conditions for the development of a microbial consortium, which has optimal waste removal properties for the treatment requirements at hand. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Treatment of Biofilm Communities: An Update on New Tools from the Nanosized World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Bertoglio

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally regarded as single cell organisms, bacteria naturally and preferentially build multicellular communities that enable them to react efficiently to external stimuli in a coordinated fashion and with extremely effective outcomes. These communities are bacterial biofilms, where single cells or microcolonies are embedded in self-built Extracellular Polymeric Substance (EPS, composed of different macromolecules, e.g., polysaccharides, proteins, lipids, and extracellular DNA (eDNA. Despite being the most common form in nature and having many biotechnologically useful applications, biofilm is often regarded as a life-threatening form of bacterial infection. Since this form of bacterial life is intrinsically more resistant to antibiotic treatment and antimicrobial resistance is reaching alarming levels, we will focus our attention on how nanotechnology made new tools available to the medical community for the prevention and treatment of these infections. After a brief excursus on biofilm formation and its main characteristics, different types of nanomaterials developed to prevent or counteract these multicellular forms of bacterial infection will be described. A comparison of different classifications adopted for nanodrugs and a final discussion of challenges and future perspectives are also presented.

  4. Effects of organic pollution on biological communities of marine biofilm on hard substrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Lázaro, C; Fodelianakis, S; Guerrero-Meseguer, L; Marín, A; Karakassis, I

    2015-06-01

    We examined the effect of organic enrichment on diatom and bacterial assemblages of marine epilithic biofilms on two locations in the Mediterranean, one situated in Spain and the other in Greece. Total organic carbon, total organic nitrogen, stable isotopes (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) and chlorophyll a indicated significant incorporation of organic wastes, increased primary production and trophic niche modifications on the biofilms close to the organic enrichment source. In Spain, where the organic load was higher than in Greece, diatom and, to some extent, bacterial assemblages varied following the organic enrichment gradient. The taxonomic richness of diatom and bacterial communities was not influenced by organic enrichment. Classical community parameters showed consistent patterns to organic pollution in both locations, whereas community assemblages were only influenced when organic pollution was greatest. The successional patterns of these communities were similar to other epilithic communities. The modification of community assemblages induced by organic pollution may affect ecological functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sulfate Reducing Bacteria and Mycobacteria Dominate the Biofilm Communities in a Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Smith, C Kimloi; LaPara, Timothy M; Hozalski, Raymond M

    2015-07-21

    The quantity and composition of bacterial biofilms growing on 10 water mains from a full-scale chloraminated water distribution system were analyzed using real-time PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene and next-generation, high-throughput Illumina sequencing. Water mains with corrosion tubercles supported the greatest amount of bacterial biomass (n = 25; geometric mean = 2.5 × 10(7) copies cm(-2)), which was significantly higher (P = 0.04) than cement-lined cast-iron mains (n = 6; geometric mean = 2.0 × 10(6) copies cm(-2)). Despite spatial variation of community composition and bacterial abundance in water main biofilms, the communities on the interior main surfaces were surprisingly similar, containing a core group of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) assigned to only 17 different genera. Bacteria from the genus Mycobacterium dominated all communities at the main wall-bulk water interface (25-78% of the community), regardless of main age, estimated water age, main material, and the presence of corrosion products. Further sequencing of the mycobacterial heat shock protein gene (hsp65) provided species-level taxonomic resolution of mycobacteria. The two dominant Mycobacteria present, M. frederiksbergense (arithmetic mean = 85.7% of hsp65 sequences) and M. aurum (arithmetic mean = 6.5% of hsp65 sequences), are generally considered to be nonpathogenic. Two opportunistic pathogens, however, were detected at low numbers: M. hemophilum (arithmetic mean = 1.5% of hsp65 sequences) and M. abscessus (arithmetic mean = 0.006% of hsp65 sequences). Sulfate-reducing bacteria from the genus Desulfovibrio, which have been implicated in microbially influenced corrosion, dominated all communities located underneath corrosion tubercules (arithmetic mean = 67.5% of the community). This research provides novel insights into the quantity and composition of biofilms in full-scale drinking water distribution systems, which is critical for assessing the risks to public health and to the

  6. Discriminating activated sludge flocs from biofilm microbial communities in a novel pilot-scale reciprocation MBR using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sotto, Ryan; Ho, Jaeho; Lee, Woonyoung; Bae, Sungwoo

    2018-03-29

    Membrane bioreactors (MBRs) are a well-established filtration technology that has become a popular solution for treating wastewater. One of the drawbacks of MBRs, however, is the formation of biofilm on the surface of membrane modules. The occurrence of biofilms leads to biofouling, which eventually compromises water quality and damages the membranes. To prevent this, it is vital to understand the mechanism of biofilm formation on membrane surfaces. In this pilot-scale study, a novel reciprocation membrane bioreactor was operated for a period of 8 months and fed with domestic wastewater from an aerobic tank of a local WWTP. Water quality parameters were monitored and the microbial composition of the attached biofilm and suspended aggregates was evaluated in this reciprocating MBR configuration. The abundance of nitrifiers and composition of microbial communities from biofilm and suspended solids samples were investigated using qPCR and high throughput 16S amplicon sequencing. Removal efficiencies of 29%, 16%, and 15% of chemical oxygen demand, total phosphorus and total nitrogen from the influent were observed after the MBR process with average effluent concentrations of 16 mg/L, 4.6 mg/L, and 5.8 mg/L respectively. This suggests that the energy-efficient MBR, apart from reducing the total energy consumption, was able to maintain effluent concentrations that are within regulatory standards for discharge. Molecular analysis showed the presence of amoA Bacteria and 16S Nitrospira genes with the occurrence of nitrification. Candidatus Accumulibacter, a genus with organisms that can accumulate phosphorus, was found to be present in both groups which explains why phosphorus removal was observed in the system. High-throughput 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing revealed the genus Saprospira to be the most abundant species from the total OTUs of both the membrane tank and biofilm samples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Three common metal contaminants of urban runoff (Zn, Cu and Pb) accumulate in freshwater biofilm and modify embedded bacterial communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancion, Pierre-Yves; Lear, Gavin; Lewis, Gillian D.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the absorption rates of zinc, copper and lead in freshwater biofilm and assessed whether biofilm bacterial populations are affected by exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of these metals in flow chamber microcosms. Metals were rapidly accumulated by the biofilm and then retained for at least 14 days after transfer to uncontaminated water. Changes in bacterial populations were assessed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. Significant differences in bacterial community structure occurred within only three days of exposure to metals and remained detectable at least 14 days after transfer to uncontaminated water. The rapid uptake of stormwater-associated metals and their retention in the biofilm highlight the potential role of biofilms in the transfer of metals to organisms at higher trophic levels. The sensitivity of stream biofilm bacterial populations to metal exposure supports their use as an indicator of stream ecological health. - The rapid accumulation of metals in biofilms and their impact on bacterial communities provide new insights into how these contaminants affect freshwater ecosystems.

  8. Biofilm structures (EPS and bacterial communities) in drinking water distribution systems are conditioned by hydraulics and influence discolouration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, K; Osborn, A M; Boxall, J B

    2017-09-01

    High-quality drinking water from treatment works is degraded during transport to customer taps through the Drinking Water Distribution System (DWDS). Interactions occurring at the pipe wall-water interface are central to this degradation and are often dominated by complex microbial biofilms that are not well understood. This study uses novel application of confocal microscopy techniques to quantify the composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and cells of DWDS biofilms together with concurrent evaluation of the bacterial community. An internationally unique, full-scale, experimental DWDS facility was used to investigate the impact of three different hydraulic patterns upon biofilms and subsequently assess their response to increases in shear stress, linking biofilms to water quality impacts such as discolouration. Greater flow variation during growth was associated with increased cell quantity but was inversely related to EPS-to-cell volume ratios and bacterial diversity. Discolouration was caused and EPS was mobilised during flushing of all conditions. Ultimately, biofilms developed under low-varied flow conditions had lowest amounts of biomass, the greatest EPS volumes per cell and the lowest discolouration response. This research shows that the interactions between hydraulics and biofilm physical and community structures are complex but critical to managing biofilms within ageing DWDS infrastructure to limit water quality degradation and protect public health. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Empirical Study Regarding the Trust Relationships Established in a Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florina-Valentina NICOLAE

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper that we present aims to address the issue of relationships naturally established in a community through some items that we consider relevant to the proposed topic. In this purpose, we have initiated a quantitative research, developed through a survey, based on questionnaire, self-managed and on line. The recorded answers are statistically interpreted, using IBM SPSS application. The results suggests that the perception of the subjects participating in the study on the relationships established with their communities, on the date of the study, is not clearly contoured.

  10. Effect of temperature and colonization of Legionella pneumophila and Vermamoeba vermiformis on bacterial community composition of copper drinking water biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Helen Y; Ji, Pan; Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Pruden, Amy; Edwards, Marc A; Ashbolt, Nicholas J

    2017-07-01

    It is unclear how the water-based pathogen, Legionella pneumophila (Lp), and associated free-living amoeba (FLA) hosts change or are changed by the microbial composition of drinking water (DW) biofilm communities. Thus, this study characterized the bacterial community structure over a 7-month period within mature (> 600-day-old) copper DW biofilms in reactors simulating premise plumbing and assessed the impact of temperature and introduction of Lp and its FLA host, Vermamoeba vermiformis (Vv), co-cultures (LpVv). Sequence and quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses indicated a correlation between LpVv introduction and increases in Legionella spp. levels at room temperature (RT), while at 37°C, Lp became the dominant Legionella spp. qPCR analysis suggested Vv presence may not be directly associated with Lp biofilm growth at RT and 37°C, but may contribute to or be associated with non-Lp legionellae persistence at RT. Two-way PERMANOVA and PCoA revealed that temperature was a major driver of microbiome diversity. Biofilm community composition also changed over the seven-month period and could be associated with significant shifts in dissolved oxygen, alkalinity and various metals in the influent DW. Hence, temperature, biofilm age, DW quality and transient intrusions/amplification of pathogens and FLA hosts may significantly impact biofilm microbiomes and modulate pathogen levels over extended periods. © 2016 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Sunlight-exposed biofilm microbial communities are naturally resistant to chernobyl ionizing-radiation levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Ragon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Chernobyl accident represents a long-term experiment on the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation at the ecosystem level. Though studies of these effects on plants and animals are abundant, the study of how Chernobyl radiation levels affect prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities is practically non-existent, except for a few reports on human pathogens or soil microorganisms. Environments enduring extreme desiccation and UV radiation, such as sunlight exposed biofilms could in principle select for organisms highly resistant to ionizing radiation as well. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test this hypothesis, we explored the diversity of microorganisms belonging to the three domains of life by cultivation-independent approaches in biofilms developing on concrete walls or pillars in the Chernobyl area exposed to different levels of radiation, and we compared them with a similar biofilm from a non-irradiated site in Northern Ireland. Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria and Deinococcales were the most consistently detected bacterial groups, whereas green algae (Chlorophyta and ascomycete fungi (Ascomycota dominated within the eukaryotes. Close relatives to the most radio-resistant organisms known, including Rubrobacter species, Deinococcales and melanized ascomycete fungi were always detected. The diversity of bacteria and eukaryotes found in the most highly irradiated samples was comparable to that of less irradiated Chernobyl sites and Northern Ireland. However, the study of mutation frequencies in non-coding ITS regions versus SSU rRNA genes in members of a same actinobacterial operational taxonomic unit (OTU present in Chernobyl samples and Northern Ireland showed a positive correlation between increased radiation and mutation rates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that biofilm microbial communities in the most irradiated samples are comparable to non-irradiated samples in

  12. Sunlight-Exposed Biofilm Microbial Communities Are Naturally Resistant to Chernobyl Ionizing-Radiation Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragon, Marie; Restoux, Gwendal; Moreira, David; Møller, Anders Pape; López-García, Purificación

    2011-01-01

    Background The Chernobyl accident represents a long-term experiment on the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation at the ecosystem level. Though studies of these effects on plants and animals are abundant, the study of how Chernobyl radiation levels affect prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities is practically non-existent, except for a few reports on human pathogens or soil microorganisms. Environments enduring extreme desiccation and UV radiation, such as sunlight exposed biofilms could in principle select for organisms highly resistant to ionizing radiation as well. Methodology/Principal Findings To test this hypothesis, we explored the diversity of microorganisms belonging to the three domains of life by cultivation-independent approaches in biofilms developing on concrete walls or pillars in the Chernobyl area exposed to different levels of radiation, and we compared them with a similar biofilm from a non-irradiated site in Northern Ireland. Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria and Deinococcales were the most consistently detected bacterial groups, whereas green algae (Chlorophyta) and ascomycete fungi (Ascomycota) dominated within the eukaryotes. Close relatives to the most radio-resistant organisms known, including Rubrobacter species, Deinococcales and melanized ascomycete fungi were always detected. The diversity of bacteria and eukaryotes found in the most highly irradiated samples was comparable to that of less irradiated Chernobyl sites and Northern Ireland. However, the study of mutation frequencies in non-coding ITS regions versus SSU rRNA genes in members of a same actinobacterial operational taxonomic unit (OTU) present in Chernobyl samples and Northern Ireland showed a positive correlation between increased radiation and mutation rates. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that biofilm microbial communities in the most irradiated samples are comparable to non-irradiated samples in terms of general

  13. Biofilm Community Diversity after Exposure to 0.4% Stannous Fluoride Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Cavan; Rasmussen, Karin; Selberg, Tieg; Stevens, Justin; Jones, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To test the effect of %0.4 stannous fluoride (SnF2) glycerin based gels on the bacterial ecology in both a clinical observational study and in vitro polymicobial biofilm model. Methods and Results The influence of stannous fluoride (0.4% SnF2) gels on bacteria was tested in both an observational study in children 6-12 years of age (n=20) and an in vitro biofilm model system. The plaque derived multi-species bacterial biofilm model was based on clinical bacterial strains derived directly from the clinical study. Potential changes in the plaque ecology were determined through the Human Oral Microbial Identification Microarray-HOMIM (n=10). The semiquantitative data resulting from this system were analyzed with cumulative logit models for each bacterial strain and Bonferroni adjustments were employed to correct for multiple hypothesis testing. Both hierarchical biclustering and principal components analysis were used to graphically assess reproducibility within subjects over time. Mixed effects models were used to examine changes in plaque scores and numbers of bacterial strains found in the various conditions. Conclusions Both the observational clinical study and the biofilm model showed that short-term use of 0.4% SnF2 gel has little effect on the bacterial plaque ecology. The amount of plaque accumulation on a subject's teeth, which was measured by plaque index scores failed to show statistical significant changes over the two baselines or after treatment (p=0.9928). The in vitro results were similar when examining the effect of 0.4% SnF2 gels on biofilm adherence through a crystal violet assay (p= 0.1157). Significance and Impact of the Study The bacteria within the dental biofilms showed resilience in maintaining the overall community diversity after exposure to 0.4% Stannous Fluoride Gels. The study supports that the immediate benefits of using these gels each night to manage caries in children may be strictly from fluoride ions inhibiting tooth

  14. Community shift of biofilms developed in a full-scale drinking water distribution system switching from different water sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiying; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Junpeng; Qiao, Yu; Xu, Chen; Liu, Yao; Qian, Lin; Li, Wenming; Dong, Bingzhi

    2016-02-15

    The bacterial community of biofilms in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) with various water sources has been rarely reported. In this research, biofilms were sampled at three points (A, B, and C) during the river water source phase (phase I), the interim period (phase II) and the reservoir water source phase (phase III), and the biofilm community was determined using the 454-pyrosequencing method. Results showed that microbial diversity declined in phase II but increased in phase III. The primary phylum was Proteobacteria during three phases, while the dominant class at points A and B was Betaproteobacteria (>49%) during all phases, but that changed to Holophagae in phase II (62.7%) and Actinobacteria in phase III (35.6%) for point C, which was closely related to its water quality. More remarkable community shift was found at the genus level. In addition, analysis results showed that water quality could significantly affect microbial diversity together, while the nutrient composition (e.g. C/N ration) of the water environment might determine the microbial community. Furthermore, Mycobacterium spp. and Pseudomonas spp. were detected in the biofilm, which should give rise to attention. This study revealed that water source switching produced substantial impact on the biofilm community. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A prospective study on evaluation of pathogenesis, biofilm formation, antibiotic susceptibility of microbial community in urinary catheter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Khansa Mohammed; Usup, Gires; Ahmad, Asmat

    2015-09-01

    This study is aimed to isolate, detect biofilm formation ability and antibiotic susceptibility of urinary catheter adherent microorganisms from elderly hospitalized patient at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center. Microorganisms were isolated from three samples of urinary catheters (UC) surface; one of the acute vascular rejection patient (UCB) and two from benign prostate hyperplasia patients (UCC and UCD). A total of 100 isolates was isolated with 35 from UCB, 38 (UCC) and 28 (UCD). Ninety six were identified as Gram-negative bacilli, one Gram-positive bacilli and three yeasts. Results of biofilm forming on sterile foley catheter showed that all the isolates can form biofilm at different degrees; strong biofilm forming: 32% from the 35 isolates (UCB), 25% out of 38 isolates (UCC), 26% out of 28 isolates (UCD). As for moderate biofilm forming; 3% from UCB, 10% from UCC and 2% from UCD. Weak biofilm forming in UCC (3%). The antibiotic susceptibility for (UCB) isolates showed highly resistant to ampicillin, novobiocin and penicillin 100 (%), kanamycin (97%), tetracycline (94%), chloramphenicol (91%), streptomycin (77%) and showed low level of resistance to gentamycin (17%), while all the isolates from (UCC-D) showed high resistant towards ampicillin and penicillin, novobiocin (94%), tetracycline (61%), streptomycin (53%), gentamycin (50%) and low level of resistance to kanamycin (48%), chloramphenicol (47%). The findings indicate that these isolates can spread within the community on urinary catheters surface and produce strong biofilm, therefore, monitoring antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria isolated in the aggregation is recommended.

  16. Biofouling of reverse osmosis membranes: effects of cleaning on biofilm microbial communities, membrane performance, and adherence of extracellular polymeric substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ashhab, Ashraf; Sweity, Amer; Bayramoglu, Bihter; Herzberg, Moshe; Gillor, Osnat

    2017-05-01

    Laboratory-scale reverse osmosis (RO) flat-sheet systems were used with two parallel flow cells, one treated with cleaning agents and a control (ie undisturbed). The cleaning efforts increased the affinity of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to the RO membrane and altered the biofilm surface structure. Analysis of the membrane biofilm community composition revealed the dominance of Proteobacteria. However, within the phylum Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria dominated the cleaned membrane biofilm, while β-Proteobacteria dominated the control biofilm. The composition of the fungal phyla was also altered by cleaning, with enhancement of Ascomycota and suppression of Basidiomycota. The results suggest that repeated cleaning cycles select for microbial groups that strongly attach to the RO membrane surface by producing rigid and adhesive EPS that hampers membrane performance.

  17. Microbial community diversity and composition varies with habitat characteristics and biofilm function in macrophyte-rich streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, Peter S.; Starnawski, Piotr; Poulsen, Britta

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms in streams play an integral role in ecosystem processes and function yet few studies have investigated the broad diversity of these complex prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities. Physical habitat characteristics can affect the composition and abundance of microorganisms...... in these biofilms by creating microhabitats. Here we describe the prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial diversity of biofilms in sand and macrophyte habitats (i.e. epipsammon and epiphyton, respectively) in five macrophyte-rich streams in Jutland, Denmark. The macrophyte species varied in growth morphology, C......:N stoichiometry, and preferred stream habitat, providing a range in environmental conditions for the epiphyton. Among all habitats and streams, the prokaryotic communities were dominated by common phyla, including Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteriodetes, and Gammaproteobacteria, while the eukaryotic communities were...

  18. Alginate production affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development and architecture, but is not essential for biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stapper, A.P.; Narasimhan, G.; Oman, D.E.

    2004-01-01

    of their biofilm formation using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Biofilm Image Processing (BIP) and Community Statistics (COMSTAT) software programs were used to provide quantitative measurements of the two-dimensional biofilm images. All three strains formed distinguishable biofilm architectures, indicating...

  19. Resilience and recovery: The effect of triclosan exposure timing during development, on the structure and function of river biofilm communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.R., E-mail: john.lawrence@ec.gc.ca [Environment Canada, 11 Innovation Blvd., Saskatoon, SK S7N 3H5 (Canada); Topp, E. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON (Canada); Waiser, M.J.; Tumber, V.; Roy, J.; Swerhone, G.D.W. [Environment Canada, 11 Innovation Blvd., Saskatoon, SK S7N 3H5 (Canada); Leavitt, P. [University of Regina, Regina, SK (Canada); Paule, A. [Global Institute for Water Security, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Korber, D.R. [Food and Bioproduct Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Triclosan negatively affected structure and metabolism of biofilms under all exposure conditions. • Biofilm age, timing and exposure regime alter the effects of triclosan. • Regardless of exposure regime algae and cyanobacteria were the most affected. • Although recovery was evident no community regained the reference condition. • Initial recruitment may be significant in determining community recovery. - Abstract: Triclosan (TCS) is a ubiquitous antibacterial agent found in soaps, scrubs, and consumer products. There is limited information on hazardous effects of TCS in the environment. Here, rotating annular reactors were used to cultivate river biofilm communities exposed to 1.8 μg l{sup −1} TCS with the timing and duration of exposure and recovery during development varied. Two major treatment regimens were employed: (i) biofilm development for 2, 4 or 6 weeks prior to TCS exposure and (ii) exposure of biofilms to TCS for 2, 4 or 6 weeks followed by recovery. Biofilms not exposed to TCS were used as a reference condition. Communities cultivated without and then exposed to TCS all exhibited reductions in algal biomass and significant (p < 0.05) reductions in cyanobacterial biomass. No significant effects were observed on bacterial biomass. CLSM imaging of biofilms at 8 weeks revealed unique endpoints in terms of community architecture. Community composition was altered by any exposure to TCS, as indicated by significant shifts in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprints and exopolymer composition relative to the reference. Bacterial, algal and cyanobacterial components initially exposed to TCS were significantly different from those TCS-free at time zero. Pigment analyses suggested that significant changes in composition of algal and cyanobacterial populations occurred with TCS exposure. Bacterial thymidine incorporation rates were reduced by TCS exposure and carbon utilization spectra shifted in terms substrate metabolism

  20. Resilience and recovery: The effect of triclosan exposure timing during development, on the structure and function of river biofilm communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, J.R.; Topp, E.; Waiser, M.J.; Tumber, V.; Roy, J.; Swerhone, G.D.W.; Leavitt, P.; Paule, A.; Korber, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Triclosan negatively affected structure and metabolism of biofilms under all exposure conditions. • Biofilm age, timing and exposure regime alter the effects of triclosan. • Regardless of exposure regime algae and cyanobacteria were the most affected. • Although recovery was evident no community regained the reference condition. • Initial recruitment may be significant in determining community recovery. - Abstract: Triclosan (TCS) is a ubiquitous antibacterial agent found in soaps, scrubs, and consumer products. There is limited information on hazardous effects of TCS in the environment. Here, rotating annular reactors were used to cultivate river biofilm communities exposed to 1.8 μg l −1 TCS with the timing and duration of exposure and recovery during development varied. Two major treatment regimens were employed: (i) biofilm development for 2, 4 or 6 weeks prior to TCS exposure and (ii) exposure of biofilms to TCS for 2, 4 or 6 weeks followed by recovery. Biofilms not exposed to TCS were used as a reference condition. Communities cultivated without and then exposed to TCS all exhibited reductions in algal biomass and significant (p < 0.05) reductions in cyanobacterial biomass. No significant effects were observed on bacterial biomass. CLSM imaging of biofilms at 8 weeks revealed unique endpoints in terms of community architecture. Community composition was altered by any exposure to TCS, as indicated by significant shifts in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprints and exopolymer composition relative to the reference. Bacterial, algal and cyanobacterial components initially exposed to TCS were significantly different from those TCS-free at time zero. Pigment analyses suggested that significant changes in composition of algal and cyanobacterial populations occurred with TCS exposure. Bacterial thymidine incorporation rates were reduced by TCS exposure and carbon utilization spectra shifted in terms substrate metabolism

  1. Sequentially aerated membrane biofilm reactors for autotrophic nitrogen removal: microbial community composition and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Franck, Stephanie; Gülay, Arda

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-aerated biofilm reactors performing autotrophic nitrogen removal can be successfully applied to treat concentrated nitrogen streams. However, their process performance is seriously hampered by the growth of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). In this work we document how sequential aeration...... (rich in oxygen) and AnAOB in regions neighbouring the liquid phase. Both communities were separated by a transition region potentially populated by denitrifying heterotrophic bacteria. AOB and AnAOB bacterial groups were more abundant and diverse than NOB, and dominated by the r......-strategists Nitrosomonas europaea and Ca. Brocadia anammoxidans, respectively. Taken together, the present work presents tools to better engineer, monitor and control the microbial communities that support robust, sustainable and efficient nitrogen removal....

  2. Bacterial community radial-spatial distribution in biofilms along pipe wall in chlorinated drinking water distribution system of East China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingqing; Ren, Hongxing; Ye, Xianbei; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yan; Lou, Liping; Cheng, Dongqing; He, Xiaofang; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Qiu, Shangde; Fu, Liusong; Hu, Baolan

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms in the pipe wall may lead to water quality deterioration and biological instability in drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs). In this study, bacterial community radial-spatial distribution in biofilms along the pipe wall in a chlorinated DWDS of East China was investigated. Three pipes of large diameter (300, 600, and 600 mm) were sampled in this DWDS, including a ductile cast iron pipe (DCIP) with pipe age of 11 years and two gray cast iron pipes (GCIP) with pipe ages of 17 and 19 years, and biofilms in the upper, middle, and lower parts of each pipe wall were collected. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and culture-based method were used to quantify bacteria. 454 pyrosequencing was used for bacterial community analysis. The results showed that the biofilm density and total solid (TS) and volatile solid (VS) contents increased gradually from the top to the bottom along the pipe wall. Microorganisms were concentrated in the upper and lower parts of the pipe wall, together accounting for more than 80 % of the total biomass in the biofilms. The bacterial communities in biofilms were significantly different in different areas of the pipe wall and had no strong interaction. Compared with the upper and lower parts of the pipe wall, the bacterial community in the middle of the pipe wall was distributed evenly and had the highest diversity. The 16S rRNA genes of various possible pathogens, including Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Salmonella enterica, were detected in the biofilms, and the abundances of these possible pathogens were highest in the middle of the pipe wall among three areas. The detachment of the biofilms is the main reason for the deterioration of the water quality in DWDSs. The results of this study suggest that the biofilms in the middle of the pipe wall have highly potential risk for drinking water safety, which provides new ideas for the study of the microbial ecology in

  3. Natural antigenic differences in the functionally equivalent extracellular DNABII proteins of bacterial biofilms provide a means for targeted biofilm therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Christopher J.; Davey, Mary Ellen; Bakaletz, Lauren O.; Goodman, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacteria that persist in the oral cavity exist within complex biofilm communities. A hallmark of biofilms is the presence of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), which consists of polysaccharides, extracellular DNA (eDNA), and proteins, including the DNABII family of proteins. The removal of DNABII proteins from a biofilm results in the loss of structural integrity of the eDNA and the collapse of the biofilm structure. We examined the role of DNABII proteins in the biofilm structure of the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis and the oral commensal Streptococcus gordonii. Co-aggregation with oral streptococci is thought to facilitate the establishment of P. gingivalis within the biofilm community. We demonstrate that DNABII proteins are present in the EPS of both S. gordonii and P. gingivalis biofilms, and that these biofilms can be disrupted through the addition of antisera derived against their respective DNABII proteins. We provide evidence that both eDNA and DNABII proteins are limiting in S. gordonii but not in P. gingivalis biofilms. In addition, these proteins are capable of complementing one another functionally. We also found that while antisera derived against most DNABII proteins are capable of binding a wide variety of DNABII proteins, the P. gingivalis DNABII proteins are antigenically distinct. The presence of DNABII proteins in the EPS of these biofilms and the antigenic uniqueness of the P. gingivalis proteins provide an opportunity to develop therapies that are targeted to remove P. gingivalis and biofilms that contain P. gingivalis from the oral cavity. PMID:26988714

  4. Continuous power generation and microbial community structure of the anode biofilms in a three-stage microbial fuel cell system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Kyungmi; Okabe, Satoshi [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Dept. of Urban and Environmental Engineering

    2009-07-15

    A mediator-less three-stage two-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) system was developed and operated continuously for more than 1.5 years to evaluate continuous power generation while treating artificial wastewater containing glucose (10 mM) concurrently. A stable power density of 28 W/m3 was attained with an anode hydraulic retention time of 4.5 h and phosphate buffer as the cathode electrolyte. An overall dissolved organic carbon removal ratio was about 85%, and coulombic efficiency was about 46% in this MFC system. We also analyzed the microbial community structure of anode biofilms in each MFC. Since the environment in each MFC was different due to passing on the products to the next MFC in series, the microbial community structure was different accordingly. The anode biofilm in the first MFC consisted mainly of bacteria belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria, identified as Aeromonas sp., while the Firmicutes dominated the anode biofilms in the second and third MFCs that were mainly fed with acetate. Cyclic voltammetric results supported the presence of a redox compound(s) associated with the anode biofilm matrix, rather than mobile (dissolved) forms, which could be responsible for the electron transfer to the anode. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the anode biofilms were comprised of morphologically different cells that were firmly attached on the anode surface and interconnected each other with anchor-like filamentous appendages, which might support the results of cyclic voltammetry. (orig.)

  5. 2,4-D and Glyphosate affect aquatic biofilm accrual, gross primary production, and community respiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawton E. Shaw

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D and glyphosate are widely used agricultural herbicides commonly found in surface waters near cultivated land. Field experiments were conducted to determine the effects of 2,4-D and glyphosate on biofilms in a pond next to agricultural land in Athabasca, Alberta. Contaminant-exposure substrates (CES consisted of GF/C glass fiber or a cellulose filter paper substrates placed on specimen jars filled with agar that contained low levels of nitrogen and phosphorus, and different concentrations (15, 9.0, 1.5 mM of either 2,4-D or glyphosate. Nutrients and herbicide diffused freely through the agar to the substrate surface. CES arrays were deployed 15 cm below the water surface for 22 days, after which biofilms were collected and biomass (chlorophyll a, autotroph gross primary production (GPP, and heterotroph community respiration (CR were measured. 2,4-D (15 mM caused significant decreases in rates of biomass accrual (−22%, GPP (−34%, and CR(−63%. Glyphosate (15 mM also caused significant decreases in rates of biomass accrual (−50%, GPP (−67%, and CR (−47%. For the contaminant concentrations used, mean flux rates are estimated to be between 50–700 ng cm−2 min−1.

  6. Synergistic effects in mixed Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, A.; Holler, B.M.; Molin, Søren

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms, often composed of multiple species and genetically distinct strains, develop under complex influences of cell-cell interactions. Although detailed knowledge about the mechanisms underlying formation of single-species laboratory biofilms has emerged, little is known about...... the pathways governing development of more complex heterogeneous communities. In this study, we established a laboratory model where biofilm-stimulating effects due to interactions between genetically diverse strains of Escherichia coli were monitored. Synergistic induction of biofilm formation resulting from...... the cocultivation of 403 undomesticated E. coli strains with a characterized E. coli K-12 strain was detected at a significant frequency. The survey suggests that different mechanisms underlie the observed stimulation, yet synergistic development of biofilm within the subset of E. coli isolates (n = 56) exhibiting...

  7. Examination of the behaviour of escherichia coli in biofilms established in laboratory- scale units receiving chlorinated and chloraminated water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Momba, MNB

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater was treated with chlorine and chloramine to study the incorporation and survival of Escherichia coli (E. coli) in developing biofilms in laboratory-scale units. Membrane filter and standard spread plate procedure were used to enumerate...

  8. Flash autoclave settings may influence eradication but not presence of well-established biofilms on orthopaedic implant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Dustin L; Taylor, Nicholas B; Epperson, Richard T; Rothberg, David L

    2017-10-04

    Flash autoclaving is one of the most frequently utilized methods of sterilizing devices, implants or other materials. For a number of decades, it has been common practice for surgeons to remove implantable devices, flash autoclave and then reimplant them in a patient. Data have not yet indicated the potential for biofilms to survive or remain on the surface of orthopaedic-relevant materials following flash autoclave. In this study, monomicrobial and polymicrobial biofilms were grown on the surface of clinically relevant titanium materials and exposed to flash autoclave settings that included varying times and temperatures. Data indicated that when the sterilization and control temperatures of an autoclave were the same, biofilms were able to survive flash autoclaving that was performed for a short duration. Higher temperature and increased duration rendered biofilms non-viable, but none of the autoclave settings had the ability to remove or disperse the presence of biofilms from the titanium surfaces. These findings may be beneficial for facilities, clinics, or hospitals to consider if biofilms are suspected to be present on materials or devices, in particular implants that have had associated infection and are considered for re-implantation. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Pyrosequencing assessment of prokaryotic and eukaryotic diversity in biofilm communities from a French river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricheux, Geneviève; Morin, Loïc; Le Moal, Gwenaël; Coffe, Gérard; Balestrino, Damien; Charbonnel, Nicolas; Bohatier, Jacques; Forestier, Christiane

    2013-06-01

    Despite the recent and significant increase in the study of aquatic microbial communities, little is known about the microbial diversity of complex ecosystems such as running waters. This study investigated the biodiversity of biofilm communities formed in a river with 454 Sequencing™. This river has the particularity of integrating both organic and microbiological pollution, as receiver of agricultural pollution in its upstream catchment area and urban pollution through discharges of the wastewater treatment plant of the town of Billom. Different regions of the small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA gene were targeted using nine pairs of primers, either universal or specific for bacteria, eukarya, or archaea. Our aim was to characterize the widest range of rDNA sequences using different sets of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers. A first look at reads abundance revealed that a large majority (47-48%) were rare sequences (<5 copies). Prokaryotic phyla represented the species richness, and eukaryotic phyla accounted for a small part. Among the prokaryotic phyla, Proteobacteria (beta and alpha) predominated, followed by Bacteroidetes together with a large number of nonaffiliated bacterial sequences. Bacillariophyta plastids were abundant. The remaining bacterial phyla, Verrucomicrobia and Cyanobacteria, made up the rest of the bulk biodiversity. The most abundant eukaryotic phyla were annelid worms, followed by Diatoms, and Chlorophytes. These latter phyla attest to the abundance of plastids and the importance of photosynthetic activity for the biofilm. These findings highlight the existence and plasticity of multiple trophic levels within these complex biological systems. © 2013 The Authors. Microbiology Open published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Dps promotes survival of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in biofilm communities in vitro and resistance to clearance in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Bing; Hong, Wenzhou; Kock, Nancy D; Swords, W Edward

    2012-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a common airway commensal and opportunistic pathogen that persists within surface-attached biofilm communities. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that bacterial stress-responses are activated within biofilms. Transcripts for several factors associated with bacterial resistance to environmental stress were increased in biofilm cultures as compared to planktonic cultures. Among these, a homolog of the DNA-binding protein from starved cells (dps) was chosen for further study. An isogenic NTHi 86-028NP dps mutant was generated and tested for resistance to environmental stress, revealing a significant survival defects in high-iron conditions, which was mediated by oxidative stress and was restored by genetic complementation. As expected, NTHi 86-028NP dps had a general stress-response defect, exhibiting decreased resistance to many types of environmental stress. While no differences were observed in density and structure of NTHi 86-028NP and NTHi 86-028NP dps biofilms, bacterial survival was decreased in NTHi 86-028NP dps biofilms as compared to the parental strain. The role of dps persistence in vivo was tested in animal infection studies. NTHi 86-028NP dps had decreased resistance to clearance after pulmonary infection of elastase-treated mice as compared to NTHi 86-028NP, whereas minimal differences were observed in clearance from mock-treated mice. Similarly, lower numbers of NTHi 86-028NP dps were recovered from middle-ear effusions and bullar homogenates in the chinchilla model for otitis media (OM). Therefore, we conclude that Dps promotes bacterial survival within NTHi biofilm communities both in vitro and in chronic infections in vivo.

  11. Dps promotes survival of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in biofilm communities in vitro and resistance to clearance in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing ePang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi is a common airway commensal and opportunistic pathogen that persists within surface-attached biofilm communities. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that bacterial stress-responses are activated within biofilms. Transcripts for several factors associated with bacterial resistance to environmental stress were increased in biofilm cultures as compared to planktonic cultures. Among these, a homolog of the DNA-binding protein from starved cells (dps was chosen for further study. An isogenic NTHi 86-028NP dps mutant was generated and tested for resistance to environmental stress, revealing a significant survival defects in high-iron conditions, which was mediated by oxidative stress and was restored by genetic complementation. As expected, NTHi 86-028NP dps had a general stress-response defect, exhibiting decreased resistance to many types of environmental stress. While no differences were observed in density and structure of NTHi 86-028NP and NTHi 86-028NP dps biofilms, bacterial survival was decreased in NTHi 86-028NP dps biofilms as compared to the parental strain. The role of dps persistence in vivo was tested in animal infection studies. NTHi 86-028NP dps had decreased resistance to clearance after pulmonary infection of elastase-treated mice as compared to NTHi 86-028NP, whereas minimal differences were observed in clearance from mock-treated mice. Similarly, lower numbers of NTHi 86-028NP dps were recovered from middle-ear effusions and bullar homogenates in the chinchilla model for otitis media. Therefore, we conclude that Dps promotes bacterial survival within NTHi biofilm communities both in vitro and in chronic infections in vivo.

  12. Incorporation of Listeria monocytogenes strains in raw milk biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Christiane; Ifland, Andrea; Naumann, Annette; Kleta, Sylvia; Noll, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    Biofilms develop successively on devices of milk production without sufficient cleaning and originate from the microbial community of raw milk. The established biofilm matrices enable incorporation of pathogens like Listeria monocytogenes, which can cause a continuous contamination of food processing plants. L. monocytogenes is frequently found in raw milk and non-pasteurized raw milk products and as part of a biofilm community in milk meters and bulk milk tanks. The aim of this study was to analyze whether different L. monocytogenes strains are interacting with the microbial community of raw milk in terms of biofilm formation in the same manner, and to identify at which stage of biofilm formation a selected L. monocytogenes strain settles best. Bacterial community structure and composition of biofilms were analyzed by a cloning and sequencing approach and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (T-RFLP) based on the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The chemical composition of biofilms was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), while settled L. monocytogenes cells were quantified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Addition of individual L. monocytogenes strains to raw milk caused significant shifts in the biofilm biomass, in the chemical as well as in the bacterial community composition. Biofilm formation and attachment of L. monocytogenes cells were not serotype but strain specific. However, the added L. monocytogenes strains were not abundant since mainly members of the genera Citrobacter and Lactococcus dominated the bacterial biofilm community. Overall, added L. monocytogenes strains led to a highly competitive interaction with the raw milk community and triggered alterations in biofilm formation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of Microbial Communities in Biofilms from CSTR-Type Hollow Fiber Membrane Biofilm Reactors for Autotrophic Nitrification and Hydrogenotrophic Denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung-Hun; Kim, Byung-Chun; Choi, Okkyoung; Kim, Hyunook; Sang, Byoung-In

    2015-10-01

    Two hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactors (HF-MBfRs) were operated for autotrophic nitrification and hydrogenotrophic denitrification for over 300 days. Oxygen and hydrogen were supplied through the hollow fiber membrane for nitrification and denitrification, respectively. During the period, the nitrogen was removed with the efficiency of 82-97% for ammonium and 87-97% for nitrate and with the nitrogen removal load of 0.09-0.26 kg NH4(+)-N/m(3)/d and 0.10-0.21 kg NO3(-)-N/m(3)/d, depending on hydraulic retention time variation by the two HF-MBfRs for autotrophic nitrification and hydrogenotrophic denitrification, respectively. Biofilms were collected from diverse topological positions in the reactors, each at different nitrogen loading rates, and the microbial communities were analyzed with partial 16S rRNA gene sequences in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Detected DGGE band sequences in the reactors were correlated with nitrification or denitrification. The profile of the DGGE bands depended on the NH4(+) or NO3(-) loading rate, but it was hard to find a major strain affecting the nitrogen removal efficiency. Nitrospira-related phylum was detected in all biofilm samples from the nitrification reactors. Paracoccus sp. and Aquaspirillum sp., which are an autohydrogenotrophic bacterium and an oligotrophic denitrifier, respectively, were observed in the denitrification reactors. The distribution of microbial communities was relatively stable at different nitrogen loading rates, and DGGE analysis based on 16S rRNA (341f /534r) could successfully detect nitrate-oxidizing and hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria but not ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in the HF-MBfRs.

  14. Effect of UV on De-NOx performance and microbial community of a hybrid catalytic membrane biofilm reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhouyang; Huang, Zhensha; He, Yiming; Xiao, Xiaoliang; Wei, Zaishan

    2018-02-01

    The hybrid membrane catalytic biofilm reactor provides a new way of flue gas denitration. However, the effects of UV on denitrification performance, microbial community and microbial nitrogen metabolism are still unknown. In this study, the effects of UV on deNO x performance, nitrification and denitrification, microbial community and microbial nitrogen metabolism of a bench scale N-TiO2/PSF hybrid catalytic membrane biofilm reactor (HCMBR) were evaluated. The change from nature light to UV in the HCMBR leads to the fall of NO removal efficiency of HCMBR from 92.8% to 81.8%. UV affected the microbial community structure, but did not change microbial nitrogen metabolism, as shown by metagenomics sequencing method. Some dominant phyla, such as Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Alphaproteobacteria, increased in abundance, whereas others, such as Proteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria, decreased. There were nitrification, denitrification, nitrogen fixation, and organic nitrogen metabolism in the HCMBR.

  15. Molecular Studies of Filamentous and Biofilm-Forming Hyperthermophilic Communities in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summons, R. E.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Bradley, A. S.; Dibbell, A. K.; Fredricks, H. F.; Hinrichs, K.; Jahnke, L. L.; Shock, E.; Amend, J. P.

    2005-12-01

    The Aquificales, the most deeply-branching order of Bacteria in the phylogenetic tree of life, comprises eight recognized thermophilic genera, including Aquifex, Hydrogenobacter, and Thermocrinis. The common metabolism for these Bacteria, when grown in culture, is the oxidation of hydrogen with molecular oxygen (Knallgas reaction). Aquificales have been identified by molecular techniques (16S rRNA gene surveys, fluorescent in situ hybridization) in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), sea vent chimneys and fluids, and many other terrestrial and marine locations. In situ, Aquificales can reside as biofilms on vent sinters but they also commonly form filamentous communities, otherwise known as pink streamers, which attach to solid substrates. Initial 16S rRNA gene surveys conducted on streamer communities from Octopus Spring YNP indicated that these were low diversity ecosystems dominated by a few phylotypes including Thermocrinis sp., Thermotoga sp. and one other bacterial clade (Reysenbach et al 1994). Archaea were notable for their absence. In one of the first geobiological studies of pink streamers and vent biofilms in Yellowstone National Park, Jahnke and coworkers (2001) used classical lipidological techniques to compare Aquificales cultures with environmental samples to show that YNP pink filaments were more phylogenetically diverse and physiologically more complex than the early genomic studies indicated. The presence of archaeol, the range and structures of other lipids and a wide dispersion in the carbon isotopic signatures of biomass and individual lipids (-15 to -27%) showed that Archaea were present in pink filament communities and that there was, at least, one additional bacterial group besides the dominant Aquificales component. New molecular studies that comprise analyses of 16S rRNA genes and total lipid extracts by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry and chemical degradation with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry now show that Crenarchaea

  16. Stable isotope labeling confirms mixotrophic nature of streamer biofilm communities at alkaline hot springs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence eSchubotz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Streamer biofilm communities (SBC are often observed within chemosynthetic zones of Yellowstone hot spring outflow channels, where temperatures exceed those conducive to photosynthesis. Nearest the hydrothermal source (75-88°C SBC comprise thermophilic Archaea and Bacteria, often mixed communities including Desulfurococcales and uncultured Crenarchaeota, as well as Aquificae, Thermus, each carrying diagnostic membrane lipid biomarkers. We tested the hypothesis that SBC can alternate their metabolism between autotrophy and heterotrophy depending on substrate availability. Feeding experiments were performed at two alkaline hot springs in Yellowstone National Park: Octopus Spring and ‘Bison Pool’, using various 13C-labeled substrates (bicarbonate, formate, acetate and glucose to determine the relative uptake of these different carbon sources. Highest 13C uptake, at both sites, was from acetate into almost all bacterial fatty acids, particularly into methyl-branched C15, C17 and C19 fatty acids that are diagnostic for Thermus/Meiothermus and some Firmicutes as well as into universally common C16:0 and C18:0 fatty acids. 13C-glucose showed a similar, but a 10 to 30 times lower uptake across most fatty acids. 13C bicarbonate uptake, signifying the presence of autotrophic communities was only significant at ‘Bison Pool’ and was observed predominantly in non-specific saturated C16, C18, C20 and C22 fatty acids. Incorporation of 13C-formate occurred only at very low rates at ‘Bison Pool’ and was almost undetectable at Octopus Spring, suggesting that formate is not an important carbon source for SBC. 13C uptake into archaeal lipids occurred predominantly with 13C acetate, suggesting also that archaeal communities at both springs have primarily heterotrophic carbon assimilation pathways. We hypothesize that these communities are energy-limited and predominantly nurtured by input of exogenous organic material, with only a small fraction being

  17. Next-Generation Pyrosequencing Analysis of Microbial Biofilm Communities on Granular Activated Carbon in Treatment of Oil Sands Process-Affected Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M. Shahinoor; Zhang, Yanyan; McPhedran, Kerry N.

    2015-01-01

    The development of biodegradation treatment processes for oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) has been progressing in recent years with the promising potential of biofilm reactors. Previously, the granular activated carbon (GAC) biofilm process was successfully employed for treatment of a large variety of recalcitrant organic compounds in domestic and industrial wastewaters. In this study, GAC biofilm microbial development and degradation efficiency were investigated for OSPW treatment by monitoring the biofilm growth on the GAC surface in raw and ozonated OSPW in batch bioreactors. The GAC biofilm community was characterized using a next-generation 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing technique that revealed that the phylum Proteobacteria was dominant in both OSPW and biofilms, with further in-depth analysis showing higher abundances of Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria sequences. Interestingly, many known polyaromatic hydrocarbon degraders, namely, Burkholderiales, Pseudomonadales, Bdellovibrionales, and Sphingomonadales, were observed in the GAC biofilm. Ozonation decreased the microbial diversity in planktonic OSPW but increased the microbial diversity in the GAC biofilms. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed similar bacterial gene copy numbers (>109 gene copies/g of GAC) for both raw and ozonated OSPW GAC biofilms. The observed rates of removal of naphthenic acids (NAs) over the 2-day experiments for the GAC biofilm treatments of raw and ozonated OSPW were 31% and 66%, respectively. Overall, a relatively low ozone dose (30 mg of O3/liter utilized) combined with GAC biofilm treatment significantly increased NA removal rates. The treatment of OSPW in bioreactors using GAC biofilms is a promising technology for the reduction of recalcitrant OSPW organic compounds. PMID:25841014

  18. Next-generation pyrosequencing analysis of microbial biofilm communities on granular activated carbon in treatment of oil sands process-affected water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M Shahinoor; Zhang, Yanyan; McPhedran, Kerry N; Liu, Yang; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2015-06-15

    The development of biodegradation treatment processes for oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) has been progressing in recent years with the promising potential of biofilm reactors. Previously, the granular activated carbon (GAC) biofilm process was successfully employed for treatment of a large variety of recalcitrant organic compounds in domestic and industrial wastewaters. In this study, GAC biofilm microbial development and degradation efficiency were investigated for OSPW treatment by monitoring the biofilm growth on the GAC surface in raw and ozonated OSPW in batch bioreactors. The GAC biofilm community was characterized using a next-generation 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing technique that revealed that the phylum Proteobacteria was dominant in both OSPW and biofilms, with further in-depth analysis showing higher abundances of Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria sequences. Interestingly, many known polyaromatic hydrocarbon degraders, namely, Burkholderiales, Pseudomonadales, Bdellovibrionales, and Sphingomonadales, were observed in the GAC biofilm. Ozonation decreased the microbial diversity in planktonic OSPW but increased the microbial diversity in the GAC biofilms. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed similar bacterial gene copy numbers (>10(9) gene copies/g of GAC) for both raw and ozonated OSPW GAC biofilms. The observed rates of removal of naphthenic acids (NAs) over the 2-day experiments for the GAC biofilm treatments of raw and ozonated OSPW were 31% and 66%, respectively. Overall, a relatively low ozone dose (30 mg of O3/liter utilized) combined with GAC biofilm treatment significantly increased NA removal rates. The treatment of OSPW in bioreactors using GAC biofilms is a promising technology for the reduction of recalcitrant OSPW organic compounds. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Community analysis of dental plaque and endotracheal tube biofilms from mechanically ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Poala J; Wise, Matt P; Smith, Ann; Marchesi, Julian R; Riggio, Marcello P; Lewis, Michael A O; Williams, David W

    2017-06-01

    Mechanically ventilated patients are at risk for developing ventilator-associated pneumonia, and it has been reported that dental plaque provides a reservoir of respiratory pathogens that may aspirate to the lungs and endotracheal tube (ETT) biofilms. For the first time, metataxonomics was used to simultaneously characterize the microbiome of dental plaque, ETTs, and non-directed bronchial lavages (NBLs) in mechanically ventilated patients to determine similarities in respective microbial communities and therefore likely associations. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences from 34 samples of dental plaque, NBLs, and ETTs from 12 adult mechanically ventilated patients were analyzed. No significant differences in the microbial communities of these samples were evident. Detected bacteria were primarily oral species (e.g., Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus salivarius, Prevotella melaninogenica) with respiratory pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcuspneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae) also in high abundance. The high similarity between the microbiomes of dental plaque, NBLs, and ETTs suggests that the oral cavity is indeed an important site involved in microbial aspiration to the lower airway and ETT. As such, maintenance of good oral hygiene is likely to be highly important in limiting aspiration of bacteria in this vulnerable patient group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Biofilm scrubbing for restoration—algae community composition and succession in artificial streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Mayr

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Photoautotrophic biofilms play a pivotal role in self-purification of rivers. We took advantage of the biofilm’s cleaning capacity by applying artificial stream mesocosms, called algae turf scrubberTM (ATS, to reduce the nutrient load of a highly eutrophicated backwater in Vienna (Austria. Since purification strongly depends on benthic algae on the ATS, we focused on the algae community composition and succession. Estimation of coverage, photographic documentation for micromapping, species identification and pigment analyses were carried out. Already one week after exposition, 20–30 different taxa were recorded, suggesting a rapid colonization of the substrate. In total around 200 taxa were identified, mainly belonging to Chlorophyta, Bacillariophyceae and Cyanoprokaryota. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling implied that season and succession strongly influenced species composition on the ATS and a minimum turnover of 0.28 indicates a development towards a more stable community at the end of experiments. We measured maximum biomass production of ~250 g m−2 in June and August and during a period of 5 months nearly 19 kg ha−1 phosphorus could be removed. ATS systems proved to retain nutrients and produce algae biomass in an environmentally friendly and cost effective way and thus support restoration of highly eutrophicated water bodies.

