WorldWideScience

Sample records for bioenergy wind solar

  1. How ambitious can we be in contributing to the world's energy needs with bioenergy, wind, solar and storage?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindslev, H. (eds.)

    2009-08-15

    There is broad consensus among climate scientists that to keep the risk of dangerous climate changes to a reasonable level energy production in the world must be virtually free of green house gas emissions well before the end of this century. How far can we go, what stands in the way and what should the leading actors do? That is what the workshop addressed. The aim of the workshop, which was part of the DTU Climate Change Technologies programme (www.dtu.dk/climate), was to define a number of ambitious but realistic targets and describe roadmaps to reach these targets. The roadmaps will be given as input to the UN Climate Change Conference, COP 15, and as inspiration for action to meet climate challenges. The roadmaps describe contributions and commitments needed from industry, research and policy. The workshop addressed the challenges for increasing the contribution from wind power, bioenergy and solar energy. The aim was to identify initiatives that can accelerate development and deployment of these technologies. This includes energy storage and implementation and interaction of storage technologies with the overall energy system. (LN)

  2. Solar Wind Five

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, M. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Topics of discussion were: solar corona, MHD waves and turbulence, acceleration of the solar wind, stellar coronae and winds, long term variations, energetic particles, plasma distribution functions and waves, spatial dependences, and minor ions.

  3. Bioenergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chum, H.; Faaij, A.P.C.; Moreira, J.R.; Junginger, H.M.

    2011-01-01

    Bioenergy has a significant greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation potential, provided that the resources are developed sustainably and that efficient bioenergy systems are used. Certain current systems and key future options including perennial cropping systems, use of biomass residues and wastes and adva

  4. Bioenergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chum, H.; Faaij, A.P.C.; Moreira, J.

    2011-01-01

    Bioenergy has a signifi cant greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation potential, provided that the resources are developed sustainably and that effi cient bioenergy systems are used. Certain current systems and key future options including perennial cropping systems, use of biomass residues and wastes and ad

  5. Bioenergy

    CERN Document Server

    Wall, Judy; Demain, Arnold L

    2008-01-01

    Given the limited supply of fossil fuels and the devastating effects of ever-increasing greenhouse gases, researchers have been committed to finding alternative fuel sources. Perhaps one of the least explored areas is bioenergy from microbes. In this landmark volume, world-renowned experts explore the possible contributions of microbes to the next generation of fuels. In 31 detailed chapters, Bioenergy provides thorough explanations of the current knowledge and future areas for research on microbial energy conversions. The volume begins with 10 chapters on ethanol production from cellulosic fe

  6. Solar wind travel time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.

    A useful rule of thumb in solar terrestrial studies is that the solar wind travels 4 Earth radii (RE) per minute. Long-term studies of solar wind velocity [e.g., Luhmann et al., 1993; 1994] show that the median velocity is about 420 km/s, corresponding to 3.96 RE min-1. The quartiles are about 370 km/s and 495 km/s, corresponding to 3.48 Re min-1 and 4.66 Re min-1 respectively. This number helps estimate the delays expected when observing a discontinuity at a solar wind monitor; one example is ISEE-3 when it was at the forward libration point (about 60 min). It is also helpful for estimating how much time passes before the dayside magnetosphere is compressed as denser solar wind flows by (about 2.5 min).

  7. Heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ben

    The demand for clean and environmentally benign energy resources has been a great concern in the last two decades. To alleviate the associated environmental problems, reduction of the use of fossil fuels by developing more cost-effective renewable energy technologies becomes more and more significant. Among various types of renewable energy sources, solar energy and bioenergy take a great proportion. This dissertation focuses on the heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems, specifically for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) systems in Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants and open-channel algal culture raceways for biofuel production. The first part of this dissertation is the discussion about mathematical modeling, numerical simulation and experimental investigation of solar TES system. First of all, in order to accurately and efficiently simulate the conjugate heat transfer between Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) and filler material in four different solid-fluid TES configurations, formulas of an e?ective heat transfer coe?cient were theoretically developed and presented by extending the validity of Lumped Capacitance Method (LCM) to large Biot number, as well as verifications/validations to this simplified model. Secondly, to provide design guidelines for TES system in CSP plant using Phase Change Materials (PCM), a general storage tank volume sizing strategy and an energy storage startup strategy were proposed using the enthalpy-based 1D transient model. Then experimental investigations were conducted to explore a novel thermal storage material. The thermal storage performances were also compared between this novel storage material and concrete at a temperature range from 400 °C to 500 °C. It is recommended to apply this novel thermal storage material to replace concrete at high operating temperatures in sensible heat TES systems. The second part of this dissertation mainly focuses on the numerical and experimental study of an open-channel algae

  8. Corona and solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withbroe, G. L.

    1986-04-01

    The Pinhole/Occulter Facility is a powerful tool for studying the physics of the extended corona and origins of the solar wind. Spectroscopic data acquired by the P/OF coronal instruments can greatly expand empirical information about temperatures, densities, flow velocities, magnetic fields, and chemical abundances in the corona out to r or approx. 10 solar radii. Such information is needed to provide tight empirical constraints on critical physical processes involved in the transport and dissipation of energy and momentum, the heating and acceleration of plasma, and the acceleration of energetic particles. Because of its high sensitivity, high spatial and temporal resolutions, and powerful capabilities for plasma diagnostics, P/OF can significantly increase our empirical knowledge about coronal streamers and transients and thereby advance the understanding of the physics of these phenomena. P/OF observations can be used to establish the role in solar wind generation, if any, of small-scale dynamical phenomena, such as spicules, macrospicules and coronal bullets, and the role of the fine-scale structures, such as polar plumes. Finally, simultaneous measurements by the P/OF coronal and hard X-ray instruments can provide critical empirical information concerning nonthermal energy releases and acceleration of energetic particles in the corona.

  9. Forecasting Solar Wind Speeds

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, T K

    2006-01-01

    By explicitly taking into account effects of Alfven waves, I derive from a simple energetics argument a fundamental relation which predicts solar wind (SW) speeds in the vicinity of the earth from physical properties on the sun. Kojima et al. recently found from their observations that a ratio of surface magnetic field strength to an expansion factor of open magnetic flux tubes is a good indicator of the SW speed. I show by using the derived relation that this nice correlation is an evidence of the Alfven wave which accelerates SW in expanding flux tubes. The observations further require that fluctuation amplitudes of magnetic field lines at the surface should be almost universal in different coronal holes, which needs to be tested by future observations.

  10. Anisotropy of solar wind fluctuations: fast wind vs slow wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasso, S.; Milano, L. J.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Smith, C. W.

    2004-12-01

    The fluctuations in the solar wind are often modeled in terms of two distinct populations: (a) a 'wave-like' population with quasi-parallel wavenumbers and (b) a quasi-two dimensional 'turbulent-like' fluctuations with perpendicular wavenumbers. Here the qualification "quasi-parallel" or "quasi-2D" means that nearby wavevectors are grouped together in an idealzed way, for simplicity. The relative abundance of these two populations is important in gaining insight on the dynamics of waves or turbulence in the solar wind, and also in understanding the transport of energetic particle populations, as turbulence geometry has a major impact on scattering. It has been established in the literature that turbulence is, generally speaking, more developed in the slow solar wind, with power spectra closer to the kolmogorov value at 1AU, while the fast solar wind is more "Alfvenic", typically with higher values of the cross helicity. It seems natural therefore to investigate the anisotropy structure of solar wind fluctuations as a function of wind speed. We present here our preliminary results in this regard, obtained from magnetic and plasma data from the ACE specraft, at 1AU, essentially in the ecliptic plane. We also discuss possible implications for the modeling the evolution of waves and turbulence in the solar wind.

  11. Highly Alfvenic Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D. Aaron

    2010-01-01

    It is commonly thought that fast solar wind tends to be highly Alfvenic, with strong correlations between velocity and magnetic fluctuations, but examples have been known for over 20 years in which slow wind is both Alfvenic and has many other properties more typically expected of fast solar wind. This paper will present a search for examples of such flows from more recent data, and will begin to characterize the general characteristics of them. A very preliminary search suggests that such intervals are more common in the rising phase of the solar cycle. These intervals are important for providing constraints on models of solar wind acceleration, and in particular the role waves might or might not play in that process.

  12. Wind in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    As an astronomy instructor I am always looking for commonly experienced Earthly phenomena to help my students and me understand and appreciate similar occurrences elsewhere in the solar system. Recently I wrote short "TPT" articles on frost and precipitation. The present article is on winds in the solar system. A windy day or storm might…

  13. Wind in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    As an astronomy instructor I am always looking for commonly experienced Earthly phenomena to help my students and me understand and appreciate similar occurrences elsewhere in the solar system. Recently I wrote short "TPT" articles on frost and precipitation. The present article is on winds in the solar system. A windy day or storm might motivate…

  14. Wind loads on solar energy systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, B.J.M. van; Geurts, C.P.W.; Borsboom, W.A.; Blackmore, P.

    2005-01-01

    Wind loads on solar energy systems are not covered by current wind loading standards. This paper describes results of a parametric study into the wind loads 0on solar energy systems,. which are placed on flat roofs. Wind tunnel measurements have been carried out on a number of configurations. The re

  15. Turbulence in the solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an overview of solar wind turbulence from both the theoretical and observational perspective. It argues that the interplanetary medium offers the best opportunity to directly study turbulent fluctuations in collisionless plasmas. In fact, during expansion, the solar wind evolves towards a state characterized by large-amplitude fluctuations in all observed parameters, which resembles, at least at large scales, the well-known hydrodynamic turbulence. This text starts with historical references to past observations and experiments on turbulent flows. It then introduces the Navier-Stokes equations for a magnetized plasma whose low-frequency turbulence evolution is described within the framework of the MHD approximation. It also considers the scaling of plasma and magnetic field fluctuations and the study of nonlinear energy cascades within the same framework. It reports observations of turbulence in the ecliptic and at high latitude, treating Alfvénic and compressive fluctuations separately in...

  16. Solar Wind Variation with the Cycle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I. S. Veselovsky; A. V. Dmitriev; A. V. Suvorova; M. V. Tarsina

    2000-09-01

    The cyclic evolution of the heliospheric plasma parameters is related to the time-dependent boundary conditions in the solar corona. "Minimal" coronal configurations correspond to the regular appearance of the tenuous, but hot and fast plasma streams from the large polar coronal holes. The denser, but cooler and slower solar wind is adjacent to coronal streamers. Irregular dynamic manifestations are present in the corona and the solar wind everywhere and always. They follow the solar activity cycle rather well. Because of this, the direct and indirect solar wind measurements demonstrate clear variations in space and time according to the minimal, intermediate and maximal conditions of the cycles. The average solar wind density, velocity and temperature measured at the Earth's orbit show specific decadal variations and trends, which are of the order of the first tens per cent during the last three solar cycles. Statistical, spectral and correlation characteristics of the solar wind are reviewed with the emphasis on the cycles.

  17. 77 FR 61597 - Avalon Wind, LLC; Avalon Wind 2, LLC; Catalina Solar, LLC; Catalina Solar 2, LLC; Pacific Wind...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Avalon Wind, LLC; Avalon Wind 2, LLC; Catalina Solar, LLC; Catalina Solar 2, LLC; Pacific Wind Lessee, LLC; Pacific Wind 2, LLC; Valentine Solar, LLC; EDF Renewable Development, Inc.; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order Take notice that on September 27, 2012, Avalon...

  18. Astrospheres and Solar-like Stellar Winds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wood Brian E.

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Stellar analogs for the solar wind have proven to be frustratingly difficult to detect directly. However, these stellar winds can be studied indirectly by observing the interaction regions carved out by the collisions between these winds and the interstellar medium (ISM. These interaction regions are called "astrospheres", analogous to the "heliosphere" surrounding the Sun. The heliosphere and astrospheres contain a population of hydrogen heated by charge exchange processes that can produce enough H I Ly alpha absorption to be detectable in UV spectra of nearby stars from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST. The amount of astrospheric absorption is a diagnostic for the strength of the stellar wind, so these observations have provided the first measurements of solar-like stellar winds. Results from these stellar wind studies and their implications for our understanding of the solar wind are reviewed here. Of particular interest are results concerning the past history of the solar wind and its impact on planetary atmospheres.

  19. Distributed Wind Cost Reduction: Learning from Solar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, Suzanne

    2016-02-23

    The distributed wind energy industry can learn several lessons from the solar industry regarding reducing soft costs. Suzanne Tegen presented this overview at the 2016 Distributed Wind Energy Association Business Conference in Washington, D.C., on February 23, 2016.

  20. Wind-solar Hybrid Power System

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Fei

    2014-01-01

    In the development and utilization of new energy sources, the solar energy and wind energy are paid more attention by various countries, and have become a new field of energy development and utilization of the highest level, the most mature technology, the most widely used and commercial development conditions for new energy. But both the traditional wind power system and solar power system have the characteristic of energy instability. Therefore, wind-solar hybrid power system was proposed i...

  1. Solar wind thermal electron distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.L.; Gosling, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    Solar wind thermal electron distributions exhibit distinctive trends which suggest Coulomb collisions and geometric expansion in the interplanetary magnetic field play keys roles in electron transport. We introduce a simple numerical model incorporating these mechanisms, discuss the ramifications of model results, and assess the validity of the model in terms of ISEE-3 and Ulysses observations. Although the model duplicates the shape of the electron distributions, and explains certain other observational features, observed gradients in total electron temperature indicate the importance of additional heating mechanisms. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Solar wind thermal electron distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.L.; Gosling, J.T.

    1991-12-01

    Solar wind thermal electron distributions exhibit distinctive trends which suggest Coulomb collisions and geometric expansion in the interplanetary magnetic field play keys roles in electron transport. We introduce a simple numerical model incorporating these mechanisms, discuss the ramifications of model results, and assess the validity of the model in terms of ISEE-3 and Ulysses observations. Although the model duplicates the shape of the electron distributions, and explains certain other observational features, observed gradients in total electron temperature indicate the importance of additional heating mechanisms. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Solar wind influence on Jupiter's aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyalay, Szilard; Vogt, Marissa F.; Withers, Paul; Bunce, Emma J.

    2016-10-01

    Jupiter's main auroral emission is driven by a system of corotation enforcement currents that arises to speed up outflowing Iogenic plasma and is not due to the magnetosphere-solar wind interaction like at Earth. The solar wind is generally expected to have only a small influence on Jupiter's magnetosphere and aurora compared to the influence of rotational stresses due to the planet's rapid rotation. However, there is considerable observational evidence that the solar wind does affect the magnetopause standoff distance, auroral radio emissions, and the position and brightness of the UV auroral emissions. Using the Michigan Solar Wind Model (mSWiM) to predict the solar wind conditions upstream of Jupiter we have identified intervals of high and low solar wind dynamic pressure in the Galileo dataset, and use this information to quantify how a magnetospheric compression affects the magnetospheric field configuration. We have developed separate spatial fits to the compressed and nominal magnetic field data, accounting for variations with radial distance and local time. These two fits can be used to update the flux equivalence mapping model of Vogt et al. (2011), which links auroral features to source regions in the middle and outer magnetosphere. The updated version accounts for changing solar wind conditions and provides a way to quantify the expected solar wind-induced variability in the ionospheric mapping of the main auroral emission, satellite footprints, and other auroral features. Our results are highly relevant to interpretation of the new auroral observations from the Juno mission.

  4. Sources of solar wind over the solar activity cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletto, Giannina

    2013-05-01

    Fast solar wind has been recognized, about 40 years ago, to originate in polar coronal holes (CHs), that, since then, have been identified with sources of recurrent high speed wind streams. As of today, however, there is no general consensus about whether there are, within CHs, preferential locations where the solar wind is accelerated. Knowledge of slow wind sources is far from complete as well. Slow wind observed in situ can be traced back to its solar source by backward extrapolation of magnetic fields whose field lines are streamlines of the outflowing plasma. However, this technique often has not the necessary precision for an indisputable identification of the region where wind originates. As the Sun progresses through its activity cycle, different wind sources prevail and contribute to filling the heliosphere. Our present knowledge of different wind sources is here summarized. Also, a Section addresses the problem of wind acceleration in the low corona, as inferred from an analysis of UV data, and illustrates changes between fast and slow wind profiles and possible signatures of changes along the solar cycle. A brief reference to recent work about the deep roots of solar wind and their changes over different solar cycles concludes the review.

  5. Dynamic Biogas Upgrading for Integration of Renewable Energy from Wind, Biomass and Solar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurgensen, Lars

    The Sabatier process is investigated as a storage scheme for renewable energy. Hydrogen derived from fluctuating renewable energy sources like wind and solar is converted to methane by the hydrogenation/methanation of carbon oxides. Biogas from anaerobic digestion is considered in this study...... as a high concentrated source of carbon dioxide. By using the Sabatier process, the CO2 content of the biogas is converted to CH4, which is a new upgrading process for biogas. By switching between (i) this upgrading process during periods of extensive electricity production from wind and solar, and (ii......) combined heat and power production from biogas during periods of electricity demand, bioenergy utilization becomes a dynamic process. In such a process scheme, biomass, wind, and solar could be integrated in a local context. This thesis aims to demonstrate the feasibility of the dynamic biogas upgrading...

  6. Solar energy system with wind vane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grip, Robert E

    2015-11-03

    A solar energy system including a pedestal defining a longitudinal axis, a frame that is supported by the pedestal and that is rotateable relative to the pedestal about the longitudinal axis, the frame including at least one solar device, and a wind vane operatively connected to the frame to urge the frame relative to the pedestal about the longitudinal axis in response to wind acting on the wind vane.

  7. Global Network of Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooker, N. U.; Antiochos, S. K.; Zhao, X.; Neugebauer, M.

    2012-01-01

    The streamer belt region surrounding the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) is generally treated as the primary or sole source of the slow solar wind. Synoptic maps of solar wind speed predicted by the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model during selected periods of solar cycle 23, however, show many areas of slow wind displaced from the streamer belt. These areas commonly have the form of an arc that is connected to the streamer belt at both ends. The arcs mark the boundaries between fields emanating from different coronal holes of the same polarity and thus trace the paths of belts of pseudostreamers, i.e., unipolar streamers that form over double arcades and lack current sheets. The arc pattern is consistent with the predicted topological mapping of the narrow open corridor or singular separator line that must connect the holes and, thus, consistent with the separatrix-web model of the slow solar wind. Near solar maximum, pseudostreamer belts stray far from the HCS-associated streamer belt and, together with it, form a global-wide web of slow wind. Recognition of pseudostreamer belts as prominent sources of slow wind provides a new template for understanding solar wind stream structure, especially near solar maximum.

  8. Wave Modeling of the Solar Wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, Leon

    The acceleration and heating of the solar wind have been studied for decades using satellite observations and models. However, the exact mechanism that leads to solar wind heating and acceleration is poorly understood. In order to improve the understanding of the physical mechanisms that are involved in these processes a combination of modeling and observational analysis is required. Recent models constrained by satellite observations show that wave heating in the low-frequency (MHD), and high-frequency (ion-cyclotron) range may provide the necessary momentum and heat input to coronal plasma and produce the solar wind. This review is focused on the results of several recent solar modeling studies that include waves explicitly in the MHD and the kinetic regime. The current status of the understanding of the solar wind acceleration and heating by waves is reviewed.

  9. DSCOVR High Time Resolution Solar Wind Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), previously known as Triana, spacecraft is expected to be launched in late 2014. It will carry a fluxgate magnetometer, Faraday Cup solar wind detector and a top-hat electron electrostatic analyzer. The Faraday Cup will provide an unprecedented 10 vectors/sec time resolution measurement of the solar wind proton and alpha reduced distribution functions. Coupled with the 40 vector/sec vector magnetometer measurements, the identification of specific wave modes in the solar wind will be possible for the first time. The science objectives and data products of the mission will be discussed.

  10. Verification of high-speed solar wind stream forecasts using operational solar wind models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Martin A.; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid M.; Nikolic, Ljubomir; Vennerstrom, Susanne; Schöngassner, Florian; Hofmeister, Stefan J.

    2016-07-01

    High-speed solar wind streams emanating from coronal holes are frequently impinging on the Earth's magnetosphere causing recurrent, medium-level geomagnetic storm activity. Modeling high-speed solar wind streams is thus an essential element of successful space weather forecasting. Here we evaluate high-speed stream forecasts made by the empirical solar wind forecast (ESWF) and the semiempirical Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model based on the in situ plasma measurements from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft for the years 2011 to 2014. While the ESWF makes use of an empirical relation between the coronal hole area observed in Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) images and solar wind properties at the near-Earth environment, the WSA model establishes a link between properties of the open magnetic field lines extending from the photosphere to the corona and the background solar wind conditions. We found that both solar wind models are capable of predicting the large-scale features of the observed solar wind speed (root-mean-square error, RMSE ≈100 km/s) but tend to either overestimate (ESWF) or underestimate (WSA) the number of high-speed solar wind streams (threat score, TS ≈ 0.37). The predicted high-speed streams show typical uncertainties in the arrival time of about 1 day and uncertainties in the speed of about 100 km/s. General advantages and disadvantages of the investigated solar wind models are diagnosed and outlined.

  11. Solar wind tans young asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    A new study published in Nature this week reveals that asteroid surfaces age and redden much faster than previously thought -- in less than a million years, the blink of an eye for an asteroid. This study has finally confirmed that the solar wind is the most likely cause of very rapid space weathering in asteroids. This fundamental result will help astronomers relate the appearance of an asteroid to its actual history and identify any after effects of a catastrophic impact with another asteroid. ESO PR Photo 16a/09 Young Asteroids Look Old "Asteroids seem to get a ‘sun tan' very quickly," says lead author Pierre Vernazza. "But not, as for people, from an overdose of the Sun's ultraviolet radiation, but from the effects of its powerful wind." It has long been known that asteroid surfaces alter in appearance with time -- the observed asteroids are much redder than the interior of meteorites found on Earth [1] -- but the actual processes of this "space weathering" and the timescales involved were controversial. Thanks to observations of different families of asteroids [2] using ESO's New Technology Telescope at La Silla and the Very Large Telescope at Paranal, as well as telescopes in Spain and Hawaii, Vernazza's team have now solved the puzzle. When two asteroids collide, they create a family of fragments with "fresh" surfaces. The astronomers found that these newly exposed surfaces are quickly altered and change colour in less than a million years -- a very short time compared to the age of the Solar System. "The charged, fast moving particles in the solar wind damage the asteroid's surface at an amazing rate [3]", says Vernazza. Unlike human skin, which is damaged and aged by repeated overexposure to sunlight, it is, perhaps rather surprisingly, the first moments of exposure (on the timescale considered) -- the first million years -- that causes most of the aging in asteroids. By studying different families of asteroids, the team has also shown that an asteroid

  12. Interplanetary shocks and solar wind extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vats, Hari

    The interplanetary shocks have a very high correlation with the annual sunspot numbers during the solar cycle; however the correlation falls very low on shorter time scale. Thus poses questions and difficulty in the predictability. Space weather is largely controlled by these interplanetary shocks, solar energetic events and the extremes of solar wind. In fact most of the solar wind extremes are related to the solar energetic phenomena. It is quite well understood that the energetic events like flares, filament eruptions etc. occurring on the Sun produce high speed extremes both in terms of density and speed. There is also high speed solar wind steams associated with the coronal holes mainly because the magnetic field lines are open there and the solar plasma finds it easy to escape from there. These are relatively tenuous high speed streams and hence create low intensity geomagnetic storms of higher duration. The solar flares and/or filament eruptions usually release excess coronal mass into the interplanetary medium and thus these energetic events send out high density and high speed solar wind which statistically found to produce more intense storms. The other extremes of solar wind are those in which density and speed are much lower than the normal values. Several such events have been observed and are found to produce space weather consequences of different kind. It is found that such extremes are more common around the maximum of solar cycle 20 and 23. Most of these have significantly low Alfven Mach number. This article is intended to outline the interplanetary and geomagnetic consequences of observed by ground based and satellite systems for the solar wind extremes.

  13. Verification of high-speed solar wind stream forecasts using operational solar wind models

    OpenAIRE

    Reiss, Martin A.; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid M.; Nikolic, Ljubomir; Vennerstrom, Susanne; Schoengassner, Florian; Hofmeister, Stefan J.

    2016-01-01

    High-speed solar wind streams emanating from coronal holes are frequently impinging on the Earth's magnetosphere causing recurrent, medium-level geomagnetic storm activity. Modeling high-speed solar wind streams is thus an essential element of successful space weather forecasting. Here we evaluate high-speed stream forecasts made by the empirical solar wind forecast (ESWF) and the semiempirical Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model based on the in situ plasma measurements from the ACE spacecraft for ...

  14. Electrostatic Solitary Waves in the Solar Wind: Evidence for Instability at Solar Wind Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, David M.; Newman, David L.; Wilson, Lynn Bruce; Goetz, Keith; Kellogg, Paul J.; Kerstin, Kris

    2013-01-01

    A strong spatial association between bipolar electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) and magnetic current sheets (CSs) in the solar wind is reported here for the first time. This association requires that the plasma instabilities (e.g., Buneman, electron two stream) which generate ESWs are preferentially localized to solar wind CSs. Distributions of CS properties (including shear angle, thickness, solar wind speed, and vector magnetic field change) are examined for differences between CSs associated with ESWs and randomly chosen CSs. Possible mechanisms for producing ESW-generating instabilities at solar wind CSs are considered, including magnetic reconnection.

  15. Solar and Wind Site Screening Decision Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA and NREL created a decision tree to guide state and local governments and other stakeholders through a process for screening sites for their suitability for future redevelopment with solar photovoltaic (PV) energy and wind energy.

  16. Ceres interaction with the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Mats; Lindkvist, Jesper

    2016-10-01

    The solar wind interaction with Ceres is studied for a high water vapor release from its surface using a hybrid model including photoionization. We use a water vapor production rate thought to be due to subsurface sublimation, corresponding to a detection on 6 March 2013 by the Herschel Space Observatory. We present the general morphology of the plasma interactions, both close to Ceres and on a larger scale. Mass-loading of water ions causes a magnetic pile-up region in-front of Ceres, where the solar wind deflects and slows down. The large body makes an obstacle to the solar wind and creates an asymmetric wake downstream. On a global scale, Ceres has a comet-like interaction with the solar wind with observable perturbations far downstream of the body.

  17. Quantifying Solar Wind-Polar Cap Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, K. D.; Gerrard, A. J.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Huang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that the solar wind is a major driver of ultra-low frequency [ULF] power at ground locations from low to high latitudes. However, due to the scarcity of deep polar cap magnetometer sites, it is not clear when, where, or if this is true deep inside the polar cap on open field lines where interplanetary magnetic field [IMF] ULF waves could possibly be directly detected. Given recent observations of very large Joule heating estimates from DMSP data, together with the large heating reported by the CHAMP satellite, it is important to understand the degree to which ULF waves in the solar wind can directly cause such heating. Using a time series of lagged correlation sequences ("dynamic correlograms") between GSM Bz ULF power (computed via data obtained from NASA's Advanced Composition Explorer [ACE] ahead of Earth in the solar wind) and the horizontal ULF power (H^2=N^2+E^2) from ground-based magnetometers in Earth's southern polar cap, we investigate the direct penetration of ULF waves from the solar wind into the polar ionosphere during a gamut of space weather conditions at a distributed network of Automated Geophysical Observatories [AGOs] in Antarctica. To infer causation, a predicted lag correlation maximum at each time step is computed by simply dividing the associated distance of ACE from Earth by the concurrent bulk solar wind speed. This technique helps parse out direct penetration of solar wind ULF waves from other sources (e.g., via leakage from closed field line resonances due to the bulk solar wind plasma viscously interacting at dawn/dusk flanks inducing Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities [KHI] or compressional modes induced by impulses in solar wind dynamic pressure). The identified direct-penetrating ULF waves are related to the DMSP-derived Poynting fluxes by regression analysis, and conclusions are drawn for the importance of the ULF source for the measured heating.

  18. The interaction of the solar wind with the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axford, W. I.

    1972-01-01

    The expected characteristics of the solar wind, extrapolated from the vicinity of the earth are described. Several models are examined for the interaction of the solar wind with the interstellar plasma and magnetic field. Various aspects of the penetration of neutral interstellar gas into the solar wind are considered. The dynamic effects of the neutral gas on the solar wind are described. Problems associated with the interaction of cosmic rays with the solar wind are discussed.

  19. Wind loads on solar energy roofs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, C.P.W.; Bentum, C.A. van

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the wind loads on roofs, equipped with solar energy products, so called Active Roofs. Values given in this paper have been based on wind tunnel and full scale measurements, carried out at TNO, and on an interpretation of existing rules and guidelines. The results a

  20. Origin of the Ubiquitous Fast Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habbal, S. R.; Woo, R.; Fineschi, S.; O'Neal, R.; Kohl, J.; Noci, G.

    1997-01-01

    The solar wind is a direct manifestation of the coronal heating processes which continue to elude us. For over three decades, observations in interplanetary space have identified two types of wind: a slow component with highly variable physical properties also characterized by speeds typically beow 500 kn/s, and a much less variable fast wind flowing on average at 750 km/s1.

  1. The Distribution of Solar Wind Speeds During Solar Minimum: Calibration for Numerical Solar Wind Modeling Constraints on the Source of the Slow Solar Wind (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-05

    2003) and Schwadron et al. (2005) as constraints. The new relationship was tested by using it to drive the ENLIL 3‐D MHD solar wind model and obtain...it to drive the ENLIL 3‐D MHD solar wind model and obtain solar wind parameters at Earth (1.0 AU) and Ulysses (1.4 AU). The improvements in speed...propagated out into the heliosphere using the ENLIL solar wind model . ENLIL is a 3‐D Magne- tohydrodynamic ( MHD ) model of the heliosphere [Odstrcil, 2003

  2. Solar Wind Interaction With the Lunar Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halekas, J. S.

    2005-12-01

    The Earth's Moon, lacking a substantial atmosphere or global magnetic field, presents one of the simpler obstacles to solar wind flow in our solar system. Despite this apparent simplicity, a rich array of interesting plasma physics occurs in the lunar environment. To first order, the Moon is completely unshielded from solar wind plasma and solar photons, and direct incidence of solar wind plasma can lead to implantation of volatiles and ion sputtering and pickup. The solar wind is blocked by the lunar obstacle, resulting in a plasma void on the night side. A potential drop across the wake boundary is generated as solar wind electrons attempt to refill the wake cavity, resulting in a tenuous high-temperature electron population and anisotropic ion beams in the wake. A system of diamagnetic currents is formed on the boundary surface, enhancing the magnetic field in the wake and reducing the field around it. Meanwhile, waves are generated by the unstable particle distributions generated by this interaction. On the day side, photon-driven positive charging of the lunar surface occurs. On the night side, on the other hand, charging is controlled by the tenuous wake plasma, and is generally electron-driven and negative. When the Moon traverses the Earth's magnetotail and is exposed to low-density plasma in the tail lobes and high-temperature plasma in the plasmasheet, extreme surface charging of up to hundreds of V positive and several keV negative can occur. Lunar surface charging may affect ion sputtering and likely results in significant dust transport. The presence of remanent crustal magnetism causes significant perturbations to this picture. Some crustal fields are large enough to stand off the solar wind (possibly affecting solar wind volatile implantation), and we observe large shock-like magnetic enhancements upstream from the largest crustal sources. The occurence of these "limb shocks" depends on solar wind parameters, suggesting that the crustal sources are

  3. Yaglom law in the expanding solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Gogoberidze, G; Carbone, V

    2013-01-01

    We study the Yaglom law, which relates the mixed third order structure function to the average dissipation rate of turbulence, in a uniformly expanding solar wind by using the two scales expansion model of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We show that due to the expansion of the solar wind two new terms appear in the Yaglom law. The first term is related to the decay of the turbulent energy by nonlinear interactions, whereas the second term is related to the non-zero cross-correlation of the Els\\"asser fields. Using magnetic field and plasma data from WIND and Helios 2 spacecrafts, we show that at lower frequencies in the inertial range of MHD turbulence the new terms become comparable to Yaglom's third order mixed moment, and therefore they cannot be neglected in the evaluation of the energy cascade rate in the solar wind.

  4. Solar wind origin of terrestrial water

    CERN Document Server

    Merkl, Hans

    2011-01-01

    The origin of the Earth water reserves during the evolution of the planet is one of the big miracles in geophysics. Common explanations are storage of water in the Earth mantle at a time when the crust had not yet formed and depositing of water by comets during the time of late heavy bombardement. Both explanations have different problems - especially when comparing with the evolution of Mars and Venus. Here we discuss the possible role of hydrogen collected from the solar wind by the early Earth magnetosphere. While the water production by solar wind capture is very small today it may have been significant during the first billion years after planetary formation because solar wind was much stronger at that time and Earth magnetospheric configuration may have been different. We estimate that the contribution of solar wind hydrogen to the Earth water reserves can be up to 10% when we assume a that the Earth dipole acted as a collector and early solar wind was 1000 times stronger than today. We can not even exc...

  5. Ancient solar wind in lunar microbreccias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemens, M. H.; Clayton, R. N.

    1980-03-01

    Possible components of the ancient solar wind, particularly the N-15/N-14 ratio, are investigated on the basis of lunar microbreccia studies. Nitrogen contents and isotope ratios were determined for Apollo 11 and 15 microbreccia samples by means of vacuum pyrolysis techniques. The Apollo 11 soil breccias, which had been closed to the addition of recent solar wind due to their compaction, are found to contain the lowest N-15/N-14 ratios yet reported for the solar wind, extending the range of variation of the ratio to between a delta N-15 of -190% in the past to +120% at present. Nitrogen isotope analysis of the Apollo 15 drill core, which had undergone two episodes of solar wind exposure, also support the secular variation in the N-15 content of the solar wind, which is attributed to spallation reactions in the sun. The formation of the breccias at the Apollo 11 and 15 sites is discussed on the basis of the observed nitrogen systematics, and differences between N-15 and Ne-21 cosmic ray exposure ages implied are attributed to the diffusive loss of neon from lunar soils.

  6. WIND observations of coherent electrostatic waves in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mangeney

    Full Text Available The time domain sampler (TDS experiment on WIND measures electric and magnetic wave forms with a sampling rate which reaches 120 000 points per second. We analyse here observations made in the solar wind near the Lagrange point L1. In the range of frequencies above the proton plasma frequency fpi and smaller than or of the order of the electron plasma frequency fpe, TDS observed three kinds of electrostatic (e.s. waves: coherent wave packets of Langmuir waves with frequencies f ~ fpe, coherent wave packets with frequencies in the ion acoustic range fpi < f < fpe, and more or less isolated non-sinusoidal spikes lasting less than 1 ms. We confirm that the observed frequency of the low frequency (LF ion acoustic wave packets is dominated by the Doppler effect: the wavelengths are short, 10 to 50 electron Debye lengths λD. The electric field in the isolated electrostatic structures (IES and in the LF wave packets is more or less aligned with the solar wind magnetic field. Across the IES, which have a spatial width of the order of ~ 25λD, there is a small but finite electric potential drop, implying an average electric field generally directed away from the Sun. The IES wave forms, which have not been previously reported in the solar wind, are similar, although with a smaller amplitude, to the weak double layers observed in the auroral regions, and to the electrostatic solitary waves observed in other regions in the magnetosphere. We have also studied the solar wind conditions which favour the occurrence of the three kinds of waves: all these e.s. waves are observed more or less continuously in the whole solar wind (except in the densest regions where a parasite prevents the TDS observations. The type (wave packet or IES of the observed LF waves is mainly determined

  7. ENERGY DISSIPATION PROCESSES IN SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Wei, F. S.; Feng, X. S.; Sun, T. R.; Zuo, P. B. [SIGMA Weather Group, State Key Laboratory for Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Xu, X. J. [Space Science Institute, Macau University of Science and Technology, Macao (China); Zhang, J., E-mail: yw@spaceweather.ac.cn [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, MSN 3F3, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Turbulence is a chaotic flow regime filled by irregular flows. The dissipation of turbulence is a fundamental problem in the realm of physics. Theoretically, dissipation ultimately cannot be achieved without collisions, and so how turbulent kinetic energy is dissipated in the nearly collisionless solar wind is a challenging problem. Wave particle interactions and magnetic reconnection (MR) are two possible dissipation mechanisms, but which mechanism dominates is still a controversial topic. Here we analyze the dissipation region scaling around a solar wind MR region. We find that the MR region shows unique multifractal scaling in the dissipation range, while the ambient solar wind turbulence reveals a monofractal dissipation process for most of the time. These results provide the first observational evidences for intermittent multifractal dissipation region scaling around a MR site, and they also have significant implications for the fundamental energy dissipation process.

  8. Complexity induced solar wind turbulence and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, T.

    2003-04-01

    "Complexity" has become a hot topic in nearly every field of modern physics. Solar wind plasmas are of no exception. Recently, Chang [2002], in analogy with theories developed for phenomena observed in the magnetotail and the auroral zone [Chang, 1999; 2001], demonstrated that the sporadic and localized interactions of magnetic coherent structures arising from plasma resonances could be the origin of "complexity" of nonresonant pseudo-2D spatiotemporal fluctuations in solar wind turbulence and in the coronal hole base. Such nonresonant fluctuations were shown to exist in the solar wind by Matthaeus et al. [1990] in terms of the two-dimensional correlation as a function of distance parallel and perpendicular to the mean magnetic field based on the ISEE-3 magnetometer data. Other evidences indicating the existence of such type of fluctuations in the solar wind have been reported by Tu et al. [1989], Tu and Marsch [1990, 1991], Bruno and Bavassano [1991], Bavassano and Bruno [1992], Bruno et al. [2001], and others. These results explain [Tu and Marsch, 1991] why the Alfvén ratio (a quantitative measure of Alfvénicity) is often found to be less than one in the solar wind [Belcher and Davis 1971, Solodyna et al., 1977, Bruno et al, 1985, Roberts et al., 1990], particularly for the space range farther than 0.3 AU. The above observational results are also consistent with the conclusions obtained from 2D MHD numerical simulations [Matthaeus and Larkin, 1986, Roberts and Goldstein, 1988, Goldstein et al., 1989, Roberts et al., 1991, and Roberts, 1992]. Such findings have led Chang [2002] to suggest the following evolutional scenario for the plasma turbulence in the generic fast solar wind. In and near the coronal hole base, the turbulent fluctuations are predominantly nonresonantly generated by pseudo-2D nonlinear interactions. As the fluctuations emerge from the coronal hole base, they propagate resonantly in the field-aligned direction primarily as Alfvén waves

  9. Energy dissipation processes in solar wind turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Y; Feng, X S; Xu, X J; Zhang, J; Sun, T R; Zuo, P B

    2015-01-01

    Turbulence is a chaotic flow regime filled by irregular flows. The dissipation of turbulence is a fundamental problem in the realm of physics. Theoretically, dissipation cannot be ultimately achieved without collisions, and so how turbulent kinetic energy is dissipated in the nearly collisionless solar wind is a challenging problem. Wave particle interactions and magnetic reconnection are two possible dissipation mechanisms, but which mechanism dominates is still a controversial topic. Here we analyze the dissipation region scaling around a solar wind magnetic reconnection region. We find that the magnetic reconnection region shows a unique multifractal scaling in the dissipation range, while the ambient solar wind turbulence reveals a monofractal dissipation process for most of the time. These results provide the first observational evidences for the intermittent multifractal dissipation region scaling around a magnetic reconnection site, and they also have significant implications for the fundamental energy...

  10. Solar wind-magnetosphere energy input functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bargatze, L.F.; McPherron, R.L.; Baker, D.N.

    1985-01-01

    A new formula for the solar wind-magnetosphere energy input parameter, P/sub i/, is sought by applying the constraints imposed by dimensional analysis. Applying these constraints yields a general equation for P/sub i/ which is equal to rho V/sup 3/l/sub CF//sup 2/F(M/sub A/,theta) where, rho V/sup 3/ is the solar wind kinetic energy density and l/sub CF//sup 2/ is the scale size of the magnetosphere's effective energy ''collection'' region. The function F which depends on M/sub A/, the Alfven Mach number, and on theta, the interplanetary magnetic field clock angle is included in the general equation for P/sub i/ in order to model the magnetohydrodynamic processes which are responsible for solar wind-magnetosphere energy transfer. By assuming the form of the function F, it is possible to further constrain the formula for P/sub i/. This is accomplished by using solar wind data, geomagnetic activity indices, and simple statistical methods. It is found that P/sub i/ is proportional to (rho V/sup 2/)/sup 1/6/VBG(theta) where, rho V/sup 2/ is the solar wind dynamic pressure and VBG(theta) is a rectified version of the solar wind motional electric field. Furthermore, it is found that G(theta), the gating function which modulates the energy input to the magnetosphere, is well represented by a ''leaky'' rectifier function such as sin/sup 4/(theta/2). This function allows for enhanced energy input when the interplanetary magnetic field is oriented southward. This function also allows for some energy input when the interplanetary magnetic field is oriented northward. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Verification of high-speed solar wind stream forecasts using operational solar wind models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiss, Martin A.; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid M.

    2016-01-01

    High-speed solar wind streams emanating from coronal holes are frequently impinging on the Earth's magnetosphere causing recurrent, medium-level geomagnetic storm activity. Modeling high-speed solar wind streams is thus an essential element of successful space weather forecasting. Here we evaluate...... high-speed stream forecasts made by the empirical solar wind forecast (ESWF) and the semiempirical Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model based on the in situ plasma measurements from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft for the years 2011 to 2014. While the ESWF makes use of an empirical relation...... between the coronal hole area observed in Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) images and solar wind properties at the near-Earth environment, the WSA model establishes a link between properties of the open magnetic field lines extending from the photosphere to the corona...

  12. Geo-effectiveness of Solar Wind Extremes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hari Om Vats

    2006-06-01

    Examples of extreme events of solar wind and their effect on geomagnetic conditions are discussed here. It is found that there are two regimes of high speed solar wind streams with a threshold of ∼ 850 km s-1. Geomagnetic activity enhancement rate (GAER) is defined as an average increase in Ap value per unit average increase in the peak solar wind velocity (Vp) during the stream. GAER was found to be different in the two regimes of high speed streams with +ve and -ve IMF. GAER is 0.73 and 0.53 for solar wind streams with +ve and -ve IMF respectively for the extremely high speed streams (< 850 km s-1). This indicates that streams above the threshold speed with +ve IMF are 1.4 times more effective in enhancing geomagnetic activity than those with -ve IMF. However, the high speed streams below the threshold with -ve IMF are 1.1 times more effective in enhancing geomagnetic activity than those with +ve IMF. The violent solar activity period (October–November 2003) of cycle 23 presents a very special case during which many severe and strong effects were seen in the environment of the Earth and other planets; however, the z-component of IMF (Bz) is mostly positive during this period. The most severe geomagnetic storm of this cycle occurred when Bz was positive.

  13. Solar wind composition measurements by the Ulysses SWICS experiment during transient solar wind flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, A. B.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Shafer, C. M.; Geiss, J.; Ogilvie, K.

    1993-01-01

    For the March/April 1991 time period, the alpha/proton abundance ratio, the proton kinetic temperature and speed distributions, and the relative abundance of O(+7) to O(+6) is determined over each 13-minute duty cycle of the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICs) experiment on Ulysses. The ratio O(+7)/O(+6) (as a relative measure of ionization temperature) is shown to be useful in identifying possible coronal mass ejection (CME) events. We report measurements of silicon/oxygen abundance ratios and silicon and oxygen charge state distributions in the solar wind during a CME event and compare these compositions to a 'normal' solar wind time period.

  14. Magnetospheric Cavity Modes Driven by Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Claudepierre, S G; Elkington, S R; Lotko, W; Hudson, M K; 10.1029/2009GL039045

    2010-01-01

    We present results from Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction. We use these simulations to investigate the role that solar wind dynamic pressure fluctuations play in the generation of magnetospheric ultra-low frequency (ULF) pulsations. The simulations presented in this study are driven with idealized solar wind input conditions. In four of the simulations, we introduce monochromatic ULF fluctuations in the upstream solar wind dynamic pressure. In the fifth simulation, we introduce a continuum of ULF frequencies in the upstream solar wind dynamic pressure fluctuations. In this numerical experiment, the idealized nature of the solar wind driving conditions allows us to study the magnetospheric response to only a fluctuating upstream dynamic pressure, while holding all other solar wind driving parameters constant. The simulation results suggest that ULF fluctuations in the solar wind dynamic pressure can drive magnet...

  15. Wind/solar resource in Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, V.; Starcher, K.; Gaines, H. [West Texas A& M Univ., Canyon, TX (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Data are being collected at 17 sites to delineate a baseline for the wind and solar resource across Texas. Wind data are being collected at 10, 25, and 40 m (in some cases at 50 m) to determine wind shear and power at hub heights of large turbines. Many of the sites are located in areas of predicted terrain enhancement. The typical day in a month for power and wind turbine output was calculated for selected sites and combination of sites; distributed systems. Major result to date is that there is the possibility of load matching in South Texas during the summer months, even though the average values by month indicate a low wind potential.

  16. Implications of solar wind measurements for solar models and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serenelli, Aldo; Scott, Pat; Villante, Francesco L.; Vincent, Aaron C.; Asplund, Martin; Basu, Sarbani; Grevesse, Nicolas; Peña-Garay, Carlos

    2016-11-01

    We critically examine recent claims of a high solar metallicity by von Steiger & Zurbuchen (2016, vSZ16) based on in situ measurements of the solar wind, rather than the standard spectroscopically inferred abundances (Asplund et al. 2009, hereafter AGSS09). We test the claim by Vagnozzi et al. (2016) that a composition based on the solar wind enables one to construct a standard solar model in agreement with helioseismological observations and thus solve the decades-old solar modelling problem. We show that, although some helioseismological observables are improved compared to models computed with spectroscopic abundances, most are in fact worse. The high abundance of refractory elements leads to an overproduction of neutrinos, with a predicted 8B flux that is nearly twice its observed value, and 7Be and CNO fluxes that are experimentally ruled out at high confidence. A combined likelihood analysis shows that models using the vSZ16 abundances are worse than AGSS09 despite a higher metallicity. We also present astrophysical and spectroscopic arguments showing the vSZ16 composition to be an implausible representation of the solar interior, identifying the first ionization potential effect in the outer solar atmosphere and wind as the likely culprit.

  17. Verification of high-speed solar wind stream forecasts using operational solar wind models

    CERN Document Server

    Reiss, Martin A; Veronig, Astrid M; Nikolic, Ljubomir; Vennerstrom, Susanne; Schoengassner, Florian; Hofmeister, Stefan J

    2016-01-01

    High-speed solar wind streams emanating from coronal holes are frequently impinging on the Earth's magnetosphere causing recurrent, medium-level geomagnetic storm activity. Modeling high-speed solar wind streams is thus an essential element of successful space weather forecasting. Here we evaluate high-speed stream forecasts made by the empirical solar wind forecast (ESWF) and the semiempirical Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model based on the in situ plasma measurements from the ACE spacecraft for the years 2011 to 2014. While the ESWF makes use of an empirical relation between the coronal hole area observed in Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) images and solar wind properties at the near-Earth environment, the WSA model establishes a link between properties of the open magnetic field lines extending from the photosphere to the corona and the background solar wind conditions. We found that both solar wind models are capable of predicting the large-scale features of the observed sol...

