WorldWideScience

Sample records for biofeedback psychology

  1. Biofeedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a health condition or physical performance. Types of biofeedback Your therapist might use several different biofeedback methods. ... reading can prompt you to begin relaxation techniques. Biofeedback devices You can receive biofeedback training in physical ...

  2. Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback Intervention for Reduction of Psychological Stress During the Early Postpartum Period

    OpenAIRE

    Kudo, Naoko; Shinohara, Hitomi; KODAMA, Hideya

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback intervention for reduction of psychological stress in women in the early postpartum period. On postpartum day 4, 55 healthy subjects received a brief explanation about HRV biofeedback using a portable device. Among them, 25 mothers who agreed to implement HRV biofeedback at home were grouped as the biofeedback group, and other 30 mothers were grouped as the control group. At 1 month postpartum, there was a signi...

  3. Heart rate variability biofeedback intervention for reduction of psychological stress during the early postpartum period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Naoko; Shinohara, Hitomi; Kodama, Hideya

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback intervention for reduction of psychological stress in women in the early postpartum period. On postpartum day 4, 55 healthy subjects received a brief explanation about HRV biofeedback using a portable device. Among them, 25 mothers who agreed to implement HRV biofeedback at home were grouped as the biofeedback group, and other 30 mothers were grouped as the control group. At 1 month postpartum, there was a significant decrease in total Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale score (P biofeedback group; this change was brought about mainly by decreases in items related to anxiety or difficulty sleeping. There was also a significant increase in standard deviation of the normal heartbeat interval (P biofeedback group after adjusting for potential covariates. In conclusion, postpartum women who implemented HRV biofeedback after delivery were relatively free from anxiety and complained less of difficulties sleeping at 1 month postpartum. Although the positive effects of HRV biofeedback may be partly attributable to intervention effects, due to its clinical outcome, HRV biofeedback appears to be recommendable for many postpartum women as a feasible health-promoting measure after childbirth.

  4. Biofeedback in rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giggins, Oonagh M; Persson, Ulrik McCarthy; Caulfield, Brian

    2013-06-18

    This paper reviews the literature relating to the biofeedback used in physical rehabilitation. The biofeedback methods used in rehabilitation are based on biomechanical measurements and measurements of the physiological systems of the body. The physiological systems of the body which can be measured to provide biofeedback are the neuromuscular system, the respiratory system and the cardiovascular system. Neuromuscular biofeedback methods include electromyography (EMG) biofeedback and real-time ultrasound imaging (RTUS) biofeedback. EMG biofeedback is the most widely investigated method of biofeedback and appears to be effective in the treatment of many musculoskeletal conditions and in post cardiovascular accident (CVA) rehabilitation. RTUS biofeedback has been demonstrated effective in the treatment of low back pain (LBP) and pelvic floor muscle dysfunction. Cardiovascular biofeedback methods have been shown to be effective in the treatment of a number of health conditions such as hypertension, heart failure, asthma, fibromyalgia and even psychological disorders however a systematic review in this field has yet to be conducted. Similarly, the number of large scale studies examining the use of respiratory biofeedback in rehabilitation is limited. Measurements of movement, postural control and force output can be made using a number of different devices and used to deliver biomechanical biofeedback. Inertial based sensing biofeedback is the most widely researched biomechanical biofeedback method, with a number of studies showing it to be effective in improving measures of balance in a number of populations. Other types of biomechanical biofeedback include force plate systems, electrogoniometry, pressure biofeedback and camera based systems however the evidence for these is limited. Biofeedback is generally delivered using visual displays, acoustic or haptic signals, however more recently virtual reality (VR) or exergaming technology have been used as biofeedback

  5. [Biofeedback treatment for epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yoko

    2014-05-01

    Pharmacological treatment is the mainstay for the treatment of epilepsy. However concerns regarding long-term side effects of drugs are increasingly voiced. Behavioral treatments including biofeedback, represents an alternative management option for the control of epilepsy. Biofeedback is a non-invasive bio-behavioral procedure through which patients can learn to gain psychophysiological control over seizures. This article will first overview seizure precipitation from a psychological perspective, and then introduce three major biofeedback treatments. Sensory motor rhythm (SMR) and slow cortical potential(SCP) biofeedback uses electroencephalographic parameters and are categorized as neurofeedback. Electrodermal activity (EDA) biofeedback focuses on modulation of peripheral sympathetic tone. The neural mechanisms underlying biofeedback treatment will be discussed in relation to thalamo-cortical regulation(of neural excitability across brain networks).

  6. The effect of heart rate variability biofeedback on performance psychology of basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Maman; Garg, Kanupriya

    2012-06-01

    Coping with pressure and anxiety is an ineluctable demand of sports performance. Heart rate variability (HRV) Biofeedback (BFB) shall be used as a tool for self regulating physiological responses resulting in improved psycho physiological interactions. For further analysis, the present study has been designed to examine the relationship between anxiety and performance and also effectiveness of biofeedback protocol to create stress-eliciting situation in basketball players. Thirty basketball players of university level and above (both male and female) aged 18-28 years, who scored a minimum of 20 in state trait anxiety inventory, were randomly divided into three equal groups- Experimental (Biofeedback) group, Placebo group and Control (No Treatment) group. The BFB group received HRV BFB training for 10 consecutive days for 20 min that included breathing at individual's resonant frequency through a pacing stimulus; Placebo group was shown motivational video clips for 10 consecutive days for 10 min, whereas No Treatment Control group was not given any intervention. Two way repeated measure ANOVA was applied to analyze the differences within and between the groups. Anxiety, coping self-efficacy, heart rate variability, respiration rate, and performance (dribbling, passing and shooting) at session 1, 10 and 1 month follow up were statistically significant in each group along with interaction of group and time (p variable except performance. The results of the study support the idea that HRV BFB lowers the anxiety and thus there seems to be a potential association between HRV BFB and performance optimization.

  7. EEG biofeedback

    OpenAIRE

    Dvořáček, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Vznik EEG aktivity v mozku, rozdělení EEG vln podle frekvence, způsob měření EEG, přístroje pro měření EEG. Dále popis biofeedback metody, její možnosti a návrh biofeedback her. Popis zpracování naměřených EEG signálů. EEG generation, brain rhythms, methods of recording EEG, EEG recorder. Description of biofeedback, potentialities of biofeedback, proposal of biofeedback games. Description of processing measured EEG signals. B

  8. 运用生物反馈疗法对CCU患者实施心理干预%Application of biofeedback therapy on CCU patients undergoing psychological intervention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周永香; 张加荣

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the biofeedback therapy on CCU patients undergoing psychological intervention Methods Thirty patients in CCU were randomly divided into two groups, interventional group and control group, with fifteen patients in each group. The patients in the in-terventional group were given conventional mental nursing and therapies of biofeedback, while the patients in the control group were treated routinely. Comparison of evaluation differences of symptoms between the two groups was done in terms of SCL - 90 after one week. Results There were some significant differences in four factors of anxiety, fear, depression and interpersonal relationship. Conclusion The therapy of biofeedback can reduce the negative moods of CCU patients. It has practical significance in mental nursing of CCU patients.%目的 探讨生物反馈疗法对CCU监护患者的心理影响.方法 收集CCU监护患者30例,分为2组.干预组15例给予常规心理护理和生物反馈训练;对照组15例给予常规心理护理,1周后通过症状自评量表(SCL- 90)评定两组症状差异性.结果 干预组恐惧、焦虑、抑郁、人际关系4个项目的因子分均低于对照组.结论 对CCU监护患者实施生物反馈训练,能有效地降低患者的负性情绪,对CCU监护患者的心理护理具有实践意义.

  9. The effect of biofeedback training on patients with functional constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Meihong; Lin, Zheng; Lin, Lin; Zhang, Hongjie; Wang, Meihfeng

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this prospective quasi-experimental study was to explore the influence of biofeedback training on patients with functional constipation (FC). Changes in clinical symptoms, psychological status, quality of life, and autonomic nervous function in 21 FC patients before and after biofeedback training were investigated. The psychological status and quality of life were evaluated with the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS), and a Chinese version of the MOS 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey. Autonomic nervous function was assessed on the basis of heart rate variability recorded with a HANS-1000 autonomic nervous biofeedback apparatus. After a complete course of training (10 sessions), clinical symptoms were greatly improved (p biofeedback (p .05). We conclude that biofeedback training can improve clinical symptoms, psychological status, and quality of life in FC patients, but further research is needed to determine whether biofeedback training can improve the autonomic nervous function in FC patients.

  10. Clinical Observation on EEG Biofeedback combined with Psychological Treatment to Child Tic Disorder%生物反馈结合心理治疗儿童抽动障碍疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丹; 刘红英; 郭鑫

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨脑电生物反馈结合心理干预治疗儿童抽动障碍的疗效。方法对2012年1月-2014年8月我院儿童保健康复门诊的39例抽动障碍患儿进行脑电生物反馈和心理干预治疗,并采用耶鲁抽动症整体严重度量表(YGTSS)评分进行疗效评定。结果39例患儿经生物反馈结合心理治疗,显效12例,好转24例,无效3例,有效率达92.3%。结论脑电生物反馈结合心理干预是治疗儿童抽动障碍一种安全有效的治疗方法。%Objective To discuss the curative effect of EEG biofeedback combined with psychological treatment to 39 child tic disorder. Methods EEG biofeedback combined with psychological treatment was applied to children with tic disorder received by Children's health care and rehabilitation departments from Jan 2012 to Aug 2014, and therapeutic evaluation with YGTSS was made before and after the treatments. Result Among 39 children with EEG biofeedback combined with psychological treatment 12 cases were effective, 24 cases got better, 3 cases were of no effects, the total effective ratio was 92.3%.Conclusion EEG biofeedback combined with psychological treatment is a safe and effective method to cure child tic disorder.

  11. 心理护理结合生物反馈治疗在焦虑症康复中的疗效观察%The effect of psychological nursing combined with biofeedback therapy on anxiety disorders rehabilitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐朝英; 王从杰; 钱一平; 崔卫香

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore and compare the effects of psychological nursing combined with biofeedback therapy and alone biofeedback treatment on promoting the rehabilitation of patients with anxiety disorders. Methods To-taled of 60 cases of anxiety patients were randomized into the psychological care with biofeedback treatment observation group (30 cases) and biofeedback treatment control group (30 cases) . and observed for six weeks, respectively clini-cal efficacy was assessed by using the Hamilton Anxiety scale (HAMA) before treatment and after 2, 6 weeks. Results HAMA scores at 2, 6 weekends were significantly lower than those before treatment in observation group, while there was significant difference only at 6 weeks of treatment in the control group ( P 0. 05 ) . Conclusions Although two methods both have a significant effects on the treatment of anxiety disorders, the effects of psychological care combined with biofeed-back therapy on improving the recent anxiety were significantly superior to simple biofeedback therapy to relieve the pa-tient's symptoms of somatization, and enhanced clinical efficacy.%目的:比较与探讨心理护理结合生物反馈治疗与单纯生物反馈治疗两种方法在促进焦虑症患者康复中的效果。方法将入组的焦虑症患者按随机分组法分为心理护理结合生物反馈治疗观察组(30例)和单纯生物反馈治疗对照组(30例),观察6周,分别于治疗前及治疗后第2、6周采用汉密顿焦虑量表( HAMA)评定两组临床疗效。结果观察组治疗后第2、6周末HAMA评分均较治疗前显著下降( P0.05)。结论两组方法治疗焦虑症均有显著疗效,心理护理结合生物反馈治疗对近期焦虑情绪的改善效果明显优于单纯生物反馈治疗,减轻了患者的躯体化症状,增强了疗效。

  12. Incontinence Treatment: Biofeedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Lifestyle Changes Dietary Tips Medication Bowel Management Biofeedback Surgical Treatments Newer Treatment Options Tips on Finding ... Treatment Lifestyle Changes Dietary Tips Medication Bowel Management Biofeedback Surgical Treatments Newer Treatment Options Tips on Finding ...

  13. Biofeedback Therapy: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebert, Bryan

    1976-01-01

    In this paper the major therapeutic claims of biofeedback training and the respective methodologies used, are outlined, along with some of the research difficulties that are encountered in biofeedback training. (Author)

  14. Biofeedback: Its Uses in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Doris B.

    This paper begins by defining biofeedback and describing some of the major biofeedback machines. An historical perspective is provided of research literature on the relationship of biofeedback and learning. Biofeedback and relaxation are discussed and research is cited for the use of biofeedback techniques in relaxation training with children. Two…

  15. BIOFEEDBACK TRAINING AND TENSION-TYPE HEADACHE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šecić, Ana; Cvjeticanin, Timon; Kes, Vanja Bašić

    2016-03-01

    Biofeedback is a training method, which connects physiological and psychological processes in a person for the purposes of improving his/her physical, emotional, mental and spiritual health. In biofeedback treatment, an active role of the patient is stressed for him/her to be able to actively control the physiological and emotional processes. The aim of biofeedback is to improve the conscious control of the individual's involuntary physiological activity. Research has shown that biofeedback, either applied alone or in combination with other behavioral therapies (techniques), is an effective treatment for various medical and psychological disorders, from headache and hypertension to temporomandibular and attention deficit disorders. More than 90% of adults experience headache once a year, which makes headache one of the most common symptoms and diagnoses in medicine. Tension-type headaches occur in at least 40% of the population and their impact on the health insurance costs and diminished productivity is significant. Studies have shown that clinical biofeedback training is effective in treating headaches. Moreover, the authors stress the need for additional research and further development of methodology for this kind of research.

  16. Biofeedback: Infant asthma Biofeedback: asma infantil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Nombela

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available

    The present study is a revision of the different applications of biofeedback in infantile bronchial asthma. The technique may be used on its own (preferably in the motor area or in conjunction with other techniques such as hypnosis, relaxation, etc. However, it should be stated that previous work published in this field is difficult to interpret since results are inconclusive, it is, therefore, difficult to produce a scientific summary.

    KEY WORDS: Biofeedback; infantile asthma; respiratory biofeedback.

    Con este trabajo se pretende hacer una revisión sobre las distintas aplicaciones del biofeedback en el asma bronquial infantil, bien solo (preferentemente en el campo motriz o bien asociado a otras técnicas de hipnosis, relajación, etc. Aunque es necesario manifestar que la producción científica relacionada con el tema, hace que tenga una difícil valoración dado que sus resultados son no concluyentes y discutibles, lo cual dificulta la elaboración de un resumen científico.
    PALABRAS CLAVE: Biofeedback; asma infantil; biofeedback respiratorio

  17. [Biofeedback in psychomotor training. Electrophysiological bases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazanova, O M; Mernaia, E M; Shtark, M B

    2008-05-01

    Comparison of influence of usual musical practice and the same trainings but using biofeedback on electrophysiological and psychological markers of optimal psychomotor functioning in 39 students-musicians revealed that the obvious musical practice caused psychomotor pressure in most students (with initially low individual alpha peak frequency), whereas similar practice combined with an individualized session of alpha-EEG/EMG biofeedback was accompanied by increase of alpha-activity in all examinees and a decrease (reduction) of integrated EMG that indicated reaching of optimal psychomotor functioning. It appears that the psychomotor learning ability depends on the baseline individual alpha-activity. Individual alpha peak frequency was associated with fluency and efficiency of psychomotor performance, individual alpha band width--with plasticity and creativity, individual amount of alpha suppression in response to opening eyes--with the level of selfactualization. These alpha activity EEG indices correlated with efficiency of the biofeedback training.

  18. Biofeedback as Intrapersonal Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandt, Fred E.; Beaver, Claude D.

    Any physiological process which can be monitored in some way may provide biofeedback, which can range from galvanic skin resistance to electroencephalograph (EEG) alpha feedback. Biofeedback techniques have several implications and applications for research in both intrapersonal and interpersonal communication. Both EEG alpha and electromyograph…

  19. Role of Biofeedback in Optimizing Psychomotor Performance in Sports

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Maman; Garg, Kanupriya; Singh Sandhu, Jaspal

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Biofeedback is an emerging tool to acquire and facilitate physiological and psychological domains of the human body like response time and concentration. Thus, the present study aims at determining the reconstitution of psychomotor and performance skills in basketball players through biofeedback training. Methods Basketball players (N=30) with different levels of expertise (university, state and national) aged 18-28 years (both male and female) were randomly divided into 3 equal group...

  20. The benefit of heart rate variability biofeedback and relaxation training in reducing trait anxiety†

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jieun; Kim, Jung K; Wachholtz, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Previous research studies have indicated that biofeedback treatment and relaxation techniques are effective in reducing psychological and physical symptoms (Hammond, 2005; Manzoni, G. M., Pagnini, F., Castelnuovo, G., & Molinari, E., 2008). However, dearth of studies has compared heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback treatment and relaxation training to reduce trait anxiety. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of HRV biofeedback treatment and relaxation training in redu...

  1. Prospective study of biofeedback retraining in patients with chronic idiopathic functional constipation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Wang; Mao-Hong Luo; Qing-Hui Qi; Zuo-Liang Dong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To determine the efficacy and long-term outcome of biofeedback treatment for chronic idiopathic constipation and to compare the efficacy of two modes of biofeedback (EMG-based and manometry-based biofeedback).METHODS: Fifty consecutive contactable patients included 8 cases of slow transit constipation, 36 cases of anorectic outlet obstruction and 6 cases of mixed constipation. Two modes of biofeedback were used for these 50 patients, 30 of whom had EMG-based biofeedback, and 20 had manometrybased biofeedback. Before treatment, a consultation and physical examination were done for all the patients, related information such as bowel function and gut transit time was documented, psychological test (symptom checkJist 90, SCL90)and anorectic physiological test and defecography were applied. After biofeedback management, all the patients were followed up. The Student′s t-test, chi-squared test and Logistic regression were used for statistical analysis.RESULTS: The period of following up ranged from 12 to 24months (Median 18 months). 70% of patients felt that biofeedback was helpful, and 62.5% of patients with constipation were improved. Clinical manifestations including straining, abdominal pain, bloating, were relieved, and less oral laxative was used. Spontaneous bowel frequency and psychological state were improved significantly after treatment. Patients with slow and normal transit, and those with and without paradoxical contraction of the anal sphincter on straining, benefited equally from the treatment. The psychological status rather than anorectal test could predict outcome. The efficacy of the two modes of biofeedback was similar without side effects.CONCLUSION: This study suggests that biofeedback has a long-term effect with no side effects, for the majority of patients with chronic idiopathic constipation unresponsive to traditional treatment. Pelvic floor abnormalities and transit time should not be the selection criteria for treatment.

  2. Biofeedback of heart rate variability and related physiology: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat, Amanda L; Larkin, Kevin T

    2010-09-01

    Low heart rate variability (HRV) characterizes several medical and psychological diseases. HRV biofeedback is a newly developed approach that may have some use for treating the array of disorders in which HRV is relatively low. This review critically appraises evidence for the effectiveness of HRV and related biofeedback across 14 studies in improving (1) HRV and baroreflex outcomes and (2) clinical outcomes. Results revealed that HRV biofeedback consistently effectuates acute improvements during biofeedback practice, whereas the presence of short-term and long-term carry-over effects is less clear. Some evidence suggests HRV biofeedback may result in long-term carry-over effects on baroreflex gain, which is an area most promising for future investigations. On the other hand, concerning clinical outcomes, there is ample evidence attesting to efficacy of HRV biofeedback. However, because clinical and physiological outcomes do not improve concurrently in all cases, the mechanism by which HRV biofeedback results in salutary effects in unclear. Considerations for the field in addressing shortcomings of the reviewed studies and advancing understanding of the way in which HRV biofeedback may improve physiological and clinical outcomes are offered in light of the reviewed evidence.

  3. Stress Management by Biofeedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    In the 1980's, Dr. Patrick Doyle served on a project to train U.S. astronauts at Johnson Space Center in biofeedback techniques to control anxiety and hypertension. Traditional biofeedback concepts were found to be too mundane, repetitive and boring, so Doyle developed Bio-Games with more interesting and involved formats. The first product, Bio-Ball, is an interactive, multimedia baseball video game that is played by relaxing in order to hit the ball. Gradually the player is able to relax at will, and with practice is able to apply the skills to real-life situations. Doyle has since gone on to create a number of biofeedback games marketed by Creative MultiMedia Inc. including Bio-Golf, Clutch City, and Pachyderm. Stress-busting screen savers are also being marketed under the Buddies series. In addition to being used in the corporate world, Bio-Games have been recognized by the Starbright Foundation which focuses on improving the total hospital environments of critically injured and chronically-ill children.

  4. Biofeedback: The Beat Goes On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kater, Donna; Spires, Jeanette

    1975-01-01

    This article reviews some of the research applications of biofeedback techniques and suggests how these may be of use in counseling. The goals toward which biofeedback can be used are increased self-awareness, integration of the individual, and the freedom to make choices regarding states of consciousness. (SJL)

  5. Biofeedback. Psychofysiologische en leertheoretische aspecten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Schelte Jan

    1978-01-01

    Het voornaamste uitgangspunt van deze studie was de gecompliceerdheid van biofeedback, waarin diverse psychologische en psychofysiologische processen een rol spelen. Het belang van theorie-ontwikkeling- ook ten behoeve van toepassingen van de biofeedback- werd uiteengezet en de nadruk lag dan ook op

  6. The effects of biofeedback training on clinical symptoms, psychological status and quality of life in patients with functional constipation%生物反馈训练对功能性便秘患者临床症状、心理状况和生活质量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱芬芬; 林征; 林琳; 王美峰; 周丽荣

    2010-01-01

    目的 探讨生物反馈训练对功能性便秘(FC)患者临床症状、心理状况和生活质量的影响.方法 对49例符合FC罗马Ⅲ标准的患者进行生物反馈训练,应用临床症状积分量表、Zung焦虑自评量表(SAS)、抑郁自评量表(SDS)、汉化版简明健康调查量表(SF-36)评定患者治疗前后的临床症状、心理状况和生活质量的综合改善情况.结果 生物反馈训练后,FC患者临床症状显著改善,临床症状积分量表中排便间隔天数、费力程度、排便不尽和坠胀感、粪便性状、腹胀评分及总积分均有显著降低(临床症状改善).SF-36量表的8个维度(总体健康、生理功能、生理职能、躯体疼痛、活力、社会功能、情感职能和精神健康)的评分均显著提高(生活质量改善).患者治疗后与治疗前相比,SAS量表评分(41.0±8.1比46.5±11.9)和SDS量表评分(44.0±8.2比51.2±11.5)亦显著降低(焦虑、抑郁状况改善).结论 生物反馈训练不仅能有效改善FC患者的临床症状,还可提高患者的生活质量和心理健康水平.%Objective To explore the effects of biofeedback training on clinical symptom,psychological state and quality of life in patients with functional constipation (FC).Methods Forty-nine patients with FC diagnosed by Rome Ⅲ were enrolled and received biofeedback training Bowel symptom measure, Zung's self-rating anxiety scale (SAS), self-rating depression scale (SDS) and Chinese version of the MOS 36-item short form healthy survey (SF-36) were recorded to assess the effects before and aftertreatment.Results After biofeedback training, clinical symptom of patients with FC was greatly improved:there was a very significant decrease in total and subscales scores of bowel symptom including spontaneous frequency of bowel movements, straining effort, sensation of anorectal obstruction/blockage, stool consistence and bloating.Patients with FC also improved their quality of life as well as

  7. Recent developments in biofeedback for neuromotor rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Jiping

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The original use of biofeedback to train single muscle activity in static positions or movement unrelated to function did not correlate well to motor function improvements in patients with central nervous system injuries. The concept of task-oriented repetitive training suggests that biofeedback therapy should be delivered during functionally related dynamic movement to optimize motor function improvement. Current, advanced technologies facilitate the design of novel biofeedback systems that possess diverse parameters, advanced cue display, and sophisticated control systems for use in task-oriented biofeedback. In light of these advancements, this article: (1 reviews early biofeedback studies and their conclusions; (2 presents recent developments in biofeedback technologies and their applications to task-oriented biofeedback interventions; and (3 discusses considerations regarding the therapeutic system design and the clinical application of task-oriented biofeedback therapy. This review should provide a framework to further broaden the application of task-oriented biofeedback therapy in neuromotor rehabilitation.

  8. Biofeedback therapy for dyssynergic defecation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giuseppe Chiarioni; Steve Heymen; William E Whitehead

    2006-01-01

    Dyssynergic defecation is one of the most common forms of functional constipation both in children and adults;it is defined by incomplete evacuation of fecal material from the rectum due to paradoxical contraction or failure to relax pelvic floor muscles when straining to defecate.This is believed to be a behavioral disorder because there are no associated morphological or neurological abnormalities, and consequently biofeedback training has been recommended for treatment. Biofeedback involves the use of pressure measurements or averaged electromyographic activity within the anal canal to teach patients how to relax pelvic floor muscles when straining to defecate. This is often combined with teaching the patient more appropriate techniques for straining (increasing intra-abdominal pressure) and having the patient practice defecating a water filled balloon. In adults, randomized controlled trials show that this form of biofeedback is more effective than laxatives, general muscle relaxation exercises (described as sham biofeedback), and drugs to relax skeletal muscles. Moreover, its effectiveness is specific to patients who have dyssynergic defecation and not slow transit constipation. However, in children, no clear superiority for biofeedback compared to laxatives has been demonstrated. Based on three randomized controlled studies in the last two years, biofeedback appears to be the preferred treatment for dyssynergic defecation in adults.

  9. A psychoengineering paradigm for the neurocognitive mechanisms of biofeedback and neurofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaume, A; Vialatte, A; Mora-Sánchez, A; Ramdani, C; Vialatte, F B

    2016-09-01

    We believe that the missing keystone to design effective and efficient biofeedback and neurofeedback protocols is a comprehensive model of the mechanisms of feedback learning. In this manuscript we review the learning models in behavioral, developmental and cognitive psychology, and derive a synthetic model of the psychological perspective on biofeedback. We afterwards review the neural correlates of feedback learning mechanisms, and present a general neuroscience model of biofeedback. We subsequently show how biomedical engineering principles can be applied to design efficient feedback protocols. We finally present an integrative psychoengineering model of the feedback learning processes, and provide new guidelines for the efficient design of biofeedback and neurofeedback protocols. We identify five key properties, (1) perceptibility=can the subject perceive the biosignal?, (2) autonomy=can the subject regulate by himself?, (3) mastery=degree of control over the biosignal, (4) motivation=rewards system of the biofeedback, and (5) learnability=possibility of learning. We conclude with guidelines for the investigation and promotion of these properties in biofeedback protocols.

  10. Biofeedback for psychiatric disorders: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenberg, P.L.; David, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Biofeedback potentially provides non-invasive, effective psychophysiological interventions for psychiatric disorders. The encompassing purpose of this review was to establish how biofeedback interventions have been used to treat select psychiatric disorders [anxiety, autistic spectrum disorders, dep

  11. Biofeedback in the treatment of heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravec, Christine S; McKee, Michael G

    2011-08-01

    Biofeedback is a method of training subjects to regulate their own physiology using feedback from physiologic sensors connected to an output display. Biofeedback-assisted stress management (BFSM) incorporates the physiologic signals with instructions on stress management. The goal of BFSM training is to give subjects the tools to control their own mental and physiologic reactions, leading to improved health and wellness. In cardiovascular disease, overactivation of the sympathetic component of the autonomic nervous system and psychologic stress together negatively affect quality of life and clinical status. BFSM targets both areas. We hypothesize that this intervention can be used in cardiovascular disease to improve clinical status and quality of life, as well as interfere with disease progression. We are conducting trials of BFSM in heart failure and stable coronary artery disease. Preliminary data suggest that use of BFSM by heart failure patients may actually cause cellular and molecular remodeling of the failing heart in the direction of normal. We are comparing the effects of BFSM with usual care in patients with stable coronary artery disease, testing the hypothesis that the intervention will decrease both sympathetic hyperarousal and activation of the inflammatory cascade. Since heart rate variability is abnormal in both cardiovascular disease and depression, and since BFSM has been successfully used to change heart rate variability, we also expect this intervention to have a positive impact on the depression that often accompanies cardiovascular disease.

  12. 21 CFR 882.5050 - Biofeedback device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Biofeedback device. 882.5050 Section 882.5050 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5050 Biofeedback device. (a) Identification. A biofeedback device is an instrument that provides a visual or auditory signal corresponding...

  13. Effectiveness of Alpha Biofeedback Therapy: Negative Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Charles G.; Herder, Joseph

    1980-01-01

    Assessed the utility of alpha biofeedback training in the treatment of patients (N=66). Biofeedback and placebo biofeedback groups were given alpha or mock-alpha training sessions. Improvement on 54 variables was compared to that of no-treatment controls. Only a chance number of significant changes appeared among the groups. (Author)

  14. Biofeedback and dance performance: a preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Joshua; Sajid, Imran; Parkinson, Lesley A; Gruzelier, John H

    2005-03-01

    Alpha-theta neurofeedback has been shown to produce professionally significant performance improvements in music students. The present study aimed to extend this work to a different performing art and compare alpha-theta neurofeedback with another form of biofeedback: heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback. Twenty-four ballroom and Latin dancers were randomly allocated to three groups, one receiving neurofeedback, one HRV biofeedback and one no intervention. Dance was assessed before and after training. Performance improvements were found in the biofeedback groups but not in the control group. Neurofeedback and HRV biofeedback benefited performance in different ways. A replication with larger sample sizes is required.

  15. Intervention of EMG Biofeedback to Biopsychological Markers and Psychological Markers of the Patient With Somatoform disorders%肌电生物反馈对躯体形式障碍的心理与生理指标的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭平; 郭华; 郭振宇; 贡永宁; 张华

    2012-01-01

      Objective:To investigate the EMG biofeedback therapy on somatoform disorders patients by observed the change of biological maker and psychological maker. Methods: 160 patients were randomly divided into two groups.All subjects were treated with drugs therapy.the 4-week treatment,the study group used the EMG biofeedback therapy ,the control group were treated with mimic biofeedback therapy;the use of the Symptom checklist 90(scl-90)assessed the officacy.Myoelectricity heart rate and blood presure were collected before and after desensitization therapy.Results:(1)Scl-90 score,two groups of comparison,4factor scores,than the pre-treatment has dedined significantly(p<0.05);two groups of comparison,the study group compared the control group,4 over the weekend of somatization and anxiety have decreased significantly ((p<0.01).(2)Myoelectricity:In the beginning has no significant difference,and after the treament there were significant difference between two groups((p<0.05).Conclusions: EMG biofeedback therapy treatment somatoform disorders effect quickly,it could relapse anxiety symptoms.%  目的:探讨肌电生物反馈对躯体形式障碍患者的生理和心理指标的影响.方法:将160例患者随机分为2组,在药物治疗的基础上,1组加生物反馈治疗,1组加模拟生物反馈治疗,治疗每天1次,治疗4周.采用症状自评量表(SCL-90)评定疗效,每次生物反馈治疗前后测额肌电值、心率、血压,以观察患者生理指标的变化.结果:(1) SCL-90评分,2组比较治疗4周末各因子分均较治疗前有显著下降(P<0.05);(2)额肌电值:入组时2组患者无显著性差异(P<0.05),治疗后2组患者肌电值差异具有统计学差异(P<0.01).结论:肌电生物反馈治疗躯体形式障碍起效快,可迅速缓解焦虑症状.

  16. Biofeedback for Better Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Biofeedtrac, Inc.'s Accommotrac Vision Trainer, invented by Dr. Joseph Trachtman, is based on vision research performed by Ames Research Center and a special optometer developed for the Ames program by Stanford Research Institute. In the United States, about 150 million people are myopes (nearsighted), who tend to overfocus when they look at distant objects causing blurry distant vision, or hyperopes (farsighted), whose vision blurs when they look at close objects because they tend to underfocus. The Accommotrac system is an optical/electronic system used by a doctor as an aid in teaching a patient how to contract and relax the ciliary body, the focusing muscle. The key is biofeedback, wherein the patient learns to control a bodily process or function he is not normally aware of. Trachtman claims a 90 percent success rate for correcting, improving or stopping focusing problems. The Vision Trainer has also proved effective in treating other eye problems such as eye oscillation, cross eyes, and lazy eye and in professional sports to improve athletes' peripheral vision and reaction time.

  17. Biofeedback for robotic gait rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colombo Gery

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development and increasing acceptance of rehabilitation robots as well as advances in technology allow new forms of therapy for patients with neurological disorders. Robot-assisted gait therapy can increase the training duration and the intensity for the patients while reducing the physical strain for the therapist. Optimal training effects during gait therapy generally depend on appropriate feedback about performance. Compared to manual treadmill therapy, there is a loss of physical interaction between therapist and patient with robotic gait retraining. Thus, it is difficult for the therapist to assess the necessary feedback and instructions. The aim of this study was to define a biofeedback system for a gait training robot and test its usability in subjects without neurological disorders. Methods To provide an overview of biofeedback and motivation methods applied in gait rehabilitation, previous publications and results from our own research are reviewed. A biofeedback method is presented showing how a rehabilitation robot can assess the patients' performance and deliver augmented feedback. For validation, three subjects without neurological disorders walked in a rehabilitation robot for treadmill training. Several training parameters, such as body weight support and treadmill speed, were varied to assess the robustness of the biofeedback calculation to confounding factors. Results The biofeedback values correlated well with the different activity levels of the subjects. Changes in body weight support and treadmill velocity had a minor effect on the biofeedback values. The synchronization of the robot and the treadmill affected the biofeedback values describing the stance phase. Conclusion Robot-aided assessment and feedback can extend and improve robot-aided training devices. The presented method estimates the patients' gait performance with the use of the robot's existing sensors, and displays the resulting biofeedback

  18. Biofeedback & Bowel Disorders: Teaching Yourself to Live without the Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Laxatives Tips on Finding a Doctor What is biofeedback? Biofeedback is a neuromuscular reeducation tool therapists can ... to coordinate two responses more effectively. How can biofeedback help? Bowel control is a bodily function that ...

  19. Biofeedback-Based Behavioral Treatment for Chronic Tinnitus: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Cornelia; Heinecke, Kristin; Rief, Winfried

    2008-01-01

    Many tinnitus sufferers believe that their tinnitus has an organic basis and thus seek medical rather than psychological treatments. Tinnitus has been found to be associated with negative appraisal, dysfunctional attention shift, and heightened psychophysiological arousal, so cognitive-behavioral interventions and biofeedback are commonly…

  20. Stress Inoculation through Cognitive and Biofeedback Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Cognitive and Biofeedback Training LCDR Joseph Cohn, PhD Gershon Weltman, PhD, Raj Ratwani, PhD Don Chartrand Office of Naval Research...This paper describes a new technology that blends cognitive training to anticipate the effects of stress with advanced biofeedback to mitigate...effects. These skills can be greatly enhanced by combining cognitive learning methodologies grounded in learning theory and biofeedback techniques

  1. Biofeedback and Performance: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    non-biofeedback meditation procedure; a single control was a group untrained in relaxation. It is not clear what instructions if any were given to...and extraneous muscle activity interferes with efficient acquisition of a psychomotor skill. Keeping in mind the effect noted by Sabourin and Rioux...of Neuroscience , 9, 175-183. Lutzenberger, W., Elbert, T. Rockstroh, B., and Birbaumer, N. (1982) Biofeed- back produced slow brain potentials and

  2. Heart Rate Variability (HRV biofeedback: A new training approach for operator’s performance enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auditya Purwandini Sutarto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The widespread implementation of advanced and complex systems requires predominantly operators’ cognitive functions and less importance of human manual control. On the other hand, most operators perform their cognitive functions below their peak cognitive capacity level due to fatigue, stress, and boredom. Thus, there is a need to improve their cognitive functions during work. The goal of this paper is to present a psychophysiology training approach derived from cardiovascular response named heart rate variability (HRV biofeedback. Description of resonant frequency biofeedback - a specific HRV training protocol - is discussed as well as its supported researches for the performance enhancement. HRV biofeedback training works by teaching people to recognize their involuntary HRV and to control patterns of this physiological response. The training is directed to increase HRV amplitude that promotes autonomic nervous system balance. This balance is associated with improved physiological functioning as well as psychological benefits. Most individuals can learn HRV biofeedback training easily which involves slowing the breathing rate (around six breaths/min to each individual’s resonant frequency at which the amplitude of HRV is maximized. Maximal control over HRV can be obtained in most people after approximately four sessions of training. Recent studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of HRV biofeedback to the improvement of some cognitive functions in both simulated and real industrial operators.

  3. Biofeedback and Communication: Perspectives and Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohm, C.E.; Goyer, R.S.

    This paper discusses the term "biofeedback" in its historical context and relates it to behavioral research in speech communication. The paper presents an operational model of the communication process, suggesting that biofeedback techniques might be used within the scope of the model to monitor, study, and ultimately modify an…

  4. EXPERIENCE OF BIOFEEDBACK IN CLINIC OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Dyakovich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofeedback in toxic encephalopathy in the late period chronic intoxication by mercury and complex toxic substances led to decrease in the EEG changes, performance improvement of the amplitude and latency evoked potentials, in vibration disease – to decrease manifestations of angiodystonia syndrome, recovery of neuromuscular conductivity. The effectiveness of biofeedback is confirmed by changes in subjective measures of the patients.

  5. Biofeedback for psychiatric disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberg, Poppy L A; David, Anthony S

    2014-06-01

    Biofeedback potentially provides non-invasive, effective psychophysiological interventions for psychiatric disorders. The encompassing purpose of this review was to establish how biofeedback interventions have been used to treat select psychiatric disorders [anxiety, autistic spectrum disorders, depression, dissociation, eating disorders, schizophrenia and psychoses] to date and provide a useful reference for consultation by clinicians and researchers planning to administer a biofeedback treatment. A systematic search of EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and WOK databases and hand searches in Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, and Journal of Neurotherapy, identified 227 articles; 63 of which are included within this review. Electroencephalographic neurofeedback constituted the most investigated modality (31.7%). Anxiety disorders were the most commonly treated (68.3%). Multi-modal biofeedback appeared most effective in significantly ameliorating symptoms, suggesting that targeting more than one physiological modality for bio-regulation increases therapeutic efficacy. Overall, 80.9% of articles reported some level of clinical amelioration related to biofeedback exposure, 65.0% to a statistically significant (p biofeedback interventions within mainstream psychiatry.

  6. Using music as a signal for biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, Ilias; Seinfeld, Sofia; Arroyo-Palacios, Jorge; Slater, Mel; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V

    2014-07-01

    Studies on the potential benefits of conveying biofeedback stimulus using a musical signal have appeared in recent years with the intent of harnessing the strong effects that music listening may have on subjects. While results are encouraging, the fundamental question has yet to be addressed, of how combined music and biofeedback compares to the already established use of either of these elements separately. This experiment, involving young adults (N = 24), compared the effectiveness at modulating participants' states of physiological arousal of each of the following conditions: A) listening to pre-recorded music, B) sonification biofeedback of the heart rate, and C) an algorithmically modulated musical feedback signal conveying the subject's heart rate. Our hypothesis was that each of the conditions (A), (B) and (C) would differ from the other two in the extent to which it enables participants to increase and decrease their state of physiological arousal, with (C) being more effective than (B), and both more than (A). Several physiological measures and qualitative responses were recorded and analyzed. Results show that using musical biofeedback allowed participants to modulate their state of physiological arousal at least equally well as sonification biofeedback, and much better than just listening to music, as reflected in their heart rate measurements, controlling for respiration-rate. Our findings indicate that the known effects of music in modulating arousal can therefore be beneficially harnessed when designing a biofeedback protocol.

  7. Biofeedback therapy for fecal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, D A; Hodges, K; Hershe, T; Jinich, H

    1980-10-01

    Operant conditioning offers a new therapeutic modality for fecal incontinence. Our experience with biofeedback therapy in six male and six female patients (ages 12-78 years) is presented. Incontinence was associated with a surgical procedure in six patients and with a medical condition in six patients. Rectosphincteric manometry was performed using a three balloon technic, with one balloon positioned in the rectum as a distending stimulus and the others at the internal and external sphinchters. Pressure responses to measured volumes of rectal distention were displayed on a polygraph. Rectosphincteric reflexes and sensory thresholds for rectal distention were determined. Patients were then encouraged to elevate sphinchter pressures while observing their manometric responses. Follow-up of 10-96 weeks showed ten patients had good responses, with complete continence in six patients. Nine of 10 responders required only one treatment session. Operant conditioning is a valuable technic in properly selected patients with an 80% probability of success.

  8. The effects of respiratory sinus arrhythmia biofeedback on heart rate variability and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Terri L; Samuelson, Kristin W; Muench, Frederick; Greenberg, Melanie A; Gevirtz, Richard N

    2009-06-01

    Recent studies have found a significant association between PTSD and low heart rate variability (HRV), a biomarker of autonomic dysregulation. Research indicates that respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) biofeedback increases HRV while reducing related pathological symptoms. This controlled pilot study compared RSA biofeedback to progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) as adjunctive interventions for 38 persons with PTSD symptoms in a residential treatment facility for a substance use disorder. Both groups were assessed at pre-intervention and 4-week post-intervention. Group x time interactions revealed significantly greater reductions in depressive symptoms and increases in HRV indices for the RSA group. Both groups significantly reduced PTSD and insomnia symptoms and a statistical trend was observed for reduced substance craving for the RSA group. Increases in HRV were significantly associated with PTSD symptom reduction. Overall, these results provide preliminary support for the efficacy of RSA biofeedback in improving physiological and psychological health for individuals with PTSD.

  9. Is a cognitive-behavioural biofeedback intervention useful to reduce injury risk in junior football players?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsson, Arne; Ivarsson, Andreas; Johnson, Urban

    2012-01-01

    Athletes participating in sport are exposed to a relatively high injury risk. Previous research has suggested that it could be possible to reduce sports injuries through psychological skills training. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which a cognitive behavioural biofeedback intervention could reduce the number of sports injuries in a sample of players in Swedish elite football high schools. Participants from four elite football high schools (16-19 years old) were divided into one experiment (n = 13) and one control group (n = 14). Participants were asked to complete three questionnaires to assess anxiety level (Sport Anxiety Scale), history of stressors (Life Event Scale for Collegiate Athletes) and coping skills (Athletic Coping Skills Inventory - 28) in a baseline measure. Mann-Whitney U-tests showed no significant differences in pre-intervention scores based on the questionnaires. The experimental group participated in a nine-week intervention period consisting of seven sessions, including: somatic relaxation, thought stopping, emotions/problem focused coping, goal setting, biofeedback training as well as keeping a critical incident diary. A Mann-Whitney U test showed no significant difference between the control and experimental group U (n1 = 13, n2 = 14) = 51.00, p = 0.054. However, considering the small sample, the statistical power (0.05 for present study), to detect effects was low. The results of the study are discussed from a psychological perspective and proposals for future research are given. Key pointsCognitive-behavioral training together with biofeedback training seems to be an effective strategy to decrease the occurrence of injuries.More intervention studies should be conducted applying existing biofeedback methodology, especially in the injury preventive area.Future research should develop a bio-psychological injury model aimed at predicting injury occurrence which describes the physiological stress responses and how they

  10. Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, Susan; Fouad, Nadya; Kagan, Jerome; Kosslyn, Stephen; Posner, Michael; Sternburg, Robert; Driscoll, Marcy; Ge, Xun; Parrish, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of psychology were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Susan Blackmore, Nadya Fouad, Jerome Kagan, Stephen Kosslyn, Michael Posner, and Robert Sternberg.…

  11. A smartphone based cardiac coherence biofeedback system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jonckheere, J; Ibarissene, I; Flocteil, M; Logier, R

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac coherence biofeedback training consist on slowing one's breathing to 0.1 Hz in order to simulate the baroreflex sensitivity and increase the respiratory sinus arrhythmia efficiency. Several studies have shown that these breathing exercises can constitute an efficient therapy in many clinical contexts like cardiovascular diseases, asthma, fibromyalgia or post-traumatic stress. Such a non-intrusive therapeutic solution needs to be performed on an 8 to 10 weeks period. Even if some heart rate variability based solutions exist, they presented some mobility constrain rendering these cardiac / respiratory control technologies more difficult to perform on a daily used. In this paper, we present a new simplified smartphone based solution allowing people to process efficient cardiac coherence biofeedback exercises. Based on photo-plethysmographic imaging through the smartphone camera, this sensor-less technology allows controlling cardiac coherence biofeedback exercises through a simplified heart rate variability algorithm.

  12. Transpersonal: The New Educational Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Thomas Bradford

    1974-01-01

    Transpersonal psychology deals with altered states of consciousness, man's impluse to higher states of being, psychic phenomena, biofeedback, and voluntary control of internal states. Argues that it will lead to new educational understandings and practices. Discusses some of those practices and understandings. (Author/JF)

  13. Pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation using biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Diane K

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle exercises have been recommended for urinary incontinence since first described by obstetrician gynecologist Dr. Arnold Kegel more than six decades ago. These exercises are performed to strengthen pelvic floor muscles, provide urethral support to prevent urine leakage, and suppress urgency. In clinical urology practice, expert clinicians also teach patients how to relax the muscle to improve bladder emptying and relieve pelvic pain caused by muscle spasm. When treating lower urinary tract symptoms, an exercise training program combined with biofeedback therapy has been recommended as first-line treatment. This article provides clinical application of pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation using biofeedback as a technique to enhance pelvic floor muscle training.

  14. Breaking the cycle: cognitive behavioral therapy and biofeedback training in a case of cyclic vomiting syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutsker, Barak; Konichezky, Andres; Gothelf, Doron

    2010-12-01

    The present article presents a case of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) along with heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback training for the treatment of a medication unresponsive 13-year-old boy with cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS). CVS is characterized by recurring stereotypic episodes of vomiting, interspersed with asymptomatic periods. Triggers for vomiting include anticipatory anxiety related to school examinations, family conflicts, and birthday parties as well as infectious diseases, and certain foods. Current treatment design addressed two pivotal etiological factors: autonomic dysregulation and anticipatory anxiety. Treatment outcome suggests that vomiting episodes may be successfully prevented by aiding the patient to identify and manage precipitant psychological stressors, to regulate HRV patterns, and gain a renewed sense of bodily control and self-efficacy. Further research is suggested using a controlled study with pre- and post-behavioral and stress measures to evaluate the effectiveness of CBT and biofeedback training compared to pharmacotherapy and placebo.

  15. The Response of Hyperkinesis to EMG Biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haight, Maryellen J.; And Others

    A study was conducted involving eight hyperkinetic males (11-15 years old) to determine if Ss receiving electromyography (EMG) biofeedback training would show a reduction in frontalis muscle tension, hyperactivity, and lability, and increases in self-esteem and visual and auditory attention span. Individual 45- and 30-minute relaxation exercises…

  16. Biofeedback-driven dialysis: where are we?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Antonio; Ferramosca, Emiliana; Mancini, Elena

    2008-01-01

    The progressive increase in the mean age and the growing conditions of co-morbidity, especially of cardiovascular pathologies and diabetes, have significantly worsened the patients' clinical status and tolerance to the hemodialysis (HD) treatment. On the other hand, the demand for short treatment times enhances the risk for hemodynamic instability as well as for inadequate depuration. The traditional management of the dialysis session, setting of predefined treatment parameters, with active therapeutic interventions only in the event of complications, is definitely unsuitable for short-lasting treatments, often complicated by hemodynamic instability, especially in critical patients. The first step to improve the management of the dialysis session is the utilization of continuous and uninvasive monitoring systems for hemodynamic or biochemical parameters involved in the dialysis quality. Special sensors for the continuous measurement of blood volume, blood temperature, blood pressure, heart rate, electrolytes, have been realized throughout the last 10 years. As a second step, some of these devices have been implemented in the dialysis instrumentation, mainly with a view to preventing cardiocirculatory instability but also to control the dialysis efficiency (biofeedback control systems). The basic components of a biofeedback system are: the plant, the sensors, the actuators and the controller. The plant is the biological process that we need to control, while the sensors are the devices used for measuring the output variables. The actuators are the working arms of the controller. The controller is the mathematical model that continuously sets the measured output variable against the reference input and modifies the actuators in order to reduce any discrepancies. Yet, in practice there are a number of conceptual, physical and technological difficulties to be overcome. In particular, the behavior of what is to be controlled may be non-linear and time-varying, with

  17. 生物反馈、放松内视心象法和音乐治疗相结合对鼻咽癌患者生活质量的影响%The effect of psychological intervention which biofeedback combine with relax therapy and music treatment on the quality of life and emotion in the patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温盛霖; 陶炯; 王厚亮; 杨安奎; 付剑华

    2009-01-01

    目的 研究生物反馈治疗、放松内视心象法和音乐治疗相结合对鼻咽癌病人的情绪和生活质量影响.方法 采用临床对照研究,随机将113例鼻咽癌患者分为干预组(62例)和对照组(51例),用世界卫生组织生存质量量表简表(WHOQOL-BREF)、焦虑自评量表(SAS)、抑郁自评量表(SDS)评定其干预前后的情绪和生存质量.结果 ①在干预后,干预组SAS标准分、SDS指数、精神情感症状、精神运动性障碍和抑郁心理障碍评分[分别为(44.23±7.53)分、(0.50±0.04)分、(3.01±0.87)分、(2.70±0.51)分、(17.00±1.88)分]显著低于对照组[分别为(48.36±6.77)分、(0.56±0.06)分、(3.90±1.31)分、(3.49±0.45)分、(18.07±2.11)分,P<0.05或0.01].干预组各项指标评分显著低于于预前(P<0.05).②在干预后,干预组生理领域、心理领域和生存质量总的感受评分显著高于对照组(P<0.01).结论 生物反馈治疗、放松内视心象法和音乐治疗相结合能有效改善鼻咽癌患者的焦虑抑郁情绪和生活质量,建议临床推广使用.%Objective To investigate the integration effect of psychological intervention which biofeedback combine with relax therapy and music treatment on quality of life( QOL)and emotion in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Method To use clinic control study, a total of 113 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were randomly grouped psychological intervention and control group. All participants completed pre-intervention and post-intervention measures and a 6-week follow-up questionnaire consisting of WHO quality of life questionnaire brief (WHOQOL-BREF)and SAS, SDS. Result ①After treatment, the scores of SAS, SDS, mental mood symptoms, mental motor disorder and depression disorder in the psychological therapy group (44. 23 ± 7. 53 ,0. 50 ± 0. 04, 3.01 ±0.87,2.70 ±0.51,17.00±1.88 respectively) were lower than those in control group(48. 36 ±6. 77,0. 56 ±0.06,3.90±1.31,3.49±0.45,18.07 ±2

  18. Biofeedback systems and adaptive control hemodialysis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Ahmad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available On-line monitoring devices to control functions such as volume, body temperature, and ultrafiltration, were considered more toys than real tools for routine clinical application. However, bio-feedback blood volume controlled hemodialysis (HD is now possible in routine dialysis, allowing the delivery of a more physiologically acceptable treatment. This system has proved to reduce the incidence of intra-HD hypotension episodes significantly. Ionic dialysance and the patient′s plasma conductivity can be calculated easily from on-line measurements at two different steps of dialysate conductivity. A bio-feedback system has been devised to calculate the patient′s plasma conductivity and modulate the conductivity of the dialysate continuously in order to achieve a desired end-dialysis patient plasma conductivity corresponding to a desired end-dialysis plasma sodium concentration. Another bio-feedback system can control the body tempe-rature by measuring it at the arterial and venous lines of the extra-corporeal circuit, and then modulating the dialysate temperature in order to stabilize the patients′ temperature at constant values that result in improved intra-HD cardiovascular stability. The module can also be used to quantify vascular access recirculation. Finally, the simultaneous computer control of ultrafiltration has proven the most effective means for automatic blood pressure stabilization during hemo-dialysis treatment. The application of fuzzy logic in the blood-pressure-guided biofeedback con-trol of ultrafiltration during hemodialysis is able to minimize HD-induced hypotension. In con-clusion, online monitoring and adaptive control of the patient during the dialysis session using the bio-feedback systems is expected to render the process of renal replacement therapy more physiological and less eventful.

  19. Biofeedback therapy in cardiovascular disease: rationale and research overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravec, Christine S

    2008-03-01

    Biofeedback has much therapeutic potential in cardiovascular diseases, since many of these diseases involve dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system. Studies have clearly demonstrated that patients can use biofeedback techniques to regulate the input of the autonomic nervous system to the heart, but the clinical utility of these techniques has not been well explored in systematic trials. Much biofeedback research to date has focused on patients with hypertension, but outcomes have been inconclusive. Preliminary studies suggest that heart rate variability biofeedback may be useful in improving symptoms and quality of life in patients with cardiac disease, and early studies suggest a possible effect of biofeedback on remodeling of the failing heart. Both of these areas require further research, however. Biofeedback is increasingly used as an adjunct to stress management in cardiac rehabilitation programs, providing the impetus for a large-scale, systematic study of self-regulation in cardiac disease.

  20. Magnifying the Scale of Visual Biofeedback Improves Posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehu, Deborah A; Thibault, Jérémie; Lajoie, Yves

    2016-06-01

    Biofeedback has been shown to minimize body sway during quiet standing. However, limited research has reported the optimal sensitivity parameters of visual biofeedback related to the center of pressure (COP) sway. Accordingly, 19 young adults (6 males; 13 females; aged 21.3 ± 2.5) stood with feet together and performed three visual biofeedback intensities [unmodified biofeedback (UMBF), BF magnified by 5 (BF5), BF magnified by 10 (BF10)], along with control trials with no biofeedback (NBF). The participants were instructed to stand as still as possible while minimizing the movements of the visual target. The findings revealed that UMBF produced significantly greater COP displacement in both the anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral directions, as well as greater standard deviation of the COP in the AP direction (p biofeedback should be given in order to improve postural control (i.e., BF5 or BF10).

  1. MP-1 biofeedback: luminous pattern stimulus versus acoustic biofeedback in age related macular degeneration (AMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vingolo, Enzo M; Salvatore, Serena; Limoli, Paolo G

    2013-03-01

    In this study we evaluated the efficacy of visual rehabilitation by means of two different types of biofeedback techniques in patients with age related macular degeneration (AMD). Thirty patients, bilaterally affected by AMD, were randomly divided in two groups: one group was treated with an acoustic biofeedback (AB group), the other was treated with luminous biofeedback of a black and white checkerboard flickering during the examination (LB group). All patients underwent a complete ophthalmological examination. Rehabilitation consisted of 12 training sessions of 10 min for each eye performed once a week for both groups. Both groups showed better visual performance after rehabilitation and luminous flickering biofeedback stimulus showed a statistically significant improvement in training the patients to modify their preferred retinal locus in comparison to acoustic biofeedback. This suggests that it might be possible in the damaged retina to override dead photoreceptor and outer retinal layers and involve residual surviving cells, as well as amplify and integrate retinal and brain cortex plasticity by using other spared channels towards associative pathways.

  2. The Effects of EEG Biofeedback Training on Hyperactive and/or Learning Disabled Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassel, Steve

    The literature review presents an explanation of biofeedback and a critical evaluation of the research pertaining to electroencephalographic (EEG) biofeedback training for the hyperactive and/or learning disabled child. Three hypotheses are examined: whether EEG biofeedback training is efficacious; whether EEG biofeedback training is more…

  3. An Introduction to Applications of Biofeedback Training in Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danskin, David G.; Lowenstein, Timothy J.

    Biofeedback is the use of sensitive detectors (instruments) with visual and auditory displays to reveal to an individual minute changes in his internal physiological functions. Biofeedback training with such instruments results in the ability to voluntarily regulate physiological functions formerly believed involuntary. These physiological…

  4. The Reliability of Single Subject Statistics for Biofeedback Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremner, Frederick J.; And Others

    To test the usefulness of single subject statistical designs for biofeedback, three experiments were conducted comparing biofeedback to meditation, and to a compound stimulus recognition task. In a statistical sense, this experimental design is best described as one experiment with two replications. The apparatus for each of the three experiments…

  5. Biofeedback therapy for chronic pelvic pain syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang-QunYE; DanCAI; Ru-ZhuLAN; Guang-HuiDU; Xiao-YiYUAN; ZhongCHEN; Yang-ZhiMA; You-MingHU; Gui-YunZENG

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of biofeedback therapy in patients with chronic pelvic pain syndrome(CPPS). Methods: From November 2001 to April 2002, patients visiting the Urological Outpatient Clinic of this Hospital were evaluated by means of the National Institute of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI)and classified by the NIH classification standard. Sixty-two patients of CPPS category Ⅲ were involved in this study. All patients had been treated by conventional approaches such as antibiotics and alpha-blockers for more than half a year without any improvement. The expressed prostatic secretion results were as follows: WBC 5 to 9/high power field, lipid +-+++ and bacterial culture negative. Their NIH-CPSI were 12-40. All the 62 cases complained of micturitional irritation (frequency, urgency, splitted stream and sense of residual urine), 32 cases, of pain or discomfort at the testicular, penile, scrotal, pelvic or rectal region and 13 cases, of white secretion-dripping. The patients were treated by the Urostym Biofeedback equipment (Laborie Co., Canada) 5 times a week for 2 weeks with a stimulus intensity of 15 mA-23 mA and duration of 20 minutes. Results: Sixty patients were significantly improved or cured, while no significant improvement in the remaining 2. No apparent side effect was observed. The NIH-CPSI dropped to 6 to 14 with an average reduction of 21 (P<0.01). In the 60 improved cases, pain was relieved after 2-3treatment courses and other symptoms disappeared after 4-5 courses. Conclusion: Biofeedback therapy is a safe and effective treatment for CPPS. Large randomized clinical trials are needed to confirm its efficacy and to explore the mechanism of action. ( Asian J Androl 2003 Jun; 5:155-158 )

  6. IS A COGNITIVE-BEHAVIOURAL BIOFEEDBACK INTERVENTION USEFUL TO REDUCE INJURY RISK IN JUNIOR FOOTBALL PLAYERS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Edvardsson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Athletes participating in sport are exposed to a relatively high injury risk. Previous research has suggested that it could be possible to reduce sports injuries through psychological skills training. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which a cognitive behavioural biofeedback intervention could reduce the number of sports injuries in a sample of players in Swedish elite football high schools. Participants from four elite football high schools (16-19 years old were divided into one experiment (n = 13 and one control group (n = 14. Participants were asked to complete three questionnaires to assess anxiety level (Sport Anxiety Scale, history of stressors (Life Event Scale for Collegiate Athletes and coping skills (Athletic Coping Skills Inventory - 28 in a baseline measure. Mann-Whitney U-tests showed no significant differences in pre-intervention scores based on the questionnaires. The experimental group participated in a nine-week intervention period consisting of seven sessions, including: somatic relaxation, thought stopping, emotions/problem focused coping, goal setting, biofeedback training as well as keeping a critical incident diary. A Mann-Whitney U test showed no significant difference between the control and experimental group U (n1 = 13, n2 = 14 = 51.00, p = 0.054. However, considering the small sample, the statistical power (0.05 for present study, to detect effects was low. The results of the study are discussed from a psychological perspective and proposals for future research are given

  7. Heart rate variability biofeedback improves cardiorespiratory resting function during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Masahito; Hayano, Junichiro; Oikawa, Leo O; Katsamanis, Maria; Lehrer, Paul

    2013-12-01

    The present study was designed to examine the effect of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback on the cardiorespiratory resting function during sleep in daily life. Forty-five healthy young adults were randomly assigned to one of three groups: HRV biofeedback, Autogenic Training(AT), and no-treatment control. Participants in the HRV biofeedback were instructed to use a handheld HRV biofeedback device before their habitual bedtime, those in the AT were asked to listen to an audiotaped instruction before bedtime,and those in the control were asked to engage in their habitual activity before bedtime. Pulse wave signal during sleep at their own residences was measured continuously with a wrist watch-type transdermal photoelectric sensor for three time points. Baseline data were collected on the first night of measurements, followed by two successive nights for HRV biofeedback, AT, or control. Cardiorespiratory resting function was assessed quantitatively as the amplitude of high frequency(HF) component of pulse rate variability, a surrogate measure of respiratory sinus arrhythmia. HF component increased during sleep in the HRV biofeedback group,although it remained unchanged in the AT and control groups. These results suggest that HRV biofeedback before sleep may improve cardiorespiratory resting function during sleep.