  1. Metagenomic discovery of novel enzymes and biosurfactants in a slaughterhouse biofilm microbial community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thies, Stephan; Rausch, Sonja Christina; Kovacic, Filip; Schmidt-Thaler, Alexandra; Wilhelm, Susanne; Rosenau, Frank; Daniel, Rolf; Streit, Wolfgang; Pietruszka, Jörg; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2016-01-01

    DNA derived from environmental samples is a rich source of novel bioactive molecules. The choice of the habitat to be sampled predefines the properties of the biomolecules to be discovered due to the physiological adaptation of the microbial community to the prevailing environmental conditions. We have constructed a metagenomic library in Escherichia coli DH10b with environmental DNA (eDNA) isolated from the microbial community of a slaughterhouse drain biofilm consisting mainly of species from the family Flavobacteriaceae. By functional screening of this library we have identified several lipases, proteases and two clones (SA343 and SA354) with biosurfactant and hemolytic activities. Sequence analysis of the respective eDNA fragments and subsequent structure homology modelling identified genes encoding putative N-acyl amino acid synthases with a unique two-domain organisation. The produced biosurfactants were identified by NMR spectroscopy as N-acyltyrosines with N-myristoyltyrosine as the predominant species. Critical micelle concentration and reduction of surface tension were similar to those of chemically synthesised N-myristoyltyrosine. Furthermore, we showed that the newly isolated N-acyltyrosines exhibit antibiotic activity against various bacteria. This is the first report describing the successful application of functional high-throughput screening assays for the identification of biosurfactant producing clones within a metagenomic library. PMID:27271534

  2. Crenarchaeal biofilm formation under extreme conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Koerdt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biofilm formation has been studied in much detail for a variety of bacterial species, as it plays a major role in the pathogenicity of bacteria. However, only limited information is available for the development of archaeal communities that are frequently found in many natural environments. METHODOLOGY: We have analyzed biofilm formation in three closely related hyperthermophilic crenarchaeotes: Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, S. solfataricus and S. tokodaii. We established a microtitre plate assay adapted to high temperatures to determine how pH and temperature influence biofilm formation in these organisms. Biofilm analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that the three strains form very different communities ranging from simple carpet-like structures in S. solfataricus to high density tower-like structures in S. acidocaldarius in static systems. Lectin staining indicated that all three strains produced extracellular polysaccharides containing glucose, galactose, mannose and N-acetylglucosamine once biofilm formation was initiated. While flagella mutants had no phenotype in two days old static biofilms of S. solfataricus, a UV-induced pili deletion mutant showed decreased attachment of cells. CONCLUSION: The study gives first insights into formation and development of crenarchaeal biofilms in extreme environments.

  3. Co-Culture with Listeria monocytogenes within a Dual-Species Biofilm Community Strongly Increases Resistance of Pseudomonas putida to Benzalkonium Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaouris, Efstathios; Chorianopoulos, Nikos; Doulgeraki, Agapi; Nychas, George-John

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation is a phenomenon occurring almost wherever microorganisms and surfaces exist in close proximity. This study aimed to evaluate the possible influence of bacterial interactions on the ability of Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas putida to develop a dual-species biofilm community on stainless steel (SS), as well as on the subsequent resistance of their sessile cells to benzalkonium chloride (BC) used in inadequate (sub-lethal) concentration (50 ppm). The possible progressive adaptability of mixed-culture biofilms to BC was also investigated. To accomplish these, 3 strains per species were left to develop mixed-culture biofilms on SS coupons, incubated in daily renewable growth medium for a total period of 10 days, under either mono- or dual-species conditions. Each day, biofilm cells were exposed to disinfection treatment. Results revealed that the simultaneous presence of L. monocytogenes strongly increased the resistance of P. putida biofilm cells to BC, while culture conditions (mono-/dual-species) did not seem to significantly influence the resistance of L. monocytogenes biofilm cells. BC mainly killed L. monocytogenes cells when this was applied against the dual-species sessile community during the whole incubation period, despite the fact that from the 2nd day this community was mainly composed (>90%) of P. putida cells. No obvious adaptation to BC was observed in either L. monocytogenes or P. putida biofilm cells. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis showed that the different strains behaved differently with regard to biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance. Such knowledge on the physiological behavior of mixed-culture biofilms could provide the information necessary to control their formation. PMID:24130873

  4. Co-culture with Listeria monocytogenes within a dual-species biofilm community strongly increases resistance of Pseudomonas putida to benzalkonium chloride.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstathios Giaouris

    Full Text Available Biofilm formation is a phenomenon occurring almost wherever microorganisms and surfaces exist in close proximity. This study aimed to evaluate the possible influence of bacterial interactions on the ability of Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas putida to develop a dual-species biofilm community on stainless steel (SS, as well as on the subsequent resistance of their sessile cells to benzalkonium chloride (BC used in inadequate (sub-lethal concentration (50 ppm. The possible progressive adaptability of mixed-culture biofilms to BC was also investigated. To accomplish these, 3 strains per species were left to develop mixed-culture biofilms on SS coupons, incubated in daily renewable growth medium for a total period of 10 days, under either mono- or dual-species conditions. Each day, biofilm cells were exposed to disinfection treatment. Results revealed that the simultaneous presence of L. monocytogenes strongly increased the resistance of P. putida biofilm cells to BC, while culture conditions (mono-/dual-species did not seem to significantly influence the resistance of L. monocytogenes biofilm cells. BC mainly killed L. monocytogenes cells when this was applied against the dual-species sessile community during the whole incubation period, despite the fact that from the 2nd day this community was mainly composed (>90% of P. putida cells. No obvious adaptation to BC was observed in either L. monocytogenes or P. putida biofilm cells. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE analysis showed that the different strains behaved differently with regard to biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance. Such knowledge on the physiological behavior of mixed-culture biofilms could provide the information necessary to control their formation.

  5. Bacterial community changes in copper and PEX drinking water pipeline biofilms under extra disinfection and magnetic water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inkinen, J; Jayaprakash, B; Ahonen, M; Pitkänen, T; Mäkinen, R; Pursiainen, A; Santo Domingo, J W; Salonen, H; Elk, M; Keinänen-Toivola, M M

    2018-02-01

    To study the stability of biofilms and water quality in pilot scale drinking water copper and PEX pipes in changing conditions (extra disinfection, magnetic water treatment, MWT). Next-generation sequencing (NGS) of 16S ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) to describe total bacterial community and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) to describe active bacterial members in addition to traditional microbiological methods were applied. Biofilms from control copper and PEX pipes shared same most abundant bacteria (Methylobacterium spp., Sphingomonas spp., Zymomonas spp.) and average species diversities (Shannon 3·8-4·2) in rDNA and rRNA libraries, whereas few of the taxa differed by their abundance such as lower total Mycobacterium spp. occurrence in copper (disinfection (total chlorine increase from c. 0·5 to 1 mg l -1 ) affected total and active population in biofilms seen as decrease in many bacterial species and diversity (Shannon 2·7, P disinfected copper and PEX samples formed separate clusters in unweighted non-metric multidimensional scaling plot (rRNA) similarly to MWT-treated biofilms of copper (but not PEX) pipes that instead showed higher species diversity (Shannon 4·8, P < 0·05 interaction). Minor chlorine dose addition increased selection pressure and many species were sensitive to chlorination. Pipe material seemed to affect mycobacteria occurrence, and bacterial communities with MWT in copper but not in PEX pipes. This study using rRNA showed that chlorination affects especially active fraction of bacterial communities. Copper and PEX differed by the occurrence of some bacterial members despite similar community profiles. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Thermophilic prokaryotic communities inhabiting the biofilm and well water of a thermal karst system located in Budapest (Hungary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anda, Dóra; Makk, Judit; Krett, Gergely; Jurecska, Laura; Márialigeti, Károly; Mádl-Szőnyi, Judit; Borsodi, Andrea K

    2015-07-01

    In this study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and 16S rRNA gene-based phylogenetic approach were applied to reveal the morphological structure and genetic diversity of thermophilic prokaryotic communities of a thermal karst well located in Budapest (Hungary). Bacterial and archaeal diversity of the well water (73.7 °C) and the biofilm developed on the inner surface of an outflow pipeline of the well were studied by molecular cloning method. According to the SEM images calcium carbonate minerals serve as a surface for colonization of bacterial aggregates. The vast majority of the bacterial and archaeal clones showed the highest sequence similarities to chemolithoautotrophic species. The bacterial clone libraries were dominated by sulfur oxidizer Thiobacillus (Betaproteobacteria) in the water and Sulfurihydrogenibium (Aquificae) in the biofilm. A relatively high proportion of molecular clones represented genera Thermus and Bellilinea in the biofilm library. The most abundant phylotypes both in water and biofilm archaeal clone libraries were closely related to thermophilic ammonia oxidizer Nitrosocaldus and Nitrososphaera but phylotypes belonging to methanogens were also detected. The results show that in addition to the bacterial sulfur and hydrogen oxidation, mainly archaeal ammonia oxidation may play a decisive role in the studied thermal karst system.

  7. Pyrosequencing analysis yields comprehensive assessment of microbial communities in pilot-scale two-stage membrane biofilm reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontiveros-Valencia, Aura; Tang, Youneng; Zhao, He-Ping; Friese, David; Overstreet, Ryan; Smith, Jennifer; Evans, Patrick; Rittmann, Bruce E; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa

    2014-07-01

    We studied the microbial community structure of pilot two-stage membrane biofilm reactors (MBfRs) designed to reduce nitrate (NO3(-)) and perchlorate (ClO4(-)) in contaminated groundwater. The groundwater also contained oxygen (O2) and sulfate (SO4(2-)), which became important electron sinks that affected the NO3(-) and ClO4(-) removal rates. Using pyrosequencing, we elucidated how important phylotypes of each "primary" microbial group, i.e., denitrifying bacteria (DB), perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB), and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), responded to changes in electron-acceptor loading. UniFrac, principal coordinate analysis (PCoA), and diversity analyses documented that the microbial community of biofilms sampled when the MBfRs had a high acceptor loading were phylogenetically distant from and less diverse than the microbial community of biofilm samples with lower acceptor loadings. Diminished acceptor loading led to SO4(2-) reduction in the lag MBfR, which allowed Desulfovibrionales (an SRB) and Thiothrichales (sulfur-oxidizers) to thrive through S cycling. As a result of this cooperative relationship, they competed effectively with DB/PRB phylotypes such as Xanthomonadales and Rhodobacterales. Thus, pyrosequencing illustrated that while DB, PRB, and SRB responded predictably to changes in acceptor loading, a decrease in total acceptor loading led to important shifts within the "primary" groups, the onset of other members (e.g., Thiothrichales), and overall greater diversity.

  8. Role of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Coaggregation in Anaerobe Survival in Planktonic and Biofilm Oral Microbial Communities during Aeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, David J.; Marsh, Philip D.; Watson, G. Keith; Allison, Clive

    1998-01-01

    Coaggregation is a well-characterized phenomenon by which specific pairs of oral bacteria interact physically. The aim of this study was to examine the patterns of coaggregation between obligately anaerobic and oxygen-tolerant species that coexist in a model oral microbial community. Obligate anaerobes other than Fusobacterium nucleatum coaggregated only poorly with oxygen-tolerant species. In contrast, F. nucleatum was able to coaggregate not only with both oxygen-tolerant and other obligately anaerobic species but also with otherwise-noncoaggregating obligate anaerobe–oxygen-tolerant species pairs. The effects of the presence or absence of F. nucleatum on anaerobe survival in both the biofilm and planktonic phases of a complex community of oral bacteria grown in an aerated (gas phase, 200 ml of 5% CO2 in air · min−1) chemostat system were then investigated. In the presence of F. nucleatum, anaerobes persisted in high numbers (>107 · ml−1 in the planktonic phase and >107 · cm−2 in 4-day biofilms). In an equivalent culture in the absence of F. nucleatum, the numbers of black-pigmented anaerobes (Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella nigrescens) were significantly reduced (P ≤ 0.001) in both the planktonic phase and in 4-day biofilms, while the numbers of facultatively anaerobic bacteria increased in these communities. Coaggregation-mediated interactions between F. nucleatum and other species facilitated the survival of obligate anaerobes in aerated environments. PMID:9746571

  9. establishing a link between adult education and community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FOR IMPROVED TEACHING,. LEARNING AND ... ABSTRACT. Adult education and community development are two areas of practices which development ... life of the people and national development. .... balanced and independent social, ... communal work. .... and maintain cooperative.

  10. Community Services New Frontier: Establishing the Ties That Bind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, George B.

    1984-01-01

    Looks at the historical roots of community services in community colleges. Offers suggestions for keeping community colleges on the frontier of the development of these institutions (e.g., bringing the program into the instructional mainstream, emphasizing program planning, encouraging instructional innovation. (DMM)

  11. Extracellular DNA is essential for maintaining Bordetella biofilm integrity on abiotic surfaces and in the upper respiratory tract of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt S Conover

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria form complex and highly elaborate surface adherent communities known as biofilms which are held together by a self-produced extracellular matrix. We have previously shown that by adopting a biofilm mode of existence in vivo, the gram negative bacterial pathogens Bordetella bronchiseptica and Bordetella pertussis are able to efficiently colonize and persist in the mammalian respiratory tract. In general, the bacterial biofilm matrix includes polysaccharides, proteins and extracellular DNA (eDNA. In this report, we investigated the function of DNA in Bordetella biofilm development. We show that DNA is a significant component of Bordetella biofilm matrix. Addition of DNase I at the initiation of biofilm growth inhibited biofilm formation. Treatment of pre-established mature biofilms formed under both static and flow conditions with DNase I led to a disruption of the biofilm biomass. We next investigated whether eDNA played a role in biofilms formed in the mouse respiratory tract. DNase I treatment of nasal biofilms caused considerable dissolution of the biofilm biomass. In conclusion, these results suggest that eDNA is a crucial structural matrix component of both in vitro and in vivo formed Bordetella biofilms. This is the first evidence for the ability of DNase I to disrupt bacterial biofilms formed on host organs.

  12. Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria can attach to any surface in contact with water and proliferate into complex communities enclosed in an adhesive matrix, these communities are called biofilms. The matrix makes the biofilm difficult to remove by physical means, and bacteria in biofilm can survive treatment with many...

  13. Extracellular-matrix-mediated osmotic pressure drives Vibrio cholerae biofilm expansion and cheater exclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Jing; Nadell, Carey D.; Stone, Howard A.; Wingreen, Ned S.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms, surface-attached communities of bacteria encased in an extracellular matrix, are a major mode of bacterial life. How the material properties of the matrix contribute to biofilm growth and robustness is largely unexplored, in particular in response to environmental perturbations such as changes in osmotic pressure. Here, using Vibrio cholerae as our model organism, we show that during active cell growth, matrix production enables biofilm-dwelling bacterial cells to establish an osmot...

  14. Bacterial community dynamics during the early stages of biofilm formation in a chlorinated experimental drinking water distribution system: implications for drinking water discolouration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douterelo, I; Sharpe, R; Boxall, J

    2014-07-01

    To characterize bacterial communities during the early stages of biofilm formation and their role in water discolouration in a fully representative, chlorinated, experimental drinking water distribution systems (DWDS). Biofilm development was monitored in an experimental DWDS over 28 days; subsequently the system was disturbed by raising hydraulic conditions to simulate pipe burst, cleaning or other system conditions. Biofilm cell cover was monitored by fluorescent microscopy and a fingerprinting technique used to assess changes in bacterial community. Selected samples were analysed by cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Fingerprinting analysis revealed significant changes in the bacterial community structure over time (P < 0·05). Cell coverage increased over time accompanied by an increase in bacterial richness and diversity. Shifts in the bacterial community structure were observed along with an increase in cell coverage, bacterial richness and diversity. Species related to Pseudomonas spp. and Janthinobacterium spp. dominated the process of initial attachment. Based on fingerprinting results, the hydraulic regimes did not affect the bacteriological composition of biofilms, but they did influence their mechanical stability. This study gives a better insight into the early stages of biofilm formation in DWDS and will contribute to the improvement of management strategies to control the formation of biofilms and the risk of discolouration. © 2014 The Authors. published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Bacterial community dynamics during the early stages of biofilm formation in a chlorinated experimental drinking water distribution system: implications for drinking water discolouration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douterelo, I; Sharpe, R; Boxall, J

    2014-01-01

    Aims To characterize bacterial communities during the early stages of biofilm formation and their role in water discolouration in a fully representative, chlorinated, experimental drinking water distribution systems (DWDS). Methods and Results Biofilm development was monitored in an experimental DWDS over 28 days; subsequently the system was disturbed by raising hydraulic conditions to simulate pipe burst, cleaning or other system conditions. Biofilm cell cover was monitored by fluorescent microscopy and a fingerprinting technique used to assess changes in bacterial community. Selected samples were analysed by cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Fingerprinting analysis revealed significant changes in the bacterial community structure over time (P < 0·05). Cell coverage increased over time accompanied by an increase in bacterial richness and diversity. Conclusions Shifts in the bacterial community structure were observed along with an increase in cell coverage, bacterial richness and diversity. Species related to Pseudomonas spp. and Janthinobacterium spp. dominated the process of initial attachment. Based on fingerprinting results, the hydraulic regimes did not affect the bacteriological composition of biofilms, but they did influence their mechanical stability. Significance and Importance of the Study This study gives a better insight into the early stages of biofilm formation in DWDS and will contribute to the improvement of management strategies to control the formation of biofilms and the risk of discolouration. PMID:24712449

  16. Microbial Biofilm as a Smart Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Christian; Welch, Martin; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilm colonies will in many cases form a smart material capable of responding to external threats dependent on their size and internal state. The microbial community accordingly switches between passive, protective, or attack modes of action. In order to decide which strategy to employ......, it is essential for the biofilm community to be able to sense its own size. The sensor designed to perform this task is termed a quorum sensor, since it only permits collective behaviour once a sufficiently large assembly of microbes have been established. The generic quorum sensor construct involves two genes...

  17. [The bacterial biofilm and the possibilities of chemical plaque control. Literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gera, István

    2008-06-01

    Most microorganisms in the oral cavity attach to surfaces and form matrix-embedded biofilms. Biofilms are structured and spatially organized, composed of consortia of interacting microorganisms. The properties of the mass of biofilm are different from that of the simple sum of the component species. The older the plaque (biofilm) is the more structurally organized and become more resistant to environmental attacks. The bacterial community favors the growth of obligatory anaerobic microorganisms. The most effective means of the elimination of matured biofilm is the mechanical disruption of the interbacterial protective matrix and removal of bacterial colonies. The antiseptic agents are primarily effective in the prevention of biofilm formation and anticipation of the maturation of the bacterial plaque. Bacteria in matured biofilms are less susceptible to antimicrobial agents because several physical and biological factors protect the bacterial consortia. To kill bacteria in a matured, well organized biofilm, significantly higher concentration and longer exposition are required. Antiseptic mouthrinses in a conventional dose and time can only reach the superficial bacteria while the bacteria in the depth of the biofilm remains intact. Therefore, the efficacy of any antiseptic mouthwash depends not just on its microbicidal properties demonstrated in vitro, but also on its ability to penetrate the organized biofilm on the teeth. Recent studies have demonstrated that both bisbiguanid compounds and essential oils are capable of penetrating the biofilm, and reduce established plaque and gingivitis. The essential oils showed high penetrability and were more effective on organized biofilm than stannous fluorides or triclosan copolymer antiplaque agents.

  18. Effect of engineered environment on microbial community structure in biofilter and biofilm on reverse osmosis membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Sanghyun; Cho, Kyungjin; Jeong, Dawoon; Lee, Seockheon; Leiknes, TorOve; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu; Bae, Hyokwan

    2017-01-01

    Four dual media filters (DMFs) were operated in a biofiltration mode with different engineered environments (DMF I and II: coagulation with/without acidification and DMF III and IV: without/with chlorination). Designed biofilm enrichment reactors

  19. A novel model of chronic wounds: importance of redox imbalance and biofilm-forming bacteria for establishment of chronicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Dhall

    Full Text Available Chronic wounds have a large impact on health, affecting ∼6.5 M people and costing ∼$25B/year in the US alone. We previously discovered that a genetically modified mouse model displays impaired healing similar to problematic wounds in humans and that sometimes the wounds become chronic. Here we show how and why these impaired wounds become chronic, describe a way whereby we can drive impaired wounds to chronicity at will and propose that the same processes are involved in chronic wound development in humans. We hypothesize that exacerbated levels of oxidative stress are critical for initiation of chronicity. We show that, very early after injury, wounds with impaired healing contain elevated levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and, much like in humans, these levels increase with age. Moreover, the activity of anti-oxidant enzymes is not elevated, leading to buildup of oxidative stress in the wound environment. To induce chronicity, we exacerbated the redox imbalance by further inhibiting the antioxidant enzymes and by infecting the wounds with biofilm-forming bacteria isolated from the chronic wounds that developed naturally in these mice. These wounds do not re-epithelialize, the granulation tissue lacks vascularization and interstitial collagen fibers, they contain an antibiotic-resistant mixed bioflora with biofilm-forming capacity, and they stay open for several weeks. These findings are highly significant because they show for the first time that chronic wounds can be generated in an animal model effectively and consistently. The availability of such a model will significantly propel the field forward because it can be used to develop strategies to regain redox balance that may result in inhibition of biofilm formation and result in restoration of healthy wound tissue. Furthermore, the model can lead to the understanding of other fundamental mechanisms of chronic wound development that can potentially lead to novel therapies.

  20. Evaluation of single and joint toxic effects of diuron and its main metabolites on natural phototrophic biofilms using a pollution-induced community tolerance (PICT) approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Stéphane; Lissalde, Sophie; Lavieille, Delphine; Margoum, Christelle; Mazzella, Nicolas; Roubeix, Vincent; Montuelle, Bernard

    2010-09-15

    This study assessed the single and joint acute toxicity of diuron and two of its metabolites (DCPMU and 3,4-DCA) on natural phototrophic biofilms using a PICT approach with photosynthesis bioassays. River biofilm communities were collected at three sampling stations exhibiting increasing concentrations of diuron, DCPMU and 3,4-DCA from upstream to downstream. Applied individually, the parent compound was more toxic than its metabolites, with DCPMU being more toxic than 3,4-DCA which only inhibited photosynthesis at very high concentrations (EC25 at about 5 mg/l). Sensitivity of biofilm communities to diuron and DCPMU decreased from upstream to downstream, revealing tolerance induction in contaminated sections of the river, as expected from the PICT concept. Nevertheless, PICT was not applicable for 3,4-DCA, which similarly affected upstream, intermediate and downstream biofilm communities. Chemical mixtures of diuron and DCPMU demonstrated additive effects whereas combinations with 3,4-DCA enhanced the observed effects. Our results reveal that the individual and combined presence of diuron and DCPMU in lotic ecosystems can have both short-term effects (as shown with bioassays) and long-term effects (as shown through the PICT approach) on phototrophic biofilms, whereas environmental concentrations of 3,4-DCA may not affect biofilm photosynthetic activity. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Warming-induced changes in denitrifier community structure modulate the ability of phototrophic river biofilms to denitrify

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulêtreau, Stéphanie, E-mail: stephanie.bouletreau@univ-tlse3.fr [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INP, EcoLab (Laboratoire Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, EcoLab, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Lyautey, Emilie [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INP, EcoLab (Laboratoire Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, EcoLab, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Dubois, Sophie [Université de Bordeaux, EPOC - OASU, UMR 5805, Station Marine d' Arcachon, 2 rue du Professeur Jolyet, 33120 Arcachon (France); Compin, Arthur [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INP, EcoLab (Laboratoire Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, EcoLab, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Delattre, Cécile; Touron-Bodilis, Aurélie [EDF Recherche et Développement, LNHE (Laboratoire National d' Hydraulique et Environnement), 6 quai Watier, F-78401 Chatou (France); Mastrorillo, Sylvain [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INP, EcoLab (Laboratoire Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, EcoLab, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Garabetian, Frédéric [Université de Bordeaux, EPOC - OASU, UMR 5805, Station Marine d' Arcachon, 2 rue du Professeur Jolyet, 33120 Arcachon (France)

    2014-01-01

    Microbial denitrification is the main nitrogen removing process in freshwater ecosystems. The aim of this study was to show whether and how water warming (+ 2.5 °C) drives bacterial diversity and structuring and how bacterial diversity affects denitrification enzymatic activity in phototrophic river biofilms (PRB). We used water warming associated to the immediate thermal release of a nuclear power plant cooling circuit to produce natural PRB assemblages on glass slides while testing 2 temperatures (mean temperature of 17 °C versus 19.5 °C). PRB were sampled at 2 sampling times during PRB accretion (6 and 21 days) in both temperatures. Bacterial community composition was assessed using ARISA. Denitrifier community abundance and denitrification gene mRNA levels were estimated by q-PCR and qRT-PCR, respectively, of 5 genes encoding catalytic subunits of the denitrification key enzymes. Denitrification enzyme activity (DEA) was measured by the acetylene-block assay at 20 °C. A mean water warming of 2.5 °C was sufficient to produce contrasted total bacterial and denitrifier communities and, therefore, to affect DEA. Indirect temperature effect on DEA may have varied between sampling time, increasing by up to 10 the denitrification rate of 6-day-old PRB and decreasing by up to 5 the denitrification rate of 21-day-old PRB. The present results suggest that indirect effects of warming through changes in bacterial community composition, coupled to the strong direct effect of temperature on DEA already demonstrated in PRB, could modulate dissolved nitrogen removal by denitrification in rivers and streams. - Highlights: •We produced river biofilms in 2 mean temperature conditions: 17 vs 19.5 °C. •We compared their denitrifiers' structuring and functioning in 6d- and 21d-old biofilms. •A difference of 2.5 °C produced contrasted denitrifier communities. •The indirect temperature effect on denitrification activity shifted between biofilm age.

  2. Do biofilm communities respond to the chemical signatures of fracking? A test involving streams in North-central Arkansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wilson H; Douglas, Marlis R; Lewis, Jeffrey A; Stuecker, Tara N; Carbonero, Franck G; Austin, Bradley J; Evans-White, Michelle A; Entrekin, Sally A; Douglas, Michael E

    2017-02-03

    Unconventional natural gas (UNG) extraction (fracking) is ongoing in 29 North American shale basins (20 states), with ~6000 wells found within the Fayetteville shale (north-central Arkansas). If the chemical signature of fracking is detectable in streams, it can be employed to bookmark potential impacts. We evaluated benthic biofilm community composition as a proxy for stream chemistry so as to segregate anthropogenic signatures in eight Arkansas River catchments. In doing so, we tested the hypothesis that fracking characteristics in study streams are statistically distinguishable from those produced by agriculture or urbanization. Four tributary catchments had UNG-wells significantly more dense and near to our sampling sites and were grouped as 'potentially-impacted catchment zones' (PICZ). Four others were characterized by significantly larger forested area with greater slope and elevation but reduced pasture, and were classified as 'minimally-impacted' (MICZ). Overall, 46 bacterial phyla/141 classes were identified, with 24 phyla (52%) and 54 classes (38%) across all samples. PICZ-sites were ecologically more variable than MICZ-sites, with significantly greater nutrient levels (total nitrogen, total phosphorous), and elevated Cyanobacteria as bioindicators that tracked these conditions. PICZ-sites also exhibited elevated conductance (a correlate of increased ion concentration) and depressed salt-intolerant Spartobacteria, suggesting the presence of brine as a fracking effect. Biofilm communities at PICZ-sites were significantly less variable than those at MICZ-sites. Study streams differed by Group according to morphology, land use, and water chemistry but not in biofilm community structure. Those at PICZ-sites covaried according to anthropogenic impact, and were qualitatively similar to communities found at sites disturbed by fracking. The hypothesis that fracking signatures in study streams are distinguishable from those produced by other anthropogenic effects

  3. Establishing community advisory boards for clinical trial research in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    composition of CABs, leadership qualities, among others. This course places emphasis in areas that ICHGCP ... interests of the community function as a source of leadership in the partnerships between researchers and the .... This implied that the idea of volunteering or volunteer work during CAB training was not properly ...

  4. An Informatics Approach to Establishing a Sustainable Public Health Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriseman, Jeffrey Michael

    2012-01-01

    This work involved the analysis of a public health system, and the design, development and deployment of enterprise informatics architecture, and sustainable community methods to address problems with the current public health system. Specifically, assessment of the Nationally Notifiable Disease Surveillance System (NNDSS) was instrumental in…

  5. PROCEDURE FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF COMMUNITY JUNIOR COLLEGES IN ARKANSAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkansas State Commission on Coordination of Higher Educational Finance, Little Rock.

    CRITERIA FOR ESTABLISHMENT OF JUNIOR COLLEGE DISTRICTS IN ARKANSAS INCLUDE (1) A PROJECTED ENROLLMENT OF AT LEAST 300 FULL TIME EQUIVALENT STUDENTS IN THE THIRD YEAR OF OPERATION, (2) ASSESSED VALUATION ADEQUATE TO PROVIDE FROM LOCAL PROPERTY TAXES ONE-THIRD OF THE ANNUAL OPERATING COST AND THE TOTAL DEBT SERVICE REQUIREMENTS FOR CAPITAL OUTLAY,…

  6. Community participation in the establishment and management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the emergence of approaches that aim to involve those that are directly affected in the process of establishing and managing such areas. Key aspects of participatory approaches are: (i) the type of relationship between the conservation agency and the role-players concerned; and (ii) the type of benefits that accrue to local ...

  7. Comparison of the microbial communities of hot springs waters and the microbial biofilms in the acidic geothermal area of Copahue (Neuquén, Argentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbieta, María Sofía; González-Toril, Elena; Bazán, Ángeles Aguilera; Giaveno, María Alejandra; Donati, Edgardo

    2015-03-01

    Copahue is a natural geothermal field (Neuquén province, Argentina) dominated by the Copahue volcano. As a consequence of the sustained volcanic activity, Copahue presents many acidic pools, hot springs and solfataras with different temperature and pH conditions that influence their microbial diversity. The occurrence of microbial biofilms was observed on the surrounding rocks and the borders of the ponds, where water movements and thermal activity are less intense. Microbial biofilms are particular ecological niches within geothermal environments; they present different geochemical conditions from that found in the water of the ponds and hot springs which is reflected in different microbial community structure. The aim of this study is to compare microbial community diversity in the water of ponds and hot springs and in microbial biofilms in the Copahue geothermal field, with particular emphasis on Cyanobacteria and other photosynthetic species that have not been detected before in Copahue. In this study, we report the presence of Cyanobacteria, Chloroflexi and chloroplasts of eukaryotes in the microbial biofilms not detected in the water of the ponds. On the other hand, acidophilic bacteria, the predominant species in the water of moderate temperature ponds, are almost absent in the microbial biofilms in spite of having in some cases similar temperature conditions. Species affiliated with Sulfolobales in the Archaea domain are the predominant microorganism in high temperature ponds and were also detected in the microbial biofilms.

  8. Nutrient transitions are a source of persisters in Escherichia coli biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M Amato

    Full Text Available Chronic and recurrent infections have been attributed to persisters in biofilms, and despite this importance, the mechanisms of persister formation in biofilms remain unclear. The plethora of biofilm characteristics that could give rise to persisters, including slower growth, quorum signaling, oxidative stress, and nutrient heterogeneity, have complicated efforts to delineate formation pathways that generate persisters during biofilm development. Here we sought to specifically determine whether nutrient transitions, which are a common metabolic stress encountered within surface-attached communities, stimulate persister formation in biofilms and if so, to then identify the pathway. To accomplish this, we established an experimental methodology where nutrient availability to biofilm cells could be controlled exogenously, and then used that method to discover that diauxic carbon source transitions stimulated persister formation in Escherichia coli biofilms. Previously, we found that carbon source transitions stimulate persister formation in planktonic E. coli cultures, through a pathway that involved ppGpp and nucleoid-associated proteins, and therefore, tested the functionality of that pathway in biofilms. Biofilm persister formation was also found to be dependent on ppGpp and nucleoid-associated proteins, but the importance of specific proteins and enzymes between biofilm and planktonic lifestyles was significantly different. Data presented here support the increasingly appreciated role of ppGpp as a central mediator of bacterial persistence and demonstrate that nutrient transitions can be a source of persisters in biofilms.

  9. Nutrient transitions are a source of persisters in Escherichia coli biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Stephanie M; Brynildsen, Mark P

    2014-01-01

    Chronic and recurrent infections have been attributed to persisters in biofilms, and despite this importance, the mechanisms of persister formation in biofilms remain unclear. The plethora of biofilm characteristics that could give rise to persisters, including slower growth, quorum signaling, oxidative stress, and nutrient heterogeneity, have complicated efforts to delineate formation pathways that generate persisters during biofilm development. Here we sought to specifically determine whether nutrient transitions, which are a common metabolic stress encountered within surface-attached communities, stimulate persister formation in biofilms and if so, to then identify the pathway. To accomplish this, we established an experimental methodology where nutrient availability to biofilm cells could be controlled exogenously, and then used that method to discover that diauxic carbon source transitions stimulated persister formation in Escherichia coli biofilms. Previously, we found that carbon source transitions stimulate persister formation in planktonic E. coli cultures, through a pathway that involved ppGpp and nucleoid-associated proteins, and therefore, tested the functionality of that pathway in biofilms. Biofilm persister formation was also found to be dependent on ppGpp and nucleoid-associated proteins, but the importance of specific proteins and enzymes between biofilm and planktonic lifestyles was significantly different. Data presented here support the increasingly appreciated role of ppGpp as a central mediator of bacterial persistence and demonstrate that nutrient transitions can be a source of persisters in biofilms.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria in natural, industrial and clinical settings predominantly live in biofilms, i.e., sessile structured microbial communities encased in self-produced extracellular matrix material. One of the most important characteristics of microbial biofilms is that the resident bacteria display...... a remarkable increased tolerance toward antimicrobial attack. Biofilms formed by opportunistic pathogenic bacteria are involved in devastating persistent medical device-associated infections, and chronic infections in individuals who are immune-compromised or otherwise impaired in the host defense. Because...... the use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  11. Extracellular-matrix-mediated osmotic pressure drives Vibrio cholerae biofilm expansion and cheater exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jing; Nadell, Carey D; Stone, Howard A; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2017-08-23

    Biofilms, surface-attached communities of bacteria encased in an extracellular matrix, are a major mode of bacterial life. How the material properties of the matrix contribute to biofilm growth and robustness is largely unexplored, in particular in response to environmental perturbations such as changes in osmotic pressure. Here, using Vibrio cholerae as our model organism, we show that during active cell growth, matrix production enables biofilm-dwelling bacterial cells to establish an osmotic pressure difference between the biofilm and the external environment. This pressure difference promotes biofilm expansion on nutritious surfaces by physically swelling the colony, which enhances nutrient uptake, and enables matrix-producing cells to outcompete non-matrix-producing cheaters via physical exclusion. Osmotic pressure together with crosslinking of the matrix also controls the growth of submerged biofilms and their susceptibility to invasion by planktonic cells. As the basic physicochemical principles of matrix crosslinking and osmotic swelling are universal, our findings may have implications for other biofilm-forming bacterial species.Most bacteria live in biofilms, surface-attached communities encased in an extracellular matrix. Here, Yan et al. show that matrix production in Vibrio cholerae increases the osmotic pressure within the biofilm, promoting biofilm expansion and physical exclusion of non-matrix producing cheaters.

  12. [Bacterial biofilms as a natural form of existence of bacteria in the environment and host organism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanova, Iu M; Gintsburg, A L

    2011-01-01

    Advances in microscopic analysis and molecular genetics research methods promoted the acquisition of evidence that natural bacteria populations exist predominately as substrate attached biofilms. Bacteria in biofilms are able to exchange signals and display coordinated activity that is inherent to multicellular organisms. Formation of biofilm communities turned out to be one of the main survival strategies of bacteria in their ecological niche. Bacteria in attached condition in biofilm are protected from the environmental damaging factors and effects of antibacterial substances in the environment and host organism during infection. According to contemporary conception, biofilm is a continuous layer of bacterial cells that are attached to a surface and each other, and contained in a biopolymer matrix. Such bacterial communities may be composed of bacteria of one or several species, and composed of actively functioning cells as well as latent and uncultured forms. Particular attention has recently been paid to the role of biofilms in the environment and host organism. Microorganisms form biofilm on any biotic and abiotic surfaces which creates serious problems in medicine and various areas of economic activity. Currently, it is established that biofilms are one of the pathogenetic factors of chronic inflection process formation. The review presents data on ubiquity of bacteria existence as biofilms, contemporary methods of microbial community analysis, structural-functional features of bacterial biofilms. Particular attention is paid to the role of biofilm in chronic infection process formation, heightened resistance to antibiotics of bacteria in biofilms and possible mechanisms of resistance. Screening approaches for agents against biofilms in chronic infections are discussed.

  13. Community Response to a Heavy Precipitation Event in High Temperature, Chemosynthetic Biofilms and Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Loiacono, S. T.; Shock, E.

    2012-12-01

    Coordinated analysis of the "Bison Pool" (BP) Environmental Genome and a complementary contextual geochemical dataset of ~75 parameters revealed biogeochemical cycling and metabolic and microbial community shifts in a Yellowstone National Park hot spring ecosystem (1). The >22m outflow of BP is a gradient of decreasing temperature, increasing dissolved oxygen, and changing availability of nutrients. Microbial life at BP transitions from a 92°C chemosynthetic community in the BP source pool to a 56°C photosynthetic mat community. Metagenomic data at BP showed the potential for both heterotrophic and autotrophic carbon metabolism (rTCA and acetyl-CoA cycles) in the highest temperature, chemosynthetic regions (1). This region of the outflow is dominated by Aquificales and Pyrococcus relatives, with smaller contributions of heterotrophic Bacteria. Following a 2h heavy precipitation event we observed an influx of exogenous organic material into the source pool supplied from the meadow surrounding the BP area. We sampled biomass and fluid at several locations within the outflow immediately following the event, and on several occasions for the next eight days. Elemental analysis and carbon and nitrogen isotopic analyses were conducted on biomass and sediment, and dissolved organic and inorganic carbon content and δ13C of fluids were analyzed. DNA and RNA were extracted, and following RT-PCR, nitrogen cycle functional gene expression was evaluated. Previous work at BP has shown that chemosynthetic biomass may carry isotopic signatures of fractionation during carbon fixation, via the acetyl-CoA and rTCA cycles (2). However, the addition of exogenous organic carbon during the rain event had an immediate and dramatic effect on the sediments and biofilms in the chemosynthetic zone of the outflow. Dissolved organic carbon was the highest measured in six years. Chemosynthetic biomass responded by incorporating the organic carbon. Carbon isotopic signatures in chemosynthetic

  14. Pyrosequencing reveals bacterial communities in unchlorinated drinking water distribution system: an integral study of bulk water, suspended solids, loose deposits, and pipe wall biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G; Bakker, G L; Li, S; Vreeburg, J H G; Verberk, J Q J C; Medema, G J; Liu, W T; Van Dijk, J C

    2014-05-20

    The current understanding of drinking water distribution system (DWDS) microbiology is limited to pipe wall biofilm and bulk water; the contributions of particle-associated bacteria (from suspended solids and loose deposits) have long been neglected. Analyzing the composition and correlation of bacterial communities from different phases helped us to locate where most of the bacteria are and understand the interactions among these phases. In the present study, the bacteria from four critical phases of an unchlorinated DWDS, including bulk water, pipe wall biofilm, suspended solids, and loose deposits, were quantified and identified by adenosine triphosphate analysis and pyrosequencing, respectively. The results showed that the bulk water bacteria (including the contribution of suspended solids) contributed less than 2% of the total bacteria. The bacteria associated with loose deposits and pipe wall biofilm that accumulated in the DWDS accounted for over 98% of the total bacteria, and the contributions of bacteria in loose deposits and pipe wall biofilm were comparable. Depending on the amount of loose deposits, its contribution can be 7-fold higher than the pipe wall biofilm. Pyrosequencing revealed relatively stable bacterial communities in bulk water, pipe wall biofilm, and suspended solids throughout the distribution system; however, the communities present in loose deposits were dependent on the amount of loose deposits locally. Bacteria within the phases of suspended solids, loose deposits, and pipe wall biofilm were similar in phylogenetic composition. The bulk water bacteria (dominated by Polaromonas spp.) were clearly different from the bacteria from the other three phases (dominated by Sphingomonas spp.). This study highlighted that the integral DWDS ecology should include contributions from all of the four phases, especially the bacteria harbored by loose deposits. The accumulation of loose deposits and the aging process create variable microenvironments

  15. Pyrosequencing Reveals Bacterial Communities in Unchlorinated Drinking Water Distribution System: An Integral Study of Bulk Water, Suspended Solids, Loose Deposits, and Pipe Wall Biofilm

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, G.

    2014-05-20

    The current understanding of drinking water distribution system (DWDS) microbiology is limited to pipe wall biofilm and bulk water; the contributions of particle-associated bacteria (from suspended solids and loose deposits) have long been neglected. Analyzing the composition and correlation of bacterial communities from different phases helped us to locate where most of the bacteria are and understand the interactions among these phases. In the present study, the bacteria from four critical phases of an unchlorinated DWDS, including bulk water, pipe wall biofilm, suspended solids, and loose deposits, were quantified and identified by adenosine triphosphate analysis and pyrosequencing, respectively. The results showed that the bulk water bacteria (including the contribution of suspended solids) contributed less than 2% of the total bacteria. The bacteria associated with loose deposits and pipe wall biofilm that accumulated in the DWDS accounted for over 98% of the total bacteria, and the contributions of bacteria in loose deposits and pipe wall biofilm were comparable. Depending on the amount of loose deposits, its contribution can be 7-fold higher than the pipe wall biofilm. Pyrosequencing revealed relatively stable bacterial communities in bulk water, pipe wall biofilm, and suspended solids throughout the distribution system; however, the communities present in loose deposits were dependent on the amount of loose deposits locally. Bacteria within the phases of suspended solids, loose deposits, and pipe wall biofilm were similar in phylogenetic composition. The bulk water bacteria (dominated by Polaromonas spp.) were clearly different from the bacteria from the other three phases (dominated by Sphingomonas spp.). This study highlighted that the integral DWDS ecology should include contributions from all of the four phases, especially the bacteria harbored by loose deposits. The accumulation of loose deposits and the aging process create variable microenvironments

  16. Sequentially aerated membrane biofilm reactors for autotrophic nitrogen removal: microbial community composition and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Franck, Stephanie; Gülay, Arda

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-aerated biofilm reactors performing autotrophic nitrogen removal can be successfully applied to treat concentrated nitrogen streams. However, their process performance is seriously hampered by the growth of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). In this work we document how sequential aeration...

  17. Benzene degradation in a denitrifying biofilm reactor : activity and microbial community composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waals, Marcelle J.; Atashgahi, Siavash; da Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; van der Zaan, Bas M.; Smidt, Hauke; Gerritse, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Benzene is an aromatic compound and harmful for the environment. Biodegradation of benzene can reduce the toxicological risk after accidental or controlled release of this chemical in the environment. In this study, we further characterized an anaerobic continuous biofilm culture grown for more than

  18. In Situ Ecophysiology of Microbial Biofilm Communities Analyzed by CMEIAS Computer-Assisted Microscopy at Single-Cell Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef G. Yanni

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the utility of CMEIAS (Center for Microbial Ecology Image Analysis System computer-assisted microscopy to extract data from accurately segmented images that provide 63 different insights into the ecophysiology of microbial populations and communities within biofilms and other habitats. Topics include quantitative assessments of: (i morphological diversity as an indicator of impacts that substratum physicochemistries have on biofilm community structure and dominance-rarity relationships among populations; (ii morphotype-specific distributions of biovolume body size that relate microbial allometric scaling, metabolic activity and growth physiology; (iii fractal geometry of optimal cellular positioning for efficient utilization of allocated nutrient resources; (iv morphotype-specific stress responses to starvation, environmental disturbance and bacteriovory predation; (v patterns of spatial distribution indicating positive and negative cell–cell interactions affecting their colonization behavior; and (vi significant methodological improvements to increase the accuracy of color-discriminated ecophysiology, e.g., differentiation of cell viability based on cell membrane integrity, cellular respiratory activity, phylogenetically differentiated substrate utilization, and N-acyl homoserine lactone-mediated cell–cell communication by bacteria while colonizing plant roots. The intensity of these ecophysiological attributes commonly varies at the individual cell level, emphasizing the importance of analyzing them at single-cell resolution and the proper spatial scale at which they occur in situ.

  19. Molecular Characterization of the Bacterial Community in Biofilms for Degradation of Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate-co-3-Hydroxyhexanoate) Films in Seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Ogata, Kento; Okura, Tetsuo; Sato, Shunsuke

    2018-03-29

    Microplastics are fragmented pieces of plastic in marine environments, and have become a serious environmental issue. However, the dynamics of the biodegradation of plastic in marine environments have not yet been elucidated in detail. Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biodegradable polymers that are synthesized by a wide range of microorganisms. One of the PHA derivatives, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBH) has flexible material properties and a low melting temperature. After an incubation in seawater samples, a significant amount of biofilms were observed on the surfaces of PHBH films, and some PHBH films were mostly or partially degraded. In the biofilms that formed on the surfaces of unbroken PHBH films, the most dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed high similarity with the genus Glaciecola in the family Alteromonadaceae. On the other hand, the dominant OTUs in the biofilms that formed on the surfaces of broken PHBH films were assigned to the families Rhodobacteraceae, Rhodospirillaceae, and Oceanospirillaceae, and the genus Glaciecola mostly disappeared. The bacterial community in the biofilms on PHBH films was assumed to have dynamically changed according to the progression of degradation. Approximately 50 colonies were isolated from the biofilm samples that formed on the PHBH films and their PHBH-degrading activities were assessed. Two out of three PHBH-degrading isolates showed high similarities to Glaciecola lipolytica and Aestuariibacter halophilus in the family Alteromonadaceae. These results suggest that bacterial strains belonging to the family Alteromonadaceae function as the principal PHBH-degrading bacteria in these biofilms.

  20. Environmental transcriptome analysis reveals physiological differences between biofilm and planktonic modes of life of the iron oxidizing bacteria Leptospirillum spp. in their natural microbial community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parro Víctor

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extreme acidic environments are characterized by their high metal content and lack of nutrients (oligotrophy. Macroscopic biofilms and filaments usually grow on the water-air interface or under the stream attached to solid substrates (streamers. In the Río Tinto (Spain, brown filaments develop under the water stream where the Gram-negative iron-oxidizing bacteria Leptospirillum spp. (L. ferrooxidans and L. ferriphilum and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans are abundant. These microorganisms play a critical role in bioleaching processes for industrial (biominery and environmental applications (acid mine drainage, bioremediation. The aim of this study was to investigate the physiological differences between the free living (planktonic and the sessile (biofilm associated lifestyles of Leptospirillum spp. as part of its natural extremely acidophilic community. Results Total RNA extracted from environmental samples was used to determine the composition of the metabolically active members of the microbial community and then to compare the biofilm and planktonic environmental transcriptomes by hybridizing to a genomic microarray of L. ferrooxidans. Genes up-regulated in the filamentous biofilm are involved in cellular functions related to biofilm formation and maintenance, such as: motility and quorum sensing (mqsR, cheAY, fliA, motAB, synthesis of cell wall structures (lnt, murA, murB, specific proteases (clpX/clpP, stress response chaperons (clpB, clpC, grpE-dnaKJ, groESL, etc. Additionally, genes involved in mixed acid fermentation (poxB, ackA were up-regulated in the biofilm. This result, together with the presence of small organic acids like acetate and formate (1.36 mM and 0.06 mM respectively in the acidic (pH 1.8 water stream, suggests that either L. ferrooxidans or other member of the microbial community are producing acetate in the acidophilic biofilm under microaerophilic conditions. Conclusions Our results indicate that the

  1. Environmental transcriptome analysis reveals physiological differences between biofilm and planktonic modes of life of the iron oxidizing bacteria Leptospirillum spp. in their natural microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Paz, Mercedes; Gómez, Manuel J; Arcas, Aida; Parro, Víctor

    2010-06-24

    Extreme acidic environments are characterized by their high metal content and lack of nutrients (oligotrophy). Macroscopic biofilms and filaments usually grow on the water-air interface or under the stream attached to solid substrates (streamers). In the Río Tinto (Spain), brown filaments develop under the water stream where the Gram-negative iron-oxidizing bacteria Leptospirillum spp. (L. ferrooxidans and L. ferriphilum) and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans are abundant. These microorganisms play a critical role in bioleaching processes for industrial (biominery) and environmental applications (acid mine drainage, bioremediation). The aim of this study was to investigate the physiological differences between the free living (planktonic) and the sessile (biofilm associated) lifestyles of Leptospirillum spp. as part of its natural extremely acidophilic community. Total RNA extracted from environmental samples was used to determine the composition of the metabolically active members of the microbial community and then to compare the biofilm and planktonic environmental transcriptomes by hybridizing to a genomic microarray of L. ferrooxidans. Genes up-regulated in the filamentous biofilm are involved in cellular functions related to biofilm formation and maintenance, such as: motility and quorum sensing (mqsR, cheAY, fliA, motAB), synthesis of cell wall structures (lnt, murA, murB), specific proteases (clpX/clpP), stress response chaperons (clpB, clpC, grpE-dnaKJ, groESL), etc. Additionally, genes involved in mixed acid fermentation (poxB, ackA) were up-regulated in the biofilm. This result, together with the presence of small organic acids like acetate and formate (1.36 mM and 0.06 mM respectively) in the acidic (pH 1.8) water stream, suggests that either L. ferrooxidans or other member of the microbial community are producing acetate in the acidophilic biofilm under microaerophilic conditions. Our results indicate that the acidophilic filaments are dynamic structures

  2. Fate of Salmonella Typhimurium in laboratory-scale drinking water biofilms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schaefer, Lisa M

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available biofilms in monoculture and the fate and persistence of Salmonella in a mixed aquatic biofilm was examined. In monoculture S. Typhimurium formed loosely structured biofilms. Salmonella colonized established multi-species drinking water biofilms within 24...

