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Sample records for biofeedback-assisted autogenic training

  1. Effect of biofeedback-assisted autogenic training on headache activity and mood states in Korean female migraine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eun-Ho; Park, Joo-Eon; Chung, Chin-Sang; Yu, Bum-Hee

    2009-10-01

    Biofeedback with or without combined autogenic training is known to be effective for the treatment of migraine. This study aimed to examine the effect of biofeedback treatment on headache activity, anxiety, and depression in Korean female patients with migraine headache. Patients were randomized into the treatment group (n=17) and monitoring group (n=15). Mood states including anxiety and depression, and psychophysiological variables such as mean skin temperature of the patients were compared with those of the normal controls (n=21). We found greater treatment response rate (defined as > or =50% reduction in headache index) in patients with biofeedback-assisted autogenic training than in monitoring group. The scores on the anxiety and depression scales in the patients receiving biofeedback-assisted autogenic training decreased after the biofeedback treatment. Moreover, the decrease in their anxiety levels was significantly related to the treatment outcome. This result suggests that the biofeedback-assisted autogenic training is effective for the treatment of migraine and its therapeutic effect is closely related to the improvement of the anxiety level.

  2. Biofeedback-assisted relaxation training to decrease test anxiety in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prato, Catherine A; Yucha, Carolyn B

    2013-01-01

    Nursing students experiencing debilitating test anxiety may be unable to demonstrate their knowledge and have potential for poor academic performance. A biofeedback-assisted relaxation training program was created to reduce test anxiety. Anxiety was measured using Spielberger's Test Anxiety Inventory and monitoring peripheral skin temperature, pulse, and respiration rates during the training. Participants were introduced to diaphragmatic breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, and autogenic training. Statistically significant changes occurred in respiratory rates and skin temperatures during the diaphragmatic breathing session; respiratory rates and peripheral skin temperatures during progressive muscle relaxation session; respiratory and pulse rates, and peripheral skin temperatures during the autogenic sessions. No statistically significant difference was noted between the first and second TAI. Subjective test anxiety scores of the students did not decrease by the end of training. Autogenic training session was most effective in showing a statistically significant change in decreased respiratory and pulse rates and increased peripheral skin temperature.

  3. Feasibility and acceptance of biofeedback-assisted mental training in an Austrian elementary school: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevenna, Richard; Krammer, Christine; Keilani, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    This pilot study aimed to investigate feasibility, acceptance, and effects of biofeedback-assisted mental training in a population of fifteen 10-year-old pupils in an Austrian elementary school. Participants were instructed in relaxation techniques by using biofeedback. Before intervention, after 6 weeks with active mental training and with regular instructions by the teacher, and after a further time period of 6 weeks without instructions, attention and concentration improved. The results indicate feasibility, good acceptance, and beneficial effects of biofeedback-assisted mental techniques in Austrian elementary school pupils.

  4. Autogenic training and dream recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schredl, M; Doll, E

    1997-06-01

    The present study has investigated the relationship between Autogenic Training and dream recall for 112 participants in 16 beginning courses of 10 wk. Analyses confirmed the hypothesis that learning and practicing this relaxation technique enhanced dream recall.

  5. Comment on autogenic training and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, M; Sato, T; Takeichi, M; Fakunishi, I

    1997-06-01

    We comment on a report by Watanabe, et al. regarding the effects of autogenic training on hypertension. Using previous reports in the United States, we mention methodological problems on how to evaluate the effects of autogenic training and express our hope that they would provide further research to clarify the effects of autogenic training on hypertension.

  6. Management of pain through autogenic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanji, N

    2000-08-01

    Physical and emotional pain are an inevitable part of human existence and are without natural antidotes. In view of this, and in the light of increasing professional reluctance to depend on analgesics, this paper proposes the widespread application of autogenic training, a relaxation technique which has been seen to confront pain very effectively, and also to reduce substantially drugs dependency. It analyses autogenic training in respect of some of the more common pain-allied disorders such as childbirth, headaches and migraines, back pain, cancer and palliative care, and cardiology.

  7. Autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Jojić Boris R.; Leposavić Ljubica M.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction. Autogenic training is a widely recognised psychotherapy technique. The British School of Autogenic Training cites a large list of disorders, states, and changes, where autogenic training may prove to be of help. We wanted to explore the application of autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adults. Our sample consisted of a homogeneous group of 35 individuals, with an average age of 39.3±1.6 years, who were diagnosed with adjustment disorder, F 43.2, in accord...

  8. Autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Jojić Boris R.; Leposavić Ljubica M.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Autogenic training is a widespread technique used in psychotherapy. The British school of autogenic training cites a large list of diseases, health states, and life changes, in which autogenic training can be of help. We wanted to explore the application of autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adolescents. The sample consisted of a homogeneous group of 31 individuals, with an average age of 17.3±0.2 years, who were diagnosed with adjustment disorder, F 43.2,...

  9. Autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jojić Boris R.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Autogenic training is a widespread technique used in psychotherapy. The British school of autogenic training cites a large list of diseases, health states, and life changes, in which autogenic training can be of help. We wanted to explore the application of autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adolescents. The sample consisted of a homogeneous group of 31 individuals, with an average age of 17.3±0.2 years, who were diagnosed with adjustment disorder, F 43.2, in accordance with ICD 10 search criteria. OBJECTIVE The aim of our work was to figure out the influence of autogenic training on adjustment disorder, through biophysical and biochemical indicators, and to research the efficacy of autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adolescents. METHOD We observed adjustment disorder indicators and their changes in three phases, using initial, final, and control values, which we measured immediately before the beginning, immediately after the completion, and six months after the completion, of the practical course in autogenic training. We measured systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure, brachial pulse rates, cortisol levels in plasma, cholesterol levels in blood, as well as glucose concentrations. During that period, autogenic training was employed as the sole therapy. RESULTS The study confirmed our preliminary assumptions. The measurements we performed showed that arterial blood pressure, pulse rates, cholesterol and cortisol concentrations, after the application of autogenic training among adolescents suffering from adjustment disorder, were lower than the initial values. They remained lower even six months after the completion of the practical course in autogenic training. CONCLUSION We concluded that autogenic training significantly decreases the values of physiological indicators of adjustment disorder, diminishes the effects of stress in an individual, and eases the adaptation of

  10. Autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jojić Boris R.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Autogenic training is a widely recognised psychotherapy technique. The British School of Autogenic Training cites a large list of disorders, states, and changes, where autogenic training may prove to be of help. We wanted to explore the application of autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adults. Our sample consisted of a homogeneous group of 35 individuals, with an average age of 39.3±1.6 years, who were diagnosed with adjustment disorder, F 43.2, in accordance with ICD 10 search criteria. Aim. The aim of our study was to research the effectiveness of autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adults, by checking the influence of autogenic training on the biophysical and biochemical indicators of adjustment disorder. Method. We measured the indicators of adjustment disorder and their changes in three phases: before the beginning, immediately after the beginning, and six months after the completion, of a practical course in autogenic training. We measured systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure, brachial pulse rate as well as the levels of cortisol in plasma, of cholesterol in blood, and of glucose. During that period, autogenic training functioned as the sole therapy. Results. The study confirmed our preliminary assumptions. The measurements we performed demonstrated that arterial blood pressure, pulse rate, concentration of cholesterol and cortisol, after the application of autogenic training among the subjects suffering from adjustment disorder, were lower in comparison to the initial values. These values remained lower even six months after the completion of the practical course in autogenic training. Conclusion. Autogenic training significantly decreases the values of physiological indicators of adjustment disorder, diminishes the effects of stress in an individual, and helps adults to cope with stress, facilitating their recuperation.

  11. [Autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jojić, Boris R; Leposavić, Ljubica M

    2005-01-01

    Autogenic training is a widely recognised psychotherapy technique. The British School of Autogenic Training cites a large list of disorders, states, and changes, where autogenic training may prove to be of help. We wanted to explore the application of autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adults. Our sample consisted of a homogeneous group of 35 individuals, with an average age of 39.3 +/- 1.6 years, who were diagnosed with adjustment disorder, F 43.2, in accordance with ICD 10 search criteria. The aim of our study was to research the effectiveness of autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adults, by checking the influence of autogenic training on the biophysical and biochemical indicators of adjustment disorder. We measured the indicators of adjustment disorder and their changes in three phases: before the beginning, immediately after the beginning, and six months after the completion, of a practical course in autogenic training. We measured systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure, brachial pulse rate as well as the levels of cortisol in plasma, of cholesterol in blood, and of glucose. During that period, autogenic training functioned as the sole therapy. The study confirmed our preliminary assumptions. The measurements we performed demonstrated that arterial blood pressure, pulse rate, concentration of cholesterol and cortisol, after the application of autogenic training among the subjects suffering from adjustment disorder, were lower in comparison to the initial values. These values remained lower even six months after the completion of the practical course in autogenic training. Autogenic training significantly decreases the values of physiological indicators of adjustment disorder, diminishes the effects of stress in an individual, and helps adults to cope with stress, facilitating their recuperation.

  12. [Autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jojić, Boris R; Leposavić, Ljubica M

    2005-01-01

    Autogenic training is a widespread technique used in psychotherapy. The British school of autogenic training cites a large list of diseases, health states, and life changes, in which autogenic training can be of help. We wanted to explore the application of autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adolescents. The sample consisted of a homogeneous group of 31 individuals, with an average age of 17.3 +/- 0.2 years, who were diagnosed with adjustment disorder, F 43.2, in accordance with ICD 10 search criteria. The aim of our work was to figure out the influence of autogenic training on adjustment disorder, through biophysical and biochemical indicators, and to research the efficiacy of autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adolescents. We observed adjustment disorder indicators and their changes in three phases, using initial, final, and control values, which we measured immediately before the beginning, immediately after the completion, and six months after the completion, of the practical course in autogenic training. We measured systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure, brachial pulse rates, cortisol levels in plasma, cholesterol levels in blood, as well as glucose concentrations. During that period, autogenic training was employed as the sole therapy. The study confirmed our preliminary assumptions. The measurements we performed showed that arterial blood pressure, pulse rates, cholesterol and cortisol concentrations, after the application of autogenic training among adolescents suffering from adjustment disorder, were lower than the initial values. They remained lower even six months after the completion of the practical course in autogenic training. We concluded that autogenic training significantly decreases the values of physiological indicators of adjustment disorder, diminishes the effects of stress in an individual, and eases the adaptation of adolescents to stress, helping with recovery.

  13. Autogenic Training and Professional Pedagogy (Training Autogeno e Pedagogia Professionale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Blezza

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Autogenic Training (das Autogenes Training is a procedure that has been proposed by J. H. Schultz in 1932, originally with the purpose of relaxation, but which over the decades extended its role and its applications for the most varied of enhancing human personal resources. His teaching is practiced by different professionals. In this paper we discuss the contribution of social and professional pedagogy in this context and the corresponding practice, considering the methodology, didactics, the conception of the helping and assistance relationship to the person and the contribution non therapeutic to health. Even the linguistic problems in the translation from German to Italian language require attention. In the AT the professional pedagogist, apical professional in educational problems find its field of scope and exercise which has many original and very interesting features.

  14. [Effects of autogenic training in elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kircher, T; Teutsch, E; Wormstall, H; Buchkremer, G; Thimm, E

    2002-04-01

    Autogenic training (AT) is a widely available relaxation method with beneficial outcome on physiological and psychological functioning. In our study, we wanted to test the effects of an AT course in cognitively impaired, frail elderly. After a 3 month waiting period (control), AT courses (intervention) of 3 months duration were offered in 2 nursing homes. Thirty-two frail elderly took part in the study, 24 of them had a psychiatric diagnosis (mean age 82.1 +/- 7.2 years, CAMCOG 75.5 +/- 15.7, MMSE 23.3 +/- 4.3, HAMD 10.0 +/- 3.6, NOSGER 57.2 +/- 18.4, AT-SYM 32.9 +/- 17.6 points). Eight participants dropped out during the waiting period, 8 during the course. From the 16 participants, 15 (94%) were able to learn the AT according to subjective, 9 (54%) according to objective criteria. The ability to practice the AT successfully correlated with the CAMCOG (p = 0.001) and the NOSGER (p = 0.01) score. Participants with a dementia syndrome had major difficulties, whereas age, depressiveness, and number of complaints (AT-SYM) had no influence on the ability to learn the AT. There was no intervention effect, measured with the HAMD, NOSGER, AT-SYM and MMSE. In the pre-post comparison of training sessions, a significant improvement in general well being was found (p < 0.001). Mentally impaired, frail elderly participants are able to learn the AT. Cognitive impairment is disadvantageous for a successful participation.

  15. Salivation quantum--stomatopyrosis--autogenic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokupec, Josipa-Sanja Gruden; Gruden, Vladimir; Biocina-Lukenda, Dolores

    2009-09-01

    Stomatopyrosis of 'burning mouth' syndrome, in a narrower sense of definition, is a condition characterized by sensation of burning and heating in mouth, despite its normal mucosa. This research has been directed towards treatment of stomatopyrosis, putting emphasis on the implementation of psychopharmacotherapy and psychotherapy. The research was conducted on altogether 120 respondents suffering from stomatopyrosis. The respondents were divided into two equal groups: each one comprising 60 members. All the respondents were treated by means of a standard topical therapy. All the patients were assessed clinically and by means of psychological tests measuring depression and anxiety four times: once before the treatment, after one month, after two months and after four months since the beginning of the treatment. The acquired data were afterwards statistically processed. When grading the symptoms on VAS, i.e. visual analogous scale, the subjective assessment of symptoms was marked as 7-8 cm, which shows a high degree of burning sensation. According to our study, the quantity of saliva, which was at the beginning of the research slightly decreased, normalized after the treatment. Apart from the clinical investigation of stomatopyrosis, we applied Depression and Anxiety questionnaires. On the basis of our research, we have concluded the following: the comorbidity of stomatopyrosis with the phenomena of anxiety and depression proves that, among other factors, there is a psychogenic aetiology of this disease. Autogenic training, which is a psychotherapeutic anxiolytic technique, is a therapy of choice for stomatopyrosis, which contributes not only to the elimination of oral complaints, but to the emotional rehabilitation of the patients as well, and to the reduction of dryness in the mouth.

  16. Phobic postural vertigo treated with autogenic training: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Fumiyuki; Nakai, Kimiko; Kunihiro, Takanobu; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2008-09-30

    Patients suffering from dizziness due to vertigo are commonly encountered in the department of otolaryngology. If various clinical examinations do not reveal any objective findings, then the patients are referred to the department of internal medicine or psychiatry. In many cases, the diagnosis is psychological dizziness. Phobic postural vertigo, which was first reported by Brandt T et al in 1994, is supposed to be a type of psychological dizziness. The diagnosis is based on 6 characteristics proposed by Brandt et al. Patients are usually treated with conventional medical therapy, but some cases may be refractory to such a therapy. Psychotherapy is recommended in some cases; however, psychotherapy including autogenic training, which can be used for general relaxation, is not widely accepted. This paper describes the successful administration of autogenic training in a patient suffering from phobic postural vertigo. We present a case of a patient who suffered from phobic postural vertigo. A 37-year-old female complained of dizziness. She had started experiencing dizziness almost 3 years She was intractable to many sort of conventional therapy. In the end, her symptom disappeared after introduction of autogenic training. Autogenic training can be a viable and acceptable treatment option for phobic postural vertigo patients who fail to respond to other therapies. This case emphasizes the importance of autogenic training as a method to control symptom of phobic postural vertigo.

  17. Treatment of Childhood Migraine Using Autogenic Feedback Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbe, Elise L.

    1984-01-01

    Compared autogenic feedback training with a waiting-list control group as a treatment for children (N=28) with migraine headaches. Children in the treatment condition were significantly improved at the end of treatment and at one-month and six-month follow-up. No improvement was found for the children in the control condition. (BH)

  18. Cognitive Modeling of Mindfulness Therapy by Autogenic Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi Ziabari, S.S.; Treur, J.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper the effect of a mindfulness therapy based on a Network-Oriented Modeling approach is addressed. The considered therapy is Autogenic Training, that can be used when under stress; it has as two main goals to achieve feeling heavy and warm body parts (limbs). Mantra’s have been used in

  19. Autogenic training alters cerebral activation patterns in fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlamann, Marc; Naglatzki, Ryan; de Greiff, Armin; Forsting, Michael; Gizewski, Elke R

    2010-10-01

    Cerebral activation patterns during the first three auto-suggestive phases of autogenic training (AT) were investigated in relation to perceived experiences. Nineteen volunteers trained in AT and 19 controls were studied with fMRI during the first steps of autogenic training. FMRI revealed activation of the left postcentral areas during AT in those with experience in AT, which also correlated with the level of AT experience. Activation of prefrontal and insular cortex was significantly higher in the group with experience in AT while insular activation was correlated with number years of simple relaxation exercises. Specific activation in subjects experienced in AT may represent a training effect. Furthermore, the correlation of insular activation suggests that these subjects are different from untrained subjects in emotional processing or self-awareness.

  20. [Development of Autogenic Training Clinical Effectiveness Scale (ATCES)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikezuki, Makoto; Miyauchi, Yuko; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Koshikawa, Fusako

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a scale measuring clinical effectiveness of autogenic training. In Study 1, 167 undergraduates completed a survey of items concerning physical and mental states, which were thought to vary in the course of autogenic training. With item and factor analyses, 20 items were selected, and the resulting scale (ATCES) had high discrimination and clear factor structure. In Study 2, reliability and concurrent and clinical validity of the scale were examined with three groups of respondents: 85 mentally healthy, 31 control, 13 clinical persons. The scale showed a high test-retest correlation (r = .83) and alpha coefficient (alpha = .86). ATCES had a Pearson correlation coefficient of r = .56 with General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), and r = .73 with trait anxiety (STAI-T). And ATCES successfully discriminated the mentally healthy and clinical groups in terms of clinical effectiveness. These results demonstrated high reliability and sufficient concurrent and clinical validity of the new scale.

  1. Autogenic-Feedback Training Exercise (AFTE) Method and System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, Patricia S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The Autogenic-Feedback Training Exercise (AFTE) method of the present invention is a combined application of physiologic and perceptual training techniques. such as autogenic therapy and biofeedback. This combined therapy approach produces a methodology that is appreciably more effective than either of the individual techniques used separately. The AFTE method enables sufficient magnitude of control necessary to significantly reduce the behavioral and physiologic reactions to severe environmental stressors. It produces learned effects that are persistent over time and are resistant to extinction and it can be administered in a short period of time. The AFTE method may be used efficiently in several applications, among which are the following: to improve pilot and crew performance during emergency flying conditions; to train people to prevent the occurrence of nausea and vomiting associated with motion and sea sickness, or morning sickness in early pregnancy; as a training method for preventing or counteracting air-sickness symptoms in high-performance military aircraft; for use as a method for cardiovascular training, as well as for multiple other autonomic responses, which may contribute to the alleviation of Space Motion Sickness (SMS) in astronauts and cosmonauts; training people suffering from migraine or tension headaches to control peripheral blood flow and reduce forehead and/or trapezius muscle tension; training elderly people suffering from fecal incontinence to control their sphincter muscles; training cancer patients to reduce the nauseagenic effects of chemotherapy; and training patients with Chronic Intestinal Pseudo-obstruction (CIP).

  2. Autogenic-feedback training: A countermeasure for orthostatic intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.; Kamiya, Joe; Miller, Neal E.; Pickering, Thomas G.

    1991-01-01

    NASA has identified cardiovascular deconditioning as a serious biomedical problem associated with long-duration exposure to microgravity in space. High priority has been given to the development of countermeasures for this disorder and the resulting orthostatic intolerance experienced by crewmembers upon their return to the 1g norm of Earth. The present study was designed to examine the feasibility of training human subjects to control their own cardiovascular responses to gravitational stimulation (i.e., a tilt table). Using an operant conditioning procedure, Autogenic-Feedback Training (AFT), we would determine if subjects could learn to increase their own blood pressure voluntarily.

  3. The Application of Autogenic Feedback Training in a Smoking Termination Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boullion, Jean K.; Chen, W. William

    1980-01-01

    Autogenic feedback training was an effective adjunct to a smoking termination program. An 81 percent reduction in smoking activity was found for the subjects who received the training. Achieving relaxation and reducing anxiety through autogenic feedback training helped subjects restore their self-confidence and deal with stress. (Author)

  4. [A case of fibromyalgia treated with medical and autogenic training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Fumiyuki; Asama, Youji; Nakai, Kimiko

    2005-12-01

    Fibromyalgia, which is relatively rare, may include symptoms of dizziness, vertigo and tinnitus. Subject was 38 years old woman reporting vertigo and whole body pain. Cochleovestibular function was normal. Pain was gradually intensified during her outpatient clinic and she was admitted. Treatments including intramusclular injection of botulinus toxin and intravenous injection of steroid were applied. Psychological counseling and autogenic training were effective in relieving her pain and vertigo. During her admission, several spells of vertigo occurred but no nystagmus was found. The abnormality in proprioception and neural disintegration may be related to vertigo. Treatment should start as early as possible together with psychological therapy.

  5. Adjuvant auricular electroacupuncture and autogenic training in rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized controlled trial. Auricular acupuncture and autogenic training in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernateck, M; Becker, M; Schwake, C

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In contrast to psychological interventions the usefulness of acupuncture as an adjuvant therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has not yet been demonstrated. OBJECTIVE: The efficacy of auricular electroacupuncture (EA) was directly compared with autogenic training (AT). METHODS: Patients...

  6. Use of autogenic training by paratroopers in preparation for and execution of parachute jumps

    OpenAIRE

    Blinov, Oleg

    2012-01-01

    The author defines challenging aspects of enhancing emotional stability of paratroopers for parajumping execution. Psychological factors and professional activity features of servicemen of aero-mobile troops are also described. Methods of autogenic training, which are used during airborne preparation, are adapted to conditions of their operation. The results of empiric research of autogenic training use by paratroopers are presented.

  7. [Efficiency of autogenous training in medical rehabilitation of patients with irritable colon syndrome with constipation dominance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomova, I V; Aĭvazian, T A; Zaĭtsev, V P; Gusakova, E V; Molina, L P

    2008-01-01

    It was established that use of autogenous training makes possible to increase efficiency of the therapy, leading to considerable more evident improvement of somatic and psychotic state, decrease of pain syndrome. Predictors of efficiency of autogenous training were marked out. Indications for use the method in medical rehabilitation of patients with irritable colon syndrome with constipation dominance were elaborated.

  8. Autogenic Feedback Training Applications for Man in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Finding an effective treatment for the motion sickness-like symptoms that occur in space has become a high priority for NASA. This paper reviews the back-round research and procedures of an experiment designed to prevent space motion sickness in shuttle crewmembers. The preventive method used, Autogenic - Feedback Training (AFT) involves training subjects to control voluntarily several of their own physiological responses to environmental stressors. AFT has been used reliably to increase tolerance to motion sickness during around based tests in over 300 men and women under a variety of conditions that induce motion sickness, and preliminary evidence from space suggests that AFT may be an effective treatment for space motion sickness as well. Other applications of AFT described include; (1) a potential treatment for post flight orthostatic intolerance, a serious biomedical problem resulting from long duration exposure to micro-g and (2) improving pilot performance during emergency flying conditions.

  9. [Effect of autogenic training on glucose regulation and lipid status in non-insulin dependent diabetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostić, N; Secen, S

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the benefits of autogenic training in patients with type 2 diabetes and 40 diabetics treated with oral antidiabetic agents were assigned to receive autogenic training. Treatment effects on GHb levels, glycemia, lipids and lipid peroxidases were evaluated after 12 weeks. Subjects demonstrated significant improvements of GHb level (8.94 +/- 2.21% vs. 7.9 +/- 2.395) (p autogenic training (1.21 +/- 0.11 vs. 1.36 +/- 1.42) (p training (6.63 +/- 1.66 mmol/l vs. 6.10 +/- 1.12 mmol/l) (p Autogenic training in selected patients, especially those who are most responsive to stress would provide benefits for glucosE control and lipid metabolism that are not always achieved by conventional treatment.

  10. Adjuvant auricular electroacupuncture and autogenic training in rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernateck, M.; Becker, M.; Schwacke, C.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In contrast to psychological interventions the usefulness of acupuncture as an adjuvant therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has not yet been demonstrated. OBJECTIVE: The efficacy of auricular electroacupuncture (EA) was directly compared with autogenic training (AT). METHODS: Patients...

  11. Peculiarities of application the method of autogenic training in the correction of eating behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Shebanova, Vitaliya

    2014-01-01

    The article presented peculiarities of applying the method of autogenic training in the correction of eating disorders. Described stages of correction work with desadaptive eating behavior. Author makes accent on the rules self-assembly formula intentions.

  12. Autogenic Training Relaxation Helping Postpartum Mothers to Achieve Successful Breastfeeding on Early Lactation Period

    OpenAIRE

    Juanita, Farida

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The numbers of breastfeeding failures are mostly caused by mothers` disbelief to themselves. One method that can be done to overcome these problems in accordance with the self-care nursing theory is the autogenic training relaxation. This method teaches mothers to be self-sufficient in building a positive intention and motivation to help the process of breastfeeding. This study aimed to examine the influence of autogenic training relaxation to the effectiveness of breastfeeding ...

  13. Autogenic training for stress and anxiety: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, E; Kanji, N

    2000-06-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate all controlled trials of autogenic training (AT) as a means of reducing stress and anxiety levels in human subjects. A search for all published and unpublished controlled trials was carried out in the four major databases, specifically CISCOM, Medline, PsychLit and CINAHL. Eight such trials were located, all of which are included here. The majority of trials were methodologically flawed. A range of outcome measures were used, with Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory being the most popular. Deviations from the accepted technique of AT were conspicuous and trials using the classical AT were in the minority. Seven trials reported positive effects of AT in reducing stress. One study showed no such benefit. Since one trial had used AT in combination with another technique, visual imagery, no conclusion can be drawn about the effect of AT in this case. No firm conclusions could be drawn from this systematic review. AT, properly applied, remains to be tested in controlled trials that are appropriately planned and executed.

  14. Autogenic training: a meta-analysis of clinical outcome studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetter, Friedhelm; Kupper, Sirko

    2002-03-01

    Autogenic training (AT) is a self-relaxation procedure by which a psychophysiological determined relaxation response is elicited. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of AT. Seventy-three controlled outcome studies were found (published 1952-99). Sixty studies (35 randomized controlled trials [RCT]) qualified for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Medium-to-large effect sizes (ES) occurred for pre-post comparisons of disease-specific AT-effects, with the RCTs showing larger ES. When AT was compared to real control conditions, medium ES were found. Comparisons of AT versus other psychological treatment mostly resulted in no effects or small negative ES. This pattern of results was stable at follow-up. Unspecific AT-effects (i.e., effects on mood, cognitive performance, quality of life, and physiological variables) tended to be even larger than main effects. Separate meta-analyses for different disorders revealed a significant reduction of the heterogeneity of ES. Positive effects (medium range) of AT and of AT versus control in the meta-analysis of at least 3 studies were found for tension headache/migraine, mild-to-moderate essential hypertension, coronary heart disease, asthma bronchiale, somatoform pain disorder (unspecified type), Raynaud's disease, anxiety disorders, mild-to-moderate depression/dysthymia, and functional sleep disorders.

  15. Chronobiometric assessment of autogenic training effects upon blood pressure and heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Y; Halberg, F; Cornélissen, G; Saito, Y; Fukuda, K; Otsuka, K; Kikuchi, T

    1996-12-01

    Autogenic training, a method of self-hypnosis, lowers the extent of within-day variation of systolic blood pressure assessed by the circadian double amplitude. The blood pressure and heart rate of ten patients, conventionally diagnosed as having hypertension or white-coat hypertension, were automatically monitored at 30-min intervals for 7 days before autogenic training and again for 7 days, at 1 or 2 months after the start of autogenic training (practiced three times daily). The circadian double amplitude of systolic blood pressure of the patients investigated was 3 to 17 mm Hg lower on autogenic training. In 5 patients, reductions by 7 to 17 mm Hg were statistically significant. These results are regarded as provisional statistics, the utility of which depends on replication. By contrast, the over-all group reduction of the circadian double amplitude of systolic blood pressure by 8 mm Hg on the average can be taken at face value. Autogenic training also lowered the circadian double amplitude of diastolic blood pressure, but the effect was small as was the effect of autogenic training upon the MESOR (a rhythm adjusted mean) and acrophase (a measure of the timing of over-all high values recurring each day). The effect of autogenic training upon the circadian double amplitude of systolic blood pressure suggests its trial as first-line treatment of patients with an excessive circadian blood pressure amplitude, a condition which, even in the absence of an elevated 24-hr, average of blood pressure, is associated with a large increase in the risk of developing ischemic stroke or nephropathy.

  16. Autogenic-feedback training - A treatment for motion and space sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, Patricia S.

    1990-01-01

    A training method for preventing the occurrence of motion sickness in humans, called autogenic-feedback training (AFT), is described. AFT is based on a combination of biofeedback and autogenic therapy which involves training physiological self-regulation as an alternative to pharmacological management. AFT was used to reliably increase tolerance to motion-sickness-inducing tests in both men and women ranging in age from 18 to 54 years. The effectiveness of AFT is found to be significantly higher than that of protective adaptation training. Data obtained show that there is no apparent effect from AFT on measures of vestibular perception and no side effects.

  17. Application of autogenic training for anxiety disorders: a clinical study in a psychiatric setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, M

    1997-03-01

    The effects of autogenic training for anxiety disorders were investigated in a psychiatric setting of a medical school hospital and the predictors of this treatment outcome were identified. Fifty-five patients who meet the DSM-III-R criteria for anxiety disorders were treated individually with autogenic training by the author from October 1981 to October 1995. The medical records of the patients were investigated retrospectively. The results showed that the autogenic training was successful. Twenty-eight patients (51%) were cured, fourteen (25%) much improved, eight (15%) improved and five (9%) unchanged at the end of the treatment. Forty-two patients (76%) were assessed as having had successful treatment. Pretreatment variables, such as patient's clinical characteristics, did not provide a useful guide to the outcome. Four treatment variables did have a bearing on outcome. First, practicing the second standard autogenic training exercise was a satisfactory predictor of a better outcome. Second, practicing generalization training also was a useful predictor. Third, the application of other behavioral treatment techniques was found to be positively associated with outcome. Fourth, longer treatment periods were associated with a better outcome. These findings suggested that autogenic training could be of significant benefit for the treatment of anxiety disorders.

  18. Psychophysiological correlates of relaxation induced by standard autogenic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, N; Kubota, S; Nagata, S

    1999-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the psychophysiological changes induced in subjects by standard autogenic training (AT). Physiological measurements were taken under strict experimental conditions. Thirty-one healthy students were divided randomly into two groups: the AT group and the control group. In the first session, the physiological variables were measured for all students before and after all were asked to relax in their own way. The AT group were then taught AT for 3 months, after which time the measurements were repeated. In the second session, the AT group practised the standard AT exercise, while the control group repeated their own form of simple relaxation. Electrocardiogram, plethysmogram (PTG) and blood pressure (BP) were measured while the students carried out a breathing rate of 15 cycles/min. The R-R intervals and BP were analysed by an autoregressive model for spectral analysis, and the data were compared by repeated-measures ANOVA. The AT group had a significant increase in the mean R-R interval and a significant decrease in the baseline deflection of the PTG in the second session. There were no significant changes in sympathetic activity except for the change in the PTG, although low frequency amplitude of systolic BP decreased slightly. AT was found to induce significant changes that were independent of respiration in healthy students, although paced breathing might have operated as a mental stress. The increase in mean R-R interval and the decrease in baseline deflection of the PTG were the most robust correlates of AT.

  19. Autogenic training for tension type headaches: a systematic review of controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanji, N; White, A R; Ernst, E

    2006-06-01

    To determine from the published evidence whether autogenic training as sole therapy is effective for prevention of tension-type headaches in adults. Systematic review of controlled trials. Literature searches were performed in January 2005 in six major databases, specifically Medline, EMBASE, AMED, CENTRAL, PsychInfo and CINAHL and information was extracted and evaluated in a pre-defined manner. Seven controlled clinical trials were included in the review. The methodological quality of these studies was low. Patient samples were generally representative of the more severely affected cases. None of the studies show autogenic training to be convincingly superior to other interventions care. Some trials suggested that the effect of autogenic training is no different from hypnosis and inferior to biofeedback. There is no consistent evidence to suggest that autogenic training is superior to other interventions for prevention of tension headaches, or different from other forms of relaxation. Further studies should investigate the use of standard autogenic training in patients with moderate headache.

  20. A clinical study of autogenic training-based behavioral treatment for panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, M

    1996-03-01

    The present study investigated the effect of autogenic training-based behavioral treatment for panic disorder and identified the predictors of treatment outcome. Thirty-four patients meeting DSM-III-R criteria for panic disorder received autogenic training-based behavioral treatment from October 1981 to December 1994. They were treated individually by the author. The medical records of the patients were investigated for the purpose of this study. The results showed that this autogenic training-based behavioral treatment had successful results. Fifteen patients were cured, nine much improved, five improved, and five unchanged at the end of the treatment. Improvement trends were found as for the severity of panic attack and the severity of agoraphobic avoidance. No consistent findings about predictors emerged when such pretreatment variables as demographics and severity of symptoms were used to predict the outcome. Also, three treatment variables showed useful predictive power. First, practicing the second standard autogenic training exercise satisfactorily predicted better outcomes. Second, application of in vivo exposure was found to be positively associated with the treatment outcome in patients with agoraphobic avoidance. Third, longer treatment periods were associated with better outcomes. These findings suggested that the autogenic training-based behavioral treatment could provide relief to the majority of panic disorder patients.

  1. Autogenic training to reduce anxiety in nursing students: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanji, Nasim; White, Adrian; Ernst, Edzard

    2006-03-01

    This paper reports a study to determine the effectiveness of autogenic training in reducing anxiety in nursing students. Nursing is stressful, and nursing students also have the additional pressures and uncertainties shared with all academic students. Autogenic training is a relaxation technique consisting of six mental exercises and is aimed at relieving tension, anger and stress. Meta-analysis has found large effect sizes for autogenic trainings intervention comparisons, medium effect sizes against control groups, and no effects when compared with other psychological therapies. A controlled trial with 50 nursing students found that the number of certified days off sick was reduced by autogenic training compared with no treatment, and a second trial with only 18 students reported greater improvement in Trait Anxiety, but not State Anxiety, compared with untreated controls. A randomized controlled trial with three parallel arms was completed in 1998 with 93 nursing students aged 19-49 years. The setting was a university college in the United Kingdom. The treatment group received eight weekly sessions of autogenic training, the attention control group received eight weekly sessions of laughter therapy, and the time control group received no intervention. The outcome measures were the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, blood pressure and pulse rate completed at baseline, 2 months (end of treatment), and 5, 8, and 11 months from randomization. There was a statistically significantly greater reduction of State (Pautogenic training group than in both other groups immediately after treatment. There were no differences between the groups for the Maslach Burnout Inventory. The autogenic training group also showed statistically significantly greater reduction immediately after treatment in systolic (PAutogenic training has at least a short-term effect in alleviating stress in nursing students.

  2. Autogenic Feedback Training (Body Fortran) with Biofeedback and the Computer for Self-Improvement and Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, Russell N.; Sumintardja, Elmira Nasrudin

    1983-01-01

    Describes autogenic feedback training, which provides the basis whereby an individual is able to improve on well being through use of a technique described as "body fortran," implying that you program self as one programs a computer. Necessary requisites are described including relaxation training and the management of stress. (JAC)

  3. Autogenic Feedback Training (Body FORTRAN) for Musically Gifted Students at Bonita Vista High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, John M.

    1982-01-01

    The Gifted Self-Understanding Assessment Battery (GSAB) was given to 34 (27 females, 7 males) music students (aged 15-17) at Bonita Vista High School in Chula Vista (California). Biofeedback training and assessment were followed by individual counseling for Autogenic Feedback Training (AFT) to achieve improvement of the individual's own well…

  4. AUTOGENIC TRAINING RELAXATION HELPING POSTPARTUM MOTHERS TO ACHIEVE SUCCESSFUL BREASTFEEDING ON EARLY LACTATION PERIOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Juanita

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The numbers of breastfeeding failures are mostly caused by mothers` disbelief to themselves. One method that can be done to overcome these problems in accordance with the self-care nursing theory is the autogenic training relaxation. This method teaches mothers to be self-sufficient in building a positive intention and motivation to help the process of breastfeeding. This study aimed to examine the influence of autogenic training relaxation to the effectiveness of breastfeeding and the enhancement of breast milk volume on maternal postpartum. Method: By using an experimental posttest only-non equivalent control group design, 26 samples were taken based on the criteria and divided into two groups by matching technuiqe. autogenic training was given through MP3 Player for 3 weeks. Post-test observation conducted on the third week by home visit. Via Christi Breastfeeding Assessment Tool Jan Riordan modifications used to assess the effectiveness of breastfeeding, and to measure the milk ejection volume, used weighing test using electronic baby scales. Data were analyzed using one-tailed independent t test with α ≤ 0.05. Result: The analysis showed that mothers who did autogenic training relaxation could breastfeed more effectively and had greater average volume of milk ejection than the control group (p = 0.000 and p = 0.001. Discussion: It can be concluded that autogenic relaxation training techniques affect the effectiveness of breastfeeding and breast milk volume. These results can be considered that autogenic training as an intervention in program of support for breastfeeding mothers.

  5. [Predictors of efficiency of autogenous melodeclamation training in patients with chronic somatic pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trdatian, N A

    2009-01-01

    This controlled study involving 99 patients with chronic somatic diseases (CSD) had the objective to identify psychological predictors of the efficiency of a new method of psychotherapy, namely autogenous melodeclamation training (AMDT). Dynamics of the psychological status of the patients in the course of therapy was assessed using SMOL test, Spilberger STAI test, overall health-physical activity-mood test, and Beck depression inventory. It was shown that moderately compromised psychological adaptation and minor depressive disorders were the most reliable predictors of marked improvement of the patients' psychological status under effect of autogenous melodeclamation training included in the combined rehabilitative therapy of chronic somatic diseases.

  6. Effects of autogenic training on nitroglycerin-induced headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Gabriella; Zsombok, Terezia; Gonda, Xenia; Nagyne, Nora; Modosne, Edit; Bagdy, Gyorgy

    2007-03-01

    To investigate the prophylactic and acute effects of autogenic training (AT) during a nitroglycerin-induced migraine attack. Thirty female migraineurs (without aura) and 11 controls participated in the study. Of these, 11 migraineurs and 5 controls practiced AT regularly for at least 6 months prior to and during the sublingual nitroglycerin test. Headache intensity and characteristics were recorded with a standardized method. During the nitroglycerin challenge, blood was collected for plasma cortisol determination and blood pressure and pulse rate were recorded. As a long-term preventive treatment, AT significantly decreased the mean headache frequency and intensity (P = .001) compared to the pretreatment period in the migraineurs who regularly practiced AT (n = 11). During the nitroglycerin challenge, AT successfully attenuated the nitroglycerin-induced acute decrease in blood pressure and pulse rate (P = .013; n = 16 AT subjects vs n = 25 non-AT subjects). However, it was not effective in preventing immediate headache (P = .71), did not decrease the frequency of acute migraine attacks (P = .79), and could not alleviate acute migraine pain (P = .78; n = 16 AT subjects vs n = 25 non-AT subjects). Plasma cortisol concentration significantly increased (P = .003) during the acute migraine attack (n = 22), and migraine intensity correlated with plasma cortisol elevations (P < .001; n = 41) and showed a tendency of negative correlation with morning plasma cortisol concentration (P = .08; n = 41). However, AT did not alter plasma cortisol responses (P = .99; n = 16 AT subjects vs n = 25 non-AT subjects). (1) The long-term AT therapy proved to be a significantly effective preventive intervention in migraine sufferers. We hypothesized that this long-term effect of AT is based on modulation of the pain anticipation system, which is strongly correlated with function of the anterior cingulate cortex. (2) We demonstrated that AT could not alter the nitroglycerin-induced acute

  7. [Use of supportive autogenic training in multiple morbidity in geriatric psychiatry patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kircher, T; Stetter, F; Wormstall, H

    1997-01-01

    23 multimorbid, geronto-psychiatric patients, aged 60 years or older, participated in a "supportive" course of autogenic training according to Schultz. Participating in the course an average of 7 +/- 3 weeks, 17 (76%) of the subjects were able to learn the training. In general, subjects reported a better general condition after the training sessions, measured with visual analogue scales (p training success was better in the psychopathological less affected than in the more severely ill (BPRS prior r = 0.64, p = 0.001, GDS prior r = 0.46, p training success and age, number of somatic diseases, number of medication, MMSE and the "Beschwerdenliste". Autogenic training is a useful component in psychotherapeutic and psychiatric therapy for elderly multimorbid in- and outpatients. A half-open group, two therapy sessions per week, reciting the training formulae aloud, a structured, simple setting and co-therapists proved to be worthwhile.

  8. Autogenic Training and Hand Temperature Biofeedback in the Treatment of Migraine: A Preliminary Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessup, B.; And Others

    The possibility of alleviating migraine headaches by autogenic relaxation training, with or without hand temperature biofeedback, was assessed. The study examined five independent groups in a bi-directional control group design. Volunteer migraine sufferers served as subjects, each participating for 12 weeks. The first four weeks of the study were…

  9. Operational Applications of Autogenic Feedback Training Exercise as a Treatment for Airsickness in the Military

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebreyesus, Fiyore; Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Airsickness is experienced by about 50% of military aviators some time in their career. Aviators who suffer from recurrent episodes of airsickness are typically referred to the Naval Aerospace Medical Institute (NAMI) at Pensacola where they undergo extensive evaluation and 8 weeks of training in the Self-Paced Airsickness Desensitization (SPAD) program. Researchers at NASA Ames have developed an alternative mitigation training program, Autogenic Feedback Training Exercise (AFTE) that has demonstrated an 80% success rate for improving motion sickness tolerance.

  10. Application of autogenic training in patients with Ménière disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Fumiyuki; Nakai, Kimiko; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2011-10-01

    Data are limited on the role of psychotherapy in the treatment of Ménière disease. We sought to document the effect of a psychotherapeutic technique known as autogenic training on clinical outcome in Ménière disease. Six patients with Ménière disease were studied. Retrospective chart review was conducted. All patients were refractory to conventional therapy and completed a course of autogenic training, which was offered as a complementary treatment. Autogenic training with initial psychological counseling was conducted by a clinical psychologist during 45-min sessions. Outcome measures assessed were the frequency of vertigo and functional levels 2 years after initiation of autogenic training. Functional levels were evaluated according to the 1995 guidelines of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS). As a personality measure, we used the Maudsley Personality Inventory (MPI), devised by Eysenck, which measures neuroticism (N), extraversion (E), and propensity to lie (L). Five of six patients showed improved functional level after three to eight sessions of psychotherapy; hearing level did not change. The score of the N scale of the MPI was closely related to the number of psychotherapy sessions. Prognosis was evaluated based on the AAO-HNS reporting guidelines, as follows: A = 3, B = 1, C = 1, F = 1. The value of N in MPI was closely related to the number of psychological counseling sessions (R = 0.97, P autogenic training may enhance the mental well-being of patients with Ménière disease and improve clinical outcome.

  11. Efficacy of biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ibrahim Khalil Ibrahim

    2014-07-18

    Jul 18, 2014 ... ized life advice leaflet sheet with instructions.20,21 Standardized proper PFMT instruction .... Unexpectedly, female age and duration of complaint were not predictive factors of .... Chen Gin-Den. Conservative management of ... muscle: comparison of a digital and a manometric techniques. Physiotherapy ...

  12. The effect of autogenic training and biofeedback on motion sickness tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozsvai, E E; Pigeau, R A

    1996-10-01

    Motion sickness is characterized by symptoms of vomiting, drowsiness, fatigue and idiosyncratic changes in autonomic nervous system (ANS) responses such as heart rate (HR) and skin temperature (ST). Previous studies found that symptoms of motion sickness are controllable through self-regulation of ANS responses and the best method to teach such control is autogenic-feedback (biofeedback) training. Recent experiments indicated that biofeedback training is ineffective in reducing symptoms of motion sickness or in increasing tolerance to motion. If biofeedback facilitates learning of ANS self-regulation then autogenic training with true feedback (TFB) should lead to better control over ANS responses and better motion tolerance than autogenic training with false feedback (FFB). If there is a relationship between ANS self-regulation and coping with motion stress, a significant correlation should be found between amounts of control over ANS responses and measures of motion tolerance and/or symptoms of motion sickness. There were 3 groups of 6 subjects exposed for 6 weeks to weekly sessions of Coriolis stimulation to induce motion sickness. Between the first and second Coriolis sessions, subjects in the experimental groups received five episodes of autogenic training with either true (group TFB) or false (group FFB) feedback on their HR and ST. The control group (CTL) received no treatment. Subjects learned to control their HR and ST independent of whether they received true or false feedback. Learned control of ST and HR was not related to severity of motion sickness or subject's ability to withstand Coriolis stimulation following treatment. A lack of significant correlation between these variables suggested that subjects were not able to apply their skills of ANS self-regulation in the motion environment, and/ or such skills had little value in reducing symptoms of motion sickness or enhancing their ability to withstand rotations.

  13. Combined use of autogenic therapy and biofeedback in training effective control of heart rate by humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were performed on 24 men and women (aged 20-27 yr) in three equal groups who were taught to control their own heart rates by autogenic training and biofeedback under dark and sound-isolated conditions. Group I was parasympathetic dominant, group II was sympathetic dominant, and group III consisted of parasympathetic-dominant subjects and controls who received only biofeedback of their own heart rates. The results corroborate three hypotheses: (1) subjects with para-sympathetic-dominant autonomic profiles perform in a way that is both qualitatively and quantitatively different from subjects with sympathetic-dominant autonomic profiles; (2) tests of interindividual variability yield data relevant to individual performance in visceral learning tasks; and (3) the combined use of autogenic training, biofeedback, and verbal feedback is suitable for conditioning large stable autonomic responses in humans.

  14. One Session of Autogenic Training Increases Acute Subjective Sexual Arousal in Premenopausal Women Reporting Sexual Arousal Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Amelia M; Hixon, J Gregory; Nichols, Lindsey M; Meston, Cindy M

    2018-01-01

    Below average heart rate variability (HRV) has been associated with sexual arousal dysfunction and overall sexual dysfunction in women. Autogenic training, a psychophysiologic relaxation technique, has been shown to increase HRV. In a recent study, sexually healthy women experienced acute increases in physiologic (ie, genital) and subjective sexual arousal after 1 brief session of autogenic training. To build on these findings by testing the effects of a single session of autogenic training on sexual arousal in a sample of women who reported decreased or absent sexual arousal for at least 6 months. Genital sexual arousal, subjective sexual arousal, and perceived genital sensations were assessed in 25 women 20 to 44 years old before and after listening to a 22-minute autogenic training recording. HRV was assessed with electrocardiography. Change in genital sexual arousal, subjective sexual arousal, and perceived genital sensations from the pre-manipulation erotic film to the post-manipulation erotic film. Marginally significant increases in discrete subjective sexual arousal (P = .051) and significant increases in perceived genital sensations (P = .018) were observed. In addition, degree of change in HRV significantly moderated increases in subjective arousal measured continuously over time (P autogenic training, and other interventions that aim to increase HRV, could be a useful addition to treatment protocols for women who are reporting a lack of subjective arousal or decreased genital sensations. There are few treatment options for women with arousal problems. We report on a new psychosocial intervention that could improve arousal. Limitations include a relatively small sample and the lack of a control group. Our findings indicate that autogenic training significantly improves acute subjective arousal and increases perceived genital sensations in premenopausal women with self-reported arousal concerns. Stanton AM, Hixon JG, Nichols LM, Meston CM. One Session of

  15. Autogenic Feedback Training Exercise: Controlling Physiological Responses to Mitigate Motion Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Nia; Spencer, Telissa; Cowings, Patricia; Toscano, William B.

    2018-01-01

    During space travel approximately 50 of the crew experience symptoms of motion sickness that can range from mild forms of nausea or dizziness to severe malaise and vomiting1. Developing an effective treatment for these symptoms has become a priority of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Autogenic-Feedback Training Exercise (AFTE) is a nonpharmacological countermeasure for mitigating motion sickness. It involves training subjects to control physiological responses in high stress environments2. The primary goal of this experiment is to evaluate the effectiveness of AFTE for increasing tolerance to motion sickness in high stress environments.

  16. Biofeedback, autogenic training, and progressive relaxation in the treatment of Raynaud's disease: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, F J; Surwit, R S; Pilon, R N

    1980-01-01

    Twenty-one female patients suffering from diagnosed idiopathic Raynaud's Disease were trained to raise digital skin temperature using either autogenic training, progressive muscle relaxation, or a combination of autogenic training and skin temperature feedback. Patients were instructed in the treatment procedures in three one-hour group sessions spaced one week apart. All patients were instructed to practice what they had learned twice a day at home. Patients kept records of the frequency of vasospastic attacks occurring over a four-week baseline period, and during the first four weeks and the ninth week of training. In addition, patients underwent four laboratory cold stress tests during which they were instructed to maintain digital temperature as the ambient temperature was slowly dropped from 26 degrees to 17 degrees C. Cold stress tests were given during week 1 of baseline and during weeks 1, 3, and 5 of training. No significant differences between the three behavioral treatment procedures were obtained. In addition, the ability of patients to maintain digital temperature during the cold stress challenge showed significant improvement from the first to the last tests. Symptomatic improvement was maintained by all patients nine weeks after the start of training. The implications of these findings for the behavioral treatment of Raynaud's Disease are discussed. PMID:6988380

  17. Improving the Performance of Poor Readers through Autogenic Relaxation Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Herbert

    1980-01-01

    Reports that the addition of 15 minutes of relaxation training to weekly remedial reading periods for disabled readers throughout a school year raised concentration levels and decreased anxiety, neuroticism, and number of reading errors. Describes a few types of relaxation exercises that may be helpful. (ET)

  18. [Effect of hypnosis and autogenic training on acral circulation and coping with the illness in patients with progressive scleroderma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seikowski, K; Weber, B; Haustein, U F

    1995-02-01

    In 12 patients with systemic sclerosis the influence of hypnosis and autogenic training on the acral blood circulation and the coping with the disease was investigated in a pilot study. In the first step significant increases in the skin temperature of the finger (mean +/- SD: 3.9 +/- 1.2 degrees C) could be found after relaxation hypnosis. In the second step six patients (study group) gained experience with autogenic training. The other six patients served as control group. In the study group, the skin temperature of the fingers (short-term effect) was significantly higher than in the control group (1.9 +/- 1.0 degrees C). Long-term effects of the autogenic training (mean acral rewarning time, duration and course of the Raynaud attacks, acral lesions of the hands, psychosomatic status of complaints, type of relation to the disease as precondition for coping with the disease) were not found within the relatively short follow-up period of 4 months. Two patients, however, reported that they could shorten the duration of Raynaud attacks by autogenic training. In our patients heterogenicity and an increased score of multiple psychosomatic complaints were registered at the outset. As far as the type of relation to the disease is concerned, the patients could be assessed as almost adapted. Hypnosis and autogenic training can be recommended as complementary therapy in systemic sclerosis.

  19. The treatment of recalcitrant post-traumatic nightmares with autogenic training and autogenic abreaction: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadigh, M R

    1999-09-01

    Recurrent and frightening dreams are commonly experienced by patients who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder after a motor vehicle accident. Such nocturnal episodes, if left untreated, can result in the experience of severe distress with physical, emotional, and psychophysiological concomitant. The present single-case study investigated the effects of the standard autogenic exercises and autogenic abreaction in reducing the frequency and severity of post-traumatic nightmares in a survivor of a car crash. The patient was also instructed in two additional organ-specific formulas in order to improve her sleep. The results of the study showed that the interventions were successful in effectively treating the patient's distressing nightmares. Follow-up data suggested that the treatment effects persisted after the termination of therapy. Suggestions for future investigations are discussed.

  20. The Feasibility of Using the BrightHearts Biofeedback-Assisted Relaxation Application for the Management of Pediatric Procedural Pain: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Karen L O; Morrow, Angela M; Beswick, Brooke V; Khut, George P

    2018-04-17

    The objective of this pilot study was to assess the acceptability and feasibility of using BrightHearts, a biofeedback-assisted relaxation application (app), in children undergoing painful procedures. Thirty children 7 to 18 years of age undergoing a medical procedure (peripheral blood collection, botulinum toxin injection, or intravenous cannula insertion) participated. Participants used BrightHearts, a heart rate-controlled biofeedback-assisted relaxation training app delivered via an iPad with heart rate measured through a pulse oximeter worn on the ear or thumb. Feasibility was assessed through observations and patient, parent/carer, and healthcare professional feedback. Patient, parent/carer, and healthcare professional satisfaction with BrightHearts was rated using investigator-developed surveys. Eighty-three percent of child participants reported that they found BrightHearts helpful during the procedure and that they would use BrightHearts again. All parents and 96% of healthcare professionals indicated they would use BrightHearts again. Sixty-four percent of healthcare providers perceived that BrightHearts assisted with the ease of performing the procedure. Qualitative analyses found 2 themes: (1) BrightHearts calms through providing distraction and biofeedback and (2) the impact of BrightHearts on the procedure. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of using biofeedback-assisted relaxation delivered via the BrightHearts app in children undergoing peripheral blood collection and cannulation. Future studies are required to evaluate BrightHearts' efficacy in reducing pain and anxiety during painful procedures and distinguish the effects of a biofeedback-mediated app from distraction. © 2018 World Institute of Pain.