  8. Neurofeedback and biofeedback with 37 migraineurs: a clinical outcome study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lappin Martha S

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traditional peripheral biofeedback has grade A evidence for effectively treating migraines. Two newer forms of neurobiofeedback, EEG biofeedback and hemoencephalography biofeedback were combined with thermal handwarming biofeedback to treat 37 migraineurs in a clinical outpatient setting. Methods 37 migraine patients underwent an average of 40 neurofeedback sessions combined with thermal biofeedback in an outpatient biofeedback clinic. All patients were on at least one type of medication for migraine; preventive, abortive or rescue. Patients kept daily headache diaries a minimum of two weeks prior to treatment and throughout treatment showing symptom frequency, severity, duration and medications used. Treatments were conducted an average of three times weekly over an average span of 6 months. Headache diaries were examined after treatment and a formal interview was conducted. After an average of 14.5 months following treatment, a formal interview was conducted in order to ascertain duration of treatment effects. Results Of the 37 migraine patients treated, 26 patients or 70% experienced at least a 50% reduction in the frequency of their headaches which was sustained on average 14.5 months after treatments were discontinued. Conclusions All combined neuro and biofeedback interventions were effective in reducing the frequency of migraines with clients using medication resulting in a more favorable outcome (70% experiencing at least a 50% reduction in headaches than just medications alone (50% experience a 50% reduction and that the effect size of our study involving three different types of biofeedback for migraine (1.09 was more robust than effect size of combined studies on thermal biofeedback alone for migraine (.5. These non-invasive interventions may show promise for treating treatment-refractory migraine and for preventing the progression from episodic to chronic migraine.

  9. Biofeedback monitoring-devices for astronauts in space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotondo, G.; Pancheri, P.; Monesi, F.; Grantaliano, G.; DePascalis, V.

    After a reconsideration of the state-of-the-art in biofeedback research the implementation of biofeedback systems is envisioned as a countermeasure of stress for the psychoprophylaxis of the astronaut. A one-session experiment performed on two groups of subjects to assess the interference from EMG-feedback on the performance in a simultaneous psychomotor trial with a view to expanding biofeedback application is described. The results show that the experimental group performed in the same way as the control without feedback, but with less CNS activation. Some general conclusions are drawn from the advances in technology.

  10. Child trauma, attachment and biofeedback mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop-Jordanova, N; Zorcec, T

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between the quality of attachment in early infancy and the effects of child trauma, as well as to introduce some innovative therapeutic approaches. For this reason, a group of 10 children manifesting post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), diagnosed by ICD-10, was selected. The mean age of the patients was 9 +/- 3.05 years, from both sexes (girls 3, boys 7). Mothers and children were examined by a battery of psychometric instruments Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL), Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ), and State Anxiety Inventory (STAI). In addition to the classical psychotherapeutic methods (supportive, behaviour and play therapy), the multimodal computerised biofeedback technique was introduced for both assessment and therapy. The results for the children showed a high level of anxiety and stress, somatisation and behavioural problems (aggressivity, impulsivity, non-obedience, and nightmares), complemented by hypersensitive and depressive mothers and miss-attachment in the early period of infancy. Consequently, the explanation of the early predisposition to PTSD was related to be the non-developed Right Orbitofrontal Cortex-ROFC. The latter resulted from insecure attachment confirmed in all the children examined. The therapeutic results obtained with biofeedback techniques are very encouraging.

  11. Effect of biofeedback on the detection of deception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, H W

    1987-05-01

    This study examined the effect of audio electrodermal biofeedback training on the detection of deception. The subjects consisted of 68 volunteers enrolled in selected undergraduate college courses. Each subject was required to commit a mock murder, after which a polygraph examiner administered a series of five consecutive "lie detector" tests to ascertain the facts involved in his/her murder. Before testing, subjects were randomly assigned to either a biofeedback condition or to a control group. The detection efficiency associated with the subject's respiration responses was significantly enhanced by simultaneous auditory biofeedback given during the polygraph testing; however, the feedback's effect upon the detection rates associated with the electrodermal measures that it was reflecting was neither statistically significant nor in the same direction. The results support the premise that audio biofeedback might be useful in enhancing respiration's detection efficiency during polygraph testing.

  12. Resonant breathing biofeedback training for stress reduction among manufacturing operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutarto, Auditya Purwandini; Wahab, Muhammad Nubli Abdul; Zin, Nora Mat

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of resonant breathing biofeedback training for reducing stress among manufacturing operators. Resonant breathing biofeedback works by teaching people to recognize their involuntary heart rate variability and to control patterns of this physiological response. Thirty-six female operators from an electronic manufacturing factory were randomly assigned as the experimental group (n = 19) and the control group (n = 17). The participants of the intervention received 5 weekly sessions of biofeedback training. Physiological stress profiles and self-perceived depression, anxiety, and stress scale (DASS) were assessed at pre- and post-intervention. Results indicated that depression, anxiety, and stress significantly decreased after the training in the experimental group; they were supported by a significant increase in physiological measures. Overall, these results support the potential application of resonant biofeedback training to reduce negative emotional symptoms among industrial workers.

  13. Psychophysiological investigations in depersonalization disorder and effects of electrodermal biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberg, Poppy L A; Sierra, Mauricio; David, Anthony S

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies investigating depersonalization disorder (DPD) report a lower baseline skin conductance level (SCL) and attenuated skin conductance response (SCR) to emotive stimuli. We hypothesized that increasing physiological arousal levels via electrodermal biofeedback may ameliorate disembodiment and emotional numbing symptomatology. Real-time versus sham biofeedback yielded a significant SCL increase after just 3 real-time biofeedback sessions in healthy volunteers. Subsequently, a randomized controlled biofeedback trial was administered with DPD patients. Findings were not replicated as SCL tended to fall, curiously more substantially in the real-time condition, concomitant with increased low- and high-frequency heart rate variability. To further investigate abnormal autonomic regulation in DPD, we compared basal autonomic activity between patients and healthy volunteers and found the former to be significantly more labile, indexed by greater nonspecific SCRs and higher resting SCLs. Rather than low sympathetic arousal, DPD might be better characterized by abnormal autonomic regulation affecting emotional and physiological responsivity.

  14. DOES ELECTROMYOGRAPHY BIOFEEDBACK TRAINING REDUCE WORK-RELATED NECK PAIN?

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of Electromyography (EMG) biofeedback training in dental professionals to reduce upper trapezius muscle tension and thereby to reduce the work related neck pain. By reducing muscle activity in the neck and shoulder postural stabilizing muscles, EMG biofeedback training would be an effective mode of treatment in dental professionals for the management of work related neck pain. Subjects and Methods: This RCT included a total of 50...

  15. The role of EMG awareness in EMG biofeedback learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segreto, J

    1995-06-01

    Underlying most research on biofeedback learning is a theoretical model of the processes involved. The current study tested a prediction from the Awareness Model: High initial EMG awareness should facilitate response control during EMG biofeedback training. Seventy-two undergraduates were assessed for forehead EMG awareness by asking them to produce target responses from 1.0 to 5.0 microV every 15 s for 16 trials. Based on this assessment, two groups (high and low awareness) were trained for 64 trials to produce these target levels with either EMG biofeedback, practice (no feedback), or noncontingent EMG feedback. A transfer task was identical to the initial assessment. During training, the biofeedback group deviated less from target than the practice and noncontingent groups. The biofeedback group was the only group to improve from initial EMG awareness activity. During transfer, only the low awareness biofeedback group remained below initial EMG awareness level. These findings can be interpreted in terms of the Two-Process Model.

  16. Effectiveness of emWave biofeedback in improving heart rate variability reactivity to and recovery from stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whited, Amanda; Larkin, Kevin T; Whited, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    The current study examined the efficacy of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback using emWave, a publicly available biofeedback device, to determine whether training affected physiological tone and stress responses. Twenty-seven individuals aged 18-30 years were randomized to a treatment or no-treatment control group. Treatment participants underwent 4-8 sessions of emWave intervention, and all participants attended pre-treatment and post-treatment assessment sessions during which acute stressors were administered. Physiological data were collected at rest, during stress, and following stress. emWave treatment did not confer changes in tonic measures of HRV or in HRV recovery following stress. However, treatment participants exhibited higher parasympathetic responses (i.e., pNN50) during stress presentations at the post-treatment session than their control counterparts. No treatment effects were evident on self-reported measures of stress, psychological symptoms, or affect. Overall, results from the current study suggest that the emWave may confer some limited treatment effects by increasing HRV during exposure to stress. Additional development and testing of the emWave treatment protocol is necessary before it can be recommended for regular use in clinical settings, including the determination of what physiological changes are clinically meaningful during HRV biofeedback training.

  17. Learned cardiac control with heart rate biofeedback transfers to emotional reactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Peira

    Full Text Available Emotions involve subjective feelings, action tendencies and physiological reactions. Earlier findings suggest that biofeedback might provide a way to regulate the physiological components of emotions. The present study investigates if learned heart rate regulation with biofeedback transfers to emotional situations without biofeedback. First, participants learned to decrease heart rate using biofeedback. Then, inter-individual differences in the acquired skill predicted how well they could decrease heart rate reactivity when later exposed to negative arousing pictures without biofeedback. These findings suggest that (i short lasting biofeedback training improves heart rate regulation and (ii the learned ability transfers to emotion challenging situations without biofeedback. Thus, heart rate biofeedback training may enable regulation of bodily aspects of emotion also when feedback is not available.

  18. Learned cardiac control with heart rate biofeedback transfers to emotional reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peira, Nathalie; Pourtois, Gilles; Fredrikson, Mats

    2013-01-01

    Emotions involve subjective feelings, action tendencies and physiological reactions. Earlier findings suggest that biofeedback might provide a way to regulate the physiological components of emotions. The present study investigates if learned heart rate regulation with biofeedback transfers to emotional situations without biofeedback. First, participants learned to decrease heart rate using biofeedback. Then, inter-individual differences in the acquired skill predicted how well they could decrease heart rate reactivity when later exposed to negative arousing pictures without biofeedback. These findings suggest that (i) short lasting biofeedback training improves heart rate regulation and (ii) the learned ability transfers to emotion challenging situations without biofeedback. Thus, heart rate biofeedback training may enable regulation of bodily aspects of emotion also when feedback is not available.

  19. Relaxation training assisted by heart rate variability biofeedback: Implication for a military predeployment stress inoculation protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Gregory F; Hourani, Laurel; Tueller, Stephen; Kizakevich, Paul; Bryant, Stephanie; Weimer, Belinda; Strange, Laura

    2015-09-01

    Decreased heart rate variability (HRV) is associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms, but PTSD's effects on the autonomic stress response and the potential influence of HRV biofeedback in stress relaxation training on improving PTSD symptoms are not well understood. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of a predeployment stress inoculation training (PRESTINT) protocol on physiologic measures of HRV in a large sample of the military population randomly assigned to experimental HRV biofeedback-assisted relaxation training versus a control condition. PRESTINT altered the parasympathetic regulation of cardiac activity, with experimental subjects exhibiting greater HRV, that is, less arousal, during a posttraining combat simulation designed to heighten arousal. Autonomic reactivity was also found to be related to PTSD and self-reported use of mental health services. Future PRESTINT training could be appropriate for efficiently teaching self-help skills to reduce the psychological harm following trauma exposure by increasing the capacity for parasympathetically modulated reactions to stress and providing a coping tool (i.e., relaxation method) for use following a stressful situation.

  20. Physical activity, mindfulness meditation, or heart rate variability biofeedback for stress reduction: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwan, Judith Esi; de Vente, Wieke; Huizink, Anja C; Bögels, Susan M; de Bruin, Esther I

    2015-12-01

    In contemporary western societies stress is highly prevalent, therefore the need for stress-reducing methods is great. This randomized controlled trial compared the efficacy of self-help physical activity (PA), mindfulness meditation (MM), and heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) in reducing stress and its related symptoms. We randomly allocated 126 participants to PA, MM, or HRV-BF upon enrollment, of whom 76 agreed to participate. The interventions consisted of psycho-education and an introduction to the specific intervention techniques and 5 weeks of daily exercises at home. The PA exercises consisted of a vigorous-intensity activity of free choice. The MM exercises consisted of guided mindfulness meditation. The HRV-BF exercises consisted of slow breathing with a heart rate variability biofeedback device. Participants received daily reminders for their exercises and were contacted weekly to monitor their progress. They completed questionnaires prior to, directly after, and 6 weeks after the intervention. Results indicated an overall beneficial effect consisting of reduced stress, anxiety and depressive symptoms, and improved psychological well-being and sleep quality. No significant between-intervention effect was found, suggesting that PA, MM, and HRV-BF are equally effective in reducing stress and its related symptoms. These self-help interventions provide easily accessible help for people with stress complaints.

  1. DOES ELECTROMYOGRAPHY BIOFEEDBACK TRAINING REDUCE WORK-RELATED NECK PAIN?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Faisal.C.K

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of Electromyography (EMG biofeedback training in dental professionals to reduce upper trapezius muscle tension and thereby to reduce the work related neck pain. By reducing muscle activity in the neck and shoulder postural stabilizing muscles, EMG biofeedback training would be an effective mode of treatment in dental professionals for the management of work related neck pain. Subjects and Methods: This RCT included a total of 50 dental professionals (29 males and 21 females aged between 27-44 years (mean age of 36.4.They were randomly allocated equally into either experimental group who received EMG Biofeedback or the control group who received the conventional physiotherapy management. Patients in the control group were given Hot Packs, IFT and neck care advice. In addition to conventional Physiotherapy treatments, patients in the experimental group received an EMG Biofeedback training program for the bilateral trapezius. The treatments were given for 30-45 minutes/ day / 5 days in a week for 2 weeks. The outcome tools used were; Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and Neck Disability Scale (NDI and both were measured before starting the treatment and at end of 2 weeks. Results & Conclusion: Adding EMG biofeedback training for the trapezius muscles along with conventional physiotherapy management is found to be an effective method of treatment in the management of chronic non specific neck pain patients.

  2. Biofeedback of baroreflex sensitivity in patients with mild essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overhaus, Sabine; Rüddel, Heinz; Curio, Immo; Mussgay, Lutz; Scholz, O Berndt

    2003-01-01

    An attempt was made to reduce blood pressure by increasing the baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) via biofeedback. Six patients with mild essential hypertension and 5 normotensive participants were studied during 8 biofeedback sessions. Each session consisted of 5 trials, 5 min each. The first and the last trials served as baselines of heart rate, blood pressure, respiration, and BRS. During the 3 middle trials the BRS was calculated online using the sequencing technique. The resulting value was used as a visual analogue feedback signal. Participants were asked to increase BRS. The mean BRS was 8.3 [ms/mmHg] for the hypertensive patients and 12.2 [ms/mmHg] for the normotensive participants. During biofeedback trials as well as across sessions neither the hypertensive nor the normotensive group showed a statistically significant increase of BRS, only heart rate variability increased significantly. Contrary to expectation blood pressure increased in both groups. One hypertensive subject made significant progress during the training by performing valsalva maneuvers. The data show that BRS is reduced in hypertensive subjects. The increase of the heart rate variability could be a sign of the activation of the baroreflex although the BRS itself did not increase. Despite the successful technical and organizational implementation of this biofeedback approach, it was not effective to systematically reduce blood pressure. A further development in the direction of guiding the patient to use the valsalva breathing pattern and/or a prolonged duration of the biofeedback training might be promising.

  3. Controlling posture using a plantar pressure-based, tongue-placed tactile biofeedback system

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    The present paper introduces an original biofeedback system for improving human balance control, whose underlying principle consists in providing additional sensory information related to foot sole pressure distribution to the user through a tongue-placed tactile output device. To assess the effect of this biofeedback system on postural control during quiet standing, ten young healthy adults were asked to stand as immobile as possible with their eyes closed in two conditions of No-biofeedback and Biofeedback. Centre of foot pressure (CoP) displacements were recorded using a force platform. Results showed reduced CoP displacements in the Biofeedback relative to the No-biofeedback condition. The present findings evidenced the ability of the central nervous system to efficiently integrate an artificial plantar-based, tongue-placed tactile biofeedback for controlling control posture during quiet standing.

  4. A mathematical model for incorporating biofeedback into human postural control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersal Tulga

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biofeedback of body motion can serve as a balance aid and rehabilitation tool. To date, mathematical models considering the integration of biofeedback into postural control have represented this integration as a sensory addition and limited their application to a single degree-of-freedom representation of the body. This study has two objectives: 1 to develop a scalable method for incorporating biofeedback into postural control that is independent of the model’s degrees of freedom, how it handles sensory integration, and the modeling of its postural controller; and 2 to validate this new model using multidirectional perturbation experimental results. Methods Biofeedback was modeled as an additional torque to the postural controller torque. For validation, this biofeedback modeling approach was applied to a vibrotactile biofeedback device and incorporated into a two-link multibody model with full-state-feedback control that represents the dynamics of bipedal stance. Average response trajectories of body sway and center of pressure (COP to multidirectional surface perturbations of subjects with vestibular deficits were used for model parameterization and validation in multiple perturbation directions and for multiple display resolutions. The quality of fit was quantified using average error and cross-correlation values. Results The mean of the average errors across all tactor configurations and perturbations was 0.24° for body sway and 0.39 cm for COP. The mean of the cross-correlation value was 0.97 for both body sway and COP. Conclusions The biofeedback model developed in this study is capable of capturing experimental response trajectory shapes with low average errors and high cross-correlation values in both the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions for all perturbation directions and spatial resolution display configurations considered. The results validate that biofeedback can be modeled as an additional

  5. Study on the biofeedback effect and significance of getting qi in acupuncture%得气的生物反馈作用及意义的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谷忠悦; 马铁明

    2009-01-01

    本文介绍了生物反馈疗法的基本概念及针刺得气与生物反馈的关系.针刺得气作为医患之间可控的生物信息反馈的指标,符合生物反馈疗法的技术操作要求.得气对患者的心理和生理功能具有双重调节作用,在纠正患者认知错误方面有语言暗示和行为暗示的治疗效果.以得气为指标治疗心理性疾病既符合中医理论又具有现代医学研究成果支撑,丰富了生物反馈疗法的内容和手段,可促进针灸医学向生理-心理-社会医学模式发展.%In this paper, the basic concept of biofeedback therapy and the relationship between getting qi in acupuncture and biofeedback are introduced. Getting qi in acupuncture as a controllable index of biological information feedback between the physician and the patient, meets the requirement of technique manipulation for biofeedback therapy. Arrival of qi has double regulative effects on the psychological and physiological functions of the patient, and has the effectiveness of the language suggestion and behavior suggestion in correcting the error in cognition of the patient. To take getting qi as an index in treatment of mental disorders conforms to theories of traditional Chinese medicine and is supported by modern medical research achievements, enriching contents and ways of biofeedback therapy and facilitating the development of acupuncture medicine towards biological-psychological-social medicine model.

  6. Use of audio biofeedback to reduce tibial impact accelerations during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Claire M; Kipp, Kristof

    2014-05-07

    Visual biofeedback of tibial peak positive acceleration (PPA) during running has been used successfully as a method of gait retraining to reduce PPAs. Audio biofeedback generated from PPA may present a novel, portable alternative. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using PPA-generated audio biofeedback to reduce PPAs while running. Nine runners were fitted with a wireless accelerometer on their left tibia. PPAs were recorded and a custom LabVIEW program was used to emit a single beep once the PPA reached a preset threshold. The numerical difference between this threshold and peak PPA during running was scaled to the pitch of the beep, such that a foot strike with greater PPA would result in a beep with higher pitch. Subjects were then instructed to (1) run without any beeps, and/or (2) keep the pitch of the beep as low as possible. Subjects participated in a single testing session that included a five minute warm-up and two rounds of biofeedback, which consisted of five minutes of running with biofeedback followed by five minutes of running without biofeedback. Subjects were able to significantly reduce PPAs during exposure to audio biofeedback. In addition, two rounds of biofeedback were sufficient for subjects to retain a reduction in PPAs without biofeedback. PPA-generated audio biofeedback therefore appears to be a feasible method of gait retraining to reduce PPAs in runners.

  7. An Evaluation of a Visual Biofeedback Intervention in Dyslexic Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Elizabeth; Jackson, Georgina; Jackson, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    A prototype of a biofeedback system designed to treat dyslexia by improving heart-rate variability was evaluated in a single blind study of dyslexic adults. Treatment consisted of four 15 minute exposures to a visual display synchronized with either the participant's own cardiac cycle (intervention condition), or of a synthesized cardiac cycle…

  8. Characteristics of resonance in heart rate variability stimulated by biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaschillo, Evgeny G; Vaschillo, Bronya; Lehrer, Paul M

    2006-06-01

    As we previously reported, resonant frequency heart rate variability biofeedback increases baroreflex gain and peak expiratory flow in healthy individuals and has positive effects in treatment of asthma patients. Biofeedback readily produces large oscillations in heart rate, blood pressure, vascular tone, and pulse amplitude via paced breathing at the specific natural resonant frequency of the cardiovascular system for each individual. This paper describes how resonance properties of the cardiovascular system mediate the effects of heart rate variability biofeedback. There is evidence that resonant oscillations can train autonomic reflexes to provide therapeutic effect. The paper is based on studies described in previous papers. Here, we discuss the origin of the resonance phenomenon, describe our procedure for determining an individual's resonant frequency, and report data from 32 adult asthma patients and 24 healthy adult subjects, showing a negative relationship between resonant frequency and height, and a lower resonant frequency in men than women, but no relationship between resonant frequency and age, weight, or presence of asthma. Resonant frequency remains constant across 10 sessions of biofeedback training. It appears to be related to blood volume.

  9. Step-length biofeedback device for walk rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, R; Dupui, P; Pagès, B; Bessou, P

    1994-07-01

    A biofeedback gait training system for step length is proposed, adapted to the correction of spatial walking asymmetries by means of a simple, quick and reliable method for daily clinical use. The system is composed of a walkway and a gait analysis device (locometer) measuring the main temporal and distance factors of gait. The step length is imposed on the subject by lighted targets appearing on the walkway, alternately on the right and left side; the subject is asked to place a swinging foot on the lighted target. Feedback to the subject is supplied by direct visual information (the subject looking at the movement and the position of the foot with respect to the lighted target) and an acoustic signal delivered in real time when the length step error is greater than an allowed value. The method is validated on a population of hemiparetic patients who have suffered from a stroke and who have been reeducated with traditional rehabilitation methods. The patients were divided into two groups; one group following a gait training with biofeedback (BFB group) and one group following a gait training without biofeedback (reference group). Preliminary results are presented, showing a significant beneficial effect of the biofeedback method in increasing the step length of paretic limbs and in correcting step-length asymmetry.

  10. Direction of Attentional Focus in Biofeedback Treatment for /R/ Misarticulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister Byun, Tara; Swartz, Michelle T.; Halpin, Peter F.; Szeredi, Daniel; Maas, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Maintaining an external direction of focus during practice is reported to facilitate acquisition of non-speech motor skills, but it is not known whether these findings also apply to treatment for speech errors. This question has particular relevance for treatment incorporating visual biofeedback, where clinician cueing can direct the…

  11. The use of electromyogram biofeedback to reduce Trendelenburg gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrofsky, J S

    2001-09-01

    Ten subjects suffering from incomplete spinal cord injuries, clinically diagnosed as walking with Trendelenburg gait, underwent a 2 month therapy program to strengthen their muscles and reduce their gait abnormalities. Therapy involved muscle strengthening and gait training for 2 h a day, 5 days a week in a clinic. Biofeedback was also accomplished for 30 min each training day on all subjects. In addition, five of the subjects wore a two-channel electromyogram (EMG) biofeedback training device at home to see if neuromuscular re-education outside of the clinical setting could speed their recovery. The difference for these five subjects was that they would have continuous biofeedback therapy every time they walked and not biofeedback limited to only 30 min a day. Since weakness of the gluteus medius muscles is the prime contributor to Trendelenburg gait, the device provided warning tones giving feedback of improper gait through bilateral assessment of the use of the gluteus medius muscles. If too little gluteus medius activity was seen on the affected side or the step was too short in duration, the microprocessor provided an audio cue to the subjects alerting them to correct the deficit. Subjects only undergoing clinical therapy showed about a 50% reduction in hip drop due to therapy. However, the group that used the home training device showed almost normal gait after the 2 month period.

  12. Biofeedback and Counseling for Stress and Anxiety among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanasiripong, Paul; Sverduk, Kevin; Prince, Judy; Hayashino, Diane

    2012-01-01

    With the rise in stress and anxiety among college students, there is a need for more comprehensive and effective counseling options for counselors in college counseling centers. This study investigated the impact of using biofeedback and brief counseling in treating stress and anxiety in an ethnically diverse college student population. Results…

  13. Effectiveness of biofeedback therapy in patients with chronic constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Univaldo Etsuo Sagae

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of physical therapy in women diagnosed with chronic constipation using functional training of the pelvic floor (biofeedback. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From March 2009 to March 2010, 67 women with chronic constipation were prospectively evaluated. The patients were evaluated and the constipation score proposed by Agachan et al. was applied. Then, they were sent to biofeedback. These patients were divided into 2 groups: with anismus (group I: mean age of 46.90 years old and without anismus (group II: mean age of 44.89 years old and diagnosed by anorectal electromanometry. The treatment was performed with different exercises for each group, associated with some hygieno-dietetic directions. At the end of treatment, the constipation score was reapplied. RESULTS: Pre-biofeedback constipation score in group I was 15.04 (standard deviation - SD=2.48 and post-biofeedback constipation score was 3.39 (SD=1.62 (pOBJETIVO: Este trabalho objetivou avaliar o efeito do tratamento fisioterapêutico, em mulheres diagnosticadas com constipação crônica, utilizando treinamento funcional do assoalho pélvico (biofeedback. CASUÍSTICA E MÉTODO: No período de março de 2009 a março de 2010, foram avaliadas, prospectivamente, 67 mulheres com constipação intestinal. As pacientes foram avaliadas e o escore de constipação, proposto por Agachan et al., foi aplicado; então, foram encaminhadas ao biofeedback. Essas pacientes foram divididas em 2 grupos: com anismus (56 pacientes do grupo I: média de idade 46,90 anos e sem anismus (11 pacientes do grupo II: média de idade 44,89 anos, diagnosticadas pela eletromanometria anorretal. Para o tratamento, foram estipulados exercícios diferentes para cada grupo, associados com orientações higienodietéticas. Ao fim do tratamento, foi reaplicado o escore de constipação. RESULTADOS: O escore de constipação do grupo I, na avaliação pré-biofeedback, foi 15

  14. Improving Managers' Psychophysical Well-Being: Effectiveness of Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia Biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munafò, Marianna; Patron, Elisabetta; Palomba, Daniela

    2016-06-01

    High work stress has been consistently associated with disturbed autonomic balance, specifically, lowered vagal cardiac control and increased sympathetic activity, which may lead to increased cardiovascular risk. Stress management procedures have been proposed to reduce autonomic dysfunctions related to work stress in different categories of workers exposed to heightened work demands, while a limited number of studies addressed this issue in managers. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of a respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) biofeedback (BF) intervention on psychological and physiological outcomes, in managers with high-level work responsibilities. Thirty-one managers leading outstanding private or public companies were randomly assigned to either a RSA-BF training (RSA-BF; N = 16) or a control group (N = 15). The RSA-BF training consisted of five weekly 45 min sessions, designed to increase RSA, whereas controls had to provide a daily stress diary once a week. After the training, managers in both groups reported reduced heart rate at rest, lower anxiety levels and improvement in health-related quality of life. More importantly, managers in the RSA-BF group showed increased vagal control (as indexed by increased RSA), decreased sympathetic arousal (as indexed by reduced skin conductance and systolic blood pressure) and lower emotional interferences, compared to managers in the control group. Results from this study showed that RSA-BF training was effective in improving cardiac autonomic balance at rest. Moreover, findings from this study underline the effectiveness of biofeedback in reducing psychophysiological negative outcomes associated with stress in managers.

  15. Suitability of Smartphone Inertial Sensors for Real-Time Biofeedback Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Kos

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the suitability of smartphones with built-in inertial sensors for biofeedback applications. Biofeedback systems use various sensors to measure body functions and parameters. These sensor data are analyzed, and the results are communicated back to the user, who then tries to act on the feedback signals. Smartphone inertial sensors can be used to capture body movements in biomechanical biofeedback systems. These sensors exhibit various inaccuracies that induce significant angular and positional errors. We studied deterministic and random errors of smartphone accelerometers and gyroscopes, primarily focusing on their biases. Based on extensive measurements, we determined accelerometer and gyroscope noise models and bias variation ranges. Then, we compiled a table of predicted positional and angular errors under various biofeedback system operation conditions. We suggest several bias compensation options that are suitable for various examples of use in real-time biofeedback applications. Measurements within the developed experimental biofeedback application show that under certain conditions, even uncompensated sensors can be used for real-time biofeedback. For general use, especially for more demanding biofeedback applications, sensor biases should be compensated. We are convinced that real-time biofeedback systems based on smartphone inertial sensors are applicable to many similar examples in sports, healthcare, and other areas.

  16. Biofeedback to facilitate unassisted ventilation in individuals with high-level quadriplegia. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, S A

    1988-09-01

    The purpose of this case report is to discuss the effectiveness of electromyographic biofeedback in reeducating and strengthening the accessory breathing muscles in an individual with high-level (C1) complete quadriplegia. Six unassisted breathing sessions were performed with EMG biofeedback intervention. Six unassisted breathing sessions without EMG biofeedback intervention were also performed. In both conditions, the subject's vital capacity and the amount of time of unassisted ventilation were recorded. The study results indicated that EMG biofeedback may be a helpful modality in training accessory breathing muscles to enable an individual with high-level quadriplegia to become independent of mechanical ventilation for varying amounts of time.

  17. Suitability of Smartphone Inertial Sensors for Real-Time Biofeedback Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Anton; Tomažič, Sašo; Umek, Anton

    2016-02-27

    This article studies the suitability of smartphones with built-in inertial sensors for biofeedback applications. Biofeedback systems use various sensors to measure body functions and parameters. These sensor data are analyzed, and the results are communicated back to the user, who then tries to act on the feedback signals. Smartphone inertial sensors can be used to capture body movements in biomechanical biofeedback systems. These sensors exhibit various inaccuracies that induce significant angular and positional errors. We studied deterministic and random errors of smartphone accelerometers and gyroscopes, primarily focusing on their biases. Based on extensive measurements, we determined accelerometer and gyroscope noise models and bias variation ranges. Then, we compiled a table of predicted positional and angular errors under various biofeedback system operation conditions. We suggest several bias compensation options that are suitable for various examples of use in real-time biofeedback applications. Measurements within the developed experimental biofeedback application show that under certain conditions, even uncompensated sensors can be used for real-time biofeedback. For general use, especially for more demanding biofeedback applications, sensor biases should be compensated. We are convinced that real-time biofeedback systems based on smartphone inertial sensors are applicable to many similar examples in sports, healthcare, and other areas.

  18. Comparing the Efficacy of Biofeedback and Balloon-Assisted Training in the Treatment of Dyssynergic Defecation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbs Ali Pourmomeny

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dyssynergic defecation does not respond appropriately to routine treatments for constipation. Recently, research has shown that biofeedback therapy is useful in anorectal dyssynergia.

  19. Effect of visual biofeedback of posterior tongue movement on articulation rehabilitation in dysarthria patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, J; Shirahige, C; Oki, K; Oisaka, N; Kumakura, I; Tsubahara, A; Minagi, S

    2015-08-01

    Articulation is driven by various combinations of movements of the lip, tongue, soft palate, pharynx and larynx, where the tongue plays an especially important role. In patients with cerebrovascular disorder, lingual motor function is often affected, causing dysarthria. We aimed to evaluate the effect of visual biofeedback of posterior tongue movement on articulation rehabilitation in dysarthria patients with cerebrovascular disorder. Fifteen dysarthria patients (10 men and 5 women; mean age, 70.7 ± 10.3 years) agreed to participate in this study. A device for measuring the movement of the posterior part of the tongue was used for the visual biofeedback. Subjects were instructed to produce repetitive articulation of [ka] as fast and steadily as possible between a lungful with/without visual biofeedback. For both the unaffected and affected sides, the range of ascending and descending movement of the posterior tongue with visual biofeedback was significantly larger than that without visual biofeedback. The coefficient of variation for these movements with visual biofeedback was significantly smaller than that without visual biofeedback. With visual biofeedback, the range of ascent exhibited a significant and strong correlation with that of descent for both the unaffected and affected sides. The results of this study revealed that the use of visual biofeedback leads to prompt and preferable change in the movement of the posterior part of the tongue. From the standpoint of pursuing necessary rehabilitation for patients with attention and memory disorders, visualization of tongue movement would be of marked clinical benefit.

  20. Efficacy of Adaptive Biofeedback Training in Treating Constipation-Related Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofeedback therapy is a well-known and effective therapeutic treatment for constipation. A previous study suggested that adaptive biofeedback (ABF training was more effective than traditional (fixed training parameters biofeedback training. The aim of this study was to verify the effectiveness of ABF in relieving constipation-related symptoms. We noticed that in traditional biofeedback training, a patient usually receives the training twice per week. The long training sessions usually led to poor compliance. This study proposes an intensive biofeedback therapy and compares intensive therapy with nonintensive therapy in patients with constipation-related symptoms. Methods. 63 patients with constipation-related symptoms were treated with ABF between 2012 and 2013. These patients were further divided into the intensive therapy and nonintensive therapy groups. Results. A total of 63 patients were enrolled in the study, including 24 in the nonintensive therapy group and 39 in the intensive therapy group. 100% (N=21 of constipation patients achieved the primary efficacy endpoint (≥3 bowel movements/week. There was significant improvement in constipation-related symptoms after adaptive biofeedback. The intensive biofeedback therapy did not show better performance compared to nonintensive biofeedback therapy. Conclusions. This investigation provides support for the efficacy of biofeedback for constipation-related symptoms. The efficacy of intensive therapy is similar to nonintensive therapy.

  1. Recurrent abdominal pain, medical intervention, and biofeedback: what happened to the biopsychosocial model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Kevin S

    2006-06-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) is a significant and common problem among pediatric populations. Based on results from randomized controlled trials there are no established efficacious treatments for this disorder. Biofeedback (BFB) and other psychological treatments offer logically appealing alternatives or adjuncts to medical interventions and there is some evidence to support their use. This paper presents a typical case of RAP that exemplifies how the lack of integration of the biopsychosocial model may result in less than optimal treatment. Specifically, it demonstrates that the patient was exposed to potentially risky treatments that lack evidence to support their use and were not beneficial. Although there was evidence of psychological involvement early in the treatment, this was only attended to following numerous medical trials and exploratory surgery over three years. The patient was finally referred for BFB and during a course of seven sessions over five months that variously included heart rate variability and skin temperature feedback along with extensive home practice of paced breathing and hand warming the patient achieved significant symptom reduction and improved coping abilities. This case vividly illustrates the need for multidisciplinary collaboration and full implementation and integration of the biopsychosocial model of health and illness.

  2. Impact of EEG Biofeedback on Psychological Disorder Efficacy and Ability of Daily Living of Post-stroke%脑电生物反馈对脑卒中后心理障碍及日常生活能力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔燕; 元小冬; 申健; 张健; 孟令民; 邓宏亮; 吴丽清; 雷军; 王淑娟

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the intervention effect of EEG biofeedback treatment combined with antidepressant drugs to pa -tients with depression,anxiety,cognitive dysfunction after stroke and its impact on daily living of post -stroke.Methods As observed objects,90 patients with post -stroke depression and anxiety associated with cognitive dysfunction were randomly divided into control group and treatment group .Patients of the control group were given fluoxetine 20mg/d and the treatment group accepted further EEG bio-feedback therapy while in the application of fluoxetine.Hamilton Depression Scale(HAMD),Hamilton Anxiety Scale(HAMA),Mini Mental State Examination(MMSE) and Modified Barthel index(MBI) were respectively used to assess the degree of depression ,anxiety, cognitive function and the ability of ADL before treatment and after treatment for 4 weeks.Results After treatment,scores of HAMD, HAMA,MMSE and MBI in the treatment group were respectively (8.76 ±4.98ab),(7.02 ±2.82ab),(22.27 ±3.00ab) and(56.64 ± 11.99ab) while they were respectively(11.42 ±5.66a),(8.98 ±4.02a),(19.42 ±3.23a) and(49.13 ±10.48a) in the control group,there were significant differences between the two groups (P<0.05).The cure rate and effective rate were respectively 17.14%and 54.29%in the treatment group,while in the control group were 2.86%and 20.00%respectively.Conclusion The therapy of anti-depressant drugs combined with EEG biofeedback treatment can further relieve depression ,anxiety and cognitive function in stroke pa-tients.Because of relief of mentation ,the patients'ability of daily living has been improved .So the combination therapy should be widely applied.%目的:探讨脑电生物反馈联合抗抑郁药物对脑卒中后抑郁、焦虑和认知功能干预效果,以及对日常生活能力的影响。方法共选取90例脑卒中后抑郁、焦虑伴认知障碍患者,将其随机分为对照组和治疗组,对照组给予氟西汀20mg/d,治疗组在应用

  3. Biofeedback effectiveness to reduce upper limb muscle activity during computer work is muscle specific and time pressure dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Pernille; Søgaard, Karen; Blangsted, Anne Katrine

    2011-01-01

    Continuous electromyographic (EMG) activity level is considered a risk factor in developing muscle disorders. EMG biofeedback is known to be useful in reducing EMG activity in working muscles during computer work. The purpose was to test the following hypotheses: (1) unilateral biofeedback from...... trapezius (TRA) can reduce bilateral TRA activity but not extensor digitorum communis (EDC) activity; (2) biofeedback from EDC can reduce activity in EDC but not in TRA; (3) biofeedback is more effective in no time constraint than in the time constraint working condition. Eleven healthy women performed...... computer work during two different working conditions (time constraint/no time constraint) while receiving biofeedback. Biofeedback was given from right TRA or EDC through two modes (visual/auditory) by the use of EMG or mechanomyography as biofeedback source. During control sessions (no biofeedback), EMG...

  4. IMPLEMENTATION OF BIOFEEDBACK IN A CLOSED LOOP OF HEART RATE VARIABILITY AND PACED BREATHING IN PATIENTS WITH ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

    OpenAIRE

    Kulik, O.; Schmidt, O; BELAL S. A. S.; Rank, I.

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of biofeedback in a closed loop of heart rate variability (HRV) and paced breathing in patients with arterial hypertension was studied. 61 subjects with arterial hypertension (31 females and 30 males, mean age 56.8 ± 6.2 years) were examined. In accordance with the objective of the study all subjects were divided into 2 groups: 1 biofeedback group (34 subjects) and 2 the comparison group (27 subjects). 5 biofeedback sessions were performed in biofeedback group. In the compar...

  5. Bilateral eccentric vision training on pseudovitelliform dystrophy with microperimetry biofeedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Marco Ulises; Saker, Saker; Amoaku, Winfried M

    2015-01-01

    Low vision patients with eccentric viewing (EV) use extrafoveal retinal areas to compensate for the loss of central vision. Such retinal loci are known as the preferred retinal locus (PRL). It is known that EV is accompanied by unstable fixation. Microperimetry systems with biofeedback training have been used as a rehabilitation aid to improve fixation stability in EV patients. Normally, only the best or dominant eye is selected for such rehabilitation. This case report describes the rehabilitation on both eyes by means of PRL relocation with MAIA microperimetry (Centervue, Padova, Italy) with biofeedback training technology of a 74-year-old woman diagnosed with adult pseudovitelliform dystrophy. The patient presented binocularly similar anatomical and functional characteristics with the PRL located over the dystrophic area. At the end of the 3 months rehabilitation period, the PRL was successfully relocated inferiorly from the fovea showing relevant visual acuity improvement. PMID:25576513

  6. Heart rate variability biofeedback: how and why does it work?

    OpenAIRE

    Lehrer, Paul M.; Richard eGevirtz

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there has been substantial support for heart rate variability biofeedback (HRVB) as a treatment for a variety of disorders and for performance enhancement (Gevirtz, 2013). Since conditions as widely varied as asthma and depression seem to respond to this form of cardiorespiratory feedback training, the issue of possible mechanisms becomes more salient. The most supported possible mechanism is the strengthening of homeostasis in the baroreceptor (Vaschillo et al., 2002; Lehrer ...

  7. Pelvic Floor Biofeedback via a Smart Phone App for Treatment Of Stress Urinary Incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Julie A; Drobnis, Erma Z; Cornelius, Chelsea

    2016-01-01

    Biofeedback can be useful for treatment of stress urinary incontinence. Many women have difficulty isolating their pelvic floor muscles and adhering to a daily exercise regimen. This case study highlights a woman's experience using PeriCoach, a home biofeedback device that assists women in strengthening their pelvic floor muscles through Bluetooth technology using a smartphone.

  8. Biofeedback Treatment of Paradoxical Vocal Fold Motion and Respiratory Distress in an Adolescent Girl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnes, Emily; Allen, Keith D.

    2005-01-01

    In this investigation, we evaluated the effectiveness of surface electromyography (EMG) biofeedback to treat paradoxical vocal fold motion in a 16-year-old girl. EMG biofeedback training occurred once per week over the course of 10 weeks. In a changing criterion design, muscle tension showed systematic changes that corresponded with changes in the…

  9. Biofeedback and physiotherapy versus physiotherapy alone in the treatment of genuine stress urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glavind, K; Nøhr, S B; Walter, S

    1996-01-01

    Biofeedback is a method of pelvic floor rehabilitation using a surface electrode inserted into the vagina and a catheter in the rectum. Forty women with genuine urinary stress incontinence were randomized to compare the efficacy of physiotherapy and physiotherapy in combination with biofeedback...

  10. Biofeedback as complementary treatment in patients with epilepsy – an underestimated therapeutic option? Review, results, discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uhlmann Carmen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Biofeedback methods represent side effect free complementary options in the treatment of epilepsy. In this paper we review the current status of these methods in terms of clinical study results and their evaluation by systematic review papers. Possible mechanisms of action in biofeedback methods are discussed.

  11. Integrating Course Work With Field Work Placements in Undergraduate Clinical Biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motiff, James P.

    The three major aspects of the clinical biofeedback experience for undergraduates at Hope College, Holland, Michigan are presented in terms of the academic program, the actual clinical experience, and the procedures for becoming certified as a "biofeedback assistant." The academic program is detailed, including the requirements for…

  12. Biofeedback systems for stress reduction: Towards a Bright Future for a Revitalized Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, van den Egon L.; Westerink, Joyce H.D.M.; Conchon, E.; Correia, C.; Fred, A.; Gamboa, H.

    2012-01-01

    Stress has recently been baptized as the black death of the 21st century, which illustrates its threat to current health standards. This article proposes biofeedback systems as a means to reduce stress. A concise state-ofthe-art introduction on biofeedback systems is given. The field of mental healt

  13. Is EEG-biofeedback an effective treatment in autism spectrum disorders? A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouijzer, M.E.J.; Schie, H.T. van; Gerrits, B.J.L.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Moor, J.M.H. de

    2013-01-01

    EEG-biofeedback has been reported to reduce symptoms of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in several studies. However, these studies did not control for nonspecific effects of EEG-biofeedback and did not distinguish between participants who succeeded in influencing their own EEG activity and participa

  14. Heart rate variability biofeedback reduces food cravings in high food cravers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meule, Adrian; Freund, Rebecca; Skirde, Ann Kathrin; Vögele, Claus; Kübler, Andrea

    2012-12-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback has been reported to increase HRV while decreasing symptoms in patients with mental disorders. In addition, associations between low HRV and lowered self-regulation were found in non-clinical samples, e.g., in individuals with strong chocolate cravings or unsuccessful dieting. The current study aimed at decreasing food cravings with HRV-biofeedback in individuals frequently experiencing such cravings. Participants (N = 56) with strong or low food cravings associated with a lack of control over eating were selected from the local community. Half of the participants with strong cravings (craving-biofeedback; n = 14) performed 12 sessions of HRV-biofeedback while the other half (craving-control; n = 14) and a group with low cravings (non-craving-control; n = 28) received no intervention. Subjective food cravings related to a lack of control over eating decreased from pre- to post-measurement in the craving-biofeedback group, but remained constant in the control groups. Moreover, only the craving-biofeedback group showed a decrease in eating and weight concerns. Although HRV-biofeedback was successful in reducing food cravings, this change was not accompanied by an increase in HRV. Instead, HRV decreased in the craving-control group. This study provides preliminary evidence that HRV-biofeedback could be beneficial for attenuating dysfunctional eating behavior although specific mechanisms remain to be elucidated.

  15. Biofeedback for stress reduction: towards a brigth future for a revitalized field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Broek, E.L.; Westerink, J.H.D.

    2012-01-01

    Stress has recently been baptized as the black death of the 21st century, which illustrates its threat to current health standards. Thisarticle proposes biofeedback systems as a means to reduce stress. Aconcise state-ofthe-art introduction on biofeedback systems is given. The field of mental health

  16. Critique: Can Children with AD/HD Learn Relaxation and Breathing Techniques through Biofeedback Video Games?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Craig; Conlon, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a critique on K. Amon and A. Campbell's "Can children with AD/HD learn relaxation and breathing techniques through biofeedback video games?". Amon and Campbell reported a successful trial of a commercially available biofeedback program, "The Wild Divine", in reducing symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)…

  17. Using a False Biofeedback Methodology to Explore Relationships between Learners' Affect, Metacognition, and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, Amber Chauncey; Azevedo, Roger; D'Mello, Sidney K.

    2013-01-01

    We used a false-biofeedback methodology to manipulate physiological arousal in order to induce affective states that would influence learners' metacognitive judgments and learning performance. False-biofeedback is a method used to induce physiological arousal (and resultant affective states) by presenting learners with audio stimuli of false heart…

  18. Biofeedback systems for stress reduction : Towards a bright future for a revitalized field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, E.L. van den; Westerink, J.H.D.M.

    2012-01-01

    Stress has recently been baptized as the black death of the 21st century, which illustrates its threat to current health standards. This article proposes biofeedback systems as a means to reduce stress. A concise state-of-the-art introduction on biofeedback systems is given. The field of mental heal

  19. Biofeedback for training balance and mobility tasks in older populations : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Agnes; Mancini, Martina; Chiari, Lorenzo; Zijlstra, Wiebren

    2010-01-01

    Context: An effective application of biofeedback for interventions in older adults with balance and mobility disorders may be compromised due to co-morbidity. Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and the effectiveness of biofeedback-based training of balance and/or mobility in older adults. Data S

  20. [Correction of psycho-emotional state by the biofeedback method in patients with metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koichubekov, B K; Shaikhin, A M; Tabagari, S I; Sorokina, M A; Omarbekova, N K

    2014-11-01

    Metabolic syndrome is one of the important clinical problems of medicine. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the efficacy of heart rate variability biofeedback method in correction of mental and emotional state in patients with metabolic syndrome. For this task was set to study the dynamics of indicators of mental and emotional stress by biofeedback based hardware-software complex "Amblyocor" in patients with metabolic syndrome. Course of heart rate variability biofeedback passed 10 patients with the metabolic syndrome. During biofeedback sessions conducted tests that assess psycho-emotional state by 5 characters. Data processing was performed using software package «Statistica 8.0» and showed a statistically significant decrease in indicators of mental and emotional stress, that demonstrates the effectiveness of biofeedback in the correction of mental and emotional stress in patients with metabolic syndrome.

  1. Effect of visual biofeedback to acquire supraglottic swallow in healthy individuals: a randomized-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imada, Miho; Kagaya, Hitoshi; Ishiguro, Yuriko; Kato, Miho; Inamoto, Yoko; Tanaka, Takashi; Shibata, Seiko; Saitoh, Eiichi

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of visual biofeedback therapy in acquiring supraglottic swallow (SGS) in a randomized-controlled trial with healthy individuals. Eighteen individuals (mean age, 26 years) who could not close or keep closed the vocal folds before and during the swallow in SGS were allocated randomly to either a visual biofeedback group (eight individuals) or a nonbiofeedback group (10 individuals). A videoendoscope was inserted intranasally and an SGS exercise, using 4 ml of green-colored water, was performed 30 times per day up to 5 days. When the participant failed to perform SGS, the result was provided only to the participants in the visual biofeedback group. The median length of time until acquiring SGS was 1.5 days in the visual biofeedback group and 3.5 days in the nonbiofeedback group (P=0.040). We concluded that visual biofeedback effectively enabled participants to acquire SGS earlier.

  2. Pelvic floor exercises with biofeedback for stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V. Capelini

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Prospective study to objectively evaluate the benefits of pelvic floor strengthening exercises associated to biofeedback for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fourteen patients diagnosed with stress urinary incontinence (SUI were selected for this study. All patients underwent a pelvic floor training associated to biofeedback for 12 consecutive weeks. Urodynamic tests, pad test and bladder diary were analyzed at the beginning of the study, at the end and after 3 months. The King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ was applied before and after treatment to assess the impact in the quality of life. RESULTS: There was a significant reduction in the pad weight (from 14.21 g to 1 g, number of urinary leakage episodes (from 8.14 per day to 2.57 per day and daytime frequency (from 7.93 per day to 5.85 per day. At urodynamics the authors observed a significant increase in Valsalva leak-point pressure (from 103.93 cm H2O to 139.14 cm H2O, cistometric capacity (from 249.29 mL to 336.43 mL, p = 0.0015 and bladder volume at first desire to void (from 145 mL to 215.71 mL. Those differences were kept during the first 3 months of follow up. The KHQ revealed significant differences except in the case of "general health perception", which covers health in general and not exclusively urinary incontinence. CONCLUSION: Treatment of SUI with pelvic floor exercises associated to biofeedback caused significant changes in the parameters analyzed, with maintenance of good results 3 months after treatment.

  3. Biofeedback treatment in chronically constipated patients with dyssynergic defecation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Simón

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar los efectos del entrenamiento en biofeedback-EMG en pacientes con estreñimiento crónico debido a defecación disinérgica. Con este propósito, 10 pacientes (4 varones, 6 mujeres con defecación disinérgica que no respondían a correcciones dietéticas y suplementos de fibra, fueron seleccionados e incluidos en el estudio sobre la base de cumplir los criterios Roma III para el diagnóstico de este trastorno funcional gastrointestinal. El estudio se llevó a cabo a lo largo de una serie de fases definidas: evaluación psicofisiológica y clínica previa al tratamiento (4 semanas, tratamiento por medio de biofeedback-EMG (8 sesiones, a razón de dos sesiones semanales y seguimiento (4 semanas un mes más tarde. En todas las fases, cuatro variables clínicas fueron evaluadas a través de autorregistro (frecuencia de defecaciones semanales, sensación de evacuación incompleta, nivel de dificultad de la evacuación y dolor perianal en la defecación; además, se obtuvieron medidas psicofisiológicas a través de electromiografía (EMG del esfínter anal externo. Los resultados muestran mejoras significativas en las medidas psicofisiológicas (actividad-EMG durante el esfuerzo para defecar e índice de anismus, así como en las variables clínicas. Los beneficios del biofeedback se mantuvieron en el período de seguimiento.

  4. Heart rate variability biofeedback: how and why does it work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, Paul M; Gevirtz, Richard

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there has been substantial support for heart rate variability biofeedback (HRVB) as a treatment for a variety of disorders and for performance enhancement (Gevirtz, 2013). Since conditions as widely varied as asthma and depression seem to respond to this form of cardiorespiratory feedback training, the issue of possible mechanisms becomes more salient. The most supported possible mechanism is the strengthening of homeostasis in the baroreceptor (Vaschillo et al., 2002; Lehrer et al., 2003). Recently, the effect on the vagal afferent pathway to the frontal cortical areas has been proposed. In this article, we review these and other possible mechanisms that might explain the positive effects of HRVB.

  5. Biofeedback treatment in chronically constipated patients with dyssynergic defecation

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel A Simón; Ana M. Bueno; Montserrat Durán

    2011-01-01

    El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar los efectos del entrenamiento en biofeedback-EMG en pacientes con estreñimiento crónico debido a defecación disinérgica. Con este propósito, 10 pacientes (4 varones, 6 mujeres) con defecación disinérgica que no respondían a correcciones dietéticas y suplementos de fibra, fueron seleccionados e incluidos en el estudio sobre la base de cumplir los criterios Roma III para el diagnóstico de este trastorno funcional gastrointestinal. El estudio se llevó a ca...

  6. Advanced biofeedback from surface electromyography signals using fuzzy system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samani, Afshin; Holtermann, Andreas; Søgaard, Karen;

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to develop a fuzzy inference-based biofeedback system and investigate its effects when inducing active (shoulder elevation) and passive (relax) pauses on the trapezius muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity during computer work. Surface EMG signals were recorded from...... clavicular, descending (bilateral) and ascending parts of the trapezius muscles during computer work. The fuzzy system readjusted itself based on the history of previous inputs. The effect of feedback was assessed in terms of muscle activation regularity and amplitude. Active pause resulted in non...

  7. Heart rate variability biofeedback: How and why does it work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Lehrer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been substantial support for Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback (HRVB as a treatment for a variety of disorders and for performance enhancement (Gevirtz, 2013. Since conditions as widely varied as asthma and depression seem to respond to this form of cardiorespiratory feedback training, the issue of possible mechanisms becomes more salient. The most supported possible mechanism is the strengthening of homeostasis in the barorecptor (Vashillo, et al, 2002; Lehrer, et al, 2003. Recently, the effect on the vagal afferent pathway to the frontal cortical areas has been proposed. In this article, we review these and other possible mechanisms that might explain the positive effects of HRVB.

  8. Effects of innovative virtual reality game and EMG biofeedback on neuromotor control in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Ji Won; Lee, Dong Ryul; Sim, Yon Ju; You, Joshua H; Kim, Cheol J

    2014-01-01

    Sensorimotor control dysfunction or dyskinesia is a hallmark of neuromuscular impairment in children with cerebral palsy (CP), and is often implicated in reaching and grasping deficiencies due to a neuromuscular imbalance between the triceps and biceps. To mitigate such muscle imbalances, an innovative electromyography (EMG)-virtual reality (VR) biofeedback system were designed to provide accurate information about muscle activation and motivation. However, the clinical efficacy of this approach has not yet been determined in children with CP. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a combined EMG biofeedback and VR (EMG-VR biofeedback) intervention system to improve muscle imbalance between triceps and biceps during reaching movements in children with spastic CP. Raw EMG signals were recorded at a sampling rate of 1,000 Hz, band-pass filtered between 20-450 Hz, and notch-filtered at 60 Hz during elbow flexion and extension movements. EMG data were then processed using MyoResearch Master Edition 1.08 XP software. All participants underwent both interventions consisting of the EMG-VR biofeedback combination and EMG biofeedback alone. EMG analysis resulted in improved muscle activation in the underactive triceps while decreasing overactive or hypertonic biceps in the EMG-VR biofeedback compared with EMG biofeedback. The muscle imbalance ratio between the triceps and biceps was consistently improved. The present study is the first clinical trial to provide evidence for the additive benefits of VR intervention for enhancing the upper limb function of children with spastic CP.

  9. The internal-external respiratory motion correlation is unaffected by audiovisual biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Harry; Pollock, Sean; Lee, Danny; Keall, Paul; Kim, Taeho

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluated if an audiovisual (AV) biofeedback causes variation in the level of external and internal correlation due to its interactive intervention in natural breathing. The internal (diaphragm) and external (abdominal wall) respiratory motion signals of 15 healthy human subjects under AV biofeedback and free breathing (FB) were analyzed and measures of correlation and regularity taken. Regularity metrics (root mean square error and spectral power dispersion metric) were obtained and the correlation between these metrics and the internal and external correlation was investigated. For FB and AV biofeedback assisted breathing the mean correlations found between internal and external respiratory motion were 0.96±0.02 and 0.96±0.03, respectively. This means there is no evidence to suggest (p-value=0.88) any difference in the correlation between internal and external respiratory motion with the use of AV biofeedback. Our results confirmed the hypothesis that the internal-external correlation with AV biofeedback is the same as for free breathing. Should this correlation be maintained for patients, AV biofeedback can be implemented in the clinic with confidence as regularity improvements using AV biofeedback with an external signal will be reflected in increased internal motion regularity.