  3. Antifouling Coatings Influence both Abundance and Community Structure of Colonizing Biofilms: a Case Study in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, Mercedes; Barani, Aude; Gregori, Gérald; Bouchez, Agnès; Le Berre, Brigitte; Bressy, Christine; Blache, Yves

    2014-01-01

    When immersed in seawater, substrates are rapidly colonized by both micro- and macroorganisms. This process is responsible for important economic and ecological prejudices, particularly when related to ship hulls or aquaculture nets. Commercial antifouling coatings are supposed to reduce biofouling, i.e., micro- and macrofoulers. In this study, biofilms that primarily settled on seven different coatings (polyvinyl chloride [PVC], a fouling release coating [FRC], and five self-polishing copolymer coatings [SPC], including four commercial ones) were quantitatively studied, after 1 month of immersion in summer in the Toulon Bay (Northwestern Mediterranean Sea, France), by using flow cytometry (FCM), microscopy, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. FCM was used after a pretreatment to separate cells from the biofilm matrix, in order to determine densities of heterotrophic bacteria, picocyanobacteria, and pico- and nanoeukaryotes on these coatings. Among diatoms, the only microphytobenthic class identified by microscopy, Licmophora, Navicula, and Nitzschia were determined to be the dominant taxa. Overall, biocide-free coatings showed higher densities than all other coatings, except for one biocidal coating, whatever the group of microorganisms. Heterotrophic bacteria always showed the highest densities, and diatoms showed the lowest, but the relative abundances of these groups varied depending on the coating. In particular, the copper-free SPC failed to prevent diatom settlement, whereas the pyrithione-free SPC exhibited high picocyanobacterial density. These results highlight the interest in FCM for antifouling coating assessment as well as specific selection among microbial communities by antifouling coatings. PMID:24907329

  4. Establishing a Research Center: The Minority Male Community College Collaborative (M2C3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, J. Luke; Urias, Marissa Vasquez; Harris, Frank, III

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the establishment of the Minority Male Community College Collaborative (M2C3), a research and practice center at San Diego State University. M2C3 partners with community colleges across the United States to enhance access, achievement, and success among men of color. This chapter begins with a description of the national…

  5. Biofilms in wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, R A; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, M

    2014-01-01

    Following confirmation of the presence of biofilms in chronic wounds, the term biofilm became a buzzword within the wound healing community. For more than a century pathogens have been successfully isolated and identified from wound specimens using techniques that were devised in the nineteenth...... extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Cells within such aggregations (or biofilms) display varying physiological and metabolic properties that are distinct from those of planktonic cells, and which contribute to their persistence. There are many factors that influence healing in wounds and the discovery...... of biofilms in chronic wounds has provided new insight into the reasons why. Increased tolerance of biofilms to antimicrobial agents explains the limited efficacy of antimicrobial agents in chronic wounds and illustrates the need to develop new management strategies. This review aims to explain the nature...

  6. New insights into the spatial variability of biofilm communities and potentially negative bacterial groups in hydraulic concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wei; Li, Yi; Niu, Lihua; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang; Meng, Fangang

    2017-10-15

    The composition and distribution characteristics of bacterial communities in biofilms attached to hydraulic concrete structure (HCS) surfaces were investigated for the first time in four reservoirs in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River Basin using 16S rRNA Miseq sequencing. High microbial diversity was found in HCS biofilms, and notable differences were observed in different types of HCS. Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi were the predominant phyla, with respective relative abundances of 35.3%, 25.4% and 13.0%. The three most abundant genera were Leptolyngbya, Anaerolineaceae and Polynucleobacter. The phyla Beta-proteobacteria and Firmicutes and genus Lyngbya were predominant in CGP, whereas the phyla Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi and genera Leptolyngbya, Anaerolinea and Polynucleobacter survived better in land walls and bank slopes. Dissolved oxygen, ammonia nitrogen and temperature were characterized as the main factors driving the bacterial community composition. The most abundant groups of metabolic functions were also identified as ammonia oxidizers, sulphate reducers, and dehalogenators. Additionally, functional groups related to biocorrosion were found to account for the largest proportion (14.0% of total sequences) in gate piers, followed by those in land walls (11.5%) and bank slopes (10.2%). Concrete gate piers were at the greatest risk of biocorrosion with the most abundant negative bacterial groups, especially for sulphate reducers. Thus, it should be paid high attention to the biocorrosion prevention of concrete gate piers. Overall, this study contributed to the optimization of microbial control and the improvement of the safety management for water conservation structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of early colonizers on in vitro subgingival biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Ammann

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of early colonizing species on the structure and the composition of the bacterial community developing in a subgingival 10-species biofilm model system. The model included Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus anginosus, Actinomycesoris, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleatum, Veillonella dispar, Campylobacter rectus, Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola. Based on literature, we considered Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus anginosus, and Actinomyces oris as early colonizers and examined their role in the biofilms by either a delayed addition to the consortium, or by not inoculating at all the biofilms with these species. We quantitatively evaluated the resulting biofilms by real-time quantitative PCR and further compared the structures using confocal laser scanning microscopy following fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The absence of the early colonizers did not hinder biofilm formation. The biofilms reached the same total counts and developed to normal thickness. However, quantitative shifts in the abundances of individual species were observed. In the absence of streptococci, the overall biofilm structure appeared looser and more dispersed. Moreover, besides a significant increase of P. intermedia and a decrease of P. gingivalis , P. intermedia appeared to form filamented long chains that resembled streptococci. A. oris, although growing to significantly higher abundance in absence of streptococci, did not have a visible impact on the biofilms. Hence, in the absence of the early colonizers, there is a pronounced effect on P. intermedia and P. gingivalis that may cause distinct shifts in the structure of the biofilm. Streptococci possibly facilitate the establishment of P. gingivalis into subgingival biofilms, while in their absence P. intermedia became more dominant and forms elongated chains.

  8. Establishment of a Community-Based Mental Health Center in Yazd: A Short Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golrasteh Kholasehzadeh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available About 40 years ago, the mental health services providing strategies have been dramatically changed worldwide. As well as, it is considered as a new revolution in mental health and named as community-based mental health movement. Moreover, mental health centers in Iran have been established in order to make a change in urban community-based mental health (CMHC. The first CMHC was founded in Tehran 16th district in 2010. In Yazd, it was established in 2010. In this article, the steps for establishment of the first CMHC were described.

  9. Establishment and Implementation of the Balingasay Marine Protected Area: A Community-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severino Salmo III

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available A community-based approach in the establishment and implementation of a marine protected area (MPA in Balingasay, Bolinao, Pangasinan is presented. The factors necessary to facilitate the successful establishment and implementation of a community-managed MPA include heightening of environmental awareness, community mobilization, and legal/institutional and financial assistance. A heightened environmental awareness encouraged the community to undertake resource management action. The formation of a people’s organization, SAMMABAL (Samahan ng mga Mangingisda at Mamamayan ng Balingasay, was crucial in assessing environmental problems (e.g., overfishing and identifying the establishment of an MPA as a management tool to address the problem. SAMMABAL was also instrumental in eliciting community support for the issuance of a municipal ordinance in the establishment of the MPA. Subsequently, the organization initiated the patrolling of the MPA. Institutions involved in the community-based management of the MPA also included the multi-sectoral council (BRMC – Balingasay Resource Management Council and representatives from the barangay council and the municipal government. This institutional arrangement has proven to be very resilient, indicating a high probability of sustaining its successes despite some obstacles and shortcomings. Clear delineation of the role and functions of the institutions and the stakeholders was essential in advancing the initiative. This case study will draw on the lessons from the experience of a four-year community-managed MPA.

  10. Environmental switching during biofilm development in a cold seep system and functional determinants of species sorting

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Weipeng; Tian, Renmao; Yang, Bo; Cao, Huiluo; Cai, Lin; Chen, Lianguo; Zhou, Guowei; Sun, Jingya; Zhang, Xixiang; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz M.; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The functional basis for species sorting theory remains elusive, especially for microbial community assembly in deep sea environments. Using artificial surface-based biofilm models, our recent work revealed taxonomic succession during biofilm development in a newly defined cold seep system, the Thuwal cold seeps II, which comprises a brine pool and the adjacent normal bottom water (NBW) to form a metacommunity via the potential immigration of organisms from one patch to another. Here, we designed an experiment to investigate the effects of environmental switching between the brine pool and the NBW on biofilm assembly, which could reflect environmental filtering effects during bacterial immigration to new environments. Analyses of 16S rRNA genes of 71 biofilm samples suggested that the microbial composition of biofilms established in new environments was determined by both the source community and the incubation conditions. Moreover, a comparison of 18 metagenomes provided evidence for biofilm community assembly that was based primarily on functional features rather than taxonomic identities; metal ion resistance and amino acid metabolism were the major species sorting determinants for the succession of biofilm communities. Genome binning and pathway reconstruction of two bacterial species (Marinobacter sp. and Oleispira sp.) further demonstrated metal ion resistance and amino acid metabolism as functional traits conferring the survival of habitat generalists in both the brine pool and NBW. The results of the present study sheds new light on microbial community assembly in special habitats and bridges a gap in species sorting theory.

  11. Environmental switching during biofilm development in a cold seep system and functional determinants of species sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weipeng; Tian, Renmao; Bo, Yang; Cao, Huiluo; Cai, Lin; Chen, Lianguo; Zhou, Guowei; Sun, Jin; Zhang, Xixiang; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2016-05-01

    The functional basis for species sorting theory remains elusive, especially for microbial community assembly in deep-sea environments. Using artificial surface-based biofilm models, our recent work revealed taxonomic succession during biofilm development in a newly defined cold seep system, the Thuwal cold seeps II, which comprises a brine pool and the adjacent normal bottom water (NBW) to form a metacommunity via the potential immigration of organisms from one patch to another. Here, we designed an experiment to investigate the effects of environmental switching between the brine pool and the NBW on biofilm assembly, which could reflect environmental filtering effects during bacterial immigration to new environments. Analyses of 16S rRNA genes of 71 biofilm samples suggested that the microbial composition of biofilms established in new environments was determined by both the source community and the incubation conditions. Moreover, a comparison of 18 metagenomes provided evidence for biofilm community assembly that was based primarily on functional features rather than taxonomic identities; metal ion resistance and amino acid metabolism were the major species sorting determinants for the succession of biofilm communities. Genome binning and pathway reconstruction of two bacterial species (Marinobacter sp. and Oleispira sp.) further demonstrated metal ion resistance and amino acid metabolism as functional traits conferring the survival of habitat generalists in both the brine pool and NBW. The results of this study shed new light on microbial community assembly in special habitats and bridge a gap in species sorting theory. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Environmental switching during biofilm development in a cold seep system and functional determinants of species sorting

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Weipeng

    2015-11-28

    The functional basis for species sorting theory remains elusive, especially for microbial community assembly in deep sea environments. Using artificial surface-based biofilm models, our recent work revealed taxonomic succession during biofilm development in a newly defined cold seep system, the Thuwal cold seeps II, which comprises a brine pool and the adjacent normal bottom water (NBW) to form a metacommunity via the potential immigration of organisms from one patch to another. Here, we designed an experiment to investigate the effects of environmental switching between the brine pool and the NBW on biofilm assembly, which could reflect environmental filtering effects during bacterial immigration to new environments. Analyses of 16S rRNA genes of 71 biofilm samples suggested that the microbial composition of biofilms established in new environments was determined by both the source community and the incubation conditions. Moreover, a comparison of 18 metagenomes provided evidence for biofilm community assembly that was based primarily on functional features rather than taxonomic identities; metal ion resistance and amino acid metabolism were the major species sorting determinants for the succession of biofilm communities. Genome binning and pathway reconstruction of two bacterial species (Marinobacter sp. and Oleispira sp.) further demonstrated metal ion resistance and amino acid metabolism as functional traits conferring the survival of habitat generalists in both the brine pool and NBW. The results of the present study sheds new light on microbial community assembly in special habitats and bridges a gap in species sorting theory.

  13. Biofilm forming ability of Sphingomonas paucimobilis isolated from community drinking water systems on plumbing materials used in water distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Parul; Ghosh, Moushumi

    2017-10-01

    Sphingomonas paucimobilis, an oligotroph, is well recognized for its potential for biofilm formation. The present study explored the biofilm forming ability of a strain isolated from municipal drinking water on plumbing materials. The intensity of biofilm formation of this strain on different plumbing materials was examined by using 1 × 1 cm 2 pieces of six different pipe materials, i.e. polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polypropylene (PP), polyethylene (PE), aluminium (Al), copper (Cu) and rubber (R) and observing by staining with the chemical chromophore, Calcofluor. To understand whether biofilm formation occurs under flow through conditions, a laboratory-scale simulated distribution system, comprised of the above materials was fabricated. Biofilm samples were collected from the designed system at different biofilm ages (10, 40 and 90 hours old) and enumerated. The results indicated that the biofilm formation occurred on all plumbing materials with Cu and R as exceptions. The intensity of biofilm formation was found to be maximum on PVC followed by PP and PE. We also demonstrated the chemical chromophore (Calcofluor) successfully for rapid and easy visual detection of biofilms, validated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis of the plumbing materials. Chlorination has little effect in preventing biofilm development.

  14. Transported biofilms and their influence on subsequent macrofouling colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweat, L Holly; Swain, Geoffrey W; Hunsucker, Kelli Z; Johnson, Kevin B

    2017-05-01

    Biofilm organisms such as diatoms are potential regulators of global macrofouling dispersal because they ubiquitously colonize submerged surfaces, resist antifouling efforts and frequently alter larval recruitment. Although ships continually deliver biofilms to foreign ports, it is unclear how transport shapes biofilm microbial structure and subsequent macrofouling colonization. This study demonstrates that different ship hull coatings and transport methods change diatom assemblage composition in transported coastal marine biofilms. Assemblages carried on the hull experienced significant cell losses and changes in composition through hydrodynamic stress, whereas those that underwent sheltered transport, even through freshwater, were largely unaltered. Coatings and their associated biofilms shaped distinct macrofouling communities and affected recruitment for one third of all species, while biofilms from different transport treatments had little effect on macrofouling colonization. These results demonstrate that transport conditions can shape diatom assemblages in biofilms carried by ships, but the properties of the underlying coatings are mainly responsible for subsequent macrofouling. The methods by which organisms colonize and are transferred by ships have implications for their distribution, establishment and invasion success.

  15. The characterization of functions involved in the establishment and maturation of Klebsiella pneumoniae in vitro biofilm reveals dual roles for surface exopolysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balestrino, D.; Ghigo, J.M.; Charbonnel, N.

    2008-01-01

    of biofilm development. A 2200 K. pneumoniae mutant library previously obtained by signature-tagged mutagenesis was screened in static and dynamic culture models to detect clones impaired at early and/or mature stages of biofilm formation. A total of 28 mutants were affected during late phases of biofilm...... formation, whereas 16 mutants displayed early adhesion defect. These mutants corresponded to genes involved in potential cellular and DNA metabolism pathways and to membrane transport functions. Eight mutants were deficient in capsule or LPS production. Gene disruption and microscopic analyses showed...

  16. Biofilm in endodontics: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhajharia, Kapil; Parolia, Abhishek; Shetty, K Vikram; Mehta, Lata Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic disease is a biofilm-mediated infection, and primary aim in the management of endodontic disease is the elimination of bacterial biofilm from the root canal system. The most common endodontic infection is caused by the surface-associated growth of microorganisms. It is important to apply the biofilm concept to endodontic microbiology to understand the pathogenic potential of the root canal microbiota as well as to form the basis for new approaches for disinfection. It is foremost to understand how the biofilm formed by root canal bacteria resists endodontic treatment measures. Bacterial etiology has been confirmed for common oral diseases such as caries and periodontal and endodontic infections. Bacteria causing these diseases are organized in biofilm structures, which are complex microbial communities composed of a great variety of bacteria with different ecological requirements and pathogenic potential. The biofilm community not only gives bacteria effective protection against the host's defense system but also makes them more resistant to a variety of disinfecting agents used as oral hygiene products or in the treatment of infections. Successful treatment of these diseases depends on biofilm removal as well as effective killing of biofilm bacteria. So, the fundamental to maintain oral health and prevent dental caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis is to control the oral biofilms. From these aspects, the formation of biofilms carries particular clinical significance because not only host defense mechanisms but also therapeutic efforts including chemical and mechanical antimicrobial treatment measures have the most difficult task of dealing with organisms that are gathered in a biofilm. The aim of this article was to review the mechanisms of biofilms’ formation, their roles in pulpal and periapical pathosis, the different types of biofilms, the factors influencing biofilm formation, the mechanisms of their antimicrobial resistance, techniques to

  17. Interactions in multispecies biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burmølle, Mette; Ren, Dawei; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The recent focus on complex bacterial communities has led to the recognition of interactions across species boundaries. This is particularly pronounced in multispecies biofilms, where synergistic interactions impact the bacterial distribution and overall biomass produced. Importantly, in a number...... of settings, the interactions in a multispecies biofilm affect its overall function, physiology, or surroundings, by resulting in enhanced resistance, virulence, or degradation of pollutants, which is of significant importance to human health and activities. The underlying mechanisms causing these synergistic...

  18. Herbivory and dominance shifts among exotic and congeneric native plant species during plant community establishment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelkes, Tim; Meisner, Annelein; Morriën, Elly

    2016-01-01

    in a riparian ecosystem during early establishment of invaded communities. We planted ten plant communities each consisting of three individuals of each of six exotic plant species as well as six phylogenetically related natives. Exotic plant species were selected based on a rapid recent increase in regional...... abundance, the presence of a congeneric native species, and their co-occurrence in the riparian ecosystem. All plant communities were covered by tents with insect mesh. Five tents were open on the leeward side to allow herbivory. The other five tents were completely closed in order to exclude insects...... and vertebrates. Herbivory reduced aboveground biomass by half and influenced which of the plant species dominated the establishing communities. Exposure to herbivory did not reduce the total biomass of natives more than that of exotics, so aboveground herbivory did not selectively enhance exotics during...

  19. Nitrosomonas Nm143-like ammonia oxidizers and Nitrospira marina -like nitrite oxidizers dominate the nitrifier community in a marine aquaculture biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foesel, Bärbel U.; Gieseke, Armin; Schwermer, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    Zero-discharge marine aquaculture systems are an environmentally friendly alternative to conventional aquaculture. In these systems, water is purified and recycled via microbial biofilters. Here, quantitative data on nitrifier community structure of a trickling filter biofilm associated with a re......Zero-discharge marine aquaculture systems are an environmentally friendly alternative to conventional aquaculture. In these systems, water is purified and recycled via microbial biofilters. Here, quantitative data on nitrifier community structure of a trickling filter biofilm associated...

  20. Community perceptions towards the establishment of an urban forest plantation: a case of Dzivaresekwa, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mureva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The health of urban forest communities not only depend on the government and nongovernmental organizations, but also strongly rely on local community stewardship. A study was carried out to assess community perceptions on the establishment of an urban forest plantation among urban residents in Dzivaresekwa, an urban area in Harare. Randomized systematic sampling was used to select 150 households and one resident per household was interviewed using a pretested questionnaire with both closed and open-ended questions. The objectives of the study were to determine how age and gender and employment status variables, were related to the urban residents’ perceptions towards establishment of a forest plantation in an urban area. Most females (58.3% viewed the plantation as a threat while most men (51.7% viewed the plantation as a recreational area. The highest proportion (61.9% of the middle age group (21-40 years perceived the plantation as a source of employment. There was a statistically significant relationship (p = 0.040 between gender and the general perception of establishing a forest plantation in the urban area. However, there was no statistically significant relationship (p = 0.203 between age groups and the perception of establishing a forest plantation in the urban area. It is concluded that the community had diverse perceptions on urban community forestry.

  1. Linking community tolerance and structure with low metallic contamination: a field study on 13 biofilms sampled across the Seine river basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechner, Lise C; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine; Tusseau-Vuillemin, Marie-Hélène

    2014-03-15

    It is difficult to assess the biological consequences of diffuse water contamination by micropollutants which are present in rivers at low, even sublethal levels. River biofilms, which respond quickly to changes of environmental parameters, are good candidates to acquire knowledge on the response of aquatic organisms to diffuse chemical contamination in the field. The study was designed as an attempt to link biofilm metal tolerance and metallic contamination in a field survey covering 13 different sampling sites in the Seine river basin (north of France) with low contamination levels. Cd and Zn tolerance of heterotrophic communities was assessed using a short-term toxicity test based on β-glucosidase activity. Metal tolerance levels varied between sites but there was no obvious correlation between tolerance and corresponding water contamination levels for Cd and Zn. Indeed, metallic contamination at the sampling sites remained subtle when compared to water quality standards (only two sampling sites had either Zn or both Cu and Zn concentrations exceeding the Environmental Quality Standards set by the EU Water Framework Directive). Yet, multivariate analysis of the data using Partial Least Squares Regression revealed that both metallic and environmental parameters were important variables explaining the variability of metal tolerance levels. Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) was also performed on both bacterial and eukaryotic biofilm communities from the 13 sampling sites. Multivariate analysis of ARISA fingerprints revealed that biofilms with similar tolerance levels have similar ARISA profiles. Those results confirm that river biofilms are potential indicators of low, diffuse contamination levels of aquatic systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Biofilm Risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirtanen, Gun Linnea; Salo, Satu

    2016-01-01

    This chapter on biofilm risks deals with biofilm formation of pathogenic microbes, sampling and detection methods, biofilm removal, and prevention of biofilm formation. Several common pathogens produce sticky and/or slimy structures in which the cells are embedded, that is, biofilms, on various...... surfaces in food processing. Biofilms of common foodborne pathogens are reviewed. The issue of persistent and nonpersistent microbial contamination in food processing is also discussed. It has been shown that biofilms can be difficult to remove and can thus cause severe disinfection and cleaning problems...... in food factories. In the prevention of biofilm formation microbial control in process lines should both limit the number of microbes on surfaces and reduce microbial activity in the process. Thus the hygienic design of process equipment and process lines is important in improving the process hygiene...

  3. Bacterial Biofilm Communities and Coral Larvae Settlement at Different Levels of Anthropogenic Impact in the Spermonde Archipelago, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Kegler

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Populations on small islands surrounded by coral reefs often heavily depend on the services provided by these reefs. The health and recovery of reefs are strongly influenced by recruitment of coral larvae. Their settlement relies on cues such as those emitted from bacterial communities forming biofilms on reef surfaces. Environmental conditions can change these bacterial community compositions (BCC and may in turn affect settlement of coral larvae. At three small inhabited islands in the Spermonde Archipelago, Indonesia, with different distance from the mainland, BCC and coral recruitment were investigated on artificial ceramic tiles after 2–8 weeks exposure time and on natural reef substrate. Water parameters showed a clear separation between inshore and near-shore/mid-shelf sites, with distinct benthic communities at all three sites. No coral recruitment was observed at the inshore site with highest natural and anthropogenic stressors. At the other two sites coral recruitment occurred on natural surfaces (recruits per 100 cm2: 0.73 ± 1.75 near-shore, 0.90 ± 1.97 mid-shelf, but there was no significant difference between the two sites. On artificial substrates coral recruitment differed between these two sites, with tile orientation and with exposure time of the tiles in the reef. The most abundant bacteria on both substrates were Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. BCC was strongly correlated with water quality and significant differences in BCC between the inshore site and near-shore/mid-shelf were found. On artificial substrates there was a significant difference in BCC also with exposure time in the reef. Our study highlights the value of taking both BCC and coral recruitment into account, in addition to the environmental conditions, when considering the recovery potential of coral reefs.

  4. Salmonella biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castelijn, G.A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Salmonellaspp. is a problem in the food industry, since biofilms may act as a persistent source of product contamination. Therefore the aim of this study was to obtain more insight in the processes involved and the factors contributing to Salmonellabiofilm

  5. Establishment of different riparian plant communities from the same soil seed bank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Heerdt, Gerhardus

    2016-01-01

    This thesis shows that weather conditions during the first year of establishment, strongly affect the composition of riparian plant communities. This is one of the factors determining if some goals of the Water Framework Directive and Natura 2000, reed beds and accompanying bird species, can be met.

  6. 77 FR 16131 - Establishing a White House Council on Strong Cities, Strong Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... Order 13602 of March 15, 2012 Establishing a White House Council on Strong Cities, Strong Communities By... enable them to develop and implement economic strategies to become more competitive, sustainable, and... resources to develop and implement their economic vision and strategies. Sec. 2. White House Council on...

  7. Biofilm roughness determines Cryptosporidium parvum retention in environmental biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCesare, E A Wolyniak; Hargreaves, B R; Jellison, K L

    2012-06-01

    The genus Cryptosporidium is a group of waterborne protozoan parasites that have been implicated in significant outbreaks of gastrointestinal infections throughout the world. Biofilms trap these pathogens and can contaminate water supplies through subsequent release. Biofilm microbial assemblages were collected seasonally from three streams in eastern Pennsylvania and used to grow biofilms in laboratory microcosms. Daily oocyst counts in the influx and efflux flow allowed the calculation of daily oocyst retention in the biofilm. Following the removal of oocysts from the influx water, oocyst attachment to the biofilm declined to an equilibrium state within 5 days that was sustained for at least 25 days. Varying the oocyst loading rate for the system showed that biofilm retention could be saturated, suggesting that discrete binding sites determined the maximum number of oocysts retained. Oocyst retention varied seasonally but was consistent across all three sites; however, seasonal oocyst retention was not consistent across years at the same site. No correlation between oocyst attachment and any measured water quality parameter was found. However, oocyst retention was strongly correlated with biofilm surface roughness and roughness varied among seasons and across years. We hypothesize that biofilm roughness and oocyst retention are dependent on environmentally driven changes in the biofilm community rather than directly on water quality conditions. It is important to understand oocyst transport dynamics to reduce risks of human infection. Better understanding of factors controlling biofilm retention of oocysts should improve our understanding of oocyst transport at different scales.

  8. Establishing a community-wide DNA barcode library as a new tool for arctic research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirta, H.; Várkonyi, G.; Rasmussen, C.

    2016-01-01

    DNA sequences offer powerful tools for describing the members and interactions of natural communities. In this study, we establish the to-date most comprehensive library of DNA barcodes for a terrestrial site, including all known macroscopic animals and vascular plants of an intensively studied...... area of the High Arctic, the Zackenberg Valley in Northeast Greenland. To demonstrate its utility, we apply the library to identify nearly 20 000 arthropod individuals from two Malaise traps, each operated for two summers. Drawing on this material, we estimate the coverage of previous morphology...... ongoing shifts in arctic communities and ecosystems. The DNA barcode library now established for Zackenberg offers new scope for such explorations, and for the detailed dissection of interspecific interactions throughout the community....

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm, a Programmed Bacterial Life for Fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keehoon; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2017-06-28

    A biofilm is a community of microbes that typically inhabit on surfaces and are encased in an extracellular matrix. Biofilms display very dissimilar characteristics to their planktonic counterparts. Biofilms are ubiquitous in the environment and influence our lives tremendously in both positive and negative ways. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bacterium known to produce robust biofilms. P. aeruginosa biofilms cause severe problems in immunocompromised patients, including those with cystic fibrosis or wound infection. Moreover, the unique biofilm properties further complicate the eradication of the biofilm infection, leading to the development of chronic infections. In this review, we discuss the history of biofilm research and general characteristics of bacterial biofilms. Then, distinct features pertaining to each stage of P. aeruginosa biofilm development are highlighted. Furthermore, infections caused by biofilms on their own or in association with other bacterial species ( i.e. , multispecies biofilms) are discussed in detail.

  10. Microbial ecology of phototrophic biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeselers, G.

    2007-01-01

    Biofilms are layered structures of microbial cells and an extracellular matrix of polymeric substances, associated with surfaces and interfaces. Biofilms trap nutrients for growth of the enclosed microbial community and help prevent detachment of cells from surfaces in flowing systems. Phototrophic

  11. New Technologies for Studying Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    FRANKLIN, MICHAEL J.; CHANG, CONNIE; AKIYAMA, TATSUYA; BOTHNER, BRIAN

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have traditionally been studied as single-cell organisms. In laboratory settings, aerobic bacteria are usually cultured in aerated flasks, where the cells are considered essentially homogenous. However, in many natural environments, bacteria and other microorganisms grow in mixed communities, often associated with surfaces. Biofilms are comprised of surface-associated microorganisms, their extracellular matrix material, and environmental chemicals that have adsorbed to the bacteria or their matrix material. While this definition of a biofilm is fairly simple, biofilms are complex and dynamic. Our understanding of the activities of individual biofilm cells and whole biofilm systems has developed rapidly, due in part to advances in molecular, analytical, and imaging tools and the miniaturization of tools designed to characterize biofilms at the enzyme level, cellular level, and systems level. PMID:26350329

  12. Discovering Biofilms: Inquiry-Based Activities for the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redelman, Carly V.; Marrs, Kathleen; Anderson, Gregory G.

    2012-01-01

    In nature, bacteria exist in and adapt to different environments by forming microbial communities called "biofilms." We propose simple, inquiry-based laboratory exercises utilizing a biofilm formation assay, which allows controlled biofilm growth. Students will be able to qualitatively assess biofilm growth via staining. Recently, we developed a…

  13. Insights into the diversity of eukaryotes in acid mine drainage biofilm communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Brett J; Tyson, Gene W; Goosherst, Lindsey; Banfield, Jillian F

    2009-04-01

    Microscopic eukaryotes are known to have important ecosystem functions, but their diversity in most environments remains vastly unexplored. Here we analyzed an 18S rRNA gene library from a subsurface iron- and sulfur-oxidizing microbial community growing in highly acidic (pH morphological characterization. Results revealed that the populations vary significantly with the habitat and no group is ubiquitous. Surprisingly, many of the eukaryotic lineages (with the exception of the APC) are closely related to neutrophiles, suggesting that they recently adapted to this extreme environment. Molecular analyses presented here confirm that the number of eukaryotic species associated with the acid mine drainage (AMD) communities is low. This finding is consistent with previous results showing a limited diversity of archaea, bacteria, and viruses in AMD environments and suggests that the environmental pressures and interplay between the members of these communities limit species diversity at all trophic levels.

  14. Effect of nitrate on activity and community structure of a sulfidogenic wastewater biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Michael Vedel Wegener; Mohanakrishnan, Janani; Schramm, Andreas

    (dsrB), and periplasmic nitrate reductase(napA). Addition of nitrate did not inhibit sulfide production although sulfate reduction and dsrB expression were suppressed, suggesting that sulfide production occurred from the reduction of other sulfur compounds. Nitrate induced a community-shift of SRB from Desulfobacter...

  15. Challenges in the care of clients with established cardiovascular disease: lessons learned from Australian community pharmacists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanni P Puspitasari

    Full Text Available As primary healthcare professionals, community pharmacists have both opportunity and potential to contribute to the prevention and progression of chronic diseases. Using cardiovascular disease (CVD as a case study, we explored factors that influence community pharmacists' everyday practice in this area. We also propose a model to best illustrate relationships between influencing factors and the scope of community pharmacy practice in the care of clients with established CVD.In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 community pharmacists in New South Wales, Australia. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed ad verbatim, and analysed using a "grounded-theory" approach.Our model shows that community pharmacists work within a complex system and their practice is influenced by interactions between three main domains: the "people" factors, including their own attitudes and beliefs as well as those of clients and doctors; the "environment" within and beyond the control of community pharmacy; and outcomes of their professional care. Despite the complexity of factors and interactions, our findings shed some light on the interrelationships between these various influences. The overarching obstacle to maximizing the community pharmacists' contribution is the lack of integration within health systems. However, achieving better integration of community pharmacists in primary care is a challenge since the systems of remuneration for healthcare professional services do not currently support this integration.Tackling chronic diseases such as CVD requires mobilization of all sources of support in the community through innovative policies which facilitate inter-professional collaboration and team care to achieve the best possible healthcare outcomes for society.

  16. Experimental evolution in biofilm populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenackers, Hans P.; Parijs, Ilse; Foster, Kevin R.; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a major form of microbial life in which cells form dense surface associated communities that can persist for many generations. The long-life of biofilm communities means that they can be strongly shaped by evolutionary processes. Here, we review the experimental study of evolution in biofilm communities. We first provide an overview of the different experimental models used to study biofilm evolution and their associated advantages and disadvantages. We then illustrate the vast amount of diversification observed during biofilm evolution, and we discuss (i) potential ecological and evolutionary processes behind the observed diversification, (ii) recent insights into the genetics of adaptive diversification, (iii) the striking degree of parallelism between evolution experiments and real-life biofilms and (iv) potential consequences of diversification. In the second part, we discuss the insights provided by evolution experiments in how biofilm growth and structure can promote cooperative phenotypes. Overall, our analysis points to an important role of biofilm diversification and cooperation in bacterial survival and productivity. Deeper understanding of both processes is of key importance to design improved antimicrobial strategies and diagnostic techniques. PMID:26895713

  17. Influence of CeO2 NPs on biological phosphorus removal and bacterial community shifts in a sequencing batch biofilm reactor with the differential effects of molecular oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yi; Wang, Chao; Hou, Jun; Wang, Peifang; You, Guoxiang; Miao, Lingzhan; Lv, Bowen; Yang, Yangyang

    2016-01-01

    The effects of CeO 2 nanoparticles (CeO 2 NPs) on a sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) with established biological phosphorus (P) removal were investigated from the processes of anaerobic P release and aerobic P uptake. At low concentration (0.1 mg/L), no significant impact was observed on total phosphorus (TP) removal after operating for 8 h. However, at a concentration of 20 mg/L, TP removal efficiency decreased from 83.68% to 55.88% and 16.76% when the CeO 2 NPs were added at the beginning of the anaerobic and aerobic periods, respectively. Further studies illustrated that the inhibition of the specific P release rate was caused by the reversible states of Ce 3+ and Ce 4+ , which inhibited the activity of exopolyphosphatase (PPX) and transformation of poly-β-hydoxyalkanoates (PHA) and glycogen, as well as the uptake of volatile fatty acids (VFAs). The decrease in the specific P uptake rate was mainly attributed to the significantly suppressed energy generation and decreased abundance of Burkholderia caused by excess reactive oxygen species. The removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was not influenced by CeO 2 NPs under aerobic conditions, due to the increased abundance of Acetobacter and Acidocella after exposure. The inhibitory effects of CeO 2 NPs with molecular oxygen were reduced after anaerobic exposure due to the enhanced particle size and the presence of Ce 3+ . - Highlights: • CeO 2 NPs (20 mg/L) had a notable toxicity effect on P removal in SBBR system. • The deteriorated SPRR was caused by the inhibited key enzyme activity (PPX). • The decreased SPUR was caused by the bacterial community shifts. • Ce ions converting and excess ROS generation are related toxicity mechanisms.

  18. Access to Community Living Infrastructure and Its Impact on the Establishment of Community-Based Day Care Centres for Seniors in Rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Man; Zhong, Renyao; Zhu, Shanwen; Ramsay, Lauren C; Li, Fen; Coyte, Peter C

    2018-06-06

    Community-based day care centres play an important role in service delivery for Chinese seniors. Little research has examined how community living infrastructure has influenced the establishment of these day care centres in rural communities. The purposes of this study were: (1) explore regional differences in community living infrastructure; and (2) to examine the impact of such infrastructure on the establishment of day care centres for Chinese seniors in rural communities. The data were derived from “The Fourth Sample Survey on the Living Conditions of Elderly People in Urban and Rural China (2015)”. The establishment of at least one day care centre was the outcome of interest, which was dichotomized at the community level into the establishment of at least one day care centre or the absence of any day care centres. Logistic regression analysis was employed to examine the impact of various community living infrastructural characteristics on the establishment of day care centres. The results showed that of the 4522 rural communities surveyed in 2015, only 10.1% had established at least one day care centre. Community living infrastructural characteristics that were significantly associated with the establishment of day care centres were the availability of cement/asphalt roads, natural gas, tap drinking water, sewage systems, and centralized garbage disposal. Our findings suggest that the significant association between community-level characteristics, especially community living infrastructure, and the establishment of rural day care centre for seniors may inform policy decision making.

  19. Access to Community Living Infrastructure and Its Impact on the Establishment of Community-Based Day Care Centres for Seniors in Rural China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Li

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Community-based day care centres play an important role in service delivery for Chinese seniors. Little research has examined how community living infrastructure has influenced the establishment of these day care centres in rural communities. The purposes of this study were: (1 explore regional differences in community living infrastructure; and (2 to examine the impact of such infrastructure on the establishment of day care centres for Chinese seniors in rural communities. The data were derived from “The Fourth Sample Survey on the Living Conditions of Elderly People in Urban and Rural China (2015”. The establishment of at least one day care centre was the outcome of interest, which was dichotomized at the community level into the establishment of at least one day care centre or the absence of any day care centres. Logistic regression analysis was employed to examine the impact of various community living infrastructural characteristics on the establishment of day care centres. The results showed that of the 4522 rural communities surveyed in 2015, only 10.1% had established at least one day care centre. Community living infrastructural characteristics that were significantly associated with the establishment of day care centres were the availability of cement/asphalt roads, natural gas, tap drinking water, sewage systems, and centralized garbage disposal. Our findings suggest that the significant association between community-level characteristics, especially community living infrastructure, and the establishment of rural day care centre for seniors may inform policy decision making.

  20. Establishment of a Hub for the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Online Monitoring Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lybeck, Nancy J.; Tawfik, Magdy S.; Pham, Binh T.

    2011-01-01

    Implementation of online monitoring and prognostics in existing U.S. nuclear power plants will involve coordinating the efforts of national laboratories, utilities, universities, and private companies. Internet-based collaborative work environments provide necessary communication tools to facilitate interaction between geographically diverse participants. Available technologies were considered, and a collaborative workspace was established at INL as a hub for the light water reactor sustainability online monitoring community.

  1. Establishment and current status of patient community at Tokyo Dental College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Hirata, Soichiro; Sugihara, Naoki; Mochizuki, Riuji; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Kawada, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    The "Dental students training to address the needs of each individual patient: enhancement of ability to make a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plans with high ethical standards and good communication skills", project launched at Tokyo Dental College was adopted by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology as part of its "Program for Promoting University Education and Student Support, Theme A: Program for Promoting University Education Reform" in 2009. One of the main goals of this subject is "the establishment of Patient Community". Patient Community members allowed students to gain a more realistic experience of clinical practice than simulated patients. The Patient Community consists of patients and members of the parents' association who have agreed to cooperate for the advancement of dental education, becoming involved in dental student education through Communication Studies, which are held for first- to fourth-year students. Patient Community members were recruited at the open lectures (15 times, between July 10, 2010 and November 30, 2011). The Patient Community comprised 24 members, including 8 men and 16 women by November 30, 2011. The cumulative number of attendees in Communication Studies (I-IV, 6 times) was 35, including 13 men and 22 women. Fourteen people applied for admission on the day of the open lecture. Seven people signed up between 1 and 7 days after the open lecture. On the other hand, only 3 people applied within 8 to 9 days after the open lecture. However, interestingly, the ratio of the attendance for Communication Studies by Patient Community members who applied 8 to 9 days after the open lecture was higher than that of members who applied for admission on the day of the open lecture. Since the number of Patient Community members is insufficient for the purposes of the Patient Community, it is necessary to think about how recruitment methods can be made more effective and how such open lectures should be

  2. Biofilms on Hospital Shower Hoses: Characterization and Implications for Nosocomial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although the source of drinking water used in hospitals is commonly, biofilms on water pipelines are refuge to bacteria that survive different disinfection strategies. Drinking water (DW) biofilms are well known to harbor opportunistic pathogens, however, these biofilm communitie...

  3. Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Moser, Claus Ernst

    A still increasing interest and emphasis on the sessile bacterial lifestyle biofilms has been seen since it was realized that the vast majority of the total microbial biomass exists as biofilms. Aggregation of bacteria was first described by Leeuwenhoek in 1677, but only recently recognized...... as being important in chronic infection. In 1993 the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) recognized that the biofilm mode of growth was relevant to microbiology. This book covers both the evidence for biofilms in many chronic bacterial infections as well as the problems facing these infections...... such as diagnostics, pathogenesis, treatment regimes and in vitro and in vivo models for studying biofilms. This is the first scientific book on biofilm infections, chapters written by the world leading scientist and clinicians. The intended audience of this book is scientists, teachers at university level as well...

  4. Current understanding of multi-species biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    every year worldwide to deal with damage to equipment, contaminations of products, energy losses, and infections in human beings resulted from microbial biofilms. Microorganisms compete, cooperate, and communicate with each other in multi-species biofilms. Understanding the mechanisms of multi......Direct observation of a wide range of natural microorganisms has revealed the fact that the majority of microbes persist as surface-attached communities surrounded by matrix materials, called biofilms. Biofilms can be formed by a single bacterial strain. However, most natural biofilms are actually......-species biofilm formation will facilitate the development of methods for combating bacterial biofilms in clinical, environmental, industrial, and agricultural areas. The most recent advances in the understanding of multi-species biofilms are summarized and discussed in the review....

  5. Candida Biofilms: Development, Architecture, and Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHANDRA, JYOTSNA; MUKHERJEE, PRANAB K.

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular device–related infections are often associated with biofilms (microbial communities encased within a polysaccharide-rich extracellular matrix) formed by pathogens on the surfaces of these devices. Candida species are the most common fungi isolated from catheter-, denture-, and voice prosthesis–associated infections and also are commonly isolated from contact lens–related infections (e.g., fungal keratitis). These biofilms exhibit decreased susceptibility to most antimicrobial agents, which contributes to the persistence of infection. Recent technological advances have facilitated the development of novel approaches to investigate the formation of biofilms and identify specific markers for biofilms. These studies have provided extensive knowledge of the effect of different variables, including growth time, nutrients, and physiological conditions, on biofilm formation, morphology, and architecture. In this article, we will focus on fungal biofilms (mainly Candida biofilms) and provide an update on the development, architecture, and resistance mechanisms of biofilms. PMID:26350306

  6. Conductive properties of methanogenic biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Lesnik, Keaton Larson; Liu, Hong

    2018-02-01

    Extracellular electron transfer between syntrophic partners needs to be efficiently maintained in methanogenic environments. Direct extracellular electron transfer via electrical current is an alternative to indirect hydrogen transfer but requires construction of conductive extracellular structures. Conductive mechanisms and relationship between conductivity and the community composition in mixed-species methanogenic biofilms are not well understood. The present study investigated conductive behaviors of methanogenic biofilms and examined the correlation between biofilm conductivity and community composition between different anaerobic biofilms enriched from the same inoculum. Highest conductivity observed in methanogenic biofilms was 71.8±4.0μS/cm. Peak-manner response of conductivity upon changes over a range of electrochemical potentials suggests that electron transfer in methanogenic biofilms occurs through redox driven super-exchange. The strong correlation observed between biofilm conductivity and Geobacter spp. in the metabolically diverse anaerobic communities suggests that the efficiency of DEET may provide pressure for microbial communities to select for species that can produce electrical conduits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Case Studies of Community-Academic Partnerships Established Using the Give-Get Grid Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behringer, Bruce; Southerland, Jodi L; Plummer, Robert M

    2017-11-01

    While partnerships for health delivery and improvement are frequently described by their structure, goals, and plans, less attention is paid to the interactive relationships among partners or for larger stakeholder groups' coalition memberships. The Give-Get Grid group process tool can be used to assess each stakeholders' expected benefits ("gets") and contributions ("gives") needed to establish and maintain long-term, mutually advantageous community-academic partnerships. This article describes three case study experiences using the Give-Get Grid in real-world context to understand and generate ideas to address contemporary health promotion opportunities among a variety of stakeholders. The case studies address three distinct community health promotion opportunities: prevention of school-based adolescent obesity disparities, higher education health professions training programs in rural community-based settings, and methods for engaging community coalitions in state Comprehensive Cancer Control Programs. The case studies demonstrate the Give-Get Grid's utility in both planning and evaluating partnerships and documenting key elements for progress in health promotion initiatives built on long-term community-academic relationships. Steps are explained with practical lessons learned in using the Grid.

  8. Killing of Serratia marcescens biofilms with chloramphenicol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Christopher; Shenoy, Anukul T; Orihuela, Carlos J; González-Juarbe, Norberto

    2017-03-29

    Serratia marcescens is a Gram-negative bacterium with proven resistance to multiple antibiotics and causative of catheter-associated infections. Bacterial colonization of catheters mainly involves the formation of biofilm. The objectives of this study were to explore the susceptibility of S. marcescens biofilms to high doses of common antibiotics and non-antimicrobial agents. Biofilms formed by a clinical isolate of S. marcescens were treated with ceftriaxone, kanamycin, gentamicin, and chloramphenicol at doses corresponding to 10, 100 and 1000 times their planktonic minimum inhibitory concentration. In addition, biofilms were also treated with chemical compounds such as polysorbate-80 and ursolic acid. S. marcescens demonstrated susceptibility to ceftriaxone, kanamycin, gentamicin, and chloramphenicol in its planktonic form, however, only chloramphenicol reduced both biofilm biomass and biofilm viability. Polysorbate-80 and ursolic acid had minimal to no effect on either planktonic and biofilm grown S. marcescens. Our results suggest that supratherapeutic doses of chloramphenicol can be used effectively against established S. marcescens biofilms.

  9. Biofilm comprising phototrophic, diazotrophic, and hydrocarbon-utilizing bacteria: a promising consortium in the bioremediation of aquatic hydrocarbon pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bader, Dhia; Kansour, Mayada K; Rayan, Rehab; Radwan, Samir S

    2013-05-01

    Biofilms harboring simultaneously anoxygenic and oxygenic phototrophic bacteria, diazotrophic bacteria, and hydrocarbon-utilizing bacteria were established on glass slides suspended in pristine and oily seawater. Via denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis on PCR-amplified rRNA gene sequence fragments from the extracted DNA from biofilms, followed by band amplification, biofilm composition was determined. The biofilms contained anoxygenic phototrophs belonging to alphaproteobacteria; pico- and filamentous cyanobacteria (oxygenic phototrophs); two species of the diazotroph Azospirillum; and two hydrocarbon-utilizing gammaproteobacterial genera, Cycloclasticus and Oleibacter. The coexistence of all these microbial taxa with different physiologies in the biofilm makes the whole community nutritionally self-sufficient and adequately aerated, a condition quite suitable for the microbial biodegradation of aquatic pollutant hydrocarbons.

  10. Pattern formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parsek, Matthew R.; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria are capable of forming elaborate multicellular communities called biofilms. Pattern formation in biofilms depends on cell proliferation and cellular migration in response to the available nutrients and other external cues, as well as on self-generated intercellular signal molecules...... and the production of an extracellular matrix that serves as a structural 'scaffolding' for the biofilm cells. Pattern formation in biofilms allows cells to position themselves favorably within nutrient gradients and enables buildup and maintenance of physiologically distinct subpopulations, which facilitates...... survival of one or more subpopulations upon environmental insult, and therefore plays an important role in the innate tolerance displayed by biofilms toward adverse conditions....

  11. The importance of community building for establishing data management and curation practices for physical samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdeen, S.; Hangsterfer, A.; Stanley, V. L.

    2017-12-01

    There is growing enthusiasm for curation of physical samples in the Earth Science community (see sessions at AGU, GSA, ESIP). Multiple federally funded efforts aim to develop best practices for curation of physical samples; however, these efforts have not yet been consolidated. Harmonizing these concurrent efforts would enable the community as a whole to build the necessary tools and community standards to move forward together. Preliminary research indicate the various groups focused on this topic are working in isolation, and the development of standards needs to come from the broadest view of `community'. We will investigate the gaps between communities by collecting information about preservation policies and practices from curators, who can provide a diverse cross-section of the grand challenges to the overall community. We will look at existing reports and study results to identify example cases, then develop a survey to gather large scale data to reinforce or clarify the example cases. We will be targeting the various community groups which are working on similar issues, and use the survey to improve the visibility of developed best practices. Given that preservation and digital collection management for physical samples are both important and difficult at present (GMRWG, 2015; NRC, 2002), barriers to both need to be addressed in order to achieve open science goals for the entire community. To address these challenges, EarthCube's iSamples, a research coordination network established to advance discoverability, access, and curation of physical samples using cyberinfrastructure, has formed a working group to collect use cases to examine the breadth of earth scientists' work with physical samples. This research team includes curators of state survey and oceanographic geological collections, and a researcher from information science. In our presentation, we will share our research and the design of the proposed survey. Our goal is to engage the audience in a

  12. Long-term survey of heavy-metal pollution, biofilm contamination and diatom community structure in the Riou Mort watershed, South-West France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, S.; Duong, T.T.; Dabrin, A.; Coynel, A.; Herlory, O.; Baudrimont, M.; Delmas, F.; Durrieu, G.; Schaefer, J.; Winterton, P.; Blanc, G.; Coste, M.