  1. The Effect of Autogenic Training on Self-Efficacy, Anxiety, and Performance on Nursing Student Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Brian; Gosselin, Kevin; Mulcahy, Angela

    The increased anxiety experienced by nursing students during simulations can serve as a significant barrier to learning. The use of anxiety-reducing techniques such as autogenic training (AT) can mitigate the negative effects of anxiety and improve the overall learning experience. The investigators in this study sought to understand the effect of AT on student performance and self-efficacy during simulation experiences. The use of AT was an effective technique to decrease anxiety and increase performance among nursing students during nursing simulations. Reducing anxiety during simulations can improve the student learning experience.

  2. [Essential hypertension and stress. When do yoga, psychotherapy and autogenic training help?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, J M

    2002-05-09

    Psychosocial factors play an important role in the development and course of essential hypertension, although "stress" can account for only 10% of blood pressure variance. A variety of psychotherapeutic interventions, such as relaxation techniques (autogenic training or progressive muscular relaxation), behavioral therapy or biofeedback techniques, can lower elevated blood pressure by an average of 10 mmHg (systolic) and 5 mmHg (diastolic). As a "secondary effect", such measures may also prompt the hypertensive to adopt a more health-conscious lifestyle.

  3. Effect of autogenic training on drug consumption in patients with primary headache: an 8-month follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsombok, Terezia; Juhasz, Gabriella; Budavari, Agota; Vitrai, Jozsef; Bagdy, Gyorgy

    2003-03-01

    To examine the effects of Schultz-type autogenic training on headache-related drug consumption and headache frequency in patients with migraine, tension-type, or mixed (migraine plus tension-type) headache over an 8-month period. Behavioral treatments often are used alone or adjunctively for different types of headache. There are, however, only a few studies that have compared the efficacy and durability of the same treatment in different types of primary headache, and the effects of treatment on headache-related drug consumption rarely have been assessed even in these studies. Twenty-five women with primary headache (11 with mixed headache, 8 with migraine, and 6 with tension-type headache) were evaluated via an open-label, self-controlled, 8-month, follow-up study design. After an initial 4 months of observation, patients began learning Schultz-type autogenic training as modified for patients with headache. They practiced autogenic training on a regular basis for 4 months. Based on data from headache diaries and daily medication records, headache frequencies and the amounts of analgesics, "migraine-specific" drugs (ergots and triptans), and anxiolytics taken by the patients were compared in the three subgroups over the 8-month period. Results.-From the first month of implementation of autogenic training, headache frequencies were significantly reduced in patients with tension-type and mixed headache. Significant reduction in frequency was achieved in patients with migraine only from the third month of autogenic training. Decreases in headache frequencies were accompanied by decreases in consumption of migraine drugs and analgesics resulting in significant correlations among these parameters. Reduction in consumption of anxiolytic drugs was more rapid and robust in patients with tension-type headache compared to patients with migraine, and this outcome failed to show any correlation with change in headache frequency. Schultz-type autogenic training is an effective

  4. Autogenic-feedback training: A preventive method for space adaptation syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Sharp, Joseph C.; Toscano, William B.; Kamiya, Joe; Miller, Neal E.

    1987-01-01

    The progress made to date on the reduction of data for Spacelab 3 Shuttle experiment, No. 3AFT23 is reported. Four astronauts participated as subjects in this experiment. Crewmen A and B served as treatment subjects (i.e., received preflight training for control of their own motion sickness symptoms) and Crewmen C and D served as control (i.e., did not receive training). A preliminary evaluation of Autogenic Feedback Training (AFT) was made from visual inspections of graphs that were generated from the preflight and inflight and inflight physiological data which included: (1) Baseline rotating chair tests for all crewmen; (2) Posttraining rotating chair tests of treatment groups subjects; (3) Preflight data from Joint Integrated Simulations for all crewmen; and (4) Flight data for all crewmen during mission days 0 through 4, and mission day 6 for treatment subjects only. A summary of the findings suggested by these data is outlined.

  5. Autogenic-Feedback Training for the Control of Space Motion Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, W. B.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents case-studies of 9 shuttle crewmembers (prime and alternates) and one U.S. Navy F-18 pilot, as they participated in all preflight training and testing activities in support of a life sciences flight experiment aboard Spacelab-J, and Spacelab-3. The primary objective of the flight experiment was to determine if Autogenic-feedback training (AFT), a physiological self-regulation training technique would be an effective treatment for motion sickness and space motion sickness in these crewmembers. Additional objectives of this study involved the examining human physiological responses to motion sickness on Earth and in space, as well as developing predictive criteria for susceptibility to space motion sickness based on ground-based data. Comparisons of these crewmembers are made to a larger set of subjects from previous experiments (treatment and "test-only" controls subjects). This paper describes all preflight methods, results and proposed changes for future tests.

  6. [Autogenic training (AT)--respiratory feedback (RFB); similarities and limits in general practice oriented differential indications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barolin, G S

    1988-04-15

    Autogenic Training (AT) is not merely a "relaxation exercise". We quote five dimensions of AT that should by clearly differentiated: 1) concentration, 2) relaxation, 3) vegetative switch toward the hypnoid state, 4) dynamising reprise exercise. 5) holistic inclusion in a complex psychotherapeutical concept. We consider the self induced hypnoid state plus dynamising reprise exercise as the main components for the beneficial effect of AT. The hynoid state has its neurophysiological definition as a third human state of consciousness. The reprise exercise is more than making it abolish, but has its own therapeutical values: dynamisation. Respiratory feedback (RBF - a special kind of biofeedback) has the factors relaxation and vegetative switch towards hypnoid in common with autogenic training. Where these components are specially requested, RFB proves valuable in therapy. In other indications however AT is of much better use. Namely: where the educational value of mutation, self-concentration and the therapeutic context is of predominant importance. AT as well as RFB may be considered "misused" in having them replace the therapeutical and understanding conversation between doctor and patients, in a mechanistic way. As a slogan it may be said: AT goes deeper, RFB goes quicker.

  7. Effectiveness of autogenic relaxation training on children and adolescents with behavioral and emotional problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbeck, Lutz; Schmid, Katharina

    2003-09-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of autogenic relaxation training in a mildly disturbed outpatient population of children and adolescents with mostly internalizing symptoms, and/or some aggressive, impulsive, or attention deficit symptoms. Fifty children and adolescents from southern Germany (mean age 10.2 years; range 6-15 years; mostly intact middle class family background) participated in a group intervention program. Fifteen patients were randomly assigned to a waiting-list control group. Behavior symptoms (Child Behavior Checklist), psychosomatic complaints (Giessen Complaint List), and level of stress were assessed before and after the intervention or after the waiting phase. Individual goal attainment was evaluated at the end of the intervention and in a 3-month follow-up. The parent report on CBCL reflected reduced symptoms compared with control. The child report indicated reduced stress and psychosomatic complaints both in the intervention and control group, and no significant group x time interaction effects occurred on these scales. Effect sizes of 0.49 in the CBCL and 0.36 in the complaint list indicated clinically relevant effects of the intervention compared with the control group. At the end of the intervention, 56% of the children and 55% of the parents reported partial goal attainment, 38% of the children and 30% of the parents reported complete goal attainment; 71% of the parents confirmed partial goal attainment 3 months postintervention. Autogenic relaxation training is an effective broadband method for children and adolescents.

  8. [Effect of autogenic training with cognitive and symbol therapy on the treatment of patients with primary headache].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsombók, Terézia; Juhász, Gabriella; Gonda, Xénia; Vitrai, József; Bagdy, György

    2005-01-01

    Only a minor part of headaches are associated with an organic abnormality in the nervous system. In case of migraine and tension headache, the main provoking factor is psychological stress. Furthermore, these syndromes often occur together with depression and anxiety disorders, and when these comorbid conditions are present headache attacks tend to be more frequent, longer and stronger, causing an increase in the consumption of antimigraine agents, and at the same time increase the consumption of antidepressant and anxiolytic agents. Further to drugs, modified versions of Schultz-type autogenic training is also frequently used for anxiolysis. The aim of our research was to study the effect of the cognitive and symbol therapy enhanced autogenic training on headache and related drug consumption in three different types of primary headaches. Twenty five female patients with migraine, tension-type headache or mixed headache participated in an eight-month follow-up study. Headache frequency, analgesic, antimigraine and anxiolytic consumption were measured by means of a headache diary. During the first four months (observation phase) patients became familiar with using the diary, and in the second four months they participated in autogenic training. The data of the second, third and fourth months were considered as baseline data. Our method decreased headache frequency and drug consumption in all three headache groups. This means that the cognitive and symbol therapy enhanced autogenic training is an effective alternative for medications in the treatment of primary headaches.

  9. A Single Session of Autogenic Training Increases Acute Subjective and Physiological Sexual Arousal in Sexually Functional Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Amelia; Meston, Cindy

    2017-10-03

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has recently been associated with female sexual function (Stanton, Lorenz, Pulverman, & Meston, 2015). Below-average HRV was identified as a possible risk factor for sexual arousal dysfunction and overall sexual dysfunction in women. Based on this newly established relationship between HRV and female sexual function, the present study examined the effect of autogenic training to increase HRV on acute physiological and subjective sexual arousal in women. Specifically, vaginal pulse amplitude (VPA), an index of genital sexual arousal, and subjective sexual arousal were assessed in 33 sexually functional women, aged 18 to 27, before and after a short session of autogenic training. Autogenic training, a relaxation technique that restores the balance between the activity of the sympathetic and the parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system, has been shown to significantly increase HRV (Miu, Heilman, & Miclea, 2009). After autogenic training, significant increases in both VPA (p <.05) and subjective sexual arousal (p <.005) were observed. Moreover, change in HRV from pre- to postmanipulation significantly moderated changes in subjective sexual arousal (p <.05) when it was measured continuously during the presentation of the erotic stimulus. This cost-effective, easy-to-administer behavioral intervention may have important implications for increasing sexual arousal in women.

  10. The application of autogenic training in counseling center for mother and child in order to promote breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidas, Mercedes; Folnegović-Smalc, Vera; Catipović, Marija; Kisić, Marko

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether mothers with newborn children, the usage of autogenic training with advice on breastfeeding effect on: the decision and the duration of breastfeeding, increase maternal confidence and support. It was assumed that the above result in a higher percentage of mothers who exclusively breastfed baby during the first six months of child's life. The survey was conducted in the Association "For a healthy and happy childhood"-Counseling center for mother and child, in Bjelovar in 2010. The Counseling center was attended by 100 nursing mothers with children aged up to two months. They randomly went to the study or control group. Mothers of both groups were advised to successful breastfeeding. Study group has practiced autogenic training until the child's age of six months. In parallel, by using psychotherapeutic interview and specific questionnaires we collected data on the somatic, psychological and social situation of the mother, discovered mother's mental changes (anxiety, depression) that were treated. The results at the end of the study confirm the initial expected benefits from the application of autogenic training. Mothers of the study group were significantly more emotionally balanced with a higher self-esteem. Autogenous training with the advices for successful breastfeeding conducted in this counseling center contributed in significantly higher rate of breastfeeding children up to six months of life, improved mental and physical health of mother and child and their peculiar relationship.

  11. Autogenic-Feedback Training: A Potential Treatment for Orthostatic Intolerance in Aerospace Crews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, P. S.; Toscano, W. B.; Miller, N. E.; Pickering, T. G.; Shapiro, D.; Stevenson, J.; Maloney, S.; Knapp, J.

    1994-01-01

    Postflight orthostatic intolerance has been identified as a serious biomedical problem associated with long-duration exposure to microgravity in space. High priority has been given to the development of countermeasures for this disorder that are both effective and practical. A considerable body of clinical research has demonstrated that people can be taught to increase their own blood pressure voluntarily, and that this is an effective treatment for chronic orthostatic intolerance in paralyzed patients. The current pilot study was designed to examine the feasibility of adding training in control of blood pressure to an existing preflight training program designed to facilitate astronaut adaptation to microgravity. Using an operant conditioning procedure, autogenic-feedback training (AFT), three men and two women participated in four to nine training (15-30-minute) sessions. At the end of training, the average increase in systolic and diastolic pressure, as well as mean arterial pressures, that the subjects made ranged between 20 and 50 mm Hg under both supine and 45 deg head-up tilt conditions. These findings indicate that AFT may be a useful alternative treatment or supplement to existing approaches for preventing postflight orthostatic intolerance. Furthermore, the use of operant conditioning methods for training cardiovascular responses may contribute to the general understanding of the mechanisms of orthostatic intolerance.

  12. Autogenic-feedback training: A potential treatment for post-flight orthostatic intolerance in aerospace crews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.; Miller, Neil E.; Pickering, Thomas G.; Shapiro, David

    1993-01-01

    Postflight orthostatic intolerance was identified as a serious biomedical problem associated with long duration exposure to microgravity in space. High priority was given to the development of countermeasures for this disorder which are both effective and practical. A considerable body of clinical research demonstrated that people can be taught to increase their own blood pressure voluntarily and that this is an effective treatment for chronic orthostatic intolerance in paralyzed patients. The present pilot study was designed to examine the feasibility of adding training in control of blood pressure to an existing preflight training program designed to facilitate astronaut adaptation to microgravity. Using an operant conditioning procedure, Autogenic-Feedback Training (AFT), three men and two women participated in four to nine (15-30 training sessions). At the end of training, the average increase in systolic and diastolic pressure, as well as mean arterial pressures that the subjects made, ranged between 20 and 5O mmHg under both supine and 45 deg head-up tilt conditions. These findings suggest that AFT may be a useful alternative treatment or supplement to existing approaches for preventing postflight orthostatic intolerance. Further, the use of operant conditioning methods for training cardiovascular responses may contribute to the general understanding of the mechanisms of orthostatic intolerance.

  13. Autogenic feedback training experiment: A preventative method for space motion sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, Patricia S.

    1993-01-01

    Space motion sickness is a disorder which produces symptoms similar to those of motion sickness on Earth. This syndrome has affected approximately 50 percent of all astronauts and cosmonauts exposed to microgravity in space, but it differs from what is commonly known as motion sickness in a number of critical ways. There is currently no ground-based method for predicting susceptibility to motion sickness in space. Antimotion sickness drugs have had limited success in preventing or counteracting symptoms in space, and frequently caused debilitating side effects. The objectives were: (1) to evaluate the effectiveness of Autogenic-Feedback Training as a countermeasure for space motion sickness; (2) to compare physiological data and in-flight symptom reports to ground-based motion sickness data; and (3) to predict susceptibility to space motion sickness based on pre-flight data of each treatment group crew member.

  14. Effects of autogenic training and antihypertensive agents on circadian and circaseptan variation of blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yoshihiko; Cornélissen, Germaine; Watanabe, Misako; Watanabe, Fumihiko; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Ohkawa, Shi-ichiro; Kikuchi, Takenori; Halberg, Franz

    2003-10-01

    Even when the daily blood pressure mean is acceptable, too large a circadian amplitude of blood pressure largely increases cardiovascular disease risk. Autogenic training (N = 11), a non-pharmacologic intervention capable of lowering an excessive blood pressure variability, may be well-suited for MESOR-normotensive patients diagnosed with circadian-hyper-amplitude-tension (CHAT). Not all anti-hypertensive drugs affect blood pressure variability. Accordingly, long-acting carteolol (N = 11) and/or atenolol (N = 8) may be preferred to captopril retard (N = 13), nilvadipine (N = 8), or amlodipine (N = 7) for midline-estimating statistic of rhythm (MESOR)-hypertensive patients with CHAT. Prospective outcome studies are needed to assess whether the relative merits of these treatments are in keeping with their effects on blood pressure and blood pressure variability.

  15. [Self-relaxation techniques for glaucoma patients. Significance of autogenic training, hypnosis and music therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelmann, T; Strempel, I

    2016-02-01

    Glaucoma is currently the second most common cause of severe visual impairment and blindness worldwide. Standard pharmaceutical and surgical interventions often fail to prevent progression of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. To evaluate whether adjuvantly applied self-relaxation techniques can significantly impact intraocular pressure, ocular perfusion and the overall mental state of affected patients. A search of the literature was carried out and a comprehensive overview of currently available data is presented. Autogenic training, hypnosis and music therapy can significantly impact intraocular pressure, ocular perfusion and overall mental state of patients suffering from glaucoma. As all of these adjuvant therapeutic options are cost-effective, available almost everywhere and at anytime as well as without any known side effects, they can be useful additional techniques in the overall concept for treating glaucoma patients. Regular ocular examinations by an ophthalmologist are, however, mandatory.

  16. Autogenic training reduces anxiety after coronary angioplasty: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanji, N; White, A R; Ernst, E

    2004-03-01

    Autogenic training (AT) is a method of autosuggestion with some potential for reducing anxiety. This study tests whether AT lowers anxiety levels experienced by patients undergoing coronary angioplasty. Fifty-nine patients were randomly assigned to receive regular AT or no such therapy as an adjunct to standard care for 5 months. The primary outcome measure was State Anxiety at 2 months. Qualitative information was generated by face-to-face interviews. State Anxiety showed a significant intergroup difference both at 2 and 5 months. This finding was corroborated by secondary outcome measures, for example, quality of life, and by qualitative information about patients' experiences. The results do not allow us to determine whether the observed effects are specific to AT or of a nonspecific nature. Our results suggest that AT may have a role in reducing anxiety of patients undergoing coronary angioplasty.

  17. NASA-Navy Telemedicine: Autogenic Feedback Training Exercises for Motion Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acromite, Michael T.; Cowings, Patricia; Toscano, William; Davis, Carl; Porter, Henry O.

    2010-01-01

    Airsickness is the most significant medical condition affecting naval aviation training. A 2001 study showed that airsickness was reported in 81% of naval aviation students and was associated with 82% of below average flight scores. The cost to a single training air-wing was over $150,000 annually for fuel and maintenance costs alone. Resistent cases are sent to the Naval Aerospace Medical Institute (NAMI) for evaluation and desensitization in the self-paced airsickness desensitization (SPAD) program. This approach is 75% successful, but can take up to 8 weeks at a significant travel cost. NASA Ames Research Center's Autogenic Feedback Training Exercises (AFTE) uses physiological and biofeedback training for motion sickness prevention. It has a remote capability that has been used from Moffett Field, CA to Atlanta, GA . AFTE is administered in twelve (30-minute) training sessions. The success rate for the NASA AFTE program has been over 85%. Methods: Implementation Phases: Phase I: Transfer NASA AFTE to NAMI; NASA will remotely train aviation students at NAMI. Phase II: NAMI-centered AFTE application with NASA oversight. Phase III: NAMI-centered AFTE to remotely train at various Navy sites. Phase IV: NAMI to offer Tri-service application and examine research opportunities. Results: 1. Use available telemedicine connectivity between NAMI and NASA. 2. Save over $2,000 per student trained. 3. Reduce aviation training attrition. 4. Provide standardization of multi-location motion sickness training. 5. Future tri-service initiatives. 6. Data to NASA and Navy for QA and research opportunities.

  18. Adjuvant auricular electroacupuncture and autogenic training in rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized controlled trial. Auricular acupuncture and autogenic training in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernateck, Michael; Becker, Mareike; Schwake, Christine; Hoy, Ludwig; Passie, Torsten; Parlesak, Alexandr; Fischer, Michael J; Fink, Matthias; Karst, Matthias

    2008-08-01

    In contrast to psychological interventions the usefulness of acupuncture as an adjuvant therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has not yet been demonstrated. The efficacy of auricular electroacupuncture (EA) was directly compared with autogenic training (AT). Patients with RA (n = 44) were randomized into EA or AT groups. EA and lessons in AT were performed once weekly for 6 weeks. Primary outcome measures were the mean weekly pain intensity and the disease activity score 28 (DAS 28); secondary outcome measures were the use of pain medication, the pain disability index (PDI), the clinical global impression (CGI) and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, which were assessed during the study period and 3 months after the end of treatment. At the end of the treatment and at 3-month follow-up a clinically meaningful and statistically significant improvement (p < 0.05) could be observed in all outcome parameters and both groups. In contrast to the AT group, the onset of these effects in the EA group could already be observed after the 2nd treatment week. In the 4th treatment week the EA group reported significantly less pain than the AT group (p = 0.040). After the end of treatment (7th week) the EA group assessed their outcome as significantly more improved than the AT group (p = 0.035). The erythrocyte sedimentation rate in the EA group was significantly reduced (p = 0.010), and the serum concentration of tumor necrosis factor-alpha was significantly increased compared to the AT group (p = 0.020). The adjuvant use of both EA and AT in the treatment of RA resulted in significant short- and long-term treatment effects. The treatment effects of auricular EA were more pronounced. Copyright (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Autogenic-feedback training exercise is superior to promethazine for control of motion sickness symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, P. S.; Toscano, W. B.

    2000-01-01

    Motion sickness symptoms affect approximately 50% of the crew during space travel and are commonly treated with intramuscular injections of promethazine. The purpose of this paper is to compare the effectiveness of three treatments for motion sickness: intramuscular injections (i.m.) of promethazine, a physiological training method (autogenic-feedback training exercise [AFTE]), and a no-treatment control. An earlier study tested the effects of promethazine on cognitive and psychomotor performance and motion sickness tolerance in a rotating chair. For the present paper, motion sickness tolerance, symptom reports, and physiological responses of these subjects were compared to matched subjects selected from an existing database who received either AFTE or no treatment. Three groups of 11 men, between the ages of 33 and 40 years, were matched on the number of rotations tolerated during their initial rotating-chair motion sickness test. The motion sickness test procedures and the 7-day interval between tests were the same for all subjects. The drug group was tested under four treatment conditions: baseline (no injections), a 25 mg dose of promethazine, a 50 mg dose of promethazine, and a placebo of sterile saline. AFTE subjects were given four 30-minute AFTE sessions before their second, third, and fourth motion sickness tests (6 hours total). The no-treatment control subjects were only given the four rotating-chair tests. Motion sickness tolerance was significantly increased after 4 hours of AFTE when compared to either 25 mg (p training.

  20. Effects of autogenic training on stress response and heart rate variability in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seung-Joo; Kim, Chunmi

    2014-12-01

    This study was undertaken to confirm the effects of autogenic training (AT) on stress response and heart rate variability in nursing school students experiencing stress related to clinical training. The study was carried out from September 2012 to April 2013 in a quasi-experimental nonequivalent control group using a pretest-posttest design. The participants were 40 nursing students in their third year at either of two nursing colleges. All consented to participate. Nineteen nursing students at one college were assigned to the experimental group and underwent the 8-week AT program, and the other 21 were assigned to the control group and did not undergo any training. Stress response was assessed by questionnaire and HRV was measured three times, that is, before the program, at the end of the program, and 6 months after the end of the AT program. A significant time/group interaction was found for stress response (F = 4.68, p = .012), a subjective indicator. However, no significant interaction was found for the objective indicators of heart rate variability, normalized low frequency (F = 2.59, p = .090), normalized high frequency (F = 2.59, p = .090), or low frequency to high frequency ratio (F = 1.38, p = .257). The results suggest that AT provides an acceptable approach to stress reduction in nursing students. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Autogenic Feedback Training Exercise and pilot performance: enhanced functioning under search-and-rescue flying conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, P. S.; Kellar, M. A.; Folen, R. A.; Toscano, W. B.; Burge, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Studies have shown that autonomous mode behavior is one cause of aircraft fatalities due to pilot error. In such cases, the pilot is in a high state of psychological and physiological arousal and tends to focus on one problem, while ignoring more critical information. This study examined the effect of training in physiological self-recognition and regulation, as a means of improving crew cockpit performance. Seventeen pilots were assigned to the treatment and control groups matched for accumulated flight hours. The treatment group contained 4 pilots from HC-130 Hercules aircraft and 4 HH-65 Dolphin helicopter pilots; the control group contained 3 pilots of HC-130s and 6 helicopter pilots. During an initial flight, physiological data were recorded on each crewmember and an instructor pilot rated individual crew performance. Eight crewmembers were then taught to regulate their own physiological response levels using Autogenic-Feedback Training Exercise (AFTE). The remaining participants received no training. During a second flight, treatment participants showed significant improvement in performance (rated by the same instructor pilot as in pretests) while controls did not improve. The results indicate that AFTE management of high states of physiological arousal may improve pilot performance during emergency flying conditions.

  2. Autogenic Training as a behavioural approach to insomnia: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Ann; Lorenc, Ava; Robinson, Nicola

    2012-04-01

    Insomnia is commonly associated with chronic health problems. Behavioural and cognitive factors often perpetuate a vicious cycle of anxiety and sleep disturbance, leading to long-term insomnia. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence currently recommends behavioural approaches before prescribing hypnotics. Behavioural approaches aim to treat underlying causes, but are not widely available. Research usually includes patients diagnosed with insomnia rather than secondary, co-morbid sleep- related problems. To examine the effectiveness of autogenic training (AT) as a non-drug approach to sleep-related problems associated with chronic ill health. Prospective pre- and post-treatment cohort study. AT centre, Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. All patients referred for AT from April 2007 to April 2008 were invited to participate. Participants received standard 8-week training, with no specific focus on sleep. Sleep questionnaires were administered at four time points, 'Measure Your Medical Outcome Profile' (MYMOP) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, before and after treatment. Results before and after treatment were compared. Camden and Islington Community Local Research and Ethics Committee approved the study. The AT course was completed by 153 participants, of whom 73% were identified as having a sleep-related problem. Improvements in sleep patterns included: sleep onset latency (P = 0.049), falling asleep quicker after night waking (P training. AT may provide an approach to insomnia that could be incorporated into primary care.

  3. Autogenic-feedback training improves pilot performance during emergency flying conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellar, Michael A.; Folen, Raymond A.; Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.; Hisert, Glen L.

    1994-01-01

    Studies have shown that autonomous mode behavior is one cause of aircraft fatalities due to pilot error. In such cases, the pilot is in a high state of psychological and physiological arousal and tends to focus on one problem, while ignoring more critical information. This study examined the effect of training in physiological self-recognition and regulation, as a means of improving crew cockpit performance. Seventeen pilots were assigned to the treatment and control groups matched for accumulated flight hours. The treatment group comprised three pilots of HC-130 Hercules aircraft and four HH-65 Dolphin helicopter pilots; the control group comprised three pilots of HC-130's and six Dolphin helicopter pilots. During an initial flight, physiological data were recorded for each crew member and individual crew performance was rated by an instructor pilot. Eight crewmembers were then taught to regulate their own physiological response levels using Autogenic-Feedback Training (AFT). The remaining subjects received no training. During a second flight, treatment subjects showed significant improvement in performance, while controls did not improve. The results indicate that AFT management of high states of physiological arousal may improve pilot performance during emergency flying conditions.

  4. [Substance P and vasoactive intestinal peptide in patients with progressive scleroderma. Determination of plasma level before and after autogenic training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haustein, U F; Weber, B; Seikowski, K

    1995-02-01

    In 12 patients suffering from systemic sclerosis (SSc) the influence of autogenic training on the plasma level of the neuropeptides substance P and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) was studied. Compared with healthy controls the SSc patients exhibited significantly elevated levels of substance P (mean +/- SD: 7.1 +/- 3.2 pmol/l vs 1.6 +/- 1.6 pmol/l). Apart from variations the VIP plasma concentration did not significantly differ from that in healthy controls (mean +/- SD 10.7 +/- 7.1 pmol/l versus 12.0 +/- 5.3 pmol/l). Autogenic training did not bring about any significant changes in the plasma levels of neuropeptides.

  5. [Autogenic training in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göhr, M; Röpcke, B; Pistor, K; Eggers, C

    1997-04-01

    This paper discusses psychosocial influences of diabetes mellitus type 1 on children and young patients. A group of 21 patients, age 9 to 14 years with Diabetes mellitus type 1 attended a course in "Autogenic Training" for a period of 11 weeks. From the multidimensional questionnaire for children (PFK 9-14, SETZ U. RAUSCHE 1976) 15 dimensions of personality and 5 second rank factors were extracted at the beginning and at the end of training and 5 months later. Additionally HbA1-scores were assessed at the beginning and at the end at a 2 month and a 5 month-follow-up. At the beginning of the course only on one of the 15 scales a significant difference could be observed between experimental group and age related normal population. After training 5 scales and one second rank factor showed significant changes. Significant reduction was observed in: "need for aggressive forms of dominance behaviour" "feeling of submission with respects to other:", "emotional lability" and "tendency for dependence on adults". A significantly increased score was observed in the scale measuring "self confidence regarding one's own meaning, decisions and planning ability". The second rank faktor "neuroticism" was significantly reduced. Against expectations there was no reduction in HbA1 scores. At the end of training HbA1 scores even had increased significantly. But this might have been related to the high frequency of infections during this course. In subjective ratings of training evaluation most of the course members and their parents described fewer problems with attention, less test-anxiety and less aggression and nervousness. The results of this prospective pilot-study are discussed in terms of the psychodynamic influence on diabetes.

  6. Relaxation and health-related quality of life in multiple sclerosis: the example of autogenic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Georgina; Andersen, Mark B; Morris, Tony

    2005-06-01

    This study was a pilot project to explore the effect of an autogenic training program (AT; a relaxation intervention) on the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and well-being for people with multiple sclerosis. Participants either met weekly for sessions in AT for 10 weeks (n = 11) or were assigned to the control group (n = 11). The AT group was also asked to practice the technique daily at home. Scales designed to measure HRQOL and aspects of well-being (mood and depressed affect) were taken preintervention and at week 8 of the 10-week program. ANCOVAs using a measure of social support and pretest scores as covariates revealed that at the posttest the AT group reported more energy and vigor than the control group and were less limited in their roles due to physical and emotional problems. Future research should involve studies conducted over an extended period, together with sufficiently sized samples to explore the effect of frequency of practice of relaxation training on HRQOL and well-being for people with multiple sclerosis.

  7. Effect of autogenic training on cardiac autonomic nervous activity in high-risk fire service workers for posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Satoko; Fujita, Masatoshi; Sakamoto, Satoko; Shirakawa, Taro

    2006-05-01

    We investigated the effect of autogenic training (AT) on cardiac autonomic nervous activity in fire services workers with the use of the questionnaire of the Japanese-language version of Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R-J) and indexes of heart rate variability. We studied 22 male fire services workers who were divided into posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-related stress group (n=10) and control group (n=12). They underwent AT twice or three times a week for 2 months. Posttraumatic stress disorder-related stress group showed a significantly higher cardiac sympathetic nervous activity and a significantly lower cardiac parasympathetic nervous activity than control group at baseline. Autogenic training significantly decreased cardiac sympathetic nervous activity and significantly increased cardiac parasympathetic nervous activity in both groups. These changes were accompanied by a significant decrease in the total points of IES-R-J. Autogenic training is effective for ameliorating the disturbance of cardiac autonomic nervous activity and psychological issues secondary to PTSD.

  8. Reduced heart rate variability and vagal tone in anxiety: trait versus state, and the effects of autogenic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miu, Andrei C; Heilman, Renata M; Miclea, Mircea

    2009-01-28

    This study investigated heart rate variability (HRV) in healthy volunteers that were selected for extreme scores of trait anxiety (TA), during two opposite psychophysiological conditions of mental stress, and relaxation induced by autogenic training. R-R intervals, HF and LF powers, and LF/HF ratios were derived from short-term electrocardiographic recordings made during mental stress and relaxation by autogenic training, with respiratory rate and skin conductance being controlled for in all the analyses. The main finding was that high TA was associated with reduced R-R intervals and HF power across conditions. In comparison to mental stress, autogenic training increased HRV and facilitated the vagal control of the heart. There were no significant effects of TA or the psychophysiological conditions on LF power, or LF/HF ratio. These results support the view that TA, which is an important risk factor for anxiety disorders and predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, is associated with autonomic dysfunction that seems likely to play a pathogenetic role in the long term.

  9. Response of spinal myoclonus to a combination therapy of autogenic training and biofeedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kempuraj Duraisamy

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Clinical evidence indicates that certain types of movement disorders are due to psychosomatic factors. Patients with myoclonic movements are usually treated by a variety of therapeutic agents. Autogenic training (AT, a recognized form of psychosomatic therapies, is suitable for certain types of neurological diseases. We describe a patient with myoclonus who failed to respond to conventional medical therapy. His symptoms were exaggerated by psychogenic factors, especially anger. Case presentation A 42-year-old man was admitted to our hospital, Preventive Welfare Clinic, for severe paroxysmal axial myoclonus of the left shoulder and abdominal muscles. The initial diagnosis was "combination of spinal segmental myoclonus and propriospinal myoclonus". The myoclonic movements did not occur during sleep but were aggravated by bathing, alcohol drinking, and anger. Psychological examination indicated hostile attribution. Although considered not to be a case of psychogenic myoclonus, a "psychogenic factor" was definitely involved in the induction of the organic myoclonus. The final diagnosis was "combination of spinal segmental myoclonus and propriospinal myoclonus accompanied by features of psychosomatic disorders". The patient underwent psychosomatic therapy including AT and surface electromyography (EMG-biofeedback therapy and treatment with clonazepam and carbamazepine. Results AT and EMG-biofeedback resulted in shortening the duration and reducing the amplitude and frequency of the myoclonic discharges. Conclusion Psychosomatic therapy with AT and surface EMG-biofeedback produced excellent improvement of myoclonic movements and allowed the reduction of the dosage of conventional medications.

  10. Perceived changes associated with autogenic training for anxiety: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurdakul, Levent; Holttum, Sue; Bowden, Ann

    2009-12-01

    Autogenic training (AT) is a behaviourally orientated intervention usually taught in eight or nine sessions in the United Kingdom: clients are taught six simple mental formulae designed to induce a calm state of mind and body, five additional emotional expression exercises, and individually tailored 'personal formulae' for supporting positive change. In the absence of existing psychological (as opposed to neuro-physiological) models of AT's mechanisms, this study aimed to produce the first such model, drawing on the perceptions of recent AT clients. An abbreviated form of grounded theory was used to explore retrospectively and in detail the experiences of a small sample of people of the process of change. Forty people were approached and 12 women participated who had completed AT in group form after referral for anxiety. Each was interviewed individually. A preliminary model of change was produced, grounded in the interview data. Factors reported to be salient were learning in a group, the core AT experience (the six standard exercises), difficulties with practice, the importance of regular practice integrated into daily life, and enhanced well-being and coping, which incorporated reduced worrying and clearer thinking. Limitations of the study are discussed, as are areas for further research and implications for anxiety treatment. This was a small study with a self-selected sample. However, theoretical generalizations can be made about the process of change. Since AT does not specifically focus on challenging negative cognitions, the cognitive changes reported have implications for anxiety treatments.

  11. Response of spinal myoclonus to a combination therapy of autogenic training and biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Koreaki; Theoharides, Theoharis C; Kempuraj, Duraisamy; Conti, Pio

    2007-10-12

    Clinical evidence indicates that certain types of movement disorders are due to psychosomatic factors. Patients with myoclonic movements are usually treated by a variety of therapeutic agents. Autogenic training (AT), a recognized form of psychosomatic therapies, is suitable for certain types of neurological diseases. We describe a patient with myoclonus who failed to respond to conventional medical therapy. His symptoms were exaggerated by psychogenic factors, especially anger. A 42-year-old man was admitted to our hospital, Preventive Welfare Clinic, for severe paroxysmal axial myoclonus of the left shoulder and abdominal muscles. The initial diagnosis was "combination of spinal segmental myoclonus and propriospinal myoclonus". The myoclonic movements did not occur during sleep but were aggravated by bathing, alcohol drinking, and anger. Psychological examination indicated hostile attribution. Although considered not to be a case of psychogenic myoclonus, a "psychogenic factor" was definitely involved in the induction of the organic myoclonus. The final diagnosis was "combination of spinal segmental myoclonus and propriospinal myoclonus accompanied by features of psychosomatic disorders". The patient underwent psychosomatic therapy including AT and surface electromyography (EMG)-biofeedback therapy and treatment with clonazepam and carbamazepine. AT and EMG-biofeedback resulted in shortening the duration and reducing the amplitude and frequency of the myoclonic discharges. Psychosomatic therapy with AT and surface EMG-biofeedback produced excellent improvement of myoclonic movements and allowed the reduction of the dosage of conventional medications.

  12. Effectiveness of autogenic training in improving motor performances in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajimsha, M S; Majeed, Nisar A; Chinnavan, Elanchezhian; Thulasyammal, Ramiah Pillai

    2014-06-01

    Relaxation training can be an important adjunct in reducing symptoms associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). Autogenic Training (AT) is a simple, easily administered and inexpensive technique for retraining the mind and the body to be able to relax. AT uses visual imagery and body awareness to promote a state of deep relaxation. To investigate whether AT when used as an adjunct to Physiotherapy (PT) improves motor performances in PD in comparison with a control group receiving PT alone. Randomized, controlled, single blinded trial. Movement Disorder Clinic and Department of Physiotherapy, Sree Chithira Thirunal Institute of Medical Sciences and Technology in Trivandrum, Kerala, India. Patients with PD of grade 2 or 3 of Hoehn & Yahr (H&Y) scale (N = 66). AT group or control group. The techniques were administered by Physiotherapists trained in AT and consisted of 40 sessions per patient over 8 weeks. Motor score subscale of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) was used to measure the motor performances. The primary outcome measure was the difference in Motor score subscale of UPDRS scores between Week 1 (pretest score), Week 8 (posttest score), and follow-up at Week 12 after randomization. The simple main effects analysis showed that the AT group performed better than the control group in weeks 8 and 12 (P < .005). Patients in the AT and control groups reported a 51.78% and 35.24% improvement, respectively, in their motor performances in Week 8 compared with that in Week 1, which persisted, in the follow-up (Week 12) as 30.82% in the AT group and 21.42% in the control group. This study provides evidence that AT when used as an adjunct to PT is more effective than PT alone in improving motor performances in PD patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cerebral somatic pain modulation during autogenic training in fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naglatzki, R P; Schlamann, M; Gasser, T; Ladd, M E; Sure, U; Forsting, M; Gizewski, E R

    2012-10-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies are increasingly employed in different conscious states. Autogenic training (AT) is a common clinically used relaxation method. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cerebral modulation of pain activity patterns due to AT and to correlate the effects to the degree of experience with AT and strength of stimuli. Thirteen volunteers familiar with AT were studied with fMRI during painful electrical stimulation in a block design alternating between resting state and electrical stimulation, both without AT and while employing the same paradigm when utilizing their AT abilities. The subjective rating of painful stimulation and success in modulation during AT was assessed. During painful electrical stimulation without AT, fMRI revealed activation of midcingulate, right secondary sensory, right supplementary motor, and insular cortices, the right thalamus and left caudate nucleus. In contrast, utilizing AT only activation of left insular and supplementary motor cortices was revealed. The paired t-test revealed pain-related activation in the midcingulate, posterior cingulate and left anterior insular cortices for the condition without AT, and activation in the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex under AT. Activation of the posterior cingulate cortex and thalamus correlated with the amplitude of electrical stimulation. This study revealed an effect on cerebral pain processing while performing AT. This might represent the cerebral correlate of different painful stimulus processing by subjects who are trained in performing relaxation techniques. However, due to the absence of a control group, further studies are needed to confirm this theory. © 2012 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  14. Workability’s recreation methodic with application of cupping massage and autogenic training of women student teams’ basketball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozina Zh.L.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to experimentally subsituate effectiveness of non traditional complex methodic of recreation in female basketball players’ training process. Material: 22 basketball players of women student’s team participated in the research. Pedagogic testing was conducted by 12 tests in special physical and technical fitness. Psycho-physiological testing was conducted by program PSYCHO-DIAGNOSTIC. Groups were trained by identical programs during 9 weeks. Results: we authors observed increased physical and technical fitness of basketball players. Besides, quantity of mistakes in response to visual irritator reduced. It indirectly witnesses about strengthening of nervous processes. There was registered influence of mind on quality of organism’s recreation after physical loads. Conclusions: the authors recommend methodic of cupping massage, combined with autogenic training. Autogenic training implies repeated pronouncing by instructor (or independently by sportswomen of text, describing coming turn by turn natural images. Peculiarities of massage were influence of massage passes on muscles and ligaments. Cupping massage was used after warming up classic massage techniques.

  15. Workability’s recreation methodic with application of cupping massage and autogenic training of women student teams’ basketball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zh.L. Kozina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to experimentally subsituate effectiveness of non traditional complex methodic of recreation in female basketball players’ training process. Material: 22 basketball players of women student’s team participated in the research. Pedagogic testing was conducted by 12 tests in special physical and technical fitness. Psycho-physiological testing was conducted by program PSYCHO-DIAGNOSTIC. Groups were trained by identical programs during 9 weeks. Results: we authors observed increased physical and technical fitness of basketball players. Besides, quantity of mistakes in response to visual irritator reduced. It indirectly witnesses about strengthening of nervous processes. There was registered influence of mind on quality of organism’s recreation after physical loads. Conclusions: the authors recommend methodic of cupping massage, combined with autogenic training. Autogenic training implies repeated pronouncing by instructor (or independently by sportswomen of text, describing coming turn by turn natural images. Peculiarities of massage were influence of massage passes on muscles and ligaments. Cupping massage was used after warming up classic massage techniques.

  16. AUTOGENIC THERAPY IN TENSION HEADACHE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amruthraj, Brunda; Mishra, H.; Kumaraiah, V.

    1987-01-01

    SUMMARY Ten subjects diagnosed as Psychalgia were taken for study. A multiple baseline design was adapted and clients were subjected to 30 sessions of autogenic training. They were assessed using physiological (EMG and thermal change) and behavioural measures (Visual analogue scale and behavioural symptom checklist). Findings revealed autogenic therapy to be effective in reducing tension headache. PMID:21927245

  17. AUTOGENIC THERAPY IN TENSION HEADACHE

    OpenAIRE

    Amruthraj, Brunda; Mishra, H.; Kumaraiah, V.

    1987-01-01

    SUMMARY Ten subjects diagnosed as Psychalgia were taken for study. A multiple baseline design was adapted and clients were subjected to 30 sessions of autogenic training. They were assessed using physiological (EMG and thermal change) and behavioural measures (Visual analogue scale and behavioural symptom checklist). Findings revealed autogenic therapy to be effective in reducing tension headache.

  18. Case report: a case of intractable Meniere's disease treated with autogenic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Fumiyuki; Nakai, Kimiko; Kunihiro, Takanobu; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2008-01-25

    Psychological stress plays an important role in the onset and course of Meniere's disease. Surgical therapy and intratympanic gentamicin treatment are options for cases that are intractable to conventional medical therapy. Psychotherapy, however, including autogenic training (AT), which can be used for general relaxation, is not widely accepted. This paper describes the successful administration of AT in a subject suffering from intractable Meniere's disease. A 51-year-old male patient has suffered from fluctuating right sensorineural hearing loss with vertigo since 1994. In May 2002, he was first admitted to our hospital due to a severe vertigo attack accompanied by right sensorineural hearing loss. Spontaneous nystagmus toward the right side was observed. Since April 2004, he has experienced vertigo spells with right-sided tinnitus a few times per month that are intractable to conventional medical therapy. After four months, tympanic tube insertion was preformed in the right tympanic membrane. Intratympanic injection of dexamethasone was ineffective. He refused Meniett therapy and intratympanic gentamicin injection. In addition to his vertigo spells, he suffered from insomnia, tinnitus, and anxiety. Tranquilizers such as benzodiazepines and antidepressants such as serotonin selective re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) failed to stop the vertigo and only slightly improved his insomnia. In December 2006, the patient began psychological counseling with a psychotherapist. After brief psychological counseling along with cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), he began AT. He diligently and regularly continued his AT training in his home according to a written timetable. His insomnia, tinnitus, and vertigo spells disappeared within a few weeks after only four psychotherapy sessions. In order to master the six standard formulas of AT, he underwent two more sessions. Thereafter, he underwent follow-up for 9 months with no additional treatment. He is now free from drugs, including

  19. Case report: a case of intractable Meniere's disease treated with autogenic training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakai Kimiko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychological stress plays an important role in the onset and course of Meniere's disease. Surgical therapy and intratympanic gentamicin treatment are options for cases that are intractable to conventional medical therapy. Psychotherapy, however, including autogenic training (AT, which can be used for general relaxation, is not widely accepted. This paper describes the successful administration of AT in a subject suffering from intractable Meniere's disease. Case presentation A 51-year-old male patient has suffered from fluctuating right sensorineural hearing loss with vertigo since 1994. In May 2002, he was first admitted to our hospital due to a severe vertigo attack accompanied by right sensorineural hearing loss. Spontaneous nystagmus toward the right side was observed. Since April 2004, he has experienced vertigo spells with right-sided tinnitus a few times per month that are intractable to conventional medical therapy. After four months, tympanic tube insertion was preformed in the right tympanic membrane. Intratympanic injection of dexamethasone was ineffective. He refused Meniett therapy and intratympanic gentamicin injection. In addition to his vertigo spells, he suffered from insomnia, tinnitus, and anxiety. Tranquilizers such as benzodiazepines and antidepressants such as serotonin selective re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs failed to stop the vertigo and only slightly improved his insomnia. In December 2006, the patient began psychological counseling with a psychotherapist. After brief psychological counseling along with cognitive behavior therapy (CBT, he began AT. He diligently and regularly continued his AT training in his home according to a written timetable. His insomnia, tinnitus, and vertigo spells disappeared within a few weeks after only four psychotherapy sessions. In order to master the six standard formulas of AT, he underwent two more sessions. Thereafter, he underwent follow-up for 9 months with no

  20. Autogenic training to manage symptomology in women with chest pain and normal coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asbury, Elizabeth A; Kanji, Nasim; Ernst, Edzard; Barbir, Mahmoud; Collins, Peter

    2009-01-01

    To explore autogenic training (AT) as a treatment for psychological morbidity, symptomology, and physiological markers of stress among women with chest pain, a positive exercise test for myocardial ischemia, and normal coronary arteries (cardiac syndrome X). Fifty-three women with cardiac syndrome X (mean +/- SD age, 57.1 +/- 8 years) were randomized to an 8-week AT program or symptom diary control. Symptom severity and frequency, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire (CAQ), and Ferrans and Powers Quality of Life Index (QLI), blood pressure, heart rate, electrocardiogram, and plasma catecholamines were measured before and after intervention and at the 8-week follow-up. Women who underwent AT had improved symptom frequency (8.04 +/- 10.08 vs 1.66 +/- 2.19, P < 0.001) compared with control women and reduced symtom severity (2.08 +/- 1.03 vs 1.23 +/- 1.36, P = 0.02) and frequency (6.11 +/- 3.17 vs 1.66 +/- 2.19, P < G 0.001) post-AT compared with baseline within group. Within-group improvements among women who underwent AT include QLI health functioning (17.80 +/- 5.74 vs 19.41 +/- 5.19, P = 0.04) and CAQ fear (1.53 +/- 0.61 vs 1.35 +/- 0.56, P = 0.02) post-AT and QLI health functioning (17.80 +/- 5.74 vs 20.09 +/- 5.47, P = 0.01), CAQ fear (1.53 +/- 0.61 vs 1.30 +/- 0.67, P = 0.002), CAQ total (1.42 +/- 0.54 vs 1.29 +/- 0.475, P = 0.04), Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory trait anxiety (42.95 +/- 11.19 vs 38.68 +/- 11.47, P = 0.01), and QLI quality of life (20.67 +/- 5.37 vs 21.9 +/- 4.89, P = 0.02) at follow-up. An 8-week AT program improves symptom frequency, with near-significant improvements in symptom severity in women with cardiac syndrome X.

  1. The effect of autogenic training on salivary immunoglobulin A in surgical patients with breast cancer: a randomized pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minowa, Chika; Koitabashi, Kikuyo

    2014-11-01

    Psychological stress among breast cancer patients can inhibit immune function and contribute to disease progression. We investigated the effects of autogenic training (AT), a relaxation method for reducing stress, on salivary immunoglobulin A (sIgA) in breast cancer surgery patients. Thirty patients scheduled to undergo breast cancer surgery were randomly assigned to an AT or control group (usual care). Patients in the AT group underwent training for 7 days after surgery. Salivary IgA and heart rate variability were assessed on the day before surgery, and on the third and seventh postoperative days. Levels of sIgA were significantly higher on the seventh postoperative day in the AT group (n = 7) compared to the control group (n = 7) (p = 0.049). These findings suggest that AT may improve immune function in breast surgery patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Autogenic-Feedback Training (AFT) as a preventive method for space motion sickness: Background and experimental design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.

    1993-01-01

    Finding an effective treatment for the motion sickness-like symptoms that occur in space has become a high priority for NASA. The background research is reviewed and the experimental design of a formal life sciences shuttle flight experiment designed to prevent space motion sickness in shuttle crew members is presented. This experiment utilizes a behavioral medicine approach to solving this problem. This method, Autogenic-Feedback Training (AFT), involves training subjects to voluntarily control several of their own physiological responses to environmental stressors. AFT has been used reliably to increase tolerance to motion sickness during ground-based tests in over 200 men and women under a variety of conditions that induce motion sickness, and preliminary evidence from space suggests that AFT may be an effective treatment for space motion sickness as well. Proposed changes to this experiment for future manifests are included.

  3. Intractable depression successfully treated with a combination of autogenic training and high-dose antidepressant in department of otorhinolaryngology: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Fumiyuki; Nakai, Kimiko; Murakami, Masato; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2009-08-14

    Patients suffering from ear discomfort are commonly encountered in the department of otolaryngology. If various clinical examinations do not reveal any objective findings, then the patients are referred to the department of internal medicine or psychiatry. Psychotherapy is recommended in some cases. This paper describes the successful administration of autogenic training in a patient suffering from ear discomfort due to major depression. We present a case of intractable depression that was successfully treated with a combination of psychotherapy, administered by a clinical psychologist, and high-dose antidepressant. The patient was a 36-year-old female with hearing discomfort in her left ear. In 2003, she experienced insomnia and an appetite loss, and her condition was diagnosed as major depression along with an avoidant personality disorder. Her depression has not been improved with antidepressant treatment for 3 years in department of psychosomatic medicine. She was referred to our department because of ear discomfort in her left ear. There was no abnormality in her physical examinations. She wanted to be treated in department of otorhinolaryngology. We increased the dose of fluvoxamine maleate up to 200 mg/day, and introduced cognitive therapy and autogenic training by a clinical psychologist. Eventually, her depressive state as well as the hearing complaint was markedly alleviated. Autogenic training can be a viable and acceptable treatment option for patients who fail to respond to other therapies. This case emphasizes the importance of autogenic training as a method to control physical symptom of depression.

  4. A Potential Treatment for Post-Flight Orthostatic Intolerance in Aero-Space Crews: Autogenic-Feedback Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, P. S.; Toscano, W. B.; Miller, N. E.; Pickering, T. G.; Shapiro, D.

    1994-01-01

    Postflight orthostatic intolerance has been identified as a serious biomedical problem associated with long duration exposure to microgravity in space. High priority has been given to the development of countermeasures for this disorder which are both effective and practical. A considerable body of clinical research has demonstrated that people can be taught to increase their own blood pressure voluntarily and that this is an effective treatment for chronic Orthostatic intolerance in paralyzed patients. The present pilot study was designed to examine the feasibility of adding training in control of blood pressure to an existing preflight training program designed to facilitate astronaut adaptation to microgravity. Using in operant conditioning procedure, Autogenic-Feedback Training (AFT), three men and two women participated in four to nine (15-30 training sessions). At the end of training ranged between 20 and 50 mm Hg under both supine and 450 head-up tilt conditions. These findings suggest that AFT may be a useful alternative treatment or supplement to existing approaches for preventing postflight Orthostatic intolerance. Further, the use of operant conditioning methods for training cardiovascular responses may contribute to the general understanding of the mechanisms of orthostatic intolerance.

  5. [2-stage group psychotherapy with integrated autogenic training within the scope of a general integrated psychotherapy concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barolin, Gerhard S

    2003-01-01

    Group-therapy and autogenic training in combination show mutual potentiation. Our results have proved the hypothesis to be true and we have also been able to explain it by an analysis of the neurophysiological and psychological findings concerning both methods. Our "model" has proved to be very economical in time and can be easily applied. It needs basic psychotherapeutical education but no special additive schooling. It is particularly well employed in rehabilitation patients, elderly patients and geronto-rehabilitation patients. As numbers of such patients are steadily increasing, it could soon become highly important, and in the technically dominated medicine of today, the particularly communicative component that we postulate in integrated psychotherapy could also grow in importance. By combining the two methods, it is not method that is at the centre of our endeavours but the patient.

  6. Autogenic-feedback training as a treatment for airsickness in high-performance military aircraft: Two case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.; Miller, Neal E.; Reynoso, Samuel

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a detailed description of the physiological and performance responses of two military pilots undergoing a treatment for motion sickness. The treatment used, Autogenic-Feedback Training (AFT), is an operant conditioning procedure where subjects are taught to control several of their autonomic responses and thereby suppress their motion sickness symptoms. Two male, active duty military pilots (U.S. Navy and U. S. Marine Corps), ages 30 and 35, were each given twelve 30-minute training sessions. The primary criterion for success of training was the subject's ability to tolerate rotating chair motion sickness tests for progressively longer periods of time and at higher rotational velocities. A standardized diagnostic scale was used during motion sickness to assess changes in the subject's perceived malaise. Physiological data were obtained from one pilot during tactical maneuvers in an F-18 aircraft after completion of his training. A significant increase in tolerance to laboratory-induced motion sickness tests and a reduction in autonomic nervous system (ANS) response variability was observed for both subjects after training. Both pilots were successful in applying AFT for controlling their airsickness during subsequent qualification tests on F-18 and T-38 aircraft and were returned to active duty flight status.