  10. [Biofeedback and drug-resistant epilepsy: back to an earlier treatment?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoulaud-Franchi, J A; Lanteaume, L; Pallanca, O; Vion-Dury, J; Bartolomei, F

    2014-03-01

    Biofeedback is a complementary non-pharmacological and non-surgical therapeutic developed over the last thirty years in the management of drug-resistant epilepsy. Biofeedback allows learning cognitive and behavioral strategies via a psychophysiological feedback loop. Firstly, this paper describes the different types of biofeedback protocols used for the treatment of drug-refractory epilepsy and their physiological justifications. Secondly, this paper analyzes the evidence of effectiveness, from a medical point of view, on reducing the numbers of seizures, and from a neurophysiological point of view, on the changing brain activity. Electroencephalography (EEG) biofeedback (neurofeedback) protocol on sensorimotor rhythms (SMR) has been investigated in many studies, the main limitation being small sample sizes and lack of control groups. The newer neurofeedback protocol on slow cortical potential (SCP) and galvanic skin response (GSR) biofeedback protocols have been used in a smaller number of studies. But, these studies are more rigorous with larger sized samples, matched control groups, and attempts to control the placebo effect. These protocols also open the way for innovative neurophysiological researches and may predict a renewal of biofeedback techniques. Biofeedback would have legitimacy in the field of clinical drug-resistant epilepsy at the interface between therapeutic and clinical neurophysiology.

  11. Rehabilitation of balance-impaired stroke patients through audio-visual biofeedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gheorghe, Cristina; Nissen, Thomas; Juul Rosengreen Christensen, Daniel;

    2015-01-01

    This study explored how audio-visual biofeedback influences physical balance of seven balance-impaired stroke patients, between 33–70 years-of-age. The setup included a bespoke balance board and a music rhythm game. The procedure was designed as follows: (1) a control group who performed a balance...... training exercise without any technological input, (2) a visual biofeedback group, performing via visual input, and (3) an audio-visual biofeedback group, performing via audio and visual input. Results retrieved from comparisons between the data sets (2) and (3) suggested superior postural stability...

  12. Business model design for a wearable biofeedback system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidefjäll, Patrik; Titkova, Dina

    2015-01-01

    Wearable sensor technologies used to track daily activities have become successful in the consumer market. In order for wearable sensor technology to offer added value in the more challenging areas of stress-rehab care and occupational health stress-related biofeedback parameters need to be monitored and more elaborate business models are needed. To identify probable success factors for a wearable biofeedback system (Affective Health) in the two mentioned market segments in a Swedish setting, we conducted literature studies and interviews with relevant representatives. Data were collected and used first to describe the two market segments and then to define likely feasible business model designs, according to the Business Model Canvas framework. Needs of stakeholders were identified as inputs to business model design. Value propositions, a key building block of a business model, were defined for each segment. The value proposition for occupational health was defined as "A tool that can both identify employees at risk of stress-related disorders and reinforce healthy sustainable behavior" and for healthcare as: "Providing therapists with objective data about the patient's emotional state and motivating patients to better engage in the treatment process".

  13. Development and preliminary evaluation of an Android based heart rate variability biofeedback system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abtahi, F; Berndtsson, A; Abtahi, S; Seoane, F; Lindecrantz, K

    2014-01-01

    The reduced Heart Rate Variability (HRV) is believed to be associated with several diseases such as congestive heart failure, diabetes and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). In these cases, HRV biofeedback may be a potential intervention method to increase HRV which in turn is beneficial to these patients. In this work, a real-time Android biofeedback application based on a Bluetooth enabled ECG and thoracic electrical bioimpedance (respiration) measurement device has been developed. The system performance and usability have been evaluated in a brief study with eight healthy volunteers. The result demonstrates real-time performance of system and positive effects of biofeedback training session by increased HRV and reduced heart rate. Further development of the application and training protocol is ongoing to investigate duration of training session to find an optimum length and interval of biofeedback sessions to use in potential interventions.

  14. A wearable respiratory biofeedback system based on generalized body sensor network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guan-Zheng; Huang, Bang-Yu; Wang, Lei

    2011-06-01

    Wearable medical devices have enabled unobtrusive monitoring of vital signs and emerging biofeedback services in a pervasive manner. This article describes a wearable respiratory biofeedback system based on a generalized body sensor network (BSN) platform. The compact BSN platform was tailored for the strong requirements of overall system optimizations. A waist-worn biofeedback device was designed using the BSN. Extensive bench tests have shown that the generalized BSN worked as intended. In-situ experiments with 22 subjects indicated that the biofeedback device was discreet, easy to wear, and capable of offering wearable respiratory trainings. Pilot studies on wearable training patterns and resultant heart rate variability suggested that paced respirations at abdominal level and with identical inhaling/exhaling ratio were more appropriate for decreasing sympathetic arousal and increasing parasympathetic activities.

  15. Sensory supplementation system based on electrotactile tongue biofeedback of head position for balance control

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Chenu, Olivier; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan; Danilov, Yuri

    2008-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the effects of an artificial head position-based tongue-placed electrotactile biofeedback on postural control during quiet standing under different somatosensory conditions from the support surface. Eight young healthy adults were asked to stand as immobile as possible with their eyes closed on two Firm and Foam support surface conditions executed in two conditions of No-biofeedback and Biofeedback. In the Foam condition, a 6-cm thick foam support surface was placed under the subjects' feet to alter the quality and/or quantity of somatosensory information at the plantar sole and the ankle. The underlying principle of the biofeedback consisted of providing supplementary information about the head orientation with respect to gravitational vertical through electrical stimulation of the tongue. Centre of foot pressure (CoP) displacements were recorded using a force platform. Larger CoP displacements were observed in the Foam than Firm conditions in the two conditions of No...

  16. A Wearable Respiratory Biofeedback System Based on Generalized Body Sensor Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guan-Zheng; Huang, Bang-Yu

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Wearable medical devices have enabled unobtrusive monitoring of vital signs and emerging biofeedback services in a pervasive manner. This article describes a wearable respiratory biofeedback system based on a generalized body sensor network (BSN) platform. The compact BSN platform was tailored for the strong requirements of overall system optimizations. A waist-worn biofeedback device was designed using the BSN. Extensive bench tests have shown that the generalized BSN worked as intended. In-situ experiments with 22 subjects indicated that the biofeedback device was discreet, easy to wear, and capable of offering wearable respiratory trainings. Pilot studies on wearable training patterns and resultant heart rate variability suggested that paced respirations at abdominal level and with identical inhaling/exhaling ratio were more appropriate for decreasing sympathetic arousal and increasing parasympathetic activities. PMID:21545293

  17. The Effect of EEG Biofeedback Therapy on Motor Abilities of Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Žiaková

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Currently, EEG biofeedback (Neurofeedback is used in the rehabilitation of children with brain damage with the symptoms of attention deficit disorder, hyperactivity and impulsivity. After treatment improvements were observed not only in the control of attention and impulsivity but also in voluntary and involuntary movements. The aim of the prospective clinical study was to measure the impact of EEG biofeedback on motor abilities of children with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and compare the effectiveness of EEG biofeedback with classical rehabilitation. It was assumed that in children with ADHD in combination with central motor disorders EEG biofeedback therapy will strengthen not only the control of impulsivity and attention but also motor skills. Material. The observed group consisted of 60 (N = 60 children with mild central motor disorders with ADHD. They were randomly assigned to either the EEG biofeedback group (N = 30, mean age 8.9 years or the classical rehabilitation group (N = 30, mean age 8.5 years. Methods. Both groups received thirty 30-45 minute sessions of training, at a frequency of 2-3 times a week. Pre-post assessment included testing of motor skills with PANESS test (Physical and Neurological Examination for Subtle Signs for both groups and the EEG biofeedback group were assessed also for changes in impulse and attention control using CPT (Continuous Performance Test test AX version and changes observed by parents using TLC Subjective Assessment (The Learning Curve, 2004. Results. Achieved overall score of EEG biofeedback group was lower after therapy (Mdn = 24.00 than before therapy (Mdn = 55.00, T = 0.00, p <0.01, Z = -4.78, r = -0.62. Values of significance (Asymp.Sig. 2-tailed = 0.000 and effect size (effect size r = -0.62 indicate a statistical and factual significant positive effect of EEG biofeedback to improve overall motor skills (lower score is better. Conclusion. EEG biofeedback therapy

  18. Heart Rate Variability and the Efficacy of Biofeedback in Heroin Users with Depressive Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, I-Mei; Ko, Jiun-Min; Fan, Sheng-Yu; YEN, CHENG-FANG

    2016-01-01

    Objective Low heart rate variability (HRV) has been confirmed in heroin users, but the effects of heart-rate-variability–biofeedback in heroin users remain unknown. This study examined (1) correlations between depression and HRV indices; (2) group differences in HRV indices among a heroin-user group, a group with major depressive disorder but no heroin use, and healthy controls; and (3) the effects of heart-rate-variability–biofeedback on depressive symptoms, HRV indices, and respiratory rate...

  19. BIOFEEDBACK APPLICATION FOR PREGNANT WOMAN TRAINING UNDER MONITORING OF MOTHER – FETUS SYSTEM CONDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Khlopova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Raining influence with biofeedback on system mother fetus was investigated. The technique of biofeedback training for the pregnant women was developed, which had main objective to control of parameters of vegetative nervous system by means of breath. The technique was tested on a group of pregnant wo men on term of a gestation of 32–35 weeks. It is established: change of a functional condition of mother influences level of sympathetic regulation of a heart rhythm of a fetus.

  20. Effects of electromyographic and mechanomyographic biofeedback on upper trapezius muscle activity during standardized computer work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madeleine, Pascal; Vedsted, Pernille; Blangsted, Anne Katrine

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this laboratory study was to investigate the effects of surface electromyography (EMG)- and mechanomyography (MMG)-based audio and visual biofeedback during computer work. Standardized computer work was performed for 3 min with/without time constraint and biofeedback in a randomized...... alternative to EMG in ergonomics. A lowering of the trapezius muscle activity may contribute to diminish the risk of work related musculoskeletal disorders development....

  1. Short-term HRV Biofeedback: Perspectives in Environmental Physiology and Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliya V. Poskotinova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This review demonstrates the effectiveness of short-term HRV biofeedback sessions in an evaluation of human adaptation to uncomfortable environments. A single HRV biofeedback session can be used as a test for the effectiveness of cortical-visceral connections in patients with cardiovascular disease. In addition, this method can be used as short-term assistance in adaptation to social stressful factors.

  2. A Vibrotactile and Plantar Force Measurement-Based Biofeedback System: Paving the Way towards Wearable Balance-Improving Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Christina Zong-Hao Ma; Anson Hong-Ping Wan; Duo Wai-Chi Wong; Yong-Ping Zheng; Winson Chiu-Chun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Although biofeedback systems have been used to improve balance with success, they were confined to hospital training applications. Little attempt has been made to investigate the use of in-shoe plantar force measurement and wireless technology to turn hospital training biofeedback systems into wearable devices. This research developed a wearable biofeedback system which detects body sway by analyzing the plantar force and provides users with the corresponding haptic cues. The effects of this ...

  3. The effect of biofeedback on function in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Kimberly S; Gevirtz, Richard N; Brown, Milton; Spira, James; Guarneri, Ermina; Stoletniy, Liset

    2009-06-01

    Decreased HRV has been consistently associated with increased cardiac mortality and morbidity in HF patients. The aim of this study is to determine if a 6-week course of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback and breathing retraining could increase exercise tolerance, HRV, and quality of life in patients with New York Heart Association Class I-III heart failure (HF). Participants (N = 29) were randomly assigned to either the treatment group consisting of six sessions of breathing retraining, HRV biofeedback and daily practice, or the comparison group consisting of six sessions of quasi-false alpha-theta biofeedback and daily practice. Exercise tolerance, measured by the 6-min walk test (6MWT), HRV, measured by the standard deviation of normal of normal beats (SDNN), and quality of life, measured by the Minnesota Living with Congestive Heart Failure Questionnaire, were measured baseline (week 0), post (week 6), and follow-up (week 18). Cardiorespiratory biofeedback significantly increased exercise tolerance (p = .05) for the treatment group in the high (>or=31%) left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) category between baseline and follow-up. Neither a significant difference in SDNN (p = .09) nor quality of life (p = .08), was found between baseline and follow-up. A combination of HRV biofeedback and breathing retraining may improve exercise tolerance in patients with HF with an LVEF of 31% or higher. Because exercise tolerance is considered a strong prognostic indicator, cardiorespiratory biofeedback has the potential to improve cardiac mortality and morbidity in HF patients.

  4. Audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D.; Greer, P. B.; Arm, J.; Keall, P.; Kim, T.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback can improve image quality and reduce scan time for respiratory-gated 3D thoracic MRI. For five healthy human subjects respiratory motion guidance in MR scans was provided using an AV biofeedback system, utilizing real-time respiratory motion signals. To investigate the improvement of respiratory-gated 3D MR images between free breathing (FB) and AV biofeedback (AV), each subject underwent two imaging sessions. Respiratory-related motion artifacts and imaging time were qualitatively evaluated in addition to the reproducibility of external (abdominal) motion. In the results, 3D MR images in AV biofeedback showed more anatomic information such as a clear distinction of diaphragm, lung lobes and sharper organ boundaries. The scan time was reduced from 401±215 s in FB to 334±94 s in AV (p-value 0.36). The root mean square variation of the displacement and period of the abdominal motion was reduced from 0.4±0.22 cm and 2.8±2.5 s in FB to 0.1±0.15 cm and 0.9±1.3 s in AV (p-value of displacement biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential to be a useful motion management tool in medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  5. Haptic biofeedback for improving compliance with lower-extremity partial weight bearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Michael C; DeLuke, Levi; Buerba, Rafael A; Fan, Richard E; Zheng, Ying Jean; Leslie, Michael P; Baumgaertner, Michael R; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2014-11-01

    After lower-extremity orthopedic trauma and surgery, patients are often advised to restrict weight bearing on the affected limb. Conventional training methods are not effective at enabling patients to comply with recommendations for partial weight bearing. The current study assessed a novel method of using real-time haptic (vibratory/vibrotactile) biofeedback to improve compliance with instructions for partial weight bearing. Thirty healthy, asymptomatic participants were randomized into 1 of 3 groups: verbal instruction, bathroom scale training, and haptic biofeedback. Participants were instructed to restrict lower-extremity weight bearing in a walking boot with crutches to 25 lb, with an acceptable range of 15 to 35 lb. A custom weight bearing sensor and biofeedback system was attached to all participants, but only those in the haptic biofeedback group were given a vibrotactile signal if they exceeded the acceptable range. Weight bearing in all groups was measured with a separate validated commercial system. The verbal instruction group bore an average of 60.3±30.5 lb (mean±standard deviation). The bathroom scale group averaged 43.8±17.2 lb, whereas the haptic biofeedback group averaged 22.4±9.1 lb (Pbiofeedback group averaged 14.5±6.3% (Pbiofeedback to improve compliance with lower-extremity partial weight bearing, haptic biofeedback was superior to conventional physical therapy methods. Further studies in patients with clinical orthopedic trauma are warranted.

  6. The effects of heart rate variability biofeedback in patients with preterm labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepmann, Martin; Hennig, Una-Dorothea; Siepmann, Timo; Nitzsche, Katharina; Mück-Weymann, Michael; Petrowski, Katja; Weidner, Kerstin

    2014-03-01

    Preterm birth is a highly prevalent phenomenon that was shown to be associated with mental stress during pregnancy (Rich-Edwards and Grizzard in Am J Obstet Gynecol 192(5 Suppl):S30-S35, 2005). We aimed to assess the effects of heart rate variability (HRV)-biofeedback in patients with preterm labour. Therefore, we conducted a controlled randomized parallel group study in 48 female patients aged 19-38 years (median = 29) with preterm labour at gestational week 24th-32nd (median = 29th). In this study, one group (n = 24) attended six sessions of HRV-biofeedback over 2 weeks whereas patients of the other group (n = 24) were assigned to control sessions. In the HRV-biofeedback treated group, perception of chronic stress was decreased 4 weeks after completion of training compared to baseline (p biofeedback group, preterm birth was seen in 3 patients (13 %) whereas in the control group, preterm delivery occurred in 8 patients (33 %, p = n.s.). There was no difference in birth weight between groups and HRV remained unchanged. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that HRV-biofeedback can reduce chronic stress in patients with preterm labour when administered as an adjunct to routine care. However, it remains unclear whether stress reduction through HRV-biofeedback has a beneficial effect on preterm birth.

  7. Effects of Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback on EEG Alpha Asymmetry and Anxiety Symptoms in Male Athletes: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziembowska, Inga; Izdebski, Paweł; Rasmus, Anna; Brudny, Janina; Grzelczak, Marta; Cysewski, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    Heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BFB) has been shown as useful tool to manage stress in various populations. The present study was designed to investigate whether the biofeedback-based stress management tool consisting of rhythmic breathing, actively self-generated positive emotions and a portable biofeedback device induce changes in athletes' HRV, EEG patterns, and self-reported anxiety and self-esteem. The study involved 41 healthy male athletes, aged 16-21 (mean 18.34 ± 1.36) years. Participants were randomly divided into two groups: biofeedback and control. Athletes in the biofeedback group received HRV biofeedback training, athletes in the control group didn't receive any intervention. During the randomized controlled trial (days 0-21), the mean anxiety score declined significantly for the intervention group (change-4 p biofeedback group showed substantial and statistically significant improvement in heart rate variability indices and changes in power spectra of both theta and alpha brain waves, and alpha asymmetry. These changes suggest better self-control in the central nervous system and better flexibility of the autonomic nervous system in the group that received biofeedback training. A HRV biofeedback-based stress management tool may be beneficial for stress reduction for young male athletes.

  8. USING BIOFEEDBACK FOR REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS WITH PARKINSON'S DESEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Grebysheva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of a self regulation technique based on the biological feedback (BFB has been studied during treatment in patients with Parkinson's desease. The specific recommendations for patients with Par­kinson's desease have been determined taking into account an appearance of the distinctive symptoms. The treatment method based on the BFB has been realized. The controllable physiological signals both electrocardiography and electromyography have been used in this method. The rehabilitation psycho-physiological complex “Reakor” has been used for the treatment and diagnostic procedures as well. The statistical analysis of the effectiveness of the self regulation method was performed. It has been shown the combination of medication and biofeedback training aids in the normalization of personal emotional parameters.

  9. Short-term memory effects of an auditory biofeedback on isometric force control: Is there a differential effect as a function of transition trials?

    CERN Document Server

    Cuisinier, Rémy; Troccaz, Jocelyne; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Nougier, Vincent; 10.1016/j.humov.2010.06.008

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate memory effects, force accuracy, and variability during constant isometric force at different force levels, using auditory biofeedback. Two types of transition trials were used: a biofeedback-no biofeedback transition trial and a no biofeedback-biofeedback transition trial. The auditory biofeedback produced a low- or high-pitched sound when participants produced an isometric force lower or higher than required, respectively. To achieve this goal, 16 participants were asked to produce and maintain two different isometric forces (30$\\pm$5% and 90N$\\pm$5%) during 25s. Constant error and standard deviation of the isometric force were calculated. While accuracy and variability of the isometric force varied according to the transition trial, a drift of the force appeared in the no biofeedback condition. This result suggested that the degradation of information about force output in the no biofeedback condition was provided by a leaky memory buffer which was mainly depe...

  10. The Mozart effect in biofeedback visual rehabilitation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore S

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Serena Salvatore, Aloisa Librando, Mariacristina Esposito, Enzo M VingoloDepartment of Ophthalmology, University La Sapienza, Polo Pontino, Alfredo Fiorini Hospital, Terracina, ItalyPurpose: To evaluate the usefulness of acoustic biofeedback by means of Mozart’s Sonata for Two Pianos in D Major K. 448 to maintain and/or restore visual performance in a patient with macular pucker and glaucoma.Methods: A 74-year-old patient with open angle glaucoma in both eyes and macular pucker in the right eye (RE underwent visual rehabilitation with acoustic biofeedback by means of the MAIA™ Vision Training Module (Centervue, Padova, Italy 10 minutes each eye once a week for 5 weeks. The patient was asked to move his eyes according to a sound which changed into Mozart’s Sonata for Two Pianos when the patient locked the fixation target.Results: Best-corrected visual acuity improved in his right eye (RE and was stable in the left eye (LE. Fixation stability improved in both eyes, and retinal sensitivity decreased in the RE and improved in the LE. The characteristic of the macular pucker did not change during the training as demonstrated with optical coherence tomography. The patient was very satisfied with the training, as demonstrated by a 25-item questionnaire (National Eye Institute – Visual Functioning Questionnaire, NEI-VFQ-25. The patient’s reading speed and the character size which he was able to read improved in his RE.Conclusion: Music could enhance synaptic plasticity and affect neural learning and fixation training by means of MAIA vision training. Therefore it can improve visual performance in patients with macular pucker, postpone the surgical time, and assure a better quality of life for the patient.Keywords: glaucoma, macular cellophane, music, vision training

  11. A controlled evaluation of thermal biofeedback and thermal biofeedback combined with cognitive therapy in the treatment of vascular headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, E B; Appelbaum, K A; Radnitz, C L; Morrill, B; Michultka, D; Kirsch, C; Guarnieri, P; Hillhouse, J; Evans, D D; Jaccard, J

    1990-04-01

    One-hundred-sixteen patients suffering from vascular headache (migraine or combined migraine and tension) were, after 4 weeks of pretreatment baseline headache monitoring, randomly assigned to one of four conditions: (a) thermal biofeedback with adjunctive relaxation training (TBF); (b) TBF plus cognitive therapy; (c) pseudomediation as an ostensible attention-placebo control; or (d) headache monitoring. The first three groups received 16 individual sessions over 8 weeks, while the fourth group continued to monitor headaches. All groups then monitored headaches for a 4-week posttreatment baseline. Analyses revealed that all treated groups improved significantly more than the headache monitoring group with no significant differences among the three treated groups. On a measure of clinically significant improvement, the two TBF groups had slightly higher (51%) degree of improvement than the meditation group (37.5%). It is argued that the attention-placebo control became an active relaxation condition.

  12. SU-E-J-29: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves Tumor Motion Consistency for Lung Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Makhija, K; Keall, P [The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Greer, P [The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Arm, J; Hunter, P [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Kim, T [The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the breathing-guidance system: audiovisual (AV) biofeedback improves tumor motion consistency for lung cancer patients. This will minimize respiratory-induced tumor motion variations across cancer imaging and radiotherapy procedues. This is the first study to investigate the impact of respiratory guidance on tumor motion. Methods: Tumor motion consistency was investigated with five lung cancer patients (age: 55 to 64), who underwent a training session to get familiarized with AV biofeedback, followed by two MRI sessions across different dates (pre and mid treatment). During the training session in a CT room, two patient specific breathing patterns were obtained before (Breathing-Pattern-1) and after (Breathing-Pattern-2) training with AV biofeedback. In each MRI session, four MRI scans were performed to obtain 2D coronal and sagittal image datasets in free breathing (FB), and with AV biofeedback utilizing Breathing-Pattern-2. Image pixel values of 2D images after the normalization of 2D images per dataset and Gaussian filter per image were used to extract tumor motion using image pixel values. The tumor motion consistency of the superior-inferior (SI) direction was evaluated in terms of an average tumor motion range and period. Results: Audiovisual biofeedback improved tumor motion consistency by 60% (p value = 0.019) from 1.0±0.6 mm (FB) to 0.4±0.4 mm (AV) in SI motion range, and by 86% (p value < 0.001) from 0.7±0.6 s (FB) to 0.1±0.2 s (AV) in period. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback improves both breathing pattern and tumor motion consistency for lung cancer patients. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential for facilitating reproducible tumor motion towards achieving more accurate medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  13. Lower-extremity weight-bearing compliance is maintained over time after biofeedback training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hustedt, Joshua W; Blizzard, Daniel J; Baumgaertner, Michael R; Leslie, Michael P; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2012-11-01

    Previous studies have shown immediate compliance with weight-bearing instructions to be better after biofeedback training than after verbal or scale training. This study assessed retention of biofeedback training to determine potential clinical applicability. Twelve participants were enrolled in a prospective clinical study at an academic orthopedic center. Participants were trained with a biofeedback device to comply with touch-down weight-bearing instructions (25 lb). Immediately following the training session, weight bearing was assessed for each participant. The retention of this training was then reassessed at 2 to 4, 6 to 8, and 22 to 24 hours. Two control participants were given no biofeedback training (verbal instructions only) and were followed similarly. Following initial biofeedback training at 25 lb, participants bore an average of 20.4±2.12 lb. Retention tests during the 24-hour period showed no significant difference from the original testing, with 2- to 4-hour retention of 19.98±4.75 lb, 6- to 8-hour retention of 25.07±6.60 lb, and 22- to 24-hour retention of 21.75±4.58 lb. Participants who only received verbal instructions consistently bore several-fold greater weight than instructed. Biofeedback training has previously been shown to have a strong immediate effect on partial weight-bearing compliance. This study demonstrated that this effect lasts up to 24 hours. This maintained weight-bearing compliance after biofeedback training suggests that this method may be an effective way to train patients to comply with given instructions for limited weight bearing.

  14. ABILITY TO SELF-CONTROL IN BIOFEEDBACK GAMES AND SUCCESS OF PUPILS OF 11–13 YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Gileva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The relation of indicators of biofeedback and the school success was studied. The relation of pulse interval, wave structure of heart rate, Sacred George's index (StGe and progress of children is found out. Results are discussed with relations of use of computer biofeedback games for studying of psychophysiological features and predictors of school success.

  15. Impact of biofeedback on self-efficacy and stress reduction in obesity: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teufel, Martin; Stephan, Kerstin; Kowalski, Axel; Käsberger, Saskia; Enck, Paul; Zipfel, Stephan; Giel, Katrin E

    2013-09-01

    Biofeedback application is an evidence-based technique to induce relaxation. A primary mechanism of action is the improvement of self-efficacy, which is needed to facilitate the translation of health behavioral intentions into action. Obesity is often associated with low self-efficacy and dysfunctional eating patterns, including comfort eating as an inexpedient relaxation technique. This is the first study investigating the effects of biofeedback on self-efficacy and relaxation in obesity. In the present experiment, 31 women, mean body mass index 35.5 kg/m², were randomized to a food-specific biofeedback paradigm, a non-specific relaxation biofeedback paradigm, or a waiting list control. Eight sessions of biofeedback of the electrodermal activity were performed while presenting either a challenging food stimulus or a non-specific landscape stimulus. Self-efficacy, stress, ability to relax, eating behavior, and electrodermal activity were assessed before, directly after, and 3 months after the intervention. The food-specific biofeedback predominantly showed effects on food-related self-efficacy and perceived stress. The non-specific relaxation biofeedback showed effects on the ability to relax. Self-reported improvements were confirmed by corresponding decrease in the electrodermal reaction to food stimuli. Biofeedback treatment is effective in improving self-efficacy in individuals with obesity and might therefore be a valuable additional intervention in obesity treatment.

  16. Biofeedback in Partial Weight Bearing : Usability of Two Different Devices from a Patient's and Physical Therapist's Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lieshout, Remko; Pisters, Martijn F; Vanwanseele, Benedicte; de Bie, Rob A; Wouters, Eveline J; Stukstette, Mirelle J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Partial weight bearing is frequently instructed by physical therapists in patients after lower-limb trauma or surgery. The use of biofeedback devices seems promising to improve the patient's compliance with weight-bearing instructions. SmartStep and OpenGo-Science are biofeedback devices

  17. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC BIOFEEDBACK AS PART OF A MENISCAL REPAIR REHABILITATION PROGRAMME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Oravitan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to assess the effectiveness of using electromyographic biofeedback in the early stages of rehabilitation after meniscal repair. In this randomised, controlled, parallel group study, the evolution of patients with meniscal lesions treated by meniscal suture who received (study group, n = 33 or did not receive (control group, n = 31 electromyographic biofeedback as part of their early rehabilitation programme has been compared. A total of 64 patients with previous meniscal repair participated in the study. The patients received a baseline assessment (after 1 postoperative week and a follow-up (after 8 postoperative weeks consisting of surface electromyography, dynamometry of thigh muscles and the assessment of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS. The electrical potential in contraction and the speed for contraction and relaxation for all monitored muscles increased significantly in the study group (p < 0.05. The difference between groups in the assessed score was significant for sport and recreational function (p < 0.05. The strength of the thigh muscles was not significantly influenced by the introduction of electromyographic biofeedback (EMG- BFB in the rehabilitation programme. Electromyographic biofeedback helped patients to control their muscles after meniscal repair to accomplish physical activities that require better neuromuscular coordination and control. For these reasons, one may consider electromyographic biofeedback as an important component of rehabilitation after meniscal repair

  18. The effect of biofeedback therapy on dyssynergic constipation in patients with or without Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tannaz Ahadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Rome II and III diagnostic criteria for dyssynergic defecation recommended the exclusion of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. This study determined the effect of biofeedback therapy on dyssynergic constipation in patients with or without IBS. Materials and Methods: This study was a nonrandomized, single blinded, semi experimental study. Dyssynergic defecation patients with and without IBS were asked to undergo biofeedback therapy 8 sessions. The defecation dynamics and balloon expulsion time were evaluated before, at the end and 1 month after the biofeedback therapy. IBS symptoms were graded using a 4-point Likert scale. Mann-Whitney U-test, Wilcoxon test and Friedman test were applied to analyze data using SPSS software package (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA. Results: After the biofeedback therapy, the IBS symptoms have been decreased significantly (the median of 2 before and 1 after therapy, P 0.05 with respect to outcome. No complication was observed in treatment groups. Conclusion: Dyssynergic constipation patients with and without IBS will likely benefit from biofeedback therapy.

  19. Biofeedback relaxation for pain associated with continuous passive motion in Taiwanese patients after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tsae-Jyy; Chang, Ching-Fen; Lou, Meei-Fang; Ao, Man-Kuan; Liu, Chiung-Chen; Liang, Shu-Yuan; Wu, Shu-Fang Vivienne; Tung, Heng-Hsing

    2015-02-01

    Effective pain management is crucial for patient recovery after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Biofeedback therapy, which encourages relaxation and helps alleviate various conditions associated with stress, may help to decrease postoperative pain in patients undergoing TKA. A quasi- experimental design was used to investigate the efficacy of a biofeedback relaxation intervention in reducing pain associated with postoperative continuous passive motion (CPM) therapy. Sixty-six patients admitted to a general hospital in Taiwan for TKA were recruited and randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. The intervention group received biofeedback training twice daily for 5 days, concurrent with CPM therapy, whereas the control group did not receive the biofeedback intervention. Pain was measured using a numeric rating scale before and after each CPM therapy session on postoperative days 1 through 5. The CPM-elicited pain score was calculated by subtracting the pre-CPM pain score from the post-CPM pain score. Results of repeated-measures analysis of variance showed intervention group reported significantly less pain caused by CPM than did the control group (f = 29.70, p biofeedback relaxation, a non-invasive and non-pharmacological intervention, as a complementary treatment option for pain management in this population.

  20. Efficacy of a telerehabilitation intervention programme using biofeedback among computer operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golebowicz, Merav; Levanon, Yafa; Palti, Ram; Ratzon, Navah Z

    2015-01-01

    Computer operators spend long periods of time sitting in a static posture at computer workstations and therefore have an increased exposure to work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSD). The present study is aimed at investigating the feasibility and effectiveness of a tele-biofeedback ergonomic intervention programme among computer operators suffering from WRMSD. Twelve subjects with WRMSD were assigned an ergonomic intervention accompanied by remote tele-biofeedback training, which was practised at their workstations. Evaluations of pain symptoms and locations, body posture and psychosocial characteristics were carried out before and after the intervention in the workplace. The hypothesis was partially verified as it showed improved body position at the workstation and decreased pain in some body parts. Tele-biofeedback, as part of an intervention, appears to be feasible and efficient for computer operators who suffer from WRMSD. This study encourages further research on tele-health within the scope of occupational therapy practice. Practitioner summary: Research concerning tele-health using biofeedback is scarce. The present study analyses the feasibility and partial effectiveness of a tele-biofeedback ergonomic intervention programme for computer operators suffering from WRMSD. The uniqueness and singularity of this study is the usage of remote communication between participants and practitioners through the Internet.

  1. A Controlled Study of the Effectiveness of EEG Biofeedback Training on Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Zhonggui; SHI Shuhua; XU Haiqing

    2005-01-01

    Summary: In order to study the treatment of the children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the integrated visual and auditory continuous performance test (IVA-CPT) was clinically applied to evaluate the effectiveness of electroencephalogram (EEG) biofeedback training. Of all the 60 children with ADHD aged more than 6 years, the effective rate of EEG biofeedback training was 91.6 % after 40 sessions of EEG biofeedback training. Before and after treatment by EEG biofeedback training, the overall indexes of IVA were significantly improved among predominately inattentive, hyperactive, and combined subtype of children with ADHD (P<0.001). It was suggested that EEG biofeedback training was an effective and vital treatment on children with ADHD.

  2. Tongue-placed tactile biofeedback suppresses the deleterious effects of muscle fatigue on joint position sense at the ankle

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Chenu, Olivier; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    Whereas the acuity of the position sense at the ankle can be disturbed by muscle fatigue, it recently also has been shown to be improved, under normal ankle neuromuscular state, through the use of an artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback. The underlying principle of this biofeedback consisted of supplying individuals with supplementary information about the position of their matching ankle position relative to their reference ankle position through electrotactile stimulation of the tongue. Within this context, the purpose of the present experiment was to investigate whether this biofeedback could mitigate the deleterious effect of muscle fatigue on joint position sense at the ankle. To address this objective, sixteen young healthy university students were asked to perform an active ankle-matching task in two conditions of No-fatigue and Fatigue of the ankle muscles and two conditions of No-biofeedback and Biofeedback. Measures of the overall accuracy and the variability of the positioning were determin...

  3. Assessment of postural balance in community-dwelling older adults - methodological aspects and effects of biofeedback-based Nintendo Wii training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Martin Grønbech

    citizens' centers and/or in the home of the elderly. The results presented in this thesis suggest that strict control of time-of-day is an important methodological aspect when evaluating postural balance in older adults, and an assessment protocol using the Nintendo Wii-Balance Board is reproducible......The overall purpose of this thesis was to examine selected methodological aspects and novel approaches for measuring postural balance older adults, and to examine the effects of biofeedback-based Nintendo Wii training on selected physiological, psychological and functional outcome variables...... in community-dwelling older adults. In Study I balance control was investigated using force plate analysis of Centre of Pressure (COP) excursion during static bilateral standing in 32 community-dwelling older adults at three different time-points (09:00, 12:30, and 16:00) throughout the day. An overall...

  4. Benefits of multi-session balance and gait training with multi-modal biofeedback in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Shannon B; Horslen, Brian C; Davis, Justin R; Allum, John H J; Carpenter, Mark G

    2016-06-01

    Real-time balance-relevant biofeedback from a wearable sensor can improve balance in many patient populations, however, it is unknown if balance training with biofeedback has lasting benefits for healthy older adults once training is completed and biofeedback removed. This study was designed to determine if multi-session balance training with and without biofeedback leads to changes in balance performance in healthy older adults; and if changes persist after training. 36 participants (age 60-88) were randomly divided into two groups. Both groups trained on seven stance and gait tasks for 2 consecutive weeks (3×/week) while trunk angular sway and task duration were monitored. One group received real-time multi-modal biofeedback of trunk sway and a control group trained without biofeedback. Training effects were assessed at the last training session, with biofeedback available to the feedback group. Post-training effects (without biofeedback) were assessed immediately after, 1-week, and 1-month post-training. Both groups demonstrated training effects; participants swayed less when standing on foam with eyes closed (EC), maintained tandem-stance EC longer, and completed 8 tandem-steps EC faster and with less sway at the last training session. Changes in sway and duration, indicative of faster walking, were also observed after training for other gait tasks. While changes in walking speed persisted post-training, few other post-training effects were observed. These data suggest there is little added benefit to balance training with biofeedback, beyond training without, in healthy older adults. However, transient use of wearable balance biofeedback systems as balance aides remains beneficial for challenging balance situations and some clinical populations.

  5. Improving human ankle joint position sense using an artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, N; Demongeot, J; Payan, Y; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Chenu, Olivier; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2006-01-01

    Proprioception is comprised of sensory input from several sources including muscle spindles, joint capsule, ligaments and skin. The purpose of the present experiment was to investigate whether the central nervous system was able to integrate an artificial biofeedback delivered through electrotactile stimulation of the tongue to improve proprioceptive acuity at the ankle joint. To address this objective, nine young healthy adults were asked to perform an active ankle-matching task with and without biofeedback. The underlying principle of the biofeedback consisted of supplying subjects with supplementary information about the position of their matching ankle position relative to their reference ankle position through a tongue-placed tactile output device (Tongue Display Unit). Measures of the overall accuracy and the variability of the positioning were determined using the absolute error and the variable error, respectively. Results showed more accurate and more consistent matching performances with than withou...

  6. Combined use of autogenic therapy and biofeedback in training effective control of heart rate by humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were performed on 24 men and women (aged 20-27 yr) in three equal groups who were taught to control their own heart rates by autogenic training and biofeedback under dark and sound-isolated conditions. Group I was parasympathetic dominant, group II was sympathetic dominant, and group III consisted of parasympathetic-dominant subjects and controls who received only biofeedback of their own heart rates. The results corroborate three hypotheses: (1) subjects with para-sympathetic-dominant autonomic profiles perform in a way that is both qualitatively and quantitatively different from subjects with sympathetic-dominant autonomic profiles; (2) tests of interindividual variability yield data relevant to individual performance in visceral learning tasks; and (3) the combined use of autogenic training, biofeedback, and verbal feedback is suitable for conditioning large stable autonomic responses in humans.

  7. ANALYSIS OF A DIFFERENTIATED APPROACH TO THE APPOINTMENT OF DICK METHODS IN BIOFEEDBACK CORRECTION AUTONOMIC DYSFUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Polyakova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Goal of research: analysis of the effectiveness of Biofeedback therapy is differentiated depending on the clinical forms of autonomic dysfunction. Exchange rate control efficacy of biofeedback hardware was conducted on the dynamics of clinical andl aboratory data, surveys and assessment of the functional State of the SNC using heart rate variability, vegetative resonance test, Kerdo index definition, as well as èlektrokardiografiče applications and questionnaires, characterizing the State of psychoemotional sphere (Spilbergera–Hanina, test, Luscher. Laboratory tests include a complete blood count with evaluation of Adaptive reactions of the organism. The results of the rehabilitation complex of the patients with the use of biofeedback have confirmed its effectiveness.

  8. The influence of biofeedback training on trapezius activity and rest during occupational computer work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, A; Søgaard, K; Christensen, H

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate effects of biofeedback training on trapezius activity and rest (gaps) during occupational computer work. A randomized controlled trial with 164 computer workers was performed. Two groups working with computer mouse more than 50% (n = 64) and less than 25% (n...... = 49) of their work time performed five sessions with unilateral electromyographical (EMG) biofeedback from the dominant trapezius during computer work. A third group working with computer mouse more than 50% of their work time (n = 51) served as controls. Bipolar EMG from the bilateral upper trapezius...... muscles during normal computer work was recorded. Changes in discomfort/pain were not recorded. The biofeedback training reduced activity (P computer work...

  9. Enhancing generalisation in biofeedback intervention using the challenge point framework: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchcock, Elaine R; Byun, Tara McAllister

    2015-01-01

    Biofeedback intervention can help children achieve correct production of a treatment-resistant error sound, but generalisation is often limited. This case study suggests that generalisation can be enhanced when biofeedback intervention is structured in accordance with a "challenge point" framework for speech-motor learning. The participant was an 11-year-old with residual /r/ misarticulation who had previously attained correct /r/ production through a structured course of ultrasound biofeedback treatment but did not generalise these gains beyond the word level. Treatment difficulty was adjusted in an adaptive manner following predetermined criteria for advancing, maintaining, or moving back a level in a multidimensional hierarchy of functional task complexity. The participant achieved and maintained virtually 100% accuracy in producing /r/ at both word and sentence levels. These preliminary results support the efficacy of a semi-structured implementation of the challenge point framework as a means of achieving generalisation and maintenance of treatment gains.

  10. Heart Rate Variability and the Efficacy of Biofeedback in Heroin Users with Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, I-Mei; Ko, Jiun-Min; Fan, Sheng-Yu; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Objective Low heart rate variability (HRV) has been confirmed in heroin users, but the effects of heart-rate-variability–biofeedback in heroin users remain unknown. This study examined (1) correlations between depression and HRV indices; (2) group differences in HRV indices among a heroin-user group, a group with major depressive disorder but no heroin use, and healthy controls; and (3) the effects of heart-rate-variability–biofeedback on depressive symptoms, HRV indices, and respiratory rates within the heroin group. Methods All participants completed a depression questionnaire and underwent electrocardiogram measurements, and group differences in baseline HRV indices were examined. The heroin group underwent electrocardiogram and respiration rate measurements at baseline, during a depressive condition, and during a happiness condition, before and after which they took part in the heart-rate-variability–biofeedback program. The effects of heart-rate-variability–biofeedback on depressive symptoms, HRV indices, and respiration rates were examined. Results There was a negative correlation between depression and high frequency of HRV, and a positive correlation between depression and low frequency to high frequency ratio of HRV. The heroin group had a lower overall and high frequency of HRV, and a higher low frequency/high frequency ratio than healthy controls. The heart-rate-variability–biofeedback intervention increased HRV indices and decreased respiratory rates from pre-intervention to post-intervention. Conclusion Reduced parasympathetic and increased sympathetic activations were found in heroin users. Heart-rate-variability–biofeedback was an effective non-pharmacological intervention to restore autonomic balance. PMID:27121428

  11. Research Progress on Respiratory Biofeedback%呼吸反馈的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘官正; 朱青松; 郭彦伟; 王磊

    2011-01-01

    By respiratory biofeedback training, the patients can learns to control and modify the physiological response under measurement and bring these measures back to a healthy level. Respiratory biofeedback is a drugless, effective, cost-effective, and noninvasive procedure. It has been widely applied to relaxation therapy and the regulation in cardiovascular diseases and respiratory-related diseases. In this review, we analyzed the influence of various respiratory parameters on biofeedback, summarized the clinical application of respiratory biofeedback, explored the mechanism of respiratory biofeedback, and introduced the development status of related devices. Finally, the latest development tendency and existing problems of respiration biofeedback were discussed.%呼吸反馈训练是一种安全、有效、费用低和非侵袭性的治疗过程,能够让患者学会控制和调节被测量的生理反应,并将其调整到健康水平.呼吸反馈被广泛应用于放松疗法、心血管疾病和呼吸相关疾病调节中.分析不同的呼吸参数对生物反馈的影响,总结呼吸反馈在临床中的应用,探讨呼吸反馈的内在机制,阐述生物反馈仪器的现状,最后对呼吸反馈的最新发展趋势和存在的问题展开讨论.

  12. BIOFEEDBACK: A NEW METHOD FOR CORRECTION OF MOTOR DISORDERS IN PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya. S. Pekker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Major disabling factors in multiple sclerosis is motor disorders. Rehabilitation of such violations is one of the most important medical and social problems. Currently, most of the role given to the development of methods for correction of motor disorders based on accessing natural resources of the human body. One of these methods is the adaptive control with biofeedback (BFB. The aim of our study was the correction of motor disorders in multiple sclerosis patients using biofeedback training. In the study, we have developed scenarios for training rehabilitation program computer EMG biofeedback aimed at correction of motor disorders in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. The method was tested in the neurological clinic of SSMU. The study included 9 patients with definite diagnosis of MS with the presence of the clinical picture of combined pyramidal and cerebellar symptoms. Assessed the effectiveness of rehabilitation procedures biofeedback training using specialized scales (rating scale functional systems Kurtzke; questionnaire research quality of life – SF-36, evaluation of disease impact Profile – SIP and score on a scale fatigue – FSS. In the studied group of patients decreased score on a scale of fatigue (FSS, increased motor control (SIP2, the physical and mental components of health (SF-36. The tendency to reduce the amount of neurological deficit by reducing the points on the pyramidal Kurtske violations. Analysis of the exchange rate dynamics of biofeedback training on EMG for trained muscles indicates an increase in the recorded signal OEMG from session to session. Proved a tendency to increase strength and coordination trained muscles of patients studied.Positive results of biofeedback therapy in patients with MS can be recommended to use this method in the complex rehabilitation measures to correct motor and psycho-emotional disorders.

  13. The effectiveness of biofeedback therapy in children with monosymptomatic enuresis resistant to desmopressin treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancak, Eyüp Burak; Akbaş, Alpaslan; Kurt, Ömer; Alan, Cabir; Ersay, Ahmet Reşit

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of biofeedback therapy on children with desmopressin- resistant primary monosymptomatic enuresis (MsE). Material and methods The study comprised both retrospective and prospective sections. A total of 262 medical files of patients who were diagnosed as enuresis between November 2012 and January 2015 were retrospectively screened. Patients with neuropathic bladder, daytime voiding problems, anatomical pathology and enuresis-related diseases were excluded from the study. The demographic data and family characteristics of 29 children with desmopressin- resistantprimary MsE were recorded. After biofeedback treatment patients whose frequency of enuretic episodes decrease by more than 50% were included in the successful biofeedback treatment group (SBTG), while other patients were categorized in the unsuccessful biofeedback treatment group (USGBT). The outcomes of uroflowmetry, voided volume, postvoiding residue (PVR) and total bladder volume/age-adjusted normal bladder capacity (TBV/NBC) were recorded before and at the sixth month of the treatment. Results The mean age of 29 patients included in the study was 9.14±3.07 (6–15) years. Of patients, 16 were male (55.2%) and 13 were female (44.8%). Before biofeedback treatment the frequency of enuresis was 25.1±5.76 days/month, while after treatment this was calculated as 8.52±10.07 days/month. After treatment 8 patients (28.6%) achieved complete dryness. Twenty patients (69%), benefited from biofeedback (SBTG), while there were 9 patients (31%) in the USBTG group. There was no significant difference between the SBTG and USBTG groups in terms of age, body mass index and sex. The average bladder capacity of the patients increased from 215 mL to 257 mL after biofeedback treatment (p<0.001). The TBV/NBC value before treatment was 0.66, while after treatment it was 0.77 (p<0.001). There was a statistically significant difference between the SBTG and USBTG groups in terms of presence of Ms

  14. Negative transfer of heart rate control following biofeedback training: a partial replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steptoe, A; Macready, D

    1985-09-01

    Ability to raise and lower heart rate (HR) on instruction was tested before and after unidirectional biofeedback training in two groups of 10 male volunteers. Instructional control was assessed in 2-min trials before training, and after 5 and 10 biofeedback trials of increasing (Group I) and decreasing (Group D) HR. The magnitude of HR elevations produced by Group D diminished following training, while modifications in Group I were unchanged. This negative transfer effect is discussed in relation to whether voluntary speeding and slowing HR reflect distinct capacities.

  15. Biofeedback assisted relaxation (bar in management of hyperhidrosis : A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Gurmukh

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Ten adult male patients suffering from hyperhidrosis were managed with biofeedback assisted relaxation (BAR regimen using skin conductivity. Six of them showed significant improvement, 2 showed minimal to moderate improvement, whereas no improvement was observed in the remaining 2 cases. Mean values of skin conductivity showed a range of 1.29 to 6.79 mho units before biofeedback session with reduction in these values to the range of 0.53 to 1.64 mho units after therapy in 6 patients showing good response. The grades of clinical improvement correlated well with corresponding reduction in skin conductivity in all the cases.

  16. Review: Psychological intervention in temporomandibular disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Araneda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD frecuently present psychological and psychiatric problems. These patients often show increased somatization, depression, anxiety, stress reaction and catastrophism, wich plays a role in the predisposition, initiation and perpetuation of TMD and treatment response. This review presents thaerapeutic options that compromise the psychological axis of patients with TMD, wich primarily seek to reduce the anxiety and the emotional stress present, modify different perceptions of pain and coping. There are different posibilities, within wich are: patient education, identifying situations that increase the tension to avoid them, teaching relaxation techniques such as biofeedback, hipnosis and yoga. As for psychological treatment, the most common for chronic orofacial pain is cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT. The appropriate and effective psychological intervention can reduce TMD pain, decreasing the probability that the symptoms become more complex. Within psychological treatment options for TMD, conservative standard treatment (education, self-instruction, avoidance of painful movements, soft diet, even the shortest, may be sufficient in the short term for most patients with TMD, especially in cases of acute conditions. The addition of CBT, by a specialist, gives coping skills that will add to the effectiveness, especially in chronic cases, obtaining better results in the long term.

  17. Assessment of postural balance in community-dwelling older adults - methodological aspects and effects of biofeedback-based Nintendo Wii training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Martin Grønbech

    2014-01-01

    The overall purpose of this thesis was to examine selected methodological aspects and novel approaches for measuring postural balance older adults, and to examine the effects of biofeedback-based Nintendo Wii training on selected physiological, psychological and functional outcome variables in community-dwelling older adults. In Study I balance control was investigated using force plate analysis of Centre of Pressure (COP) excursion during static bilateral standing in 32 community-dwelling older adults at three different time-points (09:00, 12:30, and 16:00) throughout the day. An overall significant time-of-day effect was observed for all selected COP variables. The greatest change in all COP variables was observed (on average ~15%) between midday (12:30) and the afternoon (16:00), indicating that a systematic time-of-day influence on static postural balance exists in community-dwelling older adults. Consequently, longitudinal (i.e. pre-to-post training) comparisons of postural balance in in older adults with repeated assessments should be conducted at the same time-of-day. In Study II a novel approach for measuring postural balance (using the Nintendo Wii Stillness and Agility tests) was examined for reproducibility and concurrent validity in 30 community-dwelling older adults. While the Nintendo Wii Stillness test showed a high reproducibility, a systematic learning effect between successive sessions was observed for the Agility test. Moderate-to-excellent concurrent validity was seen for the Stillness test. In contrast, the Agility test revealed a poor concurrent validity. In conclusion, the Wii Stillness test seems to represent a low-cost objective reproducible test of postural balance in community-dwelling older adults and appears feasible in various clinical settings. A habituation (familiarization) period is necessary for the Wii Agility test to avoid a systematic learning effect between successive test sessions. Study III investigated the effect of ten

  18. Breathing biofeedback as an adjunct to exposure in cognitive behavioral therapy hastens the reduction of PTSD symptoms: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosaura Polak, A; Witteveen, Anke B; Denys, Damiaan; Olff, Miranda

    2015-03-01

    Although trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) with exposure is an effective treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), not all patients recover. Addition of breathing biofeedback to exposure in TF-CBT is suggested as a promising complementary technique to improve recovery of PTSD symptoms. Patients (n = 8) with chronic PTSD were randomized to regular TF-CBT or TF-CBT with complementary breathing biofeedback to exposure. PTSD symptoms were measured before, during and after TF-CBT with the Impact of Event Scale-Revised. The results show that breathing biofeedback is feasible and can easily be complemented to TF-CBT. Although PTSD symptoms significantly decreased from pre to post treatment in both conditions, there was a clear trend towards a significantly faster (p = .051) symptom reduction in biofeedback compared to regular TF-CBT. The most important limitation was the small sample size. The hastened clinical improvement in the biofeedback condition supports the idea that breathing biofeedback may be an effective complementary component to exposure in PTSD patients. The mechanism of action of breathing biofeedback may relate to competing working memory resources decreasing vividness and emotionality, similar to eye movement desensitization and reprocessing. Future research is needed to examine this.

  19. Tackling sleeplessness: Psychological treatment options for insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie D Dautovich

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Natalie D Dautovich1, Joseph McNamara2, Jacob M Williams3, Natalie J Cross4, Christina S McCrae31Department of Psychology, 2Department of Psychiatry, 3Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; 4Department of Veterans Affairs Community Based Outpatient Clinic, Greenville, NC, USAAbstract: The purpose of the present paper is to review and summarize the research supporting nonpharmacologic treatment options for insomnia. The different treatment approaches are described followed by a review of both original research articles and meta-analyses. Meta-analytic reviews suggest that common nonpharmacologic approaches exert, on average, medium to large effect sizes on SOL, WASO, NWAK, SQR, and SE while smaller effects are seen for TST. Stimulus control therapy, relaxation training, and CBT-I are considered standard treatments for insomnia by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM. Sleep restriction, multicomponent therapy without cognitive therapy, paradoxical intention, and biofeedback approaches have received some levels of support by the AASM. Sleep hygiene, imagery training, and cognitive therapy did not receive recommendation levels as single (standalone therapies by the AASM due to lack of empirical evidence. Less common approaches have been introduced (Internet-based interventions, bright light treatment, biofeedback, mindfulness, acupuncture, and intensive sleep retraining but require further research. Brief and group treatments have been shown to be as efficacious as longer and individually-administered treatments. Considerations are presented for special populations, including older adults, children and teens, individuals from diverse cultural backgrounds, insomnia comorbid with other disorders, and individuals who are taking hypnotics.Keywords: insomnia, nonpharmacologic, psychological, behavioral, treatments, sleep

  20. Feasibility and acceptance of biofeedback-assisted mental training in an Austrian elementary school: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevenna, Richard; Krammer, Christine; Keilani, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    This pilot study aimed to investigate feasibility, acceptance, and effects of biofeedback-assisted mental training in a population of fifteen 10-year-old pupils in an Austrian elementary school. Participants were instructed in relaxation techniques by using biofeedback. Before intervention, after 6 weeks with active mental training and with regular instructions by the teacher, and after a further time period of 6 weeks without instructions, attention and concentration improved. The results indicate feasibility, good acceptance, and beneficial effects of biofeedback-assisted mental techniques in Austrian elementary school pupils.

  1. Physical activity, mindfulness meditation, or heart rate variability biofeedback for stress reduction: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwan, J.E.; de Vente, W.; Huizink, A.C.; Bögels, S.M.; de Bruin, E.I.

    2015-01-01

    In contemporary western societies stress is highly prevalent, therefore the need for stress-reducing methods is great. This randomized controlled trial compared the efficacy of self-help physical activity (PA), mindfulness meditation (MM), and heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) in reducing

  2. Stress Testing Recovery EMG for Evaluation of Biofeedback and Progressive Muscle Relaxation Training Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sime, Wesley E.; DeGood, Douglas E.

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess biofeedback (BF) and progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and placebo-control training by means of a post-training transfer test. The subjects for the research were 30 women. Initial tests consisted of measuring the electromyographic response of the frontalis muscle of the forehead to stress. After…

  3. Blindness, Diabetes, and Amputation: Alleviation of Depression and Pain through Thermal Biofeedback Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, W. E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A 39-year-old man who was blind, diabetic, and had a double amputation with chronic renal failure and peripheral vascular disease was treated with thermal biofeedback to reduce his depression through increased self-control, to minimize pain, and to facilitate healing of a pregangrenous hand. On treatment discharge, his mental and physical states…

  4. Active biofeedback changes the spatial distribution of upper trapezius muscle activity during computer work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samani, Afshin; Holtermann, Andreas; Søgaard, Karen

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the spatio-temporal effects of advanced biofeedback by inducing active and passive pauses on the trapezius activity pattern using high-density surface electromyography (HD-EMG). Thirteen healthy male subjects performed computer work with superimposed...... benefit of superimposed muscle contraction in relation to the spatial organization of muscle activity during computer work....

  5. Influence of posturographic platform biofeedback training on the dynamic balance of adult stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciaszek, Janusz; Borawska, Sylwia; Wojcikiewicz, Jacek

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the experiment was to analyze the influence of posturographic platform biofeedback training on the dynamic balance of patients who experienced ischemic stroke. The study included 21 patients treated at the Rehabilitation Center of the District Hospital in Białogard, in the Ward of Neurological Rehabilitation with the Stroke Division. The age of the patients (11 in the experimental and 10 in the control group) ranged between 55 and 65 years. The level of dynamic balance was determined with Timed Up and Go Test. The experimental group was subjected to the biofeedback training, practicing maintenance of body balance (forced sway training) on posturographic platform for 15 consecutive days. The perception of dynamic balance in the group subjected to biofeedback training improved to a markedly greater extent (P biofeedback training exerted stronger effect on the dynamic balance of patients who experienced the stroke of the left hemisphere with right-sided hemiparesis than in those with right hemisphere stroke and left-sided hemiparesis. The utilization of feedback mechanisms during training on a posturographic platform can be reflected by enhanced stimulation and further improvement of the control of performed motor tasks.

  6. Analysis of different image-based biofeedback models for improving cycling performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibbo, D.; Conforto, S.; Bernabucci, I.; Carli, M.; Schmid, M.; D'Alessio, T.

    2012-03-01

    Sport practice can take advantage from the quantitative assessment of task execution, which is strictly connected to the implementation of optimized training procedures. To this aim, it is interesting to explore the effectiveness of biofeedback training techniques. This implies a complete chain for information extraction containing instrumented devices, processing algorithms and graphical user interfaces (GUIs) to extract valuable information (i.e. kinematics, dynamics, and electrophysiology) to be presented in real-time to the athlete. In cycling, performance indexes displayed in a simple and perceivable way can help the cyclist optimize the pedaling. To this purpose, in this study four different GUIs have been designed and used in order to understand if and how a graphical biofeedback can influence the cycling performance. In particular, information related to the mechanical efficiency of pedaling is represented in each of the designed interfaces and then displayed to the user. This index is real-time calculated on the basis of the force signals exerted on the pedals during cycling. Instrumented pedals for bikes, already designed and implemented in our laboratory, have been used to measure those force components. A group of subjects underwent an experimental protocol and pedaled with (the interfaces have been used in a randomized order) and without graphical biofeedback. Preliminary results show how the effective perception of the biofeedback influences the motor performance.