    2008-01-01

    In a metal-polluted stream in the Riou Mort watershed in SW France, periphytic biofilm was analyzed for diatom cell densities and taxonomic composition, dry weight and metal bio-accumulation (cadmium and zinc). Periphytic diatom communities were affected by the metal but displayed induced tolerance, seen through structural impact (dominance of small, adnate species) as well as morphological abnormalities particularly in the genera Ulnaria and Fragilaria. Species assemblages were characterized by taxa known to occur in metal-polluted environments, and shifts in the community structure expressed seasonal patterns: high numbers of Eolimna minima, Nitzschia palea and Pinnularia parvulissima were recorded in Summer and Autumn, whereas the species Surirella brebissonii, Achnanthidium minutissimum, Navicula lanceolata and Surirella angusta were dominant in Winter and Spring. Commonly used indices such as the Shannon diversity index and Specific Pollution Sensitivity Index reflected the level of pollution and suggest seasonal periodicity, the lowest diversities being observed in Summer. - Periphytic biofilm diatom communities are suitable indicators for the bioassay of elevated levels of metals in contaminated river water

  13. Establishing a community-wide DNA barcode library as a new tool for arctic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirta, H; Várkonyi, G; Rasmussen, C; Kaartinen, R; Schmidt, N M; Hebert, P D N; Barták, M; Blagoev, G; Disney, H; Ertl, S; Gjelstrup, P; Gwiazdowicz, D J; Huldén, L; Ilmonen, J; Jakovlev, J; Jaschhof, M; Kahanpää, J; Kankaanpää, T; Krogh, P H; Labbee, R; Lettner, C; Michelsen, V; Nielsen, S A; Nielsen, T R; Paasivirta, L; Pedersen, S; Pohjoismäki, J; Salmela, J; Vilkamaa, P; Väre, H; von Tschirnhaus, M; Roslin, T

    2016-05-01

    DNA sequences offer powerful tools for describing the members and interactions of natural communities. In this study, we establish the to-date most comprehensive library of DNA barcodes for a terrestrial site, including all known macroscopic animals and vascular plants of an intensively studied area of the High Arctic, the Zackenberg Valley in Northeast Greenland. To demonstrate its utility, we apply the library to identify nearly 20 000 arthropod individuals from two Malaise traps, each operated for two summers. Drawing on this material, we estimate the coverage of previous morphology-based species inventories, derive a snapshot of faunal turnover in space and time and describe the abundance and phenology of species in the rapidly changing arctic environment. Overall, 403 terrestrial animal and 160 vascular plant species were recorded by morphology-based techniques. DNA barcodes (CO1) offered high resolution in discriminating among the local animal taxa, with 92% of morphologically distinguishable taxa assigned to unique Barcode Index Numbers (BINs) and 93% to monophyletic clusters. For vascular plants, resolution was lower, with 54% of species forming monophyletic clusters based on barcode regions rbcLa and ITS2. Malaise catches revealed 122 BINs not detected by previous sampling and DNA barcoding. The insect community was dominated by a few highly abundant taxa. Even closely related taxa differed in phenology, emphasizing the need for species-level resolution when describing ongoing shifts in arctic communities and ecosystems. The DNA barcode library now established for Zackenberg offers new scope for such explorations, and for the detailed dissection of interspecific interactions throughout the community. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. A cathelicidin-2-derived peptide effectively impairs Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molhoek, E.M.; van Dijk, A.; Veldhuizen, E.J.A.; Haagsman, H.P.; Bikker, F.J.

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a major cause of nosocomial infections owing to its ability to form biofilms on the surface of medical devices. Biofilms are surface-adhered bacterial communities. In mature biofilms these communities are encased in an extracellular matrix composed of bacterial

  15. Modeling of the Bacillus subtilis Bacterial Biofilm Growing on an Agar Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Guoqing; Hao, Mudong

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are organized communities composed of millions of microorganisms that accumulate on almost any kinds of surfaces. In this paper, a biofilm growth model on an agar substrate is developed based on mass conservation principles, Fick's first law, and Monod's kinetic reaction, by considering nutrient diffusion between biofilm and agar substrate. Our results show biofilm growth evolution characteristics such as biofilm thickness, active biomass, and nutrient concentration in the agar substrate. We quantitatively obtain biofilm growth dependence on different parameters. We provide an alternative mathematical method to describe other kinds of biofilm growth such as multiple bacterial species biofilm and also biofilm growth on various complex substrates.

  16. Quantification of diatoms in biofilms: Standardisation of methods

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, J.S.; Anil, A.C.

    of the difficulty in sampling and enumeration. Scraping or brushing are the traditional methods used for removal of diatoms from biofilms developed on solid substrata. The method of removal is the most critical step in enumerating the biofilm diatom community...

  17. Dental biofilm: ecological interactions in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsh, P.D.; Zaura, E.

    Background: The oral microbiome is diverse and exists as multispecies microbial communities on oral surfaces in structurally and functionally organized biofilms. Aim: To describe the network of microbial interactions (both synergistic and antagonistic) occurring within these biofilms and assess

  18. Bacteriophage-antibiotic synergism to control planktonic and biofilm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amina Amal Mahmoud Nouraldin

    2015-07-11

    Jul 11, 2015 ... mote resistance to antimicrobial agents, and its occurrence during the infectious ... Biofilm is a structured community of bacterial cells adher- ent to an inert or ..... biofilms with bacteriophages and chlorine. Biotechnol Bioeng.

  19. Microsensor Measurements of Sulfate Reduction and Sulfide Oxidation in Compact Microbial Communities of Aerobic Biofilms Rid A-1977-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    KUHL, M.; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1992-01-01

    The microzonation of O2 respiration, H2S oxidation, and SO4(2-) reduction in aerobic trickling-filter biofilms was studied by measuring concentration profiles at high spatial resolution (25 to 100-mu-m) with microsensors for O2, S2-, and pH. Specific reaction rates were calculated from measured...

  20. Biofilm responses to marine fish farm wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz-Lazaro, Carlos; Navarrete-Mier, Francisco; Marin, Arnaldo

    2011-01-01

    The changes in the biofilm community due to organic matter enrichment, eutrophication and metal contamination derived from fish farming were studied. The biofilm biomass, polysaccharide content, trophic niche and element accumulation were quantified along an environmental gradient of fish farm wastes in two seasons. Biofilm structure and trophic diversity was influenced by seasonality as well as by the fish farm waste load. Fish farming enhanced the accumulation of organic carbon, nutrients, selenium and metals by the biofilm community. The accumulation pattern of these elements was similar regardless of the structure and trophic niche of the community. This suggests that the biofilm communities can be considered a reliable tool for assessing dissolved aquaculture wastes. Due to the ubiquity of biofilms and its wide range of consumers, its role as a sink of dissolved wastes may have important implications for the transfer of aquaculture wastes to higher trophic levels in coastal systems. - Research highlights: → Biofilms can act as a trophic pathway of fish farm dissolved wastes. → Biofilms are reliable tools for monitoring fish farm dissolved wastes. → The influence of the fish farm dissolved wastes can be detected 120-350 m from farm. - Under the influence of fish farming biofilm accumulates organic carbon, nutrients, selenium and metals, regardless of the structure and trophic niche of the community.

  1. Biofilm responses to marine fish farm wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz-Lazaro, Carlos, E-mail: carsanz@um.es [Departamento de Ecologia e Hidrologia, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad de Murcia, 30100 Murcia (Spain); Navarrete-Mier, Francisco; Marin, Arnaldo [Departamento de Ecologia e Hidrologia, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad de Murcia, 30100 Murcia (Spain)

    2011-03-15

    The changes in the biofilm community due to organic matter enrichment, eutrophication and metal contamination derived from fish farming were studied. The biofilm biomass, polysaccharide content, trophic niche and element accumulation were quantified along an environmental gradient of fish farm wastes in two seasons. Biofilm structure and trophic diversity was influenced by seasonality as well as by the fish farm waste load. Fish farming enhanced the accumulation of organic carbon, nutrients, selenium and metals by the biofilm community. The accumulation pattern of these elements was similar regardless of the structure and trophic niche of the community. This suggests that the biofilm communities can be considered a reliable tool for assessing dissolved aquaculture wastes. Due to the ubiquity of biofilms and its wide range of consumers, its role as a sink of dissolved wastes may have important implications for the transfer of aquaculture wastes to higher trophic levels in coastal systems. - Research highlights: > Biofilms can act as a trophic pathway of fish farm dissolved wastes. > Biofilms are reliable tools for monitoring fish farm dissolved wastes. > The influence of the fish farm dissolved wastes can be detected 120-350 m from farm. - Under the influence of fish farming biofilm accumulates organic carbon, nutrients, selenium and metals, regardless of the structure and trophic niche of the community.

  2. Biofilm Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade we have gained much knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that are involved in initiation and termination of biofilm formation. In many bacteria, these processes appear to occur in response to specific environmental cues and result in, respectively, induction or terminat......During the past decade we have gained much knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that are involved in initiation and termination of biofilm formation. In many bacteria, these processes appear to occur in response to specific environmental cues and result in, respectively, induction...... or termination of biofilm matrix production via the second messenger molecule c-di-GMP. In between initiation and termination of biofilm formation we have defined specific biofilm stages, but the currently available evidence suggests that these transitions are mainly governed by adaptive responses......, and not by specific genetic programs. It appears that biofilm formation can occur through multiple pathways and that the spatial structure of the biofilms is species dependent as well as dependent on environmental conditions. Bacterial subpopulations, e.g., motile and nonmotile subpopulations, can develop...

  3. Tailoring reablement: A grounded theory study of establishing reablement in a community setting in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Cathrine; Brinchmann, Berit Støre

    2018-01-01

    Reablement is an interprofessional, home-based rehabilitation service that aims to enable senior residents to cope with everyday life and to prevent functional impairments. Systematic accounts of what practitioners actually do when establishing reablement are lacking. This study aims to generate a grounded theory of practitioners' patterns of action when establishing reablement. The study is located in Norway, and grounded theory is the methodological approach. Data were collected from January 2014 to August 2016 through participant observations, focus group interviews and individual interviews. Informants are municipal healthcare employees in different organisational areas associated with the process of establishing reablement services (managers of conventional home care and representatives from the administration and service-provider offices). Altogether, 17 individuals are interviewed. The empirical data are analysed several times using open, selective and theoretical coding. The grounded theory, "tailoring reablement," includes three phases-replicating, adapting and establishing-and the strategies of collaborating, developing knowledge, habituating and filtering. The theory of tailoring reablement also includes the impact of the contextual factors. The study seeks to bridge the gap between research and practice. The theory of tailoring reablement emerges from an inductive approach and theorises participants' actions. The theory focuses on the phases from innovation to implementation. Establishing a new service model in a complex welfare setting requires a wide range of actors and agencies. Tailoring reablement also requires flexibility and professional autonomy. It is important to create terms and conditions for this within a stringent health and care service. The insights of this study have implications for practice development of reablement and can fit other public sector fields. © 2017 The Authors. Health and Social Care in the Community Published by John

  4. Molecular Basis for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Biofilm Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kaj Scherz

    In this study, I sought to identify genes regulating the global molecular program for development of sessile multicellular communities, also known as biofilm, of the eukaryotic microorganism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast). Yeast biofilm has a clinical interest, as biofilms can cause chronic...... infections in humans. Biofilm is also interesting from an evolutionary standpoint, as an example of primitive multicellularity. By using a genome-wide screen of yeast deletion mutants, I show that 71 genes are essential for biofilm formation. Two-thirds of these genes are required for transcription of FLO11......, but only a small subset is previously described as regulators of FLO11. These results reveal that the regulation of biofilm formation and FLO11 is even more complex than what has previously been described. I find that the molecular program for biofilm formation shares many essential components with two...

  5. Streptococcus mutans Protein Synthesis during Mixed-Species Biofilm Development by High-Throughput Quantitative Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Marlise I.; Xiao, Jin; Lu, Bingwen; Delahunty, Claire M.; Yates, John R.; Koo, Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms formed on tooth surfaces are comprised of mixed microbiota enmeshed in an extracellular matrix. Oral biofilms are constantly exposed to environmental changes, which influence the microbial composition, matrix formation and expression of virulence. Streptococcus mutans and sucrose are key modulators associated with the evolution of virulent-cariogenic biofilms. In this study, we used a high-throughput quantitative proteomics approach to examine how S. mutans produces relevant proteins that facilitate its establishment and optimal survival during mixed-species biofilms development induced by sucrose. Biofilms of S. mutans, alone or mixed with Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus oralis, were initially formed onto saliva-coated hydroxyapatite surface under carbohydrate-limiting condition. Sucrose (1%, w/v) was then introduced to cause environmental changes, and to induce biofilm accumulation. Multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT) approach detected up to 60% of proteins encoded by S. mutans within biofilms. Specific proteins associated with exopolysaccharide matrix assembly, metabolic and stress adaptation processes were highly abundant as the biofilm transit from earlier to later developmental stages following sucrose introduction. Our results indicate that S. mutans within a mixed-species biofilm community increases the expression of specific genes associated with glucan synthesis and remodeling (gtfBC, dexA) and glucan-binding (gbpB) during this transition (Pmutans up-regulates specific adaptation mechanisms to cope with acidic environments (F1F0-ATPase system, fatty acid biosynthesis, branched chain amino acids metabolism), and molecular chaperones (GroEL). Interestingly, the protein levels and gene expression are in general augmented when S. mutans form mixed-species biofilms (vs. single-species biofilms) demonstrating fundamental differences in the matrix assembly, survival and biofilm maintenance in the presence of other

  6. Assessing the impact of water treatment on bacterial biofilms in drinking water distribution systems using high-throughput DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jennifer L A; Monis, Paul; Fabris, Rolando; Ho, Lionel; Braun, Kalan; Drikas, Mary; Cooper, Alan

    2014-12-01

    Biofilm control in drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs) is crucial, as biofilms are known to reduce flow efficiency, impair taste and quality of drinking water and have been implicated in the transmission of harmful pathogens. Microorganisms within biofilm communities are more resistant to disinfection compared to planktonic microorganisms, making them difficult to manage in DWDSs. This study evaluates the impact of four unique drinking water treatments on biofilm community structure using metagenomic DNA sequencing. Four experimental DWDSs were subjected to the following treatments: (1) conventional coagulation, (2) magnetic ion exchange contact (MIEX) plus conventional coagulation, (3) MIEX plus conventional coagulation plus granular activated carbon, and (4) membrane filtration (MF). Bacterial biofilms located inside the pipes of each system were sampled under sterile conditions both (a) immediately after treatment application ('inlet') and (b) at a 1 km distance from the treatment application ('outlet'). Bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that the outlet biofilms were more diverse than those sampled at the inlet for all treatments. The lowest number of unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and lowest diversity was observed in the MF inlet. However, the MF system revealed the greatest increase in diversity and OTU count from inlet to outlet. Further, the biofilm communities at the outlet of each system were more similar to one another than to their respective inlet, suggesting that biofilm communities converge towards a common established equilibrium as distance from treatment application increases. Based on the results, MF treatment is most effective at inhibiting biofilm growth, but a highly efficient post-treatment disinfection regime is also critical in order to prevent the high rates of post-treatment regrowth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Establishing community-based integrated care for elderly patients through interprofessional teamwork: a qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asakawa T

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Tomohiro Asakawa,1 Hidenobu Kawabata,1 Kengo Kisa,2 Takayoshi Terashita,3 Manabu Murakami,4 Junji Otaki1 1Department of Medical Education and General Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, 2Kutchan-Kosei General Hospital, Kutchan, Hokkaido, 3Graduate School of Radiological Technology Gunma Prefectural College of Health Sciences, Kamioki-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 4International Relations Office, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan Background: Working in multidisciplinary teams is indispensable for ensuring high-quality care for elderly people in Japan’s rapidly aging society. However, health professionals often experience difficulty collaborating in practice because of their different educational backgrounds, ideas, and the roles of each profession. In this qualitative descriptive study, we reveal how to build interdisciplinary collaboration in multidisciplinary teams. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a total of 26 medical professionals, including physicians, nurses, public health nurses, medical social workers, and clerical personnel. Each participant worked as a team member of community-based integrated care. The central topic of the interviews was what the participants needed to establish collaboration during the care of elderly residents. Each interview lasted for about 60 minutes. All the interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and subjected to content analysis. Results: The analysis yielded the following three categories concerning the necessary elements of building collaboration: 1 two types of meeting configuration; 2 building good communication; and 3 effective leadership. The two meetings described in the first category – “community care meetings” and “individual care meetings” – were aimed at bringing together the disciplines and discussing individual cases, respectively. Building good communication referred to the activities

  8. Establishing an integrated gastroenterology service between a medical center and the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niv, Yaron; Dickman, Ram; Levi, Zohar; Neumann, Gadi; Ehrlich, Dorit; Bitterman, Haim; Dreiher, Jacob; Cohen, Arnon; Comaneshter, Doron; Halpern, Eyran

    2015-02-21

    To combine community and hospital services in order to enable improvements in patient management, an integrated gastroenterology service (IGS) was established. Referral patterns to specialist clinics were optimized; open access route for endoscopic procedures (including esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy, sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy) was established; family physicians' knowledge and confidence were enhanced; direct communication lines between experts and primary care physicians were opened. Continuing education, guidelines and agreed instructions for referral were promoted by the IGS. Six quality indicators were developed by the Delphi method, rigorously designed and regularly monitored. Improvement was assessed by comparing 2010, 2011 and 2012 indicators. An integrated delivery system in a specific medical field may provide a solution to a fragmented healthcare system impaired by a lack of coordination. In this paper we describe a new integrated gastroenterology service established in April 2010. Waiting time for procedures decreased: 3 mo in April 30th 2010 to 3 wk in April 30th 2011 and stayed between 1-3 wk till December 30th 2012. Average cost for patient's visit decreased from 691 to 638 NIS (a decrease of 7.6%). Six health indicators were improved significantly comparing 2010 to 2012, 2.5% to 67.5%: Bone densitometry for patients with inflammatory bowel disease, preventive medications for high risk patients on aspirin/NSAIDs, colonoscopy following positive fecal occult blood test, gastroscopy in Barrett's esophagus, documentation of family history of colorectal cancer, and colonoscopy in patients with a family history of colorectal cancer. Establishment of an IGS was found to effectively improve quality of care, while being cost-effective.

  9. Biofilm Induced Tolerance Towards Antimicrobial Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Anders; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Zampaloni, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    Increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents is thought to be an important feature of microbes growing in biofilms. We address the question of how biofilm organization affects antibiotic susceptibility. We established Escherichia coli biofilms with differential structural organization due...... to the presence of IncF plasmids expressing altered forms of the transfer pili in two different biofilm model systems. The mature biofilms were subsequently treated with two antibiotics with different molecular targets, the peptide antibiotic colistin and the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin. The dynamics...... of microbial killing were monitored by viable count determination, and confocal laser microscopy. Strains forming structurally organized biofilms show an increased bacterial survival when challenged with colistin, compared to strains forming unstructured biofilms. The increased survival is due to genetically...

  10. Biofilms of vaginal Lactobacillus in vitro test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Rui; Xiao, Bing-Bing; Liao, Qin-Ping

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on biofilms of Lactobacillus spp. - a type of normal flora isolated from healthy human vaginas of women of childbearing age; thereupon, it broadens the research scope of investigation of vaginal normal flora. The static slide culture method was adopted to foster biofilms, marked by specific fluorescence staining. Laser scanning confocal and scanning electron microscopy were used to observe the microstructure of the biofilms. Photographs taken from the microstructure were analysed to calculate the density of the biofilms. The body of Lactobacillus spp., though red, turned yellow when interacting with the green extracellular polysaccharides. The structure of the biofilm and aquaporin within the biofilm were imaged. Lactobacillus density increases over time. This study provides convincing evidence that Lactobacillus can form biofilms and grow over time in vitro. This finding establishes an important and necessary condition for selecting proper strains for the pharmaceutics of vaginal ecology.

  11. Wound biofilms: lessons learned from oral biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Mancl, Kimberly A.; Kirsner, Robert S.; Ajdic, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many chronic infections. Oral biofilms, more commonly known as dental plaque,are a primary cause of oral diseases including caries, gingivitis and periodontitis. Oral biofilms are commonly studied as model biofilm systems as they are easily accessible, thus biofilm research in oral diseases is advanced with details of biofilm formation and bacterial interactions being well-elucidated. In contrast, wound research has relati...

  12. Establishing the Common Community Physics Package by Transitioning the GFS Physics to a Collaborative Software Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, L.; Firl, G.; Zhang, M.; Jimenez, P. A.; Gill, D.; Carson, L.; Bernardet, L.; Brown, T.; Dudhia, J.; Nance, L. B.; Stark, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    The Global Model Test Bed (GMTB) has been established to support the evolution of atmospheric physical parameterizations in NCEP global modeling applications. To accelerate the transition to the Next Generation Global Prediction System (NGGPS), a collaborative model development framework known as the Common Community Physics Package (CCPP) is created within the GMTB to facilitate engagement from the broad community on physics experimentation and development. A key component to this Research to Operation (R2O) software framework is the Interoperable Physics Driver (IPD) that hooks the physics parameterizations from one end to the dynamical cores on the other end with minimum implementation effort. To initiate the CCPP, scientists and engineers from the GMTB separated and refactored the GFS physics. This exercise demonstrated the process of creating IPD-compliant code and can serve as an example for other physics schemes to do the same and be considered for inclusion into the CCPP. Further benefits to this process include run-time physics suite configuration and considerably reduced effort for testing modifications to physics suites through GMTB's physics test harness. The implementation will be described and the preliminary results will be presented at the conference.

  13. Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis of Respiratory and Household Water Biofilm Isolates of “Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis” with Establishment of a PCR Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakhiaeva, Elena; Howard, Susan T.; Brown Elliott, Barbara A.; McNulty, Steven; Newman, Kristopher L.; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Williams, Myra; Kwait, Rebecca; Lande, Leah; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Turenne, Christine

    2016-01-01

    “Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis” is an important cause of pulmonary disease. It is acquired from environmental sources, but there is no methodology for large population studies. We evaluated the potential of variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis. Clinical and household biofilm M. avium isolates underwent molecular identification. Testing for IS901 was done to separate M. avium subsp. avium from M. avium subsp. hominissuis. VNTR types were defined using VNTR loci, and subtyping was performed using 3′ hsp65 and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing. Forty-nine VNTR types and eight subtypes of M. avium subsp. hominissuis (IS901 negative) were identified among 416 isolates of M. avium from 121 patients and 80 biofilm sites. Of those types, 67% were found only among patient isolates, 11% only among household water isolates, and 23% among both. Of 13 VNTR types that included ≥4 patients, the majority (61.5%) represented geographic clustering (same city). Most VNTR types with multiple patients belonged to the same 3′ hsp65 sequence code (sequevar). A total of 44 isolates belonging to four M. avium subsp. hominissuis VNTR types (8%), including three with the rare Mav-F ITS sequence and 0/8 subspecies, produced amplicons with IS901 PCR primers. By sequencing, all 44 amplicons were not IS901 but ISMav6, which was recently observed in Japan but had not been previously described among U.S. isolates. VNTR analysis of M. avium subsp. hominissuis isolates is easier and faster than pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Seven VNTR loci separated 417 isolates into 49 types. No isolates of M. avium subsp. avium were identified. The distributions of the VNTR copy numbers, the allelic diversity, and the low prevalence of ISMav6 differed from the findings for respiratory isolates reported from Japan. PMID:26739155

  14. Establishing community partnerships to support late-life anxiety research: lessons learned from the Calmer Life project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, John Paul; Shrestha, Srijana; Escamilla, Monica; Clark, Sharonda; Wilson, Nancy; Kunik, Mark; Zeno, Darrell; Harris, Toi B; Peters, Alice; Varner, Ivory L; Scantlebury, Carolyn; Scott-Gurnell, Kathy; Stanley, Melinda

    2012-01-01

    This article outlines the development of the Calmer Life project, a partnership established between researchers and faith-based and social service organizations to examine the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) incorporating religious/spiritual components for older African Americans in low-income communities. The program was designed to bypass several barriers to delivery of CBT within the specified community; it allows multimodal delivery (in person or by telephone) that occurs outside traditional mental health settings through faith-based organizations and neighborhood community centers. It includes religion/spirituality as an element, dependent upon the preference of the participant, and is modular, so that people can select the skills they wish to learn. Established relationships within the community were built upon, and initial meetings were held in community settings, allowing feedback from community organizations. This ongoing program is functioning successfully and has strengthened relationships with community partners and facilitated increased availability of education and services in the community. The lessons learned in establishing these partnerships are outlined. The growth of effectiveness research for late-life anxiety treatments in underserved minority populations requires development of functional partnerships between academic institutions and community stakeholders, along with treatment modifications to effectively address barriers faced by these consumers. The Calmer Life project may serve as a model.

  15. Self-organization of bacterial communities against environmental pH variation: Controlled chemotactic motility arranges cell population structures in biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasaki, Sohei; Nakayama, Madoka; Shoji, Wataru

    2017-01-01

    As with many living organisms, bacteria often live on the surface of solids, such as foods, organisms, buildings and soil. Compared with dispersive behavior in liquid, bacteria on surface environment exhibit significantly restricted mobility. They have access to only limited resources and cannot be liberated from the changing environment. Accordingly, appropriate collective strategies are necessarily required for long-term growth and survival. However, in spite of our deepening knowledge of the structure and characteristics of individual cells, strategic self-organizing dynamics of their community is poorly understood and therefore not yet predictable. Here, we report a morphological change in Bacillus subtilis biofilms due to environmental pH variations, and present a mathematical model for the macroscopic spatio-temporal dynamics. We show that an environmental pH shift transforms colony morphology on hard agar media from notched 'volcano-like' to round and front-elevated 'crater-like'. We discover that a pH-dependent dose-response relationship between nutritional resource level and quantitative bacterial motility at the population level plays a central role in the mechanism of the spatio-temporal cell population structure design in biofilms.

  16. Effects of habitat-forming species richness, evenness, identity, and abundance on benthic intertidal community establishment and productivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Lemieux

    Full Text Available In a context of reduced global biodiversity, the potential impacts from the loss of habitat-forming species (HFS on ecosystem structure and functioning must be established. These species are often the main community primary producers and have a major role in the establishment of organisms through facilitation processes. This study focuses on macroalgae and mussels as HFS within an intertidal zone along the St. Lawrence estuary (Quebec, Canada. Over a 16-week period, we manipulated the in situ diversity profile (richness, evenness, identity, and abundance of the dominant HFS (Fucus distichus edentatus, F. vesiculosus, and Mytilus spp. in order to define their role in both the establishment of associated species and community primary production. Contrary to expectation, no general change in HFS richness, evenness, abundance, or identity on associated species community establishment was observed. However, over the study period, the HFS diversity profile modified the structure within the trophic guilds, which may potentially affect further community functions. Also, our results showed that the low abundance of HFS had a negative impact on the primary productivity of the community. Our results suggest that HFS diversity profiles have a limited short-term role in our study habitat and may indicate that biological forcing in these intertidal communities is less important than environmental conditions. As such, there was an opportunistic establishment of species that ensured rapid colonization regardless of the absence, or the diversity profile, of facilitators such as HFS.

  17. The Interface between Fungal Biofilms and Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Kernien

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal biofilms are communities of adherent cells surrounded by an extracellular matrix. These biofilms are commonly found during infection caused by a variety of fungal pathogens. Clinically, biofilm infections can be extremely difficult to eradicate due to their resistance to antifungals and host defenses. Biofilm formation can protect fungal pathogens from many aspects of the innate immune system, including killing by neutrophils and monocytes. Altered immune recognition during this phase of growth is also evident by changes in the cytokine profiles of monocytes and macrophages exposed to biofilm. In this manuscript, we review the host response to fungal biofilms, focusing on how these structures are recognized by the innate immune system. Biofilms formed by Candida, Aspergillus, and Cryptococcus have received the most attention and are highlighted. We describe common themes involved in the resilience of fungal biofilms to host immunity and give examples of biofilm defenses that are pathogen-specific.

  18. Roles of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Soil Abiotic Conditions in the Establishment of a Dry Grassland Community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Knappová

    Full Text Available The importance of soil biota in the composition of mature plant communities is commonly acknowledged. In contrast, the role of soil biota in the early establishment of new plant communities and their relative importance for soil abiotic conditions are still poorly understood.The aim of this study was to understand the effects of soil origin and soil fungal communities on the composition of a newly established dry grassland plant community. We used soil from two different origins (dry grassland and abandoned field with different pH and nutrient and mineral content. Grassland microcosms were established by sowing seeds of 54 species of dry grassland plants into the studied soils. To suppress soil fungi, half of the pots were regularly treated with fungicide. In this way, we studied the independent and combined effects of soil origin and soil community on the establishment of dry grassland communities.The effect of suppressing the soil fungal community on the richness and composition of the plant communities was much stronger than the effect of soil origin. Contrary to our expectations, the effects of these two factors were largely additive, indicating the same degree of importance of soil fungal communities in the establishment of species-rich plant communities in the soils from both origins. The negative effect of suppressing soil fungi on species richness, however, occurred later in the soil from the abandoned field than in the soil from the grassland. This result likely occurred because the negative effects of the suppression of fungi in the field soil were caused mainly by changes in plant community composition and increased competition. In contrast, in the grassland soil, the absence of soil fungi was limiting for plants already at the early stages of their establishment, i.e., in the phases of germination and early recruitment. While fungicide affects not only arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi but also other biota, our data indicate that changes

  19. Establishing a Framework for Successful Social Network Site Use in the Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fentry, Rhonda Spells; Boykin, Tiffany F.; Vickery, Kristen B.

    2017-01-01

    Many colleges and universities have created college-sponsored communities on Facebook and Twitter as a means to interact, connect, and build community online (Center for Community College Student Engagement, 2009; Wankel & Wankel, 2011). However, the literature provides no clear picture of how community college students use social network…

  20. Genetic Basis for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Biofilm in Liquid Medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kaj Scherz; Bojsen, Rasmus Kenneth; Gro Rejkjær Sørensen, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm-forming microorganisms switch between two forms: free-living planktonic and sessile multicellular. Sessile communities of yeast biofilms in liquid medium provide a primitive example of multicellularity and are clinically important because biofilms tend to have other growth characteristics...

  1. Extracellular DNA as matrix component in microbial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria in nature primarily live in surface-associated communities commonly known as biofilms. Because bacteria in biofilms, in many cases, display tolerance to host immune systems, antibiotics, and biocides, they are often difficult or impossible to eradicate. Biofilm formation, therefore, leads...

  2. Exploiting social evolution in biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyle, Kerry E; Heilmann, Silja; van Ditmarsch, Dave

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria are highly social organisms that communicate via signaling molecules, move collectively over surfaces and make biofilm communities. Nonetheless, our main line of defense against pathogenic bacteria consists of antibiotics-drugs that target individual-level traits of bacterial cells...... and thus, regrettably, select for resistance against their own action. A possible solution lies in targeting the mechanisms by which bacteria interact with each other within biofilms. The emerging field of microbial social evolution combines molecular microbiology with evolutionary theory to dissect...... the molecular mechanisms and the evolutionary pressures underpinning bacterial sociality. This exciting new research can ultimately lead to new therapies against biofilm infections that exploit evolutionary cheating or the trade-off between biofilm formation and dispersal....

  3. Sustained effects of volcanic ash on biofilm stoichiometry, enzyme activity and community composition in North- Patagonia streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Uara; Díaz-Villanueva, Verónica; Modenutti, Beatriz

    2018-04-15

    Volcanic eruptions are extreme perturbations that affect ecosystems. These events can also produce persistent effects in the environment for several years after the eruption, with increased concentrations of suspended particles and the introduction of elements in the water column. On 4th June 2011, the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcanic Complex (40.59°S-72.11°W, 2200m.a.s.l.) erupted explosively in southern Chile. The area affected by the volcano was devastated; a thick layer of volcanic ash (up to 30cm) was deposited in areas 50 km east of the volcano towards Argentina. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of volcanic ash deposits on stream ecosystems four years after the eruption, comparing biofilm stoichiometry, alkaline phosphatase activity, and primary producer's assemblage in streams which were severely affected by the volcano with unaffected streams. We confirmed in the laboratory that ash deposited in the catchment of affected streams still leach phosphorus (P) into the water four years after eruption. Results indicate that affected streams still receive volcanic particles and that these particles release P, thus stream water exhibits high P concentration. Biofilm P content was higher and the C:P ratio lower in affected streams compared to unaffected streams. As a consequence of less P in unaffected streams, the alkaline phosphatase activity was higher compared to affected streams. Cyanobacteria increased their abundances (99.9% of total algal biovolume) in the affected streams suggesting that the increase in P may positively affect this group. On the contrary, unaffected streams contained a diatom dominant biofilm. In this way, local heterogeneity was created between sub-catchments located within 30 km of each other. These types of events should be seen as opportunities to gather valuable ecological information about how severe disturbances, like volcanic eruptions, shape landscapes and lotic systems for several years after the event

  4. Synergistic Interactions in Multispecies Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Dawei

    The coexistence of hugely diverse microbes in most environments highlights the intricate interactions in microbial communities, which are central to their properties, such as productivity, stability and the resilience to disturbance. Biofilm, in environmental habitats, is such a spatially...... multispecies biofilm models, oral microbial community, also known as “dental plaque” is thoroughly investigated as a focal point to describe the interspecies interactions [1]. However, owing to the lack of a reliable high throughput and quantitative approach for exploring the interplay between multiple...... bacterial species, the study to elucidate the impact of interaction networks on the multispecies biofilms in natural ecosystems, especially in soil, is still at an early stage. The diverse patterns of interactions within the mixed communities as well as the predatorprey relationship between protozoa...

  5. Microbial biofilms: biosurfactants as antibiofilm agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banat, Ibrahim M; De Rienzo, Mayri A Díaz; Quinn, Gerry A

    2014-12-01

    Current microbial inhibition strategies based on planktonic bacterial physiology have been known to have limited efficacy on the growth of biofilm communities. This problem can be exacerbated by the emergence of increasingly resistant clinical strains. All aspects of biofilm measurement, monitoring, dispersal, control, and inhibition are becoming issues of increasing importance. Biosurfactants have merited renewed interest in both clinical and hygienic sectors due to their potential to disperse microbial biofilms in addition to many other advantages. The dispersal properties of biosurfactants have been shown to rival those of conventional inhibitory agents against bacterial and yeast biofilms. This makes them suitable candidates for use in new generations of microbial dispersal agents and for use as adjuvants for existing microbial suppression or eradication strategies. In this review, we explore aspects of biofilm characteristics and examine the contribution of biologically derived surface-active agents (biosurfactants) to the disruption or inhibition of microbial biofilms.

  6. Effect of Different Disinfection Protocols on Microbial and Biofilm Contamination of Dental Unit Waterlines in Community Dental Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Dallolio

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Output water from dental unit waterlines (DUWLs may be a potential source of infection for both dental healthcare staff and patients. This study compared the efficacy of different disinfection methods with regard to the water quality and the presence of biofilm in DUWLs. Five dental units operating in a public dental health care setting were selected. The control dental unit had no disinfection system; two were disinfected intermittently with peracetic acid/hydrogen peroxide 0.26% and two underwent continuous disinfection with hydrogen peroxide/silver ions (0.02% and stabilized chlorine dioxide (0.22%, respectively. After three months of applying the disinfection protocols, continuous disinfection systems were more effective than intermittent systems in reducing the microbial contamination of the water, allowing compliance with the CDC guidelines and the European Council regulatory thresholds for drinking water. P. aeruginosa, Legionella spp, sulphite-reducing Clostridium spores, S. aureus and β-haemolytic streptococci were also absent from units treated with continuous disinfection. The biofilm covering the DUWLs was more extensive, thicker and more friable in the intermittent disinfection dental units than in those with continuous disinfection. Overall, the findings showed that the products used for continuous disinfection of dental unit waterlines showed statistically better results than the intermittent treatment products under the study conditions.

  7. Effect of different disinfection protocols on microbial and biofilm contamination of dental unit waterlines in community dental practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallolio, Laura; Scuderi, Amalia; Rini, Maria S; Valente, Sabrina; Farruggia, Patrizia; Sabattini, Maria A Bucci; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Acacci, Anna; Roncarati, Greta; Leoni, Erica

    2014-02-18

    Output water from dental unit waterlines (DUWLs) may be a potential source of infection for both dental healthcare staff and patients. This study compared the efficacy of different disinfection methods with regard to the water quality and the presence of biofilm in DUWLs. Five dental units operating in a public dental health care setting were selected. The control dental unit had no disinfection system; two were disinfected intermittently with peracetic acid/hydrogen peroxide 0.26% and two underwent continuous disinfection with hydrogen peroxide/silver ions (0.02%) and stabilized chlorine dioxide (0.22%), respectively. After three months of applying the disinfection protocols, continuous disinfection systems were more effective than intermittent systems in reducing the microbial contamination of the water, allowing compliance with the CDC guidelines and the European Council regulatory thresholds for drinking water. P. aeruginosa, Legionella spp, sulphite-reducing Clostridium spores, S. aureus and β-haemolytic streptococci were also absent from units treated with continuous disinfection. The biofilm covering the DUWLs was more extensive, thicker and more friable in the intermittent disinfection dental units than in those with continuous disinfection. Overall, the findings showed that the products used for continuous disinfection of dental unit waterlines showed statistically better results than the intermittent treatment products under the study conditions.

  8. Distinct roles of extracellular polymeric substances in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Hu, Yifan; Liu, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria form surface attached biofilm communities as one of the most important survival strategies in nature. Biofilms consist of water, bacterial cells and a wide range of self‐generated extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Biofilm formation is a dynamic self‐assembly process and several d...... polysaccharide is more important than Pel polysaccharide in P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance. Our study thus suggests that different EPS materials play distinct roles during bacterial biofilm formation.......Bacteria form surface attached biofilm communities as one of the most important survival strategies in nature. Biofilms consist of water, bacterial cells and a wide range of self‐generated extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Biofilm formation is a dynamic self‐assembly process and several...... distinguishable stages are observed during bacterial biofilm development. Biofilm formation is shown to be coordinated by EPS production, cell migration, subpopulation differentiation and interactions. However, the ways these different factors affect each other and contribute to community structural...

  9. Impact of osteitis and biofilm formation and correlation between both ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The pathogenesis of diffuse sinonasal polyposis is still not completely established, possible explanations are osteitis, aeroallergens, fungal sinusitis and biofilms. There are no reports in Egypt about osteitis and biofilms in those patients. Purpose: To study the incidence and impact of osteitis and biofilms in ...

  10. Dynamic interactions of neutrophils and biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefine Hirschfeld

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The majority of microbial infections in humans are biofilm-associated and difficult to treat, as biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and protect themselves from external threats in various ways. Biofilms are tenaciously attached to surfaces and impede the ability of host defense molecules and cells to penetrate them. On the other hand, some biofilms are beneficial for the host and contain protective microorganisms. Microbes in biofilms express pathogen-associated molecular patterns and epitopes that can be recognized by innate immune cells and opsonins, leading to activation of neutrophils and other leukocytes. Neutrophils are part of the first line of defense and have multiple antimicrobial strategies allowing them to attack pathogenic biofilms. Objective/design: In this paper, interaction modes of neutrophils with biofilms are reviewed. Antimicrobial strategies of neutrophils and the counteractions of the biofilm communities, with special attention to oral biofilms, are presented. Moreover, possible adverse effects of neutrophil activity and their biofilm-promoting side effects are discussed. Results/conclusion: Biofilms are partially, but not entirely, protected against neutrophil assault, which include the processes of phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. However, virulence factors of microorganisms, microbial composition, and properties of the extracellular matrix determine whether a biofilm and subsequent microbial spread can be controlled by neutrophils and other host defense factors. Besides, neutrophils may inadvertently contribute to the physical and ecological stability of biofilms by promoting selection of more resistant strains. Moreover, neutrophil enzymes can degrade collagen and other proteins and, as a result, cause harm to the host tissues. These parameters could be crucial factors in the onset of periodontal inflammation and the subsequent tissue breakdown.

  11. [Biofilms and their significance in medical microbiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernohorská, L; Votava, M

    2002-11-01

    Microorganisms are able to adhere to various surfaces and to form there a three-dimensional structure known as biofilm. In biofilms, microbial cells show characteristics and behaviours different from those of plankton cells. Intercellular signalizations of the quorum-sensing type regulate interaction between members of the biofilm. Bacteria embedded in the biofilm can escape and form well known planktonic forms, that are obviously only a part of the bacterial life cycle. Bacteria adhere also to medically important surfaces such as catheters, either urinary or intravenous ones, artificial heart valves, orthopedic implants and so on and contribute to device-related infections like cystitis, catheter-related sepsis, endocarditis etc. Once a biofilm has been established on a surface, the bacteria harboured inside are less exposed to the host's immune response and less susceptible to antibiotics. As an important cause of nosocomial infections the biofilm must remain in the centre of the microbiologist's attention.

  12. Spaceflight promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wooseong Kim

    Full Text Available Understanding the effects of spaceflight on microbial communities is crucial for the success of long-term, manned space missions. Surface-associated bacterial communities, known as biofilms, were abundant on the Mir space station and continue to be a challenge on the International Space Station. The health and safety hazards linked to the development of biofilms are of particular concern due to the suppression of immune function observed during spaceflight. While planktonic cultures of microbes have indicated that spaceflight can lead to increases in growth and virulence, the effects of spaceflight on biofilm development and physiology remain unclear. To address this issue, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cultured during two Space Shuttle Atlantis missions: STS-132 and STS-135, and the biofilms formed during spaceflight were characterized. Spaceflight was observed to increase the number of viable cells, biofilm biomass, and thickness relative to normal gravity controls. Moreover, the biofilms formed during spaceflight exhibited a column-and-canopy structure that has not been observed on Earth. The increase in the amount of biofilms and the formation of the novel architecture during spaceflight were observed to be independent of carbon source and phosphate concentrations in the media. However, flagella-driven motility was shown to be essential for the formation of this biofilm architecture during spaceflight. These findings represent the first evidence that spaceflight affects community-level behaviors of bacteria and highlight the importance of understanding how both harmful and beneficial human-microbe interactions may be altered during spaceflight.

  13. Hydraulic resistance of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Dreszer, C.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.; Paulitsch-Fuchs, Astrid H.; Zwijnenburg, Arie; Kruithof, Joop C.; Flemming, Hans Curt

    2013-01-01

    resistance is very low compared to the expected biofilm resistance and, thus, biofilm resistance can be determined accurately. Transmembrane pressure drop was monitored. As biofilm parameters, thickness, total cell number, TOC, and extracellular polymeric

  14. Establishing a Virtual Community of Practice in Simulation: The Value of Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Brent; Brazil, Victoria; Spurr, Jesse; Palaganas, Janice; Eppich, Walter; Grant, Vincent; Cheng, Adam

    2018-04-01

    Professional development opportunities are not readily accessible for most simulation educators, who may only connect with simulation experts at periodic and costly conferences. Virtual communities of practice consist of individuals with a shared passion who communicate via virtual media to advance their own learning and that of others. A nascent virtual community of practice is developing online for healthcare simulation on social media platforms. Simulation educators should consider engaging on these platforms for their own benefit and to help develop healthcare simulation educators around the world. Herein, we describe this developing virtual community of practice and offer guidance to assist educators to engage, learn, and contribute to the growth of the community.

  15. Established Independent School Collaborates with Social Service Agency to Launch New School: Community Partnership School, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Community Partnership School (CPS) serves 90 to 95 students annually in preK-5th grade. Of these, 100 percent are African American or multiracial, and all qualify for free or reduced-price lunch. Community Partnership School began as a collaboration between Germantown Academy, which had trouble recruiting low-income students to its suburban…

  16. Long term effects of cerium dioxide nanoparticles on the nitrogen removal, micro-environment and community dynamics of a sequencing batch biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yi; Wang, Chao; Hou, Jun; Wang, Peifang; Miao, Lingzhan; You, Guoxiang; Lv, Bowen; Yang, Yangyang; Zhang, Fei

    2017-12-01

    The influences of cerium dioxide nanoparticles (CeO 2 NPs) on nitrogen removal in biofilm were investigated. Prolonged exposure (75d) to 0.1mg/L CeO 2 NPs caused no inhibitory effects on nitrogen removal, while continuous addition of 10mg/L CeO 2 NPs decreased the treatment efficiency to 53%. With the progressive concentration of CeO 2 NPs addition, the removal efficiency could nearly stabilize at 67% even with the continues spike of 10mg/L. The micro-profiles of dissolved oxygen, pH, and oxidation reduction potential suggested the developed protection mechanisms of microbes to progressive CeO 2 NPs exposure led to the less influence of microenvironment, denitrification bacteria and enzyme activity than those with continuous ones. Furthermore, high throughput sequencing illustrated the drastic shifted communities with gradual CeO 2 NPs spiking was responsible for the adaption and protective mechanisms. The present study demonstrated the acclimated microbial community was able to survive CeO 2 NPs addition more readily than those non-acclimated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Focus on the physics of biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecuyer, Sigolene; Stocker, Roman; Rusconi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are the smallest and most abundant form of life. They have traditionally been considered as primarily planktonic organisms, swimming or floating in a liquid medium, and this view has shaped many of the approaches to microbial processes, including for example the design of most antibiotics. However, over the last few decades it has become clear that many bacteria often adopt a sessile, surface-associated lifestyle, forming complex multicellular communities called biofilms. Bacterial biofilms are found in a vast range of environments and have major consequences on human health and industrial processes, from biofouling of surfaces to the spread of diseases. Although the study of biofilms has been biologists’ territory for a long time, a multitude of phenomena in the formation and development of biofilms hinges on physical processes. We are pleased to present a collection of research papers that discuss some of the latest developments in many of the areas to which physicists can contribute a deeper understanding of biofilms, both experimentally and theoretically. The topics covered range from the influence of physical environmental parameters on cell attachment and subsequent biofilm growth, to the use of local probes and imaging techniques to investigate biofilm structure, to the development of biofilms in complex environments and the modeling of colony morphogenesis. The results presented contribute to addressing some of the major challenges in microbiology today, including the prevention of surface contamination, the optimization of biofilm disruption methods and the effectiveness of antibiotic treatments. (editorial)

  18. Microbial Biofilm as a Smart Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Garde

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biofilm colonies will in many cases form a smart material capable of responding to external threats dependent on their size and internal state. The microbial community accordingly switches between passive, protective, or attack modes of action. In order to decide which strategy to employ, it is essential for the biofilm community to be able to sense its own size. The sensor designed to perform this task is termed a quorum sensor, since it only permits collective behaviour once a sufficiently large assembly of microbes have been established. The generic quorum sensor construct involves two genes, one coding for the production of a diffusible signal molecule and one coding for a regulator protein dedicated to sensing the signal molecules. A positive feedback in the signal molecule production sets a well-defined condition for switching into the collective mode. The activation of the regulator involves a slow dimerization, which allows low-pass filtering of the activation of the collective mode. Here, we review and combine the model components that form the basic quorum sensor in a number of Gram-negative bacteria, e.g., Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  19. Unravelling the core microbiome of biofilms in cooling tower systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gregorio, L; Tandoi, V; Congestri, R; Rossetti, S; Di Pippo, F

    2017-11-01

    In this study, next generation sequencing and catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization, combined with confocal microscopy, were used to provide insights into the biodiversity and structure of biofilms collected from four full-scale European cooling systems. Water samples were also analyzed to evaluate the impact of suspended microbes on biofilm formation. A common core microbiome, containing members of the families Sphingomonadaceae, Comamonadaceae and Hyphomicrobiaceae, was found in all four biofilms, despite the water of each coming from different sources (river and groundwater). This suggests that selection of the pioneer community was influenced by abiotic factors (temperature, pH) and tolerances to biocides. Members of the Sphingomonadaceae were assumed to play a key role in initial biofilm formation. Subsequent biofilm development was driven primarily by light availability, since biofilms were dominated by phototrophs in the two studied 'open' systems. Their interactions with other microbial populations then shaped the structure of the mature biofilm communities analyzed.

  20. Combined Reactor and Microelectrode Measurements in Laboratory Grown Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tove; Harremoës, Poul

    1994-01-01

    A combined biofilm reactor-/microelectrode experimental set-up has been constructed, allowing for simultaneous reactor mass balances and measurements of concentration profiles within the biofilm. The system consists of an annular biofilm reactor equipped with an oxygen microelectrode. Experiments...... were carried out with aerobic glucose and starch degrading biofilms. The well described aerobic glucose degradation biofilm system was used to test the combined reactor set-up. Results predicted from known biofilm kinetics were obtained. In the starch degrading biofilm, basic assumptions were tested...... with the microelectrode measurements. It was established, that even with a high molecular weight, non-diffusible substrate, degradation took place in the depths of the biofilm. Intrinsic enzymatic hydrolysis was not limiting and the volumetric removal rate of oxygen was zero order....