  7. Spacelab 3 flight experiment No. 3AFT23: Autogenic-feedback training as a preventive method for space adaptation syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.; Kamiya, Joe; Miller, Neal E.; Sharp, Joseph C.

    1988-01-01

    Space adaptation syndrome is a motion sickness-like disorder which affects up to 50 percent of all people exposed to microgravity in space. This experiment tested a physiological conditioning procedure (Autogenic-Feedback Training, AFT) as an alternative to pharmacological management. Four astronauts participated as subjects in this experiment. Crewmembers A and B served as treatment subjects. Both received preflight training for control of heart rate, respiration rate, peripheral blood volume, and skin conductance. Crewmembers C and D served as controls (i.e., did not receive training). Crewmember A showed reliable control of his own physiological responses, and a significant increase in motion sickness tolerance after training. Crewmember B, however, demonstrated much less control and only a moderate increase in motion sickness tolerance was observed after training. The inflight symptom reports and physiological data recordings revealed that Crewmember A did not experience any severe symptom episodes during the mission, while Crewmember B reported one severe symptom episode. Both control group subjects, C and D (who took antimotion sickness medication), reported multiple symptom episodes on mission day 0. Both inflight data and crew reports indicate that AFT may be an effective countermeasure. Additional data must be obtained inflight (a total of eight treatment and eight control subjects) before final evaluation of this treatment can be made.

  8. COMPARATIVE EFFECT OF SPECIFIC YOGIC EXERCISES AND COMBINATION OF SPECIFIC YOGIC EXERCISES WITH AUTOGENIC TRAINING ON VITAL CAPACITY OF THE MIDDLE AGED MEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SURESH KUMAR

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to find out the comparative effect of specific yogic exercises and combination of specific yogic exercises with autogenic training on vital capacity of the middle aged men. The study tried to find out type of training program that had a maximum effect on the vital capacity of the subjects. The study has been conducted on sixty middle aged men, in the age group of 30 to 50 years. The subjects (N=60 were at random divided into three equalgroups two experimental Groups and one control group, and group consisting of 20 middle aged men. Two experimental Groups participated in two different training programmes i.e. Specific yogic exercises and Combination of specific yogic exercises with autogenic training for twenty four weeks and control group performed the routine work. The data was collected were collected in beginning ,at the end of twelve week and twenty four week of training program in term of pre, mid and post test respectively by using Wetspirometer. The training schedule was prepared systematically and carefully,keeping the individual differences of the subjects and loading principals in mind. Repeated measures of ANOVA andNewman Keul’s test were applied to find out significance of mean difference among the three tests. ANACOVA andScheffe’s Post Hoc test were applied to determine the significance of mean difference among the three groups. From the results it was found that the Practice of the combination of specific yogic exercises with autogenic training is significantly effective than the specific yogic exercises programme and control group in improving the vital capacityamong the middle aged men. Twelve weeks’ practice of combination of specific yogic exercises with autogenic training significantly improved in the vital capacity among the middle aged men than the twenty four weeks of practice

  9. A quantitative and qualitative pilot study of the perceived benefits of autogenic training for a group of people with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, S; Courtney, U; Crowther, D

    2002-06-01

    This paper describes the application of autogenic training (AT), a technique of deep relaxation and self-hypnosis, in patients diagnosed with cancer,with the aim of increasing their coping ability, and reports the results of a questionnaire survey performed before and after an AT course. A reduction in arousal and anxiety can help individuals to perceive their environment as less hostile and threatening, with implications for improved perceived coping ability. Complementary therapies are considered useful in enhancing symptom relief, overall well-being and self-help when used as adjuvant therapies to allopathic medical interventions. The present study aimed to validate, in an Irish context, the effectiveness of AT as a complementary therapy for patients with cancer. Each participant completed a Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Profile of Mood States questionnaire before and after a 10-week AT course. The results indicated a significant reduction in anxiety and increase in 'fighting spirit' after compared with before training, with an improved sense of coping and improved sleep being apparent benefits of AT practice.

  10. Effect of autogenic training on general improvement in patients with irritable bowel syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, Masae; Kanazawa, Motoyori; Kano, Michiko; Endo, Yuka; Nakaya, Naoki; Hongo, Michio; Fukudo, Shin

    2010-09-01

    Autogenic training (AT) is a useful and comprehensive relaxation technique. However, no studies have investigated the effects of AT on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In this study we tested the hypothesis that AT improves symptoms of IBS. Twenty-one patients with IBS were randomly assigned to AT (n = 11, 5 male, 6 female) or control therapy (n = 10, 5 male, 5 female). AT patients were trained intensively, while the control therapy consisted of discussions about patients' meal habits and life styles. All patients answered a question related to adequate relief (AR) of IBS symptoms and four questionnaires: Self-induced IBS Questionnaire (SIBSQ), Self-reported Depression Scale (SDS), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and Medical Outcome Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36). The proportion of AR in the last AT session in the AT group (9/11, 81.8%) was significantly higher than that in the controls (3/10, 30.0%, Chi-square test, p = 0.048). Two subscales of the SF-36, i.e., social functioning and bodily pain, were significantly improved in the AT group (p < 0.05) as compared to the control group. Role emotional (p = 0.051) and general health (p = 0.068) showed a tendency for improvement in the AT group. AT may be useful in the treatment of IBS by enhancing self-control.

  11. Saliva amylase as a measure of sympathetic change elicited by autogenic training in patients with functional somatic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiba, Tadashi; Kanbara, Kenji; Ban, Ikumi; Kato, Fumie; Kawashima, Sadanobu; Saka, Yukie; Yamamoto, Kazumi; Nishiyama, Junji; Mizuno, Yasuyuki; Abe, Tetsuya; Fukunaga, Mikihiko

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to discuss the effect of autogenic training (AT) on patients with functional somatic syndrome (FSS) using salivary amylase, the skin temperature of the finger, subjective severity of symptoms, and psychological characteristics as measures. We assessed 20 patients with FSS and 23 healthy controls before and after AT. Baseline levels of salivary amylase prior to an AT session were significantly higher in the FSS group than in the control group. However, this difference was not significant after AT. The skin temperature of the finger increased after AT in both the FSS and control groups. AT contributed to the improvement of somatic symptoms in patients with FSS. Our results regarding psychological characteristics suggest that mood disturbances are deeply involved in the pathology of FSS. Individuals with FSS exhibited elevated levels of sympathetic activity compared with healthy controls. Our data indicates that AT eased dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system in patients with FSS. Thus, salivary amylase may be a useful index of change induced by AT in patients with FSS.

  12. The effects of autogenic-feedback training on motion sickness severity and heart rate variability in astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, William B.; Cowings, Patricia S.

    1994-01-01

    Space motion sickness (SMS) affects 50 percent of all people during early days of spaceflight. This study describes the results of two Shuttle flight experiments in which autogenic-feedback training (AFT), a physiological conditioning method, was tested as a treatment for this disorder. Of the six who were designated as flight subjects (two women and four men), three were given treatment and three served as controls (i.e., no AFT). Treatment subjects were given 6 hours of preflight AFT. Preflight results showed that AFT produced a significant increase in tolerance to rotating chair motion sickness tests. Further, this increased tolerance was associated with changes in specific physiological responses and reports of reduced malaise. Flight results showed that two of the three control subjects experienced repeated vomiting on the first mission day, while one subject experienced only moderate malaise. Of the three treatment subjects, one experienced mild discomfort, one moderate discomfort, and one severe motion sickness. Only the three control subjects took medication for symptom suppression. Measures of cardiac function reflective of vagal control were shown to be affected especially strongly on the first day of space flight. AFT given for control of heart rate, respiration, and other autonomic activity influenced both the vagal control measures and SMS. These data suggest that AFT may be an effective treatment for space motion sickness; however, this cannot be demonstrated conclusively with the small number of subjects described.

  13. Reducing motion sickness - A comparison of autogenic-feedback training and an alternative cognitive task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, W. B.; Cowings, P. S.

    1982-01-01

    Eighteen men were randomly assigned to three groups matched for susceptibility to Coriolis motion sickness. All subjects were given six Coriolis Sickness Susceptibility Index (CSSI) tests separated by 5-d intervals. Treatment Group I subjects were taught to control their own autonomic responses before the third, fourth, and fifth CSSI tests (6 h total training). Group II subjects were given 'sham' training in an alternative cognitive task under conditions otherwise identical to those of Group I. Group III subjects received no treatment. Results showed that Group I subjects could withstand the stress of Coriolis acceleration significantly longer after training. Neither of the other two groups changed significantly.

  14. [Comparison of the psychological effects of standard exercises with those of space exercises in autogenic training: from the perspective of passive concentration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Ikuyo; Koshikawa, Fusako

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the psychological effects of the heaviness and the warmth Standard Exercises (SE) with those of the first Space Exercises (SP) in Autogenic Training (AT) on college students. This study was conducted by the repeated practice of two experimental groups (SE, SP) and one control group (CT). The participants in the experimental groups practiced once a week, for three weeks. All the participants were assessed with State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Trait Anxiety (STAI-T), Autogenic Training Clinical Effectiveness Scale (ATCES), and Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale. The results showed that the SE group showed more decreases in STAI-T and more increases in ATCES than the SP group, while the more neurotic, showed more increases in self-esteem in both the SE and SP groups. It is possible that non-clinical adults with high neuroticism might be able to enhance their STAI-T and ATCES in the SE group than in the SP group if their SE trainers respected their bodily abilities in readily responding to changes in sensations.

  15. A pilot randomized trial assessing the effects of autogenic training in early stage cancer patients in relation to psychological status and immune system responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidderley, Margaret; Holt, Martin

    2004-03-01

    Autogenic training (AT) is a type of meditation usually used for reducing stress. This pilot study describes how AT was used on a group of early stage cancer patients and the observed effect on stress-related behaviours and immune system responses. This was a randomized trial with 31 early stage breast cancer women, having received a lumpectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. The women were randomized into two groups. Group 1 received a home visit only. Group 2 received a home visit and 2 months' weekly Autogenic training. At the beginning and end of the 2 monthly periods, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and T and B cell markers were measured to give an indication of changes in immune system responses and measurement of anxiety and depression. At the end of the study, HADS scores and T and B cell markers remained similar in the women who did not receive AT. The women receiving AT showed a strong statistical difference for an improvement in their HADS scores and those women observed in a meditative state as opposed to a relaxed state were found to have an increase in their immune responses. This study suggests AT as a powerful self-help therapy.

  16. Autogenic-Feedback Training Exercise (AFTE) Mitigates the Effects of Spatial Disorientation to Simulated Orion Spacecraft Re-Entry: Individual Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.; Reschke, Millard F.; Gebreyesus, Fiyori; Rocha, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    NASA has identified a potential risk of spatial disorientation to future astronauts during re-entry of the proposed Orion spacecraft. The purpose of this study was to determine if a 6-hour physiological training procedure, Autogenic-Feedback Training Exercise (AFTE), can mitigate these effects. Twenty subjects were assigned to two groups (AFTE and Control) matched for motion sickness susceptibility and gender. All subjects received a standard rotating chair test to determine motion sickness susceptibility; three training sessions on a manual performance task; and four exposures to a simulated Orion re-entry test in the rotating chair. Treatment subjects were given two hours of AFTE training before each Orion test. A diagnostic scale was used to evaluate motion sickness symptom severity. Results showed that 2 hours of AFTE significantly reduced motion sickness symptoms during the second Orion test. AFTE subjects were able to maintain lower heart rates and skin conductance levels and other responses than the control group subjects during subsequent tests. Trends show that performance was less degraded for AFTE subjects. The results of this study indicate that astronauts could benefit from receiving at least 2 hours of preflight AFTE. In addition, flight crews could benefit further by practicing physiologic self-regulation using mobile devices.

  17. The relationship between salivary amylase and the physical and psychological changes elicited by continuation of autogenic training in patients with functional somatic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiba, Tadashi; Abe, Tetsuya; Kanbara, Kenji; Kato, Fumie; Kawashima, Sadanobu; Saka, Yukie; Yamamoto, Kazumi; Mizuno, Yasuyuki; Nishiyama, Junji; Fukunaga, Mikihiko

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the changes in biological measures during autogenic training (AT) sessions and the relationship between these biological measures and the changes in physical and psychological measures induced by continuation of AT in patients with functional somatic syndrome (FSS). We used the salivary amylase (SAMY) level, skin temperature of the finger (TEMP), subjective symptom scores, and psychological characteristics to assess these changes. We assessed 24 patients with FSS and 23 healthy controls before and after AT. We then conducted the same tests after the participants had practiced AT at home 1 and 2 months later. The baseline SAMY levels in the first session were significantly higher in the FSS group than in the control group. However, this difference was not significant in the second and third sessions. The pattern of changes in TEMP induced by AT was not different between the FSS and control groups. Tension-anxiety and somatic symptoms in patients with FSS were improved by AT. In the FSS group, the baseline SAMY levels in the first session showed a significant negative correlation with the changes in the subjective symptom score and tension-anxiety score at baseline. The practice of AT, both during the first session and after 1 month of continuation, eased the dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system that is reflected in SAMY in patients with FSS. AT also contributed to decreases in the tension-anxiety and somatic symptoms in patients with FSS. We suggest that SAMY is related to both physical and psychological effects of AT in patients with FSS.

  18. Autogenous Deformation of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autogenous deformation of concrete can be defined as the free deformation of sealed concrete at a constant temperature. A number of observed problems with early age cracking of high-performance concretes can be attributed to this phenomenon. During the last 10 years , this has led to an increased...... focus on autogenous deformation both within concrete practice and concrete research. Since 1996 the interest has been significant enough to hold international, yearly conferences entirely devoted to this subject. The papers in this publication were presented at two consecutive half-day sessions...... at the American Concrete Institute’s Fall Convention in Phoenix, Arizona, October 29, 2002. All papers have been reviewed according to ACI rules. This publication, as well as the sessions, was sponsored by ACI committee 236, Material Science of Concrete. The 12 presentations from 8 different countries indicate...

  19. Autogenic therapy: Techniques, foundations, health and clinical applications, and empirical support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel R. Abuín

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Autogenic therapy emerges from the "autogenic training" method created by Schultz, and its development incorporates different therapeutic methods based on a psychophysiological approach. All these methods promote homeostatic self-regulatory brain processes. The aims of this paper are to describe and analyse the autogenic methods, the psychophysiological and neurophysiological processes involved, and their effective applications in both health and clinical fields. For these purposes, beside reviewing the earlier work by Schultz and Luthe, an electronic search of literature was conducted in order to find relevant contributions on these topics. Results show a big development of autogenic methods until the 80s, with an enormous amount of applications and studies on the psychophysiological and neurophysiological changes related to the practice of autogenic training. However, their expansion during the last 25 years has been much lower in comparison with other methods such as mindfulness and hypnosis. Possible causes are discussed and new challenges are suggested

  20. Bioelectrical activity of the pelvic floor muscles after 6-week biofeedback training in nulliparous continent women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewska, Daria; Stania, Magdalena; Smykla, Agnieszka; Kwaśna, Krystyna; Błaszczak, Edward; Sobota, Grzegorz; Skrzypulec-Plinta, Violetta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a 6-week sEMG-biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training program on pelvic floor muscle activity in young continent women. Pelvic floor muscle activity was recorded using a vaginal probe during five experimental trials. Biofeedback training was continued for 6 weeks, 3 times a week. Muscle strenghtening and endurance exercises were performed alternately. SEMG (surface electromyography) measurements were recorded on four different occasions: before training started, after the third week of training, after the sixth week of training, and one month after training ended. A 6-week sEMG-biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training program significantly decreased the resting activity of the pelvic floor muscles in supine lying and standing. The ability to relax the pelvic floor muscles after a sustained 60-second contraction improved significantly after the 6-week training in both positions. SEMG-biofeedback training program did not seem to affect the activity of the pelvic floor muscles or muscle fatigue during voluntary pelvic floor muscle contractions. SEMG-biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training might be recommended for physiotherapists to improve the effectiveness of their relaxation techniques.

  1. Training Lessons Learned from Peak Performance Episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    psychical self-regulation program developed in Russia. This program uses techniques from numerous training systems ( meditation , yoga, hypnosis, autogenic ...athletes’ activation levels through auto suggestion. ’-- These techniques (e.g., autogenic training, biofeedback, breathing exercises, progressive muscle

  2. Dynamic correlations between heart and brain rhythm during Autogenic meditation

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dae-Keun; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Jongwha; Whang, Min-Cheol; Kang, Seung Wan

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed to determine significant physiological parameters of brain and heart under meditative state, both in each activities and their dynamic correlations. Electrophysiological changes in response to meditation were explored in 12 healthy volunteers who completed 8 weeks of a basic training course in autogenic meditation. Heart coherence, representing the degree of ordering in oscillation of heart rhythm intervals, increased significantly during meditation. Relative EEG alpha pow...

  3. Multipass autogenous electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.L.; Mustaleski, T.M. Jr.; Watson, L.C.

    1986-01-01

    A multipass, autogenous welding procedure was developed for 7.6 mm (0.3 in.) wall thickness Type 304L stainless steel cylinders. The joint geometry has a 1.5 mm (0.06 in.) root-face width and a rectangular stepped groove that is 0.762 mm (0.03 in.) wide at the top of the root face and extends 1.5 mm in height, terminating into a groove width of 1.27 mm which extends to the outside of the 1.27 mm high weld-boss. One weld pass is made on the root, three passes on the 0.762 mm wide groove and three passes to complete the weld. Multipass, autogenous, electron beam welds maintain the characteristic high depth-to-width ratios and low heat input of single-pass, electron beam welds. The increased part distortion (which is still much less than from arc processes) in multipass weldments is corrected by a preweld machined compensation. Mechanical properties of multipass welds compare well with single-pass welds. The yield strength of welds in aluminum alloy 5083 is approximately the same for single-pass or multipass electron beam and gas, metal-arc welds. The incidence and size of porosity is less in multipass electron beam welding of aluminum as compared to gas, metal-arc welds. The multipass, autogenous, electron beam welding method has proven to be a reliable way to make some difficult welds in multilayer parts or in an instance where inside part temperature or weld underbead must be controlled and weld discontinuities must be minimized

  4. Autogenic Training, Metacognition and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Bastien

    2013-01-01

    In French universities, only one out of two students is successful in his/her first year. The change of the working rhythm and the importance of self-regulated learning (relying on metacognition) can to a large extent explain these dramatic rates. Metacognition, as the process of being aware of one's own cognition and activity implies awareness…

  5. Autogenic drainage for airway clearance in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Pamela; Burnham, Paul; Southern, Kevin W

    2017-10-06

    Autogenic drainage is an airway clearance technique that was developed by Jean Chevaillier in 1967. The technique is characterised by breathing control using expiratory airflow to mobilise secretions from smaller to larger airways. Secretions are cleared independently by adjusting the depth and speed of respiration in a sequence of controlled breathing techniques during exhalation. The technique requires training, concentration and effort from the individual. It is important to systematically review the evidence demonstrating that autogenic drainage is an effective intervention for people with cystic fibrosis. To compare the clinical effectiveness of autogenic drainage in people with cystic fibrosis with other physiotherapy airway clearance techniques. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews, as well as two trials registers (31 August 2017).Dtae of most recent search of the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: 25 September 2017. We identified randomised and quasi-randomised controlled studies comparing autogenic drainage to another airway clearance technique or no therapy in people with cystic fibrosis for at least two treatment sessions. Data extraction and assessments of risk of bias were independently performed by two authors. The authors assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE system. The authors contacted two investigators for further information pertinent to their published studies. Searches retrieved 35 references to 21 individual studies, of which seven (n = 208) were eligible for inclusion. One study was of parallel design with the remaining six being cross-over in design; participant numbers ranged from 17 to 75. The total study duration varied between four days and two years. The age of participants ranged between seven and 63 years with a wide

  6. Mitigation strategies for autogenous shrinkage cracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Dale P.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2004-01-01

    As the use of high-performance concrete has increased, problems with early-age cracking have become prominent. The reduction in water-to-cement ratio, the incorporation of silica fume, and the increase in binder content of high-performance concretes all contribute to this problem. In this paper......, the fundamental parameters contributing to the autogenous shrinkage and resultant early-age cracking of concrete are presented. Basic characteristics of the cement paste that contribute to or control the autogenous shrinkage response include the surface tension of the pore solution, the geometry of the pore...... of early-age cracking due to autogenous shrinkage. Mitigation strategies discussed in this paper include: the addition of shrinkage-reducing admixtures more commonly used to control drying shrinkage, control of the cement particle size distribution, modification of the mineralogical composition...

  7. Autogenous Phenomena in Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    Denne afhandling er skrevet med henblik på opnåelse af den danske doktorgrad i teknik, dr.techn. Den vedrører autogene fænomener i cementbaserede materialer – primært deformation og ændring af den relative luftfugtighed (RF). I afhandlingen er det belyst, hvordan betydningen af disse fænomener bl...

  8. Autogenic dynamics of debris-flow fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Wilco; de Haas, Tjalling; Braat, Lisanne; Kleinhans, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    Alluvial fans develop their semi-conical shape by cyclic avulsion of their geomorphologically active sector from a fixed fan apex. These cyclic avulsions have been attributed to both allogenic and autogenic forcings and processes. Autogenic dynamics have been extensively studied on fluvial fans through physical scale experiments, and are governed by cyclic alternations of aggradation by unconfined sheet flow, fanhead incision leading to channelized flow, channel backfilling and avulsion. On debris-flow fans, however, autogenic dynamics have not yet been directly observed. We experimentally created debris-flow fans under constant extrinsic forcings, and show that autogenic dynamics are a fundamental intrinsic process on debris-flow fans. We found that autogenic cycles on debris-flow fans are driven by sequences of backfilling, avulsion and channelization, similar to the cycles on fluvial fans. However, the processes that govern these sequences are unique for debris-flow fans, and differ fundamentally from the processes that govern autogenic dynamics on fluvial fans. We experimentally observed that backfilling commenced after the debris flows reached their maximum possible extent. The next debris flows then progressively became shorter, driven by feedbacks on fan morphology and flow-dynamics. The progressively decreasing debris-flow length caused in-channel sedimentation, which led to increasing channel overflow and wider debris flows. This reduced the impulse of the liquefied flow body to the flow front, which then further reduced flow velocity and runout length, and induced further in-channel sedimentation. This commenced a positive feedback wherein debris flows became increasingly short and wide, until the channel was completely filled and the apex cross-profile was plano-convex. At this point, there was no preferential transport direction by channelization, and the debris flows progressively avulsed towards the steepest, preferential, flow path. Simultaneously

  9. Autogenous transplantation of maxillary and mandibular molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Peter P

    2008-11-01

    Autogenous tooth transplantation has been used as a predictable surgical approach to correct malocclusion and replace edentulous areas. This article focuses on the surgical approach and technique for molar transplantation. Thirty-two patients aged between 11 and 25 years underwent 44 autogenous molar transplantations. The procedure involved transplantation of impacted or newly erupted third molars into the extraction sockets of nonrestorable molars and surgical removal and replacement of horizontally impacted molars into their proper vertical alignment. Five basic procedural concepts were applied: 1) atraumatic extraction, avoiding disruption of the root sheath and root buds; 2) apical contouring of bone at the transplantation site and maxillary sinus lift via the Summers osteotome technique, when indicated, for maxillary molars; 3) preparation of a 4-wall bony socket; 4) avoidance of premature occlusal interferences; and 5) stabilization of the tooth with placement of a basket suture. All 32 patients successfully underwent the planned procedure. To date, 2 patients have had localized infection that resulted in loss of the transplant. The remaining 42 transplants remain asymptomatic and functioning, with a mean follow-up period of 19 months. No infection, ankylosis, loss of the transplant, or root resorption has been noted. In addition, endodontic therapy has not been necessary on any transplanted teeth. Autogenous tooth transplantation has been discussed and described in the literature previously, with a primary focus on cuspid and bicuspid transplantation. The molar transplant is infrequently discussed in today's literature, possibly because of the preponderance of titanium dental implants. Autogenous molar transplantation is a viable procedure with low morbidity and excellent functional and esthetic outcomes. This report shows the successful transplantation of 42 of 44 molars in 32 patients with a mean follow-up period of 19 months.

  10. Autogenous Deformation and Change of the Relative Humidity in Silica Fume-Modified Cement Paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben

    1996-01-01

    Even during sealed curing and at a constant temperature a hardening cement paste will deform and the relative humidity within its pores will lower. This autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change may be so significant that the cement paste cracks if the deformation is restrained....... This article focuses on the influence of silica fume addition on autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change. Continuous measurement of autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change for more than 1 year and 1« years, respectively, was performed. The investigations show...... thatsilica fume addition markedly increases the autogenous shrinkage as well as the autogenous relative humidity change....

  11. Autogenous Transplantation for Replacing a Hopeless Tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakershahrak, Mehrsa; Moshari, Amirabbas; Vatanpour, Mehdi; Khalilak, Zohreh; Jalali Ara, Afsoon

    2017-01-01

    Autogenous tooth transplantation (ATT) is a simple and reasonable choice for replacing the missing teeth when a proper donor tooth is available. This report presents a case of successful ATT of a maxillary right third molar for replacement of mandibular right second molar with a concomitant endodontic-periodontal disease. The mandibular second molar was believed to be hopeless due to a severe damage to coronal tooth structure, inappropriate root canal treatment and apical radiolucency. After extraction of mandibular second molar and maxillary third molar (the donor), the tooth was re-implanted into the extracted socket of second molar site. Root canal therapy was then performed. After 3 years, clinical and radiographic examinations revealed satisfying results, with no signs and symptoms. The patient is asymptomatic and the transplanted tooth is still functional with no signs of marginal periodontal pathosis. Radiographies showed bone regeneration in the site of previous extensive periapical lesion, normal periodontal ligament with no signs of root resorption.

  12. Reduction of the Early Autogenous Shrinkage of High Strength Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Saje

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of a laboratory investigation on the early autogenous shrinkage of high strength concrete, and the possibilities of its reduction, are presented. Such concrete demonstrates significant autogenous shrinkage, which should, however, be limited in the early stages of its development in order to prevent the occurrence of cracks and/or drop in the load-carrying capacity of concrete structures. The following possibilities for reducing autogenous shrinkage were investigated: the use of low-heat cement, a shrinkage-reducing admixture, steel fibres, premoistened polypropylene fibres, and presoaked lightweight aggregate. In the case of the use of presoaked natural lightweight aggregate, with a fraction from 2 to 4 mm, the early autogenous shrinkage of one-day-old high strength concrete decreased by about 90%, with no change to the concrete's compressive strength in comparison with that of the reference concrete.

  13. Measuring autogenous strain of concrete with corrugated moulds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Qian; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2008-01-01

    A reliable technique to quantify autogenous strain is a prerequisite to numerical modeling in stress calculations for high performance concrete. The introducing of a special kind of corrugated tube mould helps to transforming volume strain measurement into liner strain measurement in horizontal...... direction for fluid concrete, which not only realizes the continuous monitoring of the autogenous shrinkage since casting, but also effectively eliminates the disturbance resulting from gravity, temperature variation and mould restraint on measuring results. Based on this measuring technique, this paper...

  14. Dynamic correlations between heart and brain rhythm during Autogenic meditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Keun; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Jongwha; Whang, Min-Cheol; Kang, Seung Wan

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed to determine significant physiological parameters of brain and heart under meditative state, both in each activities and their dynamic correlations. Electrophysiological changes in response to meditation were explored in 12 healthy volunteers who completed 8 weeks of a basic training course in autogenic meditation. Heart coherence, representing the degree of ordering in oscillation of heart rhythm intervals, increased significantly during meditation. Relative EEG alpha power and alpha lagged coherence also increased. A significant slowing of parietal peak alpha frequency was observed. Parietal peak alpha power increased with increasing heart coherence during meditation, but no such relationship was observed during baseline. Average alpha lagged coherence also increased with increasing heart coherence during meditation, but weak opposite relationship was observed at baseline. Relative alpha power increased with increasing heart coherence during both meditation and baseline periods. Heart coherence can be a cardiac marker for the meditative state and also may be a general marker for the meditative state since heart coherence is strongly correlated with EEG alpha activities. It is expected that increasing heart coherence and the accompanying EEG alpha activations, heart brain synchronicity, would help recover physiological synchrony following a period of homeostatic depletion. PMID:23914165

  15. Dynamic correlations between heart and brain rhythm during Autogenic meditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daekeun eKim

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed to determine significant physiological parameters of brain and heart under meditative state, both in each activities and their dynamic correlations. Electrophysiological changes in response to meditation were explored in 12 healthy volunteers who completed 8 weeks of a basic training course in autogenic meditation. Heart coherence, representing the degree of ordering in oscillation of heart rhythm intervals, increased significantly during meditation. Relative EEG alpha power and alpha lagged coherence also increased. A significant slowing of parietal peak alpha frequency was observed. Parietal peak alpha power increased with increasing heart coherence during meditation, but no such relationship was observed during baseline. Average alpha lagged coherence also increased with increasing heart coherence during meditation, but, again, no significant relationship was observed at baseline. Relative alpha power increased with increasing heart coherence during both meditation and baseline periods. Heart coherence can be a cardiac marker for the meditative state and also may be a general marker for the meditative state since heart coherence is strongly correlated with EEG alpha activities. It is expected that increasing heart coherence and the accompanying EEG alpha activations, heart brain synchronicity, would help recover physiological synchrony following a period of homeostatic depletion.

  16. Dynamic correlations between heart and brain rhythm during Autogenic meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Keun; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Jongwha; Whang, Min-Cheol; Kang, Seung Wan

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed to determine significant physiological parameters of brain and heart under meditative state, both in each activities and their dynamic correlations. Electrophysiological changes in response to meditation were explored in 12 healthy volunteers who completed 8 weeks of a basic training course in autogenic meditation. Heart coherence, representing the degree of ordering in oscillation of heart rhythm intervals, increased significantly during meditation. Relative EEG alpha power and alpha lagged coherence also increased. A significant slowing of parietal peak alpha frequency was observed. Parietal peak alpha power increased with increasing heart coherence during meditation, but no such relationship was observed during baseline. Average alpha lagged coherence also increased with increasing heart coherence during meditation, but weak opposite relationship was observed at baseline. Relative alpha power increased with increasing heart coherence during both meditation and baseline periods. Heart coherence can be a cardiac marker for the meditative state and also may be a general marker for the meditative state since heart coherence is strongly correlated with EEG alpha activities. It is expected that increasing heart coherence and the accompanying EEG alpha activations, heart brain synchronicity, would help recover physiological synchrony following a period of homeostatic depletion.

  17. Computed tomography evaluation of autogenous graft in sinus lift surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajzen, Sergio Aron; Moscatiello, Rafael Andrade; Lima, Aida Maria Custodio de; Moscatiello, Vitoria Aparecida Muglia; Helio Kiitiro Yamashita; Mosacatiello, Rafael Muglia; Nishiguchi, Celso Itiro; Alves, Maria Teresa de Seixas

    2001-01-01

    The objective was to quantify bone formation within autogenous bone grafts and autogenous bone grafts in combination with platelet-rich plasma obtained either from apheresis or centrifugation using computed tomography. This prospective, double-blind study was conducted in 34 male and female adult patients (mean age of 28 years and 8 months), with either unilateral or bilateral pneumatization of the maxillary sinuses, requiring bone graft for dental implant. All patients were submitted to computed tomography examinations prior and six months after sinus lift surgery. Fifty-three maxillary sinuses were operated and divided into three distinct groups: autogenous bone graft, autogenous bone graft in combination with platelet-rich plasma obtained by centrifugation, and autogenous bone graft in combination with platelet-rich plasma obtained by apheresis. The results showed that computed tomography demonstrated bone growth in height and width between the initial and the follow-up computed tomography scans in all three groups. However, no statistical difference was found either for bone height or width. It was concluded that clinical evidence demonstrates the effectiveness of autogenous bone grafts, particularly when used in combination with bone growth factors such as platelet-rich plasma, which allow prosthetic and functional restoration of maxillofacial structures through fixation of dental implants. (author)

  18. Autogenous healing properties of cement-based grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onofrei, M.; Roe, L.; Shenton, B.

    1997-05-01

    This report presents the results of a study conducted to provide information on the ability of cement-based grouts to self-seal. Autogenous sealing was investigated both on bulk grouts and in thin films of grouts. In both cases, the self-sealing capabilities of the cement-based grouts were investigated with water flowing through the grout. Autogenous sealing was studied through changes in pore structure (decrease in pore radius and volume of pores) and changes in the rate of water flow through the cement-based grouts. (author)

  19. Measuring techniques for autogenous strain of cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2007-01-01

    Volumetric measurement of autogenous strain is frequently performed by placing the fresh cement paste in a rubber membrane submerged in water. The volume change of the cement paste is measured by the amount of water displaced by the submerged sample. Volumetric and linear measurements of autogenous...... of the volumetric method. Water absorption is driven by a lowering of the water activity in the cement paste due to dissolved salts in the pore fluid and to self-desiccation. From the moment of casting, significant water uptake was registered in all experiments. This water uptake influenced the volumetric...... on the same cement pastes....

  20. The effects of progressive muscle relaxation and autogenic relaxation on young soccer players' mood states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Hairul Anuar; Hanafi Ahmad Yusof, Hazwani

    2011-06-01

    This study was designed to compare the effects of two different relaxation techniques, namely progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and autogenic relaxation (AGR) on moods of young soccer players. sixteen adolescent athletes (mean age: 14.1 ± 1.3) received either PMR or AGR training. Using Profile of Mood States- Adolescents, their mood states were measured one week before relaxation training, before the first relaxation session, and after the twelfth relaxation session. Mixed ANOVA revealed no significant interaction effects and no significant main effects in any of the subscales. However, significant main effects for testing sessions were found for confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscales. Post hoc tests revealed post-intervention reductions in the confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscale scores. These two relaxation techniques induce equivalent mood responses and may be used to regulate young soccer players' mood states.

  1. The Effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Autogenic Relaxation on Young Soccer Players’ Mood States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Hairul Anuar; Hanafi@Ahmad Yusof, Hazwani

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to compare the effects of two different relaxation techniques, namely progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and autogenic relaxation (AGR) on moods of young soccer players. Methods Sixteen adolescent athletes (mean age: 14.1 ± 1.3) received either PMR or AGR training. Using Profile of Mood States- Adolescents, their mood states were measured one week before relaxation training, before the first relaxation session, and after the twelfth relaxation session. Results Mixed ANOVA revealed no significant interaction effects and no significant main effects in any of the subscales. However, significant main effects for testing sessions were found for confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscales. Post hoc tests revealed post-intervention reductions in the confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscale scores. Conclusion These two relaxation techniques induce equivalent mood responses and may be used to regulate young soccer players’ mood states. PMID:22375225

  2. Thermodynamics of Autogenous Self-healing in Cementitious Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, H.

    2014-01-01

    Concrete is a brittle composite cementitious material that easily fractures under tensile loading. Microcracks can appear throughout the concrete prior to application of any load because of temperature-induced strain and autogenous and drying shrinkage. There is no doubt that these cracks provide

  3. Autogenous tooth transplantation: an alternative to replace extracted tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Kamadjaja

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The gold standard treatment to replace missing tooth is dental implants, however, in certain cases, such as in young patients its placement is contraindicated. Autogenous tooth transplantation, which has been widely done in Scandinavian countries for many years, may become a good alternative to overcome this problem. Purpose: This article attempted to provide information about the indication, treatment planning, surgical technique and the successful result of autogenous tooth transplantation. Case: A fifteen year old male patient presented with large caries and periapical disease of his lower left first molar, which was partially erupted and the roots was not fully formed in radiograph. Case management: Autogenous tooth transplantation procedure was performed consisting of extraction of #36, odontectomy of #38 followed by its implantation to socket #36 and fixation of the transplanted tooth to the adjacent teeth. Post operative evaluation was done on regular basis within 18 months period. There was no complaint, the tooth was clinically stable and no evidence of periodontal problem. Serial radiographs showed healing of alveolar bone and periodontal tissue, and the complete root formation was evident by 18 months post operatively. Conclusion: Autogenous tooth transplantation is a potential alternative to replace extracted tooth. Provided that the case be properly planned and operation carefully performed, successful result of this treatment can be achieved.

  4. Autogenous Metallic Pipe Leak Repair in Potable Water Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Min; Triantafyllidou, Simoni; Edwards, Marc A

    2015-07-21

    Copper and iron pipes have a remarkable capability for autogenous repair (self-repair) of leaks in potable water systems. Field studies revealed exemplars that metallic pipe leaks caused by nails, rocks, and erosion corrosion autogenously repaired, as confirmed in the laboratory experiments. This work demonstrated that 100% (N = 26) of 150 μm leaks contacting representative bulk potable water in copper pipes sealed autogenously via formation of corrosion precipitates at 20-40 psi, pH 3.0-11.0, and with upward and downward leak orientations. Similar leaks in carbon steel pipes at 20 psi self-repaired at pH 5.5 and 8.5, but two leaks did not self-repair permanently at pH 11.0 suggesting that water chemistry may control the durability of materials that seal the leaks and therefore the permanence of repair. Larger 400 μm holes in copper pipes had much lower (0-33%) success of self-repair at pH 3.0-11.0, whereas all 400 μm holes in carbon steel pipes at 20 psi self-repaired at pH 4.0-11.0. Pressure tests indicated that some of the repairs created at 20-40 psi ambient pressure could withstand more than 100 psi without failure. Autogenous repair has implications for understanding patterns of pipe failures, extending the lifetime of decaying infrastructure, and developing new plumbing materials.

  5. Pasteurized intercalary autogenous bone graft: radiographic and scintigraphic features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehara, Shigeru; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Nishida, Jun; Shiraishi, Hideo

    2000-01-01

    Objective. Pasteurized autogenous bone graft sterilized at a low temperature (60 C) is one option for reconstruction after resection of bone and soft tissue tumors. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the normal and abnormal radiographic and scintigraphic findings of pasteurized intercalary autogenous bone graft after resection of bone and soft tissue sarcomas.Design. This was a retrospective evaluation of the radiography and bone scintigraphy findings in patients after treatment of bone and soft tissue sarcomas using an intercalary pasteurized autogenous bone graft.Patients. Among 10 consecutive patients, eight had intercalary grafts, and they constitute the subjects of this study. All available radiography and bone scintigraphy findings were reviewed for the healing process and the possibility of complications.Results and conclusions. Healing and incorporation of the graft were observed in five patients during the follow-up, but the other three did not heal satisfactorily. Rapid incorporation of pasteurized autogenous bone graft can be demonstrated by means of radiography and bone scintigraphy. (orig.)

  6. Synthesis of Magnesium Nickel Boride Aggregates via Borohydride Autogenous Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Mahboobeh; Cathey, Henrietta E; Mackinnon, Ian D R

    2018-03-23

    We demonstrate synthesis of the ternary intermetallic MgNi₃B₂ using autogenous pressure from the reaction of NaBH₄ with Mg and Ni metal powder. The decomposition of NaBH₄ to H₂ and B₂H₆ commences at low temperatures in the presence of Mg and/or Ni and promotes formation of Ni-borides and MgNi₃B₂ with the increase in temperature. MgNi₃B₂ aggregates with Ni-boride cores are formed when the reaction temperature is >670 °C and autogenous pressure is >1.7 MPa. Morphologies and microstructures suggest that solid-gas and liquid-gas reactions are dominant mechanisms and that Ni-borides form at a lower temperature than MgNi₃B₂. Magnetic measurements of the core-shell MgNi₃B₂ aggregates are consistent with ferromagnetic behaviour in contrast to stoichiometric MgNi₃B₂ which is diamagnetic at room temperature.

  7. Reorganization of the Brain and Heart Rhythm During Autogenic Meditation

    OpenAIRE

    Dae-Keun eKim; Dae-Keun eKim; Jyoo-Hi eRhee; Seung Wan eKang; Seung Wan eKang

    2014-01-01

    The underlying changes in heart coherence that are associated with reported EEG changes in response to meditation have been explored. We measured EEG and heart rate variability (HRV) before and during autogenic meditation. Fourteen subjects participated in the study. Heart coherence scores were significantly increased during meditation compared to the baseline. We found near significant decrease in high beta absolute power, increase in alpha relative power and significant increases in lower(a...

  8. Reorganization of the brain and heart rhythm during autogenic meditation

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dae-Keun; Rhee, Jyoo-Hi; Kang, Seung Wan

    2014-01-01

    The underlying changes in heart coherence that are associated with reported EEG changes in response to meditation have been explored. We measured EEG and heart rate variability (HRV) before and during autogenic meditation. Fourteen subjects participated in the study. Heart coherence scores were significantly increased during meditation compared to the baseline. We found near significant decrease in high beta absolute power, increase in alpha relative power and significant increases in lower (...

  9. Autogenous tooth transplantation for replacing a lost tooth: case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Youn Kang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The autogenous tooth transplantation is an alternative treatment replacing a missing tooth when a suitable donor tooth is available. It is also a successful treatment option to save significant amount of time and cost comparing implants or conventional prosthetics. These cases, which required single tooth extraction due to deep caries and severe periodontal disease, could have good results by transplanting non-functional but sound donor tooth to the extraction site.

  10. Audio-Visual and Autogenic Relaxation Alter Amplitude of Alpha EEG Band, Causing Improvements in Mental Work Performance in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikicin, Mirosław; Kowalczyk, Marek

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of regular audio-visual relaxation combined with Schultz's autogenic training on: (1) the results of behavioral tests that evaluate work performance during burdensome cognitive tasks (Kraepelin test), (2) changes in classical EEG alpha frequency band, neocortex (frontal, temporal, occipital, parietal), hemisphere (left, right) versus condition (only relaxation 7-12 Hz). Both experimental (EG) and age-and skill-matched control group (CG) consisted of eighteen athletes (ten males and eight females). After 7-month training EG demonstrated changes in the amplitude of mean electrical activity of the EEG alpha bend at rest and an improvement was significantly changing and an improvement in almost all components of Kraepelin test. The same examined variables in CG were unchanged following the period without the intervention. Summing up, combining audio-visual relaxation with autogenic training significantly improves athlete's ability to perform a prolonged mental effort. These changes are accompanied by greater amplitude of waves in alpha band in the state of relax. The results suggest usefulness of relaxation techniques during performance of mentally difficult sports tasks (sports based on speed and stamina, sports games, combat sports) and during relax of athletes.

  11. Influence of temperature on autogenous deformation and relative humidity change in hardening cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change (RH change) in hardening cement paste. Theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented, which elucidate the influence of temperature on these properties. This is an important subject in the control...

  12. Cracking in cement paste induced by autogenous shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Weiss, Jason

    2009-01-01

    technique allows identification of microcracks while avoiding artefacts induced by unwanted restraint, drying, or temperature variations during sample preparation. Small cylindrical samples of cement paste are cast with steel rods of different diameters in their centre. The rods restrain the autogenous......, and creep as a function of hydration time were used as inputs in the analysis. The experimental results and the numerical analysis showed that samples with larger steel rods had the highest probability of developing microcracks. In addition, the pattern and the width of the observed microcracks showed good...

  13. Measuring techniques for autogenous strain of cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2006-01-01

    of the volumetric method. Water absorption is driven by a lowering of the water activity in the cement paste due to dissolved salts in the pore fluid and to self-desiccation. From the moment of casting, significant water uptake was registered in all experiments. This water uptake influenced the volumetric...... measurements by the same order of magnitude as the autogenous strain itself. By performing the measurements in a paraffin oil bath instead of a water bath, this artefact was eliminated. Furthermore, volumetric measurements performed in paraffin oil gave almost identical results as linear measurements performed...

  14. STS-47 MS Davis trains at Payload Crew Training Complex at Marshall SFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Mission Specialist (MS) N. Jan Davis, wearing the Autogenic Feedback Training System 2 suit and lightweight headset, reviews a Payload Systems Handbook in the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) mockup during training at the Payload Crew Training Complex at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. View provided with alternate number 92P-137.

  15. Bacterial phagocytosis by macrophage of autogenous splenic implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marques R. G.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Autogenous splenic implant seems to be the only alternative for preservation of splenic tissue after total splenectomy. This work was carried out to analyze the morphologic regeneration of autotransplanted splenic tissue in Wistar rats and to determine the bacterial phagocytic function of their macrophages. We utilized an experimental model with thirty-two rats, of both sexes, submitted to total splenectomy combined with autotransplantation in greater omentum of slices of the whole spleen mass. The animals were divided into two groups: I - young rats weighing 100 to 150 g; and II - adult rats weighing 250 to 300 g. Sixteen weeks later animals were intravenously inoculated with a suspension of Escherichia coli AB1157. Twenty minutes after inoculation, the animals were sacrificed and the splenic autotransplants were removed for morphological study. There was regeneration of autotransplanted splenic tissue in all animals. A similar morphological aspect among all animals was observed, with splenic tissue showing red and white pulps, lymphoid follicles, and marginal zone, with a moderate architectural disarrangement. Macrophages containing gram-negative bacterial aggregates as well as macrophages with hemosiderin pigments within the cytoplasm were observed. Blood vessels showed preserved walls, with no signs of vasculitis or thrombosis. The present results suggest that autogenous splenic implants in the greater omentum of the rat acquire the macro- and microscopic architecture of a normal spleen, with reduced dimensions, and preserve bacterial phagocyte function.

  16. [Application of joint reconstruction with autogenous coronoid process graft to treat temporomandibular joint ankylosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qing-tiao; Huang, Xuan-ping; Jiang, Xian-fang; Yang, Yuan-yuan; Li, Hua; Lin, Xi

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the clinical effect of joint reconstruction by using autogenous coronoid process graft to treat temporomandibular joint(TMJ) ankylosis. Nine cases of TMJ ankylosis from September 2008 to September 2010 were surgically treated by joint reconstruction with autogenous coronoid process graft, using autogenous articular disc or prosthodontic membrane as interpositional material. Mouth opening, occlusion and cone beam CT(CBCT) were used for evaluation before and after surgery. Satisfactory mouth opening was achieved in all patients and no one got occlusal changes or reankylosis during follow-up. CBCT showed that coronoid process graft reached bone union with the ramus and turned to be round. It is effective to cure TMJ ankylosis through joint reconstruction with autogenous coronoid process graft.

  17. Evaluation of the efficacy of an autogenous Escherichia coli vaccine in broiler breeders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Lili; Thøfner, Ida; Christensen, Jens Peter

    2017-01-01

    vaccine in broiler breeders. Three groups of 28 weeks old broiler breeders (unvaccinated, vaccinated once and twice, respectively) were challenged with a homologous E. coli strain (same strain as included in the vaccine) or a heterologous challenge strain in an experimental ascending model. The clinical...... infection, significant protection of an autogenous E. coli vaccine against neither a homologous nor a heterologous E. coli challenge could not be documented.......In poultry production Escherichia coli autogenous vaccines are often used. However, the efficacy of autogenous E. coli vaccinations has not been evaluated experimentally in chickens after start of lay. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective effect of an autogenous E. coli...

  18. The influence of superabsorbent polymers on the autogenous shrinkage properties of cement pastes with supplementary cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoeck, D.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; De Belie, N.

    2015-01-01

    Fly ash and blast-furnace slag containing binders are frequently used in the construction industry and it is important to know the extent of autogenous shrinkage and its (ideal) mitigation by superabsorbent polymers in these systems as a function of their age. In this paper, the autogenous...... shrinkage was determined by manual and automated shrinkage measurements. Autogenous shrinkage was reduced in cement pastes with the supplementary cementitious materials versus Portland cement pastes. At later ages, the rate of autogenous shrinkage is higher due to the pozzolanic activity. Internal curing...

  19. Autogenic and Allogenic: Emergent Coastline Patterns Interact With Forcing Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, A. B.; Alvarez Antolinez, J. A.; Mendez, F. J.; Moore, L. J.; Wood, J.; Farley, G.

    2017-12-01

    between forcing and coastline shape. Comparisons between model predictions and observed shoreline-change patterns support the suggestion that the relationship between emergent coastline behaviours (autogenic processes) and external influences (autogenic forcing) involves such memory effects (Antolinez et al., in revision).

  20. Reorganization of the brain and heart rhythm during autogenic meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Keun; Rhee, Jyoo-Hi; Kang, Seung Wan

    2014-01-13

    The underlying changes in heart coherence that are associated with reported EEG changes in response to meditation have been explored. We measured EEG and heart rate variability (HRV) before and during autogenic meditation. Fourteen subjects participated in the study. Heart coherence scores were significantly increased during meditation compared to the baseline. We found near significant decrease in high beta absolute power, increase in alpha relative power and significant increases in lower (alpha) and higher (above beta) band coherence during 3~min epochs of heart coherent meditation compared to 3~min epochs of heart non-coherence at baseline. The coherence and relative power increase in alpha band and absolute power decrease in high beta band could reflect relaxation state during the heart coherent meditation. The coherence increase in the higher (above beta) band could reflect cortico-cortical local integration and thereby affect cognitive reorganization, simultaneously with relaxation. Further research is still needed for a confirmation of heart coherence as a simple window for the meditative state.

  1. Reorganization of the Brain and Heart Rhythm During Autogenic Meditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Keun eKim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The underlying changes in heart coherence that are associated with reported EEG changes in response to meditation have been explored. We measured EEG and heart rate variability (HRV before and during autogenic meditation. Fourteen subjects participated in the study. Heart coherence scores were significantly increased during meditation compared to the baseline. We found near significant decrease in high beta absolute power, increase in alpha relative power and significant increases in lower(alpha and higher(above beta band coherence during 3 minute epochs of heart coherent meditation compared to 3 minute epochs of heart noncoherence at baseline. The coherence and relative power increase in alpha band and absolute power decrease in high beta band could reflect relaxation state during the heart coherent meditation. The coherence increase in the higher(above beta band could reflect cortico-cortical local integration and thereby affect cognitive reorganization, simultaneously with relaxation. Further research is still needed for a confirmation of heart coherence as a simple window for the meditative state.

  2. Autogenous Crack Control during Construction Phases of MOSE Venice Dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertagnoli, Gabriele; Anerdi, Constanza; Malavisi, Marzia; Zoratto, Nadia

    2017-10-01

    The design of concrete structures exposed to severe environmental attack, like in marine environment, requires serious attention for concrete durability. Early age cracking due to autogenous deformations can be detrimental to the performance of tidal structures. The study of the structural effects of hydration heat and rheological behaviour of a set of huge concrete structures of the Mobile Venice Dams known with the MOSE acronym (Experimental Electromechanical Module) is presented in this paper. Together with other measures such as coastal reinforcement, the raising of quaysides, and the paving and improvement of the lagoon, MOSE is designed to protect Venice and the lagoon from tides of up to 3 meters. Construction began simultaneously in 2003 at all three lagoon inlets, and the project has been completed in 2014. Floods have caused damage since ancient times and have become more frequent and intense as a result of the combined effect of eustatism (a rise in sea level) and subsidence (a drop in land level) caused by natural and man-induced phenomena. Nowadays, towns and villages in the lagoon are about 23 cm lower with respect to the water level than at the beginning of the 1900s. Each year, floods can cause serious problems for the inhabitants as well as deterioration of architecture, urban structures and the ecosystem. Over the entire lagoon area, there is also a constant risk of a catastrophic event such as that of 4 November 1966, when a tide of 194 cm submerged Venice, Chioggia and the other built-up areas.

  3. Brain structural alterations in obsessive-compulsive disorder patients with autogenous and reactive obsessions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Subirà

    Full Text Available Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD is a clinically heterogeneous condition. Although structural brain alterations have been consistently reported in OCD, their interaction with particular clinical subtypes deserves further examination. Among other approaches, a two-group classification in patients with autogenous and reactive obsessions has been proposed. The purpose of the present study was to assess, by means of a voxel-based morphometry analysis, the putative brain structural correlates of this classification scheme in OCD patients. Ninety-five OCD patients and 95 healthy controls were recruited. Patients were divided into autogenous (n = 30 and reactive (n = 65 sub-groups. A structural magnetic resonance image was acquired for each participant and pre-processed with SPM8 software to obtain a volume-modulated gray matter map. Whole-brain and voxel-wise comparisons between the study groups were then performed. In comparison to the autogenous group, reactive patients showed larger gray matter volumes in the right Rolandic operculum. When compared to healthy controls, reactive patients showed larger volumes in the putamen (bilaterally, while autogenous patients showed a smaller left anterior temporal lobe. Also in comparison to healthy controls, the right middle temporal gyrus was smaller in both patient subgroups. Our results suggest that autogenous and reactive obsessions depend on partially dissimilar neural substrates. Our findings provide some neurobiological support for this classification scheme and contribute to unraveling the neurobiological basis of clinical heterogeneity in OCD.