  7. Can Children with AD/HD Learn Relaxation and Breathing Techniques through Biofeedback Video Games?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amon, Krestina L.; Campbell, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated "The Journey to Wild Divine" as a biofeedback management tool teaching breathing and relaxation skills to children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD). The children played the game by manipulating their heart rate using breathing techniques taught in the game, measured through three finger sensors. Parents…

  8. Heart rate variability and skin conductance biofeedback: A triple-blind randomized controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, S.F.; Steel,F.W.; Goede, M. de; Wouwe, N.C. van; Erp, J.B.F. van; Brouwer, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    High heart rate variability (HRV) and low skin conductance level (SCL) have been associated with low levels of stress. Biofeedback - providing an individual with online information about his or her own physiological state – may help to change these signals in the desired direction and therewith impr

  9. Evaluation of a Biofeedback Intervention in College Students Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westlake, Garret

    2013-01-01

    This study used exploratory data analysis (EDA) to examine the use of a biofeedback intervention in the treatment of anxiety for college students diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (n = 10) and in a typical college population (n = 37). The use of EDA allowed for trends to emerge from the data and provided a foundation for future…

  10. Meta-Analysis of Biofeedback for Tension-Type Headache: Efficacy, Specificity, and Treatment Moderators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestoriuc, Yvonne; Rief, Winfried; Martin, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    The aims of the present meta-analysis were to investigate the short- and long-term efficacy, multidimensional outcome, and treatment moderators of biofeedback as a behavioral treatment option for tension-type headache. A literature search identified 74 outcome studies, of which 53 were selected according to predefined inclusion criteria.…

  11. Evaluation of Novel EMG Biofeedback for Postural Correction During Computer Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, Brecca M; Maluf, Katrina S; Davidson, Bradley S

    2016-06-01

    Postural correction is an effective rehabilitation technique used to treat chronic neck and shoulder pain, and is aimed toward reducing the load on the surrounding muscles by adopting a neutral posture. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the effectiveness of real-time high-density surface EMG (HDsEMG) biofeedback for postural correction during typing. Twenty healthy participants performed a typing task with two forms of postural feedback: (1) verbal postural coaching and (2) verbal postural coaching plus HDsEMG biofeedback. The interface used activity from two HDsEMG arrays placed over the trapezius designed to shift trapezius muscle activity inferiorly. The center of gravity across both arrays was used to quantify the spatial distribution of trapezius activity. Planar angles taken from upper extremity reflective markers quantified cervicoscapular posture. During the biofeedback condition, trapezius muscle activity was located 12.74 ± 3.73 mm more inferior, the scapula was 2.58 ± 1.18° more adducted and 0.23 ± 0.24° more depressed in comparison to verbal postural coaching alone. The results demonstrate the short-term effectiveness of a real-time HDsEMG biofeedback intervention to achieve postural correction, and may be more effective at creating an inferior shift in trapezius muscle activity in comparison to verbal postural coaching alone.

  12. SU-E-J-235: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves the Correlation Between Internal and External Respiratory Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Greer, P [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Ludbrook, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Paganelli, C [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Kim, T [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: External respiratory surrogates are often used to predict internal lung tumor motion for beam gating but the assumption of correlation between external and internal surrogates is not always verified resulting in amplitude mismatch and time shift. To test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback improves the correlation between internal and external respiratory motion, in order to improve the accuracy of respiratory-gated treatments for lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods: In nine lung cancer patients, 2D coronal and sagittal cine-MR images were acquired across two MRI sessions (pre- and mid-treatment) with (1) free breathing (FB) and (2) AV biofeedback. External anterior-posterior (AP) respiratory motions of (a) chest and (b) abdomen were simultaneously acquired with physiological measurement unit (PMU, 3T Skyra, Siemens Healthcare Erlangen, Germany) and real-time position management (RPM) system (Varian, Palo Alto, USA), respectively. Internal superior-inferior (SI) respiratory motions of (c) lung tumor (i.e. centroid of auto-segmented lung tumor) and (d) diaphragm (i.e. upper liver dome) were measured from individual cine-MR images across 32 dataset. The four respiratory motions were then synchronized with the cine-MR image acquisition time. Correlation coefficients were calculated in the time variation of two nominated respiratory motions: (1) chest-abdomen, (2) abdomen-diaphragm and (3) diaphragm-lung tumor. The three combinations were compared between FB and AV biofeedback. Results: Compared to FB, AV biofeedback improved chest-abdomen correlation by 17% (p=0.005) from 0.75±0.23 to 0.90±0.05 and abdomen-diaphragm correlation by 4% (p=0.058) from 0.91±0.11 to 0.95±0.05. Compared to FB, AV biofeedback improved diaphragm-lung tumor correlation by 12% (p=0.023) from 0.65±0.21 to 0.74±0.16. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that AV biofeedback significantly improved the correlation of internal and external respiratory motion, thus

  13. Biofeedback training effects on minimum toe clearance variability during treadmill walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirosh, Oren; Cambell, Amity; Begg, Rezaul K; Sparrow, W A

    2013-08-01

    A number of variability analysis techniques, including Poincaré plots and detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) were used to investigate minimum toe clearance (MTC) control during walking. Ten young adults walked on a treadmill for 10 min at preferred speed in three conditions: (i) no-intervention baseline, (ii) with biofeedback of MTC within a target range, and (iii) no-biofeedback retention. Mean, median, standard deviation (SD), and inter quartile range of MTC during biofeedback (45.57 ± 11.65, 44.98 ± 11.57, 7.08 ± 2.61, 8.58 ± 2.77 mm, respectively) and retention (56.95 ± 20.31, 56.69 ± 20.94, 10.68 ± 5.41, 15.38 ± 10.19 mm) were significantly greater than baseline (30.77 ± 9.49, 30.51 ± 9.49, 3.04 ± 0.77, 3.66 ± 0.91 mm). Relative to baseline, skewness was reduced in biofeedback and retention but only significantly for retention (0.88 ± 0.51, 0.63 ± 0.55, and 0.40 ± 0.40, respectively). Baseline Poincaré measures (SD1 = 0.25, SD2 = 0.34) and DFA (α1 = 0.72 and α2 = 0.64) were lower than biofeedback (SD1 = 0.58, SD2 = 0.83, DFA α1 = 0.76 and α2 = 0.92) with significantly greater variability in retention compared to biofeedback only in the long-term SD2 and α2 analyses. Increased DFA longer-term correlations α2 in retention confirm that a novel gait pattern was acquired with a longer-term variability structure. Short- and long-term variability analyses were both useful in quantifying gait adaptations with biofeedback. The findings provide evidence that MTC can be modified with feedback, suggesting future applications in gait training procedures for impaired populations designed to reduce tripping risk.

  14. Role of physical countermaneuvers in the management of orthostatic hypotension: efficacy and biofeedback augmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvette, C. M.; McPhee, B. R.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.; Low, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of various physical countermaneuvers in reducing orthostatic hypotension and its associated symptoms and to assess the efficacy of biofeedback training in enhancing the effectiveness of physical countermaneuvers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In nine study subjects with neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, four training sessions on physical countermaneuvers were performed after tilt-up, three with visual feedback on the effect of physical countermaneuvers on blood pressure and other cardiovascular variables. Blood pressure change and orthostatic symptoms during tilt-up were determined, as were the changes in total peripheral resistance, stroke index, and heart rate. RESULTS: The five female and four male patients had a mean age of 53 years and a mean duration of symptoms of 4.2 years. On an orthostatic symptom scale of 0 to 10, these patients had a mean symptom score of 7.3. The increment in systolic blood pressure was better for some maneuvers (such as leg crossing and a combination) than others (such as neck flexion and abdominal contraction). Three patterns of responses to biofeedback were found. Simple maneuvers such as squatting did not improve with training; visual feedback was needed for maneuvers such as thigh contraction, and performance declined without biofeedback; the third pattern, seen in maneuvers such as leg crossing, showed continued improvement with training, even without biofeedback. A survey at 3 to 4 months after training revealed continued use of physical maneuvers (3.8 +/- 3.1 per day), increased standing time with each episode of presyncopal symptoms (8.3 +/- 5.8 minutes), and continued global symptomatic improvement. Total peripheral resistance, but not heart rate or stroke index, showed significant regression with blood pressure improvement. CONCLUSION: Physical countermaneuvers are efficacious in reducing orthostatic hypotension, can be augmented by use of biofeedback, and may significantly improve the

  15. The effect of a single session of short duration heart rate variability biofeedback on EEG: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinsloo, Gabriell E; Rauch, H G Laurie; Karpul, David; Derman, Wayne E

    2013-03-01

    This pilot study examines the effect of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback on measures of electroencephalogram (EEG) during and immediately after biofeedback. Eighteen healthy males exposed to work-related stress, were randomised into an HRV biofeedback (BIO) or a comparative group (COM). EEG was recorded during the intervention and during rest periods before and after the intervention. Power spectral density in theta, alpha and beta frequency bands and theta/beta ratios were calculated. During the intervention, the BIO group had higher relative theta power [Fz and Pz (p biofeedback after a single training session was associated with changes in EEG suggestive of increased internal attention and relaxation both during and after the intervention. However, the comparative intervention was associated with changes suggestive of increased mental effort and possible anxiety during and after the intervention.

  16. How a plantar pressure-based, tongue-placed tactile biofeedback modifies postural control mechanisms during quiet standing

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Chenu, Olivier; Boisgontier, Matthieu; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of a plantar pressure-based, tongue-placed tactile biofeedback on postural control mechanisms during quiet standing. To this aim, sixteen young healthy adults were asked to stand as immobile as possible with their eyes closed in two conditions of No-biofeedback and Biofeedback. Centre of foot pressure (CoP) displacements, recorded using a force platform, were used to compute the horizontal displacements of the vertical projection the centre of gravity (CoGh) and those of the difference between the CoP and the vertical projection of the CoG (CoP-CoGv). Altogether, the present findings suggest that the main way the plantar pressure-based, tongue-placed tactile biofeedback improves postural control during quiet standing is via both a reduction of the correction thresholds and an increased efficiency of the corrective mechanism involving the CoGh displacements.

  17. Breathing Biofeedback as an Adjunct to Exposure in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Hastens the Reduction of PTSD Symptoms: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Rosaura Polak, A.; Witteveen, Anke B.; Denys, Damiaan; Olff, Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Although trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) with exposure is an effective treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), not all patients recover. Addition of breathing biofeedback to exposure in TF-CBT is suggested as a promising complementary technique to improve recovery of PTSD symptoms. Patients (n = 8) with chronic PTSD were randomized to regular TF-CBT or TF-CBT with complementary breathing biofeedback to exposure. PTSD symptoms were measured before, during and a...

  18. Heart rate variability biofeedback in patients with alcohol dependence: a randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penzlin AI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ana Isabel Penzlin,1 Timo Siepmann,2 Ben Min-Woo Illigens,3 Kerstin Weidner,4 Martin Siepmann4 1Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, 2Department of Neurology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Saxony, Germany; 3Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 4Department of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatic Medicine, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Saxony, Germany Background and objective: In patients with alcohol dependence, ethyl-toxic damage of vasomotor and cardiac autonomic nerve fibers leads to autonomic imbalance with neurovascular and cardiac dysfunction, the latter resulting in reduced heart rate variability (HRV. Autonomic imbalance is linked to increased craving and cardiovascular mortality. In this study, we sought to assess the effects of HRV biofeedback training on HRV, vasomotor function, craving, and anxiety. Methods: We conducted a randomized controlled study in 48 patients (14 females, ages 25–59 years undergoing inpatient rehabilitation treatment. In the treatment group, patients (n=24 attended six sessions of HRV biofeedback over 2 weeks in addition to standard rehabilitative care, whereas, in the control group, subjects received standard care only. Psychometric testing for craving (Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale, anxiety (Symptom Checklist-90-Revised, HRV assessment using coefficient of variation of R-R intervals (CVNN analysis, and vasomotor function assessment using laser Doppler flowmetry were performed at baseline, immediately after completion of treatment or control period, and 3 and 6 weeks afterward (follow-ups 1 and 2. Results: Psychometric testing showed decreased craving in the biofeedback group immediately postintervention (OCDS scores: 8.6±7.9 post-biofeedback versus 13.7±11.0 baseline [mean ± standard deviation], P<0.05, whereas craving was unchanged at

  19. Psychological Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IBS Pain IBS Global Treatments IBS Diet Low FODMAP Diet Complimentary or Alt Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments ... IBS Pain IBS Global Treatments IBS Diet Low FODMAP Diet Complimentary or Alt Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments ...

  20. Positive Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Positive psychology is a deliberate correction to the focus of psychology on problems. Positive psychology does not deny the difficulties that people may experience but does suggest that sole attention to disorder leads to an incomplete view of the human condition. Positive psychologists concern themselves with four major topics: (1) positive…

  1. Discursive Psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molder, te H.

    2015-01-01

    Discursive psychology was established in the United Kingdom by the end of the 1980s, mainly in response to the dominant cognitivist approach in social psychology. While it borrowed notions from poststructuralism and sociology of science, it is most akin to conversation analysis. Discursive psycholog

  2. Biofeedback for training balance and mobility tasks in older populations: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiari Lorenzo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Context An effective application of biofeedback for interventions in older adults with balance and mobility disorders may be compromised due to co-morbidity. Objective To evaluate the feasibility and the effectiveness of biofeedback-based training of balance and/or mobility in older adults. Data Sources PubMed (1950-2009, EMBASE (1988-2009, Web of Science (1945-2009, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (1960-2009, CINAHL (1982-2009 and PsycINFO (1840-2009. The search strategy was composed of terms referring to biofeedback, balance or mobility, and older adults. Additional studies were identified by scanning reference lists. Study Selection For evaluating effectiveness, 2 reviewers independently screened papers and included controlled studies in older adults (i.e. mean age equal to or greater than 60 years if they applied biofeedback during repeated practice sessions, and if they used at least one objective outcome measure of a balance or mobility task. Data Extraction Rating of study quality, with use of the Physiotherapy Evidence Database rating scale (PEDro scale, was performed independently by the 2 reviewers. Indications for (noneffectiveness were identified if 2 or more similar studies reported a (nonsignificant effect for the same type of outcome. Effect sizes were calculated. Results and Conclusions Although most available studies did not systematically evaluate feasibility aspects, reports of high participation rates, low drop-out rates, absence of adverse events and positive training experiences suggest that biofeedback methods can be applied in older adults. Effectiveness was evaluated based on 21 studies, mostly of moderate quality. An indication for effectiveness of visual feedback-based training of balance in (frail older adults was identified for postural sway, weight-shifting and reaction time in standing, and for the Berg Balance Scale. Indications for added effectiveness of applying biofeedback during training of

  3. 短程心率变异性评估疗养飞行员生物反馈训练效果的研究%Short-range Assessment of Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback Training Effect Infirmary Pilot Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洪芳; 田建全; 胡乃鉴

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the short-range assessment of heart rate variability biofeedback training effect infirmary pilot,and provide the basis for aviation psychological training.Methods:Using multi-parameter analyzer biofeedback training for pilots and short-range detection of heart rate variabil-ity.Results:Short HRV comparison showed,SDNN,RMSSD,HF and TP were increased after training( t=2.33~8.46,P<0.01);HR,LF,LF /HF were lower after training(t=4.13~20.54,P<0.01).Con-clusion:Biofeedback training can improve the functional activity of the autonomic nervous pilots situation effectively assess performance short convalescence HRV biofeedback training pilots effect.%目的:探讨短程心率变异性评估疗养飞行员生物反馈训练效果,为航空心理训练提供依据。方法:采用多参数生物反馈仪对飞行员进行训练及短程心率变异性检测。结果:短程心率变异性比较结果显示, SDNN、RMSSD、HF和TP均是训练后升高,有非常显著统计学意义(t=2.33~8.46,P<0.01);HR、LF、LF/HF均是训练后降低,有非常显著统计学意义(t=4.13~20.54,P<0.01)。结论:生物反馈训练能改善飞行员自主神经功能活性状况,短程心率变异性能有效评估疗养飞行员生物反馈训练的效果。

  4. Análise da resposta ao biofeedback nos pacientes com incontinência fecal Analysis of biofeedback for fecal incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Figueiredo Accetta

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Incontinência fecal é uma condição com importante impacto na qualidade de vida, e inúmeras formas de tratamento são descritas. Objetivo: Avaliar a resposta ao tratamento por biofeedback e o perfil epidemiológico dos pacientes com incontinência fecal, descrevendo os critérios de seleção e a técnica utilizada. Métodos: Estudo retrospectivo dos pacientes tratados em três anos (junho de 2005 a junho de 2008. Resultados: Trinta pacientes, sendo 26 mulheres e 4 homens, com idade média de 66 anos. O número de gestações e partos normais variou de nenhuma a seis e a histerectomia esteve presente em nove casos. Todos os pacientes apresentavam hipotonia na manometria. Dezoito pacientes ficaram satisfeitos com o tratamento proposto, dez ficaram parcialmente satisfeitos, nenhum ficou completamente insatisfeito, e dois abandonaram a terapia. Conclusão: O tratamento clínico associado ao biofeedback pode ser eficaz para a melhoria dos sintomas; entretanto, o entendimento e compreensão do problema por parte do paciente parece ser o efeito mais importante para esses resultados. A presença de diabetes mellitus, cirurgias orificiais e histerectomia podem ter relação com as queixas de incontinência.Fecal incontinence is a disabling condition with relevant social costs. Many therapies are described. Objective: To evaluate the response to biofeedback and epidemiological profile, describing the used technique. Methods: A retrospective study in 3 years (June 2005 - June 2008. Results: Thirty patients, 26 women and 4 men, with an average age of 66. The number of normal pregnancies and births varied from none to six and hysterectomy was present in nine. Hypotonia in manometry was present in all patients. Eighteen patients were satisfied, ten were partially met, none was completely dissatisfied, and two have abandoned the therapy. Conclusion: The clinical therapy to biofeedback can be effective for incontinence, but the comprehension by patient

  5. A Robot-Based Tool for Physical and Cognitive Rehabilitation of Elderly People Using Biofeedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leire Lopez-Samaniego

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This publication presents a complete description of a technological solution system for the physical and cognitive rehabilitation of elderly people through a biofeedback system, which is combined with a Lego robot. The technology used was the iOS’s (iPhone Operating System Objective-C programming language and its XCode programming environment; and SQLite in order to create the database. The biofeedback system is implemented by the use of two biosensors which are, in fact, a Microsoft band 2 in order to register the user’s heart rate and a MYO sensor to detect the user’s arm movement. Finally, the system was tested with seven elderly people from La Santa y Real Casa de la Misericordia nursing home in Bilbao. The statistical assessment has shown that the users are satisfied with the usability of the system, with a mean score of 79.29 on the System Usability Scale (SUS questionnaire.

  6. BIOFEEDBACK Y DEPORTES: POTENCIALES L͍NEAS DE ACTUACIÓN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Godoy

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available

    En este trabajo se presentan potenciales líneas de integración del biofeedback en el área de la actividad física y deportiva, revisando tres posibles áreas de actuación en el deporte utilizando procedimientos o técnicas de biofeedback: a mejora en el entrenamiento deportivo u optimización del proceso de preparación física del deportista, b mejora de la actuación deportiva u optimización del rendimiento del deportista y c prevención y rehabilitación de lesiones generadas por la práctica deportiva.

     

  7. Comparing tomographic EEG neurofeedback and EMG biofeedback in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurizio, Stefano; Liechti, Martina Daniela; Heinrich, Hartmut; Jäncke, Lutz; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Walitza, Susanne; Brandeis, Daniel; Drechsler, Renate

    2014-01-01

    Two types of biofeedback (BF), tomographic electroencephalogram (EEG) neurofeedback (NF) and electromyographic biofeedback (EMG-BF), both with phasic and tonic protocols, were compared for treatment effects and specificity in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Thirteen children with ADHD trained their brain activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and twelve trained activity of arm muscles involved in fine motor skills. In each training session, resting state 24-channel EEG and training performances were recorded. Both groups showed similar behavioral improvements and artifact reduction in selected conditions, with no significant advantages despite medium effect sizes on primary outcomes for NF. Only the EMG-BF group, however, showed clear improvement in training regulation performance, and specific motor coordination effects. The NF group tended to present individual normalization of trained frequency bands in the ACC during rest across training. The results provide evidence for some specific effects in our small sample, albeit only to a small extent.

  8. A Robot-Based Tool for Physical and Cognitive Rehabilitation of Elderly People Using Biofeedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Samaniego, Leire; Garcia-Zapirain, Begonya

    2016-01-01

    This publication presents a complete description of a technological solution system for the physical and cognitive rehabilitation of elderly people through a biofeedback system, which is combined with a Lego robot. The technology used was the iOS’s (iPhone Operating System) Objective-C programming language and its XCode programming environment; and SQLite in order to create the database. The biofeedback system is implemented by the use of two biosensors which are, in fact, a Microsoft band 2 in order to register the user’s heart rate and a MYO sensor to detect the user’s arm movement. Finally, the system was tested with seven elderly people from La Santa y Real Casa de la Misericordia nursing home in Bilbao. The statistical assessment has shown that the users are satisfied with the usability of the system, with a mean score of 79.29 on the System Usability Scale (SUS) questionnaire. PMID:27886146

  9. Controlling the emotional heart: heart rate biofeedback improves cardiac control during emotional reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peira, Nathalie; Fredrikson, Mats; Pourtois, Gilles

    2014-03-01

    When regulating negative emotional reactions, one goal is to reduce physiological reactions. However, not all regulation strategies succeed in doing that. We tested whether heart rate biofeedback helped participants reduce physiological reactions in response to negative and neutral pictures. When viewing neutral pictures, participants could regulate their heart rate whether the heart rate feedback was real or not. In contrast, when viewing negative pictures, participants could regulate heart rate only when feedback was real. Ratings of task success paralleled heart rate. Participants' general level of anxiety, emotion awareness, or cognitive emotion regulation strategies did not influence the results. Our findings show that accurate online heart rate biofeedback provides an efficient way to down-regulate autonomic physiological reactions when encountering negative stimuli.

  10. Heart-pulse Biofeedback in Playful Exercise using a Wearable device and Modular Interactive Tiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shimokakimoto, Tomoya; Lund, Henrik Hautop; Suzuki, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    interactive tiles. The system consists of a wearable device that measures heart-pulse via ear-mounted sensor, and modular interactive tiles which are used for physical rehabilitation exercise through playing a game. The wearable devise enables detection of heart pulse in real-time and therefore provides heart...... beat rate during playful activities, even if the heart pulse wave have motion artifacts. The tiles are designed to build flexible structures and to provide immediate feedback based on the users’ physical interaction with the tiles. We combine the two systems to provide users with heart pulse...... biofeedback in playful exercise. We show that using the developed system it is possible for the users to regulate the exercise intensity on their own with biofeedback, and also possible to analyze exercise activity using number of steps on the tiles and heart beat rate....

  11. Reactivity of the EEG characteristics in teenagers with varying degrees of HRV biofeedback training success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Dyomin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the nature of the brain bioelectric activity changes in the dynamics of heart rate variability parameters biofeedback sessions in teenagers. There was revealed increase in predominance of the brain functional activity and increase in the stability of the subcortical brain structures. The biggest bioelectric reorganizations are revealed in the right brain hemisphere, often involving the frontal brain lobes. These changes were more pronounced in adolescents with successful completion of training.

  12. Pilot study employing heart rate variability biofeedback training to decrease anxiety in patients with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolnick, Barbara; Mostofsky, David I; Keane, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback, a technique which encourages slow meditative breathing, was offered to 25 in-patients with various eating disorder diagnoses-anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. We found that this modality had no serious side effects, and was subjectively useful to most participants. An enhanced ability to generate highly coherent HRV patterns in patients with recent onset anorexia nervosa was observed.

  13. Pattern analysis of defecography in patients with chronic functional constipation: is it predictable for the responsiveness of biofeedback therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hye Rin; Kim, Ah Young; Hong, Seong Sook; Byun, Jae Ho; Myung Seung Jae; Ha, Hyun Kwon [University of Ulsan of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-08-15

    To determine of pattern analysis of defecography can predict the responsiveness of biofeedback therapy in patients with chronic functional constipation. Over a two-year period, 104 patients with chronic functional constipation underwent defecography and biofeedback therapy. Two blinded readers analyzed the defecographic findings and classified them into six types; I = normal defecation, II = hypertonic lower anal sphincter (poor anal opening due to a persistent contraction of the lower anal sphincter), III dyskinetic puborectal sling (inadequate laxity of the puborectal sling), IV spastic pelvic floor syndrome (persistent contraction of both the puborectal sling and the lower and sphincter), V unclassified (including paradoxical contraction of the anal sphincter), VI anatomical obstruction. In addition, the degree of rectal contraction during defecation was scored (grade 0 to 3). After biofeedback therapy, the differences in the defecography patterns or rectal contraction between the two groups, the responsive or non-responsive group, were analyzed. The defecograms revealed that the type IV of the spastic pelvic floor syndrome was most common (50 of 104 patients, 48%), followed by II (21/104, 20%), III (12/104, 11.5%), V (9/104, 9%) and VI (12/104, 11.5%). Biofeedback therapy showed a therapeutic response in 71 out of 104 patients (68%) but failed in 33 patients (32%). However, there were no significant differences in the defecographic pattern between the responsive and non-responsive groups ({rho} = 0.630). The defecograms revealed contractions in 78 patients (75%) and moderate to vigorous contractions (more than grade 2) in 66 patients. Most of the biofeedback-responsive group showed rectal contractions (66 of 71 patients, 93%, {rho} < 0.001). In patients with chronic functional constipation, there was no significant difference in the morphological patterns of the defecogram between the responsive and non-responsive biofeedback groups. However, the presence of

  14. Prospective evaluation of the treatment of solitary rectal ulcer syndrome with biofeedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaizey, C; Roy, A; Kamm, M

    1997-01-01

    Background—Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is often resistant to medical and surgical treatment. 
Aim—To determine whether biofeedback retraining is a useful treatment for this condition. 
Patients—Thirteen consecutive patients with SRUS (three men, median age 34 years, median duration of symptoms three years) underwent treatment. Previous surgical treatment had failed in five. 
Methods—Patients were evaluated prospectively. Anorectal physiological studies were performed in 11 patients before treatment. A standardised questionnaire was used before and after treatment, and all but two patients were examined after treatment. 
Results—Median follow up was nine months (range 3-22 months). After treatment four patients were asymptomatic, and four felt improved. Symptom improvement or elimination occurred in: need to strain (7/13 patients), digitation (7/11), laxative use (5/9). Time in the toilet (median 30 v 10 minutes, before v after treatment) and number of visits to toilet (6 v 3/day) were also improved. Three patients were able to maintain employment before treatment compared with eight after treatment. The solitary ulcer did not heal completely in any of the nine patients examined after treatment, but improved in four. Previous surgery, the macroscopic appearance of the ulcer, the presence of pelvic floor paradox, and other physiological parameters did not predict outcome. 
Conclusion—Biofeedback retraining is a useful treatment for this condition. Long term studies are now required. 

 Keywords: solitary rectal ulcer syndrome; biofeedback therapy PMID:9462216

  15. Microperimetric Biofeedback Training Improved Visual Acuity after Successful Macular Hole Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Ueda-Consolvo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy of setting a preferred retinal locus relocation target (PRT and performing Macular Integrity Assessment (MAIA biofeedback training in patients showing insufficient recovery of best corrected visual acuity (BCVA despite successful closure of an idiopathic macular hole (MH. Methods. Retrospective interventional case series. Nine eyes of 9 consecutive patients with the decimal BCVA of less than 0.6 at more than 3 months after successful MH surgery were included. A PRT was chosen based on MAIA microperimetry and the patients underwent MAIA biofeedback training. BCVA, reading speed, fixation stability, and 63% bivariate contour ellipse area (BCEA were evaluated before and after the training. Statistical analysis was carried out using paired Student’s t-test. Results. PRT was chosen on the nasal side of the closed MH fovea in 8 patients. After the MAIA training, BCVA improved in all patients. The mean logMAR value of BCVA significantly improved from 0.33 to 0.12 (p=0.007. Reading speed improved in all patients (p=0.29, fixation stability improved in 5 patients (p=0.70, and 63% BCEA improved in 7 patients (p=0.21, although these improvements were not statistically significant. Conclusion. MAIA biofeedback training improved visual acuity in patients with insufficient recovery of BCVA after successful MH surgery.

  16. Electromyographic biofeedback and recovery of quadriceps femoris muscle function following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, V

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of biofeedback-facilitated exercise with exercise alone on the recovery rate of quadriceps femoris muscle function following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Functional measures included 1) a dynamometric test of quadriceps femoris muscle isometric peak torque during the 12th postoperative week and 2) the number of days post-operatively that a patient achieved full active extension of the knee. Twenty-two patients with acute ACL injury were randomly assigned to a Treatment (biofeedback) Group (n = 11) or a Control (nonfeedback) Group (n = 11) during the first therapy session one week after reconstructive surgery. After the patients had completed the 12-week exercise program, the quadriceps femoris muscle isometric peak torque in the operative limb was compared with that in the nonoperative limb at three angles (90 degrees, 60 degrees, and 45 degrees) of extension. An analysis of variance revealed significant differences between the Treatment and Control Groups at all three angles. Mean recovery time was calculated for each group, and a t test for independent samples indicated a significant difference between the groups. These results demonstrate that the addition of biofeedback to muscle strengthening exercises facilitates the rate of recovery of quadriceps femoris muscle function following ACL reconstruction.

  17. Psychological Empowerment

    OpenAIRE

    Flohrer, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Instilling psychological empowerment in employees is one of the most important tasks of modern leadership. Building on quantitative research and the development of a new psychometric scale related to project management this thesis shows: First, individuals' characteristics and their work team environment influence perceptions of access to information and resources – two important antecedents of psychological empowerment. Second, while a project briefing strengthens the link of the psychologic...

  18. Inter-individual variability in sensory weighting of a plantar pressure-based, tongue-placed tactile biofeedback for controlling posture

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Boisgontier, Matthieu; Chenu, Olivier; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to investigate whether the sensory weighting of a plantar pressure-based, tongue-placed tactile biofeedback for controlling posture could be subject to inter-individual variability. To achieve this goal, 60 young healthy adults were asked to stand as immobile as possible with their eyes closed in two conditions of No-biofeedback and Biofeedback. Centre of foot pressure (CoP) displacements were recorded using a force platform. Overall, results showed reduced CoP displacements in the Biofeedback relative to the No-biofeedback condition, evidencing the ability of the central nervous system to efficiently integrate an artificial plantar-based, tongue-placed tactile biofeedback for controlling posture during quiet standing. Results further showed a significant positive correlation between the CoP displacements measured in the No-biofeedback condition and the decrease in the CoP displacements induced by the use of the biofeedback. In other words, the degree of postural stab...

  19. [Political psychology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resch, Mária; Bella, Tamás

    2013-04-21

    In Hungary one can mostly find references to the psychological processes of politics in the writings of publicists, public opinion pollsters, philosophers, social psychologists, and political analysts. It would be still important if not only legal scientists focusing on political institutions or sociologist-politologists concentrating on social structures could analyse the psychological aspects of political processes; but one could also do so through the application of the methods of political psychology. The authors review the history of political psychology, its position vis-à-vis other fields of science and the essential interfaces through which this field of science, which is still to be discovered in Hungary, connects to other social sciences. As far as its methodology comprising psycho-biographical analyses, questionnaire-based queries, cognitive mapping of interviews and statements are concerned, it is identical with the psychiatric tools of medical sciences. In the next part of this paper, the focus is shifted to the essence and contents of political psychology. Group dynamics properties, voters' attitudes, leaders' personalities and the behavioural patterns demonstrated by them in different political situations, authoritativeness, games, and charisma are all essential components of political psychology, which mostly analyses psychological-psychiatric processes and also involves medical sciences by relying on cognitive and behavioural sciences. This paper describes political psychology, which is basically part of social sciences, still, being an interdisciplinary science, has several ties to medical sciences through psychological and psychiatric aspects.

  20. An Experimental Study of Biofeedback Therapy on Intervention for Test Anxiety of University Students%生物反馈疗法对大学生考试焦虑的治疗作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢念湘; 佟玉英

    2012-01-01

    探讨生物反馈疗法对大学生考试焦虑的治疗作用。在某大学随机抽取学生1500名,采用考试焦虑量表进行筛查,选取焦虑组和对照组各30名。利用生物反馈疗法进行干预,采用脑电α波相对功率、肌电和皮电导联进行检测,每周2次,持续4周。结果表明:1.经过4周的干预,焦虑组干预前后各生理指标存在差异;2.生物反馈疗法干预考试焦虑在疗效上存在性别差异。结论:生物反馈疗法能有效降低大学生考试焦虑水平,对其治疗取得良好的效果。%Test anxiety,a type of psychological stress in time of emergency,is currently widely spread among university students.Negative emotions,such as stress,anxiety and fear prior to or during the examination,can cause psychological changes of unease and fast heart beat and sped-up breath,sweaty body,etc.This type of anxiety not only affects exam results,but also plays a role in health hazard to candidates physically and mentally(problems with immune function,cognitive ability,emotional states,etc.).Through the adoption of a multi-function biofeedback therapy,the study researched into the intervention to reduce severe college students'test anxiety. The examiners detected the candidates' physiological indicators including the relative power of alpha waves of EEG(α%relative power, referred to as alpha%),EMG(electromyography) and galvanic skin(skin conductance).The study has been conducted to explore the effects that the biofeedback therapy has on the intervention for test anxiety in university students.The examiners randomly selected 1,500 students in a comprehensive university and used the Test Anxiety Scale(TAS) for evaluation.According to the survey results, the students were divided into two groups;the anxiety group(n = 30),in which the students experienced anxiety in the text,and the control group(n = 30),which included people who did not experience anxiety.Both the anxiety group and the control group

  1. Biofeedback for treatment of awake and sleep bruxism in adults: systematic review protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Bruxism is a disorder of jaw-muscle activity characterised by repetitive clenching or grinding of the teeth which results in discomfort and damage to dentition. The two clinical manifestations of the condition (sleep and awake bruxism) are thought to have unrelated aetiologies but are palliated using similar techniques. The lack of a definitive treatment has prompted renewed interest in biofeedback, a behaviour change method that uses electronic detection to provide a stimulus whenever bruxism occurs. This systematic review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the state of research into biofeedback for bruxism; to assess the efficacy and acceptability of biofeedback therapy in management of awake bruxism and, separately, sleep bruxism in adults; and to compare findings between the two variants. Methods A systematic review of published literature examining biofeedback as an intervention directed at controlling primary bruxism in adults. We will search electronic databases and the grey literature using a predefined search strategy to identify randomised and non-randomised studies, technical reports and patents. Searches will not be restricted by language or date and will be expanded through contact with authors and experts, and by following up reference lists and citations. Two authors, working independently, will conduct screening of search results, study selection, data extraction and quality assessment and a third will resolve any disagreements. The primary outcomes of acceptability and effectiveness will be assessed using only randomised studies, segregated by bruxism subtype. A meta-analysis of these data will be conducted only if pre-defined conditions for quality and heterogeneity are met, otherwise the data will be summarized in narrative form. Data from non-randomised studies will be used to augment a narrative synthesis of the state of technical developments and any safety-related issues. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42013006880

  2. Investigating the impact of audio instruction and audio-visual biofeedback for lung cancer radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Rohini

    Lung cancer accounts for 13% of all cancers in the Unites States and is the leading cause of deaths among both men and women. The five-year survival for lung cancer patients is approximately 15%.(ACS facts & figures) Respiratory motion decreases accuracy of thoracic radiotherapy during imaging and delivery. To account for respiration, generally margins are added during radiation treatment planning, which may cause a substantial dose delivery to normal tissues and increase the normal tissue toxicity. To alleviate the above-mentioned effects of respiratory motion, several motion management techniques are available which can reduce the doses to normal tissues, thereby reducing treatment toxicity and allowing dose escalation to the tumor. This may increase the survival probability of patients who have lung cancer and are receiving radiation therapy. However the accuracy of these motion management techniques are inhibited by respiration irregularity. The rationale of this thesis was to study the improvement in regularity of respiratory motion by breathing coaching for lung cancer patients using audio instructions and audio-visual biofeedback. A total of 331 patient respiratory motion traces, each four minutes in length, were collected from 24 lung cancer patients enrolled in an IRB-approved breathing-training protocol. It was determined that audio-visual biofeedback significantly improved the regularity of respiratory motion compared to free breathing and audio instruction, thus improving the accuracy of respiratory gated radiotherapy. It was also observed that duty cycles below 30% showed insignificant reduction in residual motion while above 50% there was a sharp increase in residual motion. The reproducibility of exhale based gating was higher than that of inhale base gating. Modeling the respiratory cycles it was found that cosine and cosine 4 models had the best correlation with individual respiratory cycles. The overall respiratory motion probability distribution

  3. Efficacy of biofeedback therapy via a mini wireless device on sleep bruxism contrasted with occlusal splint: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, WeiPing; Yang, Jie; Zhang, FeiMin; Yin, XinMin; Wei, XiaoLong; Wang, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The putative causes of bruxism are multifactorial and there are no definite measures for bruxism management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of biofeedback therapy on sleep bruxism, compared with occlusal splint. Twenty-four volunteers with sleep bruxism were divided into two groups: the GTB group that were treated with biofeedback therapy (n  = 12) and the GTO group that were treated with occlusal splint (n  = 12). A mini pressure sensor integrated with a monitoring circuit by use of a maxillary biofeedback splint was fabricated. To foster the relaxation of the masticatory muscles and the nervous system, the wireless device received signals from bruxism events and vibrations alerted the bruxer when the threshold was exceeded. Total episodes and average duration of bruxism events during 8 hours of sleep were analyzed with the monitoring program (TRMY1.0). After 6 and 12 weeks, the episodes (P  =  0.001) and duration (P 0.05). Furthermore, the episodes had significant differences between the GTB group and the GTO group after the same period of treatment (P  =  0.000). The results suggest that biofeedback therapy may be an effective and convenient measure for mild bruxers, when compared with occlusal splint therapy. The mini wireless biofeedback method may be of value for the diagnosis and management of bruxism in the future. PMID:25859272

  4. A pilot study on the effects of heart rate variability biofeedback in patients with depression and in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepmann, Martin; Aykac, Volkan; Unterdörfer, Jana; Petrowski, Katja; Mueck-Weymann, Michael

    2008-12-01

    Decreased vagal activity and increased sympathetic arousal have been proposed as major contributors to the increased risk of cardiovascular mortality in patients with depression. It was aim of the present study to assess the feasibility of using heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback to treat moderate to severe depression. This was an open-label study in which 14 patients with different degrees of depression (13 f, 1 m) aged 30 years (18-47; median; range) and 12 healthy volunteers attended 6 sessions of HRV biofeedback over two weeks. Another 12 healthy subjects were observed under an active control condition. At follow up BDI was found significantly decreased (BDI 6; 2-20; median 25%-75% quartile) as compared to baseline conditions (BDI 22;15-29) in patients with depression. In addition, depressed patients had reduced anxiety, decreased heart rate and increased HRV after conduction of biofeedback (p biofeedback nor in normal controls. In conclusion, HRV biofeedback appears to be a useful adjunct for the treatment of depression, associated with increases in HRV.

  5. A Vibrotactile and Plantar Force Measurement-Based Biofeedback System: Paving the Way towards Wearable Balance-Improving Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Zong-Hao Ma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although biofeedback systems have been used to improve balance with success, they were confined to hospital training applications. Little attempt has been made to investigate the use of in-shoe plantar force measurement and wireless technology to turn hospital training biofeedback systems into wearable devices. This research developed a wearable biofeedback system which detects body sway by analyzing the plantar force and provides users with the corresponding haptic cues. The effects of this system were evaluated in thirty young and elderly subjects with simulated reduced foot sensation. Subjects performed a Romberg test under three conditions: (1 no socks, system turned-off; (2 wearing five layers of socks, system turned-off; (3 wearing five layers of socks, and system turned-on. Degree of body sway was investigated by computing the center of pressure (COP movement measured by a floor-mounted force platform. Plantar tactile sensation was evaluated using a monofilament test. Wearing multiple socks significantly decreased the plantar tactile sensory input (p < 0.05, and increased the COP parameters (p < 0.017, indicating increased postural sway. After turning on the biofeedback system, the COP parameters decreased significantly (p < 0.017. The positive results of this study should inspire future development of wearable plantar force-based biofeedback systems for improving balance in people with sensory deficits.

  6. Long-term effects of electrodermal biofeedback training on seizure control in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yoko; Trimble, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    We report data from two patients, followed over 3 years after electrodermal biofeedback treatment. Patients were trained three times each week for four weeks to increase their sympathetic arousal using electrodermal biofeedback. This treatment was directed at enabling the patients to change their psychophysiological state as a countermeasure to prevent seizures. Both patients voluntarily kept a record of seizure frequency over the year preceding the treatment and continued to record their seizures for up to 3 years after the termination of biofeedback treatment. Both patients showed a marked reduction in seizure frequency (54.9% and 59.8%) during the month of biofeedback treatment. This improvement was maintained over the subsequent years. We highlight the therapeutic potential of biofeedback interventions that enable patients to volitionally control their state of physiological arousal in the management of drug-resistant epilepsy.

  7. Psychological behaviorism and behaviorizing psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, A W

    1994-01-01

    Paradigmatic or psychological behaviorism (PB), in a four-decade history of development, has been shaped by its goal, the establishment of a behaviorism that can also serve as the approach in psychology (Watson's original goal). In the process, PB has become a new generation of behaviorism with abundant heuristic avenues for development in theory, philosophy, methodology, and research. Psychology has resources, purview and problem areas, and nascent developments of many kinds, gathered in chaotic diversity, needing unification (and other things) that cognitivism cannot provide. Behaviorism can, within PB's multilevel framework for connecting and advancing both psychology and behaviorism.

  8. Psychological experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boven, Martijn; Emmanuel, Steven M.; McDonald, William; Stewart, Jon

    2015-01-01

    For Kierkegaard the ‘psychological experiment’ is a literary strategy. It enables him to dramatize an existential conflict in an experimental mode. Kierkegaard’s aim is to study the source of movement that animates the existing individual (this is the psychological part). However, he is not interest

  9. The use of EMG biofeedback for learning of selective activation of intra-muscular parts within the serratus anterior muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, A; Mork, P J; Andersen, L L;

    2010-01-01

    anterior can be learned with electromyographical (EMG) biofeedback, and whether the lower serratus anterior and the lower trapezius muscle comprise the lower scapula rotation force couple by synergistic activation. Nine healthy males practiced selective activation of intra-muscular parts within...... the serratus anterior with visual EMG biofeedback, while the activity of four parts of the serratus anterior and four parts of the trapezius muscle was recorded. One subject was able to selectively activate both the upper and the lower serratus anterior respectively. Moreover, three subjects managed.......05). The learning of complete selective activation of both the lower and the upper serratus anterior of one subject, and selective activation of either the upper or lower serratus anterior by five subjects designates the promising clinical application of EMG biofeedback for restoring scapular muscle balance...

  10. Biofeedback Therapy Before Ileostomy Closure in Patients Undergoing Sphincter-Saving Surgery for Rectal Cancer: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Ki; Jeon, Byeong Geon; Song, Yoon Suk; Seo, Mi Sun; Kwon, Yoon-Hye; Park, JI Won; Ryoo, Seung-Bum; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study prospectively investigated the effects of biofeedback therapy on objective anorectal function and subjective bowel function in patients after sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer. Methods Sixteen patients who underwent an ileostomy were randomized into two groups, one receiving conservative management with the Kegel maneuver and the other receiving active biofeedback before ileostomy closure. Among them, 12 patients (mean age, 57.5 years; range, 38 to 69 years; 6 patients in each group) completed the study. Conservative management included lifestyle modifications, Kegel exercises, and medication. Patients were evaluated at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after ileostomy closure by using anal manometry, modified Wexner Incontinence Scores (WISs), and fecal incontinence quality of life (FI-QoL) scores. Results Before the ileostomy closure, the groups did not differ in baseline clinical characteristics or resting manometric parameters. After 12 months of follow-up, the biofeedback group demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the mean maximum squeezing pressure (from 146.3 to 178.9, P = 0.002). However, no beneficial effect on the WIS was noted for biofeedback compared to conservative management alone. Overall, the FI-QoL scores were increased significantly in both groups after ileostomy closure (P = 0.006), but did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion Although the biofeedback therapy group demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the maximum squeezing pressure, significant improvements in the WISs and the FI-QoL scores over time were noted in both groups. The study was terminated early because no therapeutic benefit of biofeedback had been demonstrated. PMID:26361615

  11. Efficacy of Biofeedback Therapy before and after Sphincteroplasty for Fecal Incontinence because of Obstetric Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Ghahramani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fecal incontinence is a challenging condition in that it exerts various psychosocial impacts on daily life. Different treatment modalities have been suggested for fecal incontinence. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of biofeedback therapy in combination with surgery in the management of fecal incontinence. The present randomized controlled trial was performed on 27 women with a complaint of fecal incontinence because of delivery trauma. The patients underwent sphincteroplasty and levatorplasty via the same method by 2 colorectal surgeons. In Group I, biofeedback therapy was performed 3 months before and 6 months after the surgery; in Group II, biofeedback therapy was applied only 6 months after the surgery; and in Group III, only surgical management was performed. The results revealed a significant difference between the preoperative and postoperative Wexner scores of incontinence in all the 3 groups. Additionally, the difference between the preoperative and postoperative scores was significant only in Group I and Group III, but not in Group II. The reduction in the Wexner score was significantly less in Group III. However, no significant difference was observed between the 3 groups concerning the mean difference of preoperative and postoperative manometry. The present study revealed no significant role for biofeedback therapy alone in the improvement of manometric evaluation. However, the Wexner score, which is an indicator of patient satisfaction, increased with biofeedback therapy following sphincteroplasty. In general, surgical treatment is now reserved for selected patients with fecal incontinence and has recently been developed with biofeedback therapy. Trial Registration Number: IRCT201206039936N1

  12. Analysis and Modeling of the Galvanic Skin Response Spontaneous Component in the context of Intelligent Biofeedback Systems Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unakafov, A.

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents an approach to galvanic skin response (GSR) spontaneous component analysis and modeling. In the study a classification of biofeedback training methods is given, importance of intelligent methods development is shown. The INTENS method, which is perspective for intellectualization, is presented. An important problem of biofeedback training method intellectualization - estimation of the GSR spontaneous component - is solved in the main part of the work. Its main characteristics are described; results of GSR spontaneous component modeling are shown. Results of small research of an optimum material for GSR probes are presented.

  13. Audio-Biofeedback training for posture and balance in Patients with Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zijlstra Wiebren

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD suffer from dysrhythmic and disturbed gait, impaired balance, and decreased postural responses. These alterations lead to falls, especially as the disease progresses. Based on the observation that postural control improved in patients with vestibular dysfunction after audio-biofeedback training, we tested the feasibility and effects of this training modality in patients with PD. Methods Seven patients with PD were included in a pilot study comprised of a six weeks intervention program. The training was individualized to each patient's needs and was delivered using an audio-biofeedback (ABF system with headphones. The training was focused on improving posture, sit-to-stand abilities, and dynamic balance in various positions. Non-parametric statistics were used to evaluate training effects. Results The ABF system was well accepted by all participants with no adverse events reported. Patients declared high satisfaction with the training. A significant improvement of balance, as assessed by the Berg Balance Scale, was observed (improvement of 3% p = 0.032, and a trend in the Timed up and go test (improvement of 11%; p = 0.07 was also seen. In addition, the training appeared to have a positive influence on psychosocial aspects of the disease as assessed by the Parkinson's disease quality of life questionnaire (PDQ-39 and the level of depression as assessed by the Geriatric Depression Scale. Conclusions This is, to our knowledge, the first report demonstrating that audio-biofeedback training for patients with PD is feasible and is associated with improvements of balance and several psychosocial aspects.

  14. Neural activity based biofeedback therapy for Autism spectrum disorder through wearable wireless textile EEG monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahi, Ahna; Rai, Pratyush; Oh, Sechang; Ramasamy, Mouli; Harbaugh, Robert E.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2014-04-01

    Mu waves, also known as mu rhythms, comb or wicket rhythms are synchronized patterns of electrical activity involving large numbers of neurons, in the part of the brain that controls voluntary functions. Controlling, manipulating, or gaining greater awareness of these functions can be done through the process of Biofeedback. Biofeedback is a process that enables an individual to learn how to change voluntary movements for purposes of improving health and performance through the means of instruments such as EEG which rapidly and accurately 'feedback' information to the user. Biofeedback is used for therapeutic purpose for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) by focusing on Mu waves for detecting anomalies in brain wave patterns of mirror neurons. Conventional EEG measurement systems use gel based gold cup electrodes, attached to the scalp with adhesive. It is obtrusive and wires sticking out of the electrodes to signal acquisition system make them impractical for use in sensitive subjects like infants and children with ASD. To remedy this, sensors can be incorporated with skull cap and baseball cap that are commonly used for infants and children. Feasibility of Textile based Sensor system has been investigated here. Textile based multi-electrode EEG, EOG and EMG monitoring system with embedded electronics for data acquisition and wireless transmission has been seamlessly integrated into fabric of these items for continuous detection of Mu waves. Textile electrodes were placed on positions C3, CZ, C4 according to 10-20 international system and their capability to detect Mu waves was tested. The system is ergonomic and can potentially be used for early diagnosis in infants and planning therapy for ASD patients.

  15. Evaluating the ChillFish Biofeedback Game with Children with ADHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Tobias; Jensen, Mads Møller

    2016-01-01

    Breathing exercises have been shown to have multiple benefits for children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). However, these children can have issues retaining attention to such an exercise. In this paper we present a study of ChillFish, a respiration game for children with ADHD....... Our findings show tendencies that the game works in terms of having a calming effect. However, the study also highlighted issues of evaluating biofeedback games with children with ADHD that are not present when evaluating with adults. This work presents an iteration in the ChillFish development cycle...

  16. A Pilot Study on Measuring the Readers’ Emotions Using HRV Biofeedback at University Malaysia Pahang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iftikhar Yousaf

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Positive associations have been found between reading and emotions. Various techniques, including traditional as well as modern, have been used to measure emotions in the previous studies. However, emotional measurement of the readers of a literary piece through HRV Biofeedback has never been investigated. A study was undertaken to assess whether Heart Rate Variability (HRV biofeedback regarding  measurement of emotions in the readers of English Literature is likely to be effective or not for the first time at University Malaysia Pahang. In this study two scripts of the plays “Dr. Faustus” and “Waiting for Godot” were used. The Scripts were prepared from the Original Texts of these two plays, which might convey the overall message of the plays to the readers and resultantly produce the desired effect on the readers’ emotions. The total words of these two scripts were around 1050 each, allowing the students to complete one script in 7-8 minutes. Six subjects were selected randomly. While they were sitting calm and quiet at the desk, photoplethysmograph sensor was attached to their one of the earlobes which was connected to the emWave Desktop-PC software to record their Baseline HRV. The subjects, one at a time, read the Script 1 “Waiting for Godot” silently. After completion of the reading of Script 1, the emWave software was stopped and the HRV of the subject was recorded and saved automatically in the computer. The same process was repeated with Script 2 “Dr. Faustus”. In this way, emWave software recorded three HRV data for every subject. Results show obvious changes and significant correlations in the HRV of the participants while reading both the scripts. VLF increased for Script 1 while it decreased for Script 2. On the other hand, HF increased for Script 1 and further increased for Script 2.  LF decreased for Script 1 and increased for Script 2. These results point out the tendency that the stress level of the

  17. 飞行人员生物反馈放松训练效果评价%The evaluation of pilots' biofeedback relaxation training effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘军; 王煜蕙; 杜长伟; 刘玉华; 赵春华; 王开辉; 冯琦

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of pilots' biofeedback training in aviation psychological training. Methods After practicing pilots by four kinds of relaxation training ( progressive muscle relaxation, breath adjusting relaxation, intention relaxation and music relaxation) , the scores of heart rate, pressure and PNN50 were statistical analyzed. Results Three physiological inde-xes were changed during earlier stage, medium stage and later stage and the difference had statistical significance ( P < 0.05 or P < 0.01), but were not found significant different among four methods ( P < 0. 01). Compared with the older group and the oldest group, the difference of heart rate scores changes in younger group before, during and after training had statistical significance ( P < 0.01). Conclusion The biofeedback relaxation training was effective in pilots. There was no statistical significance in difference of training effects between different methods and results. The training effects of different age groups were different, and scores of younger group were higher than others.%目的 评价航空心理训练中对飞行人员实施生物反馈放松训练的效果.方法 分别采用渐进性肌肉放松、呼吸调整放松、意向放松和音乐放松等四种方法 进行反馈训练,对训练中心率、压力指数和PNN50生理指标进行统计分析.结果 训练前、中和后期各生理指标变化的差异有统计学意义(P<0.05或P<0.01);四种训练方法 之间生理指标变化无差异(P>0.05);低年龄组心率变化在训练前和训练中、训练后与中间和高年龄组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).结论 飞行人员生物反馈放松训练效果明显,不同放松方法 的训练效果比较差异无统计学意义;不同年龄组训练效果差异有统计学意义,低年龄组训练效果好于中间和高年龄组.

  18. Balance Improvement Effects of Biofeedback Systems with State-of-the-Art Wearable Sensors: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Zong-Hao Ma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Falls and fall-induced injuries are major global public health problems. Balance and gait disorders have been the second leading cause of falls. Inertial motion sensors and force sensors have been widely used to monitor both static and dynamic balance performance. Based on the detected performance, instant visual, auditory, electrotactile and vibrotactile biofeedback could be provided to augment the somatosensory input and enhance balance control. This review aims to synthesize the research examining the effect of biofeedback systems, with wearable inertial motion sensors and force sensors, on balance performance. Randomized and non-randomized clinical trials were included in this review. All studies were evaluated based on the methodological quality. Sample characteristics, device design and study characteristics were summarized. Most previous studies suggested that biofeedback devices were effective in enhancing static and dynamic balance in healthy young and older adults, and patients with balance and gait disorders. Attention should be paid to the choice of appropriate types of sensors and biofeedback for different intended purposes. Maximizing the computing capacity of the micro-processer, while minimizing the size of the electronic components, appears to be the future direction of optimizing the devices. Wearable balance-improving devices have their potential of serving as balance aids in daily life, which can be used indoors and outdoors.

  19. Heart rate variability biofeedback as a method for assessing baroreflex function: a preliminary study of resonance in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaschillo, Evgeny; Lehrer, Paul; Rishe, Naphtali; Konstantinov, Mikhail

    2002-03-01

    This study describes the use of a biofeedback method for the noninvasive study of baroreflex mechanisms. Five previously untrained healthy male participants learned to control oscillations in heart rate using biofeedback training to modify their heart rate variability at specific frequencies. They were instructed to match computer-generated sinusoidal oscillations with oscillations in heart rate at seven frequencies within the range of 0.01-0.14 Hz. All participants successfully produced high-amplitude target-frequency oscillations in both heart rate and blood pressure. Stable and predictable transfer functions between heart rate and blood pressure were obtained in all participants. The highest oscillation amplitudes were produced in the range of 0.055-0.11 Hz for heart rate and 0.02-0.055 Hz for blood pressure. Transfer functions were calculated among sinusoidal oscillations in the target stimuli, heart rate, blood pressure, and respiration for frequencies at which subjects received training. High and low target-frequency oscillation amplitudes at specific frequencies could be explained by resonance among various oscillatory processes in the cardiovascular system. The exact resonant frequencies differed among individuals. Changes in heart rate oscillations could not be completely explained by changes in breathing. The biofeedback method also allowed us to quantity characteristics of inertia, delay, and speed sensitivity in baroreflex system. We discuss the implications of these findings for using heart rate variability biofeedback as an aid in diagnosing various autonomic and cardiovascular system disorders and as a method for treating these disorders.

  20. [Individual Types Reactivity of EEG Oscillations in Effective Heart Rhythm Biofeedback Parameters in Adolescents and Young People in the North].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivonogova, E V; Poskotinova, L V; Demin, D B

    2015-01-01

    A single session of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback in apparently healthy young people and adolescents aged 14-17 years in order to increase vagal effects on heart rhythm and also electroencephalograms were carried out. Different variants of EEG spectral power during the successful HRV biofeedback session were identified. In the case of I variant of EEG activity the increase of power spectrum of alpha-, betal-, theta-components takes place in all parts of the brain. In the case of II variant of EEG activity the reduction of power spectrum of alpha-, betal-, theta-activity in all parts of the brain was observed. I and II variants of EEG activity cause more intensive regime of cortical-subcortical interactions. During the III variant of EEG activity the successful biofeedback is accompanied by increase of alpha activity in the central, front and anteriofrontal brain parts and so indicates the formation of thalamocortical relations of neural network in order to optimize the vegetal regulation of heart function. There was an increase in alpha- and beta1-activity in the parietal, central, frontal and temporal brain parts during the IV variant of EEG activity and so that it provides the relief of neural networks communication for information processing. As a result of V variance of EEG activity there was the increase of power spectrum of theta activity in the central and frontal parts of both cerebral hemispheres, so it was associated with the cortical-hippocampal interactions to achieve a successful biofeedback.

  1. Optimizing the use of an artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback for improving ankle joint position sense in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillerme, N; Chenu, O; Fleury, A; Demongeot, J; Payan, Y

    2006-01-01

    The performance of an artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback device for improving ankle joint position sense was assessed in 12 young healthy adults using an active matching task. The underlying principle of this system consisted of supplying individuals with supplementary information about the position of the matching ankle relative to the reference ankle position through a tongue-placed tactile output device generating electrotactile stimulation on a 36- point (6 x 6) matrix held against the surface of the tongue dorsum. Precisely, (1) no electrodes were activated when both ankles were in a similar angular position within predetermined "angular dead zone" (ADZ); (2) 12 electrodes (2 x 6) of the anterior and posterior zones of the matrix were activated (corresponding to the stimulation of the front and rear portion of the tongue) when the matching ankle was in too plantar and dorsiflexed position relative to the reference ankle, respectively. The effects of two ADZ values of 0.5 degrees and 1.5 degrees were evaluated. Results showed (1) more accurate and more consistent matching performances with than without biofeedback and (2) more accurate and more consistent ankle joint matching performances when using the biofeedback device with the smaller ADZ value. These findings suggest that (1) electrotactile stimulation of the tongue can be used to improve ankle joint proprioception and (2) this improvement can be increased through an appropriate specification of the ADZ parameter provided by the biofeedback system. Further investigations are needed to strengthen the potential clinical value of this device.

  2. Balance Improvement Effects of Biofeedback Systems with State-of-the-Art Wearable Sensors: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Christina Zong-Hao; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Lam, Wing Kai; Wan, Anson Hong-Ping; Lee, Winson Chiu-Chun

    2016-03-25

    Falls and fall-induced injuries are major global public health problems. Balance and gait disorders have been the second leading cause of falls. Inertial motion sensors and force sensors have been widely used to monitor both static and dynamic balance performance. Based on the detected performance, instant visual, auditory, electrotactile and vibrotactile biofeedback could be provided to augment the somatosensory input and enhance balance control. This review aims to synthesize the research examining the effect of biofeedback systems, with wearable inertial motion sensors and force sensors, on balance performance. Randomized and non-randomized clinical trials were included in this review. All studies were evaluated based on the methodological quality. Sample characteristics, device design and study characteristics were summarized. Most previous studies suggested that biofeedback devices were effective in enhancing static and dynamic balance in healthy young and older adults, and patients with balance and gait disorders. Attention should be paid to the choice of appropriate types of sensors and biofeedback for different intended purposes. Maximizing the computing capacity of the micro-processer, while minimizing the size of the electronic components, appears to be the future direction of optimizing the devices. Wearable balance-improving devices have their potential of serving as balance aids in daily life, which can be used indoors and outdoors.