  1. Aspartate inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hang; Wang, Mengyue; Yu, Junping; Wei, Hongping

    2015-04-01

    Biofilm formation renders Staphylococcus aureus highly resistant to conventional antibiotics and host defenses. Four D-amino acids (D-Leu, D-Met, D-Trp and D-Tyr) have been reported to be able to inhibit biofilm formation and disassemble established S. aureus biofilms. We report here for the first time that both D- and L-isoforms of aspartate (Asp) inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation on tissue culture plates. Similar biofilm inhibition effects were also observed against other staphylococcal strains, including S. saprophyticus, S. equorum, S. chromogenes and S. haemolyticus. It was found that Asp at high concentrations (>10 mM) inhibited the growth of planktonic N315 cells, but at subinhibitory concentrations decreased the cellular metabolic activity without influencing cell growth. The decreased cellular metabolic activity might be the reason for the production of less protein and DNA in the matrix of the biofilms formed in the presence of Asp. However, varied inhibition efficacies of Asp were observed for biofilms formed by clinical staphylococcal isolates. There might be mechanisms other than decreasing the metabolic activity, e.g. the biofilm phenotypes, affecting biofilm formation in the presence of Asp. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Establishing a Sense of Community, Interaction, and Knowledge Exchange Among Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Davidsen, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    an academic and social sense of community among the students, through encouraging interaction and knowledge exchange. Studies show that students prefer to use Facebook for academic and social purposes. Consequently, teachers have limited insight into the academic challenges facing students, which...... is problematic when trying to create and support an academic community. Moreover, it is problematic that the institutional system Moodle primarily is used by the teachers to push information in the direction of the students. Thus, we wanted to design a third space that would fit in-between Facebook and Moodle......, and which would allow the students to experience the benefits of participating in an online community with fellow students and teachers. The study shows that teachers are crucial in developing and maintaining the online community. Nevertheless, there was also evidence that some of the online activities...

  3. Some elements for the community development starting from the establishment and use of an energetic forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantillo Higuera, Edgard Ernesto

    2000-01-01

    With this article it is looked to present several elements of community development starting from the forestry and use of energetic forests, in such a way that they guarantee a better level of the population's life, as well as the protection of the natural resources. It seeks to offer development perspectives starting from the appropriate handling of the forestall resource by means of the community participation, like productive force that should be impelled by the technical and economic contribution of the Colombian state. It is necessary to define the protagonistic paper of the municipal authorities and the community like actors in the process of sustainable development of the forestall resource as well as to identify the processes required in a system that integrates the state, the community and the natural resources for the obtaining of goods and ecological, economic and social services of the rural sector

  4. Treatment of Oral Multispecies Biofilms by an Anti-Biofilm Peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhejun Wang

    Full Text Available Human oral biofilms are multispecies microbial communities that exhibit high resistance to antimicrobial agents. Dental plaque gives rise to highly prevalent and costly biofilm-related oral infections, which lead to caries or other types of oral infections. We investigated the ability of the recently identified anti-biofilm peptide 1018 to induce killing of bacterial cells present within oral multispecies biofilms. At 10 μg/ml (6.5 μM, peptide 1018 was able to significantly (p50% of the biofilm being killed and >35% being dispersed in only 3 minutes. Peptide 1018 may potentially be used by itself or in combination with CHX as a non-toxic and effective anti-biofilm agent for plaque disinfection in clinical dentistry.

  5. The acceptability of community leaders in establishing a nuclear power plant in Thailand: a case study of Chumphon province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aukaravarothai, A.

    1998-01-01

    Acceptability of community leaders regarding the establishment of a nuclear power plant in Amphoe Pathiu of Chumphon Province in studied. The objectives are to investigate the level of understanding, the attitudes of acceptance and the possible benefits the community expects from the establishment of a nuclear power plant in the province. The study method involved interviewing the selected 118 community leaders and then applying the statistical method to analysis their responses and obtain a general description of the acceptability. The Chi-quire method was used to test the hypothesis at the confidence levels of 95% and 99%. The results revealed that 88.1% of the respondents were male and 11.9% were female, 88.2% have lived there permanently, 39.8% were university graduates and 48.3% are government officials, 48.3% were acceptable about the establishment of the nuclear power plant, 54.2% were not acceptable and 29.7% were ambiguous because they were afraid and uncertain about the safety of the power plant. In the acceptable group there was no correlation between the responses and the general Background of the respondents, i.e. age, occupation, education and field of study. However, in the unacceptable and ambiguous groups, a correlation was found between their responses and general background. This could be due to an information drive in the community prior to this study

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms Biofilms in Acute InfectionIndependent of Cell-to-Cell Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaber, J. Andy; Triffo, W.J.; Suh, Sang J.; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Hastert, Mary C.; Griswold, John A.; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2006-09-20

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 hours of infection in thermally-injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections. P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burned tissue surrounding blood vessels and adipose cells. Although quorum sensing (QS), a bacterial signaling mechanism, coordinates differentiation of biofilms in vitro, wild type and QS-deficient P. aeruginosa formed similar biofilms in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on specific host tissues independent of QS.

  7. Sticking together: building a biofilm the Bacillus subtilis way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlamakis, Hera; Chai, Yunrong; Beauregard, Pascale; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2013-03-01

    Biofilms are ubiquitous communities of tightly associated bacteria encased in an extracellular matrix. Bacillus subtilis has long served as a robust model organism to examine the molecular mechanisms of biofilm formation, and a number of studies have revealed that this process is regulated by several integrated pathways. In this Review, we focus on the molecular mechanisms that control B. subtilis biofilm assembly, and then briefly summarize the current state of knowledge regarding biofilm disassembly. We also discuss recent progress that has expanded our understanding of B. subtilis biofilm formation on plant roots, which are a natural habitat for this soil bacterium.

  8. Alginate overproduction affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Teitzel, G.M.; Balzer, G.J.

    2001-01-01

    -resistant communities of microorganisms organized in biofilms. Although biofilm formation and the conversion to mucoidy are both important aspects of CF pathogenesis, the relationship between them is at the present unclear. In this study, we report that the overproduction of alginate affects biofilm development...... on an abiotic surface. Biofilms formed by an alginate- overproducing strain exhibit a highly structured architecture and are significantly more resistant to the antibiotic tobramycin than a biofilm formed by an isogenic nonmucoid strain. These results suggest that an important consequence of the conversion...

  9. Cleaning and Disinfection of Biofilms Composed of Listeria monocytogenes and Background Microbiota from Meat Processing Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møretrø, Trond; Heir, Even; Briandet, Romain; Langsrud, Solveig

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Surfaces of food processing premises are exposed to regular cleaning and disinfection (C&D) regimes, using biocides that are highly effective against bacteria growing as planktonic cells. However, bacteria growing in surface-associated communities (biofilms) are typically more tolerant toward C&D than their individual free-cell counterparts, and survival of pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes may be affected by interspecies interactions within biofilms. In this study, Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter were the most frequently isolated genera surviving on conveyor belts subjected to C&D in meat processing plants. In the laboratory, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, and L. monocytogenes dominated the community, both in suspensions and in biofilms formed on conveyor belts, when cultures were inoculated with eleven-genus cocktails of representative bacterial strains from the identified background flora. When biofilms were exposed to daily C&D cycles mimicking treatments used in food industry, the levels of Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas mandelii diminished, and biofilms were instead dominated by Pseudomonas putida (65 to 76%), Pseudomonas fluorescens (11 to 15%) and L. monocytogenes (3 to 11%). The dominance of certain species after daily C&D correlated with high planktonic growth rates at 12°C and tolerance to C&D. In single-species biofilms, L. monocytogenes developed higher tolerance to C&D over time, for both the peracetic acid and quaternary ammonium disinfectants, indicating that a broad-spectrum mechanism was involved. Survival after C&D appeared to be a common property of L. monocytogenes strains, as persistent and sporadic subtypes showed equal survival rates in complex biofilms. Biofilms established preferentially in surface irregularities of conveyor belts, potentially constituting harborage sites for persistent contamination. IMPORTANCE In the food industry, efficient production hygiene is a key measure to avoid the accumulation of spoilage bacteria and

  10. Cleaning and disinfection of biofilms composed of Listeria monocytogenes and background microbiota from meat processing surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlund, Annette; Møretrø, Trond; Heir, Even; Briandet, Romain; Langsrud, Solveig

    2017-06-30

    Surfaces of food processing premises are exposed to regular cleaning and disinfection (C&D) regimes, using biocides that are highly effective against bacteria growing as planktonic cells. However, bacteria growing in surface associated communities (biofilms) are typically more tolerant towards C&D than their individual free cells counterparts, and survival of pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes may be affected by interspecies interactions within biofilms. In this study, Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter were the most frequently isolated genera surviving on conveyor belts subjected to C&D in meat processing plants. In the laboratory, Pseudomonas , Acinetobacter and L. monocytogenes dominated the community both in suspensions and in biofilms formed on conveyor belts, when cultures were inoculated with eleven-genera cocktails of representative bacterial strains from the identified background flora. When biofilms were exposed to daily C&D cycles, mimicking treatments used in food industry, the levels of Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas mandelii diminished, and biofilms were instead dominated by Pseudomonas putida (65-76%), Pseudomonas fluorescens (11-15%) and L. monocytogenes (3-11%). The dominance of certain species after daily C&D correlated with high planktonic growth rates at 12°C and tolerance to C&D. In single-species biofilms, L. monocytogenes developed higher tolerance to C&D over time, both for the peracetic acid and quaternary ammonium disinfectant, indicating that a broad-spectrum mechanism was involved. Survival after C&D appeared to be a common property of L. monocytogenes strains, as both persistent and sporadic subtypes showed equal survival in complex biofilms. Biofilms established preferentially in surface irregularities of conveyor belts, potentially constituting harborage sites for persistent contamination. IMPORTANCE In food industry, efficient production hygiene is a key measure to avoid accumulation of spoilage bacteria and eliminate pathogens

  11. Building healthy communities: establishing health and wellness metrics for use within the real estate industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, Matthew J; Pickell, Sarah Gauche; Pyke, Christopher R; Jutte, Douglas P

    2014-11-01

    It is increasingly well recognized that the design and operation of the communities in which people live, work, learn, and play significantly influence their health. However, within the real estate industry, the health impacts of transportation, community development, and other construction projects, both positive and negative, continue to operate largely as economic externalities: unmeasured, unregulated, and for the most part unconsidered. This lack of transparency limits communities' ability to efficiently advocate for real estate investment that best promotes their health and well-being. It also limits market incentives for innovation within the real estate industry by making it more difficult for developers that successfully target health behaviors and outcomes in their projects to differentiate themselves competitively. In this article we outline the need for actionable, community-relevant, practical, and valuable metrics jointly developed by the health care and real estate sectors to better evaluate and optimize the "performance" of real estate development projects from a population health perspective. Potential templates for implementation, including the successful introduction of sustainability metrics by the green building movement, and preliminary data from selected case-study projects are also discussed. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  12. 75 FR 80044 - Notice of Establishment of the White House Council for Community Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    ... set of perspectives from across the country. Each member of the Council will be appointed to serve a...- developed solutions. II. Structure The Council shall consist of not more than 30 members, including its... 12731). Management and support services shall be provided by the Corporation for National and Community...

  13. Biofilm retention on surfaces with variable roughness and hydrophobicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone; Pillai, Saju; Revsbech, Niels Peter

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms on food processing equipment cause food spoilage and pose a hazard to consumers. The bacterial community on steel surfaces in a butcher’s shop was characterized, and bacteria representative of this community enriched from minced pork were used to study biofilm retention. Stainless steel...

  14. The in vivo biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, Maria; Alhede, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria can grow and proliferate either as single, independent cells or organized in aggregates commonly referred to as biofilms. When bacteria succeed in forming a biofilm within the human host, the infection often becomes very resistant to treatment and can develop into a chronic state. Biofilms...... have been studied for decades using various in vitro models, but it remains debatable whether such in vitro biofilms actually resemble in vivo biofilms in chronic infections. In vivo biofilms share several structural characteristics that differ from most in vitro biofilms. Additionally, the in vivo...... experimental time span and presence of host defenses differ from chronic infections and the chemical microenvironment of both in vivo and in vitro biofilms is seldom taken into account. In this review, we discuss why the current in vitro models of biofilms might be limited for describing infectious biofilms...

  15. Differential growth of wrinkled biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espeso, D. R.; Carpio, A.; Einarsson, B.

    2015-02-01

    Biofilms are antibiotic-resistant bacterial aggregates that grow on moist surfaces and can trigger hospital-acquired infections. They provide a classical example in biology where the dynamics of cellular communities may be observed and studied. Gene expression regulates cell division and differentiation, which affect the biofilm architecture. Mechanical and chemical processes shape the resulting structure. We gain insight into the interplay between cellular and mechanical processes during biofilm development on air-agar interfaces by means of a hybrid model. Cellular behavior is governed by stochastic rules informed by a cascade of concentration fields for nutrients, waste, and autoinducers. Cellular differentiation and death alter the structure and the mechanical properties of the biofilm, which is deformed according to Föppl-Von Kármán equations informed by cellular processes and the interaction with the substratum. Stiffness gradients due to growth and swelling produce wrinkle branching. We are able to reproduce wrinkled structures often formed by biofilms on air-agar interfaces, as well as spatial distributions of differentiated cells commonly observed with B. subtilis.

  16. Root nodule symbiosis in Lotus japonicus drives the establishment of distinctive rhizosphere, root, and nodule bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgadzaj, Rafal; Garrido-Oter, Ruben; Jensen, Dorthe Bodker; Koprivova, Anna; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Radutoiu, Simona

    2016-12-06

    Lotus japonicus has been used for decades as a model legume to study the establishment of binary symbiotic relationships with nitrogen-fixing rhizobia that trigger root nodule organogenesis for bacterial accommodation. Using community profiling of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, we reveal that in Lotus, distinctive nodule- and root-inhabiting communities are established by parallel, rather than consecutive, selection of bacteria from the rhizosphere and root compartments. Comparative analyses of wild-type (WT) and symbiotic mutants in Nod factor receptor5 (nfr5), Nodule inception (nin) and Lotus histidine kinase1 (lhk1) genes identified a previously unsuspected role of the nodulation pathway in the establishment of different bacterial assemblages in the root and rhizosphere. We found that the loss of nitrogen-fixing symbiosis dramatically alters community structure in the latter two compartments, affecting at least 14 bacterial orders. The differential plant growth phenotypes seen between WT and the symbiotic mutants in nonsupplemented soil were retained under nitrogen-supplemented conditions that blocked the formation of functional nodules in WT, whereas the symbiosis-impaired mutants maintain an altered community structure in the nitrogen-supplemented soil. This finding provides strong evidence that the root-associated community shift in the symbiotic mutants is a direct consequence of the disabled symbiosis pathway rather than an indirect effect resulting from abolished symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Our findings imply a role of the legume host in selecting a broad taxonomic range of root-associated bacteria that, in addition to rhizobia, likely contribute to plant growth and ecological performance.

  17. Functional Metagenomics of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Interactions with Spinach Indigenous Microorganisms during Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Michelle Q.; Xue, Kai; Brandl, Maria T.; Liu, Feifei; Wu, Liyou; Louie, Jacqueline W.; Mandrell, Robert E.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2012-01-01

    The increase in foodborne outbreaks worldwide attributed to fresh fruit and vegetables suggests that produce may serve as an ecological niche for enteric pathogens. Here we examined the interaction of E. coli O157:H7 (EcO157) with spinach leaf indigenous microorganisms during co-colonization and establishment of a mixed biofilm on a stainless steel surface. Stainless steel surface was selected to mimic the surface of produce-processing equipment, where retention of foodborne pathogens such as EcO157 could serve as a potential source for transmission. We observed a positive effect of spinach-associated microbes on the initial attachment of EcO157, but an antagonistic effect on the EcO157 population at the later stage of biofilm formation. Metagenomic analyses of the biofilm community with the GeoChip revealed an extremely diverse community (gene richness, 23409; Shannon-Weiner index H, 9.55). Presence of EcO157 in the mixed biofilm resulted in a significant decrease in the community α-diversity (t test, Pbiofilm at 48 h (ANOVA, Pbiofilm is likely associated with its metabolic potential in utilizing spinach nutrients: the generation time of EcO157 in spinach lysates at 28°C is ∼ 38 min, which is comparable to that in rich broth. The significant decrease in the abundance of many genes involved in carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycling in the EcO157-inoculated biofilms (t test, Pbiofilm species. PMID:22957052

  18. Paradigm of universalistic particularism to reform the Indonesian economic law in the framework of establishing the 2015 ASEAN Economic Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H., M. Hum. TAUFIQURRAHMAN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A reality that cannot be denied that the laws of Indonesia applicable today, especially regarding international trade transactions, are less conducive to the changes. This can be understood because the law that in fact is a legacy of the Dutch colonial government has not been changed at all, but the dynamics of the community continue to run endlessly. Changes in society increasingly run quickly along with the progress achieved in the field of Science and Technology, particularly Information and Communication. Such an objective conditions will in turn lead to new legal issues in the community, namely the absence of law and the emergence of the legal gap between what the law in book with what the law in action. The increasingly complex legal issues in related to be the establishment of an ASEAN Economic Community (AEC of 2015. The theory used to analyze is the Jeremy Bentham’s Legislation Theory and the Theory of Legal Development from Mochtar Kusumaatmadja. While the research method applied is normative legal research methods with the statute, and conceptual approaches. The analysis shows that the convergence paradigm namely universalistic particularism is appropriate used in law reform in Indonesia. In addition, in order to provide a clear direction of Indonesian economic law reform efforts in the context of the establishment of 2015 AEC, it is necessary to establish the Indonesian Economic System in the national legislation.

  19. Establishment of a fish community in the hayden-rhodes and salt-gila aqueducts, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, G.

    1996-01-01

    Fish populations were studied in the Central Arizona Project's canal system during the first 4 years of aqueduct operation (1986-1989). Ichthyoplankton entering the canal from Lake Havasu averaged 1 larva/m3 during April-June 1987 and 1988. Larval fish densities increased significantly in downstream samples, substantiating diver observations that fish were spawning in the canal system. Of the 16 fish species collected, 14 were assumed to have originated from Lake Havasu and 2 were introduced by anglers from their bait buckets. Initially, the fish community was dominated numerically by threadfin shad Dorosoma petenense (>88%), centrarchids (< 10%), cyprinids (<2%), and striped bass Morone saxatilis (<1%). However, as annual water diversions increased from 13 x 108 m3 in 1986 to 9.4 x 108 m3 in 1989, community composition shifted from clupeids to centrarchids (70%). Fish densities dropped from an estimated 1,260 fish/ha in 1986 to 17 fish/ha in 1989, and biomass dropped from 116 to 73 kg/ha. Declines were attributed to higher operational velocities, associated scour, deprivation, and predation. Although initial populations adjusted downward to planned operational conditions, the fish community continued to represent a potentially valuable, but as yet unused, resource.

  20. Biophysics of biofilm infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Philip S

    2014-04-01

    This article examines a likely basis of the tenacity of biofilm infections that has received relatively little attention: the resistance of biofilms to mechanical clearance. One way that a biofilm infection persists is by withstanding the flow of fluid or other mechanical forces that work to wash or sweep microorganisms out of the body. The fundamental criterion for mechanical persistence is that the biofilm failure strength exceeds the external applied stress. Mechanical failure of the biofilm and release of planktonic microbial cells is also important in vivo because it can result in dissemination of infection. The fundamental criterion for detachment and dissemination is that the applied stress exceeds the biofilm failure strength. The apparent contradiction for a biofilm to both persist and disseminate is resolved by recognizing that biofilm material properties are inherently heterogeneous. There are also mechanical aspects to the ways that infectious biofilms evade leukocyte phagocytosis. The possibility of alternative therapies for treating biofilm infections that work by reducing biofilm cohesion could (1) allow prevailing hydrodynamic shear to remove biofilm, (2) increase the efficacy of designed interventions for removing biofilms, (3) enable phagocytic engulfment of softened biofilm aggregates, and (4) improve phagocyte mobility and access to biofilm. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fungal Biofilms: In Vivo Models for Discovery of Anti-Biofilm Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nett, Jeniel E; Andes, David R

    2015-06-01

    During infection, fungi frequently transition to a biofilm lifestyle, proliferating as communities of surface-adherent aggregates of cells. Phenotypically, cells in a biofilm are distinct from free-floating cells. Their high tolerance of antifungals and ability to withstand host defenses are two characteristics that foster resilience. Biofilm infections are particularly difficult to eradicate, and most available antifungals have minimal activity. Therefore, the discovery of novel compounds and innovative strategies to treat fungal biofilms is of great interest. Although many fungi have been observed to form biofilms, the most well-studied is Candida albicans. Animal models have been developed to simulate common Candida device-associated infections, including those involving vascular catheters, dentures, urinary catheters, and subcutaneous implants. Models have also reproduced the most common mucosal biofilm infections: oropharyngeal and vaginal candidiasis. These models incorporate the anatomical site, immune components, and fluid dynamics of clinical niches and have been instrumental in the study of drug resistance and investigation of novel therapies. This chapter describes the significance of fungal biofilm infections, the animal models developed for biofilm study, and how these models have contributed to the development of new strategies for the eradication of fungal biofilm infections.

  2. Bacteriophages as Weapons Against Bacterial Biofilms in the Food Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Rodríguez-Rubio, Lorena; Martínez, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Ana; García, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Microbiological contamination in the food industry is often attributed to the presence of biofilms in processing plants. Bacterial biofilms are complex communities of bacteria attached to a surface and surrounded by an extracellular polymeric material. Their extreme resistance to cleaning and disinfecting processes is related to a unique organization, which implies a differential bacterial growth and gene expression inside the biofilm. The impact of biofilms on health, and the economic consequences, has promoted the development of different approaches to control or remove biofilm formation. Recently, successful results in phage therapy have boosted new research in bacteriophages and phage lytic proteins for biofilm eradication. In this regard, this review examines the environmental factors that determine biofilm development in food-processing equipment. In addition, future perspectives for the use of bacteriophage-derived tools as disinfectants are discussed.

  3. Extracellular DNA as matrix component in microbial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria in nature primarily live in surface-associated communities commonly known as biofilms. Because bacteria in biofilms, in many cases, display tolerance to host immune systems, antibiotics, and biocides, they are often difficult or impossible to eradicate. Biofilm formation, therefore, leads...... to various persistent infections in humans and animals, and to a variety of complications in industry, where solid–water interfaces occur. Knowledge about the molecular mechanisms involved in biofilm formation is necessary for creating strategies to control biofilms. Recent studies have shown...... that extracellular DNA is an important component of the extracellular matrix of microbial biofilms. The present chapter is focussed on extracellular DNA as matrix component in biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa as an example from the Gram-negative bacteria, and Streptococcus and Staphylococcus as examples...

  4. Bacterial signaling ecology and potential applications during aquatic biofilm construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Leticia M; Alvarez, Pedro J; McLean, Robert J C

    2014-07-01

    In their natural environment, bacteria and other microorganisms typically grow as surface-adherent biofilm communities. Cell signal processes, including quorum signaling, are now recognized as being intimately involved in the development and function of biofilms. In contrast to their planktonic (unattached) counterparts, bacteria within biofilms are notoriously resistant to many traditional antimicrobial agents and so represent a major challenge in industry and medicine. Although biofilms impact many human activities, they actually represent an ancient mode of bacterial growth as shown in the fossil record. Consequently, many aquatic organisms have evolved strategies involving signal manipulation to control or co-exist with biofilms. Here, we review the chemical ecology of biofilms and propose mechanisms whereby signal manipulation can be used to promote or control biofilms.

  5. Impact of drinking water conditions and copper materials on downstream biofilm microbial communities and legionella pneumophila colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legionella pneumophila, the medically important species within the genus Legionella, is a concern in engineered water systems. Its ability to amplify within free-living amoebae is well documented, but its interactions/ecology within the microbial community of drinking water biofi...

  6. Effect of Changing Treatment Disinfectants on the Microbiology of Distributed Water and Pipe Biofilm Communities using Conventional and Metagenomic Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this research was to add to our knowledge of chlorine and monochloramine disinfectants, with regards to effects on the microbial communities in distribution systems. A whole metagenome-based approach using sophisticated molecular tools (e.g., next generation sequen...

  7. Bursting the bubble on bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crusz, Shanika A; Popat, Roman; Rybtke, Morten Theil

    2012-01-01

    The flow cell biofilm system is an important and widely used tool for the in vitro cultivation and evaluation of bacterial biofilms under hydrodynamic conditions of flow. This paper provides an introduction to the background and use of such systems, accompanied by a detailed guide to the assembly...... of the apparatus including the description of new modifications which enhance its performance. As such, this is an essential guide for the novice biofilm researcher as well as providing valuable trouble-shooting techniques for even the most experienced laboratories. The adoption of a common and reliable...... methodology amongst researchers would enable findings to be shared and replicated amongst the biofilm research community, with the overall aim of advancing understanding and management of these complex and widespread bacterial communities....

  8. Molecular characterization of host-specific biofilm formation in a vertebrate gut symbiont.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A Frese

    Full Text Available Although vertebrates harbor bacterial communities in their gastrointestinal tract whose composition is host-specific, little is known about the mechanisms by which bacterial lineages become selected. The goal of this study was to characterize the ecological processes that mediate host-specificity of the vertebrate gut symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri, and to systematically identify the bacterial factors that are involved. Experiments with monoassociated mice revealed that the ability of L. reuteri to form epithelial biofilms in the mouse forestomach is strictly dependent on the strain's host origin. To unravel the molecular basis for this host-specific biofilm formation, we applied a combination of transcriptome analysis and comparative genomics and identified eleven genes of L. reuteri 100-23 that were predicted to play a role. We then determined expression and importance of these genes during in vivo biofilm formation in monoassociated mice. This analysis revealed that six of the genes were upregulated in vivo, and that genes encoding for proteins involved in epithelial adherence, specialized protein transport, cell aggregation, environmental sensing, and cell lysis contributed to biofilm formation. Inactivation of a serine-rich surface adhesin with a devoted transport system (the SecA2-SecY2 pathway completely abrogated biofilm formation, indicating that initial adhesion represented the most significant step in biofilm formation, likely conferring host specificity. In summary, this study established that the epithelial selection of bacterial symbionts in the vertebrate gut can be both specific and highly efficient, resulting in biofilms that are exclusively formed by the coevolved strains, and it allowed insight into the bacterial effectors of this process.

  9. Influence of CeO{sub 2} NPs on biological phosphorus removal and bacterial community shifts in a sequencing batch biofilm reactor with the differential effects of molecular oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yi; Wang, Chao [Key Laboratory of Integrated Regulation and Resources Development on Shallow Lakes, Ministry of Education, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Environment, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); Hou, Jun, E-mail: hhuhjyhj@126.com [Key Laboratory of Integrated Regulation and Resources Development on Shallow Lakes, Ministry of Education, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Environment, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); Wang, Peifang, E-mail: pfwang2005@hhu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Integrated Regulation and Resources Development on Shallow Lakes, Ministry of Education, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Environment, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); You, Guoxiang; Miao, Lingzhan; Lv, Bowen; Yang, Yangyang [Key Laboratory of Integrated Regulation and Resources Development on Shallow Lakes, Ministry of Education, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Environment, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China)

    2016-11-15

    The effects of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles (CeO{sub 2} NPs) on a sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) with established biological phosphorus (P) removal were investigated from the processes of anaerobic P release and aerobic P uptake. At low concentration (0.1 mg/L), no significant impact was observed on total phosphorus (TP) removal after operating for 8 h. However, at a concentration of 20 mg/L, TP removal efficiency decreased from 83.68% to 55.88% and 16.76% when the CeO{sub 2} NPs were added at the beginning of the anaerobic and aerobic periods, respectively. Further studies illustrated that the inhibition of the specific P release rate was caused by the reversible states of Ce{sup 3+} and Ce{sup 4+}, which inhibited the activity of exopolyphosphatase (PPX) and transformation of poly-β-hydoxyalkanoates (PHA) and glycogen, as well as the uptake of volatile fatty acids (VFAs). The decrease in the specific P uptake rate was mainly attributed to the significantly suppressed energy generation and decreased abundance of Burkholderia caused by excess reactive oxygen species. The removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was not influenced by CeO{sub 2} NPs under aerobic conditions, due to the increased abundance of Acetobacter and Acidocella after exposure. The inhibitory effects of CeO{sub 2} NPs with molecular oxygen were reduced after anaerobic exposure due to the enhanced particle size and the presence of Ce{sup 3+}. - Highlights: • CeO{sub 2} NPs (20 mg/L) had a notable toxicity effect on P removal in SBBR system. • The deteriorated SPRR was caused by the inhibited key enzyme activity (PPX). • The decreased SPUR was caused by the bacterial community shifts. • Ce ions converting and excess ROS generation are related toxicity mechanisms.

  10. Pyrosequencing Reveals Bacterial Communities in Unchlorinated Drinking Water Distribution System: An Integral Study of Bulk Water, Suspended Solids, Loose Deposits, and Pipe Wall Biofilm

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, G.; Bakker, G. L.; Li, S.; Vreeburg, J. H G; Verberk, J. Q J C; Medema, G. J.; Liu, W. T.; Van Dijk, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    The current understanding of drinking water distribution system (DWDS) microbiology is limited to pipe wall biofilm and bulk water; the contributions of particle-associated bacteria (from suspended solids and loose deposits) have long been neglected

  11. Role of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Coaggregation in Anaerobe Survival in Planktonic and Biofilm Oral Microbial Communities during Aeration

    OpenAIRE

    Bradshaw, David J.; Marsh, Philip D.; Watson, G. Keith; Allison, Clive

    1998-01-01

    Coaggregation is a well-characterized phenomenon by which specific pairs of oral bacteria interact physically. The aim of this study was to examine the patterns of coaggregation between obligately anaerobic and oxygen-tolerant species that coexist in a model oral microbial community. Obligate anaerobes other than Fusobacterium nucleatum coaggregated only poorly with oxygen-tolerant species. In contrast, F. nucleatum was able to coaggregate not only with both oxygen-tolerant and other obligate...

  12. The in vitro effect of xylitol on chronic rhinosinusitis biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, R; Lee, T; Hardcastle, T; Biswas, K; Radcliff, F; Douglas, R

    2016-12-01

    Biofilms have been implicated in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and may explain the limited efficacy of antibiotics. There is a need to find more effective, non-antibiotic based therapies for CRS. This study examines the effects of xylitol on CRS biofilms and planktonic bacteria. Crystal violet assay and spectrophotometry were used to quantify the effects of xylitol (5% and 10% solutions) against Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus. The disruption of established biofilms, inhibition of biofilm formation and effects on planktonic bacteria growth were investigated and compared to saline and no treatment. Xylitol 5% and 10% significantly reduced biofilm biomass (S. epidermidis), inhibited biofilm formation (S. aureus and P. aeruginosa) and reduced growth of planktonic bacteria (S. epidermidis, S. aureus, and P. aeruginosa). Xylitol 5% inhibited formation of S. epidermidis biofilms more effectively than xylitol 10%. Xylitol 10% reduced S. epidermidis planktonic bacteria more effectively than xylitol 5%. Saline, xylitol 5% and 10% disrupted established biofilms of S. aureus when compared with no treatment. No solution was effective against established P. aeruginosa biofilm. Xylitol has variable activity against biofilms and planktonic bacteria in vitro and may have therapeutic efficacy in the management of CRS.

  13. An update on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, tolerance, and dispersal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Morten; Yang, Liang; Pamp, Sünje Johanna

    2010-01-01

    We review the recent advances in the understanding of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm lifestyle from studies using in vitro laboratory setups such as flow chambers and microtiter trays. Recent work sheds light on the role of nutrients, motility, and quorum sensing in structure formation in P....... aeruginosa biofilms. The second messenger, c-di-GMP, is established as an important regulator of the synthesis of polysaccharide and protein components of the biofilm matrix. Extracellular DNA is shown to be an essential component of the biofilm matrix. It has become apparent that biofilm formation involves...... interactions between different subpopulations. The molecular mechanisms underlying the tolerance of biofilm bacteria to antimicrobial agents are beginning to be unraveled, and new knowledge has been obtained regarding the environmental cues and regulatory mechanisms involved in biofilm dispersal....

  14. Marine and estuarine natural microbial biofilms: ecological and biogeochemical dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Roger Anderson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Marine and estuarine microbial biofilms are ubiquitously distributed worldwide and are increasingly of interest in basic and applied sciences because of their unique structural and functional features that make them remarkably different from the biota in the plankton. This is a review of some current scientific knowledge of naturally occurring microbial marine and estuarine biofilms including prokaryotic and microeukaryotic biota, but excluding research specifically on engineering and applied aspects of biofilms such as biofouling. Because the microbial communities including bacteria and protists are integral to the fundamental ecological and biogeochemical processes that support biofilm communities, particular attention is given to the structural and ecological aspects of microbial biofilm formation, succession, and maturation, as well as the dynamics of the interactions of the microbiota in biofilms. The intent is to highlight current state of scientific knowledge and possible avenues of future productive research, especially focusing on the ecological and biogeochemical dimensions.

  15. Establishing a community of practice of researchers, practitioners, policy-makers and communities to sustainably manage environmental health risks in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Jerry M; Breilh, Jaime; Beltran, Efrain; Parra, Jorge; Solis, Fernanda; Yassi, Annalee; Rojas, Alejandro; Orrego, Elena; Henry, Bonnie; Bowie, William R; Pearce, Laurie; Gaibor, Juan; Velasquez, Patricio; Concepcion, Miriam; Parkes, Margot

    2011-11-08

    The Sustainably Managing Environmental Health Risk in Ecuador project was launched in 2004 as a partnership linking a large Canadian university with leading Cuban and Mexican institutes to strengthen the capacities of four Ecuadorian universities for leading community-based learning and research in areas as diverse as pesticide poisoning, dengue control, water and sanitation, and disaster preparedness. In implementing curriculum and complementary innovations through application of an ecosystem approach to health, our interdisciplinary international team focused on the question: "Can strengthening of institutional capacities to support a community of practice of researchers, practitioners, policy-makers and communities produce positive health outcomes and improved capacities to sustainably translate knowledge?" To assess progress in achieving desired outcomes, we review results associated with the logic framework analysis used to guide the project, focusing on how a community of practice network has strengthened implementation, including follow-up tracking of program trainees and presentation of two specific case studies. By 2009, train-the-trainer project initiation involved 27 participatory action research Master's theses in 15 communities where 1200 community learners participated in the implementation of associated interventions. This led to establishment of innovative Ecuadorian-led master's and doctoral programs, and a Population Health Observatory on Collective Health, Environment and Society for the Andean region based at the Universidad Andina Simon Bolivar. Building on this network, numerous initiatives were begun, such as an internationally funded research project to strengthen dengue control in the coastal community of Machala, and establishment of a local community eco-health centre focusing on determinants of health near Cuenca. Strengthening capabilities for producing and applying knowledge through direct engagement with affected populations and

  16. Establishing a community of practice of researchers, practitioners, policy-makers and communities to sustainably manage environmental health risks in Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Bonnie

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Sustainably Managing Environmental Health Risk in Ecuador project was launched in 2004 as a partnership linking a large Canadian university with leading Cuban and Mexican institutes to strengthen the capacities of four Ecuadorian universities for leading community-based learning and research in areas as diverse as pesticide poisoning, dengue control, water and sanitation, and disaster preparedness. Methods In implementing curriculum and complementary innovations through application of an ecosystem approach to health, our interdisciplinary international team focused on the question: “Can strengthening of institutional capacities to support a community of practice of researchers, practitioners, policy-makers and communities produce positive health outcomes and improved capacities to sustainably translate knowledge?” To assess progress in achieving desired outcomes, we review results associated with the logic framework analysis used to guide the project, focusing on how a community of practice network has strengthened implementation, including follow-up tracking of program trainees and presentation of two specific case studies. Results By 2009, train-the-trainer project initiation involved 27 participatory action research Master’s theses in 15 communities where 1200 community learners participated in the implementation of associated interventions. This led to establishment of innovative Ecuadorian-led master’s and doctoral programs, and a Population Health Observatory on Collective Health, Environment and Society for the Andean region based at the Universidad Andina Simon Bolivar. Building on this network, numerous initiatives were begun, such as an internationally funded research project to strengthen dengue control in the coastal community of Machala, and establishment of a local community eco-health centre focusing on determinants of health near Cuenca. Discussion Strengthening capabilities for producing and

  17. Biofilm Fixed Film Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipesh Das

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The work reviewed here was published between 2008 and 2010 and describes research that involved aerobic and anoxic biofilm treatment of water pollutants. Biofilm denitrification systems are covered when appropriate. References catalogued here are divided on the basis of fundamental research area or reactor types. Fundamental research into biofilms is presented in two sections, Biofilm Measurement and Characterization and Growth and Modeling. The reactor types covered are: trickling filters, rotating biological contactors, fluidized bed bioreactors, submerged bed biofilm reactors, biological granular activated carbon, membrane bioreactors, and immobilized cell reactors. Innovative reactors, not easily classified, are then presented, followed by a section on biofilms on sand, soil and sediment.

  18. ObsPy: Establishing and maintaining an open-source community package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischer, L.; Megies, T.; Barsch, R.

    2017-12-01

    Python's ecosystem evolved into one of the most powerful and productive research environment across disciplines. ObsPy (https://obspy.org) is a fully community driven, open-source project dedicated to provide a bridge for seismology into that ecosystem. It does so by offering Read and write support for essentially every commonly used data format in seismology, Integrated access to the largest data centers, web services, and real-time data streams, A powerful signal processing toolbox tuned to the specific needs of seismologists, and Utility functionality like travel time calculations, geodetic functions, and data visualizations. ObsPy has been in constant unfunded development for more than eight years and is developed and used by scientists around the world with successful applications in all branches of seismology. By now around 70 people directly contributed code to ObsPy and we aim to make it a self-sustaining community project.This contributions focusses on several meta aspects of open-source software in science, in particular how we experienced them. During the panel we would like to discuss obvious questions like long-term sustainability with very limited to no funding, insufficient computer science training in many sciences, and gaining hard scientific credits for software development, but also the following questions: How to best deal with the fact that a lot of scientific software is very specialized thus usually solves a complex problem but at the same time can only ever reach a limited pool of developers and users by virtue of it being so specialized? Therefore the "many eyes on the code" approach to develop and improve open-source software only applies in a limited fashion. An initial publication for a significant new scientific software package is fairly straightforward. How to on-board and motivate potential new contributors when they can no longer be lured by a potential co-authorship? When is spending significant time and effort on reusable

  19. Biofilm Formation As a Response to Ecological Competition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno M Oliveira

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria form dense surface-associated communities known as biofilms that are central to their persistence and how they affect us. Biofilm formation is commonly viewed as a cooperative enterprise, where strains and species work together for a common goal. Here we explore an alternative model: biofilm formation is a response to ecological competition. We co-cultured a diverse collection of natural isolates of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and studied the effect on biofilm formation. We show that strain mixing reliably increases biofilm formation compared to unmixed conditions. Importantly, strain mixing leads to strong competition: one strain dominates and largely excludes the other from the biofilm. Furthermore, we show that pyocins, narrow-spectrum antibiotics made by other P. aeruginosa strains, can stimulate biofilm formation by increasing the attachment of cells. Side-by-side comparisons using microfluidic assays suggest that the increase in biofilm occurs due to a general response to cellular damage: a comparable biofilm response occurs for pyocins that disrupt membranes as for commercial antibiotics that damage DNA, inhibit protein synthesis or transcription. Our data show that bacteria increase biofilm formation in response to ecological competition that is detected by antibiotic stress. This is inconsistent with the idea that sub-lethal concentrations of antibiotics are cooperative signals that coordinate microbial communities, as is often concluded. Instead, our work is consistent with competition sensing where low-levels of antibiotics are used to detect and respond to the competing genotypes that produce them.

  20. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antibiotics in biofilm infections of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hengzhuang, Wang; Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana

    2014-01-01

    Although progress on biofilm research has been obtained during the past decades, the treatment of biofilm infections with antibiotics remains a riddle. The pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of an antimicrobial agent provide important information helping to establish an effici......Although progress on biofilm research has been obtained during the past decades, the treatment of biofilm infections with antibiotics remains a riddle. The pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of an antimicrobial agent provide important information helping to establish...

  1. Commission of the european communities. Joint research centre. Petten Establishment. Annual Report 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977 marked the beginning of a new multiannual research programme for the European Commission's Joint research Centre. Regarding the exploitation of HFR (High Flux Reactor), the year was one of steady, on-schedule operation with high utilization, although this fell off slightly in the autumn due to overloading of our capsule project engineering team and manufacturing services. We are pleased to note that the HFR Users' Meeting, held in October, drew about 100 participants from Europe and America and demonstrated a lively interest in the Commission's materials testing reactor. Technical improvements to the plant are being examined as one means of maintaining or even increasing this interest in the 1980's. Following the wishes of the Council of Ministers, new Advisory Committees for Programme Management have been set up for all the Joint Research Centre's activities and those for HFR and High Temperature Materials Programmes have met at Petten. This latter Committee is entirely new to its task, the programme having been served until 1977 by a number of ad hoc meetings of national experts. The work of the Organic Chemistry Laboratory falls under the wings of the Community Reference Bureau Advisory Committee, who have met in Brussels and strongly encouraged the development of the activity

  2. Effects of phosphate addition on biofilm bacterial communities and water quality in annular reactors equipped with stainless steel and ductile cast iron pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun-Jung; Choi, Young-June; Ro, Hee-Myong; Ka, Jong-Ok

    2012-02-01

    The impact of orthophosphate addition on biofilm formation and water quality was studied in corrosion-resistant stainless steel (STS) pipe and corrosion-susceptible ductile cast iron (DCI) pipe using cultivation and culture-independent approaches. Sample coupons of DCI pipe and STS pipe were installed in annular reactors, which were operated for 9 months under hydraulic conditions similar to a domestic plumbing system. Addition of 5 mg/L of phosphate to the plumbing systems, under low residual chlorine conditions, promoted a more significant growth of biofilm and led to a greater rate reduction of disinfection by-products in DCI pipe than in STS pipe. While the level of THMs (trihalomethanes) increased under conditions of low biofilm concentration, the levels of HAAs (halo acetic acids) and CH (chloral hydrate) decreased in all cases in proportion to the amount of biofilm. It was also observed that chloroform, the main species of THM, was not readily decomposed biologically and decomposition was not proportional to the biofilm concentration; however, it was easily biodegraded after the addition of phosphate. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequences of 102 biofilm isolates revealed that Proteobacteria (50%) was the most frequently detected phylum, followed by Firmicutes (10%) and Actinobacteria (2%), with 37% of the bacteria unclassified. Bradyrhizobium was the dominant genus on corroded DCI pipe, while Sphingomonas was predominant on non-corroded STS pipe. Methylobacterium and Afipia were detected only in the reactor without added phosphate. PCR-DGGE analysis showed that the diversity of species in biofilm tended to increase when phosphate was added regardless of the pipe material, indicating that phosphate addition upset the biological stability in the plumbing systems.

  3. Treatment of Oral Multispecies Biofilms by an Anti-Biofilm Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhejun; de la Fuente-Núñez, Cesar; Shen, Ya; Haapasalo, Markus; Hancock, Robert E W

    2015-01-01

    Human oral biofilms are multispecies microbial communities that exhibit high resistance to antimicrobial agents. Dental plaque gives rise to highly prevalent and costly biofilm-related oral infections, which lead to caries or other types of oral infections. We investigated the ability of the recently identified anti-biofilm peptide 1018 to induce killing of bacterial cells present within oral multispecies biofilms. At 10 μg/ml (6.5 μM), peptide 1018 was able to significantly (pbiofilm formation over 3 days. The activity of the peptide on preformed biofilms was found to be concentration-dependent since more than 60% of the total plaque biofilm cell population was killed by 10 μg/ml of peptide 1018 in 3 days, while at 5 μg/ml 50% of cells were dead and at 1 μg/ml the peptide triggered cell death in around 30% of the total bacterial population, as revealed by confocal microscopy. The presence of saliva did not affect peptide activity, since no statistically significant difference was found in the ability of peptide 1018 to kill oral biofilms using either saliva coated and non-saliva coated hydroxyapatite surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy experiments indicated that peptide 1018 induced cell lysis in plaque biofilms. Furthermore, combined treatment using peptide 1018 and chlorhexidine (CHX) increased the anti-biofilm activity of each compound compared to when these were used alone, resulting in >50% of the biofilm being killed and >35% being dispersed in only 3 minutes. Peptide 1018 may potentially be used by itself or in combination with CHX as a non-toxic and effective anti-biofilm agent for plaque disinfection in clinical dentistry.

  4. Characterization of Mechanical Properties of Microbial Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callison, Elizabeth; Gose, James; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven

    2017-11-01

    The physical properties of microbial biofilms grown subject to shear flows determine the form and mechanical characteristics of the biofilm structure, and consequently, the turbulent interactions over and through the biofilm. These biofilms - sometimes referred to as slime - are comprised of microbial cells and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrices that surround the multicellular communities. Some of the EPSs take the form of streamers that tend to oscillate in flows, causing increased turbulent mixing and drag. As the presence of EPS governs the compliance and overall stability of the filamentous streamers, investigation of the mechanical properties of biofilms may also inform efforts to understand hydrodynamic performance of fouled systems. In this study, a mixture of four diatom genera was grown under turbulent shear flow on test panels. The mechanical properties and hydrodynamic performance of the biofilm were investigated using rheology and turbulent flow studies in the Skin-Friction Flow Facility at the University of Michigan. The diatoms in the mixture of algae were identified, and the elastic and viscous moduli were determined from small-amplitude oscillations, while a creep test was used to evaluate the biofilm compliance.

  5. Biofilms in Infections of the Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo J. M. Bispo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to form biofilms in a variety of environments is a common trait of bacteria, and may represent one of the earliest defenses against predation. Biofilms are multicellular communities usually held together by a polymeric matrix, ranging from capsular material to cell lysate. In a structure that imposes diffusion limits, environmental microgradients arise to which individual bacteria adapt their physiologies, resulting in the gamut of physiological diversity. Additionally, the proximity of cells within the biofilm creates the opportunity for coordinated behaviors through cell–cell communication using diffusible signals, the most well documented being quorum sensing. Biofilms form on abiotic or biotic surfaces, and because of that are associated with a large proportion of human infections. Biofilm formation imposes a limitation on the uses and design of ocular devices, such as intraocular lenses, posterior contact lenses, scleral buckles, conjunctival plugs, lacrimal intubation devices and orbital implants. In the absence of abiotic materials, biofilms have been observed on the capsule, and in the corneal stroma. As the evidence for the involvement of microbial biofilms in many ocular infections has become compelling, developing new strategies to prevent their formation or to eradicate them at the site of infection, has become a priority.

  6. Comparative study of isolates from community-acquired and catheter-associated urinary tract infections with reference to biofilm-producing property, antibiotic sensitivity and multi-drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardoloi, Vishwajeet; Yogeesha Babu, K V

    2017-07-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) can be community-acquired (Com-UTI) or catheter-associated (CAUTI) and may be associated with biofilm-producing organisms. A comparative analysis of biofilm-producing property (BPP), antibiotic-sensitivity and multi-drug resistance (MDR) and their relation with the BPP of isolates from Com-UTI and CAUTI has not yet been performed and necessitated this study. (1) isolation of bacteria from CAUTI and Com-UTI and identification of their BPP, antibiotic-sensitivity and MDR status; (2) comparison of the isolates from CAUTI and Com-UTI as regards BPP, MDR status and their relation with BPP. isolates from 100 cases each of Com-UTI and CAUTI were subjected to Congo redagar (CRA) and Safranin tube tests. Antibiotic susceptibility was investigated using the disc diffusion method. Both groups were compared regarding BPP, drug sensitivity and MDR status. Statistical analyses were performed using χ2 and Fisher's exact tests. 76.19 % of isolates from Com-UTI and 60.72 % from CAUTI had BPP (P=0.0252; significant). The Safranin tube test detected more isolates with BPP than the CRA test. MDR is greater in CAUTI than Com-UTI (83.33 % versus 64.76 %; P=0.0039; significant). MDR is greater in isolates with BPP in both Com-UTI and CAUTI (76.47 and 62.35 %; non-significant). BPP was found in both Com-UTI and CAUTI. When used together, the Safranin tube test and the CRA test increased the sensitivity of detecting BPP. MDR was higher in CAUTI than Com-UTI. MDR and BPP are not interrelated or associated, especially in settings where it is not certain that isolates were obtained from a well-formed biofilm. However, this does not rule out a higher incidence or prevalence of MDR in isolates with BPP taken directly from the biofilms.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten; Hultqvist, Louise Dahl; Givskov, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Studies of biopsies from infectious sites, explanted tissue and medical devises have provided evidence that biofilms are the underlying cause of a variety of tissue-associated and implant-associated recalcitrant human infections. With a need for novel anti-biofilm treatment strategies, research...... in biofilm infection microbiology, biofilm formation mechanisms and biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance has become an important area in microbiology. Substantial knowledge about biofilm formation mechanisms, biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance and immune evasion mechanisms has been obtained...... through work with biofilms grown in in vitro experimental setups, and the relevance of this information in the context of chronic infections is being investigated by the use of animal models of infection. Because our current in vitro experimental setups and animal models have limitations, new advanced...

  8. Establishing the Antarctic Dome C community reference standard site towards consistent measurements from Earth observation satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, C.; Uprety, S.; Xiong, J.; Wu, A.; Jing, P.; Smith, D.; Chander, G.; Fox, N.; Ungar, S.