  18. Coronal Plumes in the Fast Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velli, Marco; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2011-01-01

    The expansion of a coronal hole filled with a discrete number of higher density coronal plumes is simulated using a time-dependent two-dimensional code. A solar wind model including an exponential coronal heating function and a flux of Alfven waves propagating both inside and outside the structures is taken as a basic state. Different plasma plume profiles are obtained by using different scale heights for the heating rates. Remote sensing and solar wind in situ observations are used to constrain the parameter range of the study. Time dependence due to plume ignition and disappearance is also discussed. Velocity differences of the order of approximately 50 km/s, such as those found in microstreams in the high-speed solar wind, may be easily explained by slightly different heat deposition profiles in different plumes. Statistical pressure balance in the fast wind data may be masked by the large variety of body and surface waves which the higher density filaments may carry, so the absence of pressure balance in the microstreams should not rule out their interpretation as the extension of coronal plumes into interplanetary space. Mixing of plume-interplume material via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability seems to be possible within the parameter ranges of the models defined here, only at large di stances from the Sun, beyond 0.2-0.3 AU. Plasma and composition measurements in the inner heliosphere, such as those which will become available with Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus, should therefore definitely be able to identify plume remnants in the solar wind.

  19. Wind loads on solar energy systems, mounted on flat roofs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, C.P.W.; Bentum, C.A. van; Blackmore, P.

    2005-01-01

    Wind loads on solar energy systems are not covered by current wind loading standards. This paper describes results of a parametric study into the wind loads on solar energy systems, which are placed on flat roofs. Wind tunnel measurements have been carried out on a number of configurations. The resu

  20. Energy Primer: Solar, Water, Wind, and Biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portola Inst., Inc., Menlo Park, CA.

    This is a comprehensive, fairly technical book about renewable forms of energy--solar, water, wind, and biofuels. The biofuels section covers biomass energy, agriculture, aquaculture, alcohol, methane, and wood. The focus is on small-scale systems which can be applied to the needs of the individual, small group, or community. More than one-fourth…

  1. The Solar Wind as a Turbulence Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Carbone

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this review we will focus on a topic of fundamental importance for both astrophysics and plasma physics, namely the occurrence of large-amplitude low-frequency fluctuations of the fields that describe the plasma state. This subject will be treated within the context of the expanding solar wind and the most meaningful advances in this research field will be reported emphasizing the results obtained in the past decade or so. As a matter of fact, Helios inner heliosphere and Ulysses' high latitude observations, recent multi-spacecrafts measurements in the solar wind (Cluster four satellites and new numerical approaches to the problem, based on the dynamics of complex systems, brought new important insights which helped to better understand how turbulent fluctuations behave in the solar wind. In particular, numerical simulations within the realm of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD turbulence theory unraveled what kind of physical mechanisms are at the basis of turbulence generation and energy transfer across the spectral domain of the fluctuations. In other words, the advances reached in these past years in the investigation of solar wind turbulence now offer a rather complete picture of the phenomenological aspect of the problem to be tentatively presented in a rather organic way.

  2. Solar wind and motion of dust grains

    CERN Document Server

    Klacka, J; Pastor, P; Komar, L

    2009-01-01

    Action of solar wind on arbitrarily shaped interplanetary dust particle is investigated. The final relativistically covariant equation of motion of the particle contains both orbital evolution and change of particle's mass. Non-radial solar wind velocity vector is also included. The covariant equation of motion reduces to the Poynting-Robertson effect in the limiting case when spherical particle is treated, the speed of the incident solar wind corpuscles tends to the speed of light and the corpuscles spread radially from the Sun. The results of quantum mechanics have to be incorporated into the physical considerations, in order to obtain the limiting case. The condition for the solar wind effect on motion of spherical interplanetary dust particle is $\\vec{p}'_{out}$ $=$ (1 $-$ $\\sigma'_{pr} / \\sigma'_{tot}$) $\\vec{p}'_{in}$, where $\\vec{p}'_{in}$ and $\\vec{p}'_{out}$ are incoming and outgoing radiation momenta (per unit time) measured in the proper frame of reference of the particle; $\\sigma'_{pr}$ and $\\sigm...

  3. Solar Wind and Motion of Meteoroids

    CERN Document Server

    Klacka, J

    1999-01-01

    The effect of nonradial component of solar wind is discussed from the qualitative point of view. It is shown that the direction of nonradial component is opposite in comparison with the direction used in papers dealing with orbital evolution of meteoroids.

  4. Combined Solar and Wind Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripanagnostopoulos, Y.; Souliotis, M.; Makris, Th.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the new concept of combined solar and wind energy systems for buildings applications. Photovoltaics (PV) and small wind turbines (WTs) can be install on buildings, in case of sufficient wind potential, providing the building with electricity. PVs can be combined with thermal collectors to form the hybrid photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) systems. The PVs (or the PV/Ts) and WT subsystems can supplement each other to cover building electrical load. In case of using PV/T collectors, the surplus of electricity, if not used or stored in batteries, can increase the temperature of the thermal storage tank of the solar thermal unit. The description of the experimental set-up of the suggested PV/T/WT system and experimental results are presented. In PV/T/WT systems the output from the solar part depends on the sunshine time and the output of the wind turbine part depends on the wind speed and is obtained any time of day or night. The use of the three subsystems can cover a great part of building energy load, contributing to conventional energy saving and environment protection. The PV/T/WT systems are considered suitable in rural and remote areas with electricity supply from stand-alone units or mini-grid connection. PV/T/WT systems can also be used in typical grid connected applications.

  5. Wind and solar energy in Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasir, S.M.; Raza, S.M. (Balochistan Univ., Quetta (Pakistan). Dept. of Physics)

    1993-04-01

    Hourly wind-speed data at four meteorological observatories (Quetta, Karachi, Peshawar, and Lahore) in Pakistan have been analysed to determine monthly and annual wind power and these are then compared with the monthly mean solar radiation energies for the period 1980-1984. The monthly average wind speeds for the four stations range from 2.5 to 4.4, 2.75 to 6.7, 0.6 to 1.7, and 0.7 to 1.6 m/sec while the solar radiation varies from 3.6 to 7.65, 3.39 to 6.31, 2.4 to 6.35, and 2.8 to 6.27 kWh/m[sup 2], respectively. (author)

  6. Kinetic Physics of the Solar Corona and Solar Wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsch Eckart

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic plasma physics of the solar corona and solar wind are reviewed with emphasis on the theoretical understanding of the in situ measurements of solar wind particles and waves, as well as on the remote-sensing observations of the solar corona made by means of ultraviolet spectroscopy and imaging. In order to explain coronal and interplanetary heating, the microphysics of the dissipation of various forms of mechanical, electric and magnetic energy at small scales (e.g., contained in plasma waves, turbulences or non-uniform flows must be addressed. We therefore scrutinise the basic assumptions underlying the classical transport theory and the related collisional heating rates, and also describe alternatives associated with wave-particle interactions. We elucidate the kinetic aspects of heating the solar corona and interplanetary plasma through Landau- and cyclotron-resonant damping of plasma waves, and analyse in detail wave absorption and micro instabilities. Important aspects (virtues and limitations of fluid models, either single- and multi-species or magnetohydrodynamic and multi-moment models, for coronal heating and solar wind acceleration are critically discussed. Also, kinetic model results which were recently obtained by numerically solving the Vlasov–Boltzmann equation in a coronal funnel and hole are presented. Promising areas and perspectives for future research are outlined finally.

  7. Electric solar wind sail mass budget model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Janhunen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The electric solar wind sail (E-sail is a new type of propellantless propulsion system for Solar System transportation, which uses the natural solar wind to produce spacecraft propulsion. The E-sail consists of thin centrifugally stretched tethers that are kept charged by an onboard electron gun and, as such, experience Coulomb drag through the high-speed solar wind plasma stream. This paper discusses a mass breakdown and a performance model for an E-sail spacecraft that hosts a mission-specific payload of prescribed mass. In particular, the model is able to estimate the total spacecraft mass and its propulsive acceleration as a function of various design parameters such as the number of tethers and their length. A number of subsystem masses are calculated assuming existing or near-term E-sail technology. In light of the obtained performance estimates, an E-sail represents a promising propulsion system for a variety of transportation needs in the Solar System.

  8. Decoding solar wind-magnetosphere coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beharrell, M. J.; Honary, F.

    2016-10-01

    We employ a new NARMAX (Nonlinear Auto-Regressive Moving Average with eXogenous inputs) code to disentangle the time-varying relationship between the solar wind and SYM-H. The NARMAX method has previously been used to formulate a Dst model, using a preselected solar wind coupling function. In this work, which uses the higher-resolution SYM-H in place of Dst, we are able to reveal the individual components of different solar wind-magnetosphere interaction processes as they contribute to the geomagnetic disturbance. This is achieved with a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based NARMAX code that is around 10 orders of magnitude faster than previous efforts from 2005, before general-purpose programming on GPUs was possible. The algorithm includes a composite cost function, to minimize overfitting, and iterative reorthogonalization, which reduces computational errors in the most critical calculations by a factor of ˜106. The results show that negative deviations in SYM-H following a southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) are first a measure of the increased magnetic flux in the geomagnetic tail, observed with a delay of 20-30 min from the time the solar wind hits the bow shock. Terms with longer delays are found which represent the dipolarization of the magnetotail, the injections of particles into the ring current, and their subsequent loss by flowout through the dayside magnetopause. Our results indicate that the contribution of magnetopause currents to the storm time indices increase with solar wind electric field, E = v × B. This is in agreement with previous studies that have shown that the magnetopause is closer to the Earth when the IMF is in the tangential direction.

  9. Martian ionosphere response to solar wind variability during solar minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Cano, Beatriz; Lester, Mark; Witasse, Olivier; Mays, M. Leila; Hall, Benjamin E. S.; Milan, Stephen E.; Cartacci, Marco; Blelly, Pierre-Louis; Andrews, David; Opgenoorth, Hermann; Odstrcil, Dusan

    2016-04-01

    Solar cycle variations in solar radiation create notable density changes in the Martian ionosphere. In addition to this long-term variability, there are numerous short-term and non-recurrent solar events that hit Mars which need to be considered, such as Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs), Co-Rotation Interaction Regions (CIRs), solar flares, or solar wind high speed streams. The response of the Martian plasma system to each of these events is often unusual, especially during the long period of extreme low solar activity in 2008 and 2009. This work shows the long-term solar cycle impact on the ionosphere of Mars using data from The Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS), and The Analyzer of Space Plasma and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA-3), and with empirical and numerical models on Mars Express. Particular attention is given to the different ionospheric responses observed during the last, extended solar minimum. Mars' ionospheric response followed a similar pattern to the response observed in the Earth's ionosphere, despite the large differences related to the inner-origin of the magnetic field of both planets. The ionospheric temperature was cooler, the topside scale height was smaller and almost constant with altitude, the secondary ionospheric layer practically disappeared and the whole atmospheric total electron content (TEC) suffered an extreme reduction of about 30-40%, not predicted before by models. Moreover, there is a larger probability for the induced magnetic field to be present in the ionosphere, than in other phases of the solar cycle. The short-term variability is also addressed with the study of an ICME followed by a fast stream that hit Mars in March 2008, where solar wind data are provided by ACE and STEREO-B and supported by simulations using the WSA-ENLIL Model. The solar wind conditions lead to the formation of a CIR centred on the interface of the fast and the slow solar wind streams. Mars' system reacted to

  10. Biomass for bioenergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentsen, Niclas Scott

    for displacing fossil resources and is perceived as one of the main pillars of a future low-carbon or no-carbon energy supply. However, biomass, renewable as it is, is for any relevant, time horizon to be considered a finite resource as it replenishes at a finite rate. Conscientious stewardship of this finite......Across the range of renewable energy resources, bioenergy is probably the most complex, as using biomass to support energy services ties into a number of fields; climate change, food production, rural development, biodiversity and environmental protection. Biomass offer several options...... the undesirable impacts of bioenergy done wrong. However, doing bioenergy right is a significant challenge due to the ties into other fields of society. Fundamentally plant biomass is temporary storage of solar radiation energy and chemically bound energy from nutrients. Bioenergy is a tool to harness solar...

  11. Elemental building blocks of the slow solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepko, L.; Viall, N. M.; Lepri, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    While the source of the fast solar wind is well understood to be linked to coronal holes, the source of the slow solar wind has remained elusive. A distinguishing characteristic of the slow solar wind is the high variability of the plasma parameters, such as magnetic field, velocity, density, composition, and charge state. Many previous studies of the slow solar wind have examined trends in the composition and charge states over long time scales and using data with comparatively low temporal resolution. In this study, we take advantage of high time resolution (12 min) measurements of the charge-state abundances recently reprocessed by the ACE SWICS science team to probe the timescales of solar wind variability of coherent structures at relatively small scales (<2000 Mm, or ~ 90 minutes at slow wind speeds). We use an interval of slow solar wind containing quasi pressure-balanced, periodic number density structures previously studied by Kepko et al and shown to be important in solar wind-magnetospheric coupling. The combination of high temporal resolution composition measurements and the clearly identified boundaries of the periodic structures allows us to probe the elemental slow solar wind flux tubes/structures. We use this train of 2000Mm periodic density structures as tracers of solar wind origin and/or acceleration. We find that each 2000 Mm parcel of slow solar wind, though its speed is steady, exhibits the complete range of charge state and composition variations expected for the entire range of slow solar wind, in a repeated sequence. Each parcel cycles through three states: 1) 'normal' slow wind, 2) compositionally slow wind with very high density, and 3) compositionally fast but typical slow solar wind density. We conclude by suggesting these structures form elemental building blocks of the slow solar wind, and discuss whether it is necessary to decouple separately the process(es) responsible for the release and acceleration.

  12. Solar wind correlations: Statistical and case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paularena, K. I.; Richardson, J. D.; Zastenker, G. N.; Dalin, P. A.

    1999-06-01

    Recent work on solar wind plasma correlations using data from several widely-separated spacecraft (IMP 8, INTERBALL-1, WIND, and ISEE-3) has shown that, for 6-hour periods, the average plasma correlation is ~0.7. The focus of these studies has been directed toward a statistical understanding of gross solar wind correlation behavior. In all correlations examined, lower average correlations are caused by the presence of many points from the low correlation subpopulation; nevertheless, data points from the high correlation population are still present. No single organizational factor has yet been found which adequately separates low-correlation periods from high-correlation periods. Some of the spread in correlations is due to the spatial orientations and dimensions of solar wind structures, and thus to the locational alignments of the spacecraft being correlated, but this does not adequately explain all the good or poor correlations since sometimes three nearby spacecraft show poor correlations, while sometimes three widely-separated space-craft show good correlations. Thus, in order to understand the underlying physics, detailed investigation of individual cases has been undertaken. These results will be important in assigning quality measures to space weather predictions using satellite measurements taken at L1, for example.

  13. Deimos: an obstacle to the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, K; Dubinin, E; Baumgärtel, K; Bogdanov, A

    1995-08-25

    Two isolated solar wind disturbances about 5 minutes in duration were detected aboard the Russian spacecraft Phobos-2 upon its crossing the wake of the martian moon Deimos about 15,000 kilometers downstream from the moon on 1 February 1989. These plasma and magnetic events are interpreted as the inbound and outbound crossings of a Mach cone that is formed as a result of an effective interaction of the solar wind with Deimos. Possible mechanisms such as remanent magnetization, cometary type interaction caused by heavy ion or charged dust production, and unipolar induction resulting from the finite conductivity of the body are discussed. Although none of the present models is fully satisfactory, neutral gas emission through water loss by Deimos at a rate of about 10(23) molecules per second, combined with a charged dust coma, is favored.

  14. Solar wind thermally induced magnetic fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, R E; Moya, P S; Muñoz, V; Araneda, J A; F-Viñas, A; Valdivia, J A

    2014-06-20

    A kinetic description of Alfvén-cyclotron magnetic fluctuations for anisotropic electron-proton quasistable plasmas is studied. An analytical treatment, based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, consistently shows that spontaneous fluctuations in plasmas with stable distributions significantly contribute to the observed magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind, as seen, for example, in [S. D. Bale et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 211101 (2009)], even far below from the instability thresholds. Furthermore, these results, which do not require any adjustable parameters or wave excitations, are consistent with the results provided by hybrid simulations. It is expected that this analysis contributes to our understanding of the nature of magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind.

  15. Anisotropy in solar wind plasma turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oughton, S; Matthaeus, W H; Wan, M; Osman, K T

    2015-05-13

    A review of spectral anisotropy and variance anisotropy for solar wind fluctuations is given, with the discussion covering inertial range and dissipation range scales. For the inertial range, theory, simulations and observations are more or less in accord, in that fluctuation energy is found to be primarily in modes with quasi-perpendicular wavevectors (relative to a suitably defined mean magnetic field), and also that most of the fluctuation energy is in the vector components transverse to the mean field. Energy transfer in the parallel direction and the energy levels in the parallel components are both relatively weak. In the dissipation range, observations indicate that variance anisotropy tends to decrease towards isotropic levels as the electron gyroradius is approached; spectral anisotropy results are mixed. Evidence for and against wave interpretations and turbulence interpretations of these features will be discussed. We also present new simulation results concerning evolution of variance anisotropy for different classes of initial conditions, each with typical background solar wind parameters.

  16. Suprathermal Solar Wind Electrons and Langmuir Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunjung; Yoon, Peter H.; Choe, G. S.; moon, Y.-J.

    2016-09-01

    The steady-state model recently put forth for the solar wind electron velocity distribution function during quiet time conditions, was originally composed of three population electrons (core, halo, and superhalo) with the core remaining nonresonant with any plasma waves while the halo and superhalo separately maintained steady-state resonance with whistler- and Langmuir-frequency range fluctuations, respectively. However, a recent paper demonstrates that whistler-range fluctuations in fact have no significant contribution. The present paper represents a consummation of the model in that a self-consistent model of the suprathermal electron population, which encompasses both the halo and the superhalo, is constructed solely on the basis of the Langmuir fluctuation spectrum. Numerical solutions to steady-state particle and wave kinetic equations are obtained on the basis of an initial trial electron distribution and Langmuir wave spectrum. Such a finding offers a self-consistent explanation for the observed steady-state electron distribution in the solar wind.

  17. Solar Wind Earth Exchange Project (SWEEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-28

    person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information   if it does not display a currently valid OMB control ...of SWEEP was to compare theoretical models of X-ray emission in the terrestrial magnetosphere caused by the Solar Wind Charge Exchange (SWCX...imaging of the magnetosphere by future wide field-of- view X-ray instruments. This research is an essential precursor by providing verification of

  18. Solar Wind Associated with Near Equatorial Coronal Hole

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Hegde; K. M. Hiremath; Vijayakumar H. Doddamani; Shashanka R. Gurumath

    2015-09-01

    Present study probes temporal changes in the area and radiative flux of near equatorial coronal hole associated with solar wind parameters such as wind speed, density, magnetic field and temperature. Using high temporal resolution data from SDO/AIA for the two wave-lengths 193 Å and 211 Å, area and radiative flux of coronal holes are extracted and are examined for the association with high speed solar wind parameters. We find a strong association between different parameters of coronal hole and solar wind. For both the wavelength bands, we also compute coronal hole radiative energy near the earth and it is found to be of similar order as that of solar wind energy. However, for the wavelength 193 Å, owing to almost similar magnitudes of energy emitted by coronal hole and energy due to solar wind, it is conjectured that solar wind might have originated around the same height where 193 Å line is formed in the corona.

  19. Solar Wind Charge Exchange During Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Ina P.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Sibeck, David G.; Collier, Michael R.; Kuntz, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    On March 31st. 2001, a coronal mass ejection pushed the subsolar magnetopause to the vicinity of geosynchronous orbit at 6.6 RE. The NASA/GSFC Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMe) employed a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model to simulate the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction during the peak of this geomagnetic storm. Robertson et aL then modeled the expected 50ft X-ray emission due to solar wind charge exchange with geocoronal neutrals in the dayside cusp and magnetosheath. The locations of the bow shock, magnetopause and cusps were clearly evident in their simulations. Another geomagnetic storm took place on July 14, 2000 (Bastille Day). We again modeled X-ray emission due to solar wind charge exchange, but this time as observed from a moving spacecraft. This paper discusses the impact of spacecraft location on observed X-ray emission and the degree to which the locations of the bow shock and magnetopause can be detected in images.

  20. Magnetic pumping of the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egedal, Jan; Lichko, Emily; Daughton, William

    2015-11-01

    The transport of matter and radiation in the solar wind and terrestrial magnetosphere is a complicated problem involving competing processes of charged particles interacting with electric and magnetic fields. Given the rapid expansion of the solar wind, it would be expected that superthermal electrons originating in the corona would cool rapidly as a function of distance to the Sun. However, this is not observed, and various models have been proposed as candidates for heating the solar wind. In the compressional pumping mechanism explored by Fisk and Gloeckler particles are accelerated by random compressions by the interplanetary wave turbulence. This theory explores diffusion due to spatial non-uniformities and provides a mechanism for redistributing particle. For investigation of a related but different heating mechanism, magnetic pumping, in our work we include diffusion of anisotropic features that develops in velocity space. The mechanism allows energy to be transferred to the particles directly from the turbulence. Guided by kinetic simulations a theory is derived for magnetic pumping. At the heart of this work is a generalization of the Parker Equation to capture the role of the pressure anisotropy during the pumping process. Supported by NASA grant NNX15AJ73G.

  1. A statistical study of the interdependence of solar wind parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shollykutty John; P. J. Kurian

    2009-01-01

    Correlation analysis of solar wind parameters, namely solar wind velocity, pro- ton density, proton temperature and mean interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) from the ACE spacecraft data near Earth, was done. To our best knowledge, this study is a novel one since we consider here only the parameters inside the solar wind, including the mean IMF and, hence, the solar wind is a self consistent system. We have proposed a Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) model for the prediction of the response variable (solar wind velocity) using the parameters proton density, proton temperature and mean IMF mea- sured as dally averages. About 60% of the observed value can be predicted using this model. It is shown that, in general, the correlation between solar wind parameters is sig- nificant. A deviation from the prediction at the solar maximum is interpreted. These results are verified by a graphical method.

  2. Implications of solar wind measurements for solar models and composition

    CERN Document Server

    Serenelli, Aldo; Villante, Francesco L; Vincent, Aaron C; Asplund, Martin; Basu, Sarbani; Grevesse, Nicolas; Pena-Garay, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    We critically examine recent claims of a high solar metallicity by von Steiger \\& Zurbuchen (2016; vSZ16) based on in situ measurements of the solar wind, rather than the standard spectroscopically-inferred abundances (Asplund et al. 2009). We test the claim by Vagnozzi et al. (2016) that a composition based on the solar wind enables one to construct a standard solar model in agreement with helioseismological observations and thus solve the decades-old solar modelling problem. We show that, although some helioseismological observables are improved compared to models computed with established abundances, most are in fact worse. The high abundance of refractory elements leads to an overproduction of neutrinos, with a predicted $^8$B flux that is nearly twice its observed value, and $^7$Be and CNO fluxes that are experimentally ruled out at high confidence. A combined likelihood analysis shows that models using the vSZ16 abundances fare much worse than AGSS09 despite a higher metallicity. We also present ast...

  3. Equatorwards Expansion of Unperturbed, High-Latitude Fast Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Dorrian, Gareth; Fallows, Richard; Bisi, Mario

    2012-01-01

    We use dual-site radio observations of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) with extremely long baselines (ELB) to examine meridional flow characteristics of the ambient fast solar wind at plane-of-sky heliocentric distances of 24-85 solar radii (R\\odot). Our results demonstrate an equatorwards deviation of 3-4{\\deg} in the bulk fast solar wind flow direction over both northern and southern solar hemispheres during different times in the declining phase of Solar Cycle 23.

  4. About the correlation between solar micro bursts and the change of the solar wind parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveros, Juan Carlos Martinez; P, Daniel Ricardo Izquierdo

    2005-01-01

    The Sun is the closest star to our planet and it is the most studied, perhaps, there exist too much procesess not-understood. One of the solar processes that have a direct interaction with the earth is the solar wind. The solar wind is defined as the plasma expulsed from the solar atmosphere, this wind was cataloged and is considered that have three components: - Passive solar wind: Is the constant component of the solar wind. - Supersonic and quasistady flux. - Sporadic supersonic flux. We p...

  5. Electric solar wind sail applications overview

    CERN Document Server

    Janhunen, Pekka; Envall, Jouni; Merikallio, Sini; Montesanti, Giuditta; del Amo, Jose Gonzalez; Kvell, Urmas; Noorma, Mart; Lätt, Silver

    2014-01-01

    We analyse the potential of the electric solar wind sail for solar system space missions. Applications studied include fly-by missions to terrestrial planets (Venus, Mars and Phobos, Mercury) and asteroids, missions based on non-Keplerian orbits (orbits that can be maintained only by applying continuous propulsive force), one-way boosting to outer solar system, off-Lagrange point space weather forecasting and low-cost impactor probes for added science value to other missions. We also discuss the generic idea of data clippers (returning large volumes of high resolution scientific data from distant targets packed in memory chips) and possible exploitation of asteroid resources. Possible orbits were estimated by orbit calculations assuming circular and coplanar orbits for planets. Some particular challenge areas requiring further research work and related to some more ambitious mission scenarios are also identified and discussed.

  6. Bio-energy. Innovators talking; Bio-energie. Innovators aan het woord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-02-15

    Qualitative studies have been conducted of the results of completed projects focused on energy innovation, spread over the seven themes of the top sector Energy: Energy saving in industry, Energy conservation in the built environment, Gas, Bio-energy, Smart grids, Offshore Wind, Solar PV. This provides insight into the follow-up activities and lessons of some EOS (Energy Research Subsidy) completed projects with the aim to inspire, connect and strengthen the TKIs (Topconsortia for Knowledge and Innovation) and individual companies and researchers working on energy innovation. This report concerns the research on bio-energy [Dutch] Er is een kwalitatief onderzoek uitgevoerd naar de resultaten van afgeronde projecten gericht op energie-innovatie, verdeeld over de zeven thema's van de topsector Energie: Energiebesparing in de industrie; Energiebesparing in de gebouwde omgeving; Gas; Bio-energie; Smart grids; Wind op zee; Zon-pv. Daarmee wordt inzicht gegeven in de vervolgactiviteiten en lessen van een aantal afgesloten EOS-projecten (Energie Onderzoek Subsidie) met het oog op het inspireren, verbinden en versterken van de TKI's (Topconsortia voor Kennis en Innovatie) en individuele bedrijven en onderzoekers die werken aan energie-innovatie. Dit rapport betreft het onderzoek naar bio-energie.

  7. Topological Origins of the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, S.

    2008-12-01

    Although the slow solar wind has been studied for decades with both in situ and remote sensing observations, its origin is still a matter of intense debate. In the standard quasi-steady model, the slow wind is postulated to originate near coronal hole boundaries that define topologically well-behaved separatrices between open and closed field regions. In the interchange model, on the other hand, the slow wind is postulated to originate on open flux that is dynamically diffusing throughout the seemingly closed-field corona. We argue in favor of the quasi-steady scenario and propose that the slow wind is due to two effects: First, the open-closed boundary is highly complex due to the complexity of the photospheric flux distribution. Second, this boundary is continuously driven by the transport of magnetic helicity from the closed field region into the open. The implications of this model for the structure and dynamics of the corona and slow wind are discussed, and observational tests of the model are presented. This work has been supported, in part, by the NASA LWS, HTP, and SR&T programs.

  8. Solar wind rare gas analysis: Trapped solar wind helium and neon in Surveyor 3 material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, F.; Eberhardt, P.; Geiss, J.; Schwarzmueller, J.

    1972-01-01

    The He-4 and Ne-20 contents in sections of the Surveyor 3 support strut samples were determined by optical and scanning electron microscopy and are compared to the results of the Apollo solar wind composition (SWC) experiments. The He-4/Ne-20 ratio in the samples from the sunlit side of the strut was approximately 300; the ratios determined in Apollo 12 lunar fines and SWC foil were below 100. The He-4/He-3 ratios were also determined, and the ratio obtained from Surveyor 3 material is higher than those found with Apollo 11 and 12 SWC experiments. The effects of spallation by cosmic rays or solar protons, stripping by cosmic ray or energetic solar alpha particles, recycling of solar wind He and radiogenic Ne, He from terrestrial atmosphere, mass discrimination near the moon, mass dependence of trapping probability, diffusion, and contamination by lunar dust are considered.

  9. Turbulent Transport in a Three-dimensional Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, D.; Zank, G. P.; Adhikari, L.; Hunana, P.; Telloni, D.; Bruno, R.

    2017-03-01

    Turbulence in the solar wind can play essential roles in the heating of coronal and solar wind plasma and the acceleration of the solar wind and energetic particles. Turbulence sources are not well understood and thought to be partly enhanced by interaction with the large-scale inhomogeneity of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field and/or transported from the solar corona. To investigate the interaction with background inhomogeneity and the turbulence sources, we have developed a new 3D MHD model that includes the transport and dissipation of turbulence using the theoretical model of Zank et al. We solve for the temporal and spatial evolution of three moments or variables, the energy in the forward and backward fluctuating modes and the residual energy and their three corresponding correlation lengths. The transport model is coupled to our 3D model of the inhomogeneous solar wind. We present results of the coupled solar wind-turbulence model assuming a simple tilted dipole magnetic configuration that mimics solar minimum conditions, together with several comparative intermediate cases. By considering eight possible solar wind and turbulence source configurations, we show that the large-scale solar wind and IMF inhomogeneity and the strength of the turbulence sources significantly affect the distribution of turbulence in the heliosphere within 6 au. We compare the predicted turbulence distribution results from a complete solar minimum model with in situ measurements made by the Helios and Ulysses spacecraft, finding that the synthetic profiles of the turbulence intensities show reasonable agreement with observations.

  10. Wavelet Analysis on Solar Wind Parameters and Geomagnetic Indices

    CERN Document Server

    Katsavrias, Ch; Moussas, X

    2012-01-01

    The sun as an oscillator produces frequencies which propagate in the heliosphere, via solar wind, to the terrestrial magnetosphere. We searched for those frequencies in the parameters of the near Earth solar plasma and the geomagnetic indices for the past four solar cycles. The solar wind parameters used in this work are the interplanetary magnetic field, plasma beta, Alfven Mach number, solar wind speed, plasma temperature, plasma pressure, plasma density and the geomagnetic indices DST, AE, Ap and Kp. We found out that each parameter of the solar wind exhibit certain periodicities which di?erentiate in each cycle. Our results indicate intermittent periodicities in our data, some of them shared between the solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices.

  11. Genesis Solar Wind Science Canister Components Curated as Potential Solar Wind Collectors and Reference Contamination Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allton, J. H.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Allums, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    The Genesis mission collected solar wind for 27 months at Earth-Sun L1 on both passive and active collectors carried inside of a Science Canister, which was cleaned and assembled in an ISO Class 4 cleanroom prior to launch. The primary passive collectors, 271 individual hexagons and 30 half-hexagons of semiconductor materials, are described in. Since the hard landing reduced the 301 passive collectors to many thousand smaller fragments, characterization and posting in the online catalog remains a work in progress, with about 19% of the total area characterized to date. Other passive collectors, surfaces of opportunity, have been added to the online catalog. For species needing to be concentrated for precise measurement (e.g. oxygen and nitrogen isotopes) an energy-independent parabolic ion mirror focused ions onto a 6.2 cm diameter target. The target materials, as recovered after landing, are described in. The online catalog of these solar wind collectors, a work in progress, can be found at: http://curator.jsc.nasa.gov/gencatalog/index.cfm This paper describes the next step, the cataloging of pieces of the Science Canister, which were surfaces exposed to the solar wind or component materials adjacent to solar wind collectors which may have contributed contamination.

  12. Genesis Solar Wind Samples: Update of Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, C. P.; Allums, K. K.; Allton, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    The Genesis mission collected solar wind atoms for 28 months with a variety of collectors. The array wafer collector availability is displayed in the online catalog. The purpose of this report is to update the community on availability of array wafer samples and to preview other collectors which are in the process of being added to the online catalog. A total of fifteen pure materials were selected based on engineering and science requirements. Most of the materials were semiconductor wafers which were mounted on the arrays.

  13. Multifractality and intermittency in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. M. Macek

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the complex dynamics of the solar wind's fluctuating plasma parameters, there is a detectable, hidden order described by a chaotic strange attractor which has a multifractal structure. The multifractal spectrum has been investigated using Voyager (magnetic field data in the outer heliosphere and using Helios (plasma data in the inner heliosphere. We have also analyzed the spectrum for the solar wind attractor. The spectrum is found to be consistent with that for the multifractal measure of the self-similar one-scale weighted Cantor set with two parameters describing uniform compression and natural invariant probability measure of the attractor of the system. In order to further quantify the multifractality, we also consider a generalized weighted Cantor set with two different scales describing nonuniform compression. We investigate the resulting multifractal spectrum depending on two scaling parameters and one probability measure parameter, especially for asymmetric scaling. We hope that this generalized model will also be a useful tool for analysis of intermittent turbulence in space plasmas.

  14. Magnetosonic Waveguide Model of Solar Wind Flow Tubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. K. Srivastava; B. N. Dwivedi

    2006-06-01

    We consider solar wind flow tubes as a magnetosonic wave-guide. Assuming a symmetric expansion in edges of slab-modelled wave-guide, we study the propagation characteristics of magnetosonic wave in the solar wind flow tubes. We present the preliminary results and discuss their implications.

  15. Solar and wind energy potential and utilization in Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raja, I.A. (Balochistan Univ., Quetta (Pakistan). Dept. of Physics); Abro, R.S. (Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Architecture Studies)

    1994-08-01

    This paper identifies the potentials of solar and wind energy. The prime sites for wind are coastal area, arid zone and hill terrains. Solar energy is abundant over most parts of the country, the maximum being received over Quetta valley. (author)

  16. Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2005-12-01

    DOE's Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress summarizes the technology roadmaps for solar- and wind-based hydrogen production. Published in December 2005, it fulfills the requirement under section 812 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005.

  17. INTERPRETING MAGNETIC VARIANCE ANISOTROPY MEASUREMENTS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TenBarge, J. M.; Klein, K. G.; Howes, G. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Podesta, J. J., E-mail: jason-tenbarge@uiowa.edu [Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2012-07-10

    The magnetic variance anisotropy (A{sub m}) of the solar wind has been used widely as a method to identify the nature of solar wind turbulent fluctuations; however, a thorough discussion of the meaning and interpretation of the A{sub m} has not appeared in the literature. This paper explores the implications and limitations of using the A{sub m} as a method for constraining the solar wind fluctuation mode composition and presents a more informative method for interpreting spacecraft data. The paper also compares predictions of the A{sub m} from linear theory to nonlinear turbulence simulations and solar wind measurements. In both cases, linear theory compares well and suggests that the solar wind for the interval studied is dominantly Alfvenic in the inertial and dissipation ranges to scales of k{rho}{sub i} {approx_equal} 5.

  18. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lew, Debra [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Brinkman, Greg [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ibanez, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Florita, A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heaney, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hodge, B. -M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hummon, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Stark, G. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); King, J. [RePPAE; Lefton, S. A. [Intertek-APTECH, Houston, TX (United States); Kumar, N. [Intertek-APTECH, Houston, TX (United States); Agan, D. [Intertek-APTECH, Houston, TX (United States); Jordan, G. [GE Energy, Fairfield, CT (United States); Venkataraman, S. [GE Energy, Fairfield, CT (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The electric grid is a highly complex, interconnected machine, and changing one part of the grid can have consequences elsewhere. Adding wind and solar affects the operation of the other power plants and adding high penetrations can induce cycling of fossil-fueled generators. Cycling leads to wear-and-tear costs and changes in emissions. Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-2) evaluated these costs and emissions and simulated grid operations for a year to investigate the detailed impact of wind and solar on the fossil-fueled fleet. This built on Phase 1, one of the largest wind and solar integration studies ever conducted, which examined operational impacts of high wind and solar penetrations in the West(GE Energy 2010).

  19. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Ibanez, E.; Hodge, B. M.; Hummon, M.; Florita, A.; Heaney, M.

    2013-09-01

    The electric grid is a highly complex, interconnected machine, and changing one part of the grid can have consequences elsewhere. Adding wind and solar affects the operation of the other power plants and adding high penetrations can induce cycling of fossil-fueled generators. Cycling leads to wear-and-tear costs and changes in emissions. Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-2) evaluated these costs and emissions and simulated grid operations for a year to investigate the detailed impact of wind and solar on the fossil-fueled fleet. This built on Phase 1, one of the largest wind and solar integration studies ever conducted, which examined operational impacts of high wind and solar penetrations in the West.

  20. Solar Wind Composition: First Results from SOHO and Future Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, A. B.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.; Coplan, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Hilchenbach, M.; Buergi, A.; Klecker, B.; Scholer, M.; Bochsler, P.; Balsiger, H.; Geiss, J.; Kallenbach, R.; Wurz, P.; Gruenwaldt, H.; Axford, W. I.; Livi, S.; Marsch, E.; Wilken, B.; Gliem, F.; Reiche, K.-U.; Lee, M. A.; Moebius, E.; Hsieh, K. C.; Neugebauer, M.; Managadze, G. G.; Verigin, M. I.

    1996-05-01

    The SOHO payload includes three experiments designed to make "in situ" particle measurements of the solar wind and solar energetic particles (CELIAS, D. Hovestadt PI; COSTEP, H. Kunow PI; ERNE, J. Torsti PI). The solar wind measurements that are the focus of this talk are primarily provided by the CELIAS CTOF and MTOF sensors. (CELIAS/STOF and COSTEP-ERNE measure solar and interplanetary suprathermal and energetic particle populations.) CELIAS/CTOF measures solar wind heavy ion elemental and charge state abundances, information which is used (for example) in identifying the type of solar wind flow and the ionization processes in the corona where the solar wind charge states become "frozen-in". CELIAS/MTOF provides heavy ion elemental and isotopic abundances that are important (for example) in the study of fractionation factors in coronal abundances (as in the so-called "FIP-effect") for the rarer elements not resolvable in conventional solar wind composition instruments, and in determining the isotopic make-up of the solar corona. MTOF is, by far, the most powerful solar wind mass spectrometer flown to date, and already has new science to report at the time of this writing. This happenstance is due to a combination of (1) advanced technology in obtaining high mass resolution for ions at solar wind energies, and (2) increased statistics. The excellent counting statistics are largely due to continuous solar wind monitoring (with its position at L1, ``the Sun never sets on SOHO''), and the continuous sampling of the solar wind by the 3-axis stabilized spacecraft further enhanced by MTOF's novel, never previously flown deflection system that encompasses a very large dynamic range. As might be expected, this unique opportunity has allowed MTOF to identify a number of elements for the first time in the solar wind (e.g., P, Ti, Cr and Ni). A rich assortment of solar wind isotopes have been identified for the first time, many of which (e.g., Fe 54 and 56; Ni 58,60,62) have

  1. Polar solar wind and interstellar wind properties from interplanetary Lyman-alpha radiation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, N.; Blum, P. W.; Ajello, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis of Mariner 10 observations of Lyman-alpha resonance radiation shows an increase of interplanetary neutral hydrogen densities above the solar poles. This increase is caused by a latitudinal variation of the solar wind velocity and/or flux. Using both the Mariner 10 results and other solar wind observations, the values of the solar wind flux and velocity with latitude are determined for several cases of interest. The latitudinal variation of interplanetary hydrogen gas, arising from the solar wind latitudinal variation, is shown to be most pronounced in the inner solar system. From this result it is shown that spacecraft Lyman-alpha observations are more sensitive to the latitudinal anisotropy for a spacecraft location in the inner solar system near the downwind axis.

  2. Development of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model for solar corona and solar wind simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xingqiu; Trichtchenko, Larisa; Boteler, David

    Propagation of coronal mass ejections from solar surface to the Earth magnetosphere is strongly influenced by the conditions in solar corona and ambient solar wind. Thus, reliable simulation of the background solar wind is the primary task toward the development of numerical model for the transient events. In this paper we introduce a new numerical model which has been specifically designed for numerical study of the solar corona and ambient solar wind. This model is based on our recently developed three-dimensional Spherical Coordinate Adaptive Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) code (SCA-MHD-3D) [Yuan et al., 2009]. Modifications has been done to include the observed magnetic field at the photosphere as inner boundary conditions. The energy source term together with reduced plasma gamma are used in the nonlinear MHD equations in order to simulate the solar wind acceleration from subsonic speed at solar surface to supersonic speed at the inter-heliosphere region, and the absorbing boundary conditions are used at the solar surface. This model has been applied to simulate the background solar wind condition for several different solar rotations, and comparison between the observation and model output have shown that it reproduces many features of solar wind, including open and closed magnetic fields, fast and slow solar wind speed, sector boundaries, etc.

  3. Bioenergy: Potentials and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, E.-D.; Canadell, J. G.

    2015-08-01

    In this lecture we explain 1) the biochemical basis for photosynthesis and plant production and 2) the future demands on biomass for human use. Summing all physiological processes, the efficiency of converting solar energy into biomass is bioenergy. We estimate this fraction to be between 3 and 8% of the global energy demand by 2050. The contribution of bioenergy is at the higher end in tropical regions and in the less industrialized parts of the world, but may even be < 3% in industrialized nations.

  4. Stationarity of extreme bursts in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, N R; Davidsen, J

    2014-05-01

    Recent results have suggested that the statistics of bursts in the solar wind vary with solar cycle. Here, we show that this variation is basically absent if one considers extreme bursts. These are defined as threshold-exceeding events over the range of high thresholds for which their number decays as a power law. In particular, we find that the distribution of duration times and energies of extreme bursts in the solar wind ε parameter and similar observables are independent of the solar cycle and in this sense stationary, and show robust asymptotic power laws with exponents that are independent of the specific threshold. This is consistent with what has been observed for solar flares and, thus, provides evidence in favor of a link between solar flares and extreme bursts in the solar wind.

  5. Spatio-temporal Assessment Of The Land Use Implications Of Solar PV And Bioenergy Deployment In The UK TM Energy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobral Mourao, Z.; Konadu, D. D.; Skelton, S.; Lupton, R.

    2015-12-01

    The UK TIMES model (UKTM) succeeds the UK MARKAL as the underlying model of the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) for long term energy system planning and policy development. It generates energy system pathways which achieve the 80% greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction target by 2050, stipulated in the UK Climate Change Act (2008), at the least possible cost. Some of these pathways prescribe large-scale deployment of solar PV and indigenously sourced bioenergy, which are land intensive and could result in significant land use transitions; but would this create competition and stress for UK land use? To answer the above question, this study uses an integrated spatio-temporal modelling approach, ForeseerTM, which characterises the interdependencies between the energy and land systems by evaluating the land required under each pathways for solar PV and bioenergy, based on scenarios of a range of PV conversion efficiencies, and energy crop yield projections. The outcome is compared with availability of suitable locations for solar PV and sustainable limits of agricultural land appropriation for bioenergy production to assess potential stresses and competition with other land use services. Preliminary results show UKTM pathways could pose significant impact on the UK land use system. Bioenergy deployment could potentially compete with other land services by taking up a significant part of the available UK agricultural land thus competing directly with food production, most notably livestock production. For pathways with significant solar PV deployment, direct competition would not be focussed on the high quality land used for food crop production but rather for land used for livestock production and other ecosystem services.

  6. Solar energetic particle events in different types of solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahler, S. W. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, 3550 Aberdeen Avenue, Kirtland AFB, NM 87117 (United States); Vourlidas, A., E-mail: stephen.kahler@kirtland.af.mil [Space Sciences Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    We examine statistically some properties of 96 20 MeV gradual solar energetic proton (SEP) events as a function of three different types of solar wind (SW) as classified by Richardson and Cane. Gradual SEP (E > 10 MeV) events are produced in shocks driven by fast (V ≳ 900 km s{sup –1}) and wide (W > 60°) coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We find no differences among the transient, fast, and slow SW streams for SEP 20 MeV proton event timescales. It has recently been found that the peak intensities Ip of these SEP events scale with the ∼2 MeV proton background intensities, which may be a proxy for the near-Sun shock seed particles. Both the intensities Ip and their 2 MeV backgrounds are significantly enhanced in transient SW compared to those of fast and slow SW streams, and the values of Ip normalized to the 2 MeV backgrounds only weakly correlate with CME V for all SW types. This result implies that forecasts of SEP events could be improved by monitoring both the Sun and the local SW stream properties and that the well known power-law size distributions of Ip may differ between transient and long-lived SW streams. We interpret an observed correlation between CME V and the 2 MeV background for SEP events in transient SW as a manifestation of enhanced solar activity.

  7. Innovations in Wind and Solar PV Financing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cory, K.; Coughlin, J.; Jenkin, T.; Pater, J.; Swezey, B.

    2008-02-01

    There is growing national interest in renewable energy development based on the economic, environmental, and security benefits that these resources provide. Historically, greater development of our domestic renewable energy resources has faced a number of hurdles, primarily related to cost, regulation, and financing. With the recent sustained increase in the costs and associated volatility of fossil fuels, the economics of renewable energy technologies have become increasingly attractive to investors, both large and small. As a result, new entrants are investing in renewable energy and new business models are emerging. This study surveys some of the current issues related to wind and solar photovoltaic (PV) energy project financing in the electric power industry, and identifies both barriers to and opportunities for increased investment.

  8. Genesis Solar Wind Array Collector Cataloging Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett, P.J.; Rodriguez, M.C.; Calaway, M.C.; Allton, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Genesis solar wind array collectors were fractured upon landing hard in Utah in 2004. The fragments were retrieved from the damaged canister, imaged, repackaged and shipped to the Johnson Space Center curatorial facility [1]. As of January 2009, the collection consists of 3460 samples. Of these, 442 are comprised into "multiple" sample groupings, either affixed to adhesive paper (177) or collected in jars (17), culture trays (87), or sets of polystyrene vials (161). A focused characterization task was initiated in May 2008 to document the largest samples in the collection. The task consisted of two goals: to document sapphire based fragments greater than 2 cm in one dimension, and to document silicon based fragments greater than 1 cm in one direction.

  9. Solar updraft tower - structural optimisation under dynamic wind action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Eck, S.; Coenders, J.L.; Doomen, R.

    2015-01-01

    A solar updraft tower is a type of power plant which uses solar irradiation to generate electricity. It consists of three elements: a solar air collector, wind turbines and a chimney. The proposed concepts for this chimney schematise it as a 1-km-tall reinforced concrete shell, which are vulnerable

  10. COMPOSITION OF THE SOLAR CORONA, SOLAR WIND, AND SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmelz, J. T. [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States); Reames, D. V. [IPST, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Von Steiger, R. [ISSI, Hallerstrasse 6, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Basu, S., E-mail: jschmelz@memphis.edu [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2012-08-10

    Along with temperature and density, the elemental abundance is a basic parameter required by astronomers to understand and model any physical system. The abundances of the solar corona are known to differ from those of the solar photosphere via a mechanism related to the first ionization potential of the element, but the normalization of these values with respect to hydrogen is challenging. Here, we show that the values used by solar physicists for over a decade and currently referred to as the 'coronal abundances' do not agree with the data themselves. As a result, recent analysis and interpretation of solar data involving coronal abundances may need to be revised. We use observations from coronal spectroscopy, the solar wind, and solar energetic particles as well as the latest abundances of the solar photosphere to establish a new set of abundances that reflect our current understanding of the coronal plasma.

  11. Electrifying Greece with solar and wind energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mentis Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ensuring energy security, reducing GHG emissions and boosting the competitiveness of a country’s economy by attracting investments and technical knowhow are of paramount importance considering the targets of “20-20-20” set by the European community. Being the cradle of civilization, Greece appears today as a country caught in a prolonged hard economic and social crisis, the way out of which its citizens are looking forward as well as the entire European Union. Establishment of the leading renewable energy sources like solar and wind in Greece will not only increase the independence of its own electrification but will also provide with a foundation for developing the market of international trade of “green” energy. This paper initially highlights the current status of photovoltaics and wind turbines in Greece. Furthermore, this study evaluates whether a higher penetration of the above mentioned green energy sources would have positive impact in the economy of the country or not and in what extent they could decline the CO2 emissions until 2020, comparing to the corresponding levels in 2010.