  3. A Vibrotactile and Plantar Force Measurement-Based Biofeedback System: Paving the Way towards Wearable Balance-Improving Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Christina Zong-Hao; Wan, Anson Hong-Ping; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Lee, Winson Chiu-Chun

    2015-12-15

    Although biofeedback systems have been used to improve balance with success, they were confined to hospital training applications. Little attempt has been made to investigate the use of in-shoe plantar force measurement and wireless technology to turn hospital training biofeedback systems into wearable devices. This research developed a wearable biofeedback system which detects body sway by analyzing the plantar force and provides users with the corresponding haptic cues. The effects of this system were evaluated in thirty young and elderly subjects with simulated reduced foot sensation. Subjects performed a Romberg test under three conditions: (1) no socks, system turned-off; (2) wearing five layers of socks, system turned-off; (3) wearing five layers of socks, and system turned-on. Degree of body sway was investigated by computing the center of pressure (COP) movement measured by a floor-mounted force platform. Plantar tactile sensation was evaluated using a monofilament test. Wearing multiple socks significantly decreased the plantar tactile sensory input (p wearable plantar force-based biofeedback systems for improving balance in people with sensory deficits.

  4. 生物反馈电刺激治疗功能性便秘%Biofeedback Treatment of Functional Constipation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卞秀华

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨功能性便秘采用生物反馈电刺激治疗的意义。方法55例患者进行生物反馈电刺激治疗1个月前后的排便情况的对比、直肠肛管测压、24 h结肠传输试验以及直肠和盆底肌电描记进行对比分析。结果生物反馈电刺激治疗对各型的FC均有一定疗效。结论对FC采用生物反馈电刺激治疗后肛管直肠动力异常改善,盆底肌不协调运动消失,每周便次增加,便秘改善。%ObjectiveTo investigate the functional constipation using Biofeedback therapy significance.Methods A comparative analysis of 55 patients were compared Biofeedback therapy defecation a month before and after, anorectal manometry, 24 hours colon and rectum and pelvic transmission test EMG tracings were.Results Biofeedback treatment of various types of FC all have a certain effect.Conclusion FC using Biofeedback treatment of anorectal motility disorders improve, uncoordinated movement of the pelvic floor muscles disappear, it plays increase, constipation improve every week.

  5. Breathing biofeedback as an adjunct to exposure in cognitive behavioral therapy hastens the reduction of PTSD symptoms : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosaura Polak, A; Witteveen, Anke B; Denys, D.; Olff, Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Although trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) with exposure is an effective treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), not all patients recover. Addition of breathing biofeedback to exposure in TF-CBT is suggested as a promising complementary technique to improve recovery of

  6. The Effects of Bilateral EEG Biofeedback on Verbal, Visual-Spatial, and Creative Skills in Learning Disabled Male Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Mark D.; Murphy, Philip J.

    1981-01-01

    The EEG biofeedback training produced baseline effects in the presumably dysfunctional left hemisphere and had an impact on arousal in task, suggesting remedial potential for the possible hemispheric arousal deficts in learning disabilities. Training the right hemisphere toward higher arousal and the left hemisphere toward lower arousal resulted…

  7. A smart cane with vibrotactile biofeedback improves cane loading for people with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routson, Rebecca L; Bailey, Marcus; Pumford, Isabelle; Czerniecki, Joseph M; Aubin, Patrick M

    2016-08-01

    Nine million adults have symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) in the U.S. and almost half of those people have a walking aid such as a cane. Proper cane loading (e.g. 15% body weight [BW]) can reduce knee loading and may slow OA progression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a novel smart cane with vibrotactile biofeedback that aims to facilitate increased cane loading. Ten subjects with knee OA performed a 50 m hallway walk test under four conditions: 1) naïve, 2) conventional cane with verbal instruction, 3) smart cane, and 4) conventional cane post smart cane. The cane load (% BW; mean ± 1 standard deviation) for the four conditions was 9.0 ± 1.9 (naïve), 12.7 ± 2.6 (conventional cane), 17.6 ± 2.4 (smart cane), and 15.6 ±3.1 (conventional cane post smart cane). These results indicate that the smart cane's vibrotactile biofeedback helped the users achieve the target cane loading of 15% BW or more as compared to naïve or verbal instruction alone. After using the smart cane, conventional cane loading was higher than the naïve and verbal instruction conditions demonstrating a potential smart cane training effect. Long term increased cane loading may reduce knee pain and improve joint function.

  8. Use of a portable biofeedback device to improve insomnia in a combat zone, a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLay, Robert N; Spira, James L

    2009-12-01

    Insomnia is a common problem in situations of stress. Some forms of stress, however, may contraindicate the use of traditional, pharmacological interventions. Working in a combat zone is such a situation. Alternative means of improving sleep are clearly needed for Service Members. We report a case involving a medical provider who was serving in a military, emergency-services facility in Iraq, and who presented with anxiety, depressed mood, and insomnia. Symptoms were sub-threshold for major depressive disorder or acute stress disorder. Mood and anxiety symptoms responded to traditional therapy techniques, but problems with insomnia remained. The patient was given a portable biofeedback device that employs an infrared sensor photoplethysmograph to measure heart rate variability (HRV) from peripheral finger pulse. One week later, sleep was significantly improved. Symptom improvement lasted to at least 6 weeks while in theater. One year later, a check-in with the patient revealed that after returning home, he had been diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD symptoms had resolved after 6 months of psychopharmacology and cognitive behavioral therapy. These results indicate that biofeedback may be a useful means of improving sleep in a combat zone, but that such improvements may not necessarily prevent the development of more serious symptoms later. No clear causality can be inferred from a single case, and further study is needed to determine if this finding have wider applicability.

  9. Combined heart rate variability and pulse oximetry biofeedback for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, Nicholas D; Chan, Leighton; Borson, Soo

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of an intervention that included heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback and walking with pulse oximetry feedback to improve functioning and quality of life for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Twenty patients with COPD participated in 5 weekly sessions of HRV biofeedback and 4 weekly sessions of walking practice with oximetry feedback, with instructions for daily home practice. Primary outcomes measures were the distance walked in 6 min (6MWD) and overall quality of life, as measured by the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). Secondary outcomes included measures of self-efficacy, self-reported disability, anxiety, depression, dyspnea before and after the 6MWD, and HRV at the frequency of respiration during spontaneous and paced breathing. After 10 weeks of training, participants showed statistically and clinically significant improvements in 6MWD and quality of life. Significant changes were also seen in self-efficacy, disability, dyspnea before and after the 6MWD, and HRV amplitude during spontaneous breathing. We conclude that our intervention is feasible for patients with COPD and that further research using a randomized controlled design is warranted.

  10. Microperimetry biofeedback training in a patient with bilateral myopic macular degeneration with central scotoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Raman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microperimetry-1 (MP-1 evaluation and MP-1 biofeedback training were done in a case of bilateral myopic macular degeneration with a central scotoma. Fixation behavior, location and stability of preferred retinal locus, eye movement speed, and mean sensitivity were assessed. The mean retinal sensitivities before, after and at 1-year after training in the right eye were 2.9 dB, 2.9 dB and 3.7 dB and in the left eye were 3.5 dB, 3.7 dB and 1.8 dB. The fixation point in the 2° gravitation circle, improved from 40% to 50% in the right eye and from 43% to 67% in the left eye. The average eye speed before, after and at 1-year after training in right eye were 0.19°/s, 0.26°/s and 0.25°/s and in left eye were 0.36°/s, 0.25°/s and 0.27°/s. Thus, biofeedback training using MP-1 can improve the visual function in patients with macular diseases and central scotoma.

  11. A novel biofeedback cycling training to improve gait symmetry in stroke patients: a case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, Emilia; Ferrante, Simona; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Guanziroli, Eleonora; Molteni, Franco

    2011-01-01

    The restoration of walking ability is crucial for maximizing independent mobility among patients with stroke. Leg cycling is becoming an established intervention to supplement ambulation training for stroke patients with problems of unbalance and weakness. The aim of the study was to explore the feasibility of a biofeedback pedaling treatment and its effects on cycling and walking ability in chronic stroke patients. Three patients were included in the study. The training consisted of a 2-week treatment of 6 sessions, during which a visual biofeedback helped the participants in maintaining a symmetrical pedaling. Participants were assessed before, after training and at follow-up, by means of a pedaling test and gait analysis. Outcome measurements were the unbalance during pedaling, the temporal, spatial and symmetry parameters during walking. An intra-subject statistical analysis (ANOVA, p<;0.05) showed that all patients significantly decreased pedaling unbalance after treatment and maintained the improvements at follow-up. The training induced some gait pattern modifications in two patients: one significantly improved mean velocity and gait symmetry, while the other one reduced the compensation strategy of the healthy leg. The results demonstrated the feasibility of the treatment. If further trials on a larger and controlled scale confirmed the same results, this treatment, thanks to its safety and low price, could have a significant impact as a home-rehabilitation treatment.

  12. Biofeedback cardiovascular e suas aplicações: revisão de literatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    July Silveira Gomes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular biofeedback is a technique for physiological modulation mediated by the resonance between two mechanisms of cardiovascular regulation: the baroreceptor reflex and the respiratory sinus arrhythmia. When this phenomenon occurs, it is possible to see a significant increase in the amplitude of the frequency around 0.1Hz, called low frequency (LF. In this paper, the Pubmed database was consulted and 31 papers published between July of 2000 and June of 2012 were reviewed. The protocol most cited (for 41.94 % of the papers was the one created by Lehrer, Vaschillo, & Vaschillo (2000 and involves 10 weekly sessions, for 20 minutes each, plus home-training twice a day for 20 minutes. Biofeedback training has shown promising result as a complementary therapy for different disorders, with significant reduction in the scores of anxiety and depression scales, whether these pathologies occur as the only complaint or as comorbidly with other diseases. The effects on cognitive changes have shown inconsistent results.

  13. Using ultrasound visual biofeedback to treat persistent primary speech sound disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Joanne; Scobbie, James M; Wrench, Alan A

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that speech intervention using visual biofeedback may benefit people for whom visual skills are stronger than auditory skills (for example, the hearing-impaired population), especially when the target articulation is hard to describe or see. Diagnostic ultrasound can be used to image the tongue and has recently become more compact and affordable leading to renewed interest in it as a practical, non-invasive visual biofeedback tool. In this study, we evaluate its effectiveness in treating children with persistent speech sound disorders that have been unresponsive to traditional therapy approaches. A case series of seven different children (aged 6-11) with persistent speech sound disorders were evaluated. For each child, high-speed ultrasound (121 fps), audio and lip video recordings were made while probing each child's specific errors at five different time points (before, during and after intervention). After intervention, all the children made significant progress on targeted segments, evidenced by both perceptual measures and changes in tongue-shape.

  14. The effects of frontal EMG biofeedback and progressive relaxation upon hyperactivity and its behavioral concomitants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braud, L W

    1978-03-01

    Hyperactive children (N = 15) and nonhyperactive children (N = 15) were compared. Hyperactive children were found to possess significantly higher (p less than .002) muscular tension levels and, in addition, presented more behavioral problems and had lower test scores. Both electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback and progressive relaxation exercises were successful in the significant reduction of muscular tension, hyperactivity, distractability, irritability, impulsivity, explosiveness, aggressivity, and emotionality in hyperactive children. The greatest improvement was seen in the area of "emotionality-aggression" (irritability, explosiveness, impulsivity, low frustration tolerance, aggresion). No differences were seen in the EMG improvement of drug and nondrug hyperactive children; both made progress under these self-control techniques. However, nondrug children made greater improvements in the behavioral area. Both EMG biofeedback and progressive relaxation resulted in improvements on the test scores of hyperactive subjects (Bender-Gestalt, Visual Sequential Memory, Digit Span, Coding). The therapy would appear to be improved by the inclusion of mental relaxation, concentration, meditation, and mind-blanking exercises for mental control.

  15. A knitted garment using intarsia technique for Heart Rate Variability biofeedback: Evaluation of initial prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abtahi, F; Ji, G; Lu, K; Rödby, K; Seoane, F

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback is a method based on paced breathing at specific rate called resonance frequency by giving online feedbacks from user respiration and its effect on HRV. Since the HRV is also influence by different factors like stress and emotions, stress related to an unfamiliar measurement device, cables and skin electrodes may cover the underling effect of such kind of intervention. Wearable systems are usually considered as intuitive solutions which are more familiar to the end-user and can help to improve usability and hence reducing the stress. In this work, a prototype of a knitted garment using intarsia technique is developed and evaluated. Results show the satisfactory level of quality for Electrocardiogram and thoracic electrical bioimpedance i.e. for respiration monitoring as a part of HRV biofeedback system. Using intarsia technique and conductive yarn for making the connection instead of cables will reduce the complexity of fabrication in textile production and hence reduce the final costs in a final commercial product. Further development of garment and Android application is ongoing and usability and efficiency of final prototype will be evaluated in detail.

  16. Single case methodology in neurobehavioural rehabilitation: preliminary findings on biofeedback in the treatment of challenging behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Brian; Findlay, Gemma

    2014-01-01

    The use of single-case methodology (SCM) in brain injury rehabilitation is described and contrasted with other methodologies. SCM is optimal when attempting to meet highly individual presentations or to trial innovative solutions. Portable biofeedback is a potentially effective means of helping persons with brain injury to recognise and regulate emotional states. Emotional dysregulation, associated with disinhibition on tests of executive function, is hypothesised to underpin aggressive challenging behaviour and may be amenable to feedback on heart rate variability, a marker for stress. Two case studies of a novel biofeedback intervention, emWave2, to address aggression directed towards the self and towards others are presented. Data from two A-B designs were analysed using the non-overlap all pairs (NAP) statistical method. Clinical significance of outcome is reported in both cases but only Case 2 reached statistical significance. The discussion highlights limitations of the methodology. Results are discussed in relation to the device helping participants differentiate the physiological state associated with stress. The future application of wearable physiological sensing and feedback systems is explored.

  17. Biofeedback for anxiety: A Meta-analysis%生物反馈治疗焦虑症状的Meta分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈玲; 张桂青; 胡敏; 梁霞

    2014-01-01

    目的 应用Meta分析评价生物反馈训练对焦虑症状患者的疗效.方法 计算机检索CNKI、VIP、CBM等数据库,收集2013年12月以前国内关于生物反馈干预有焦虑症状患者的随机对照试验,用国际Cochrane协作组提供的Revman 5.0软件对纳入的研究进行Meta分析.结果 11项研究符合纳入标准,Meta分析显示,生物反馈训练对比空白对照能较好改善患者焦虑情绪,差异有统计学意义(SMD=-3.00,95%CI:-4.40~-1.61);生物反馈训练联合药物治疗相比单纯药物治疗更能有效改善患者焦虑情绪,差异有统计学意义(SMD=-1.33,95%CI:-1.82~-0.85).结论 生物反馈训练单独使用或联合药物使用均能有效降低患者的焦虑水平.%Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of biofeedback for anxiety patients by carrying out a Meta-analysis.Methods We searched CNKI,VIP,CBM(1989 to 2013) to identify relevant randomized-control trials applying biofeedback for anxiety patients.We used Review Management (RevMan) 5.0 software (provided by the Cochrane collaboration) to conduct Meta-analysis.Results We included 11 studies.Meta-analysis for the biofeedback group vs.the control group showed that biofeedback was significantly superior to control (SMD=-3.00,95%CI:-4.40~-1.61); Meta-analysis for the biofeedback plus drug group vs.drug group showed that biofeedback plus drug was significantly superior to drug (SMD=-1.33,95%CI:-1.82~-0.85).Conclusions We found evidence that biofeedback (applying alone or combined with drugs) is effective in improving anxiety symptom.But all the studies had methodological limitations,our conclusion needs further studies with strict design,high quality and consistent assessment tools to be expounded and proven.

  18. Balance control enhancement using sub-sensory stimulation and visual-auditory biofeedback strategies for amputee subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Yih; Lin, Chih-Feng; Soon, Kok-Soon

    2007-12-01

    Sub-sensory electrical or mechanical stimulation can enhance the sensitivity of the human somatosensory system to improve the balance control capabilities of elderly. In addition, clinical studies suggest that visual-auditory biofeedback can improve sensory compensation for the elderly. This study hypothesizes that the static balance and gait performance of single leg quiet standing and treadmill walking could be improved for providing proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation using sub-sensory stimulation and visual-auditory biofeedback in amputee subjects. To test this, a computerized foot pressure biofeedback sensory compensation system using sub-threshold low-level electrical stimulation combined with visual-auditory biofeedback was developed. Seven unilateral trans-tibial amputees who wore prostheses over 2 years were recruited. The subjects performed multiple single leg quiet standing trials with sub-sensory electrical stimulation applied at the quadriceps muscle during half of the trials. Static balance performance was characterized by using a Zebris motion analysis system to measure the sway distance and duration of the centre of mass on the second sacral (S2) of the subjects. In addition, multiple treadmill ambulatory trials with or without visual-auditory biofeedback was performed. Dynamic gait performance was characterized with a Zebris instrumented insole to measure the temporal responses of foot pressure sensors. Experimental results showed an improvement in three balance performance indices (Holding Time Index, HTI, Maximum Sway Distance Index, MSDI, and Average Sway Distance Index, ASDI) during single leg quiet standing by applying sub-sensory stimulation. The improvement ratio of these balance performance indices across subjects for single leg quiet standing tests resulted in 132.34% in HTI, 44.61% in MSDI, and 61.45% in ASDI. With visual-auditory biofeedback as a cue for heel contact and toe push-off condition during treadmill ambulation, the

  19. Efficacy of biofeedback therapy via a mini wireless device on sleep bruxism contrasted with occlusal splint: a pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WeiPing Gu; Jie Yang; FeiMin Zhang; XinMin Yin; XiaoLong Wei; Chen Wang

    2015-01-01

    The putative causes of bruxism are multifactorial and there are no definite measures for bruxism management.The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of biofeedback therapy on sleep bruxism,compared with occlusal splint.Twenty-four volunteers with sleep bruxism were divided into two groups:the GTB group that were treated with biofeedback therapy (n =12) and the GTO group that were treated with occlusal splint (n =12).A mini pressure sensor integrated with a monitoring circuit by use of a maxillary biofeedback splint was fabricated.To foster the relaxation of the masticatory muscles and the nervous system,the wireless device received signals from bruxism events and vibrations alerted the bruxer when the threshold was exceeded.Total episodes and average duration of bruxism events during 8 hours of sleep were analyzed with the monitoring program (TRMY].0).After 6 and 12 weeks,the episodes (P =0.001) and duration (P < 0.05) in the GTB group declined dramatically.In contrast,there were no significant differences in the GTO group after the treatment (P > 0.05).Furthermore,the episodes had significant differences between the GTB group and the GTO group after the same period of treatment (P =0.000).The results suggest that biofeedback therapy may be an effective and convenient measure for mild bruxers,when compared with occlusal splint therapy.The mini wireless biofeedback method may be of value for the diagnosis and management of bruxism in the future.

  20. Randomised controlled trial of brief intervention with biofeedback and hypnotherapy in patients with refractory irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbin, A; Dobbin, J; Ross, S C; Graham, C; Ford, M J

    2013-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder associated with profoundly impaired quality of life and emotional distress. The management of refractory IBS symptoms remains challenging and non-pharmacological therapeutic approaches have been shown to be effective. We compared brief interventions with biofeedback and hypnotherapy in women referred by their GP with refractory IBS symptoms. Patients were randomised to one of two treatment groups, biofeedback or hypnotherapy, delivered as three one-hour sessions over 12 weeks. Symptom assessments were undertaken using validated, self-administered questionnaires. Two of the 128 consecutive IBS patients suitable for the study declined to consider nonpharmacological therapy and 29 patients did not attend beyond the first session. Of the 97 patients randomised into the study, 21 failed to attend the therapy session; 15 of 76 patients who attended for therapy dropped out before week 12 post-therapy. The mean (SD) change in IBS symptom severity score 12 weeks post-treatment in the biofeedback group was -116.8 (99.3) and in the hypnotherapy group -58.0 (101.1), a statistically significant difference between groups (difference=-58.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] for difference [-111.6, -6.1], p=0.029). In 61 patients with refractory IBS, biofeedback and hypnotherapy were equally effective at improving IBS symptom severity scores, total non-gastrointestinal symptom scores and anxiety and depression ratings during 24 weeks follow-up. Biofeedback may prove to be the more cost-effective option as it requires less expertise.

  1. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Patil

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Education Psychology is one of the most rapidly advancing disciplines which is concerned with the description, explanation and control of the educational processes arising from the interaction between the teacher and learner in the context of a specified or unspecified subject. The concept of educational psycology is changing as a result of the general impact of the disciplines such as sociology, anthropology,economics, political science and so on. The subject matter of educational psychology is also reflecting a diversity of structures and emphases in its connection.

  2. Psychology Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Ken; Tew, Mark D.; Williams, John E.

    2001-01-01

    A goal of the PsychExperiments project was to reduce the financial burden on psychology departments for hardware/software used in their laboratories. In its third year, the PsychExperiments site now hosts 39 experiments. Over 200 classrooms worldwide have signed up as official site users and there have been nearly 10,000 data sessions conducted.…

  3. Space psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parin, V. V.; Gorbov, F. D.; Kosmolinskiy, F. P.

    1974-01-01

    Psychological selection of astronauts considers mental responses and adaptation to the following space flight stress factors: (1) confinement in a small space; (2) changes in three dimensional orientation; (3) effects of altered gravity and weightlessness; (4) decrease in afferent nerve pulses; (5) a sensation of novelty and danger; and (6) a sense of separation from earth.

  4. IVABRADINE AND QUALITY OF BIOFEEDBACK IN THE LOOP OF PACED BREATHING UNDER THE CONTROL OF HEART RATE VARIABILITY PARAMETERS IN HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS

    OpenAIRE

    BELAL S. A. S.; Nazarenko, E.; Radchenko, A.; Kulik, A.; MARTYNENKO A.; Yabluchansky, N.

    2013-01-01

    On 15 healthy volunteers aged from 18 to 22 years the effect of ivabradine on the quality of biofeedback in the loop of paced breathing under the control of heart rate variability parameters were estimated. It was found that ivabradine contributes to an earlier onset and more significant optimization of regulatory systems in systematic sessions of biofeedback that allows to expand the indications for its clinical use.

  5. Biofeedback assisted control of respiratory sinus arrhythmia as a biobehavioral intervention for depressive symptoms in patients after cardiac surgery: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patron, Elisabetta; Messerotti Benvenuti, Simone; Favretto, Giuseppe; Valfrè, Carlo; Bonfà, Carlotta; Gasparotto, Renata; Palomba, Daniela

    2013-03-01

    The current study investigated whether biofeedback training aimed at increasing respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), a measure of cardiac vagal modulation, can reduce depressive symptoms in patients after cardiac surgery. This randomized controlled study enrolled 26 patients after first-time cardiac surgery. The patients were randomly assigned to an RSA-biofeedback group (N = 13) or to a treatment as usual group (N = 13). The biofeedback training consisted of five 45 min sessions designed to increase RSA. The outcome was assessed as changes in RSA and in the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies of Depression (CES-D) values from pre- to post-training. Both groups were comparable for demographic and biomedical characteristics. RSA increased significantly in patients who underwent RSA-biofeedback compared to controls. Moreover, the CES-D scores were reduced significantly from pre- to post-training in the RSA-biofeedback group compared to the controls. Changes in RSA were inversely related to changes in CES-D scores from pre- to post-training. These findings extend the effectiveness of RSA-biofeedback for increasing vagal modulation as well as for reducing depressive symptoms in post-surgical patients. Overall, the current study also suggests that this biobehavioral intervention may add to the efficacy of postoperative risk reduction programs and rehabilitation protocols in cardiac surgery patients.

  6. Effects of manipulation of the thorax and intensity of the pressure biofeedback unit on the superficial cervical flexors muscle during craniocervical flexion exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin Mo; Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of manipulation of the thorax and the intensity of the pressure biofeedback unit on the superficial cervical flexors muscle during craniocervical flexion exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty three subjects participated in the experiment. Thirty three healthy people without any orthopedic history were also selected. The subjects could monitor the pressure applied to cervical vertebra 3 of the craniocervical junction by markings on the pressure biofeedback unit. Craniocervical flexion exercise was performed for 20 seconds per pressure, and two minutes of rest was allowed after exercise to reduce muscle fatigue. [Results] Significant differences in the post-training gains in the sternocleidomastoid and scalene were observed between the thorax fixation group and thorax non-fixation group. The thorax fixation group showed that muscle activation of the sternocleidomastoid and scalene was increased when the pressure biofeedback unit intensity was 40 mmHg than when pressure biofeedback unit intensity was 20 mmHg and 30 mmHg in the post-hoc result. The thorax non-fixation group showed that muscle activation of the sternocleidomastoid and scalene was higher when the pressure biofeedback unit intensity was 40mmHg compared to that when the pressure biofeedback unit intensity was 20mmHg in the post-hoc result. [Conclusion] Craniocervical flexion exercise is a clinically effective method that reduces the superficial neck flexor muscle activation. PMID:28265158

  7. Comparison Between Acupuncture and Biofeedback as Adjunctive Treatments for Primary Insomnia Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsien-Te; Lin, Shang-Lun; Lin, Chi-Hung; Tzeng, Dong-Sheng

    2017-02-27

    Context • Insomnia affects from 5% to 35% of the general population worldwide. Primary insomnia disorder is the most frequently diagnosed, sleep-related disorder. Pharmacological treatments remain the most widely used treatments for insomnia. Nonpharmacological treatments for primary insomnia disorder have been found to be effective. Objective • This study intended to determine the appropriateness of acupuncture and biofeedback as adjuncts to medication for primary insomnia disorder. Design • The research team designed a randomized, controlled study. Setting • The study took place in a psychosomatic clinic at a regional general hospital in southern Taiwan. Participants • Participants were patients at the clinic with primary insomnia disorder who had never received prior hypnotic medication or alternative treatments. Intervention • All participants received 10 mg of zolpidem. The participants were divided into 3 groups: (1) acupuncture adjunctive to zolpidem (AAZ) group- 18 patients received 1 acupuncture session weekly; (2) biofeedback adjunctive to zolpidem (BAZ) group- 17 patients received 1 biofeedback session weekly; and (3) control (OZ) group-14 patients received only zolpidem. Patients visited the clinic 1 ×/wk for 4 wk, at baseline and on days 7, 14, and 21 of the intervention. Outcome Measures • The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used to measure outcomes. Treatment success was defined as a final PSQI score of ≤5. The generalized estimating equation (GEE) was used for statistical analysis. Results • Using analysis of variance, the reduction in the PSQI scores were (1) 3.72 for the AAZ group, (2) 2.00 for the BAZ group, and (3) 2.29 for the OZ group (P = .28). The GEE analysis indicated no differences in the therapeutic effects among the 3 groups: P = .37 for the AAZ group vs the OZ group and P = .07 for the BAZ group vs the OZ group, when the PSQI of the OZ group was set to 0. The AAZ group had a significantly higher score than

  8. Functional neuroanatomy and the rationale for using EEG biofeedback for clients with Asperger's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lynda; Thompson, Michael; Reid, Andrea

    2010-03-01

    This paper reviews the symptoms of Asperger's Syndrome (AS), a disorder along the autism continuum, and highlights research findings with an emphasis on brain differences. Existing theories concerning AS are described, including theory of mind (Hill and Frith in Phil Trans Royal Soc Lond, Bull 358:281-289, 2003), mirror neuron system (Ramachandran and Oberman in Sci Am 295(5):62-69, 2006), and Porges' (Ann N Y Acad Sci 1008:31-47, 2003, The neurobiology of autism, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, 2004) polyvagal theory. (A second paper, Outcomes using EEG Biofeedback Training in Clients with Asperger's Syndrome, summarizes clinical outcomes obtained with more than 150 clients.) Patterns seen with QEEG assessment are then presented. Single channel assessment at the vertex (CZ) reveals patterns similar to those found in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. Using 19-channel data, significant differences (z-scores > 2) were found in the amplitude of both slow waves (excess theta and/or alpha) and fast waves (beta) at various locations. Differences from the norm were most often found in mirror neuron areas (frontal, temporal and temporal-parietal). There were also differences in coherence patterns, as compared to a normative database (Neuroguide). Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography Analysis (Pascual-Marqui et al. in Methods Find Exp Clin Pharmacol 24C:91-95, 2002) suggested the source of the abnormal activity was most often the anterior cingulate. Other areas involved included the amygdala, uncus, insula, hippocampal gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, fusiform gyrus, and the orbito-frontal and/or ventromedial areas of the prefrontal cortex. Correspondence between symptoms and the functions of the areas found to have abnormalities is evident and those observations are used to develop a rationale for using EEG biofeedback, called neurofeedback (NFB), intervention. NFB training is targeted to improve symptoms that include difficulty reading and mirroring

  9. Psychological and psychophysiological factors in prevention and treatment of cold injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappes, B; Mills, W; O'Malley, J

    1993-01-01

    Cold injured patients in Alaska come from many sources. Although sport and work continues to provide large numbers of cold injured, most severe repeat injuries tend to reflect other biopsychosocial consequences. Certain behaviors can increase the probability of injury, however all persons living in cold climates are potential candidates. One can decrease risk by education, knowledge and intelligent behavior. Proper respect for adequate protection and hydration seem to be critical factors. Understanding the psychological, physiological and psychophysiological aspects of the cold environment performer helps refine the prevention and treatment strategies for cold injury. Skill training with bio-behavioral methods, such as thermal biofeedback, and the value of medical psychotherapy appear to offer continued promise by facilitating physiologic recovery from injury, as well as assisting in long term rehabilitation. Both approaches increase the likelihood of a favorable healing response by soliciting active patient participation. Medical Psychotherapy for traumatic injuries can also help identify and manage cognitive emotional issues for families and patients faced with the permanent consequences of severe thermal injuries. Thermal biofeedback therapy has the potential benefit of encouraging greater self-reliance and responsibility for self-regulating overall health by integrating self-management skills regarding physiology, diet and lifestyle. Inpatient and outpatient biofeedback training offers specific influence over vascular responses for healing, as well as providing an effective tool for pain management. Interest in cold region habitation has continued to expand our study of human tolerance to harsh, extreme environments. Biological, psychological, sociological, and anthropological views on adaptation, habituation, acclimatization, and injury in cold environments acknowledges the role of development, learning and educated responses to cold environments. The study of

  10. Biofeedback Assisted Stress Management in Patients with Lung Cancer: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Benjamin R; Grossman, Elizabeth F; Bolwell, Gregory; Reynard, Alison K; Pennell, Nathan A; Moravec, Christine S; McKee, Michael G

    2015-09-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer-related death for men and women in the United States. NSCLC causes a variety of symptoms which result in significant distress and reduced quality of life for patients. Behavioral and other non-pharmacologic treatment interventions for NSCLC have resulted in improved quality of life, reduced emotional distress, and improved longevity. This study investigates the feasibility and effectiveness of biofeedback assisted stress management (BFSM) to reduce stress in patients with NSCLC. Because of patient dropout, this study was terminated prematurely. Despite this, evaluation of data revealed positive trends, with patients learning to reduce their stress, improve their respiration and heart rate variability, and improve coping. These trends suggest that patients with NSCLC can learn to self-regulate physiology and BFSM may be useful for them, although a less ill patient population may be desirable for future investigations.

  11. Mobile biofeedback of heart rate variability in patients with diabetic polyneuropathy: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druschky, Katrin; Druschky, Achim

    2015-09-01

    Biofeedback of heart rate variability (HRV) was applied to patients with diabetic polyneuropathy using a new mobile device allowing regularly scheduled self-measurements without the need of visits to a special autonomic laboratory. Prolonged generation of data over an eight-week period facilitated more precise investigation of cardiac autonomic function and assessment of positive and negative trends of HRV parameters over time. Statistical regression analyses revealed significant trends in 11 of 17 patients, while no significant differences were observed when comparing autonomic screening by short-term HRV and respiratory sinus arrhythmia at baseline and after the 8 weeks training period. Four patients showed positive trends of HRV parameters despite the expected progression of cardiac autonomic dysfunction over time. Patient compliance was above 50% in all but two patients. The results of this preliminary study indicate a good practicality of the handheld device and suggest a potential positive effect on cardiac autonomic neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  12. A Plantar-pressure Based Tongue-placed Tactile Biofeedback System for Balance Improvement

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Pinsault, Nicolas; Fleury, Anthony; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    Maintaining an upright stance represents a complex task, which is achieved by integrating sensory information from the visual, vestibular and somatosensory systems. When one of these sensory inputs becomes unavailable and/or inaccurate and/or unreliable, postural control generally is degraded. One way to solve this problem is to supplement and/or substitute limited/altered/missing sensory information by providing additional sensory information to the central nervous system via an alternative sensory modality. Along these lines, we developed an original biofeedback system [1] whose underlying principle consists in supplying the user with supplementary sensory information related to foot sole pressure distribution through a tongue-placed output device (Tongue Display Unit, "TDU" [2]). The purpose of the present experiment was to assess its effectiveness in improving balance in young healthy adults.

  13. Artificial Tongue-Placed Tactile Biofeedback for perceptual supplementation: application to human disability and biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Moreau-Gaudry, Alexandre; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    The present paper aims at introducing the innovative technologies, based on the concept of "sensory substitution" or "perceptual supplementation", we are developing in the fields of human disability and biomedical engineering. Precisely, our goal is to design, develop and validate practical assistive biomedical and/technical devices and/or rehabilitating procedures for persons with disabilities, using artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback systems. Proposed applications are dealing with: (1) pressure sores prevention in case of spinal cord injuries (persons with paraplegia, or tetraplegia); (2) ankle proprioceptive acuity improvement for driving assistance in older and/or disabled adults; and (3) balance control improvement to prevent fall in older and/or disabled adults. This paper presents results of three feasibility studies performed on young healthy adults.

  14. Bio-feedback treatment of fecal incontinence: Where are we, and where are we going?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giuseppe Chiarioni; Barbara Ferri; Antonio Morelli; Guido Iantorno; Gabrio Bassotti

    2005-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is a disabling disease, often observed in young subjects, that may have devastating psycho-social consequences. In the last years, numerous evidences have been reported on the efficacy of bio-feedback techniques for the treatment of this disorder. Overall, the literature data claim a success rate in more than 70% of cases in the short term. However, recent controlled trials have not confirmed this optimistic view, thus emphasizing the role of standard care. Nonetheless, many authors believe that this should be the first therapeutic approach for fecal incontinence due to the efficacy, lack of side-effects,and scarce invasiveness. Well-designed randomized,controlled trial are eagerly awaited to solve this therapeutic dilemma.

  15. Evaluating the ChillFish Biofeedback Game with Children with ADHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Tobias; Jensen, Mads Møller

    Breathing exercises have been shown to have multiple benefits for children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). However, these children can have issues retaining attention to such an exercise. In this paper we present a study of ChillFish, a respiration game for children with ADHD....... Our findings show tendencies that the game works in terms of having a calming effect. However, the study also highlighted issues of evaluating biofeedback games with children with ADHD that are not present when evaluating with adults. This work presents an iteration in the ChillFish development cycle...... that will hopefully result in a stable system that can assist children with ADHD in their everyday life....

  16. Developing wearable bio-feedback systems: a general-purpose platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Luigi; Babiloni, Fabio; Cincotti, Febo; Arrivas, Marco; Bollero, Patrizio; Marciani, Maria Grazia

    2003-06-01

    Microprocessors, even those in PocketPCs, have adequate power for many real-time biofeedback applications for disabled people. This power allows design of portable or wearable devices that are smaller and lighter, and that have longer battery life compared to notebook-based systems. In this paper, we discuss a general-purpose hardware/software solution based on industrial or consumer devices and a C++ framework. Its flexibility and modularity make it adaptable to a wide range of situations. Moreover, its design minimizes system requirements and programming effort, thus allowing efficient systems to be built quickly and easily. Our design has been used to build two brain computer interface systems that were easily ported from the Win32 platform.

  17. Revisión sobre las técnicas de biofeedback y sus aplicaciones

    OpenAIRE

    Montserrat Conde Pastor; Francisco Javier Menéndez Balaña

    2002-01-01

    El surgimiento de las técnicas de biofeedback, ha sido uno de los fenómenos más importantes ocurridos en este siglo en el campo de la psicología clínica. No sólo se ha demostrado la posibilidad de aplicar las técnicas operantes al aprendizaje de funciones autonómicas y viscerales, sino también la posibilidad de aplicar estas técnicas, con fines de intervención terapéutica en multitud de trastornos psicosomáticos. Este artículo pretende ofrecer una visión histó...

  18. Muscular and intraocular pressure responses among ocular-hypertensive subjects: is there a rationale for biofeedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raczynski, J M; Mason, D A; Wilson, R P; Silvia, E S; Kleinstein, R N

    1985-12-01

    Several animal and human investigations have indicated that intraocular pressure (IOP) levels may be associated with extreme drug-induced changes in the extraocular muscles. Further, recent data suggest that, among individuals with normal IOP level, moderate increases in facial muscle (EMG) activity around the eye while the eye is open are associated with increases in IOP. To investigate further the relationship between facial EMG activity and IOP levels and to examine a group of individuals with elevated IOP levels, subjects were recruited from outpatients at an optometry clinic. Three groups of subjects were selected: a group of ocular hypertensive subjects who showed elevated pressures at the optometry clinic and upon the day of testing, a group of labile ocular hypertensive subjects who evinced elevated pressures during their visit to the optometry clinic but lower pressures on the day of testing, and a group of normal IOP subjects who showed normal pressures both during their optometry clinic visit and on the day of testing. To investigate anxiety differences, subjects were administered the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, but subsequent analysis revealed no group differences. To evaluate the role of stress upon muscle (EMG) functioning around the eye, subjects were subjected to imagery and standardized mental arithmetic stressors; analyses of these results also revealed no significant group differences. Finally, subjects were given EMG biofeedback for muscle activity around the eye while IOP was assessed during five alternating periods in which they made decreases and increases in EMG activity. Results revealed significant group, period, and group by period interaction effects. The pattern of results is interpreted as implicating EMG activity in IOP fluctuations; the implications of these data for potential biofeedback and stress management treatments are discussed.

  19. Focal electrical stimulation as an effective sham control for active rTMS and biofeedback treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffer, Christine E; Mennemeier, Mark; Landes, Reid D; Dornhoffer, John; Kimbrell, Timothy; Bickel, Warren; Brackman, Sharon; Chelette, Kenneth C; Brown, Ginger; Vuong, Mai

    2013-01-01

    A valid sham control is important for determining the efficacy and effectiveness of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) as an experimental and clinical tool. Given the manner in which rTMS is applied, separately or in combination with self-regulatory approaches, and its intended impact on brain states, a valid sham control of this type may well serve as a meaningful control for biofeedback studies, where efforts to develop a credible control have often been less than ideal. This study examined the effectiveness of focal electrical stimulation of the frontalis muscle as a sham technique for blinding participants to high-frequency rTMS over the dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) at durations, intensities, and schedules of stimulation similar to many clinical applications. In this within-subjects single blind design, 19 participants made guesses immediately after receiving 54 counterbalanced rTMS sessions (sham, 10Hz, 20Hz); 7 (13%) of the guesses were made for sham, 31 (57%) were made for 10Hz, and 16 (30%) were made for 20Hz. Participants correctly guessed the sham condition 6% (CI: 1%, 32%) of the time, which is less than the odds of chance (i.e., of guessing at random, 33%); correctly guessed the 10Hz condition 66% (CI: 43%, 84%) of the time, which was greater than chance; and correctly guessed the 20Hz condition 41% (CI: 21%, 65%) of the time, which was no different than chance. Focal electrical stimulation therefore can be an effective sham control for high-frequency rTMS of the DLPFC, as well as for active biofeedback interventions. Participants were unaware that electrical stimulation was, in fact, sham rTMS. PMID:23702828

  20. Biofeedback and the electromyographic activity of pelvic floor muscles in pregnant women Biofeedback na atividade eletromiográfica dos músculos do assoalho pélvico em gestantes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta L. A. Batista

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Maintaining continence is among the functions of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM and their dysfunction can cause urinary incontinence (UI, which is a common occurrence during pregnancy and the puerperal period. Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT, therefore, is important during pregnancy, although most women perform the muscle contractions unsatisfactorily. OBJECTIVES: This study is an exploratory analysis of the results of three electromyographic (EMG activity biofeedback sessions in pregnant women. METHODS: The study sample included 19 nulliparous women with low risk pregnancies. The participants performed three sessions of EMG biofeedback consisting of slow and fast contractions. The average value of the normalized amplitudes of surface electromyography was used to evaluate the results. The linear regression model with mixed effects was used for statistical analysis, with the EMG data normalized by maximum voluntary contraction (MVC. RESULTS: A steady increase in EMG amplitude was observed during each contraction and by the end of the biofeedback sessions, although this difference was only significant when comparing the first tonic contraction of each session (p=0.03. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that three sessions of training with biofeedback improved PFM EMG activity during the second trimester in women with low-risk pregnancies. The effectiveness of this protocol should be further investigated in randomized controlled trials.CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: Dentre as funções dos músculos do assoalho pélvico (MAPs, pode-se citar a manutenção da continência, sendo que sua disfunção pode causar a incontinência urinária (IU, muito frequente no período gestacional e no puerpério. Diante disso, se faz importante o treinamento dos músculos do assoalho pélvico (TMAP durante o período gestacional, entretanto grande parte das mulheres realiza a contração dessa musculatura de maneira insatisfatória. OBJETIVOS: Realizar uma an

  1. Psychology Faculty Perceptions of Abnormal Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapport, Zachary

    2011-01-01

    The problem. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the perceptions and opinions of psychology professors regarding the accuracy and inclusiveness of abnormal psychology textbooks. It sought answers from psychology professors to the following questions: (1) What are the expectations of the psychology faculty at a private university of…

  2. The efficacy evaluation of enema therapy and biofeedback training for constipation%生物反馈训练和灌肠治疗便秘的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴青眉; 张爱群; 林婕

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect of biofeedback training and enema therapy for constipation.Methods All 140 cases of constipation patients were divided randomly into the control group and experimental group with 70 cases in each group.In control group,enema therapy was used for constipation and in the experimental group biofeedback training method was used.The clinical symptoms and psychological assessment were applied to evaluate the efficacy of two methods for constipation patients.Results After treatment,the improvement of clinical symptoms in patients with constipation was 22.9% (16/70)and the total effective rate was 70.0% (49/ 70) in the control group.The total effectiveness of biofeedback training in the experimental group was more than in the control group.The phenomena of depression and anxiety of patients in the experimental group were lower than in the control group.Conclusion Biofeedback training can improve the clinical symptoms of functional constipation patients and the mental health.%目的 比较生物反馈训练与灌肠治疗便秘的疗效.方法 将140例接受便秘治疗的患者完全随机分为灌肠组(70例)和生物反馈组(70例).灌肠组采用灌肠法治疗,生物反馈组采用生物反馈训练治疗法治疗.通过比较患者临床症状和心理评估来评定2种方法对便秘患者的疗效.结果 治疗后,灌肠组患者的临床症状显效率为22.9%(16/70),有效率为47.1%(33/70),总有效率为70.0%(49/70);生物反馈组显效率为37.1% (26/70),有效率为52.9%(37/70),总有效率为90.0% (63/70);生物反馈组的总有效率明显高于灌肠组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).生物反馈组患者治疗后的焦虑自评量表和抑郁自评量表分值均较灌肠组治疗后分值低,差异有统计学意义[焦虑自评量表评分:(33±7)分比(40±8)分,抑郁自评量表评分:(45±8)分比(53±9)分,均P<0.01].结论 生物反馈训练在改善功能性便秘患者的临床症状方

  3. A rapprochement of the operant-conditioning and awareness views of biofeedback training: the role of discrimination in voluntary control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, W B

    1981-09-01

    In order to adequately evaluate Cott, Pavloski and Black's claim that the discrimination of a physiological response is not necessary for the voluntary control of that response, this commentary presents a set of formal articulations and clarifications of intentional action, voluntary control, discrimination, awareness, and physiological response. It is concluded on logical grounds that Cott et al. are necessarily mistaken and that the conceptual foundations of the issue have not been clearly articulated heretofore. Based upon this discussion, a rapprochement is offered of the operant conditioning and awareness views of biofeedback training, demonstrating that the awareness view is essentially a tautology that aids us in understanding what is meant by "voluntary control of the physiological response." Finally, the issue of mediation in biofeedback-augmented self-regulation is reconceptualized and it is argued that the search for a "neurophysiological mechanism" of voluntary control is meaningless, reflecting a misappropriation of the concept of voluntary control.

  4. Spectroscopic biofeedback on cutaneous carotenoids as part of a prevention program could be effective to raise health awareness in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ruo-Xi; Köcher, Wolfgang; Darvin, Maxim E; Büttner, Monika; Jung, Sora; Lee, Bich Na; Klotter, Christoph; Hurrelmann, Klaus; Meinke, Martina C; Lademann, Jürgen

    2014-11-01

    The cutaneous carotenoid concentration correlates with the overall antioxidant status of a person and can be seen as biomarker for nutrition and lifestyle. 50 high school students were spectroscopically measured for their cutaneous carotenoid concentrations initially in a static phase, followed by an intervention phase with biofeedback of their measured values, living a healthy lifestyle and on healthy food this time. The volunteers showed higher carotenoid concentrations than found in previous studies. A significant correlation of healthy lifestyle habits and a high antioxidant status could be determined. Subjects improved their nutritional habits and significantly increased their carotenoid concentration during intervention. Follow-up five months later showed a consolidation of the increase. The investigations show that a healthy diet and a well-balanced lifestyle correlate with a high cutaneous antioxidant concentration and that spectroscopic biofeedback measurement of cutaneous carotenoids as part of an integrated prevention program is a feasible and effective means to raise the health awareness in adolescents.

  5. Efficacy of transvaginal biofeedback and electrical stimulation in women with urinary urgency and frequency and associated pelvic floor muscle spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendaña, Emma E; Belarmino, James M; Dinh, Jenny H; Cook, Cynthia L; Murray, Brian P; Feustel, Paul J; De, Elise J B

    2009-01-01

    Women with urinary urgency and frequency may also have pelvic floor muscle spasm. Transvaginal biofeedback (TVBF) and electrical stimulation (EStim) is a treatment modality that has been used to treat vaginismus and chronic pelvic pain. In this study, TVBF/EStim was evaluated in women with pelvic floor muscle spasm associated with urinary symptoms. Fifty-two women underwent therapy with TVBF/EStim and reported a mean symptom improvement of 64.5%.

  6. Psychological IVF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adrian, Stine Willum

    2015-01-01

    upon Thompson's notion of ontological choreography and Barad's theory of agential realism, extending these concepts to develop the notion of emotional choreography. Finally, this paper aims to contribute to current discussions regarding (new) materialisms within feminist theory, underscoring......’. This theoretical work has three aims. First, it seeks to illustrate how the story of psychological IVF offers a rich range of materializations of emotions. Secondly, this work proposes a feminist materialist conceptualization of emotions that is both non-representational and posthuman. This conceptualization draws...... the conceptual importance of the feminist legacy....

  7. Effect of Task Specific Exercises, Gait Training, and Visual Biofeedback on Equinovarus Gait among Individuals with Stroke: Randomized Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Elsayed Khallaf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Equinovarus foot is a common sign after stroke. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of task specific exercises, gait training, and visual biofeedback on correcting equinovarus gait among individuals with stroke. Subjects and Methods. Sixteen subjects with ischemic stroke were randomly assigned to two equal groups (G1 and G2. All the patients were at stage 4 of motor recovery of foot according to Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment without any cognitive dysfunction. E-med pedography was used to measure contact time, as well as force underneath hind and forefoot during walking. Outcome measures were collected before randomization, one week after the last session, and four weeks later. Participants in G1 received task specific exercises, gait training, and visual biofeedback and a traditional physical therapy program was applied for participants in G2 for 8 weeks. Results. Significant improvement was observed among G1 patients (P≤0.05 which lasts one month after therapy termination. On the other hand, there were no significant differences between measurements of the participants in G2. Between groups comparison also revealed a significant improvement in G1 with long lasting effect. Conclusion. The results of this study showed a positive long lasting effect of the task specific exercises, gait training, and visual biofeedback on equinovarus gait pattern among individuals with stroke.

  8. Reduced heart rate variability in chronic severe traumatic brain injury: Association with impaired emotional and social functioning, and potential for treatment using biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Heather M; Fisher, Alana; Rushby, Jacqueline A; McDonald, Skye

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) may provide an index of capacity for social functioning and may be remediated by HRV biofeedback. Given reductions in HRV are found following traumatic brain injury (TBI), the present study aimed to determine whether lower HRV in TBI is associated with social function, and whether HRV biofeedback might be a useful remediation technique in this population. Resting state HRV and measures of social and emotional processing were collected in 30 individuals with severe TBI (3-34 years post-injury) and 30 controls. This was followed by a single session of HRV biofeedback. HRV was positively associated with social cognition and empathy, and negatively associated with alexithymia for the TBI group. Both TBI and control groups showed significantly increased HRV on both time-domain (i.e., SDNN, rMSSD) and frequency-domain measures (LF, HF, LF:HF ratio) during biofeedback compared to baseline. These results suggest that decreased HRV is linked to social and emotional function following severe TBI, and may be a novel target for therapy using HRV biofeedback techniques.

  9. Polycultural psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Michael W; Chiu, Chi-yue; Liu, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    We review limitations of the traditional paradigm for cultural research and propose an alternative framework, polyculturalism. Polyculturalism assumes that individuals' relationships to cultures are not categorical but rather are partial and plural; it also assumes that cultural traditions are not independent, sui generis lineages but rather are interacting systems. Individuals take influences from multiple cultures and thereby become conduits through which cultures can affect each other. Past literatures on the influence of multiple cultural identities and cultural knowledge legacies can be better understood within a polyculturalist rubric. Likewise, the concept elucidates how cultures are changed by contact with other cultures, enabling richer psychological theories of intercultural influence. Different scientific paradigms about culture imply different ideologies and policies; polyculturalism's implied policy of interculturalism provides a valuable complement to the traditional policy frames of multiculturalism and colorblindness.

  10. Biofeedback improves postural control recovery from multi-axis discrete perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sienko Kathleen H

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-axis vibrotactile feedback has been shown to significantly reduce the root-mean-square (RMS sway, elliptical fits to sway trajectory area, and the time spent outside of the no feedback zone in individuals with vestibular deficits during continuous multidirectional support surface perturbations. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of multidirectional vibrotactile biofeedback on postural stability during discrete multidirectional support surface perturbations. Methods The vibrotactile biofeedback device mapped tilt estimates onto the torso using a 3-row by 16-column tactor array. The number of columns displayed was varied to determine the effect of spatial resolution upon subject response. Torso kinematics and center of pressure data were measured in six subjects with vestibular deficits. Transient and steady state postural responses with and without feedback were characterized in response to eight perturbation directions. Four feedback conditions in addition to the tactors off (no feedback configuration were evaluated. Postural response data captured by both a force plate and an inertial measurement unit worn on the torso were partitioned into three distinct phases: ballistic, recovery, and steady state. Results The results suggest that feedback has minimal effects during the ballistic phase (body’s outbound trajectory in response to the perturbation, and the greatest effects during the recovery (return toward baseline and steady state (post-recovery phases. Specifically, feedback significantly decreases the time required for the body tilt to return to baseline values and significantly increases the velocity of the body’s return to baseline values. Furthermore, feedback significantly decreases root mean square roll and pitch sway and significantly increases the amount of time spent in the no feedback zone. All four feedback conditions produced comparable performance improvements. Incidences of delayed

  11. Psychology Ethics in Introductory Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchero, Renee' A.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research revealed that introductory psychology textbooks included limited information about psychology ethics. This study reviewed 48 current introductory psychology textbooks for research and other APA ethics content. These textbooks included slightly more total ethics content and were more thorough in their review of research ethics…

  12. Psychological pain interventions and neurophysiology: implications for a mechanism-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flor, Herta

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an illustrative overview of neurophysiological changes related to acute and chronic pain involving structural and functional brain changes, which might be the targets of psychological interventions. A number of psychological pain treatments have been examined with respect to their effects on brain activity, ranging from cognitive- and operant behavioral interventions, meditation and hypnosis, to neuro- and biofeedback, discrimination training, imagery and mirror treatment, as well as virtual reality and placebo applications. These treatments affect both ascending and descending aspects of pain processing and act through brain mechanisms that involve sensorimotor areas as well as those involved in affective-motivational and cognitive-evaluative aspects. The analysis of neurophysiological changes related to effective psychological pain treatment can help to identify subgroups of patients with chronic pain who might profit from different interventions, can aid in predicting treatment outcome, and can assist in identifying responders and nonresponders, thus enhancing the efficacy and efficiency of psychological interventions. Moreover, new treatment targets can be developed and tested. Finally, the use of neurophysiological measures can also aid in motivating patients to participate in psychological interventions and can increase their acceptance in clinical practice.

  13. Marketing analysis of a positive technology app for the self-management of psychological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederhold, Brenda K; Boyd, Chelsie; Sulea, Camelia; Gaggioli, Andrea; Riva, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The INTERSTRESS project developed a completely new concept in the treatment of psychological stress: Interreality, a concept that combines cognitive behavioral therapy with a hybrid, closed-loop empowering experience bridging real and virtual worlds. This model provides the opportunity for individual citizens to become active participants in their own health and well-being. This article contains the results of the Marketing Trial and analysis of the opinions of individual consumers/end users of the INTERSTRESS product. The specific objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, efficacy and user acceptance of a novel mobile-based relaxation training tool in combination with biofeedback exercises and wearable biosensors. Relaxation was aided through immersion in a mobile virtual scenario (a virtual island) featuring pre-recorded audio narratives guiding a series of relaxation exercises. During biofeedback exercises, a wearable biosensor system provided data which directly modified the virtual reality experience in real-time. Thirty-six participants evaluated the product and overall feedback from users was positive, with some variation seen based on participant gender. A larger market study is now underway to understand if there are cultural variations in acceptability of the device.

  14. Effects of autonomic nervous biofeedback training on heat rate, heart rate variability and blood pressure of the military personnel stationed on plateau%自主神经调节反馈训练对高原驻训军事人员心率、心率变异性及血压的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘庆峰; 宋华淼; 陈勇胜; 曹征涛; 彭飞; 杨蕾; 周玉彬; 罗永昌

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of autonomic nervous biofeedback training on heart rate variabitity (HRV) and blood pressure of the military personnel stationed on plateau and to supply them with psychological support.Methods Seventy-one male military personnel (average age:27.6±6.5 yr) were selected as subjects.They were stationed on plateau of 3780 m for 60 d.Autonomic nervous biofeedback training that combined deep breath with HRV biofeedback was performed on them.HR,HRV and blood pressure of subjects were collected at sitting state and biofeedback state.Only 47 subjects' blood pressures were collected becauseof experimental condition limitation.Results ①Mean heart rate under autonomic nervous biofeedback state was significantly lower than that under sitting state (t=2.010,P<0.05).Subjects' standard deviation of HRV in N-N interval and low frequency under autonomic nervous biofeedback state were significantly higher than those under sitting state (t 3.700,5.401,P<0.01).②Ratio of diastolic pressure higher than 90 mm Hg was 31.91%under sitting state.Both systolic pressure and diastolic pressure under biofeedback state were significantly lower than those under sitting state (t=4.062,7.632,P<0.01).The level of blood pressure was positively correlated to age under both states (r=0.363-0.605,P < 0.05).Conclusions Autonomic nervous biofeedback training can reduce heart rate and blood pressure,but increase HRV of the subjects on plateau.It is suggested to strengthen psychological support for the military personnel stationed on plateau because of its benefits on moderating the hypoxia effects on physiology and improving mental state.%目的 研究自主神经调节反馈训练对高原环境驻训军人的心率变异性和血压的影响,为高原驻训心理卫生保障提供技术方法. 方法 71名高原驻训军人,平均年龄(27.6±6.5)岁,在进驻高原(海拔3780 m) 60 d后,进行深呼吸和心率变异性生物反馈相结合的自主神经调

  15. Psychology of psychology? A theoretization of psychological science through historical and socio-anthropological analysis of Psychology as institution

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Žužek-Kres

    2008-01-01

    The article presents a "new" history of psychology, which is also termed as "psychology of psychology". In some academic communities this unconventional history of psychology represents today an accepted approach to epistemological questions about psychological concepts and it enables an insight into social contextualization of Psychology as an institution. The conclusion presents a referential and institutional context where this psychology of psychology is realized.

  16. Performance enhancement in swimming: the effect of mental training with biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Eli, M; Blumenstein, B

    2004-12-01

    In this study, the relationship between mental training with biofeedback and swimmers' performance was investigated. The Wingate five-step approach was used as a mental preparation technique for enhancing the performance among 16-18 year-old pre-elite swimmers. Participants (n = 40) were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: (a) experimental--regular training plus the Wingate 5-step mental training program (adapted for swimming), and (b) control--regular training plus relaxing activities. After a baseline measurement, participants were tested on running and swimming five times during a 10-week period. Results indicated that the experimental group improved its performance over time on both running and swimming, with improvement being most substantial during transformation and realisation (steps 4 and 5). In contrast, the control group remained relatively stable on both dependent measures. Results are discussed in reference to previous work on the 5-step approach, including several methodological and theoretical aspects that are particularly relevant to the use of such interventions with other athletic tasks and populations.

  17. HRV biofeedback for pediatric irritable bowel syndrome and functional abdominal pain: a clinical replication series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Mark J; Guiles, Robert A F; Gevirtz, Richard

    2014-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and Functional Abdominal Pain (FAP) are among the most commonly reported Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders. Both have been associated with varying autonomic dysregulation. Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback (HRVB) has recently begun to show efficacy in the treatment of both IBS and FAP. The purpose of this multiple clinical replication series was to analyze the clinical outcomes of utilizing HRVB in a clinical setting. Archival data of twenty-seven consecutive pediatric outpatients diagnosed with IBS or FAP who received HRVB were analyzed. Clinical outcomes were self-report and categorized as full or remission with patient satisfaction, or no improvement. Qualitative reports of patient experiences were also noted. Full remission was achieved by 69.2 % and partial remission was achieved by 30.8 % of IBS patients. Full remission was achieved by 63.6 % and partial remission was achieved by 36.4 % of FAP patients. No patients in either group did not improve to a level of patient satisfaction or >50 %. Patient's commonly reported feeling validated in their discomfort as a result of psychophysiological education. Results suggest that HRVB is a promising intervention for pediatric outpatients with IBS or FAP. Randomized controlled trials are necessary to accurately determine clinical efficacy of HRVB in the treatment of IBS and FAP.