  4. Aspects of energy reduction by autogenous copper production in the copper smelting plant Bor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najdenov, Ivan; Raić, Karlo T.; Kokeza, Gordana

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a comparative analysis of the energy consumption during copper production by the “standard” procedure (roasting in a fluo–solid reactor and smelting in a reverberatory furnace) in the Smelting Plant in Bor with modern autogenous procedures. All forms of expended energy were reduced to primary energy or to the same energy form, i.e., to the energy equivalent of the process (EEP), the raw material and the process materials. In addition, the energy equivalent of the process and waste products (water vapour, thermal energy and similar) were balanced. To complete the consumption of all energy generating products in copper production, they were reduced to conditional fuel (coal equivalent = 29.3 MJ/kg). Additionally, this study suggests replacement of the existing technology by an appropriate autogenous procedure and considers the prospects for further development of mining and metallurgy in Bor. Estimates of development perspectives for copper production should be comprehensive, based on complete and relevant data, as well as on real considerations of future development in world production. -- Highlights: ► “Standard” autogenous copper production in the Smelting Plant, Bor, Serbia. ► Comparation of energy consumption in “standard” with other autogenous procedures. ► All forms of energy are reduced to energy equivalent and conditional fuel. ► Replacement of existing technology with the appropriate autogenous procedure. ► Perspectives of further development of mining and metallurgy in Bor.

  5. Reconstruction of mandibular defects with autogenous bone grafts: a review of 30 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajid, M.A.; Warraich, R.A.; Abid, H.; Haq, M.E.; Shah, K.L.; Khan, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Multitudes of options are available for reconstruction of functional and cosmetic defects of the mandible, caused by various ailments. At the present time, autogenous bone grafting is the gold standard by which all other techniques of reconstruction of the mandible can be judged. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of different osseous reconstruction options using autogenous bone grafts for mandibular reconstruction. Methods: This Interventional study was conducted at Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, King Edward Medical University/Mayo Hospital Lahore, from January 2008 to July 2009 including one year follow-up. The study was carried out on thirty patients having bony mandibular defects. They were reconstructed with the autogenous bone grafts from different graft donor sites. On post-operative visits they were evaluated for outcome variables. Results: Success rate of autogenous bone grafts in this study was 90%. Only 10% of the cases showed poor results regarding infection, resorption and graft failure. Conclusion: Autogenous bone grafts, non-vascularized or vascularized, are a reliable treatment modality for the reconstruction of the bony mandibular defects with predictable functional and aesthetic outcome. (author)

  6. The Efficacy of Relaxation Training in Treating Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesco, Pagnini; Mauro, Manzoni Gian; Gianluca, Castelnuovo; Enrico, Molinari

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a review of scientific literature about relaxation training and its effects on anxiety. Research investigating progressive relaxation, meditation, applied relaxation and autogenic training were considered. All these methods proved to be effective in reducing anxiety in all kind of samples, affected or not by physical or…

  7. Use of rice husk ash for mitigating the autogenous shrinkage of cement pastes at low water cement ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, H.; Ye, G.; Fehling, Ekkehard; Middendorf, Bernhard; Thiemicke, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    It is well recognized that the high risk of early age micro-crack of HPC/UHPC is attributed to the large magnitude of early age autogenous shrinkage caused by self-desiccation in binder hydration. Over the years, several methods have been proposed to mitigate autogenous shrinkage based on internal

  8. Autogenous shrinkage in high-performance cement paste: An evaluation of basic mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; van Breugel, Klaas

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, various mechanisms Suggested to cause autogenous shrinkage are presented. The mechanisms are evaluated from the point of view of their soundness and applicability to quantitative modeling of autogenous shrinkage. The capillary tension approach is advantageous, because it has a sound...... mechanical and thermodynamical basis. Furthermore, this mechanism is easily applicable in a numerical model when dealing with a continuously changing microstructure. In order to test the numerical model, autogenous deformation and internal relative humidity (RH) of a Portland cement paste were measured...... on the capillary tension approach. Because a part of the RH drop in the cement paste is due to dissolved salts in the pore solution, a method is suggested to separate this effect from self-desiccation and to calculate the actual stress in the pore fluid associated with menisci formation....

  9. Autogenous Tooth Transplantation: A Case Report with Three-Year Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narimon Limprasert, D.D.S.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In Thailand, it is commonly considered that autogenous tooth transplantation can only be performed by oral surgeons. Though the author is an oral surgeon, a general dental practitioner who can carry out simple surgerycanalsoperformautogenoustoothtransplantation withgoodfunctional resultsandsignificantcostsavings over other options for carefully selected patients. This report presents a case of a 16 year-old Thai male patient who underwent autogenous tooth transplantation following the surgical technique recommended by Clokie CM, et al. The right mandibular third molar was transplanted to the right mandibular second molar showing successful results with radiographic follow-up for three years.

  10. A thermal comparator sensor for measuring autogenous deformation in hardening Portland cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Thomas; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a simple and accurate experimental device specially developed to measure autogenous deformation in hardening cement-based materials. The measuring system consists of a so-called thermal comparator sensor and a modular thermostatically controlled system. The operating principle...... of the thermal comparator is based on thermal expansion of aluminium. A particular characteristic of the measuring system is the fixation of the thermal comparator sensor to the deforming specimen. The modular system ensures effective thermostatic control of the hydrating cement paste samples. The technique...... allows continuous measurement with high accuracy of the linear deformation as well as determination of the activation energy of autogenous deformation....

  11. Autogenous shrinkage in high-performance cement paste: An evaluation of basic mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lura, Pietro; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Breugel, Klaas van

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, various mechanisms suggested to cause autogenous shrinkage are presented. The mechanisms are evaluated from the point of view of their soundness and applicability to quantitative modeling of autogenous shrinkage. The capillary tension approach is advantageous, because it has a sound mechanical and thermodynamical basis. Furthermore, this mechanism is easily applicable in a numerical model when dealing with a continuously changing microstructure. In order to test the numerical model, autogenous deformation and internal relative humidity (RH) of a Portland cement paste were measured during the first week of hardening. The isothermal heat evolution was also recorded to monitor the progress of hydration and the elastic modulus in compression was measured. RH change, degree of hydration and elastic modulus were used as input data for the calculation of autogenous deformation based on the capillary tension approach. Because a part of the RH drop in the cement paste is due to dissolved salts in the pore solution, a method is suggested to separate this effect from self-desiccation and to calculate the actual stress in the pore fluid associated with menisci formation

  12. Trait- and density-mediated indirect interactions initiated by an exotic invasive plant autogenic ecosystem engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean E. Pearson

    2010-01-01

    Indirect interactions are important for structuring ecological systems. However, research on indirect effects has been heavily biased toward top-down trophic interactions, and less is known about other indirect-interaction pathways. As autogenic ecosystem engineers, plants can serve as initiators of nontrophic indirect interactions that, like top-down pathways, can...

  13. Silicate minerals for CO2 scavenging from biogas in Autogenerative High Pressure Digestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, R.E.F.; Ferrer, I.; Weijma, J.; Lier, van J.B.

    2013-01-01

    Autogenerative High Pressure Digestion (AHPD) is a novel concept that integrates gas upgrading with anaerobic digestion by selective dissolution of CO2 at elevated biogas pressure. However, accumulation of CO2 and fatty acids after anaerobic digestion of glucose resulted in pH 3–5, which is

  14. Measurement with corrugated tubes of early-age autogenous shrinkage of cement-based material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Qian; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2009-01-01

    The use of a special corrugated mould enables transformation of volume strain into horizontal, linear strain measurement in the fluid stage. This allows continuous measurement of the autogenous shrinkage of cement-based materials since casting, and also effectively eliminates unwanted influence...

  15. Ultra high performance concrete made with rice husk ash for reduced autogenous shrinkage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Breugel, K.; Van Tuan, N.

    2014-01-01

    Ultra High Strength Concrete (UHPC) is generally made with low w/c mixtures and by adding silica fume. Low w/c mixtures, however, exhibit high autogenous shrinkage, while a high amount of silica fume increases the price of these mixtures. For designing ultra high strength mixtures with low

  16. Liquid nitrogen-treated autogenous dentin as bone substitute: an experimental study in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiya, Basim K; Shanmuhasuntharam, Palasuntharam; Huat, Siar; Abdulrazzak, Shurooq; Oon, Ha

    2014-01-01

    Different forms of dentin, including untreated, undemineralized, demineralized, boiled, or mixed with other materials, have been evaluated for efficacy as bone substitutes. However, the effects of application of liquid nitrogen-treated dentin for bone grafting remain unknown. The objective of this study was to chronologically evaluate bone healing following grafting with liquid nitrogen-treated dentin in a rabbit model. Autogenous dentin treated with liquid nitrogen at -196°C for 20 minutes was used. In 16 New Zealand White rabbits, a bone defect (5 mm in diameter) was created in each femur and randomly grafted with either autogenous dentin (experimental group) or autogenous bone grafts (positive control). In another four rabbits (negative control), a similar defect in each femur was left empty. The rabbits were sacrificed at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Explants of grafted sites were harvested for histologic and histomorphometric analysis. At 2 and 4 weeks in both the experimental and positive control groups, accelerated formation of new bone was observed, which was undergoing remodeling at 8 and 12 weeks. The mean new bone score was higher in the experimental than in the negative control groups, but this was not statistically significant. The present results demonstrated that liquid nitrogen-treated autogenous dentin has both osteoconductive and osteoinductive properties and therefore has potential as a bone substitute.

  17. Autogenous shrinkage of Ducorit S5R ASTM C 1698-09 test method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkilde, Lars

    The report deals with experimental measurement of autogenous shrinkage of Ducorit S5R according to the test method ASTM C 1698-09. This test method measures the bulk strain of a sealed cementitious specimen, at constant temperature and not subjected to external forces, from the time of final...

  18. Acromioclavicular Reconstruction using Autogenous Semitendinosus Tendon Graft and the Importance of Postoperative Rehabilitation: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jade PY Ho

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocation (Rockwood type 5 in which the choice of acromioclavicular reconstruction using autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft was made due to its superiority in anatomical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments, and the impact of postoperative rehabilitation on the recovery of this patient. We also discuss the rationale behind this.

  19. Autogenous and drying shrinkage of sodium carbonate activated slag altered by limestone powder incorporation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, B.; Yu, Q.L.; Dainese, E.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to study the shrinkage mechanism of sodium carbonate activated slag containing limestone powder (LP). The workability, pore structure, reaction kinetics and strength development were characterized. The results show that the autogenous shrinkage increases when the dosage of LP is low

  20. Starch hydrolysis in autogenerative high pressure digestion: Gelatinisation and saccharification as rate limiting steps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, R.E.F.; Ding, L.; Weijma, J.; Plugge, C.M.; Lier, van J.B.

    2014-01-01

    Autogenerative high pressure digestion (AHPD) provides an integrated biogas upgrading technology, capable of producing biogas with a CH4 content exceeding 95% at pressures up to 90 bar. Hydrolysis is generally regarded as the rate-limiting step in the anaerobic digestion of complex organic matter,

  1. Role of ferrite and phosphorus plus sulphur in the crack sensitivity of autogenously welded type 309 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, F.J. Jr.

    1976-07-01

    A study on autogenous welding of Type 309 thin stainless steel sheet was made after experiencing cracking difficulties on several commercial heats. A relationship exists between the sum of the phosphorus plus sulfur, the ferrite control of the weld metal, and the crack sensitivity of autogenously made welds. A new simple weld test for thin-gage sheet is utilized for studying the susceptibility to cracking. A chemistry modification is suggested to alleviate possible weld cracking when autogenously welding this grade. The principles of crack sensitivity prediction could apply to other austenitic stainless steel types where chemistry limits are such that ferrite is possible

  2. Temperature dependence of autogenous shrinkage of silica fume cement pastes with a very low water–binder ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, I., E-mail: ippei@dali.nuac.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, ES Building, No. 539, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Teramoto, A. [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Faculty of Engineering, ES Building, No. 546, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Ultra-high-strength concrete with a large unit cement content undergoes considerable temperature increase inside members due to hydration heat, leading to a higher risk of internal cracking. Hence, the temperature dependence of autogenous shrinkage of cement pastes made with silica fume premixed cement with a water–binder ratio of 0.15 was studied extensively. Development of autogenous shrinkage showed different behaviors before and after the inflection point, and dependence on the temperature after mixing and subsequent temperature histories. The difference in autogenous shrinkage behavior poses problems for winter construction because autogenous shrinkage may increase with decrease in temperature after mixing before the inflection point and with increase in temperature inside concrete members with large cross sections.

  3. Temperature dependence of autogenous shrinkage of silica fume cement pastes with a very low water–binder ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, I.; Teramoto, A.

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-high-strength concrete with a large unit cement content undergoes considerable temperature increase inside members due to hydration heat, leading to a higher risk of internal cracking. Hence, the temperature dependence of autogenous shrinkage of cement pastes made with silica fume premixed cement with a water–binder ratio of 0.15 was studied extensively. Development of autogenous shrinkage showed different behaviors before and after the inflection point, and dependence on the temperature after mixing and subsequent temperature histories. The difference in autogenous shrinkage behavior poses problems for winter construction because autogenous shrinkage may increase with decrease in temperature after mixing before the inflection point and with increase in temperature inside concrete members with large cross sections

  4. EFFECTIVENESS OF AUTOGENIC DRAINAGE VERSUS POSTURAL DRAINAGE ON OXYGEN SATURATION IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC BRONCHITIS WITH 15 MINUTES POST THERAPY

    OpenAIRE

    V. Kiran; Dr. Bhimasen .S; E. Mastanaiah; A. Thiruppathi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with COPD will have more amount of secretions. To clear the secretions by using of different bronchial hygiene techniques like postural drainage and autogenic drainage technique, manual hyperventilation technique ,active cycle breathing technique .Hence in this study to compare the short-term effects of postural drainage with clapping (PD) and autogenic drainage (AD) on level of oxygen saturation in blood, and amount of sputum recovery. Methodology: The study was done ...

  5. Stress fracture as a complication of autogenous bone graft harvest from the distal tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Loretta B; Mann, Roger A; Coughlin, Michael J; McPeake, William T; Mizel, Mark S

    2007-02-01

    Autogenous bone graft from the distal tibia provides cancellous bone graft for foot and ankle operations, and it has osteogenic and osteoconductive properties. The site is in close proximity to the foot and ankle, and published retrospective studies show low morbidity from the procedure. One-hundred autografts were obtained from the distal tibia between 2000 and 2003. In four cases the distal tibial bone graft harvest resulted in a stress fracture. There were three women and one man. The average time of diagnosis of the stress fracture from the operation was 1.8 months. All stress fractures healed with a short course (average 2.4 months) of cast immobilization. This study demonstrated that a stress fracture from the donor site of autogenous bone graft of the distal tibia occurs and can be successfully treated nonoperatively.

  6. Autogenic succession and deterministic recovery following disturbance in soil bacterial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurburg, Stephanie D.; Nunes, Ines Marques; Stegen, James C.

    2017-01-01

    The response of bacterial communities to environmental change may affect local to global nutrient cycles. However the dynamics of these communities following disturbance are poorly understood, given that they are often evaluated over macro-ecological time scales and end-point measurements. In ord...... diversity and functional redundancy, respond to disturbances like many macro-ecological systems and exhibit path-dependent, autogenic dynamics during secondary succession. These results highlight the role of autogenic factors and successional dynamics in microbial recovery....... to understand the successional trajectory of soil bacterial communities following disturbances and the mechanisms controlling these dynamics at a scale relevant for these organisms, we subjected soil microcosms to a heat disturbance and followed the community composition of active bacteria over 50 days...... slowed down, and a stability phase (after 29 days), during which the community tended towards its original composition. Phylogenetic turnover patterns indicated that the community experienced stronger deterministic selection during recovery. Thus, soil bacterial communities, despite their extreme...

  7. Articular reconstruction of the humeral head with autogenous allograft in the treatment of the osteonecrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Naoki Miyazaki

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The authors describe a surgical biological reconstruction of the humeral head with frozen autogenous allograft technique for the treatment of young patients with focal osteonecrosis of the humeral head. This represents a possible alternative, maybe even definitive for some patients, when compared to hemiarthroplasty or total shoulder arthroplasty. The technique consists of the fixation of a frozen autogenous allograft with previously-molded articular cartilage from the humeral head, after cleansing the osteonecrotic focus. Five patients under 50 years of age were treated, with three very satisfactory results, one patient was lost to follow-up, and one patient had an unsatisfactory result (converted to hemiarthroplasty. The study describes the technique in detail and the three cases with a longer follow-up time.

  8. Treatment of ankylosed maxillary central incisors by segmental osteotomy with autogenous bone graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Kug-Ho; Min, Yon-Sook; Baik, Hyoung-Seon

    2012-04-01

    This case report describes the treatment of a 16-year-old girl with ankylosed maxillary central incisors that were noticeably infraoccluded and labially displaced. We performed a segmental osteotomy with an autogenous bone graft in a single-stage surgery to align and level the ankylosed teeth. The dento-osseous segment was successfully repositioned with satisfactory periodontal results. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Autogenous Partial Bone Chip Grafting on the Exposed Inferior Alveolar Nerve After Cystic Enucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Mi Hyun; Eo, Mi Young; Cho, Yun Ju; Kim, Soung Min; Lee, Suk Keun

    2018-03-01

    This prospective study evaluated the clinical effectiveness of the new approach of partial autogenous bone chip grafts for the treatment of mandibular cystic lesions related to the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). A total of 38 patients treated for mandibular cysts or benign tumors were included in this prospective study and subsequently divided into 3 groups depending on the bone grafting method used: cystic enucleation without a bone graft (group 1), partial bone chip graft covering the exposed IAN (group 2), and autogenous bone graft covering the entire defect (group 3). We evaluated the symptoms, clinical signs, and radiographic changes using dental panorama preoperatively, immediate postoperatively, and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Radiographic densities were compared using Adobe Photoshop CS5 (Adobe Systems Inc., San Jose, CA). Repeated measures analysis of variance was used for statistical evaluation with SPSS 22.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL), and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.Radiopacities were the most increased at 1 year postoperative in group 3; groups 2 and 3 did not show statistically significant differences, whereas groups 1 and 3 were statistically significant. In terms of radiographic bone healing with clinical regeneration of the exposed IAN, healing occurred in all patients, although the best healing was achieved in group 2.This autogenous partial bone chip grafting procedure to cover the exposed IAN is suggested as a new surgical protocol for the treatment of cystic lesions associated with the IAN.

  10. Post-General Anesthesia Ultrasound-Guided Venous Mapping Increases Autogenous Access Placement Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Png, C Y Maximilian; Korayem, Adam; Finlay, David J

    2018-04-18

    This study investigates the impact of introducing a post-general anesthesia ultrasound mapping (PAUS) on the type of vascular access chosen for hemodialysis in patients without previous accesses. 203 of 297 consecutive patients met inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Within-subjects analysis was performed on patients with both an outpatient ultrasound-guided vein mapping and a PAUS using sign tests and Wilcoxon signed ranked tests. Further, a between-subjects analysis added patients with only the outpatient vein mapping; demographic and comorbidity data were analyzed using t-tests and chi-squared tests. An ordinal logit regression was run for the type of access placed, while a bivariate logit regression was used to compare rates of autogenous access maturation. 165 (81%) patients received both a standard outpatient vein mapping and a PAUS. At the outpatient vein mapping, 130 (79%) patients had suitable veins for an autogenous access while 35 (21%) patients did not have suitable veins for an autogenous access and were planned for a prosthetic access. During PAUS, all 165 (100%) patients were found to have suitable veins for autogenous access formation (P<0.001). When comparing specific autogenous access configurations, Wilcoxon signed rank testing showed significantly more preferable access configurations in the PAUS group compared to the outpatient mapping (P<0.001); Outpatient mapping resulted in 81 (47%) radiocephalic accesses, 10 (6%) radiobasilic accesses, 20 (12%) brachiocephalic accesses, 19 (12%) brachiobasilic accesses and 35 (21%) prosthetic accesses planned, in contrast to 149 (90%) radiocephalic accesses, 3 (2%) radiobasilic accesses, 10 (6%) brachiocephalic accesses, 3 (2%) brachiobasilic accesses and 0 prosthetic accesses when the same patients were analyzed using PAUS. With the analysis expanded to include the 38 (19%) patients with only the outpatient vein mapping (without-PAUS), the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test showed no significant differences

  11. Comparison of autogeneic and allogeneic natural killer cells immunotherapy on the clinical outcome of recurrent breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang S

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Shuzhen Liang,1,2 Kecheng Xu,1,2 Lizhi Niu,1,2 Xiaohua Wang,1 Yingqing Liang,1 Mingjie Zhang,3 Jibing Chen,1,2 Mao Lin1,2 1Department of Central Laboratory, Fuda Cancer Hospital, Jinan University School of Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China; 2Fuda Cancer Institute, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China; 3Hank Bioengineering Co., Ltd, Shenzhen, China Abstract: In the present study, we aimed to compare the clinical outcome of autogeneic and allogeneic natural killer (NK cells immunotherapy for the treatment of recurrent breast cancer. Between July 2016 and February 2017, 36 patients who met the enrollment criteria were randomly assigned to two groups: autogeneic NK cells immunotherapy group (group I, n=18 and allogeneic NK cells immunotherapy group (group II, n=18. The clinical efficacy, quality of life, immune function, circulating tumor cell (CTC level, and other related indicators were evaluated. We found that allogeneic NK cells immunotherapy has better clinical efficacy than autogeneic therapy. Moreover, allogeneic NK cells therapy improves the quality of life, reduces the number of CTCs, reduces carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen 15-3 (CA15-3 expression, and significantly enhances immune function. To our knowledge, this is the first clinical trial to compare the clinical outcome of autogeneic and allogeneic NK cells immunotherapy for recurrent breast cancer. Keywords: clinical outcome, autogeneic, allogeneic, natural killer cells, recurrent breast cancer

  12. Autogenous bone graft and ePTFE membrane in the treatment of peri-implantitis. II. Stereologic and histologic observations in cynomolgus monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Søren; Holmstrup, Palle; Skovgaard, Lene Theil

    2003-01-01

    autogenous bone graft; guided bone regeneration; histology; membrane; non-human primates; oral implants; osseointegration; pathalogy; peri-implantitis; stereology; treatment......autogenous bone graft; guided bone regeneration; histology; membrane; non-human primates; oral implants; osseointegration; pathalogy; peri-implantitis; stereology; treatment...

  13. Maxillary sinus floor elevation surgery with BioOss (R) mixed with a bone marrow concentrate or autogenous bone : test of principle on implant survival and clinical performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rickert, D.; Vissink, A.; Slot, Jan; Sauerbier, S.; Meijer, H. J. A.; Raghoebar, G. M.

    The purpose of this study was to assess implant survival and 1-year clinical performance of implants placed in the posterior maxilla that had been subjected to maxillary sinus floor elevation surgery with bovine bone mineral (BioOss (R)) mixed with autogenous bone marrow concentrate or autogenous

  14. Bone healing around nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite, deproteinized bovine bone mineral, biphasic calcium phosphate, and autogenous bone in mandibular bone defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broggini, Nina; Bosshardt, Dieter D; Jensen, Simon S

    2015-01-01

    The individual healing profile of a given bone substitute with respect to osteogenic potential and substitution rate must be considered when selecting adjunctive grafting materials for bone regeneration procedures. In this study, standardized mandibular defects in minipigs were filled...... with nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA-SiO), deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM), biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) with a 60/40% HA/β-TCP (BCP 60/40) ratio, or particulate autogenous bone (A) for histological and histomorphometric analysis. At 2 weeks, percent filler amongst the test groups (DBBM (35.65%), HA......-SiO (34.47%), followed by BCP 60/40 (23.64%)) was significantly higher than the more rapidly substituted autogenous bone (17.1%). Autogenous bone yielded significantly more new bone (21.81%) over all test groups (4.91%-7.74%) and significantly more osteoid (5.53%) than BCP 60/40 (3%) and DBBM (2...

  15. Maxillary sinus floor augmentation with Bio-Oss or Bio-Oss mixed with autogenous bone as graft in animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T; Schou, S; Stavropoulos, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present systematic review was to test the hypothesis of no differences between the use of Bio-Oss or Bio-Oss mixed with autogenous bone as graft for maxillary sinus floor augmentation (MSFA) applying the lateral window technique, as evaluated in animals. A MEDLINE (Pub...... of the graft improved significantly with increased proportion of Bio-Oss. Bone regeneration, bone-to-implant contact (BIC), biomechanical implant test values, and biodegradation of Bio-Oss after MSFA with Bio-Oss or Bio-Oss mixed with autogenous bone have never been compared within the same study in animals....... Thus, the hypothesis of no differences between the use of Bio-Oss and Bio-Oss mixed with autogenous bone as graft for MSFA could neither be confirmed nor rejected based on existing animal studies....

  16. Frontalis Sling Operation using Silicone Rod Compared with Autogenous Fascia Lata for Simple Congenital Ptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purnima Rajkarnikar Sthapit

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To evaluate the cosmetic results and recurrence of unilateral frontalis sling surgery using a silicone rod compared with autogenous fascia lata in cases of simple congenital ptosis. Methods: This is a retrospective comparative study of 59 patients who underwent a frontalis sling operation for congenital ptosis. Patients were divided into two groups according to the sling material used; an autogeneous fascia lata (fl group (n = 24 and a silicone rod group (sl (n = 35. Cosmetic results and recurrence rates were compared between these 2 groups. The cosmetic results of the frontalis sling operation were assessed as good, fair, or poor based on the difference between the Margin Reflex Distance of both eyelids and graded as good if the difference in two eyes was ≤1mm and poor if it was 2mm or more. Recurrence was defined as the conversion of the cosmetic result from good or fair to poor category. Results: At postoperative day seven and 30, MRD of both the groups were good but on three months follow-up MRD of silicon rod group dropped, however it was not statistically significant .Lid contour was good in both the groups, however, lid symmetry was poor in two cases of fascia lata at three months follow-up. Repeat surgery for poor outcome was done in 8.6% of cases in silicon rod and 8.3% of fascia lata group. Conclusions: The frontalis sling operation using either a silicone rod or autogenous fascia lata showed equally good cosmetic results and lower recurrence rate at three months follow up. Keywords: congenital ptosis; fascia lata; frontalis sling surgery; margin reflex distance; silicone rod.

  17. Histomorphometric evaluation of bone regeneration using autogenous bone and beta-tricalcium phosphate in diabetic rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živadinović Milka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The mechanism of impaired bone healing in diabetes mellitus includes different tissue and cellular level activities due to micro- and macrovascular changes. As a chronic metabolic disease with vascular complications, diabetes affects a process of bone regeneration as well. The therapeutic approach in bone regeneration is based on the use of osteoinductive autogenous grafts as well as osteoconductive synthetic material, like a β-tricalcium phosphate. The aim of the study was to determine the quality and quantity of new bone formation after the use of autogenous bone and β-tricalcium phosphate in the model of calvarial critical-sized defect in rabbits with induced diabetes mellitus type I. Methods. The study included eight 4-month-old Chincilla rabbits with alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus type I. In all animals, there were surgically created two calvarial bilateral defects (diameter 12 mm, which were grafted with autogenous bone and β-tricalcium phosphate (n = 4 or served as unfilled controls (n = 4. After 4 weeks of healing, animals were sacrificed and calvarial bone blocks were taken for histologic and histomorphometric analysis. Beside descriptive histologic evaluation, the percentage of new bone formation, connective tissue and residual graft were calculated. All parameters were statistically evaluated by Friedman Test and post hock Wilcoxon Singed Ranks Test with a significance of p < 0.05. Results. Histology revealed active new bone formation peripherally with centrally located connective tissue, newly formed woven bone and well incorporated residual grafts in all treated defects. Control samples showed no bone bridging of defects. There was a significantly more new bone in autogeonous graft (53% compared with β-tricalcium phosphate (30%, (p < 0.030 and control (7%, (p < 0.000 groups. A significant difference was also recorded between β-tricalcium phosphate and control groups (p < 0.008. Conclusion. In the present

  18. The internal strength of rivers: autogenic processes in control of the sediment load (Tana River, Kenya)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geeraert, Naomi; Ochieng Omengo, Fred; Tamooh, Fredrick; Paron, Paolo; Bouillon, Steven; Govers, Gerard

    2014-05-01

    The construction of sediment rating curves for monitoring stations is a widely used technique to budget sediment fluxes. Changes in the relationship between discharge and sediment concentrations over time are often attributed to human-induced changes in catchment characteristics, such as land use change, dam construction or soil conservation measures and many models have been developed to quantitatively link catchment characteristics and river sediment load. Conversely, changes in river sediment fluxes are often interpreted as indications of major changes in the catchment. By doing so, autogenic processes, taking place within the river channel, are overlooked despite the increasing awareness of their importance. We assessed the role of autogenic processes on the sediment load of Tana River (Kenya). The Tana river was impacted by major dam construction between 1968 and 1988, effectively blocking at least 80% of the sediment transfer from the highlands to the lower river reaches. However, a comparison of pre-dam sediment fluxes at Garissa (located 250 km downstream of the dams) with recent measurements shows that sediment fluxes have not changed significantly. This suggests that most of the sediment in the post-dam period has to originate from inside the alluvial plain of the river, as tributaries downstream of the dams are scarce and intermittent. Several observations are consistent with this hypothesis. We observed that, during the wet season, sediment concentrations rapidly increased below the dams and are not controlled by inputs from tributaries. Also, sediment concentrations were high at the beginning of the wet season, which can be attributed to channel adjustment to the higher discharges. The river sediment does not contain significant amounts of 137Cs or 210Pbxs, suggesting that sediments are not derived from topsoil erosion. Furthermore, we observed a counter clockwise hysteresis during individual events which can be explained by the fact that sediment

  19. Autogenous bone grafts in the esthetic zone: optimizing the procedure using piezosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Piotr

    2012-12-01

    Soft and hard tissue defects pose a therapeutic challenge in modern implant dentistry. There are a multitude of surgical techniques available, and it is necessary to match the problem with the solution. This report describes the reconstruction of the alveolar ridge in the esthetic zone with the help of autogenous bone blocks harvested from the chin that were shaped to fit and stabilized at the recipient site. The procedures were performed using Piezosurgery, which made it possible to introduce surgical modifications and had a significant impact on the accuracy of the procedure. An observation period of 2 to 7 years showed positive stable results for treatment in terms of function and esthetics.

  20. The role of ubiquinone supplementation on osteogenesis of nonvascularized autogenous bone graft

    OpenAIRE

    Taufiqurrahman, Irham; Harijadi, Achmad; Simanjuntak, Roberto M.; D, Coen Pramono; Istiati, Istiati

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ubiquinone is one of food supplement which is known have positive effect in wound healing. However the study to evaluate the possible role of ubiquinone in bone healing in autogenous bone grafting after mandibular resection has not been studied. An in vitro study is required to evaluate whether ubiquinone or coenzyme Q-10 (CoQ10) has a positive effect on osteogenesis. Viability test of CoQ10 and a model of osteogenic-induced and hypoxic-condition mesenchymal stem cell culture were...

  1. Treatment of Rockwood type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation using autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft and endobutton technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye G

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gang Ye, Chao-An Peng, Hua-Bin Sun, Jing Xiao, Kang Zhu Department of Orthopedics, the People’s Hospital of Huangpi District, Wuhan City, People’s Republic of China Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of autogenous semitendinosus graft and endobutton technique, and compare with hook plate in treatment of Rockwood type III acromioclavicular (AC joint dislocation.Methods: From April 2012 to April 2013, we treated 46 patients with Rockwood type III AC joint dislocation. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: Group A was treated using a hook plate and Group B with autogenous semitendinosus graft and endobutton technique. All participants were followed up for 12 months. Radiographic examinations were performed every 2 months postoperatively, and clinical evaluation was performed using the Constant–Murley score at the last follow-up.Results: Results indicated that patients in Group B showed higher mean scores (90.3±5.4 than Group A (80.4±11.5 in terms of Constant–Murley score (P=0.001. Group B patients scored higher in terms of pain (P=0.002, activities (P=0.02, range of motion (P<0.001, and strength (P=0.004. In Group A, moderate pain was reported by 2 (8.7% and mild pain by 8 (34.8% patients. Mild pain was reported by 1 (4.3% patient in Group B. All patients in Group B maintained complete reduction, while 2 (8.7% patients in Group A experienced partial reduction loss. Two patients (8.7% encountered acromial osteolysis on latest radiographs, with moderate shoulder pain and limited range of motion.Conclusion: Autogenous semitendinosus graft and endobutton technique showed better results compared with the hook plate method and exhibited advantages of fewer complications such as permanent pain and acromial osteolysis. Keywords: Rockwood type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation, autogenous semitendinosus graft, endobutton, hook plate

  2. Stepwise surgical approach to diabetic partial foot amputations with autogenous split thickness skin grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal L. Ramanujam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the surgical treatment of severe diabetic foot infections, substantial soft tissue loss often accompanies partial foot amputations. These sizeable soft tissue defects require extensive care with the goal of expedited closure to inhibit further infection and to provide resilient surfaces capable of withstanding long-term ambulation. Definitive wound closure management in the diabetic population is dependent on multiple factors and can have a major impact on the risk of future diabetic foot complications. In this article, the authors provide an overview of autogenous skin grafting, including anatomical considerations, clinical conditions, surgical approach, and adjunctive treatments, for diabetic partial foot amputations.

  3. An Experimental Evaluation of Stress-Management Training for the Airborne Soldier

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    4 State of the Art............................4 Transcendental Meditation ......................5 The Relaxation...Response ................... 5 Autogenic Training .......................... 6 Progressive Relaxation ........................ 6 The Quieting Response...as suspect, at best, or hokum, at worst. A partial listing of these new or scientifically resurrected techniques follows: Transcendental Meditation

  4. Athletes in Motion: Training for the Olympic Games with Mind and Body: Two Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungerleider, Steven

    Two case studies illustrate the Fine-Tuning Effect and its benefit to participants in athletic competition. The Fine-Tuning Effect is the sharpening of psychological processes that enable physical skills to be expressed in a maximum fashion. Such techniques as muscle relaxation, visual imagery, guided fantasy, autogenic training, and meditation…

  5. Evaluation and Observation of Autogenous Healing Ability of Bond Cracks along Rebar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choonghyun Kang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Micro cracks occurring in concrete around tensile rebar is well known latent damage phenomenon. These micro cracks develop, and can be detected after reaching the surface of the concrete. Detection of these cracks before they are fully formed is preferable, but observing the whole crack structure is difficult. Another problem is repairing micro cracks under the concrete surface. The autogenous ability of bond cracks along rebar was evaluated using the air permeability test. Air permeability coefficients were measured before and after tensile loading, and experimental air permeability coefficients became larger near cracks along rebar as a result of tensile loading. Recuring for 28 days after tensile loading made the air permeability coefficients smaller, but this restriction only occurred during water recuring. Observation of crack patterns helped the understanding of change in the air permeability coefficients. Several small cracks along rebar were observed after tensile loading, and most cracks along rebar were not found after water recuring. On the other hand, the crack pattern did not change after air recuring. These results indicate that bond cracks along rebar can be closed by autogenous healing, and cause the air permeability coefficients.

  6. Early prophylactic autogenous bone grafting in type III open tibial fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesemenli, Cumhur C; Kapukaya, Ahmet; Subaşi, Mehmet; Arslan, Huseyin; Necmioğlu, Serdar; Kayikçi, Cuma

    2004-08-01

    The authors report the results achieved in patients with type III open tibial fractures who underwent primary autogenous bone grafting at the time of debridement and skeletal stabilisation. Twenty patients with a mean age of 35.8 years (range, 24-55) were treated between 1996 and 1999. Eight fractures were type IIIA, 11 were type IIIB, and 1 was type IIIC. At the index procedure, wound debridement, external fixation and autogenous bone grafting with bone coverage were achieved. The mean follow-up period was 46 months (range, 34-55). The mean time to fixator removal was 21 weeks (range, 14-35), and the mean time to union was 28 weeks (range, 19-45). Skin coverage was achieved by a myocutaneous flap in 2 patients, late primary closure in 4, and split skin grafting in 14. One (5%) of the patients experienced delayed union, and 1 (5%) developed infection. In tibial type III open fractures, skin coverage may be delayed, using the surrounding soft tissue to cover any exposed bone after thorough débridement and wound cleansing. Primary prophylactic bone grafting performed at the same time reduces the rate of delayed union, shortens the time to union, and does not increase the infection rate.

  7. Microstructure and mechanical performance of autogenously fibre laser beam welded Ti-6242 butt joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashaev, Nikolai, E-mail: nikolai.kashaev@hzg.de; Pugachev, Dmitry; Ventzke, Volker; Fomin, Fedor; Burkhardt, Irmela; Enz, Josephin; Riekehr, Stefan

    2017-05-10

    This work deals with the effects of laser beam power, focus position and advance speed on the geometry, microstructure and mechanical properties such as the tensile strength and microhardness of autogenously fibre laser beam welded Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo (denoted as Ti-6242) butt joints used for high temperature applications. The Ti-6242 sheet employed here is characterized by a globular (α+β) microstructure. Laser beam welded butt joints consisted of a martensitic fusion zone, inhomogeneous heat affected zones and equiaxed base materials. The microhardness increased from 330 HV 0.3 in base material to 430 HV 0.3 in fusion zone due to the martensitic transformation. Butt joints showed the base material level of strength in tensile test. The local increase in microhardness provided a shielding effect that protected the Ti-6242 butt joint against mechanical damage during the static tensile load test. The predicted critical total underfill depth that does not reduce the tensile strength of the weld was determined to be 25% of the specimen thickness. - Highlights: • Autogenous fibre LBW of Ti-6242 was successfully achieved. • Butt joints showed low levels of porosity and an appropriate seam geometry. • Base material level of strength achieved for tensile strength. • Predicted critical underfill depth is 25% of the specimen thickness.

  8. Comparison of the effect of three autogenous bone harvesting methods on cell viability in rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi Haghgoo, Janet; Arabi, Seyed Reza; Hosseinipanah, Seyyed Mohammad; Solgi, Ghasem; Rastegarfard, Neda; Farhadian, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Background. This study was designed to compare the viability of autogenous bone grafts, harvested using different methods, in order to determine the best harvesting technique with respect to more viable cells. Methods. In this animal experimental study, three harvesting methods, including manual instrument (chisel), rotary device and piezosurgery, were used for harvesting bone grafts from the lateral body of the mandible on the left and right sides of 10 rabbits. In each group, 20 bone samples were collected and their viability was assessed using MTS kit. Statistical analyses, including ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests, were used for evaluating significant differences between the groups. Results. One-way ANOVA showed significant differences between all the groups (P=0.000). Data analysis using post hoc Tukey tests indicated that manual instrument and piezosurgery had no significant differences with regard to cell viability (P=0.749) and the cell viability in both groups was higher than that with the use of a rotary instrument (P=0.000). Conclusion. Autogenous bone grafts harvested with a manual instrument and piezosurgery had more viable cells in comparison to the bone chips harvested with a rotary device. PMID:28748046

  9. Autogenous cultured growth plate chondrocyte transplantation in the treatment of physeal injury in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewski, R; Bohosiewicz, J; Gap, A; Bursig, H; Wysocka, A

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this experimental study on New Zealand's white rabbits was to investigate the transplantation of autogenous growth plate cells in order to treat the injured growth plate. They were assessed in terms of measurements of radiological tibial varus and histological characteristics. An experimental model of plate growth medial partial resection of the tibia in 14 New Zealand white rabbits was created. During this surgical procedure the plate growth cells were collected and cultured. While the second surgery was being performed, the autologous cultured growth plate cells were grafted at the right tibia, whereas the left tibia was used as a control group. Histological examinations showed that the grafted right tibia presented the regular shape of the plate growth with hypertrophic maturation, chondrocyte columniation and endochondral calcification. Radiological study shows that the mean tibial deformity at the left angle was 20.29° (6.25 to 33) and 7.21° (5 to 10) in the right angle. This study has demonstrated that grafting of autogenous cultured growth plate cells into a defect of the medial aspect of the proximal tibial physis can prevent bone bridge formation, growth arrest and the development of varus deformity. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:310-16. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  10. Evaluation of autogenous tooth transplantation for replacement of the missing or unrestorable mandibular molar tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahiduj Jaman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to evaluate the functional and occlusal stability of autogenous tooth transplantation. A total of 30 patients were included. Among them, 21 participants received transplanted first molar and the remaining 9 received transplanted second molar. In all the cases, donor tooth were third molar. In each participant, extraction of un-restorable first or second molar tooth was performed which was then replaced by atrumatic extracted third molar tooth. Each third molar tooth was placed in the recipient extracted socket, followed by the evaluation of the occlusion and then stabilized with arch bar and ligature wire. Clinical follow-up evaluation was performed at 15 days, 3 and 12 months in respect to occlusal stability, tooth mobility and periodontal status. It was found that 23 transplanted tooth were successful and the remaining 7 tooth need long-term observation for the final outcome, which was statistically significant. It can be concluded that the autogenous tooth transplantation can replace missing tooth to ensure the preservation of function, aesthetic and to prevent bone resorption of the missing area of the jaw, which can lead to exceptional esthetic and functional outcome.

  11. Relaxation training for anxiety: a ten-years systematic review with meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Castelnuovo Gianluca; Pagnini Francesco; Manzoni Gian; Molinari Enrico

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Relaxation training is a common treatment for anxiety problems. Lacking is a recent quantitative meta-analysis that enhances understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety reduction outcomes after relaxation treatment. Methods All studies (1997–2007), both RCT, observational and without control group, evaluating the efficacy of relaxation training (Jacobson's progressive relaxation, autogenic training, applied relaxation and meditation) for anxiety p...

  12. STS-47 MS Jemison trains in SLJ module at MSFC Payload Crew Training Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Mission Specialist (MS) Mae C. Jemison, wearing Autogenic Feedback Training System 2 suit, works with the Frog Embryology Experiment in a General Purpose Workstation (GPWS) in the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) module mockup at the Payload Crew Training Complex. The experiment will study the effects of weightlessness on the development of frog eggs fertilized in space. The Payload Crew Training Complex is located at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. View provided with alternate number 92P-139.

  13. Influence of Cement Particle-Size Distribution on Early Age Autogenous Strains and Stresses in Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Dale P.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2001-01-01

    The influence of cement particle-size distribution on autogenous strains and stresses in cement pastes of identical water-to-cement ratios is examined for cement powders of four different finenesses. Experimental measurements include chemical shrinkage, to quantify degree of hydration; internal r...

  14. Morphological variation and habitat modification are strongly correlated for the autogenic ecosystem engineer Spartina anglica (common cordgrass)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulzen, J.B.; Van Soelen, J.; Bouma, T.J.

    2007-01-01

    We explored to what extent morphological variation and habitat modification are correlated for an autogenic ecosystem engineer, which is an organism that modifies its habitat via its own physical structures. The intertidal salt marsh species Spartina anglica is well known for its capacity to enhance

  15. Retrograde tracing of fluorescent gold after autogenous nerve transplantation on spinal cord injured in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, X; Liu, W; Ding, Ming

    2016-01-01

    , the transplantation group using autologous sural nerve graft to repair spinal cord injury period and non-transplantation group was only exposed incision without treatment. In the 4, 6 and 8 weeks after operation, the retrograde tracing of FG Fluoro-Gold was performed to discover the recovery of the axial plasma......Objective To investigate the changes of the fluorescent gold retrograde tracing autogenous nerve transplantation on spinal cord injured in rats. Methods The animals were divided into two groups, with modified Allen impact method to establish model of spinal cord injury. After 4 weeks.......01). Conclusion After spinal cord injury, autologous nerve graft was repaired and survived well and promote the recovery of spinal cord injury segment shaft pulp transportation function....

  16. Effect of an autogenous free fat graft on hemilaminectomy defects in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, J.; Koga, M.; Kishimoto, M.; Lee, K.J.; Iwasaki, T.; Miyake, Y.; Yamada, K.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of an autogenous free fat graft (FFG) on hemilaminectomy defects. Hemilaminectomy was performed at three levels in three beagles, and each defect was designated as a control site or a site treated with one of two different sizes of FFG. Subsequently, longitudinal computed tomography scanning and histopathological examination were performed. As a result, no postoperative dural adhesion was recognized at the sites where FFGs were placed regardless of the size of the FFG. Moreover, there was no compression of the spinal cord by the FFG. Therefore, it appears that postoperative dural adhesion was controlled by the FFG and that the possibility of FFG migration into the spinal canal is low in hemilaminectomy. In conclusion, placement of an FFG over the defect was considered useful for preventing complications in hemilaminectomy

  17. Histological evaluation of healing after transalveolar maxillary sinus augmentation with bioglass and autogenous bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stavropoulos, Andreas; Sima, Catalin; Sima, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    the transalveolar osteotomy by means of a trephine bur and non-decalcified sections through the long axis of the cylinder were produced. After a strict selection process, taking into account the presurgical residual bone height and biopsy length, 8 and 15 biopsies representing the new tissues formed inside......OBJECTIVES: The aim was to evaluate histologically the outcome of a bioglass and autogenous bone (at 1 : 1 ratio) composite implantation for transalveolar sinus augmentation. METHODS: In 31 patients, during implant installation ca. 4 months after sinus augmentation, biopsies were harvested through...... the sinus and the transalveolar osteotomy, respectively, qualified for analysis. The tissue fractions occupied by newly formed bone (mineralized tissue+bone marrow), soft connective tissue, residual biomaterial+empty spaces, and debris inside the sinus cavity or the transalveolar osteotomy were estimated...

  18. Effect of Cement Type on Autogenous Deformation of Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pietro, Lura; Ye, Guang; van Breugel, Klaas

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, measurements of non-evaporable water content, chemical shrinkage, autogenous deformation, internal relative humidity (RH), pore solution composition, and early-age elastic modulus are presented and discussed. All experiments were performed on Portland cement and blast-furnace slag...... (BFS) cement pastes. Self-desiccation shrinkage of the BFS cement paste was modeled based on the RH measurements, following the capillary-tension approach. The main findings of this study are: 1) self-desiccation shrinkage can be related to self-desiccation both for Portland and for BFS cement pastes......, taking into account the influence of the dissolved salts in the pore solution, 2) the BFS cement paste studied shows pronounced self-desiccation and self-desiccation shrinkage, mainly caused by its very fine pore structure....

  19. Autogenic geomorphic processes determine the resolution and fidelity of terrestrial paleoclimate records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Brady Z; Straub, Kyle M

    2017-09-01

    Terrestrial paleoclimate records rely on proxies hosted in alluvial strata whose beds are deposited by unsteady and nonlinear geomorphic processes. It is broadly assumed that this renders the resultant time series of terrestrial paleoclimatic variability noisy and incomplete. We evaluate this assumption using a model of oscillating climate and the precise topographic evolution of an experimental alluvial system. We find that geomorphic stochasticity can create aliasing in the time series and spurious climate signals, but these issues are eliminated when the period of climate oscillation is longer than a key time scale of internal dynamics in the geomorphic system. This emergent autogenic geomorphic behavior imparts regularity to deposition and represents a natural discretization interval of the continuous climate signal. We propose that this time scale in nature could be in excess of 10 4 years but would still allow assessments of the rates of climate change at resolutions finer than the existing age model techniques in isolation.

  20. Endovascular Treatment of Autogenous Radiocephalic Fistulas with the 'Eighth Note' Deformity for Hemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng Meijui; Chen, Matt Chiung-Yu; Chi Wenche; Liu Yichun; Chien Kofen; Liang Hueilung; Pan, Huay-Ben

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a unique 'eighth note' deformity of the autogenous radiocephalic fistula for hemodialysis and to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of its endovascular treatment. Over 3 years, a total of 808 patients and 558 autogenous radiocephalic fistulas were treated for vascular access dysfunction or thrombosis. These included 14 fistulas in 14 patients (9 men, 5 women; mean age, 58.2 ± 2.8 years; range 27-79 years) whose fistulograms before treatment resembled a musical note, the eighth note. Endovascular treatment sought to remodel the deformed vascular access to a classic radiocephalic fistula and increase the number of cannulation sites available for hemodialysis. The technical and clinical success rates were each 92.8% (13/14). Fistula remodeling was successful in 13 patients. The postintervention primary patency was 100% at 90 days, 91.7 ± 0.8% at 120 days, 78.6 ± 13.9% at 180 days, 62.9 ± 17.9% at 360 days, 31.4 ± 24.0% at 540 days, and 0% at 720 days. The postintervention secondary patency was 100% at 90 days, 100% at 120 days, 100% at 180 days, 85.7 ± 13.2% at 360 days, and 85.7 ± 13.2% at 720 days. No major complications were noted. Minor complications were found in 71.4% of patients, all of which resolved spontaneously. In conclusion, endovascular treatment of fistulas with the eighth note deformity can effectively increase the number of available cannulation sites, facilitate fistula maturation, and facilitate thromboaspiration after fistula thrombosis.

  1. Unprotected autogenous bone block grafts in anterior maxilla: Resorption rates and clinical outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosanić Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The use of autogenous bone grafts for augmentation of the resorbed alveolar ridge is still considered the gold standard in implant dentistry. The aim of this study was to analyze the resorption rate of autogenous bone block grafts from the retromolar region placed in the frontal segment of the upper jaw unprotected by barrier membranes, to assess the stability of implants placed into the grafted bone, as well as to monitor its changes during the healing period. Methods. The study included 18 patients with a total of 20 grafted sites. The residual alveolar ridge was measured before and after the augmentation and prior to implant placement. All implants were restored with provisional crowns within 48 hours after the placement. Implant stability was assessed using resonance frequency analysis. Results. The average period from ridge augmentation to reentry was 5.4 months (range 4–6 months. At reentry the healed alveolar ridge had a mean width of 6.1 ± 1.27 mm. The mean calculated width gain was 3.04 ± 1.22 mm. The overall surface resorption of block grafts was 0.68 ± 0.69 mm (18.85%. At the time of implant placement the mean value of implant stability quotient (ISQ was 71.25 ± 5.77. The lowest ISQ values were noted after three weeks of healing, followed by a gradual increase until week 12. After 12 weeks implants showed significantly higher ISQ values compared to primary stability (p < 0.05 Wilcoxon signed ranks test. During the 3-years followup period no cases of implant loss were recorded. Conclusion. Despite a significant resorption of bone grafts, it was possible to place implants in all the cases and to use the immediate loading protocol without affecting implant survival rate. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no.175021

  2. Computed tomography evaluation of autogenous graft in sinus lift surgery; Analise por tomografia computadorizada do enxerto autogeno na cirurgia de 'sinus lift'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajzen, Sergio Aron; Moscatiello, Rafael Andrade; Lima, Aida Maria Custodio de; Moscatiello, Vitoria Aparecida Muglia; Helio Kiitiro Yamashita [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem; Mosacatiello, Rafael Muglia; Nishiguchi, Celso Itiro [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Disciplina de Tecnica Operatoria e Cirurgia Experimental; Alves, Maria Teresa de Seixas [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Disciplina de Anatomia Patologica

    2001-02-01

    The objective was to quantify bone formation within autogenous bone grafts and autogenous bone grafts in combination with platelet-rich plasma obtained either from apheresis or centrifugation using computed tomography. This prospective, double-blind study was conducted in 34 male and female adult patients (mean age of 28 years and 8 months), with either unilateral or bilateral pneumatization of the maxillary sinuses, requiring bone graft for dental implant. All patients were submitted to computed tomography examinations prior and six months after sinus lift surgery. Fifty-three maxillary sinuses were operated and divided into three distinct groups: autogenous bone graft, autogenous bone graft in combination with platelet-rich plasma obtained by centrifugation, and autogenous bone graft in combination with platelet-rich plasma obtained by apheresis. The results showed that computed tomography demonstrated bone growth in height and width between the initial and the follow-up computed tomography scans in all three groups. However, no statistical difference was found either for bone height or width. It was concluded that clinical evidence demonstrates the effectiveness of autogenous bone grafts, particularly when used in combination with bone growth factors such as platelet-rich plasma, which allow prosthetic and functional restoration of maxillofacial structures through fixation of dental implants. (author)

  3. The effect of butyric acid with autogenous omental graft on healing of experimental Achilles tendon injury in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahani, S; Moslemi, H R; Dehghan, M M; Sedaghat, R; Mazaheri Nezhad, R; Rezaee Moghaddam, D

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the role of local injection of butyric acid (BA) with autogenous omental graft was evaluated in healing of experimental Achilles tendon injury in rabbits. Nine adult male New Zealand rabbits were anesthetized and a partial thickness tenotomy was created on both hindlimbs. In treated group, omental graft was secured in place using BA soaked polygalactin 910 suture. In control group, the graft was sutured without BA. Butyric acid and normal saline were injected daily to treatment and control groups for three days, respectively. Based on the findings, on day 15 after injury, the tendon sections showed that healing rate in BA treated group was higher than that in control group. Furthermore, at days 28 and 45, comparison between BA treated and control groups demonstrated that BA increased the healing rate but with no significance. In summary, results of this study show that application of BA with autogenous omental graft can improve healing process of damaged Achilles tendon.

  4. Hard and Soft Tissue Management of a Localized Alveolar Ridge Atrophy with Autogenous Sources and Biomaterials: A Challenging Clinical Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Maiorana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Particularly in the premaxillary area, the stability of hard and soft tissues plays a pivotal role in the success of the rehabilitation from both a functional and aesthetic aspect. The present case report describes the clinical management of a localized alveolar ridge atrophy in the area of the upper right canine associated with a thin gingival biotype with a lack of keratinized tissue. An autogenous bone block harvested from the chin associated with heterologous bone particles was used to replace the missing bone, allowing for a prosthetic driven implant placement. Soft tissues deficiency was corrected by means of a combined epithelialized and subepithelial connective tissue graft. The 3-year clinical and radiological follow-up demonstrated symmetric gingival levels of the upper canines, with physiological peri-implant probing depths and bone loss. Thus, the use of autogenous tissues combined with biomaterials might be considered a reliable technique in case of highly aesthetic demanding cases.