  12. Residual Energy Spectrum of Solar Wind Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C H K; Salem, C S; Maruca, B A

    2013-01-01

    It has long been known that the energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind is not in equipartition. In this paper, we present an analysis of 5 years of Wind data at 1 AU to investigate the reason for this. The residual energy (difference between energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations) was calculated using both the standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) normalization for the magnetic field and a kinetic version, which includes temperature anisotropies and drifts between particle species. It was found that with the kinetic normalization, the fluctuations are closer to equipartition, with a mean normalized residual energy of sigma_r = -0.19 and mean Alfven ratio of r_A = 0.71. The spectrum of residual energy, in the kinetic normalization, was found to be steeper than both the velocity and magnetic field spectra, consistent with some recent MHD turbulence predictions and numerical simulations, having a spectral index close to -1.9. The local properties of residual energy and cros...

  13. Comparative Study of MHD Modeling of the Background Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Gressl, C; Temmer, M; Odstrcil, D; Linker, J A; Mikic, Z; Riley, P

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge about the background solar wind plays a crucial role in the framework of space weather forecasting. In-situ measurements of the background solar wind are only available for a few points in the heliosphere where spacecraft are located, therefore we have to rely on heliospheric models to derive the distribution of solar wind parameters in interplanetary space. We test the performance of different solar wind models, namely Magnetohydrodynamic Algorithm outside a Sphere/ENLIL (MAS/ENLIL), Wang-Sheeley-Arge/ENLIL (WSA/ENLIL), and MAS/MAS, by comparing model results with in-situ measurements from spacecraft located at 1 AU distance to the Sun (ACE, Wind). To exclude the influence of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), we chose the year 2007 as a time period with low solar activity for our comparison. We found that the general structure of the background solar wind is well reproduced by all models. The best model results were obtained for the parameter solar wind speed. However, the predicted ar...

  14. Little or no solar wind enters Venus' atmosphere at solar minimum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T L; Delva, M; Baumjohann, W; Auster, H-U; Carr, C; Russell, C T; Barabash, S; Balikhin, M; Kudela, K; Berghofer, G; Biernat, H K; Lammer, H; Lichtenegger, H; Magnes, W; Nakamura, R; Schwingenschuh, K; Volwerk, M; Vörös, Z; Zambelli, W; Fornacon, K-H; Glassmeier, K-H; Richter, I; Balogh, A; Schwarzl, H; Pope, S A; Shi, J K; Wang, C; Motschmann, U; Lebreton, J-P

    2007-11-29

    Venus has no significant internal magnetic field, which allows the solar wind to interact directly with its atmosphere. A field is induced in this interaction, which partially shields the atmosphere, but we have no knowledge of how effective that shield is at solar minimum. (Our current knowledge of the solar wind interaction with Venus is derived from measurements at solar maximum.) The bow shock is close to the planet, meaning that it is possible that some solar wind could be absorbed by the atmosphere and contribute to the evolution of the atmosphere. Here we report magnetic field measurements from the Venus Express spacecraft in the plasma environment surrounding Venus. The bow shock under low solar activity conditions seems to be in the position that would be expected from a complete deflection by a magnetized ionosphere. Therefore little solar wind enters the Venus ionosphere even at solar minimum.

  15. The Radial Evolution of Solar Wind Speeds (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-05

    the equatorial region, solar wind observed above 600 km/s has rarely been accelerated from slower speeds (see Figure 3), therefore speeds greater...unlimited. ratios. This solar wind rarely has an O7+/O6+ value greater than 0.05, or a C6+/C5+ charge state ratio greater than 0.5. These maximum O7+/O6...structure and coronal sources of the solar wind during May 12th, 1997 CME, J. Atmos. Sol. Terr . Phys., 66, 1295–1309. Hefti, S., H. Grunwaldt, P

  16. Multifractal properties of solar wind turbulence: theory and observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanov, A. V.; Avanov, L. A.; Zastenker, G. N.; Zelenyj, L. M.

    1996-10-01

    A fractal model of the solar wind is presented. This model treats fluctuations of the solar wind velocity from the viewpoint of nonlinear processes originating in the convective region and photosphere of the Sun. The multifractal structure of proton velocity fluctuations in a region of heliocentric distances from 0.2 to 0.8 AU is a result of these processes. Continuous measurements of solar wind velocity aboard the ISEE-3 spacecraft during one month were used to compare the theoretical and experimental results. It is shown that fluctuations of proton velocity have a multifractal structure in a frequency range of 10-5 - 10-3Hz.

  17. Solar wind plasma interaction with solar probe plus spacecraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillemant, S. [Univ. Paul Sabatier de Toulouse et CNRS, Toulouse (FR). IRAP (Inst. der Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie); ONERA (Office National d' Etudes et Recherches Aerospatiales), Toulouse (France); Genot, V.; Louarn, P. [Univ. Paul Sabatier de Toulouse et CNRS, Toulouse (FR). IRAP (Inst. der Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie); Mateo-Velez, J.C. [ONERA (Office National d' Etudes et Recherches Aerospatiales), Toulouse (France); Ergun, R. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics

    2012-07-01

    3-D PIC (Particle In Cell) simulations of spacecraft-plasma interactions in the solar wind context of the Solar Probe Plus mission are presented. The SPIS software is used to simulate a simplified probe in the near-Sun environment (at a distance of 0.044AU or 9.5 R{sub S} from the Sun surface).We begin this study with a cross comparison of SPIS with another PIC code, aiming at providing the static potential structure surrounding a spacecraft in a high photoelectron environment. This paper presents then a sensitivity study using generic SPIS capabilities, investigating the role of some physical phenomena and numerical models. It confirms that in the near- sun environment, the Solar Probe Plus spacecraft would rather be negatively charged, despite the high yield of photoemission. This negative potential is explained through the dense sheath of photoelectrons and secondary electrons both emitted with low energies (2-3 eV). Due to this low energy of emission, these particles are not ejected at an infinite distance of the spacecraft and would rather surround it. As involved densities of photoelectrons can reach 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3} (compared to ambient ions and electrons densities of about 7 x 10{sup 3} cm{sup -3}), those populations affect the surrounding plasma potential generating potential barriers for low energy electrons, leading to high recollection. This charging could interfere with the low energy (up to a few tens of eV) plasma sensors and particle detectors, by biasing the particle distribution functions measured by the instruments. Moreover, if the spacecraft charges to large negative potentials, the problem will be more severe as low energy electrons will not be seen at all. The importance of the modelling requirements in terms of precise prediction of spacecraft potential is also discussed. (orig.)

  18. Erosion of carbon/carbon by solar wind charged particle radiation during a solar probe mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Witold; O'Donnell, Tim; Millard, Jerry

    1991-01-01

    The possible erosion of a carbon/carbon thermal shield by solar wind-charged particle radiation is reviewed. The present knowledge of erosion data for carbon and/or graphite is surveyed, and an explanation of erosion mechanisms under different charged particle environments is discussed. The highest erosion is expected at four solar radii. Erosion rates are analytically estimated under several conservative assumptions for a normal quiet and worst case solar wind storm conditions. Mass loss analyses and comparison studies surprisingly indicate that the predicted erosion rate by solar wind could be greater than by nominal free sublimation during solar wind storm conditions at four solar radii. The predicted overall mass loss of a carbon/carbon shield material during the critical four solar radii flyby can still meet the mass loss mission requirement of less than 0.0025 g/sec.

  19. Chaos in the solar wind flow near Earth

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shollykutty John; P J Kurian

    2009-04-01

    We have done a time series analysis of daily average data of solar wind velocity, density and temperature at 1 AU measured by ACE spacecraft for a period of nine years. We have used the raw data without filtering to give a faithful representation of the nonlinear behaviour of the solar wind flow which is a novel one. The sensitivity of the results on filtering is highlighted. The attractor dimension is estimated for every parameter of the solar wind and it is found that they differ substantially. Hence a chaotic picture for the problem from different angles have been obtained. The calculated Kolmogorov entropies and Lyapunov exponents are positive showing evidences that the complex solar wind near the Earth is most likely a deterministic chaotic system.

  20. Solar wind stream structure at large heliocentric distances Pioneer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazis, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    Time profiles and histograms of plasma data from Pioneers 10 and 11 are examined for the period between 1975 and 1983. During this time, Pioneer 10 traveled between a heliocentric distance of 8.7 and 30.4 AU. The velocity structure of the solar wind at these heliocentric distances is found to have one of two distinct forms: approximately 70 percent of the time the solar wind has a nearly flat velocity profile. Occasionally, this flat velocity profile is accompanied by quasi-periodic variations in density and in thermal speed consistent with the concept that the 'corotating interaction regions' which are produced by the interaction of high- and low-speed streams at intermediate heliocentric distances are replaced by 'pressure regions' in the outer heliosphere. The remaining 30 percent of the time the solar wind is marked by large (50-200 km/s) long-term (30-120 days) shifts in the average solar wind velocity.

  1. Quantitative evaluation of solar wind time-shifting methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Taylor; Jackel, Brian

    2016-11-01

    Nine years of solar wind dynamic pressure and geosynchronous magnetic field data are used for a large-scale statistical comparison of uncertainties associated with several different algorithms for propagating solar wind measurements. The MVAB-0 scheme is best overall, performing on average a minute more accurately than a flat time-shift. We also evaluate the accuracy of these time-shifting methods as a function of solar wind magnetic field orientation. We find that all time-shifting algorithms perform significantly worse (>5 min) due to geometric effects when the solar wind magnetic field is radial (parallel or antiparallel to the Earth-Sun line). Finally, we present an empirical scheme that performs almost as well as MVAB-0 on average and slightly better than MVAB-0 for intervals with nonradial B.

  2. Solar wind magnetic turbulence: Inferences from spectral shape

    CERN Document Server

    Treumann, R A; Narita, Y

    2016-01-01

    Some differences between theoretical, numerical and observational determinations of spectral slopes of solar wind turbulence are interpreted in the thermodynamical sense. Confirmations of turbulent Kolmogorov slopes in solar wind magnetic turbulence and magnetohydrodynamic simulations exhibit tiny differences. These are used to infer about entropy generation in the turbulent cascade and to infer about the anomalous turbulent collision frequency in the dissipative range as well as the average energy input in solar wind turbulence. Anomalous turbulent collision frequencies are obtained of the order of v < 200 Hz. The corresponding stationary solar wind magnetic energy input into magnetic turbulence in the Kolmogorov inertial range is obtained to be of the order of 50 eV/s. Its thermal fate is discussed.

  3. Transient flows of the solar wind associated with small-scale solar activity in solar minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemzin, Vladimir; Veselovsky, Igor; Kuzin, Sergey; Gburek, Szymon; Ulyanov, Artyom; Kirichenko, Alexey; Shugay, Yulia; Goryaev, Farid

    The data obtained by the modern high sensitive EUV-XUV telescopes and photometers such as CORONAS-Photon/TESIS and SPHINX, STEREO/EUVI, PROBA2/SWAP, SDO/AIA provide good possibilities for studying small-scale solar activity (SSA), which is supposed to play an important role in heating of the corona and producing transient flows of the solar wind. During the recent unusually weak solar minimum, a large number of SSA events, such as week solar flares, small CMEs and CME-like flows were observed and recorded in the databases of flares (STEREO, SWAP, SPHINX) and CMEs (LASCO, CACTUS). On the other hand, the solar wind data obtained in this period by ACE, Wind, STEREO contain signatures of transient ICME-like structures which have shorter duration (<10h), weaker magnetic field strength (<10 nT) and lower proton temperature than usual ICMEs. To verify the assumption that ICME-like transients may be associated with the SSA events we investigated the number of weak flares of C-class and lower detected by SPHINX in 2009 and STEREO/EUVI in 2010. The flares were classified on temperature and emission measure using the diagnostic means of SPHINX and Hinode/EIS and were confronted with the parameters of the solar wind (velocity, density, ion composition and temperature, magnetic field, pitch angle distribution of the suprathermal electrons). The outflows of plasma associated with the flares were identified by their coronal signatures - CMEs (only in few cases) and dimmings. It was found that the mean parameters of the solar wind projected to the source surface for the times of the studied flares were typical for the ICME-like transients. The results support the suggestion that weak flares can be indicators of sources of transient plasma flows contributing to the slow solar wind at solar minimum, although these flows may be too weak to be considered as separate CMEs and ICMEs. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Programme

  4. Predicted Impacts of Proton Temperature Anisotropy on Solar Wind Turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Kristopher G; Howes, Gregory G.

    2015-01-01

    Particle velocity distributions measured in the weakly collisional solar wind are frequently found to be non-Maxwellian, but how these non-Maxwellian distributions impact the physics of plasma turbulence in the solar wind remains unanswered. Using numerical solutions of the linear dispersion relation for a collisionless plasma with a bi-Maxwellian proton velocity distribution, we present a unified framework for the four proton temperature anisotropy instabilities, identifying the associated s...

  5. Analysis of ISEE-3/ICE solar wind data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplan, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    Under the grant that ended November 11, 1988 work was accomplished in a number of areas, as follows: (1) Analysis of solar wind data; (2) Analysis of Giacobini/Zinner encounter data; (3) Investigation of solar wind and magnetospheric electron velocity distributions; and (4) Experimental investigation of the electronic structure of clusters. Reprints and preprints of publications resulting from this work are included in the appendices.

  6. Modulation of the Solar Wind Velocity by Mercury

    CERN Document Server

    Nikulin, Igor F

    2013-01-01

    To study the variations in the solar wind velocity during inferior conjunctions of Mercury and Earth, we analyzed 54 events in the period 1995 to 2012 by the superimposed epoch method. We have found a noticeable increase in the velocity both before and after the conjunctions as well as decrease in the velocity within 3-4 days after them, which seems to be associated with Mercury's "shadow". The results obtained might be used to improve a forecast of the solar wind velocity.

  7. Solar and Wind Power in Hybird Energy Systems in China

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Qing

    2014-01-01

    In order to solve problems created by traditional energy, reducing the amount of usage of traditional energy and enlarging the range of usage of new energy, particularly some renewable energy should be developed immediately. In the recent years, China has been paying more attention to the utilization of renewable energy resources. Wind energy and solar energy are particularly popular due to lower cost and high economic effectiveness. As the development of wind energy and solar energy, scienti...

  8. On Electron-scale Whistler Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Y.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Motschmann, U.; Giles, B.; Magnes, W.; Fischer, D.; Torbert, R. B.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Burch, J. L.; Nariyuki, Y.; Saito, S.; Gary, S. P.

    2016-08-01

    For the first time, the dispersion relation for turbulence magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind is determined directly on small scales of the order of the electron inertial length, using four-point magnetometer observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission. The data are analyzed using the high-resolution adaptive wave telescope technique. Small-scale solar wind turbulence is primarily composed of highly obliquely propagating waves, with dispersion consistent with that of the whistler mode.

  9. The Character of the Solar Wind, Surface Interactions, and Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, William M.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the key characteristics of the proton-rich solar wind and describe how it may interact with the lunar surface. We suggest that solar wind can be both a source and loss of water/OH related volatiles, and review models showing both possibilities. Energy from the Sun in the form of radiation and solar wind plasma are in constant interaction with the lunar surface. As such, there is a solar-lunar energy connection, where solar energy and matter are continually bombarding the lunar surface, acting at the largest scale to erode the surface at 0.2 Angstroms per year via ion sputtering [1]. Figure 1 illustrates this dynamically Sun-Moon system.

  10. Potential for Development of Solar and Wind Resource in Bhutan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilman, P.; Cowlin, S.; Heimiller, D.

    2009-09-01

    With support from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) produced maps and data of the wind and solar resources in Bhutan. The solar resource data show that Bhutan has an adequate resource for flat-plate collectors, with annual average values of global horizontal solar radiation ranging from 4.0 to 5.5 kWh/m2-day (4.0 to 5.5 peak sun hours per day). The information provided in this report may be of use to energy planners in Bhutan involved in developing energy policy or planning wind and solar projects, and to energy analysts around the world interested in gaining an understanding of Bhutan's wind and solar energy potential.

  11. On Solar Wind Origin and Acceleration: Measurements from ACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakhiv, Mark; Lepri, Susan T.; Landi, Enrico; Tracy, Patrick; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2016-10-01

    The origin and acceleration of the solar wind are still debated. In this paper, we search for signatures of the source region and acceleration mechanism of the solar wind in the plasma properties measured in situ by the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft. Using the elemental abundances as a proxy for the source region and the differential velocity and ion temperature ratios as a proxy for the acceleration mechanism, we are able to identify signatures pointing toward possible source regions and acceleration mechanisms. We find that the fast solar wind in the ecliptic plane is the same as that observed from the polar regions and is consistent with wave acceleration and coronal-hole origin. We also find that the slow wind is composed of two components: one similar to the fast solar wind (with slower velocity) and the other likely originating from closed magnetic loops. Both components of the slow solar wind show signatures of wave acceleration. From these findings, we draw a scenario that envisions two types of wind, with different source regions and release mechanisms, but the same wave acceleration mechanism.

  12. Sputtering by the Solar Wind: Effects of Variable Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, R. M.; Arrell, W. M.; Sarantos, M.; Delory, G. T.

    2011-01-01

    It has long been recognized that solar wind bombardment onto exposed surfaces in the solar system will produce an energetic component to the exospheres about those bodies. Laboratory experiments have shown that there is no increase in the sputtering yield caused by highly charged heavy ions for metallic and for semiconducting surfaces, but the sputter yield can be noticeably increased in the case of a good insulating surface. Recently measurements of the solar wind composition have become available. It is now known that the solar wind composition is highly dependent on the origin of the particular plasma. Using the measured composition of the slow wind, fast wind, solar energetic particle (SEP) population, and coronal mass ejection (CME), broken down into its various components, we have estimated the total sputter yield for each type of solar wind. Whereas many previous calculations of sputtering were limited to the effects of proton bombardment. we show that the heavy ion component. especially the He++ component. can greatly enhance the total sputter yield during times when the heavy ion population is enhanced. We will discuss sputtering of both neutrals and ions.

  13. Using the fingerprints of solar magnetic reconnection to identify the elemental building blocks of the slow solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepko, Larry; Viall, Nicholeen M.; Kasper, Justin; Lepri, Sue

    2015-04-01

    While the source of the fast solar wind is well understood to be linked to coronal holes, the source of the slow solar wind has remained elusive. Many previous studies of the slow solar wind have examined trends in the composition and charge states over long time scales and found strong relationships between the solar wind velocity and these plasma parameters. These relationships have been used to constrain models of solar wind source and acceleration. In this study, we take advantage of high time resolution (12 min) measurements of solar wind composition and charge-state abundances recently reprocessed by the ACE Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) science team to probe the timescales of solar wind variability at relatively small scales. We study an interval of slow solar wind containing quasi-periodic 90 minute structures and show that they are remnants of solar magnetic reconnection. Each 90-minute parcel of slow solar wind, though the speed remains steady, exhibits the complete range of charge state and composition variations expected for the entire range of slow solar wind, which is repeated again in the next 90-minute interval. These observations show that previous statistical results break down on these shorter timescales, and impose new and important constraints on models of slow solar wind creation. We conclude by suggesting these structures were created through interchange magnetic reconnection and form elemental building blocks of the slow solar wind. We also discuss the necessity of decoupling separately the process(es) responsible for the release and acceleration.

  14. Implications of the Deep Minimum for Slow Solar Wind Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Mikic, Z.; Lionello, R.; Titov, V. S.; Linker, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    The origin of the slow solar wind has long been one of the most important problems in solar/heliospheric physics. Two observational constraints make this problem especially challenging. First, the slow wind has the composition of the closed-field corona, unlike the fast wind that originates on open field lines. Second, the slow wind has substantial angular extent, of order 30 degrees, which is much larger than the widths observed for streamer stalks or the widths expected theoretically for a dynamic heliospheric current sheet. We propose that the slow wind originates from an intricate network of narrow (possibly singular) open-field corridors that emanate from the polar coronal hole regions. Using topological arguments, we show that these corridors must be ubiquitous in the solar corona. The total solar eclipse in August 2008, near the lowest point of the Deep Minimum, affords an ideal opportunity to test this theory by using the ultra-high resolution Predictive Science's (PSI) eclipse model for the corona and wind. Analysis of the PSI eclipse model demonstrates that the extent and scales of the open-field corridors can account for both the angular width of the slow wind and its closed-field composition. We discuss the implications of our slow wind theory for the structure of the corona and heliosphere at the Deep Minimum and describe further observational and theoretical tests. This work has been supported by the NASA HTP, SR&T, and LWS programs.

  15. Impacts of wind stilling on solar radiation variability in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Changgui; Yang, Kun; Huang, Jianping; Tang, Wenjun; Qin, Jun; Niu, Xiaolei; Chen, Yingying; Chen, Deliang; Lu, Ning; Fu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Solar dimming and wind stilling (slowdown) are two outstanding climate changes occurred in China over the last four decades. The wind stilling may have suppressed the dispersion of aerosols and amplified the impact of aerosol emission on solar dimming. However, there is a lack of long-term aerosol monitoring and associated study in China to confirm this hypothesis. Here, long-term meteorological data at weather stations combined with short-term aerosol data were used to assess this hypothesis. It was found that surface solar radiation (SSR) decreased considerably with wind stilling in heavily polluted regions at a daily scale, indicating that wind stilling can considerably amplify the aerosol extinction effect on SSR. A threshold value of 3.5 m/s for wind speed is required to effectively reduce aerosols concentration. From this SSR dependence on wind speed, we further derived proxies to quantify aerosol emission and wind stilling amplification effects on SSR variations at a decadal scale. The results show that aerosol emission accounted for approximately 20% of the typical solar dimming in China, which was amplified by approximately 20% by wind stilling.

  16. Solar Wind ~20-300 keV Superhalo Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Yang, L.; He, J.; Tu, C. Y.; Pei, Z.

    2014-12-01

    High-energy superhalo electrons are present in the interplanetary medium even in absence of any solar activity, carrying important information on the electron acceleration in the solar wind. We present a statistical survey of ~20-300 keV superhalo electrons measured at 1 AU by the WIND 3DP instrument during quiet-time periods from 1995 January through 2013 December. The velocity distribution function of the observed quiet-time superhalo electrons generally fits to a power-law spectrum, f ~ v-γ, with γ ranging from ~4 to ~10. The integrated density of these superhalo electrons at 20-300 keV, nsup, ranges from 10-9 cm-3 to 10-5 cm-3. Both log(nsup) and γ show a good correlation with the sunspot number, with larger density and softer spectrum (γ~ 6-8) at solar maximum, and smaller density and harder spectrum (γ~ 4-5) at solar minimum. The observed power-law spectrum also has no clear association with flares, CMEs, active regions and solar wind core populations, while it shows a weak (~0.3) correlation with in situ solar wind turbulence spectrum. These results suggest that the seed particles of quiet-time superhalo electrons could originate from the Sun, and their acceleration could mainly occur in the interplanetary medium, probably by the electron interaction with solar wind turbulence, or by acceleration at the CIRs.

  17. Constraints on neon and argon isotopic fractionation in solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshik, Alex; Mabry, Jennifer; Hohenberg, Charles; Marrocchi, Yves; Pravdivtseva, Olga; Burnett, Donald; Olinger, Chad; Wiens, Roger; Reisenfeld, Dan; Allton, Judith; McNamara, Karen; Stansbery, Eileen; Jurewicz, Amy J G

    2007-10-19

    To evaluate the isotopic composition of the solar nebula from which the planets formed, the relation between isotopes measured in the solar wind and on the Sun's surface needs to be known. The Genesis Discovery mission returned independent samples of three types of solar wind produced by different solar processes that provide a check on possible isotopic variations, or fractionation, between the solar-wind and solar-surface material. At a high level of precision, we observed no significant inter-regime differences in 20Ne/22Ne or 36Ar/38Ar values. For 20Ne/22Ne, the difference between low- and high-speed wind components is 0.24 +/- 0.37%; for 36Ar/38Ar, it is 0.11 +/- 0.26%. Our measured 36Ar/38Ar ratio in the solar wind of 5.501 +/- 0.005 is 3.42 +/- 0.09% higher than that of the terrestrial atmosphere, which may reflect atmospheric losses early in Earth's history.

  18. A survey of solar wind conditions at 5 AU: A tool for interpreting solar wind-magnetosphere interactions at Jupiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Wilkes Ebert

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We examine Ulysses solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF observations at 5 AU for two ~13 month intervals during the rising and declining phases of solar cycle 23 and the predicted response of the Jovian magnetosphere during these times. The declining phase solar wind, composed primarily of corotating interaction regions and high-speed streams, was, on average, faster, hotter, less dense, and more Alfvénic relative to the rising phase solar wind, composed mainly of slow wind and interplanetary coronal mass ejections. Interestingly, none of solar wind and IMF distributions reported here were bimodal, a feature used to explain the bimodal distribution of bow shock and magnetopause standoff distances observed at Jupiter. Instead, many of these distributions had extended, non-Gaussian tails that resulted in large standard deviations and much larger mean over median values. The distribution of predicted Jupiter bow shock and magnetopause standoff distances during these intervals were also not bimodal, the mean/median values being larger during the declining phase by ~1 – 4%. These results provide data-derived solar wind and IMF boundary conditions at 5 AU for models aimed at studying solar wind-magnetosphere interactions at Jupiter and can support the science investigations of upcoming Jupiter system missions. Here, we provide expectations for Juno, which is scheduled to arrive at Jupiter in July 2016. Accounting for the long-term decline in solar wind dynamic pressure reported by McComas et al. (2013, Jupiter’s bow shock and magnetopause is expected to be at least 8 – 12% further from Jupiter, if these trends continue.

  19. Solar wind ion trends and signatures: STEREO PLASTIC observations approaching solar minimum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Galvin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available STEREO has now completed the first two years of its mission, moving from close proximity to Earth in 2006/2007 to more than 50 degrees longitudinal separation from Earth in 2009. During this time, several large-scale structures have been observed in situ. Given the prevailing solar minimum conditions, these structures have been predominantly coronal hole-associated solar wind, slow solar wind, their interfaces, and the occasional transient event. In this paper, we extend earlier solar wind composition studies into the current solar minimum using high-resolution (1-h sampling times for the charge state analysis. We examine 2-year trends for iron charge states and solar wind proton speeds, and present a case study of Carrington Rotation 2064 (December 2007 which includes minor ion (He, Fe, O kinetic and Fe composition parameters in comparison with proton and magnetic field signatures at large-scale structures observed during this interval.

  20. Multicriteria GIS modeling of wind and solar farms in Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, Jason R. [Metropolitan State College of Denver, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, CB 22 P.O. Box 173362-22, Denver, CO 80217-3362 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The majority of electricity and heat in Colorado comes from coal and natural gas; however, renewable energy sources will play an integral role in the state's energy future. Colorado is the 11th windiest state and has more than 250 sunny days per year. The objectives of this research are to: 1) determine which landcover classes are affiliated with high wind and solar potential; and 2) identify areas that are suitable for wind and solar farms using multicriteria GIS modelling techniques. Renewable potential (NREL wind speed measurements at 50 m above the ground and NREL annual insolation data), landcover, population density, federal lands, and distance to roads, transmission lines, and cities were reclassified according to their suitability. Each was assigned weights based on their relative importance to one another. Superb wind classes are located in high alpine areas. Unfortunately, these areas are not suitable for large-scale wind farm development due to their inaccessibility and location within a sensitive ecosystem. Federal lands have low wind potential. According to the GIS model, ideal areas for wind farm development are located in northeastern Colorado. About 41 850 km{sup 2} of the state has model scores that are in the 90-100% range. Although annual solar radiation varies slightly, inter-mountain areas receive the most insolation. As far as federal lands, Indian reservations have the greatest solar input. The GIS model indicates that ideal areas for solar development are located in northwestern Colorado and east of Denver. Only 191 km{sup 2} of the state had model scores that were in the 90-100% range. These results suggest that the variables used in this analysis have more of an effect at eliminating non-suitable areas for large-scale solar farms; a greater area exists for suitable wind farms. However, given the statewide high insolation values with minimal variance, solar projects may be better suited for small-scale residential or commercial

  1. Global solar wind variations over the last four centuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, M J; Lockwood, M; Riley, P

    2017-01-31

    The most recent "grand minimum" of solar activity, the Maunder minimum (MM, 1650-1710), is of great interest both for understanding the solar dynamo and providing insight into possible future heliospheric conditions. Here, we use nearly 30 years of output from a data-constrained magnetohydrodynamic model of the solar corona to calibrate heliospheric reconstructions based solely on sunspot observations. Using these empirical relations, we produce the first quantitative estimate of global solar wind variations over the last 400 years. Relative to the modern era, the MM shows a factor 2 reduction in near-Earth heliospheric magnetic field strength and solar wind speed, and up to a factor 4 increase in solar wind Mach number. Thus solar wind energy input into the Earth's magnetosphere was reduced, resulting in a more Jupiter-like system, in agreement with the dearth of auroral reports from the time. The global heliosphere was both smaller and more symmetric under MM conditions, which has implications for the interpretation of cosmogenic radionuclide data and resulting total solar irradiance estimates during grand minima.

  2. Global solar wind variations over the last four centuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, M. J.; Lockwood, M.; Riley, P.

    2017-01-01

    The most recent “grand minimum” of solar activity, the Maunder minimum (MM, 1650–1710), is of great interest both for understanding the solar dynamo and providing insight into possible future heliospheric conditions. Here, we use nearly 30 years of output from a data-constrained magnetohydrodynamic model of the solar corona to calibrate heliospheric reconstructions based solely on sunspot observations. Using these empirical relations, we produce the first quantitative estimate of global solar wind variations over the last 400 years. Relative to the modern era, the MM shows a factor 2 reduction in near-Earth heliospheric magnetic field strength and solar wind speed, and up to a factor 4 increase in solar wind Mach number. Thus solar wind energy input into the Earth’s magnetosphere was reduced, resulting in a more Jupiter-like system, in agreement with the dearth of auroral reports from the time. The global heliosphere was both smaller and more symmetric under MM conditions, which has implications for the interpretation of cosmogenic radionuclide data and resulting total solar irradiance estimates during grand minima.

  3. Simulation study of solar wind push on a charged wire: basis of solar wind electric sail propulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Janhunen

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available One possibility for propellantless propulsion in space is to use the momentum flux of the solar wind. A way to set up a solar wind sail is to have a set of thin long wires which are kept at high positive potential by an onboard electron gun so that the wires repel and deflect incident solar wind protons. The efficiency of this so-called electric sail depends on how large force a given solar wind exerts on a wire segment and how large electron current the wire segment draws from the solar wind plasma when kept at a given potential. We use 1-D and 2-D electrostatic plasma simulations to calculate the force and present a semitheoretical formula which captures the simulation results. We find that under average solar wind conditions at 1 AU the force per unit length is (5±1×10−8 N/m for 15 kV potential and that the electron current is accurately given by the well-known orbital motion limited (OML theory cylindrical Langmuir probe formula. Although the force may appear small, an analysis shows that because of the very low weight of a thin wire per unit length, quite high final speeds (over 50 km/s could be achieved by an electric sailing spacecraft using today's flight-proved components. It is possible that artificial electron heating of the plasma in the interaction region could increase the propulsive effect even further.

  4. A Possible Cause of the Diminished Solar Wind During the Solar Cycle 23 - 24 Minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Kan; Wu, Chin-Chun

    2016-12-01

    Interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind plasma density observed at 1 AU during Solar Cycle 23 - 24 (SC-23/24) minimum were significantly smaller than those during its previous solar cycle (SC-22/23) minimum. Because the Earth's orbit is embedded in the slow wind during solar minimum, changes in the geometry and/or content of the slow wind region (SWR) can have a direct influence on the solar wind parameters near the Earth. In this study, we analyze solar wind plasma and magnetic field data of hourly values acquired by Ulysses. It is found that the solar wind, when averaging over the first (1995.6 - 1995.8) and third (2006.9 - 2008.2) Ulysses' perihelion ({˜} 1.4 AU) crossings, was about the same speed, but significantly less dense ({˜} 34 %) and cooler ({˜} 20 %), and the total magnetic field was {˜} 30 % weaker during the third compared to the first crossing. It is also found that the SWR was {˜} 50 % wider in the third ({˜} 68.5^deg; in heliographic latitude) than in the first ({˜} 44.8°) solar orbit. The observed latitudinal increase in the SWR is sufficient to explain the excessive decline in the near-Earth solar wind density during the recent solar minimum without speculating that the total solar output may have been decreasing. The observed SWR inflation is also consistent with a cooler solar wind in the SC-23/24 than in the SC-22/23 minimum. Furthermore, the ratio of the high-to-low latitude photospheric magnetic field (or equatorward magnetic pressure force), as observed by the Mountain Wilson Observatory, is smaller during the third than the first Ulysses' perihelion orbit. These findings suggest that the smaller equatorward magnetic pressure at the Sun may have led to the latitudinally-wider SRW observed by Ulysses in SC-23/24 minimum.

  5. Solar coronal plumes and the fast solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Dwivedi, B N

    2015-01-01

    The spectral profiles of the coronal Ne viii line at 77 nm have different shapes in quiet-Sun regions and coronal holes (CHs). A single Gaussian fit of the line profile provides an adequate approximation in quiet-Sun areas, whereas a strong shoulder on the long-wavelength side is a systematic feature in CHs. Although this has been noticed since 1999, no physical reason for the peculiar shape could be given. In an attempt to identify the cause of this peculiarity, we address three problems that could not be conclusively resolved in a review article by a study team of the International Space Science Institute (ISSI; Wilhelm et al. 2011) : (1) The physical processes operating at the base and inside of plumes as well as their interaction with the solar wind (SW). (2) The possible contribution of plume plasma to the fast SW streams. (3) The signature of the first-ionization potential (FIP) effect between plumes and inter-plume regions (IPRs). Before the spectroscopic peculiarities in IPRs and plumes in polar coron...

  6. Modeling Jets in the Corona and Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Torok, T; Titov, V S; Leake, J E; Mikic, Z; Linker, J A; Linton, M G

    2015-01-01

    Coronal jets are transient, collimated eruptions that occur in regions of predominantly open magnetic field in the solar corona. Our understanding of these events has greatly evolved in recent years but several open questions, such as the contribution of coronal jets to the solar wind, remain. Here we present an overview of the observations and numerical modeling of coronal jets, followed by a brief description of "next-generation" simulations that include an advanced description of the energy transfer in the corona ("thermodynamic MHD"), large spherical computational domains, and the solar wind. These new models will allow us to address some of the open questions.

  7. Scale-free texture of the fast solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnat, B; Chapman, S C; Gogoberidze, G; Wicks, R T

    2011-12-01

    The higher-order statistics of magnetic field magnitude fluctuations in the fast quiet solar wind are quantified systematically, scale by scale. We find a single global non-Gaussian scale-free behavior from minutes to over 5 h. This spans the signature of an inertial range of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and a ~1/f range in magnetic field components. This global scaling in field magnitude fluctuations is an intrinsic component of the underlying texture of the solar wind and puts a strong constraint on any theory of solar corona and the heliosphere. Intriguingly, the magnetic field and velocity components show scale-dependent dynamic alignment outside of the inertial range.

  8. Shear flow induced wave couplings in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poedts, S. [KULeuven, Heverlee (Belgium). Centre for Plasma Astrophysics; Rogava, A.D. [Tbilisi State Univ. (Georgia). Dept. of Physics]|[International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Mahajan, S.M. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Institute for Fusion Studies]|[International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)

    1998-01-01

    A sheared background flow in a plasma induces coupling between different MHD wave modes, resulting in their mutual transformations with corresponding energy redistributing between the modes. In this way, the energy can be transfered from one wave mode to the other, but energy can also be added to or extracted from the background flow. In the present paper it is investigated whether the wave coupling and energy transfer mechanisms can operate under solar wind conditions. It is shown that this is indeed the case. Hence, the long-period waves observed in the solar wind at r > 0.3 AU might be generated by much faster periodic oscillations in the photosphere of the Sun. Other possible consequences for observable beat phenomena in the wind and the acceleration of the solar wind particles are also discussed.

  9. Acceleration of weakly collisional solar-type winds

    CERN Document Server

    Zouganelis, I; Landi, S; Maksimovic, M; Pantellini, F

    2005-01-01

    One of the basic properties of the solar wind, that is the high speed of the fast wind, is still not satisfactorily explained. This is mainly due to the theoretical difficulty of treating weakly collisional plasmas. The fluid approach implies that the medium is collision dominated and that the particle velocity distributions are close to Maxwellians. However the electron velocity distributions observed in the solar wind depart significantly from Maxwellians. Recent kinetic collisionless models (called exospheric) using velocity distributions with a suprathermal tail have been able to reproduce the high speeds of the fast solar wind. In this letter we present new developments of these models by generalizing them over a large range of corona conditions. We also present new results obtained by numerical simulations that include collisions. Both approaches calculate the heat flux self-consistently without any assumption on the energy transport. We show that both approaches - the exospheric and the collisional one...

  10. Coronal Streamers and Their Associated Solar Wind Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, M. P.; Landi, E.; Cranmer, S. R.; Cohen, O.; Raymond, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    We use the EUV spectrometers aboard SOHO and Hinode and white-light coronagraphs to characterize the physical properties of coronal streamers during Earth/Ulysses quadrature configurations for the previous two solar minimum periods. In addition, comparisons between coronal observations and in situ measurements of solar wind plasma properties are being used to further characterize the origins of slow wind streams. In order to investigate slow solar wind heating and acceleration, we also compare with predictions from three-dimensional MHD models. We aim to use the empirical measurements to distinguish between different proposed physical processes for slow wind acceleration (e.g., waves/turbulence versus reconnection). This work is supported by NASA grant NNX10AQ58G to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

  11. Relationship Between Solar Wind Speed and Coronal Magnetic Field Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiki, Ken'ichi; Iju, Tomoya; Hakamada, Kazuyuki; Kojima, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the relationship between the solar-wind speed $[V]$ and the coronal magnetic-field properties (a flux expansion factor [$f$] and photospheric magnetic-field strength [$B_{\\mathrm{S}}$]) at all latitudes using data of interplanetary scintillation and solar magnetic field obtained for 24 years from 1986 to 2009. Using a cross-correlation analyses, we verified that $V$ is inversely proportional to $f$ and found that $V$ tends to increase with $B_{\\mathrm{S}}$ if $f$ is the same. As a consequence, we find that $V$ has extremely good linear correlation with $B_{\\mathrm{S}}/f$. However, this linear relation of $V$ and $B_{\\mathrm{S}}/f$ cannot be used for predicting the solar-wind velocity without information on the solar-wind mass flux. We discuss why the inverse relation between $V$ and $f$ has been successfully used for solar-wind velocity prediction, even though it does not explicitly include the mass flux and magnetic-field strength, which are important physical parameters for solar-wind accele...

  12. The magnetosphere under weak solar wind forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Farrugia

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The Earth's magnetosphere was very strongly disturbed during the passage of the strong shock and the following interacting ejecta on 21–25 October 2001. These disturbances included two intense storms (Dst*≈−250 and −180 nT, respectively. The cessation of this activity at the start of 24 October ushered in a peculiar state of the magnetosphere which lasted for about 28 h and which we discuss in this paper. The interplanetary field was dominated by the sunward component [B=(4.29±0.77, −0.30±0.71, 0.49±0.45 nT]. We analyze global indicators of geomagnetic disturbances, polar cap precipitation, ground magnetometer records, and ionospheric convection as obtained from SuperDARN radars. The state of the magnetosphere is characterized by the following features: (i generally weak and patchy (in time low-latitude dayside reconnection or reconnection poleward of the cusps; (ii absence of substorms; (iii a monotonic recovery from the previous storm activity (Dst corrected for magnetopause currents decreasing from ~−65 to ~−35 nT, giving an unforced decreased of ~1.1 nT/h; (iv the probable absence of viscous-type interaction originating from the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH instability; (v a cross-polar cap potential of just 20–30 kV; (vi a persistent, polar cap region containing (vii very weak, and sometimes absent, electron precipitation and no systematic inter-hemisphere asymmetry. Whereas we therefore infer the presence of a moderate amount of open flux, the convection is generally weak and patchy, which we ascribe to the lack of solar wind driver. This magnetospheric state approaches that predicted by Cowley and Lockwood (1992 but has never yet been observed.

  13. Clean energy in progress: Proceeding of 7th Iberish Congress on Solar Energy, 30 May-1 June 1994, Vigo (Spain); Energias limpias en progreso: Libro de actas del VII Congreso Iberico de Energia Solar, 30 Mayo-1 Junio, 1994, Vigo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This books summarizes the papers presented to the 7th Congress on Solar energy hold in Vigo (Spain). The main sessions were: 1.- Solar radiation: data analysis, maps. 2.- Thermal conversion of Solar Energy. 3.- Photovoltaic systems. 4.- Solar Architecture 5.- Bioenergy 6.- Wind Power

  14. Wind-induced vibration experiment on solar wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamura Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes wind tunnel experimental results of wind-induced responses of a solar wing system, and investigates its aeroelastic instability using a scaled model. The model comprised 12 solar wing units, each supported by 2 cables. The gaps between units were set constant. Two sag ratios (i.e. sag/span length were adopted. The wind speed was varied from 0 to 16m/s, and 18 different wind speeds were used. From the experiment, when the sag was 2%, a sudden increase in fluctuating displacement was found near a mean wind speed of 10m/s at a wind direction of 40° A sudden increase in fluctuating displacements was also found near a mean wind speed of 1m/s when the wind direction was larger than 60° When the sag increased to 5%, some differences among units in mean displacements were found and complicate vibration in fluctuating displacement at low wind speed was observed.

  15. Direct evidence for kinetic effects associated with solar wind reconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaojun; Wang, Yi; Wei, Fengsi; Feng, Xueshang; Deng, Xiaohua; Ma, Yonghui; Zhou, Meng; Pang, Ye; Wong, Hon-Cheng

    2015-01-28

    Kinetic effects resulting from the two-fluid physics play a crucial role in the fast collisionless reconnection, which is a process to explosively release massive energy stored in magnetic fields in space and astrophysical plasmas. In-situ observations in the Earth's magnetosphere provide solid consistence with theoretical models on the point that kinetic effects are required in the collisionless reconnection. However, all the observations associated with solar wind reconnection have been analyzed in the context of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) although a lot of solar wind reconnection exhausts have been reported. Because of the absence of kinetic effects and substantial heating, whether the reconnections are still ongoing when they are detected in the solar wind remains unknown. Here, by dual-spacecraft observations, we report a solar wind reconnection with clear Hall magnetic fields. Its corresponding Alfvenic electron outflow jet, derived from the decouple between ions and electrons, is identified, showing direct evidence for kinetic effects that dominate the collisionless reconnection. The turbulence associated with the exhaust is a kind of background solar wind turbulence, implying that the reconnection generated turbulence has not much developed.

  16. Role of Concentrating Solar Power in Integrating Solar and Wind Energy: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2015-06-03

    As wind and solar photovoltaics (PV) increase in penetration it is increasingly important to examine enabling technologies that can help integrate these resources at large scale. Concentrating solar power (CSP) when deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) can provide multiple services that can help integrate variable generation (VG) resources such as wind and PV. CSP with TES can provide firm, highly flexible capacity, reducing minimum generation constraints which limit penetration and results in curtailment. By acting as an enabling technology, CSP can complement PV and wind, substantially increasing their penetration in locations with adequate solar resource.

  17. Self-similar signature of the active solar corona within the inertial range of solar-wind turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyani, K; Chapman, S C; Hnat, B; Nicol, R M

    2007-05-25

    We quantify the scaling of magnetic energy density in the inertial range of solar-wind turbulence seen in situ at 1 AU with respect to solar activity. At solar maximum, when the coronal magnetic field is dynamic and topologically complex, we find self-similar scaling in the solar wind, whereas at solar minimum, when the coronal fields are more ordered, we find multifractality. This quantifies the solar-wind signature that is of direct coronal origin and distinguishes it from that of local MHD turbulence, with quantitative implications for coronal heating of the solar wind.

  18. The Importance of Suprathermal Electrons in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    LE CHAT, G.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Pantellini, F. G. E.; Issautier, K.; Moncuquet, M.

    2014-12-01

    Non-Gaussian distributions are ubiquitous in systems having long-range interactions, from real-world networks to astrophysical plasmas. The corona and solar wind are no exception. In this review, we concentrate on the corona and solar wind electrons, whose suprathermal tail governs heat transport and plays a crucial role in the temperature structure and wind production, as first suggested thirty years ago by Olbert and confirmed by a large number of subsequent studies. These non-thermal electrons have been measured in both the corona and solar wind, and are a direct consequence of the fast increase with speed of the Coulomb free-path, compared to the pressure scale-height. This situation has four important consequences: (1) the fluid description, on which the vast majority of solar wind models are based is inadequate; (2) the heat flux is NOT given by the classical Spitzer-Härm expression in the corona and solar wind; (3) for most non-thermal distributions (except the convenient and fashionable Kappa distribution), the fraction of supra-thermal electrons increases with altitude in the corona because of velocity filtration; for example, with a sum of Maxwellians, the hotter the population, the larger the increase with altitude of its fractional contribution; (4) ad-hoc heat addition - assumed in most models, is not necessarily required to produce the observed variation in temperature and the wind acceleration. We will shortly review the observed electron velocity distributions together with the theoretical expectations, the major role of the electric field and the consequences on the heat flux, the temperature structure and the wind acceleration.

  19. Long-term Trends in the Solar Wind Proton Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Heather A.; McComas, David J.; DeForest, Craig E.

    2016-11-01

    We examine the long-term time evolution (1965-2015) of the relationships between solar wind proton temperature (T p) and speed (V p) and between the proton density (n p) and speed using OMNI solar wind observations taken near Earth. We find a long-term decrease in the proton temperature-speed (T p-V p) slope that lasted from 1972 to 2010, but has been trending upward since 2010. Since the solar wind proton density-speed (n p-V p) relationship is not linear like the T p-V p relationship, we perform power-law fits for n p-V p. The exponent (steepness in the n p-V p relationship) is correlated with the solar cycle. This exponent has a stronger correlation with current sheet tilt angle than with sunspot number because the sunspot number maxima vary considerably from cycle to cycle and the tilt angle maxima do not. To understand this finding, we examined the average n p for different speed ranges, and found that for the slow wind n p is highly correlated with the sunspot number, with a lag of approximately four years. The fast wind n p variation was less, but in phase with the cycle. This phase difference may contribute to the n p-V p exponent correlation with the solar cycle. These long-term trends are important since empirical formulas based on fits to T p and V p data are commonly used to identify interplanetary coronal mass ejections, but these formulas do not include any time dependence. Changes in the solar wind density over a solar cycle will create corresponding changes in the near-Earth space environment and the overall extent of the heliosphere.

  20. Enigmatic Solar Wind Disappearance Events – Do We Understand Them?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Janardhan P.