  18. Heart rate variability in the assessment and biofeedback training of common mental health problems in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nada, Pop-Jordanova

    2009-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is a measure of the beat-to-beat variations in heart rate related to the work of autonomic nervous system. It may serve as a psychophysiological indicator for arousal, emotional state and stress level. We used this parameter in both the assessment and biofeedback training, for dealing with five groups of common mental health problem in school children (anxious-phobic, somatoform, obsessive-compulsive, attention deficit hyperactivity and conduct disorders). The obtained results were compared with healthy children at the same age. In order to define the four main characteristics of personality (extroversion/introversion, neuroticism/stability, psychopathological traits and honesty) Eysenck Personality Questionnaire was applied. Results showed significantly higher psychopathological traits in ADHD and somatoform group, lower extroversion in somatoform, higher neurotism in OCD and lower lie scores in ADHD and OCD groups. As HRV instrument we used Heart Math Freeze-Framer System. After 15 sessions of training, children from nearby all groups showed improved high and medium HRV which corresponded to the improved clinical outcome. Hereby, the best results were obtained for conduct and anxiety disorder, and the worst for ADHD.

  19. Game Design to Measure Reflexes and Attention Based on Biofeedback Multi-Sensor Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inigo de Loyola Ortiz-Vigon Uriarte

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a multi-sensor system for implementing biofeedback as a human-computer interaction technique in a game involving driving cars in risky situations. The sensors used are: Eye Tracker, Kinect, pulsometer, respirometer, electromiography (EMG and galvanic skin resistance (GSR. An algorithm has been designed which gives rise to an interaction logic with the game according to the set of physiological constants obtained from the sensors. The results reflect a 72.333 response to the System Usability Scale (SUS, a significant difference of p = 0.026 in GSR values in terms of the difference between the start and end of the game, and an r = 0.659 and p = 0.008 correlation while playing with the Kinect between the breathing level and the energy and joy factor. All the sensors used had an impact on the end results, whereby none of them should be disregarded in future lines of research, even though it would be interesting to obtain separate breathing values from that of the cardio.

  20. Efectividad del biofeedback electromiográfico en la rehabilitación de lesiones deportivas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Hern\\u00E1ndez-Mendo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available La utilización del biofeedback electromiográfico (BF-EMG en la rehabilitación de lesiones está sobradamente referenciada en la literatura psicológica. A pesar de los trabajos pioneros en la década de los años ochenta, en el ámbito deportivo, apenas ha transcendido su utilización en la rehabilitación de lesiones deportivas. Se presenta un estudio de doce casos de futbolistas profesionales de la liga española agrupados en dos tipos de patologías distintas (fracturas en los miembros superiores y lesiones de rodilla que han sido sometidos a un tratamiento de BF-EMG, paralelo al plan de rehabilitación establecido por los servicios médicos de cada club. Se utiliza un diseño ABA. En cada sesión se registra una línea pre y post que permite determinar la ganancia EMG adquirida en cada punto de la sesión. La intervención se da por finalizada cuando el futbolista alcanza de forma estable el criterio establecido por el miembro hemilateral. En todos los casos se realiza una sesión más de seguimiento. Todos los casos presentan mejorías notorias y estables. Los resultados globales permiten considerar que el BF-EMG es eficaz en estas patologías.

  1. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF EMG BIOFEEDBACK ON HAND FUNCTION IN SUBJECTS WITH STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sethana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stroke is an event caused by the interruption of the blood supply to the brain, usually because a blood vessel bursts or blocked by a clot. Biofeedback can be defined as the technique of using equipment usually electronic to reveal to human beings about some of their internal physiological events normal and abnormal in form of auditory and visual signals. Method: The stroke patients diagnosed by neurologist were recruited from physiotherapy department and inpatients from neurology and general wards of SVIMS hospital, Tirupathi Andhra Pradesh. In the present study 30 subjects were randomly assigned to 15 experimental and 15 control groups. The subject was made to sit comfortably and the Surfaces electrodes were placed on Extensor carpi radialis, Extensor digitorum communis muscle belly and for 30minutes patient voluntarily contracts until signals displayed on screen for which visually and auditory cues are given. In control group placebo EMG where machine is turned away & has no cues. Both groups received CONVENTIONAL PHYSIOTHERAPY; for 30 minutes at a Frequency: 1 hour per day for 5days in a week, for 6weeks. Results: There was statistically significant (p<0.05 improvement in both variables from baseline to 6thweek in experimental group compared to control group. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates the potential benefits of EMG BF in improving hand function in subjects with stroke.

  2. A Serious Game for Upper Limb Stroke Rehabilitation Using Biofeedback and Mirror-Neurons Based Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargnin, Diego João; Cordeiro d'Ornellas, Marcos; Cervi Prado, Ana Lúcia

    2015-01-01

    Upper limb stroke rehabilitation requires early, intensive and repetitive practice to be effective. Consequently, it is often difficult to keep patients committed to their rehabilitation regimen. In addition to direct measures of rehabilitation achievable through targeted assessments, other factors can indirectly lead to rehabilitation. Current levels of integration between commodity graphics software, hardware, and body-tracking devices have provided a reliable tool to build what are referred to as serious games, focusing on the rehabilitation paradigm. More specifically, serious games can captivate and engage players for a specific purpose such as developing new knowledge or skills. This paper discusses a serious game application with a focus on upper limb rehabilitation in patients with hemiplegia or hemiparesis. The game makes use of biofeedback and mirror-neurons to enhance the patient's engagement. Results from the application of a quantitative self-report instrument to assess in-game engagement suggest that the serious game is a viable instructional approach rather than an entertaining novelty and, furthermore, demonstrates the future potential for dual action therapy-focused games.

  3. Development of a Biofeedback Therapeutic Exercise Supporting Manipulator for Lower Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yosuke; Hisada, Takashi; Komada, Satoshi; Hirai, Junji

    Although equipments that support physical therapy have been developed, there are few types of equipment to improve quality of physical therapy. This paper proposes a new concept of robotic biofeedback exercise equipment that displays human muscle force during training. The concept tries to have therapeutic value through grasping of condition for trainee during exercise and giving an incentive to perform training. The equipment is not only for convalescent patients but also for athletes and healthy persons with a physical trouble. The manipulator is designed to support lower limb rehabilitation of knee and hip joints in sagittal plane, where a 3-degrees-of-freedom manipulator is adopted in order to realize low height equipment. Since the manipulator has redundant degree of freedom, collision avoidance is performed by a controller based on acceleration control by disturbance observer. Moreover, simultaneous isokinetic movement for knee and hip joints that has an adjustment capability of maximum speed and time constant is realized in order to perform safe training by isokinetic muscular contraction. Desired motion is realized experimentally by the proposed manipulator.

  4. Skin conductance biofeedback training in adults with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and stress-triggered seizures: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoulaud-Franchi, Jean-Arthur; Kotwas, Iliana; Lanteaume, Laura; Berthet, Christelle; Bastien, Mireille; Vion-Dury, Jean; McGonigal, Aileen; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2014-12-01

    The present proof-of-concept study investigated the feasibility of skin conductance biofeedback training in reducing seizures in adults with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), whose seizures are triggered by stress. Skin conductance biofeedback aims to increase levels of peripheral sympathetic arousal in order to reduce cortical excitability. This might seem somewhat counterintuitive, since such autonomic arousal may also be associated with increased stress and anxiety. Thus, this sought to verify that patients with TLE and stress-triggered seizures are not worsened in terms of stress, anxiety, and negative emotional response to this nonpharmacological treatment. Eleven patients with drug-resistant TLE with seizures triggered by stress were treated with 12 sessions of biofeedback. Patients did not worsen on cognitive evaluation of attentional biases towards negative emotional stimuli (P>.05) or on psychometric evaluation with state anxiety inventory (P = .059); in addition, a significant improvement was found in the Negative Affect Schedule (P = .014) and in the Beck Depression Inventory (P = .009). Biofeedback training significantly reduced seizure frequency with a mean reduction of -48.61% (SD = 27.79) (P = .005). There was a correlation between the mean change in skin conductance activity over the biofeedback treatment and the reduction of seizure frequency (r(11) = .62, P = .042). Thus, the skin conductance biofeedback used in the present study, which teaches patients to achieve an increased level of peripheral sympathetic arousal, was a well-tolerated nonpharmacological treatment. Further, well-controlled studies are needed to confirm the therapeutic value of this nonpharmacological treatment in reducing seizures in adults with drug-resistant TLE with seizures triggered by stress.

  5. Mainstreaming Culture in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Fanny M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the "awakening" to the importance of culture in psychology in America, international psychology has remained on the sidelines of psychological science. The author recounts her personal and professional experience in tandem with the stages of development in international/cross-cultural psychology. Based on her research in cross-cultural…

  6. Introduction to Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lesley

    Designed for community students interested in learning about psychology as a field of study, this module offers group and individual activities to involve the beginning student in research, experimentation and discussion. Unit 1, "What Is Psychology?," includes the use of animals in psychology, ethics, the history of psychology, an…

  7. NOTE: Development and preliminary evaluation of a prototype audiovisual biofeedback device incorporating a patient-specific guiding waveform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Raghu B.; Sawant, Amit; Suh, Yelin; George, Rohini; Keall, Paul J.

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effectiveness of a novel audio-visual biofeedback respiratory training tool to reduce respiratory irregularity. The audiovisual biofeedback system acquires sample respiratory waveforms of a particular patient and computes a patient-specific waveform to guide the patient's subsequent breathing. Two visual feedback models with different displays and cognitive loads were investigated: a bar model and a wave model. The audio instructions were ascending/descending musical tones played at inhale and exhale respectively to assist in maintaining the breathing period. Free-breathing, bar model and wave model training was performed on ten volunteers for 5 min for three repeat sessions. A total of 90 respiratory waveforms were acquired. It was found that the bar model was superior to free breathing with overall rms displacement variations of 0.10 and 0.16 cm, respectively, and rms period variations of 0.77 and 0.33 s, respectively. The wave model was superior to the bar model and free breathing for all volunteers, with an overall rms displacement of 0.08 cm and rms periods of 0.2 s. The reduction in the displacement and period variations for the bar model compared with free breathing was statistically significant (p = 0.005 and 0.002, respectively); the wave model was significantly better than the bar model (p = 0.006 and 0.005, respectively). Audiovisual biofeedback with a patient-specific guiding waveform significantly reduces variations in breathing. The wave model approach reduces cycle-to-cycle variations in displacement by greater than 50% and variations in period by over 70% compared with free breathing. The planned application of this device is anatomic and functional imaging procedures and radiation therapy delivery.

  8. Effect of biofeedback cycling training on functional recovery and walking ability of lower extremity in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huei-Ching; Lee, Chia-Ling; Lin, Roxane; Hsu, Miao-Ju; Chen, Chia-Hsin; Lin, Jau-Hong; Lo, Sing Kai

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of biofeedback cycling training on lower limb functional recovery, walking endurance, and walking speed for patients with chronic stroke. Thirty-one patients with stroke (stroke onset >3 months) were randomly assigned into two groups using a crossover design. One group (N = 16; mean: 53.6 ± 10.3 years) underwent conventional rehabilitation and cycling training (30 minutes/time, 5 times per week for 4 weeks), followed by only conventional rehabilitation for another 4 weeks. The other group (N = 15; mean: 54.5 ± 8.0 years) underwent the same training in reverse order. The bike used in this biofeedback cycling training was the MOTOmed viva2 Movement Trainer. Outcome measures included the lower extremity subscale of Fugl-Meyer assessment (LE-FMA), the 6-minute walk test (6MWT), the 10-meter walk test (10MWT), and the modified Ashworth scale (MAS). All participants were assessed at the beginning of the study, at the end of the 4(th) week, and at the end of the 8(th) week. Thirty participants completed the study, including the cycling training interventions and all assessments. The results showed that improvements in the period with cycling training were significantly better than the noncycling period in the LE-FMA (p < 0.05), 6MWT (p < 0.001), 10MWT (p < 0.001), and MAS (p < 0.001) scores. No significant carryover effects were observed. The improvements on outcome measures were significantly different between the cycling period and the noncycling period after adjusting for potential confounding factors in the multivariate analysis of variance (p < 0.001). The study result indicates that the additional 4-week biofeedback cycling training could lead to improved LE functional recovery, walking endurance, and speed for patients with chronic stroke.

  9. Development and preliminary evaluation of a prototype audiovisual biofeedback device incorporating a patient-specific guiding waveform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkat, Raghu B; Sawant, Amit; Suh, Yelin; Keall, Paul J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5847 (United States); George, Rohini [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)], E-mail: Paul.Keall@stanford.edu

    2008-06-07

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effectiveness of a novel audio-visual biofeedback respiratory training tool to reduce respiratory irregularity. The audiovisual biofeedback system acquires sample respiratory waveforms of a particular patient and computes a patient-specific waveform to guide the patient's subsequent breathing. Two visual feedback models with different displays and cognitive loads were investigated: a bar model and a wave model. The audio instructions were ascending/descending musical tones played at inhale and exhale respectively to assist in maintaining the breathing period. Free-breathing, bar model and wave model training was performed on ten volunteers for 5 min for three repeat sessions. A total of 90 respiratory waveforms were acquired. It was found that the bar model was superior to free breathing with overall rms displacement variations of 0.10 and 0.16 cm, respectively, and rms period variations of 0.77 and 0.33 s, respectively. The wave model was superior to the bar model and free breathing for all volunteers, with an overall rms displacement of 0.08 cm and rms periods of 0.2 s. The reduction in the displacement and period variations for the bar model compared with free breathing was statistically significant (p = 0.005 and 0.002, respectively); the wave model was significantly better than the bar model (p = 0.006 and 0.005, respectively). Audiovisual biofeedback with a patient-specific guiding waveform significantly reduces variations in breathing. The wave model approach reduces cycle-to-cycle variations in displacement by greater than 50% and variations in period by over 70% compared with free breathing. The planned application of this device is anatomic and functional imaging procedures and radiation therapy delivery. (note)

  10. Clinical application of computerized evaluation and re-education biofeedback prototype for sensorimotor control of the hand in stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Hsiu-Yun

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemianaesthesia patients usually exhibit awkward and inefficient finger movements of the affected hands. Conventionally, most interventions emphasize the improvement of motor deficits, but rarely address sensory capability and sensorimotor control following stroke. Thus it is critical for stroke patients with sensory problems to incorporate appropriate strategies for dealing with sensory impairment, into traditional hand function rehabilitation programs. In this study, we used a custom-designed computerized evaluation and re-education biofeedback (CERB prototype to analyze hand grasp performances, and monitor the training effects on hand coordination for stroke patients with sensory disturbance and without motor deficiency. Methods The CERB prototype was constructed to detect momentary pinch force modulation for 14 sub-acute and chronic stroke patients with sensory deficiency and 14 healthy controls. The other ten chronic stroke patients (ranges of stroke period: 6–60 months were recruited to investigate the effects of 4-weeks computerized biofeedback treatments on the hand control ability. The biofeedback procedures provide visual and auditory cues to the participants when the interactive force of hand-to-object exceeded the target latitude in a pinch-up-holding task to trigger optimal motor strategy. Follow-up measurements were conducted one month after training. The hand sensibility, grip forces and results of hand functional tests were recorded and analyzed. Results The affected hands of the 14 predominant sensory stroke patients exhibited statistically significant elevation in the magnitude of peak pinch force (p = 0.033 in pinching and lifting-up tasks, and poor results for hand function tests (p = 0.005 than sound hands did. In addition, the sound hands of patients were less efficient in force modulation (p = 0.009 than the hands of healthy subjects were. Training with the biofeedback system produced

  11. Historizing epistemology in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Gordana

    2010-12-01

    The conflict between the psychometric methodological framework and the particularities of human experiences reported in psychotherapeutic context led Michael Schwarz to raise the question whether psychology is based on a methodological error. I take this conflict as a heuristic tool for the reconstruction of the early history of psychology, which bears witness to similar epistemological conflicts, though the dominant historiography of psychology has largely forgotten alternative conceptions and their valuable insights into complexities of psychic phenomena. In order to work against the historical amnesia in psychology I suggest to look at cultural-historical contexts which decisively shaped epistemological choices in psychology. Instead of keeping epistemology and history of psychology separate, which nurtures individualism and naturalism in psychology, I argue for historizing epistemology and for historical psychology. From such a historically reflected perspective psychology in contemporary world can be approached more critically.

  12. ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHIC BIOFEEDBACK IMPROVES FOCUSED ATTENTION IN ATTENTION DEFICIT/HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Sokhadze

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available EEG biofeedback (so called neurofeedback is considered as an efficacious treatment for ADHD. We propose that operant conditioning of EEG in neurofeedback training mode, aimed to mitigate inattention and low arousal in ADHD, will be accompanied by changes in EEG bands' relative power. Patients were 18 children diagnosed with ADHD. The neurofeedback protocol (“Focus/Alertness” by Peak Achievement Trainer, Neurotek, KY used to train patients has focused attention training procedure, which according to specifications, represents wide band EEG amplitude suppression training. Quantitative EEG analysis was completed on each of 25 min long twelve sessions to determine the relative power of each of the EEG bands of interest throughout each session, and from the first session to the last session. Additional statistical analysis was performed to determine significant changes in relative power within sessions (from minute 1 to minute 25, and between sessions (from session 1 to session 12 for an individual patient. We performed analysis of relative power of Theta, Alpha, Low and High Beta, Theta/Alpha, Theta/Beta, and Theta/Low Beta and Theta/High Beta ratios. We performed also analysis between the “Focus”measure and changes in relative power of above EEG rhythms and their ratios. Additional secondary measures of patients’ post-neurofeedback outcomes were assessed using an audio-visual selective attention test (IVA + Plus and behavioral evaluation scores from Aberrant Behavior Checklist. We found that, as expected, Theta/Low Beta and Theta/Alpha ratios decreased significantly from Session 1 to Session 12 and from minute 1 to minute 25 within sessions. The ‘Focus” measure of protocol showed high negative correlation with both Theta/Alpha and Theta/Beta ratios. The findings regarding EEG changes resulting from self-regulation training along with behavioral evaluations will help in elucidation of neural mechanisms of neurofeedback aimed to improve

  13. Individualistic Aptitude and Biofeedback on Improvement of Coordination in Young Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saha Srilekha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sports cognition encompasses the primary affective-motivational aspect related to primordial fight-or flight responses, which are essentially the precursors for both the BAS (behavioural activation system - the reward system and BIS (behavioural inhibition system- the punishment or fear-eliciting system. In Asian and especially South-Asian perspective, impulsivity and aggressive out-bursts are by and large considered as conduct disorders, thus more acceptable docile tendency in children and pre-adolescent lead them to a cognitive-motivational make-up of BIS orientation. With such a background the present study was carried out to identify the extent of cognitive-affective competence of the skilled competitive players in enhancing bilateral motor coordination required for high sport performance. Eighty-one high performing female ball game players matched with their performance-specific motor coordination ability, were categorised into three differential groups based on their psychobiological competence, viz; Group A- consisted of twenty-seven players diagnosed with moderate level of sympathovagal balance; Group B (N = 27 – consisted of twenty-seven players diagnosed with discordant sympathovagal balance, while Group C (n = 27 were identified as having high sympathovagal balance. Thereafter, players of Group B & C were introduced to training of skin-conductance biofeedback tailored for musculoskeletal enhancement (20 min.s/ day; three days/ week for twelve weeks. Mid-term analyses of motor coordination as well as the post-intervention analyses (carried out after the twelfth week revealed that players having higher sympathovagal balance had higher efficiency in modulation of muscle tension as well as in perceptual –motor adaptation, which have prompted them to have enhanced bilateral and visual-motor coordination compared to their counterparts.

  14. The use of biofeedback in clinical virtual reality: the INTREPID project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, Claudia; Gorini, Alessandra; Vigna, Cinzia; Algeri, Davide; Pallavicini, Federica; Riva, Giuseppe

    2009-11-12

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a psychiatric disorder characterized by a constant and unspecific anxiety that interferes with daily-life activities. Its high prevalence in general population and the severe limitations it causes, point out the necessity to find new efficient strategies to treat it. Together with the cognitive-behavioral treatments, relaxation represents a useful approach for the treatment of GAD, but it has the limitation that it is hard to be learned. The INTREPID project is aimed to implement a new instrument to treat anxiety-related disorders and to test its clinical efficacy in reducing anxiety-related symptoms. The innovation of this approach is the combination of virtual reality and biofeedback, so that the first one is directly modified by the output of the second one. In this way, the patient is made aware of his or her reactions through the modification of some features of the VR environment in real time. Using mental exercises the patient learns to control these physiological parameters and using the feedback provided by the virtual environment is able to gauge his or her success. The supplemental use of portable devices, such as PDA or smart-phones, allows the patient to perform at home, individually and autonomously, the same exercises experienced in therapist's office. The goal is to anchor the learned protocol in a real life context, so enhancing the patients' ability to deal with their symptoms. The expected result is a better and faster learning of relaxation techniques, and thus an increased effectiveness of the treatment if compared with traditional clinical protocols.

  15. The effect of visual biofeedback on balance in elderly population: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhasan, Hammad; Hood, Victoria; Mainwaring, Frederick

    2017-01-01

    Background Balance is commonly affected by multiple factors, especially among the elderly population. Visual biofeedback (VBF) is an intervention tool that can be used in balance rehabilitation. Aim This study aimed to systematically review randomized controlled trials that examine whether VBF training is effective in improving balance in an elderly population. Data sources Three databases were searched: CIAHL, EMBASE, and MEDLINE. The searches were limited to the period from 2010 to 2016. Eligibility criteria Healthy adults, aged ≥65 years, with no specific disorders were included. Interventions were any VBF intervention with the aim of improving balance and were compared to no intervention, traditional exercises, placebo, or standard care. The outcome measures were balance as measured by any validated outcome measure. Studies appraisal method The Physiotherapy Evidence Database quality assessment tool and The Cochrane Collaboration tool for assessing risk of bias were used by two independent authors (HA and FM) in order to appraise the included studies. Results The database search resulted in 879 articles, of which five papers were included. VBF was compared to no intervention, a placebo, and traditional exercise. The total number of participants in all the five included studies was 181, with a mean age of 74.3 years (standard deviation 6.7). Two studies were rated as high-quality studies, and three were rated as fair quality. Conclusion Engaging elderly people living in the community in VBF training was found to be effective and could improve their balance ability. However, the variation between studies in methodology, intervention protocol, and outcomes utilized made it difficult to inform a definitive statement regarding the potential application of VBF for balance training with the elderly. Furthermore, high-quality randomized control trials are required. The systematic review level of evidence is moderate, and the strength of recommendation is that VBF is

  16. 生物反馈疗法对64名强制隔离戒毒人员的随机对照试验%Randomized Controlled Trial of 64 Compulsory Isolation Addicts with Biofeedback Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾东明; 钱世军; 潘云清; 谢文

    2015-01-01

    目的:探究生物反馈疗法对强制隔离戒毒人员生理、心理康复的影响。方法:采用随机对照研究将64例强制隔离戒毒人员分成试验组(n =32)与对照组(n =32),对照组只进行强戒场所的常规康复管理,实验组除常规康复管理外进行20次生物反馈治疗,观测皮电 EMG 和脑电 EEG(α波,θ波)指标变化,分别于治疗前以及治疗结束时,应用 SAS、SDS 量表以及第三方评价进行测评,评估治疗前后心理生理反应情况。结果:治疗前两组间量表无统计学差异,治疗后,EG 组的 SAS、SDS 得分均低于 CG 组,且有统计学意义;EG 组肌电 EMG 值降低、脑电 EEG 值(α波,θ波)升高。结论:通过生物反馈的 EMG 和α-θ波训练治疗对改善康复期戒毒患者的焦虑、抑郁情绪改善有积极作用。%Objective:To evaluate the physiological and psychological effect of biofeedback therapy on rehabilitation of compulsory isolation detoxification addicts. Methods:64 male of compulsory isolation detoxification were randomly divided into experimental group (EG)(n = 32)and control group(CG)(n = 32),the control group were managed by routine rehabilitation,the experimental group were carried on biofeedback therapy of 20 times,observation of EMG and EEG EEG(alpha,theta wave respectively)besides routine rehabilitation. The subjects were assessed with the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale(SAS),Self-Rating Depression Scale(SDS)and the third party evaluation tests. Results:There were no significant differences between the two groups,after treatment,SAS and SDS of EG were lower than those of CG,and have statistical significance;the EMG value of EG lowered and EEG value(alpha,theta)of EG increased. Conclusion:It suggests that biofeedback therapy could improve addictsˊsymptoms of depression and anxiety through EEG and EEG(α-θ)training.

  17. 艾司西酞普兰合并生物反馈治疗惊恐障碍的对照研究%Biofeedback therapy combined with escitalopram for panic disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周浩; 孔令军; 李龙

    2012-01-01

      Objective :To investigate the clinical effect of biofeedback combined with escitalopram in the treatment of panic disorder. Methods :80 cases patients were randomly divided into two groups,each group had 40 cases,the control group was given escitalopram treatment,the observation group in some basis with biofeedback treatment,the clinical results of two groups were retrospectively analyzed. Results :The total effective rate of the observation group was87.5%,the total efficiency of the control group was 70.0%,the differences of the total efficiency between two groups were statisticaly significant(P0.05). The 2W had significant difference(P0.05),the two group after treatment were better than before treatment,during treatment of article 8W,the observation group social relationships, independence,psychological and physiological score was significantly higher than the control group,the difference was statisticaly significant(P0.05).Conclusion: Biofeedback therapy combined with escitalopram was effective for patients with panic disorder. Quality of life was ameliorated significantly their combination escitalopram alone.%  目的:探讨生物反馈合并艾司西酞普兰治疗惊恐障碍的临床效果.方法:将80例惊恐障碍患者随机分为两组,各40例,对照组给予艾司西酞普兰治疗,观察组在此基础上加用生物反馈治疗,对两组临床结果进行回顾性分析.结果:观察组总有效率为87.5%,对照组总有效率为70.0%,两组总有效率比较差异有统计学意义(P0.05),在治疗第2周、4周、8周比较差异有统计学意义(P0.05),两组治疗后均优于治疗前,在治疗第8周,观察组社会关系、独立性、心理及生理评分显著高于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P0.05).结论:生物反馈合并艾司西酞普兰治疗惊恐障碍疗效优,患者的生活质量有明显提高.

  18. Comparison of the efficacy of electromyographic biofeedback, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and conservative medical interventions in the treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flor, H; Birbaumer, N

    1993-08-01

    In this study, three types of treatments for chronic musculoskeletal pain were compared. Fifty-seven patients who suffered from chronic back pain and 21 patients who suffered from temporomandibular pain and dysfunction were randomly assigned to either electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback, cognitive-behavioral therapy, or conservative medical treatment. At posttreatment, improvements were noted in all three treatment groups, with the biofeedback group displaying the most substantial change. At the 6- and 24-month follow-up, only the biofeedback group maintained significant reductions in pain severity, interference, affective distress, pain-related use of the health care system, stress-related reactivity of the affected muscles, and an increase in active coping self-statements. Treatment outcome was predicted by chronicity and treatment-specific variables. Analysis of attrition showed a significant effect for therapist and extent of somatic pathology. Results suggest that pain patients who suffer from musculoskeletal pain problems and display few physical disabilities may profit the most from short-term EMG biofeedback treatment.

  19. The Effect of Voice Ambulatory Biofeedback on the Daily Performance and Retention of a Modified Vocal Motor Behavior in Participants with Normal Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Stan, Jarrad H.; Mehta, Daryush D.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Ambulatory biofeedback has potential to improve carryover of newly established vocal motor behaviors into daily life outside of the clinic and warrants systematic research that is lacking in the literature. This proof-of-concept study was designed to establish an empirical basis for future work in this area by formally assessing whether…

  20. Effects of heart rate variability biofeedback in subjects with stress-related chronic neck pain: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman, David M; Olsson, Erik M G; von Schéele, Bo; Melin, Lennart; Lyskov, Eugene

    2011-06-01

    Recent studies focusing on autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunctions, together with theoretical pathophysiological models of musculoskeletal disorders, indicate the involvement of ANS regulation in development and maintenance of chronic muscle pain. Research has demonstrated the effectiveness of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback (BF) in increasing HRV and reducing the symptoms of different disorders characterized by ANS aberration. The study investigated the effects of resonance frequency HRV BF on autonomic regulation and perceived health, pain, stress and disability in 24 subjects with stress-related chronic neck-shoulder pain. Twelve subjects participated in 10 weekly sessions of resonant HRV BF and were compared to a control group. Subjective reports and HRV measures during relaxation and in response to a standardized stress protocol were assessed for both groups pre- and post-intervention. Group × time interactions revealed a significantly stronger increase over time in perceived health (SF-36) for the treatment group, including vitality, bodily pain and social functioning. Interactions were also seen for HRV during relaxation and reactivity to stress. The present pilot study indicates improvement in perceived health over a 10 week intervention with HRV-biofeedback in subjects with chronic neck-pain. Increased resting HRV as well as enhanced reactivity to hand grip and cold pressor tests might reflect beneficial effects on ANS regulation, and suggest that this intervention protocol is suitable for a larger controlled trial.

  1. Low-vision rehabilitation by means of MP-1 biofeedback examination in patients with different macular diseases: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vingolo, Enzo M; Salvatore, Serena; Cavarretta, Sonia

    2009-06-01

    Macular disease is one of the main causes of visual impairment. We studied the efficacy of low-vision rehabilitation by means of MP-1 biofeedback examination in patients with different macular disease. Five patients were enrolled (3 female and 2 male, mean age 53.8 years) and a total of 9 eyes was examined: 2 eyes with vitelliform dystrophy, 1 with a post-traumatic macular scar, 2 with Stargardt disease, 2 with myopic macular degeneration, 2 with cone dystrophy. All the patients underwent the following tests: visual acuity, reading speed, fixation test, MP-1 microperimetry. Low-vision rehabilitation, which lasted 10 weeks, consisted of 10 training sessions of 10 min for each eye, performed once a week using the MP-1 biofeedback examination. Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test. p values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. After training all patients displayed an improvement in visual acuity, fixation behaviour, retinal sensitivity and reading speed. Fixation behaviour within the 2 degrees diameter circle improved and was statistically significant for reading speed (p = 0.01). Reading speed improved from a mean value of 64.3 to 92 words/min. Our results show that audio feedback can, by increasing attentional modulation, help the brain to fix the final preferred retinal locus. Audio feedback facilitates stimuli transmission between intraretinal neurons as well as between the retina and brain, which is where the highest level of stimuli processing occurs, thereby probably supporting a "remapping phenomenon".

  2. Using biofeedback while immersed in a stressful videogame increases the effectiveness of stress management skills in soldiers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Bouchard

    Full Text Available This study assessed the efficacy of using visual and auditory biofeedback while immersed in a tridimensional videogame to practice a stress management skill (tactical breathing. All 41 participants were soldiers who had previously received basic stress management training and first aid training in combat. On the first day, they received a 15-minute refresher briefing and were randomly assigned to either: (a no additional stress management training (SMT for three days, or (b 30-minute sessions (one per day for three days of biofeedback-assisted SMT while immersed in a horror/first-person shooter game. The training was performed in a dark and enclosed environment using a 50-inch television with active stereoscopic display and loudspeakers. On the last day, all participants underwent a live simulated ambush with an improvised explosive device, where they had to provide first aid to a wounded soldier. Stress levels were measured with salivary cortisol collected when waking-up, before and after the live simulation. Stress was also measured with heart rate at baseline, during an apprehension phase, and during the live simulation. Repeated-measure ANOVAs and ANCOVAs confirmed that practicing SMT was effective in reducing stress. Results are discussed in terms of the advantages of the proposed program for military personnel and the need to practice SMT.

  3. Synergists activation pattern of the quadriceps muscle differs when performing sustained isometric contractions with different EMG biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, Nicolas; Matkowski, Boris; Martin, Alain; Lepers, Romuald

    2006-10-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine (1) endurance time and (2) activation pattern of vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles during fatiguing isometric knee extensions performed with different EMG biofeedbacks. Thirteen men (27 +/- 5 year) volunteered to participate in three experimental sessions. Each session involved a submaximal isometric contraction held until failure at an EMG level corresponding to 40% maximal voluntary contraction torque (MVC), with visual EMG biofeedback provided for either (1) RF muscle (RF task), (2) VL and VM muscles (Vasti task) or (3) the sum of the VL, VM and RF muscles (Quadriceps task). EMG activity of VL, VM and RF muscles was recorded during each of the three tasks and further analyzed. Time to task failures and MVC loss (P 0.05) between the three sessions (182 s and approximately 28%, respectively) (P > 0.05). Moreover, the magnitude of central and peripheral fatigue was not different at failure of the three tasks. Activation pattern was similar for knee extensors at the beginning of each task (P > 0.05). However, RF EMG activity decreased (P pattern for the bi-articular RF muscle compared to the mono-articular vasti muscles during fatigue.

  4. 多发性抽动患儿的生物反馈治疗%Biofeedback therapy for children with Tourette syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴玉帆; 束晓梅

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the curative effect of biofeedback therapy for children with Tourette syndrome. Methods; Twelve children with Tourette syndrome were treated with strengthening SMR waves, reducing myoelectricity and skin conductance, stepping up skin temperature through a cerebral biofeedback therapeutic apparatus; Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) was used to evaluate the severity of Tourette syndrome. Results: After biofeedback training for twenty times and forty times, the effective rates were 75. 0% and 91. 7% , respectively , after terminating biofeedback training for six months, the effective rate also maintained at 83. 3%. The total score of YGTSS after biofeedback training for twenty times was ( 19. 09 ± 14. 27 ) , which was significantly lower than that before biofeedback training (35. 96 ± 13.46) (P 0. 05 ) Conclusion: Biofeedback therapy is effective for children with Tourette syndrome.%目的:探讨生物反馈治疗对儿童多发性抽动的疗效.方法:对12例多发性抽动患儿采用脑电生物反馈治疗仪进行强化SMR波,降低肌电(MyoScan)、皮电(SC)、升高皮温(TEMP)治疗,采用耶鲁全面抽动严重程度量表(YGTSS)对抽动障碍的严重程度进行评价.结果:治疗20次后有效率为75.0%,治疗40次后有效率达91.7%,停止治疗后6个月有效率仍能维持在83.3%;治疗20次YGTSS总分(19.09±14.27)较治疗前 (35.96±13.46)明显下降(P<0.05),40次时YGTSS总分(11.13±12.85)较20次时进一步下降,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);6个月随访YGTSS总分(11.48±14.10)与40次治疗结束时比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论:生物反馈治疗对多发性抽动患儿有效.

  5. Psychology in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imada, Hiroshi; Tanaka-Matsumi, Junko

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide information about Japan and its psychology in advance of the 31st International Congress of Psychology (ICP), to be held in Yokohama, Japan, in 2016. The article begins with the introduction of the Japanese Psychological Association (JPA), the hosting organization of the ICP 2016, and the Japanese Union of Psychological Associations consisting of 51 associations/societies, of which the JPA is a member. This is followed by a brief description of a history of psychology of Japan, with emphasis on the variation in our approach to psychology in three different periods, that is, the pre- and post-Pacific War periods, and the post-1960 period. Next, the international contributions of Japanese psychology/psychologists are discussed from the point of view of their visibility. Education and training in psychology in Japanese universities is discussed with a final positive remark about the long-awaited enactment of the Accredited Psychologist Law in September, 2015.

  6. Personality theory, abnormal psychology, and psychological measurement. A psychological behaviorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, A W

    1993-01-01

    Behaviorism, because it has not had a theory of personality, has been separated from the rest of psychology, unable in large part to draw from or contribute to it. Traditional psychology has not had a theory of personality that says what personality is, how it comes about, or how it functions. An antagonism has resulted that weakens rather than complements each tradition. Psychological behaviorism presents a new type of theory of personality. Derived from experimentation, it is constructed from basic theories of emotion, language, and sensory-motor behavior. It says personality is composed of learned basic behavioral repertoires (BBRs) that affect behavior. Personality measurement instruments are analyzed in terms of the BBRs, beginning the behaviorization of this field and calling for much additional research. These multilevel developments are then basic in psychological behaviorism's theory of abnormal behavior and of clinical treatment. The approach opens many new avenues of empirical and theoretical work.

  7. Psychology of Religion

    OpenAIRE

    Ulu, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter of book that entitled Science, Religion and Society: An Encyclopedia of History, Culture, and Controversy has been given important informations about psychology of religion’s historical development as well as pioneer figures’ contributions. In this text some evaluations has been made by categorizing studies in field of psychology of religion. Finally some informations are provided about current status of the psychology of religion and position of the psychology of religion ...

  8. Psychology and Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, David

    1987-01-01

    Psychology and literature focus on human behavior. There are several points where the interests of psychologists and literary scholars converge. This convergence is evident in the use of literature to test psychological theories and to understand human behavior in historical times, in the psychological analyses of literature, and in psychological…

  9. Humanistic Psychology: How Realistic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebel, Linda

    1982-01-01

    Overviews themes relating to humanistic psychology. Discusses the tendency of theorists to unconsciously externalize their own psyches. Examines the historical context of humanistic psychology. Discusses humanistic psychology's contribution to understanding the less healthy person. Provides instances of unrealistic thinking by humanistic…

  10. Psychology in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushma, B.; Padmaja, G.

    2011-01-01

    Psychology forms the basis of every human activity. The scope of psychology is increasingly widening in various economic, political, social, cultural and technological aspects. Though the application of psychology is extending to various aspects of life, it needs to be indigenised to address the dynamic needs in the various socio-economic contexts…

  11. Psychology in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Eleonora Rubio

    2011-01-01

    The first formal psychology course taught in Mexico was in 1896 at Mexico's National University; today, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM in Spanish). The modern psychology from Europe and the US in the late 19th century were the primary influences of Mexican psychology, as well as psychoanalysis and both clinical and experimental…

  12. Intro through Internet Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Sandra K.; Kelliher, Thomas P.

    Psychology and computer science were clustered into a course in "Internet Psychology" with the goal of enabling students to use electronic networks responsibly and creatively and to understand the principles of psychology as they operate in the electronic context. Fourteen students from a variety of majors registered for the class.…

  13. The effect of visual biofeedback on balance in elderly population: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alhasan H

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Hammad Alhasan,1 Victoria Hood,2 Frederick Mainwaring2 1Physiotherapy Department, Faculty of Applied Medical Science, Umm al-Qura University, Mecca, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 2School of Health Science, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, UK Background: Balance is commonly affected by multiple factors, especially among the elderly population. Visual biofeedback (VBF is an intervention tool that can be used in balance rehabilitation.Aim: This study aimed to systematically review randomized controlled trials that examine whether VBF training is effective in improving balance in an elderly population.Data sources: Three databases were searched: CIAHL, EMBASE, and MEDLINE. The searches were limited to the period from 2010 to 2016.Eligibility criteria: Healthy adults, aged ≥65 years, with no specific disorders were included. Interventions were any VBF intervention with the aim of improving balance and were compared to no intervention, traditional exercises, placebo, or standard care. The outcome measures were balance as measured by any validated outcome measure.Studies appraisal method: The Physiotherapy Evidence Database quality assessment tool and The Cochrane Collaboration tool for assessing risk of bias were used by two independent authors (HA and FM in order to appraise the included studies.Results: The database search resulted in 879 articles, of which five papers were included. VBF was compared to no intervention, a placebo, and traditional exercise. The total number of participants in all the five included studies was 181, with a mean age of 74.3 years (standard deviation 6.7. Two studies were rated as high-quality studies, and three were rated as fair quality.Conclusion: Engaging elderly people living in the community in VBF training was found to be effective and could improve their balance ability. However, the variation between studies in methodology, intervention protocol, and outcomes utilized made it difficult to

  14. Mainstreaming culture in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Fanny M

    2012-11-01

    Despite the "awakening" to the importance of culture in psychology in America, international psychology has remained on the sidelines of psychological science. The author recounts her personal and professional experience in tandem with the stages of development in international/cross-cultural psychology. Based on her research in cross-cultural personality assessment, the author discusses the inadequacies of sole reliance on either the etic or the emic approach and points out the advantages of a combined emic-etic approach in bridging global and local human experiences in psychological science and practice. With the blurring of the boundaries between North American-European psychologies and psychology in the rest of the world, there is a need to mainstream culture in psychology's epistemological paradigm. Borrowing from the concept of gender mainstreaming that embraces both similarities and differences in promoting equal opportunities, the author discusses the parallel needs of acknowledging universals and specifics when mainstreaming culture in psychology. She calls for building a culturally informed universal knowledge base that should be incorporated in the psychology curriculum and textbooks.

  15. Exploring the effectiveness of a computer-based heart rate variability biofeedback program in reducing anxiety in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Gregg; Keffer, Steven; Abrahamson, Craig; Horst, S Jeanne

    2011-06-01

    Given the pervasiveness of stress and anxiety in our culture it is important to develop and implement interventions that can be easily utilized by large numbers of people that are readily available, inexpensive and have minimal side effects. Two studies explored the effectiveness of a computer-based heart rate variability biofeedback program on reducing anxiety and negative mood in college students. A pilot project (n = 9) of highly anxious students revealed sizable decreases in anxiety and negative mood following utilizing the program for 4 weeks. A second study (n = 35) employing an immediate versus delayed treatment design replicated the results, although the magnitude of the impact was not quite as strong. Despite observing decreases in anxiety, the expected changes in psychophysiological coherence were not observed.

  16. Effects of heart rate variability biofeedback on cardiovascular responses and autonomic sympathovagal modulation following stressor tasks in prehypertensives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S; Sun, P; Wang, S; Lin, G; Wang, T

    2016-02-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is implicated in prehypertension, and previous studies have suggested that therapies that improve modulation of sympathovagal balance, such as biofeedback and slow abdominal breathing, are effective in patients with prehypertension at rest. However, considering that psychophysiological stressors may be associated with greater cardiovascular risk in prehypertensives, it is important to investigate whether heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) results in equivalent effects on autonomic cardiovascular responses control during stressful conditions in prehypertensives. A total of 32 college students with prehypertension were enrolled and randomly assigned to HRV-BF (n=12), slow abdominal breathing (SAB, n=10) or no treatment (control, n=10) groups. Then, a training experiment consisting of 15 sessions was employed to compare the effect of each intervention on the following cardiovascular response indicators before and after intervention: heart rate (HR); heart rate variability (HRV) components; blood volume pulse amplitude (BVPamp); galvanic skin response; respiration rate (RSP); and blood pressure. In addition, the cold pressor test and the mental arithmetic challenge test were also performed over two successive days before and after the invention as well as after 3 months of follow-up. A significant decrease in HR and RSP and a significant increase in BVPamp were observed after the HRV-BF intervention (P<0.001). For the HRV analysis, HRV-BF significantly reduced the ratio of low-frequency power to high-frequency power (the LF/HF ratio, P<0.001) and increased the normalized high-frequency power (HFnm) (P<0.001) during the stress tests, and an added benefit over SAB by improving HRV was also observed. In the 3-month follow-up study, similar effects on RSP, BVPamp, LF/HF and HFnm were observed in the HRV-BF group compared with the SAB group. HRV-BF training contributes to the beneficial effect of reducing the stress-related cardiovascular

  17. Defecation function of children patients after treatment with biofeedback training%应用生物反馈训练无肛术后患儿的排便功能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伟; 史立伟; 袁正伟; 王维林

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Encopresis after operation for congenital.ectopic anus can cause psychological, physiological and social ability disorders.OBJECTIVE: To treat the children with encopresis with biofeedback training so as to improve the function of post-operative defecation.DESIGN: A self-controlled trial.SETTING: Department of Pediatric Surgery, Second Clinical College of China Medical University.PARTICIPANTS: Totally 20 cases of encopresis after treatment with operation for ectopic anus, were recruited from the Department of Pediatric Surgery, Second Clinical College of China Medical University, between January 1998 and October 2004. Among them, there were 4 cases of complete encopresis, 7 cases of loose encopresis and 9 cases of blotch. All the cases were followed up. There were 9 cases of ectopic anus in the middle and lower parts, and 11 cases of ectopic anus at the high part.METHODS: The objective measuring methods of biofeedback training such as anorectal pressure and anus sphincter electromyography were used to train the patients with postoperative encopresis. After one-month self-directed training in anus contraction and defecation habit, the children received proper biofeedback training. ① Biofeedback training to strengthen the muscles around the anus twice per day. The portable biofeedback-training machine was taken home after the children patients could automically contract the muscles around the anus 3 weeks later. ② Biofeedback training to improve rectal sensitivity and coordination of anus sphincter, and repeated training in expanding saccus. A normal defecation reflex was established. Anus sphincter presented reflex contraction to prevent encopresis once the rectum expanded. ③ Defecation training was performed for 30 minutes after meals every day. ④ Electrostimulation combined with biofeedback training was performed for 10 minutes twice a day for 3 or 4 consecutive weeks.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① The maximum contraction anal pressure, vector

  18. Identity of psychology, identity and psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Nastran Ule

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with epistemic issues of modern psychology with the starting hypothesis being that scientific psychology must satisfy three main interests: scientific, practical and emancipatory interest. Particularly important is the emancipatory interest, which is based on the social reflection of scientific work and conclusions. Psychological knowledge involves not only neutral descriptions of facts, but also implicit rules, expectations regarding values or norms, and criticism of undesirable behavior. The traditional psychological model attempts to satisfy the scientific interest and partly practical interest, while avoiding emancipatory interest. But I believe modern socio-historical models of psychology to be significant precisely owing to the inclusion of emancipatory interest. The difference between these two models of psychology is most obvious in their perception of identity i.e. individuality. Conventional perceptions follow the logic of "possessive individualism" in which the individual is seen as an autonomous bearer and owner of his/her psychological states and processes. The conventional model of identity supports the modernist concept of the individual as being focused on his/her self or personal identity. Socio-historical models, on the other hand, see the individual as a being embedded in social relations and social interactions, and one who builds and expresses his/her individuality through the reflection on social interactions, discursive practices, and response to the hierarchy of power and social mechanisms of control. According to this model, identity evolves through a series of social constructions which are embodied in the individual and represent him/her in society. Identity thus becomes a notion that combines individuality and social context, subjectivation and objectivation of the individual, and historical and biographical time.

  19. Positive Psychology: Considerations and Implications for Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollen, Debra; Ethington, Lanaya L.; Ridley, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    Why has the specialty of counseling psychology been overlooked in the larger conversation about positive psychology? Is it reasonable that counseling psychology claims positive psychology as its own? What are some of the problems in defining "positive psychology," and how does the lack of consensus around operationalization thwart discourse on…

  20. Public Image of Counseling Psychology: What Introductory Psychology Textbooks Say.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, David N.; Vrochopoulos, Sam; Burton, Jennifer

    1997-01-01

    Examines the adequacy of descriptions of counseling psychology and its professionals in introductory psychology textbooks compared to the descriptions of other applied areas of psychology. Results indicate that counseling psychology is less represented than industrial or organizational and clinical psychology and more represented than school…

  1. Psychological Test Validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gessmann H.-W.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical overview of current aspects about the validity problems of psychological tests. The article demonstrates the importance of the development of psychological tests and the scientific studies of their validity, describes the different types of validity and the possible ways of measurement and determination of the validity coefficients. The paper is recommended for researchers, whose work is dedicated to the development, modification or adaptation of the psychological test.

  2. Ethnographic Fieldwork in psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanggaard, Lene

    2014-01-01

    It is argued in the present article that ethnographic fieldwork can serve useful methodological ends within psychology and open the discipline to the cultural landscape of psychological phenomena in everyday life in social practices. Furthermore, a positive case is made for the soundness...... of ethnographic fieldwork. That is, rather than disputing the claim that qualitative methods can serve scientific ends, it is argued that ethnographic fieldwork is suitable for studying the constitution of psychological phenomena in social practices across time....

  3. Psychological violence against children

    OpenAIRE

    Jurkovič, Sabina

    2012-01-01

    The topic of my thesis is a study of how parents and primary school teachers perceive and identify psychological abuse of children. Psychological abuse is an especially sensitive area because children do not perceive interpersonal relations and activities in their environment in the same way as adults. Children also do not possess the physical or psychological power required to withstand or defend themselves against different forms of violence, abuse and harassment. Children who are the victi...

  4. The effectiveness of biofeedback in treatment of women with stress urinary incontinence: a systematic review Eficácia do biofeedback no tratamento de mulheres com incontinência urinária de esforço: revisão sistemática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Maria Alvares Barbosa

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to assess whether pelvic-floor muscle training associated with biofeedback is more effective in the treatment of women with stress urinary incontinence, when compared to exercise alone. METHODS: a research of articles published in the last 20 years in Lilacs, PubMed and SCIRUS databases, using the descriptors "urinary incontinence, stress" and "biofeedback" was conducted. Randomized clinical trials comparing pelvic-floor muscle training with and without biofeedback were included. RESULTS: the study involved three randomized clinical trials involving 169 patients. A physical therapist was responsible for conducting the treatment using electromyographic or pressure biofeedback, and exercises were performed in the clinic or at home. The assessment methods, treatment times and protocols used were heterogeneous. Statistical analysis and rates of cure/improvement were similar between the groups of articles analyzed. Two studies had a score 8, and the third had 6 points according to PEDro's Scale. CONCLUSIONS: examination of the studies found suggests that adding biofeedback to pelvic-floor muscle training appears not to bring about a significant difference in terms of the success of treatment, when compared to perineal exercises performed in isolation.OBJETIVOS: verificar se os exercícios para a musculatura do assoalho pélvico (MAP associados ao biofeedback promovem maior eficácia no tratamento da incontinência urinária de esforço em mulheres, quando comparados a cinesioterapia de forma isolada. MÉTODOS: foi realizada uma pesquisa dos artigos publicados nos últimos 20 anos, nas bases de dados Lilacs, PubMed e SCIRUS, através dos descritores "urinary incontinence, stress" e "biofeedback". Foram incluídos ensaios clínicos aleatorizados que utilizaram como intervenção exercícios para a MAP isolados e associados ao biofeedback, de forma comparativa. RESULTADOS: foram incluídos três ensaios clínicos randomizados envolvendo 169

  5. Nonlinear dynamics in psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Guastello

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a survey of the applications of nonlinear dynamical systems theory to substantive problems encountered in the full scope of psychological science. Applications are organized into three topical areas – cognitive science, social and organizational psychology, and personality and clinical psychology. Both theoretical and empirical studies are considered with an emphasis on works that capture the broadest scope of issues that are of substantive interest to psychological theory. A budding literature on the implications of NDS principles in professional practice is reported also.

  6. Psychological Component of Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  7. Center for Deployment Psychology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Deployment Psychology was developed to promote the education of psychologists and other behavioral health specialists about issues pertaining to the...

  8. SU-F-303-10: Impact of Visual Biofeedback On Respiratory Reproducibility in 4DMRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    To, D; Price, R.G. [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Kim, J; Chetty, I.J.; Glide-Hurst, C [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Precise radiation therapy (RT) for abdominal lesions is complicated by respiratory motion and suboptimal soft tissue contrast in 4DCT. 4DMRI offers improved contrast. However, long scan times and irregular breathing patterns can be limiting. To address this, we introduced visual biofeedback (VBF) into 4DMRI. Methods: Eight healthy volunteers were consented to an IRB-approved protocol. Prospective respiratory-triggered, T2-weighted coronal 4DMRIs were acquired on an open 1.0T MR- SIM. VBF was integrated using an MR-compatible interactive breath-hold control system. Subjects visually monitored their breathing patterns to stay within pre-determined tolerances. 4DMRIs were acquired with and without VBF for 2–8 phase acquisitions. Normalized respiratory waveforms were evaluated for scan time, duty cycle (programmed/acquisition time), breathing period, end-inhale (EI) amplitude, and breathing variability (coefficient of variation, EI-COV). B-spline-based deformable image registration propagated contours from end-exhale (EE) to EI phases. Respiration-induced liver motion was calculated via centroid analysis and compared. Results: Incorporating VBF reduced 2-phase acquisition time (4.7±0.6 and 5.6±1.4 minutes with and without VBF, respectively) while reducing the amplitude EI-COV by 53.0±8.1%. On average, incorporating VBF reduced 8-phase 4DMRI acquisition times by 1.7±1.2 minutes and EI-COVs by 46.0±15.8%. Using VBF yielded higher duty cycles than free breathing (34.7% versus 28.3%, respectively). 4DMRI acquisition time was reduced for the cohort with VBF despite breathing rate remaining similar (10.5±4.0 with vs. 10.6±3.3 BPM without). Respiratory waveforms showed higher EI amplitude with VBF (0.84±0.05 a.u.) as compared to 0.72±0.06 a.u. without. This translated to differences in liver excursions, where superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and left-right EE-EI displacements were 14.3±3.6, 4.8±2.1, and 1.6±1.0 mm, respectively, with VBF compared

  9. Applied psychophysiology: beyond the boundaries of biofeedback (mending a wall, a brief history of our field, and applications to control of the muscles and cardiorespiratory systems).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, Paul

    2003-12-01

    The field of applied psychophysiology overlaps a number of others, from behavioral and psychosomatic medicine to Eastern disciplines and complementary medicine. Although the proliferation of societies and professional identities across these fields emphasizes this diversity, it also may hinder growth. The history of our field is one of innovation, often at odds with conventional wisdom and practice. It is important that this innovativeness not be sacrificed in a justified quest for professional respectability. This paper reviews the earliest research in biofeedback and applied psychophysiology, and modern applications and interpretations in the areas of muscular and autonomic control, including progressive relaxation and heart rate variability biofeedback, and draws parallels to disciplines of Yoga, QiGong, and Zen practices and their psychophysiological effects.

  10. Pressure sensor-based tongue-placed electrotactile biofeedback for balance improvement - Biomedical application to prevent pressure sores formation and falls

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Pinsault, Nicolas; Moreau-Gaudry, Alexandre; Fleury, Anthony; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    We introduce the innovative technologies, based on the concept of "sensory substitution", we are developing in the fields of biomedical engineering and human disability. Precisely, our goal is to design, develop and validate practical assistive biomedical and/or technical devices and/or rehabilitating procedures for persons with disabilities, using artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback systems. Proposed applications are dealing with: (1) pressure sores prevention in case of spinal cord injuries (persons with paraplegia, or tetraplegia); and (2) balance control improvement to prevent fall in older and/or disabled adults. This paper describes the architecture and the functioning principle of these biofeedback systems and presents preliminary results of two feasibility studies performed on young healthy adults.

  11. Improved air trapping evaluation in chest computed tomography in children with cystic fibrosis using real-time spirometric monitoring and biofeedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongstad, Thomas; Buchvald, Frederik F; Green, Kent

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The quality of chest Computed Tomography (CT) images in children is dependent upon a sufficient breath hold during CT scanning. This study evaluates the influence of spirometric breath hold monitoring with biofeedback software on inspiratory and expiratory chest CT lung density measures......, and on trapped air (TA) scoring in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). This is important because TA is an important component of early and progressive CF lung disease. METHODS: A cross sectional comparison study was completed for chest CT imaging in two cohorts of CF children with comparable disease severity......, using spirometric breath hold monitoring and biofeedback software (Copenhagen (COP)) or unmonitored breath hold manoeuvres (Gothenburg (GOT)). Inspiratory-expiratory lung density differences were calculated, and TA was scored to assess the difference between the two cohorts. RESULTS: Eighty-four chest...

  12. Matter over mind: a randomised-controlled trial of single-session biofeedback training on performance anxiety and heart rate variability in musicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Wells

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Musical performance is a skilled activity performed under intense pressure, thus is often a profound source of anxiety. In other contexts, anxiety and its concomitant symptoms of sympathetic nervous system arousal have been successfully ameliorated with HRV biofeedback (HRV BF, a technique involving slow breathing which augments autonomic and emotional regulatory capacity. OBJECTIVE: This randomised-controlled study explored the impact of a single 30-minute session of HRV BF on anxiety in response to a highly stressful music performance. METHODS: A total of 46 trained musicians participated in this study and were randomly allocated to a slow breathing with or without biofeedback or no-treatment control group. A 3 Group×2 Time mixed experimental design was employed to compare the effect of group before and after intervention on performance anxiety (STAI-S and frequency domain measures of HRV. RESULTS: Slow breathing groups (n=30 showed significantly greater improvements in high frequency (HF and LF/HF ratio measures of HRV relative to control (n=15 during 5 minute recordings of performance anticipation following the intervention (effect size: η(2 =0.122 and η(2 =0.116, respectively. The addition of biofeedback to a slow breathing protocol did not produce differential results. While intervention groups did not exhibit an overall reduction in self-reported anxiety, participants with high baseline anxiety who received the intervention (n=15 displayed greater reductions in self-reported state anxiety relative to those in the control condition (n=7 (r=0.379. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that a single session of slow breathing, regardless of biofeedback, is sufficient for controlling physiological arousal in anticipation of psychosocial stress associated with music performance and that slow breathing is particularly helpful for musicians with high levels of anxiety. Future research is needed to further examine the effects of

  13. The Effect of EEG Biofeedback on the Reduction of Depression, Anxiety, Stress and Craving Beliefs in Individuals with Substance Abuse Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: The aim of this study is the investigation of EEG biofeedback (neurofeedback) on the reduction of depression, anxiety, stress and craving beliefs of individuals with substance abuse disorder. Method: Thirty-four males diagnosed as having substance abuse disorder (morphine addicted) were randomly assigned to experimental (N=16) and control (N=18) groups. The study used the pretest–posttest experimental and control group design. Subjects were assessed prior and subsequ...

  14. Biofeedback therapy combined with traditional chinese medicine prescription improves the symptoms, surface myoelectricity, and anal canal pressure of the patients with spleen deficiency constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yi-Bo; Cao, Yong-Qing; Guo, Xiu-Tian; Yi, Jin; Liang, Hong-Tao; Wang, Chen; Lu, Jin-Gen

    2013-01-01

    In order to observe the clinical therapeutic effects of Yiqi Kaimi Prescription and biofeedback therapy on treating constipation with deficiency of spleen qi, the 30 cases in the control group were given oral administration of Yiqi Kaimi Prescription, in combination with anus-lifting exercise; the 30 cases in the treatment group were given biofeedback therapy on the basis of the afore mentioned methods for the control group. The TCM symptom scores and anorectal pressures before and after treatment were observed and evaluated. There were significant differences in TCM symptom scores, anorectal pressure, and clinical recovery rate before and after treatment. In the treatment group, the total recovery rate was 86.66%, while in the control group it was 50%; there were significant differences between the two groups (P < 0.01). Yiqi Kaimi Prescription coupled with biofeedback therapy is clinically effective for treating constipation with deficiency of spleen qi, and thus this method is applicable for functional constipation with deficiency of spleen qi.