  5. Comparative studies on the biology and filarial susceptibility of selected blood-feeding and autogenous Aedes togoi sub-colonies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuluck Junkum

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Blood-feeding and autogenous sub-colonies were selected from a laboratory, stock colony of Aedes togoi, which was originally collected from Koh Nom Sao, Chanthaburi province, Southeast Thailand. Comparative biology and filarial susceptibility between the two sub-colonies (blood-feeding: F11, F13; autogeny: F38, F40 were investigated to evaluate their viability and vectorial capacity. The results of comparison on biology revealed intraspecific differences, i.e., the average egg deposition/gravid female (F11/F38; F13/F40, embryonation rate (F13/F40, hatchability rate (F11/F38; F13/F40, egg width (F11/F38, wing length of females (F13/F40, and wing length and width of males (F11/F38 in the blood-feeding sub-colony were significantly greater than that in the autogenous sub-colony; and egg length (F11/F38 and width (F13/F40, and mean longevity of adult females (F11/F38 and males (F13/F40 in the blood-feeding sub-colony were significantly less than that in the autogenous sub-colony. The results of comparison on filarial susceptibility demonstrated that both sub-colonies yielded similar susceptibilities to Brugia malayi [blood-feeding/autogeny = 56.7% (F11/53.3%(F38, 60%(F13/83.3%(F40] and Dirofilaria immitis [blood-feeding/autogeny = 85.7%(F11/75%(F38, 45%(F13/29.4%(F40], suggesting autogenous Ae. togoi sub-colony was an efficient laboratory vector in study of filariasis.

  6. Hard and Soft Tissue Management of a Localized Alveolar Ridge Atrophy with Autogenous Sources and Biomaterials: A Challenging Clinical Case

    OpenAIRE

    C. Maiorana; D. Andreoni; P. P. Poli

    2016-01-01

    Particularly in the premaxillary area, the stability of hard and soft tissues plays a pivotal role in the success of the rehabilitation from both a functional and aesthetic aspect. The present case report describes the clinical management of a localized alveolar ridge atrophy in the area of the upper right canine associated with a thin gingival biotype with a lack of keratinized tissue. An autogenous bone block harvested from the chin associated with heterologous bone particles was used to re...

  7. [Fusion of reconstructed titanic plate, vertebral pedical screws and autogenous granulated cancellous bone graft in posterior occipitocervical region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Dejun; Song, Yueming

    2006-08-01

    To explore the technique of fusing the reconstructed titanic plate, the C2 pedical screws, and the autogenous granulated cancellous bone graft in the occipitocervical region. From April 2002 to January 2005, 19 patients aged 31-67 years with occipitocervical instability underwent the occipitocervical fusion using the reconstructed plate, C2 pedical screws, and autogenous granulated cancellous bone graft. Of the patients, 8 had complex occipitocervical deformity, 8 had old atlantoaxial fracture and dislocation, 2 had rheumatoid arthritis and anterior dislocation of the atlantoaxial joint, and 1 had cancer of the deltoid process of the axis. No complication occurred during and after operation. The follow-up for an average of 16 months in 19 patients showed that all the patients achieved solid bony fusion in the occipitocervical region. There was no broken plate, broken screw, looseness of the internal fixation or neurovascular injury. The fixation of the C2 pedical screws with the reconstructed titanic plate is reliable, the insertion is easy, and the autogenous granulated cancellous bone graft has a high fusion rate, thus resulting in a satisfactory effect in the occipitocervical fusion.

  8. Microstructure Characterization and Stress Corrosion Evaluation of Autogenous and Hybrid Friction Stir Welded Al-Cu-Li 2195 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhixian; Arbegast, William J.; Meletis, Efstathios I.

    1997-01-01

    Friction stir welding process is being evaluated for application on the Al-Cu-Li 2195 Super-Light Weight External Tank of the Space Transportation System. In the present investigation Al-Cu-Li 2195 plates were joined by autogenous friction stir welding (FSW) and hybrid FSW (friction stir welding over existing variable polarity plasma arc weld). Optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized to characterize microstructures of the weldments processed by both welding methods. TEM observations of autogenous FSW coupons in the center section of the dynamically-recrystallized zone showed an equiaxed recrystallized microstructure with an average grain size of approx. 3.8 microns. No T(sub 1), precipitates were present in the above-mentioned zone. Instead, T(sub B) and alpha precipitates were found in this zone with a lower population. Alternate immersion, anodic polarization, constant load, and slow strain tests were carried out to evaluate the general corrosion and stress-corrosion properties of autogenous and hybrid FSW prepared coupons. The experimental results will be discussed.

  9. Autogenic Versus Allogenic Controls on the Evolution of a Coupled Fluvial Megafan-Mountainous Catchment System: Insight from Numerical Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchene, M.; van der Beek, P.; Carretier, S.; Mouthereau, F.

    2017-12-01

    Alluvial megafans are sensitive recorders of landscape evolution, controlled by both autogenic processes and allogenic forcing, and they are influenced by the coupled dynamics of the fan with its mountainous catchment. The Mio-Pliocene Lannemezan megafan in the northern Pyrenean foreland (SW France) was abandoned by its mountainous feeder stream during the Quaternary and subsequently incised. The flight of alluvial terraces abandoned along the stream network may suggest a climatic control on the incision. We use a landscape evolution numerical model (CIDRE) to explore the relative roles of autogenic processes and external forcing in the building, abandonment and incision of a foreland megafan, and we compare the results with the inferred evolution of the Lannemezan megafan. Autogenic processes are sufficient to explain the building of a megafan and the long-term entrenchment of its feeding river on time and space scales that match the Lannemezan setting. Climate, through temporal variations in precipitation rate, may have played a role in the episodic pattern of incision on a shorter timescale. In contrast, base-level changes, tectonic activity in the mountain range or tilting of the foreland through flexural isostatic rebound do not appear to have played a role in the abandonment of the megafan.

  10. Autogenous bone particle/titanium fiber composites for bone regeneration in a rabbit radius critical-size defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huanxin; Ji, Ye; Tian, Qi; Wang, Xintao; Zhang, Nan; Zhang, Yicai; Xu, Jun; Wang, Nanxiang; Yan, Jinglong

    2017-11-01

    To explore the effects of autogenous bone particle/titanium fiber composites on repairing segmental bone defects in rabbits. A model of bilateral radial bone defect was established in 36 New Zealand white rabbits which were randomly divided into 3 groups according to filling materials used for bilaterally defect treatment: in group C, 9 animal bone defect areas were prepared into simple bilateral radius bone defect (empty sham) as the control group; 27 rabbits were used in groups ABP and ABP-Ti. In group ABP, left defects were simply implanted with autogenous bone particles; meanwhile, group ABP-Ti animals had right defects implanted with autogenous bone particle/titanium fiber composites. Animals were sacrificed at 4, 8, and 12 weeks, respectively, after operation. Micro-CT showed that group C could not complete bone regeneration. Bone volume to tissue volume values in group ABP-Ti were better than group ABP. From histology and histomorphometry Groups ABP and ABP-Ti achieved bone repair, the bone formation of group ABP-Ti was better. The mechanical strength of group ABP-Ti was superior to that of other groups. These results confirmed the effectiveness of autologous bone particle/titanium fiber composites for promoting bone regeneration and mechanical strength.

  11. Effects of Autogenous Bone Marrow Aspirate Concentrate on Radiographic Integration of Femoral Condylar Osteochondral Allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladeji, Lasun O; Stannard, James P; Cook, Cristi R; Kfuri, Mauricio; Crist, Brett D; Smith, Matthew J; Cook, James L

    2017-10-01

    Transplantation of fresh osteochondral allografts (OCAs) is an attractive treatment option for symptomatic articular cartilage lesions in young, healthy patients. Because the lack of OCA bone integration can be a cause of treatment failure, methods for speeding and enhancing OCA bone integration to mitigate this potential complication are highly desirable. To determine if autogenous bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMC) treatment of large femoral condylar OCAs would be associated with superior radiographic OCA bone integration compared with nontreated allografts during the critical first 6 months after surgery. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A review of patients enrolled in a prospective registry who were treated with transplantation of large OCAs to one or both femoral condyles at our institution from March 12, 2013 to March 14, 2016 was performed. Patients were stratified into 2 groups based on BMC treatment versus no BMC treatment; the treatment was nonrandomized and was rooted in a shift in practice and a continuing effort to optimize OCA transplantation at our institution. Patients were excluded if they did not have orthogonal view radiographs performed at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months postoperatively. Each condyle undergoing OCA transplantation was assessed individually by an independent musculoskeletal radiologist, who was blinded to the treatment group and time point. OCAs were assessed with respect to graft integration (0%-100%; 0 = no integration, 100 = complete integration) and degree of sclerosis (0-3; 0 = normal, 1 = mild sclerosis, 2 = moderate sclerosis, and 3 = severe sclerosis) of the graft at each time point. This study identified 17 condyles in 15 patients who underwent OCA transplantation without BMC and 29 condyles in 22 patients who underwent OCA transplantation with BMC. The BMC group had significantly ( P = .033) higher graft integration scores at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. Graft sclerosis was significantly ( P

  12. Autogenous healing and reinforcement corrosion of water-penetrated separation cracks in reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramm, W.; Biscoping, M.

    1998-01-01

    Depending on the crack width, the thickness of the structure, the water pressure, and the degree of acid of the water, long-term investigations have been performed over a period of 2 years with respect to the autogenous healing and reinforcement corrosion of water-penetrated separation cracks in reinforced concrete by the University of Kaiserslautern, supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG). For the waters penetrating the cracks deionised water (neutral, pH=7.0), and boric acid treated deionised water with a pH-value of 6.1 and 5.2 (weakly acid waters) were used. A complete autogenous healing could not be observed. The water penetrating the cracks could hardly be measured with a pH-value of 7.0 at the end of the test. While naturally at the beginning of the test, no influence of the water-chemical degree of the acids could be determined, the existing flow-through quantities towards the end of the test period depended clearly on the crack width and the pH-value. With an increasing crack width and an increasing acid-degree larger flow-through quantities were measured. Depending on the pH-value and the crack width it was determined whether and to which extent corrosion developed at the reinforcing steel bars crossing the cracks. With a crack width of 0.1 mm, corrosion was not to be observed in any case. For the test specimens with a crack width of 0.2 mm a start of the corrosion was found depending on the pH-value. With an increasing width of the crack, an increasing corrosion development is to be expected for test specimens penetrated by acid water. For a crack width of 0.4 mm and a pH-value of 5.2, the highest corrosion development was to be observed, however, there were weakenings of the cross section not worth being mentioned even after a 2-year test period. (orig.)

  13. Effect of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty on the stenosis of autogenous radiocephalic ateriovenous fistula for hemodialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Sun Min; Kim, Jeong Ho; Byun, Sung Su; Kang, Jin MMo; Choi, Sang Tae; Kim, Jong Woo; Kim, Hyung Sik; Choi, Hye Young [Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seonam University College of Medicine, Myongji Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) on stenosis of autogenous radiocephalic arteriovenous fistula (RCF) for hemodialysis and to determine the factors influencing patency. This retrospective study included 136 patients referred for PTA of RCF stenosis between March 2005 and July 2014. The technical success rate, complications, and patency rate were evaluated. The following factors were analyzed as they might influence patency: age, gender, site and duration of arteriovenous fistula, underlying disease, body mass index, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, peripheral artery or coronary artery occlusive disease, stenosis length/grade, cutting balloon, and balloon size. The initial technical success rate was 91.9% (125/136). Complications included vessel rupture (n = 2) and vessel dissection (n = 2). The patency rates at 6, 12, 24, and 48 months after PTA were 81.9, 67.1, 52.7, and 42.3%, respectively. The patency rate was higher in cases with longer (> 3 cm) stenosis (p = 0.04). Use of cutting balloon and larger size of balloon catheter made the patency longer, but this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.637, 0.258). PTA is a safe and effective way to manage stenosis in RCF. The length of stenosis was the only factor which affected the patency rate in this study.

  14. Influence of bouncing and assisted autogenic drainage on acid gastro-oesophageal reflux in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ginderdeuren, Filip; Vandenplas, Yvan; Deneyer, Michel; Vanlaethem, Sylvie; Buyl, Ronald; Kerckhofs, Eric

    2017-08-01

    To determine the influence of modern airway clearance techniques using assisted autogenic drainage (AAD), whether or not combined with bouncing, on acid gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) in infants reflux episodes (RE) and the refluxindex (RI) were the outcome measures. The results obtained during (T15) and 15 min after the intervention (T30) were compared to a period of 15 min before treatment (T0). The results of 150 infants, evenly distributed over the three treatment groups, were analyzed. No significant differences were found in number of RE at T15 and T30 compared to T0 in the bouncing group (P = 0.42), the AAD group (P = 0.14), and the BAAD group (P = 0.91). RI was significantly lower in the AAD group at T15 compared to T0 (P < 0.01). No differences in RI were found in the bouncing group (P = 0.28), nor in the BAAD group (P = 0.81). Bouncing, AAD and BAAD do not induce, nor aggravate acid GOR in infants under the age of 1 year. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A new autogenous mobile system driven by vibration without impacts, excited by an impulse periodic force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duong The-Hung

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a new proposed design for autogenous mobile systems which can move without any external mechanisms such as legs or wheels. A Duffing oscillator with a cubic spring, which is excited by an impulse periodic force, is utilized to drive the whole system. The rectilinear motion of the system is performed employing the periodically oscillation of the internal mass interacting without collisions with the main body. Utilizing the nonlinear restoring force of the cubic spring, the system can move in desired directions. When the ratio between the excitation force and the friction force is smaller than 2.5, backward or forward motion can be easily achieved by applying an excitation force in the same desired direction. Different from other vibro-impact drifting devices, no impact needed to drive the new proposed system. This novel structure allows to miniaturize the device as well as to simplify the control algorithm thus can significantly expand applicability of the proposed system.

  16. Cephalic Arch Stenosis in Autogenous Haemodialysis Fistulas: Treatment With the Viabahn Stent-Graft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shawyer, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.shawyer@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk [The Royal London Hospital, Radiology Department (United Kingdom); Fotiadis, Nicos I., E-mail: fotiadis.nicholas@gmail.com [Royal Marsden Hospital, Radiology Department, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Namagondlu, Girish, E-mail: girish.namagondlu@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk [The Royal London Hospital, Renal Medicine Department (United Kingdom); Iyer, Arun, E-mail: arun.iyer@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk [The Royal London Hospital, Radiology Department (United Kingdom); Blunden, Mark, E-mail: mark.blunden@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk; Raftery, Martin, E-mail: martin.raftery@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk; Yaqoob, Magdi, E-mail: magdi.yaqoob@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk [The Royal London Hospital, Renal Medicine Department (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    Cephalic arch stenosis (CAS) is an important and common cause of dysfunction in autogenous haemodialysis fistulas that requires multiple reinterventions and aggressive surveillance. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of the Viabahn stent-graft for the management of CAS. Between April 2005 and October 2011, 11 consecutive patients [four men and seven women (mean age 56.7 years)] with CAS and dysfunctional fistulas were treated with insertion of 11 Viabahn stent-grafts. Six stent-grafts were inserted due to residual stenosis after angioplasty and five for fistuloplasty-induced rupture. No patient was lost to follow-up. The technical and clinical success rate was 100 %. Primary access patency rates were 81.8 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.482-0.977] at 6 months and 72.7 % (95 % CI 0.390-0.939) at 12 months. Secondary access patency rates were 90.9 % at 6 months (95 % CI 0.587-0.997). There were no procedure-related complications. Mean follow-up was 543.8 days (range 156-2,282). The use of the Viabahn stent-graft in the management of CAS is technically feasible and, in this small series, showed patency rates that compare favorably with historical data of angioplasty and bare stents.

  17. Cephalic Arch Stenosis in Autogenous Haemodialysis Fistulas: Treatment With the Viabahn Stent-Graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shawyer, Andrew; Fotiadis, Nicos I.; Namagondlu, Girish; Iyer, Arun; Blunden, Mark; Raftery, Martin; Yaqoob, Magdi

    2013-01-01

    Cephalic arch stenosis (CAS) is an important and common cause of dysfunction in autogenous haemodialysis fistulas that requires multiple reinterventions and aggressive surveillance. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of the Viabahn stent-graft for the management of CAS. Between April 2005 and October 2011, 11 consecutive patients [four men and seven women (mean age 56.7 years)] with CAS and dysfunctional fistulas were treated with insertion of 11 Viabahn stent-grafts. Six stent-grafts were inserted due to residual stenosis after angioplasty and five for fistuloplasty-induced rupture. No patient was lost to follow-up. The technical and clinical success rate was 100 %. Primary access patency rates were 81.8 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.482–0.977] at 6 months and 72.7 % (95 % CI 0.390–0.939) at 12 months. Secondary access patency rates were 90.9 % at 6 months (95 % CI 0.587–0.997). There were no procedure-related complications. Mean follow-up was 543.8 days (range 156–2,282). The use of the Viabahn stent-graft in the management of CAS is technically feasible and, in this small series, showed patency rates that compare favorably with historical data of angioplasty and bare stents.

  18. Histological evaluation of the influence of magnetic field application in autogenous bone grafts in rats

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    Ponzoni Deise

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone grafts are widely used in oral and maxillofacial reconstruction. The influence of electromagnetic fields and magnets on the endogenous stimulation of target tissues has been investigated. This work aimed to assess the quality of bone healing in surgical cavities filled with autogenous bone grafts, under the influence of a permanent magnetic field produced by in vivo buried devices. Methods Metal devices consisting of commercially pure martensitic stainless steel washers and titanium screws were employed. Thirty male Wistar rats were divided into 3 experimental and 3 control groups. A surgical bone cavity was produced on the right femur, and a bone graft was collected and placed in each hole. Two metallic washers, magnetized in the experimental group but not in the control group, were attached on the borders of the cavity. Results The animals were sacrificed on postoperative days 15, 45 and 60. The histological analysis of control and experimental samples showed adequate integration of the bone grafts, with intense bone neoformation. On days 45 and 60, a continued influence of the magnetic field on the surgical cavity and on the bone graft was observed in samples from the experimental group. Conclusion The results showed intense bone neoformation in the experimental group as compared to control animals. The intense extra-cortical bone neoformation observed suggests that the osteoconductor condition of the graft may be more susceptible to stimulation, when submitted to a magnetic field.

  19. Anwendung des autogenen Trainings im Kindesalter

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    Sühling, Nikola

    2004-01-01

    The autogenic training was developed by J.H.Schulz in the period between 1912-1920 based on the experiences of his hypnosis patients. These reported of a regular occurrence of certain perceptions at the beginning of the treatment. J.H.Schulz derived six exercises from this experience, through which the patient is said to get relaxed. Among others these exercises contain the idea to get warm and heavy arms and legs. Furthermore, physical reactions in the abdomen, thorax and the head will be in...

  20. A study of 23 unicameral bone cysts of the calcaneus: open chip allogeneic bone graft versus percutaneous injection of bone powder with autogenous bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Il-Hyung; Micic, Ivan Dragoljub; Jeon, In-Ho

    2008-02-01

    The treatment of unicameral bone cyst varies from percutaneous needle biopsy, aspiration and local injection of steroid, autologous bone marrow, or demineralized bone matrix to curettage and open bone-grafting. The purpose of this study was to compare the results of open chip allogeneic bone graft versus percutaneous injection of demineralized bone powder with autogenous bone marrow in management of calcaneal cysts. Twenty-three calcaneal unicameral cysts in 20 patients were treated. Lyophilized irradiated chip allogeneic bone (CAB) and autogenous bone marrow were used for treatment of 13 cysts in 11 patients, and 10 cysts in 9 patients were treated with percutaneous injection of irradiated allogeneic demineralized bone powder (DBP) and autogenous bone marrow. There were 11 males and 9 female patients with mean age of 17 years. The patients were followed for an average of 49.4 months. Complete healing was achieved in 9 cysts treated with chip allogeneic bone and in 5 cysts treated with powdered bone. Four cysts treated with CAB and 3 cysts treated with DBP healed with a defect. Two cysts treated with powdered bone and autogenous bone marrow were classified as persistent. No infections or pathological fractures were observed during the followup period. Percutaneous injection of a mixture of allogeneic bone powder with autogenous bone marrow is a minimal invasive method and could be an effective alternative in the treatment of unicameral calcaneal bone cysts. The postoperative morbidity was low, the hospital stay was brief, and patient's comfort for unrestricted activity was enhanced.

  1. A combined approach of enamel matrix derivative gel and autogenous bone grafts in treatment of intrabony periodontal defects. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, George; Jin, Lijian

    2003-04-01

    Enamel matrix derivative (EMD) has recently been introduced as a new modality in regenerative periodontal therapy. This case report demonstrates a combined approach in topical application of EMD gel (Emdogain) and autogenous bone grafts for treatment of intrabony defects and furcation involvement defects in a patient with chronic periodontitis. The seven-month post-surgery clinical and radiographic results were presented. The combined application of EMD gel with autogenous bone grafts in intrabony osseous defects resulted in clinically significant gain of attachment on diseased root surfaces and bone fill on radiographs. Further controlled clinical studies are required to confirm the long-term effectiveness of the combination of EMD gel and autogenous bone grafts in treatment of various osseous defects in subjects with chronic periodontitis.

  2. Clinical trial comparing autogenous fascia lata sling and Gore-Tex suspension in bilateral congenital ptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsamkary MA

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mahmoud Ahmed Elsamkary,1 Maged Maher Salib Roshdy1,2 1Ophthalmology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt; 2Pediatric Ophthalmology Department, Al Watany Eye Hospital, Cairo, Egypt Purpose: To study the effect of autogenous fascia lata sling (AFLS versus Gore-Tex suspension (GTS regarding the functional and aesthetic outcomes in patients with bilateral congenital ptosis. Patients and methods: A prospective comparative randomized single-center study enrolled 110 patients with bilateral congenital ptosis. One group (n=55 underwent AFLS and the second group (n=55 underwent GTS. Exclusion criteria were good levator function, absent Bell’s phenomenon, and abnormal ocular motility. Follow-up period was 2 years. Functional outcome was measured from digital photos by analysis of upper eyelid margin position relative to the superior limbus and classified as very good (<3 mm, good (3–5 mm, poor (>5 mm, and recurrent. Aesthetic outcome was assessed in terms of lid contour, symmetry of eyelid height, and lid crease presence. Complications were also reported. Results: Failure rate (recurrence and complications was less in AFLS (P=0.035. Symmetrical lid height and good contour were more frequently attained by AFLS (P=0.007 and 0.047, respectively. However, the frequency of very good, good, poor, recurrence, lagopthalmos, ectropion, infection, and formed lid crease individually showed no statistically significant difference (P=0.252, 0.482, 1, 0.489, 0.438, 1, 0.618, and 0.506, respectively. Conclusion: AFLS is a better choice in surgery for patients with bilateral congenital ptosis because it has fewer complications and a lesser recurrence rate than GTS. Keywords: ptosis surgery, surgical outcomes, ptosis recurrence, lagophthalmos

  3. Assisted autogenic drainage in infants and young children hospitalized with uncomplicated pneumonia, a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corten, Lieselotte; Jelsma, Jennifer; Human, Anri; Rahim, Sameer; Morrow, Brenda M

    2018-01-01

    Pneumonia is the most important respiratory problem in low-to-middle income countries. Airway clearance therapy continues to be used in children with pneumonia and secretion retention; however, there is lack of evidence to support or reject this treatment. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) on the efficacy and safety of assisted autogenic drainage (AAD) compared to standard nursing care in children hospitalized with uncomplicated pneumonia. A single-blinded pilot RCT was conducted on 29 children (median age 3.5 months, IQR 1.5-9.4) hospitalized with uncomplicated pneumonia. The intervention group received standard nursing care with additional bi-daily AAD, for 10 to 30 min. The control group only received standard nursing care, unless otherwise deemed necessary by the physician or physiotherapist. The primary outcome measure was duration of hospitalization. The secondary outcome measures included days of fever and supplemental oxygen support; respiratory rate (RR) and heart rate adjusted for age; RR and oxygen saturation pre-, post-, and 1-hr post-treatment; oxygen saturation; adverse events; and mortality. No difference was found for duration of hospitalization (median 7.5 and 7.0 days for the control and intervention groups, respectively); however, Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a strong tendency towards a shorter time to discharge in the intervention group (p = .06). No significant differences were found for the other outcome measures at time of discharge. No adverse events were reported. Within the intervention group, a significant reduction in RR adjusted for age was found. As no adverse events were reported, and AAD did not prolong hospitalization; AAD might be considered as safe and effective in young children with uncomplicated pneumonia. However, a larger multicentred RCT is warranted to determine the efficacy of AAD compared to standard nursing care. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Bridging Graft in Irreparable Massive Rotator Cuff Tears: Autogenic Biceps Graft versus Allogenic Dermal Patch Graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Sung Min; Oh, Joo Han

    2017-12-01

    Few comparative studies have reported on the use of biologic grafts for irreparable massive rotator cuff tears. The purpose of this study was to assess the results of arthroscopic bridging graft in irreparable massive rotator cuff tears using an autogenic long head of biceps tendon (LHBT) or an allogenic dermal patch (ADP). We retrospectively reviewed 24 patients treated using the LHBT (group I) and eight patients with complete rupture of the LHBT treated using an ADP (group II) since 2011. Preoperative Goutallier's fatty degeneration, range of motion (ROM), visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score were assessed and healing failure was evaluated at 1 year after surgery by ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging. The mean fatty degeneration in groups I and II was 3.9 and 3.6 for the supraspinatus ( p = 0.288), 2.7 and 2.9 for the infraspinatus ( p = 0.685), 0.9 and 1.3 for the subscapularis ( p = 0.314), and 1.3 and 3.0 for the teres minor ( p = 0.005), respectively. Subscapularis tears were found in 8 patients (33.3%) in group I and in 7 patients (87.5%) in group II ( p = 0.023). Mean ROMs and functional scores improved significantly in group I (forward flexion: 121.7° to 153.3°, p = 0.010; external rotation: 32.7° to 52.7°, p = 0.001; external rotation at 90°: 63.3° to 74.5°, p = 0.031; internal rotation: T10.5 to T9.3, p = 0.045; VAS: 7.0 to 1.1, p rotator cuff tears, especially in patients with severe fatty degeneration in the teres minor or combined biceps and subscapularis tears.

  5. Self-organization in irregular landscapes: Detecting autogenic interactions from field data using descriptive statistics and dynamical systems theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, L.; Watts, D.; Khurana, A.; Anderson, J. L.; Xu, C.; Merritts, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The classic signal of self-organization in nature is pattern formation. However, the interactions and feedbacks that organize depositional landscapes do not always result in regular or fractal patterns. How might we detect their existence and effects in these "irregular" landscapes? Emergent landscapes such as newly forming deltaic marshes or some restoration sites provide opportunities to study the autogenic processes that organize landscapes and their physical signatures. Here we describe a quest to understand autogenic vs. allogenic controls on landscape evolution in Big Spring Run, PA, a landscape undergoing restoration from bare-soil conditions to a target wet meadow landscape. The contemporary motivation for asking questions about autogenic vs. allogenic controls is to evaluate how important initial conditions or environmental controls may be for the attainment of management objectives. However, these questions can also inform interpretation of the sedimentary record by enabling researchers to separate signals that may have arisen through self-organization processes from those resulting from environmental perturbations. Over three years at Big Spring Run, we mapped the dynamic evolution of floodplain vegetation communities and distributions of abiotic variables and topography. We used principal component analysis and transition probability analysis to detect associative interactions between vegetation and geomorphic variables and convergent cross-mapping on lidar data to detect causal interactions between biomass and topography. Exploratory statistics revealed that plant communities with distinct morphologies exerted control on landscape evolution through stress divergence (i.e., channel initiation) and promoting the accumulation of fine sediment in channels. Together, these communities participated in a negative feedback that maintains low energy and multiple channels. Because of the spatially explicit nature of this feedback, causal interactions could not

  6. Treatment of active unicameral bone cysts with percutaneous injection of demineralized bone matrix and autogenous bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougraff, Bruce T; Kling, Thomas J

    2002-06-01

    The treatment of unicameral bone cysts varies from open bone-grafting procedures to percutaneous injection of corticosteroids or bone marrow. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of percutaneous injection of a mixture of demineralized bone matrix and autogenous bone marrow for the treatment of simple bone cysts. Twenty-three patients with an active unicameral bone cyst were treated with trephination and injection of allogeneic demineralized bone matrix and autogenous bone marrow. The patients were followed for an average of fifty months (range, thirty to eighty-one months), at which time pain, function, and radiographic signs of resolution of the cyst were assessed. The average time until the patients had pain relief was five weeks, and the average time until the patients returned to full, unrestricted activities was six weeks. Bone-healing at the site of the injection was first seen radiographically at three to six months. No patient had a pathologic fracture during this early bone-healing stage. Cortical remodeling was seen radiographically by six to nine months, and after one year the response was usually complete, changing very little from then on. Five patients required a second injection because of recurrence of the cyst, and all five had a clinically and radiographically quiescent cyst after an average of thirty-six additional months of follow-up. Seven of the twenty-three patients had incomplete healing manifested by small, persistent radiolucent areas within the original cyst. None of these cysts increased in size or resulted in pain or fracture. Percutaneous injection of allogeneic demineralized bone matrix and autogenous bone marrow is an effective treatment for unicameral bone cysts.

  7. Management of unicameral bone cyst by using freeze dried radiation sterilized bone allograft impregnate with autogenous bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, N K; Das, K P; Alam, M S; Kaiser, M S

    2014-07-01

    Unicameral bone cyst is a common benign bone tumor and most frequent cause of the pathological fracture in children. We have started a prospective study for that treatment of unicameral bone cyst by using freeze dried radiation sterilized bone allograft impregnated with autogenous bone marrow in the department of Orthopaedics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) during May 1999 to April 2012. Aim of this study was to see Freeze dried radiation sterilized bone allograft impregnate with autogenous bone marrow a satisfactory graft material in the treatment of unicameral bone cyst as well as factors such as patients age, sex, cyst size and site of lesion influence on cyst healing. A total 35 patients of unicameral bone cyst were operated. In this study out of 35 patients, male were 22(62.86%) and female were 13(37.14). Male Female ratio 22:13(1.70:1) Age of the patients ranging from 2 years 6 month to 20 years, mean age 12.18 years more common 11 years to 20 years 29(82.86%) patients. Common bones sites involvements are proximal end of Humerus 20(57.14%), proximal end of Femur 7(20 %), proximal end of Tibia 3(8.57%), Calcanium 2(5.71%), proximal end of Ulna 1(2.86%), shaft of Radius 1(2.86%) and Phalanx 1(2.86%). Final clinical outcome of unicameral bone cyst treated by thorough curettage of cavity and tightly filled with freeze dried radiation sterilized bone allograft impregnate with autogenous bone marrow in which healed (success rate) 88.57% (31) and recurrence rate is 11.43% (4). P value is unicameral bone cyst.

  8. EFFECTIVENESS OF AUTOGENIC DRAINAGE VERSUS POSTURAL DRAINAGE ON OXYGEN SATURATION IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC BRONCHITIS WITH 15 MINUTES POST THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kiran

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with COPD will have more amount of secretions. To clear the secretions by using of different bronchial hygiene techniques like postural drainage and autogenic drainage technique, manual hyperventilation technique ,active cycle breathing technique .Hence in this study to compare the short-term effects of postural drainage with clapping (PD and autogenic drainage (AD on level of oxygen saturation in blood, and amount of sputum recovery. Methodology: The study was done on 60 patients with COPD. Dividing Patients into two group and patients were treated with PD or AD in separate Groups. The effectiveness of the treatment was measured up to 6 days. Pulse oximetry was monitored and sputum was collected immediately after treatment and 15 minutes following each treatment. Results: The results of the study shown that there was significant difference in the amount of sputum recovered with AD (14.0±3.5 g vs PD (24.4±3.0 g and significant differences in Oxygen saturation; during PD fell from 93.3±0.7% to 91.2±0.8% (p<0.01 and required 15 min following treatment to return to baseline. Oxygen saturation did not fall during AD and increased to gradually following complete treatment days (baseline, 93.3±0.8%; p<0.01. Conclusion: Hence this study concludes that Autogenic drainage is more effective in improving spo2 in COPD & does not cause a sudden fall in spo2 as occurs in Postural drainage immediately after therapy. And it can be better tolerated by patients with COPD while producing fewer benefits in sputum clearance. In concern to mean amount of secretion removal Postural is found to be more effective

  9. Modified Weaver-Dunn Procedure Versus The Use of Semitendinosus Autogenous Tendon Graft for Acromioclavicular Joint Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, Galal; Safwat, Hesham; Seddik, Mahmoud; Al-Shal, Ehab A; Al-Sebai, Ibrahim; Negm, Mohame

    2016-01-01

    The optimal operative method for acromioclavicular joint reconstruction remains controversial. The modified Weaver-Dunn method is one of the most popular methods. Anatomic reconstruction of coracoclavicular ligaments with autogenous tendon grafts, widely used in treating chronic acromioclavicular joint instability, reportedly diminishes pain, eliminates sequelae, and improves function as well as strength. To compare clinical and radiologic outcomes between a modified Weaver-Dunn procedure and an anatomic coracoclavicular ligaments reconstruction technique using autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft. Twenty patients (mean age, 39 years) with painful, chronic Rockwood type III acromioclavicular joint dislocations were subjected to surgical reconstruction. In ten patients, a modified Weaver-Dunn procedure was performed, in the other ten patients; autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft was used. The mean time between injury and the index procedure was 18 month (range from 9 - 28). Clinical evaluation was performed using the Oxford Shoulder Score and Nottingham Clavicle Score after a mean follow-up time of 27.8 months. Preoperative and postoperative radiographs were compared. In the Weaver-Dunn group the Oxford Shoulder Score improved from 25±4 to 40±2 points. While the Nottingham Clavicle Score increased from 48±7 to 84±11. In semitendinosus tendon graft group, the Oxford Shoulder Score improved from 25±3 points to 50±2 points and the Nottingham Clavicle Score from 48±8 points to 95±8, respectively. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction using the semitendinosus tendon graft achieved better Oxford Shoulder Score and Nottingham Clavicle Score compared to the modified Weaver-Dunn procedure.

  10. METHODOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF TRAINING STUDENT basketball teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozina Zh.L.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Considered the leading position of the preparation of basketball teams in high schools. The system includes the following: reliance on top-quality players in the structure of preparedness, widespread use of visual aids, teaching movies and cartoons with a record of technology implementation of various methods by professional basketball players, the application of the methods of autogenic and ideomotor training according to our methodology. The study involved 63 students 1.5 courses from various universities of Kharkov 1.2 digits: 32 experimental group and 31 - control. The developed system of training students, basketball players used within 1 year. The efficiency of the developed system in the training process of students, basketball players.

  11. [Autogenous platelet-rich plasma gel with acellular xenogeneic dermal matrix for treatment of deep II degree burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Tianzhi; Zhu, Jingmin; Hu, Wenbo; Zhang, Hua; Gao, Zhenhui; Wen, Xuehui; Zhou, Zhi; Lu, Gang; Liu, Jingjie; Li, Wen

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of autogenous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) gel with acellular xenogeneic dermal matrix in the treatment of deep II degree burns. From January 2007 to December 2009, 30 cases of deep II degree burns were treated. There were 19 males and 11 females with an average age of 42.5 years (range, 32-57 years). The burn area was 10% to 48% of total body surface area. The time from burn to hospitalization was 30 minutes to 8 hours. All patients were treated with tangential excision surgery, one side of the wounds were covered with autogenous PRP gel and acellular xenogeneic dermal matrix (PRP group), the other side of the wounds were covered with acellular xenogeneic dermal matrix only (control group). The healing rate, healing time, infection condition, and scar formation were observed. At 7 days after operation, the infection rate in PRP group (6.7%, 2/30) was significantly lower than that in control group (16.7%, 5/30, P deep II degree burns as well as alleviate the scar proliferation.

  12. Effects of Autogenic Drainage on Sputum Recovery and Pulmonary Function in People with Cystic Fibrosis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Kimbly; Osterling, Kristin; Gilbert, Robert; Dechman, Gail

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effects of short- and long-term use of autogenic drainage (AD) on pulmonary function and sputum recovery in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). The authors conducted a systematic review of randomized and quasi-randomized clinical trials in which participants were people with CF who use AD as their sole airway clearance technique. Searches in 4 databases and secondary sources using 5 key terms yielded 735 articles, of which 58 contained the terms autogenic drainage and cystic fibrosis. Ultimately, 4 studies, 2 of which were long term, were included. All measured forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and found no change. The long-term studies were underpowered to detect change in FEV1; however, the short-term studies found a clinically significant sputum yield (≥4 g). AD has been shown to produce clinically significant sputum yields in a limited number of investigations. The effect of AD on the function of the pulmonary system remains uncertain, and questions have emerged regarding the appropriateness of FEV1 as a valid measure of airway clearance from peripheral lung regions. Further consideration should be given to the use of FEV1 as a primary measure of the effect of AD.

  13. Synthesis of MnV{sup 2}O{sup 6} under autogenous hydrothermal conditions and its anodic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inagaki, Michio; Morishita, Takahiro; Hirano, Masanori; Gupta, Vinay; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi [Faculty of Engineering, Aichi Institute of Technology, Yakusa, Toyota 470-0392 (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    Anhydrous crystalline powders of MnV{sub 2}O{sub 6} (brannerite) were successfully precipitated from mixed aqueous solution of Mn(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2} and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} with a metal ion concentration of 0.01-1.0 mol/l at 135-200 C under autogenous hydrothermal condition in a closed vessel. The characterization of MnV{sub 2}O{sub 6} synthesized was carried out by XRD, TG, TEM and anodic performance measurement. In case of mixtures with a concentration of 0.1-1.0 mol/l, single phase anhydrous crystalline MnV{sub 2}O{sub 6} with homogeneous thin rod-like particles were synthesized by autogenous hydrothermal process, though starting reagent V{sub 2}O{sub 5} was not fully dissolved. They showed high anodic performance in lithium ion batteries; high charge capacity as 600 mA h/g even after the 10th cycle and stable cyclic performance. MnV{sub 2}O{sub 6} powders synthesized from relatively high concentration of metal ions showed an abrupt increase in charge capacity after third or fourth discharge/charge cycles, though the first cycle showed rather high irreversible capacity.

  14. Alcohol extract of Schinu sterebinthifolius raddi (anacardiaceae) as a local antimicrobial agent in severe autogenously fecal peritonitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Maria Cecília Santos Cavalcanti; Gadelha, Diego Nery Benevides; Oliveira, Thárcia Kiara Beserra; Brandt, Carlos Teixeira

    2014-01-01

    To develop an alcoholic extract of the inner bark of the Schinus terebinthifolius raddi and to test its impact on autogenously fecal peritonitis in Wistar rats. The inner bark of the Schinus terebinthifolius raddi was kept for seven days in 70% ethanol alcohol. The total elimination of the solvent was performed in a rotary evaporator under reduced pressure at 55-60°C. Four milliliter of this extract was injected, after 24 h, into the abdominal cavity of six out of eight survival rats that underwent autogenously fecal peritonitis with five milliliter of 10% filtered fecal suspension. They were clinically followed up for 45 days when they were euthanized. The necropsy findings (inventory) of the abdominal and thorax cavities were inspected and the main findings were recorded and photographed. The investigation was approved by the Ethics Committee. Two out of six survival rats that were critically ill after 24 h died within the 12 h after the extract injection into the abdominal cavity. Four rats that were also critically ill recovered and gradually became healthy, eating well, regaining weight and moving normally in the cage. At 45 days post severe peritonitis the necropsy findings revealed few signs of residual infection on the abdominal and thorax cavities. There were no bowel adhesions. The impact of alcoholic extract of the inner bark of the Schinus terebinthifolius raddi was considered very positive and promising as natural local antiseptic against very severe peritonitis in Wistar rats.

  15. The role of ubiquinone supplementation on osteogenesis of nonvascularized autogenous bone graft

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    Irham Taufiqurrahman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ubiquinone is one of food supplement which is known have positive effect in wound healing. However the study to evaluate the possible role of ubiquinone in bone healing in autogenous bone grafting after mandibular resection has not been studied. An in vitro study is required to evaluate whether ubiquinone or coenzyme Q-10 (CoQ10 has a positive effect on osteogenesis. Viability test of CoQ10 and a model of osteogenic-induced and hypoxic-condition mesenchymal stem cell culture were established to support the study. Purpose: The study was made to evaluate the role of ubiquinone in osteogenesis by analyzing the toxicity effect and the optimal dose of CoQ10 that might interfere in bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell (BM-MSC that was dose in cell culture medium. The BM-MSC culture under hypoxia condition were also observed. Method: The toxicity and the optimum viability concentration of ubiquinone were observed using MTT assay. The osteogenic differentiation under hypoxic condition was done on BM-MSC in osteogenic medium that composed of ascorbic acid, glycerolphosphate and dexamethasone in hypoxia chamber for 21 days. Osteogenic differentiation and cellular hypoxia features were tested with immunocytochemical staining using anti-Runx2 and anti-HIF1α monoclonal antibody, respectively. Result: The maximum density value of  1.826 was found in the group of ubiquinone concentration of 75μM/ml, increasing of in concentration of ubiquinone resulted with the decrease ofoptical density of CoQ10. Statistic analysis using Anova showed with no significant difference among groups with various concentration. Immunocytochemical staining showed that Runx2 expression in 3% hypoxia group (p<0.05. Conclusion:Ubiquinone was found non toxic in its optimum dose of 75μM/ml, showed by optimum result in the expression ofRunx2 and HIF1α further study is necessary to evaluate the angiogenic and osteogenic effect ofubiquione.

  16. Lateral ridge augmentation with Bio-Oss alone or Bio-Oss mixed with particulate autogenous bone graft: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aludden, H C; Mordenfeld, A; Hallman, M; Dahlin, C; Jensen, T

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to test the hypothesis of no difference in implant treatment outcomes when using Bio-Oss alone or Bio-Oss mixed with particulate autogenous bone grafts for lateral ridge augmentation. A search of the MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Embase databases in combination with a hand-search of relevant journals was conducted. Human studies published in English from 1 January 1990 to 1 May 2016 were included. The search provided 337 titles and six studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Considerable variation prevented a meta-analysis from being performed. The two treatment modalities have never been compared within the same study. Non-comparative studies demonstrated a 3-year implant survival of 96% with 50% Bio-Oss mixed with 50% autogenous bone graft. Moreover, Bio-Oss alone or Bio-Oss mixed with autogenous bone graft seems to increase the amount of newly formed bone as well as the width of the alveolar process. Within the limitations of this systematic review, lateral ridge augmentation with Bio-Oss alone or in combination with autogenous bone graft seems to induce newly formed bone and increase the width of the alveolar process, with high short-term implant survival. However, long-term studies comparing the two treatment modalities are needed before final conclusions can be drawn. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Autogenous transplantation of rib cartilage preserved in glycerol, after removal of the perichondrium, to the malar process of rats--a histological study (Part I).

    OpenAIRE

    Okamoto, T.; Gabrielli, M. A.; de Oliveira Júnior, O. B.; Marcantonio, E.; Gabrielli, M. F.

    1990-01-01

    Seventy-two male albino rats received autogenous transplants of glycerol-preserved rib cartilage into the malar process. The animals were divided into two groups which received preserved cartilage with or without perichondrium. The implants were well tolerated and removal of the perichondrium enhanced the rate of resorption and bone replacement of the material.

  18. Allogenic and Autogenic Signals in the Detrital Zircon U-Pb Record of the Deep-Sea Bengal Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, M. D.; Rogers, K. G.; Gleason, J. D.; Najman, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The Himalayan-sourced Ganges-Brahmaputra river system and the deep-sea Bengal Fan represent Earth's largest sediment-dispersal system. This presentation summarizes a new detrital zircon U-Pb (DZ) provenance record from the Bengal Fan from cores collected during IODP Expedition 354, with coring sites located 1350 km downdip from the shelf margin. Each of our 15 samples were collected from medium- to fine-grained turbidite sand and, based on shipboard biostratigraphic analyses, our samples are late Miocene to late Pleistocene in age. Each sample was analyzed by LA-ICPMS at the Arizona Laserchron facility, with an average of n=270 concordant U-Pb ages per sample. Our goals are to use these data to evaluate the influence of allogenic controls vs. autogenic processes on signal propagation from source-to-sink. At the first order, large-scale sediment transfer to the Bengal Fan clearly records the strong tectonic and climatic forcing associated with the Himalayas and Ganges-Brahmaputra system: after up to 2500 km of river transport, and 1350 km of transport in turbidity currents, the DZ record faithfully represents Himalayan source terrains. The sand-rich turbidite part of the record is nevertheless biased towards glacial periods when rivers extended across the shelf in response to climate-forced sea-level fall, and discharged directly to slope canyons. However, only part of the Bengal Fan DZ record represents either the Ganges or the Brahmaputra, with most samples representing varying degrees of mixing of sediments from the two systems: this mixing, or the lack thereof, represents the signal of autogenic avulsions on the delta plain that result in the two river systems delivering sediment separately to the shelf margin, or together as they do today. Within the allogenic framework established by tectonic processes, the climatic system, and global climate-forced sea-level change, the DZ U-Pb record of sediment mixing or the lack thereof provides a fingerprint of autogenic

  19. Autogenous Tumbling Media Assessment to Clean Weathered Surfaces of Waste-Rock Particles from a Basalt Quarry

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    Baran Tufan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the optimum feed composition in autogenous tumbling of basalt waste-rock particles to clean their weathered surface was determined. The weathered surfaces of basalt are generally cut out consequent to extraction of basalt columns in quarry operations. The inefficiently cut out portions of basalt cause formation of huge quarry waste dumps causing visual pollution on roadsides. Mixtures of different particle size fractions of basalt waste-rock particles were experimented to achieve the optimum feed material composition. The minimum loss of commercially available basalt particles and maximum clear surface was intended. The results were compared with respect to weight loss (% and reflectance values of used and generated samples.

  20. Defect nonunion of a metatarsal bone fracture in a cow: successful management with bone plating and autogenous cancellous bone graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, M; Singh, N; Singh, T; Gopinathan, A; Mohindroo, J; Atri, K

    2013-01-01

    A two-and-half-year-old cow was presented with a defect nonunion of the right metatarsal III/IV bone following a severely comminuted open fracture two months previously. The animal underwent open fixation using a 4.5 mm, broad, 10-hole, dynamic compression plate and autogenous cancellous bone graft collected from the contralateral iliac shaft. The animal started partial weight bearing after the third postoperative day and resumed complete weight bearing after the 10th day. Fracture healing was complete and the implants were removed after the 120th postoperative day. Stable fixation by means of a bone plate in conjunction with a cancellous bone graft facilitated complete healing and restoration of the bone column of the defect and the metatarsal fracture. The animal made a complete recovery.

  1. Alveolar ridge preservation using autogenous tooth graft versus beta-tricalcium phosphate alloplast: A randomized, controlled, prospective, clinical pilot study

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    Chaitanya Pradeep Joshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A randomized, prospective clinical, radiographical, and histological study was conducted to evaluate healing after alveolar ridge preservation technique using two different graft materials, namely, a novel autogenous graft material i. e., autogenous tooth graft (ATG and beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP alloplast. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients undergoing extraction of at least three teeth were selected. Atraumatic extractions were performed. Of the three extraction sockets, one was grafted with ATG, other with β-TCP, and the third was left ungrafted. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were taken immediately after grafting and 4 months postoperatively to check the changes in alveolar crest height and width at all the sites. Three patients in whom implant placement was done after complete healing; bone samples were harvested using a 3 mm diameter trephine during osteotomy preparation from both the ridge preserved sites and studied histologically. Results: There was a statistically significant difference when the changes in width and height of alveolar crest were compared within all the three groups (P < 0.05. Among three sites, ATG-grafted sites showed the most superior results with a minimal reduction in alveolar crest height and width. Histological analysis also showed the same trend with more new bone formation at ATG-grafted sites as compared to β-TCP-grafted sites. Conclusion: Postextraction, ridge preservation leads to more predictable maintenance of alveolar ridge height and width. ATG as compared to β-TCP provided superior results. Based on this, we conclude that ATG material can serve as a better alternative to conventional bone graft materials.

  2. Allogeneic cultured keratinocytes vs. cadaveric skin to cover wide-mesh autogenous split-thickness skin grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monstrey, S; Beele, H; Kettler, M; Van Landuyt, K; Blondeel, P; Matton, G; Naeyaert, J M

    1999-09-01

    Improved shock therapy has extended the limits of survival in patients with massive burns, and nowadays skin coverage has become the major problem in burn management. The use of mesh skin grafts is still the simplest technique to expand the amount of available donor skin. However, very wide-mesh skin grafts take a very long time to heal, often resulting in unaesthetic scar formation. On the other hand, allogeneic cultured keratinocytes have been reported as a natural source of growth factors and thus could be useful to improve wound healing of these wide-mesh grafts. A clinical study was performed to compare the use of cryopreserved allogeneic cultured keratinocytes vs. the traditional cadaveric skin as a double layer over widely expanded autogenous skin grafts. This procedure was performed in 18 pairs of full-thickness burn wounds (with similar depth and location) in 11 severely burned patients. Early clinical evaluation was made at 2, 3, and 4 to 5 weeks. Parameters such as epithelialization, granulation tissue formation, infection, and scar formation were evaluated. Biopsies were taken to compare the histological characteristics of the epidermis, the epidermal-dermal junction, and the dermis. Late evaluations were performed at 6 and 12 months regarding color, softness, thickness, and subjective feeling of the scar tissue. Aside from a faster (p keratinocyte group at 2 weeks, there were no statistically different results in any of the early evaluated parameters, neither clinically nor histologically. At long-term follow-up, clinical results and scar characteristics were not significantly different in the two compared groups. It is concluded from the results of this study that, during the early phase, epithelialization was faster with allogeneic cultured keratinocytes compared with cadaveric skin. However, taking into account the substantial difference in costs, the described use of cryopreserved allogeneic cultured keratinocytes as a double layer on meshed

  3. Loss of reduction and complications of coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction with autogenous tendon graft in acute acromioclavicular dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Nam Hong; Lim, Seok Min; Lee, Sang Young; Lim, Tae Kang

    2017-04-01

    This study was conducted to report loss of reduction and complications after single-tunnel coracoclavicular (CC) ligament reconstruction with autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft for acute acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocations. This retrospective study included patients with acute, unstable AC dislocations (surgery within 6 weeks after trauma). We excluded patients with chronic injury and distal clavicle fractures with CC ligaments disruption. We measured the CC distance on anteroposterior radiographs of both clavicles, preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and at the final follow-up visit. We evaluated clinical outcomes using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Assessment and the University of California, Los Angeles Shoulder Rating Scale scores and perioperative complications. There were 30 patients (27 men and 3 women) with mean age of 41 years (range, 19-70 years). The mean follow-up period was 31 months (range, 12-186 months). Mean CC distance was 15.5 ± 3.7 mm (84% ± 14% of the contralateral shoulder) preoperatively, 8.9 ± 2.6 mm (9% ± 40%) immediately postoperatively (P 25% increase of CC distance) developed in 14 patients (47%), and complications occurred in 6 patients (20%), including 3 distal clavicle fractures through the tunnel. Final clinical scores were significantly lower in patients with complications (27 vs. 33 of the University of California, Los Angeles assessment [P < .001] and 81 vs. 95 of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder assessment [P < .001]). In acute AC joint dislocation, single-tunnel CC ligament reconstruction using autogenous tendon graft resulted in loss of reduction rate of 47% and a complication rate of 20%. The development of complications adversely affected clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Intraoperative extracorporeal autogenous irradiated tendon grafts for functional limb salvage surgery of soft tissue sarcomas of the wrist and hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Shinsuke; Hamada, Kenichiro; Outani, Hidetatsu; Oshima, Kazuya; Joyama, Susumu; Tomita, Yasuhiko; Naka, Norifumi; Araki, Nobuhito; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2015-05-12

    In patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the wrist and hand, limb salvage operation is extremely challenging for surgeons in attempting a complete tumor resection with negative surgical margins. In this study, we report four patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the wrist and hand treated by limb salvage operation with intraoperative extracorporeal autogenous irradiated tendon grafts. The patients were all male, and the mean age at the time of surgery was 45 years. Histological diagnoses included clear cell sarcoma in two patients, synovial sarcoma in one, and angiosarcoma in one. All four patients had high grade tumors, wherein three had American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage III disease and one with AJCC stage IV disease. The tumors were resected en bloc with involved tendons. The tendons were isolated from the resected tissues, irradiated ex vivo, and re-implanted into the host tendons. In one patient, the bone was resected additionally because of tumor invasion to the bone. Hand function was evaluated using Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) rating system. Of the four patients, three died of distant metastatic disease. The remaining patient lives and remains disease-free. The mean follow-up period was 33 months. One patient had local recurrence outside the irradiated graft at 20 months after surgery. The functional rating was 22. Lower scores were seen in patients with reconstruction of flexor tendons than extensor tendons. Limb salvage operation with intraoperative extracorporeal autogenous irradiated tendon grafts is an acceptable method in selected patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the wrist and hand.