    2006-06-01

    At the Sun–Earth distance of one astronomical unit (1 AU), the solar wind is known to be strongly supersonic and super Alfvénic with Mach and Alfvén numbers being on average 12 and 9 respectively. Also, solar wind densities (average ∼ 10 cm-3) and velocities (average ∼ 450 km s-1) at 1 AU, are known to be inversely correlated with low velocities having higher than average densities and vice versa. However, on May 11 and 12 1999 the Earth was engulfed by an unusually low density (< 0.1 cm-3) and low velocity (< 350 km s-1) solar wind with an Alfvén Mach number significantly less than 1. This was a unique low-velocity, low-density, sub-Alfvénic solar wind flow which spacecraft observations have shown lasted more than 24 hours. One consequence of this extremely tenuous solar wind was a spectacular expansion of the Earth’s magnetosphere and bow shock. The expanding bow shock was observed by several spacecraft and reached record upstream distances of nearly 60 Earth radii, the lunar orbit. The event was so dramatic that it has come to be known as the solar wind disappearance event. Though extensive studies of this event were made by many authors in the past, it has only been recently shown that the unusual solar wind flows characterizing this event originated from a small coronal hole in the vicinity of a large active region on the Sun. These recent results have put to rest speculation that such events are associated with global phenomenon like the periodic solar polar field reversal that occurs at the maximum of each solar cycle. In this paper we revisit the 11 May 1999 event, look at other disappearance events that have ocurred in the past, examine the reasons why speculations about the association of such events with global phenomena like solar polar field reversals were made and also examine the role of transient coronal holes as a possible solar source for such events.

  1. A hybrid reconfigurable solar and wind energy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadkari, Sagar A.

    We study the feasibility of a novel hybrid solar-wind hybrid system that shares most of its infrastructure and components. During periods of clear sunny days the system will generate electricity from the sun using a parabolic concentrator. The concentrator is formed by individual mirror elements and focuses the light onto high intensity vertical multi-junction (VMJ) cells. During periods of high wind speeds and at night, the same concentrator setup will be reconfigured to channel the wind into a wind turbine which will be used to harness wind energy. In this study we report on the feasibility of this type of solar/wind hybrid energy system. The key mechanisms; optics, cooling mechanism of VMJ cells and air flow through the system were investigated using simulation tools. The results from these simulations, along with a simple economic analysis giving the levelized cost of energy for such a system are presented. An iterative method of design refinement based on the simulation results was used to work towards a prototype design. The levelized cost of the system achieved in the economic analysis shows the system to be a good alternative for a grid isolated site and could be used as a standalone system in regions of lower demand. The new approach to solar wind hybrid system reported herein will pave way for newer generation of hybrid systems that share common infrastructure in addition to the storage and distribution of energy.

  2. Velocity and abundance of silicon ions in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochsler, P.

    1989-03-01

    Using data from the ISEE-3 ion composition instrument (ICI), velocities and abundances of silicon ions in the solar wind have been determined. The period of investigation covers the maximum of solar cycle 21, beginning with launch of ISEE-3 in August 1978 and ending at the removal of the spacecraft from the Lagrangian Point L1 in June 1982. The results generally confirm previous ICI observations of iron, the other heavy element with a low first ionization potential measured with the ICI. Silicon ions (and other ions in the same M/Q range) tend to stream at the bulk velocity of /sup 4/He/sup + +/ in low-speed solar wind. At high-speed solar wind. Si lags by up to or about 20 km/s after /sup 4/He/sup + +/. By means of a minimum variance estimation technique, fluxes (and densities) of silicon in the solar wind have been obtained free of bias. An average Si/O flux ratio of 0.19 +- 0.04 is derived. This value is larger by a factor of 3 or 4 than the Si/O abundance ratio at the solar surface. copyright American Geophysical Union 1989

  3. Generalized similarity in finite range solar wind magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, S C; Nicol, R M

    2009-12-11

    Extended or generalized similarity is a ubiquitous but not well understood feature of turbulence that is realized over a finite range of scales. The ULYSSES spacecraft solar polar passes at solar minimum provide in situ observations of evolving anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the solar wind under ideal conditions of fast quiet flow. We find a single generalized scaling function characterizes this finite range turbulence and is insensitive to plasma conditions. The recent unusually inactive solar minimum--with turbulent fluctuations down by a factor of approximately 2 in power--provides a test of this invariance.

  4. International Solar Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) WIND Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, R.; Sizemore, K. O.

    1991-01-01

    The launch of the WIND spacecraft will place the satellite into a sunside apogee double-lunar swing-by orbit for a period of one year, after which WIND may be transferred to a Sun-Earth L1 Halo orbit. Information is presented in tabular form on the following topics: Deep Space Network support; frequency assignments, telemetry, command, and ranging.

  5. Solar identification of solar-wind disturbances observed at Ulysses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemen, J. R.; Acton, L. W.; Alexander, D.; Galvin, A. B.; Harvey, K. L.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Zhao, X.; Hudson, H. S.

    1996-07-01

    The Ulysses polar passages are producing a unique set of observations of solar-wind disturbances at high heliographic latitudes. In this paper we use the Yohkoh soft X-ray telescope (SXT) to locate some of these events, as defined by the Ulysses/SWICS data, in the solar corona. Of 8 events, we identify two with flares, three with front-side large arcade events, two with far-side events, and one was not seen in the Ulysses data. The arcade events generally resemble long-duration flares seen in active regions, but are larger, slower, and cooler. We present Yohkoh images of each of these events. In the large arcade events (see Alexander et al., 1996, for a detailed look at one of them) the magnetic morphology at the location of the Yohkoh arcade is generally consistent with the development of a large system of loops. Some of the identifications are ambiguous, and we summarize the reasons for this. From the SWICS data we have obtained ionization temperatures for several events, and find that they have no obvious pattern in relation to the X-ray temperatures; this may be expected on the basis that the interplanetary plasma cloud is physically distinct from the plasma trapped in the corona. Soft X-ray observations of the solar corona show occasional occurrences of large-scale brightenings in the form of arcades of loops. Such structures have been known since Skylab (e.g., Sturrock, 1980), and have a clear relationship with coronal mass ejections (e.g., Kahler, 1977). We now may study this phenomenon statistically with the much more comprehensive Yohkoh observations; with Yohkoh movies we can also begin to extend our knowledge to the three-dimensional development of the structures. At the same time Ulysses has sampled the latitude dependence of the interplanetary effects. With this paper we introduce this subject and provide a preliminary listing of events from the passage of Ulysses through high heliographic latitudes. The starting point of the present survey is a list

  6. XMM-Newton Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, S. L.; Collier, M. R.; Kuntz, K. D.

    2004-01-01

    We present an XMM-Newton spectrum of diffuse X-ray emission from within the solar system. The spectrum is dominated by O VII and O VIII lines at 0.57 keV and 0.65 keV, O VIII (and possibly Fe XVII) lines at approximately 0.8 keV, Ne IX lines at approximately 0.92 keV, and Mg XI lines at approximately 1.35 keV. This spectrum is consistent with what is expected from charge exchange emission between the highly ionized solar wind and either interstellar neutrals in the heliosphere or material from Earth's exosphere. The emission is clearly seen as a low-energy ( E less than 1.5 keV) spectral enhancement in one of a series of observations of the Hubble Deep Field North. The X-ray enhancement is concurrent with an enhancement in the solar wind measured by the ACE satellite. The solar wind enhancement reaches a flux level an order of magnitude more intense than typical fluxes at 1 AU, and has ion ratios with significantly enhanced higher ionization states. Whereas observations of the solar wind plasma made at a single point reflect only local conditions which may only be representative of solar wind properties with spatial scales ranging from less than half of an Earth radii (approximately 10 s) to 100 Earth radii, X-ray observations of solar wind charge exchange are remote sensing measurements which may provide observations which are significantly more global in character. Besides being of interest in its own right for studies of the solar system, this emission can have significant consequences for observations of more cosmological objects. It can provide emission lines at zero redshift which are of particular interest (e.g., O VII and O VIII) in studies of diffuse thermal emission, and which can therefore act as contamination in objects which cover the entire detector field of view. We propose the use of solar wind monitoring data, such as from the ACE and Wind spacecraft, as a diagnostic to screen for such possibilities.

  7. Short term fluctuations of wind and solar power systems

    CERN Document Server

    Anvari, M; Wächter, M; Milan, P; Lorenz, E; Heinemann, D; Tabar, M Reza Rahimi; Peinke, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Wind and solar power are known to be highly influenced by weather events and may ramp up or down abruptly. Such events in the power production influence not only the availability of energy, but also the stability of the entire power grid. By analysing significant amounts of data from several regions around the world with resolutions of seconds to minutes, we provide strong evidence that renewable wind and solar sources exhibit multiple types of variability and nonlinearity in the time scale of {\\it seconds} and characterise their stochastic properties. In contrast to previous findings, we show that only the jumpy characteristic of renewable sources decreases when increasing the spatial size over which the renewable energies are harvested. Otherwise, the strong non-Gaussian, intermittent behaviour in the cumulative power of the total field survives even for a country-wide distribution of the systems. The strong fluctuating behaviour of renewable wind and solar sources can be well characterised by Kolmogorov-li...

  8. Proton Kinetic Effects in Vlasov and Solar Wind Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Servidio, S; Valentini, F; Perrone, D; Califano, F; Chapman, S; Matthaeus, W H; Veltri, P

    2013-01-01

    Kinetic plasma processes have been investigated in the framework of solar wind turbulence, employing Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell (HVM) simulations. The dependency of proton temperature anisotropy T_{\\perp}/T_{\\parallel} on the parallel plasma beta \\beta_{\\parallel}, commonly observed in spacecraft data, has been recovered using an ensemble of HVM simulations. By varying plasma parameters, such as plasma beta and fluctuation level, the simulations explore distinct regions of the parameter space given by T_{\\perp}/T_{\\parallel} and \\beta_{\\parallel}, similar to solar wind sub-datasets. Moreover, both simulation and solar wind data suggest that temperature anisotropy is not only associated with magnetic intermittent events, but also with gradient-type structures in the flow and in the density. This connection between non-Maxwellian kinetic effects and various types of intermittency may be a key point for understanding the complex nature of plasma turbulence.

  9. Analysis of Ion Charge States in Solar Wind and CMEs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arati Dasgupta; J. M. Laming

    2008-03-01

    We discuss needs in dielectronic recombination data motivated by recent work directed at a quantitative understanding of ion charge states of various elements observed in situ in the solar wind and CMEs. The competing processes of ionization and recombination lead to departures from collision ionization equilibrium. The use of this as a diagnostic of acceleration and heating processes of the solar wind and CMEs is sensitive to the accuracy of the atomic rates in a way that steady state ionization equilibrium plasmas are not. The most pressing need is dielectronic recombination rates for ions Fe8+-12+. These are among the dominant species observed in various regions of the solar wind and CMEs, and in remotely sensed EUV spectra.

  10. Mechanism of proton anisotropic velocity distribution in the solar wind

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AO; Xianzhi(敖先志); SHEN; Ji(沈迹); TU; Chuanyi(涂传诒)

    2003-01-01

    Although it has been long that spacecraft observed the anisotropy of velocity protons in the solar wind, there is still not a reasonable explanation. In this paper we try to give an explanation from the diffusion plateau of protoncyclotron resonance predicted by the quasi-linear theory for the resonance between the protons and the parallel propagating waves. We consider the effect of dispersion relation on diffusion plateau and notice that the diffusion plateau we have got by using cold plasma dispersion relation accords with the density contours in the velocity phase space detected at 0.3 AU in fast solar wind. For explaining proton distributions obtained in the fast solar wind from 0.7 AU to 1 AU hot plasma dispersion relation should be considered. We also give a theoretical relation of proton thermal anisotropy A and plasma parameter β.

  11. Intermittency and local heating in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K T; Matthaeus, W H; Wan, M; Rappazzo, A F

    2012-06-29

    Evidence for nonuniform heating in the solar wind plasma near current sheets dynamically generated by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is obtained using measurements from the ACE spacecraft. These coherent structures only constitute 19% of the data, but contribute 50% of the total plasma internal energy. Intermittent heating manifests as elevations in proton temperature near current sheets, resulting in regional heating and temperature enhancements extending over several hours. The number density of non-Gaussian structures is found to be proportional to the mean proton temperature and solar wind speed. These results suggest magnetofluid turbulence drives intermittent dissipation through a hierarchy of coherent structures, which collectively could be a significant source of coronal and solar wind heating.

  12. The Interplanetary Magnetic Field and Solar Wind Driven Magnetospheric Reconfiguration

    CERN Document Server

    Savov, E

    2002-01-01

    The magnetic disturbances are associated with electric currents as it is well checked at laboratory room scales and described by the Maxwell's equations of electromagnetic field. The analysis of spacecraft observations for more than a quarter of a century failed to provide a self-consistent three-dimensional picture of the solar wind-magnetosphere dynamo generated magnetospheric and ionospheric current systems. The proposed solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) driven reconfiguration of the earth's magnetosphere directly accounts for the observed magnetic disturbances. So role of the magnetospheric currents in creation of the magnetic disturbances is reconsidered in accordance with some poorly understood observations. A quantitative agreement with observations is demonstrated and a laboratory experiment to test the suggested model of the solar wind/IMF-magnetosphere interaction is described.

  13. Solar Wind Turbulence and the Role of Ion Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrova, Olga; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Horbury, Timothy S; Bale, Stuart D

    2013-01-01

    Solar wind is probably the best laboratory to study turbulence in astrophysical plasmas. In addition to the presence of magnetic field, the differences with neutral fluid isotropic turbulence are: weakness of collisional dissipation and presence of several characteristic space and time scales. In this paper we discuss observational properties of solar wind turbulence in a large range from the MHD to the electron scales. At MHD scales, within the inertial range, turbulence cascade of magnetic fluctuations develops mostly in the plane perpendicular to the mean field. Solar wind turbulence is compressible in nature. The spectrum of velocity fluctuations do not follow magnetic field one. Probability distribution functions of different plasma parameters are not Gaussian, indicating presence of intermittency. At the moment there is no global model taking into account all these observed properties of the inertial range. At ion scales, turbulent spectra have a break, compressibility increases and the density fluctuat...

  14. Firehose constraints for the solar wind suprathermal electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Lazar, M; Poedts, S; Štverák, Š

    2016-01-01

    The indefinite increase of temperature predicted by the solar wind expansion in the direction parallel to the interplanetary magnetic field is already notorious for not being confirmed by the observations. In hot and dilute plasmas from space particle-particle collisions are not efficient in constraining large deviations from isotropy, but the resulting firehose instability provides in this case plausible limitations for the temperature anisotropy of the thermal (core) populations of both the electron and proton species. The present paper takes into discussion the suprathermal (halo) electrons, which are ubiquitous in the solar wind. Less dense but hotter than the core, suprathermals may be highly anisotropic and susceptible to the firehose instability. The main features of the instability are here derived from a first-order theory for conditions specific to the suprathermal electrons in the solar wind and terrestrial magnetospheres. Unveiled here, new regimes of the electron firehose instability may be exclu...

  15. THE NEW HORIZONS SOLAR WIND AROUND PLUTO (SWAP) OBSERVATIONS OF THE SOLAR WIND FROM 11–33 au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, H. A.; McComas, D. J.; Valek, P.; Weidner, S.; Livadiotis, G. [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States); Nicolaou, G., E-mail: helliott@swri.edu [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Box 812, SE-98128, Kiruna (Sweden)

    2016-04-15

    The Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument on National Aeronautics and Space Administration's New Horizons Pluto mission has collected solar wind observations en route from Earth to Pluto, and these observations continue beyond Pluto. Few missions have explored the solar wind in the outer heliosphere making this dataset a critical addition to the field. We created a forward model of SWAP count rates, which includes a comprehensive instrument response function based on laboratory and flight calibrations. By fitting the count rates with this model, the proton density (n), speed (V), and temperature (T) parameters are determined. Comparisons between SWAP parameters and both propagated 1 au observations and prior Voyager 2 observations indicate consistency in both the range and mean wind values. These comparisons as well as our additional findings confirm that small and midsized solar wind structures are worn down with increasing distance due to dynamic interaction of parcels of wind with different speed. For instance, the T–V relationship steepens, as the range in V is limited more than the range in T with distance. At times the T–V correlation clearly breaks down beyond 20 au, which may indicate wind currently expanding and cooling may have an elevated T reflecting prior heating and compression in the inner heliosphere. The power of wind parameters at shorter periodicities decreases with distance as the longer periodicities strengthen. The solar rotation periodicity is present in temperature beyond 20 au indicating the observed parcel temperature may reflect not only current heating or cooling, but also heating occurring closer to the Sun.

  16. The New Horizons Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) Observations of the Solar Wind from 11-33 au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, H. A.; McComas, D. J.; Valek, P.; Nicolaou, G.; Weidner, S.; Livadiotis, G.

    2016-04-01

    The Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument on National Aeronautics and Space Administration's New Horizons Pluto mission has collected solar wind observations en route from Earth to Pluto, and these observations continue beyond Pluto. Few missions have explored the solar wind in the outer heliosphere making this dataset a critical addition to the field. We created a forward model of SWAP count rates, which includes a comprehensive instrument response function based on laboratory and flight calibrations. By fitting the count rates with this model, the proton density (n), speed (V), and temperature (T) parameters are determined. Comparisons between SWAP parameters and both propagated 1 au observations and prior Voyager 2 observations indicate consistency in both the range and mean wind values. These comparisons as well as our additional findings confirm that small and midsized solar wind structures are worn down with increasing distance due to dynamic interaction of parcels of wind with different speed. For instance, the T-V relationship steepens, as the range in V is limited more than the range in T with distance. At times the T-V correlation clearly breaks down beyond 20 au, which may indicate wind currently expanding and cooling may have an elevated T reflecting prior heating and compression in the inner heliosphere. The power of wind parameters at shorter periodicities decreases with distance as the longer periodicities strengthen. The solar rotation periodicity is present in temperature beyond 20 au indicating the observed parcel temperature may reflect not only current heating or cooling, but also heating occurring closer to the Sun.

  17. What geometrical factors determine the in situ solar wind speed?

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong

    2011-01-01

    At present it remains to address why the fast solar wind is fast and the slow wind is slow. Recently we have shown that the field line curvature may substantially influence the wind speed $v$, thereby offering an explanation for the Arge et al. finding that $v$ depends on more than just the flow tube expansion factor. Here we show by extensive numerical examples that the correlation between $v$ and field line curvature is valid for rather general base boundary conditions and for rather general heating functions. Furthermore, the effect of field line curvature is even more pronounced when the proton-alpha particle speed difference is examined. We suggest that any solar wind model has to take into account the field line shape for any quantitative analysis to be made.

  18. Agua Caliente Wind/Solar Project at Whitewater Ranch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooks, Todd [Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians, Palm Springs, CA (United States); Stewart, Royce [Red Mountain Energy Partners, Sante Fe, NM (United States)

    2014-12-16

    Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians (ACBCI) was awarded a grant by the Department of Energy (DOE) to study the feasibility of a wind and/or solar renewable energy project at the Whitewater Ranch (WWR) property of ACBCI. Red Mountain Energy Partners (RMEP) was engaged to conduct the study. The ACBCI tribal lands in the Coachella Valley have very rich renewable energy resources. The tribe has undertaken several studies to more fully understand the options available to them if they were to move forward with one or more renewable energy projects. With respect to the resources, the WWR property clearly has excellent wind and solar resources. The DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has continued to upgrade and refine their library of resource maps. The newer, more precise maps quantify the resources as among the best in the world. The wind and solar technology available for deployment is also being improved. Both are reducing their costs to the point of being at or below the costs of fossil fuels. Technologies for energy storage and microgrids are also improving quickly and present additional ways to increase the wind and/or solar energy retained for later use with the network management flexibility to provide power to the appropriate locations when needed. As a result, renewable resources continue to gain more market share. The transitioning to renewables as the major resources for power will take some time as the conversion is complex and can have negative impacts if not managed well. While the economics for wind and solar systems continue to improve, the robustness of the WWR site was validated by the repeated queries of developers to place wind and/or solar there. The robust resources and improving technologies portends toward WWR land as a renewable energy site. The business case, however, is not so clear, especially when the potential investment portfolio for ACBCI has several very beneficial and profitable alternatives.

  19. Magnetic Influences on the Solar Wind (Ph.D. Dissertation)

    CERN Document Server

    Woolsey, Lauren N

    2016-01-01

    The steady, supersonic outflow from the Sun we call the solar wind was first posited in the 1950s and initial theories rightly linked the acceleration of the wind to the existence of the million-degree solar corona. Still today, the wind acceleration mechanisms and the coronal heating processes remain unsolved challenges in solar physics. In this work, I seek to answer a portion of the mystery by focusing on a particular acceleration process: Alfven waves launched by the motion of magnetic field footpoints in the photosphere. The entire corona is threaded with magnetic loops and flux tubes that open up into the heliosphere. I have sought a better understanding of the role these magnetic fields play in determining solar wind properties in open flux tubes. After an introduction of relevant material, I discuss my parameter study of magnetic field profiles and the statistical understanding we can draw from the resulting steady-state wind. In the chapter following, I describe how I extended this work to consider t...

  20. Source reliability in a combined wind-solar-hydro system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traca de Almeida, A.; Martins, A.; Jesus, H.; Climaco, J.

    1983-06-01

    The results of an examination of the feasibility of using coupled wind-solar-hydro power generation systems to provide all of Portugal's electricity by the year 2000 are reported. Portugal used 15.6 TWh of electricity in 1981, of which hydro supplied 10 TWh. Demand is expected to reach 34 TWh in 2000 AD. The full development of hydropower resource would furnish 18 TWh and a storage capacity of 4.5 TWh. The installed hydro system could meet the peak demand of 6 GW, while solar cells and wind turbines must produce 16 TWh annually plus a reserve. The Growian wind turbine, 100 m tall, is considered for its 2.2 MW output. A coastal strip of wind turbines 150 x 20 km, with 1 km spacing between the machines, would be needed to produce 5.4 GW of power. Partially tracking solar cell arrays generating 9.4 GW of electricity would require an area of 100 sq km. Computer simulations of the annual rainfall, combined with projections of the variations in wind-solar output, demonstrates that a reserve margin of 1.20 will be necessary. The costs of installation of the renewable energy converters are estimated at about three times that currently necessary for obtaining the same capacity from fission power plants, although the situation may change due to import and technical considerations.

  1. Modulation of Saturn's radio clock by solar wind speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarka, Philippe; Lamy, Laurent; Cecconi, Baptiste; Prangé, Renée; Rucker, Helmut O

    2007-11-08

    The internal rotation rates of the giant planets can be estimated by cloud motions, but such an approach is not very precise because absolute wind speeds are not known a priori and depend on latitude: periodicities in the radio emissions, thought to be tied to the internal planetary magnetic field, are used instead. Saturn, despite an apparently axisymmetric magnetic field, emits kilometre-wavelength (radio) photons from auroral sources. This emission is modulated at a period initially identified as 10 h 39 min 24 +/- 7 s, and this has been adopted as Saturn's rotation period. Subsequent observations, however, revealed that this period varies by +/-6 min on a timescale of several months to years. Here we report that the kilometric radiation period varies systematically by +/-1% with a characteristic timescale of 20-30 days. Here we show that these fluctuations are correlated with solar wind speed at Saturn, meaning that Saturn's radio clock is controlled, at least in part, by conditions external to the planet's magnetosphere. No correlation is found with the solar wind density, dynamic pressure or magnetic field; the solar wind speed therefore has a special function. We also show that the long-term fluctuations are simply an average of the short-term ones, and therefore the long-term variations are probably also driven by changes in the solar wind.

  2. Long-Term Trends In The Solar Wind Proton Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, Heather A; DeForest, Craig E

    2016-01-01

    We examine the long-term time evolution (1965-2015) of the relationships between solar wind proton temperature (Tp) and speed (Vp) and between the proton density (np) and speed using OMNI solar wind observations taken near Earth. We find a long-term decrease in the proton temperature-speed (Tp-Vp) slope that lasted from 1972 to 2010, but has been trending upward since 2010. Since the solar wind proton density-speed (np-Vp) relationship is not linear like the Tp-Vp relationship, we perform power law fits for np-Vp. The exponent (steepness in the np-Vp relationship) is correlated with the solar cycle. This exponent has a stronger correlation with current sheet tilt angle than with sunspot number because the sunspot number maxima vary considerably from cycle to cycle and the tilt angle maxima do not. To understand this finding, we examined the average np for different speed ranges, and found that for the slow wind np is highly correlated with the sunspot number with a lag of ~4 years. The fast wind np variation ...

  3. Coherent structure and Intermittent Turbulence in the Solar Wind Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondhiya, Deepak Kumar; Gwal, Ashok Kumar; Kasde, Satish Kumar

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the coherent structures and intermittent turbulence in the solar wind plasma using measurements from the Wind spacecraft. Previously established novel wavelet and higher order statistics are used in this work. We analyze the wavelet power spectrum of various solar wind plasma parameters. We construct a statistical significance level in the wavelet power spectrum to quantify the interference effects arising from filling missing data in the time series, allowing extraction of significant power from the measured data. We analyze each wavelet power spectra for transient coherency, and global periodicities resulting from the superposition of repeating coherent structures. Furthermore, these coherent structures are preferentially found in plasma unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. These results offer a new understanding of various processes in a turbulent regime. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for current theories of solar wind generation and describe future work for determining the relationship between the coherent structures in our ionic composition data and the structure of the coronal magnetic field. Keywords: Wavelet Power Spectrum, Coherent structure and Solar wind plasma

  4. Distribution of solar wind implanted noble gases in lunar samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiko, J.; Kirsten, T.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of solar wind implanted noble gases in lunar samples depends on implantation energy, fluence, diffusion, radiation damage and erosion. It is known that at least the lighter rare gases are fractionated after implantation, but the redistribution processes, which mainly drive the losses, are not well understood. Some information about this one can get by looking at the concentration profiles of solar wind implanted He-4 measured by the Gas Ion Probe in single lunar grains. The observed profiles were divided in three groups. These groups are illustrated and briefly discussed.

  5. Modified temperature-anisotropy instability thresholds in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlickeiser, R; Michno, M J; Ibscher, D; Lazar, M; Skoda, T

    2011-11-11

    The proton and electron temperature anisotropies in the solar wind are constrained by the instability thresholds for temperature-anisotropy-driven kinetic plasma instabilities. The modifications to the marginal instability conditions from accounting for the influence of damping connected with the collisional effects in the solar wind plasma are calculated for right- and left-handed polarized parallel propagating Alfvén waves and mirror and firehose fluctuations. These modifications provide tighter threshold constraints compared to the marginal thresholds but do not fully explain the observations at small values of the parallel plasma beta.

  6. Ion kinetic scale in the solar wind observed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śafránková, Jana; Němeček, Zdeněk; Přech, Lubomír; Zastenker, Georgy N

    2013-01-11

    This Letter shows the first results from the solar wind monitor onboard the Spektr-R spacecraft which measures plasma moments with a time resolution of 31 ms. This high-time resolution allows us to make direct observations of solar wind turbulence below ion kinetic length scales. We present examples of the frequency spectra of the density, velocity, and thermal velocity. Our study reveals that although these parameters exhibit the same behavior at the magnetohydrodynamic scale, their spectra are remarkably different at the kinetic scale.

  7. Wind and solar energy curtailment: A review of international experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, Lori; Lew, Debra; Milligan, Michael; Carlini, E. Maria; Estanqueiro, Ana; Flynn, Damian; Gomez-Lazaro, Emilio; Holttinen, Hannele; Menemenlis, Nickie; Orths, Antje; Eriksen, Peter Børre; Smith, J. Charles; Soder, Lennart; Sorensen, Poul; Altiparmakis, Argyrios; Yasuda, Yoh; Miller, John

    2016-11-01

    Greater penetrations of variable renewable generation on some electric grids have resulted in increased levels of curtailment in recent years. Studies of renewable energy grid integration have found that curtailment levels may grow as the penetration of wind and solar energy generation increases. This paper reviews international experience with curtailment of wind and solar energy on bulk power systems in recent years, with a focus on eleven countries in Europe, North America, and Asia. It examines levels of curtailment, the causes of curtailment, curtailment methods and use of market-based dispatch, as well as operational, institutional, and other changes that are being made to reduce renewable energy curtailment.

  8. Flank solar wind interaction. Annual report, June 1991-July 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, S.L.; Greenstadt, E.W.

    1992-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of the first 12 months of our program to study the interaction of the Earth's magnetosphere with the solar wind on the far flanks of the bow shock. This study employs data from the ISEE-3 spacecraft during its traversals of the Earth's magnetotail and correlative data from spacecraft monitoring the solar wind upstream. Our main effort to date has involved assembling data sets and developing new plotting programs. Two talks were given at the Spring Meeting of the American Geophysical Union describing our initial results from analyzing data from the far flank foreshock and magnetosheath. The following sections summarize our results.

  9. Solar Wind Electric Fields in the Ion Cyclotron Frequency Range

    CERN Document Server

    Kellogg, P J; Mozer, F S; Horbury, T S; Reme, H

    2006-01-01

    Measurements of fluctuations of electric fields in the frequency range from a fraction of one Hz to 12.5 Hz are presented, and corrected for the Lorentz transformation of magnetic fluctuations to give the electric fields in the plasma frame. The electric fields are large enough to provide the dominant force on the ions of the solar wind in the region near the ion cyclotron frequency of protons, larger than the force due to magnetic fluctuations. They provide sufficient velocity space diffusion or heating to counteract conservation of magnetic moment in the expanding solar wind to maintain nearly isotropic velocity distributions.

  10. Reconstructing the Solar Wind From Its Early History To Current Epoch

    CERN Document Server

    Airapetian, Vladimir S

    2016-01-01

    Stellar winds from active solar type stars can play a crucial role in removal of stellar angular momentum and erosion of planetary atmospheres. However, major wind properties except for mass loss rates cannot be directly derived from observations. We employed a three dimensional magnetohydrodynamic Alfven wave driven solar wind model, ALF3D, to reconstruct the solar wind parameters including the mass loss rate, terminal velocity and wind temperature at 0.7, 2 and 4.65 Gyr. Our model treats the wind thermal electrons, protons and pickup protons as separate fluids and incorporates turbulence transport, eddy viscosity, turbulent resistivity, and turbulent heating to properly describe proton and electron temperatures of the solar wind. To study the evolution of the solar wind, we specified three input model parameters, the plasma density, Alfven wave amplitude and the strength of the dipole magnetic field at the wind base for each of three solar wind evolution models that are consistent with observational constra...

  11. Numerical Simulations of Magnetized Winds of Solar-Like Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Vidotto, A A; Jatenco-Pereira, V; Gombosi, T I

    2009-01-01

    We investigate magnetized solar-like stellar winds by means of self-consistent three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) numerical simulations. We analyze winds with different magnetic field intensities and densities as to explore the dependence on the plasma-beta parameter. By solving the fully ideal 3D MHD equations, we show that the plasma-beta parameter is the crucial parameter in the configuration of the steady-state wind. Therefore, there is a group of magnetized flows that would present the same terminal velocity despite of its thermal and magnetic energy densities, as long as the plasma-beta parameter is the same.

  12. Power generation from wind turbines in a solar chimney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foote, Tudor [Graduate Student, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University in St. Louis, Jolley Hall, Campus Box 1185, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri, 63130 (United States); Agarwal, Ramesh K. [William Palm Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University in St. Louis, Jolley Hall, Campus Box 1185, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri, 63130 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that shrouded wind turbines can generate greater power compared to bare turbines. A solar chimney generates an upward draft of wind inside a tower and a shroud around the wind turbine. There are numerous empty silos on farms in the U.S. that can be converted to solar chimneys with minor modifications at modest cost. The objective of this study is to determine the potential of these silos/chimneys for generating wind power. The study is conducted through analytical/computational approach by employing the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software. Computations are performed for five different geometric configurations consisting of a turbine, a cylindrical silo, and/or a venturi and/or a diffuser using the dimensions of typical silos and assuming Class 3 wind velocity. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with the Boussinesq approximation and a two equation realizable {kappa}-{epsilon} model are employed in the calculations, and the turbine is modeled as an actuator disk. The power coefficient (Cp) and generated power are calculated for the five cases. Consistent with recent literature, it was found that the silos with diffusers increase the Cp beyond Betz’s limit significantly and thus the generated power. It should be noted that Cp is calculated by normalizing it by the turbine area swept by the wind. This study shows the potential of using abandoned silos in the mid-west and other parts of the country for localized wind power generation.

  13. Power generation from wind turbines in a solar chimney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor Foote, Ramesh K. Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that shrouded wind turbines can generate greater power compared to bare turbines. A solar chimney generates an upward draft of wind inside a tower and a shroud around the wind turbine. There are numerous empty silos on farms in the U.S. that can be converted to solar chimneys with minor modifications at modest cost. The objective of this study is to determine the potential of these silos/chimneys for generating wind power. The study is conducted through analytical/computational approach by employing the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD software. Computations are performed for five different geometric configurations consisting of a turbine, a cylindrical silo, and/or a venturi and/or a diffuser using the dimensions of typical silos and assuming Class 3 wind velocity. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with the Boussinesq approximation and a two equation realizable k – ε model are employed in the calculations, and the turbine is modeled as an actuator disk. The power coefficient (Cp and generated power are calculated for the five cases. Consistent with recent literature, it was found that the silos with diffusers increase the Cp beyond Betz’s limit significantly and thus the generated power. It should be noted that Cp is calculated by normalizing it by the turbine area swept by the wind. This study shows the potential of using abandoned silos in the mid-west and other parts of the country for localized wind power generation.

  14. Wind effects in solar fields with various collector designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paetzold, Joachim; Cochard, Steve; Fletcher, David F.; Vassallo, Anthony

    2016-05-01

    Parabolic trough power plants are often located in areas that are subjected to high wind speeds, as an open terrain without any obstructions is beneficial for the plant performance. The wind impacts both the structural requirements and the performance of the plant. The aerodynamic loads from the wind impose strong requirements on the support structure of the reflectors, and they also impact the tracking accuracy. On a thermal level the airflow around the glass envelope of the receiver tube cools its outer surface through forced convection, thereby contributing to the heat loss. Based on previous studies at the level of an individual row of collectors, this study analyses the wind effects in a full-scale solar field of different continuous and staggered trough designs. The airflow around several rows of parabolic trough collectors (PTC) is simulated at full scale in steady state simulations in an atmospheric boundary layer flow using the commercial computational fluid dynamics software ANSYSO® CFX 15.0. The effect of the wake of a collector row on the following collectors is analysed, and the aerodynamic loads are compared between the different geometries. The outermost collectors of a solar field experience the highest wind forces, as the rows in the interior of the solar field are protected from high wind speeds. While the aerodynamic forces in the interior of the solar field are almost independent of the collector shape, the deeper troughs (with large rim angles) tested in this study show a lower heat loss due to forced convection on the outer surface of the receiver tube than the shallower ones (with small rim angles) in most of the solar field.

  15. A Model fot the Sources of the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Mikic, Z.; Titov, V. S.; Lionello, R.; Linker, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Models for the origin of the slow solar wind must account for two seemingly contradictory observations: the slow wind has the composition of the closed-field corona, implying that it originates from the continuous opening and closing of flux at the boundary between open and closed field. On the other hand, the slow wind also has large angular width, up to approx.60deg, suggesting that its source extends far from the open-closed boundary. We propose a model that can explain both observations. The key idea is that the source of the slow wind at the Sun is a network of narrow (possibly singular) open-field corridors that map to a web of separatrices and quasi-separatrix layers in the heliosphere. We compute analytically the topology of an open-field corridor and show that it produces a quasi-separatrix layer in the heliosphere that extends to angles far from the heliospheric current sheet. We then use an MHD code and MDI/SOHO observations of the photospheric magnetic field to calculate numerically, with high spatial resolution, the quasi-steady solar wind, and magnetic field for a time period preceding the 2008 August 1 total solar eclipse. Our numerical results imply that, at least for this time period, a web of separatrices (which we term an S-web) forms with sufficient density and extent in the heliosphere to account for the observed properties of the slow wind. We discuss the implications of our S-web model for the structure and dynamics of the corona and heliosphere and propose further tests of the model. Key words: solar wind - Sun: corona - Sun: magnetic topology

  16. Weak and strong comets in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Geraint Hughes

    When within the inner solar system, comets possess gaseous atmospheres. The gases therein are ionized, and eventually join the solar wind. This thesis describes an investigation of the interaction of comets with the solar wind. The work begins with an overview of the processes involved in the comet-solar wind interaction region, and the domains and boundaries that exist in the region. A review of remote observations of cometary ions is given. The characteristics of visible plasma features are summarized, together with the theories proposed to explain them. An overview of the Giotto spacecraft and its instruments, and a description of its mission to two comets are presented. Ground-based observations were obtained of the ion features present in Comet C/1996 B2 Hyakutake. The morphologies and motions of the comet's plasma features are described. The formation of tail rays was captured during a high temporal resolution image sequence. A gas production rate estimate is derived from the observations, and a model of ray morphologies is proposed, based partly upon observational evidence. 45P/Honda-Mrkos-Pajdusakova and C/1996 Q1 Tabur were also observed; however, no strong ion features were detected. An analysis of the plasma features of 26P/Grigg-Skjellerup then follows. A description of the solar wind conditions at that comet during the Giotto encounter is given, and an estimate of its production rate is made. Ground-based observations of Grigg-Skjellerup are compared to in-situ Giotto data. Morphological features were detected in ground-based images; it is proposed that they could have been linked to certain solar wind discontinuities. A qualitative description of a model of ion ray formation then follows. The thesis concludes with a summary of the main results.

  17. Solar and solar-wind composition results from the genesis mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiens, Roger C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Burnett, D. S. [Geological and Planetary Sciences, Pasadena, CA (United States); Hohenberg, C. M. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Meshik, A. [Isotope Geology, Zurich (Switzerland); Heber, V. [Isotope Geology, Zurich (Switzerland); Grimberg, A. [Isotope Geology, Zurich (Switzerland); Wieler, R. [Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States); Reisenfeld, D. B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2007-02-20

    The Genesis mission returned samples of solar wind to Earth in September, 2004 for ground-based analyses of solar-wind composition, particularly for isotope ratios. Substrates, consisting mostly of high-purity semiconductor materials, were exposed to the solar wind at L1 from December 2001 to April 2004. In addition to a bulk sample of the solar wind, separate samples of coronal hole, interstream, and coronal mass ejection material were obtained. While many of the substrates were broken upon landing due to the failure to deploy the parachute, a number of results have been obtained, and most of the primary science objectives will likely be met. These include noble gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) isotope ratios in the bulk solar wind and in different solarwind regimes, and the nitrogen and oxygen isotope ( 18O/17O/16O) ratios to high precision. The greatest successes to date have been with the noble gases. Light noble gases from bulk solar wind and separate solar-wind regime samples have been analyzed to date. The regime compositions are so far ambiguous on the occurrence of the type of isotopic fractionation expected from Coulomb drag acceleration. Neon results from closed system stepped etching of bulk metallic glass have revealed the nature of isotopic fractionation as a function of depth, which in lunar samples have for years deceptively suggested the presence of a separate solar component. Isotope ratios of the heavy noble gases, nitrogen, and oxygen are still in the process of being measured.

  18. Livestock water pumping with wind and solar power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent developments in pumping technologies have allowed for efficient use of renewable energies like wind and solar to power new pumps for remote water pumping. A helical type, positive displacement pump was developed a few years ago and recently modified to accept input from a variable power sourc...

  19. Air emissions due to wind and solar power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzenstein, Warren; Apt, Jay

    2009-01-15

    Renewables portfolio standards (RPS) encourage large-scale deployment of wind and solar electric power. Their power output varies rapidly, even when several sites are added together. In many locations, natural gas generators are the lowest cost resource available to compensate for this variability, and must ramp up and down quickly to keep the grid stable, affecting their emissions of NOx and CO2. We model a wind or solar photovoltaic plus gas system using measured 1-min time-resolved emissions and heat rate data from two types of natural gas generators, and power data from four wind plants and one solar plant. Over a wide range of renewable penetration, we find CO2 emissions achieve approximately 80% of the emissions reductions expected if the power fluctuations caused no additional emissions. Using steam injection, gas generators achieve only 30-50% of expected NOx emissions reductions, and with dry control NOx emissions increase substantially. We quantify the interaction between state RPSs and NOx constraints, finding that states with substantial RPSs could see significant upward pressure on NOx permit prices, if the gas turbines we modeled are representative of the plants used to mitigate wind and solar power variability.

  20. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study: Executive Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-05-01

    This Study investigates the operational impact of up to 35% energy penetration of wind, photovoltaics (PVs), and concentrating solar power (CSP) on the power system operated by the WestConnect group of utilities in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Wyoming.

  1. Magnetosheath control of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkkinen, T. I.; Dimmock, A. P.; Lakka, A.; Osmane, A.; Kilpua, E.; Myllys, M.; Tanskanen, E. I.; Viljanen, A.

    2016-09-01

    We examine the role of the magnetosheath in solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling using the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms plasma and magnetic field observations in the magnetosheath together with OMNI solar wind data and auroral electrojet recordings from the International Monitor for Auroral Geomagnetic Effects (IMAGE) magnetometer chain. We demonstrate that the electric field and Poynting flux reaching the magnetopause are not linear functions of the electric field and Poynting flux observed in the solar wind: the electric field and Poynting flux at the magnetopause during higher driving conditions are lower than those predicted from a linear function. We also show that the Poynting flux normal to the magnetopause is linearly correlated with the directly driven part of the auroral electrojets in the ionosphere. This indicates that the energy entering the magnetosphere in the form of the Poynting flux is directly responsible for driving the electrojets. Furthermore, we argue that the polar cap potential saturation discussed in the literature is associated with the way solar wind plasma gets processed during the bow shock crossing and motion within the magnetosheath.

  2. Source of electrostatic fluctuations in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemons, D.S.; Asbridge, J.R.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Peter Gray, S.; Gosling, J.T.

    1979-05-01

    Solar wind electron and ion distribution functions measured simultaneously with or close to times of intense electrostatic fluctuations are subjected to a linear Vlasov stability analysis. Although all distributions tested were found to be stable, the analysis suggests that the ion beam instability is the most likely source of the fluctuations.

  3. The Solar Wind in the Outer Heliosphere and Heliosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, J. D.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2011-01-01

    The solar wind environment has a large influence on the transport of cosmic rays. This chapter discusses the observations of the solar wind plasma and magnetic field in the outer heliosphere and the heliosheath. In the supersonic solar wind, interaction regions with large magnetic fields form barriers to cosmic ray transport. This effect, the "CR-B" relationship, has been quantified and is shown to be valid everywhere inside the termination shock (TS). In the heliosheath, this relationship breaks down, perhaps because of a change in the nature of the turbulence. Turbulence is compressive in the heliosheath, whereas it was non-compressive in the solar wind. The plasma pressure in the outer heliosphere is dominated by the pickup ions which gain most of the flow energy at the TS. The heliosheath plasma and magnetic field are highly variable on scales as small as ten minutes. The plasma flow turns away from the nose roughly as predicted, but the radial speeds at Voyager 1 are much less than those at Voyager 2, which is not understood. Despite predictions to the contrary, magnetic reconnection is not an important process in the inner heliosheath with only one observed occurrence to date.

  4. Simulation of turbulent magnetic reconnection in the smallscale solar wind

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏奉思; 胡强; R.Schwen; 冯学尚

    2000-01-01

    Some observational examples for the possible occurrence of the turbulent magnetic reconnection in the solar wind are found by analysing Helios spacecraft’s high resolution data. The phenom-ena of turbulent magnetic reconnections in small scale solar wind are simulated by introducing a third order accuracy upwind compact difference scheme to the compressible two-dimensional MHD flow. Numerical results verify that the turbulent magnetic reconnection process could occur in small scale in-terplanetary solar wind, which is a basic feature characterizing the magnetic reconnection in high-mag-netie Peynolds number ( RM = 2 000-10 000) solar wind. The configurations of the magnetic reconnection could evolve from a single X-line to a multiple X-line reconnection, exhibiting a complex picture of the formation, merging and evolution of magnetic islands, and finally the magnetic reconnection would evolve into a low-energy state. Its life-span of evolution is about one hour order of magnitude. Various magnetic and f

  5. A Review of Hybrid Solar PV and Wind Energy System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid Al Badwawi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the fact that solar and wind power is intermittent and unpredictable in nature, higher penetration of their types in existing power system could cause and create high technical challenges especially to weak grids or stand-alone systems without proper and enough storage capacity. By integrating the two renewable resources into an optimum combination, the impact of the variable nature of solar and wind resources can be partially resolved and the overall system becomes more reliable and economical to run. This paper provides a review of challenges and opportunities / solutions of hybrid solar PV and wind energy integration systems. Voltage and frequency fluctuation, and harmonics are major power quality issues for both grid-connected and stand-alone systems with bigger impact in case of weak grid. This can be resolved to a large extent by having proper design, advanced fast response control facilities, and good optimization of the hybrid systems. The paper gives a review of the main research work reported in the literature with regard to optimal sizing design, power electronics topologies and control. The paper presents a review of the state of the art of both grid-connected and stand-alone hybrid solar and wind systems.

  6. Tsallis non-extensive statistics and solar wind plasma complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlos, G. P.; Iliopoulos, A. C.; Zastenker, G. N.; Zelenyi, L. M.; Karakatsanis, L. P.; Riazantseva, M. O.; Xenakis, M. N.; Pavlos, E. G.

    2015-03-01

    This article presents novel results revealing non-equilibrium phase transition processes in the solar wind plasma during a strong shock event, which took place on 26th September 2011. Solar wind plasma is a typical case of stochastic spatiotemporal distribution of physical state variables such as force fields (B → , E →) and matter fields (particle and current densities or bulk plasma distributions). This study shows clearly the non-extensive and non-Gaussian character of the solar wind plasma and the existence of multi-scale strong correlations from the microscopic to the macroscopic level. It also underlines the inefficiency of classical magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) or plasma statistical theories, based on the classical central limit theorem (CLT), to explain the complexity of the solar wind dynamics, since these theories include smooth and differentiable spatial-temporal functions (MHD theory) or Gaussian statistics (Boltzmann-Maxwell statistical mechanics). On the contrary, the results of this study indicate the presence of non-Gaussian non-extensive statistics with heavy tails probability distribution functions, which are related to the q-extension of CLT. Finally, the results of this study can be understood in the framework of modern theoretical concepts such as non-extensive statistical mechanics (Tsallis, 2009), fractal topology (Zelenyi and Milovanov, 2004), turbulence theory (Frisch, 1996), strange dynamics (Zaslavsky, 2002), percolation theory (Milovanov, 1997), anomalous diffusion theory and anomalous transport theory (Milovanov, 2001), fractional dynamics (Tarasov, 2013) and non-equilibrium phase transition theory (Chang, 1992).

  7. Comparison of algorithms for determination of solar wind regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Marcia; Reisenfeld, Daniel; Richardson, Ian G.

    2016-09-01

    This study compares the designation of different solar wind flow regimes (transient, coronal hole, and streamer belt) according to two algorithms derived from observations by the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer, the Solar Wind Electron Proton Alpha Monitor, and the Magnetometer on the ACE spacecraft, with a similar regime determination performed on board the Genesis spacecraft. The comparison is made for the interval from late 2001 to early 2004 when Genesis was collecting solar wind ions for return to Earth. The agreement between hourly regime assignments from any pair of algorithms was less than two thirds, while the simultaneous agreement between all three algorithms was only 49%. When the results of the algorithms were compared to a catalog of interplanetary coronal mass ejection events, it was found that almost all the events in the catalog were confirmed by the spacecraft algorithms. On the other hand, many short transient events, lasting 1 to 13 h, that were unanimously selected as transient like by the algorithms, were not included in the catalog.

  8. A Model for the Sources of the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.; Mikic, Z.; Lionello, R.; Titov, V.; Linker, J.