  15. Biofeedback Therapy Combined with Traditional Chinese Medicine Prescription Improves the Symptoms, Surface Myoelectricity, and Anal Canal Pressure of the Patients with Spleen Deficiency Constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Bo Yao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to observe the clinical therapeutic effects of Yiqi Kaimi Prescription and biofeedback therapy on treating constipation with deficiency of spleen qi, the 30 cases in the control group were given oral administration of Yiqi Kaimi Prescription, in combination with anus-lifting exercise; the 30 cases in the treatment group were given biofeedback therapy on the basis of the afore mentioned methods for the control group. The TCM symptom scores and anorectal pressures before and after treatment were observed and evaluated. There were significant differences in TCM symptom scores, anorectal pressure, and clinical recovery rate before and after treatment. In the treatment group, the total recovery rate was 86.66%, while in the control group it was 50%; there were significant differences between the two groups (P<0.01. Yiqi Kaimi Prescription coupled with biofeedback therapy is clinically effective for treating constipation with deficiency of spleen qi, and thus this method is applicable for functional constipation with deficiency of spleen qi.

  16. COMPARE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF EMG BIOFEEDBACK ASSISSTED CORE STABILITY EXERCISES VERSUS CORE STABILITY EXERCISES ALONE ON PAIN AND DISABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH LOW BACK PAI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurkirat Kaur

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low Back Pain (LBP is a health related problem than affects 80% of the population within the age limit of 15 to 45 years. The primary treatment used for patients with LBP includes muscle strengthening along with thermotherapeutic modalities. Thus the purpose of the study is to see the efficacy of EMG biofeedback assisted core stability exercises versus core stability exercises alone in patients suffering from pain and disability. Methodology: A total of 30 patients were divided through convenient sampling method into two group- A and B. Each group had 15 patients. In Group A-SWD, traction, IFT and core stability exercises were given where as in Group B EMG biofeedback assisted core stability exercises were given for 5 treatment session per week for 2 weeks and reassessment was done on 5th and 10th day post treatment. Result: The result of the study showed that there was statistically significant (p<0.05 improvement in both Group A and B in terms of pain (NPRS and disability (ODQ after 10th day of treatment. Whereas on comparison within groups the result showed that there was significant (p<0.05 improvement in Group B 10th day post treatment rather than Group A on day 10th. Conclusion: The study supports that EMG biofeedback assisted core stability exercises are helpful for treating patients with LBP to reduce their pain as well as disability.

  17. The social biofeedback theory of parental affect-mirroring: the development of emotional self-awareness and self-control in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergely, G; Watson, J S

    1996-12-01

    The authors present a new theory of parental affect-mirroring and its role in the development of emotional self-awareness and control in infancy. It is proposed that infants first become sensitised to their categorical emotion-states through a natural social biofeedback process provided by the parent's 'marked' reflections of the baby's emotion displays during affect-regulative interactions. They argue that this sensitisation process is mediated (similarly to that of adult biofeedback training) by the mechanism of contingency-detection and maximising. Apart from sensitisation, affect-mirroring serves three further developmental functions: (1) it contributes to the infant's state-regulation; (2) it leads to the establishment of secondary representations that become associated with the infant's primary procedural affect-states providing the cognitive means for accessing and attributing emotions to the self; (3) it results in the development of a generalised communicative code of "marked' expressions characterised by the representational functions of referential decoupling, anchoring and suspension of realistic consequences. They consider the clinical implications of our theory, relating it to current psychodynamic approaches to the functions of parental affect-mirroring. Using their model they identify various types of deviant mirroring styles and speculate about their developmental consequences. Finally, they discuss what role their social biofeedback model may play as a mediating mechanism in the therapeutic process.

  18. Alchemical crossings in Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helton Marculino de Souza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to discuss the contributions of Alchemy to the field of Psychology, especially for Analytical Psychology as a proposal of an Alchemical Psychology, whose representatives highlighted here are Carl Gustav Jung and James Hillman. It is understood that the knowledge of Alchemy have been applied in various areas such as metallurgy, chemistry, philosophy, and it has a possible application in the field of Psychology. In this sense, it is observed that if to Jung the concepts of Alchemy interlace connections with the knowledge proposed by Analytical Psychology, on the other hand Hillman adopts this knowledge to develop a strategy for use in the field of psychotherapy, proposing to think alchemically. Thus, for this second author in the exercise of Psychology, the meetings with the patient go beyond the application of theories, constituting as a “do-soul” in the office. This is, more than translating symbols, it is proposed to “stay with the image”, with an attention from both the patient and the psychologist for that the words expressed in this dialogue does not become “wordthings” or be reduced to a unique meaning that tends to discard the image. It is hoped, through this work, to promote knowledge of the professionals about the Analytical Psychology and Alchemy Psychology in their connections with Alchemy and its reverberations in the field of psychotherapy in these approaches.

  19. Psychology for All

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Nash

    2008-01-01

    In "Psychology in its place" (2008) John Radford explores and attempts to initiate a debate on what is or should be the place and role of psychology in Higher Education, primarily as a main subject for a first degree. In this paper, the author raises the stakes, and argues that Higher Education should provide a certain form of practical psychology…

  20. Child Psychology Experiences Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walla Walla Coll., WA.

    Recognizing the need for trained teachers to enter the classroom with confidence and professional capacity, Walla Walla College introduced a Child Psychology Experience program. Personnel from several departments contribute to this program. In connection with the child psychology courses, the project features a laboratory/demonstration center…

  1. Psychology and History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsterburg, Hugo

    1994-01-01

    This essay considers the discipline of psychology as distinct from history, defining it as a science within philosophy dedicated to the study of the causal structure of the human mind. Although Hugo Munsterburg was considered an important figure in applied psychology, this essay represents an earlier epistemology. (SLD)

  2. The psychology of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swencionis, Charles; Rendell, Sarah Litman

    2012-10-01

    G. Stanley Hall, the first person to earn a Ph.D. in psychology in the United States, did research on eating behaviors in the nineteenth century (Lepore in The New Yorker, 2011). Research on psychological aspects of obesity accelerated in the 1950s and there has been a great deal done at this point. We review areas of considerable activity and relevance.

  3. Simulation and psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieckmann, Peter; Krage, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Psychology is relevant for improving the use of simulation in anesthesiology, as it allows us to describe, explain and optimize the interactions of learners and instructors as well as the design of simulation scenarios and debriefings. Much psychological expertise is not used for simulation...

  4. The Psychology of Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaswamy, A.; Balasubramanian, P.; Nirmala, R. Sweety

    2007-01-01

    Psychology plays a significant role in the life of each and every human being. Starting from childhood, if psychology of learning is utilized positively it would play a vital role in the building up of a bright career of a child. The explosion of information technology has been exercising far reaching influence on the area of educational…

  5. Genetics and Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomin, Robert

    2004-01-01

    One of the major changes in developmental psychology during the past 50 years has been the acceptance of the important role of nature (genetics) as well as nurture (environment). Past research consisting of twin and adoption studies has shown that genetic influence is substantial for most domains of developmental psychology. Present research…

  6. Evacuation models and disaster psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.C.M. Vorst

    2010-01-01

    In evacuation models of buildings, neighborhoods, areas, cities and countries important psychological parameters are not frequently used. In this paper the relevance of some important variables from disaster psychology will be discussed. Modeling psychological variables will enhance prediction of hu

  7. Theorising context in psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to address the issue of what context is and how it can be incorporated in psychological theory by using the case study of creativity research. It starts from a basic definition of context as the spatiotemporal continuum that, together with psychological phenomena, constitutes...... a totality and should be considered a single, integrated whole. As such, contexts are neither subjective, existing only in perception, nor are they a set of variables external to the person, but participate directly in the processes under study in psychology. We can therefore distinguish between “flat......” theorising, one-dimensional and overconcerned with intra-psychological factors, and “3-D” models trying to articulate the psychological, the spatial (sociomaterial), and the temporal. These categories are illustrated by different theoretical approaches to creativity. It is argued here that a cultural...

  8. Four Social Psychological Lenses for Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zittoun, Tania; Perret-Clermont, Anne-Nelly

    2009-01-01

    How can the advances of social and developmental psychology be integrated? This conceptual paper proposes to examine four basic theoretical models of social situations through which learning and development have been observed in the post-piagetian tradition: the psychosocial triangle, the frame, models of transfer and transitions, and models…

  9. Influência do biofeedback respiratório associado ao padão quiet breathing sobre a função pulmonar e hábitos de respiradores bucais funcionais Influence of respiratory biofeedback associated with a quiet breathing pattern on the pulmonary function and habits of functional mouth breathers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EF Barbiero

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar os efeitos da utilização do biofeedback respiratório (BR associado ao padrão quiet breathing sobre a perimetria torácica, função pulmonar, força dos músculos respiratórios e os seguintes hábitos de respiradores bucais funcionais (RBF: vigília de boca aberta, boca aberta durante o sono, baba no travesseiro, despertar difícil, ronco e sono inquieto. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliadas 20 crianças RBF, as quais foram submetidas a 15 sessões de BR por meio do biofeedback pletsmovent (MICROHARD® V1.0, o qual proporciona o biofeedback dos movimentos tóraco-abdominais. Perimetria torácica, espirometria e medidas das pressões respiratórias máximas estáticas foram realizadas antes e após a terapia. Questões respondidas pelos responsáveis foram utilizadas para avaliar os hábitos dos RBF. Os dados foram analisados por meio de teste t de Student para dados pareados e testes não paramétricos. RESULTADOS: O uso do BR associado ao padrão quiet breathing não produziu alterações significativas na perimetria torácica e nos valores de volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo (VEF1, capacidade vital forçada (CVF, pico de fluxo expiratório (PFE, índice de Tiffeneau (IT e na pressão expiratória máxima (PEmáx. Entretanto, a pressão inspiratória máxima (PImáx apresentou diferença estatisticamente significativa (-53,6 ± 2,9 cmH2O vs. -65,0 ± 6,0 cmH2O; pOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of using respiratory biofeedback associated with a quiet breathing pattern, on chest circumference, pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength and the following functional mouth-breathing habits: watching things with mouth open, sleeping with mouth open, dribbling on the pillow, difficulty in waking up, snoring and restlessness during sleep. METHOD: Twenty functional mouth-breathing children were evaluated. They underwent 15 sessions of respiratory biofeedback by means of the biofeedback pletsmovent (MICROHARD® V1

  10. Discursive and scientific psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Derek

    2012-09-01

    I begin with the origins of Loughborough University's Discourse and Rhetoric Group (DARG), and in particular discursive psychology (DP). Rather than attempting to summarize DP, versions of which are plentiful, the article attempts to clarify various relationships and tensions between DP and other kinds of social psychology, particularly experimental. Common sense psychology is defined as DP's topic rather than rival; the aim is to study how people deploy everyday psychological notions and manage psychological business within talk and text, and what they accomplish by such deployments, rather than trying, as experimental psychology is often characterized as doing, to replace it all with something purportedly better. Claims for DP being particularly interpretative rather than scientific are rejected, by appeal to an 'interpretative gap' between phenomena, data, analysis, and conclusions that all research must manage, that gap being often much larger in quantitative and experimental work. The importance of pursuing causal explanations of psychological phenomena is questioned, and the importance asserted, of discovering, through rigorous empirical and conceptual analysis, the normative bases of human conduct and accountability.

  11. Discursive social psychology now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Ian

    2012-09-01

    This paper reviews the progress of discourse-analytic approaches in social psychology from the late 1980s to the present day, with a particular focus on the way conceptual and methodological contributions from within the Discourse and Rhetoric Group at Loughborough University have negotiated a positive role for innovative studies of language in the discipline of psychology. Social psychology has become a key site for the accumulation of a series of empirical studies that have seen the flourishing of a distinctive form of 'discursive social psychology' that has succeeded in moving from the margins of the discipline to a more accepted position. The paper traces this trajectory of discourse analysis from the limits to the centre of social psychology attending to five features that now characterise its contribution to psychology; an emphasis on everyday conversation, a concern with interpersonal interaction, explication of formal sequences; an insistence on empirical claims; and fidelity to the ethos of its host discipline. The paper concludes with some comments on the wider context of this new approach inside psychology today.

  12. SPORT AND EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Lane

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION The book introduces the undergraduate psychology student to both academic and professional aspects of Sport and Exercise Psychology. It uses up to date research evidence, established theory and a variety of activities that help the student consider and understand academic and professional aspects of this particular academic discipline. PURPOSE The book aims to provide the undergraduate psychology student with a structured introduction to the subject area and an insight into the theoretical evidence and practical suggestions that underpin what a Sport and Exercise psychologist does. The book also aims to support one term or one semester courses in Sport and Exercise Psychology. It is also appropriate for Masters level courses. FEATURES The book begins with a chapter on applied sports psychology to give the reader an insight into the domain of sport psychology, providing an overview of the techniques that could be used. The next three chapters focus on mood, anxiety and self confidence, which influence performance. This leads on to four chapters that focus on managing psychological states. There is also a chapter on leadership which interestingly includes leadership development in coaches and in athletes. Two chapters focus on the effects of exercise on psychological states, providing a balance between the benefits and potential drawbacks. The final chapter examines the issue of placebo effects. Throughout each chapter there are useful activities than can help the reader's understanding of practical and theoretical issues. These also have practical implications for the work of a Sport and Exercise Psychologist. Key ethical issues are raised on a regular basis throughout the text. The book offers an excellent blend of theory and practical suggestions which are critically discussed thus giving valuable insights regarding the research process and applied practice which is often lacking in the more well known standard textbooks for Sport

  13. SU-E-J-236: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves Breath-Hold Lung Tumor Position Reproducibility Measured with 4D MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Greer, P [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Lapuz, C; Ludbrook, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Kim, T [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Audiovisual biofeedback breath-hold (AVBH) was employed to reproduce tumor position on inhale and exhale breath-holds for 4D tumor information. We hypothesize that lung tumor position will be more consistent using AVBH compared with conventional breath-hold (CBH). Methods: Lung tumor positions were determined for seven lung cancer patients (age: 25 – 74) during to two separate 3T MRI sessions. A breathhold training session was performed prior to the MRI sessions to allow patients to become comfortable with AVBH and their exhale and inhale target positions. CBH and AVBH 4D image datasets were obtained in the first MRI session (pre-treatment) and the second MRI session (midtreatment) within six weeks of the first session. Audio-instruction (MRI: Siemens Skyra) in CBH and verbal-instruction (radiographer) in AVBH were used. A radiation oncologist contoured the lung tumor using Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems); tumor position was quantified as the centroid of the contoured tumor after rigid registration based on vertebral anatomy across two MRI sessions. CBH and AVBH were compared in terms of the reproducibility assessed via (1) the difference between the two exhale positions for the two sessions and the two inhale positions for the sessions. (2) The difference in amplitude (exhale to inhale) between the two sessions. Results: Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of two exhale (or inhale) lung tumor positions relative to each other by 33%, from 6.4±5.3 mm to 4.3±3.0 mm (p=0.005). Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of exhale and inhale amplitude by 66%, from 5.6±5.9 mm to 1.9±1.4 mm (p=0.005). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback can be utilized for improving the reproducibility of breath-hold lung tumor position. These results are advantageous towards achieving more accurate emerging radiation treatment planning methods, in addition to imaging and treatment modalities utilizing breath

  14. The Individual Differences Tradition in Counseling Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawis, Rene V.

    1992-01-01

    Traces historical development from individual differences psychology through psychological testing, vocational counseling, and student personnel work, to counseling psychology. Describes individual differences tradition in counseling psychology research and practice. Discusses how individual differences psychology has influenced counseling…

  15. Deconstructivism and psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metka Mencin Čeplak

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In last ten, fifteen years, variety of disciplines literary throng the conceptualizations of identity. This plurality of discourses blurs the boundaries between disciplines and at the same time deepens them. The deconstruction positions in psychology, referring to Althusser's concept of interpellation, Lacanian psychoanalysis and Foucault's theorization of discourse and power relations do not try to define the boundaries and connections between the disciplines. However, in the analyses of the birth of psychological knowledge and their consequences the deconstruction position points out that psychological knowledge fatally reduces the factors constructing identity and subjectivity by limiting itself on individual and interpersonal. This article discusses two consequences of this reduction: this reduction leads to the conclusion that social differentiation is the effect of the individual differences in capacities and personal characteristics and at the same time this reduction impedes psychological knowledge in the analyses of its own role in the power relations.

  16. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  17. Globalization, culture and psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melluish, Steve

    2014-10-01

    This article outlines the cultural and psychological effects of globalization. It looks at the impact of globalization on identity; ideas of privacy and intimacy; the way we understand and perceive psychological distress; and the development of the profession of psychology around the world. The article takes a critical perspective on globalization, seeing it as aligned with the spread of neoliberal capitalism, a tendency towards cultural homogenization, the imposition of dominant 'global north' ideas and the resultant growing inequalities in health and well-being. However, it also argues that the increased interconnectedness created by globalization allows for greater acknowledgement of our common humanity and for collective efforts to be developed to tackle what are increasingly global problems. This requires the development of more nuanced understandings of cultural differences and of indigenous psychologies.

  18. Psychological constraints on egalitarianism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasperbauer, Tyler Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Debates over egalitarianism for the most part are not concerned with constraints on achieving an egalitarian society, beyond discussions of the deficiencies of egalitarian theory itself. This paper looks beyond objections to egalitarianism as such and investigates the relevant psychological...... processes motivating people to resist various aspects of egalitarianism. I argue for two theses, one normative and one descriptive. The normative thesis holds that egalitarians must take psychological constraints into account when constructing egalitarian ideals. I draw from non-ideal theories in political...... philosophy, which aim to construct moral goals with current social and political constraints in mind, to argue that human psychology must be part of a non-ideal theory of egalitarianism. The descriptive thesis holds that the most fundamental psychological challenge to egalitarian ideals comes from what...

  19. Social Psychology as History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergen, Kenneth J.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis of theory and research in social psychology reveals that while methods of research are scientific in character, theories of social behavior are primarily reflections of contemporary history. (Author)

  20. Psychological intervention of murophobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asrie Yihun

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Although phobia is more commonly observed during adolescence as compared to adulthood, its specific type of murophobia is uncommon. Especially in a country like Ethiopia, where awareness, orientation to mental health and its psychological treatment is undergoing its infancy on account of several reasons, the neurotic disorders are rarely reported to mental health clinicians. The present study is a case report of a 16-year old adolescent female with murophobia. The case was not registered in any general medical clinic and was sent to our department for further psychological assessment and intervention. The client was comprehensively examined through clinical interview, behavioural analysis and treated by cognitive-behaviour technique of psychological intervention and without the inclusion of psychiatric treatment. Details of the psychological assessment and intervention have been presented in this case report.

  1. Goals and Psychological Accounting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Alexander Karl; Nafziger, Julia

    -induced reference points make substandard performance psychologically painful and motivate the individual to stick to his goals. How strong the commitment to goals is depends on the type of psychological account. We provide conditions when it is optimal to evaluate goals in narrow accounts. The key intuition......We model how people formulate and evaluate goals to overcome self-control problems. People often attempt to regulate their behavior by evaluating goal-related outcomes separately (in narrow psychological accounts) rather than jointly (in a broad account). To explain this evidence, our theory...... of endogenous narrow or broad psychological accounts combines insights from the literatures on goals and mental accounting with models of expectations-based reference-dependent preferences. By formulating goals the individual creates expectations that induce reference points for task outcomes. These goal...

  2. Operational Psychology Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Al

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the history of long duration spaceflight, and the changes in the International Space Station crew and the effect that this has had on the psychology of astronaut selection and training.

  3. Democracy and Cultural Psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steffen Moltrup Ernø

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses a theme touched upon in Robert Innis’s article on cultural psych- ology and philosophy, namely how we, within cultural psychology, seem to be undecided about how best to provide value on a societal level. It is discussed how psychology has provided us with several valuable...... tools for examining and understanding our own exist- ence, despite the fact that it is also a field that has seemed to be in one crisis after another since its inception. It is argued that cultural psychology is an intellectual tech- nology that allows us to peek under the hood of society, which...... is of utmost importance in today’s society, where democratic ideals are under severe pressure. Corporations, industries, and privileged individuals exercise increased control over political processes, having created obscure systems by which they operate. It is concluded that cultural psychology needs to find...

  4. Poverty and psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poluektova, Olga V.; Efremova, Maria V.; Breugelmans, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the association between dimensions of poverty (income, subjective socioeconomic status, deprivation, and socioeconomic status in childhood) and individual psychological characteristics. In this study, our goal was to determine: 1) the differences in individual psycholo

  5. Ecological psychology and social psychology: continuing discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Eric P

    2012-06-01

    What form would an ideal merger of ecological and social psychology take? Is that ideal attainable? Many researchers and theorists are working to answer these questions. Charles (2009, 2011a) offered insights from E. B. Holt, one of James J. Gibson's mentors, who argued that minds-mental kinds, processes, states, etc.-are observable aspects of the environment. Phrasing that in Ecological terms, the minds of other organisms are specified in the structure of ambient energy extended over time and space; they are directly perceivable by a properly attuned organism. Ecological Psychology enhances Holt's story, by brining to the table a sophisticated theory of direct perception; Holt enhances the Ecological story by brining to the table a sophisticated theory about the nature of minds. The two combine to form the long-sought ideal merger. Thus, I claimed, Ecological Psychology will either rediscover its roots, or go through the trouble of re-creating them. This paper further develops those ideas, by presenting a simpler version of the argument, suggesting easy ways of dismissing that argument, and addressing the concerns expressed by Castro and Lafuente (2011).

  6. Eating, Psychology of

    OpenAIRE

    Dovey, T

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this article was to provide the reader with a brief guide to the psychology of eating. Biological, developmental, cognitive, social, eating disorders and obesity were all discussed and their relative contribution to the psychology of eating was described. This paper has also described how eating behaviourists have conceptualised hunger and fullness in order to understand human motivations to feed. It is hoped that interested readers will continue beyond this article to gain a...

  7. Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology (SNP)

    OpenAIRE

    Mouras, Harold; Faucherre, Adèle

    2011-01-01

    It is an exciting challenge for us to launch a new interdisciplinary journal, Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology. We believe the journal will appeal to a wide audience across several scientific specialties. In recent decades, considerable technical and theoretical advances have shed new light on psychological and neural processes. For example, in the area of neuroimaging techniques, it is now possible to explore the role of the brain in a wide variety of behaviours and paradigms (mo...

  8. Giving Psychology Away Is Expensive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsuch, Richard L.; Wallace, William L.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents comments on "Does Psychology make a significant difference in our lives?" by P. Zimbardo. We deeply appreciate the documentation and inspiration provided by Zimbardo on how psychology is reaching out to the public by "giving psychology away" (p. 340). We totally agree that psychology has much, much more to offer that could be…

  9. Political Psychology of European Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manners, Ian James

    2014-01-01

    The chapter engages in a survey of what political psychology and European integration have to say to each other in the understanding of the European Union. The chapter draws on five strands of political psychology as part of this engagement – conventional psychology, social psychology, social...

  10. Introduction to Psychology. Fourth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalat, James W.

    Chapters in this textbook for college students in introductory psychology courses are: (1) What is Psychology?; (2) Scientific Methods in Psychology; (3) Biological Psychology; (4) Sensation and Perception; (5) Altered States; (6) Learning; (7) Memory; (8) Cognition and Language; (9) Intelligence and Its Measurement; (10) Development; (11)…

  11. Psychological distress and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenley, J R; Young, T B; Schoenherr, R A

    1982-04-01

    Psychologically distressed patients and clients of health care and social service organizations are found to report somewhat more dissatisfaction with services than do the nondistressed. Four explanations for this relationship are examined: 1) the psychologically distressed are generally dissatisfied; 2) service providers react negatively to the psychologically distressed; 3) psychologically distressed patients are dissatisfied when service providers do not respond to their psychological needs; and 4) patients who deny their psychological distress tend to be dissatisfied. The results show that the psychologically distressed report more dissatisfaction because of the very high levels of dissatisfaction found among patients who deny having personal problems.

  12. Practice parameters for the psychological and behavioral treatment of insomnia: an update. An american academy of sleep medicine report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthaler, Timothy; Kramer, Milton; Alessi, Cathy; Friedman, Leah; Boehlecke, Brian; Brown, Terry; Coleman, Jack; Kapur, Vishesh; Lee-Chiong, Teofilo; Owens, Judith; Pancer, Jeffrey; Swick, Todd

    2006-11-01

    Insomnia is highly prevalent, has associated daytime consequences which impair job performance and quality of life, and is associated with increased risk of comorbidities including depression. These practice parameters provide recommendations regarding behavioral and psychological treatment approaches, which are often effective in primary and secondary insomnia. These recommendations replace or modify those published in the 1999 practice parameter paper produced by the American Sleep Disorders Association. A Task Force of content experts was appointed by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine to perform a comprehensive review of the scientific literature since 1999 and to grade the evidence regarding non-pharmacological treatments of insomnia. Recommendations were developed based on this review using evidence-based methods. These recommendations were developed by the Standards of Practice Committee and reviewed and approved by the Board of Directors of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Psychological and behavioral interventions are effective in the treatment of both chronic primary insomnia (Standard) and secondary insomnia (Guideline). Stimulus control therapy, relaxation training, and cognitive behavior therapy are individually effective therapies in the treatment of chronic insomnia (Standard) and sleep restriction therapy, multicomponent therapy (without cognitive therapy), biofeedback and paradoxical intention are individually effective therapies in the treatment of chronic insomnia (Guideline). There was insufficient evidence to recommend sleep hygiene education, imagery training and cognitive therapy as single therapies or when added to other specific approaches. Psychological and behavioral interventions are effective in the treatment of insomnia in older adults and in the treatment of insomnia among chronic hypnotic users (Standard).

  13. Qigong as a Traditional Vegetative Biofeedback Therapy: Long-Term Conditioning of Physiological Mind-Body Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Luís Carlos; Sousa, Cláudia Maria; Gonçalves, Mário; Gabriel, Joaquim; Machado, Jorge; Greten, Henry Johannes

    2015-01-01

    A contemporary understanding of Chinese Medicine (CM) regards CM diagnosis as a functional vegetative state that may be treated by vegetative reflex therapies such as acupuncture. Within this context, traditional mind-body exercises such as Qigong can be understood as an attempt to enhance physiological proprioception, by combining a special state of "awareness" with posture, movement, and breath control. We have formerly trained young auditing flutists in "White Ball" Qigong to minimize anxiety-induced cold hands and lower anxiety-induced heart rate. Functional changes occurred 2-5 min after training and were observed over the whole training program, allowing the children to control their symptoms. In our current work, we report that warm fingers and calm hearts could be induced by the children even without Qigong exercises. Thus, these positive changes once induced and "conditioned" vegetatively were stable after weeks of training. This may show the mechanism by which Qigong acts as a therapeutic measure in disease: positive vegetative pathways may be activated instead of dysfunctional functional patterns. The positive vegetative patterns then may be available in critical stressful situations. Qigong exercise programs may therefore be understood as an ancient vegetative biofeedback exercise inducing positive vegetative functions which are added to the individual reactive repertoire.

  14. Qigong as a Traditional Vegetative Biofeedback Therapy: Long-Term Conditioning of Physiological Mind-Body Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Carlos Matos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A contemporary understanding of Chinese Medicine (CM regards CM diagnosis as a functional vegetative state that may be treated by vegetative reflex therapies such as acupuncture. Within this context, traditional mind-body exercises such as Qigong can be understood as an attempt to enhance physiological proprioception, by combining a special state of “awareness” with posture, movement, and breath control. We have formerly trained young auditing flutists in “White Ball” Qigong to minimize anxiety-induced cold hands and lower anxiety-induced heart rate. Functional changes occurred 2–5 min after training and were observed over the whole training program, allowing the children to control their symptoms. In our current work, we report that warm fingers and calm hearts could be induced by the children even without Qigong exercises. Thus, these positive changes once induced and “conditioned” vegetatively were stable after weeks of training. This may show the mechanism by which Qigong acts as a therapeutic measure in disease: positive vegetative pathways may be activated instead of dysfunctional functional patterns. The positive vegetative patterns then may be available in critical stressful situations. Qigong exercise programs may therefore be understood as an ancient vegetative biofeedback exercise inducing positive vegetative functions which are added to the individual reactive repertoire.

  15. Moderating laboratory adaptation with the use of a heart-rate variability biofeedback device (StressEraser).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebben, Matthew R; Kurbatov, Vadim; Pollak, Charles P

    2009-12-01

    Difficulty sleeping is a common problem with laboratory polysomnograms. This affects both polysomnograms that are used as a clinical tool to investigate sleep pathology or as an outcome variable in research. The goal of this study was to use a handheld biofeedback device (StressEraser) to improve sleep quality in the laboratory. Ten subjects without a history of sleep disorders were randomly assigned to either a StressEraser or no-treatment control condition. A sleep disturbance scale derived from sleep efficiency, REM latency, minutes of stage 1 sleep, and wake after sleep onset was created to evaluate the differences between these groups. Subjects in the StressEraser group had significantly lower scores on the sleep disturbance scale compared to the no-treatment control group (p = 0.003). Sleep latency was not improved. In conclusion, the StressEraser significantly improved sleep quality compared to a no-treatment control group. This suggests that the StressEraser may be an effective tool to help reduce the first-night effect in nighttime laboratory sleep studies.

  16. Randomized controlled trial of heart rate variability biofeedback in cardiac autonomic and hostility among patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, I-Mei; Fan, Sheng-Yu; Lu, Hsueh-Chen; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Kuo, Hsuan-Fu; Lee, Chee-Siong; Lu, Ye-Hsu

    2015-07-01

    Hostility is a psychosocial risk factor that may decrease heart rate variability (HRV) in coronary artery disease (CAD) through cardiac autonomic imbalance. Heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) increases HRV indices and baroreflex gain. This study examines the effectiveness of HRV-BF in restoring cardiac autonomic balance and decreasing hostility among patients with CAD. One hundred and fifty-four patients with CAD were assigned randomly to receive 6 weeks of HRV-BF, in addition to the standard medical care received by the wait-list control (WLC) group. A 5-min electrocardiogram, blood pressure, and hostility were assessed pre-intervention, post-intervention, and at 1-month follow-up. The standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN), low frequency (LF), and log LF at post-intervention was significantly higher than that at pre-intervention in the HRV-BF group. Baseline log LF was significantly higher post-intervention and at follow-up after HRV-BF training than at pre-intervention. The treatment curve of log LF pre-session increased significantly after session 2, which was maintained to post-intervention. Expressive hostility, suppressive hostility, and hostility total score at post-intervention and one-month follow-up after HRV-BF were significantly lower than at pre-intervention. This study showed increased HRV and decreased expressive and suppressive hostility behavior in patients with CAD following HRV-BF.

  17. Optimizing the Use of an Artificial Tongue-Placed Tactile Biofeedback for Improving Ankle Joint Position Sense in Humans

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, N; Fleury, A; Demongeot, J; Payan, Y; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Chenu, Olivier; Fleury, Anthony; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2006-01-01

    The performance of an artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback device for improving ankle joint position sense was assessed in 12 young healthy adults using an active matching task. The underlying principle of this system consists of supplying individuals with supplementary information about the position of the matching ankle relative to the reference ankle position through a tongue-placed tactile output device generating electrotactile stimulation on a 36-point (6 X 6) matrix held against the surface of the tongue dorsum. Precisely, (1) no electrodes were activated when both ankles were in a similar angular position within a predetermined "angular dead zone" (ADZ); (2) 12 electrodes (2 X 6) of the anterior and posterior zones of the matrix were activated (corresponding to the stimulation of the front and rear portion of the tongue) when the matching ankle was in a too plantarflexed and dorsiflexed position relative to the reference ankle, respectively. Two ADZ values of 0.5° and 1.5° were...

  18. Brain-computer interface game applications for combined neurofeedback and biofeedback treatment for children on the autism spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth V C Friedrich

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD show deficits in social and communicative skills, including imitation, empathy, and shared attention, as well as restricted interests and repetitive patterns of behaviors. Evidence for and against the idea that dysfunctions in the mirror neuron system are involved in imitation and could be one underlying cause for ASD is discussed in this review. Neurofeedback interventions have reduced symptoms in children with ASD by self-regulation of brain rhythms. However, cortical deficiencies are not the only cause of these symptoms. Peripheral physiological activity, such as the heart rate, is closely linked to neurophysiological signals and associated with social engagement. Therefore, a combined approach targeting the interplay between brain, body and behavior could be more effective. Brain-computer interface applications for combined neurofeedback and biofeedback treatment for children with ASD are currently nonexistent. To facilitate their use, we have designed an innovative game that includes social interactions and provides neural- and body-based feedback that corresponds directly to the underlying significance of the trained signals as well as to the behavior that is reinforced.

  19. Feasibility of a gait retraining strategy for reducing knee joint loading: increased trunk lean guided by real-time biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Michael A; Simic, Milena; Hinman, Rana S; Bennell, Kim L; Wrigley, Tim V

    2011-03-15

    The purpose of this feasibility study was to examine changes in frontal plane knee and hip walking biomechanics following a gait retraining strategy focused on increasing lateral trunk lean and to quantify reports of difficulty and joint discomfort when performing such a gait modification. After undergoing a baseline analysis of normal walking, 9 young, healthy participants were trained to modify their gait to exhibit small (4°), medium (8°), and large (12°) amounts of lateral trunk lean. Training was guided by the use of real-time biofeedback of the actual trunk lean angle. Peak frontal plane external knee and hip joint moments were compared across conditions. Participants were asked to report the degree of difficulty and the presence of any joint discomfort for each amount of trunk lean modification. Small (4°), medium (8°), and large (12°) amounts of lateral trunk lean reduced the peak external knee adduction moment (KAM) by 7%, 21%, and 25%, respectively, though the peak KAM was only significantly less in the medium and large conditions (pknee, hip, and/or lower spine discomfort. Results from this study indicate that a gait pattern with increased lateral trunk lean can effectively reduce frontal plane joint moments. Though these findings have implications for pathological populations, learning this gait pattern was associated with some difficulty and joint discomfort.

  20. Dynamic processes in regulation and some implications for biofeedback and biobehavioral interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, Paul; Eddie, David

    2013-06-01

    Systems theory has long been used in psychology, biology, and sociology. This paper applies newer methods of control systems modeling for assessing system stability in health and disease. Control systems can be characterized as open or closed systems with feedback loops. Feedback produces oscillatory activity, and the complexity of naturally occurring oscillatory patterns reflects the multiplicity of feedback mechanisms, such that many mechanisms operate simultaneously to control the system. Unstable systems, often associated with poor health, are characterized by absence of oscillation, random noise, or a very simple pattern of oscillation. This modeling approach can be applied to a diverse range of phenomena, including cardiovascular and brain activity, mood and thermal regulation, and social system stability. External system stressors such as disease, psychological stress, injury, or interpersonal conflict may perturb a system, yet simultaneously stimulate oscillatory processes and exercise control mechanisms. Resonance can occur in systems with negative feedback loops, causing high-amplitude oscillations at a single frequency. Resonance effects can be used to strengthen modulatory oscillations, but may obscure other information and control mechanisms, and weaken system stability. Positive as well as negative feedback loops are important for system function and stability. Examples are presented of oscillatory processes in heart rate variability, and regulation of autonomic, thermal, pancreatic and central nervous system processes, as well as in social/organizational systems such as marriages and business organizations. Resonance in negative feedback loops can help stimulate oscillations and exercise control reflexes, but also can deprive the system of important information. Empirical hypotheses derived from this approach are presented, including that moderate stress may enhance health and functioning.

  1. The Lack of Representation of Educational Psychology and School Psychology in Introductory Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Jennifer L.; Blazek, Melissa A.; Raley, Amber B.; Washington, Christi

    2005-01-01

    The first goal of this study was to look at the representation of educational and school psychology in introductory psychology textbooks. Research into the representation of other sub-fields of psychology has been conducted but no research has looked specifically at educational or school psychology. The second goal was to compare the…

  2. SU-D-17A-04: The Impact of Audiovisual Biofeedback On Image Quality During 4D Functional and Anatomic Imaging: Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keall, P; Pollock, S [University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Yang, J; Diehn, M; Berger, J; Graves, E; Loo, B [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Yamamoto, T [UC Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The ability of audiovisual (AV) biofeedback to improve breathing regularity has not previously been investigated for functional imaging studies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of AV biofeedback on 4D-PET and 4D-CT image quality in a prospective clinical trial. We hypothesized that motion blurring in 4D-PET images and the number of artifacts in 4D-CT images are reduced using AV biofeedback. Methods: AV biofeedback is a real-time, interactive and personalized system designed to help a patient self-regulate his/her breathing using a patient-specific representative waveform and musical guides. In an IRB-approved prospective clinical trial, 4D-PET and 4D-CT images of 10 lung cancer patients were acquired with AV biofeedback (AV) and free breathing (FB). The 4D-PET images in 6 respiratory bins were analyzed for motion blurring by: (1) decrease of GTVPET and (2) increase of SUVmax in 4-DPET compared to 3D-PET. The 4D-CT images were analyzed for artifacts by: (1) comparing normalized cross correlation-based scores (NCCS); and (2) quantifying a visual assessment score (VAS). A two-tailed paired t-test was used to test the hypotheses. Results: The impact of AV biofeedback on 4D-PET and 4D-CT images varied widely between patients, suggesting inconsistent patient comprehension and capability. Overall, the 4D-PET decrease of GTVPET was 2.0±3.0cm3 with AV and 2.3±3.9cm{sup 3} for FB (p=0.61). The 4D-PET increase of SUVmax was 1.6±1.0 with AV and 1.1±0.8 with FB (p=0.002). The 4D-CT NCCS were 0.65±0.27 with AV and 0.60±0.32 for FB (p=0.32). The 4D-CT VAS was 0.0±2.7 (p=ns). Conclusion: A 10-patient study demonstrated a statistically significant reduction of motion blurring of AV over FB for 1/2 functional 4D-PET imaging metrics. No difference between AV and FB was found for 2 anatomic 4D-CT imaging metrics. Future studies will focus on optimizing the human-computer interface and including patient training sessions for improved

  3. Lest we forget that industrial and organisational psychology is psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DJW Strümpfer

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The tie between industrial/organisational psychology (IOP and general psychology should be taken seriously. The origin of the split into separate academic departments is discussed. Four IOP topics are presented which are rooted in psychology or where the psychological quality is strong, making the tie-in clear: motivation, leadership, assessment, and appreciative inquiry; by way of illustration, proponents are referred to. Specialisation and professionalisation often bring undue emphasis on technology. IOP cannot be human resource management. Suggestions are made about bringing IOP and psychology closer within teaching programmes and internships. Appreciative images of what IOP, hand-in-hand with psychology, could be like, are put forward.

  4. The psychological present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, L J

    1992-01-01

    The present paper compares behavior-analytic and cognitive treatments of the concept of psychological history with regard to its role in current action. Both treatments take the position that the past bears some responsibility for the present, and are thereby obligated to find a means of actualizing the past in the present. Both do so by arguing that the past is brought to bear in the present via the organism. Although the arguments of the two positions differ on this issue, neither provides a complete account. An unconventional treatment of psychological history is proposed, the logic of which is exemplified in anthropological, biological, and psychological perspectives. The unconventional treatment in psychological perspective holds that (a) the organism's interaction with its environment, not the organism itself, changes with experience; and (b) the past interactions of an organism exist as, and only as, the present interactions of that organism. This solution to the problem of psychological history provides obligations and opportunities for analysis that are not available when the more conventional positions of cognitivism and behavior analysis are adopted.

  5. Comparison of visual biofeedback system with a guiding waveform and abdomen-chest motion self-control system for respiratory motion management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Yujiro; Kadoya, Noriyuki; Kanai, Takayuki; Ito, Kengo; Sato, Kiyokazu; Dobashi, Suguru; Yamamoto, Takaya; Ishikawa, Yojiro; Matsushita, Haruo; Takeda, Ken; Jingu, Keiichi

    2016-07-01

    Irregular breathing can influence the outcome of 4D computed tomography imaging and cause artifacts. Visual biofeedback systems associated with a patient-specific guiding waveform are known to reduce respiratory irregularities. In Japan, abdomen and chest motion self-control devices (Abches) (representing simpler visual coaching techniques without a guiding waveform) are used instead; however, no studies have compared these two systems to date. Here, we evaluate the effectiveness of respiratory coaching in reducing respiratory irregularities by comparing two respiratory management systems. We collected data from 11 healthy volunteers. Bar and wave models were used as visual biofeedback systems. Abches consisted of a respiratory indicator indicating the end of each expiration and inspiration motion. Respiratory variations were quantified as root mean squared error (RMSE) of displacement and period of breathing cycles. All coaching techniques improved respiratory variation, compared with free-breathing. Displacement RMSEs were 1.43 ± 0.84, 1.22 ± 1.13, 1.21 ± 0.86 and 0.98 ± 0.47 mm for free-breathing, Abches, bar model and wave model, respectively. Period RMSEs were 0.48 ± 0.42, 0.33 ± 0.31, 0.23 ± 0.18 and 0.17 ± 0.05 s for free-breathing, Abches, bar model and wave model, respectively. The average reduction in displacement and period RMSE compared with the wave model were 27% and 47%, respectively. For variation in both displacement and period, wave model was superior to the other techniques. Our results showed that visual biofeedback combined with a wave model could potentially provide clinical benefits in respiratory management, although all techniques were able to reduce respiratory irregularities.

  6. EFFECT OF AUDITORY & VISUAL BIOFEEDBACK WITH ELECTRICAL STIMULATION OF THE TIBIALIS ANTERIOR MUSCLE ON ACTIVE ROM & SELECTIVE MOTOR CONTROL OF ANKLE OF CHILDREN WITH SPASTIC CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayuri Sharma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Cerebral palsy (CP is the most common cause of movement disability in childhood, with an incidence of 1.5–2.5 per 1000 live born children. It is a non-progressive disorder that covers a number of neurological conditions, resulting in an abnormal development of movement and postural control. It is believed that an inability to maximally activate their muscles contributed to this weakness. Visual and auditory feedback cues have been shown to improve ROM & VMC in patients with movement disorders. The aim of this work was to investigate the efficacy of using biofeedback and neuromuscular electrical stimulation applied on tibialis anterior in children with cerebral palsy. The present work was designed to compare the effect of treatment with or without biofeedback applied to children with diplegic CP. Materials and Method: The 30 children with CP were divided in to 2 groups(experimental & control.The control group received NMES on tibialis anterior for 20 min. a day ,6 days in a week for a period of 6 weeks.the experimental group received NMES +biofeedback +conventional treatment.pre and post treatment evaluation included range of motion ,VMC and GMFM scoring. Results: Results showed that there was main effect for time, f(1,28;0.05=4.37, p<0.046 & a main effect for time, f(1,28;0.05=1.30, p<0.00,however there main effects were qualified by a group × time interaction, f (1,28;0.05=219.37, p<0.00.There was main effect for time, f(1,28;0.05=4.64. p<0.04 & a main effect for group, f(1,28;0.05=485.96, p<0.00,however there main effects were qualified by a group × time interaction, f (1,28;0.05=65.96, p <0.00 in right and left ankle joint. Conclusion: A significant improvement in range of motion, VMC & GMFM in experimental group as compare to control group. The study determined that biofeedback have positive clinical effects on the ROM & VMC of ankle of spastic diplegic.

  7. 生物反馈在功能性肛肠疾病中的应用%Application of biofeedback in functional anorectal disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵志泉; 林琳

    2001-01-01

    @@ 1生物反馈及其机制 生物反馈(biofeedback)是利用仪器将与心理生理过程有关的体内的某些生物学信息(如肌电活动、皮肤温度、心率、血压等)加以处理,以视觉或听觉的方式显示给人(即信息的反馈),使人们认识并有意识地控制自身的心理生理活动.

  8. Biofeedback therapy of pelvic floor functional constipation%盆底功能失调型便秘的生物反馈治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄忠诚; 刘祺; 罗维珍; 苏冀; 唐佳新; 王爱民; 刘清安

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of biofeedback therapy on pelvic floor functional constipation. Methods An analysis of the clinical data of 46 cases of biofeedback therapy of pelvic floor functional constipation was made retrosoectively. Results Among 44 cases who completed the course, anorectic manometer detection results of 35 cases indicated that the rectum sensitivity threshold and the maximum tolerance capacity and recto-anal inhibitory reflex decreased, compared with those before treatment. Paradoxical contraction of pelvic floor disappeared and normal bowel movement was regained; in 6 cases the symptoms were improved,including times of bowel movement, sense of incomplete defecation and anorectic distention. The effective rate of biofeedback trestment was 93.2 %. Only 3 cases were ineffective and 2 cases lost follow-up after treatment. Conclusions The short-term effect of biofeedback therapy for pelvic floor functional constipation is satisfactory,and has advantages of non-traumatic, low cost and unhospitalization.%目的 探讨盆底功能失调型便秘的生物反馈治疗的效果.方法 回顾性分析46例盆底功能失调型便秘行生物反馈治疗患者的资料.结果 44例坚持完成治疗的患者中,35例肛管直肠压力测定示直肠感觉阈值、最大耐受容量、直肠肛门抑制反射较治疗前降低,盆底肌的反常收缩消失,恢复正常排便;6例排便次数、排便不尽感、肛门坠胀感较治疗前有所改善;3例无效;2例终止治疗后失访,总有效率为93.2%.结论 盆底功能失调型便秘生物反馈治疗近期疗效满意,具有无创、费用低、无需住院等特点.

  9. Computerized evaluation of deambulatory pattern before and after visual rehabilitation treatment performed with biofeedback in visually impaired patients suffering from macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Pacella

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was double: the primary endpoint was to evaluate the efficacy of visual rehabilitation of visually impaired patients with macular degeneration (AMD. The secondary endpoint was to assess the effect of rehabilitation treatment on the ambulatory pattern using a computerized evaluation of walking, focusing the attention on space-time parameters that are influenced in patients with visual impairment. Methods: 10 patients with AMD were enrolled, 6 males and 4 females, and examined 15 eyes, at Department of Sense Organs, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. Visual rehabilitation was carried out with the use of a microperimeter MP1 using the examination of biofeedback. Patients are asked to move their eyes in coordination with an audible feedback that alerts the patient when he is setting properly the fixation target previously selected. All patients were subjected to 10 sessions lasting 15 minutes each for each eye, 1 time per week. The best corrected visual acuity (BCVA was assessed by far with the ETDRS optotype IN LOG MAR, and by close to 25 cm by adding + 4 ball (addition to near to the BCVA. For each eye the PB ( print body on the distance of 25 cm was measured; It fixation stability for 30 seconds was examined by microperimeter. Gait Analysis was performed with system ELITE BTS SpA (Milan, Italy. Results: At the end of the rehabilitation treatment with biofeedback it was found a marked improvement in BCVA. The BCVA before the rehabilitation treatment was ETDRS 12 LETTERS = 0.86 logMAR. At the end of the visual rehabilitation 16 LETTERS = 0.78 logMAR. The near visual acuity presented a decrease of the printer body measurement (PB and a statistically significant improvement in the fixation stability. Analysis of the spatial and temporal parameters of gait cycle, aimed at assessing the global aspects of gait (speed, rhythm, symmetry, fluidity, dynamic balance showed no significant changes

  10. Advancing family psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiese, Barbara H

    2016-02-01

    To realize the broad and complex nature of the field of family psychology, I have slightly revised the mission statement of the Journal of Family Psychology (JFP) to capture contemporary scholarship in family psychology and to advance systems perspectives in this top-tier scientific journal. Over the next 6 years, I hope that authors will consider JFP as an outlet for their best work in the following areas: (1) JFP addresses societal challenges faced by families today; (2) JFP publishes important studies on what makes couple and family relationships work; (3) JFP is a leader in publishing reports that use cutting-edge sophisticated approaches to research design and data analysis; and (4) JFP imparts knowledge about effective therapy and prevention programs relevant to couples and families. The journal is also expanding its publication rate to eight issues per year.

  11. [Psychological theories of motivation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quoniam, Nolwenn; Bungener, Catherine

    2004-03-01

    The comprehension of the principles guiding the human actions has always been an important aspect of philosophy. The development of experimental psychology first completely rejected all mental explanations such as will, intentions or motives. Behavior should then only be understood as determined by conditioning and learning. However, different theories denied that human behavior could be considered as purely reactive to the environment and stressed the active role of the organism on the environment. Theories from the humanist psychology and the social psychology described two kinds of motivation. The extrinsic motivation results from external stimuli and the intrinsic motivation from the organism himself. Our behavior is therefore determined by an interaction between our beliefs, expectations, needs and the environment. Actually, the concept of motivation is not well specified. It refers either to a global dynamic structure responsible for action either to a specific tendency toward some specific actions. Anyway, motivation is a concept infered from behavior. Therefore, its evaluation could only be secondary.

  12. Qualitative experiments in psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagoner, Brady

    2015-01-01

    was in a state of transition from a focus on elements (the concern of psychophysics) to a focus on wholes (the concern of Gestalt psychology). The defining feature of BARTLETT's early experiments is his holistic treatment of human responses, in which the basic unit of analysis is the active person relating......In this article, I explore the meaning of experiments in early twentieth century psychology, focusing on the qualitative experimental methodology of psychologist Frederic BARTLETT. I begin by contextualizing BARTLETT's experiments within the continental research tradition of his time, which...... to some material within the constraints of a social and material context. This manifests itself in a number of methodological principles that contrast with contemporary understandings of experimentation in psychology. The contrast is further explored by reviewing the history of "replications...

  13. Psychology, replication & beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Keith R

    2016-06-01

    Modern psychology is apparently in crisis and the prevailing view is that this partly reflects an inability to replicate past findings. If a crisis does exists, then it is some kind of 'chronic' crisis, as psychologists have been censuring themselves over replicability for decades. While the debate in psychology is not new, the lack of progress across the decades is disappointing. Recently though, we have seen a veritable surfeit of debate alongside multiple orchestrated and well-publicised replication initiatives. The spotlight is being shone on certain areas and although not everyone agrees on how we should interpret the outcomes, the debate is happening and impassioned. The issue of reproducibility occupies a central place in our whig history of psychology.

  14. A Social Psychological Perspective:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi; Westerling, Allan

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates intergenerational care in family life in Denmark. It compares different patterns of care between three groups of families: 1) Monoethnic Danish Families (n=701), 2) Monoethnic South Asian Families (n =5) and 3) Multiethnic Families (n=15). Through the use of network analys...... of agency with the changing societal structures and the diaspora context is confirmed. Key words: intergenerational care, individualisation, social network analysis, socio-cultural psychology, modernisation...... institutionalised individualism and interconnectedness. The focus is on the vertical and horizontal relationships within the socio-cultural psychological framework combining positioning theory with the  life course perspectives. Moreover there is focus on the diaspora processes for the South Asian young adults....... The paper analyses the discourses of intergenerational care as they intersect with everyday life practices and psychological realities of persons. The results indicate changes in the care pattern and deals with the dilemmas of solidarity, which are in contrast to dominant discourses of generations...

  15. Embodiment in social psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Brian P; Schnall, Simone; Schwarz, Norbert; Bargh, John A

    2012-10-01

    Psychologists are increasingly interested in embodiment based on the assumption that thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are grounded in bodily interaction with the environment. We examine how embodiment is used in social psychology, and we explore the ways in which embodied approaches enrich traditional theories. Although research in this area is burgeoning, much of it has been more descriptive than explanatory. We provide a critical discussion of the trajectory of embodiment research in social psychology. We contend that future researchers should engage in a phenomenon-based approach, highlight the theoretical boundary conditions and mediators involved, explore novel action-relevant outcome measures, and address the role of individual differences broadly defined. Such research will likely provide a more explanatory account of the role of embodiment in general terms as well as how it expands the knowledge base in social psychology.

  16. Democracy and Cultural Psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steffen Moltrup Ernø

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses a theme touched upon in Robert Innis’s article on cultural psych- ology and philosophy, namely how we, within cultural psychology, seem to be undecided about how best to provide value on a societal level. It is discussed how psychology has provided us with several valuable...... is of utmost importance in today’s society, where democratic ideals are under severe pressure. Corporations, industries, and privileged individuals exercise increased control over political processes, having created obscure systems by which they operate. It is concluded that cultural psychology needs to find...... its role as a scientific discipline that contributes to making transparent the political, social, and interpersonal relations that define how our lives are shaped, if we want a discipline that provides value beyond the scientific realm....

  17. Discursive psychology and feminism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherall, Ann

    2012-09-01

    This appraisal highlights the productive engagement between feminism and discursive psychology (DP). It discusses some of the confluence and tensions between DP and feminism. The two share critical perspectives on science and psychology, a concern with prejudice, and have ideas in common about the constructed nature of social categories, such as gender. One difficulty arises from the relativism associated with the post-structural theoretical underpinnings of DP, which can be understood as politically paralyzing. Another problem comes from an endorsement of a conversation analytic mentality, where identity categories such as gender can only be legitimately used in an analysis when participants' orient to their relevance. The high-profile debates and literature in DP shows it has made a notable contribution to social psychology and its influence can also be found in other areas. A particular influence of DP highlighted in the present appraisal is on gender and language research.

  18. Qualitative experiments in psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagoner, Brady

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I explore the meaning of experiments in early twentieth century psychology, focusing on the qualitative experimental methodology of psychologist Frederic BARTLETT. I begin by contextualizing BARTLETT's experiments within the continental research tradition of his time, which...... was in a state of transition from a focus on elements (the concern of psychophysics) to a focus on wholes (the concern of Gestalt psychology). The defining feature of BARTLETT's early experiments is his holistic treatment of human responses, in which the basic unit of analysis is the active person relating...... to some material within the constraints of a social and material context. This manifests itself in a number of methodological principles that contrast with contemporary understandings of experimentation in psychology. The contrast is further explored by reviewing the history of "replications...

  19. Sociogenomic personality psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Brent W; Jackson, Joshua J

    2008-12-01

    In this article, we address a number of issues surrounding biological models of personality traits. Most traditional and many contemporary biological models of personality traits assume that biological systems underlying personality traits are causal and immutable. In contrast, sociogenomic biology, which we introduce to readers in this article, directly contradicts the widely held assumption that something that is biological, heritable, or temperamental, is unchangeable. We provide examples of how seemingly unchanging biological systems, such as DNA, are both dependent on environments for elicitation and can be modified by environmental changes. Finally, we synthesize sociogenomic biology with personality psychology in a model of personality traits that integrates this more modern perspective on biology, physiology, and environment that we term sociogenomic personality psychology. We end the article with a discussion of the future directions of sociogenomic personality psychology.

  20. Psychological models of suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzilay, Shira; Apter, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Suicidal behavior is highly complex and multifaceted. Consequent to the pioneering work of Durkheim and Freud, theoreticians have attempted to explain the biological, social, and psychological nature of suicide. The present work presents an overview and critical discussion of the most influential theoretical models of the psychological mechanisms underlying the development of suicidal behavior. All have been tested to varying degrees and have important implications for the development of therapeutic and preventive interventions. Broader and more in-depth approaches are still needed to further our understanding of suicidal phenomena.

  1. The psychology of creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    2014-01-01

    The psychology of creativity is nowadays a thriving field of investigation, but also a discipline in crisis. This is the premise for the critical reading of past and present work within this area proposed here. The presentation follows the typical headings of a research article, beginning...... in order to help us develop a stronger psychology of creativity in the decades to come. In the end, six main points are placed on a hypothetical agenda for future (creative) creativity re-search. In this sense, a critical reading is actually the first step in the process of being constructive and calling...

  2. Psychology of programming

    CERN Document Server

    Hoc, J-M

    1991-01-01

    Psychology provides a backdrop for most of the study of human*b1computer interaction. In this volume the psychological issues that pertain to programming, rather than systems design, are examined in four sections: Theoretical and Methodological Issues; Language Design and Skill Acquisition; Expert Programming; and the Future.****The book was inspired by working groups in France and the United Kingdom but also includes work by major North American figures (such as Curtis and Soloway). It is the first comprehensive work on this topic since the early 1980s.

  3. Mindfulness and clinical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, David

    2011-09-01

    Does mindfulness offer more to psychology than a useful therapeutic technique? This paper argues that it can also establish a state of presence which is understood in relation to the practice of phenomenology. Mindfulness is then both linked to a Western intellectual tradition and offers that tradition a systematic method. This is an opening for psychological investigation of the non-conceptual basis of everyday experience. The combination of this theoretical stance with the increasingly widespread practical training of clinical psychologists in mindfulness has broad implications for clinical practice; this is illustrated in relation to the descriptive approach to clinical problems, qualitative research, and reflective practice.

  4. Neuroeconomics and business psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    2010-01-01

    To determine parameters of the frontal power of executive integration for application in business, this paper reviewed neuroeconomic neuroimaging research and discussion in relation to business psychology. The results are that limbic system (L) is a centre of primary consciousness based on a meso......To determine parameters of the frontal power of executive integration for application in business, this paper reviewed neuroeconomic neuroimaging research and discussion in relation to business psychology. The results are that limbic system (L) is a centre of primary consciousness based...

  5. Placebo and other psychological interactions in headache treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autret, A; Valade, D; Debiais, S

    2012-04-01

    administration was limited, the control of attacks uncertain as well as the evolution of the co-morbid psycho-pathology. Considering the reviews and meta-analysis of complex prophylactic procedures, it must be concluded that their effect is mostly linked to a placebo and non-specific psychological effects. Acupuncture may have a slight specific effect on tension type headache, but not on migraine. Manual therapy studies do not exhibit difference between manipulation, mobilization, and controls; touch has no proven specific effect. A comprehensive efficacy review of biofeedback studies concludes to a small specific effect on tension type headache but not on migraine. A review of behavioral treatment conclude to an interesting mean improvement but did not demonstrated a specific effect with the exception of a four arm study including a pseudo meditation control group. Expectation-linked placebo, conditioning, and non-specific psychological effects vary according clinical situations and psychological context; likely low in RCT, high after anempathic medical contact, and at its maximum with a desired charismatic healer. The announcements of doctors strongly influence the beliefs of patients, and in consequence their pain and anxiety sensibilities; this modulates the amplitude of the placebo and the non-specific psychological effects and is therefore a major determinant of the therapeutic success. Furthermore, any repetitive contact, even through a placebo, may interfere positively with the psychopathological co-morbidity. One has to keep in mind that the non-specific psychological interactions play a major role in the improvement of the majority of the headache sufferers.