    2010-01-01

    Establishing satellite measurement consistency by using common desert sites has become increasingly more important not only for climate change detection but also for quantitative retrievals of geophysical variables in satellite applications. Using the Antarctic Dome C site (75°06′S, 123°21′E, elevation 3.2 km) for satellite radiometric calibration and validation (Cal/Val) is of great interest owing to its unique location and characteristics. The site surface is covered with uniformly distributed permanent snow, and the atmospheric effect is small and relatively constant. In this study, the long-term stability and spectral characteristics of this site are evaluated using well-calibrated satellite instruments such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). Preliminary results show that despite a few limitations, the site in general is stable in the long term, the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model works well, and the site is most suitable for the Cal/Val of reflective solar bands in the 0.4–1.0 µm range. It was found that for the past decade, the reflectivity change of the site is within 1.35% at 0.64 µm, and interannual variability is within 2%. The site is able to resolve calibration biases between instruments at a level of ~1%. The usefulness of the site is demonstrated by comparing observations from seven satellite instruments involving four space agencies, including OrbView-2–SeaWiFS, Terra–Aqua MODIS, Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) – Hyperion, Meteorological Operational satellite programme (MetOp) – Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), Envisat Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) – dvanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR), and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+). Dome C is a promising candidate site for climate quality calibration of satellite radiometers towards more consistent satellite measurements, as part

  9. The efficacy of different anti-microbial metals at preventing the formation of, and eradicating bacterial biofilms of pathogenic indicator strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugala, Natalie; Lemire, Joe A; Turner, Raymond J

    2017-06-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens and the prevalence of biofilm-related infections have generated a demand for alternative anti-microbial therapies. Metals have not been explored in adequate detail for their capacity to combat infectious disease. Metal compounds can now be found in textiles, medical devices and disinfectants-yet, we know little about their efficacy against specific pathogens. To help fill this knowledge gap, we report on the anti-microbial and antibiofilm activity of seven metals: silver, copper, titanium, gallium, nickel, aluminum and zinc against three bacterial strains, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. To evaluate the capacity of metal ions to prevent the growth of, and eradicate biofilms and planktonic cells, bacterial cultures were inoculated in the Calgary Biofilm Device (minimal biofilm eradication concentration) in the presence of the metal salts. Copper, gallium and titanium were capable of preventing planktonic and biofilm growth, and eradicating established biofilms of all tested strains. Further, we observed that the efficacies of the other tested metal salts displayed variable efficacy against the tested strains. Further, contrary to the enhanced resistance anticipated from bacterial biofilms, particular metal salts were observed to be more effective against biofilm communities versus planktonic cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that the identity of the bacterial strain must be considered before treatment with a particular metal ion. Consequent to the use of metal ions as anti-microbial agents to fight multidrug-resistant and biofilm-related infections increases, we must aim for more selective deployment in a given infectious setting.

  10. Modeling of the Bacillus subtilis Bacterial Biofilm Growing on an Agar Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial biofilms are organized communities composed of millions of microorganisms that accumulate on almost any kinds of surfaces. In this paper, a biofilm growth model on an agar substrate is developed based on mass conservation principles, Fick’s first law, and Monod’s kinetic reaction, by considering nutrient diffusion between biofilm and agar substrate. Our results show biofilm growth evolution characteristics such as biofilm thickness, active biomass, and nutrient concentration in the agar substrate. We quantitatively obtain biofilm growth dependence on different parameters. We provide an alternative mathematical method to describe other kinds of biofilm growth such as multiple bacterial species biofilm and also biofilm growth on various complex substrates.

  11. The Biofilm Challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Maria; Alhede, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The concept of biofilms has emerged in the clinical setting during the last decade. Infections involving biofilms have been documented in all parts of the human body, and it is currently believed that the presence of biofilm-forming bacteria is equivalent to chronic infection. A quick Pubmed search...

  12. Experimental model of biofilm implant-related osteomyelitis to test combination biomaterials using biofilms as initial inocula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Dustin L; Haymond, Bryan S; Woodbury, Kassie L; Beck, J Peter; Moore, David E; Epperson, R Tyler; Bloebaum, Roy D

    2012-07-01

    Currently, the majority of animal models that are used to study biofilm-related infections use planktonic bacterial cells as initial inocula to produce positive signals of infection in biomaterials studies. However, the use of planktonic cells has potentially led to inconsistent results in infection outcomes. In this study, well-established biofilms of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were grown and used as initial inocula in an animal model of a Type IIIB open fracture. The goal of the work was to establish, for the first time, a repeatable model of biofilm implant-related osteomyelitis, wherein biofilms were used as initial inocula to test combination biomaterials. Results showed that 100% of animals that were treated with biofilms developed osteomyelitis, whereas 0% of animals not treated with biofilm developed infection. The development of this experimental model may lead to an important shift in biofilm and biomaterials research by showing that when biofilms are used as initial inocula, they may provide additional insights into how biofilm-related infections in the clinic develop and how they can be treated with combination biomaterials to eradicate and/or prevent biofilm formation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Effects of below-ground insects, mycorrhizal fungi and soil fertility on the establishment of Vicia in grassland communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganade, G; Brown, V K

    1997-02-01

     The effects of, and interactions between, insect root feeders, vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and soil fertility on the establishment, growth and reproduction of Vicia sativa and V. hirsuta (Fabaceae) were investigated in an early-successional grassland community. Seeds of both species were sown into plots where soil insecticide (Dursban 5G), soil fungicide (Rovral) and soil fertiliser (NPK) were applied in a factorial randomised block design. Fertiliser addition reduced growth, longevity and reproduction of both Vicia species, due to the commonly recorded increase in the competitive advantage of the non-nitrogen-fixing species when nitrogen is added to the plant community. However, in plots where fertiliser was not applied, a reduction in root feeders and mycorrhizal infection led to an increase in seedling establishment and fruit production of V. sativa, and to an increase in flower production for both Vicia species. The interaction between all three soil treatments explained much of the variation in growth and longevity of V. sativa. Plants grew larger and survived longer in plots where natural levels of mycorrhizal infection and root feeders were low compared with plots where all the treatments were applied. This suggests that, although soil nutrient availability was a strong determinant of the performance of these two leguminous species, at natural levels of soil fertility biotic factors acting in the soil, such as mycorrhizal fungi and soil-dwelling insects, were important in shaping the competitive interactions between the two Vicia species and the plant community. Our results indicate that non-additive interactions between ecological factors in the soil environment may strongly affect plant performance.

  14. A Functional DNase I Coating to Prevent Adhesion of Bacteria and the Formation of Biofilm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swartjes, Jan J. T. M.; Das, Theerthankar; Sharifi, Shahriar; Subbiahdoss, Guruprakash; Sharma, Prashant K.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are detrimental in many industrial and biomedical applications and prevention of biofilm formation has been a prime challenge for decades. Biofilms consist of communities of adhering bacteria, supported and protected by extracellular-polymeric-substances (EPS), the so-called house of

  15. The protective layer of biofilm : A repellent function for a new class of amphiphilic proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovacs, Akos T.; van Gestel, Jordi; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    Bacteria can survive harsh conditions when growing in complex communities of cells known as biofilms. The matrix of the biofilm presents a scaffold where cells are attached to each other and to the surface. The biofilm matrix is also a protective barrier that confers tolerance against various

  16. Enhanced biofilm formation in dual-species culture of Listeria monocytogenes and Ralstonia insidiosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the environment, many microorganisms coexist in communities as biofilms. The objective of this study was to investigate the interactions between Listeria monocytogenes and Ralstonia insidiosa in dual species biofilms. Biofilm development was measured using crystal violet in 96-well microtiter pla...

  17. Density of founder cells affects spatial pattern formation and cooperation in Bacillus subtilis biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gestel, Jordi; Weissing, Franz J.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kovacs, Akos T.

    2014-01-01

    In nature, most bacteria live in surface-attached sedentary communities known as biofilms. Biofilms are often studied with respect to bacterial interactions. Many cells inhabiting biofilms are assumed to express 'cooperative traits', like the secretion of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS). These

  18. Species-independent attraction to biofilms through electrical signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Jacqueline; Xiong, Liyang; Liu, Jintao; Prindle, Arthur; Yuan, Fang; Arjes, Heidi A.; Tsimring, Lev; Süel, Gürol M.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Bacteria residing within biofilm communities can coordinate their behavior through cell-to-cell signaling. However, it remains unclear if these signals can also influence the behavior of distant cells that are not part of the community. Using a microfluidic approach, we find that potassium ion channel-mediated electrical signaling generated by a Bacillus subtilis biofilm can attract distant cells. Integration of experiments and mathematical modeling indicates that extracellular potassium emitted from the biofilm alters the membrane potential of distant cells, thereby directing their motility. This electrically-mediated attraction appears to be a generic mechanism that enables cross-species interactions, as Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells also become attracted to the electrical signal released by the B. subtilis biofilm. Cells within a biofilm community can thus not only coordinate their own behavior, but also influence the behavior of diverse bacteria at a distance through long-range electrical signaling. PMID:28086091

  19. New approaches to combat Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerits, Evelien; Verstraeten, Natalie; Michiels, Jan

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In nature, bacteria predominantly reside in structured, surface-attached communities embedded in a self-produced, extracellular matrix. These so-called biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many infections, as they are difficult to eradicate due to their resistance to antimicrobials and host defense mechanisms. This review focusses on the biofilm-forming periodontal bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis. Current knowledge on the virulence mechanisms underlying P. gingivalis biofilm formation is presented. In addition, oral infectious diseases in which P. gingivalis plays a key role are described, and an overview of conventional and new therapies for combating P. gingivalis biofilms is given. More insight into this intriguing pathogen might direct the development of better strategies to combat oral infections. PMID:28473880

  20. Implications of Biofilm Formation on Urological Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadieux, Peter A.; Wignall, Geoffrey R.; Carriveau, Rupp; Denstedt, John D.

    2008-09-01

    Despite millions of dollars and several decades of research targeted at their prevention and eradication, biofilm-associated infections remain the major cause of urological device failure. Numerous strategies have been aimed at improving device design, biomaterial composition, surface properties and drug delivery, but have been largely circumvented by microbes and their plethora of attachment, host evasion, antimicrobial resistance, and dissemination strategies. This is not entirely surprising since natural biofilm formation has been going on for millions of years and remains a major part of microorganism survival and evolution. Thus, the fact that biofilms develop on and in the biomaterials and tissues of humans is really an extension of this natural tendency and greatly explains why they are so difficult for us to combat. Firstly, biofilm structure and composition inherently provide a protective environment for microorganisms, shielding them from the shear stress of urine flow, immune cell attack and some antimicrobials. Secondly, many biofilm organisms enter a metabolically dormant state that renders them tolerant to those antibiotics and host factors able to penetrate the biofilm matrix. Lastly, the majority of organisms that cause biofilm-associated urinary tract infections originate from our own oral cavity, skin, gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts and therefore have already adapted to many of our host defenses. Ultimately, while biofilms continue to hold an advantage with respect to recurrent infections and biomaterial usage within the urinary tract, significant progress has been made in understanding these dynamic microbial communities and novel approaches offer promise for their prevention and eradication. These include novel device designs, antimicrobials, anti-adhesive coatings, biodegradable polymers and biofilm-disrupting compounds and therapies.

  1. Redox stratified biofilms to support completely autotrophic nitrogen removal: Principles and results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Smets, Barth F.

    liquid. If operated properly, MABRs yield compact and homogeneous redox-stratified biofilms capable of hosting side-by-side aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities. We have recently demonstrated that completely autotrophic nitrogen removal is feasible in MABRs at nitrogen removal rates as high as 5......After 10 years of pilot and full-scale studies, completely autotrophic nitrogen via coupled aerobic and anaerobic ammonium oxidation is now firmly established in the wastewater treatment community. The reasons for the popularization of the technology are numerous, but the most attractive....... The continuous and sustained inoculation of metabolically active anaerobic oxidizing bacteria from a biofilm reactor placed in the recirculation line of our MABRs showed to shorten considerably the onset of autotrophic nitrogen removal. However, the main hurdle keeping MABRs from attaining high removal...

  2. Can a web-based community of practice be established and operated to lead falls prevention activity in residential care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis-Coad, Jacqueline; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; Bulsara, Caroline; Nobre, Debbie; Hill, Anne-Marie

    The aims of this study were to evaluate establishing and operating a web-based community of practice (CoP) to lead falls prevention in a residential aged care (RAC) setting. A mixed methods evaluation was conducted in two phases using a survey and transcripts from interactive electronic sources. Nurses and allied health staff (n = 20) with an interest in falls prevention representing 13 sites of an RAC organization participated. In Phase 1, the CoP was developed, and the establishment of its structure and composition was evaluated using determinants of success reported in the literature. In Phase 2, all participants interacted using the web, but frequency of engagement by any participant was low. Participatory barriers, including competing demands from other tasks and low levels of knowledge about information communication technology (ICT) applications, were identified by CoP members. A web-based CoP can be established and operated across multiple RAC sites if RAC management support dedicated time for web-based participation and staff are given web-based training. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The impact of manganese on biofilm development of Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mhatre, Eisha; Troszok, Agnieszka; Gallegos-Monterrosa, Ramses; Lindstädt, Stefanie; Hölscher, Theresa; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kovács, Ákos T.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are dynamic and structurally complex communities, involving cell-to-cell interactions. In recent years, various environmental signals were identified that induce the complex biofilm development of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. These signaling molecules are often

  4. Multi-layer composite mechanical modeling for the inhomogeneous biofilm mechanical behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoling; Han, Jingshi; Li, Kui; Wang, Guoqing; Hao, Mudong

    2016-08-01

    Experiments showed that bacterial biofilms are heterogeneous, for example, the density, the diffusion coefficient, and mechanical properties of the biofilm are different along the biofilm thickness. In this paper, we establish a multi-layer composite model to describe the biofilm mechanical inhomogeneity based on unified multiple-component cellular automaton (UMCCA) model. By using our model, we develop finite element simulation procedure for biofilm tension experiment. The failure limit and biofilm extension displacement obtained from our model agree well with experimental measurements. This method provides an alternative theory to study the mechanical inhomogeneity in biological materials.

  5. Commonly used disinfectants fail to eradicate Salmonella enterica biofilms from food contact surface materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, M; Morris, D; De Lappe, N; O'Connor, J; Lalor, P; Dockery, P; Cormican, M

    2014-02-01

    Salmonellosis is the second most common cause of food-borne illness worldwide. Contamination of surfaces in food processing environments may result in biofilm formation with a risk of food contamination. Effective decontamination of biofilm-contaminated surfaces is challenging. Using the CDC biofilm reactor, the activities of sodium hypochlorite, sodium hydroxide, and benzalkonium chloride were examined against an early (48-h) and relatively mature (168-h) Salmonella biofilm. All 3 agents result in reduction in viable counts of Salmonella; however, only sodium hydroxide resulted in eradication of the early biofilm. None of the agents achieved eradication of mature biofilm, even at the 90-min contact time. Studies of activity of chemical disinfection against biofilm should include assessment of activity against mature biofilm. The difficulty of eradication of established Salmonella biofilm serves to emphasize the priority of preventing access of Salmonella to postcook areas of food production facilities.

  6. Sticking together: building a biofilm the Bacillus subtilis way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlamakis, Hera; Chai, Yunrong; Beauregard, Pascale; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Preface Biofilms are ubiquitous communities of tightly associated bacteria encased in an extracellular matrix. Bacillus subtilis has long-served as a robust model organism to examine the molecular mechanisms of biofilm formation and a number of studies have revealed that this process is subject to a number of integrated regulatory pathways. In this Review, we focus on the molecular mechanisms controlling biofilm assembly and briefly summarize the current state of knowledge regarding their disassembly. We also discuss recent progress that has expanded our understanding of biofilm formation on plant roots, which are a natural habitat for this soil bacterium. PMID:23353768

  7. Anti-Biofilm Compounds Derived from Marine Sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Melander

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial biofilms are surface-attached communities of microorganisms that are protected by an extracellular matrix of biomolecules. In the biofilm state, bacteria are significantly more resistant to external assault, including attack by antibiotics. In their native environment, bacterial biofilms underpin costly biofouling that wreaks havoc on shipping, utilities, and offshore industry. Within a host environment, they are insensitive to antiseptics and basic host immune responses. It is estimated that up to 80% of all microbial infections are biofilm-based. Biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are of particular concern, since once the device is colonized, infection is almost impossible to eliminate. Given the prominence of biofilms in infectious diseases, there is a notable effort towards developing small, synthetically available molecules that will modulate bacterial biofilm development and maintenance. Here, we highlight the development of small molecules that inhibit and/or disperse bacterial biofilms specifically through non-microbicidal mechanisms. Importantly, we discuss several sets of compounds derived from marine sponges that we are developing in our labs to address the persistent biofilm problem. We will discuss: discovery/synthesis of natural products and their analogues—including our marine sponge-derived compounds and initial adjuvant activity and toxicological screening of our novel anti-biofilm compounds.

  8. Inhibition of Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm by Trimethylsilane Plasma Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yibao; Jones, John E.; Ritts, Andrew C.; Yu, Qingsong

    2012-01-01

    Biofilm formation on implantable medical devices is a major impediment to the treatment of nosocomial infections and promotes local progressive tissue destruction. Staphylococcus epidermidis infections are the leading cause of biofilm formation on indwelling devices. Bacteria in biofilms are highly resistant to antibiotic treatment, which in combination with the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance among human pathogens further complicates treatment of biofilm-related device infections. We have developed a novel plasma coating technology. Trimethylsilane (TMS) was used as a monomer to coat the surfaces of 316L stainless steel and grade 5 titanium alloy, which are widely used in implantable medical devices. The results of biofilm assays demonstrated that this TMS coating markedly decreased S. epidermidis biofilm formation by inhibiting the attachment of bacterial cells to the TMS-coated surfaces during the early phase of biofilm development. We also discovered that bacterial cells on the TMS-coated surfaces were more susceptible to antibiotic treatment than their counterparts in biofilms on uncoated surfaces. These findings suggested that TMS coating could result in a surface that is resistant to biofilm development and also in a bacterial community that is more sensitive to antibiotic therapy than typical biofilms. PMID:22964248

  9. Agriculturally important microbial biofilms: Present status and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmourougane, Kulandaivelu; Prasanna, Radha; Saxena, Anil Kumar

    2017-07-01

    Microbial biofilms are a fascinating subject, due to their significant roles in the environment, industry, and health. Advances in biochemical and molecular techniques have helped in enhancing our understanding of biofilm structure and development. In the past, research on biofilms primarily focussed on health and industrial sectors; however, lately, biofilms in agriculture are gaining attention due to their immense potential in crop production, protection, and improvement. Biofilms play an important role in colonization of surfaces - soil, roots, or shoots of plants and enable proliferation in the desired niche, besides enhancing soil fertility. Although reports are available on microbial biofilms in general; scanty information is published on biofilm formation by agriculturally important microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, bacterial-fungal) and their interactions in the ecosystem. Better understanding of agriculturally important bacterial-fungal communities and their interactions can have several implications on climate change, soil quality, plant nutrition, plant protection, bioremediation, etc. Understanding the factors and genes involved in biofilm formation will help to develop more effective strategies for sustainable and environment-friendly agriculture. The present review brings together fundamental aspects of biofilms, in relation to their formation, regulatory mechanisms, genes involved, and their application in different fields, with special emphasis on agriculturally important microbial biofilms. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Sexual Biofilm Formation in Candida tropicalis Opaque Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephen K.; Hirakawa, Matthew P.; Bennett, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis are opportunistic fungal pathogens that can transition between white and opaque phenotypic states. White and opaque cells differ both morphologically and in their responses to environmental signals. In C. albicans, opaque cells respond to sexual pheromones by undergoing conjugation, while white cells are induced by pheromones to form sexual biofilms. Here, we show that sexual biofilm formation also occurs in C. tropicalis but, unlike C. albicans, biofilms are formed exclusively by opaque cells. C. tropicalis biofilm formation was dependent on the pheromone receptors Ste2 and Ste3, confirming the role of pheromone signaling in sexual biofilm development. Structural analysis of C. tropicalis sexual biofilms revealed stratified communities consisting of a basal layer of yeast cells and an upper layer of filamentous cells, together with an extracellular matrix. Transcriptional profiling showed that genes involved in pheromone signaling and conjugation were upregulated in sexual biofilms. Furthermore, FGR23, which encodes an agglutinin-like protein, was found to enhance both mating and sexual biofilm formation. Together, these studies reveal that C. tropicalis opaque cells form sexual biofilms with a complex architecture, and suggest a conserved role for sexual agglutinins in mediating mating, cell cohesion and biofilm formation. PMID:24612417

  11. Direct Comparison of Physical Properties of Bacillus subtilis NCIB 3610 and B-1 Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesel, Sara; Grumbein, Stefan; Gümperlein, Ina; Tallawi, Marwa; Marel, Anna-Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Many bacteria form surface-attached communities known as biofilms. Due to the extreme resistance of these bacterial biofilms to antibiotics and mechanical stresses, biofilms are of growing interest not only in microbiology but also in medicine and industry. Previous studies have determined the extracellular polymeric substances present in the matrix of biofilms formed by Bacillus subtilis NCIB 3610. However, studies on the physical properties of biofilms formed by this strain are just emerging. In particular, quantitative data on the contributions of biofilm matrix biopolymers to these physical properties are lacking. Here, we quantitatively investigated three physical properties of B. subtilis NCIB 3610 biofilms: the surface roughness and stiffness and the bulk viscoelasticity of these biofilms. We show how specific biomolecules constituting the biofilm matrix formed by this strain contribute to those biofilm properties. In particular, we demonstrate that the surface roughness and surface elasticity of 1-day-old NCIB 3610 biofilms are strongly affected by the surface layer protein BslA. For a second strain, B. subtilis B-1, which forms biofilms containing mainly γ-polyglutamate, we found significantly different physical biofilm properties that are also differently affected by the commonly used antibacterial agent ethanol. We show that B-1 biofilms are protected from ethanol-induced changes in the biofilm's stiffness and that this protective effect can be transferred to NCIB 3610 biofilms by the sole addition of γ-polyglutamate to growing NCIB 3610 biofilms. Together, our results demonstrate the importance of specific biofilm matrix components for the distinct physical properties of B. subtilis biofilms. PMID:26873313

  12. Development and maturation of Escherichia coli K-12 biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, A.; Haagensen, J.A.J.; Schembri, Mark

    2003-01-01

    The development and maturation of E. coli biofilms in flow-chambers was investigated. We found that the presence of transfer constitutive IncF plasmids induced biofilm development forming structures resembling those reported for Pseudomonas aeruginosa . The development occurred in a step...... occurred in conjugation pilus proficient plasmid-carrying strains. The final shapes of the expanding structures in the mature biofilm seem to be determined by the pilus configuration, as various mutants affected in the processing and activity of the transfer pili displayed differently structured biofilms....... We further provide evidence that flagella, type 1 fimbriae, curli and Ag43 are all dispensable for the observed biofilm maturation. In addition, our results indicate that cell-to-cell signalling mediated by autoinducer 2 (AI-2) is not required for differentiation of E. coli within a biofilm community...

  13. IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31

    colonizes and degrades insoluble substrates. Major accomplishments of the project include: • Development of media containing dialysis tubing (described by the manufacturer as “regenerated cellulose”) as sole carbon and energy source and a nutritive surface for the growth of cellulolytic bacteria, and development of various microscopic methods to image biofilms on dialysis tubing. • Demonstration that cultures of C. phytofermentans, an obligate anaerobe, C. uda, a facultative aerobe, and T. fusca, a filamentous aerobe, formed microbial communities on the surface of dialysis tubing, which possessed architectural features and functional characteristics typical of biofilms. • Demonstration that biofilm formation on the nutritive surface, cellulose, involves a complex developmental processes, including colonization of dialysis tubing, formation of cell clusters attached to the nutritive surface, cell morphological changes, formation of complex structures embedded in extracellular polymeric matrices, and dispersal of biofilm communities as the nutritive surface is degraded. • Determination of surface specificity and regulatory aspects of biofilm formation by C. phytofermentans, C. uda, and T. fusca. • Demonstration that biofilm formation by T. fusca forms an integral part of the life cycle of this filamentous cellulolytic bacterium, including studies on the role of mycelial pellet formation in the T. fusca life cycle and a comparison of mycelial pellets to surface-attached T. fusca biofilms. • Characterization of T. fusca biofilm EPS, including demonstration of a functional role for EPS constituents. • Correlation of T. fusca developmental life cycle and cellulase gene expression.

  14. Investigation of mass transfer phenomena in biofilm systems; Untersuchung von Stoffuebergangsphaenomenen in Biofilmsystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waesche, S.; Hempel, D.C. [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Bioverfahrenstechnik; Horn, H. [Fachhochschule Magdeburg (Germany). Hydro- und Abfallchemie

    1999-07-01

    Substance transfer in the boundary layer bulk/biofilm can be only inadequately described by conventional model concepts. In such cases where the surface structure of a biofilm adapts to given hydraulic conditions, the substance transfer phenomena need to be studied in depth. In addition, the entire biofilm structure is much influenced both by substrate conditions and by hydrodynamic conditions during growth. With a view to quantifying these factors, biofilms were cultured under various substrate and hydrodynamic conditions in tube reactors with a diameter of 2.6 cm. For characterizing the cultured biofilms, biofilm density and substrate turnover measured as maximum mass transfer density were determined in each test series. Biofilm density (dry biomass/biofilm volume) was determined by gravimetry. Maximum mass transfer densities in biofilm were established in batch experiments with excess substrate. By means of oxygen microelectrodes, oxygen profiles in the biofilm were measured directly in the reactor. These measurements concerned biofilms of thicknesses ranging from 400 to 2000 {mu}m, where the biofilms did not yet exhibit erosion. (orig.) [German] Der Stoffuebergang in der Grenzschicht Bulk/Biofilm ist mit herkoemmlichen Modellvorstellungen nur ungenuegend beschreibbar. Eine sich an die aktuellen hydraulischen Bedingungen anpassende Oberflaechenstruktur des Biofilms erfordert eine intensive Untersuchung der Stoffuebergangsphaenomene in derartigen Systemen. Darueber hinaus wird die gesamte Biofilmstruktur sowohl von den Substratbedingungen als auch von den hydrodynamischen Bedingungen waehrend des Wachstums stark beeinflusst. Um diese Faktoren quantifizieren zu koennen, wurden Biofilme bei verschiedenen Substrat- und hydrodynamischen Bedingungen in Rohrreaktoren mit einem Durchmesser von 2,6 cm kultiviert. Zur Charakterisierung der kultivierten Biofilme wurde die Biofilmdichte und der Substratumsatz, gemessen als maximale Massestromdichte, bei jeder Versuchsreihe

  15. Influence of culture conditions on Escherichia coli O157:H7 biofilm formation by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Y.J.; Jo, W.; Yang, Y.; Park, S.

    2007-01-01

    Biofilms are complex microbial communities that are resistant against attacks by bacteriophages and removal by drugs and chemicals. In this study, biofilms of Escherichia coli O157:H7, a bacterial pathogen, were investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in terms of the dynamic transition of morphology and surface properties of bacterial cells over the development of biofilms. The physical and topographical properties of biofilms are different, depending on nutrient availability. Compared to biofilms formed in a high nutrient medium, biofilms form faster and a higher number of bacterial cells were recovered on glass surface in a low nutrient medium. We demonstrate that AFM can obtain high-resolution images and the elastic information about biofilms. As E. coli biofilm becomes mature, the magnitude of the force between a tip and the surface of the biofilm gets stronger, suggesting that extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs), sticky components of biofilms, accumulate over the surface of cells upon the initial attachment of bacterial cells to surfaces

  16. Plant community, primary productivity, and environmental conditions following wetland re-establishment in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R.L.; Fujii, R.

    2010-01-01

    Wetland restoration can mitigate aerobic decomposition of subsided organic soils, as well as re-establish conditions favorable for carbon storage. Rates of carbon storage result from the balance of inputs and losses, both of which are affected by wetland hydrology. We followed the effect of water depth (25 and 55 cm) on the plant community, primary production, and changes in two re-established wetlands in the Sacramento San-Joaquin River Delta, California for 9 years after flooding to determine how relatively small differences in water depth affect carbon storage rates over time. To estimate annual carbon inputs, plant species cover, standing above- and below-ground plant biomass, and annual biomass turnover rates were measured, and allometric biomass models for Schoenoplectus (Scirpus) acutus and Typha spp., the emergent marsh dominants, were developed. As the wetlands developed, environmental factors, including water temperature, depth, and pH were measured. Emergent marsh vegetation colonized the shallow wetland more rapidly than the deeper wetland. This is important to potential carbon storage because emergent marsh vegetation is more productive, and less labile, than submerged and floating vegetation. Primary production of emergent marsh vegetation ranged from 1.3 to 3.2 kg of carbon per square meter annually; and, mid-season standing live biomass represented about half of the annual primary production. Changes in species composition occurred in both submerged and emergent plant communities as the wetlands matured. Water depth, temperature, and pH were lower in areas with emergent marsh vegetation compared to submerged vegetation, all of which, in turn, can affect carbon cycling and storage rates. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.

  17. Mycobacterium avium Possesses Extracellular DNA that Contributes to Biofilm Formation, Structural Integrity, and Tolerance to Antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasha J Rose

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis is an opportunistic pathogen that is associated with biofilm-related infections of the respiratory tract and is difficult to treat. In recent years, extracellular DNA (eDNA has been found to be a major component of bacterial biofilms, including many pathogens involved in biofilm-associated infections. To date, eDNA has not been described as a component of mycobacterial biofilms. In this study, we identified and characterized eDNA in a high biofilm-producing strain of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH. In addition, we surveyed for presence of eDNA in various MAH strains and other nontuberculous mycobacteria. Biofilms of MAH A5 (high biofilm-producing strain and MAH 104 (reference strain were established at 22°C and 37°C on abiotic surfaces. Acellular biofilm matrix and supernatant from MAH A5 7 day-old biofilms both possess abundant eDNA, however very little eDNA was found in MAH 104 biofilms. A survey of MAH clinical isolates and other clinically relevant nontuberculous mycobacterial species revealed many species and strains that also produce eDNA. RAPD analysis demonstrated that eDNA resembles genomic DNA. Treatment with DNase I reduced the biomass of MAH A5 biofilms when added upon biofilm formation or to an already established biofilm both on abiotic surfaces and on top of human pharyngeal epithelial cells. Furthermore, co-treatment of an established biofilm with DNase 1 and either moxifloxacin or clarithromycin significantly increased the susceptibility of the bacteria within the biofilm to these clinically used antimicrobials. Collectively, our results describe an additional matrix component of mycobacterial biofilms and a potential new target to help treat biofilm-associated nontuberculous mycobacterial infections.

  18. Roles of ionic strength and biofilm roughness on adhesion kinetics of Escherichia coli onto groundwater biofilm grown on PVC surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjaroen, Dao; Ling, Fangqiong; Monroy, Guillermo; Derlon, Nicolas; Mogenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A.; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of Escherichia coli attachment on biofilms grown on PVC coupons were investigated. Biofilms were grown in CDC reactors using groundwater as feed solution over a period up to 27 weeks. Biofilm physical structure was characterized at the micro- and meso-scales using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), respectively. Microbial community diversity was analyzed with Terminal Restricted Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP). Both physical structure and microbial community diversity of the biofilms were shown to be changing from 2 weeks to 14 weeks, and became relatively stable after 16 weeks. A parallel plate flow chamber coupled with an inverted fluorescent microscope was also used to monitor the attachment of fluorescent microspheres and E. coli on clean PVC surfaces and biofilms grown on PVC surfaces for different ages. Two mechanisms of E. coli attachment were identified. The adhesion rate coefficients (kd) of E. coli on nascent PVC surfaces and 2-week biofilms increased with ionic strength. However, after biofilms grew for 8 weeks, the adhesion was found to be independent of solution chemistry. Instead, a positive correlation between kd and biofilm roughness as determined by OCT was obtained, indicating that the physical structure of biofilms could play an important role in facilitating the adhesion of E. coli cells. PMID:23497979

  19. In vitro characterization of biofilms formed by Kingella kingae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, J B; Sampathkumar, V; Bendaoud, M; Giannakakis, A K; Lally, E T; Balashova, N V

    2017-08-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Kingella kingae is part of the normal oropharyngeal mucosal flora of children biofilm formation has been coupled with pharyngeal colonization, osteoarticular infections, and infective endocarditis, no studies have investigated biofilm formation in K. kingae. In this study we measured biofilm formation by 79 K. kingae clinical isolates using a 96-well microtiter plate crystal violet binding assay. We found that 37 of 79 strains (47%) formed biofilms. All strains that formed biofilms produced corroding colonies on agar. Biofilm formation was inhibited by proteinase K and DNase I. DNase I also caused the detachment of pre-formed K. kingae biofilm colonies. A mutant strain carrying a deletion of the pilus gene cluster pilA1pilA2fimB did not produce corroding colonies on agar, autoaggregate in broth, or form biofilms. Biofilm forming strains have higher levels of pilA1 expression. The extracellular components of biofilms contained 490 μg cm -2 of protein, 0.68 μg cm -2 of DNA, and 0.4 μg cm -2 of total carbohydrates. We concluded that biofilm formation is common among K. kingae clinical isolates, and that biofilm formation is dependent on the production of proteinaceous pili and extracellular DNA. Biofilm development may have relevance to the colonization, transmission, and pathogenesis of this bacterium. Extracellular DNA production by K. kingae may facilitate horizontal gene transfer within the oral microbial community. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The directive establishing a community framework for the nuclear safety of nuclear installations: the European Union approach to nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garribba, M.; Chirtes, A.; Nauduzaite, M.

    2009-01-01

    This article aims at explaining the evolution leading to the adoption of the recent Council Directive 2009/71/EURATOM establishing a Community framework for the nuclear safety of nuclear installations adopted with the consent of all 27 members states following the overwhelming support of the European Parliament, that creates for the first time, a binding legal framework that brings legal certainty to European Union citizens and reinforces the role and independence of national regulators. The paper is divided into three sections. The first section addresses the competence of the European Atomic energy Community to legislate in the area of nuclear safety. It focuses on the 2002 landmark ruling of the European Court of justice that confirmed this competence by recognizing the intrinsic link between radiation protection and nuclear safety. The second part describes the history of the Nuclear safety directive from the initial 2003 European Commission proposal to today 's text in force. The third part is dedicated to a description of the content of the Directive and its implications on the further development of nuclear safety in the European Union. (N.C.)

  1. Establishment of a community care center for isolation and management of Ebola patients - Bomi County, Liberia, October 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Gorbee; Vora, Neil M; Nyensuah, Tolbert G; Gasasira, Alex; Mott, Joshua; Walke, Henry; Mahoney, Frank; Luce, Richard; Flannery, Brendan

    2014-11-07

    As of October 29, 2014, a total of 6,454 Ebola virus disease (Ebola) cases had been reported in Liberia by the Liberian Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, with 2,609 deaths. Although the national strategy for combating the ongoing Ebola epidemic calls for construction of Ebola treatment units (ETUs) in all 15 counties of Liberia, only a limited number are operational, and most of these are within Montserrado County. ETUs are intended to improve medical care delivery to persons whose illnesses meet Ebola case definitions, while also allowing for the safe isolation of patients to break chains of transmission in the community. Until additional ETUs are constructed, the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare is supporting development of community care centers (CCCs) for isolation of patients who are awaiting Ebola diagnostic test results and for provision of basic care (e.g., oral rehydration salts solutions) to patients confirmed to have Ebola who are awaiting transfer to ETUs. CCCs often have less bed capacity than ETUs and are frequently placed in areas not served by ETUs; if built rapidly enough and in sufficient quantity, CCCs will allow Ebola-related health measures to reach a larger proportion of the population. Staffing requirements for CCCs are frequently lower than for ETUs because CCCs are often designed such that basic patient needs such as food are provided for by friends and family of patients rather than by CCC staff. (It is customary in Liberia for friends and family to provide food for hospitalized patients.) Creation of CCCs in Liberia has been led by county health officials and nongovernmental organizations, and this local, community-based approach is intended to destigmatize Ebola, to encourage persons with illness to seek care rather than remain at home, and to facilitate contact tracing of exposed family members. This report describes one Liberian county's approach to establishing a CCC.

  2. Interplay of Bacterial Interactions and Spatial Organisation in Multispecies Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wenzheng

    -tispecies biofilms, which provides theoretical and practical arguments for further ad-vancement of this field. Here, a reproducible four-species biofilm, composed of Stenotrophomonas rhizophila, Xan-thomonas retroflexus, Microbacterium oxydans and Paenibacillus amylolyticus, was established to study the effect...

  3. Carbon gas fluxes in re-established wetlands on organic soils differ relative to plant community and hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robin L.

    2011-01-01

    We measured CO2 and CH4 fluxes for 6 years following permanent flooding of an agriculturally managed organic soil at two water depths (~25 and ~55 cm standing water) in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California, as part of research studying C dynamics in re-established wetlands. Flooding rapidly reduced gaseous C losses, and radiocarbon data showed that this, in part, was due to reduced oxidation of "old" C preserved in the organic soils. Both CO2 and CH4 emissions from the water surface increased during the first few growing seasons, concomitant with emergent marsh establishment, and thereafter appeared to stabilize according to plant communities. Areas of emergent marsh vegetation in the shallower wetland had greater net CO2 influx (-485 mg Cm-1 h-1), and lower CH4 emissions (11.5 mg Cm-2 h-1), than in the deeper wetland (-381 and 14.1 mg Cm-2 h-1, respectively). Areas with submerged and floating vegetation in the deeper wetland had CH4 emissions similar to emergent vegetation (11.9 and 12.6 mg Cm-2 h-1, respectively), despite lower net CO2 influx (-102 gC m-2 h-1). Measurements of plant moderated net CO2 influx and CH4 efflux indicated greatest potential reduction of greenhouse gases in the more shallowly flooded wetland.

  4. Strategies for combating bacterial biofilms: A focus on anti-biofilm agents and their mechanisms of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ranita; Tiwari, Monalisa; Donelli, Gianfranco; Tiwari, Vishvanath

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Biofilm refers to the complex, sessile communities of microbes found either attached to a surface or buried firmly in an extracellular matrix as aggregates. The biofilm matrix surrounding bacteria makes them tolerant to harsh conditions and resistant to antibacterial treatments. Moreover, the biofilms are responsible for causing a broad range of chronic diseases and due to the emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria it has really become difficult to treat them with efficacy. Furthermore, the antibiotics available till date are ineffective for treating these biofilm related infections due to their higher values of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC), which may result in in-vivo toxicity. Hence, it is critically important to design or screen anti-biofilm molecules that can effectively minimize and eradicate biofilm related infections. In the present article, we have highlighted the mechanism of biofilm formation with reference to different models and various methods used for biofilm detection. A major focus has been put on various anti-biofilm molecules discovered or tested till date which may include herbal active compounds, chelating agents, peptide antibiotics, lantibiotics and synthetic chemical compounds along with their structures, mechanism of action and their respective MICs, MBCs, minimum biofilm inhibitory concentrations (MBICs) as well as the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values available in the literature so far. Different mode of action of anti biofilm molecules addressed here are inhibition via interference in the quorum sensing pathways, adhesion mechanism, disruption of extracellular DNA, protein, lipopolysaccharides, exopolysaccharides and secondary messengers involved in various signaling pathways. From this study, we conclude that the molecules considered here might be used to treat biofilm-associated infections after significant structural modifications, thereby

  5. Spore formation and toxin production in Clostridium difficile biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina G Semenyuk

    Full Text Available The ability to grow as a biofilm can facilitate survival of bacteria in the environment and promote infection. To better characterize biofilm formation in the pathogen Clostridium difficile, we established a colony biofilm culture method for this organism on a polycarbonate filter, and analyzed the matrix and the cells in biofilms from a variety of clinical isolates over several days of biofilm culture. We found that biofilms readily formed in all strains analyzed, and that spores were abundant within about 6 days. We also found that extracellular DNA (eDNA, polysaccharide and protein was readily detected in the matrix of all strains, including the major toxins A and/or B, in toxigenic strains. All the strains we analyzed formed spores. Apart from strains 630 and VPI10463, which sporulated in the biofilm at relatively low frequencies, the frequencies of biofilm sporulation varied between 46 and 65%, suggesting that variations in sporulation levels among strains is unlikely to be a major factor in variation in the severity of disease. Spores in biofilms also had reduced germination efficiency compared to spores obtained by a conventional sporulation protocol. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that in 3 day-old biofilms, the outermost structure of the spore is a lightly staining coat. However, after 6 days, material that resembles cell debris in the matrix surrounds the spore, and darkly staining granules are closely associated with the spores surface. In 14 day-old biofilms, relatively few spores are surrounded by the apparent cell debris, and the surface-associated granules are present at higher density at the coat surface. Finally, we showed that biofilm cells possess 100-fold greater resistance to the antibiotic metronidazole then do cells cultured in liquid media. Taken together, our data suggest that C. difficile cells and spores in biofilms have specialized properties that may facilitate infection.

  6. Spore formation and toxin production in Clostridium difficile biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenyuk, Ekaterina G; Laning, Michelle L; Foley, Jennifer; Johnston, Pehga F; Knight, Katherine L; Gerding, Dale N; Driks, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The ability to grow as a biofilm can facilitate survival of bacteria in the environment and promote infection. To better characterize biofilm formation in the pathogen Clostridium difficile, we established a colony biofilm culture method for this organism on a polycarbonate filter, and analyzed the matrix and the cells in biofilms from a variety of clinical isolates over several days of biofilm culture. We found that biofilms readily formed in all strains analyzed, and that spores were abundant within about 6 days. We also found that extracellular DNA (eDNA), polysaccharide and protein was readily detected in the matrix of all strains, including the major toxins A and/or B, in toxigenic strains. All the strains we analyzed formed spores. Apart from strains 630 and VPI10463, which sporulated in the biofilm at relatively low frequencies, the frequencies of biofilm sporulation varied between 46 and 65%, suggesting that variations in sporulation levels among strains is unlikely to be a major factor in variation in the severity of disease. Spores in biofilms also had reduced germination efficiency compared to spores obtained by a conventional sporulation protocol. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that in 3 day-old biofilms, the outermost structure of the spore is a lightly staining coat. However, after 6 days, material that resembles cell debris in the matrix surrounds the spore, and darkly staining granules are closely associated with the spores surface. In 14 day-old biofilms, relatively few spores are surrounded by the apparent cell debris, and the surface-associated granules are present at higher density at the coat surface. Finally, we showed that biofilm cells possess 100-fold greater resistance to the antibiotic metronidazole then do cells cultured in liquid media. Taken together, our data suggest that C. difficile cells and spores in biofilms have specialized properties that may facilitate infection.

  7. Experimental toxicity and bioaccumulation of cadmium in freshwater periphytic diatoms in relation with biofilm maturity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duong, Thi Thuy; Morin, Soizic; Coste, Michel; Herlory, Olivier; Feurtet-Mazel, Agnes; Boudou, Alain

    2010-01-01

    A study was undertaken to examine cadmium accumulation in freshwater biofilm, its effects on biofilm development and on diatom community structure in laboratory experimental conditions. A suspension of a biofilm originated from the Riou-Mort River (South West France) was inoculated into three experimental units containing clean glass substrates under laboratory conditions. Settling and already developed biofilms were exposed to a Cd concentration of 100 μg L -1 . Metal accumulation (total and intracellular metal content) in biofilms, dry weight and ash-free dry mass, diatom cell density and diatom community composition were analyzed. Both total and intracellular Cd accumulated by the biofilm throughout the experiment increased with duration of metal exposure. Biofilms in the course of maturation were showed higher Cd content and less effective development than settled biofilms. However diatom communities in younger biofilms exposed to Cd increased their tolerance to Cd by a highly significant development of Nitzschia palea. In contrast, Cd exposure had different effect in installed biofilm and taxonomic composition. These results indicate that mature biofilm may limit Cd accumulation into its architecture and protect diatom communities from the effects of metals.

  8. A soil-based microbial biofilm exposed to 2,4-D: bacterial community development and establishment of conjugative plasmid pJP4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aspray, T.J.; Hansen, Susse Kirkelund; Burns, R.G.

    2005-01-01

    fluorescing cells and images were captured using confocal scanning laser microscopy (GFP fluorescence was repressed in the donor due to the presence of a chromosomally located lacl(q) repressor gene). Approximately 5-10 transconjugant microcolonies, 20-40 mu m in diameter, could be seen to develop in each...

  9. Biofilm growth program and architecture revealed by single-cell live imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jing; Sabass, Benedikt; Stone, Howard; Wingreen, Ned; Bassler, Bonnie

    Biofilms are surface-associated bacterial communities. Little is known about biofilm structure at the level of individual cells. We image living, growing Vibrio cholerae biofilms from founder cells to ten thousand cells at single-cell resolution, and discover the forces underpinning the architectural evolution of the biofilm. Mutagenesis, matrix labeling, and simulations demonstrate that surface-adhesion-mediated compression causes V. cholerae biofilms to transition from a two-dimensional branched morphology to a dense, ordered three-dimensional cluster. We discover that directional proliferation of rod-shaped bacteria plays a dominant role in shaping the biofilm architecture, and this growth pattern is controlled by a single gene. Competition analyses reveal the advantages of the dense growth mode in providing the biofilm with superior mechanical properties. We will further present continuum theory to model the three-dimensional growth of biofilms at the solid-liquid interface as well as solid-air interface.

  10. Material properties of biofilms – key methods for understanding permeability and mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Nicole; Birjiniuk, Alona; Samad, Tahoura S.; Doyle, Patrick S.; Ribbeck, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms can form biofilms, which are multicellular communities surrounded by a hydrated extracellular matrix of polymers. Central properties of the biofilm are governed by this extracellular matrix, which provides mechanical stability to the three-dimensional biofilm structure, regulates the ability of the biofilm to adhere to surfaces, and determines the ability of the biofilm to adsorb gasses, solutes, and foreign cells. Despite their critical relevance for understanding and eliminating of biofilms, the materials properties of the extracellular matrix are understudied. Here, we offer the reader a guide to current technologies that can be utilized to specifically assess the permeability and mechanical properties of the biofilm matrix and its interacting components. In particular, we highlight technological advances in instrumentation and interactions between multiple disciplines that have broadened the spectrum of methods available to conduct these studies. We review pioneering work that furthers our understanding of the material properties of biofilms. PMID:25719969

  11. Comparison of post-fire seedling establishment between scrub communities in mediterranean and non-mediterranean climate ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, M.E.; Keeley, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    I Both fire regimes and the conditions under which fires occur vary widely. Abiotic conditions (such as climate) in combination with fire season, frequency and intensity could influence vegetation responses to fire. A variety of adaptations facilitate post-fire recruitment in mediterranean climate ecosystems, but responses of other communities are less well known. We evaluated the importance of climate by comparing sites with mediterranean and subtropical climates. 2 We used paired burned and mature sites in chamise chaparral, mixed chaparral and coastal sage scrub (California), and rosemary scrub, sand pine scrub and sand-hill (Florida), to test whether (i) patterns of pre-fire and post-fire seedling recruitment are more similar between communities within a region than between regions, and (ii) post-fire stimulation of seedling establishment is greater in regions with marked fire-induced contrasts in abiotic site characteristics. 3 Post-fire seedling densities were more similar among sites within climatic regions than between regions. Both seedling densities and proportions of species represented by seedlings after fires were generally higher in California. 4 The only site characteristic showing a pre-fire-post-fire contrast was percentage open canopy, and the effect was greater in California than in Florida. Soil properties were unaffected by fire. 5 Mediterranean climate ecosystems in other regions have nutrient-poor soils similar to our subtropical Florida sites, but show post-fire seedling recruitment patterns more similar to the nutrient-rich sites in California. Climate therefore appears to play a more major role than soil characteristics.

  12. Sulfate reducing bacteria and their activities in oil sands process-affected water biofilm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hong; Yu, Tong, E-mail: tong.yu@ualberta.ca; Liu, Yang, E-mail: yang.liu@ualberta.ca

    2015-12-01

    Biofilm reactors were constructed to grow stratified multispecies biofilm in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) supplemented with growth medium. The development of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) within the biofilm and the biofilm treatment of OSPW were evaluated. The community structure and potential activity of SRB in the biofilm were investigated with H{sub 2}S microsensor measurements, dsrB gene-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), and the real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Multispecies biofilm with a thickness of 1000 μm was successfully developed on engineered biocarriers. H{sub 2}S production was observed in the deeper anoxic zone of the biofilm from around 750 μm to 1000 μm below the bulk water-biofilm interface, revealing sulfate reduction in the deeper zone of the stratified biofilm. The biofilm removed chemical oxygen demand (COD), sulfate, and nitrogen. The study expands current knowledge of biofilm treatment of OSPW and the function of anaerobic SRB in OSPW biofilm, and thus provides information for future bioreactor development in the reclamation of OSPW. - Graphical abstract: The development of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) within Oil Sands Process-affected Water (OSPW) biofilm and the biofilm treatment of OSPW were evaluated by Liu and coworkers. Combined microsensor and molecular biology techniques were utilized in this study. Their results demonstrated that multispecies biofilm with a thickness of 1000 μm was successfully developed on engineered biocarriers. H{sub 2}S production was observed in the deeper anoxic zone of the biofilm from around 750 μm to 1000 μm below the bulk water-biofilm interface, revealing sulfate reduction in the deeper zone of the biofilm. The biofilm removed chemical oxygen demand (COD), sulfate, and nitrogen. - Highlights: • Biofilm in oil sands wastewater was developed on engineered biocarriers. • Bacterial community and in situ activity of SRB were studied in the

  13. Sulfate reducing bacteria and their activities in oil sands process-affected water biofilm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hong; Yu, Tong; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm reactors were constructed to grow stratified multispecies biofilm in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) supplemented with growth medium. The development of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) within the biofilm and the biofilm treatment of OSPW were evaluated. The community structure and potential activity of SRB in the biofilm were investigated with H 2 S microsensor measurements, dsrB gene-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), and the real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Multispecies biofilm with a thickness of 1000 μm was successfully developed on engineered biocarriers. H 2 S production was observed in the deeper anoxic zone of the biofilm from around 750 μm to 1000 μm below the bulk water-biofilm interface, revealing sulfate reduction in the deeper zone of the stratified biofilm. The biofilm removed chemical oxygen demand (COD), sulfate, and nitrogen. The study expands current knowledge of biofilm treatment of OSPW and the function of anaerobic SRB in OSPW biofilm, and thus provides information for future bioreactor development in the reclamation of OSPW. - Graphical abstract: The development of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) within Oil Sands Process-affected Water (OSPW) biofilm and the biofilm treatment of OSPW were evaluated by Liu and coworkers. Combined microsensor and molecular biology techniques were utilized in this study. Their results demonstrated that multispecies biofilm with a thickness of 1000 μm was successfully developed on engineered biocarriers. H 2 S production was observed in the deeper anoxic zone of the biofilm from around 750 μm to 1000 μm below the bulk water-biofilm interface, revealing sulfate reduction in the deeper zone of the biofilm. The biofilm removed chemical oxygen demand (COD), sulfate, and nitrogen. - Highlights: • Biofilm in oil sands wastewater was developed on engineered biocarriers. • Bacterial community and in situ activity of SRB were studied in the biofilm.