    2010-05-01

    Models for the origin of the slow solar wind must account for two seemingly contradictory observations: The slow wind has the composition of the closed-field corona, implying that it originates at the open-closed field boundary layer, but it also has large angular width, up to 40 degrees. We propose a model that can explain both observations. The key idea is that the source of the slow wind at the Sun is a network of narrow (possibly singular) open-field corridors that map to a web of separatrices and quasi-separatrix layers in the heliosphere. We calculate with high numerical resolution, the quasi-steady solar wind and magnetic field for a Carrington rotation centered about the August 1, 2008 total solar eclipse. Our numerical results demonstrate that, at least for this time period, a web of separatrices (S-web) forms with sufficient density and extent in the heliosphere to account for the observed properties of the slow wind. We discuss the implications of our S-web model for the structure and dynamics of the corona and heliosphere, and propose further tests of the model. This work was supported, in part, by the NASA HTP, TR&T and SR&T programs.

  9. Study on Pyroelectric Harvesters Integrating Solar Radiation with Wind Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ching Hsiao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pyroelectric harvesters use temperature fluctuations to generate electrical outputs. Solar radiation and waste heat are rich energy sources that can be harvested. Pyroelectric energy converters offer a novel and direct energy-conversion technology by transforming time-dependent temperatures directly into electricity. Moreover, the great challenge for pyroelectric energy harvesting lies in finding promising temperature variations or an alternating thermal loading in real situations. Hence, in this article, a novel pyroelectric harvester integrating solar radiation with wind power by the pyroelectric effect is proposed. Solar radiation is a thermal source, and wind is a dynamic potential. A disk generator is used for harvesting wind power. A mechanism is considered to convert the rotary energy of the disk generator to drive a shutter for generating temperature variations in pyroelectric cells using a planetary gear system. The optimal period of the pyroelectric cells is 35 s to harvest the stored energy, about 70 μJ, while the rotary velocity of the disk generator is about 31 RPM and the wind speed is about 1 m/s. In this state, the stored energy acquired from the pyroelectric harvester is about 75% more than that from the disk generator. Although the generated energy of the proposed pyroelectric harvester is less than that of the disk generator, the pyroelectric harvester plays a complementary role when the disk generator is inactive in situations of low wind speed.

  10. Ion‐driven instabilities in the solar wind: Wind observations of 19 March 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Lan K.; Broiles, Thomas W.; Stevens, Michael L.; Podesta, John J.; Kasper, Justin C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intervals of enhanced magnetic fluctuations have been frequently observed in the solar wind. But it remains an open question as to whether these waves are generated at the Sun and then transported outward by the solar wind or generated locally in the interplanetary medium. Magnetic field and plasma measurements from the Wind spacecraft under slow solar wind conditions on 19 March 2005 demonstrate seven events of enhanced magnetic fluctuations at spacecraft‐frame frequencies somewhat above the proton cyclotron frequency and propagation approximately parallel or antiparallel to the background magnetic field B o. The proton velocity distributions during these events are characterized by two components: a more dense, slower core and a less dense, faster beam. Observed plasma parameters are used in a kinetic linear dispersion equation analysis for electromagnetic fluctuations at k x B o = 0; for two events the most unstable mode is the Alfvén‐cyclotron instability driven by a proton component temperature anisotropy T⊥/T|| > 1 (where the subscripts denote directions relative to B o), and for three events the most unstable mode is the right‐hand polarized magnetosonic instability driven primarily by ion component relative flows. Thus, both types of ion anisotropies and both types of instabilities are likely to be local sources of these enhanced fluctuation events in the solar wind.

  11. Influence of upstream solar wind on thermospheric flows at Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, J N; Guio, P

    2010-01-01

    The coupling of Jupiter's magnetosphere and ionosphere plays a vital role in creating its auroral emissions. The strength of these emissions is dependent on the difference in speed of the rotational flows within Jupiter's high-latitude thermosphere and the planet's magnetodisc. Using an azimuthally symmetric global circulation model, we have simulated how upstream solar wind conditions affect the energy and direction of atmospheric flows. In order to simulate the effect of a varying dynamic pressure in the upstream solar wind, we calculated three magnetic field profiles representing compressed, averaged and expanded `middle' magnetospheres. These profiles were then used to solve for the angular velocity of plasma in the magnetosphere. This angular velocity determines the strength of currents flowing between the ionosphere and magnetosphere. We examine the influence of variability in this current system upon the global winds and energy inputs within the Jovian thermosphere. We find that the power dissipated by...

  12. Solar wind induced magnetic field around the unmagnetized Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Birk, G T; Konz, C

    2004-01-01

    The Earth is a planet with a dipolar magnetic field which is agitated by a magnetized plasma wind streaming from the Sun. The magnetic field shields the Earth's surface from penetrating high energy solar wind particles, as well as interstellar cosmic rays. The magnetic dipole has reversed sign some hundreds of times over the last 400 million years. These polarity reversals correspond to drastic breakdowns of the dynamo action. The question arises what the consequences for the Earth's atmosphere, climate, and, in particular, biosphere are. It is shown by kinematic estimates and three-dimensional plasma-neutral gas simulations that the solar wind can induce very fast a magnetic field in the previously completely unmagnetized Earth's ionosphere that is strong enough to protect Earth from cosmic radiations comparable to the case of an intact magnetic dynamo.

  13. Large Scale Wind and Solar Integration in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, Bernhard; Schreirer, Uwe; Berster, Frank; Pease, John; Scholz, Cristian; Erbring, Hans-Peter; Schlunke, Stephan; Makarov, Yuri V.

    2010-02-28

    This report provides key information concerning the German experience with integrating of 25 gigawatts of wind and 7 gigawatts of solar power capacity and mitigating its impacts on the electric power system. The report has been prepared based on information provided by the Amprion GmbH and 50Hertz Transmission GmbH managers and engineers to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory representatives during their visit to Germany in October 2009. The trip and this report have been sponsored by the BPA Technology Innovation office. Learning from the German experience could help the Bonneville Power Administration engineers to compare and evaluate potential new solutions for managing higher penetrations of wind energy resources in their control area. A broader dissemination of this experience will benefit wind and solar resource integration efforts in the United States.

  14. Large scale international bioenergy trading. How bioenergy trading can be reliazed under safe and sustainable frame conditions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo; Kirchovas, Simas

    2011-01-01

    Biomass sources as Woodchips – Wood pellets, Straw – Bio pellets, animal manure, farm-by products and new cropping systems are integrated in our society’s needs. The mindset for shifting from fossil fuels based economies into sustainable energy economies already exist. Bioenergy utilization systems...... has for many years been forming the basis for the change together with wind and solar energy. These resources still contains great potentials for energy supply chains in increasing areas of Europe and the World. Biomass sustainability issues could be solved by developing the international...

  15. Geomagnetic response to IMF and solar wind over different latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, A. M.; Tripathi, Sharad Chandra; Mansoori, Azad Ahmad; Waheed, Malik Abdul

    2016-07-01

    In this paper a study on the response of geomagnetic field characteristics to the solar wind variation during three solar cycles (SC 21, SC 22, SC 23) have been conducted in a long term scale. The difference in the response of two different latitudinal characteristic indices has been investigated. For the purpose we have considered the high latitude index AE and the mid-latitude aa index and both gives the knowledge about the perturbations in the geomagnetic field conditions. Eventually we can infer the idea about the ionospheric current system changes in response to the solar wind conditions. The variation found in the AE and aa indices have been found to follow a 11 year cycle as similar to the sunspot variation. Also the correlation between the annual means of the solar wind parameters velocity V, magnetic filed B and the composite parameters BV and BV ^{2 } have been calculated . A difference was found between the correlations obtained for the AE and aa indices. We could also see that the difference in correlation follows a cyclic pattern i.e. the large difference is found during the solar maxima while a small difference is observed during the minima.

  16. Solar origins of solar wind properties during the cycle 23 solar minimum and rising phase of cycle 24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Janet G; Petrie, Gordon; Riley, Pete

    2013-05-01

    The solar wind was originally envisioned using a simple dipolar corona/polar coronal hole sources picture, but modern observations and models, together with the recent unusual solar cycle minimum, have demonstrated the limitations of this picture. The solar surface fields in both polar and low-to-mid-latitude active region zones routinely produce coronal magnetic fields and related solar wind sources much more complex than a dipole. This makes low-to-mid latitude coronal holes and their associated streamer boundaries major contributors to what is observed in the ecliptic and affects the Earth. In this paper we use magnetogram-based coronal field models to describe the conditions that prevailed in the corona from the decline of cycle 23 into the rising phase of cycle 24. The results emphasize the need for adopting new views of what is 'typical' solar wind, even when the Sun is relatively inactive.

  17. Solar origins of solar wind properties during the cycle 23 solar minimum and rising phase of cycle 24

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet G. Luhmann

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The solar wind was originally envisioned using a simple dipolar corona/polar coronal hole sources picture, but modern observations and models, together with the recent unusual solar cycle minimum, have demonstrated the limitations of this picture. The solar surface fields in both polar and low-to-mid-latitude active region zones routinely produce coronal magnetic fields and related solar wind sources much more complex than a dipole. This makes low-to-mid latitude coronal holes and their associated streamer boundaries major contributors to what is observed in the ecliptic and affects the Earth. In this paper we use magnetogram-based coronal field models to describe the conditions that prevailed in the corona from the decline of cycle 23 into the rising phase of cycle 24. The results emphasize the need for adopting new views of what is ‘typical’ solar wind, even when the Sun is relatively inactive.

  18. Sources of the Slow Solar Wind During the Solar Cycle 23/24 Minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpua, E. K. J.; Madjarska, M. S.; Karna, N.; Wiegelmann, T.; Farrugia, C.; Yu, W.; Andreeova, K.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the characteristics and the sources of the slow ( {global coronal structure, including the frequent presence of low-latitude active regions in 2006 - 2007, long-lived low- and mid-latitude coronal holes in 2006 - mid-2008 and mostly the quiet Sun in 2009. We examined Carrington rotation averages of selected solar plasma, charge state, and compositional parameters and distributions of these parameters related to the quiet Sun, active region Sun, and the coronal hole Sun. While some of the investigated parameters (e.g. speed, the C+6/C+4 and He/H ratios) show clear variations over our study period and with solar wind source type, some (Fe/O) exhibit very little changes. Our results highlight the difficulty of distinguishing between the slow solar wind sources based on the inspection of solar wind conditions.

  19. Solar wind velocity at solar maximum: A search for latitudinal effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bavassano

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Observations by Ulysses during its second out-of-ecliptic orbit have shown that near the solar activity maximum the solar wind appears as a highly variable flow at all heliolatitudes. In the present study Ulysses data from polar latitudes are compared to contemporary ACE data in the ecliptic plane to search for the presence of latitudinal effects in the large-scale structure of the solar wind velocity. The investigated period roughly covers the Sun's magnetic polarity reversal. The Ulysses-ACE comparison is performed through a multi-scale statistical analysis of the velocity fluctuations at scales from 1 to 64 days. The results indicate that, from a statistical point of view, the character of the wind velocity structure does not appear to change remarkably with latitude. It is likely that this result is characteristic of the particular phase of the solar magnetic cycle.

  20. Sustainable business models for wind and solar energy in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichifor Maria Alexandra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy has become a crucial element for the business environment as the need for new energy resources and the degree of climate change are increasing. As developed economies strive towards greater progress, sustainable business models are of the essence in order to maintain a balance between the triple bottom line: people, planet and profit. In recent years, European Union countries have installed important capacities of renewable energy, especially wind and solar energy to achieve this purpose. The objective of this article is to make a comparative study between the current sustainable business models implemented in companies that are active in the wind and solar energy sector in Romania. Both sectors underwent tremendous changes in the last two years due to changing support schemes which have had a significant influence on the mechanism of the renewable energy market, as well as on its development. Using the classical Delphi method, based on questionnaires and interviews with experts in the fields of wind and solar energy, this paper offers an overview of the sustainable business models of wind and solar energy companies, both sectors opting for the alternative of selling electricity to trading companies as a main source of revenue until 2013 and as the main future trend until 2020. Furthermore, the participating wind energy companies noted a pessimistic outlook of future investments due to legal instability that made them to reduce their projects in comparison to PV investments, which are expected to continue. The subject of the article is of interest to scientific literature because sustainable business models in wind and photovoltaic energy have been scarcely researched in previous articles and are essential in understanding the activity of the companies in these two fields of renewable energy.

  1. The Controversies over Bioenergy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard; Andersen, Bente Hessellund

    2012-01-01

    for processing of biomass for biofuels. The alignment with the private car regime is strong, because biofuel enables continuation of fuel-driven vehicles as dominating transportation mode. Danish farmers see manure as important source for biogas while arguing for reduction of climate impact and nuisances from...... a prominent role in several Danish climate and energy plans, alongside with wind and solar energy, and energy savings. There are major controversies about targets for bioenergy with respect to acceptable types, sources and amounts of biomass. Strong path dependency is identified. Energy companies in Denmark...... convert coal fired power plants to biomass in order to sustain the role of these power plants. Their increasing use of imported wood pellets is criticized for increasing greenhouse gas emissions because of fast logging of years of forest growth. A Danish biotech company is developing enzymes...

  2. Photonic spin control for solar wind electric sail

    CERN Document Server

    Janhunen, P

    2012-01-01

    The electric solar wind sail (E-sail) is a novel, efficient propellantless propulsion concept which utilises the natural solar wind for spacecraft propulsion with the help of long centrifugally stretched charged tethers. The E-sail requires auxiliary propulsion applied to the tips of the main tethers for creating the initial angular momentum and possibly for modifying the spinrate later during flight to counteract the orbital Coriolis effect and possibly for mission specific reasons. We introduce the possibility of implementing the required auxiliary propulsion by small photonic blades (small radiation pressure solar sails). The blades would be stretched centrifugally. We look into two concepts, one with and one without auxiliary tethers. The use of photonic blades has the benefit of providing sufficient spin modification capability for any E-sail mission while keeping the technology fully propellantless. We conclude that the photonic blades appear to be a feasible and attractive solution to E-sail spinrate c...

  3. WSA-Enlil Solar Wind Prediction

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — WSA-Enlil is a large-scale, physics-based prediction model of the heliosphere, used by the Space Weather Forecast Office to provide 1-4 day advance warning of solar...

  4. Solar Panel Buffeted by Wind at Phoenix Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Winds were strong enough to cause about a half a centimeter (.19 inch) of motion of a solar panel on NASA's Phoenix Mars lander when the lander's Surface Stereo Imager took this picture on Aug. 31, 2008, during the 96th Martian day since landing. The lander's telltale wind gauge has been indicating wind speeds of about 4 meters per second (9 miles per hour) during late mornings at the site. These conditions were anticipated and the wind is not expected to do any harm to the lander. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  5. Compressive fluctuations in the solar wind and their polytropic index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bavassano

    Full Text Available Magnetohydrodynamic compressive fluctuations of the interplanetary plasma in the region from 0.3 to 1 AU have been characterized in terms of their polytropic index. Following Chandrasekhar's approach to polytropic fluids, this index has been determined through a fit of the observed variations of density and temperature. At least three different classes of fluctuations have been identified: (1 variations at constant thermal pressure, in low-speed solar wind and without a significant dependence on distance, (2 adiabatic variations, mainly close to 1 AU and without a relevant dependence on wind speed, and (3 variations at nearly constant density, in fast wind close to 0.3 AU. Variations at constant thermal pressure are probably a subset of the ensemble of total-pressure balanced structures, corresponding to cases in which the magnetic field magnitude does not vary appreciably throughout the structure. In this case the pressure equilibrium has to be assured by its thermal component only. The variations may be related to small flow-tubes with approximately the same magnetic-field intensity, convected by the wind in conditions of pressure equilibrium. This feature is mainly observed in low-velocity solar wind, in agreement with the magnetic topology (small open flow-tubes emerging through an ensemble of closed structures expected for the source region of slow wind. Variations of adiabatic type may be related to magnetosonic waves excited by pressure imbalances between contiguous flow-tubes. Such imbalances are probably built up by interactions between wind flows with different speeds in the spiral geometry induced by the solar rotation. This may account for the fact that they are mainly found at a large distance from the sun. Temperature variations at almost constant density are mostly found in fast flows close to the sun. These are the solar wind regions with the best examples of incompressible behaviour. They are characterized by very stable

  6. Simulation and optimum design of hybrid solar-wind and solar-wind-diesel power generation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei

    Solar and wind energy systems are considered as promising power generating sources due to its availability and topological advantages in local power generations. However, a drawback, common to solar and wind options, is their unpredictable nature and dependence on weather changes, both of these energy systems would have to be oversized to make them completely reliable. Fortunately, the problems caused by variable nature of these resources can be partially overcome by integrating these two resources in a proper combination to form a hybrid system. However, with the increased complexity in comparison with single energy systems, optimum design of hybrid system becomes more complicated. In order to efficiently and economically utilize the renewable energy resources, one optimal sizing method is necessary. This thesis developed an optimal sizing method to find the global optimum configuration of stand-alone hybrid (both solar-wind and solar-wind-diesel) power generation systems. By using Genetic Algorithm (GA), the optimal sizing method was developed to calculate the system optimum configuration which offers to guarantee the lowest investment with full use of the PV array, wind turbine and battery bank. For the hybrid solar-wind system, the optimal sizing method is developed based on the Loss of Power Supply Probability (LPSP) and the Annualized Cost of System (ACS) concepts. The optimization procedure aims to find the configuration that yields the best compromise between the two considered objectives: LPSP and ACS. The decision variables, which need to be optimized in the optimization process, are the PV module capacity, wind turbine capacity, battery capacity, PV module slope angle and wind turbine installation height. For the hybrid solar-wind-diesel system, minimization of the system cost is achieved not only by selecting an appropriate system configuration, but also by finding a suitable control strategy (starting and stopping point) of the diesel generator. The

  7. CME propagation: Where does the solar wind drag take over?

    CERN Document Server

    Sachdeva, Nishtha; Colaninno, Robin; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the Sun-Earth dynamics of a set of eight well observed solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using data from the STEREO spacecraft. We seek to quantify the extent to which momentum coupling between these CMEs and the ambient solar wind (i.e., the aerodynamic drag) influences their dynamics. To this end, we use results from a 3D flux rope model fit to the CME data. We find that solar wind aerodynamic drag adequately accounts for the dynamics of the fastest CME in our sample. For the relatively slower CMEs, we find that drag-based models initiated below heliocentric distances ranging from 15 to 50 $R_{\\odot}$ cannot account for the observed CME trajectories. This is at variance with the general perception that the dynamics of slow CMEs are influenced primarily by solar wind drag from a few $R_{\\odot}$ onwards. Several slow CMEs propagate at roughly constant speeds above 15--50 $R_{\\odot}$. Drag-based models initiated above these heights therefore require negligible aerodynamic drag to explain their...

  8. Invited article: Electric solar wind sail: toward test missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janhunen, P; Toivanen, P K; Polkko, J; Merikallio, S; Salminen, P; Haeggström, E; Seppänen, H; Kurppa, R; Ukkonen, J; Kiprich, S; Thornell, G; Kratz, H; Richter, L; Krömer, O; Rosta, R; Noorma, M; Envall, J; Lätt, S; Mengali, G; Quarta, A A; Koivisto, H; Tarvainen, O; Kalvas, T; Kauppinen, J; Nuottajärvi, A; Obraztsov, A

    2010-11-01

    The electric solar wind sail (E-sail) is a space propulsion concept that uses the natural solar wind dynamic pressure for producing spacecraft thrust. In its baseline form, the E-sail consists of a number of long, thin, conducting, and centrifugally stretched tethers, which are kept in a high positive potential by an onboard electron gun. The concept gains its efficiency from the fact that the effective sail area, i.e., the potential structure of the tethers, can be millions of times larger than the physical area of the thin tethers wires, which offsets the fact that the dynamic pressure of the solar wind is very weak. Indeed, according to the most recent published estimates, an E-sail of 1 N thrust and 100 kg mass could be built in the rather near future, providing a revolutionary level of propulsive performance (specific acceleration) for travel in the solar system. Here we give a review of the ongoing technical development work of the E-sail, covering tether construction, overall mechanical design alternatives, guidance and navigation strategies, and dynamical and orbital simulations.

  9. Observations of turbulence and fluctuations in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, L.W.

    1987-01-01

    Observational and theoretical studies of turbulent fluctuations in space plasma have been ongoing for many years. There are still many unanswered questions about the origin and evolution of the fluctuations in the heliosphere. This work pursues the subject and uses Voyage 1 and 2, and ISEE-3 measurements to study the evolution of solar-wind plasma and the magnetic field between heliocentric distances of 1 and 20 AU and to more than 25/sup 0/ in latitude above the ecliptic plane. Parker's 1958 solar-wind model is found to be accurate to within 5% in predicting the behavior of long-term (solar rotation) averages in the interplanetary magnetic field when time dependencies in the bulk plasma speed are included. No evidence was found of flux loss in the outer heliosphere as recently reported in the literature. Methods of turbulence analysis and are used to organize the observations and several predictions and expectations of ideal MHD turbulence theory are tested. Spectral indices expected for inertial-range turbulence are present in much of the data analyzed, and this inertial range is found in increasingly larger spatial scales with increasing radial distance from the sun. Evidence for inverse cascade of magnetic helicity is observed in selected intervals, although this was not found to be true in general in the solar wind.

  10. The Spectroscopic Footprint of the Fast Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, Scott W; De Pontieu, Bart

    2010-01-01

    We analyze a large, complex equatorial coronal hole (ECH) and its immediate surroundings with a focus on the roots of the fast solar wind. We start by demonstrating that our ECH is indeed a source of the fast solar wind at 1AU by examining in situ plasma measurements in conjunction with recently developed measures of magnetic conditions of the photosphere, inner heliosphere and the mapping of the solar wind source region. We focus the bulk of our analysis on interpreting the thermal and spatial dependence of the non-thermal line widths in the ECH as measured by SOHO/SUMER by placing the measurements in context with recent studies of ubiquitous Alfven waves in the solar atmosphere and line profile asymmetries (indicative of episodic heating and mass loading of the coronal plasma) that originate in the strong, unipolar magnetic flux concentrations that comprise the supergranular network. The results presented in this paper are consistent with a picture where a significant portion of the energy responsible for t...

  11. Small solar wind transients: Stereo-A observations in 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, W.; Farrugia, C. J.; Galvin, A. B.; Simunac, K. D. C.; Popecki, M. A.; Lugaz, N. [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Kilpua, E. K. J. [Dept. of Physics, Division of Geophysics and Astronomy, University of Helsinki (Finland); Moestl, C. [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, 8010 Graz, Austria and Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Luhmann, J. G. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Opitz, A.; Sauvaud, J.-A. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie (CNRS-UPS), Universite de Toulouse, F-31038, Toulouse (France)

    2013-06-13

    Year 2009 was the last year of a long and pronounced solar activity minimum. In this year the solar wind in the inner heliosphere was for 90% of the time slow (< 450 km s{sup -1}) and with a weaker magnetic field strength compared to the previous solar minimum 1995-1996. We choose this year to present the results of a systematic search for small solar wind transients (STs) observed by the STEREO-Ahead (ST-A) probe. The data are from the PLASTIC and IMPACT instrument suites. By 'small' we mean a duration from {approx}1 to 12 hours. The parameters we search for to identify STs are (i) the total field strength, (ii) the rotation of the magnetic field vector, (iii) its smoothness, (iv) proton temperature, (v) proton beta, and (vi) Alfven Mach number. We find 45 examples. The STs have an average duration of {approx}4 hours. Ensemble averages of key quantities are: (i) maximum B = 7.01 nT; (ii) proton {beta}= 0.18; (iii) proton thermal speed = 20.8 km s{sup -1}; and (iv) Alfven Mach number = 6.13. No distinctive feature is found in the pitch angle distributions of suprathermal electrons. Our statistical results are compared with those of STs observed near Earth by Wind during 2009.

  12. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study: Hydropower Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acker, T.; Pete, C.

    2012-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) study of 20% Wind Energy by 2030 was conducted to consider the benefits, challenges, and costs associated with sourcing 20% of U.S. energy consumption from wind power by 2030. This study found that with proactive measures, no insurmountable barriers were identified to meet the 20% goal. Following this study, DOE and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted two more studies: the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) covering the eastern portion of the U.S., and the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) covering the western portion of the United States. The WWSIS was conducted by NREL and research partner General Electric (GE) in order to provide insight into the costs, technical or physical barriers, and operational impacts caused by the variability and uncertainty of wind, photovoltaic, and concentrated solar power when employed to serve up to 35% of the load energy in the WestConnect region (Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Wyoming). WestConnect is composed of several utility companies working collaboratively to assess stakeholder and market needs to and develop cost-effective improvements to the western wholesale electricity market. Participants include the Arizona Public Service, El Paso Electric Company, NV Energy, Public Service of New Mexico, Salt River Project, Tri-State Generation and Transmission Cooperative, Tucson Electric Power, Xcel Energy and the Western Area Power Administration.

  13. A Model for the Sources of the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.; Mikic, Z.; Titov, V. S.; Lionello, R.; Linker, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Models for the origin of the slow solar wind must account for two seemingly contradictory observations: The slow wind has the composition of the closed-field corona, implying that it originates from the continuous opening and closing of flux at the boundary between open and closed field. On the other hand, the slow wind has large angular width, up to approximately 60 degrees, suggesting that its source extends far from the open-closed boundary. We propose a model that can explain both observations. The key idea is that the source of the slow wind at the Sun is a network of narrow (possibly singular) open-field corridors that map to a web of separatrices and quasi-separatrix layers in the heliosphere. We compute analytically the topology of an open-field corridor and show that it produces a quasi-separatrix layer in the heliosphere that extends to angles far front the heliospheric current sheet. We then use an MHD code and MIDI/SOHO observations of the photospheric magnetic field to calculate numerically, with high spatial resolution, the quasi-steady solar wind and magnetic field for a time period preceding the August 1, 2008 total solar eclipse. Our numerical results imply that, at least for this time period, a web of separatrices (which we term an S-web) forms with sufficient density and extent in the heliosphere to account for the observed properties of the slow wind. We discuss the implications of our S-web model for the structure and dynamics of the corona and heliosphere, and propose further tests of the model.

  14. Sources of The Slow Solar wind During the Solar Cycle 23/24 Minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Kilpua, E K J; Karna, N; Wiegelmann, T; Farrugia, C; Yu, W; Andreeova, K

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the characteristics and the sources of the slow (< 450 km/s) solar wind during the four years (2006-2009) of low solar activity between Solar Cycles 23 and 24. We use a comprehensive set of in-situ observations in the near-Earth solar wind (Wind and ACE) and remove the periods when large-scale interplanetary coronal mass ejections were present. The investigated period features significant variations in the global coronal structure, including the frequent presence of low-latitude active regions in 2006-2007, long-lived low- and mid-latitude coronal holes in 2006 - mid-2008 and mostly the quiet Sun in 2009. We examine both Carrington Rotation averages of selected solar plasma, charge state and compositional parameters and distributions of these parameters related to Quiet Sun, Active Region Sun and the Coronal Hole Sun. While some of the investigated parameters (e.g., speed, the C^{+6}/C^{+4} and He/H ratio) show clear variations over our study period and with solar wind source type, some (Fe/...

  15. Solar Wind Fluctuations and Their Consequences on the Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-Lin

    2005-01-01

    Efforts have been made to extract the physical meaning of each term in our prediction model of the Dst index using the solar wind as the only input. The work has been published Journal of Geophysical Research (Temerin and Li, 21002). We found different terms in the model representing different current in the magnetospheric system and each current has different rise and decay times, with the symmetric ring current the slowest, then the partial ring current, then the tail current. We also have been trying to understand the physical meaning of the diffusion coefficient used in our prediction model of relativistic electron fluxes at geostationary orbit. The model reproduced the observations of MeV electron flux variations well, the diffusion coefficient had be assumed only die to local magnetic field fluctuations, leading to its 10th power dependence on the L. We have studied the theoretical derivation of the diffusion coefficient and we believe that the effect electric field fluctuations at smaller L could become more significant. We have expanded our previous radiation belt electron prediction model, which predicted MeV electron geosynchronous orbit based on solar wind measurements, to predict MeV electrons inside geosynchronous orbit. The model results are compared with measurements from Polar/CEPPAD. Prediction efficiencies of 0.56 and 0.54, respectively, at L=6 and L=4, have been achieved over the entire year of 1998. This work wa reported at 2003 Fall AGU and has been accepted for publication in Space Weather (Barker et al., 2005). We also have used simultaneous measurements of the upstream solar wind and of energetic electrons at geosynchronous orbit to analyze the response of electrons over a very wide energy range, 50 keV-6MeV, to solar wind variations. Enhancements of energetic electron fluxes over this whole energy range are modulated by the solar wind speed and the polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The solar wind speed seems to be a

  16. Implementation Strategy for a Global Solar and Wind Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-01-15

    In July 2009, Major Economies Forum leaders met to prepare for the COP 15 Copenhagen Conference that took place later that year. At this occasion the Major Economies Forum Global Partnership f or low carbon and climate-friendly technology was founded and Technology Action Plans (TAPs) for ten key low-carbon technologies were drafted. At that juncture Denmark, Germany and Spain took on the responsibility for drafting TAPs for Solar and Wind Energy Technologies. The TAPs were then consolidated and presented at COP 15 that would later take place in December in Copenhagen. Since then, countries that led the development of the Action Plans have started their implementation. During a first Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM) in July 2010 in Washington on the invitation of Steven Chu, US Secretary of Energy, several initiatives were launched. Denmark, Germany and Spain took the lead in the implementation of the TAPs for Solar and Wind Technologies and initiated the Multilateral Working Group on Solar and Wind Energy Technologies (MWGSW). Several countries joined the working group in Washington and afterwards. In two international workshops in Bonn (June 2010) and Madrid (November 2010) and in meetings during the first CEM in Washington (July 2010) and the second CEM in Abu Dhabi (April 2011) the Multilateral Working Group made substantial progress in the two initial fields of action: (1) the Development of a Global Solar and Wind Atlas; and (2) the Development of a Long-term Strategy on Joint Capacity Building. Discussion papers on the respective topics were elaborated involving the Working Group's member countries as well as various international institutions. This led to concrete proposals for several pilot activities in both fields of action. After further specifying key elements of the suggested projects in two expert workshops in spring 2011, the Multilateral Working Group convened for a third international workshop in Copenhagen, Denmark, to discuss the project

  17. The genesis solar-wind sample return mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiens, Roger C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The compositions of the Earth's crust and mantle, and those of the Moon and Mars, are relatively well known both isotopically and elementally. The same is true of our knowledge of the asteroid belt composition, based on meteorite analyses. Remote measurements of Venus, the Jovian atmosphere, and the outer planet moons, have provided some estimates of their compositions. The Sun constitutes a large majority, > 99%, of all the matter in the solar system. The elemental composition of the photosphere, the visible 'surface' of the Sun, is constrained by absorption lines produced by particles above the surface. Abundances for many elements are reported to the {+-}10 or 20% accuracy level. However, the abundances of other important elements, such as neon, cannot be determined in this way due to a relative lack of atomic states at low excitation energies. Additionally and most importantly, the isotopic composition of the Sun cannot be determined astronomically except for a few species which form molecules above sunspots, and estimates derived from these sources lack the accuracy desired for comparison with meteoritic and planetary surface samples measured on the Earth. The solar wind spreads a sample of solar particles throughout the heliosphere, though the sample is very rarified: collecting a nanogram of oxygen, the third most abundant element, in a square centimeter cross section at the Earth's distance from the Sun takes five years. Nevertheless, foil collectors exposed to the solar wind for periods of hours on the surface of the Moon during the Apollo missions were used to determine the helium and neon solar-wind compositions sufficiently to show that the Earth's atmospheric neon was significantly evolved relative to the Sun. Spacecraft instruments developed subsequently have provided many insights into the composition of the solar wind, mostly in terms of elemental composition. These instruments have the advantage of observing a number of

  18. High-latitude Conic Current Sheets in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabarova, Olga V.; Malova, Helmi V.; Kislov, Roman A.; Zelenyi, Lev M.; Obridko, Vladimir N.; Kharshiladze, Alexander F.; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Sokół, Justyna M.; Grzedzielski, Stan; Fujiki, Ken’ichi

    2017-02-01

    We provide observational evidence for the existence of large-scale cylindrical (or conic-like) current sheets (CCSs) at high heliolatitudes. Long-lived CCSs were detected by Ulysses during its passages over the South Solar Pole in 1994 and 2007. The characteristic scale of these tornado-like structures is several times less than a typical width of coronal holes within which the CCSs are observed. CCS crossings are characterized by a dramatic decrease in the solar wind speed and plasma beta typical for predicted profiles of CCSs. Ulysses crossed the same CCS at different heliolatitudes at 2–3 au several times in 1994, as the CCS was declined from the rotation axis and corotated with the Sun. In 2007, a CCS was detected directly over the South Pole, and its structure was strongly highlighted by the interaction with comet McNaught. Restorations of solar coronal magnetic field lines reveal the occurrence of conic-like magnetic separators over the solar poles in both 1994 and 2007. Such separators exist only during solar minima. Interplanetary scintillation data analysis confirms the presence of long-lived low-speed regions surrounded by the typical polar high-speed solar wind in solar minima. Energetic particle flux enhancements up to several MeV/nuc are observed at edges of the CCSs. We built simple MHD models of a CCS to illustrate its key features. The CCSs may be formed as a result of nonaxiality of the solar rotation axis and magnetic axis, as predicted by the Fisk–Parker hybrid heliospheric magnetic field model in the modification of Burger and coworkers.

  19. Sustainable bioenergy production

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lijun

    2014-01-01

    Section I Fundamentals of Engineering Analysis and Design of Bioenergy Production SystemsGenetic Engineering of Bioenergy Crops toward High Biofuel ProductionGuosheng Xie and Liangcai PengNovel Cropping Technologies and Management Applied to Energy CropsLorenzo BarbantiMathematical Modeling in Biomass and Bioenergy SystemsLijun Wang, Samuel Asomaning Agyemang and Abolghasem ShahbaziLife-Cycle Assessment of Bioenergy SystemsReinout Heijungs and Edi Iswanto WilosoSustainability of Bioenergy Systems

  20. Solar winds surfs waves in the Sun's atmosphere!

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    The fact that this electrified plasma speeds up to almost 3 million kilometres per hour as it leaves the Sun - twice as fast as originally predicted - has been known for years. The interpretation of how it happens is the real and surprising novelty: "The waves in the Sun's atmosphere are produced by vibrating solar magnetic field lines, which give solar wind particles a push just like an ocean wave gives a surfer a ride" said Dr John Kohl, principal investigator for the Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer (UVCS) - the instrument among the 12 aboard SOHO which gathered the data - and for the Spartan 201 mission. The outermost solar atmosphere, or corona, is only seen from Earth during a total eclipse of the Sun, when it appears as a shimmering, white veil surrounding the black lunar disc. The corona is an extremely tenuous, electrically charged gas, known as plasma, that flows throughout the solar system as the solar wind. The waves are formed by rapidly vibrating magnetic fields in the coronal plasma. They are called magneto - hydro - dynamic (MHD) waves and are believed to accelerate the solar wind. The solar wind is made up of electrons and ions, electrically charged atoms that have lost electrons. The electric charge of the solar wind particles forces them to travel along invisible lines of magnetic force in the corona. The particles spiral around the magnetic field lines as they rush into space. "The magnetic field acts like a violin string: when it's touched, it vibrates. When the Sun's magnetic field vibrates with a frequency equal to that of the particle spiraling around the magnetic field, it heats it up, producing a force that accelerates the particle upward and away from the Sun," says Dr. Ester Antonucci, an astronomer at the observatory of Turin, Italy, and co-investigator for SOHO's UVCS an instrument developed with considerable financial support by the Italian Space Agency, ASI. In a way this is similar to what happens if two people hold a string at

  1. The acceleration of the nonspherically symmetric solar wind and the solar probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsinganos, K.

    The initial acceleration of the nonspherically symmetric solar wind is discussed according to recent treatments via nonspherically symmetric and nonpolytropic MHD models. These studies give some physical quantities of the plasma outflow which the proposedSolar Probe mission could measure. For example, among the predictions of such two-dimensional models is that as one approaches the sun the spatially extended heating and temperature increase while as the polar axis is approached, the outflow speed increases, although the plasma density and pressure decrease. The sonic transition is closer to the Sun in streamlines closer to the solar rotation axis than it is for streamlines further away and closer to the ecliptic plane. Preliminary observations from the Ulysses spacecraft at several AU suggesting a latitudinal gradient of ~ 3.5 AU, are in agreement with such models. Thus, since most measurements of the solar wind parameters have taken place to this date on the ecliptic plane and at distances larger than >~ 100 r_solar, a comparison of the data of the Solar Probe mission with such theories shall be of considerable interest for a deeper understanding of the initial acceleration of the closer astrophysical outflow of the solar wind with profound implications as well for other more distant and similar cosmic phenomena.

  2. Solar Rotational Periodicities and the Semiannual Variation in the Solar Wind, Radiation Belt, and Aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Barbara A.; Richardson, Ian G.; Evans, David S.; Rich, Frederick J.; Wilson, Gordon R.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of a number of solar wind, radiation belt, auroral and geomagnetic parameters is examined during the recent extended solar minimum and previous solar cycles, covering the period from January 1972 to July 2010. This period includes most of the solar minimum between Cycles 23 and 24, which was more extended than recent solar minima, with historically low values of most of these parameters in 2009. Solar rotational periodicities from S to 27 days were found from daily averages over 81 days for the parameters. There were very strong 9-day periodicities in many variables in 2005 -2008, triggered by recurring corotating high-speed streams (HSS). All rotational amplitudes were relatively large in the descending and early minimum phases of the solar cycle, when HSS are the predominant solar wind structures. There were minima in the amplitudes of all solar rotational periodicities near the end of each solar minimum, as well as at the start of the reversal of the solar magnetic field polarity at solar maximum (approx.1980, approx.1990, and approx. 2001) when the occurrence frequency of HSS is relatively low. Semiannual equinoctial periodicities, which were relatively strong in the 1995-1997 solar minimum, were found to be primarily the result of the changing amplitudes of the 13.5- and 27-day periodicities, where 13.5-day amplitudes were better correlated with heliospheric daily observations and 27-day amplitudes correlated better with Earth-based daily observations. The equinoctial rotational amplitudes of the Earth-based parameters were probably enhanced by a combination of the Russell-McPherron effect and a reduction in the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiency during solstices. The rotational amplitudes were cross-correlated with each other, where the 27 -day amplitudes showed some of the weakest cross-correlations. The rotational amplitudes of the > 2 MeV radiation belt electron number fluxes were progressively weaker from 27- to 5-day periods

  3. MHD effects of the solar wind flow around planets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. K. Biernat

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the interaction of the solar wind with magnetized and unmagnetized planets forms a central topic of space research. Focussing on planetary magnetosheaths, we review some major developments in this field. Magnetosheath structures depend crucially on the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field, the solar wind Alfvén Mach number, the shape of the obstacle (axisymmetric/non-axisymmetric, etc., the boundary conditions at the magnetopause (low/high magnetic shear, and the degree of thermal anisotropy of the plasma. We illustrate the cases of Earth, Jupiter and Venus. The terrestrial magnetosphere is axisymmetric and has been probed in-situ by many spacecraft. Jupiter's magnetosphere is highly non-axisymmetric. Furthermore, we study magnetohydrodynamic effects in the Venus magnetosheath.

  4. Wind and solar energy curtailment: A review of international experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bird, Lori; Lew, Debra; Milligan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    . This paper reviews international experience with curtailment of wind and solar energy on bulk power systems in recent years, with a focus on eleven countries in Europe, North America, and Asia. It examines levels of curtailment, the causes of curtailment, curtailment methods and use of market based dispatch......Greater penetrations of variable renewable generation on some electric grids have resulted in increased levels of curtailment in recent years. Studies of renewable energy grid integration have found that curtailment levels may grow as the penetration of wind and solar energy generation increases......, as well as operational, institutional, and other changes that are being made to reduce renewable energy curtailment. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  5. Predicted Impacts of Proton Temperature Anisotropy on Solar Wind Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Kristopher G

    2015-01-01

    Particle velocity distributions measured in the weakly collisional solar wind are frequently found to be non-Maxwellian, but how these non-Maxwellian distributions impact the physics of plasma turbulence in the solar wind remains unanswered. Using numerical solutions of the linear dispersion relation for a collisionless plasma with a bi-Maxwellian proton velocity distribution, we present a unified framework for the four proton temperature anisotropy instabilities, identifying the associated stable eigenmodes, highlighting the unstable region of wavevector space, and presenting the properties of the growing eigenfunctions. Based on physical intuition gained from this framework, we address how the proton temperature anisotropy impacts the nonlinear dynamics of the \\Alfvenic fluctuations underlying the dominant cascade of energy from large to small scales and how the fluctuations driven by proton temperature anisotropy instabilities interact nonlinearly with each other and with the fluctuations of the large-scal...

  6. Scaling of Compressible Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence in the Fast Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, S.; Hadid, L. Z.; Sahraoui, F.; Galtier, S.

    2016-10-01

    The role of compressible fluctuations in the energy cascade of fast solar wind turbulence is studied using a reduced form of an exact law derived recently for compressible isothermal magnetohydrodynamics and in situ observations from the THEMIS B/ARTEMIS P1 spacecraft. A statistical survey of the data revealed a turbulent energy cascade over a range of two decades of scales that is broader than the previous estimates made from an exact incompressible law. A term-by-term analysis of the compressible model reveals new insight into the role played by the compressible fluctuations in the energy cascade. The compressible fluctuations are shown to amplify by two to four times the turbulent cascade rate with respect to the incompressible model in ∼ 10 % of the analyzed samples. This new estimated cascade rate is shown to provide the adequate energy dissipation required to account for the local heating of the non-adiabatic solar wind.

  7. Recent observations of MHD fluctuations in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bavassano

    Full Text Available A short review of recent observations of solar wind fluctuations in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD range of scales is presented. In recent years, the use of high time-resolution data on an extended interval of heliocentric distance has allowed significant advances in our knowledge of MHD fluctuations. We first focus on the origin and evolution of the Alfvénic-type fluctuations. The role of interplanetary sources and the influence of interactions with structures convected by the solar wind are examined. Then compressive fluctuations are investigated, with special attention being given to their nature and origin. Observations are discussed in the light of recent theories and models. Finally, predictions for MHD turbulence in polar regions of the heliosphere are highlighted.

  8. The global interaction of comets with the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houpis, Harry L. F.

    1987-01-01

    The recent in-situ measurements of the plasma-neutral gas environment of comet Halley by the GIOTTO and VEGA spacecraft have confirmed the global theory of the comet-solar wind interaction. The ionopause, cometopause, and bow shock distances are the primary predictions of the model, although various momentum collisional cross-sections can also be estimated. With this greater confidence in the global model, the sharp Sunward intensity decrease in the spatial H2O+ profiles observed for comet Halley between 2.14 AU pre- and post-perihelion are interpreted as the cometopause boundary. This interpretation may then be used to determine the solar wind conditions local to the comet.

  9. Charge Exchange Losses and Stochastic Acceleration in the Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Kenny, Ciaran

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic acceleration of particles under a pressure balance condition can accommodate the universal $p^{-5}$ spectra observed under many different conditions in the inner heliosphere. In this model, in order to avoid an infinite build up of particle pressure, a relationship between the momentum diffusion of particles and the adiabatic deceleration in the solar wind must exist. This constrains both the spatial and momentum diffusion coefficients and results in the $p^{-5}$ spectrum in the presence of adiabatic losses in the solar wind. However, this theory cannot explain the presence of such spectra beyond the termination shock, where adiabatic deceleration is negligible. To explain this apparent discrepancy, we include the effect of charge exchange losses, resulting in new forms of both the spatial and momentum diffusion coefficients that have not previously been considered. Assuming that the turbulence is of a large-scale compressible nature, we find that a balance between momentum diffusion and losses can...

  10. Solar wind and micrometeorite effects in the lunar regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housley, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    Using available data from the literature, an outline is formulated for the major physical and chemical effects expected during solar-wind bombardment of the lunar regolith. In agreement with results of Auger and other analyses of the composition of lunar grain surfaces, this outline predicts that solar-wind sputtering will tend to clean exposed grain surfaces by ejecting material at velocities exceeding lunar escape velocity. Results are also discussed which show that Fe is partially reduced in the outer few 10 nm of grain surfaces and that this reduced Fe forms 10-nm-diameter metal spheres throughout the glass during agglutinate formation by micrometeorite impacts. These metal spheres give the agglutinates their distinctive optical and magnetic properties and are partially responsible for the decreasing albedo of the lunar surface with exposure age.

  11. Solar wind collimation of the Jupiter high velocity dust streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flandes, A.; Krueger, H.

    2006-12-01

    The dust bursts discovered by the Ulysses dust sensor when approaching Jupiter in 1992 were later confirmed as collimated streams of high velocity (~200 km/s) charged (~5V) dust grains escaping from Jupiter and dominated by the interplanetary Magnetic field (IMF). With Cassini, a similar phenomenon was observed in Saturn. It was demonstrated that the Jovian dust streams are closely related to the solar wind compressed regions, either Corotating interaction regions (CIRs) or Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) ¨Cto a minor extent-. Actually the dust streams seem ultimately to be generated by such events. This can be explained considering that dust grains are accelerated as they gain substantial energy while compressed at the forward and reverse shocks that bound or precede these solar wind regions.

  12. A review on solar wind modeling: kinetic and fluid aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Echim, Marius; Lie-Svendsen, Oystein

    2013-01-01

    We review the main advantages and limitations of the kinetic exospheric and fluid models of the solar wind (SW). We discuss the hydrostatic model imagined by Chapman, the first supersonic hydrodynamic models published by Parker and the first generation subsonic kinetic model proposed by Chamberlain. It is shown that a correct estimation of the electric field as in the second generation kinetic exospheric models developed by Lemaire and Scherer, provides a supersonic expansion of the corona, reconciling the hydrodynamic and the kinetic approach. The third generation kinetic exospheric models considers kappa velocity distribution function (VDF) instead of a Maxwellian at the exobase and in addition they treat a non-monotonic variation of the electric potential with the radial distance; the fourth generation exospheric models include Coulomb collisions based on the Fokker--Planck collision term. Multi-fluid models of the solar wind provide a coarse grained description and reproduce with success the spatio-tempor...

  13. A desalination plant with solar and wind energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Ye, Z.; Gao, W.

    2013-12-01

    The shortage of freshwater resources has become a worldwide problem. China has a water shortage, although the total amount of water resources is the sixth in the world, the per capita water capacity is the 121th (a quarter of the world's per capita water capacity), and the United Nations considers China one of the poorest 13 countries in the world in terms of water. In order to increase the supply of fresh water, a realistic way is to make full use of China's long and narrow coastline for seawater desalination. This paper discusses a sea water desalination device, the device adopts distillation, uses the greenhouse effect principle and wind power heating principle, and the two-type start is used to solve the problem of vertical axis wind turbine self-starting. Thrust bearings are used to ensure the stability of the device, and to ensure absorbtion of wind energy and solar energy, and to collect evaporation of water to achieve desalination. The device can absorb solar and wind energy instead of input energy, so it can be used in ship, island and many kinds of environment. Due to the comprehensive utilization of wind power and solar power, the efficiency of the device is more than other passive sea water desalting plants, the initial investment and maintenance cost is lower than active sea water desalting plant. The main part of the device cannot only be used in offshore work, but can also be used in deep sea floating work, so the device can utilise deep sea energy. In order to prove the practicability of the device, the author has carried out theory of water production calculations. According to the principle of conservation of energy, the device ais bsorbing solar and wind power, except loose lost part which is used for water temperature rise and phase transition. Assume the inflow water temperature is 20 °C, outflow water temperature is 70 °C, the energy utilization is 60%, we can know that the water production quantity is 8 kg/ m2 per hour. Comparing with the

  14. Velocity fluctuations in polar solar wind: a comparison between different solar cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bavassano

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The polar solar wind is a fast, tenuous and steady flow that, with the exception of a relatively short phase around the Sun's activity maximum, fills the high-latitude heliosphere. The polar wind properties have been extensively investigated by Ulysses, the first spacecraft able to perform in-situ measurements in the high-latitude heliosphere. The out-of-ecliptic phases of Ulysses cover about seventeen years. This makes possible to study heliospheric properties at high latitudes in different solar cycles. In the present investigation we focus on hourly- to daily-scale fluctuations of the polar wind velocity. Though the polar wind is a quite uniform flow, fluctuations in its velocity do not appear negligible. A simple way to characterize wind velocity variations is that of performing a multi-scale statistical analysis of the wind velocity differences. Our analysis is based on the computation of velocity differences at different time lags and the evaluation of statistical quantities (mean, standard deviation, skewness, and kurtosis for the different ensembles. The results clearly show that, though differences exist in the three-dimensional structure of the heliosphere between the investigated solar cycles, the velocity fluctuations in the core of polar coronal holes exhibit essentially unchanged statistical properties.