  5. Effect of current and speed on porosity in autogenous Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding of aluminum alloys A1100 butt joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milyardi, Indra; Sunar Baskoro, Ario

    2018-04-01

    Autogenous Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding has been conducted on aluminum alloy A1100. The purpose of this research is to determine the proper current and speed of autogenous TIG welding with butt joint pattern. Variations on welding current are 150 A, 155 A, and 160 A with the variations on welding speed are 1 mm/seconds, 1.1 mm/seconds, 1.2 mm/seconds. The welded results were tested using non-destructive test (NDT) method using X-Ray radiography. After the test, it is found that the appropriate current for the best result without porosity can be achieved using the welding parameter of welding current of 160 A and the welding speed of 1.1 mm seconds.

  6. A theory for the origin of a self-replicating chemical system. I - Natural selection of the autogen from short, random oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    A general theory is presented for the origin of a self-replicating chemical system, termed an autogen, which is capable of both crude replication and translation (protein synthesis). The theory requires the availability of free energy and monomers to the system, a significant background low-yield synthesis of kinetically stable oligopeptides and oligonucleotides, the localization of the oligomers, crude oligonucleotide selectivity of amino acids during oligopeptide synthesis, crude oligonucleotide replication, and two short peptide families which catalyze replication and translation, to produce a localized group of at least one copy each of two protogenes and two protoenzymes. The model posits a process of random oligomerization, followed by the random nucleation of functional components and the rapid autocatalytic growth of the functioning autogen to macroscopic amounts, to account for the origin of the first self-replicating system. Such a process contains steps of such high probability and short time periods that it is suggested that the emergence of an autogen in a laboratory experiment of reasonable time scale may be possible.

  7. Twelve month follow-up on a randomised controlled trial of relaxation training for post-stroke anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golding, Katherine; Fife-Schaw, Chris; Kneebone, Ian

    2017-09-01

    To follow up participants in a randomised controlled trial of relaxation training for anxiety after stroke at 12 months. Twelve month follow-up to a randomised controlled trial, in which the control group also received treatment. Community. Fifteen of twenty one original participants with post-stroke anxiety participated in a one year follow-up study. A self-help autogenic relaxation CD listened to five times a week for one month, immediately in the intervention group and after three months in the control group. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety subscale and the Telephone Interview of Cognitive Status for inclusion. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety subscale for outcome. All measures were administered by phone. Anxiety ratings reduced significantly between pre and post-intervention, and between pre-intervention and one year follow-up ( χ 2 (2) = 22.29, p autogenic relaxation CD appear to be maintained after one year.

  8. Parametric Assessment of Stress Development and Cracking in Internally Cured Restrained Mortars Experiencing Autogenous Deformations and Thermal Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Raoufi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A finite element model is used to examine how the properties of cementitious mortar are related to the stress development in the dual ring test. The results of this investigation are used to explain the thermal cracking behavior of mixtures containing prewetted lightweight aggregates (LWA by quantifying the contribution of several material properties individually. In addition to the beneficial effects of using the LWA as an internal curing agent to reduce the autogenous shrinkage of concrete, the LWA also helps to reduce the potential for thermal cracking due to a lower elastic modulus and increased stress relaxation. The rate of stress development, age of cracking, and magnitude of the temperature drop necessary to induce cracking in a dual ring specimen are dependent on a variety of factors, including the coefficient of thermal expansion of both the cementitious mortar and the restraining rings, elastic modulus of the mortar, creep effect of the mortar, and rate of thermal loading. Depending on the rate of cooling, cracking may or may not occur. The slowest rate of cooling (2.5∘C/h minimizes the effects of creep while cooling rates faster than 8∘C/h can produce a thermal gradient through the mortar cross-section that needs to be considered.

  9. Effect of fibrin glue derived from snake venom on the viability of autogenous split-thickness skin graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.C. Rahal

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of snake venom derived from fibrin glue on the viability of split-thickness skin graft. Nine crossbreed dogs were used. Full-thickness skin segments measuring 4 x 4 cm were bilaterally excised from the proximal radial area on each dog. A split-thickness skin graft was harvestedfrom left lateral thoracic area using a freehand graft knife, and was secured to the left recipient bed using several simple interrupted sutures of 3-0 nylon (sutured graft. A split-thickness skin graft was harvested from the right lateral thoracic area using a graft knife. Fibrin glue derived from snake venom was applied to the recipient bed, and 8 equidistant simple interrupted sutures of 3-0 nylon were used to secure the skin graft (glued graft. Viable and nonviable areas were traced on a transparent sheet and measured using a Nikon Photomicroscope connected to a KS-300 image analysis system. The skin graft and recipient bed were collected from three dogs at day 7, 15, and 30 postoperative. The glued grafts had statistically higher graft viability than sutured grafts. Histological examination showed that the tissue repair process in the glued grafts was more accentuated than sutured grafts. It was possible to conclude that fibrin glue derived from snake venom increased survival of autogenous split-thickness skin graft.

  10. Bimaxillary protrusion with an atrophic alveolar defect: orthodontics, autogenous chin-block graft, soft tissue augmentation, and an implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Grace S C; Chang, Chris H N; Roberts, W Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Bimaxillary protrusion in a 28-year-old woman was complicated by multiple missing, restoratively compromised, or hopeless teeth. The maxillary right central incisor had a history of avulsion and replantation that subsequently evolved into generalized external root resorption with Class III mobility and severe loss of the supporting periodontium. This complex malocclusion had a discrepancy index of 21, and 8 additional points were scored for the atrophic dental implant site (maxillary right central incisor). The comprehensive treatment plan included extraction of 4 teeth (both maxillary first premolars, the maxillary right central incisor, and the mandibular right first molar), orthodontic closure of all spaces except for the future implant site (maxillary right central incisor), augmentation of the alveolar defect with an autogenous chin-block graft, enhancement of the gingival biotype with a connective tissue graft, and an implant-supported prosthesis. Orthodontists must understand the limitations of bone grafts. Augmented alveolar defects are slow to completely turn over to living bone, so they are usually good sites for implants but respond poorly to orthodontic space closure. However, postsurgical orthodontic treatment is often indicated to optimally finish the esthetic zone before placing the final prosthesis. The latter was effectively performed for this patient, resulting in a total treatment time of about 36 months for comprehensive interdisciplinary care. An excellent functional and esthetic result was achieved. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Medical-pedagogical supervisions for sportsmen short-trek in a period of еducational and trainings employments

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    Zaycev V.P.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The results of inspection of sportsmen are generalized. 8 highly skilled sportsmen were inspected. A method is presented medical-pedagogical supervisions. Age of sportsmen: 16-18 years - 2 sportsmen, 19-20 years - 3 sportsmen, 22-25 years - 3 sportsmen. The results of the use of clinical inspection and visual supervisions are rotined. Frequency of heart-throbs and arteriotony is certain. Information of pulsator is resulted, functional tests and tests, dynamometer. For renewal of organism after educational and training employment employment it is recommended to accept water procedures, vitaminized food, autogenic training, active and passive rest.

  12. Análise por tomografia computadorizada do enxerto autógeno na cirurgia de "sinus lift" Computed tomography evaluation of autogenous graft in sinus lift surgery

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    Sérgio Aron Ajzen

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Quantificar a formação óssea nos enxertos com e sem plasma rico em plaquetas, obtido pelos métodos de centrifugação e aférese, comparando os três tipos de enxertos realizados por meio de análise tomográfica. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Este estudo prospectivo, duplo cego, utilizou uma amostra composta de 34 pacientes adultos, de ambos os sexos, com idade média de 48 anos e 8 meses, portadores de pneumatização unilateral ou bilateral dos seios maxilares, que necessitavam de enxertos ósseos, com a finalidade de melhorar as condições locais para a colocação dos implantes dentários. Todos os pacientes realizaram tomografia computadorizada antes da cirurgia. Foram operados 53 seios maxilares, divididos em três grupos: enxerto de plasma rico em plaquetas obtido pelos métodos de aférese, centrifugação e enxerto apenas de osso autógeno. Após seis meses do procedimento cirúrgico foram realizados novos exames de imagem. RESULTADOS: Pela avaliação tomográfica, houve crescimento em altura e em largura nos três grupos quando foram comparados os momentos inicial e final, entretanto, não houve diferença estatística para a altura e para a largura. CONCLUSÃO: Evidências clínicas demonstram a eficácia dos enxertos autógenos, principalmente os associados a fatores indutores de crescimento ósseo, como o plasma rico em plaquetas, recuperando o arcabouço maxilofacial, necessário para a reconstrução protética e funcional por meio de implantes dentários.OBJECTIVE: To quantify bone formation within autogenous bone grafts and autogenous bone grafts in combination with platelet-rich plasma obtained either from aphaeresis or centrifugation using computed tomography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This prospective, double-blind study was conducted in 34 male and female adult patients (mean age of 28 years and 8 months, with either unilateral or bilateral pneumatization of the maxillary sinuses, requiring bone graft for dental

  13. Autovacinas: técnicas de preparo e fatores de eficiência Autogenous vaccine: preparation technique and efficiency factors

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    Rolando Cury

    1972-12-01

    Full Text Available Verificou-se que a obtenção de excelentes autovacinas é possível usando-se a técnica de semeadura, dos germes apropriados, isolados de um material clínico em meios de cultura selecionados. As condições do cultivo devem ser adequadas para estimular, ou pelo menos preservar, as qualidades antigênicas dos germes. O processo de inativação necessita ser cuidadosamente acertado, a fim de não lesar os antígenos presentes. Foram descritos métodos capazes de cumprir estes requisitos, e que ao mesmo tempo fossem práticos e relativamente simples em sua execução, com equipamentos ao alcance de qualquer laboratório clínico.A very good autogenous vaccine may be obtained by inoculation, in a separate medium, of microorganisms collected from clinical material. A selected culture medium and adequate culture conditions are necessary to stimulate or at least preserve the antigenic properties of microorganisms. The inactivation process must be used carefully in order to prevent damage to existing antigenous contents of the bacteria. A description of a method capable of covering every requirement and which would at the same time be practical and of a relatively simple execution, with the equipment available in any clinical laboratory was attempted in this study. This method has been selected from the best present knowledge of bacteriological technique. It is not considered beyond improvement, in part or in whole, as new and better knowledge is added to Immunology and Bacteriology.

  14. Global and local characteristics of an autogenous single pass electron beam weld in thick gage UNS S41500 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarafan, S., E-mail: Sheida.Sarafan.1@ens.etsmtl.ca [École de Technologie Supérieure, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C 1K3 (Canada); National Research Council Canada, Aerospace, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3T 2B2 (Canada); Wanjara, P., E-mail: priti.wanjara@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [National Research Council Canada, Aerospace, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3T 2B2 (Canada); Gholipour, J., E-mail: Javad.gholipour@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [National Research Council Canada, Aerospace, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3T 2B2 (Canada); Champliaud, H., E-mail: henri.champliaud@etsmtl.ca [École de Technologie Supérieure, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C 1K3 (Canada)

    2016-06-01

    Electron beam welding of UNS S41500, a low carbon martensitic stainless steel utilized in hydroelectric turbine manufacturing, was investigated by applying a single pass autogenous process to penetrate a section thickness of 72 mm without preheating. In the as-welded and post-weld heat treated conditions, the evolution in microhardness and microstructure across the weldments, as well as the global and local tensile properties, were evaluated. In the as-welded condition, assessment of the microhardness and the associated microstructure across the welds led to the identification of six regions, including the fusion zone, four heat affected zones and the base metal; each of these regions consisted of different phase constituents, such as tempered martensite, untempered martensite, delta ferrite and retained austenite. Post-weld heat treatment, undertaken to temper the untempered martensite in the as-welded microstructure, was effective in homogenizing the hardness across the weldment. The mechanical response of the welds, determined through tensile testing at room temperature with an automated non-contact three-dimensional deformation measurement system, indicated that the global tensile properties in the as-welded and post-weld heat treated conditions met the acceptance criteria in the ASME Section IX standard. Also, evaluation of the local tensile properties in the fusion and heat affected zones of the as-welded samples allowed a more comprehensive understanding of the strength and ductility associated with the different microstructures in the “composite” nature of the weldment. Fractographic analysis demonstrated dimpled features on the tensile fracture surfaces and failure was associated with debonding between the martensitic matrix and the secondary phases (such as delta ferrite and retained austenite) that resulted in the formation, growth and coalescence of voids into a macroscale crack.

  15. Management of chest deformity caused by microtia reconstruction: Comparison of autogenous diced cartilage versus cadaver cartilage graft partial filling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Ju Young; Kang, Bo Young; Hwang, Jin Hee; Oh, Kap Sung

    2017-01-01

    Efforts to prevent chest wall deformity after costal cartilage graft are ongoing. In this study, we introduce a new method to prevent donor site deformation using irradiated cadaver cartilage (ICC) and compare this method to the autogenous diced cartilage (ADC) technique. Forty-two pediatric patients comprised the ADC group (n = 24) and the ICC group (n = 18). After harvesting costal cartilage, the empty perichondrial space was filled with autologous diced cartilage in the ADC group and cadaver cartilage in the ICC group. Digital photographs and rib cartilage three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) data were analyzed to compare the preventive effect of donor site deformity. We compared the pre- and postoperative costal cartilage volumes using 3D-CT and graded the volumes (grade I: 0%-25%, grade II: 25%-50%, grade III: 50%-75%, and grade IV: 75%-100%). The average follow-up period was 20 and 24 months in the ADC and ICC groups, respectively. Grade IV maintenance of previous costal cartilage volume was evident postoperatively in 22% of patients in the ADC group and 82% of patients in the ICC group. Intercostal space narrowing and chest wall depression were less in the ICC group. There were no complications or severe resorption of cadaver cartilage. ICC support transected costal ring and prevented stability loss by acting as a spacer. The ICC technique is more effective in preventing intercostal space narrowing and chest wall depression than the ADC technique. Samsung Medical Center Institution Review Board, Unique protocol ID: 2009-10-006-008. This study is also registered on PRS (ClinicalTrials.gov Record 2009-10-006). Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction with the autogenous anterior half of the peroneus longus tendon for distal clavicle fracture (Neer type Ⅱ-b: A report of 26 cases

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    Guang-you YANG

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the clinical effect of coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction with the autogenous anterior half of peroneus longus tendon (AHPLT for distal clavicle fracture (Neer type Ⅱ-b. Methods The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed of 26 Neer type Ⅱ-b distal clavicle fracture surgically treated by coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction with autogenous AHPLT in Ganyu District People's Hospital of Lianyungang from June 2012 to May 2015. Among the 26 cases, 16 males and 10 females, aged from 19-56 years (average 38.7 years. Fracture occurred in left side in 18 cases and in right side in 8 cases. Postoperative observations were done on fracture healing, shoulder and ankle-foot function recovery. Results For all the 26 cases, surgical incisions were healed well, and no infection, vascular and peroneal nerve injury and iatrogenic fracture occurred. Follow-up was carried out for 10-24 months with average of 15.3 months. All the fractures were healed within 12-20 weeks with an average of 14.6 weeks. One patient was found of losing the fracture reduction part during the follow-up process, and then got eventual healing by extending the limb brake time. Another patient was found of slight tendon sensation disorder with no significant effect on daily life and exercise, and the symptoms disappeared 6 months later. At the last follow-up, the Constant-Murley score was 92-100 with an average of 97.8 points. The ankle-hind foot score of American Society of Ankle and Orthopedics was excellent. Conclusion Reconstruction of coracoclavicular ligament with autogenous AHPLT is an effective treatment for Neer type Ⅱ-b distal clavicle fracture with good safety and without negative effect on the ankle-foot function, and thus it is worthy of wider clinical use. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.12.12

  17. Prevention of Bone Bridge Formation Using Transplantation of the Autogenous Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Physeal Defects: An Experimental Study in Rabbits

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    L. Plánka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Physeal cartilage is known to have poor self-repair capacity after injury. Evaluation of the ability of cultured mesenchymal stem cells to repair damaged physis is the topic of current research. In 10 immature New Zealand white rabbits autogenous mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted into a iatrogenic physeal defect in a lateral portion of the distal growth plate of the right femur. The same defect without stem cells transplantation in the left femoral distal physis served as a control. In our study, we used our own technique of implantation of MSCs with a newly modified gel scaffold (New Composite Hyaluronate/Collagen Type I/Fibrin Scaffold. The rabbits were euthanized 4 months after transplantation. Bone length discrepancy and valgus deformity were measured from femoral radiographs. Healing of the defect was investigated histologically. The ability of mesenchymal stem cells to survive and promote cartilage healing in the physeal defect was assessed by immunofluorescence. Average difference in femur length measured from surgery to euthanasia (4 months was 0.61 ± 0.19 cm after preventive transplantation of MSCs in the right femur, but only 0.11 ± 0.07 cm in the left femur. Average angular (valgus deformity of the right femur with MSCs preventively transplanted to iatrogenically damaged distal femoral physis was 1.2 ± 0.72 °. Valgus deformity in the left femur was 5.4 ± 2.5 °. Prophylactic transplantation of autogenous mesenchymal stem cells to iatrogenically damaged distal growth plate of the rabbit femur prevented a bone bridge formation and resulted in healing of the physeal defect with hyaline cartilage. Immunofluorescence examination showed that the chondrocytes newly formed in growth zone are the result of implanted MSCs differentiation. Femur growth in traumatized physis was maintained even after transplantation of autogenous MSCs. As compared with the opposite femur (with physeal defect but without transplanted MSCs, the bone

  18. A Systematic Review of Biopsychosocial Training Programs for the Self-Management of Emotional Stress: Potential Applications for the Military

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Shawn S.; Jonas, Wayne B.; Walter, Joan A. G.

    2013-01-01

    Combat-exposed troops and their family members are at risk for stress reactions and related disorders. Multimodal biopsychosocial training programs incorporating complementary and alternative self-management techniques have the potential to reduce stress-related symptoms and dysfunction. Such training can preempt or attenuate the posttraumatic stress response and may be effectively incorporated into the training cycle for deploying and redeploying troops and their families. A large systematic review was conducted to survey the literature on multimodal training programs for the self-management of emotional stress. This report is an overview of the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) identified in this systematic review. Select programs such as mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, Cognitive Behavioral Stress Management, Autogenic Training, Relaxation Response Training, and other meditation and mind-body skills practices are highlighted, and the feasibility of their implementation within military settings is addressed. PMID:24174982

  19. A Systematic Review of Biopsychosocial Training Programs for the Self-Management of Emotional Stress: Potential Applications for the Military

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Crawford

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Combat-exposed troops and their family members are at risk for stress reactions and related disorders. Multimodal biopsychosocial training programs incorporating complementary and alternative self-management techniques have the potential to reduce stress-related symptoms and dysfunction. Such training can preempt or attenuate the posttraumatic stress response and may be effectively incorporated into the training cycle for deploying and redeploying troops and their families. A large systematic review was conducted to survey the literature on multimodal training programs for the self-management of emotional stress. This report is an overview of the randomized controlled trials (RCTs identified in this systematic review. Select programs such as mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, Cognitive Behavioral Stress Management, Autogenic Training, Relaxation Response Training, and other meditation and mind-body skills practices are highlighted, and the feasibility of their implementation within military settings is addressed.

  20. A systematic review of biopsychosocial training programs for the self-management of emotional stress: potential applications for the military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Cindy; Wallerstedt, Dawn B; Khorsan, Raheleh; Clausen, Shawn S; Jonas, Wayne B; Walter, Joan A G

    2013-01-01

    Combat-exposed troops and their family members are at risk for stress reactions and related disorders. Multimodal biopsychosocial training programs incorporating complementary and alternative self-management techniques have the potential to reduce stress-related symptoms and dysfunction. Such training can preempt or attenuate the posttraumatic stress response and may be effectively incorporated into the training cycle for deploying and redeploying troops and their families. A large systematic review was conducted to survey the literature on multimodal training programs for the self-management of emotional stress. This report is an overview of the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) identified in this systematic review. Select programs such as mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, Cognitive Behavioral Stress Management, Autogenic Training, Relaxation Response Training, and other meditation and mind-body skills practices are highlighted, and the feasibility of their implementation within military settings is addressed.

  1. Relaxation training after stroke: potential to reduce anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneebone, Ian; Walker-Samuel, Natalie; Swanston, Jennifer; Otto, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    To consider the feasibility of setting up a relaxation group to treat symptoms of post stroke anxiety in an in-patient post-acute setting; and to explore the effectiveness of relaxation training in reducing self-reported tension. A relaxation group protocol was developed in consultation with a multidisciplinary team and a user group. Over a period of 24 months, 55 stroke patients attended group autogenic relaxation training on a rehabilitation ward. Attendance ranged between one and eleven sessions. Self-reported tension was assessed pre and post relaxation training using the Tension Rating Circles (TRCs). The TRCs identified a significant reduction in self-reported tension from pre to post training, irrespective of the number of sessions attended; z = -3.656, p training. The TRCs proved acceptable to group members, but should be validated against standard anxiety measures. Further exploration of the application of relaxation techniques in clinical practice is desirable. Implications for Rehabilitation Anxiety is prevalent after stroke and likely affects rehabilitation outcomes. Relaxation training is a well proven treatment for anxiety in the non-stroke population. A significant within session reduction in tension, a hallmark symptom of anxiety, was evidenced via group relaxation training delivered in a post-acute, in-patient stroke unit setting. Relaxation training a shows promise as a treatment for anxiety after stroke.

  2. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Language Training Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 1st March to 25 June 2004 (2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957.

  3. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 1st March to 25 June 2004 (2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957.

  4. Histomorhological and clinical evaluation of maxillary alveolar ridge reconstruction after craniofacial trauma by applying combination of allogeneic and autogenous bone graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Saverio De Ponte

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A variety of techniques and materials for the rehabilitation and reconstruction of traumatized maxillary ridges prior to dental implants placement have been described in literature. Autogenous bone grafting is considered ideal by many researchers and it still remains the most predictable and documented method. The aim of this report is to underline the effectiveness of using allogeneic bone graft for managing maxillofacial trauma. A case of a 30-year-old male with severely atrophic maxillary ridge as a consequence of complex craniofacial injury is presented here. Augmentation procedure in two stages was performed using allogeneic and autogenous bone grafts in different areas of the osseous defect. Four months after grafting, during the implants placement surgery, samples of both sectors were withdrawn and submitted to histological evaluation. On the examination of the specimens, treated by hematoxylin and eosin staining, the morphology of integrated allogeneic bone grafts was revealed to be similar to the autologous bone. Our clinical experience shows how the allogeneic bone graft presented normal bone tissue architecture and is highly vascularized, and it can be used for reconstruction of severe trauma of the maxilla.

  5. Histomorhological and clinical evaluation of maxillary alveolar ridge reconstruction after craniofacial trauma by applying combination of allogeneic and autogenous bone graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ponte, Francesco Saverio; Falzea, Roberto; Runci, Michele; Siniscalchi, Enrico Nastro; Lauritano, Floriana; Bramanti, Ennio; Cervino, Gabriele; Cicciu, Marco

    2017-02-01

    A variety of techniques and materials for the rehabilitation and reconstruction of traumatized maxillary ridges prior to dental implants placement have been described in literature. Autogenous bone grafting is considered ideal by many researchers and it still remains the most predictable and documented method. The aim of this report is to underline the effectiveness of using allogeneic bone graft for managing maxillofacial trauma. A case of a 30-year-old male with severely atrophic maxillary ridge as a consequence of complex craniofacial injury is presented here. Augmentation procedure in two stages was performed using allogeneic and autogenous bone grafts in different areas of the osseous defect. Four months after grafting, during the implants placement surgery, samples of both sectors were withdrawn and submitted to histological evaluation. On the examination of the specimens, treated by hematoxylin and eosin staining, the morphology of integrated allogeneic bone grafts was revealed to be similar to the autologous bone. Our clinical experience shows how the allogeneic bone graft presented normal bone tissue architecture and is highly vascularized, and it can be used for reconstruction of severe trauma of the maxilla. Copyright © 2017 Daping Hospital and the Research Institute of Surgery of the Third Military Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of passive concentration as instructional set for training enhancement of EEG alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, S S

    1980-12-01

    The technique of passive concentration, employed by autogenic training and Transcendental Meditation for achieving relaxation, was tested here as a technique for enhancing EEG alpha. Of 30 subjects displaying between 15% and 74% alpha in their resting EEGs recruited, 10 had to be eliminated. The remaining 20 constituted two groups. One was instructed only to attempt to maintain a tone indicating alpha but given no information about technique (control group). The other was given additional instructions in passive concentration (experimental group). Both were given four 5-min. trials a day for 4 consecutive days. Heart rate and skin conductance were measured to monitor autonomic arousal. The group receiving instructions in passive concentration had significantly less alpha than the control group, which did not increase amount of alpha above baseline. The reduction of alpha in the experimental group was interpreted as resulting from beginning long training periods (20 min. per day), a practice advocated by Transcendental Meditation but discouraged by autogenic training. It was concluded that the relevance of passive concentration for alpha enhancement is doubtful.

  7. Language Training: French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. This course is designed for people with a good level of s...

  8. Language Training: French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. This course is designed for people with a good level...

  9. Maxillary sinus floor augmentation with Bio-Oss or Bio-Oss mixed with autogenous bone as graft: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas; Schou, Søren; Stavropoulos, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The objective of the present systematic review was to test the hypothesis of no differences in the implant treatment outcome when Bio-Oss or Bio-Oss mixed with autogenous bone is used as graft for the maxillary sinus floor augmentation (MSFA) applying the lateral window technique. Material...... and methods: A MEDLINE (PubMed) search in combination with a hand search of relevant journals was conducted by including human studies published in English from January 1, 1990 to June 1, 2010. The search provided 879 titles and 35 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Considerable variation...... in the included studies prevented meta-analysis from being performed and no long-term study comparing MSFA with the two treatment modalities was identified. Also, the survival of suprastructures after the two augmentation procedures was not compared within the same study. Results: The 1-year implant survival...

  10. Clinical Comparison of Autogenous Bone Graft with and without Plasma Rich in Growth Factors in the Treatment of Grade II Furcation Involvement of Mandibular Molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardeshir Lafzi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF is a concentrated suspension of growth factors, which is used to promote periodontal tissue regeneration. The aim of this randomized, controlled, clinical trial was to evaluate of the treatment of grade II mandibular molar furcation involvement using autogenous bone graft with and without PRGF. Materials and methods. In this double-blind clinical trial, thirty mandibular molars with grade II furcation involvement in 30 patients were selected. The test group received bone graft combined with PRGF, while the control group was treated with bone graft only. Clinical parameters included clinical probing depth (CPD, vertical clinical attachment level (V-CAL, horizontal clinical attachment level (H-CAL, location of gingival margin (LGM, surgically exposed horizontal probing depth of bony defect (E-HPD, vertical depth of bone crest (V-DBC, vertical depth of the base of bony defect (V-DBD, and length of the intrabony defect (LID. After six months, a re-entry surgery was performed. Data were analyzed by SPSS 14, using Kolmogorov, Mann-Whitney U, and paired t-test. Results. After 6 months, both treatment methods led to significant improvement in V-CAL and H-CAL and significant decreases in CPD, E-HPD, V-DBD and LID; there was no significant difference in LGM and V-DBC in any of the treated groups compared to the baseline values. Also, none of the parameters showed significant differences between the study groups. Conclusion. Although autogenous bone grafts, with or without PRGF, were successful in treating grade II furcation involvement, no differences between the study groups were observed.

  11. Clinical Comparison of Autogenous Bone Graft with and without Plasma Rich in Growth Factors in the Treatment of Grade II Furcation Involvement of Mandibular Molars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafzi, Ardeshir; Shirmohammadi, Adileh; Faramarzi, Masoumeh; Jabali, Sahar; Shayan, Arman

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) is a concentrated suspension of growth factors, which is used to promote periodontal tissue regeneration. The aim of this randomized, controlled, clinical trial was to evaluate of the treatment of grade II mandibular molar furcation involvement using autogenous bone graft with and without PRGF. Materials and methods In this double-blind clinical trial, thirty mandibular molars with grade II furcation involvement in 30 patients were selected. The test group received bone graft combined with PRGF, while the control group was treated with bone graft only. Clinical parameters included clinical probing depth (CPD), vertical clinical attachment level (V-CAL), horizontal clinical attachment level (H-CAL), location of gingival margin (LGM), surgically exposed horizontal probing depth of bony defect (E-HPD), vertical depth of bone crest (V-DBC), vertical depth of the base of bony defect (V-DBD), and length of the intrabony defect (LID). After six months, a re-entry surgery was performed. Data were analyzed by SPSS 14, using Kolmogorov, Mann-Whitney U, and paired t-test. Results After 6 months, both treatment methods led to significant improvement in V-CAL and H-CAL and significant decreases in CPD, E-HPD, V-DBD and LID; there was no significant difference in LGM and V-DBC in any of the treated groups compared to the baseline values. Also, none of the parameters showed significant differences between the study groups. Conclusion Although autogenous bone grafts, with or without PRGF, were successful in treating grade II furcation involvement, no differences between the study groups were observed. PMID:23486928

  12. Implantation of autogenous meniscal fragments wrapped with a fascia sheath enhances fibrocartilage regeneration in vivo in a large harvest site defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yasukazu; Yasuda, Kazunori; Kondo, Eiji; Katsura, Taro; Tanabe, Yoshie; Kimura, Masashi; Tohyama, Harukazu

    2010-04-01

    Concerning meniscal tissue regeneration, many investigators have studied the development of a tissue-engineered meniscus. However, the utility still remains unknown. Implantation of autogenous meniscal fragments wrapped with a fascia sheath into the donor site meniscal defect may significantly enhance fibrocartilage regeneration in vivo in the defect. Controlled laboratory study. Seventy-five mature rabbits were used in this study. In each animal, an anterior one-third of the right medial meniscus was resected. Then, the animals were divided into the following 3 groups of 25 rabbits each: In group 1, no treatment was applied to the meniscal defect. In group 2, the defect was covered with a fascia sheath. In group 3, after the resected meniscus was fragmented into small pieces, the fragments were grafted into the defect. Then, the defect with the meniscal fragments was covered with a fascia sheath. In each group, 5 rabbits were used for histological evaluation at 3, 6, and 12 weeks after surgery, and 5 rabbits were used for biomechanical evaluation at 6 and 12 weeks after surgery. Histologically, large round cells in group 3 were scattered in the core portion of the meniscus-shaped tissue, and the matrix around these cells was positively stained by safranin O and toluisin blue at 12 weeks. The histological score of group 3 was significantly higher than that of group 1 and group 2. Biomechanically, the maximal load and stiffness of group 3 were significantly greater than those of groups 1 and 2. This study clearly demonstrated that implantation of autogenous meniscal fragments wrapped with a fascia sheath into the donor site meniscal defect significantly enhanced fibrocartilage regeneration in vivo in the defect at 12 weeks after implantation in the rabbit. This study proposed a novel strategy to treat a large defect after a meniscectomy.

  13. Bioactive glass-ceramic bone repair associated or not with autogenous bone: a study of organic bone matrix organization in a rabbit critical-sized calvarial model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biguetti, Claudia Cristina; Cavalla, Franco; Tim, Carla Roberta; Saraiva, Patrícia Pinto; Orcini, Wilson; De Andrade Holgado, Leandro; Rennó, Ana Claudia Muniz; Matsumoto, Mariza Akemi

    2018-04-26

    The aim of the study was to analyze bone matrix (BMX) organization after bone grafting and repair using a new bioactive glass-ceramic (Biosilicate ® ) associated or not with particulate autogenous bone graft. Thirty rabbits underwent surgical bilateral parietal defects and divided into groups according to the materials used: (C) control-blood clot, (BG) particulate autogenous bone, (BS) bioactive glass-ceramic, and BG + BS. After 7, 14, and 30 days post-surgery, a fragment of each specimen was fixed in - 80 °C liquid nitrogen for zymographic evaluation, while the remaining was fixed in 10% formalin for histological birefringence analysis. The results of this study demonstrated that matrix organization in experimental groups was significantly improved compared to C considering collagenous organization. Zymographic analysis revealed pro-MMP-2, pro-MMP-9, and active (a)-MMP-2 in all groups, showing gradual decrease of total gelatinolytic activity during the periods. At day 7, BG presented more prominent gelatinolytic activity for pro-MMP-2 and 9 and a-MMP-2, when compared to the other groups. In addition, at day 7, a 53% activation ratio (active form/[active form + latent form]) was evident in C group, 33% in BS group, and 31% in BG group. In general, BS allowed the production of a BMX similar to BG, with organized collagen deposition and MMP-2 and MMP-9 disponibility, permitting satisfactory bone remodeling at the late period. The evaluation of new bone substitute, with favorable biological properties, opens the possibility for its use as a viable and efficient alternative to autologous bone graft.

  14. Training management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, H.D.

    1986-01-01

    The following topics to be covered in this report are: Design principles for training programmes; training methods, materials and facilities; national and international organization; training assessment and documentation; relation between supplier and customer, licensing requirements and practices. (orig.)

  15. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Document Server

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in...

  16. Language Training - French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 January to 3rd April 2009. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Nathalie Dumeaux : Tel. 78144. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 January to 3rd April 2009. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Nathalie Dumeaux : Tel. 78144. Nathalie Dumeaux Tel. 78144 mailto:nathalie.dumeaux@cern.ch

  17. Language Training - French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 January to 3rd April 2009. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Nathalie Dumeaux : Tel. 78144. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 January to 3rd April 2009. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Nathalie Dumeaux : Tel. 78144. Nathalie Dumeaux Tel. 78144 mailto:nathalie.dumeaux@cern.ch

  18. Training organisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrlova, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Slovenske elektrarne considers a specific training and education of experienced experts to be a key issue. The company gradually undergoes quite demanding change in the field of education and training of the nuclear power plants staff. We have an ambitious vision - to create one of the best training organisations in Europe by the means of systematic approach to the training. (author)

  19. Filling of extraction sockets with autogenous bone in cats Preenchimento de alvéolos dentais de gatos com osso autógeno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelina Maria da Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate bone healing in the extraction socket of the feline mandibular canine tooth after grafting. METHODS: Eighteen adult cats were submitted to unilateral extraction of mandibular canine tooth and divided into three groups. In group 1 (n=6, control, the extraction socket was left empty. In group 2 (n=6, the extraction socket was filled with autogenous cancelous bone from the iliac crest and in group 3 (n=6, with cortical bone chips from the iliac crest. Cats were euthanized at 6 weeks postoperative. RESULTS: Immediate postoperative radiographs in dorsoventral view showed a radiolucent area at the extraction wound. A decreased radiolucency was observed on the radiographs taken at 6 weeks postoperative. Histological examination showed formation of woven bone within the extraction socket. The percentage of newly formed bone within the extraction socket, measured by the histometry, showed no statistically significant difference among the values of the three groups (Kruskal-Wallis'test p>0.05 (group 1: 52.54 ± 15.46, group 2: 50.51 ± 5.01, group 3: 51.85 ± 9.52. CONCLUSION: The bone regeneration observed in the extraction sockets filled with autogenous cancellous bone or autogenous cortical bone chips was similar to that observed in the control sites, given an observation period of 6 weeks after extraction of the mandibular canine tooth.OBJETIVO: Avaliar a regeneração óssea de alvéolos dentais de gatos após enxertia. MÉTODOS: Dezoito gatos adultos, distribuídos em três grupos de 6 animais cada, foram submetidos a extração do canino mandibular direito ou esquerdo. No grupo 1, controle, o alvéolo foi deixado vazio. No grupo 2, o alvéolo foi preenchido com osso esponjoso autógeno do osso ilíaco e no grupo 3, com raspa de osso cortical do osso ilíaco. Os animais foram submetidos à eutanásia 6 semanas após a cirurgia. RESULTADOS: Nas radiografias realizadas no pós-operatório imediato na projeção ventrodorsal

  20. Language Training - French Training

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 29 January to 30 March 2007. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 29 January to 30 March 2007. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages:   http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from January to June 2007 (break at Easter). This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) Timetable will be fixed after discussion with the students. For registratio...

  1. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For further information, please contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Date and timetable will be fixed when there are sufficient participants enrolled. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 langua...

  2. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Document Server

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For further information, please contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Date and timetable will be fixed when there are sufficient participants enrolled. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 languag...

  3. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    La prochaine session se déroulera du 04 octobre 2004 au 11 février 2005 (interruption de 3 semaines à Noël). Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages Web : http://cern.ch/Training Vous pouvez aussi contacter M. Liptow, tél. 72957. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants ...

  4. Snake Train

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李鲁

    1993-01-01

    The Parisian Transit Authority (RATP) has beguntesting a new train it hopes will be the 'metro① of theyear 2000': a 150-foot-long continuous tube dubbed② the'Boa.' The train is not sectioned off into cars③, thusallowing as many as 890 passengers to walk from one endof the Boa to the other. Swiveling axles beneath the train

  5. Bone scintigraphy in evaluating the viability of composite bone grafts revascularized by microvascular anastomoses, conventional autogenous bone grafts, and free non-revascularized periosteal grafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berggren, A.; Weiland, A.J.; Ostrup, L.T.

    1982-01-01

    Researchers studied the value of bone scintigraphy in the assessment of anastomotic patency and bone-cell viability in free bone grafts revascularized by microvascular anastomoses in twenty-seven dogs. The dogs were divided into three different groups, and scintigraphy was carried out using technetium-labeled methylene diphosphonate in composite bone grafts revascularized by microvascular anastomoses, conventional autogenous bone grafts, and periosteal grafts placed in different recipient beds. The viability of the grafts were evaluated by histological examination and fluorescence microscopy after triple labeling with oxytetracycline on the first postoperative day, alizarin complexone on the fourth postoperative day, and DCAF on the eleventh postoperative day. A positive scintiscan within the first week following surgery indicated patent microvascular anastomoses, and histological study and fluorescence microscopy confirmed that bone throughout the graft was viable. A positive scintiscan one week after surgery or later does not necessarily indicate microvascular patency or bone-cell survival, because new bone formed by creeping substitution on the surface of a dead bone graft can result in this finding

  6. Evaluation of healing potential of autogenous, macroscopic fat deposited or fat free, omental graft in experimental radius bone defect in rabbit: Radiological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masouleh, M.N.; Haghdoost, I.S.; Heydari, G.A.C.; Raissi, A.; Mohitmafi, S.

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed for evaluation of the difference between the ability of greater omentum graft with or without macroscopic fat deposition in acceleration of bone healing process. Adult female New Zealand white rabbits (n=15) were randomly divided into three equal groups. In groups A and B, the drilled hole on the left radius was filled by the omentum without and with macroscopic fat deposition, respectively while drilled hole on the right radius left intact for consideration as control. In group C, the drilled hole on the left and right radius was filled by the omentum sample with and without macroscopic fat deposition, respectively. Experimental bone defects on the radiuses were secured by the pieces of greater omentum, with or without macroscopic fat deposition, which obtained as an autogenous graft from each rabbit in accompany with control samples. Standardized serial radiography for evaluation of bone healing was performed and the difference in bone healing process in three groups of study was determined. According to the obtained data, the radius bones which filled by omentum without macroscopic fat deposition showed faster healing process than the radius bones which filled by omentum with macroscopic fat deposition (P<0.05). (author)

  7. The Effect of Shielding N{sub 2} gas on The Pitting Corrosion of Seal-welded Super Austenitic Stainless Steel by Autogenous Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Tae; Kim, Young Sik [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyun Young [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Many research efforts on the effect of nitrogen on the corrosion resistance of stainless steels have been reported, but little research has been conducted on the effect of nitrogen for the weldment of stainless steels by the seal-weld method. Therefore, this work focused on the determining the corrosion resistance of tube/tube sheet mock-up specimen for sea water condensers, and elucidating the effect of shielding nitrogen gas on its resistance. The pitting corrosion of autogenously welded specimen propagated preferentially along the dendritic structure. Regardless of the percent of shielding nitrogen gas, the analyzed nitrogen contents were very much lower than that of the bulk specimen. This can be arisen because the nitrogen in shielding gas may partly dissolve into the weldment, but simultaneously during the welding process, nitrogen in the alloy may escape into the atmosphere. However, the pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) of the interdendrite area was higher than that of the dendrite arm, regardless of the shielding gas percent; and the PREN of the interdendrite area was higher than that of the base metal; the PREN of the dendrite arm was lower than that of the base metal because of the formation of (Cr, Mo) rich phases by welding.

  8. Microstructural, Mechanical, and Electrochemical Analysis of Duplex and Superduplex Stainless Steels Welded with the Autogenous TIG Process Using Different Heat Input

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucio Soares da Fonseca

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Duplex Stainless Steels (DSS and Superduplex Stainless Steels (SDSS have a strong appeal in the petrochemical industry. These steels have excellent properties, such as corrosion resistance and good toughness besides good weldability. Welding techniques take into account the loss of alloying elements during the process, so this loss is usually compensated by the addition of a filler metal rich in alloying elements. A possible problem would be during the welding of these materials in adverse conditions in service, where the operator could have difficulties in welding with the filler metal. Therefore, in this work, two DSS and one SDSS were welded, by autogenous Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG, i.e., without addition of a filler metal, by three different heat inputs. After welding, microstructural, mechanical, and electrochemical analysis was performed. The microstructures were characterized for each welding condition, with the aid of optical microscopy (OM. Vickers hardness, Charpy-V, and cyclic polarization tests were also performed. After the electrochemical tests, the samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The SDSS welded with high heat input kept the balance of the austenite and ferrite, and toughness above the limit value. The hardness values remain constant in the weld regions and SDSS is the most resistant to corrosion.

  9. Language Training - English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Nathalie Dumeaux, tel. 78144. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be an average of 8 participants per class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays, etc., depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is designed for people ...

  10. Language Training - English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Nathalie Dumeaux, tel. 78144. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is designed for people w...

  11. Relaxation training for anxiety: a ten-years systematic review with meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Pagnini, Francesco; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Molinari, Enrico

    2008-01-01

    Background Relaxation training is a common treatment for anxiety problems. Lacking is a recent quantitative meta-analysis that enhances understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety reduction outcomes after relaxation treatment. Methods All studies (1997–2007), both RCT, observational and without control group, evaluating the efficacy of relaxation training (Jacobson's progressive relaxation, autogenic training, applied relaxation and meditation) for anxiety problems and disorders were identified by comprehensive electronic searches with Pubmed, Psychinfo and Cochrane Registers, by checking references of relevant studies and of other reviews. Our primary outcome was anxiety measured with psychometric questionnaires. Meta-analysis was undertaken synthesizing the data from all trials, distinguishing within and between effect sizes. Results 27 studies qualified for the inclusion in the meta-analysis. As hypothesized, relaxation training showed a medium-large effect size in the treatment of anxiety. Cohen's d was .57 (95% CI: .52 to .68) in the within analysis and .51 (95% CI: .46 to .634) in the between group analysis. Efficacy was higher for meditation, among volunteers and for longer treatments. Implications and limitations are discussed. Conclusion The results show consistent and significant efficacy of relaxation training in reducing anxiety. This meta-analysis extends the existing literature through facilitation of a better understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety improvement subsequent to relaxation training. PMID:18518981

  12. [The effect of EMG level by EMG biofeedback with progressive muscle relaxation training on tension headache].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, U J; Kim, N C; Kim, H S

    1990-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess if EMG biofeedback training with progressive muscle relaxation training is effective in reducing the EMG level in patients with tension headaches. This study which lasted from 23 October to 30 December 1989, was conducted on 10 females who were diagnosed as patients with tension headaches and selected from among volunteers at C. University in Seoul. The process of the study was as follows: First, before the treatment, the baseline was measured for two weeks and the level of EMG was measured five times in five minutes. And then EMG biofeedback training was used for six weeks, 12 sessions in all, and progressive muscle relaxation was done at home by audio tape over eight weeks. Each session was composed of a 5-minute baseline, two 5-minute EMG biofeedback training periods and a 5-minute self-control stage. Each stage was followed by a five minute rest period. So each session took a total of 40 minutes. The EMG level was measured by EMG biofeedback (Autogenic-Cyborg: M 130 EMG module). The results were as follows: 1. The average age of the subjects was 44.1 years and the average history of headache was 10.6 years (range: 6 months-20 years). 2. The level of EMG was lowest between the third and the fourth week of the training except in Cases I and IV. 3. The patients began to show a nonconciliatory attitude at the first session of the fifth week of the training.

  13. Relaxation training for anxiety: a ten-years systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Pagnini, Francesco; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Molinari, Enrico

    2008-06-02

    Relaxation training is a common treatment for anxiety problems. Lacking is a recent quantitative meta-analysis that enhances understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety reduction outcomes after relaxation treatment. All studies (1997-2007), both RCT, observational and without control group, evaluating the efficacy of relaxation training (Jacobson's progressive relaxation, autogenic training, applied relaxation and meditation) for anxiety problems and disorders were identified by comprehensive electronic searches with Pubmed, Psychinfo and Cochrane Registers, by checking references of relevant studies and of other reviews. Our primary outcome was anxiety measured with psychometric questionnaires. Meta-analysis was undertaken synthesizing the data from all trials, distinguishing within and between effect sizes. 27 studies qualified for the inclusion in the meta-analysis. As hypothesized, relaxation training showed a medium-large effect size in the treatment of anxiety. Cohen's d was .57 (95% CI: .52 to .68) in the within analysis and .51 (95% CI: .46 to .634) in the between group analysis. Efficacy was higher for meditation, among volunteers and for longer treatments. Implications and limitations are discussed. The results show consistent and significant efficacy of relaxation training in reducing anxiety. This meta-analysis extends the existing literature through facilitation of a better understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety improvement subsequent to relaxation training.

  14. Acute Effects of Online Mind-Body Skills Training on Resilience, Mindfulness, and Empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Kathi J; Khirallah, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Some studies have begun to show benefits of brief in-person mind-body skills training. We evaluated the effects of 1-hour online elective mind-body skills training for health professionals on mindfulness, resilience, and empathy. Between May and November, 2014, we described enrollees for the most popular 1-hour modules in a new online mind-body skills training program; compared enrollees' baseline stress and burnout to normative samples; and assessed acute changes in mindfulness, resilience, and empathy. The 513 enrollees included dietitians, nurses, physicians, social workers, clinical trainees, and health researchers; about 1/4 were trainees. The most popular modules were the following: Introduction to Stress, Resilience, and the Relaxation Response (n = 261); Autogenic Training (n = 250); Guided Imagery and Hypnosis for Pain, Insomnia, and Changing Habits (n = 112); Introduction to Mindfulness (n = 112); and Mindfulness in Daily Life (n = 102). Initially, most enrollees met threshold criteria for burnout and reported moderate to high stress levels. Completing 1-hour modules was associated with significant acute improvements in stress (P training reaches diverse, stressed health professionals and is associated with acute improvements in stress, mindfulness, empathy, and resilience. Additional research is warranted to compare the long-term cost-effectiveness of different doses of online and in-person mind-body skills training for health professionals. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Relaxation training for anxiety: a ten-years systematic review with meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castelnuovo Gianluca

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relaxation training is a common treatment for anxiety problems. Lacking is a recent quantitative meta-analysis that enhances understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety reduction outcomes after relaxation treatment. Methods All studies (1997–2007, both RCT, observational and without control group, evaluating the efficacy of relaxation training (Jacobson's progressive relaxation, autogenic training, applied relaxation and meditation for anxiety problems and disorders were identified by comprehensive electronic searches with Pubmed, Psychinfo and Cochrane Registers, by checking references of relevant studies and of other reviews. Our primary outcome was anxiety measured with psychometric questionnaires. Meta-analysis was undertaken synthesizing the data from all trials, distinguishing within and between effect sizes. Results 27 studies qualified for the inclusion in the meta-analysis. As hypothesized, relaxation training showed a medium-large effect size in the treatment of anxiety. Cohen's d was .57 (95% CI: .52 to .68 in the within analysis and .51 (95% CI: .46 to .634 in the between group analysis. Efficacy was higher for meditation, among volunteers and for longer treatments. Implications and limitations are discussed. Conclusion The results show consistent and significant efficacy of relaxation training in reducing anxiety. This meta-analysis extends the existing literature through facilitation of a better understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety improvement subsequent to relaxation training.

  16. Instructor training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuzhakov, A.Yu.

    1995-01-01

    A SAT-based Instructor Training Course was developed and implemented at NVTC. The duration of the initial course is 3 weeks and 2 weeks for annual refresher course. NVTC has had much experience with this Instructor Training Course generating the following lessons-learned: SAT implementation needs to be supported by plant management; age of instructors; developments of training materials and conducting training at the same time; knowledge and use of the PC; English language skills; social transitioning from the NPP to the TC; motivation; workplace environment and conditions

  17. Influence of two barrier membranes on staged guided bone regeneration and osseointegration of titanium implants in dogs: part 1. Augmentation using bone graft substitutes and autogenous bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Frank; Mihatovic, Ilja; Golubovic, Vladimir; Hegewald, Andrea; Becker, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    To assess the influence of two barrier membranes and two bone graft substitutes mixed with autogenous bone (AB) on staged guided bone regeneration and osseointegration of titanium implants in dogs. Four saddle-type defects each were prepared in the upper jaw of six fox hounds and randomly filled with a natural bone mineral (NBM)+AB and a biphasic calcium phosphate (SBC)+AB and allocated to either an in situ gelling polyethylene glycol (PEG) or a collagen membrane (CM). At 8 weeks, modSLA titanium implants were inserted and left to heal in a submerged position. At 8+2 weeks, dissected blocks were processed for histomorphometrical analysis (e.g., treated area [TA], bone-to-implant contact [BIC]). The mean TA values (mm(2) ) and BIC values (%) tended to be higher in the PEG groups(TA: NBM+AB [10.4 ± 2.5]; SBC+AB [10.4 ± 5.8]/BIC: NBM+AB [86.4 ± 20.1]; SBC+AB [80.1 ± 21.5]) when compared with the corresponding CM groups (TA: NBM+AB [9.7 ± 4.8]; SBC+AB [7.8 ± 4.3]/BIC: NBM+AB [71.3 ± 20.8]; SBC+AB [72.4 ± 20.3]). A significant difference was observed for the mean TA values in the SBC+AB groups. It was concluded that all augmentation procedures investigated supported bone regeneration and staged osseointegration of modSLA titanium implants. However, the application of PEG may be associated with increased TA values. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Autogenous bone versus deproteinised bovine bone matrix in 1-stage lateral sinus floor elevation in the severely atrophied maxilla: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merli, Mauro; Moscatelli, Marco; Mariotti, Giorgia; Rotundo, Roberto; Nieri, Michele

    2013-01-01

    To compare 100% deproteinised bovine bone matrix (DBBM) grafts (test group) with 100% autogenous bone (AB) grafts (control group) for lateral maxillary sinus floor elevation in a parallel group, superiority, randomised controlled trial. Patients with 1 to 3 mm of residual bone height below the maxillary sinus were randomised for sinus floor elevation with DBBM and AB grafts and simultaneous implant placement. Randomisation was computer generated with allocation concealment by sealed envelopes and the radiographic examiner was blinded to group assignment. The abutment connection was performed 8 months after surgery and insertion of the provisional prostheses was performed 9 months after surgery. Outcome variables were implant failures, prosthetic failures, complications, chair time, postoperative pain and radiographic bone level 6 months after loading. Forty patients were randomised: 20 (32 implants) to the DBBM group and 20 (27 implants) to the AB group. One patient from the AB group dropped out. Two implant failures occurred in the DBBM group and no implant failure occurred in the AB group (P = 0.4872). All of the planned prostheses could be delivered. One complication occurred in the DBBM group and 2 in the AB group (P = 0.6050). Chair time was shorter for the DBBM group, with a difference of 27.3 minutes (P = 0.0428). Pain difference measured with a visual analogue scale for 6 days post-surgery was 0.2 in favour of the DBBM group (P = 0.6838). The difference in vertical bone height was 0.0 mm (95% CI -1.1, 1.1; P = 0.9703) and the difference in marginal bone level was 0.3 in favour of AB (95% CI -0.3, 0.9; P = 0.3220). No differences apart from chair time were observed when comparing DBBM and AB grafts with simultaneous implant placement in sinus elevation.

  19. Field training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mumford, G.E.; Hadaway, E.H.

    1991-01-01

    Individualized, personal training can be used to increase an employee's awareness of the HSE program. Such training can stimulate personal commitment and provide personal skills that can be utilized for the benefit of the overall HSE effort. But, providing such training within our industry can be a difficult task due to the scheduling, travel arrangements, and cost associated with bringing employees from isolated, remote locations to centrally located training facilities. One method of overcoming these obstacles involves the use of field instructors to provide the training at the many, and varied number of individuals can be reached with minimal disruption to their work scheduling or to their time off. In fact, this type of on-site training is already used by some oil companies and drilling contractors with encouraging results. This paper describes one drilling contractor's experiences with such a training program. The results after eight years how that this program not only can provide and efficient, economical means of employee training, but also can have a direct application to employee motivation regarding a company's HSE effort

  20. [Teacher Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmatier, Robert A., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    This issue collects three articles concerning reading-teacher training. "Language, Failure, and Panda Bears" by Patricia M. Cunningham calls attention to dialect difficulties in the classroom and provides ideas for teacher training programs and for public schools to solve this problem. William H. Rupley, in "Improving Teacher Effectiveness in…

  1. ENGLISH TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch PLACES AVAILABLE Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English who need to improve their professional writing (administrative, scientific, technical). Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) Date and timetable will be fixed when there are sufficient participants enrolled. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their sp...