  14. Quantification of biofilm structures by the novel computer program COMSTAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydorn, A; Nielsen, A T; Hentzer, M; Sternberg, C; Givskov, M; Ersbøll, B K; Molin, S

    2000-10-01

    The structural organization of four microbial communities was analysed by a novel computer program, COMSTAT, which comprises ten features for quantifying three-dimensional biofilm image stacks. Monospecies biofilms of each of the four bacteria, Pseudomonas: putida, P. aureofaciens, P. fluorescens and P. aeruginosa, tagged with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) were grown in flow chambers with a defined minimal medium as substrate. Analysis by the COMSTAT program of four variables describing biofilm structure - mean thickness, roughness, substratum coverage and surface to volume ratio - showed that the four Pseudomonas: strains represent different modes of biofilm growth. P. putida had a unique developmental pattern starting with single cells on the substratum growing into micro-colonies, which were eventually succeeded by long filaments and elongated cell clusters. P. aeruginosa colonized the entire substratum, and formed flat, uniform biofilms. P. aureofaciens resembled P. aeruginosa, but had a stronger tendency to form micro-colonies. Finally, the biofilm structures of P. fluorescens had a phenotype intermediate between those of P. putida and P. aureofaciens. Analysis of biofilms of P. aureofaciens growing on 0.03 mM, 0.1 mM or 0.5 mM citrate minimal media showed that mean biofilm thickness increased with increasing citrate concentration. Moreover, biofilm roughness increased with lower citrate concentrations, whereas surface to volume ratio increased with higher citrate concentrations.

  15. Spatial transcriptomes within the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heacock-Kang, Yun; Sun, Zhenxin; Zarzycki-Siek, Jan; McMillan, Ian A; Norris, Michael H; Bluhm, Andrew P; Cabanas, Darlene; Fogen, Dawson; Vo, Hung; Donachie, Stuart P; Borlee, Bradley R; Sibley, Christopher D; Lewenza, Shawn; Schurr, Michael J; Schweizer, Herbert P; Hoang, Tung T

    2017-12-01

    Bacterial cooperative associations and dynamics in biofilm microenvironments are of special interest in recent years. Knowledge of localized gene-expression and corresponding bacterial behaviors within the biofilm architecture at a global scale has been limited, due to a lack of robust technology to study limited number of cells in stratified layers of biofilms. With our recent pioneering developments in single bacterial cell transcriptomic analysis technology, we generated herein an unprecedented spatial transcriptome map of the mature in vitro Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm model, revealing contemporaneous yet altered bacterial behaviors at different layers within the biofilm architecture (i.e., surface, middle and interior of the biofilm). Many genes encoding unknown functions were highly expressed at the biofilm-solid interphase, exposing a critical gap in the knowledge of their activities that may be unique to this interior niche. Several genes of unknown functions are critical for biofilm formation. The in vivo importance of these unknown proteins was validated in invertebrate (fruit fly) and vertebrate (mouse) models. We envisage the future value of this report to the community, in aiding the further pathophysiological understanding of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Our approach will open doors to the study of bacterial functional genomics of different species in numerous settings. © 2017 The Authors. Molecular Microbiology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Reduced Efficiency of Chlorine Disinfection of Naegleria fowleri in a Drinking Water Distribution Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Haylea C; Wylie, Jason; Dejean, Guillaume; Kaksonen, Anna H; Sutton, David; Braun, Kalan; Puzon, Geoffrey J

    2015-09-15

    Naegleria fowleri associated with biofilm and biological demand water (organic matter suspended in water that consumes disinfectants) sourced from operational drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs) had significantly increased resistance to chlorine disinfection. N. fowleri survived intermittent chlorine dosing of 0.6 mg/L for 7 days in a mixed biofilm from field and laboratory-cultured Escherichia coli strains. However, N. fowleri associated with an attached drinking water distribution biofilm survived more than 30 times (20 mg/L for 3 h) the recommended concentration of chlorine for drinking water. N. fowleri showed considerably more resistance to chlorine when associated with a real field biofilm compared to the mixed laboratory biofilm. This increased resistance is likely due to not only the consumption of disinfectants by the biofilm and the reduced disinfectant penetration into the biofilm but also the composition and microbial community of the biofilm itself. The increased diversity of the field biofilm community likely increased N. fowleri's resistance to chlorine disinfection compared to that of the laboratory-cultured biofilm. Previous research has been conducted in only laboratory scale models of DWDSs and laboratory-cultured biofilms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating how N. fowleri can persist in a field drinking water distribution biofilm despite chlorination.

  17. Control of Biofilms with the Fatty Acid Signaling Molecule cis-2-Decenoic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia N. H. Marques

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms in organized structures attached to surfaces. Importantly, biofilms are a major cause of bacterial infections in humans, and remain one of the most significant challenges to modern medical practice. Unfortunately, conventional therapies have shown to be inadequate in the treatment of most chronic biofilm infections based on the extraordinary innate tolerance of biofilms to antibiotics. Antagonists of quorum sensing signaling molecules have been used as means to control biofilms. QS and other cell-cell communication molecules are able to revert biofilm tolerance, prevent biofilm formation and disrupt fully developed biofilms, albeit with restricted effectiveness. Recently however, it has been demonstrated that Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a small messenger molecule cis-2-decenoic acid (cis-DA that shows significant promise as an effective adjunctive to antimicrobial treatment of biofilms. This molecule is responsible for induction of the native biofilm dispersion response in a range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and in yeast, and has been shown to reverse persistence, increase microbial metabolic activity and significantly enhance the cidal effects of conventional antimicrobial agents. In this manuscript, the use of cis-2-decenoic acid as a novel agent for biofilm control is discussed. Stimulating the biofilm dispersion response as a novel antimicrobial strategy holds significant promise for enhanced treatment of infections and in the prevention of biofilm formation.

  18. Biofilms on Hospital Shower Hoses: Characterization and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although the source of drinking water used in hospitals is commonly, biofilms on water pipelines are refuge to bacteria that survive different disinfection strategies. Drinking water (DW) biofilms are well known to harbor opportunistic pathogens, however, these biofilm communities remain poorly characterized by culture-independent approaches that circumvent the limitations of conventional monitoring efforts. Hence, the frequency of pathogens in DW biofilms and how biofilm members withstand high doses of disinfectants and/or chlorine residuals in the water supply remain speculative, but directly impact public health. The aim of this study was to characterize the composition of microbial communities growing on five hospital shower hoses using both culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques. Two different sequence-based methods were used to characterize the bacterial fractions: 16S rRNA gene sequencing of bacterial cultures and next generation sequencing of metagenomes. Based on the metagenomic data, we found that Mycobacterium-like species was the abundant bacterial taxa that overlapped among the five samples. We also recovered the draft genome of a novel Mycobacterium species, closely related to opportunistic pathogenic nontuberculous mycobacteria, M. rhodesiae and M. tusciae, in addition to other, less abundant species. In contrast, the cultured fraction was mostly affiliated to Proteobacteria, such as members of the Sphingomonas, Blastomonas and Porph

  19. Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and dispersion during colonization and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yashuan; Marks, Laura R.; Pettigrew, Melinda M.; Hakansson, Anders P.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is a common colonizer of the human nasopharynx. Despite a low rate of invasive disease, the high prevalence of colonization results in millions of infections and over one million deaths per year, mostly in individuals under the age of 5 and the elderly. Colonizing pneumococci form well-organized biofilm communities in the nasopharyngeal environment, but the specific role of biofilms and their interaction with the host during colonization and disease is not yet clear. Pneumococci in biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and this phenotype can be recapitulated when pneumococci are grown on respiratory epithelial cells under conditions found in the nasopharyngeal environment. Pneumococcal biofilms display lower levels of virulence in vivo and provide an optimal environment for increased genetic exchange both in vitro and in vivo, with increased natural transformation seen during co-colonization with multiple strains. Biofilms have also been detected on mucosal surfaces during pneumonia and middle ear infection, although the role of these biofilms in the disease process is debated. Recent studies have shown that changes in the nasopharyngeal environment caused by concomitant virus infection, changes in the microflora, inflammation, or other host assaults trigger active release of pneumococci from biofilms. These dispersed bacteria have distinct phenotypic properties and transcriptional profiles different from both biofilm and broth-grown, planktonic bacteria, resulting in a significantly increased virulence in vivo. In this review we discuss the properties of pneumococcal biofilms, the role of biofilm formation during pneumococcal colonization, including their propensity for increased ability to exchange genetic material, as well as mechanisms involved in transition from asymptomatic biofilm colonization to dissemination and disease of otherwise sterile sites. Greater understanding of pneumococcal biofilm

  20. Facilitated establishment of Quercus ilex in shrub-dominated communities within a Mediterranean ecosystem: do mycorrhizal partners matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Franck; Selosse, Marc-André; Gardes, Monique

    2009-04-01

    Positive plant-plant interaction is a widespread phenomenon, especially in harsh environments, which can contribute to secondary successions. Here, we investigated whether Arbutus unedo positively influences Quercus ilex establishment in shrub communities by abiotic and/or biotic interactions in a Mediterranean forest ecosystem, where we previously showed that A. unedo and Q. ilex share numerous species of mycorrhizal fungi. In a first field experiment, patterns of Q. ilex survivorship were documented. During the summer following germination, a majority of seedlings survived in A. unedo chaparral (AU), whereas most of them died in previous succession stages dominated by Erica arborea (EA). These results showed that survival of the Q. ilex seedling is succession stage dependent, probably due to the differential effects of the summer drought. In a second experiment, Q. ilex seedlings were used as bait plants to investigate the mycorrhizal inoculum in EA and AU. Morphotyping and molecular typing revealed 2.5 times higher colonization in AU than in EA, with more diverse fungi. Our results demonstrate that A. unedo facilitates mycorrhization of Q. ilex by hosting compatible ectomycorrhizal symbionts and positively influences seedling survival by buffering abiotic conditions. A comprehensive understanding of facilitation should thus include investigations of the soil biological patterns.

  1. Proteins with GGDEF and EAL domains regulate Pseudomonas putida biofilm formation and dispersal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjermansen, Morten; Ragas, Paula Cornelia; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2006-01-01

    Microbial biofilm formation often causes problems in medical and industrial settings, and knowledge about the factors that are involved in biofilm development and dispersion is useful for creating strategies to control the processes. In this report, we present evidence that proteins with GGDEF...... and EAL domains are involved in the regulation of biofilm formation and biofilm dispersion in Pseudomonas putida. Overexpression in P. putida of the Escherichia coli YedQ protein, which contains a GGDEF domain, resulted in increased biofilm formation. Overexpression in P. putida of the E. coli Yhj......H protein, which contains an EAL domain, strongly inhibited biofilm formation. Induction of YhjH expression in P. putida cells situated in established biofilms led to rapid dispersion of the biofilms. These results support the emerging theme that GGDEF-domain and EAL-domain proteins are involved...

  2. Prophage spontaneous activation promotes DNA release enhancing biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Carrolo

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus is able to form biofilms in vivo and previous studies propose that pneumococcal biofilms play a relevant role both in colonization and infection. Additionally, pneumococci recovered from human infections are characterized by a high prevalence of lysogenic bacteriophages (phages residing quiescently in their host chromosome. We investigated a possible link between lysogeny and biofilm formation. Considering that extracellular DNA (eDNA is a key factor in the biofilm matrix, we reasoned that prophage spontaneous activation with the consequent bacterial host lysis could provide a source of eDNA, enhancing pneumococcal biofilm development. Monitoring biofilm growth of lysogenic and non-lysogenic pneumococcal strains indicated that phage-infected bacteria are more proficient at forming biofilms, that is their biofilms are characterized by a higher biomass and cell viability. The presence of phage particles throughout the lysogenic strains biofilm development implicated prophage spontaneous induction in this effect. Analysis of lysogens deficient for phage lysin and the bacterial major autolysin revealed that the absence of either lytic activity impaired biofilm development and the addition of DNA restored the ability of mutant strains to form robust biofilms. These findings establish that limited phage-mediated host lysis of a fraction of the bacterial population, due to spontaneous phage induction, constitutes an important source of eDNA for the S. pneumoniae biofilm matrix and that this localized release of eDNA favors biofilm formation by the remaining bacterial population.

  3. Viscoelasticity of biofilms and their recalcitrance to mechanical and chemical challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Brandon W.; He, Yan; Ren, Yijin; Zerdoum, Aidan; Libera, Matthew R.; Sharma, Prashant K.; van Winkelhoff, Arie-Jan; Neut, Danielle; Stoodley, Paul; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    We summarize different studies describing mechanisms through which bacteria in a biofilm mode of growth resist mechanical and chemical challenges. Acknowledging previous microscopic work describing voids and channels in biofilms that govern a biofilms response to such challenges, we advocate a more quantitative approach that builds on the relation between structure and composition of materials with their viscoelastic properties. Biofilms possess features of both viscoelastic solids and liquids, like skin or blood, and stress relaxation of biofilms has been found to be a corollary of their structure and composition, including the EPS matrix and bacterial interactions. Review of the literature on viscoelastic properties of biofilms in ancient and modern environments as well as of infectious biofilms reveals that the viscoelastic properties of a biofilm relate with antimicrobial penetration in a biofilm. In addition, also the removal of biofilm from surfaces appears governed by the viscoelasticity of a biofilm. Herewith, it is established that the viscoelasticity of biofilms, as a corollary of structure and composition, performs a role in their protection against mechanical and chemical challenges. Pathways are discussed to make biofilms more susceptible to antimicrobials by intervening with their viscoelasticity, as a quantifiable expression of their structure and composition. PMID:25725015

  4. The catabolite repression control protein Crc plays a role in the development of antimicrobial-tolerant subpopulations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lianbo; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Gao, Qingguo

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria form complex surface-attached biofilm communities in nature. Biofilm cells differentiate into subpopulations which display tolerance towards antimicrobial agents. However, the signal transduction pathways regulating subpopulation differentiation in biofilms are largely unelucidated. In t....... In the present study, we show that the catabolite repression control protein Crc regulates the metabolic state of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells in biofilms, and plays an important role in the development of antimicrobial-tolerant subpopulations in P. aeruginosa biofilms....

  5. Paired methods to measure biofilm killing and removal: a case study with Penicillin G treatment of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausbacher, D; Lorenz, L; Pitts, B; Stewart, P S; Goeres, D M

    2018-03-01

    Biofilms are microbial aggregates that show high tolerance to antibiotic treatments in vitro and in vivo. Killing and removal are both important in biofilm control, therefore methods that measure these two mechanisms were evaluated in a parallel experimental design. Kill was measured using the single tube method (ASTM method E2871) and removal was determined by video microscopy and image analysis using a new treatment flow cell. The advantage of the parallel test design is that both methods used biofilm covered coupons harvested from a CDC biofilm reactor, a well-established and standardized biofilm growth method. The control Staphylococcus aureus biofilms treated with growth medium increased by 0·6 logs during a 3-h contact time. Efficacy testing showed biofilms exposed to 400 μmol l -1 penicillin G decreased by only 0·3 logs. Interestingly, time-lapse confocal scanning laser microscopy revealed that penicillin G treatment dispersed the biofilm despite being an ineffective killing agent. In addition, no biofilm removal was detected when assays were performed in 96-well plates. These results illustrate that biofilm behaviour and impact of treatments can vary substantially when assayed by different methods. Measuring both killing and removal with well-characterized methods will be crucial for the discovery of new anti-biofilm strategies. Biofilms are tolerant to antimicrobial treatments and can lead to persistent infections. Finding new anti-biofilm strategies and understanding their mode-of-action is therefore of high importance. Historically, antimicrobial testing has focused on measuring the decrease in viability. While kill data are undeniably important, measuring biofilm disruption provides equally useful information. Starting with biofilm grown in the same reactor, we paired assessment of biofilm removal using a new treatment-flow-cell and real-time microscopy with kill data collected using the single tube method (ASTM E2871). Pairing these two methods

  6. Functional metagenomics of Escherichia coli O157:H7 interactions with spinach indigenous microorganisms during biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Q Carter

    Full Text Available The increase in foodborne outbreaks worldwide attributed to fresh fruit and vegetables suggests that produce may serve as an ecological niche for enteric pathogens. Here we examined the interaction of E. coli O157:H7 (EcO157 with spinach leaf indigenous microorganisms during co-colonization and establishment of a mixed biofilm on a stainless steel surface. Stainless steel surface was selected to mimic the surface of produce-processing equipment, where retention of foodborne pathogens such as EcO157 could serve as a potential source for transmission. We observed a positive effect of spinach-associated microbes on the initial attachment of EcO157, but an antagonistic effect on the EcO157 population at the later stage of biofilm formation. Metagenomic analyses of the biofilm community with the GeoChip revealed an extremely diverse community (gene richness, 23409; Shannon-Weiner index H, 9.55. Presence of EcO157 in the mixed biofilm resulted in a significant decrease in the community α-diversity (t test, P<0.05, indicating a putative competition between the pathogen and indigenous spinach microbes. The decrease in the β-diversity of the EcO157-inoculated biofilm at 48 h (ANOVA, P<0.05 suggested a convergent shift in functional composition in response to EcO157 invasion. The success of EcO157 in the mixed biofilm is likely associated with its metabolic potential in utilizing spinach nutrients: the generation time of EcO157 in spinach lysates at 28°C is ~ 38 min, which is comparable to that in rich broth. The significant decrease in the abundance of many genes involved in carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycling in the EcO157-inoculated biofilms (t test, P<0.05 further support our conclusion that competition for essential macronutrients is likely the primary interaction between the EcO157 and indigenous spinach-biofilm species.

  7. Carbon-Fiber Nitrite Microsensor for In Situ Biofilm Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    During nitrification, nitrite is produced as an intermediate when ammonia is oxidized to nitrate. It is well established that nitrifying biofilm are involved in nitrification episodes in chloraminated drinking water distribution systems with nitrite accumulation occurring during ...

  8. Hydraulic resistance of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Dreszer, C.

    2013-02-01

    Biofilms may interfere with membrane performance in at least three ways: (i) increase of the transmembrane pressure drop, (ii) increase of feed channel (feed-concentrate) pressure drop, and (iii) increase of transmembrane passage. Given the relevance of biofouling, it is surprising how few data exist about the hydraulic resistance of biofilms that may affect the transmembrane pressure drop and membrane passage. In this study, biofilms were generated in a lab scale cross flow microfiltration system at two fluxes (20 and 100Lm-2h-1) and constant cross flow (0.1ms-1). As a nutrient source, acetate was added (1.0mgL-1 acetate C) besides a control without nutrient supply. A microfiltration (MF) membrane was chosen because the MF membrane resistance is very low compared to the expected biofilm resistance and, thus, biofilm resistance can be determined accurately. Transmembrane pressure drop was monitored. As biofilm parameters, thickness, total cell number, TOC, and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were determined, it was demonstrated that no internal membrane fouling occurred and that the fouling layer actually consisted of a grown biofilm and was not a filter cake of accumulated bacterial cells. At 20Lm-2h-1 flux with a nutrient dosage of 1mgL-1 acetate C, the resistance after 4 days reached a value of 6×1012m-1. At 100Lm-2h-1 flux under the same conditions, the resistance was 5×1013m-1. No correlation of biofilm resistance to biofilm thickness was found; Biofilms with similar thickness could have different resistance depending on the applied flux. The cell number in biofilms was between 4×107 and 5×108 cellscm-2. At this number, bacterial cells make up less than a half percent of the overall biofilm volume and therefore did not hamper the water flow through the biofilm significantly. A flux of 100Lm-2h-1 with nutrient supply caused higher cell numbers, more biomass, and higher biofilm resistance than a flux of 20Lm-2h-1. However, the biofilm thickness

  9. Diffuse urban pollution increases metal tolerance of natural heterotrophic biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fechner, Lise C.; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine; Bourgeault, Adeline; Tusseau-Vuillemin, Marie-Hélène

    2012-01-01

    This study is a first attempt to investigate the impact of urban contamination on metal tolerance of heterotrophic river biofilms using a short-term test based on β-glucosidase activity. Tolerance levels to Cu, Cd, Zn, Ni and Pb were evaluated for biofilms collected at three sites along an urban gradient in the Seine river (France). Metallic pollution increased along the river, but concentrations remained low compared to environmental quality standards. Biofilm metal tolerance increased downstream from the urban area. Multivariate analysis confirmed the correlation between tolerance and contamination and between multi-metallic and physico-chemical gradients. Therefore, tolerance levels have to be interpreted in relation to the whole chemical and physical characteristics and not solely metal exposure. We conclude that community tolerance is a sensitive biological response to urban pressure and that mixtures of contaminants at levels lower than quality standards might have a significant impact on periphytic communities. - Highlights: ► A new short-term test based on β-glucosidase activity to assess biofilm metal tolerance. ► Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn tolerance of natural biofilms collected along an urban gradient. ► Metal tolerance levels increase upstream to downstream the river. ► Community tolerance increases at environmental quality standard exposure concentrations. ► Biofilm tolerance is a sensitive biological response to diffuse urban pollution. - Metal concentrations below environmental quality standards increase tolerance levels of natural, hetetrophic biofilms downstream from an urban area.

  10. Bacillus cereus growth and biofilm formation: the impact of substratum, iron sources, and transcriptional regulator Sigma 54

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayrapetyan, Hasmik

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated communities of microbial cells embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymers. It is generally accepted that the biofilm growth mode represents the most common lifestyle of microorganisms. Next to beneficial biofilms used in biotechnology applications, undesired

  11. Meningococcal biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappann, M.; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Claus, H.

    2006-01-01

    We show that in a standardized in vitro flow system unencapsulated variants of genetically diverse lineages of Neisseria meningitidis formed biofilms, that could be maintained for more than 96 h. Biofilm cells were resistant to penicillin, but not to rifampin or ciprofloxacin. For some strains......, microcolony formation within biofilms was observed. Microcolony formation in strain MC58 depended on a functional copy of the pilE gene encoding the pilus subunit pilin, and was associated with twitching of cells. Nevertheless, unpiliated pilE mutants formed biofilms showing that attachment and accumulation......X alleles was identified among genetically diverse meningococcal strains. PilX alleles differed in their propensity to support autoaggregation of cells in suspension, but not in their ability to support microcolony formation within biofilms in the continuous flow system....

  12. Biofilms in churches built in grottoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cennamo, Paola; Montuori, Naomi; Trojsi, Giorgio; Fatigati, Giancarlo; Moretti, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated microorganisms dwelling on rocks, walls and paintings in two votive chapels built in grottoes in the Region of Campania, Italy. One grotto was near the coast in an area with a Mediterranean climate, and the other grotto was inland on a mountain in an area with a cold continental climate. Color and distribution of biofilms in various areas of the grottoes were examined. Microbial components of biofilms were identified by light and electron microscopy and by molecular techniques (DNA analyses and Automatic rRNA Intergenic Spacer Analysis). Biofilms were also analyzed by X-ray diffraction to detect inorganic constituents deriving from rocks in the grottoes and walls of the churches and by X-ray fluorescence to detect the elements that made up the pigments of the mural paintings; optical cross sections were used to observe their relationships with substrata. Species of eubacteria, cyanobacteria and green algae were identified. Some of these species occurred in both grottoes, while others were exclusive to only one of the grottoes. The diversity of species, their common or exclusive occurrence in the grottoes, the relationships among microbial communities and the differences in color and distribution of biofilms were discussed on the basis of the different climatic factors affecting the two grottoes and the different inorganic components of substrata. - Highlights: • Biofilms concur to the degradation of cultural heritage. • Microorganisms cause esthetic and structural damage in votive churches. • Biofilm features vary on different substrata, as limestone, plaster and paintings. • Features of biofilms mainly depend on environmental conditions. • Molecular biology techniques are indispensable in the study of biodegradation.

  13. Biofilms in churches built in grottoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cennamo, Paola, E-mail: paola.cennamo@unisob.na.it [Facoltà di Lettere, Università degli Studi Suor Orsola Benincasa di Napoli, Via Santa Caterina da Siena 37, 80135 Naples (Italy); Montuori, Naomi [Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Via Foria 223, 80139 Naples (Italy); Trojsi, Giorgio; Fatigati, Giancarlo [Facoltà di Lettere, Università degli Studi Suor Orsola Benincasa di Napoli, Via Santa Caterina da Siena 37, 80135 Naples (Italy); Moretti, Aldo [Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Via Foria 223, 80139 Naples (Italy)

    2016-02-01

    We investigated microorganisms dwelling on rocks, walls and paintings in two votive chapels built in grottoes in the Region of Campania, Italy. One grotto was near the coast in an area with a Mediterranean climate, and the other grotto was inland on a mountain in an area with a cold continental climate. Color and distribution of biofilms in various areas of the grottoes were examined. Microbial components of biofilms were identified by light and electron microscopy and by molecular techniques (DNA analyses and Automatic rRNA Intergenic Spacer Analysis). Biofilms were also analyzed by X-ray diffraction to detect inorganic constituents deriving from rocks in the grottoes and walls of the churches and by X-ray fluorescence to detect the elements that made up the pigments of the mural paintings; optical cross sections were used to observe their relationships with substrata. Species of eubacteria, cyanobacteria and green algae were identified. Some of these species occurred in both grottoes, while others were exclusive to only one of the grottoes. The diversity of species, their common or exclusive occurrence in the grottoes, the relationships among microbial communities and the differences in color and distribution of biofilms were discussed on the basis of the different climatic factors affecting the two grottoes and the different inorganic components of substrata. - Highlights: • Biofilms concur to the degradation of cultural heritage. • Microorganisms cause esthetic and structural damage in votive churches. • Biofilm features vary on different substrata, as limestone, plaster and paintings. • Features of biofilms mainly depend on environmental conditions. • Molecular biology techniques are indispensable in the study of biodegradation.

  14. Involvement of NADH Oxidase in Biofilm Formation in Streptococcus sanguinis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuchun Ge

    Full Text Available Biofilms play important roles in microbial communities and are related to infectious diseases. Here, we report direct evidence that a bacterial nox gene encoding NADH oxidase is involved in biofilm formation. A dramatic reduction in biofilm formation was observed in a Streptococcus sanguinis nox mutant under anaerobic conditions without any decrease in growth. The membrane fluidity of the mutant bacterial cells was found to be decreased and the fatty acid composition altered, with increased palmitic acid and decreased stearic acid and vaccenic acid. Extracellular DNA of the mutant was reduced in abundance and bacterial competence was suppressed. Gene expression analysis in the mutant identified two genes with altered expression, gtfP and Idh, which were found to be related to biofilm formation through examination of their deletion mutants. NADH oxidase-related metabolic pathways were analyzed, further clarifying the function of this enzyme in biofilm formation.

  15. Interspecific bacterial interactions are reflected in multispecies biofilm spatial organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzheng Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Interspecies interactions are essential for the persistence and development of any kind of complex community, and microbial biofilms are no exception. Multispecies biofilms are structured and spatially defined communities that have received much attention due to their omnipresence in natural environments. Species residing in these complex bacterial communities usually interact both intra- and interspecifically. Such interactions are considered to not only be fundamental in shaping overall biomass and the spatial distribution of cells residing in multispecies biofilms, but also to result in coordinated regulation of gene expression in the different species present. These communal interactions often lead to emergent properties in biofilms, such as enhanced tolerance against antibiotics, host immune responses and other stresses, which have been shown to provide benefits to all biofilm members not only the enabling sub-populations. However, the specific molecular mechanisms of cellular processes affecting spatial organization, and vice versa, are poorly understood and very complex to unravel. Therefore, detailed description of the spatial organization of individual bacterial cells in multispecies communities can be an alternative strategy to reveal the nature of interspecies interactions of constituent species. Closing the gap between visual observation and biological processes may become crucial for resolving biofilm related problems, which is of utmost importance to environmental, industrial, and clinical implications. This review briefly presents the state of the art of studying interspecies interactions and spatial organization of multispecies communities, aiming to support theoretical and practical arguments for further advancement of this field.

  16. Global gene expression in Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Kjærgaard, K.; Klemm, Per

    2003-01-01

    It is now apparent that microorganisms undergo significant changes during the transition from planktonic to biofilm growth. These changes result in phenotypic adaptations that allow the formation of highly organized and structured sessile communities, which possess enhanced resistance to antimicr......It is now apparent that microorganisms undergo significant changes during the transition from planktonic to biofilm growth. These changes result in phenotypic adaptations that allow the formation of highly organized and structured sessile communities, which possess enhanced resistance...... the transition to biofilm growth, and these included genes expressed under oxygen-limiting conditions, genes encoding (putative) transport proteins, putative oxidoreductases and genes associated with enhanced heavy metal resistance. Of particular interest was the observation that many of the genes altered...... in expression have no current defined function. These genes, as well as those induced by stresses relevant to biofilm growth such as oxygen and nutrient limitation, may be important factors that trigger enhanced resistance mechanisms of sessile communities to antibiotics and hydrodynamic shear forces....

  17. Diagnosis and understanding of chronic biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Trine Rolighed

    2016-01-01

    Title: Diagnosis and understanding of chronic biofilm infections. Name: Trine Rolighed Thomsen Aalborg University and Danish Technological Institute, Denmark Recent evidence suggests that the microbial community, its spatial distribution and activity play an important role in the prolongation......, anaerobic or unculturable bacteria living in biofilms. Thus, diagnosis of chronic infections is challenged by lack of appropriate sampling strategies and by limitations in microbiological testing methods. The purpose of this study was to improve sampling and diagnosis of chronic infections, especially...... considering the biofilm issue. Systematic and optimized sampling of various specimen types was performed. Extended culture, optimized DNA extraction, quantitative PCR, cloning, next generation sequencing and PNA FISH were applied on different types of specimens for optimized diagnosis. For further...

  18. Biofilm composition in the Olt River (Romania) reservoirs impacted by a chlor-alkali production plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranguet, P; Cosio, C; Le Faucheur, S; Hug Peter, D; Loizeau, J-L; Ungureanu, V-Gh; Slaveykova, V I

    2017-05-24

    Freshwater biofilms can be useful indicators of water quality and offer the possibility to assess contaminant effects at the community level. The present field study examines the effects of chlor-alkali plant effluents on the community composition of biofilms grown in the Olt River (Romania) reservoirs. The relationship between ambient water quality variables and community composition alterations was explored. Amplicon sequencing revealed a significant modification of the composition of microalgal, bacterial and fungal communities in the biofilms collected in the impacted reservoirs in comparison with those living in the uncontaminated control reservoir. The abundance corrected Simpson index showed lower richness and diversity in biofilms collected in the impacted reservoirs than in the control reservoir. The biofilm bacterial communities of the impacted reservoirs were characterized by the contaminant-tolerant Cyanobacteria and Bacteroidetes, whereas microalgal communities were predominantly composed of Bacillariophyta and fungal communities of Lecanoromycetes and Paraglomycetes. A principal component analysis revealed that major contaminants present in the waste water of the chlor-alkali production plant, i.e. Na + , Ca 2+ , Cl - and Hg, were correlated with the alteration of biofilm community composition in the impacted reservoirs. However, the biofilm composition was also influenced by water quality variables such as NO 3 - , SO 4 2- , DOC and Zn from unknown sources. The results of the present study imply that, even when below the environmental quality standards, typical contaminants of chlor-alkali plant releases may affect biofilm composition and that their impacts on the microbial biodiversity might be currently overlooked.

  19. Biofilm-mediated Antibiotic-resistant Oral Bacterial Infections: Mechanism and Combat Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanwar, Indulata; Sah, Abhishek K; Suresh, Preeti K

    2017-01-01

    Oral diseases like dental caries and periodontal disease are directly associated with the capability of bacteria to form biofilm. Periodontal diseases have been associated to anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria forming a subgingival plaque (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Actinobacillus, Prevotella and Fusobacterium). Biofilm is a complex bacterial community that is highly resistant to antibiotics and human immunity. Biofilm communities are the causative agents of biological developments such as dental caries, periodontitis, peri-implantitis and causing periodontal tissue breakdown. The review recapitulates the latest advancements in treatment of clinical biofilm infections and scientific investigations, while these novel anti-biofilm strategies are still in nascent phases of development, efforts dedicated to these technologies could ultimately lead to anti-biofilm therapies that are superior to the current antibiotic treatment. This paper provides a review of the literature focusing on the studies on biofilm in the oral cavity, formation of dental plaque biofilm, drug resistance of bacterial biofilm and the antibiofilm approaches as biofilm preventive agents in dentistry, and their mechanism of biofilm inhibition. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Bacillus subtilis biofilm induction by plant polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauregard, Pascale B; Chai, Yunrong; Vlamakis, Hera; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2013-04-23

    Bacillus subtilis is a plant-beneficial Gram-positive bacterium widely used as a biofertilizer. However, relatively little is known regarding the molecular processes underlying this bacterium's ability to colonize roots. In contrast, much is known about how this bacterium forms matrix-enclosed multicellular communities (biofilms) in vitro. Here, we show that, when B. subtilis colonizes Arabidopsis thaliana roots it forms biofilms that depend on the same matrix genes required in vitro. B. subtilis biofilm formation was triggered by certain plant polysaccharides. These polysaccharides served as a signal for biofilm formation transduced via the kinases controlling the phosphorylation state of the master regulator Spo0A. In addition, plant polysaccharides are used as a source of sugars for the synthesis of the matrix exopolysaccharide. The bacterium's response to plant polysaccharides was observed across several different strains of the species, some of which are known to have beneficial effects on plants. These observations provide evidence that biofilm genes are crucial for Arabidopsis root colonization by B. subtilis and provide insights into how matrix synthesis may be triggered by this plant.

  1. The biofilm matrix destabilizers, EDTA and DNaseI, enhance the susceptibility of nontypeable Hemophilus influenzae biofilms to treatment with ampicillin and ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaliere, Rosalia; Ball, Jessica L; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B

    2014-08-01

    Nontypeable Hemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that causes chronic biofilm infections of the ears and airways. The biofilm matrix provides structural integrity to the biofilm and protects biofilm cells from antibiotic exposure by reducing penetration of antimicrobial compounds into the biofilm. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has been found to be a major matrix component of biofilms formed by many species of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including NTHi. Interestingly, the cation chelator ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (EDTA) has been shown to reduce the matrix strength of biofilms of several bacterial species as well as to have bactericidal activity against various pathogens. EDTA exerts its antimicrobial activity by chelating divalent cations necessary for growth and membrane stability and by destabilizing the matrix thus enhancing the detachment of bacterial cells from the biofilm. In this study, we have explored the role of divalent cations in NTHi biofilm development and stability. We have utilized in vitro static and continuous flow models of biofilm development by NTHi to demonstrate that magnesium cations enhance biofilm formation by NTHi. We found that the divalent cation chelator EDTA is effective at both preventing NTHi biofilm formation and at treating established NTHi biofilms. Furthermore, we found that the matrix destablilizers EDTA and DNaseI increase the susceptibility of NTHi biofilms to ampicillin and ciprofloxacin. Our observations indicate that DNaseI and EDTA enhance the efficacy of antibiotic treatment of NTHi biofilms. These observations may lead to new strategies that will improve the treatment options available to patients with chronic NTHi infections. © 2014 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Synergistic Interactions within a Multispecies Biofilm Enhance Individual Species Protection against Grazing by a Pelagic Protozoan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prem K. Raghupathi

    2018-01-01

    enhance overall community fitness under stressful conditions such as grazing. These emerging inter- and intra-species interactions could play a vital role in biofilm dynamics in natural environments like soil or aquatic systems.

  3. Cohorts and community: a case study of community engagement in the establishment of a health and demographic surveillance site in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allotey, Pascale; Reidpath, Daniel D.; Devarajan, Nirmala; Rajagobal, Kanason; Yasin, Shajahan; Arunachalam, Dharmalingam; Imelda, Johanna Debora; Soyiri, Ireneous; Davey, Tamzyn; Jahan, Nowrozy

    2014-01-01

    Background Community engagement is an increasingly important requirement of public health research and plays an important role in the informed consent and recruitment process. However, there is very little guidance about how it should be done, the indicators for assessing effectiveness of the community engagement process and the impact it has on recruitment, retention, and ultimately on the quality of the data collected as part of longitudinal cohort studies. Methods An instrumental case study approach, with data from field notes, policy documents, unstructured interviews, and focus group discussions with key community stakeholders and informants, was used to explore systematically the implementation and outcomes of the community engagement strategy for recruitment of an entire community into a demographic and health surveillance site in Malaysia. Results For a dynamic cohort, community engagement needs to be an ongoing process. The community engagement process has likely helped to facilitate the current response rate of 85% in the research communities. The case study highlights the importance of systematic documentation of the community engagement process to ensure an understanding of the effects of the research on recruitment and the community. Conclusions A critical lesson from the case study data is the importance of relationships in the recruitment process for large population-based studies, and the need for ongoing documentation and analysis of the impact of cumulative interactions between research and community engagement. PMID:24804983

  4. Extracellular DNA Shields against Aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Nilsson, Martin; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2013-01-01

    Within recent years, it has been established that extracellular DNA is a key constituent of the matrix of microbial biofilms. In addition, it has recently been demonstrated that DNA binds positively charged antimicrobials such as aminoglycosides and antimicrobial peptides. In the present study, we...... provide evidence that extracellular DNA shields against aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We show that exogenously supplemented DNA integrates into P. aeruginosa biofilms and increases their tolerance toward aminoglycosides. We provide evidence that biofilms formed by a DNA release......-deficient P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing mutant are more susceptible to aminoglycoside treatment than wild-type biofilms but become rescued from the detrimental action of aminoglycosides upon supplementation with exogenous DNA. Furthermore, we demonstrate that exposure to lysed polymorphonuclear leukocytes...

  5. Removal of Foodborne Pathogen Biofilms by Acidic Electrolyzed Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Han

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms, which are complex microbial communities embedded in the protective extracellular polymeric substances (EPS, are difficult to remove in food production facilities. In this study, the use of acidic electrolyzed water (AEW to remove foodborne pathogen biofilms was evaluated. We used a green fluorescent protein-tagged Escherichia coli for monitoring the efficiency of AEW for removing biofilms, where under the optimal treatment conditions, the fluorescent signal of cells in the biofilm disappeared rapidly and the population of biofilm cells was reduced by more than 67%. Additionally, AEW triggered EPS disruption, as indicated by the deformation of the carbohydrate C-O-C bond and deformation of the aromatic rings in the amino acids tyrosine and phenylalanine. These deformations were identified by EPS chemical analysis and Raman spectroscopic analysis. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM images confirmed that the breakup and detachment of biofilm were enhanced after AEW treatment. Further, AEW also eradicated biofilms formed by both Gram-negative bacteria (Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Gram-positive bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes and was observed to inactivate the detached cells which are a potential source of secondary pollution. This study demonstrates that AEW could be a reliable foodborne pathogen biofilm disrupter and an eco-friendly alternative to sanitizers traditionally used in the food industry.

  6. Biofilm-forming activity of bacteria isolated from toilet bowl biofilms and the bactericidal activity of disinfectants against the isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Miho; Gomi, Mitsuhiro; Matsumune, Norihiko; Niizeki, Kazuma; Sakagami, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the sanitary conditions of toilets, the bacterial counts of the toilet bowl biofilms in 5 Kansai area and 11 Kansai and Kanto area homes in Japan were measured in winter and summer seasons, respectively. Isolates (128 strains) were identified by analyzing 16S ribosomal RNA sequences. The number of colonies and bacterial species from biofilms sampled in winter tended to be higher and lower, respectively, than those in summer. Moreover, the composition of bacterial communities in summer and winter samples differed considerably. In summer samples, biofilms in Kansai and Kanto areas were dominated by Blastomonas sp. and Mycobacterium sp., respectively. Methylobacterium sp. was detected in all toilet bowl biofilms except for one sample. Methylobacterium sp. constituted the major presence in biofilms along with Brevundimonas sp., Sphingomonas sp., and/or Pseudomonas sp. The composition ratio of the sum of their genera was 88.0 from 42.9% of the total bacterial flora. The biofilm formation abilities of 128 isolates were investigated, and results suggested that Methylobacterium sp. and Sphingomonas sp. were involved in biofilm formation in toilet bowls. The biofilm formation of a mixed bacteria system that included bacteria with the highest biofilm-forming ability in a winter sample was greater than mixture without such bacteria. This result suggests that isolates possessing a high biofilm-forming activity are involved in the biofilm formation in the actual toilet bowl. A bactericidal test against 25 strains indicated that the bactericidal activities of didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) tended to be higher than those of polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) and N-benzyl-N,N-dimethyldodecylammonium chloride (ADBAC). In particular, DDAC showed high bactericidal activity against approximately 90% of tested strains under the 5 h treatment.

  7. Lessons learned from community-based participatory research: establishing a partnership to support lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender ageing in place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Leslie A; King, Diane K; Retrum, Jessica H; Helander, Kenneth; Wilkins, Shari; Boggs, Jennifer M; Portz, Jennifer Dickman; Nearing, Kathryn; Gozansky, Wendolyn S

    2017-06-01

    Due to a history of oppression and lack of culturally competent services, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) seniors experience barriers to accessing social services. Tailoring an evidence-based ageing in place intervention to address the unique needs of LGBT seniors may decrease the isolation often faced by this population. To describe practices used in the formation of a community-based participatory research (CBPR), partnership involving social workers, health services providers, researchers and community members who engaged to establish a LGBT ageing in place model called Seniors Using Supports To Age In Neighborhoods (SUSTAIN). A case study approach was employed to describe the partnership development process by reflecting on past meeting minutes, progress reports and interviews with SUSTAIN's partners. Key partnering practices utilized by SUSTAIN included (i) development of a shared commitment and vision; (ii) identifying partners with intersecting spheres of influence in multiple communities of identity (ageing services, LGBT, health research); (iii) attending to power dynamics (e.g. equitable sharing of funds); and (iv) building community capacity through reciprocal learning. Although the partnership dissolved after 4 years, it served as a successful catalyst to establish community programming to support ageing in place for LGBT seniors. Multi-sector stakeholder involvement with capacity to connect communities and use frameworks that formalize equity was key to establishing a high-trust CBPR partnership. However, lack of focus on external forces impacting each partner (e.g. individual organizational strategic planning, community funding agency perspectives) ultimately led to dissolution of the SUSTAIN partnership even though implementation of community programming was realized. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Treatment of Oral Biofilms by a D-Enantiomeric Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian; Wang, Zhejun; Hancock, Robert E W; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Haapasalo, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Almost all dental diseases are caused by biofilms that consist of multispecies communities. DJK-5, which is a short D-enantiomeric, protease-resistant peptide with broad-spectrum anti-biofilm activity, was tested for its effect on oral multispecies biofilms. Peptide DJK-5 at 10 μg/mL effectively prevented the growth of these microbes in culture media in a time-dependent manner. In addition to the prevention of growth, peptide DJK-5 completely killed both Streptococcus mutans and Enterococcus faecalis suspended from biofilms after 30 minutes of incubation in liquid culture media. DJK-5 also led to the effective killing of microbes in plaque biofilm. The proportion of bacterial cells killed by 10 μg/mL of DJK-5 was similar after 1 and 3 days, both exceeding 85%. DJK-5 was able to significantly prevent biofilm formation over 3 days (P = 0.000). After 72 hours of exposure, DJK-5 significantly reduced and almost completely prevented plaque biofilm production by more than 90% of biovolume compared to untreated controls (P = 0.000). The proportion of dead biofilm bacteria at the 10 μg/mL DJK-5 concentration was similar for 1- and 3-day-old biofilms, whereby >86% of the bacteria were killed. DJK-5 was also able to kill >79% and >85% of bacteria, respectively, after one-time and three brief treatments of 3-day-old biofilms. The combination of DJK-5 and chlorhexidine showed the best bacterial killing among all treatments, with ~83% and >88% of bacterial cells killed after 1 and 3 minutes, respectively. No significant difference was found in the percentage of biofilm killing amongst three donor plaque samples after DJK-5 treatment. In particular, DJK-5 showed strong performance in inhibiting biofilm development and eradicating pre-formed oral biofilms compared to L-enantiomeric peptide 1018. DJK-5 was very effective against oral biofilms when used alone or combined with chlorhexidine, and may be a promising agent for use in oral anti-biofilm strategies in the future.

  9. Disinfection efficiencies of sage and spearmint essential oils against planktonic and biofilm Staphylococcus aureus cells in comparison with sodium hypochlorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetas, Dimitrios; Dimitropoulou, Eleni; Mitropoulou, Gregoria; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Giaouris, Efstathios

    2017-09-18

    Staphylococcus aureus causes human infections and foodborne intoxications. This study explored the potential antibacterial actions of sage and spearmint essential oils (EOs) against both its planktonic and biofilm cells, in comparison with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), a commonly applied chemical sanitizer. Initially, the minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations (MICs, MBCs) of each plant mixture were determined against planktonic cultures, following growth at 30°C for 24h. Stationary phase planktonic bacteria were then individually exposed for 6min to either each EO (applied at 1-2×MBC; 2.5-5%), or NaOCl (250-450ppm). These were also left to form biofilms on 96-well polystyrene microplates, at 30°C for 96h, with medium renewal at 48h, in the presence of 10 different concentrations of each EO, expanding from sub- to super-inhibitory for planktonic growth, and the minimum biofilm inhibitory concentrations (MBICs; >90% inhibition) of each plant mixture were calculated. Formed biofilms were finally exposed for 6min to either each EO (applied at 2-6×MBC; 5-15%), or NaOCl (7500-25,000ppm; applied either alone or in combination with each EO at 5%). Results showed that both EOs presented MIC and MBC equal to 1.25 and 2.5%, respectively. As expected, their application at their MIC and above significantly inhibited biofilm formation, while spearmint EO was still able to cause this at ½ of its MIC, with MBICs equal to 1.25 and 0.63% for sage and spearmint EOs, respectively. Alarmingly, the application of both EOs at 1/8 to 1/16 of their MIC further increased biofilm formation. Regarding biofilm disinfection experiments, the individual application of each EO against the pre-established sessile communities resulted in log decrease ranges of 0.8-3logCFU/cm 2 , while in the case of NaOCl application (either alone or combined with each EO), the observed reductions never exceeded 1.7logCFU/cm 2 . These last results highlight the great antimicrobial recalcitrance of

  10. Impact of Chloramination on the Development of Laboratory-Grown Biofilms Fed with Filter-Pretreated Groundwater

    KAUST Repository

    Ling, Fangqiong

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the continuous impact of monochloramine disinfection on laboratory-grown biofilms through the characterization of biofilm architecture and microbial community structure. Biofilm development and disinfection were achieved using CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) biofilm reactor systems with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) coupons as the substratum and sand filter-pretreated groundwater as the source of microbial seeding and growth nutrient. After 2 weeks of growth, the biofilms were subjected to chloramination for 8 more weeks at concentrations of 7.5±1.4 to 9.1±0.4 mg Cl2 L-1. Control reactors received no disinfection during the development of biofilms. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and image analysis indicated that chloramination could lead to 81.4-83.5% and 86.3-95.6% reduction in biofilm biomass and thickness, respectively, but could not eliminate biofilm growth. 16S rRNA gene terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis indicated that microbial community structures between chloraminated and non-chloraminated biofilms exhibited different successional trends. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis further revealed that chloramination could select members of Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria as the dominant populations, whereas natural development leads to the selection of members of Nitrospira and Bacteroidetes as dominant biofilm populations. Overall, chloramination treatment could alter the growth of multi-species biofilms on the PVC surface, shape the biofilm architecture, and select a certain microbial community that can survive or proliferate under chloramination.

  11. "Rekindle and Recapture the Love": Establishing System-Wide Indicators of Progress in Community Engagement and Economic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Emily M.