  15. Scaling of the electron dissipation range of solar wind turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Electron scale solar wind turbulence has attracted great interest in recent years. Clear evidences have been given from the Cluster data that turbulence is not fully dissipated near the proton scale but continues cascading down to the electron scales. However, the scaling of the energy spectra as well as the nature of the plasma modes involved at those small scales are still not fully determined. Here we survey 10 years of the Cluster search-coil magnetometer (SCM) waveforms measured in the s...

  16. On the relation between ionospheric winter anomalies and solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. Rumi

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available There are two different winter anomalies. A small one that appears in connection with ionization at relatively low latitudes in the bottom of the D-region of the ionosphere. There, the electron densities in the winter happen to be less than should be expected. On the other hand, the classic winter anomaly is present when in the winter the upper D-region, again at relatively low latitudes, has more ionization than should be expected. Both these effects are due to the slant compression of the geomagnetic field produced by the solar wind in the winter season (which is, of course, the summer season when reference is made to events in the other hemisphere. It is shown that the small winter anomaly is a consequence of a hemispheric imbalance in the flux of galactic cosmic rays determined by the obliquely distorted geomagnetic field. It is shown that the standard winter anomaly can be ascribed to the influx of a super solar wind, which penetrates into the Earth’s polar atmosphere down to E-region heights and, duly concentrated through a funneling action at the winter pole of the distorted geomagnetic field, slows down the winter polar vortex. An equatorward motion of the polar air with its content of nitric oxide brings about the excess of ionization in the upper D-region at lower latitudes. The experimentally observed rhythmic recurrence of the upper winter anomaly is correlated to a possible rhythmic recurrence of the super solar wind. The actual detection of the upper winter anomaly could yield some information on the velocity of the basic solar wind. A by-product of the present analysis, the determination of à , the coefficient of collisional detachment of the electrons from the O2 ions, is presented in the Appendix.

  17. The solar wind interaction with comets: A post encounter view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendis, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    The recent spacecraft encounters with comets Giacobini-Zinner and Halley have led to an enormous increase in our knowledge of comets, including their dust, neutral gas, plasma, and magnetic field environments. The latter has in turn led to better understanding of the nature of the solar wind interaction with the well developed atmosphere of a comet. The post-encounter understanding of this interaction is reviewed, underscoring the differences with pre-encounter reasoning. The problems outstanding in this area are emphasized.

  18. (abstract) Ulysses Observations of Magnetic Nulls in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterhalter, D.; Murphy, N.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.; Balogh, A.; Erdos, G.

    1993-01-01

    High time resolution magnetic field measurements (1 vector/s) at radial distances out to 5.3 AU and heliographic latitudes from 0(deg) to > 35(deg) S reveal the presence of solitary pulses lasting tens of seconds in which the field magnitude approaches or reaches zero. The properties of these nulls, their spatial distribution and relation to solar wind structures and to similar-apppearing interplanetary and magnetospheric impulses will be discussed.

  19. OMNI: A Description of Near-Earth Solar Wind Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papitashvili, Natasha; Bilitza, Dieter; King, Joseph

    OMNI is an hourly resolution multi-source data set of near-Earth solar wind's magnetic field and plasma parameters spanning the period from November 1963 (IMP 1 launch) to today, and it is being updated regularly with new data. OMNI is widely used in the heliospheric community as is documented by the large number of acknowledgements in scientific papers. OMNI provides the IMF (magnitude and vector), flow velocity (magnitude and vector), flow pressure, proton density, alpha particle to proton density ratio, and several additional parameters including sunspot and geomagnetic indices and energetic proton fluxes from IMP and GOES. Spacecraft data used for compiling the OMNI solar wind reference include IMP-8, ACE, Wind, ISEE-3, and Geotail. The data from ISEE-3, Wind, and ACE were time-shifted because they are about an hour upstream of the Earth's magnetosphere. Extensive quality control and cross- comparisons of overlapping data sets were made in creating OMNI. This presentation will describe the OMNI data set and highlight its wide use in the space science community. We will also present some of the many capabilities of the OMNIweb interface (http://omniweb.gsfc.nasa.gov/ow.html) that provides access to the entire OMNI data set. OMNIWeb allows users to generate plots vs. time, to create scatter plots of any two OMNI parameters, to filter with user-specified parameter range criteria, to list and download OMNI parameters, to generate distributions of OMNI parameter values, and to browse and retrieve a static (but periodically updated) daily-resolution IMF polarity plot covering the entire OMNI time span. The Omni data set represents a thorough description of various characteristics of near-Earth solar wind magnetic field and plasma, which could be used as a basis for that space environment's standard.

  20. Analysis of the solar/wind resources in Southern Spain for optimal sizing of hybrid solar-wind power generation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-Ruiz, S.; Pozo-Vazquez, D.; Santos-Alamillos, F. J.; Lara-Fanego, V.; Ruiz-Arias, J. A.; Tovar-Pescador, J.

    2010-09-01

    A drawback common to the solar and wind energy systems is their unpredictable nature and dependence on weather and climate on a wide range of time scales. In addition, the variation of the energy output may not match with the time distribution of the load demand. This can partially be solved by the use of batteries for energy storage in stand-alone systems. The problem caused by the variable nature of the solar and wind resources can be partially overcome by the use of energy systems that uses both renewable resources in a combined manner, that is, hybrid wind-solar systems. Since both resources can show complementary characteristics in certain location, the independent use of solar or wind systems results in considerable over sizing of the batteries system compared to the use of hybrid solar-wind systems. Nevertheless, to the day, there is no single recognized method for properly sizing these hybrid wind-solar systems. In this work, we present a method for sizing wind-solar hybrid systems in southern Spain. The method is based on the analysis of the wind and solar resources on daily scale, particularly, its temporal complementary characteristics. The method aims to minimize the size of the energy storage systems, trying to provide the most reliable supply.

  1. Short term fluctuations of wind and solar power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anvari, M.; Lohmann, G.; Wächter, M.; Milan, P.; Lorenz, E.; Heinemann, D.; Rahimi Tabar, M. Reza; Peinke, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    Wind and solar power are known to be highly influenced by weather events and may ramp up or down abruptly. Such events in the power production influence not only the availability of energy, but also the stability of the entire power grid. By analysing significant amounts of data from several regions around the world with resolutions of seconds to minutes, we provide strong evidence that renewable wind and solar sources exhibit multiple types of variability and nonlinearity in the time scale of seconds and characterise their stochastic properties. In contrast to previous findings, we show that only the jumpy characteristic of renewable sources decreases when increasing the spatial size over which the renewable energies are harvested. Otherwise, the strong non-Gaussian, intermittent behaviour in the cumulative power of the total field survives even for a country-wide distribution of the systems. The strong fluctuating behaviour of renewable wind and solar sources can be well characterised by Kolmogorov-like power spectra and q-exponential probability density functions. Using the estimated potential shape of power time series, we quantify the jumpy or diffusive dynamic of the power. Finally we propose a time delayed feedback technique as a control algorithm to suppress the observed short term non-Gaussian statistics in spatially strong correlated and intermittent renewable sources.

  2. Magnetic discontinuities in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdankin, Vladimir; Boldyrev, Stanislav; Mason, Joanne; Perez, Jean Carlos

    2012-04-27

    Recent measurements of solar wind turbulence report the presence of intermittent, exponentially distributed angular discontinuities in the magnetic field. In this Letter, we study whether such discontinuities can be produced by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We detect the discontinuities by measuring the fluctuations of the magnetic field direction, Δθ, across fixed spatial increments Δx in direct numerical simulations of MHD turbulence with an imposed uniform guide field B(0). A large region of the probability density function (pdf) for Δθ is found to follow an exponential decay, proportional to exp(-Δθ/θ(*)), with characteristic angle θ(*)≈(14°)(b(rms)/B(0))(0.65) for a broad range of guide-field strengths. We find that discontinuities observed in the solar wind can be reproduced by MHD turbulence with reasonable ratios of b(rms)/B(0). We also observe an excess of small angular discontinuities when Δx becomes small, possibly indicating an increasing statistical significance of dissipation-scale structures. The structure of the pdf in this case closely resembles the two-population pdf seen in the solar wind. We thus propose that strong discontinuities are associated with inertial-range MHD turbulence, while weak discontinuities emerge from dissipation-range turbulence. In addition, we find that the structure functions of the magnetic field direction exhibit anomalous scaling exponents, which indicates the existence of intermittent structures.

  3. Construction of Solar-Wind-Like Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Dana Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuations in the solar wind fields tend to not only have velocities and magnetic fields correlated in the sense consistent with Alfven waves traveling from the Sun, but they also have the magnitude of the magnetic field remarkably constant despite their being broadband. This paper provides, for the first time, a method for constructing fields with nearly constant magnetic field, zero divergence, and with any specified power spectrum for the fluctuations of the components of the field. Every wave vector, k, is associated with two polarizations the relative phases of these can be chosen to minimize the variance of the field magnitude while retaining the\\random character of the fields. The method is applied to a case with one spatial coordinate that demonstrates good agreement with observed time series and power spectra of the magnetic field in the solar wind, as well as with the distribution of the angles of rapid changes (discontinuities), thus showing a deep connection between two seemingly unrelated issues. It is suggested that using this construction will lead to more realistic simulations of solar wind turbulence and of the propagation of energetic particles.

  4. Influence of solar wind ions on photoemission charging of dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouzak, Libor; Richterova, Ivana; Pavlu, Jiri; Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek

    2016-04-01

    The lunar surface covered by a layer of dust grains is exposed to solar wind particles and photons coming from the Sun on the sunlit side. Solar wind ions cause sputtering of dust grains or can be implanted into grains. We suppose that as a consequence of ion implantation, an additional energy is transferred to grains, more valence band electrons are excited, and the photoelectron yield is increased. An increase of the photoelectron current causes the enhanced density of electrons that form a sheet above the illuminated lunar surface. Thus, an influence of solar wind ions on the Debye length and photoelectron sheet formation is expected. We present laboratory estimations of work functions and photoelectron yields of a single micron-sized silica grain before and after ion implantation. The silica grain used as a lunar simulant is caught in the electrodynamic trap. Grain's specific charge is evaluated by an analysis of the grain motion within the trap, while its work function is determined from observations of a time evolution of the charge-to-mass ratio when the grain is irradiated by photons of different emission lines. By comparison of the photoelectron current (from grain) with photon flux (from UV source), we establish the photoelectron yield of the trapped object. The influence of ion implantation is thoroughly analyzed and discussed.

  5. Solar-wind and interplanetary electron measurements on the Apollo 15 subsatellite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K. A.; Chase, L. M.; Lin, R. P.; Mcguire, R. E.; Mccoy, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of high-energy solar-wind electrons have been made from a low orbit around the moon. Solar-wind electrons can be identified up to energies of about 3000 eV, at which an electron population of entirely different characteristics becomes dominant. The solar-wind cavity on the moon's antisolar side shows evidence of being filled by plasma coming from the downstream direction. When the direction of the interplanetary field corresponds to solar ecliptic azimuth angles of about 90 deg, a partial solar-wind cavity extends across most of the eastern sunlit side of the moon within 20 deg of the moon meridian. There are localized increases in the 500-eV electron flux over much of the sunlit hemisphere. These increases are interpreted to be the result of an interaction between the solar wind and the moon that deflects some of the solar-wind flow and results in limb shocks.

  6. Anisotropic Solar Wind Sputtering of the Lunar Surface Induced by Crustal Magnetic Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, A. R.; Sarantos, M.; Halekas, J. S.; Delory, G. T.; Saito, Y.; Nishino, M.

    2014-01-01

    The lunar exosphere is generated by several processes each of which generates neutral distributions with different spatial and temporal variability. Solar wind sputtering of the lunar surface is a major process for many regolith-derived species and typically generates neutral distributions with a cosine dependence on solar zenith angle. Complicating this picture are remanent crustal magnetic anomalies on the lunar surface, which decelerate and partially reflect the solar wind before it strikes the surface. We use Kaguya maps of solar wind reflection efficiencies, Lunar Prospector maps of crustal field strengths, and published neutral sputtering yields to calculate anisotropic solar wind sputtering maps. We feed these maps to a Monte Carlo neutral exospheric model to explore three-dimensional exospheric anisotropies and find that significant anisotropies should be present in the neutral exosphere depending on selenographic location and solar wind conditions. Better understanding of solar wind/crustal anomaly interactions could potentially improve our results.

  7. A multiple flux-tube solar wind model

    CERN Document Server

    Pinto, Rui F

    2016-01-01

    We present a new model, MULTI-VP, that computes the three-dimensional structure of the solar wind which includes the chromosphere, the transition region, and the corona and low heliosphere. MULTI- VP calculates a large ensemble of wind profiles flowing along open magnetic field-lines which sample the whole three-dimensional atmosphere or, alternatively, on a given region of interest. The radial domain starts from the photosphere and extends, typically, to about 30 $R_{sun}$ . The elementary uni-dimensional wind solutions are based on a mature numerical scheme which was adapted in order to accept any flux-tube geometry. We discuss here the first results obtained with this model. We use Potential Field Source-Surface (PFSS) extrapolations of magnetograms from the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) to determine the structure of the background magnetic field. Our results support the hypothesis that the geometry of the magnetic flux-tubes in the lower corona controls the distribution of slow and fast wind flows. The i...

  8. Study of Drag Coefficients in Solar Panel Under Wind Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro López Llanusa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the geographical situation of Cuba the wind plays an important role in the design of the solar panels. The aim of the research is to evaluate the differences that appear in the support reactions of the panel, due to pressures acting, in correspondence with the implementation of the Cuban standard NC-285: 2003 but varying the pressure coefficient by using standards NBR 6123: 1988, CIRSOC 102, CN-285: 2003, Eurocode 1-4: 2005, ASCE 7-10 and AS-1170.2: 2011. These reactions are also calculat-ed from pressure coefficients obtained by wind tunnel testing on a scale model and coefficients proposed by another international work carried out on a wind tunnel on a similar solar panel. The main conclusions are that: among the standards, the use of the pressure coefficients proposed by the Eurocode 1- 4: 2005 leads to higher values of the support reactions and about the studies on wind tunnel testing, it can be concluded that the use of a total value of pressure coefficient it is not a good approximation to the actual behavior of the pressures on the panel.

  9. Earth's magnetosphere and outer radiation belt under sub-Alfvénic solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugaz, Noé; Farrugia, Charles J; Huang, Chia-Lin; Winslow, Reka M; Spence, Harlan E; Schwadron, Nathan A

    2016-10-03

    The interaction between Earth's magnetic field and the solar wind results in the formation of a collisionless bow shock 60,000-100,000 km upstream of our planet, as long as the solar wind fast magnetosonic Mach (hereafter Mach) number exceeds unity. Here, we present one of those extremely rare instances, when the solar wind Mach number reached steady values solar wind-magnetosphere coupling which is unusual for planets in our solar system but may be common for close-in extrasolar planets.

  10. Solar wind modulation of the Martian ionosphere observed by Mars Global Surveyor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-S. Wang

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Electron density profiles in the Martian ionosphere observed by the radio occultation experiment on board Mars Global Surveyor have been analyzed to determine if the densities are influenced by the solar wind. Evidence is presented that the altitude of the maximum ionospheric electron density shows a positive correlation to the energetic proton flux in the solar wind. The solar wind modulation of the Martian ionosphere can be attributed to heating of the neutral atmosphere by the solar wind energetic proton precipitation. The modulation is observed to be most prominent at high solar zenith angles. It is argued that this is consistent with the proposed modulation mechanism.

  11. Analysis of off-grid hybrid wind turbine/solar PV water pumping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    While many remote water pumping systems exist (e.g. mechanical windmills, solar photovoltaic , wind-electric, diesel powered), very few combine both the wind and solar energy resources to possibly improve the reliability and the performance of the system. In this paper, off-grid wind turbine (WT) a...

  12. Ensemble downscaling in coupled solar wind-magnetosphere modeling for space weather forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, M J; Horbury, T S; Wicks, R T; McGregor, S L; Savani, N P; Xiong, M

    2014-06-01

    Advanced forecasting of space weather requires simulation of the whole Sun-to-Earth system, which necessitates driving magnetospheric models with the outputs from solar wind models. This presents a fundamental difficulty, as the magnetosphere is sensitive to both large-scale solar wind structures, which can be captured by solar wind models, and small-scale solar wind "noise," which is far below typical solar wind model resolution and results primarily from stochastic processes. Following similar approaches in terrestrial climate modeling, we propose statistical "downscaling" of solar wind model results prior to their use as input to a magnetospheric model. As magnetospheric response can be highly nonlinear, this is preferable to downscaling the results of magnetospheric modeling. To demonstrate the benefit of this approach, we first approximate solar wind model output by smoothing solar wind observations with an 8 h filter, then add small-scale structure back in through the addition of random noise with the observed spectral characteristics. Here we use a very simple parameterization of noise based upon the observed probability distribution functions of solar wind parameters, but more sophisticated methods will be developed in the future. An ensemble of results from the simple downscaling scheme are tested using a model-independent method and shown to add value to the magnetospheric forecast, both improving the best estimate and quantifying the uncertainty. We suggest a number of features desirable in an operational solar wind downscaling scheme.

  13. The Contribution of Coronal Jets To The Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Lionello, R; Titov, V S; Leake, J E; MikiĆ, Z; Linker, J A; Linton, M G

    2016-01-01

    Transient collimated plasma eruptions in the solar corona, commonly known as coronal (or X-ray) jets, are among the most interesting manifestations of solar activity. It has been suggested that these events contribute to the mass and energy content of the corona and solar wind, but the extent of these contributions remains uncertain. We have recently modeled the formation and evolution of coronal jets using a three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code with thermodynamics in a large spherical domain that includes the solar wind. Our model is coupled to 3D MHD flux-emergence simulations, i.e, we use boundary conditions provided by such simulations to drive a time-dependent coronal evolution. The model includes parametric coronal heating, radiative losses, and thermal conduction, which enables us to simulate the dynamics and plasma properties of coronal jets in a more realistic manner than done so far. Here we employ these simulations to calculate the amount of mass and energy transported by coronal j...

  14. Cometary X-rays : solar wind charge exchange in cometary atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewits, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of the solar wind with the planets and the interstellar medium is of key importance for the evolution of our solar system. The interaction with Earth's atmosphere is best known for the northern light. In case of Mars, the interaction with the solar wind might have lead to the erosion

  15. Solar Wind Strahl Broadening by Self-Generated Plasma Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, J.; Vinas, A. F.; Yoon, P. H.; Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.

    2013-01-01

    This Letter reports on the results of numerical simulations which may provide a possible explanation for the strahl broadening during quiet solar conditions. The relevant processes involved in the broadening are due to kinetic quasi-linear wave-particle interaction. Making use of static analytical electron distribution in an inhomogeneous field, it is found that self-generated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency, i.e., Langmuir waves, are capable of scattering the strahl component, resulting in energy and pitch-angle diffusion that broadens its velocity distribution significantly. The present theoretical results provide an alternative or complementary explanation to the usual whistler diffusion scenario, suggesting that self-induced electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency might play a key role in broadening the solar wind strahl during quiet solar conditions.

  16. Measuring the Turbulent Cascade in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacBride, B. T.; Forman, M. A.; Smith, C. W.

    2006-12-01

    Kolmogorov's famous 4/5 law for the Navier-Stokes equation states that in isotropic hydrodynamic (HD) turbulence, the third moment of longitudinal velocity fluctuations at a spatial distance L is (4/5) ɛ ěrt L ěrt where ɛ is the turbulent energy cascade rate = heating rate per unit mass. A definite, signed, third moment is a fundamental property of the turbulent velocity fluctuations arising from the non-linear term in the Navier-Stokes equation, the only direct indicator that a cascade exists, the only measure of what direction that cascade takes (to smaller or larger spatial scales), and the truest indication of the cascade rate. The solar wind is MHD, however, and its turbulence is anisotropic. Dasso et al. (2005) perform a study on the anisotropy in the solar wind as a function of flow speed and find that there exists "quasi-two-dimensional" turbulence in low speed streams and a one dimensional "slab" structure in high speed flow. Politano and Pouquet (1998; PP) have derived an exact expression, valid in anisotropic situations, for the divergence with lag vector L of a certain vector third moment of the fluctuations in the Elsasser variables as a function of L. We perform an analysis of the third-order moment derived by PP. We use 8 years of ACE combine 64-s magnetic field and plasma measurements in variably defined subsets to compute the Elsasser variables in mean-field coordinates for different solar wind conditions (high/low wind speed, yearly, etc.). Most significantly, we attempt to separately resolve parallel and perpendicular cascades relative to the mean magnetic field. We find (1) the third moment structure functions are approximately proportional to lag as expected, (2) the inferred energy dissipation rate for outward-moving waves is larger than for inward-moving waves with many intervals showing evidence of an inverse cascade of the minority component, (3) the total energy-dissipation rate inferred by this method is frequently in disagreement

  17. 2015 Bioenergy Market Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, Ethan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Moriarty, Kristi [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lewis, John [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Milbrandt, Anelia [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schwab, Amy [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-02-28

    This report is an update to the 2013 report and provides a status of the markets and technology development involved in growing a domestic bioenergy economy as it existed at the end of 2015. It compiles and integrates information to provide a snapshot of the current state and historical trends influencing the development of bioenergy markets. This version features details on the two major bioenergy markets: biofuels and biopower and an overview of bioproducts that enable bioenergy production. The information is intended for policy-makers as well as technology developers and investors tracking bioenergy developments. It also highlights some of the key energy and regulatory drivers of bioenergy markets.

  18. The influence of solar wind variability on magnetospheric ULF wave power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokhotelov, D.; Rae, I.J. [UCL, Dorking (United Kingdom). Mullard Space Science Lab.; Murphy, K.R. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Mann, I.R. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Physics

    2015-10-01

    Magnetospheric ultra-low frequency (ULF) oscillations in the Pc 4-5 frequency range play an important role in the dynamics of Earth's radiation belts, both by enhancing the radial diffusion through incoherent interactions and through the coherent drift-resonant interactions with trapped radiation belt electrons. The statistical distributions of magnetospheric ULF wave power are known to be strongly dependent on solar wind parameters such as solar wind speed and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation. Statistical characterisation of ULF wave power in the magnetosphere traditionally relies on average solar wind-IMF conditions over a specific time period. In this brief report, we perform an alternative characterisation of the solar wind influence on magnetospheric ULF wave activity through the characterisation of the solar wind driver by its variability using the standard deviation of solar wind parameters rather than a simple time average. We present a statistical study of nearly one solar cycle (1996-2004) of geosynchronous observations of magnetic ULF wave power and find that there is significant variation in ULF wave powers as a function of the dynamic properties of the solar wind. In particular, we find that the variability in IMF vector, rather than variabilities in other parameters (solar wind density, bulk velocity and ion temperature), plays the strongest role in controlling geosynchronous ULF power. We conclude that, although time-averaged bulk properties of the solar wind are a key factor in driving ULF powers in the magnetosphere, the solar wind variability can be an important contributor as well. This highlights the potential importance of including solar wind variability especially in studies of ULF wave dynamics in order to assess the efficiency of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling.

  19. Estimation of wind and solar resources in Mali

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badger, J.; Kamissoko, F.; Olander Rasmussen, M.; Larsen, Soeren; Guidon, N.; Boye Hansen, L.; Dewilde, L.; Alhousseini, M.; Noergaard, P.; Nygaard, I.

    2012-11-15

    The wind resource has been estimated for all of Mali at 7.5 km resolution using the KAMM/WAsP numerical wind atlas methodology. Three domains were used to cover entire country and three sets of wind classes used to capture change in large scale forcing over country. The final output includes generalized climate statistics for any location in Mali, giving wind direction and wind speed distribution. The modelled generalized climate statistics can be used directly in the WAsP software. The preliminary results show a wind resource, which is relatively low, but which under certain conditions may be economically feasible, i.e. at favourably exposed sites, giving enhanced winds, and where practical utilization is possible, given consideration to grid connection or replacement or augmentation of diesel-based electricity systems. The solar energy resource for Mali was assessed for the period between July 2008 and June 2011 using a remote sensing based estimate of the down-welling surface shortwave flux. The remote sensing estimates were adjusted on a month-by-month basis to account for seasonal differences between the remote sensing estimates and in situ data. Calibration was found to improve the coefficient of determination as well as decreasing the mean error both for the calibration and validation data. Compared to the results presented in the ''Renewable energy resources in Mali - preliminary mapping''-report that showed a tendency for underestimation compared to data from the NASA PPOWER/SSE database, the presented results show a very good agreement with the in situ data (after calibration) with no significant bias. Unfortunately, the NASA-database only contains data up until 2005, so a similar comparison could not be done for the time period analyzed in this study, although the agreement with the historic NASA data is still useful as reference. (LN)

  20. Effect of uncertainties in solar synoptic magnetic flux maps in modeling of solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Bertello, Luca; MacNeice, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Recently, the NSO/SOLIS team developed variance (error) maps that represent uncertainties in magnetic flux synoptic charts. These uncertainties are determined by the spatial variances of the magnetic flux distribution from full disk magnetograms that contribute to each bin in the synoptic chart. Here we present a study of the effects of variances on solar wind parameters (wind speed, density, magnetic field, and temperature) derived using the WSA-ENLIL model and ensemble modeling approach. We compare the results of the modeling with near-Earth solar wind magnetic field and plasma data as extracted from NASA/GSFC's OMNI data set. We show that analysis of uncertainties may be useful for understanding the sensitivity of the model predictions to short-term evolution of magnetic field and noise in the synoptic magnetograms.

  1. Wind Tunnel Tests of Parabolic Trough Solar Collectors: March 2001--August 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoya, N.; Peterka, J. A.; Gee, R. C.; Kearney, D.

    2008-05-01

    Conducted extensive wind-tunnel tests on parabolic trough solar collectors to determine practical wind loads applicable to structural design for stress and deformation, and local component design for concentrator reflectors.

  2. Kinetic scale turbulence and dissipation in the solar wind: key observational results and future outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, M L; Wicks, R T; Perri, S; Sahraoui, F

    2015-05-13

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in the solar wind. Turbulence causes kinetic and magnetic energy to cascade to small scales where they are eventually dissipated, adding heat to the plasma. The details of how this occurs are not well understood. This article reviews the evidence for turbulent dissipation and examines various diagnostics for identifying solar wind regions where dissipation is occurring. We also discuss how future missions will further enhance our understanding of the importance of turbulence to solar wind dynamics.

  3. Investigating the Correlation Between Wind and Solar Power Forecast Errors in the Western Interconnection: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J.; Hodge, B. M.; Florita, A.

    2013-05-01

    Wind and solar power generations differ from conventional energy generation because of the variable and uncertain nature of their power output. This variability and uncertainty can have significant impacts on grid operations. Thus, short-term forecasting of wind and solar generation is uniquely helpful for power system operations to balance supply and demand in an electricity system. This paper investigates the correlation between wind and solar power forecasting errors.

  4. Solar wind influences on atmospheric electricity variables in polar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michnowski, Stanisław

    The measurement techniques applied in magnetospheric and ionospheric research enable detection of strong, intrinsic effects of solar wind on ionospheric electrical potential distribution and conductivity of the atmosphere. These manifestations of the solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere and ionosphere are especially evident at high latitudes. The possibility of observing there the response of the atmospheric electricity variables to solar wind has been questioned for a long time despite the fact that the atmospheric electric field and current variations at the ground are physically linked with electric potential of the ionosphere and conductivity of the lower atmosphere. The serious doubts were mainly due to the generally accepted opinion that the highly conducting ionosphere is an almost ideal equipotential electric screen that separates the weakly conductive lower atmosphere of the influence from space. This assumption could not be further upheld in view of the new findings. They have been provided for some time by ground-based atmospheric electric field and current measurements (AEMs) with simultaneous upper atmosphere observations and by corresponding balloon measurements. Recent ground-based AEMs in polar regions, i.e., in the near-subauroral, auroral, and polar cap high-latitude regions, have detected considerable influence of solar wind on the lower-atmosphere electric variables. However, the use of atmospheric electric observations in studying solar-terrestrial relations is still limited. The main reason is difficulty in separating various local meteorological effects, anthropogenic effects, and the effects of the global electric current circuit which affect simultaneously the measured quantities. Transmission of the electric signals through the lower atmosphere can also introduce troublesome disturbances. The paper outlines these problems and hints how the difficulties involved might be partly overcome in a feasible way. The needs and possible

  5. Multifractal analysis of high resolution solar wind proton density measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Carbone, Francesco; Leonardis, Ersilia; Chen, Christopher H. K.; Šafránková, Jana; Němeček, Zdenek

    2017-03-01

    The solar wind is a highly turbulent medium, with a high level of field fluctuations throughout a broad range of scales. These include an inertial range where a turbulent cascade is assumed to be active. The solar wind cascade shows intermittency, which however may depend on the wind conditions. Recent observations have shown that ion-scale magnetic turbulence is almost self-similar, rather than intermittent. A similar result was observed for the high resolution measurements of proton density provided by the spacecraft Spektr-R. Intermittency may be interpreted as the result of the multifractal properties of the turbulent cascade. In this perspective, this paper is devoted to the description of the multifractal properties of the high resolution density measurements. In particular, we have used the standard coarse-graining technique to evaluate the generalized dimensions Dq , and from these the multifractal spectrum f (α) , in two ranges of scale. A fit with the p-model for intermittency provided a quantitative measure of multifractality. Such indicator was then compared with alternative measures: the width of the multifractal spectrum, the peak of the kurtosis, and its scaling exponent. The results indicate that the small-scale fluctuations are multifractal, and suggest that different measures of intermittency are required to fully understand the small scale cascade.

  6. The Solar Wind as a Magnetofluid Turbulence Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2011-01-01

    The solar wind is the Sun's exosphere. As the solar atmosphere expands into interplanetary space, it is accelerated and heated. Data from spacecraft located throughout the heliosphere have revealed that this exosphere has velocities of several hundred kilometers/sec, densities at Earth orbit of about 5 particles/cu cm, and an entrained magnetic field that at Earth orbit that is about 5 10-5 Gauss. A fascinating feature of the solar wind is that the magnetic field fluctuates in a way that is highly reminiscent of "Alfven waves, i.e., the fluctuating magnetic fields are more-or-less aligned with fluctuations in the velocity of the plasma and, with proper normalization, have approximately equal magnitudes. The imperfect (observed) alignment leads to a variety of complex interactions. In many respects, the flow patterns appear to be an example of fully developed magneto fluid turbulence. Recently, the dissipation range of this turbulence has been studied using search coil magnetometer data from the STAFF instrument on the four Cluster spacecraft. I will attempt to give an overview of selected properties of this large-scale and small-scale turbulence.

  7. Observations and Simulations of Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, M. L.

    2006-12-01

    Alfvénic fluctuations are a ubiquitous component of the solar wind. Evidence from many spacecraft indicates that the fluctuations are convected out of the solar corona with relatively flat power spectra and constitute a source of free energy for a turbulent cascade of magnetic and kinetic energy to high wave numbers. Observations and simulations support the conclusion that the cascade evolves most rapidly in the vicinity of velocity shears and current sheets. Numerical solutions of the magnetohydrodynamic equations have elucidated the role of expansion on the evolution of the turbulence. Such studies are clarifying not only how a turbulent cascade develops, but also the nature of the symmetries of the turbulence. Of particular interest is the origin of the two-component correlation function of magnetic fluctuations that was deduced from ISEE-3 data. A central issue to be resolved is whether the correlation function indicates the existence of a quasi-two- dimensional component of the turbulence, or reflects another origin, such as pressure-balanced structures or small velocity shears. In our efforts to simulate solar wind turbulence we have included a tilted rotating current heliospheric sheet as well as variety of waves (e.g., Alfvénic, quasi-two-dimensional, pressure balance structures) and microstreams. These simulations have replicated many of the observations, but challenges remain.

  8. Slow Solar Wind: Observable Characteristics for Constraining Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.; Abbo, L.; Antiochos, S. K.; Hansteen, V. H.; Harra, L.; Ko, Y. K.; Lapenta, G.; Li, B.; Riley, P.; Strachan, L.; von Steiger, R.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Slow Solar Wind (SSW) origin is an open issue in the post SOHO era and forms a major objective for planned future missions such as the Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus.Results from spacecraft data, combined with theoretical modeling, have helped to investigate many aspects of the SSW. Fundamental physical properties of the coronal plasma have been derived from spectroscopic and imaging remote-sensing data and in-situ data, and these results have provided crucial insights for a deeper understanding of the origin and acceleration of the SSW.Advances models of the SSW in coronal streamers and other structures have been developed using 3D MHD and multi-fluid equations.Nevertheless, there are still debated questions such as:What are the source regions of SSW? What are their contributions to the SSW?Which is the role of the magnetic topology in corona for the origin, acceleration and energy deposition of SSW?Which are the possible acceleration and heating mechanisms for the SSW?The aim of this study is to present the insights on the SSW origin and formationarisen during the discussions at the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) by the Team entitled ''Slowsolar wind sources and acceleration mechanisms in the corona'' held in Bern (Switzerland) in March2014--2015. The attached figure will be presented to summarize the different hypotheses of the SSW formation.

  9. Critical point of the solar wind by radio sounding data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotova, N. A.; Oraevsky, V. N.; Pisarenko, Ya. V.; Vladimirskii, K. V.

    1995-01-01

    Results of the close-to-Sun plasmas sounding at the transonic region of the solar wind, where the sub-to supersonic flow transition proceeds (at 10 to 40 solar radii from the Sun), are presented. Natural sources of two types were used, water vapour maser sources at 1.35 cm and guasars at 2.9 m wavelength. scattering observations cover the period of 1986 to 1993, Russian Academy of Sciences telescopes RT-22 and DCR-1000 were used, IPS index and scattering angle being the immediate results of observations. Extensive studies of the scintillation index and scattering angle radial profiles reveal a remarkable structural detail, 'transonic region forrunner'-narrow region of diminished scattering close to the internal border of the extended transonic region with its characteristic enhanced scattering. Comparisons of the scattering and plasma velocity profiles let it possible to determine the critical point positions by the comparatively simple scattering observations. This new possibility widely improves the process of the basic data accumulation in the fundamental problem of the solar wind acceleration mechanism.

  10. Solar wind dynamic pressure and electric field as the main factors controlling Saturn's aurorae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, F J; Clarke, J T; Dougherty, M K; Hanlon, P G; Hansen, K C; Steinberg, J T; Barraclough, B L; Coates, A J; Gérard, J-C; Grodent, D; Kurth, W S; Mitchell, D G; Rymer, A M; Young, D T

    2005-02-17

    The interaction of the solar wind with Earth's magnetosphere gives rise to the bright polar aurorae and to geomagnetic storms, but the relation between the solar wind and the dynamics of the outer planets' magnetospheres is poorly understood. Jupiter's magnetospheric dynamics and aurorae are dominated by processes internal to the jovian system, whereas Saturn's magnetosphere has generally been considered to have both internal and solar-wind-driven processes. This hypothesis, however, is tentative because of limited simultaneous solar wind and magnetospheric measurements. Here we report solar wind measurements, immediately upstream of Saturn, over a one-month period. When combined with simultaneous ultraviolet imaging we find that, unlike Jupiter, Saturn's aurorae respond strongly to solar wind conditions. But in contrast to Earth, the main controlling factor appears to be solar wind dynamic pressure and electric field, with the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field playing a much more limited role. Saturn's magnetosphere is, therefore, strongly driven by the solar wind, but the solar wind conditions that drive it differ from those that drive the Earth's magnetosphere.

  11. Solar Wind Sputtering of Lunar Soil Analogs: The Effect of Ionic Charge and Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijazi, H.; Bannister, M. E.; Meyer, F. W.; Rouleau, C. M.; Barghouty, A. F.; Rickman, D. L.; Hijazi, H.

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution we report sput-tering measurements of anorthite, an analog material representative of the lunar highlands, by singly and multicharged ions representative of the solar wind. The ions investigated include protons, as well as singly and multicharged Ar ions (as proxies for the heavier solar wind constituents), in the charge state range +1 to +9, and had a fixed solar-wind-relevant impact velocity of approximately 310 km/s or 500 eV/ amu. The goal of the measurements was to determine the sputtering contribution of the heavy, multicharged minority solar wind constituents in comparison to that due to the dominant H+ fraction.

  12. Genesis Solar Wind Interstream, Coronal Hole and Coronal Mass Ejection Samples: Update on Availability and Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allton, J. H.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Allums, K. K.

    2017-01-01

    Recent refinement of analysis of ACE/SWICS data (Advanced Composition Explorer/Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer) and of onboard data for Genesis Discovery Mission of 3 regimes of solar wind at Earth-Sun L1 make it an appropriate time to update the availability and condition of Genesis samples specifically collected in these three regimes and currently curated at Johnson Space Center. ACE/SWICS spacecraft data indicate that solar wind flow types emanating from the interstream regions, from coronal holes and from coronal mass ejections are elementally and isotopically fractionated in different ways from the solar photosphere, and that correction of solar wind values to photosphere values is non-trivial. Returned Genesis solar wind samples captured very different kinds of information about these three regimes than spacecraft data. Samples were collected from 11/30/2001 to 4/1/2004 on the declining phase of solar cycle 23. Meshik, et al is an example of precision attainable. Earlier high precision laboratory analyses of noble gases collected in the interstream, coronal hole and coronal mass ejection regimes speak to degree of fractionation in solar wind formation and models that laboratory data support. The current availability and condition of samples captured on collector plates during interstream slow solar wind, coronal hole high speed solar wind and coronal mass ejections are de-scribed here for potential users of these samples.

  13. Operation of Concentrating Solar Power Plants in the Western Wind and Solar Integration Phase 2 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denholm, P.; Brinkman, G.; Lew, D.; Hummon, M.

    2014-05-01

    The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) explores various aspects of the challenges and impacts of integrating large amounts of wind and solar energy into the electric power system of the West. The phase 2 study (WWSIS-2) is one of the first to include dispatchable concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) in multiple scenarios of renewable penetration and mix. As a result, it provides unique insights into CSP plant operation, grid benefits, and how CSP operation and configuration may need to change under scenarios of increased renewable penetration. Examination of the WWSIS-2 results indicates that in all scenarios, CSP plants with TES provides firm system capacity, reducing the net demand and the need for conventional thermal capacity. The plants also reduced demand during periods of short-duration, high ramping requirements that often require use of lower efficiency peaking units. Changes in CSP operation are driven largely by the presence of other solar generation, particularly PV. Use of storage by the CSP plants increases in the higher solar scenarios, with operation of the plant often shifted to later in the day. CSP operation also becomes more variable, including more frequent starts. Finally, CSP output is often very low during the day in scenarios with significant PV, which helps decrease overall renewable curtailment (over-generation). However, the configuration studied is likely not optimal for High Solar Scenario implying further analysis of CSP plant configuration is needed to understand its role in enabling high renewable scenarios in the Western United States.

  14. 2013 Bioenergy Market Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwab, Amy [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Moriarty, Kristi [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Milbrandt, Anelia [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Geiger, Jesse [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lewis, John [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-28

    This report provides a status of the markets and technology development involved in growing a domestic bioenergy economy as it existed at the end of 2013. It compiles and integrates information to provide a snapshot of the current state and historical trends influencing the development of bioenergy markets. This information is intended for policy-makers as well as technology developers and investors tracking bioenergy developments. It also highlights some of the key energy and regulatory drivers of bioenergy markets.

  15. Standing shocks in the inner slow solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Bo; Li, Xing

    2011-01-01

    The slow solar wind, or at least a significant part of it, originates from the region bordering streamer helmets, where the flow tube geometry is distinct from flow tubes rooted in the center of coronal holes. We examine whether this particular tube geometry leads to standing shocks in the inner slow wind in this region. To isolate the influence of tube geometry, a simple isothermal wind model is employed and is solved in terms of the Lambert W function. In addition to a continuous solution, the model may also admit solutions with shocks, readily constructed with a graphical approach. When allowed, the shock solutions appear in pairs, one with a shock located in the streamer stalk, the other with a shock below the cusp along the streamer border. We show that solutions with standing shocks exist in a broad area in the parameter space characterizing the wind temperature and flow tube. In particular, streamers with cusps located at a heliocentric distance $\\gtrsim 3.2 R_\\odot$ can readily support discontinuous s...

  16. A Model for the Sources of the Slow Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Antiochos, S K; Titov, V S; Lionello, R; Linker, J A

    2011-01-01

    Models for the origin of the slow solar wind must account for two seemingly contradictory observations: The slow wind has the composition of the closed field corona, implying that it originates from the continuous opening and closing of flux at the boundary between open and closed field. On the other hand, the slow wind also has large angular width, up to ~ 60{\\circ}, suggesting that its source extends far from the open-closed boundary. We propose a model that can explain both observations. The key idea is that the source of the slow wind at the Sun is a network of narrow (possibly singular) open-field corridors that map to a web of separatrices and quasi-separatrix layers in the heliosphere. We compute analytically the topology of an open-field corridor and show that it produces a quasi-separatrix layer in the heliosphere that extends to angles far from the heliospheric current sheet. We then use an MHD code and MDI/SOHO observations of the photospheric magnetic field to calculate numerically, with high spat...

  17. Wind Solar Hybrid System Rectifier Stage Topology Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup M. Gakare

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents power-control strategies of a grid-connected hybrid generation system with versatile power transfer. The hybrid system allows maximum utilization of freely available renewable sources like wind and photovoltaic energies. This paper presents a new system configuration of the multi input rectifier stage for a hybrid wind and photovoltaic energy system. This configuration allows the two sources to supply the load simultaneously depending on the availability of the energy sources maximum power from the sun when it is available. An adaptive MPPT algorithm with a standard perturbs and observed method will be used for the Photo Voltaic system. The main advantage of the hybrid system is to give continuous power supply to the load. The gating pulses to the inverter switches are implemented with conventional and fuzzy controller. This hybrid wind-photo voltaic system is modeled in MATLAB/ SIMULINK environment. Simulation circuit is analyzed and results are presented for this hybrid wind and solar energy system.

  18. Structure, dynamics, and seasonal variability of the Mars-solar wind interaction: MAVEN Solar Wind Ion Analyzer in-flight performance and science results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halekas, J. S.; Ruhunusiri, S.; Harada, Y.; Collinson, G.; Mitchell, D. L.; Mazelle, C.; McFadden, J. P.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J. R.; Eparvier, F.; Luhmann, J. G.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the in-flight performance of the Solar Wind Ion Analyzer (SWIA) and observations of the Mars-solar wind interaction made during the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) prime mission and a portion of its extended mission, covering 0.85 Martian years. We describe the data products returned by SWIA and discuss the proper handling of measurements made with different mechanical attenuator states and telemetry modes, and the effects of penetrating and scattered backgrounds, limited phase space coverage, and multi-ion populations on SWIA observations. SWIA directly measures solar wind protons and alpha particles upstream from Mars. SWIA also provides proxy measurements of solar wind and neutral densities based on products of charge exchange between the solar wind and the hydrogen corona. Together, upstream and proxy observations provide a complete record of the solar wind experienced by Mars, enabling organization of the structure, dynamics, and ion escape from the magnetosphere. We observe an interaction that varies with season and solar wind conditions. Solar wind dynamic pressure, Mach number, and extreme ultraviolet flux all affect the bow shock location. We confirm the occurrence of order-of-magnitude seasonal variations of the hydrogen corona. We find that solar wind Alfvén waves, which provide an additional energy input to Mars, vary over the mission. At most times, only weak mass loading occurs upstream from the bow shock. However, during periods with near-radial interplanetary magnetic fields, structures consistent with Short Large Amplitude Magnetic Structures and their wakes form upstream, dramatically reconfiguring the Martian bow shock and magnetosphere.

  19. Structure and sources of solar wind in the growing phase of 24th solar cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemzin, Vladimir; Goryaev, Farid; Shugay, Julia; Rodkin, Denis; Veselovsky, Igor

    2015-04-01

    We present analysis of the solar wind (SW) structure and its association with coronal sources during the minimum and rising phase of 24th solar cycle (2009-2011). The coronal sources prominent in this period - coronal holes, small areas of open magnetic fields near active regions and transient sources associated with small-scale solar activity have been investigated using EUV solar images and soft X-ray fluxes obtained by the CORONAS-Photon/TESIS/Sphinx, PROBA2/SWAP, Hinode/EIS and AIA/SDO instruments as well as the magnetograms obtained by HMI/SDO. It was found that at solar minimum (2009) velocity and magnetic field strength of high speed wind (HSW) and transient SW from small-scale flares did not differ significantly from those of the background slow speed wind (SSW). The major difference between parameters of different SW components was seen in the ion composition represented by the C6/C5, O7/O6, Fe/O ratios and the mean charge of Fe ions. With growing solar activity, the speed of HSW increased due to transformation of its sources - small-size low-latitude coronal holes into equatorial extensions of large polar holes. At that period, the ion composition of transient SW changed from low-temperature to high-temperature values, which was caused by variation of the source conditions and change of the recombination/ionization rates during passage of the plasma flow through the low corona. However, we conclude that criteria of separation of the SW components based on the ion ratios established earlier by Zhao&Fisk (2009) for higher solar activity are not applicable to the extremely weak beginning of 24th cycle. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Commission's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under the grant agreement eHeroes (project n° 284461, www.eheroes.eu).

  20. Kinetic Signatures and Intermittent Turbulence in the Solar Wind Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Osman, K T; Hnat, B; Chapman, S C

    2012-01-01

    A connection between kinetic processes and intermittent turbulence is observed in the solar wind plasma using measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU. In particular, kinetic effects such as temperature anisotropy and plasma heating are concentrated near coherent structures, such as current sheets, which are non-uniformly distributed in space. Furthermore, these coherent structures are preferentially found in plasma unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. The inhomogeneous heating in these regions, which is present in both the magnetic field parallel and perpendicular temperature components, results in protons at least 3--4 times hotter than under typical stable plasma conditions. These results offer a new understanding of kinetic processes in a turbulent regime, where linear Vlasov theory is not sufficient to explain the inhomogeneous plasma dynamics operating near non-Gaussian structures.