  2. Operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirstad, J.

    1983-12-01

    The traditional operator job is changing, which among other things has generated a need for better job training. Surprisingly increased process automation has lead to increased operator qualifications, i.e. basic job training but also up-date and rehearsal training within certain fixed intervals. There are several, similar models for instructional system development available in the literature. One model which is of special interest integrates Operator Training development and Man-Machine Interfaces development. The extent to which Systematic Operator Training has been implemented varies with branches and companies. The nuclear power branch is given as an example in the report. This branch probably represents something better than the average among the process industries.(author)

  3. Training Standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2003-01-01

    The article describes the benefits of and required process and recommendations for implementing the standardization of training in the nuclear power industry in the United States and abroad. Current Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) enable training standardization in the nuclear power industry. The delivery of training through the Internet, Intranet and video over IP will facilitate this standardization and bring multiple benefits to the nuclear power industry worldwide. As the amount of available qualified and experienced professionals decreases because of retirements and fewer nuclear engineering institutions, standardized training will help increase the number of available professionals in the industry. Technology will make it possible to use the experience of retired professionals who may be interested in working part-time from a remote location. Well-planned standardized training will prevent a fragmented approach among utilities, and it will save the industry considerable resources in the long run. It will also ensure cost-effective and safe nuclear power plant operation

  4. System of physical training of persons of age mature and old.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iermakov Sergii Sidorovich

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available It is shown the results of the development of exercise for people of mature-aged and elderly, which contains three lines. The first trend is associated with the use of aerobic exercise of moderate intensity. The second direction is connected with employment in some kind of sport, including - in the veteran sports. The third area involves the use of special exercises. There are some exercises improving the system owned by the school Huashanskoy dao. A variant of autogenic training, which is to render natural images that promote relaxation and recovery is introduced in the article. Theoretically justified, that the use of exercise activates the sense of youth, is of great importance for increasing vitality, health and working capacity of older and mature.

  5. Training Attestations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2004-01-01

    In the past, paper Training Attestations were printed during the first quarter of a New Year for Staff Members having followed courses and seminars the previous year in the context of CERN's official Training Programmes.  The attestations were sent to Divisional Training Officers (DTO's) for distribution to all Staff Members concerned within their Division. In practise many Staff Members did not find this paper useful, however some expressed a wish to be able to have access to a self-service facility in case of need. This change was discussed by the Joint Training Board (JTB) and with the DTO's during 2003 and was supported. As a consequence, following a collaboration between HR-PMD and IT-AIS, from 2004 onwards paper Training Attestations will no longer be printed and distributed as before. Those requiring a list of training followed in the past can now obtain their attestation directly from the Human Resources Toolkit (HRT) application for all training followed since 1997. https://hrt.cern...

  6. LANGUAGE TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch FRENCH TRAINING General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 January to 02 April 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 January to 02 April 2004. This course is designed for people wi...

  7. LANGUAGE TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch FRENCH TRAINING General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 January to 02 April 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 January to 02 April 2004. This course is designed for peop...

  8. Driverless Train

    OpenAIRE

    Törnqvist, Julia; Berglund, Emma

    2017-01-01

    As automation increases in train services, this project resulted in making a driver-less train. The main purpose was to see how security can be increased. By using sensors, today’s technologies and rebuild the stations with walls on the platforms, the safety can increase for the better. This project designs a railway system consisting of a train, boom barriers and a station. The mechanical parts were made from scratch to get the system to work beneficially. The use of Arduino as a micro contro...

  9. Resuscitation training.

    OpenAIRE

    Shepherd, A.

    1995-01-01

    All physicians, dentists, nurses and health care personnel should be adequately and regularly trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Guidelines for acquiring the necessary skills in basic and advanced life support are now available.

  10. Interval Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you're overdoing it, slow down. As your stamina improves, challenge yourself to vary the pace. You ... exercise training modes in young and old humans. Cell Metabolism. 2017;25:581. Xie B, et al. ...

  11. Personnel Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokar, M.

    2012-01-01

    The professional training of employees for Units 3 and 4 of the Mochovce Power Plant is approaching finals. At the beginning, in particular the main control room operators were trained, later all the other employees needed for power plant commissioning and operation. In June, the second phase of the project will start; it will be focused on the new equipment of the Units under commissioning. (author)

  12. Supervisor training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2015-01-01

    on the experience of an integrated supervisor training programme offered in Aalborg, Denmark in 2009/2010. In this programme general issues of professional supervision and the application of artistic media as a core element in the supervisory process were Integrated. It is the hope of the author that this article...... will inspire other music therapists to develop supervisor training programmes for professional music therapists and also to undertake further research into professional supervision....

  13. Return to sports after autogenous osteochondral mosaicplasty of the femoral condyles: 25 cases at a mean follow-up of 9 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cognault, J; Seurat, O; Chaussard, C; Ionescu, S; Saragaglia, D

    2015-05-01

    Autogenous osteochondral mosaicplasty is the most common cartilage restoration technique in standard clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the return to sports 9 years after mosaicplasty of the femoral condyles. The long-term results of an osteochondral autograft show that patients can regain their pre-injury activity level. This study is based on a series of 25 patients with a mean age of 28.9 years (range, 16-44 years) who had stage 3 or 4 chondral lesions of the femoral condyles (according to the ICRS or ICRS-OCD scores). The origin of the lesion was osteochondritis dissecans (13 knees), osteochondral fracture sequelae (ten knees), or aseptic osteonecrosis (two knees). The average size of the lesion was 2.11 ± 0.9 cm(2). Ten patients (40%) had an associated procedure during the osteochondral autograft. The patients were assessed clinically (IKDC and Lysholm-Tegner scores) and radiographically by a reviewer independent of the team of operators. All patients were re-examined at a mean follow-up of 9 years (range, 6-15 years), with 84% satisfied or very satisfied with the procedure. The average IKDC was 74.5 ± 18.5 points. The average Lysholm score was 87.3 ± 11.6 points. The average Tegner score ranged from 6.35 ± 1.53 points prior to surgery to 5.60 ± 1.64 points after surgery (P = 0.001). The average loss was 0.64 points for patients whose presurgery Tegner score was greater than or equal to 7 (P = 0.019) and 0.3 points if lower than 7. The radiologic evaluation of 21 patients showed complete osteointegration of the grafts in 90% of cases. The results of the femoral condyle mosaic autografts are satisfactory, a mean of 9 years after surgery. The most active patients lowered their activity level while the more sedentary did not have to adapt their lifestyle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. The Development of Real-Time Physiological Monitoring and Training Software for Remote Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Autogenic Feedback Training Exercise (AFTE) is an protocol and technology developed by Dr. Patricia Cowings and her associates at NASA Ames Research Center as a means to facilitate astronaut adaptation to space and exposure to the microgravity. AFTE is a training method which involves teaching subjects to voluntarily control several of their own physiological responses to environmental stressors. As the procedures matured, the training program was expanded to determine if technology developed to facilitate astronaut adaptation to space would be valuable in treating patients suffering from autonomic and vestibular pathologies and symptomatic relief from nausea and/or blood pressure control anomalies such as hypo- or hypertension. The present study, performed in conjunction with Morehouse School of Medicine, Biomedical Engineering at The University of Akron and NASA Ames Research Center has demonstrated that this technology can be successfully applied over vast distances. The specific purpose of this research was to develop a PC based system which could handle processing of twenty channels of acquired physiological data in addition to the necessary duplex communication protocols that would, for example, permit a patient in Atlanta, GA to be trained by a clinician stationed in San Jose, CA. Sixteen channels of physiological data and 20 channels of processed data are included.

  15. Interest in online interprofessional elective mind-body skills (MBS) training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Suman J; Kemper, Kathi J; Lynn, Joanne

    2018-02-01

    There is growing interest in mind-body skills (MBS) education and online interprofessional elective MBS training for health professionals. We conducted this study to understand a) the demand among different health professionals for an online MBS course; b) engagement with different MBS topics; and c) planned behavior changes. We examined registrations from May 1 through August 31, 2014 for a new online MBS elective, analyzing the percentage of registrants who engaged with one or more of 12 modules by September 30, 2014. We also reviewed written comments about planned behavior change. The 693 registrants included physicians, nurses, social workers, dietitians, psychologists, and others. The two most popular topics were "Introduction: to Stress, Resilience, and Relaxation Response" and "Autogenic Training". Half of registrants (57%) engaged with at least one module and 9% completed all 12 modules within the study period. Nearly all (90%) of those who completed evaluations planned to use the technique they learned for themselves, introduce it to patients, or both. Online elective MBS training attracts diverse health professionals and leads to plans for personal and professional behavior change. Additional research is necessary to understand the impact of different amounts and kinds of MBS training on professionals' resilience, burnout, and quality of care. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Training Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Aja

    This thesis explores the phenomenon of horse-assisted leadership training and the manners, in which the training relations between horses, managers and facilitators were entangled with perceptions of, what “proper sociality” entailed and felt like in contemporary Danish society. The study...... is positioned at the intersection of anthropology and consumer culture research and is based upon 15 months of ethnographic fieldwork in fields, offices and conference rooms throughout Denmark in 2012 and 2013 as well as reading of emic literature and marketing material. The main argument of the thesis is...

  17. French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2003-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place: from 13 October to 19 December 2003. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Mrs. Fontbonne: Tel. 72844. Writing Professional Documents in French This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages or contact Mrs. Fontbonne: Tel. 72844. Language Training Françoise Benz Tel.73127 language.training@cern.ch

  18. Utility training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villaros, P.E.; Luxo, Armando; Bruant, Jacques

    1977-01-01

    The study of operational training systems for electro-nuclear utilities may be conducted through two different approaches. A first analytical approach consists of determining, for each position of a given organization chart, the necessary qualifications required and the corresponding complementary training to be provided. This approach applies preferentially to existing classical systems which are converted to nuclear operation with objectives of minimum structural changes and conservation of maximum efficiency. A second synthetical approach consists of determining the specific characteristics of nuclear plant operation, then, of deducting the training contingencies and the optimized organization chart of the plant, while taking into account, at each step, the parameters linked to local conditions. This last approach is studied in some detail in the present paper, taking advantage of its better suitability to the problems raised at the first stage of an electro-nuclear program development. In this respect, the possibility offered by this apprach to coordinate the training system of a given nuclear power station personnel with the overall problem of developing a skilled industrial labor force in the country, may lead to reconsideration of some usual priorities in the economy of operation of the nuclear power plant

  19. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    12, 13, 14, March LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 POSTPONED! - Modern Project Management Methods - POSTPONED! By G. Vallet / Ed. Highware, Paris, F. Academic Training Françoise Benz Secretariat Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  20. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order in which they are received. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from end of September 2005 to middle of February 2006 (2/ 3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Oral Expression The next session will take place from end of September to December 2005. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain the...

  1. Language training

    CERN Document Server

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training'form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order in which they are received. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Tessa Osborne, tel.16 23 40. Oral Expression The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).This course is intended for people with a goo...

  2. Language training

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order in which they are received. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Tessa Osborne, tel.16 23 40. Oral Expression The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).This course is intended for people with a good knowl...

  3. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch Monday 9 February 2004 From 10:00 to 12:00 - IT Auditorium - bldg. 31, 3rd floor ANSOFT High-Frequency Seminar David Prestaux, Application Engineer, ANSOFT F-78535 BUC, France This Technical Training seminar will present two Ansoft application products: Ansoft HFSS and Ansoft Designer. Ansoft HFSS makes use of the Finite Element Method (FEM) to calculate field solutions from first principles. It can accurately predict all high-frequency behaviours such as dispersion, mode conversion, and losses due to materials and radiation. Ansoft Designer is a suite of design tools to fully integrate high-frequency, physics-based electromagnetic simulations into a seamless system-level simulation environment. Ansoft Designer uses a simple interface to give complete control over every design task, by a method allowing multiple solvers, Solver on Demand. • Introduction • Overview of the Ansoft Total solution • Ansoft HFSS 9...

  4. Improving the Army’s Assessment of Interactive Multimedia Instruction Courseware

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Leader Development Strategy ATRRS Army Training Requirements and Resources System ATSC Army Training Support Center AUTOGEN Automated Survey...predict performance in subse- quent, more advanced training .2 The AUTOGEN program collects unit leaders’ perceptions of training effectiveness and...Evaluation questions are tied to specific training courses. AUTOGEN appears to provide the foundation for collecting data needed to analyze predictive

  5. AUTOGENOUS TOOTH TRANSPLANTATION IN ADULT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    ABSTRACT. A case of autotransplantation of a tooth in a 26 year old female African cleft palate patient is reported. This case report emphasizes the possibility and success of autotransplantation in our centre, it also emphasizes that transplantation is only technique sensitive but less equipment sensitive. It further stresses.

  6. Tracheal replacement by autogenous aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoosh Farhad

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tracheal defects may occur after trauma or prolonged intubation. Resection of tracheal tumors also poses a major challenge for substitution. In an effort to solve this problem, different techniques have been tried with little success. We report on a new animal model which showed acceptable results with fewer complications. Methods We replaced 5 cm of cervical trachea in 10 dogs with harvested infra-renal aorta and repaired the aortic defect with Dacron graft. Results Necropsy of the grafted aorta and anastomotic site revealed well healed anastomosis in all animals together with ciliated columnar epithelium coverage of grafted aorta and neovascularization of aortic wall. Conclusion Aortic graft is preferable to other substitutes because of less antigenicity, less vascularity, and no mucous secretions or peristalsis

  7. Tracheal replacement by autogenous aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoosh, Farhad; Hodjati, Hossain; Dehghani, Seifollah; Tanideh, Nader; Kumar, Perikala V

    2009-06-09

    Tracheal defects may occur after trauma or prolonged intubation. Resection of tracheal tumors also poses a major challenge for substitution. In an effort to solve this problem, different techniques have been tried with little success. We report on a new animal model which showed acceptable results with fewer complications. We replaced 5 cm of cervical trachea in 10 dogs with harvested infra-renal aorta and repaired the aortic defect with Dacron graft. Necropsy of the grafted aorta and anastomotic site revealed well healed anastomosis in all animals together with ciliated columnar epithelium coverage of grafted aorta and neovascularization of aortic wall. Aortic graft is preferable to other substitutes because of less antigenicity, less vascularity, and no mucous secretions or peristalsis.

  8. Behavioral neurocardiac training in hypertension: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Robert P; Floras, John S; Harvey, Paula J; Kamath, Markad V; Picton, Peter E; Chessex, Caroline; Hiscock, Natalie; Powell, Jonathan; Catt, Michael; Hendrickx, Hilde; Talbot, Duncan; Chen, Maggie H

    2010-04-01

    It is not established whether behavioral interventions add benefit to pharmacological therapy for hypertension. We hypothesized that behavioral neurocardiac training (BNT) with heart rate variability biofeedback would reduce blood pressure further by modifying vagal heart rate modulation during reactivity and recovery from standardized cognitive tasks ("mental stress"). This randomized, controlled trial enrolled 65 patients with uncomplicated hypertension to BNT or active control (autogenic relaxation), with six 1-hour sessions over 2 months with home practice. Outcomes were analyzed with linear mixed models that adjusted for antihypertensive drugs. BNT reduced daytime and 24-hour systolic blood pressures (-2.4+/-0.9 mm Hg, P=0.009, and -2.1+/-0.9 mm Hg, P=0.03, respectively) and pulse pressures (-1.7+/-0.6 mm Hg, P=0.004, and -1.4+/-0.6 mm Hg, P=0.02, respectively). No effect was observed for controls (P>0.10 for all indices). BNT also increased RR-high-frequency power (0.15 to 0.40 Hz; P=0.01) and RR interval (P0.10). In contrast to relaxation therapy, BNT with heart rate variability biofeedback modestly lowers ambulatory blood pressure during wakefulness, and it augments tonic vagal heart rate modulation. It is unknown whether efficacy of this treatment can be improved with biofeedback of baroreflex gain. BNT, alone or as an adjunct to drug therapy, may represent a promising new intervention for hypertension.

  9. A mindfulness-based stress prevention training for medical students (MediMind): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Sophie Merle; Bürger, Arne; Esser, Günter; Hammerle, Florian

    2015-02-08

    Medical training is very demanding and associated with a high prevalence of psychological distress. Compared to the general population, medical students are at a greater risk of developing a psychological disorder. Various attempts of stress management training in medical school have achieved positive results on minimizing psychological distress; however, there are often limitations. Therefore, the use of a rigorous scientific method is needed. The present study protocol describes a randomized controlled trial to examine the effectiveness of a specifically developed mindfulness-based stress prevention training for medical students that includes selected elements of cognitive behavioral strategies (MediMind). This study protocol presents a prospective randomized controlled trial, involving four assessment time points: baseline, post-intervention, one-year follow-up and five-year follow-up. The aims include evaluating the effect on stress, coping, psychological morbidity and personality traits with validated measures. Participants are allocated randomly to one of three conditions: MediMind, Autogenic Training or control group. Eligible participants are medical or dental students in the second or eighth semester of a German university. They form a population of approximately 420 students in each academic term. A final total sample size of 126 (at five-year follow-up) is targeted. The trainings (MediMind and Autogenic Training) comprise five weekly sessions lasting 90 minutes each. MediMind will be offered to participants of the control group once the five-year follow-up is completed. The allotment is randomized with a stratified allocation ratio by course of studies, semester, and gender. After descriptive statistics have been evaluated, inferential statistical analysis will be carried out with a repeated measures ANOVA-design with interactions between time and group. Effect sizes will be calculated using partial η-square values. Potential limitations of this study

  10. Sports Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Practitioners of martial arts have long seen a need for a precise method of measuring the power of a karate kick or a boxer's punch in training and competition. Impax sensor is a piezoelectric film less than one thousandth of an inch thick, yet extremely durable. They give out a voltage impulse when struck, the greater the force of impact, the higher the voltage. The impulse is transmitted to a compact electronics package where voltage is translated into a force-pounds reading shown on a digital display. Impax, manufactured by Impulse Technology, Inc. is used by martial arts instructors, practitioners, U.S. Olympic Committee Training Center, football blocking sleds, and boxers as well as police defensive tactics, providing a means of evaluating the performance of recruits.

  11. The combined use of rhBMP-2/ACS, autogenous bone graft, a bovine bone mineral biomaterial, platelet-rich plasma, and guided bone regeneration at nonsubmerged implant placement for supracrestal bone augmentation. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclar, Anthony G; Best, Steven P

    2013-01-01

    This case report presents the clinical application and outcomes of the use of a combined approach to treat a patient with a severe alveolar defect. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 in an absorbable collagen sponge carrier, along with autogenous bone graft, bovine bone mineral, platelet-rich plasma, and guided bone regeneration, were used simultaneous with nonsubmerged implant placement. At 1 year postsurgery, healthy peri-implant soft tissues and radiographically stable peri-implant crestal bone levels were observed along with locally increased radiographic bone density. In addition, a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan demonstrated apparent supracrestal peri-implant bone augmentation with the appearance of normal alveolar ridge contours, including the facial bone wall.

  12. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    Permanence A "permanence" for language Training has been set up. If anyone has a question or requires information on any aspect of English or French training please come to our office 5 4-016 at the following times. Lucette Fournier - French courses Monday 13.30 - 15.30 Tuesday\t10.30 - 12.30 Tessa Osborne - English courses Wednesday\t12.00 - 14.00 Thursday\t11.00 - 13.00   New courses Specific English and French courses - Exam preparation/ We are now offering specific courses in English and French leading to a recognised external examination (e.g. Cambridge, DELF, DALF). If you are interested in following one of these courses and have at least an upper intermediate level of English or French, please enrol through the following link:  English courses French courses Or contact: Tessa Osborne 72957 (English courses) Lucette Fournier 73483 (French courses) Language Training Nathalie Dumeaux Tel. 78144 nathalie.dumeaux@cern.ch

  13. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    PermanenceA "permanence" for language Training has been set up. If anyone has a question or requires information on any aspect of English or French training please come to our office 5 4-016 at the following times. Lucette Fournier French courses Monday 13.30 - 15.30 Tuesday\t10.30 - 12.30 Tessa Osborne English courses Wednesday\t12.00 - 14.00 Thursday\t11.00 - 13.00 New courses Specific English and French courses - Exam preparation/ We are now offering specific courses in English and French leading to a recognised external examination (e.g. Cambridge, DELF and BULATS). If you are interested in following one of these courses and have at least an upper intermediate level of English or French, please enrol through the following link: http://English courses http://French courses Or contact: Tessa Osborne 72957 (English courses) Lucette Fournier 73483 (French courses) Language Training Nathalie Dumeaux Tel. 78144 mailto:nathalie.dumeaux@cern.ch

  14. A feeder-free culture using autogeneic conditioned medium for undifferentiated growth of human embryonic stem cells: Comparative expression profiles of mRNAs, microRNAs and proteins among different feeders and conditioned media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou Chi-Hsien

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human embryonic stem (hES cell lines were derived from the inner cell mass of human blastocysts, and were cultured on mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF feeder to maintain undifferentiated growth, extensive renewal capacity, and pluripotency. The hES-T3 cell line with normal female karyotype was previously used to differentiate into autogeneic fibroblast-like cells (T3HDF as feeder to support the undifferentiated growth of hES-T3 cells (T3/HDF for 14 passages. Results A feeder-free culture on Matrigel in hES medium conditioned by the autogeneic feeder cells (T3HDF was established to maintain the undifferentiated growth of hES-T3 cells (T3/CMHDF for 8 passages in this investigation. The gene expression profiles of mRNAs, microRNAs and proteins between the undifferentiated T3/HDF and T3/CMHDF cells were shown to be very similar, and their expression profiles were also found to be similar to those of T3/MEF and T3/CMMEF cells grown on MEF feeder and feeder-free Matrigel in MEF-conditioned medium, respectively. The undifferentiated state of T3/HDF and T3/CMHDF as well as T3/MEF andT3/CMMEF cells was evidenced by the very high expression levels of "stemness" genes and low expression levels of differentiation markers of ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm in addition to the strong staining of OCT4 and NANOG. Conclusion The T3HDF feeder and T3HDF-conditioned medium were able to support the undifferentiated growth of hES cells, and they would be useful for drug development and toxicity testing in addition to the reduced risks of xenogeneic pathogens when used for medical applications such as cell therapies.

  15. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch Tuesday 3 February 2004 From 09:00 to 13:30 - Training Centre Auditorium - bldg. 593, room 11 USB (Universal Serial Bus) CYPRESS Seminar Claudia Colombini, Field Application Engineer CYPRESS ActiveComp Electronic GmbH D-85077 MANCHING, Germany As a pioneer in USB, CYPRESS sets the standard for cost-effective solutions without sacrificing functionality, performance or reliability. Having shipped over 200 million USB devices, Cypress is the undisputed market leader and demonstrates unmatched USB expertise. With the industry's broadest selection of USB solutions, Cypress has the right silicon, software and support for every USB application, from Low-speed to High-Speed and USB On-The-Go (OTG). 9:00 - 10:30 Overview of USB systems. USB CYPRESS product overview. Peripherals: Low Speed, Full Speed, High Speed (1.1 and 2.0). Hub Solutions, Embedded Host Solutions, On-The-Go (OTG) and wireless USB. USB Development Tools (first part) 10:30 -...

  16. Conditional Therapy in Raynaud’s Phenomenon,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-11

    conditioning, usually involving biofeedback, relaxation, meditation , autogenic training, hypnosis or a combination of these methods [6-8J. Surwit et al. [61...compared biofeedback plus autt- genic training to autogenic training alone and found increases in digital skin temperature and decreases in vasospastic...attacks; the combination of feedback and autogenic training was no more effective then autogenic training alone. A follow-up study one year later [9

  17. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    6, 7 May LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Decoding the Human Genome, Scientific basis and ethic and social aspects by S.E. Antonarakis and A. Mauron / Univ. of Geneva Decoding the Human genome is a very up-to-date topic, raising several questions besides purely scientific, in view of the two competing teams (public and private), the ethics of using the results, and the fact that the project went apparently faster and easier than expected. The lecture series will address the following chapters: Scientific basis and challenges, Ethical and social aspects of genomics. Academic Training Françoise Benz Tel. 73127

  18. Media Training

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    With the LHC starting up soon, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. The training is open for everybody. Make sure you arrive early enough to get a seat - there are only 200 seats in the Globe. The session will also be webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  19. Chapter 5: Training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2018-04-01

    The chapter 5 presents the 1) initial training; 2) periodic training, which includes: a) periodic training for employees at lower levels of the hierarchy than that of the operator; b) period training for operators; 3) operator training; 4) record of training; 5) safety culture.

  20. French training

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The next session will take place from 29 January to 30 March 2007. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 29 January to 30 March 2007. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from January to June 2007 (break at Easter). This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) Timetable will be fixed after discussion with the students. For further information and registration, please consu...

  1. English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 03 March to 28 June 2003 (2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: tel.73127 or Mr. Liptow: tel.72957. Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For registration and further information, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Tessa Osborne: Tessa.Osborne@cern. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, rol...

  2. English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 03 March to 28 June 2003 (2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: tel.73127 or Mr. Liptow: tel.72957. Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For registration and further information, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Tessa Osborne: Tessa.Osborne@cern. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-p...

  3. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Formation en anglais Cours d'anglais général et professionnel La prochaine session se déroulera: du 06 octobre 2003 au 13 février 2004 (interruption de 3/4 semaines à Noël). Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages Web: http://cern.ch/Training Vous pouvez aussi contacter Mme Benz, tél. 73127 ou Mr Liptow, tél. 72957. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 06 October 2003 to 13 February 2004 (3/4 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: tel. 73127 or Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: ...

  4. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Formation en anglais Cours d'anglais général et professionnel La prochaine session se déroulera: du 06 octobre 2003 au 13 février 2004 (interruption de 3/4 semaines à Noël). Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages Web: http://cern.ch/Training Vous pouvez aussi contacter M. Liptow, tél. 72957. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 06 October 2003 to 13 February 2004 (3/4 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of...

  5. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Formation en anglais Cours d'anglais général et professionnel La prochaine session se déroulera: du 06 octobre 2003 au 13 février 2004 (interruption de 3/4 semaines à Noël). Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages Web: http://cern.ch/Training Vous pouvez aussi contacter Mme Benz, tél. 73127 ou Mr Liptow, tél. 72957. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 06 October 2003 to 13 February 2004 (3/4 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: tel. 73127 or Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Writing Professional Documents in Engl...

  6. Strength Training. A Key to Athletic Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Patricia W.

    Characteristics of an effective strength training program are analyzed and descriptions are offered of different kinds of weight training activities. Comparisons are made between concentric, isometric, eccentric, and isokinetic training methods. The fundamentals and techniques of an exemplary training program are outlined and the organization and…

  7. Training apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteith, W.D.

    1983-01-01

    Training apparatus for use in contamination surveillance uses a mathematical model of a hypothetical contamination source (e.g. nuclear, bacteriological or chemical explosion or leak) to determine from input data defining the contamination source, the contamination level at any location within a defined exercise area. The contamination level to be displayed by the apparatus is corrected to real time from a real time clock or may be displayed in response to a time input from a keyboard. In a preferred embodiment the location is defined by entering UTM grid reference coordinates using the keyboard. The mathematical model used by a microprocessor of the apparatus for simulation of contamination levels in the event of a nuclear explosion is described. (author)

  8. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    25, 26, 27, 28 February and 1st March from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 LECTURE SERIES Neutrino masses and oscillations by A. de Rujula / CERN-TH This course will not cover its subject in the customary way. The emphasis will be on the simple theoretical concepts (helicity, handedness, chirality, Majorana masses) which are obscure in most of the literature, and on the quantum mechanics of oscillations, that ALL books get wrong. Which, hopefully, will not deter me from discussing some of the most interesting results from the labs and from the cosmos. Academic Training Françoise Benz Secretariat Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  9. English training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    You have a good level of English BUT... You still need to improve your speaking or You have problems writing professional documents Would you like to work in a small group on either of these areas? Then, the following courses are for you! Writing Professional Documents in English The aim of the course is for students to improve their professional writing. Participants will work on technical, scientific or administrative documents depending on the needs of the group. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) Oral Expression The emphasis will be on oral expression with necessary feed-back. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For registration and further information, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957 / Mrs. Tessa Osborne: Tessa.Osborne@cern.ch.

  10. English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    You have a good level of English BUT... You still need to improve your speaking or You have problems writing professional documents Would you like to work in a small group on either of these areas? Then, the following courses are for you! Writing Professional Documents in English The aim of the course is for students to improve their professional writing. Participants will work on technical, scientific or administrative documents depending on the needs of the group. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) Oral Expression The emphasis will be on oral expression with necessary feed-back. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For registration and further information, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957 / Mrs. Tessa Osborne: Tessa.Osborne@cern.ch.

  11. Advanced training systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savely, Robert T.; Loftin, R. Bowen

    1990-01-01

    Training is a major endeavor in all modern societies. Common training methods include training manuals, formal classes, procedural computer programs, simulations, and on-the-job training. NASA's training approach has focussed primarily on on-the-job training in a simulation environment for both crew and ground based personnel. NASA must explore new approaches to training for the 1990's and beyond. Specific autonomous training systems are described which are based on artificial intelligence technology for use by NASA astronauts, flight controllers, and ground based support personnel that show an alternative to current training systems. In addition to these specific systems, the evolution of a general architecture for autonomous intelligent training systems that integrates many of the features of traditional training programs with artificial intelligence techniques is presented. These Intelligent Computer Aided Training (ICAT) systems would provide much of the same experience that could be gained from the best on-the-job training.

  12. Nuclear manpower training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, In Suk; Lee, H. Y.; Joe, B. J.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, E. J.; Yoo, B. H.; Seo, K. W.; Lee, W. K.; Jun, H. I.; Yang, K. N.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, I. H.; Kim, M. Y.; Ju, Y. C.; Hyun, H. Y.; Choi, I. G.; Hong, C. S.; Won, J. Y.; Nam, J. Y.; Lee, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the annual results of training courses. the scope and contents are as follows: 1. Regional and interregional training courses 2. Training courses assisted by foreign experts 3. Training courses for nuclear industry personnel 4. Training courses for internal staff-members 5. Training courses under the law. This Nuclear Training Center executed the open-door training courses for 2,400 engineers/scientists from the regulatory body, nuclear industries, research institutes and other related organizations by means of offering 51 training courses during the fiscal year 1996. (author). 23 refs

  13. Nuclear manpower training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, In Suk; Lee, H. Y.; Joe, B. J.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, E. J.; Yoo, B. H.; Seo, K. W.; Lee, W. K.; Jun, H. I.; Yang, K. N.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, I. H.; Kim, M. Y.; Ju, Y. C.; Hyun, H. Y.; Choi, I. G.; Hong, C. S.; Won, J. Y.; Nam, J. Y.; Lee, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the annual results of training courses. the scope and contents are as follows: 1. Regional and interregional training courses 2. Training courses assisted by foreign experts 3. Training courses for nuclear industry personnel 4. Training courses for internal staff-members 5. Training courses under the law. This Nuclear Training Center executed the open-door training courses for 2,400 engineers/scientists from the regulatory body, nuclear industries, research institutes and other related organizations by means of offering 51 training courses during the fiscal year 1996. (author). 23 refs.

  14. Management Training in Retailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veness, C. Rosina

    Intended for prospective members of the new Distributive Industrial Training Board in Great Britain, this training guide concentrates on managerial functions in retailing; the selection of trainees; the planning of in-company and external training programs; scheduling and continuity of training; roles of training personnel; and the use of various…

  15. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from end of September 2005 to middle of February 2006 (2/ 3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Oral Expression in English The next session will take place from end of September to December 2005. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours Price: 440 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from end of September 2005 to middle of Febr...

  16. Language training

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 26 February or 5 March to end of June 2007 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Françoise Benz, tel. 73127. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 26 February or 5 March to end of June 2007 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 26 February or...

  17. Language training

    CERN Document Server

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from end of September 2005 to middle of February 2006 (2/ 3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Oral Expression in English The next session will take place from end of September to December 2005. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours Price: 440 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from end of September 2005 to middle of Feb...

  18. Language training

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 26 February or 5 March to end of June 2007 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Françoise Benz, tel. 73127. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 26 February or 5 March to end of June 2007 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 26 February or 5 M...

  19. Language training

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Tessa Osborne, tel.16 23 40. Oral Expression The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc., depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next ses...

  20. Coping with stress in medical students: results of a randomized controlled trial using a mindfulness-based stress prevention training (MediMind) in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, S M; Huss, M; Bürger, A; Hammerle, F

    2016-12-28

    High prevalence rates of psychological distress in medical training and later professional life indicate a need for prevention. Different types of intervention were shown to have good effects, but little is known about the relative efficacy of different types of stress management interventions, and methodological limitations have been reported. In order to overcome some of these limitations, the present study aimed at evaluating the effect of a specifically developed mindfulness-based stress prevention training for medical students (MediMind) on measures of distress, coping and psychological morbidity. We report on a prospective randomized controlled trial with three study conditions: experimental treatment (MediMind), standard treatment (Autogenic Training) and a control group without treatment. The sample consisted of medical or dental students in the second or eighth semester. They completed self-report questionnaires at baseline, after the training and at one year follow-up. Distress (Trier Inventory for the Assessment of Chronic Stress, TICS) was assessed as the primary outcome and coping (Brief COPE) as a co-primary outcome. Effects on the psychological morbidity (Brief Symptom Inventory, BSI) as a secondary outcome were expected one year after the trainings. Initially, N = 183 students were randomly allocated to the study groups. At one year follow-up N = 80 could be included into the per-protocol analysis: MediMind (n =31), Autogenic Training (n = 32) and control group (n = 17). A selective drop-out for students who suffered more often from psychological symptoms was detected (p = .020). MANCOVA's on TICS and Brief COPE revealed no significant interaction effects. On the BSI, a significant overall interaction effect became apparent (p = .002, η2partial = .382), but post hoc analyses were not significant. Means of the Global Severity Index (BSI) indicated that MediMind may contribute to a decrease in psychological morbidity. Due

  1. Orthopaedic training in Kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Orthopaedic training in Kenya, like in other East, central and .... quite a number of good facilities that would train an ... provide a forum for exchange of ideas and training. (2,3) ... administrators purely interested in service provision,.

  2. Dynamic training devices in CRM training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawver, J.

    1984-01-01

    Pilot training effectiveness and flying safety of a seasonal tour flight company are described. The change from single pilot to two pilot operated twin otters is examined. The use of the ATC 810 training device, its possibilities and training capacity is outlined. Problem areas which may arise, emergency system and pilot/passenger interaction are analyzed.

  3. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Tuesday 30 March TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR From 9:00 to 12:00 and from 13:00 to 16:00 hrs - Council Chamber, Salle B, Salle des Pas Perdus National Instruments (NI) on Tour 2004 Claudia Jüngel, Evrem Yarkin, Joel Clerc, Hervé Baour / NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS The special event NI on Tour 2004, run in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, will be at CERN on March 30. Technical seminars and free introductory courses will be offered all day long in the Council Chamber, Salle B, and Salle des Pas Perdus (buildings 61 and 503). Technical conferences: 09:00 - 12:00 Data acquisition systems on PCs. Industrial measurement and control techniques. 13:00 - 16:00 Advanced LabVIEW software and PXI instrumentation. Measuring instruments and system components for teststand automation. Introductory courses: 09:00 - 12:00 DIAdem: Data analysis and presentation 13:00 - 16:00 Data acquisition with LabVIEW Language: English and French Free special seminar. Registration is recommended with National Instruments Switzerland (please sp...

  4. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Tuesday 30 March TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR From 9:00 to 12:00 and from 13:00 to 16:00 hrs - Council Chamber, Salle B, Salle des Pas Perdus National Instruments (NI) on Tour 2004 Claudia Jüngel, Evrem Yarkin, Joel Clerc, Hervé Baour / NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS The special event NI on Tour 2004, run in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, will be at CERN on March 30. Technical seminars and free introductory courses will be offered all day long in the Council Chamber, Salle B, and Salle des Pas Perdus (buildings 61 and 503). Technical conferences: 09:00 - 12:00 Data acquisition systems on PCs. Industrial measurement and control techniques. 13:00 - 16:00 Advanced LabVIEW software and PXI instrumentation. Measuring instruments and system components for teststand automation. Introductory courses: 09:00 - 12:00 DIAdem: Data analysis and presentation 13:00 - 16:00 Data acquisition with LabVIEW Language: English and French Free special seminar. Registration is recommended with National Instruments Swi...

  5. Privacy Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recognizing that training and awareness are critical to protecting agency Personally Identifiable Information (PII), the EPA is developing online training for privacy contacts in its programs and regions.

  6. [The process and effect of heaviness exercise in autogenic training: factor analytical study of subjective response induced by the concentration upon and formal language of the sense of heaviness in the arm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikezuki, M; Sasaki, Y

    1996-02-01

    The present study examined the subjective response induced by the concentration upon and repetition of the formal language expressing the sense of heaviness--"The arm is heavy." As a result of the factor analysis of the experiment using 60 subjects, the following five factors emerged. (1) Overall sense of improvement; (2) awareness of the sensation of the arm; (3) change to less nervousness; (4) awareness of positive aspects; (5) understanding of the formal language. Also, those who were aware of psychosomatic symptoms felt their change to less nervousness more significantly, and their understanding of the formal language was significantly higher than those who were not aware of psychosomatic symptoms. The result of the experiment suggests one possibility that excessive concentration upon the body concerning psychosomatic symptoms may have changed to the concentration upon the sense of heaviness, or that the reduction of the stress thereof may have brought the change to less nervousness.

  7. Simulator training effectiveness: instructor training and qualifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholand, G.W.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear power plant simulators have become the most important tool in training nuclear power plant operators. Yet, as these machines continue to become even more sophisticated, highly trained and experienced instructors with unique skills and insights are still essential in order to achieve effective and meaningful training. The making of a qualified simulator instructor involves training and techniques that exceed the traditional programs required of a Senior Reactor Operator (SRO). This paper discusses (i) the training necessary to produce a competent simulator instructor; and (ii) the continuing task of maintaining his or her proficiency. (author)

  8. Budapest Training Technology Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budapest Training Technology Centre (Hungary).

    The Budapest Training Technology Centre (BTTC) grew out of a 1990 agreement calling for Great Britain to help Hungary develop and implement open and flexible training methods and technology-based training to support the labor force development and vocational training needs resulting from Hungary's transition to a market economy. The BTTC would be…

  9. Assessing Intercultural Training Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    Training designs are critical to the success of intercultural training programmes. A common typology for classifying intercultural training designs distinguishes among the following dimensions: experiential discovery versus didactic expository and culture-specific versus culture-general training. The purpose of this paper is to assess different…

  10. Biolab Crew Training

    OpenAIRE

    Illmer, Norbert

    2005-01-01

    In order to return optimum scientific data for the evaluation on ground astronauts have to be efficiently trained on facility operations and the science background of the experiments. The European Astronaut Centre (EAC) provides training to all astronauts assigned to experiments on the BIOLAB research facility of Columbus. This training primarily uses the full scale BIOLAB training model at EAC.

  11. FFTF operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The qualifications required and the training received by FFTF operators are described. The training includes sodium fill training and cold plant qualification. Requirements for supervisors are also outlined. Arrangement of personnel at FFTF is described. Requalification training and recertification are considered

  12. Nuclear manpower training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, In Suk; Lee, H. Y.; Lee, E. J.; Yang, K. N.; Jun, H. R.; Seo, K. W.; Lee, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, I. H.; Joe, B. J.; Koh, Y. S.; Yoo, B. H.; Kim, M. Y.; Ju, Y. C.; Hyun, H. U.; Choi, I. K.; Hong, C. S.; Won, J. Y.; Nam, J. Y.; Lee, H. J.

    1997-12-01

    This report describes the annual results of training courses. The scope and contents are as follows: 1. Education program development of nuclear field 2. International training courses for foreigners 3. Training courses for industry personnel 4. Training courses for R and D staff-members 5. Training courses under the law. The nuclear training center executed 65 training courses for 2,700 engineers/ scientists from the regulatory body, nuclear industries, research institutes and other related organizations during the fiscal year 1997. (author). 18 refs., 3 tabs

  13. Training of maintenance personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabouhams, J.

    1986-01-01

    This lecture precises the method and means developed by EDF to ensure the training of maintenance personnel according to their initial educational background and their experience. The following points are treated: General organization of the training for maintenance personnel in PWR and GCR nuclear power stations and in Creys Malville fast breeder reactor; Basic nuclear training and pedagogical aids developed for this purpose; Specific training and training provided by contractors; complementary training taking into account the operation experience and feedback; Improvement of velocity, competence and safety during shut-down operations by adapted training. (orig.)

  14. Nuclear manpower training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, In Suk; Lee, H. Y.; Lee, E. J.; Yang, K. N.; Jun, H. R.; Seo, K. W.; Lee, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, I. H.; Joe, B. J.; Koh, Y. S.; Yoo, B. H.; Kim, M. Y.; Ju, Y. C.; Hyun, H. U.; Choi, I. K.; Hong, C. S.; Won, J. Y.; Nam, J. Y.; Lee, H. J

    1997-12-01

    This report describes the annual results of training courses. The scope and contents are as follows: 1. Education program development of nuclear field 2. International training courses for foreigners 3. Training courses for industry personnel 4. Training courses for R and D staff-members 5. Training courses under the law. The nuclear training center executed 65 training courses for 2,700 engineers/ scientists from the regulatory body, nuclear industries, research institutes and other related organizations during the fiscal year 1997. (author). 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  15. Training propositional reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauer, K C; Meiser, T; Naumer, B

    2000-08-01

    Two experiments compared the effects of four training conditions on propositional reasoning. A syntactic training demonstrated formal derivations, in an abstract semantic training the standard truth-table definitions of logical connectives were explained, and a domain-specific semantic training provided thematic contexts for the premises of the reasoning task. In a control training, an inductive reasoning task was practised. In line with the account by mental models, both kinds of semantic training were significantly more effective than the control and the syntactic training, whereas there were no significant differences between the control and the syntactic training, nor between the two kinds of semantic training. Experiment 2 replicated this pattern of effects using a different set of syntactic and domain-specific training conditions.

  16. Operator training and the training simulator experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, D.

    The author outlines the approach used by Ontario Hydro to train operators from the day they are hired as Operators-in-Training until they are Authorized Unit First Operators. He describes in detail the use of the simulator in the final year of the authorization program, drawing on experience with the Pickering NGS A simulator. Simulators, he concludes, are important aids to training but by no means all that is required to guarantee capable First Operators

  17. Launch team training system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, J. T.

    1988-01-01

    A new approach to the training, certification, recertification, and proficiency maintenance of the Shuttle launch team is proposed. Previous training approaches are first reviewed. Short term program goals include expanding current training methods, improving the existing simulation capability, and scheduling training exercises with the same priority as hardware tests. Long-term goals include developing user requirements which would take advantage of state-of-the-art tools and techniques. Training requirements for the different groups of people to be trained are identified, and future goals are outlined.

  18. Training effectiveness evaluation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penrose, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    NAESCO's Training Effectiveness Evaluation Model (TEEM) integrates existing evaluation procedures with new procedures. The new procedures are designed to measure training impact on organizational productivity. TEEM seeks to enhance organizational productivity through proactive training focused on operation results. These results can be identified and measured by establishing and tracking performance indicators. Relating training to organizational productivity is not easy. TEEM is a team process. It offers strategies to assess more effectively organizational costs and benefits of training. TEEM is one organization's attempt to refine, manage and extend its training evaluation program

  19. Comparative study of two autogenous graft techniques using piezosurgery for sinus lifting Estudo comparativo de duas técnicas de enxerto autógeno utilizando piezocirurgia para levantamento de seio maxilar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Prestes de Camargo Filho

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Maxillary sinus lifting is a technique, in which, a possible complication is sinus membrane perforation. The aim of this study was to compare two techniques using ultrasound surgery to perform autogenous graft for maxillary sinus lifting. METHODS: Ten rabbits were used in the study, one of them did not undergo surgery. The other nine rabbits had their maxillary sinuses filled with autogenous bone grafts collected from the external skull diploe in particulate form on the right side, and shaved on the left side, both with ultrasonic device. Data on bone density in left and right maxillary sinus, obtained by computed tomography in transverse and longitudinal sections, recorded 90 days after the grafts, were statistically compared. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences between the two techniques that used shaved and particulate bone collected by means of ultrasonic device from rabbit skulls. CONCLUSION: Assessment of operative procedures led to the conclusion that piezoelectric ultrasound was shown to be a safe tool in the surgical approach to the maxillary sinus of rabbits, allowing sinus membrane integrity to be maintained during surgical procedures.OBJETIVO: A técnica de levantamento de seio maxilar apresenta como possível complicação a perfuração da membrana sinusal. O presente trabalho teve por objetivo comparar duas técnicas que utilizam a cirurgia ultrassônica para realização de enxerto autógeno para levantamento de seio maxilar. MÉTODOS: Dez coelhos foram utilizados no estudo, sendo que um deles não foi submetido a procedimento cirúrgico. Os nove coelhos operados tiveram os seios maxilares preenchidos com enxertos autógenos coletados de díploe externa de calota craniana, nas formas particulado do lado direito e raspado do lado esquerdo, ambos com aparelho ultrassônico. Os dados de densidade óssea nos seios maxilares esquerdo e direito, obtidos por meio de tomografia computadorizada nos

  20. "Plug" ósseo autógeno para orifícios de trepanação: nota técnica Autogenic bone plug to seal burr holes: technical note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSUÉ GUIMARÃES GRANHA VIALOGO

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Vários materiais são utilizados para ocluir os orifícios de trepanação em neurocirurgia, por motivos variados: para evitar fístula liquórica após trepanações, para auxiliar a fixação do "flap" ósseo e por motivos estéticos, na região frontal. Dentre estes materiais citamos os heterólogos (botões de silicone, miniplacas de metal, cera de osso, metilmetacrilato, gelfoam, cimento de polímero vegetal, cerâmica de hidroxiapatita, e os autólogos (pó de osso originado da trepanação, gordura, músculo, aponeurose. Os materiais heterólogos ou sintéticos podem provocar reação de corpo estranho com erosão da pele e exposição do material, tornando necessária sua retirada, em tempo variável no pós-operatório. Há cerca de três anos, o autor vem utilizando um botão ou "plug" ósseo autólogo, feito com surgicel e o pó de osso proveniente da trepanação, com bom resultado estético eliminando as desconfortáveis depressões cranianas pós-trepanação. Apresentamos a técnica de confecção deste prático `plug ósseo autólogo'. Nas neuroendoscopias, praticamente sanou-se o problema da fístula liquórica e reação de corpo estranho. Encorajamos a utilização deste botão ósseo autólogo em nosso meio, como método eficiente, econômico e biologicamente aceitável para ocluir orifícios cranianos de trepanação.Many neurosurgical procedures can be performed by a single burr hole: neuroendoscopy, microvascular decompression, stereotactic procedures, chronic subdural haematomas. It is technically difficult to suture and close the dura, located at the bottom of such holes, which can lately lead to CSF leakage. On the other hand, the surgical material used to seal the burr holes can be divided in heterogenic (metal screws, silicon plugs, gelfoam, bone wax, metilmetacrilate, hidroxiapatite, and autogenic (fat, aponeurosis, muscle, and bone dust from trephination. The heterogenic group always brings the possibility of

  1. S-shaped versus conventional straight skin incision: Impact on primary functional maturation, stenosis and thrombosis of autogenous radiocephalic arteriovenous fistula: Impact of incision on maturation, stenosis & failure of RCAVF. Study design: Prospective observational comparative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordzadeh, Ali; Panayiotopolous, Yiannis

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study is to test the null hypothesis that an S-shaped surgical incision versus conventional (straight) skin incision in the creation of autogenous radiocephalic arteriovenous fistulas (RCAVFs) have no impact on the primary end-point of primary functional maturation and secondary end points of stenosis and thrombosis. A prospective observational comparative consecutive study with intention-to-treat on individuals undergoing only radiocephalic arteriovenous fistula (RCAVFs) over a period of 12 months was conducted. Variables on patient's demographics, comorbidities, anesthesia type, mean arterial blood pressure, thrill, laterality, cephalic vein and radial artery diameter were collated. The test of probability was assessed through Chi-Square, Kaplan-Meier survival estimator and Log-Rank analysis. Total of n = 83 individuals with median age of 67 years (IQR, 20-89) and male predominance 83% during this period were subjected to RCAVF formation. Total of n = 45 patients in straight skin incision were compared to n = 38 individuals in S-shaped group. Despite equal prevalence of demographics, comorbidities, anesthesia type, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), thrill, laterality, cephalic vein and radial artery diameter ( p  > 0.05) higher incidence of juxta-anastomotic stenosis was noted in the straight skin incision group ( p  = 0.029) in comparative and survival analysis (Log-Rank, p  = 0.036). The maturation of the entire cohort was 69% (S-shaped 76% vs. straight group 62%) (p > 0.05). The outcome of this study demonstrates that S-shaped surgical skin incision is associated with a lower incidence of stenosis in comparison to straight incision type in RCAVF formation.

  2. Unveiling exceptional Baltic bog ecohydrology, autogenic succession and climate change during the last 2000 years in CE Europe using replicate cores, multi-proxy data and functional traits of testate amoebae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gałka, Mariusz; Tobolski, Kazimierz; Lamentowicz, Łukasz; Ersek, Vasile; Jassey, Vincent E. J.; van der Knaap, Willem O.; Lamentowicz, Mariusz

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of high-resolution, multi-proxy palaeoecological investigations of two parallel peat cores from the Baltic raised bog Mechacz Wielki in NE Poland. We aim to evaluate the role of regional climate and autogenic processes of the raised bog itself in driving the vegetation and hydrology dynamics. Based on partly synchronous changes in Sphagnum communities in the two study cores we suggest that extrinsic factors (climate) played an important role as a driver in mire development during the bog stage (500-2012 CE). Using a testate amoebae transfer function, we found exceptionally stable hydrological conditions during the last 2000 years with a relatively high water table and lack of local fire events that allowed for rapid peat accumulation (2.75 mm/year) in the bog. Further, the strong correlation between pH and community-weighted mean of testate amoeba traits suggests that other variables than water-table depth play a role in driving microbial properties under stable hydrological conditions. There is a difference in hydrological dynamics in bogs between NW and NE Poland until ca 1500 CE, after which the water table reconstructions show more similarities. Our results illustrate how various functional traits relate to different environmental variables in a range of trophic and hydrological scenarios on long time scales. Moreover, our data suggest a common regional climatic forcing in Mechacz Wielki, Gązwa and Kontolanrahka. Though it may still be too early to attempt a regional summary of wetness change in the southern Baltic region, this study is a next step to better understand the long-term peatland palaeohydrology in NE Europe.

  3. Training warning flags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Richard C.

    2003-01-01

    Problems in accredited training programmes at US nuclear stations have resulted in several programmes having their accreditation status designated as probationary. A limited probationary period allows time for problem resolution before the programmes are again reviewed by the National Nuclear Accrediting Board. A careful study of these problems has resulted in the identification of several 'Training Warning Flags' that singularly, or in concert, may indicate or predict degraded training programme effectiveness. These training warning flags have been used by several US nuclear stations as a framework for self-assessments, as a reference in making changes to training programmes, and as a tool in considering student and management feedback on training activities. Further analysis and consideration of the training warning flags has developed precursors for each of the training warning flags. Although more subjective than the training warning flags, the precursors may represent early indicators of factors that may lead to or contribute to degraded training programme effectiveness. Used as evaluative tools, the training warning flags and the precursors may help identify areas for improvements in training programmes and help prioritize training programme improvement efforts. (author)

  4. Training and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, E.; Oria, M.

    1977-01-01

    The paper deals with problems of training and education in a developing country which decided to launch a nuclear propramme. The aims of training and education under such circumstances are described and tecniques for accomplishing these aims are suggested [fr

  5. Moldova - Value Chain Training

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The evaluation of the GHS value chain training subactivity wwas designed to measure the extent, if any, to which the training activities improved the productivity...

  6. Nuclear instrument technician training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollesen, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on Nuclear Instrument Technician (NIT) training that has developed at an accelerated rate over the past three decades. During the 1960's commercial nuclear power plants were in their infancy. For that reason, there is little wonder that NIT training had little structure and little creditability. NIT training, in many early plants, was little more than On-The Job Training (OJT). The seventies brought changes in Instrumentation and Controls as well as emphasis on the requirements for more in depth training and documentation. As in the seventies, the eighties saw not only changes in technologies but tighter requirements, standardized training and the development of accredited Nuclear Instrument Training; thus the conclusion: Nuclear Instrument Training Isn't What It Used To Be

  7. Technical training: places available

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or for any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel: 74924)

  8. Technical training - places available

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or have any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel: 74924)

  9. Technical training: places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or for any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tél : 74924)  

  10. Training on a Shoestring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Madelyn R.

    1995-01-01

    Describes ways to train employees on a tight budget and cut training costs. Offers ideas such as using local colleges, negotiating outsourcing costs, using computers, making good use of experts, and sharing resources with other companies. (JOW)

  11. Technical training: places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or have any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel: 74924)

  12. Technical training: places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or have any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Marie Lahchimi, Technical Training Administration (Tel: 74924)

  13. Small Community Training & Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Operators Small Systems Small Community Training & Education education, training and professional implement the 1996 Amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). • EPA Environmental Education Center

  14. Mechanics of train collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-04-30

    A simple and a more detailed mathematical model for the simulation of train collisions are presented. The study presents considerable insight as to the causes and consequences of train motions on impact. Comparison of model predictions with two full ...