  6. Sport Psychology: An Emerging Domain in the Counseling Psychology Profession?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Trent A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Surveyed counseling psychologists on their involvement in sport psychology research, training, and practice; their affiliation with sport psychology professional organizations; and their attitudes toward current professional sport psychology issues. Found that counseling psychologists were minimally involved, and had received little formal…

  7. From Aesthetics to Psychology: Notes on Vygotsky's "Psychology of Art."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimaraes Lima, Marcelo

    1995-01-01

    Discusses Vygotsky's ideas in art psychology on the role of emotion in art, the nature of the aesthetic experience, the semiotic nature of psychological processes, and the foundation of a Marxist psychology and a Marxist aesthetics. Central to all of his ideas was his critique of Russian formalism. (MMU)

  8. The Representation of Applied Psychology Areas in Introductory Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselhuhn, Charlotte W.; Clopton, Kerri L.

    2008-01-01

    Many psychology majors indicate helping others as a reason for majoring in psychology, yet many enter positions not closely related to the field. This discrepancy may be due to a lack of student knowledge of the applied areas of psychology. The purpose of this study was to investigate the coverage of clinical, counseling,…

  9. Ethnic Minority Psychological Associations: Connections to Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Romero, Edward A.; Forrest, Linda; Lau, Michael Y.

    2012-01-01

    This article provides the introduction, background and rationale for the Major Contribution focused on five national ethnic minority psychological associations: the Asian American Psychological Association, The Association of Black Psychologists, the National Latina/o Psychological Association, the Society of Indian Psychologists, and the Society…

  10. Broadening the Boundaries of Psychology through Community Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    This paper argues for community psychology to be included within the discipline boundaries of psychology. In doing this, it will enable psychology to begin to address some of the large scale social issues affecting people's well-being. It will be necessary, however, to incorporate aspects of other disciplines, make explicit the political…

  11. SU-E-J-158: Audiovisual Biofeedback Reduces Image Artefacts in 4DCT: A Digital Phantom Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, S; Kipritidis, J; Lee, D; Keall, P [University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Bernatowicz, K [Paul Scherrer Institute, Psi, Aargau (Switzerland)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Irregular breathing motion has a deleterious impact on 4DCT image quality. The breathing guidance system: audiovisual biofeedback (AVB) is designed to improve breathing regularity, however, its impact on 4DCT image quality has yet to be quantified. The purpose of this study was to quantify the impact of AVB on thoracic 4DCT image quality by utilizing the digital eXtended Cardiac Torso (XCAT) phantom driven by lung tumor motion patterns. Methods: 2D tumor motion obtained from 4 lung cancer patients under two breathing conditions (i) without breathing guidance (free breathing), and (ii) with guidance (AVB). There were two breathing sessions, yielding 8 tumor motion traces. This tumor motion was synchronized with the XCAT phantom to simulate 4DCT acquisitions under two acquisition modes: (1) cine mode, and (2) prospective respiratory-gated mode. Motion regularity was quantified by the root mean square error (RMSE) of displacement. The number of artefacts was visually assessed for each 4DCT and summed up for each breathing condition. Inter-session anatomic reproducibility was quantified by the mean absolute difference (MAD) between the Session 1 4DCT and Session 2 4DCT. Results: AVB improved tumor motion regularity by 30%. In cine mode, the number of artefacts was reduced from 61 in free breathing to 40 with AVB, in addition to AVB reducing the MAD by 34%. In gated mode, the number of artefacts was reduced from 63 in free breathing to 51 with AVB, in addition to AVB reducing the MAD by 23%. Conclusion: This was the first study to compare the impact of breathing guidance on 4DCT image quality compared to free breathing, with AVB reducing the amount of artefacts present in 4DCT images in addition to improving inter-session anatomic reproducibility. Results thus far suggest that breathing guidance interventions could have implications for improving radiotherapy treatment planning and interfraction reproducibility.

  12. Interactive Bio-feedback Therapy Using Hybrid Assistive Limbs for Motor Recovery after Stroke: Current Practice and Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    MORISHITA, Takashi; INOUE, Tooru

    2016-01-01

    Interactive bio-feedback (iBF) was initially developed for the rehabilitation of motor function in patients with neurological disorders, and subsequently yielded the development of the hybrid assistive limb (HAL). Here, we provide a review of the theory underlying HAL treatment as well as our clinical experience and recommendations for future clinical studies using HAL in acute stroke patients. We performed a PubMed-based literature search, a retrospective data review of our acute stroke case series, and included a sample case report of our findings. Given past animal studies and functional imaging results, iBF therapy using the HAL in the acute phase of stroke seems an appropriate approach for preventing learned non-use and interhemispheric excitation imbalances. iBF therapy may furthermore promote appropriate neuronal network reorganization. Based on experiences in our stroke center, HAL rehabilitation is a safe and effective treatment modality for recovering motor impairments after acute stroke, and allows the design of tailored rehabilitation programs for individual patients. iBF therapy through the HAL system seems to be an effective and promising approach to stroke rehabilitation; however, the superiority of this treatment to conventional rehabilitation remains unclear. Further clinical studies are warranted. Additionally, the formation of a patient registry will permit a meta-analysis of HAL cases and address the problems associated with a controlled trial (e.g., the heterogeneity of an acute stroke cohort). The development of robotic engineering will improve the efficacy of HAL rehabilitation and has the potential to standardize patient rehabilitation practice. PMID:27616320

  13. The Effect of Continuous and Discretized Presentations of Concurrent Augmented Visual Biofeedback on Postural Control in Quiet Stance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen D'Anna

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a continuous and a discretized Visual Biofeedback (VBF on balance performance in upright stance. The coordinates of the Centre of Pressure (CoP, extracted from a force plate, were processed in real-time to implement the two VBFs, administered to two groups of 12 healthy participants. In the first group, a representation of the CoP was continuously shown, while in the second group, the discretized VBF was provided at an irregular frequency (that depended on the subject's performance by displaying one out of a set of five different emoticons, each corresponding to a specific area covered by the current position of the CoP. In the first case, participants were asked to maintain a white spot within a given square area, whereas in the second case they were asked to keep the smiling emoticon on. Trials with no VBF were administered as control. The effect of the two VBFs on balance was studied through classical postural parameters and a subset of stabilogram diffusion coefficients. To quantify the amount of time spent in stable conditions, the percentage of time during which the CoP was inside the stability area was calculated. Both VBFs improved balance maintainance as compared to the absence of any VBF. As compared to the continuous VBF, in the discretized VBF a significant decrease of sway path, diffusion and Hurst coefficients was found. These results seem to indicate that a discretized VBF favours a more natural postural behaviour by promoting a natural intermittent postural control strategy.

  14. The influence of electromyographic biofeedback therapy on knee extension following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christanell Franz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of knee extension and a deficit in quadriceps strength are frequently found following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the addition of Eletromyographic Biofeedback (EMG BFB therapy for the vastus medialis muscle to the in the early phase of the standard rehabilitation programme could improve the range of knee extension and strength after ACL reconstruction more than a standard rehabilitation programme. The correlation between EMG measurement and passive knee extension was also investigated. Method Sixteen patients, all of whom underwent endoscopic ACL reconstruction using patellar tendon autograft, were randomly assigned to two groups: • Control group (8 patients: standard rehabilitation protocol; with full weight-bearing postoperative, knee brace (0° extension, 90° flexion, electrical stimulation, aquatics and proprioceptive training. • The EMG BFB group (8 patients: EMG BFB was added to the standard rehabilitation protocol within the first postoperative week and during each session for the next 6 weeks. Each patent attended a total of 16 outpatient physiotherapy sessions following surgery. High-Heel-Distance (HHD Test, range of motion (ROM and integrated EMG (iEMG for vastus medialis were measured preoperatively, and at the 1, 2, 4 and 6-week follow ups. Additionally, knee function, swelling and pain were evaluated using standardized scoring scales. Results At 6 weeks, passive knee extension (p  0.01 differences were found between the two groups for the assessment of knee function, swelling and pain. Conclusion The results indicate that EMG BFB therapy, in the early phase of rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction, is useful in enhancing knee extension. Improved innervation of the vastus medialis can play a key role in the development of postoperative knee extension. EMG BFB therapy is a simple, inexpensive and valuable adjunct to conventional

  15. ADHD远程反馈治疗系统的研究%Study on Telemedicine System of ADHD Biofeedback Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李科

    2011-01-01

    利用脑电反馈治疗技术让注意力缺陷伴多动症(ADHD)患者在家里接受远程的评估和治疗是一种全新的远程医疗模式.该文提出了一种基于Multi-Agent的远程医疗系统的结构与协作模型,设计和实现了针对ADHD的远程评估和反馈治疗系统,建立基于多Agent同的多参数评估决策体系,将层次分析法用于协同医疗决策和对ADHD的评估.系统结合评估结果指导脑电反馈仪对患者进行治疗,达到远程治疗ADHD的目的.%Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common mental disorders that develop in children. In this paper, a telemedicine system for ADHD based on multi-agent has been designed and implemented. A framework and collaborative model of multi-agent for telemedicine has been proposed. A evaluation system of multi-parameters based on multi-agent has been developed. Analytic hierarchy process is used for the decision-making of cooperative medicine and for the evaluation of ADHD. The ADHD patients were treated using an EEG biofeedback instrument at their home. The efficiency of the evaluation and therapy of ADHD is improved by using the telemedicine system.

  16. Political Psychology of European Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manners, Ian James

    2014-01-01

    The chapter engages in a survey of what political psychology and European integration have to say to each other in the understanding of the European Union. The chapter draws on five strands of political psychology as part of this engagement – conventional psychology, social psychology, social...... construction, psychoanalysis, and critical political psychology. Within each strand a number of examples of scholarship at the interface of political psychology and European integration are examined. The chapter argues that the study of the EU has much to benefit from political psychology in terms of theories...... and methods of European identity and integration, but it also argues that political psychology can benefit from the insights of European integration by rethinking the processes that drive the marking of inside and outside, interior and exterior, belonging and otherness....

  17. Qualitative methodology in developmental psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demuth, Carolin; Mey, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative methodology presently is gaining increasing recognition in developmental psychology. Although the founders of developmental psychology to a large extent already used qualitative procedures, the field was long dominated by a (post) positivistic quantitative paradigm. The increasing...

  18. APA Educational Psychology Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Karen R., Ed.; Graham, Steve, Ed.; Urdan, Tim, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The "APA Educational Psychology Handbook" reflects the broad nature of the field today, with state-of-the-science reviews of the diverse critical theories driving research and practice; in-depth investigation of the range of individual differences and cultural/contextual factors that affect student achievement, motivation, and beliefs; and close…

  19. A Psychology of Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, B. C.

    William James, the turn of the century psychologist, philospher, and educator, was avidly interested in the relationship between psychology and teaching. This paper considers operant conditioning, timing of reinforcers, and programmed instruction--touchstones of B.F. Skinner in the teaching/learning milieu. Of course, materials not just methods…

  20. Rediscovering Differential Psychology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takooshian, Harold

    2010-01-01

    Comments on the original article, "Many forms of culture," by A. B. Cohen. Cohen offered an eye-opening review of how culture means much more than ethnicity within a nation or differences between nations. After developing a much-expanded definition of culture, he concluded, "I have lamented the fact that psychology has focused on some important…

  1. Advances in Environmental Psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Nasar, Jack L.

    2015-01-01

    When Plenum stopped publishing its edited series—Human Behavior and Environment and Advances in Environment, Behavior and Design—the field of environmental psychology suffered a loss. Scholars could go to one of the edited Plenum books to find state-of-the-art reviews on existing and emerging areas of research. [...

  2. Psychological Adjustment and Homosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsiorek, John C.

    In this paper, the diverse literature bearing on the topic of homosexuality and psychological adjustment is critically reviewed and synthesized. The first chapter discusses the most crucial methodological issue in this area, the problem of sampling. The kinds of samples used to date are critically examined, and some suggestions for improved…

  3. Paediatric psychological problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Allan; Harrison, Christopher; Charles, Janice; Britt, Helena

    2014-04-01

    A 2011 BEACH-based study showed that over the past 40 years there has been increasing general practitioner (GP) involvement in the management of paediatric mental health in Australia. There has also been a changing mix of psychological conditions managed, including increased management of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

  4. Logotherapy and positive psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar R. Oro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Psychology omitted to approach, during almost a century, the positive aspects from persons, like creativity, humor, optimism, hope, forgiveness, life meaning, and happiness. These themes are approached by Positive Psychology, with Seligman like the principal exponent. Psychology was dedicated to explore the negative aspects from human beings improving human health. Nevertheless, this pathogenic model could not prevent mental disease. Concepts of Positive Psychology have a solid antecedent in Víktor Frankl ́s studies, which is the Logotherapy founder. This allows incorporating another perspective to approach positive aspects, from a philosophical and anthropological focus. Although the ways adopted by Frank and Seligman are different, both considered main aspects of human existence. Nevertheless, they investigated in different countries (from Europe and EE.UU.; in different circumstances (concentration camps, deaths, tortures; vs. academic context; in different historical periods and different social contexts (a country that lost the war and other that gave freedom to Europeans. In this work is used the concept life sense as the focus in professional formation and psychotherapy approach. 

  5. Confronting Psychology's Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    Isaac Prilleltensky (this issue, pp. 116-136) seeks to make community psychology a more effective force for social justice. His discussion of psychopolitical validity raises a number of questions: How perfect must the theoretical framework be to usefully oppose unjust power? In what way is the notion of "psychopolitical validity" most useful? How…

  6. APA Educational Psychology Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Karen R., Ed.; Graham, Steve, Ed.; Urdan, Tim, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The "APA Educational Psychology Handbook" reflects the broad nature of the field today, with state-of-the-science reviews of the diverse critical theories driving research and practice; in-depth investigation of the range of individual differences and cultural/contextual factors that affect student achievement, motivation, and beliefs;…

  7. PSYCHOLOGY. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. We conducted replications of 100 experimental and correlational studies published in three psychology journals using high-powered designs and original materials when available. Replication effects were half the magnitude of original effects, representing a substantial decline. Ninety-seven percent of original studies had statistically significant results. Thirty-six percent of replications had statistically significant results; 47% of original effect sizes were in the 95% confidence interval of the replication effect size; 39% of effects were subjectively rated to have replicated the original result; and if no bias in original results is assumed, combining original and replication results left 68% with statistically significant effects. Correlational tests suggest that replication success was better predicted by the strength of original evidence than by characteristics of the original and replication teams.

  8. The effect of a single session of short duration biofeedback-induced deep breathing on measures of heart rate variability during laboratory-induced cognitive stress: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinsloo, Gabriell E; Derman, Wayne E; Lambert, Michael I; Laurie Rauch, H G

    2013-06-01

    This study examines the acute effect of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback on HRV measures during and immediately after biofeedback and during the following laboratory-induced stress. Eighteen healthy males exposed to work-related stress were randomised into an HRV biofeedback group (BIO) or a comparative group (COM). Subjects completed a modified Stroop task before (Stroop 1) and after (Stroop 2) the intervention. Both groups had similar physiological responses to stress in Stroop 1. In Stroop 2, the COM group responded similarly to the way they did to Stroop 1: respiratory frequency (RF) and heart rate (HR) increased, RMSSD and high frequency (HF) power decreased or had a tendency to decrease, while low frequency (LF) power showed no change. The BIO group responded differently in Stroop 2: while RF increased and LF power decreased, HR, RMSSD and HF power showed no change. In the BIO group, RMSSD was higher in Stroop 2 compared to Stroop 1. In conclusion, HRV biofeedback induced a short term carry-over effect during both the following rest period and laboratory-induced stress suggesting maintained HF vagal modulation in the BIO group after the intervention, and maintained LF vagal modulation in the COM group.

  9. Clinical Observation on electromyography biofeedback treatment to child tic disorder%肌电生物反馈治疗儿童抽动障碍疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵浦; 梁洁竞; 张磊; 崔红媛; 杨亚琦

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨肌电生物反馈治疗儿童抽动障碍的疗效。方法:对2009年10月-2011年12月儿科门诊的抽动障碍患儿进行40次肌电生物反馈治疗,治疗前后分别采用多发性抽动症综合量表进行疗效评定。结果:23例患儿经肌电生物反馈治疗,显效17例,好转4例,无效2例,有效率91.3%。结论:肌电生物反馈是治疗儿童抽动障碍的一种有效的治疗方法。%Objective:To discuss the curative effect of EMG biofeedback treatment to child tic disorder.Methods:40 EMG biofeedback treatments were applied to children with tic disorder received by pediatrics departments from October 2009 to December 2011 and therapeutic evaluation with TSGS was made before and after the treatments. Result:Among children with EMG biofeedback treatment, 17cases were effective, 4 cases got bet er, 2 cases were of no effects, the total effective rate was 91.3%. Conclusion:EMG biofeedback treatment is an egective method to cure child tic disorder.

  10. Curative ef ect observation of 37 functional constipation patients treated with biofeedback therapy%生物反馈治疗功能性便秘37例疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金学林

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨生物反馈治疗功能性便秘的临床疗效。方法对我院2012年11月-2014年5月进行生物反馈治疗的37例功能性便秘病人回顾分析。结果生物反馈治疗后患者便秘症状评分显著降低,有效率为81.08%。结论生物反馈治疗对功能性便秘治疗安全有效。%Objective We aim to study the clinical curative ef ect of biofeedback therapy for functional constipation.Methods Clinic data of 37 functional constipation patients were evalua-ted.They were treated with biofeedback therapy in our hospital during November 2012 to May 2014.Results After biofeedback therapy,functional constipation symptom scores of patients de-creased significantly,with ef ective rate of 81.08%.Conclusions Biofeedback therapy for the treatment of functional constipation is safe and ef ective.

  11. iHeartLift: a closed loop system with bio-feedback that uses music tempo variability to improve heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Thomas C T; Chen, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    "Musica delenit bestiam feram" translates into "Music soothes the savage beast". There is a hidden truth in this ancient quip passed down from generations. Besides soothing the heart, it also incites the heart to a healthier level of heart rate variability (HRV). In this paper, an approach to use and test music and biofeedback to increase the heart rate variability for people facing daily stress is discussed. By determining the music tempo variability (MTV) of a piece of music and current heart rate variability, iHeartLift is able to compare the 2 trends and locate a musical piece that is suited to increase the user's heart rate variability to a healthier level. With biofeedback, the 2 trends are continuously compared in real-time and the musical piece is changed in accordance with the current comparisons. A study was conducted and it was generally found that HRV can be uplifted by music regardless of language and meaning of musical lyrics but with limitations to musical genre.

  12. Técnicas psicoterapéuticas para proteger la confidencialidad y la responsabilidad legal: implicaciones del Biofeedback y Eeasp en el contexto jurídico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Paulino Dzib Aguilar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available El Biofeedback a través del manejo de la temperatura periférica y la Escritura Emocional Autorreflexiva con Solución Propuesta (EEASP son técnicas psicoterapéuticas que dan respuesta a las discusiones éticas jurídicas sobre la confidencialidad. El objetivo de la investigación fue conocer si existen diferencias en la temperatura periférica. La muestra fue de 42 adultos con un promedio de edad de 32.9 años, siendo 32 hombres y 10 mujeres, 16 fueron estudiantes y 26 trabajadores, quienes reportaron estar sometidos a niveles elevados de estrés. Los resultados mostraron un aumento estadísticamente significativo (t = 6.35, p = 0.001 del promedio de la temperatura (89.68 °F. Los resultados confirman que el Biofeedback y la EEASP son técnicas que tienen un impacto positivo sobre los procesos psicofisiológicos de los participantes y que pueden ser usadas sin violar la confidencialidad así como exonerar de responsabilidades legales.

  13. The efficiency of Mindfulness Based Biofeedback Therapy on depression, anxiety and HbA1c in patients with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pegah Seidi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mindfulness is a mind-body medical technique which is used alone or in combination with other techniques for patients with chronic diseases. The purpose of this study was evaluating the effectiveness of mindfulness-based biofeedback therapy (MBBT on depression, anxiety and HbA1c in type 1 diabetic patients. Methods: This study was an experimental study with pretest-posttest design and a control group. A total of 28 patients were selected by random sampling among diabetic patients who referred to Kalar Health Center in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq from 2014 to 2015. Then selected samples were then randomly assigned to two experimental and control groups, each with 14 participants. MBBT was presented in 8 sessions. Before and after training, depression, anxiety and HbA1c were measured. Data were analyzed by SPSS-22 using descriptive statistics, Levene’s test and ANCOVA. Results: The results of posttest indicated no significant difference between control and experimental groups in depression factor (p=0.475. However, a significant decline was found for state anxiety (p= 0/016, trait anxiety (p= 0/031 and HbA1c (p=0/012 in experimental group, based on the findings of posttest. Conclusion: Mindfulness-based biofeedback therapy has significant effects on anxiety and HbA1c but no effects on depression in type 1 diabetic patient.

  14. 儿童功能性便秘生物反馈治疗研究进展%Biofeedback therapy for functional constipation in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建霞

    2012-01-01

    Functional constipation ( FC ), also known as habitual or simple constipation, is a persistent primary constipation caused by non-systemic or intestinal diseases. It is a common cause of bowel disorders in children and accounts for more than 90% of constipated children. Biofeedback, as a new behavioral therapy, is widely used for FC adults with satisfactory results, but its efficacy in constipated children remains controversial. This article reviews the progress in the biofeedback therapy for functional constipation in children.%功能性便秘(functional constipation,FC)是指非全身疾病或肠道疾病所引起的原发性持续便秘,又称为习惯性便秘或单纯性便秘,是儿童排便障碍的常见原因.FC占儿童便秘的90%以上.生物反馈是一种新兴的行为疗法,被广泛用于成人FC患者的治疗,具有较好的效果.然而,其在治疗儿童便秘患者的疗效还存在一定的争议.文中就儿童FC生物反馈治疗的研究进展作一综述.

  15. Signature Strengths in Positive Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molony, Terry; Henwood, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    Positive psychology can be thought of as the scientific study of what is "right about people" as opposed to the traditional focus on the healing of psychological pain or trauma. The philosophical roots of positive psychology can be traced back to Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism, Christianity, as well as Islamic and Athenian…

  16. A Positive Psychology That Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Shane L.; Magyar-Moe, Jeana L.

    2006-01-01

    The Major Contribution intended to situate positive psychology in counseling psychology's past and future and in the complex world we live and work in today. The four reactions (Frazier, Lee,& Steger; Gerstein; Linley; Mollen, Ethington,& Ridley) provide new insights into how counseling psychology has and will contribute to the study of human…

  17. Positive Psychology and Outdoor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Dene S.; Davis-Berman, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    A relatively new movement in psychology, positive psychology, has many implications for the field of outdoor education. Positive psychology has the goal of fostering excellence through the understanding and enhancement of factors that lead to growth. It embraces the view that growth occurs when positive factors are present, as opposed to the…

  18. The Process of Psychological Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Anna; Moreland, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Consultation is a key means of service delivery in many psychological services. However, the "process" of consultation is little explored in Educational Psychology literature, particularly in the United Kingdom (UK). This paper focuses on a small-scale qualitative research study of psychological consultation provided by educational…

  19. Manitoba's School Psychology, Circa 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallin, Barry; Bednarczyk, George; Hanson, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    While the geographic landscape of Manitoba has changed very little since the last review of school psychology in Manitoba was published 15 years ago, the school psychology landscape here has changed considerably, and we continue to be alive, well, and flourishing. Two previous articles in the "Canadian Journal of School Psychology"…

  20. Indigenisation of Psychology in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Ajit K.

    2011-01-01

    Academic psychology which made a new beginning in India in the early part of 20th century was modelled on the Western scientific tradition. The teaching of psychology was very much on the British pattern since the colonial rule, whereas the research was mostly an extension of the Western work in India. Psychology went through massive expansion…

  1. Social Justice and School Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastasi, Bonnie K.

    2008-01-01

    Despite attention in other social sciences and within other areas of psychology, social justice has received minimal attention in school psychology literature. The two studies by Shriberg et al. (2008) and McCabe and Rubinson (2008) represent significant developments in exploring school psychology's commitment to social justice. In this…

  2. Educational Psychology: The Distinctive Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, R. J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper, written in the twenty-first anniversary year of the journal "Educational Psychology in Practice", attempts to uncover those distinctive aspects of the discipline and the practice of applied psychology in general and educational psychology in particular. After considering some of the reasons for attempting this task at this point in…

  3. Praktische Übungen zur Psychophysiologie im Kurs Medizinische Psychologie [A psychophysiology practical as part of the medical psychology course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiser, Jochen

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available [english] Teaching in medical psychology aims at establishing an understanding of the relationships between psychological functions and bodily reactions and of the relevance of these interactions for the development and maintenance of diseases. To illustrate these relationships, a psychophysiology practical was introduced in the first semester. Students performed practical 30-minute exercises in groups of four on the basis of comprehensive written instructions. The following topics were covered: (1 stress (dependent variable: heart rate, (2 "lie detection" (dependent variable: skin conductance response, (3 biofeedback (dependent variable: skin temperature, and (4 electroencephalogram (dependent variable: amplitude in the four classical frequency bands. The practical exercises were complemented by theoretical group work and a summary of the results of the exercises. Students evaluated the practical positively. It was considered a benefit to the course, and the self-rated knowledge in the area of psychophysiology increased significantly. These results, as well as our experiences during the practical, have reinforced our decision to establish a psychophysiology practical as part of the medical psychology/medical sociology course.[german] Die Vermittlung der Zusammenhänge zwischen psychologischen Funktionen und körperlichen Veränderungen sowie deren Relevanz für die Entstehung und Aufrechterhaltung von Krankheiten stellt ein zentrales Ziel der Ausbildung in Medizinischer Psychologie dar. Zur Veranschaulichung dieser Zusammenhänge führten wir ein Psychophysiologie-Praktikum im ersten vorklinischen Semester ein. Die Studierenden führten in Vierergruppen mit Hilfe ausführlicher schriftlicher Instruktionen jeweils ca. 30 Minuten andauernde praktische Übungen durch, die die folgenden Themen behandelten: (1 Stress (abhängige Variable: Herzrate, (2 "Lügendetektor" (abhängige Variable: Hautleitwertsreaktionen, (3 Biofeedback (abhängige Variable

  4. A nonlinear analysis of electrocardiographic and electroencephalographic signals during biofeedback%生物反馈过程心电及脑电信号的非线性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许小洋; 耿艺介; 林桂平; 王庭槐

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study the regularity of changes of electroencephalographic(EEG)and electrocardiographic(ECG)signals during electromyographic(EMG)biofeedback and the nonlinear mechanism underlying it.Methods With the linear and nonlinear dynamics parameters-approximate entropy(ApEn)and cross approximate entropy(Cross-ApEn),the regularity and nonlinear correlation existed in electromyographic,electrocardiographic and electroencephalographic signals acquired during EMG biofeedback were assessed.Results EMG biofeedback training reduced EMG amplitude significantly(biofeedback group(0.38±0.15)μN,control group (0.57±0.18)μN,P<0.05),and remarkably increased ECG ApEn(biofeedback group(0.80±0.19),control group(0.64±0.08),P<0.05);the EEG ApEn at lead FP1 and FP2 increased significantly(P<0.05),and the value of Cross-ApEn between ECG-EEG signals at leads FP1(biofeedback group(0.48±0.16),control group(0.31±0.10),P<0.05)and FP2(biofeedback group(0.43±0.14),control group(0.27±0.12),P<0.05)also increased significantly.Conclusions The increase of electric activity at lead FP1 and FP2(at the frontal pole of brain)during biofeedback indicates that the frontal pole participates in the intentional modulation of visceral function,and it might be an integral region in the central nervous system during biofeedback;Nonlinear analysis might be a novel pathway to clarify the mechanism underlying biofeedback.%目的 探讨肌电生物反馈过程中脑电、心电信号的变化规律及其非线性机制.方法 以线性及非线性动力学参数--近似熵和互近似熵分析肌电生物反馈过程中的肌电、心电和脑电信号的变化规律及其相互联系.结果 生物反馈训练可使肌电振幅明显降低[生物反馈组(0.38±0.15)μV、对照组(0.57±0.18)μV,P<0.05]、心电近似熵明显升高[分别为:(0.80±0.19)、(0.64±0.08),P<0.05];脑电近似熵以FP1和FP2导联升高显著(P<0.05);FP1(生物反馈组0.48±0.16;对照组0.31±0.10)

  5. 生物反馈治疗功能性大便失禁疗效观察%The clinical efficacy of biofeedback therapy for patients with functional incontinence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴志毅; 易文全; 刘玲

    2011-01-01

    目的 评价生物反馈治疗功能性大便失禁的2个月和1年疗效.方法 60例功能性大便失禁患者被纳入本研究,采用生物反馈治疗,比较治疗前后2个月和1年的肛门直肠测压改变及临床症状变化.结果 治疗后2个月及1年,患者直肠静息压、最大缩榨压、直肠排便感知域值和直肠最大排便容积量明显增加,直肠排便感知容积量下降,临床症状有不同程度改善.结论 生物反馈疗法治疗功能性大便失禁有效,值得临床推广.%Objective This study was performed to investigate the clinical efficacy of biofeedback therapy for patients with functional incontinence in 2 months and 1 year. Methods 60 patients with functional incontinence received biofeedback therapy for 1 year. And. Symptom change and the value of anorectal manometry were evaluated immediately after the completion of biofeedback therapy in 2 months and after 1 year. Results After the completion of biofeedback therapy in 2 months and 1 year, symptom of fecal incontinence were improved more or less. Meanwhile, anal resting pressure, anal squeeze pressure, pressure of first sensation of defecation and total volume retained were increased, and volume of first sensation of defecation were decreased than before therapy. Conclusion Biofeedback therapy was efficient in factional incontinence which deserved to spread.

  6. Psychology as a Moral Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Svend

    of morality • Confronts the “naturalistic fallacy” in contemporary psychology. • Explains why moral science need not be separated from social science. • Addresses challenges and critiques to the author’s work from both formalist and relativist theories of morality. With its bold call to reason, Psychology......, Psychology as a Moral Science argues that psychological phenomena are inherently moral, and that psychology, as prescriptive and interventive practice, reflects specific moral principles. The book cites normative moral standards, as far back as Aristotle, that give human thoughts, feelings, and actions...

  7. The use of functional neuroimaging to evaluate psychological and other non-pharmacological treatments for clinical pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Karin B.; Berna, Chantal; Loggia, Marco L.; Wasan, Ajay; Edwards, Robert R.; Gollub, Randy L.

    2013-01-01

    A large number of studies have provided evidence for the efficacy of psychological and other non-pharmacological interventions in the treatment of chronic pain. While these methods are increasingly used to treat pain, remarkably few studies focused on the exploration of their neural correlates. The aim of this article was to review the findings from neuroimaging studies that evaluated the neural response to distraction-based techniques, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), clinical hypnosis, mental imagery, physical therapy/exercise, biofeedback, and mirror therapy. To date, the results from studies that used neuroimaging to evaluate these methods have not been conclusive and the experimental methods have been suboptimal for assessing clinical pain. Still, several different psychological and non-pharmacological treatment modalities were associated with increased painrelated activations of executive cognitive brain regions, such as the ventral- and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. There was also evidence for decreased pain-related activations in afferent pain regions and limbic structures. If future studies will address the technical and methodological challenges of today’s experiments, neuroimaging might have the potential of segregating the neural mechanisms of different treatment interventions and elucidate predictive and mediating factors for successful treatment outcomes. Evaluations of treatment-related brain changes (functional and structural) might also allow for sub-grouping of patients and help to develop individualized treatments. PMID:22445888

  8. The use of functional neuroimaging to evaluate psychological and other non-pharmacological treatments for clinical pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Karin B; Berna, Chantal; Loggia, Marco L; Wasan, Ajay D; Edwards, Robert R; Gollub, Randy L

    2012-06-29

    A large number of studies have provided evidence for the efficacy of psychological and other non-pharmacological interventions in the treatment of chronic pain. While these methods are increasingly used to treat pain, remarkably few studies focused on the exploration of their neural correlates. The aim of this article was to review the findings from neuroimaging studies that evaluated the neural response to distraction-based techniques, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), clinical hypnosis, mental imagery, physical therapy/exercise, biofeedback, and mirror therapy. To date, the results from studies that used neuroimaging to evaluate these methods have not been conclusive and the experimental methods have been suboptimal for assessing clinical pain. Still, several different psychological and non-pharmacological treatment modalities were associated with increased pain-related activations of executive cognitive brain regions, such as the ventral- and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. There was also evidence for decreased pain-related activations in afferent pain regions and limbic structures. If future studies will address the technical and methodological challenges of today's experiments, neuroimaging might have the potential of segregating the neural mechanisms of different treatment interventions and elucidate predictive and mediating factors for successful treatment outcomes. Evaluations of treatment-related brain changes (functional and structural) might also allow for sub-grouping of patients and help to develop individualized treatments.

  9. Cultural Psychology and Its Future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cultural Psychology is a radical new look in psychology that studies how persons and social-cultural worlds mutually constitute one another. With the increase of globalization and multicultural exchanges, cultural psychology becomes the psychological science for the 21st century. Encounters...... Psychology series aims to highlight and develop new ideas that advance our understanding of these issues. This first volume in the series features an address by Prof. Jaan Valsiner, which is followed by ten commentary chapters and his response to them. In his lecture, Valsiner explores what Niels Bohr......’s revolutionary principle of ‘complementarity’ can contribute to the development of a cultural psychology that takes time, semiotics, and human feeling seriously. Commentators further discuss how complementarity can act as an epistemology for psychology; a number of new methodological strategies for incorporating...

  10. Normality in analytical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Steve

    2013-12-01

    Although C.G. Jung's interest in normality wavered throughout his career, it was one of the areas he identified in later life as worthy of further research. He began his career using a definition of normality which would have been the target of Foucault's criticism, had Foucault chosen to review Jung's work. However, Jung then evolved his thinking to a standpoint that was more aligned to Foucault's own. Thereafter, the post Jungian concept of normality has remained relatively undeveloped by comparison with psychoanalysis and mainstream psychology. Jung's disjecta membra on the subject suggest that, in contemporary analytical psychology, too much focus is placed on the process of individuation to the neglect of applications that consider collective processes. Also, there is potential for useful research and development into the nature of conflict between individuals and societies, and how normal people typically develop in relation to the spectrum between individuation and collectivity.

  11. Loneliness and psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, J; Cochran, S D

    1991-05-01

    Research on relationships between loneliness and psychological symptoms has generally shown significant positive associations across a wide spectrum of psychopathologies. However, such results may be artificial, to some extent, given the high intercorrelations of typical psychopathology measures. In the current study, we examined associations between psychological symptoms, assessed by the Symptom Check List-90 (SCL-90; Derogatis, Lipman, & Covi, 1973) and loneliness, as measured by the UCLA-R Loneliness Scale (Russell, Peplau, & Cutrona, 1980), in college students. Using partial correlations to control for the confounding influence of generalized distress, relationships between loneliness and individual dimensions of distress were examined. Results indicate a significant association between loneliness and interpersonal sensitivity (low self-esteem) and depression. Other dimensions of distress were not significantly related to loneliness. In addition, no sex differences in patterns of association were observed. Results support the notion that self-blame and self-devaluation are strong correlates of loneliness.

  12. Gestalt psychology in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstegen, I

    2000-01-01

    Graz gestalt psychology was introduced into Italy after World War I with Vittorio Benussi's emigration to Padua. His earliest adherent, Cesare Musatti, defended Graz theory, but after Benussi's premature death became an adherent of the Berlin gestalt psychology of Wertheimer-Köhler-Koffka. He trained his two most important students, Fabio Metelli and Gaetano Kanizsa, in orthodox Berlin theory. They established rigid "schools" in Padua and Trieste. The structure of Italian academics allowed for such strict orthodoxy, quite unlike the situation in America, where scientific objectivity mitigated against schools. In the 1960s, some of the students of Metelli and Kanizsa (above all Bozzi) initiated a realist movement-felt in Kanizsa's late work-that was quite independent of that of J. J. Gibson. Finally, more recently, Benussi and Graz theorizing have been embraced again, sentimentally, as a predecedent to Kanizsa-Bozzi.

  13. Environmental psychology matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Environmental psychology examines transactions between individuals and their built and natural environments. This includes investigating behaviors that inhibit or foster sustainable, climate-healthy, and nature-enhancing choices, the antecedents and correlates of those behaviors, and interventions to increase proenvironmental behavior. It also includes transactions in which nature provides restoration or inflicts stress, and transactions that are more mutual, such as the development of place attachment and identity and the impacts on and from important physical settings such as home, workplaces, schools, and public spaces. As people spend more time in virtual environments, online transactions are coming under increasing research attention. Every aspect of human existence occurs in one environment or another, and the transactions with and within them have important consequences both for people and their natural and built worlds. Environmental psychology matters.

  14. Reasoning, logic, and psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenning, Keith; van Lambalgen, Michiel

    2011-09-01

    We argue that reasoning has been conceptualized so narrowly in what is known as 'psychology of reasoning' that reasoning's relevance to cognitive science has become well-nigh invisible. Reasoning is identified with determining whether a conclusion follows validly from given premises, where 'valid' is taken to mean 'valid according to classical logic'. We show that there are other ways to conceptualize reasoning, more in line with current logical theorizing, which give it a role in psychological processes ranging from (verbal) discourse comprehension to (nonverbal) planning. En route we show that formal logic, at present marginalized in cognitive science, can be an extremely valuable modeling tool. In particular, there are cases in which probabilistic modeling must fail, whereas logical models do well. WIREs Cogni Sci 2011 2 555-567 DOI: 10.1002/wcs.134 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  15. Conservation Psychology: A Gap in Current Australian Undergraduate Psychology Education?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elissa Pearson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Human actions have contributed to numerous environmental challenges, including climate change and a significant loss of the world’s biodiversity. As the scientific study of human thought and behaviour, psychology has much to offer in better understanding these issues, as well as fostering greater sustainability in human actions. Yet, despite this recognition, and increasing calls from leaders in psychology education to produce graduates capable of applying their disciplinary knowledge to such real-world issues to solve worldwide behaviourally-based problems; this may not be adequately addressed in current psychology training. The present study assessed the content of all APAC (Australian Psychology Accreditation Council approved psychology programs within Australia to determine the proportion which offered a psychology-focused course (unit specifically in conservation or sustainability. Based on the data advertised through each university website, it appears that only one of 39 programs currently offers such a course, with one other university implementing a conservation psychology course in 2013. Thus 95% of current APAC-accredited programs in Australia do not have a strong focus on training psychology graduates to contribute to addressing these important issues. The need for greater integration of conservation psychology content into undergraduate psychology education in Australia and beyond is discussed.

  16. Evolutionary developmental psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ashley C; Bjorklund, David F

    2010-02-01

    The field of evolutionary developmental psychology can potentially broaden the horizons of mainstream evolutionary psychology by combining the principles of Darwinian evolution by natural selection with the study of human development, focusing on the epigenetic effects that occur between humans and their environment in a way that attempts to explain how evolved psychological mechanisms become expressed in the phenotypes of adults. An evolutionary developmental perspective includes an appreciation of comparative research and we, among others, argue that contrasting the cognition of humans with that of nonhuman primates can provide a framework with which to understand how human cognitive abilities and intelligence evolved. Furthermore, we argue that several aspects of childhood (e.g., play and immature cognition) serve both as deferred adaptations as well as imparting immediate benefits. Intense selection pressure was surely exerted on childhood over human evolutionary history and, as a result, neglecting to consider the early developmental period of children when studying their later adulthood produces an incomplete picture of the evolved adaptations expressed through human behavior and cognition.

  17. Psychology's epistemological identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Černigoj

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is first to present three different, mutually irreducible approaches to the study of human psyche, and then to offer a conceptual model that allows their meaningful integration. I begin the article with the common knowledge about three main determinants of human behavior: genetic inheritance, social environment, and one's own activity, which I then link with Stevens' (1998 conceptualization of three appropriate epistemologies in psychology. Nomothetic epistemology is adequate for the study of behavior rooted in our biological dispositions, hermeneutic epistemology for the study of behavior founded on symbolic meanings, and transformative epistemology for the study of behavior steaming from our capacity for reflexive awareness. I then interrelate these epistemologies using Gergen's (1973 idea about the continuum of temporal stability of events supplemented with the dimension of the abstractness of their treatment. I presuppose that nomothetic treatment of temporally less stable events demands a higher level of abstraction and vice versa. This is very important for psychology, because it acknowledges the possibility of psychology being a nomothetic science, but at the same time warns for the necessity of complementing its findings with the interpretive and phenomenological realizations.

  18. Virtual Reality in Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Foreman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of using virtual environments (VEs in psychology arise from the fact that movements in virtual space, and accompanying perceptual changes, are treated by the brain in much the same way as those in equivalent real space. The research benefits of using VEs, in areas of psychology such as spatial learning and cognition, include interface flexibility, the reproducibility of virtual experience, and the opportunity for on-line monitoring of performance. Applications of VEs are many and varied, but are especially beneficial where experience can be tailored via augmentation, and where dangerous training situations can be avoided. The use of programmable agents has great future potential in relation to training and interpersonal skill development, also perhaps in clinical diagnosis and therapy. Progress in VE usage in psychological education is limited by cost and availability, though VEs are being used increasingly in classroom and laboratory teaching exercises. Virtual Reality was said to be “an answer waiting for a question”, but questions are being recognized, so that applications of VEs within the behavioural sciences are likely to multiply.

  19. Psychological emergency attendance as a psychological service in educational psychology: limits and possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson do Nascimento Bezerra

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The School Psychology Emergency Practices differs from others School Psychology practices, is more than type of psychology service and should have more institutional visibility. This paper reflects on these references from both the practice of the author and the currently literature in school psychology. To this purpose, we use as reference the concept of Extended Clinic and its relation with Psychology Emergency Service area. We discuss the opportunity of the school psychologist has, among other things, to be able to listen and to welcome spontaneously anyone in the school community seeking for support in case of emergency. In so doing, the author reflects on the condition of psychological emergency service as service and as a type of treatment at school, and school psychology as an area of expertise inserted in this complex environment different of views and perspectives.

  20. Credentialing high school psychology teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Kenneth A

    2014-09-01

    The National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula (American Psychological Association, 2013b) require a teacher with considerable psychology content knowledge to teach high school psychology courses effectively. In this study, I examined the initial teaching credential requirements for high school psychology teachers in the 50 states plus the District of Columbia. Thirty-four states (the District of Columbia is included as a state) require the social studies credential to teach high school psychology. An analysis of the items on standardized tests used by states to validate the content knowledge required to teach social studies indicates little or no presence of psychology, a reflection of psychology's meager presence in the social studies teacher preparation curricula. Thus, new teachers with the social studies teaching credential are not prepared to teach high school psychology according to the National Standards. Approval of The College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards: Guidance for Enhancing the Rigor of K-12 Civics, Economics, Geography, and History (National Council for the Social Studies, 2013) presents an opportunity to advocate for establishing a psychology credential in the 34 states.

  1. Introducing positive psychology to SLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Mercer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Positive psychology is a rapidly expanding subfield in psychology that has important implications for the field of second language acquisition (SLA. This paper introduces positive psychology to the study of language by describing its key tenets. The potential contributions of positive psychology are contextualized with reference to prior work, including the humanistic movement in language teaching, models of motivation, the concept of an affective filter, studies of the good language learner, and the concepts related to the self. There are reasons for both encouragement and caution as studies inspired by positive psychology are undertaken. Papers in this special issue of SSLLT cover a range of quantitative and qualitative methods with implications for theory, research, and teaching practice. The special issue serves as a springboard for future research in SLA under the umbrella of positive psychology.

  2. Psychology Students' Interest in Graduate Training: A Need for Partnership among Undergraduate Psychology and Graduate School Psychology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinnett, Terry A.; Solomon, Benjamin G.

    2014-01-01

    An initial point of contact for recruitment of qualified persons into school psychology is undergraduate psychology degree programs. Unfortunately, the discipline of school psychology appears to receive at best only cursory coverage in undergraduate psychology texts, curriculum, and discussion by psychology department faculty even though school…

  3. Psychology and the soul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rank, O

    1996-09-01

    Otto Rank (1884-1939) wrote the present work at the height of his creative powers, betweenWill Therapy andArt and Artist. Here he presents a sweeping history of psychology-individual and social-from the animistic era to psychoanalysis. An earlier translation (by William D. Turner, 1950) was incomplete and somewhat inaccurate. Unlike Sigmund Freud, his mentor, Rank viewed religion with respect and clarifies its role in individual and communal life through this study of soul-belief through the ages. The book contains important insights on immortality, will, dreams, Judaism and Christianity, Hamlet and Don Juan, Jung and Adler, and Freud himself.

  4. The psychology of poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Janse van Rensburg

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the psychological experience of poor people and the pastoral responsibility to guide them towards poverty transition. A qualitative analysis of the narratives of three participants is compared to the enthralling history of Florcy Mabuza who in her book, Poverty mentality: The root of poverty, explains the dangers of a spiritual and emotional mindset that precipitates and feeds the plight of poverty. Using a literature study to interpret the narratives as well as a method of encoding, basic mindsets of poverty and factors that influence this mindset are identified. The study culminates in conclusions to encourage further research and pastoral involvement.

  5. On applying cognitive psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddeley, Alan

    2013-11-01

    Recent attempts to assess the practical impact of scientific research prompted my own reflections on over 40 years worth of combining basic and applied cognitive psychology. Examples are drawn principally from the study of memory disorders, but also include applications to the assessment of attention, reading, and intelligence. The most striking conclusion concerns the many years it typically takes to go from an initial study, to the final practical outcome. Although the complexity and sheer timescale involved make external evaluation problematic, the combination of practical satisfaction and theoretical stimulation make the attempt to combine basic and applied research very rewarding.

  6. History of psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidman, Nadine

    2016-02-01

    The editor of History of Psychology discusses her plan to vary the journal's content and expand its scope in specific ways. The first is to introduce a "Spotlight" feature, a relatively brief, provocative thought piece that might take one of several forms. Along with this new feature, she hopes further to broaden the journal's coverage and its range of contributors. She encourages submissions on the history of the psy-sciences off the beaten path. Finally, she plans to continue the journal's tradition of special issues, special sections, and essay reviews of two or more important recently published books in the field. (PsycINFO Database Record

  7. [Foucault's relevance for psychology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Juan

    2009-11-01

    In this article, we will attempt to address one of the most outstanding and influential thinkers of the past century: Michel Foucault, Philosopher, Psychologist, and above all (university) Professor. Michel Foucault is certainly versatile: Historian (of madness, clinical practice, imprisonment and sexuality), Archaeologist (of knowledge), Analyst (of discourse and power relations), Psychologist (genealogy of subjectivity) and Philosopher (of power and the subject). With this article, we eventually expect to offer some clues to be able to use the work of Michel Foucault for the problematization of Psychology.

  8. Psychological Therapy for People with Tinnitus: A Scoping Review of Treatment Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Deborah A.; Walker, Dawn-Marie; Hoare, Derek J.

    2017-01-01

    intervention included biofeedback, habituation, hypnosis, or relaxation as necessary parts of the treatment. Results: A total of 5043 records were retrieved of which 64 were retained. Twenty-five themes of components that have been included within a psychological therapy were identified, including tinnitus education, psychoeducation, evaluation treatment rationale, treatment planning, problem-solving behavioral intervention, thought identification, thought challenging, worry time, emotions, social comparison, interpersonal skills, self-concept, lifestyle advice, acceptance and defusion, mindfulness, attention, relaxation, sleep, sound enrichment, comorbidity, treatment reflection, relapse prevention, and common therapeutic skills. The most frequently reported psychological therapies were cognitive behavioral therapy, tinnitus education, and internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy. No records reported that an audiologist delivered any of these psychological therapies in the context of an empirical trial in which their role was clearly delineated from that of other clinicians. Conclusions: Scoping review methodology does not attempt to appraise the quality of evidence or synthesize the included records. Further research should therefore determine the relative importance of these different components of psychological therapies from the perspective of the patient and the clinician. PMID:27541331

  9. History of Asian American psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Frederick T L; Okazaki, Sumie

    2009-10-01

    An overview of the history of Asian American psychology is provided by reviewing the context for the development of the field as well as the early founding of the Asian American Psychological Association (AAPA). The presidents of AAPA as well as key events and conferences are noted. The involvement of AAPA leaders in national mental health policies and activities are reviewed. The substantive areas of Asian American psychology and the education and training of Asian American psychologists are also discussed. The article ends with some comments about the future of Asian American psychology.

  10. Psychological empowerment: issues and illustrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, M A

    1995-10-01

    Discussed several issues related to psychological empowerment. The thesis of this paper is that the development of a universal and global measure of psychological empowerment may not be a feasible or appropriate goal. I begin by distinguishing between empowerment processes and outcomes. Underlying assumptions are discussed including the notion that empowerment differs across people, contexts, and times. A nomological network that includes intrapersonal, interactional, and behavioral components is also presented. Two examples of psychological empowerment for voluntary service organization members and members of a mutual help organization are described to help illustrate differences in the specific variables that may be used to measure psychological empowerment in different populations and settings.

  11. Estudo sobre a efetividade da técnica de biofeedback em grupo de doentes com migrânea crônica

    OpenAIRE

    Dirce Maria Navas Perissinotti

    2007-01-01

    O biofeedback (BFD) é uma estratégia terapêutica em que ocorre aprendizagem por associação de sensações com o propósito de controlá-las levando a melhor enfrentamento fornecendo novas respostas e permitindo novos padrões, mesmo que se mantenha a ativação dos estímulos originais disfuncionais. Em migranosos ocorreria inibição da expressão da angústia relacionada ao nível fisiológico, devido a persistência de estados induzidos de estresse. Pesquisas de enfrentamento da migrânea incluem tratamen...

  12. Utility of a Novel Biofeedback Device for Within-Breath Modulation of Heart Rate in Rats: A Quantitative Comparison of Vagus Nerve vs. Right Atrial Pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Erin L; Chauhan, Ashok S; Zhao, Le; Lataro, Renata M; Salgado, Helio C; Nogaret, Alain; Paton, Julian F R

    2016-01-01

    In an emerging bioelectronics era, there is a clinical need for physiological devices incorporating biofeedback that permits natural and demand-dependent control in real time. Here, we describe a novel device termed a central pattern generator (CPG) that uses cutting edge analog circuitry producing temporally controlled, electrical stimulus outputs based on the real time integration of physiological feedback. Motivated by the fact that respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), which is the cyclical changes in heart rate every breath, is an essential component of heart rate variability (HRV) (an indicator of cardiac health), we have explored the versatility and efficiency of the CPG for producing respiratory modulation of heart rate in anesthetized, spontaneously breathing rats. Diaphragmatic electromyographic activity was used as the input to the device and its output connected to either the right cervical vagus nerve or the right atrium for pacing heart rate. We found that the CPG could induce respiratory related heart rate modulation that closely mimicked RSA. Whether connected to the vagus nerve or right atrium, the versatility of the device was demonstrated by permitting: (i) heart rate modulation in any phase of the respiratory cycle, (ii) control of the magnitude of heart rate modulation, and (iii) instant adaptation to changes in respiratory frequency. Vagal nerve pacing was only possible following transection of the nerve limiting its effective use chronically. Pacing via the right atrium permitted better flexibility and control of heart rate above its intrinsic level. This investigation now lays the foundation for future studies using this biofeedback technology permitting closer analysis of both the function and dysfunction of RSA.

  13. Utility of a novel biofeedback device for within-breath modulation of heart rate in rats: a quantitative comparison of vagus nerve versus right atrial pacing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Louise O'Callaghan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In an emerging bioelectronics era, there is a clinical need for physiological devices incorporating biofeedback that permits natural and demand-dependent control in real time. Here, we describe a novel device termed a central pattern generator (CPG that uses cutting edge analogue circuitry producing temporally controlled, electrical stimulus outputs based on the real time integration of physiological feedback. Motivated by the fact that respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA, which is the cyclical changes in heart rate every breath, is an essential component of heart rate variability (an indicator of cardiac health, we have explored the versatility and efficiency of the CPG for producing respiratory modulation of heart rate in anaesthetised, spontaneously breathing rats. Diaphragmatic electromyographic activity was used as the input to the device and its output connected to either the right cervical vagus nerve or the right atrium for pacing heart rate. We found that the CPG could induce respiratory related heart rate modulation that closely mimicked RSA. Whether connected to the vagus nerve or right atrium, the versatility of the device was demonstrated by permitting: (i heart rate modulation in any phase of the respiratory cycle, (ii control of the magnitude of heart rate modulation and (iii instant adaptation to changes in respiratory frequency. Vagal nerve pacing was only possible following transection of the nerve limiting its effective use chronically. Pacing via the right atrium permitted better flexibility and control of heart rate above its intrinsic level. This investigation now lays the foundation for future studies using this biofeedback technology permitting closer analysis of both the function and dysfunction of RSA.

  14. 基于虚拟现实的生物反馈技术研究进展%Advancement in Biofeedback Technology Based on Virtual Reality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘庆峰; 宋华淼; 卓著; 白玉; 师国伟

    2011-01-01

    生物反馈技术是传统的心理治疗技术之一,虚拟现实系统具有良好的沉浸性、互动性和构想性而被应用于心理治疗领域,基于这2种技术的心理治疗设备被广泛应用于临床实践中.介绍了生物反馈的基本原理,以及基于虚拟现实技术的生物反馈方法在治疗焦虑症、恐惧症、神经康复及放松训练等方面的应用现状,认为该项技术是未来国内相关领域的发展方向,应积极开展有针对性的研究和系统设备开发.%Biofeedback is a traditional psychotherapy technology. Virtual reality technology has been used in the same fieldbecause of the characteristics of immersion, interaction and imagination. In recent years, psycholotherapy equipment basedon these two technologies is widely applied in clinic. In this paper a brief introduction is made of the fundamental principleof biofeedback. And the clinical treatment in phobia, anxiety, neuro-rehabilitation and relaxation has been reviewed.Finally, an outlook is made on the trend of research in future.[Chinese Medical Equipment Journal, 2011,32 (10): 92-95

  15. Design of EEG Biofeedback Training System Based on the Android System%基于Android平台的脑电反馈训练系统设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓冬; 李华云

    2014-01-01

    EEG biofeedback is using engineering methods to de-tect unknown EEG information, and then feedback to the subject by some form so that the subject can learn how to increase or maintain a certain EEG ingredient. EEG biofeedback is an effec-tive way to treat children with attention deficit hyperactivity dis-order. This paper presents the design of EEG feedback training system based on the Android system. The system contains ripe EEG data acquisition module, in which EEG signals are trans-mitted to Android mobile devices by Bluetooth device, and then feedback program is conducted by different EEG parameters.%脑电生物反馈是指运用工程技术的方法将正常人无法知道的脑电信息检测出来,再以某种形式反馈给受试者,使其学习如何增加或者保持某种脑电成分。脑电生物反馈是治疗儿童注意力缺陷与多动障碍的有效方法。本文给出了基于Android系统的脑电反馈训练系统的设计。该系统选用成熟的脑电采集模块采集脑电数据,通过蓝牙将数据传递给Android移动终端,并在Android系统上开发反馈训练程序,实现了脑电生物反馈。

  16. Psychology of anomie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narciso Benbenaste

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Anomie is a phenomenon which not only affects daily life but also the quality of institutions and therefore, as studied by economic neo-institutionalism, the possibilities of economic development. So far the treatment of this phenomenon comes predominantly from the sociological theory. In the fi rst part of this paper we recognize some of Emile Durkheim´s contributions, adding Nino´s perspicacious comments as regards “anomia boba” (“dull anomie”.Then we describe, what makes the main purpose of this article, what we believe to be the basic psychological confi guration of a population in which anomie is not perceived as a negative value. That basic confi guration, which takes as a reference observations and data from our own research, consists of the following four characteristics-defi ned psychologically as regressive features: a The individual development represented as opposite to social interest; b tendency to represent the hierarchy as authoritarianism, where there is no difference between authority and authoritarianism; c the primarization of secondary links; d male chauvinism.

  17. The psychology of humanness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Nick; Loughnan, Steve; Holland, Elise

    2013-01-01

    This chapter explores the ways in which the concept of "humanness" illuminates a wide and fascinating variety of psychological phenomena. After introducing the concept--everyday understandings of what it is to be human--we present a model of the diverse ways in which humanness can be denied to people. According to this model people may be perceived as lacking uniquely human characteristics, and thus likened to animals, or as lacking human nature, and thus likened to inanimate objects. Both of these forms of dehumanization occur with varying degrees of subtlety, from the explicit uses of derogatory animal metaphors, to stereotypes that ascribe lesser humanness or simpler minds to particular groups, to nonconscious associations between certain humans and nonhumans. After reviewing research on dehumanization through the lens of our model we examine additional topics that the psychology of humanness clarifies, notably the perception of nonhuman animals and the objectification of women. Humanness emerges as a concept that runs an integrating thread through a variety of research literatures.

  18. Normality in Analytical Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Myers

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Although C.G. Jung’s interest in normality wavered throughout his career, it was one of the areas he identified in later life as worthy of further research. He began his career using a definition of normality which would have been the target of Foucault’s criticism, had Foucault chosen to review Jung’s work. However, Jung then evolved his thinking to a standpoint that was more aligned to Foucault’s own. Thereafter, the post Jungian concept of normality has remained relatively undeveloped by comparison with psychoanalysis and mainstream psychology. Jung’s disjecta membra on the subject suggest that, in contemporary analytical psychology, too much focus is placed on the process of individuation to the neglect of applications that consider collective processes. Also, there is potential for useful research and development into the nature of conflict between individuals and societies, and how normal people typically develop in relation to the spectrum between individuation and collectivity.

  19. Psychological testing of the psychiatrically injured worker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthaler, E S

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to provide the occupational health worker with an overview of psychological testing, including the rationale for utilizing psychological testing, the psychometric foundations of psychological tests, the types of psychological tests, and the issues related to the psychological assessment of work-related psychiatric and neuropsychiatric disorders.

  20. A Contemporary Story of School Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annan, Jean; Priestley, Anna

    2012-01-01

    A review of recent school psychology publications was conducted to discover the espoused theory of contemporary school psychology, as distinct from school psychology practice. We considered that identification of the espoused theory of school psychology, the story of school psychology, would support professional reflection and the identification…