  1. Kinetic signatures and intermittent turbulence in the solar wind plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K T; Matthaeus, W H; Hnat, B; Chapman, S C

    2012-06-29

    A connection between kinetic processes and intermittent turbulence is observed in the solar wind plasma using measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 A.U. In particular, kinetic effects such as temperature anisotropy and plasma heating are concentrated near coherent structures, such as current sheets, which are nonuniformly distributed in space. Furthermore, these coherent structures are preferentially found in plasma unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. The inhomogeneous heating in these regions, which is present in both the magnetic field parallel and perpendicular temperature components, results in protons at least 3-4 times hotter than under typical stable plasma conditions. These results offer a new understanding of kinetic processes in a turbulent regime, where linear Vlasov theory is not sufficient to explain the inhomogeneous plasma dynamics operating near non-Gaussian structures.

  2. The origins of planar magnetic structures in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neugebauer, M.; Clay, D.R. (California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena (United States)); Gosling, J.T. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1993-06-01

    The authors report on an assessment of extensive solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data obtained by ISEE-3, between Aug 1978 and Oct 1982, when it was upstream of the earth's bow shock. They looked for events given the name planar magnetic structure (PMS). A PMS event is a series of abrupt changes in the IMF, where the magnetic field is observed to take almost all values in some plane. Numerous possible explanations have been offered for these phenomena, and the authors looked at this data set to see if it would aid in the understanding of the origin of PMS. They observed the PMS events to generally be associated with two events: they tended to occur near the interplanetary current sheet, or; they tended to occur in the sheath of the wind plasma between an interplanetary shock, and the plasma which drove it.

  3. Alleviating alpha quenching by solar wind and meridional flow

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Tavakol, Reza; Brandenburg, Axel

    2010-01-01

    We study the ability of magnetic helicity expulsion to alleviate catastrophic $\\alpha$-quenching in mean field dynamos in two--dimensional spherical wedge domains. Motivated by the physical state of the outer regions of the Sun, we consider $\\alpha^2\\Omega$ mean field models with a dynamical $\\alpha$ quenching. We include two mechanisms which have the potential to facilitate helicity expulsion, namely advection by a mean flow (``solar wind'') and meridional circulation. We find that a wind alone can prevent catastrophic quenching, with the field saturating at finite amplitude. In certain parameter ranges, the presence of a large-scale meridional circulation can reinforce this alleviation. However, the saturated field strengths are typically below the equipartition field strength. We discuss possible mechanisms that might increase the saturated field.

  4. Alleviating α quenching by solar wind and meridional flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, D.; Moss, D.; Tavakol, R.; Brandenburg, A.

    2011-02-01

    Aims: We study the ability of magnetic helicity expulsion to alleviate catastrophic α-quenching in mean field dynamos in two-dimensional spherical wedge domains. Methods: Motivated by the physical state of the outer regions of the Sun, we consider α^2Ω mean field models with a dynamical α quenching. We include two mechanisms which have the potential to facilitate helicity expulsion, namely advection by a mean flow ("solar wind") and meridional circulation. Results: We find that a wind alone can prevent catastrophic quenching, with the field saturating at finite amplitude. In certain parameter ranges, the presence of a large-scale meridional circulation can reinforce this alleviation. However, the saturated field strengths are typically below the equipartition field strength. We discuss possible mechanisms that might increase the saturated field.

  5. Multiscale nature of the dissipation range in solar wind turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Told, D; TenBarge, J M; Howes, G G; Hammett, G W

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear energy transfer and dissipation in Alfv\\'en wave turbulence are analyzed in the first gyrokinetic simulation spanning all scales from the tail of the MHD range to the electron gyroradius scale. For typical solar wind parameters at 1 AU, about 30% of the nonlinear energy transfer close to the electron gyroradius scale is mediated by modes in the tail of the MHD cascade. Collisional dissipation occurs across the entire kinetic range $k_\\perp\\rho_i\\gtrsim 1$. Both mechanisms thus act on multiple coupled scales, which have to be retained for a comprehensive picture of the dissipation range in Alfv\\'enic turbulence.

  6. Assessing temporal complementarity of solar, wind and hydrokinetic energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurasz Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy sources (RES exhibit various characteristics when it comes to their availability in time and space domain. Some are characterised by significant variability and limited predictability. This makes their integration to the power grid a complicated task. Temporal and spatial complementarity of RES is perceived as one of the possible ways to facilitate the process of integration. This paper investigates the concept of temporal complementarity of solar wind and hydrokinetic energy in case of two sites in Poland. Obtained results indicate existence of some beneficial complementarity on inter-annual and annual time scale. Combination of those three RES in one hybrid system makes power source more reliable.

  7. Isotropic Scale-Invariant Dissipation of Solar Wind Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Kiyani, K H; Khotyaintsev, Yu V; Turner, A; Hnat, B; Sahraoui, F

    2010-01-01

    The anisotropic nature of solar wind magnetic fluctuations is investigated scale-by-scale using high cadence in-situ magnetic field measurements spanning five decades in scales from the inertial to dissipation ranges of plasma turbulence. We find an abrupt transition at ion kinetic scales to a single isotropic stochastic process that characterizes the dissipation range on all observable scales. In contrast to the inertial range, this is accompanied by a successive scale-invariant reduction in the ratio between parallel and transverse power. We suggest a possible phase space mechanism for this, based on nonlinear wave-particle interactions, operating in this scale-invariant isotropic manner.

  8. Three Sides Billboard Wind-Solar Hybrid System Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Xuefeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the high development of world economy, the demand of energy is increasing all the time, As energy shortage and environment problem are increasing outstanding, Renewable energy has been attracting more and more attention. A kind of three sides billboard supply by wind-Solar hybrid system has been designed in this paper, the overall structure of the system, components, working principle and control strategy has been analyzed from the system perspective. The software and hardware of the system are debugged together and the result is acquired. System function is better and has achieved the expected results.

  9. Solar wind driven dust acoustic instability with Lorentzian kappa distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arshad, Kashif [National Center for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad and University of Wah, Wah Cantt 47040 (Pakistan); Ehsan, Zahida, E-mail: Ehsan.zahida@gmail.com [National Center for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Universita degli Studi del Molise, 86090 Pesche - IS (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Defence Road, Off Raiwind Road, Lahore 86090 (Pakistan); Khan, S. A. [National Center for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Mahmood, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTEC, PO Box Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2014-02-15

    In a three species electron-ion-dust plasma following a generalized non-Maxwellian distribution function (Lorentzian or kappa), it is shown that a kinetic instability of dust-acoustic mode exists. The instability threshold is affected when such (quasineutral) plasma permeates through another static plasma. Such case is of interest when the solar wind is streaming through the cometary plasma in the presence of interstellar dust. In the limits of phase velocity of the waves larger and smaller than the thermal velocity of dust particles, the dispersion properties and growth rate of dust-acoustic mode are investigated analytically with validation via numerical analysis.

  10. Transport of Solar Wind Fluctuations: A Two-Component Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oughton, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Smith, C. W.; Breech, B.; Isenberg, P. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new model for the transport of solar wind fluctuations which treats them as two interacting incompressible components: quasi-two-dimensional turbulence and a wave-like piece. Quantities solved for include the energy, cross helicity, and characteristic transverse length scale of each component, plus the proton temperature. The development of the model is outlined and numerical solutions are compared with spacecraft observations. Compared to previous single-component models, this new model incorporates a more physically realistic treatment of fluctuations induced by pickup ions and yields improved agreement with observed values of the correlation length, while maintaining good observational accord with the energy, cross helicity, and temperature.

  11. Linear magnetosonic waves in solar wind flow tubes

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Nakariakov et al. (1996) investigated the linear magnetosonic waves trapped within solar wind flow tubes, where they accounted for a slab having boundaries at $x = \\pm d$ and extended up to infinity in the $y$ and $z$ directions. Srivastava and Dwivedi (2006) claimed to extend that work by considering a two-dimensional slab. We find that the work of Srivastava and Dwivedi (2006) is not for a two-dimensional slab and has a number of discrepancies. Further, their results for body waves are not ...

  12. The Nature of Subproton Scale Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C H K; Xia, Q; Perez, J C

    2013-01-01

    The nature of subproton scale fluctuations in the solar wind is an open question, partly because two similar types of electromagnetic turbulence can occur: kinetic Alfven turbulence and whistler turbulence. These two possibilities, however, have one key qualitative difference: whistler turbulence, unlike kinetic Alfven turbulence, has negligible power in density fluctuations. In this Letter, we present new observational data, as well as analytical and numerical results, to investigate this difference. The results show, for the first time, that the fluctuations well below the proton scale are predominantly kinetic Alfven turbulence, and, if present at all, the whistler fluctuations make up only a small fraction of the total energy.

  13. On reflection of Alfven waves in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogulec, M.; Musielak, Z. E.; Suess, S. T.; Moore, R. L.; Nerney, S. F.

    1993-01-01

    We have revisited the problem of propagation of toroidal and linear Alfven waves formulated by Heinemann and Olbert (1980) to compare WKB and non-WKB waves and their effects on the solar wind. They considered two solar wind models and showed that reflection is important for Alfven waves with periods of the order of one day and longer, and that non-WKB Alfven waves are no more effective in accelerating the solar wind than WKB waves. There are several recently published papers which seem to indicate that Alfven waves with periods of the order of several minutes should be treated as non-WKB waves and that these non-WKB waves exert a stronger acceleration force than WKB waves. The purpose of this paper is to study the origin of these discrepancies by performing parametric studies of the behavior of the waves under a variety of different conditions. In addition, we want to investigate two problems that have not been addressed by Heinemann and Olbert, namely, calculate the efficiency of Alfven wave reflection by using the reflection coefficient and identify the region of strongest wave reflection in different wind models. To achieve these goals, we investigated the influence of temperature, electron density distribution, wind velocity and magnetic field strength on the waves. The obtained results clearly demonstrate that Alfven wave reflection is strongly model dependent and that the strongest reflection can be expected in models with the base temperatures higher than 10(exp 6) K and with the base densities lower than 7 x 10(exp 7) cm(exp -3). In these models as well as in the models with lower temperatures and higher densities, Alfven waves with periods as short as several minutes have negligible reflection so that they can be treated as WKB waves; however, for Alfven waves with periods of the order of one hour or longer reflection is significant, requiring a non-WKB treatment. We also show that non-WKB, linear Alfven waves are always less effective in accelerating the

  14. A study of density modulation index in the inner heliospheric solar wind during solar cycle 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisoi, Susanta Kumar; Janardhan, P. [Astronomy and Astrophysics Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad 380009 (India); Ingale, M.; Subramanian, P. [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411021 (India); Ananthakrishnan, S. [Department of Electronic Science, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Tokumaru, M.; Fujiki, K., E-mail: susanta@prl.res.in, E-mail: jerry@prl.res.in, E-mail: i.madhusudan@students.iiserpune.ac.in, E-mail: p.subramanian@iiserpune.ac.in, E-mail: subra.anan@gmail.com, E-mail: tokumaru@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp, E-mail: fujiki@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    The ratio of the rms electron density fluctuations to the background density in the solar wind (density modulation index, ε {sub N} ≡ ΔN/N) is of vital importance for understanding several problems in heliospheric physics related to solar wind turbulence. In this paper, we have investigated the behavior of ε {sub N} in the inner heliosphere from 0.26 to 0.82 AU. The density fluctuations ΔN have been deduced using extensive ground-based observations of interplanetary scintillation at 327 MHz, which probe spatial scales of a few hundred kilometers. The background densities (N) have been derived using near-Earth observations from the Advanced Composition Explorer. Our analysis reveals that 0.001 ≲ ε {sub N} ≲ 0.02 and does not vary appreciably with heliocentric distance. We also find that ε {sub N} declines by 8% from 1998 to 2008. We discuss the impact of these findings on problems ranging from our understanding of Forbush decreases to the behavior of the solar wind dynamic pressure over the recent peculiar solar minimum at the end of cycle 23.

  15. EMMI - Electric Solar Wind Sail Facilitated Manned Mars Initiative

    CERN Document Server

    Janhunen, Pekka; Paton, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The novel propellantless electric solar wind sail (E-sail) concept promises efficient low thrust transportation in the solar system outside Earth's magnetosphere. Combined with asteroid mining to provide water and synthetic cryogenic rocket fuel in orbits of Earth and Mars, possibilities for affordable continuous manned presence on Mars open up. Orbital fuel and water eliminate the exponential nature of the rocket equation and also enable reusable bidirectional Earth-Mars vehicles for continuous manned presence on Mars. Water can also be used as radiation shielding of the manned compartment, thus reducing the launch mass further. In addition, the presence of fuel in Mars orbit provides the option for an all-propulsive landing, thus potentially eliminating issues of heavy heat shields and augmenting the capability of pinpoint landing. With this E-sail enabled scheme, the recurrent cost of continuous bidirectional traffic between Earth and Mars might ultimately approach the recurrent cost of running the Interna...

  16. EMMI-Electric solar wind sail facilitated Manned Mars Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janhunen, Pekka; Merikallio, Sini; Paton, Mark

    2015-08-01

    The novel propellantless electric solar wind sail concept promises efficient low thrust transportation in the Solar System outside Earth's magnetosphere. Combined with asteroid mining to provide water and synthetic cryogenic rocket fuel in orbits of Earth and Mars, possibilities for affordable continuous manned presence on Mars open up. Orbital fuel and water enable reusable bidirectional Earth-Mars vehicles for continuous manned presence on Mars and allow smaller fuel fraction of spacecraft than what is achievable by traditional means. Water can also be used as radiation shielding of the manned compartment, thus reducing the launch mass further. In addition, the presence of fuel in the orbit of Mars provides the option for an all-propulsive landing, thus potentially eliminating issues of heavy heat shields and augmenting the capability of pinpoint landing. With this E-sail enabled scheme, the recurrent cost of continuous bidirectional traffic between Earth and Mars might ultimately approach the recurrent cost of running the International Space Station, ISS.

  17. A 15N-poor isotopic composition for the solar system as shown by Genesis solar wind samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, B; Chaussidon, M; Wiens, R C; Jurewicz, A J G; Burnett, D S

    2011-06-24

    The Genesis mission sampled solar wind ions to document the elemental and isotopic compositions of the Sun and, by inference, of the protosolar nebula. Nitrogen was a key target element because the extent and origin of its isotopic variations in solar system materials remain unknown. Isotopic analysis of a Genesis Solar Wind Concentrator target material shows that implanted solar wind nitrogen has a (15)N/(14)N ratio of 2.18 ± 0.02 × 10(-3) (that is, ≈40% poorer in (15)N relative to terrestrial atmosphere). The (15)N/(14)N ratio of the protosolar nebula was 2.27 ± 0.03 × 10(-3), which is the lowest (15)N/(14)N ratio known for solar system objects. This result demonstrates the extreme nitrogen isotopic heterogeneity of the nascent solar system and accounts for the (15)N-depleted components observed in solar system reservoirs.

  18. Scale Dependence of Magnetic Helicity in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Balogh, Andre; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2011-01-01

    We determine the magnetic helicity, along with the magnetic energy, at high latitudes using data from the Ulysses mission. The data set spans the time period from 1993 to 1996. The basic assumption of the analysis is that the solar wind is homogeneous. Because the solar wind speed is high, we follow the approach first pioneered by Matthaeus et al. by which, under the assumption of spatial homogeneity, one can use Fourier transforms of the magnetic field time series to construct one-dimensional spectra of the magnetic energy and magnetic helicity under the assumption that the Taylor frozen-in-flow hypothesis is valid. That is a well-satisfied assumption for the data used in this study. The magnetic helicity derives from the skew-symmetric terms of the three-dimensional magnetic correlation tensor, while the symmetric terms of the tensor are used to determine the magnetic energy spectrum. Our results show a sign change of magnetic helicity at wavenumber k approximately equal to 2AU(sup -1) (or frequency nu approximately equal to 2 microHz) at distances below 2.8AU and at k approximately equal to 30AU(sup -1) (or nu approximately equal to 25 microHz) at larger distances. At small scales the magnetic helicity is positive at northern heliographic latitudes and negative at southern latitudes. The positive magnetic helicity at small scales is argued to be the result of turbulent diffusion reversing the sign relative to what is seen at small scales at the solar surface. Furthermore, the magnetic helicity declines toward solar minimum in 1996. The magnetic helicity flux integrated separately over one hemisphere amounts to about 10(sup 45) Mx(sup 2) cycle(sup -1) at large scales and to a three times lower value at smaller scales.

  19. Three-dimensional exploration of the solar wind using observations of interplanetary scintillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokumaru, Munetoshi

    2013-01-01

    The solar wind, a supersonic plasma flow continuously emanating from the Sun, governs the space environment in a vast region extending to the boundary of the heliosphere (∼100 AU). Precise understanding of the solar wind is of importance not only because it will satisfy scientific interest in an enigmatic astrophysical phenomenon, but because it has broad impacts on relevant fields. Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) of compact radio sources at meter to centimeter wavelengths serves as a useful ground-based method for investigating the solar wind. IPS measurements of the solar wind at a frequency of 327 MHz have been carried out regularly since the 1980s using the multi-station system of the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STEL) of Nagoya University. This paper reviews new aspects of the solar wind revealed from our IPS observations.

  20. The Effects of Abrupt Wind Shears in the Solar Wind on the Earth's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovsky, J.; Boudouridis, A.; Birn, J.; Denton, M.

    2014-12-01

    The solar wind is filled sudden velocity shears. The shears take the form of vorticity layers co-located with current sheets. The velocity vector makes its change in a few seconds. For shear layers with vector velocity changes greater than 50 km/s, an average of 12 shear layers pass the Earth per day. Global magnetospheric MHD simulations with four different simulation codes have been performed at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) to examine the reaction of the Earth to the solar-wind velocity shears. All 4 simulation codes predict comet-like disconnections of the magnetotail, the magnetosheath, and the bow shock on the flanks as a shear layer passes the Earth. The simulation codes also predict sudden changes in the cross-polar-cap potential and ionospheric Joule dissipation as the shear layers pass the Earth. A data-analysis research effort is underway to look for signatures of the Earth's reaction to abrupt wind shear events; preliminary results of that effort will be discussed.

  1. Continuous plasma outflows from the edge of a solar active region as a possible source of solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakao, Taro; Kano, Ryouhei; Narukage, Noriyuki; Kotoku, Jun'ichi; Bando, Takamasa; Deluca, Edward E; Lundquist, Loraine L; Tsuneta, Saku; Harra, Louise K; Katsukawa, Yukio; Kubo, Masahito; Hara, Hirohisa; Matsuzaki, Keiichi; Shimojo, Masumi; Bookbinder, Jay A; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly E; Su, Yingna; Shibasaki, Kiyoto; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Nakatani, Ichiro

    2007-12-07

    The Sun continuously expels a huge amount of ionized material into interplanetary space as the solar wind. Despite its influence on the heliospheric environment, the origin of the solar wind has yet to be well identified. In this paper, we report Hinode X-ray Telescope observations of a solar active region. At the edge of the active region, located adjacent to a coronal hole, a pattern of continuous outflow of soft-x-ray-emitting plasmas was identified emanating along apparently open magnetic field lines and into the upper corona. Estimates of temperature and density for the outflowing plasmas suggest a mass loss rate that amounts to approximately 1/4 of the total mass loss rate of the solar wind. These outflows may be indicative of one of the solar wind sources at the Sun.

  2. Predicted impacts of proton temperature anisotropy on solar wind turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, K. G., E-mail: kristopher.klein@unh.edu [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824 (United States); Howes, G. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Particle velocity distributions measured in the weakly collisional solar wind are frequently found to be non-Maxwellian, but how these non-Maxwellian distributions impact the physics of plasma turbulence in the solar wind remains unanswered. Using numerical solutions of the linear dispersion relation for a collisionless plasma with a bi-Maxwellian proton velocity distribution, we present a unified framework for the four proton temperature anisotropy instabilities, identifying the associated stable eigenmodes, highlighting the unstable region of wavevector space and presenting the properties of the growing eigenfunctions. Based on physical intuition gained from this framework, we address how the proton temperature anisotropy impacts the nonlinear dynamics of the Alfvénic fluctuations underlying the dominant cascade of energy from large to small scales and how the fluctuations driven by proton temperature anisotropy instabilities interact nonlinearly with each other and with the fluctuations of the large-scale cascade. We find that the nonlinear dynamics of the large-scale cascade is insensitive to the proton temperature anisotropy and that the instability-driven fluctuations are unlikely to cause significant nonlinear evolution of either the instability-driven fluctuations or the turbulent fluctuations of the large-scale cascade.

  3. Predicted impacts of proton temperature anisotropy on solar wind turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, K. G.; Howes, G. G.

    2015-03-01

    Particle velocity distributions measured in the weakly collisional solar wind are frequently found to be non-Maxwellian, but how these non-Maxwellian distributions impact the physics of plasma turbulence in the solar wind remains unanswered. Using numerical solutions of the linear dispersion relation for a collisionless plasma with a bi-Maxwellian proton velocity distribution, we present a unified framework for the four proton temperature anisotropy instabilities, identifying the associated stable eigenmodes, highlighting the unstable region of wavevector space and presenting the properties of the growing eigenfunctions. Based on physical intuition gained from this framework, we address how the proton temperature anisotropy impacts the nonlinear dynamics of the Alfvénic fluctuations underlying the dominant cascade of energy from large to small scales and how the fluctuations driven by proton temperature anisotropy instabilities interact nonlinearly with each other and with the fluctuations of the large-scale cascade. We find that the nonlinear dynamics of the large-scale cascade is insensitive to the proton temperature anisotropy and that the instability-driven fluctuations are unlikely to cause significant nonlinear evolution of either the instability-driven fluctuations or the turbulent fluctuations of the large-scale cascade.

  4. Solar wind implication on dust ion acoustic rogue waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelghany, A. M.; Abd El-Razek, H. N.; Moslem, W. M.; El-Labany, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    The relevance of the solar wind with the magnetosphere of Jupiter that contains positively charged dust grains is investigated. The perturbation/excitation caused by streaming ions and electron beams from the solar wind could form different nonlinear structures such as rogue waves, depending on the dominant role of the plasma parameters. Using the reductive perturbation method, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and further modified (KdV) equation. Assuming that the frequency of the carrier wave is much smaller than the ion plasma frequency, these equations are transformed into nonlinear Schrödinger equations with appropriate coefficients. Rational solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation shows that rogue wave envelopes are supported by the present plasma model. It is found that the existence region of rogue waves depends on the dust-acoustic speed and the streaming temperatures for both the ions and electrons. The dependence of the maximum rogue wave envelope amplitude on the system parameters has been investigated.

  5. Orbit limited theory in the solar wind - κ distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinović M.M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available When a solid object is immersed into ionized gas it gets brought to a certain value of electrostatic potential and surrounded by a space charge region called ‘plasma sheath’. Through this region, particles are attracted or repelled from the surface of the charge collecting object. For collisionless plasma, this process is described by the so-called orbit limited theory, which explains how the collection of particles is determined by the collector geometry and plasma velocity distribution function (VDF. In this article, we provide explicit expressions for orbit-limited currents for generalized Lorentzian (κ distributions. This work is useful to describe the charging processes of objects in non-collisional plasmas like the solar wind, where the electrons VDF is often observed to exhibit quasi power-law populations of suprathermal particles. It is found that these ‘suprathermals’ considerably increase the charge collection. Since the surface charging process that determines the value of electrostatic potential is also affected by the plasma VDF, calculation of the collector potential in the solar wind is described along with some quantitative predictions. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176002

  6. Model for vortex turbulence with discontinuities in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Verkhoglyadova

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A model of vortex with embedded discontinuities in plasma flow is developed in the framework of ideal MHD in a low b plasma. Vortex structures are considered as a result of 2-D evolution of nonlinear shear Alfvén waves in the heliosphere. Physical properties of the solutions and vector fields are analyzed and the observational aspects of the model are discussed. The ratio of normal components to the discontinuity Br /Vr can be close to -2. The alignment between velocity and magnetic field vectors takes place. Spacecraft crossing such vortices will typically observe a pair of discontinuities, but with dissimilar properties. Occurrence rate for different discontinuity types is estimated and agrees with observations in high-speed solar wind stream. Discontinuity crossing provides a backward rotation of magnetic field vector and can be observed as part of a backward arc. The Ulysses magnetometer data obtained in the fast solar wind are compared with the results of theoretical modelling.

  7. Scaling of the electron dissipation range of solar wind turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Sahraoui, F; De Patoul, J; Belmont, G; Goldstein, M L; Retino, A; Robert, P; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N; Canu, P

    2013-01-01

    Electron scale solar wind turbulence has attracted great interest in recent years. Clear evidences have been given from the Cluster data that turbulence is not fully dissipated near the proton scale but continues cascading down to the electron scales. However, the scaling of the energy spectra as well as the nature of the plasma modes involved at those small scales are still not fully determined. Here we survey 10 years of the Cluster search-coil magnetometer (SCM) waveforms measured in the solar wind and perform a statistical study of the magnetic energy spectra in the frequency range [$1, 180$]Hz. We show that a large fraction of the spectra exhibit clear breakpoints near the electon gyroscale $\\rho_e$, followed by steeper power-law like spectra. We show that the scaling below the electron breakpoint cannot be determined unambiguously due to instrumental limitations that will be discussed in detail. We compare our results to recent ones reported in other studies and discuss their implication on the physical...

  8. Turbulence and Global Properties of the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2010-01-01

    The solar wind shows striking characteristics that suggest that it is a turbulent magnetofluid, but the picture is not altogether simple. From the earliest observations, a strong correlation between magnetic fluctuations and plasma velocity fluctuations was noted. The high corrections suggest that the fluctuations are Alfven waves. In addition, the power spectrum of the magnetic fluctuation showed evidence of an inertial range that resembled that seen in fully-developed fluid turbulence. Alfven waves, however, are exact solutions of the equations of incompressible magnetohydrodynamics. Thus, there was a puzzle: how can a magnetofluid consisting of Alfven waves be turbulent? The answer lay in the role of velocity shears in the solar wind that could drive turbulent evolution. Puzzles remain: for example, the power spectrum of the velocity fluctuations is less steep than the slope of the magnetic fluctuations. The plasma in the magnetic tail of Earth's magnetosphere also shows aspects of turbulence, as does the plasma in the dayside magnetosphere near the poles the dayside cusps. Recently, new analyses of high time resolution magnetic field data from Cluster have offered a glimpse of how turbulence is dissipated, thus heating the ambient plasma.

  9. Modeling of short scale turbulence in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Krishan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The solar wind serves as a laboratory for investigating magnetohydrodynamic turbulence under conditions irreproducible on the terra firma. Here we show that the frame work of Hall magnetohydrodynamics (HMHD, which can support three quadratic invariants and allows nonlinear states to depart fundamentally from the Alfvénic, is capable of reproducing in the inertial range the three branches of the observed solar wind magnetic fluctuation spectrum - the Kolmogorov branch f -5/3 steepening to f -α1 with on the high frequency side and flattening to f -1 on the low frequency side. These fluctuations are found to be associated with the nonlinear Hall-MHD Shear Alfvén waves. The spectrum of the concomitant whistler type fluctuations is very different from the observed one. Perhaps the relatively stronger damping of the whistler fluctuations may cause their unobservability. The issue of equipartition of energy through the so called Alfvén ratio acquires a new status through its dependence, now, on the spatial scale.

  10. Observations of Anisotropic Scaling of Solar Wind Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Q. Y.; Wu, D. J.

    2010-05-01

    Using high-speed solar wind data recorded by the Ulysses spacecraft, we investigate and estimate the anisotropic inertial range scaling of the interplanetary magnetic field. We apply the method of the magnetic structure function (MSF), Sn (τ) = lang|b(t + τ) - b(t)| n rang vprop τζ(n), to analyze the scaling of solar wind turbulence over the range from 1 s to 104 s. By sorting the fluctuations according to the direction of the local mean magnetic field, we obtain a second-order structure function in (r, Θ) coordinates that reveals the scale-dependent anisotropy of the power spectrum. The scale-dependent anisotropy of the MSF indicates that the fluctuation energy tends to cascade toward the direction perpendicular to the local field. The dependence of the MSF scaling index ζ on the direction of the local field is found to be similar to that reported in Horbury et al. and Podesta, with ζbottom = 0.53 ± 0.18 and ζpar = 1.00 ± 0.14. Furthermore, we estimate and find the scaling law between the perpendicular and parallel scales r par vprop r 0.614 bottom, which implies the elongation along the parallel direction as the turbulence eddy evolves toward the small lengthscales. These results are in agreement with the predictions of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence theory.

  11. Extended MHD turbulence and its applications to the solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Abdelhamid, Hamdi M; Mahajan, Swadesh M

    2016-01-01

    Extended MHD is a one-fluid model that incorporates two-fluid effects such as electron inertia and the Hall drift. This model is used to construct fully nonlinear Alfv\\'enic wave solutions, and thereby derive the kinetic and magnetic spectra by resorting to a Kolmogorov-like hypothesis based on the constant cascading rates of the energy and generalized helicities of this model. The magnetic and kinetic spectra are derived in the ideal $\\left(k 1/\\lambda_e\\right)$ regimes; $k$ is the wavenumber and $\\lambda_s = c/\\omega_{p s}$ is the skin depth of species `$s$'. In the Hall regime, it is shown that the emergent results are fully consistent with previous numerical and analytical studies, especially in the context of the solar wind. The focus is primarily on the electron inertia regime, where magnetic energy spectra with power-law indexes of $-11/3$ and $-13/3$ are always recovered. The latter, in particular, is quite close to recent observational evidence from the solar wind with a potential slope of approxima...

  12. The Solar Wind Charge-Exchange Production Factor for Hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Kuntz, K D; Collier, M R; Connor, H K; Cravens, T E; Koutroumpa, D; Porter, F S; Robertson, I P; Sibeck, D G; Snowden, S L; Thomas, N E; Wash, B M

    2015-01-01

    The production factor, or broad band averaged cross-section, for solar wind charge-exchange with hydrogen producing emission in the ROSAT 1/4 keV (R12) band is $3.8\\pm0.2\\times10^{-20}$ count degree$^{-2}$ cm$^4$. This value is derived from a comparison of the Long-Term (background) Enhancements in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey with magnetohysdrodynamic simulations of the magnetosheath. This value is 1.8 to 4.5 times higher than values derived from limited atomic data, suggesting that those values may be missing a large number of faint lines. This production factor is important for deriving the exact amount of 1/4 keV band flux that is due to the Local Hot Bubble, for planning future observations in the 1/4 keV band, and for evaluating proposals for remote sensing of the magnetosheath. The same method cannot be applied to the 3/4 keV band as that band, being composed primarily of the oxygen lines, is far more sensitive to the detailed abundances and ionization balance in the solar wind. We also show, incidentally,...

  13. Extended MHD Turbulence and Its Applications to the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhamid, Hamdi M.; Lingam, Manasvi; Mahajan, Swadesh M.

    2016-10-01

    Extended MHD is a one-fluid model that incorporates two-fluid effects such as electron inertia and the Hall drift. This model is used to construct fully nonlinear Alfvénic wave solutions, and thereby derive the kinetic and magnetic spectra by resorting to a Kolmogorov-like hypothesis based on the constant cascading rates of the energy and generalized helicities of this model. The magnetic and kinetic spectra are derived in the ideal (k\\lt 1/{λ }i), Hall (1/{λ }i\\lt k\\lt 1/{λ }e), and electron inertia (k\\gt 1/{λ }e) regimes; k is the wavenumber and {λ }s=c/{ω }{ps} is the skin depth of species “s.” In the Hall regime, it is shown that the emergent results are fully consistent with previous numerical and analytical studies, especially in the context of the solar wind. The focus is primarily on the electron inertia regime, where magnetic energy spectra with power-law indexes of -11/3 and -13/3 are always recovered. The latter, in particular, is quite close to recent observational evidence from the solar wind with a potential slope of approximately -4 in this regime. It is thus plausible that these spectra may constitute a part of the (extended) inertial range, as opposed to the standard “dissipation” range paradigm.

  14. STEADY-STATE MODEL OF SOLAR WIND ELECTRONS REVISITED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Kim, Sunjung; Choe, G. S., E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-20

    In a recent paper, Kim et al. put forth a steady-state model for the solar wind electrons. The model assumed local equilibrium between the halo electrons, characterized by an intermediate energy range, and the whistler-range fluctuations. The basic wave–particle interaction is assumed to be the cyclotron resonance. Similarly, it was assumed that a dynamical steady state is established between the highly energetic superhalo electrons and high-frequency Langmuir fluctuations. Comparisons with the measured solar wind electron velocity distribution function (VDF) during quiet times were also made, and reasonable agreements were obtained. In such a model, however, only the steady-state solution for the Fokker–Planck type of electron particle kinetic equation was considered. The present paper complements the previous analysis by considering both the steady-state particle and wave kinetic equations. It is shown that the model halo and superhalo electron VDFs, as well as the assumed wave intensity spectra for the whistler and Langmuir fluctuations, approximately satisfy the quasi-linear wave kinetic equations in an approximate sense, thus further validating the local equilibrium model constructed in the paper by Kim et al.

  15. STRAHL FORMATION IN THE SOLAR WIND ELECTRONS VIA WHISTLER INSTABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seough, Jungjoon; Nariyuki, Yasuhiro [Faculty of Human Development, University of Toyama, 3190, Gofuku, Toyama City, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Yoon, Peter H. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Saito, Shinji [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furocho, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2015-09-20

    This Letter puts forth a possible explanation for the formation of a solar wind strahl electron distribution function by means of local wave–particle interactions. A solar wind electron consists of a core and the hot “halo” electrons, which possess a net drift speed with respect to the core. According to the present model, pitch angle scattering of the initially isotropic drifting halo occurs when the enhanced whistler waves are excited by mildly anisotropic core electrons. The pitch angle scattering primarily affects the halo moving in the anti-sunward direction, resulting in pitch angle diffusion across the 90° gap through a nonlinear scattering process, and consequently leading to a reduction in the net drift speed of halo electrons. The remaining portion of the anti-sunward moving halo, which is not affected by pitch angle scattering, simply appears to form a field-aligned strahl in the electron velocity distribution. The present scenario of local generation of the strahl is demonstrated by the particle-in-cell simulation.

  16. Value of storage technologies for wind and solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braff, William A.; Mueller, Joshua M.; Trancik, Jessika E.

    2016-10-01

    Wind and solar industries have grown rapidly in recent years but they still supply only a small fraction of global electricity. The continued growth of these industries to levels that significantly contribute to climate change mitigation will depend on whether they can compete against alternatives that provide high-value energy on demand. Energy storage can transform intermittent renewables for this purpose but cost improvement is needed. Evaluating diverse storage technologies on a common scale has proved a major challenge, however, owing to their widely varying performance along the two dimensions of energy and power costs. Here we devise a method to compare storage technologies, and set cost improvement targets. Some storage technologies today are shown to add value to solar and wind energy, but cost reduction is needed to reach widespread profitability. The optimal cost improvement trajectories, balancing energy and power costs to maximize value, are found to be relatively location invariant, and thus can inform broad industry and government technology development strategies.

  17. Validation of Model Forecasts of the Ambient Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macneice, P. J.; Hesse, M.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Rastaetter, L.; Taktakishvili, A.

    2009-01-01

    Independent and automated validation is a vital step in the progression of models from the research community into operational forecasting use. In this paper we describe a program in development at the CCMC to provide just such a comprehensive validation for models of the ambient solar wind in the inner heliosphere. We have built upon previous efforts published in the community, sharpened their definitions, and completed a baseline study. We also provide first results from this program of the comparative performance of the MHD models available at the CCMC against that of the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model. An important goal of this effort is to provide a consistent validation to all available models. Clearly exposing the relative strengths and weaknesses of the different models will enable forecasters to craft more reliable ensemble forecasting strategies. Models of the ambient solar wind are developing rapidly as a result of improvements in data supply, numerical techniques, and computing resources. It is anticipated that in the next five to ten years, the MHD based models will supplant semi-empirical potential based models such as the WSA model, as the best available forecast models. We anticipate that this validation effort will track this evolution and so assist policy makers in gauging the value of past and future investment in modeling support.

  18. Mirror Instability in the Solar Wind: The Theory Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, A.

    1995-01-01

    "Magnetic holes", localized depressions in the interplanetary magnetic field, have been identified in Ulysses data over a range of several AU and as far as 23 degrees south in latitude by Winterhalter et al., who concluded that these structures are most likely the remnants of structures caused by occasional mirror-mode instability in the solar wind. However, these authors, like a number of previous investigators, used the mirror stability criterion derived from the kinetic theory under very special assumptions. On the other hand, theoretical investigations using the fully self-consistent kinetic theory (Vlasov-Maxwell equations) have shown that the mirror stability criterion is more complicated when electrons and ions have different anisotropies, as is normally the case in the solar wind. Winterhalter et al used an instability criterion of the form R is greater than 1, where R is a function of the thermal anisotropy; the correct criterion (for bi-Maxwellian distributions) is R R is greater than 1 - x(exp 2), where x is a real quantity that depends on both the proton anisotropy and electron anisotropy. So nonzero x would modify the Winterhalter et al results in the direction of reinforcing their conclusions. We have revisited the instability criterion in its most general form, allowing for (a) non-Maxwellian velocity distributions, (b) multiple ion species, and (c) interparticle streaming. These results should give sound theoretical grounding for future observational studies related to the mirror instability, by Ulysses and other spacecraft.

  19. Near-Earth Solar Wind Flows and Related Geomagnetic Activity During more than Four Solar Cycles (1963-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Ian G.; Cane, Hilary V.

    2012-01-01

    In past studies, we classified the near-Earth solar wind into three basic flow types based on inspection of solar wind plasma and magnetic field parameters in the OMNI database and additional data (e.g., geomagnetic indices, energetic particle, and cosmic ray observations). These flow types are: (1) High-speed streams associated with coronal holes at the Sun, (2) Slow, interstream solar wind, and (3) Transient flows originating with coronal mass ejections at the Sun, including interplanetary coronal mass ejections and the associated upstream shocks and post-shock regions. The solar wind classification in these previous studies commenced with observations in 1972. In the present study, as well as updating this classification to the end of 2011, we have extended the classification back to 1963, the beginning of near-Earth solar wind observations, thereby encompassing the complete solar cycles 20 to 23 and the ascending phase of cycle 24. We discuss the cycle-to-cycle variations in near-Earth solar wind structures and l1e related geomagnetic activity over more than four solar cycles, updating some of the results of our earlier studies.

  20. Near-earth solar wind flows and related geomagnetic activity during more than four solar cycles (1963–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Ian G.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In past studies, we classified the near-Earth solar wind into three basic flow types based on inspection of solar wind plasma and magnetic field parameters in the OMNI database and additional data (e.g., geomagnetic indices, energetic particle, and cosmic ray observations. These flow types are: (1 High-speed streams associated with coronal holes at the Sun, (2 Slow, interstream solar wind, and (3 Transient flows originating with coronal mass ejections at the Sun, including interplanetary coronal mass ejections and the associated upstream shocks and post-shock regions. The solar wind classification in these previous studies commenced with observations in 1972. In the present study, as well as updating this classification to the end of 2011, we have extended the classification back to 1963, the beginning of near-Earth solar wind observations, thereby encompassing the complete solar cycles 20 to 23 and the ascending phase of cycle 24. We discuss the cycle-to-cycle variations in near-Earth solar wind structures and the related geomagnetic activity over more than four solar cycles, updating some of the results of our earlier studies.

  1. Wind observations of low energy particles within a solar wind reconnection region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. J. Huttunen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We report characteristics of thermal particle observations during the encounter of the Wind satellite with the separatrix and the outflow domains of a reconnection event on 22 July 1999 in the solar wind. During the studied event the electrostatic analyzers on Wind were transmitting three-dimensional electron and proton distributions in a burst mode every 3 s, the spin period of the spacecraft. The event was associated with a magnetic shear angle of 114° and a large guide magnetic field. The observations suggest that Wind crossed the separatrix and outflow regions about a thousand of ion skin depths from the X-line. At the leading separator boundary, a strong proton beam was identified that originated from the direction of the X-line. In the separatrix and the outflow regions, the phase space distributions of thermal electrons displayed field aligned bidirectional anisotropy. During the crossings of the current sheets bounding the outflow region, we identified two adjacent layers in which the dominant thermal electron flows were towards the X-line at the inner edges of the current sheets and away from the X-line at the outer edges. Interestingly, simulation studies and observations in the Earth's magnetosphere have revealed that the electron flows are reversed, consistent with the Hall current system.

  2. 3D Simulations of Helmet Streamer Dynamics and Implications for the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, Aleida K.; Antiochos, Spiro K.; DeVore, C. R.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2015-04-01

    The source of the slow solar wind at the Sun is still an issue of intense debate in solar and heliospheric physics. Because the majority of the solar wind observed at Earth is slow wind, understanding its origin is essential for understanding and predicting Earth’s space weather environment. In-situ and remote observations show that, when compared to the fast wind, the slow solar wind corresponds to higher freeze-in temperatures, as indicated by charge-state ratios, and more corona-like elemental abundance ratios. These results indicate that the most likely source for the slow wind is the hot plasma in the closed-field corona, but the release mechanism(s) for the wind from the closed-field regions is far from understood. We perform fully dynamic, 3D MHD simulations in order to the study the opening and closing of the Sun’s magnetic field that leads to the escape of the slow solar wind. In particular, we calculate the dynamics of helmet streamers that are driven by photospheric motions such as supergranular flows. We determine in detail the opening and closing of coronal flux, and discuss the implications of our results for theories of slow wind origin, especially the S-Web model. We also determine observational signatures for the upcoming inner heliosphere missions Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus.This work was supported by the NASA SR&T and TR&T Programs.

  3. 78 FR 77447 - California Wind Energy Association, First Solar, Inc. v. California Independent System Operator...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission California Wind Energy Association, First Solar, Inc. v. California... Practice and Procedure, 18 CFR 385.206 (2013), California Wind Energy Association and First Solar,...

  4. Developing a hybrid solar/wind powered irrigation system for crops in the Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some small scale irrigation systems (powered by wind or solar do not require subsidies, but this paper discusses ways to achieve an economical renewable energy powered center pivot irrigation system for crops in the Great Plains. By adding a solar-photovoltaic (PV) array together with a wind...

  5. Three-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of the Solar Wind Including Pickup Protons and Turbulence Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Matthaeus, William H.

    2012-01-01

    To study the effects of interstellar pickup protons and turbulence on the structure and dynamics of the solar wind, we have developed a fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model that treats interstellar pickup protons as a separate fluid and incorporates the transport of turbulence and turbulent heating. The governing system of equations combines the mean-field equations for the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and pickup protons and the turbulence transport equations for the turbulent energy, normalized cross-helicity, and correlation length. The model equations account for photoionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms and their charge exchange with solar wind protons, energy transfer from pickup protons to solar wind protons, and plasma heating by turbulent dissipation. Separate mass and energy equations are used for the solar wind and pickup protons, though a single momentum equation is employed under the assumption that the pickup protons are comoving with the solar wind protons.We compute the global structure of the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and turbulence in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU for a source magnetic dipole on the Sun tilted by 0 deg - .90 deg and compare our results with Voyager 2 observations. The results computed with and without pickup protons are superposed to evaluate quantitatively the deceleration and heating effects of pickup protons, the overall compression of the magnetic field in the outer heliosphere caused by deceleration, and the weakening of corotating interaction regions by the thermal pressure of pickup protons.

  6. 78 FR 38028 - Winding Creek Solar LLC; Notice of Petition for Enforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Winding Creek Solar LLC; Notice of Petition for Enforcement Take notice that on June 13, 2013, Winding Creek Solar LLC filed a Petition for Enforcement, pursuant to section...

  7. Solar Wind Electrons Alphas and Protons (SWEAP) Investigation: Design of the Solar Wind and Coronal Plasma Instrument Suite for Solar Probe Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Justin C.; Abiad, Robert; Austin, Gerry; Balat-Pichelin, Marianne; Bale, Stuart D.; Belcher, John W.; Berg, Peter; Bergner, Henry; Berthomier, Matthieu; Bookbinder, Jay; Brodu, Etienne; Caldwell, David; Case, Anthony W.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Cheimets, Peter; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Cranmer, Steven R.; Curtis, David W.; Daigneau, Peter; Dalton, Greg; Dasgupta, Brahmananda; DeTomaso, David; Diaz-Aguado, Millan; Djordjevic, Blagoje; Donaskowski, Bill; Effinger, Michael; Florinski, Vladimir; Fox, Nichola; Freeman, Mark; Gallagher, Dennis; Gary, S. Peter; Gauron, Tom; Gates, Richard; Goldstein, Melvin; Golub, Leon; Gordon, Dorothy A.; Gurnee, Reid; Guth, Giora; Halekas, Jasper; Hatch, Ken; Heerikuisen, Jacob; Ho, George; Hu, Qiang; Johnson, Greg; Jordan, Steven P.; Korreck, Kelly E.; Larson, Davin; Lazarus, Alan J.; Li, Gang; Livi, Roberto; Ludlam, Michael; Maksimovic, Milan; McFadden, James P.; Marchant, William; Maruca, Bennet A.; McComas, David J.; Messina, Luciana; Mercer, Tony; Park, Sang; Peddie, Andrew M.; Pogorelov, Nikolai; Reinhart, Matthew J.; Richardson, John D.; Robinson, Miles; Rosen, Irene; Skoug, Ruth M.; Slagle, Amanda; Steinberg, John T.; Stevens, Michael L.; Szabo, Adam; Taylor, Ellen R.; Tiu, Chris; Turin, Paul; Velli, Marco; Webb, Gary; Whittlesey, Phyllis; Wright, Ken; Wu, S. T.; Zank, Gary

    2016-12-01

    The Solar Wind Electrons Alphas and Protons (SWEAP) Investigation on Solar Probe Plus is a four sensor instrument suite that provides complete measurements of the electrons and ionized helium and hydrogen that constitute the bulk of solar wind and coronal plasma. SWEAP consists of the Solar Probe Cup (SPC) and the Solar Probe Analyzers (SPAN). SPC is a Faraday Cup that looks directly at the Sun and measures ion and electron fluxes and flow angles as a function of energy. SPAN consists of an ion and electron electrostatic analyzer (ESA) on the ram side of SPP (SPAN-A) and an electron ESA on the anti-ram side (SPAN-B). The SPAN-A ion ESA has a time of flight section that enables it to sort particles by their mass/charge ratio, permitting differentiation of ion species. SPAN-A and -B are rotated relative to one another so their broad fields of view combine like the seams on a baseball to view the entire sky except for the region obscured by the heat shield and covered by SPC. Observations by SPC and SPAN produce the combined field of view and measurement capabilities required to fulfill the science objectives of SWEAP and Solar Probe Plus. SWEAP measurements, in concert with magnetic and electric fields, energetic particles, and white light contextual imaging will enable discovery and understanding of solar wind acceleration and formation, coronal and solar wind heating, and particle acceleration in the inner heliosphere of the solar system. SPC and SPAN are managed by the SWEAP Electronics Module (SWEM), which distributes power, formats onboard data products, and serves as a single electrical interface to the spacecraft. SWEAP data products include ion and electron velocity distribution functions with high energy and angular resolution. Full resolution data are stored within the SWEM, enabling high resolution observations of structures such as shocks, reconnection events, and other transient structures to be selected for download after the fact. This paper describes

  8. The Influence of The Solar-cycle Induced Solar Wind Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahr, H.-J.; Scherer, K.