  15. Human factors in training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutton, J.W.; Brown, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Human Factors concept is a focused effort directed at those activities which require human involvement. Training is, by its nature, an activity totally dependent on the Human Factor. This paper identifies several concerns significant to training situations and discusses how Human Factor awareness can increase the quality of learning. Psychology in the training arena is applied Human Factors. Training is a method of communication represented by sender, medium, and receiver. Two-thirds of this communications model involves the human element directly

  16. Training Recurrent Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten With

    1997-01-01

    Training recurrent networks is generally believed to be a difficult task. Excessive training times and lack of convergence to an acceptable solution are frequently reported. In this paper we seek to explain the reason for this from a numerical point of view and show how to avoid problems when...... training. In particular we investigate ill-conditioning, the need for and effect of regularization and illustrate the superiority of second-order methods for training...

  17. A Training Technology Evaluation Tool

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Livingston, Stephen C; Dyer, Jean L; Swinson, Diadra

    2005-01-01

    A Training Technology Evaluation Tool was developed to help procurers and developers of training technologies to make informed decisions and to improve the overall effectiveness of training technologies...

  18. District nurse training

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, Arnold; Freeling, Paul; Owen, John

    1980-01-01

    Training for district nursing is being reviewed. By 1981 district nurses will have a new administrative structure, a new curriculum, and a new examination. Training for nursing, like that for general practice, is to become mandatory. The history of the development of district nurse training is briefly described.

  19. Human Factors in Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barshi, Immanuel; Byrne, Vicky; Arsintescu, Lucia; Connell, Erin

    2010-01-01

    Future space missions will be significantly longer than current shuttle missions and new systems will be more complex than current systems. Increasing communication delays between crews and Earth-based support means that astronauts need to be prepared to handle the unexpected on their own. As crews become more autonomous, their potential span of control and required expertise must grow to match their autonomy. It is not possible to train for every eventuality ahead of time on the ground, or to maintain trained skills across long intervals of disuse. To adequately prepare NASA personnel for these challenges, new training approaches, methodologies, and tools are required. This research project aims at developing these training capabilities. By researching established training principles, examining future needs, and by using current practices in space flight training as test beds, both in Flight Controller and Crew Medical domains, this research project is mitigating program risks and generating templates and requirements to meet future training needs. Training efforts in Fiscal Year 09 (FY09) strongly focused on crew medical training, but also began exploring how Space Flight Resource Management training for Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) Flight Controllers could be integrated with systems training for optimal Mission Control Center (MCC) operations. The Training Task addresses Program risks that lie at the intersection of the following three risks identified by the Project: 1) Risk associated with poor task design; 2) Risk of error due to inadequate information; and 3) Risk associated with reduced safety and efficiency due to poor human factors design.

  20. Questionnaire measuring training's impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corfield, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    A questionnaire has been prepared to evaluate the impact of training of a nuclear power plant. Items covered are the degree to which training is systematic, the influence that should be exerted by INPO, and the costs of an effective training program

  1. Computer Based Training Authors' and Designers' training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric GODET

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This communication, through couple of studies driven since 10 years, tries to show how important is the training of authors in Computer Based Training (CBT. We submit here an approach to prepare designers mastering Interactive Multimedia modules in this domain. Which institutions are really dedicating their efforts in training authors and designers in this area of CBTs? Television devices and broadcast organisations offered since year 60s' a first support for Distance Learning. New media, New Information and Communication Technologies (NICT allowed several public and private organisations to start Distance Learning projects. As usual some of them met their training objectives, other of them failed. Did their really failed? Currently, nobody has the right answer. Today, we do not have enough efficient tools allowing us to evaluate trainees' acquisition in a short term view. Training evaluation needs more than 10 to 20 years of elapsed time to bring reliable measures. Nevertheless, given the high investments already done in this area, we cannot wait until the final results of the pedagogical evaluation. A lot of analyses showed relevant issues which can be used as directions for CBTs authors and designers training. Warning - Our studies and the derived conclusions are mainly based on projects driven in the field. We additionally bring our several years experience in the training of movie film authors in the design of interactive multimedia products. Some of our examples are extracting from vocational training projects where we were involved in all development phases from the analysis of needs to the evaluation of the acquisition within the trainee's / employee job's. Obviously, we cannot bring and exhaustive approach in this domain where a lot of parameters are involved as frame for the CBT interactive multimedia modules authors' and designers' training.

  2. Abramovo Counterterrorism Training Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, Christopher M.; Ross, Larry; Kaldenbach, Karen Yvonne; Estigneev, Yuri; Murievav, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. government has been assisting the Russian Federation (RF) Ministry of Defense (MOD) for many years with nuclear weapons transportation security (NWTS) through the provision of specialized guard escort railcars and cargo railcars with integrated physical security and communication systems, armored transport vehicles, and armored escort vehicles. As a natural continuation of the NWTS program, a partnership has been formed to construct a training center that will provide counterterrorism training to personnel in all branches of the RF MOD. The Abramovo Counterterrorism Training Center (ACTC) is a multinational, multiagency project with funding from Canada, RF and the U.S. Departments of Defense and Energy. ACTC will be a facility where MOD personnel can conduct basic through advanced training in various security measures to protect Category IA material against the threat of terrorist attack. The training will enhance defense-in-depth principles by integrating MOD guard force personnel into the overall physical protection systems and improving their overall response time and neutralization capabilities. The ACTC project includes infrastructure improvements, renovation of existing buildings, construction of new buildings, construction of new training facilities, and provision of training and other equipment. Classroom training will be conducted in a renovated training building. Basic and intermediate training will be conducted on three different security training areas where various obstacles and static training devices will be constructed. The central element of ACTC, where advanced training will be held, is the 'autodrome,' a 3 km road along which various terrorist events can be staged to challenge MOD personnel in realistic and dynamic nuclear weapons transportation scenarios. This paper will address the ACTC project elements and the vision for training development and integrating this training into actual nuclear weapons transportation operations.

  3. Radiological worker training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

  4. STS-96 Crew Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The training for the crew members of the STS-96 Discovery Shuttle is presented. Crew members are Kent Rominger, Commander; Rick Husband, Pilot; Mission Specialists, Tamara Jernigan, Ellen Ochoa, and Daniel Barry; Julie Payette, Mission Specialist (CSA); and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, Mission Specialist (RSA). Scenes show the crew sitting and talking about the Electrical Power System; actively taking part in virtual training in the EVA Training VR (Virtual Reality) Lab; using the Orbit Space Vision Training System; being dropped in water as a part of the Bail-Out Training Program; and taking part in the crew photo session.

  5. Training techniques for industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.W.

    1978-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of commonly used training techniques in relation to cost-effective, prevention-oriented Quality Assurance are examined. Important questions are whether training techniques teach cost effectiveness and whether the techniques are, themselves, cost effective. To answer these questions, criteria for evaluating teaching techniques for cost effectiveness were developd, and then commonly used techniques are evaluated in terms of specific training program objectives. Motivation of personnel is also considered important to the success of a training program, and methods are outlined by which recognition of the academic quality of industrial training can be used as a motivational technique

  6. Effective mechanic training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdge, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The need for the training of mechanics is discussed, and the increased interest within the utility industry of placing a similar importance on this training as it has traditionally placed on operator training, is expressed. Effective approaches and techniques are described. Fundamental mechanical maintenance concepts and their practical application are discussed, including the use of supporting video programs. The importance of follow-up practical shop exercise which reinforces classroom instruction is stressed, drawing from practical utility experience. Utilizing success in training as a measure of eligibility for advancement is discussed as well as the interface between training and the company bargaining unit

  7. Training of nonlicensed personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetrick, D.E.

    1975-01-01

    The safety and efficiency with which a station operates is a function of the competence and proficiency of all personnel. This includes the nonlicensed personnel who make up the bulk of the station staff. Thus the training of these members of the station complement is an important function in overall station performance. Standards, regulations, regulatory guides, and codes provide guidance to the training requirements for such personnel. Training needs and objectives must be established, a plan prepared and then all incorporated into a training program. A well planned and operated training program will stimulate effective communications between the different groups within the station and between the station and off site support groups

  8. Radiological worker training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance

  9. Academic Training: Academic Training Lectures-Questionnaire

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch SUGGEST AND WIN! Its time to plan the 2004-2005 lecture series. From today until March 19 you have the chance to give your contribution to planning for next year's Academic Training Lecture Series. At the web site: http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire you will find questionnaires proposing topics in high energy physics, applied physics and science and society. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at the CERN bookshop.

  10. Making training decisions proactively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, R.F.

    1988-01-01

    The challenge of making training decisions with a high degree of confidence as to the results of those decisions face every DOD, Federal, State, and City agency. Training has historically been a very labor and paper intensive system with limited automation support. This paper outlines how one DOD component, the Air Force, is approaching that challenge. The Training Decision System (TDS) will provide the Air Force with an automated decision aid to help plan and estimate the consequences of various mixes of resident training, On-The-Job Training (OJT), and field training within a specialty such as security. The system described provides training from enlistment to separation and responds to hundreds of related security task needs. This system identifies what the tasks are, who should provide the training, what training setting should be used, what proficiency should be achieved, and through computer modeling provides an assessment of training effectiveness options and estimate the impact of implementing those options. With current budgetary constraints and with the possibility of further reductions in the future, the most cost effective training mix must be found to sustain required capabilities

  11. Training assessments and assistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przybylski, J.L.

    1994-07-01

    The Transportation Management Division, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (TMD/EM-261), United States Department of Energy (DOE), Training Program Manager has established an independent Training Assessment Program, the intent of which is to evaluate, exclusively, transportation and packaging training activities throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) community. The results generated from an application of the Training Assessment Program are intended to be utilized as a management tool for maintaining compliance with applicable regulatory-driven training requirements. In addition, the Transportation Assessment Program can be employed to evaluate training methodologies and, through a pre-arranged, cooperative, technical assistance effort, provide each Department of Energy (DOE) site with the means necessary to enhance it's overall transportation and packaging training capabilities

  12. Computer training aids for nuclear operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.G.P.; Binns, J.B.H.

    1983-01-01

    The Royal Navy's Nuclear Propulsion School at HMS SULTAN which is responsible for training all ratings and officers who operate Submarine Pressurised Water Reactor plants, has available a varied selection of classroom simulator training aids as well as purpose built Submarine Manoeuvring Room simulators. The use of these classroom training aids in the twelve months prior to Autumn 1981 is discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of using relatively expensive computer based aids to support classroom instruction for students who do not investigate mathematically the dynamics of the Reactor Plant are identified. The conclusions drawn indicate that for students of limited academic ability the classroom simulators are disproportionately expensive in cost, maintenance load, and instructional time. Secondly, the experience gained in the use of the Manoeuvring Room Simulators to train future operators who have just finished the academic phase of their training is outlined. The possible pitfalls for the instructor are discussed and the lessons learnt, concluding that these simulators provide a valuable substitute for the live plant enabling trainees to be brought up to a common standard and reducing their on job training time to an acceptable level. (author)

  13. ECP divisional training: plan 1996

    OpenAIRE

    Storr, Kenneth Mick

    1996-01-01

    The divisional training plan is produced each year at the request of the Joint Training Board (JTB) following a recommendation in the 1991 CERN Training Plan which states that divisions should produce a plan setting out training priorities. This plan presents a review of training activities. a report on ECP progress in implementing the recommendations of the 1995 CERN training plan, a discussion of divisional training objectives, and a summary of training requests generated by the 1996 period...

  14. Classical altitude training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann-Bette, B

    2008-08-01

    For more than 40 years, the effects of classical altitude training on sea-level performance have been the subject of many scientific investigations in individual endurance sports. To our knowledge, no studies have been performed in team sports like football. Two well-controlled studies showed that living and training at an altitude of >or=1800-2700 m for 3-4 weeks is superior to equivalent training at sea level in well-trained athletes. Most of the controlled studies with elite athletes did not reveal such an effect. However, the results of some uncontrolled studies indicate that sea-level performance might be enhanced after altitude training also in elite athletes. Whether hypoxia provides an additional stimulus for muscular adaptation, when training is performed with equal intensity compared with sea-level training is not known. There is some evidence for an augmentation of total hemoglobin mass after classical altitude training with duration >or=3 weeks at an altitude >or=2000 m due to altitude acclimatization. Considerable individual variation is observed in the erythropoietic response to hypoxia and in the hypoxia-induced reduction of aerobic performance capacity during training at altitude, both of which are thought to contribute to inter-individual variation in the improvement of sea-level performance after altitude training.

  15. Team skills training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coe, R.P.; Carl, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    Numerous reports and articles have been written recently on the importance of team skills training for nuclear reactor operators, but little has appeared on the practical application of this theoretical guidance. This paper describes the activities of the Training and Education Department at GPU Nuclear (GPUN). In 1987, GPUN undertook a significant initiative in its licensed operator training programs to design and develop initial and requalification team skills training. Prior to that time, human interaction skills training (communication, stress management, supervisory skills, etc.) focused more on the individual rather than a group. Today, GPU Nuclear conducts team training at both its Three Mile Island (YMI), PA and Oyster Creek (OC), NJ generating stations. Videotaped feedback is sued extensively to critique and reinforce targeted behaviors. In fact, the TMI simulator trainer has a built-in, four camera system specifically designed for team training. Evaluations conducted on this training indicated these newly acquired skills are being carried over to the work environment. Team training is now an important and on-going part of GPUN operator training

  16. Language Training: Anglais

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 2 hours a week between 26 April and 1 July 2004. Timetable: Thursdays 12.00 to 14.00 Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students and 20 hours) For registration and further information, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957 FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 language.training@cern.ch

  17. Safety training news

    CERN Multimedia

    Safety Training, HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

      SELF-RESCUE MASK The "Self-Rescue Mask" face-to-face training course has been replaced by a revised version. This measure concerns both the initial and the refresher course. For personnel who have successfully attended the initial or refresher Self-Rescue Mask training within the last three years, their Self-Rescue Mask training will still be valid.  The course description and registration form can be found in the training catalogue on the Safety Training Service’s website or catalogue. The Self-Rescue Mask training course is a mandatory prerequisite for following the new "Portable ODH Detector" e-learning course.   PORTABLE ODH DETECTOR A new e-learning awareness course, "Portable ODH Detector", is available via the SIR application on CERN’s intranet. Personnel requiring a portable ODH detector of the DRÄGER x-am 5000 type to allowed access th...

  18. Extended family medicine training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Steve; Ross, Shelley; Lawrence, Kathrine; Archibald, Douglas; Mackay, Maria Palacios; Oandasan, Ivy F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine trends in family medicine training at a time when substantial pedagogic change is under way, focusing on factors that relate to extended family medicine training. Design Aggregate-level secondary data analysis based on the Canadian Post-MD Education Registry. Setting Canada. Participants All Canadian citizens and permanent residents who were registered in postgraduate family medicine training programs within Canadian faculties of medicine from 1995 to 2013. Main outcome measures Number and proportion of family medicine residents exiting 2-year and extended (third-year and above) family medicine training programs, as well as the types and numbers of extended training programs offered in 2015. Results The proportion of family medicine trainees pursuing extended training almost doubled during the study period, going from 10.9% in 1995 to 21.1% in 2013. Men and Canadian medical graduates were more likely to take extended family medicine training. Among the 5 most recent family medicine exit cohorts (from 2009 to 2013), 25.9% of men completed extended training programs compared with 18.3% of women, and 23.1% of Canadian medical graduates completed extended training compared with 13.6% of international medical graduates. Family medicine programs vary substantially with respect to the proportion of their trainees who undertake extended training, ranging from a low of 12.3% to a high of 35.1% among trainees exiting from 2011 to 2013. Conclusion New initiatives, such as the Triple C Competency-based Curriculum, CanMEDS–Family Medicine, and Certificates of Added Competence, have emerged as part of family medicine education and credentialing. In acknowledgment of the potential effect of these initiatives, it is important that future research examine how pedagogic change and, in particular, extended training shapes the care family physicians offer their patients. As part of that research it will be important to measure the breadth and uptake of

  19. Components of Effective Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lussier, James W; Shadrick, Scott B

    2006-01-01

    .... The two types of activity are markedly different in structure, pace, amount and type of coaching required, composition of the training audience, focus of conscious attention, appropriate performance...

  20. The Hinton train disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley, A M

    1990-10-01

    In February of 1986 a head-on collision occurred between a freight train and a passenger train in western Canada killing 23 people and causing over $30 million of damage. A Commission of Inquiry appointed by the Canadian government concluded that human error was the major reason for the collision. This report discusses the factors contributing to the human error: mainly poor work-rest schedules, the monotonous nature of the train driving task, insufficient information about train movements, and the inadequate backup systems in case of human error.

  1. Virtual Environments for Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stiles, R

    1998-01-01

    .... Progress on productization of the VET Training Studio software includes increased robustness for Vista virtual environment display and interaction services, a new capability to use the STEVE visual...

  2. Nuclear Manpower Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K. W.; Lee, H. Y.; Lee, E. J. and others

    2004-12-01

    Through the project on nuclear human resources development in 2004, the Nuclear Training Center of KAERI has provided various nuclear education and training courses for 1,962 persons from the domestic nuclear related organizations such as Government Agencies, nuclear industries, R and D institutes, universities, and public as well as from IAEA Member States. The NTC has developed education programs for master/doctorial course on advanced nuclear engineering in cooperation with the University of Science and Technology which was established in 2003. Additionally, nuclear education programs such as nuclear technical training courses for the promotion of cooperation with member countries, have developed during the project period. The center has also developed and conducted 7 training courses on nuclear related technology. In parallel, the center has produced 20 training materials including textbooks, 3 multi-media education materials, and 56 Video On Demand (VOD) cyber training materials. In order to promote international cooperation for human resources development, the NTC has implemented a sub-project on the establishment of a web-portal including database for the exchange of information and materials within the framework of ANENT. Also, the center has cooperated with FNCA member countries to establish a model of human resources development, as well as with member countries on bilateral cooperation bases to develop training programs. The International Nuclear Training and Education Center (INTEC), which was opened in 2002, has hosted 318 international and domestic events (training courses, conferences, workshops, etc.) during the project period

  3. Achieving excellence in training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangin, A.M.; Solymossy, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Operating a nuclear power plant is a uniquely challenging activity, requiring a high degree of competence from all who are involved. Achieving and maintaining this competence requires excellence in training. But what does excellence mean, and how do we achieve it. Based on the experience gained by INPO in plant training evaluations and accreditation activities, this paper describes some of the actions that can be taken to achieve the quality appropriate for nuclear power plant training. These actions are discussed in relation to the four phases of a performance-based training system: (1) needs analysis, (2) program design and development, (3) implementation, and (4) evaluation and improvement

  4. Lithuania training needs analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    The present assessment of training needs in the Lithuanian natural gas sector is one of a total of four programmes on which Danish Oil and Natural Gas (DONG) and Lithuanian Gas (LG) cooperate. DONG's contribution is financed by the Danish Foreign Ministry. Long-term Objective is enhancement of the natural gas sector in Lithuania for efficient, cost-effective and environmentally responsible energy supply and utilization, in accordance with international standards. Immediate Objective is to establish a basis of competence in the Lithuanian Gas Sector, manage the modernization process effectively, and develop the involved human resources to the required performance level. The strategy for training in the Lithuanian natural gas sector proposed by this report integrates recommendations under three main headings: Six programmes of training and development. Strengthening of the institutional framework and the system for training. Upgrading of training capacity. The six programmes comprise: Legislation and Educational Planning. Management Development. Economy. Marketing and Sales. Supervisory Skills Development. Training Skills Development. Management and Specialists' Workshops on Technology. Following organisation for implementation of recommendations is proposed: Steering Board. Advisory Board. Coordination Group. Project Management Group. Group of Lithuanian Specialists. Group of Advisers. Short-term Consultants/Teachers. Lithuanian Consultants/Teachers. The project is envisaged to be implemented in carefully timed phases allowing for coordination between management workshops, training programmes and revision work regarding the institutional framework for training and the training system. (EG)

  5. Virtual Training Devices Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Virtual Training Devices (VTD) Laboratory at the Life Cycle Software Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, provides a software testing and support environment...

  6. Universal Drive Train Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This vehicle drive train research facility is capable of evaluating helicopter and ground vehicle power transmission technologies in a system level environment. The...

  7. Altitude and endurance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusko, Heikki K; Tikkanen, Heikki O; Peltonen, Juha E

    2004-10-01

    The benefits of living and training at altitude (HiHi) for an improved altitude performance of athletes are clear, but controlled studies for an improved sea-level performance are controversial. The reasons for not having a positive effect of HiHi include: (1) the acclimatization effect may have been insufficient for elite athletes to stimulate an increase in red cell mass/haemoglobin mass because of too low an altitude (altitude training period (training effect at altitude may have been compromised due to insufficient training stimuli for enhancing the function of the neuromuscular and cardiovascular systems; and (3) enhanced stress with possible overtraining symptoms and an increased frequency of infections. Moreover, the effects of hypoxia in the brain may influence both training intensity and physiological responses during training at altitude. Thus, interrupting hypoxic exposure by training in normoxia may be a key factor in avoiding or minimizing the noxious effects that are known to occur in chronic hypoxia. When comparing HiHi and HiLo (living high and training low), it is obvious that both can induce a positive acclimatization effect and increase the oxygen transport capacity of blood, at least in 'responders', if certain prerequisites are met. The minimum dose to attain a haematological acclimatization effect is > 12 h a day for at least 3 weeks at an altitude or simulated altitude of 2100-2500 m. Exposure to hypoxia appears to have some positive transfer effects on subsequent training in normoxia during and after HiLo. The increased oxygen transport capacity of blood allows training at higher intensity during and after HiLo in subsequent normoxia, thereby increasing the potential to improve some neuromuscular and cardiovascular determinants of endurance performance. The effects of hypoxic training and intermittent short-term severe hypoxia at rest are not yet clear and they require further study.

  8. Criterion-based laparoscopic training reduces total training time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, W.M.; Buzink, S.N.; Alevizos, L.; De Hingh, I.H.J.T.; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    The benefits of criterion-based laparoscopic training over time-oriented training are unclear. The purpose of this study is to compare these types of training based on training outcome and time efficiency. Methods During four training sessions within 1 week (one session per day) 34 medical interns

  9. All aboard the Safety Train(ing)!

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2015-01-01

    Would you like to influence CERN’s safety courses? Do you want to help build better training courses? If your answer is yes to one or both of these questions: now is the time! The Safety Training section is looking for volunteers from the whole CERN community to test new courses before they go online for all members of the personnel.    The Safety Training section is redesigning the CERN e-learning package in order to adopt a more educational approach and to make the courses a more enjoyable experience. The section is now calling for volunteers. “We know we can do much more with testers’ help and feedback,” explains Christoph Balle, Safety Training section leader. “By having the end users actively involved in the process, we’ll achieve our goal of communicating safety in the best possible way. As the volunteers will play an active role in the development of the courses, they will be providing a service to the whole community.&am...

  10. Intercultural Training: Six Measures Assessing Training Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Andrea; Mertesacker, Marion

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop recommendations for measures assessing intercultural training needs for international human resource management. Based on scientific as well as application-oriented criteria the aim is to select six measures assessing general intercultural competencies and with the help of behaviour ratings in…

  11. Academic Training: 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    1st Term - 01 October to 17 December 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME New Trends in Fusion Research by A. Fasoli, EPFL, Lausanne, CH 11, 12, 13 October Physics at e+e- linear collider by K. Desch, DESY, Hamburg, D 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Standard Model by R. Barbieri, CERN-PH-TH 6, 7, 8, 9 10 December The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form a...

  12. Mind-Body Skills Training to Improve Distress Tolerance in Medical Students: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Kristen M; Luberto, Christina M; O'Bryan, Emily M; Mysinger, Erica; Cotton, Sian

    2016-01-01

    Medical students face rigorous and stressful work environments, resulting in high rates of psychological distress. However, there has been a dearth of empirical work aimed at modifying risk factors for psychopathology among this at-risk group. Distress tolerance, defined as the ability to withstand emotional distress, is one factor that may be important in promoting psychological well-being in medical students. Thus, the aim of the current mixed-methods study was (a) to describe changes in facets of distress tolerance (i.e., emotional tolerance, absorption, appraisal, regulation) for medical students who completed a mind-body skills training group, and a no-intervention control group of students; (b) to examine the relationship between changes in psychological variables and changes in distress tolerance; and (c) to report students' perceptions of the mind-body group, with an emphasis on how the group may have affected personal and professional functioning due to improvements in distress tolerance. The mind-body program was an 11-week, 2-hour skills training group that focused on introducing, practicing, and processing mind-body skills such as biofeedback, guided imagery, relaxation, several forms of meditation (e.g., mindfulness), breathing exercises, and autogenic training. Participants were 52 first- and second-year medical students (62.7% female, Mage = 23.45, SD = 1.51) who participated in a mind-body group or a no-intervention control group and completed self-report measures before and after the 11-week period. Students in the mind-body group showed a modest improvement in all distress tolerance subscales over time (ΔM = .42-.53, p = .01-.03, d = .44-.53), whereas the control group showed less consistent changes across most subscales (ΔM = .11-.42, p = .10-.65, d = .01-.42). Students in the mind-body group qualitatively reported an improved ability to tolerate affective distress. Overall, improvements in psychological symptoms were associated with

  13. Technical Training for Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverland, Edgar M.

    The question has arisen as to what kind of information a manager without extensive technical training needs to learn to supervise effectively. For example, the Nike Hercules fire control platoon leader, usually an officer in his first active duty assignment, seldom has had extensive technical training. Yet he is responsibile for the…

  14. Training for Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglen, Leo; Hopkins, Sonnie; Burke, Gerald

    An exploratory study was conducted to evaluate the utility of a method to demonstrate that Australian enterprises that invest in the training of their employees gain a return from that investment through an increase in employee productivity. The method, which compares enterprise expenditure on training of personnel with labor productivity across a…

  15. Training the Hardcore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban Research Corp., Chicago, IL.

    This part of the series on Training the Hardcore covers factors involved in hiring and training the hardcore, abstracts of the 12 volumes included in the whole, and three other documents which will give management further insight into how the employment situation looks to the man in the street. Based on his experience at KLH and Polaroid, Henry M.…

  16. Simulators in driver training.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    In 2010, about 150 driving simulators were being used for the basic driver training in the Netherlands. According to theories about how people learn, simulator training has both advantages and disadvantages. In order to be able to learn something from a simulator, its technical quality must be

  17. Job Instruction Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Richard H.

    Job Instruction Training (JIT) is a step-by-step, relatively simple technique used to train employees on the job. It is especially suitable for teaching manual skills or procedures; the trainer is usually an employee's supervisor but can be a co-worker. The JIT technique consists of a series of steps that a supervisor or other instructor follows…

  18. Training Accreditation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The cornerstone of safe operation of Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is personnel performing the day-to-day functions which accomplish the facility mission. Training that is conducted efficiently and effectively and is directly related to the needs of the job (i.e. performance-based training) is fundamental to safe operation. Responsibility for the safe operation of these facilities is a line management function. Therefore, achieving performance-based training requires commitment from the organization for which training is provided. This commitment includes making subject matter experts available for participation in and review of the products of the performance-based training process. It also includes budgeting and scheduling the time required for both initial and continuing training. This commitment must be made by corporate and facility senior management from the beginning. Management must get involved at the start to ensure that they are not only cognizant of ongoing activities, but are also involved to the degree necessary to thoroughly understand the process. Policies implemented and support demonstrated by senior management provide the driving force to ensure that training programs receive the attention that is imperative if facility training programs are to be successful

  19. Measurement Science and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunderson, C. Victor

    The need for training and retraining is a central element in current discussions about the economy of the United States. This paper is designed to introduce training practitioners to some new concepts about how measurement science can provide a new framework for assessing progress and can add new discipline to the development, implementation, and…

  20. [Operative vaginal deliveries training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, O

    2008-12-01

    The appropriate use of forceps, vacuums or spatulas facilitates the rapid delivery of foetuses faced with life-threatening situations. It also makes possible the relief of certain cases of prolonged second-stage labor. In France, operative vaginal delivery (OVD) accounts for approximately 10% of all births. OVD training aims to optimize maternal, as well as neonatal safety. It should enable trainees to indicate or contraindicate an OVD safely, as well as to choose the appropriate instrument, use it correctly, and master quality control principles. Traditional OVD training is confronted with both spatial and time-related limitations. Spatial constraints involve both the teacher and trainee who only have limited visual access to the pelvic canal, and the head of the foetus; the time constraint occurs whenever the OVD occurs in an emergency setting. These limitations have been further aggravated by new constraints: decreasing time dedicated to training (European safety rules prohibit work the day after night duty), increasing litigation, and constraints imposed by society. Training by means of simulation removes such limitations making it possible to both avoid exposing pregnant women to the hazards of traditional training, and adapt the training to the skills of each trainee. OVD training should include forceps, vacuums and the use of spatulas. The OVD skills of obstetricians should be audited regularly on both a personal and a confidential level. Such audits could be based on a method using a simulator. Prospective studies comparing traditional and simulation-based training should be encouraged.

  1. Training for development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1971-01-01

    The Statute of the Agency charges it with the duty 'to encourage the exchange and training of scientists and experts in the field of peaceful uses of atomic energy'. One way in which it fulfils this function is by organizing training courses and study tours, particularly for the benefit of scientists and technicians from the developing countries. (author)

  2. Training at Aerospatiale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabod, Rene

    A training plan for Aerospatiale is outlined which incorporates goals for both the organization and the individual. Emphasis is placed on the training of staff in multiple skills such as mechanics/electronics. Other areas considered include the development of information tools, the development of commercial approaches, and the learning of new industrial techniques and foreign languages.

  3. Exports and Job Training

    OpenAIRE

    Bastos, Paulo; Silva, Joana; Proenca, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines whether export participation matters for job training. The paper draws on longitudinal worker-firm data for Brazilian manufacturing, linked with detailed records on training activity from the main provider. The analysis uses industry-specific exchange rate movements to generate exogenous variation in export status at the firm-level. The findings indicate that export par...

  4. Understanding Transfer of Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Mark G.

    1983-01-01

    Stresses the difficulty of "maintenance" of newly learned behaviors by reinforcement and feedback on the job and proposes an alternative means of promoting transfer of training--establishing rule-governed behavior. Some ways of establishing rules in training are listed and discussed, including use of behavior-modeling and other…

  5. Nuclear power training courses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The training of technical manpower for nuclear power projects in developing countries is now a significant part of the IAEA Technical Assistance Programme. Two basic courses are the cornerstones of the Agency's training programme for nuclear power: a course in planning and implementation, and a course in construction and operation management. These two courses are independent of each other. They are designed to train personnel for two distinct phases of project implementation. The nuclear power project training programme has proven to be successful. A considerable number of highly qualified professionals from developing countries have been given the opportunity to learn through direct contact with experts who have had first-hand experience. It is recognized that the courses are not a substitute for on-the-job training, but their purpose is achieved if they have resulted in the transfer of practical, reliable information and have helped developing countries to prepare themselves for the planning, construction and operation management of nuclear power stations

  6. Control of training instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, K. W.; Joo, Y. C.; Park, J. C.; Hong, C. S.; Choi, I. K.; Cho, B. J.; Lee, H. Y.; Seo, I. S.; Park, N. K.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the annual results on control of training instrument. The scope and contents are the following: 1. Control of Compact Nuclear Simulator 2. Control of Radiation/Radioactivity Measurement 3. Control of Non-Destructive Testing Equipment 4. Control of Chemical Equipment 5. Control of Personal Computer 6. Other related Lecture Aid Equipment. Efforts were employed to upgrade the training environment through retrofitting experimental facilities, compiling teaching materials and reforcing audio-visual aids. The Nuclear Training Center executed the open-door training courses for 2,496 engineers/scientists from the nuclear regulatory, nuclear industries, research institutes and other related organizations by means of offering 45 training courses during the fiscal year 1995. (author). 15 tabs., 7 figs., 13 refs

  7. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: The Joint PVSS JCOP Framework: 14 - 18.6.2004 (5 days) EXCEL 2003 - niveau 2 : 17 & 18.6.2004 (2 jours) MAGNE-04 : Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique : 6 au 8.7.2004 (3 jours) Technical Training Monique Duval - Tel.74924 technical.training@cern.ch

  8. Time Use on Trains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    . The passengers create a travel space in which they make dynamic shifts in different kinds of activities: media use, media non-use, social interactions and non-social interactions. Passengers expect the train operator to provide the travel space for different activities (including the possibility of mobile......This study explores how travel time is used and how passengers conceptualise travel time in Danish intercity trains and intercity fast trains. The new contribution to the literature this study can offer is in the inclusion of all kinds of passengers in the different compartments to understand train...... travel as a dynamic act of moving with shifts in activities. A mixed-method approach is used with self-completed questionnaires, frequency observations, shadowing observations and interviews. The findings reveal that the train passengers’ acts on the move are framed by both macro- and microstructures...

  9. Training and information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The Training and Information Division provides centralized direction and coordination for the training and information activities of the Center for Energy and Environment Research (formerly Puerto Rico Nuclear Center). The Division Head serves as Educational Officer, Technical Information Officer, and Public Information Officer. Training responsibilities include registering students; maintaining centralized records on training activities; preparing reports for ERDA; scheduling the utilization of training facilities; providing audiovisual equipment; assisting in the preparation of courses, seminars, symposia, and meetings; administering fellowship programs; and providing personal assistance to students in matters such as housing and immigration. The Division Head represents the Director on the Admissions Committee. Information responsibilities include preparation of manuscripts for ERDA patent clearance and publication release, maintenance of central files on all manuscripts and publications, preparation of the Annual Report, providing editorial and translation assistance, operation of a Technical Reading Room, operation of an ERDA Film Library, operation of a Reproduction Shop, providing copying services, and assisting visitors

  10. COMPLEX TRAINING: A BRIEF REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P. Ebben

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of plyometric training is well supported by research. Complex training has gained popularity as a training strategy combining weight training and plyometric training. Anecdotal reports recommend training in this fashion in order to improve muscular power and athletic performance. Recently, several studies have examined complex training. Despite the fact that questions remain about the potential effectiveness and implementation of this type of training, results of recent studies are useful in guiding practitioners in the development and implementation of complex training programs. In some cases, research suggests that complex training has an acute ergogenic effect on upper body power and the results of acute and chronic complex training include improved jumping performance. Improved performance may require three to four minutes rest between the weight training and plyometrics sets and the use of heavy weight training loads

  11. The real manager of training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowthert, W.H.

    1987-01-01

    For a training program to be truly effective it must belong to the line organization, not to the training group. The American nuclear industry has developed accredited training programs with large training staffs. Many managers agree that the organization receiving the training must be accountable for its quality and effectiveness. Most nuclear plant organizations actually delegate all authority and responsibility for training to the training manager. The Pennsylvania Power and Light Company (PPandL) has programs in place that ensure adequate control of training by the responsible line manager. This presentation discusses the importance of line manager accountability and authority concerning training

  12. Management of nuclear training center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, In Suk; Lee, Han Young; Cho, Boung Jae; Lee, Seung Hee; Lee, Eoi Jin; You, Byung Hoon; Lee, Won Ku; Jeon, Hyung Ryeon; Seo, Kyung Won; Kim, Young Joong; Kim, Ik Hyun; Hyun, Ha Il; Choi, Il Ki; Hong, Choon Sun; Won, Jong Yeul; Joo, Yong Chang; Nam, Jae Yeul; Sin, Eun Jeong

    1996-02-01

    This report describes the annual results of training courses. The scope and contents are as follows : 1. Regional and interregional training courses, 2. Training courses assisted by foreign experts, 3. Training courses for nuclear industry personnel, 4. Training courses for internal staff-members, 5. Training courses under the law. The nuclear training center executed the open-door training courses for 2,699 engineers/scientists from the regulatory body, nuclear industries, research institutes and other related organizations by means of offering 69 training courses during the fiscal year 1995. (Author) .new

  13. PSA in operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nos, V.; Faig, J.; Plesa, P.; Delgado, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    The systematic approach to training is internationally accepted as the best method to achieve and maintain the qualification and competence of power plant personnel and to guarantee the quality of their training. Following the recommendations and guidelines of international organisations competent in the field, TECNATOM SA has developed projects based on the systematic approach to training for all Spanish nuclear power plants. One of the latest projects was the systematic approach to training developed for the operation personnel of ASCO Nuclear Power Plant. In this case, certain results of the Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) which complement the systematic safety and reliability criteria of the systematic approach to training process have been incorporated in the traditional processes of work and task analysis and training plan design. This incorporation provides the training manager with additional criteria based not only on safety aspects obtained through the statistical treatment of considerations of skilled technical personnel (operators, operation chief supervisors, etc), but also on the independent criterion of the PSA. The inclusion of this approach basically affects all systematics in two of its stages: During the selection process of operating practices in SMR or SGI, the possible scenarios have been associated with all those situations where human actions which lead to an initiating event or human actions to mitigate an initiating event, may take place, as defined in the PSA. During the scenario development process, the instruments involved in the performance of human actions which originate or mitigate an event taking place have been identified. This pakes it possible to reconcile the scenario event sequence with the sequence considered in the PSA study, as the most likely to provoke a more serious accident. The incorporation of these PSA results contributes to the strengthening of safety aspects in training in an objective way, and confirms that

  14. Cognitive training for dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konta, Brigitte

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the HTA report is to evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive training methods to treat cognitive disorders of dementia and other diseases with cognitive deficits. For this purpose, a systematic literature search was carried out first based on the DIMDI superbase retrieval. The identified publications were judged and selected by two independent, methodically competent experts. 33 publications were included in the report. Based on the studies for a normal cognitive development in old age a theory that healthy older people have a considerable capacity reserve for an improved performance in abstract abilities of thinking can be assumed. The first symptoms for older people at risk for dementia are a reduced cognitive capacity reserve. Cognitive training methods therefore focus abilities of abstract memory. Apart from types of dementia another two groups of diseases with cognitive deficits were included in the HTA report: cerebral lesions and schizophrenic psychoses. Studies with mild as well as forms of dementia heavy forms including the Alzheimer disease were included. The described training methods were very heterogeneous with regard to their contents, the temporal sequence and the outcome parameter. The studies were methodically partly contestable. Approximately a third of the studies of all publications could show improvements in the cognitive achievements by the training. Three studies concerning cognitive training methods in case of cerebral lesions were included. All three studies demonstrated a significant improvement in the training group in some outcome parameters. Special cognitive training methods were used for the treatment of cognitive deficits at schizophrenic psychoses. The neurocognitive training (NET, the "Cognitive Remediation Therapy" as well as the strategic training with coaching proved to be effective. The studies, however, were hardly comparable and very heterogeneous in detail. Summarising the cognitive training

  15. Training 1983 and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickey, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Quality training is necessary to assure competent, safe, efficient, and economical operation of a Nuclear Power Plant thereby providing the best insurance for our investors, customers and employees. By providing quality training programs to meet our needs, we can also meet the requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Programs designed and administered to meet the utility needs will assure the rapid integration of new employees into the Nuclear Mission staff and operating units. The task of providing quality training for such diverse groups of employees, each with differing needs, is a challenge to the utility both financially and in manpower availability to perform training. A review of current training needs and resources is discussed. A new approach to training is presented to identify possible resources available and cooperative units which could be developed to increase the manpower available for operations, utilize the manpower available for training more effectively, provide more efficient use of classroom facilities, and to be more cost effective providing the funds that will be necessary to support the new needs of the total Nuclear organization

  16. Training by simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelini, E.

    1984-12-01

    Effective training by simulation is a matter of 1. accurate definition of the training need, 2. selecting the right hardware/software package to do the job cost effectively, 3. careful, methodical building of the training program and 4. an appropriate setting, such as a well-equipped training center. Several points seem clear: 1. ''Computer shock'' or computer phobia -- that is, fear of the simulator, can be a factor with some of the older operators. But it quickly disappears once they're into the program, and learn the versatility and the exciting dynamics of simulators. 2. Operator training is becoming more sophisticated throughout the HPI. Among other things, operators should get out into the plant to learn more about how their actions in the control room impact the plant. Operators are becoming more ''big picture'' oriented. 3. When inexperienced training instructors are used, they should attend a good ''train the trainer'' course emphasizing platform skills and instructional technology. 4. Operators need as much ''hands on'' experience with the plant's actual operating equipment as possible. The cognitive ''linkage'' between that equipment and what they see on the CRT is vitally important.

  17. Automatically controlled training systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milashenko, A.; Afanasiev, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that the computer system for NPP personnel training was developed for training centers in the Soviet Union. The system should be considered as the first step in training, taking into account that further steps are to be devoted to part-task and full scope simulator training. The training room consists of 8-12 IBM PC/AT personal computers combined into a network. A trainee accesses the system in a dialor manner. Software enables the instructor to determine the trainee's progress in different subjects of the program. The quality of any trainee preparedness may be evaluated by Knowledge Control operation. Simplified dynamic models are adopted for separate areas of the program. For example, the system of neutron flux monitoring has a dedicated model. Currently, training, requalification and support of professional qualifications of nuclear power plant operators is being emphasized. A significant number of emergency situations during work are occurring due to operator errors. Based on data from September-October 1989, more than half of all unplanned drops in power and stoppages of power plants were due to operator error. As a comparison, problems due to equipment malfunction accounted for no more than a third of the total. The role of personnel, especially of the operators, is significant during normal operations, since energy production costs as well as losses are influenced by the capability of the staff. These facts all point to the importance of quality training of personnel

  18. Training induced cortical plasticity compared between three tongue training paradigms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Jim

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different training types and secondary to test gender differences on the training-related cortical plasticity induced by three different tongue training paradigms: 1. Therapeutic tongue exercises (TTE), 2. Playing computer games......) (control) were established using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) at three time-points: (1) before tongue training, (2) immediately after training, (3) 1 h after training. Subject-based reports of motivation, fun, pain and fatigue were evaluated on 0-10 numerical rating scales (NRS) after training....... The resting motor thresholds of tongue MEPs were lowered by training with TDS and TPT (Ptraining with TDS and TPT (P

  19. 9 CFR 113.113 - Autogenous biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... cultures of microorganisms which have been inactivated and are nontoxic. Such products shall be prepared... relationship, Provided, That, such products may be prepared for use under the direction of a person of... affecting such animals. (1) More than one microorganism isolated from the same herd may be used as seed. (2...

  20. Identification of microcracks caused by autogenous shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Guang, Ye

    2005-01-01

    allows detection of microcracks while avoiding artifacts induced by unwanted restraint, drying or temperature variations. The technique consists of casting small circular cylindrical samples of cement pastes in silicone moulds. Steel rods of different diameters are cast into the cement paste to restrain...

  1. Autogenous Deformation and Internal Curing of Concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lura, P.

    2003-01-01

    High-performance concrete (HPC) is generally characterized by a low water/binder ratio and by silica-fume addition, which guarantee a low porosity and a discontinuous capillary pore structure of the cement paste. Modern concretes possess some highly advantageous properties compared to traditional

  2. Reactor Physics Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, P.

    2007-01-01

    University courses in nuclear reactor physics at the universities consist of a theoretical description of the physics and technology of nuclear reactors. In order to demonstrate the basic concepts in reactor physics, training exercises in nuclear reactor installations are also desirable. Since the number of reactor facilities is however strongly decreasing in Europe, it becomes difficult to offer to students a means for demonstrating the basic concepts in reactor physics by performing training exercises in nuclear installations. Universities do not generally possess the capabilities for performing training exercises. Therefore, SCK-CEN offers universities the possibility to perform (on a commercial basis) training exercises at its infrastructure consisting of two research reactors (BR1 and VENUS). Besides the organisation of training exercises in the framework of university courses, SCK-CEN also organizes theoretical courses in reactor physics for the education and training of nuclear reactor operators. It is indeed a very important subject to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. In this framework, an understanding of the fundamental principles of nuclear reactor physics is also necessary for reactor operators. Therefore, the organisation of a basic Nuclear reactor physics course at the level of reactor operators in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The objectives this activity are: (1) to provide training and education activities in reactor physics for university students and (2) to organise courses in nuclear reactor physics for reactor operators

  3. Nuclear Manpower Training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, B. J.; Han, K. W.; Lee, H. Y. and others

    2006-01-15

    Through the project on nuclear human resources development in 2005, the Nuclear Training Center of KAERI has provided 67 nuclear education and training courses for 3,658 persons from the domestic nuclear related organizations such as Government Agencies, nuclear industries, R and D institutes, universities, and public as well as from IAEA Member States. In addition, 6 students (MS and Ph D.) have taken nuclear technology related courses offered by UST-KAERI. The project has developed 8 programs and 12 courses. They includes programs for IAEA training, bilateral education and training, and in-house training as well as courses dealing with maintenance of nuclear power plants and management of electricity generation, thermal-hydraulics nuclear hydrogen, nuclear safeguards, radiation emergency preparedness and etc. National and international cooperation has been promoted. For ANENT, test operation, data loading and revision of the web-portal have been undertaken. Also the web-portal operation system has been established. For FNCA, NTC has cooperated for the establishment of a model of human resource development and the exchange of information/materials. With WNU, the NTC has made an effort for hosting 2007 WNU Summer Institute. The infrastructure for nuclear education and training has been strengthened. Basic directions for providing the customers with better service, This includes showing kindness to the customer, renovation of the interior of training facilities, and upgrading of web-based management system for learning and using facilities of NTC. Other efforts have resulted in the publication of 25 course materials (10 for international courses and 15 for national courses), and the improvement of education and training equipment. The International Nuclear Training and Education Center (INTEC), which was opened in 2002, has hosted 296 international and domestic events in 2005.

  4. 38 CFR 21.4265 - Practical training approved as institutional training or on-job training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... approved as institutional training or on-job training. 21.4265 Section 21.4265 Pensions, Bonuses, and... training or on-job training. (a) Medical-dental internships and residencies. (1) Medical residencies (other...) of this section. If the course is not so accredited such practical or on-the-job training or...

  5. Academic Training: 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    1st Term - 01 October to 17 December 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME New Trends in Fusion Research by A. Fasoli, EPFL, Lausanne, CH 11, 12, 13 October Physics at e+e- linear collider by K. Desch, DESY, Hamburg, D 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Standard Model by R. Barbieri, CERN-PH-TH 6, 7, 8, 9 10 December The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  6. CERN Technical Training : Vista !

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Are you running Vista on your new PC – or are you planning to install it? The Technical Training service is organizing a half-day training course on the new features of the VISTA operating system. This course introduces the new interfaces and presents the new functionalities for people who are experienced in the use of Windows XP. The next bilingual session of this course will take place on 30 January 2009. Register using our catalogue: http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9 or contact us with your questions/comments at mailto:Technical.Training@cern.ch

  7. [Dichoptic training for amblyopia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, M

    2016-04-01

    Dichoptic training is a promising new therapeutic approach to amblyopia, which employs simultaneous and separate stimulation of both eyes (thus dichoptic). The contrast for the good eye is reduced thus aiming at a balance with the amblyopic eye. In contrast to monocular patching, binocular vision is trained by video game tasks that can only be solved binocularly. To date the average gain in visual acuity achieved in currently available studies is only 0.20 ± 0.07 logMAR and is not significantly better than competing treatment options. This article explains the basic approach of dichoptic training, summarizes pertinent studies, names unsolved problems and closes with a personal critical assessment.

  8. Training in radiopharmacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savio, E.; Zeledon, P.; Rey, A.; Fornaro, L.; Ures, C.; Balter, H.; Monterio, N.; Apuy, J.; Padhy, A.

    2003-01-01

    The importance of having a professional with suitable training in Radiopharmacy to be responsible of a Radiopharmacy Unit in a Nuclear Medicine Service was the reason of promoting a Radiopharmacy Specialisation. With the coordination of the Radiochemistry Laboratory this training is giving by three Schools of the University: Chemistry and Pharmacy School, Sciences School and Medicine School (through the participation of the University Hospital). The training, which takes place during six months with full dedication enables the professional to implement Good Radiopharmaceutical Practice in a Nuclear Medicine Service, and to manage with diagnostic and therapeutic protocols

  9. Space Age Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Teledyne Brown developed a computer-based interactive multimedia training system for use with the Crystal Growth Furnace in the U.S. Microgravity Laboratory-2 mission on the Space Shuttle. Teledyne Brown commercialized the system and customized it for PPG Industries Aircraft Products. The system challenges learners with role-playing scenarios and software-driven simulations engaging all the senses using text, video, animation, voice, sounds and music. The transfer of this technology to commercial industrial process training has resulted in significant improvements in effectiveness, standardization, and quality control, as well as cost reductions over the usual classroom and on-the- job training approaches.

  10. Auditory Integration Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jafari

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Auditory integration training (AIT is a hearing enhancement training process for sensory input anomalies found in individuals with autism, attention deficit hyperactive disorder, dyslexia, hyperactivity, learning disability, language impairments, pervasive developmental disorder, central auditory processing disorder, attention deficit disorder, depressin, and hyperacute hearing. AIT, recently introduced in the United States, and has received much notice of late following the release of The Sound of a Moracle, by Annabel Stehli. In her book, Mrs. Stehli describes before and after auditory integration training experiences with her daughter, who was diagnosed at age four as having autism.

  11. Review: Auditory Integration Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ja'fari

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory integration training (AIT is a hearing enhancement training process for sensory input anomalies found in individuals with autism, attention deficit hyperactive disorder, dyslexia, hyperactivity, learning disability, language impairments, pervasive developmental disorder, central auditory processing disorder, attention deficit disorder, depression, and hyper acute hearing. AIT, recently introduced in the United States, and has received much notice of late following the release of the sound of a miracle, by Annabel Stehli. In her book, Mrs. Stehli describes before and after auditory integration training experiences with her daughter, who was diagnosed at age four as having autism.

  12. Nuclear security officer training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, W.F.

    1981-01-01

    Training has become complex and precise in today's world of critical review and responsibility. Entrusted to a security officer is the success or demise of large business. In more critical environments the security officer is entrusted with the monitoring and protection of life sensitive systems and devices. The awareness of this high visibility training requirement has been addressed by a limited few. Those involved in the nuclear power industry through dedication and commitment to the American public have without a doubt become leading pioneers in demanding training excellence

  13. Safety training priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, N. A.; Ruck, H. W.

    1984-04-01

    The Air Force is interested in identifying potentially hazardous tasks and prevention of accidents. This effort proposes four methods for determining safety training priorities for job tasks in three enlisted specialties. These methods can be used to design training aimed at avoiding loss of people, time, materials, and money associated with on-the-job accidents. Job tasks performed by airmen were measured using task and job factor ratings. Combining accident reports and job inventories, subject-matter experts identified tasks associated with accidents over a 3-year period. Applying correlational, multiple regression, and cost-benefit analysis, four methods were developed for ordering hazardous tasks to determine safety training priorities.

  14. CERN Technical Training : Vista !

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    Are you running Vista on your new PC – or are planning to install it? The Technical Training service is organizing a half-day training course on the new features of the VISTA operating system. This course introduces the new interfaces and presents the new functionalities for people who are experienced in the use of Windows XP. The next bilingual sessions of this course will take place on 12 December 2008 and 30 January 2009. Register using our catalogue: http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9 or contact us with your questions/comments at Technical.Training@cern.ch

  15. CERN Technical Training : Vista !

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    You are running Vista on your new PC – or are planning to install it? The Technical Training service is organizing a half-day training course on the new features of the VISTA operating system. This course introduces the new interfaces and presents the new functionalities for people who are experienced in the use of Windows XP. The next bilingual sessions of this course will take place on 12 December 2008 and 30 January 2009. Register using our catalogue: http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9 or contact us with your questions/comments at mailto:Technical.Training@cern.ch

  16. CERN Technical Training : Vista !

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    Are you running Vista on your new PC – or are you planning to install it? The Technical Training service is organizing a half-day training course on the new features of the VISTA operating system. This course introduces the new interfaces and presents the new functionalities for people who are experienced in the use of Windows XP. The next bilingual sessions of this course will take place on 12 December 2008 and 30 January 2009. Register using our catalogue: http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9 or contact us with your questions/comments at mailto:Technical.Training@cern.ch

  17. CERN Technical Training : Vista !

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    You are running Vista on your new PC – or are planning to install it? The Technical Training service is organizing a half-day training on the new features of the VISTA operating system. This course introduces the new interfaces and presents the new functionalities for people who are experienced using Windows XP. The next bilingual sessions of this course will take place on December 12, 2008 and January 30, 2009. Register using our catalogue : http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9 or contact us with your questions/comments at Technical.Training@cern.ch

  18. Cooperation in regional nuclear training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newstead, C.M.; Lee, D.S.; Spitalnik, J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the nuclear training currently being undertaken in the countries of the co-authors, and considers the degree to which training problems are amenable to common solutions such as cooperative regional training programs. Different types of cooperation are discussed including the development of regional and international training centers, cooperative bilateral and multilateral training, and the proposed US International Nuclear Safety Training Academy. The paper provides suggestions of ways for enhancing regional cooperation

  19. Corporate Training in Virtual Worlds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Nebolsky

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents virtual training worlds that are relatively low-cost distributed collaborative learning environments suitable for corporate training. A virtual training world allows a facilitator, experts and trainees communicating and acting in the virtual environment for practicing skills during collaborative problem solving. Using these environments is beneficial to both trainees and corporations. Two system prototypes – the sales training and the leadership training virtual worlds – are described. The leadership training course design is discussed in details.

  20. Khmelnitsky NPP personnel training system improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapronov, V.G.; Issupov, V.I.

    1996-01-01

    Khmelnitsky nuclear power plant personnel training system improvement is described, including creation of Training center, development of training courses based on SAT methodology, development of training hardware