    2014-01-01

    In May 2012, University of North Carolina (UNC) President Tom Ross simultaneously commissioned two task forces to develop indicators that all UNC campuses could use to measure "progress in community engagement and economic development." The charge to the Community Engagement Task Force and the Economic Development Task Force was to…

  12. Predictive Validity of Established Cut Points for Risk and Protective Factor Scales from the Communities That Care Youth Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briney, John S.; Brown, Eric C.; Hawkins, J. David; Arthur, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Community coalitions are a popular strategy to coordinate activities and resources to prevent adolescent substance use and delinquent behavior. Despite early evidence of their lack of effectiveness, a new generation of community coalitions has shown positive results in preventing youth substance use and delinquency. This success can be attributed…

  13. Molecular mechanisms involved in Bacillus subtilis biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielich-Süss, Benjamin; Lopez, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary Biofilms are the predominant lifestyle of bacteria in natural environments, and they severely impact our societies in many different fashions. Therefore, biofilm formation is a topic of growing interest in microbiology, and different bacterial models are currently studied to better understand the molecular strategies that bacteria undergo to build biofilms. Among those, biofilms of the soil-dwelling bacterium Bacillus subtilis are commonly used for this purpose. Bacillus subtilis biofilms show remarkable architectural features that are a consequence of sophisticated programs of cellular specialization and cell-cell communication within the community. Many laboratories are trying to unravel the biological role of the morphological features of biofilms, as well as exploring the molecular basis underlying cellular differentiation. In this review, we present a general perspective of the current state of knowledge of biofilm formation in B. subtilis. In particular, a special emphasis is placed on summarizing the most recent discoveries in the field and integrating them into the general view of these truly sophisticated microbial communities. PMID:24909922

  14. The Effect of Novel Heterocyclic Compounds on Cryptococcal Biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korem, Maya; Kagan, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Biofilm formation by microorganisms depends on their communication by quorum sensing, which is mediated by small diffusible signaling molecules that accumulate in the extracellular environment. During human infection, the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans can form biofilm on medical devices, which protects the organism and increases its resistance to antifungal agents. The aim of this study was to test two novel heterocyclic compounds, S-8 (thiazolidinedione derivative, TZD) and NA-8 (succinimide derivative, SI), for their anti-biofilm activity against strains of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii. Biofilms were formed in a defined medium in 96-well polystyrene plates and 8-well micro-slides. The effect of sub-inhibitory concentrations of S-8 and NA-8 on biofilm formation was measured after 48 h by a metabolic reduction assay and by confocal laser microscopy analysis using fluorescent staining. The formation and development of cryptococcal biofilms was inhibited significantly by these compounds in concentrations below the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values. These compounds may have a potential role in preventing fungal biofilm development on indwelling medical devices or even as a therapeutic measure after the establishment of biofilm. PMID:29371559

  15. Contamination potential of drinking water distribution network biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingender, J; Flemming, H C

    2004-01-01

    Drinking water distribution system biofilms were investigated for the presence of hygienically relevant microorganisms. Early biofilm formation was evaluated in biofilm reactors on stainless steel, copper, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polyethylene coupons exposed to unchlorinated drinking water. After 12 to 18 months, a plateau phase of biofilm development was reached. Surface colonization on the materials ranged between 4 x 10(6) and 3 x 10(7) cells/cm2, with heterotrophic plate count (HPC) bacteria between 9 x 10(3) and 7 x 10(5) colony-forming units (cfu)/cm2. Established biofilms were investigated in 18 pipe sections (2 to 99 years old) cut out from distribution pipelines. Materials included cast iron, galvanized steel, cement and PVC. Colonization ranged from 4 x 10(5) to 2 x 10(8) cells/cm2, HPC levels varied between 1 and 2 x 10(5) cfu/cm2. No correlation was found between extent of colonization and age of the pipes. Using cultural detection methods, coliform bacteria were rarely found, while Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Legionella spp. were not detected in the biofilms. In regular operation, distribution system biofilms do not seem to be common habitats for pathogens. However, nutrient-leaching materials like rubber-coated valves were observed with massive biofilms which harboured coliform bacteria contaminating drinking water.

  16. The Effect of Predators on Cholera Biofilms: If it Lyses, We Can Smash It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalziqi, Arben; Bernardy, Eryn; Thomas, Jacob; Ratcliff, Will; Hammer, Brian; Yunker, Peter

    Many microbes form biofilms--dense clumps of cells and proteins--on surfaces. Biofilms are complex communities that facilitate the study of biological competition (e.g., two types of microbes may compete to form a biofilm in the same location) and interesting physics (e.g., the source of a biofilm's rigidity). Vibrio cholerae can produce biofilms which have a network-like structure--however, cholera can be genetically engineered to kill other cholera with different genotypes, which leaves behind a structureless ``slime'' rather than such a biofilm. Through mechanical creep testing of both predator-prey and non-predator populations, we found that the predator-prey population responds viscously and decreases in height with repeated compression, whereas the non-predator population responds elastically and maintains its original height. The current work suggests that cell lysis after killing disrupts biofilm formation, preventing microbial colonies from forming rigid networks.

  17. Extracellular DNA facilitates the formation of functional amyloids in Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Kelly; Ganesan, Mahesh; Payne, David E; Solomon, Michael J; Boles, Blaise R

    2016-01-01

    Persistent staphylococcal infections often involve surface-associated communities called biofilms. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm development is mediated by the co-ordinated production of the biofilm matrix, which can be composed of polysaccharides, extracellular DNA (eDNA) and proteins including amyloid fibers. The nature of the interactions between matrix components, and how these interactions contribute to the formation of matrix, remain unclear. Here we show that the presence of eDNA in S. aureus biofilms promotes the formation of amyloid fibers. Conditions or mutants that do not generate eDNA result in lack of amyloids during biofilm growth despite the amyloidogeneic subunits, phenol soluble modulin peptides, being produced. In vitro studies revealed that the presence of DNA promotes amyloid formation by PSM peptides. Thus, this work exposes a previously unacknowledged interaction between biofilm matrix components that furthers our understanding of functional amyloid formation and S. aureus biofilm biology. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Identification of Streptococcus sanguinis Genes Required for Biofilm Formation and Examination of Their Role in Endocarditis Virulence▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Xiuchun; Kitten, Todd; Chen, Zhenming; Lee, Sehmi P.; Munro, Cindy L.; Xu, Ping

    2008-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is one of the pioneers in the bacterial colonization of teeth and is one of the most abundant species in the oral biofilm called dental plaque. S. sanguinis is also the most common viridans group streptococcal species implicated in infective endocarditis. To investigate the association of biofilm and endocarditis, we established a biofilm assay and examined biofilm formation with a signature-tagged mutagenesis library of S. sanguinis. Four genes that have not previousl...

  19. Correlative Imaging of Structural and Elemental Composition of Bacterial Biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y; Heine, R; Xu, F; Helfen, L; Baumbach, T; Suhonen, H; Rosenhahn, A; Gorniak, T; Kirchen, S; Schwartz, T

    2013-01-01

    Synchrotron-based phase contrast tomography (holotomography) and scanning hard X-ray fluorescence microscopy (SXFM) are combined to characterize the three-dimensional (3D) structural and corresponding elemental distribution of bacterial biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Samples were fixed without contrast agents or microtomal sectioning. Within an intact microbial community single bacteria are clearly resolved, and their morphology can be directly visualized together with the elemental content. Such 3D set of complementary information at cellular level is essential for gaining a deeper understanding of biofilm evolution aiming to develop potential strategies on biofilm growth control and prevention

  20. Establishing a professional profile of community health workers: results from a national study of roles, activities and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Maia; Reinschmidt, Kerstin M; Schachter, Ken A; Davidson, Chris L; Sabo, Samantha J; De Zapien, Jill Guernsey; Carvajal, Scott C

    2012-04-01

    Community Health Workers (CHWs) have gained national recognition for their role in addressing health disparities and are increasingly integrated into the health care delivery system. There is a lack of consensus, however, regarding empirical evidence on the impact of CHW interventions on health outcomes. In this paper, we present results from the 2010 National Community Health Worker Advocacy Survey (NCHWAS) in an effort to strengthen a generalized understanding of the CHW profession that can be integrated into ongoing efforts to improve the health care delivery system. Results indicate that regardless of geographical location, work setting, and demographic characteristics, CHWs generally share similar professional characteristics, training preparation, and job activities. CHWs are likely to be female, representative of the community they serve, and to work in community health centers, clinics, community-based organizations, and health departments. The most common type of training is on-the-job and conference training. Most CHWs work with clients, groups, other CHWs and less frequently community leaders to address health issues, the most common of which are chronic disease, prevention and health care access. Descriptions of CHW activities documented in the survey demonstrate that CHWs apply core competencies in a synergistic manner in an effort to assure that their clients get the services they need. NCHWAS findings suggest that over the past 50 years, the CHW field has become standardized in response to the unmet needs of their communities. In research and practice, the field would benefit from being considered a health profession rather than an intervention.

  1. Establishing a Baseline: Community Benefit Spending by Not-for-Profit Hospitals Prior to Implementation of the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leider, Jonathon P; Tung, Greg J; Lindrooth, Richard C; Johnson, Emily K; Hardy, Rose; Castrucci, Brian C

    Community Benefit spending by not-for-profit hospitals has served as a critical, formalized part of the nation's safety net for almost 50 years. This has occurred mostly through charity care. This article examines how not-for-profit hospitals spent Community Benefit dollars prior to full implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Using data from 2009 to 2012 hospital tax and other governmental filings, we constructed national, hospital-referral-region, and facility-level estimates of Community Benefit spending. Data were collected in 2015 and analyzed in 2015 and 2016. Data were matched at the facility level for a non-profit hospital's IRS tax filings (Form 990, Schedule H) and CMS Hospital Cost Report Information System and Provider of Service data sets. During 2009, hospitals spent about 8% of total operating expenses on Community Benefit. This increased to between 8.3% and 8.5% in 2012. The majority of spending (>80%) went toward charity care, unreimbursed Medicaid, and subsidized health services, with approximately 6% going toward both community health improvement and health professionals' education. By 2012, national spending on Community Benefit likely exceeded $60 billion. The largest hospital systems spent the vast majority of the nation's Community Benefit; the top 25% of systems spent more than 80 cents of every Community Benefit dollar. Community Benefit spending has remained relatively steady as a proportion of total operating expenses and so has increased over time-although charity care remains the major focus of Community Benefit spending overall. More than $60 billion was spent on Community Benefit prior to implementation of the ACA. New reporting and spending requirements from the IRS, alongside changes by the ACA, are changing incentives for hospitals in how they spend Community Benefit dollars. In the short term, and especially the long term, hospital systems would do well to partner with public health, other social services, and even

  2. Biofilm processes in treating mariculture wastewater may be a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shuai; Zhang, Shenghua; Ye, Chengsong; Lin, Wenfang; Zhang, Menglu; Chen, Lihua; Li, Jinmei; Yu, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotics are heavily used in Chinese mariculture, but only a small portion of the added antibiotics are absorbed by living creatures. Biofilm processes are universally used in mariculture wastewater treatment. In this study, removal of antibiotics (norfloxacin, rifampicin, and oxytetracycline) from wastewater by moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) and the influence of antibiotics on reactor biofilm were investigated. The results demonstrated that there was no significant effect of sub-μg/L–sub-mg/L concentrations of antibiotics on TOC removal. Moreover, the relative abundance of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and antibiotic resistance bacteria (ARB) in MBBR biofilm increased because of selective pressure of antibiotics. In addition, antibiotics decreased the diversity of the biofilm bacterial community and altered bacterial community structure. These findings provide an empirical basis for the development of appropriate practices for mariculture, and suggest that disinfection and advanced oxidation should be applied to eliminate antibiotics, ARGs, and ARB from mariculture wastewater. - Highlights: • The removal of antibiotics by Moving Bed Biofilm Reactors (MBBR) was investigated. • Biofilm process such as MBBR had little effect on the removal of the antibiotics. • The antibiotics decreased the diversity of biofilm bacterial community and altered bacterial community structure. • Biofilm processes in treating mariculture wastewater may be a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes.

  3. Stream biofilm responses to flow intermittency: from cells to ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Sergi eSabater; Sergi eSabater; Xisca eTimoner; Carles eBorrego; Carles eBorrego; Vicenç eAcuña

    2016-01-01

    Temporary streams are characterized by the alternation of dry and wet hydrological phases, creating both a harsh environment for the biota as well as a high diversity of opportunities for adaptation. These systems are eminently microbial-based during several of these hydrological phases, and those growing on all solid substrata (biofilms) accordingly change their physical structure and community composition. Biofilms experience large decreases on cell densities and biomass, both of bacteria a...

  4. Stream Biofilm Responses to Flow Intermittency: From Cells to Ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Sabater, Sergi; Timoner, Xisca; Borrego, Carles; Acuña, Vicenç

    2016-01-01

    Temporary streams are characterized by the alternation of dry and wet hydrological phases, creating both a harsh environment for the biota as well as a high diversity of opportunities for adaptation. These systems are mainly microbial-based during several of these hydrological phases, and those growing on all solid substrata (biofilms) accordingly change their physical structure and community composition. Biofilms experience large decreases in cell densities and biomass, both of bacteria and ...

  5. Interactions of bacteria with diatoms: Influence on natural marine biofilms.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; DeCosta, P.M.; Anil, A.C.; Sawant, S.S.

    therein). In fact, biofilms are considered a reservoir and source of dissemination for V. cholerae (Shikuma & Hadfield 2010). Nutrient concentrations in the surrounding waters also affect the progression of the biofilm community (Qian et al. 2007... to render diatom monocultures near axenic (Patil & Anil 2005c). The following diluents were used – Aged Sea Water (ASW; unenriched control), ASW+streptomycin (ASW+S), ASW+chloramphenicol (ASW+C), f/2 medium (Guillard and Ryther, 1962) prepared in ASW [f...

  6. Nanostructured coatings for controlling bacterial biofilms and antibiotic resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanova, Kristina Dimitrova

    2017-01-01

    The accelerated emergence of drug resistant bacteria is one of the most serious problems in healthcare and the difficulties in finding new antibiotics make it even more challenging. To overcome the action of antibiotics bacteria develop effective resistance mechanisms including the formation of biofilms. Biofilms are bacterial communities of cells embedded in a self-produced polymeric matrix commonly found on medical devices such as indwelling catheters. When pathogens adopt this mode of grow...

  7. Establishing the infrastructure to conduct comparative effectiveness research toward the elimination of disparities: a community-based participatory research framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Danyell S; Dapic, Virna; Sultan, Dawood H; August, Euna M; Green, B Lee; Roetzheim, Richard; Rivers, Brian

    2013-11-01

    In Tampa, Florida, researchers have partnered with community- and faith-based organizations to create the Comparative Effectiveness Research for Eliminating Disparities (CERED) infrastructure. Grounded in community-based participatory research, CERED acts on multiple levels of society to enhance informed decision making (IDM) of prostate cancer screening among Black men. CERED investigators combined both comparative effectiveness research and community-based participatory research to design a trial examining the effectiveness of community health workers and a digitally enhanced patient decision aid to support IDM in community settings as compared with "usual care" for prostate cancer screening. In addition, CERED researchers synthesized evidence through the development of systematic literature reviews analyzing the effectiveness of community health workers in changing knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of African American adults toward cancer prevention and education. An additional systematic review analyzed chemoprevention agents for prostate cancer as an emerging technique. Both of these reviews, and the comparative effectiveness trial supporting the IDM process, add to CERED's goal of providing evidence to eliminate cancer health disparities.

  8. [The effect of biyuanshu oral liquid on the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Chen, Haihong; Wang, Shengqing

    2012-07-01

    To observe the effect of biyuanshu oral liquid on the formation of pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in vitro. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm was established by plate culture and detected by Scanning electron microscopy and AgNO3 staining. After treated with different dosages of biyuanshu oral liquid and erythromycin, the pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were observed by AgNO3 staining and the number of viable bacteria were measured by serial dilution. The pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms could be detected by SEM at the seventh culture day and it was consistent with the detection of AgNO3 staining. The biyuanshu oral liquid and erythromycin have the effect on inhibiting the formation of pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. But with the already formed pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms the inhibition was not significant. The serial dilution method showed that the viable counts of bacteria of biyuanshu oral liquid and erythromycin treated groups were significantly lower than those untreated groups (P formation of pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in vitro.

  9. Compaction and relaxation of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, R.

    2015-06-18

    Operation of membrane systems for water treatment can be seriously hampered by biofouling. A better characterization of biofilms in membrane systems and their impact on membrane performance may help to develop effective biofouling control strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence, extent and timescale of biofilm compaction and relaxation (decompaction), caused by permeate flux variations. The impact of permeate flux changes on biofilm thickness, structure and stiffness was investigated in situ and non-destructively with optical coherence tomography using membrane fouling monitors operated at a constant crossflow velocity of 0.1 m s−1 with permeate production. The permeate flux was varied sequentially from 20 to 60 and back to 20 L m−2 h−1. The study showed that the average biofilm thickness on the membrane decreased after elevating the permeate flux from 20 to 60 L m−2 h−1 while the biofilm thickness increased again after restoring the original flux of 20 L m−2 h−1, indicating the occurrence of biofilm compaction and relaxation. Within a few seconds after the flux change, the biofilm thickness was changed and stabilized, biofilm compaction occurred faster than the relaxation after restoring the original permeate flux. The initial biofilm parameters were not fully reinstated: the biofilm thickness was reduced by 21%, biofilm stiffness had increased and the hydraulic biofilm resistance was elevated by 16%. Biofilm thickness was related to the hydraulic biofilm resistance. Membrane performance losses are related to the biofilm thickness, density and morphology, which are influenced by (variations in) hydraulic conditions. A (temporarily) permeate flux increase caused biofilm compaction, together with membrane performance losses. The impact of biofilms on membrane performance can be influenced (increased and reduced) by operational parameters. The article shows that a (temporary) pressure increase leads to more

  10. Haemophilus parainfluenzae Strain ATCC 33392 Forms Biofilms In Vitro and during Experimental Otitis Media Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Bing; Swords, W Edward

    2017-09-01

    Haemophilus parainfluenzae is a nutritionally fastidious, Gram-negative bacterium with an oropharyngeal/nasopharyngeal carriage niche that is associated with a range of opportunistic infections, including infectious endocarditis and otitis media (OM). These infections are often chronic/recurrent in nature and typically involve bacterial persistence within biofilm communities that are highly resistant to host clearance. This study addresses the primary hypothesis that H. parainfluenzae forms biofilm communities that are important determinants of persistence in vivo The results from in vitro biofilm studies confirmed that H. parainfluenzae formed biofilm communities within which the polymeric matrix was mainly composed of extracellular DNA and proteins. Using a chinchilla OM infection model, we demonstrated that H. parainfluenzae formed surface-associated biofilm communities containing bacterial and host components that included neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) structures and that the bacteria mainly persisted in these biofilm communities. We also used this model to examine the possible interaction between H. parainfluenzae and its close relative Haemophilus influenzae , which is also commonly carried within the same host environments and can cause OM. The results showed that coinfection with H. influenzae promoted clearance of H. parainfluenzae from biofilm communities during OM infection. The underlying mechanisms for bacterial persistence and biofilm formation by H. parainfluenzae and knowledge about the survival defects of H. parainfluenzae during coinfection with H. influenzae are topics for future work. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Rapid establishment of thermophilic anaerobic microbial community during the one-step startup of thermophilic anaerobic digestion from a mesophilic digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhe; Zhang, Yu; Li, Yuyou; Chi, Yongzhi; Yang, Min

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how fast the thermophilic anaerobic microbial community could be established during the one-step startup of thermophilic anaerobic digestion from a mesophilic digester. Stable thermophilic anaerobic digestion was achieved within 20 days from a mesophilic digester treating sewage sludge by adopting the one-step startup strategy. The succession of archaeal and bacterial populations over a period of 60 days after the temperature increment was followed by using 454-pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR. After the increase of temperature, thermophilic methanogenic community was established within 11 days, which was characterized by the fast colonization of Methanosarcina thermophila and two hydrogenotrophic methanogens (Methanothermobacter spp. and Methanoculleus spp.). At the same time, the bacterial community was dominated by Fervidobacterium, whose relative abundance rapidly increased from 0 to 28.52 % in 18 days, followed by other potential thermophilic genera, such as Clostridium, Coprothermobacter, Anaerobaculum and EM3. The above result demonstrated that the one-step startup strategy could allow the rapid establishment of the thermophilic anaerobic microbial community. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Bacteriophages and Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Harper

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are an extremely common adaptation, allowing bacteria to colonize hostile environments. They present unique problems for antibiotics and biocides, both due to the nature of the extracellular matrix and to the presence within the biofilm of metabolically inactive persister cells. Such chemicals can be highly effective against planktonic bacterial cells, while being essentially ineffective against biofilms. By contrast, bacteriophages seem to have a greater ability to target this common form of bacterial growth. The high numbers of bacteria present within biofilms actually facilitate the action of bacteriophages by allowing rapid and efficient infection of the host and consequent amplification of the bacteriophage. Bacteriophages also have a number of properties that make biofilms susceptible to their action. They are known to produce (or to be able to induce enzymes that degrade the extracellular matrix. They are also able to infect persister cells, remaining dormant within them, but re-activating when they become metabolically active. Some cultured biofilms also seem better able to support the replication of bacteriophages than comparable planktonic systems. It is perhaps unsurprising that bacteriophages, as the natural predators of bacteria, have the ability to target this common form of bacterial life.

  13. Investigating Microbial Biofilm Formations on Crustal Rock Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, M.; D'Angelo, T.; Carr, S. A.; Orcutt, B.

    2017-12-01

    Ocean crust hosts microbial life that, in some cases, alter the component rocks as a means of obtaining energy. Variations in crust lithology, included trace metal and mineral content, as well as the chemistry of the fluids circulating through them, provide substrates for some microbes to metabolize, leading to formation of biofilm community structures. Microbes have different parameters for the situations in which they will form biofilms, but they must have some source of energy in excess at the site of biofilm formation for them to become stationary and form the carbohydrate-rich structures connecting the cells to one another and the substrate. Generally, the requirements for microbes to form biofilms on crustal minerals are unclear. We designed two experiments to test (1) mineral preference and biofilm formation rates by natural seawater microbial communities, and (2) biofilm development as a function of phosphate availability for an organism isolated from subseafloor ocean crust. In Experiment 1, we observed that phyric basalt groundmass is preferentially colonized over aphyric basalt or metal sulfides in a shallow water and oxic seawater environment. In experiment 2, tests of the anaerobic heterotroph Thalassospira bacteria isolated from oceanic crustal fluids showed that they preferentially form biofilms, lose motility, and increase exponentially in number over time in higher-PO4 treatments (50 micromolar), including with phosphate-doped basalts, than in treatments with low phosphate concentrations (0.5 micromolar) often found in crustal fluids. These observations suggest phosphate as a main driver of biofilm formation in subsurface crust. Overall, these data suggest that the drivers of microbial biofilm formation on crustal substrates are selective to the substrate conditions, which has important implications for estimating the global biomass of life harbored in oceanic crust.

  14. Identification of Genes Involved in Polysaccharide-Independent Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boles, Blaise R.; Thoendel, Matthew; Roth, Aleeza J.; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a potent biofilm former on host tissue and medical implants, and biofilm growth is a critical virulence determinant for chronic infections. Recent studies suggest that many clinical isolates form polysaccharide-independent biofilms. However, a systematic screen for defective mutants has not been performed to identify factors important for biofilm formation in these strains. We created a library of 14,880 mariner transposon mutants in a S. aureus strain that generates a proteinaceous and extracellular DNA based biofilm matrix. The library was screened for biofilm defects and 31 transposon mutants conferred a reproducible phenotype. In the pool, 16 mutants overproduced extracellular proteases and the protease inhibitor α2-macroglobulin restored biofilm capacity to 13 of these mutants. The other 15 mutants in the pool displayed normal protease levels and had defects in genes involved in autolysis, osmoregulation, or uncharacterized membrane proteins. Two transposon mutants of interest in the GraRS two-component system and a putative inositol monophosphatase were confirmed in a flow cell biofilm model, genetically complemented, and further verified in a community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) isolate. Collectively, our screen for biofilm defective mutants identified novel loci involved in S. aureus biofilm formation and underscored the importance of extracellular protease activity and autolysis in biofilm development. PMID:20418950

  15. Identification of genes involved in polysaccharide-independent Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaise R Boles

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a potent biofilm former on host tissue and medical implants, and biofilm growth is a critical virulence determinant for chronic infections. Recent studies suggest that many clinical isolates form polysaccharide-independent biofilms. However, a systematic screen for defective mutants has not been performed to identify factors important for biofilm formation in these strains. We created a library of 14,880 mariner transposon mutants in a S. aureus strain that generates a proteinaceous and extracellular DNA based biofilm matrix. The library was screened for biofilm defects and 31 transposon mutants conferred a reproducible phenotype. In the pool, 16 mutants overproduced extracellular proteases and the protease inhibitor alpha(2-macroglobulin restored biofilm capacity to 13 of these mutants. The other 15 mutants in the pool displayed normal protease levels and had defects in genes involved in autolysis, osmoregulation, or uncharacterized membrane proteins. Two transposon mutants of interest in the GraRS two-component system and a putative inositol monophosphatase were confirmed in a flow cell biofilm model, genetically complemented, and further verified in a community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA isolate. Collectively, our screen for biofilm defective mutants identified novel loci involved in S. aureus biofilm formation and underscored the importance of extracellular protease activity and autolysis in biofilm development.

  16. Surface proteins and the formation of biofilms by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Joon; Chang, James; Rimal, Binayak; Yang, Hao; Schaefer, Jacob

    2018-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilms pose a serious clinical threat as reservoirs for persistent infections. Despite this clinical significance, the composition and mechanism of formation of S. aureus biofilms are unknown. To address these problems, we used solid-state NMR to examine S. aureus (SA113), a strong biofilm-forming strain. We labeled whole cells and cell walls of planktonic cells, young biofilms formed for 12-24h after stationary phase, and more mature biofilms formed for up to 60h after stationary phase. All samples were labeled either by (i) [ 15 N]glycine and l-[1- 13 C]threonine, or in separate experiments, by (ii) l-[2- 13 C, 15 N]leucine. We then measured 13 C- 15 N direct bonds by C{N} rotational-echo double resonance (REDOR). The increase in peptidoglycan stems that have bridges connected to a surface protein was determined directly by a cell-wall double difference (biofilm REDOR difference minus planktonic REDOR difference). This procedure eliminates errors arising from differences in 15 N isotopic enrichments and from the routing of 13 C label from threonine degradation to glycine. For both planktonic cells and the mature biofilm, 20% of pentaglycyl bridges are not cross-linked and are potential surface-protein attachment sites. None of these sites has a surface protein attached in the planktonic cells, but one-fourth have a surface protein attached in the mature biofilm. Moreover, the leucine-label shows that the concentration of β-strands in leucine-rich regions doubles in the mature biofilm. Thus, a primary event in establishing a S. aureus biofilm is extensive decoration of the cell surface with surface proteins that are linked covalently to the cell wall and promote cell-cell adhesion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses type III secretion system to kill biofilm-associated amoebae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matz, Carsten; Moreno, Ana Maria; Alhede, Morten

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria and protozoa coexist in a wide range of biofilm communities of natural, technical and medical importance. Generally, this interaction is characterized by the extensive grazing activity of protozoa on bacterial prey populations. We hypothesized that the close spatial coexistence in biofilms...... suggest that conserved virulence pathways and specifically the T3SS play a central role in bacteria- protozoa interactions in biofilms and may be instrumental for the environmental persistence and evolution of opportunistic bacterial pathogens....

  18. The Impacts of Recently Established Fish Populations on Zooplankton Communities in a Desert Spring, and Potential Conflicts in Setting Conservation Goals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujan M. Henkanaththegedara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Desert springs, which harbor diverse and endemic invertebrate assemblages, are often used as refuge habitats for protected fish species. Additionally, many of these springs have been colonized by invasive fish species. However, the potential impacts of recently established fish populations on invertebrate communities in desert springs have been relatively unexplored. We conducted a mesocosm experiment to assess the impact of both protected and invasive fish on community structure of spring-dwelling invertebrates focusing on zooplankton. Experimental populations of spring zooplankton communities were established and randomly assigned to one of three treatments, (1 invasive western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis; (2 endangered Mohave tui chub (Siphateles bicolor mohavensis; and (3 fishless control. Final populations of zooplankton and fish were sampled, sorted, identified and counted. The treatment differences of zooplankton communities were analyzed by comparing the densities of six major zooplankton taxa. Further, we performed nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS to visualize the patterns of zooplankton community assemblages. Four zooplankton taxa, crustacean nauplii, cladocera, calanoid and cyclopoid copepods had significantly lower densities in fish treatments compared to fishless control. Overall, invasive mosquitofish caused a 78.8% reduction in zooplankton density, while Mohave tui chub caused a 65.1% reduction. Both protected and invasive fish had similar effects on zooplankton except for cladocerans where tui chub caused a 60% reduction in density, whereas mosquitofish virtually eliminated cladocerans. The presence of fish also had a significant effect on zooplankton community structure due to population declines and local extirpations presumably due to fish predation. This work shows that conservation-translocations undertaken to conserve protected fish species may impact spring-dwelling invertebrate communities, and such impacts are

  19. Unravelling the mechanisms of bacterial interactions in model communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herschend, Jakob

    Microbial communities, such as microbial biofilms, are dynamic structural communities. The architecture and function of these communities is shaped by the interaction with the surrounding environment and by the interactions between community members. In most natural and man-made environments......, and that bacteria in different niches have different potential for interacting. Understanding the development of microbial communities is indispensable as microbial communities, such as biofilms, are highly associated with chronic infections, colonization of catheters and implants. Biofilms have also been...

  20. Illness Mapping: A time and cost effective method to estimate healthcare data needed to establish community-based health insurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Binnendijk (Erica); M. Gautham (Meenakshi); R. Koren (Ruth); D.M. Dror (David)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Most healthcare spending in developing countries is private out-of-pocket. One explanation for low penetration of health insurance is that poorer individuals doubt their ability to enforce insurance contracts. Community-based health insurance schemes (CBHI) are a solution,

  1. Establishment and metabolic analysis of a model microbial community for understanding trophic and electron accepting interactions of subsurface anaerobic environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zamin K

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Communities of microorganisms control the rates of key biogeochemical cycles, and are important for biotechnology, bioremediation, and industrial microbiological processes. For this reason, we constructed a model microbial community comprised of three species dependent on trophic interactions. The three species microbial community was comprised of Clostridium cellulolyticum, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, and Geobacter sulfurreducens and was grown under continuous culture conditions. Cellobiose served as the carbon and energy source for C. cellulolyticum, whereas D. vulgaris and G. sulfurreducens derived carbon and energy from the metabolic products of cellobiose fermentation and were provided with sulfate and fumarate respectively as electron acceptors. Results qPCR monitoring of the culture revealed C. cellulolyticum to be dominant as expected and confirmed the presence of D. vulgaris and G. sulfurreducens. Proposed metabolic modeling of carbon and electron flow of the three-species community indicated that the growth of C. cellulolyticum and D. vulgaris were electron donor limited whereas G. sulfurreducens was electron acceptor limited. Conclusions The results demonstrate that C. cellulolyticum, D. vulgaris, and G. sulfurreducens can be grown in coculture in a continuous culture system in which D. vulgaris and G. sulfurreducens are dependent upon the metabolic byproducts of C. cellulolyticum for nutrients. This represents a step towards developing a tractable model ecosystem comprised of members representing the functional groups of a trophic network.

  2. Biofilms and mechanics: a review of experimental techniques and findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, Vernita D; Davis-Fields, Megan; Kovach, Kristin; Rodesney, Christopher A

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms are developmentally-dynamic communities of sessile microbes that adhere to each other and, often, to other structures in their environment. The cohesive mechanical forces binding microbes to each other confer mechanical and structural stability on the biofilm and give rise to biofilm viscoelasticity. The adhesive mechanical forces binding microbes to other structures in their environment can promote biofilm initiation and mechanosensing that leads to changes in biological activity. Thus, physical mechanics is intrinsic to characteristics that distinguish biofilms from free-swimming or free-floating microbes in liquid culture. However, very little is known about the specifics of what mechanical traits characterize different types of biofilms at different stages of development. Even less is known about how mechanical inputs impact microbial biology and how microbes can adjust their mechanical coupling to, and interaction with, their environment. These knowledge gaps arise, in part, from the challenges associated with experimental measurements of microbial and biofilm biomechanics. Here, we review extant experimental techniques and their most-salient findings to date. At the end of this review we indicate areas where significant advances in the state-of-the art are heading. (topical review)

  3. Biofilms and mechanics: a review of experimental techniques and findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Vernita D.; Davis-Fields, Megan; Kovach, Kristin; Rodesney, Christopher A.

    2017-06-01

    Biofilms are developmentally-dynamic communities of sessile microbes that adhere to each other and, often, to other structures in their environment. The cohesive mechanical forces binding microbes to each other confer mechanical and structural stability on the biofilm and give rise to biofilm viscoelasticity. The adhesive mechanical forces binding microbes to other structures in their environment can promote biofilm initiation and mechanosensing that leads to changes in biological activity. Thus, physical mechanics is intrinsic to characteristics that distinguish biofilms from free-swimming or free-floating microbes in liquid culture. However, very little is known about the specifics of what mechanical traits characterize different types of biofilms at different stages of development. Even less is known about how mechanical inputs impact microbial biology and how microbes can adjust their mechanical coupling to, and interaction with, their environment. These knowledge gaps arise, in part, from the challenges associated with experimental measurements of microbial and biofilm biomechanics. Here, we review extant experimental techniques and their most-salient findings to date. At the end of this review we indicate areas where significant advances in the state-of-the art are heading.

  4. Escherichia coli biofilms have an organized and complex extracellular matrix structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chia; Zhou, Yizhou; Pinkner, Jerome S; Dodson, Karen W; Crowley, Jan R; Heuser, John; Chapman, Matthew R; Hadjifrangiskou, Maria; Henderson, Jeffrey P; Hultgren, Scott J

    2013-09-10

    Bacterial biofilms are ubiquitous in nature, and their resilience is derived in part from a complex extracellular matrix that can be tailored to meet environmental demands. Although common developmental stages leading to biofilm formation have been described, how the extracellular components are organized to allow three-dimensional biofilm development is not well understood. Here we show that uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains produce a biofilm with a highly ordered and complex extracellular matrix (ECM). We used electron microscopy (EM) techniques to image floating biofilms (pellicles) formed by UPEC. EM revealed intricately constructed substructures within the ECM that encase individual, spatially segregated bacteria with a distinctive morphology. Mutational and biochemical analyses of these biofilms confirmed curli as a major matrix component and revealed important roles for cellulose, flagella, and type 1 pili in pellicle integrity and ECM infrastructure. Collectively, the findings of this study elucidated that UPEC pellicles have a highly organized ultrastructure that varies spatially across the multicellular community. Bacteria can form biofilms in diverse niches, including abiotic surfaces, living cells, and at the air-liquid interface of liquid media. Encasing these cellular communities is a self-produced extracellular matrix (ECM) that can be composed of proteins, polysaccharides, and nucleic acids. The ECM protects biofilm bacteria from environmental insults and also makes the dissolution of biofilms very challenging. As a result, formation of biofilms within humans (during infection) or on industrial material (such as water pipes) has detrimental and costly effects. In order to combat bacterial biofilms, a better understanding of components required for biofilm formation and the ECM is required. This study defined the ECM composition and architecture of floating pellicle biofilms formed by Escherichia coli.

  5. Effects of Low-Dose Amoxicillin on Staphylococcus aureus USA300 Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynek, Kevin D; Callahan, Mary T; Shimkevitch, Anton V; Farmer, Jackson T; Endres, Jennifer L; Marchand, Mélodie; Bayles, Kenneth W; Horswill, Alexander R; Kaplan, Jeffrey B

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies showed that sub-MIC levels of β-lactam antibiotics stimulate biofilm formation in most methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. Here, we investigated this process by measuring the effects of sub-MIC amoxicillin on biofilm formation by the epidemic community-associated MRSA strain USA300. We found that sub-MIC amoxicillin increased the ability of USA300 cells to attach to surfaces and form biofilms under both static and flow conditions. We also found that USA300 biofilms cultured in sub-MIC amoxicillin were thicker, contained more pillar and channel structures, and were less porous than biofilms cultured without antibiotic. Biofilm formation in sub-MIC amoxicillin correlated with the production of extracellular DNA (eDNA). However, eDNA released by amoxicillin-induced cell lysis alone was evidently not sufficient to stimulate biofilm. Sub-MIC levels of two other cell wall-active agents with different mechanisms of action-d-cycloserine and fosfomycin-also stimulated eDNA-dependent biofilm, suggesting that biofilm formation may be a mechanistic adaptation to cell wall stress. Screening a USA300 mariner transposon library for mutants deficient in biofilm formation in sub-MIC amoxicillin identified numerous known mediators of S. aureus β-lactam resistance and biofilm formation, as well as novel genes not previously associated with these phenotypes. Our results link cell wall stress and biofilm formation in MRSA and suggest that eDNA-dependent biofilm formation by strain USA300 in low-dose amoxicillin is an inducible phenotype that can be used to identify novel genes impacting MRSA β-lactam resistance and biofilm formation. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Pine growth and plant community response to chemical vs. mechanical site preparation for establishing loblolly and slash pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    James H. Miller; Zhijuan Qiu

    1995-01-01

    Chemical and mechanical site preparation methods were studied for establishing loblolly (Pinus taeda L) and slash (P. elliottii var. elliottii Engelm.) pine following both integrated fuelwood-pulpwood harvesting and conventional whole-tree harvesting of pines and hardwoods in southem Alabama's Middle Coastal...

  7. Adenoid Reservoir for Pathogenic Biofilm Bacteria▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nistico, L.; Kreft, R.; Gieseke, A.; Coticchia, J. M.; Burrows, A.; Khampang, P.; Liu, Y.; Kerschner, J. E.; Post, J. C.; Lonergan, S.; Sampath, R.; Hu, F. Z.; Ehrlich, G. D.; Stoodley, P.; Hall-Stoodley, L.

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms of pathogenic bacteria are present on the middle ear mucosa of children with chronic otitis media (COM) and may contribute to the persistence of pathogens and the recalcitrance of COM to antibiotic treatment. Controlled studies indicate that adenoidectomy is effective in the treatment of COM, suggesting that the adenoids may act as a reservoir for COM pathogens. To investigate the bacterial community in the adenoid, samples were obtained from 35 children undergoing adenoidectomy for chronic OM or obstructive sleep apnea. We used a novel, culture-independent molecular diagnostic methodology, followed by confocal microscopy, to investigate the in situ distribution and organization of pathogens in the adenoids to determine whether pathogenic bacteria exhibited criteria characteristic of biofilms. The Ibis T5000 Universal Biosensor System was used to interrogate the extent of the microbial diversity within adenoid biopsy specimens. Using a suite of 16 broad-range bacterial primers, we demonstrated that adenoids from both diagnostic groups were colonized with polymicrobial biofilms. Haemophilus influenzae was present in more adenoids from the COM group (P = 0.005), but there was no significant difference between the two patient groups for Streptococcus pneumoniae or Staphylococcus aureus. Fluorescence in situ hybridization, lectin binding, and the use of antibodies specific for host epithelial cells demonstrated that pathogens were aggregated, surrounded by a carbohydrate matrix, and localized on and within the epithelial cell surface, which is consistent with criteria for bacterial biofilms. PMID:21307211

  8. Biofilm Formation Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Predicted via Genome-Scale Kinetic Models of Bacterial Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-15

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Biofilm Formation Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Predicted via Genome-Scale Kinetic Models of Bacterial Metabolism Francisco G...jaques.reifman.civ@mail.mil Abstract A hallmark of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its ability to establish biofilm -based infections that are difficult to...eradicate. Biofilms are less susceptible to host inflammatory and immune responses and have higher antibiotic tolerance than free-living planktonic

  9. Optimized candidal biofilm microtiter assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krom, Bastiaan P.; Cohen, Jesse B.; Feser, Gail E. McElhaney; Cihlar, Ronald L.

    Microtiter based candidal biofilm formation is commonly being used. Here we describe the analysis of factors influencing the development of candidal biofilms such as the coating with serum, growth medium and pH. The data reported here show that optimal candidal biofilm formation is obtained when

  10. Biofilm Formation by Bacteria Isolated from Intravenous Catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Hedayati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reports on the association of nosocomial bacterial infections with indwelling medical devices such as intravenous catheters (IVC has increased in recent years. The potential to form biofilm on these devices seems to be the main reason for establishment of such infections. The aim of this study was to measure the potential of biofilm formation by bacterialisolates from IVCs.Methods: Seventy-one IVCs were collected from hospitalized patients in ICU, NICU, hematology and oncology wards at Taleghani Hospital from Jan 2010 to Jan 2011. The bacterial isolates were identified using the standard biochemical tests and the potential to form biofilms was determined by the microtiter plate assay method (MTP and colony morphology using Congo red agar plates (CRA.Results: Overall, 54 (71% IVCs were colonized and 76 bacteria were isolated among which, 64 (84.2% were coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS, 3 (3.9% S. aureus, 3 (3.9% Enterococcus spp., 2 (2.6% E. coli and 4 (5.3% were miscellaneous isolates not further identified. Among the CoNS, biofilm formation was observed in 68.7% and 82.8% of bacteriausing MTP and CRA methods, respectively. S. aureus and E. coli isolates also were biofilm producers but Enterococcus and other unknown isolates were biofilm negative.Conclusions: Our results confirm that the prevalent biofilm forming bacteria on IVCs were CoNS and that was the reason for high rates of nosocomial infections.

  11. Molecular Determinants of the Thickened Matrix in a Dual-Species Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecalis Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keehoon; Lee, Kang-Mu; Kim, Donggeun; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2017-11-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that inhabit various surfaces and are surrounded by extracellular matrices (ECMs). Clinical microbiologists have shown that the majority of chronic infections are caused by biofilms, following the introduction of the first biofilm infection model by J. W. Costerton and colleagues (J. Lam, R. Chan, K. Lam, and J. W. Costerton, Infect Immun 28:546-556, 1980). However, treatments for chronic biofilm infections are still limited to surgical removal of the infected sites. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecalis are two frequently identified bacterial species in biofilm infections; nevertheless, the interactions between these two species, especially during biofilm growth, are not clearly understood. In this study, we observed phenotypic changes in a dual-species biofilm of P. aeruginosa and E. faecalis , including a dramatic increase in biofilm matrix thickness. For clear elucidation of the spatial distribution of the dual-species biofilm, P. aeruginosa and E. faecalis were labeled with red and green fluorescence, respectively. E. faecalis was located at the lower part of the dual-species biofilm, while P. aeruginosa developed a structured biofilm on the upper part. Mutants with altered exopolysaccharide (EPS) productions were constructed in order to determine the molecular basis for the synergistic effect of the dual-species biofilm. Increased biofilm matrix thickness was associated with EPSs, not extracellular DNA. In particular, Pel and Psl contributed to interspecies and intraspecies interactions, respectively, in the dual-species P. aeruginosa and E. faecalis biofilm. Accordingly, targeting Pel and Psl might be an effective part of eradicating P. aeruginosa polymicrobial biofilms. IMPORTANCE Chronic infection is a serious problem in the medical field. Scientists have observed that chronic infections are closely associated with biofilms, and the vast majority of infection-causing biofilms are polymicrobial. Many studies

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Biofilm in Flow Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss Nielsen, Martin; Sternberg, Claus; Molin, Søren

    2011-01-01

    well-defined conditions(2,3). The system consists of a flow cell that serves as growth chamber for the biofilm. The flow cell is supplied with nutrients and oxygen from a medium flask via a peristaltic pump and spent medium is collected in a waste container. This construction of the flow system allows......Many microbial cells have the ability to form sessile microbial communities defined as biofilms that have altered physiological and pathological properties compared to free living microorganisms. Biofilms in nature are often difficult to investigate and reside under poorly defined conditions(1...... a continuous supply of nutrients and administration of e.g. antibiotics with minimal disturbance of the cells grown in the flow chamber. Moreover, the flow conditions within the flow cell allow studies of biofilm exposed to shear stress. A bubble trapping device confines air bubbles from the tubing which...

  13. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilms: role in chronic airway infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Edward Swords

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Like many pathogens inhabiting mucosal surfaces, nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi forms multicellular biofilm communities both in vitro and in various infection models. In the past 15 years much has been learned about determinants of biofilm formation by this organism and potential roles in bacterial virulence, especially in the context of chronic and recurrent infections. However, this concept has not been without some degree of controversy, and in the past some have expressed doubts about the relevance of NTHi biofilms to disease. In this review, I will summarize the present information on the composition and potential role(s of NTHi biofilms in different clinical contexts, as well as highlight potential areas for future work.

  14. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilms: role in chronic airway infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swords, W Edward

    2012-01-01

    Like many pathogens inhabiting mucosal surfaces, nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) forms multicellular biofilm communities both in vitro and in various infection models. In the past 15 years much has been learned about determinants of biofilm formation by this organism and potential roles in bacterial virulence, especially in the context of chronic and recurrent infections. However, this concept has not been without some degree of controversy, and in the past some have expressed doubts about the relevance of NTHi biofilms to disease. In this review, I will summarize the present information on the composition and potential role(s) of NTHi biofilms in different clinical contexts, as well as highlight potential areas for future work.

  15. The interconnection between biofilm formation and horizontal gene transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Burmølle, Mette; Hansen, Lars H.

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has revealed that horizontal gene transfer and biofilm formation are connected processes. Although published research investigating this interconnectedness is still limited, we will review this subject in order to highlight the potential of these observations because....... Biofilms, furthermore, promote plasmid stability and may enhance the host range of mobile genetic elements that are transferred horizontally. Plasmids, on the other hand, are very well suited to promote the evolution of social traits such as biofilm formation. This, essentially, transpires because plasmids...... of their believed importance in the understanding of the adaptation and subsequent evolution of social traits in bacteria. Here, we discuss current evidence for such interconnectedness centred on plasmids. Horizontal transfer rates are typically higher in biofilm communities compared with those in planktonic states...

  16. Biofilm Implication in Oral Diseases of Dogs and Cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csilla Zambori

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The importance of biofilm in disease processes in humans and animals is now widely recognized. In animal species,the risk of infection is probably greater than the risk in humans. This is due to the difference in animal housing andliving environments – animals naturally live in environments with a large and much more diverse microbialcommunity. Most oral bacteria live symbiotically in biofilm. This symbiotic association gives the bacteria differentcommunal properties than individual planktonic bacteria.Bacteria that form biofilm live and develop in communities which are an important property for dental plaqueformation that leads to dental calculus formation, periodontal diseases, dental caries and systemic diseases.The objective of this study is to reveal the role of dental plaque (oral biofilm in pathogenesis of dental calculus,periodontal disease and dental caries in dogs and cats.

  17. Wild Mushroom Extracts as Inhibitors of Bacterial Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Alves

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms can colonize a wide variety of medical devices, putting patients in risk for local and systemic infectious complications, including local-site infections, catheter-related bloodstream infections, and endocarditis. These microorganisms are able to grow adhered to almost every surface, forming architecturally complex communities termed biofilms. The use of natural products has been extremely successful in the discovery of new medicine, and mushrooms could be a source of natural antimicrobials. The present study reports the capacity of wild mushroom extracts to inhibit in vitro biofilm formation by multi-resistant bacteria. Four Gram-negative bacteria biofilm producers (Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from urine were used to verify the activity of Russula delica, Fistulina hepatica, Mycena rosea, Leucopaxilus giganteus, and Lepista nuda extracts. The results obtained showed that all tested mushroom extracts presented some extent of inhibition of biofilm production. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the microorganism with the highest capacity of biofilm production, being also the most susceptible to the extracts inhibition capacity (equal or higher than 50%. Among the five tested extracts against E. coli, Leucopaxillus giganteus (47.8% and Mycenas rosea (44.8% presented the highest inhibition of biofilm formation. The extracts exhibiting the highest inhibitory effect upon P. mirabilis biofilm formation were Sarcodon imbricatus (45.4% and Russula delica (53.1%. Acinetobacter baumannii was the microorganism with the lowest susceptibility to mushroom extracts inhibitory effect on biofilm production (highest inhibition—almost 29%, by Russula delica extract. This is a pioneer study since, as far as we know, there are no reports on the inhibition of biofilm production by the studied mushroom extracts and in particular against multi-resistant clinical isolates; nevertheless, other

  18. A coverslip-based technique for evaluating Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation on human plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer N Walker

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability of the opportunistic pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, to form biofilms is increasingly being viewed as an important contributor to chronic infections. In vitro methods for analyzing S. aureus biofilm formation have focused on bacterial attachment and accumulation on abiotic surfaces, such as in microtiter plate and flow cell assays. Microtiter plates provide a rapid measure of relative biomass levels, while flow cells have limited experimental throughput but are superior for confocal microscopy biofilm visualization. Although these assays have proven effective at identifying mechanisms involved in cell attachment and biofilm accumulation, the significance of these assays in vivo remains unclear. Studies have shown that when medical devices are implanted they are coated with host factors, such as matrix proteins, that facilitate S. aureus attachment and biofilm formation. To address the challenge of integrating existing biofilm assay features with a biotic surface, we have established an in vitro biofilm technique utilizing UV-sterilized coverslips coated with human plasma. The substratum more closely resembles the in vivo state and provides a platform for S. aureus to establish a robust biofilm. Importantly, these coverslips are amenable to confocal microscopy imaging to provide a visual reference of the biofilm growth stage, effectively merging the benefits of the microtiter and flow cell assays. We confirmed the approach using clinical S. aureus isolates and mutants with known biofilm phenotypes. Altogether, this new biofilm assay can be used to assess the function of S. aureus virulence factors associated with biofilm formation and for monitoring the efficacy of biofilm treatment modalities.

  19. Establishment of community mental health systems in a postdeinstitutional era: a study of organizational structures and service provision in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markström, Urban; Lindqvist, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    This article analyzes the state of community mental health services for people with psychiatric disabilities and the interplay between different organizational levels. The study is based on document analysis and interviews with stakeholders in 10 Swedish municipalities. The results show how systems are slow to change and are linked to local traditions. The services are often delivered in closed settings, and the organizations struggle to meet the needs of a new generation of users. There is a gap between local systems and national policies because the latter pays attention to the attributes of a recovery approach.

  20. High prevalence of biofilm synergy among bacterial soil isolates in cocultures indicates bacterial interspecific cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Dawei; Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2015-01-01

    of single-species biofilms, indicating that all the individual strains benefit from inclusion in the multispecies community. Our results show a high prevalence of synergy in biofilm formation in multispecies consortia isolated from a natural bacterial habitat and suggest that interspecific cooperation...

  1. Targeting biofilms with cold plasma: new approaches to a persistent problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    For the food industry, almost nothing presents as many problems for antimicrobial sanitation as the increased difficulties presented by biofilms. Biofilms are tightly-grouped masses of microorganisms, clustered together in complex communities to provide water-impermeable cellular protection. What ma...

  2. Copper affects biofilm inductiveness to larval settlement of the serpulid polyc