    In the course of the solar activity cycle both the solar wind velocity and density un- dergo quasi-sinusoidal variations. These longperiodic variations propagate outwards through the interplanetary space for over a year until they finally reach the heliospheric termination shock. The associated variation of the solar wind ram pressure not only influences there the stand-off distance of the termination shock, but also changes the production and the heliospheric distribution of pick-up ions (PUIs). As a consequence, also the production of anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs) related to PUI-fluxes arriving at the shock varies, the propagation of ACRs is influenced and the modulation of the galactic cosmic rays strongly differs. To quantitatively study this scenario we use a a multi-fluid hydrodynamic simulation code to model the interaction of the solar-cycle modulated heliosphere with the interstellar medium. In this code all dynamically rel- evant species are described by separate plasma fluids within a consistent multifluid context. In a first step we describe the solar-cycle induced heliospheric variations by a series of static models, i.e. we discretizised the solar cycle variation of the SW param- eters and let each model for a selected set of SW parameters deliver an asymptotically stable state. Then we restart this procedure for the next set of SW parameters. The ob- tained set of different heliosphere configurations is then taken as envelopping a fully time-dependent model, in which the solar-cycle varying SW parameters are modeled on the basis of actually time-dependent variations. Here we present the results of the static model runs with emphasis on PUI, ACR and GCR distributions. We also will discuss first results of the time-dependent model.

  9. Numerical simulations of self-consistently generated κ distributions in the solar wind and solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randol, B. M.; Christian, E. R.

    2014-12-01

    In a previous study (Randol and Christian, submitted to JGR, April 2014), numerical simulations of protons and anti-protons obeying Coulomb's law provided key insight into the self-consistent generation of κ distributions in space plasmas. In that study, the velocity distribution function (VDF) first formed a tail with the common spectral index of -5 and then gradually became a κ-r distribution, with κ = 1.5, corresponding to the common spectrum. The form of this distribution was found to relate to the electric field distribution function (EDF). These results were robust to a range of initialized densities and thermal speeds; however, this range of parameters did not include values close to those of the solar wind at 1 AU. Here we report on simulations of the same type but for a broader range of parameters, including those of the solar wind and corona. Our earliest findings indicate a lack of consistency in the VDF with the common spectrum, the cause of which again lies in the EDF. The results are instructive for understanding the solar wind ion VDF core and tail, as well as for κ distributed plasmas in general.

  10. 3-D MHD Model of the Solar Wind-Interplanetary Space Combining System 1:Variation of Solar Wind Speed Associated with the Photospheric Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamizo, A.; Tanaka, T.

    2006-12-01

    Existing global models of the solar-wind/IMF expanding to the Earth's orbit are basically grounded in the idea of "source surface." It is widely accepted that the sector structure and the solar wind speed are primarily controlled by the magnetic field at the source surface and the so-called "expansion factor." On the other hand, 3-D MHD model is still off from practical use because both of scientific and technical problems. One of the former problems is the reproduction of supersonic solar-wind. From the viewpoint of the physics of the solar wind, coronal heating and outward acceleration mechanisms are invoked to explain the supersonic evolution of the solar wind. Since the mechanism responsible for the heating/acceleration is still one of the primary subjects of the physics of the solar wind, many MHD models have taken into account their effects by incorporating additional source terms corresponding to promising candidates such as thermal conductions, radiation losses and wave pressures. However there are few MHD models considering the effect of the expansion factor, which determines the solar-wind speed in the series of source surface models. In this study we newly incorporate the flux tube expansion rate into the MHD equation system including heat source function in the energy equation. Appling the unstructured grid system, we achieved the dense grid spacing at the inner boundary, which enable us to adopt realistic solar magnetic fields, and a size of simulation space of 1AU. Photospheric magnetic field data is used as the inner boundary condition.The simulation results are summarized as: (1) The variation of solar wind speed is well controlled by the structure of magnetic fields at and little above the solar surface and (2) Far above the solar surface, the interface between high and low speed flows evolves to a structure suggestive of CIRs. Comparing the data from simulation with the actual solar wind data obtained by spacecrafts, we will discuss the future

  11. Unusual Solar Radio Events Observed by the Wind and STEREO Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDowall, R. J.; Hess, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    We present several unusual solar radio events observed by the Wind spacecraft. These events - type II and type III bursts - show significant unexpected time-frequency structure that is likely due to interaction of the electron beam sources with atypical density variations of the solar wind. These events permit us to test our understanding of the emission processes, as well as demonstrating the remote detection of solar wind structure. We will also report on updates to the Wind Waves website at NASA GSFC of interest to radio data users.

  12. A new view on the solar wind interaction with the Moon

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Alok, Abhinaw; Barabash, Stas; Wieser, Martin; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Wurz, Peter; Vorburger, Audrey; Holmström, Mats; Lue, Charles; Harada, Yuki; Asamura, Kazushi

    2015-01-01

    Characterised by a surface bound exosphere and localised crustal magnetic fields, the Moon was considered as a passive object when solar wind interacts with it. However, the neutral particle and plasma measurements around the Moon by recent dedicated lunar missions, such as Chandrayaan-1, Kaguya, Chang'E-1, LRO, and ARTEMIS, as well as IBEX have revealed a variety of phenomena around the Moon which results from the interaction with solar wind, such as backscattering of solar wind protons as energetic neutral atoms (ENA) from lunar surface, sputtering of atoms from the lunar surface, formation of a "mini-magnetosphere" around lunar magnetic anomaly regions, as well as several plasma populations around the Moon, including solar wind protons scattered from the lunar surface, from the magnetic anomalies, pick-up ions, protons in lunar wake and more. This paper provides a review of these recent findings and presents the interaction of solar wind with the Moon in a new perspective.

  13. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 (Executive Summary)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lew, Debra [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Brinkman, Greg [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The electric grid is a highly complex, interconnected machine, and changing one part of the grid can have consequences elsewhere. Adding wind and solar affects the operation of the other power plants and adding high penetrations can induce cycling of fossil-fueled generators. Cycling leads to wear-and-tear costs and changes in emissions. Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-2) evaluated these costs and emissions and simulated grid operations for a year to investigate the detailed impact of wind and solar on the fossil-fueled fleet. This built on Phase 1, one of the largest wind and solar integration studies ever conducted, which examined operational impacts of high wind and solar penetrations in the West(GE Energy 2010).

  14. A new view on the solar wind interaction with the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Dhanya, M. B.; Alok, Abhinaw; Barabash, Stas; Wieser, Martin; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Wurz, Peter; Vorburger, Audrey; Holmström, Mats; Lue, Charles; Harada, Yuki; Asamura, Kazushi

    2015-12-01

    Characterised by a surface bound exosphere and localised crustal magnetic fields, the Moon was considered as a passive object when solar wind interacts with it. However, the neutral particle and plasma measurements around the Moon by recent dedicated lunar missions, such as Chandrayaan-1, Kaguya, Chang'E-1, LRO, and ARTEMIS, as well as IBEX have revealed a variety of phenomena around the Moon which results from the interaction with solar wind, such as backscattering of solar wind protons as energetic neutral atoms (ENA) from lunar surface, sputtering of atoms from the lunar surface, formation of a "mini-magnetosphere" around lunar magnetic anomaly regions, as well as several plasma populations around the Moon, including solar wind protons scattered from the lunar surface, from the magnetic anomalies, pick-up ions, protons in lunar wake and more. This paper provides a review of these recent findings and presents the interaction of solar wind with the Moon in a new perspective.

  15. Contribution of strong discontinuities to the power spectrum of the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovsky, Joseph E

    2010-09-10

    Eight and a half years of magnetic field measurements (2(22) samples) from the ACE spacecraft in the solar wind at 1 A.U. are analyzed. Strong (large-rotation-angle) discontinuities in the solar wind are collected and measured. An artificial time series is created that preserves the timing and amplitudes of the discontinuities. The power spectral density of the discontinuity series is calculated and compared with the power spectral density of the solar-wind magnetic field. The strong discontinuities produce a power-law spectrum in the "inertial subrange" with a spectral index near the Kolmogorov -5/3 index. The discontinuity spectrum contains about half of the power of the full solar-wind magnetic field over this "inertial subrange." Warnings are issued about the significant contribution of discontinuities to the spectrum of the solar wind, complicating interpretation of spectral power and spectral indices.

  16. What is the best method to calculate the solar wind propagation delay?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mailyan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a statistical study of propagation times of solar wind discontinuities between Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE spacecraft orbiting the L1 libration point and the Cluster quartet of spacecraft near the Earth's magnetopause. The propagation times for almost 200 events are compared with the predicted times from four different models. The simplest model assumes a constant convective motion of solar wind disturbances along the Sun-Earth line, whereas more sophisticated models take the orientation of the discontinuity as well as the real positions of the solar wind monitor and target into account. The results show that taking orientation and real position of the solar wind monitor and target into account gives a more precise time delay estimation in most cases. In particular, we show that recent modifications to the minimum variance technique can improve the estimation of propagation times of solar wind discontinuities.

  17. Solar Wind Driving of Magnetospheric ULF Waves: Pulsations Driven by Velocity Shear at the Magnetopause

    CERN Document Server

    Claudepierre, S G; Wiltberger, M; 10.1029/2007JA012890

    2010-01-01

    We present results from global, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the solar wind/magnetosphere interaction. These MHD simulations are used to study ultra low frequency (ULF) pulsations in the Earth's magnetosphere driven by shear instabilities at the flanks of the magnetopause. We drive the simulations with idealized, constant solar wind input parameters, ensuring that any discrete ULF pulsations generated in the simulation magnetosphere are not due to fluctuations in the solar wind. The simulations presented in this study are driven by purely southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions, changing only the solar wind driving velocity while holding all of the other solar wind input parameters constant. We find surface waves near the dawn and dusk flank magnetopause and show that these waves are generated by the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. We also find that two KH modes are generated near the magnetopause boundary. One mode, the magnetopause KH mode, propagates tailwa...

  18. Determining the solar wind speed above active regions using remote radio-wave observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougeret, J L; Fainberg, J; Stone, R G

    1983-11-04

    A new technique has made it possible to measure the velocity of portions of the solar wind during its flow outward from the sun. This analysis utilizes spacecraft (ISEE-3) observations of radio emission generated in regions of the solar wind associated with solar active regions. By tracking the source of these radio waves over periods of days, it is possible to measure the motion of the emission regions. Evidence of solar wind acceleration during this outward flow, consistent with theoretical models, has also been obtained.

  19. How does geographic scale alter the utilization of wind and solar power in the USA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clack, C.; MacDonald, A. E.; Alexander, A.; Dunbar, A.; Xie, Y.; Wilczak, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    A significant obstacle to the widespread use of wind and solar energy is the high variability. While this obstacle is significant for a small area, because of the possibility of low wind and solar energy production for a significant period every year, over larger areas renewable energy production can make use of the fact that there will always be wind or solar energy available somewhere in the domain. A key scientific question is how large does an area have to be such that wind and solar can supply significant electricity production without large shortages? Results will be presented from a study that exams whether the continental US has enough areal scale such that the weather can drive large-scale wind and solar deployment? The study uses assimilated hourly weather data for 2006-8 and hourly electric load projected from 2006-8 to 2030. An optimization model developed for this study evaluates the cost of the national system when taking into account not only the cost of wind turbines and solar panels but also the costs of building the electricity producing stations, building the transmission lines, allowing for transmission losses and the fuel burned in the dispatch-able generation. While some results from this study are intuitive, others give surprising insights relevant to planning energy systems of the future. We show that wind and solar energy utilization increases with domain size, while the total atmospheric carbon release and total system costs are subsequently reduced. We show that transmission constraints do not significantly alter the utilization of wind and solar deployment, however, transmission dramatically affect the areal locations of the wind and solar generation plants. A similar scaling for global land and adjacent coastal areas, with no transmission constraints, shows that wind and solar energy systems are most effective on large geographic areas. The optimization model will be explained in greater detail and key results will be shared.

  20. The Structure of the Solar Wind at Large Heliocentric Distances: CIRs and their Successors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazis, P. R.

    1999-01-01

    Co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs) and their associated shock pairs are dominant structures in the solar wind between the heliocentric distances of 2 and 8 AU. At larger heliocentric distances, these structures undergo a qualitative change. Shocks decay to a point where they are often difficult to detect, and may have little influence on the dynamics of the solar wind. Interaction regions spread and merge, though they appear to retain their identity to surprisingly large distances from the Sun. Solar wind and IMF data from the Pioneer 10, Pioneer 11, and Voyager 2 spacecraft were used to conduct a comprehensive survey of CIRs and their successors between heliocentric distances of 1 and 55 AU over the last two solar cycles. The structure of the solar wind varied in a consistent fashion with heliocentric distance. Similar structures were observed at similar heliocentric distances by all three spacecraft during different portions of the solar cycle.

  1. Solar power. [comparison of costs to wind, nuclear, coal, oil and gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, A. L.; Hall, Darwin C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes categories of solar technologies and identifies those that are economic. It compares the private costs of power from solar, wind, nuclear, coal, oil, and gas generators. In the southern United States, the private costs of building and generating electricity from new solar and wind power plants are less than the private cost of electricity from a new nuclear power plant. Solar power is more valuable than nuclear power since all solar power is available during peak and midpeak periods. Half of the power from nuclear generators is off-peak power and therefore is less valuable. Reliability is important in determining the value of wind and nuclear power. Damage from air pollution, when factored into the cost of power from fossil fuels, alters the cost comparison in favor of solar and wind power. Some policies are more effective at encouraging alternative energy technologies that pollute less and improve national security.

  2. Water for bioenergy: A global analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbens-Leenes, P.W.; Hoekstra, A.Y.; Meer, van der T.H.; Gasparatos, A.; Stromberg, P.

    2012-01-01

    Agriculture is by far the largest water user. This chapter reviews studies on the water footprints (WFs) of bioenergy (in the form of bioethanol, biodiesel, and heat and electricity produced from biomass) and compares their results with the WFs of fossil energy and other types of renewables (wind po

  3. Jumps of the solar wind direction and the substorm probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubyshkina, Daria; Kubyshkina, Marina; Semenov, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    Magnetospheric substorm commonly supposed to consist of two stages, loading and unloading. During the first stage the magnetic energy is stored in the magnetotail, which leads to increasing of the magnetic field intensity in the lobes and electric currents in the plasma sheet. The next uloading stage usually related to the reconnection process, which releases accumulated magnetic energy and produces the bursty bulk flows (BBFs) in the magnetotail. Such a scheme has been confirmed from both experimental and theoretical points of view. The weakest point of this scheme is the physical conditions which are necessary for the onset of the reconnection, but although the huge number of investigations was made to this end. Among them substorm triggers such as pressure pulses, turning of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) to the north direction and so on. We would like to emphasize the role of the bent current sheets first proposed by Kivelson and Hughes in 1990. The idea is that in the asymmetric configurations gradients and current density growth, so these conditions are supposed to be favorable for the reconnection. Then the minimal stress of the system can lead to the substorm onset. In the presented study we have analyzed the possibility of the current sheet asymmetry to be the trigger in theory and in observations (by statistical analysis of substorm occurrences). The bent of the current sheet can be produced by different sources. The most evident of them are the dipole tilt angle variations and the changes of the solar wind direction. The first source, tilt variations, are slow, so in the current study we at first analyzed the fast changes of the solar wind. The experimental analysis includes the investigation of the number of the events against dipole tilt angle and the solar wind direction, which both produce the distortion and inclination of the dipole current sheet. Theoretical investigation of this issue is based on the analysis of the quasi

  4. On arc-polarized structures in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. U. Ö. Sonnerup

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical model is proposed to account for some of the behavior of arc-polarized magnetic structures seen in the solar wind. To this end, an exact analytical solution is developed that describes infinite plane wave trains of arbitrary amplitude in a plasma governed by ideal Hall MHD. The main focus is on intermediate-mode wave trains, which display double-branched magnetic hodogram signatures similar to those seen in the solar wind. The theoretically derived hodograms have field rotation in the ion-polarized sense at a slightly depressed field magnitude on one branch and an electron-polarized rotation at a slightly enhanced field magnitude on the other branch. The two branches are joined at the two "turning points", at which the normal flow is exactly Alfvénic. The behavior is accounted for in terms of the opposite dispersive properties of ion and electron whistlers. The hodograms derived from the theory are shown to compare favorably with those of one event, observed by the Cluster spacecraft near the ecliptic plane, and one event at high heliographic latitude observed by the Ulysses spacecraft. However, these two observed structures comprise only a single full wave period, approximately from one turning point to the other and then back again. The theory can be used to predict propagation direction (away from, or towards, the sun from magnetic data alone, provided the sign of the magnetic field component along the wave normal can be reliably determined. Under the same condition, it also predicts whether the ion-polarized branch should precede or follow the electron-polarized branch. Both behaviors are seen in the solar wind. The major shortcoming of the theory is that it fails to reproduce the observed saw-tooth like time series for the magnetic field, in which the field rotation is rapid in the ion sense and slow in the electron sense. Instead, the theory gives about the same rotation rates. Possible explanations for this discrepancy are

  5. Solar wind heating by an embedded quasi-isothermal pick-up ion fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Fahr

    Full Text Available It is well known that the solar wind plasma consists of primary ions of solar coronal origin and secondary ions of interstellar origin. Interstellar H-atoms penetrate into the inner heliosphere and when ionized there are converted into secondary ions. These are implanted into the magnetized solar wind flow and are essentially enforced to co-move with this flow. By nonlinear interactions with wind-entrained Alfvén waves the latter are processed in the co-moving velocity space. This pick-up process, however, also causes actions back upon the original solar wind flow, leading to a deceleration, as well as a heating of the solar wind plasma. The resulting deceleration is not only due to the loading effect, but also due to the action of the pressure gradient. To calculate the latter, it is important to take into account the stochastic acceleration that suffers at their convection out of the inner heliosphere by the quasi-linear interactions with MHD turbulences. Only then can the presently reported VOYAGER observations of solar wind decelerations and heatings in the outer heliosphere be understood in terms of the current, most likely values of interstellar gas parameters. In a consistent view of the thermodynamics of the solar wind plasma, which is composed of secondary ions and solar wind protons, we also derive that the latter are globally heated at their motion to larger solar distances. The arising heat transfer is due to the action of suprathermal ions which drive MHD waves that are partially absorbed by solar wind protons and thereby establish their observed quasi-polytropy. We obtain a quantitative expression for the solar wind proton pressure as a function of solar distance. This expression clearly shows the change from an adiabatic to a quasi-polytropic behaviour with a decreasing polytropic index at increasing distances, as has been observed by the VOYAGERS. This also allows one to calculate the average percentage of the intitial energy

  6. Reconstructing the Solar Wind from Its Early History to Current Epoch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetian, Vladimir S.; Usmanov, Arcadi V.

    2016-02-01

    Stellar winds from active solar-type stars can play a crucial role in removal of stellar angular momentum and erosion of planetary atmospheres. However, major wind properties except for mass-loss rates cannot be directly derived from observations. We employed a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic Alfvén wave driven solar wind model, ALF3D, to reconstruct the solar wind parameters including the mass-loss rate, terminal velocity, and wind temperature at 0.7, 2, and 4.65 Gyr. Our model treats the wind thermal electrons, protons, and pickup protons as separate fluids and incorporates turbulence transport, eddy viscosity, turbulent resistivity, and turbulent heating to properly describe proton and electron temperatures of the solar wind. To study the evolution of the solar wind, we specified three input model parameters, the plasma density, Alfvén wave amplitude, and the strength of the dipole magnetic field at the wind base for each of three solar wind evolution models that are consistent with observational constrains. Our model results show that the velocity of the paleo solar wind was twice as fast, ∼50 times denser and 2 times hotter at 1 AU in the Sun's early history at 0.7 Gyr. The theoretical calculations of mass-loss rate appear to be in agreement with the empirically derived values for stars of various ages. These results can provide realistic constraints for wind dynamic pressures on magnetospheres of (exo)planets around the young Sun and other active stars, which is crucial in realistic assessment of the Joule heating of their ionospheres and corresponding effects of atmospheric erosion.

  7. RECONSTRUCTING THE SOLAR WIND FROM ITS EARLY HISTORY TO CURRENT EPOCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, Vladimir S.; Usmanov, Arcadi V., E-mail: vladimir.airapetian@nasa.gov, E-mail: avusmanov@gmail.com [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Stellar winds from active solar-type stars can play a crucial role in removal of stellar angular momentum and erosion of planetary atmospheres. However, major wind properties except for mass-loss rates cannot be directly derived from observations. We employed a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic Alfvén wave driven solar wind model, ALF3D, to reconstruct the solar wind parameters including the mass-loss rate, terminal velocity, and wind temperature at 0.7, 2, and 4.65 Gyr. Our model treats the wind thermal electrons, protons, and pickup protons as separate fluids and incorporates turbulence transport, eddy viscosity, turbulent resistivity, and turbulent heating to properly describe proton and electron temperatures of the solar wind. To study the evolution of the solar wind, we specified three input model parameters, the plasma density, Alfvén wave amplitude, and the strength of the dipole magnetic field at the wind base for each of three solar wind evolution models that are consistent with observational constrains. Our model results show that the velocity of the paleo solar wind was twice as fast, ∼50 times denser and 2 times hotter at 1 AU in the Sun's early history at 0.7 Gyr. The theoretical calculations of mass-loss rate appear to be in agreement with the empirically derived values for stars of various ages. These results can provide realistic constraints for wind dynamic pressures on magnetospheres of (exo)planets around the young Sun and other active stars, which is crucial in realistic assessment of the Joule heating of their ionospheres and corresponding effects of atmospheric erosion.

  8. Non Axi-symmetric Anisotropy of Solar Wind Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, A J; Chapman, S C; Hnat, B; Mueller, W -C

    2011-01-01

    A key prediction of turbulence theories is frame-invariance, and in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, axisymmetry of fluctuations with respect to the background magnetic field. Paradoxically the power in fluctuations in the turbulent solar wind are observed to be ordered with respect to the bulk macroscopic flow as well as the background magnetic field. Here, non- axisymmetry across the inertial and dissipation ranges is quantified using in-situ observations from Cluster. The observed inertial range non- axisymmetry is reproduced by a 'fly through' sampling of a Direct Numerical Simulation of MHD turbulence. Furthermore, 'fly through' sampling of a linear superposition of transverse waves with axisymmetric fluctuations generates the trend in non- axisymmetry with power spectral exponent. The observed non-axisymmetric anisotropy may thus simply arise as a sampling effect related to Taylor's hypothesis and is not related to the plasma dynamics itself.

  9. Scaling of compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the fast solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahraoui, F.; Banerjee, S.; Galtier, S.; Hadid, L.

    2015-12-01

    The role of compressible uctuations in the energy cascade of fast solar wind turbulence is studiedusing an exact law derived recently for compressible isothermal magnetohydrodynamics and in-situobservations of the THEMIS spacecraft. For the first time, a direct turbulent energy cascade isevidenced over three decades of scales which is signicantly broader than the previous estimatesmade from an exact incompressible law or from a compressible heuristic model. Unlike previousworks, our evaluation gives an energy ux which keeps a constant sign over the inertial range. Aterm-by-term analysis reveals that the dominant contribution to the energy ux comes from purecompressible uctuations. Furthermore, the compressible turbulent cascade rate is shown to providethe adequate energy dissipation required to account for the local heating of the non-adiabatic solarwind.

  10. Chaos and periodicity in solar wind speed: cycle 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Tushnik; Ray, Rajdeep; Khondekar, Mofazzal H.; Ghosh, Koushik; Banerjee, Subrata

    2015-06-01

    The solar wind speed time series data from 1st January, 1997 to 28th October, 2003 has been pre-processed using simple exponential smoothing, discrete wavelet transform for denoising to investigate the underneath dynamics of it. Recurrence plot and recurrence quantification analysis has revealed that the time series is non-stationary one with deterministic chaotic behavior. The Hilbert-Huang Transform has been used in search of the underlying periods of the data series. Present investigation has revealed the periods of 21 days, 32.5 days, 43.6 days, 148.86 days, 180.7 days, 355.5 days, 403.2 days, 413.6 days, 490.72 days, 729.6 days, 1086.76 days, 1599.4 days and 1892.6 days.

  11. Recent progress in astrophysical plasma turbulence from solar wind observations

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C H K

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarises some of the recent progress that has been made in understanding astrophysical plasma turbulence in the solar wind, from in situ spacecraft observations. At large scales, where the turbulence is predominantly Alfvenic, measurements of critical balance, residual energy, and 3D structure are discussed, along with comparison to recent models of strong Alfvenic turbulence. At these scales, a few percent of the energy is also in compressive fluctuations, and their nature, anisotropy, and relation to the Alfvenic component is described. In the small scale kinetic range, below the ion gyroscale, the turbulence becomes predominantly kinetic Alfven in nature, and measurements of the spectra, anisotropy, and intermittency of this turbulence are discussed with respect to recent cascade models. One of the major remaining questions is how the turbulent energy is dissipated, and some recent work on this question, in addition to future space missions which will help to answer it, are briefly discussed.

  12. NEW MODEL OF A SOLAR WIND AIRPLANE FOR GEOMATIC OPERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Achachi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability for an aircraft to fly during a much extended period of time has become a key issue and a target of research, both in the domain of civilian aviation and unmanned aerial vehicles. This paper describes a new design and evaluating of solar wind aircraft with the objective to assess the impact of a new system design on overall flight crew performance. The required endurance is in the range of some hours in the case of law enforcement, border surveillance, forest fire fighting or power line inspection. However, other applications at high altitudes, such as geomatic operations for delivering geographic information, weather research and forecast, environmental monitoring, would require remaining airborne during days, weeks or even months. The design of GNSS non precision approach procedure for different airports is based on geomatic data.

  13. Energetic particles as probes of solar wind disturbances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cane, H.V.; Richardson, I.G.; Wibberenz, G.

    1995-06-01

    The authors have investigated the response of particles, in the energy range approximately 1-5000 MeV, to interplanetary shocks and coronal ejecta. Shocks can accelerate particles or cause decreases in particle densities. Ejecta cause decreases. Thus particle observations can provide information about solar wind disturbances. Of particular interest is that the boundaries of ejecta can often be more readily identified from approximately l GeV particle decrease observations than from most other phenomena associated with ejecta. The authors will discuss the properties of less energetic shocks and ejecta and compare them with those of the more energetic events which are normally discussed in the context of Forbush decreases, large proton events, etc. They use data from both Helios spacecraft and IMP 8 which allows some spatial variations to be studied.

  14. Investigation of Backside Textures for Genesis Solar Wind Silicon Collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, C. P.; Burkett, P. J.; Rodriguez, M. C.; Allton, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Genesis solar wind collectors were comprised of a suite of 15 types of ultrapure materials. The single crystal, pure silicon collectors were fabricated by two methods: float zone (FZ) and Czochralski (CZ). Because of slight differences in bulk purity and surface cleanliness among the fabrication processes and the specific vendor, it is desirable to know which variety of silicon and identity of vendor, so that appropriate reference materials can be used. The Czochralski method results in a bulk composition with slightly higher oxygen, for example. The CZ silicon array wafers that were Genesis-flown were purchased from MEMC Electronics. Most of the Genesis-flown FZ silicon was purchased from Unisil and cleaned by MEMC, although a few FZ wafers were acquired from International Wafer Service (IWS).

  15. From the Solar Wind to the Magnetospheric Substorm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E.A. Ponomarev; P.A. Sedykh; O.V. Mager

    2005-01-01

    This paper gives a brief outline of the progression from the first substorm model developed in Ref.[4] and [8] based on Kennel's ideas[3], to the present views about the mechanism by which solar wind kinetic energy is converted to electromagnetic energy at the Bow Shock and by which this energy is transferred to the magnetosphere in the form of current; about the transformation of the energy of this current to gas kinetic energy of convecting plasma tubes, and, finally, the back transformation of gas kinetic energy to electromagnetic energy in secondary magnetospheric MHD generators. The questions of the formation of the magnetospheric convection system, the nature of substorm break-up, and of the matching of currents in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system are discussed.

  16. Scaling of compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the fast solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Supratik; Sahraoui, Fouad; Galtier, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    The role of compressible fluctuations in the energy cascade of fast solar wind turbulence is studied using a reduced form of an exact law derived recently (Banerjee and Galtier, PRE, 2013) for compressible isothermal magnetohydrodynamics and in-situ observations from the THEMIS B/ARTEMIS P1 spacecraft. A statistical survey of the data revealed a turbulent energy cascade over two decades of scales, which is broader than the previous estimates made from an exact incompressible law. A term-by-term analysis of the compressible model reveals new insight into the role played by the compressible fluctuations in the energy cascade. The compressible fluctuations are shown to amplify (2 to 4 times) the turbulent cascade rate with respect to the incompressible model in 10 % of the analyzed samples. This new estimated cascade rate is shown to provide the adequate energy dissipation required.

  17. Observations of the velocity distribution of solar wind ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Bochsler, P.; Geiss, J.; Coplan, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements made by the Isee 3 ion composition experiment have been used to determine the kinetic temperatures of 3He(++), 4He(++), 16O(6+), and 16O(7+) in the solar wind. It is found that these temperatures generally obey the relation that T(i)/m(i) equals const, but fluctuations, some of which are caused by dynamical effects in the flow, are observed. The temperature of oxygen sometimes rises above 10 K, which is very strong evidence for heating outside the collisional region of the corona. The tendency toward equal temperatures per nucleon occurs everywhere where collisions are unimportant, suggesting that the temperatures are set up close to the sun rather than elsewhere in the interplanetary medium. The velocity distribution function of helium is observed to be non-Maxwellian, with a pronounced high velocity tail.

  18. The relation of solar wind structure to hydromagnetic discontinuities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, C.J.; Neugebauer, M.; Smith, E.J.; Bame, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    High resolution ISEE-3 data have been used to examine the relative abundances of tangential (TD) vs rotational (RD) discontinuities in different types of solar wind flow. Three types of flow were examined; flow from coronal holes, sector boundary flow and transient flow. It has been found that coronal hole flow has substantially more discontinuities and a greater ratio of RD's to TD's than do the other types of flow. Discontinuities are least frequent in transient flows characterized by bidirectional streaming of electrons. This leads us to the conclusion that meaningful studies of the velocity dependence of the rates of occurrence of different types of discontinuities must take the type of flow (coronal hole versus transient) into account. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Electromagnetic lower hybrid instability in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakhina, G.S.

    1985-04-01

    A fully electromagnetic lower hybrid instability which is driven by a resonant halo electron component is studied analytically. It is shown that the growth rate of the instability peaks at a certain value of the wave-number and that an increase in the ratio of electron pressure to magnetic field pressure reduces the growth rate. At 0.3 AU the typical growth time for the instability is found to be of the order of 25 ms or less, whereas the most unstable wavelengths associated with the instability fall typically in a range of 27 to 90 km. Relevance of electromagnetic lower hybrid instability to the obliquely propagating whistler, characterized by large values of refractive indices, detected behind interplanetary shocks in the solar wind and to the generation mechanism of correlated whistler and electron-plasma oscillation bursts detected on ISEE-3 are discussed. 17 references.

  20. Three-Dimensional Structure of Solar Wind Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C H K; Schekochihin, A A; Horbury, T S; Wicks, R T; Bale, S D

    2011-01-01

    We have measured, for the first time, the three-dimensional structure of inertial range plasma turbulence in the fast solar wind with respect to a local, physically motivated coordinate system. We found that the incompressible Alfvenic fluctuations are three-dimensionally anisotropic, with the sense of this anisotropy changing from large to small scales. At the largest scales, the magnetic field correlations are longest in the local fluctuation direction, consistent with Alfven waves. At the smallest scales, they are longest along the local mean field direction and shortest in the direction perpendicular to the local mean field and the local field fluctuation. The compressive fluctuations are highly elongated along the local mean magnetic field direction, although axially symmetric perpendicular to it. Their large anisotropy may explain why they are not heavily damped.

  1. Kinetic Scale Density Fluctuations in the Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C H K; Bonnell, J W; Mozer, F S; Klein, K G; Bale, S D

    2013-01-01

    We motivate the importance of studying kinetic scale turbulence for understanding the macroscopic properties of the heliosphere, such as the heating of the solar wind. We then discuss the technique by which kinetic scale density fluctuations can be measured using the spacecraft potential, including a calculation of the timescale for the spacecraft potential to react to the density changes. Finally, we compare the shape of the density spectrum at ion scales to theoretical predictions based on a cascade model for kinetic turbulence. We conclude that the shape of the spectrum, including the ion scale flattening, can be captured by the sum of passive density fluctuations at large scales and kinetic Alfven wave turbulence at small scales.

  2. The role of electrons at the solar wind termination shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahr, Hans Joerg; Siewert, Mark [Argelander Institut fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, 53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Describing the solar wind termination shock as a multi-fluid MHD Rankine-Hugoniot shock structure, it is usually assumed that electrons and protons experience identical jumps in density and pressure at the plasma passage over the shock. When analysing the specific kinetic conditions for electrons and ions at this MHD shock crossing, we find that electrons react very much different from protons at their shock passage undergoing an over-adiabatic heating due to conversion of electrically induced overshoot energies into downstream thermal energies. In case of an electron-proton two-fluid plasma, electrons constitute the dominant contribution to the downstream thermal plasma pressure and thereby determine the resulting compression ratio at the shock. We show that taking this over-adiabatic electron heating into account will then deliver a correct representation of all shock data taken with VOYAGER-2.

  3. TURBULENCE IN THE SOLAR WIND MEASURED WITH COMET TAIL TEST PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeForest, C. E.; Howard, T. A. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Matthaeus, W. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, 217 Sharp Laboratory, Newark, DE 19711 (United States); Rice, D. R. [Northwestern University, 633 Clark St., Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2015-10-20

    By analyzing the motions of test particles observed remotely in the tail of Comet Encke, we demonstrate that the solar wind undergoes turbulent processing enroute from the Sun to the Earth and that the kinetic energy entrained in the large-scale turbulence is sufficient to explain the well-known anomalous heating of the solar wind. Using the heliospheric imaging (HI-1) camera on board NASA's STEREO-A spacecraft, we have observed an ensemble of compact features in the comet tail as they became entrained in the solar wind near 0.4 AU. We find that the features are useful as test particles, via mean-motion analysis and a forward model of pickup dynamics. Using population analysis of the ensemble's relative motion, we find a regime of random-walk diffusion in the solar wind, followed, on larger scales, by a surprising regime of semiconfinement that we attribute to turbulent eddies in the solar wind. The entrained kinetic energy of the turbulent motions represents a sufficient energy reservoir to heat the solar wind to observed temperatures at 1 AU. We determine the Lagrangian-frame diffusion coefficient in the diffusive regime, derive upper limits for the small scale coherence length of solar wind turbulence, compare our results to existing Eulerian-frame measurements, and compare the turbulent velocity with the size of the observed eddies extrapolated to 1 AU. We conclude that the slow solar wind is fully mixed by turbulence on scales corresponding to a 1–2 hr crossing time at Earth; and that solar wind variability on timescales shorter than 1–2 hr is therefore dominated by turbulent processing rather than by direct solar effects.

  4. On Lunar Exospheric Column Densities and Solar Wind Access Beyond the Terminator from ROSAT Soft X-Ray Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Snowden, S. L.; Sarantos, M.; Benna, M.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, T. E.; Farrell, W. M.; Fatemi, S.; Hills, H. Kent; Hodges, R. R.; Holmstrom, M.; Kuntz, K. D.; Porter, F. Scott; Read, A.; Robertson, I. P.; Sembay, S. F.; Sibeck, D. G.; Stubbs, T. J.; Travnicek, P.; Walsh, B. M.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the Rontgen satellite (ROSAT) position sensitive proportional counter soft X-ray image of the Moon taken on 29 June 1990 by examining the radial profile of the surface brightness in three wedges: two 19 deg wedges (one north and one south) 13-32 deg off the terminator toward the dark side and one wedge 38 deg wide centered on the antisolar direction. The radial profiles of both the north and the south wedges show significant limb brightening that is absent in the 38 deg wide antisolar wedge. An analysis of the soft X-ray intensity increase associated with the limb brightening shows that its magnitude is consistent with that expected due to solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with the tenuous lunar atmosphere based on lunar exospheric models and hybrid simulation results of solar wind access beyond the terminator. Soft X-ray imaging thus can independently infer the total lunar limb column density including all species, a property that before now has not been measured, and provide a large-scale picture of the solar wind-lunar interaction. Because the SWCX signal appears to be dominated by exospheric species arising from solar wind implantation, this technique can also determine how the exosphere varies with solar wind conditions. Now, along with Mars, Venus, and Earth, the Moon represents another solar system body at which SWCX has been observed.

  5. Study on the Effect of the Curvature of Solar Collector on Wind Loading Coefficients and Dynamic Response of Solar Collector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Hameed Hussein

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current research, the work concentrated on studying the effect of curvature of solar parabolic trough solar collector on wind loading coefficients and dynamic response of solar collector. The response of collector to the aerodynamic loading was estimated numerically and experimentally. The curvature of most public parabolic trough solar collectors was investigated and compared. The dynamic response of solar collector due to wind loading was investigated by using numerical solution of fluid-structure interaction concept. The experimental work was done to verify the numerical results and shows good agreement with numerical results. The numerical results were obtained by using finite element software package (ANSYS 14. It was found that the change in collector curvature (focal length lead to remarkable changes in wind loading coefficients (drag, lift, and moment, dynamic response (displacement and natural frequencies but does not affect the first mode shape.

  6. Transport of Solar Wind Across Earth's Bow Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, G. K.; Lee, E.; Yang, Z.; Liu, Y.; Fu, S.; Canu, P.; Goldstein, M. L.; Dandouras, I. S.; Reme, H.; Hong, J.

    2015-12-01

    Observations have established that about 20% of the solar wind (SW) is reflected and 80% directly transmitted across Earth's bow shock (Skopke et al, Adv. Space Sci., 15, No. 8/9, 269, 1995). The transmitted SW is not immediately thermalized and the magnetosheath plasma distribution can remain non-Maxwellian for a long time. Cluster observations have further established that most of the magnetosheath bulk flow remains super-Alfvenic except in the polar altitudes near the cusp region (Longmore et al., Anna. Geophysicae, 23, 3351-3364, 2005). We have studied SW ion distributions before and after entering the bow shock to examine the details of the solar wind-bow shock interaction. Preliminary findings indicate that a typical SW H+ beam with thermal kT ~10 eV drifting at 400 km/s in front of the bow shock appears as ~12 eV beam drifting at 250 km/s after it penetrates the shock barrier. The small kT increase is possibly due to wave-particle interaction at the boundary. While the He++ ion beam kT behaves similarly as H+ ions, the drift velocities of He++ ions do not always slow down as H+ ions. These observations indicate the physics of SW-bow shock interaction is much more complicated than the models that explain SW slow down as resulting from an electrostatic potential at the shock that decelerates the SW. We have started PIC simulation of SW transport across the bow shock and the results will be presented together with observations.

  7. Access of solar wind electrons into the Martian magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Dubinin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Electrons with energy of ~40–80 eV measured by the instrument ASPERA-3 on Mars Express and MAG-ER onboard Mars Global Surveyor are used to trace an access of solar wind electrons into the Martian magnetosphere. Crustal magnetic fields create an additional protection from solar wind plasma on the dayside of the Southern Hemisphere by shifting the boundary of the induced magnetosphere (this boundary is often refereed as the magnetic pileup boundary above strong crustal sources to ~400 km as compared to the Northern Hemisphere. Localized intrusions through cusps are also observed. On the nightside an access into the magnetosphere depends on the IMF orientation. Negative values of the ByIMF component assist the access to the regions with strong crustal magnetizations although electron fluxes are strongly weakened below ~600 km. A precipitation pattern at lower altitudes is formed by intermittent regions with reduced and enhanced electron fluxes. The precipitation sites are longitudinally stretched narrow bands in the regions with a strong vertical component of the crustal field. Fluxes ≥109 cm−2 s−1 of suprathermal electrons necessary to explain the observed aurora emissions are maintained only for the periods with enhanced precipitation. The appearance of another class of electron distributions – inverted V structures, characterized by peaks on energy spectra, is controlled by the IMF. They are clustered in the hemisphere pointed by the interplanetary electric field that implies a constraint on their origin.

  8. Non-Gaussian probability distributions of solar wind fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Marsch

    Full Text Available The probability distributions of field differences ∆x(τ=x(t+τ-x(t, where the variable x(t may denote any solar wind scalar field or vector field component at time t, have been calculated from time series of Helios data obtained in 1976 at heliocentric distances near 0.3 AU. It is found that for comparatively long time lag τ, ranging from a few hours to 1 day, the differences are normally distributed according to a Gaussian. For shorter time lags, of less than ten minutes, significant changes in shape are observed. The distributions are often spikier and narrower than the equivalent Gaussian distribution with the same standard deviation, and they are enhanced for large, reduced for intermediate and enhanced for very small values of ∆x. This result is in accordance with fluid observations and numerical simulations. Hence statistical properties are dominated at small scale τ by large fluctuation amplitudes that are sparsely distributed, which is direct evidence for spatial intermittency of the fluctuations. This is in agreement with results from earlier analyses of the structure functions of ∆x. The non-Gaussian features are differently developed for the various types of fluctuations. The relevance of these observations to the interpretation and understanding of the nature of solar wind magnetohydrodynamic (MHD turbulence is pointed out, and contact is made with existing theoretical concepts of intermittency in fluid turbulence.

  9. Moving an asteroid with electric solar wind sail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merikallio, S.; Janhunen, P.

    2010-12-01

    The electric solar wind sail (E-Sail) is a new propulsion method for interplanetary travel which was invented in 2006 and is currently under development. The E-Sail uses charged tethers to extract momentum from the solar wind particles to obtain propulsive thrust. According to current estimates, the E-Sail is 2-3 orders of magnitude better than traditional propulsion methods (chemical rockets and ion engines) in terms of produced lifetime-integrated impulse per propulsion system mass. Here we analyze the problem of using the E-Sail for directly deflecting an Earth-threatening asteroid. The problem then culminates into how to attach the E-Sail device to the asteroid. We assess alternative attachment strategies, namely straightforward direct towing with a cable and the gravity tractor method which works for a wider variety of situations. We also consider possible techniques to scale up the E-Sail force beyond the baseline one Newton level to deal with more imminent or larger asteroid or cometary threats. As a baseline case we consider an asteroid of effective diameter of 140 m and mass of 3 million tons, which can be deflected with a baseline 1 N E-Sail within 10 years. With a 5 N E-Sail the deflection could be achieved in 5 years. Once developed, the E-Sail would appear to provide a safe and reasonably low-cost way of deflecting dangerous asteroids and other heavenly bodies in cases where the collision threat becomes known several years in advance.

  10. Costs of solar and wind power variability for reducing CO2 emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueken, Colleen; Cohen, Gilbert E; Apt, Jay

    2012-09-04

    We compare the power output from a year of electricity generation data from one solar thermal plant, two solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays, and twenty Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) wind farms. The analysis shows that solar PV electricity generation is approximately one hundred times more variable at frequencies on the order of 10(-3) Hz than solar thermal electricity generation, and the variability of wind generation lies between that of solar PV and solar thermal. We calculate the cost of variability of the different solar power sources and wind by using the costs of ancillary services and the energy required to compensate for its variability and intermittency, and the cost of variability per unit of displaced CO(2) emissions. We show the costs of variability are highly dependent on both technology type and capacity factor. California emissions data were used to calculate the cost of variability per unit of displaced CO(2) emissions. Variability cost is greatest for solar PV generation at $8-11 per MWh. The cost of variability for solar thermal generation is $5 per MWh, while that of wind generation in ERCOT was found to be on average $4 per MWh. Variability adds ~$15/tonne CO(2) to the cost of abatement for solar thermal power, $25 for wind, and $33-$40 for PV.

  11. Thermospheric Response to Solar Wind Electric Field Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlongo, N. J.; Ridley, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    The electron density of the thermosphere is of paramount importance for radio communications and drag on low altitude satellites, particularly during geomagnetic storms. Transient enhancements of ion velocities and subsequent density and temperature increases frequently occur as a result of storm-driven solar wind electric field fluctuations. Since the Earth's dipole magnetic field is tilted and offset from the center of the planet, significant asymmetries arise that alter the thermospheric response to energy input based upon the time of day of the disturbance. This study utilizes the Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (GITM) to investigate this phenomenon by enhancing the convective electric field for one hour of the day in 22 different simulations. An additional baseline run was conducted with no IMF perturbation. Furthermore, four configurations of Earth's magnetic field were considered, Internal Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF), a perfect dipole, a dipole tilted by 10 degrees, and a tilted and offset dipole. These runs were conducted at equinox when the amount of sunlight falling on the different hemispheres is the same. Two additional runs were conducted at the solstices for comparison. It was found that the most geo-effective times are when the poles are pointed towards the sun. The electron density, neutral density and temperature as well as the winds are explored.

  12. Collisional Thermalization of Hydrogen and Helium in Solar Wind Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Maruca, Bennett A; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Kasper, Justin C; Stevens, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    In situ observations of the solar wind frequently show the temperature of $\\alpha$-particles (fully ionized helium), $T_\\alpha$, to significantly differ from that of protons (ionized hydrogen), $T_p$. Many heating processes in the plasma act preferentially on $\\alpha$-particles, even as collisions among ions act to gradually establish thermal equilibrium. Measurements from the $\\textit{Wind}$ spacecraft's Faraday cups reveal that, at $r=1.0\\ \\textrm{AU}$ from the Sun, the observed values of the $\\alpha$-proton temperature ratio, $\\theta_{\\alpha p} \\equiv T_\\alpha\\,/\\,T_p$ has a complex, bimodal distribution. This study applied a simple model for the radial evolution of $\\theta_{\\alpha p}$ to these data to compute expected values of $\\theta_{\\alpha p}$ at $r=0.1\\ \\textrm{AU}$. These inferred $\\theta_{\\alpha p}$-values have no trace of the bimodality seen in the $\\theta_{\\alpha p}$-values measured at $r=1.0\\ \\textrm{AU}$ but are instead consistent with the actions of the known mechanisms for $\\alpha$-particle p...

  13. INERTIAL RANGE TURBULENCE OF FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND AT 0.72 AU AND SOLAR MINIMUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teodorescu, Eliza; Echim, Marius; Munteanu, Costel [Institute for Space Sciences, Măgurele (Romania); Zhang, Tielong [Space Research Institute, Graz (Austria); Bruno, Roberto [INAF-IAPS, Istituto di Astrofizica e Planetologia Spaziali, Rome (Italy); Kovacs, Peter, E-mail: eliteo@spacescience.ro [Geological and Geophysical Institute of Hungary, Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-05-10

    We investigate Venus Express observations of magnetic field fluctuations performed systematically in the solar wind at 0.72 Astronomical Units (AU), between 2007 and 2009, during the deep minimum of solar cycle 24. The power spectral densities (PSDs) of the magnetic field components have been computed for time intervals that satisfy the data integrity criteria and have been grouped according to the type of wind, fast and slow, defined for speeds larger and smaller, respectively, than 450 km s{sup −1}. The PSDs show higher levels of power for the fast wind than for the slow. The spectral slopes estimated for all PSDs in the frequency range 0.005–0.1 Hz exhibit a normal distribution. The average value of the trace of the spectral matrix is −1.60 for fast solar wind and −1.65 for slow wind. Compared to the corresponding average slopes at 1 AU, the PSDs are shallower at 0.72 AU for slow wind conditions suggesting a steepening of the solar wind spectra between Venus and Earth. No significant time variation trend is observed for the spectral behavior of both the slow and fast wind.

  14. Transmission Benefits of Co-Locating Concentrating Solar Power and Wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

    2012-03-01

    In some areas of the U.S. transmission constraints are a limiting factor in deploying new wind and concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Texas is an example of one such location, where the best wind and solar resources are in the western part of the state, while major demand centers are in the east. The low capacity factor of wind is a compounding factor, increasing the relative cost of new transmission per unit of energy actually delivered. A possible method of increasing the utilization of new transmission is to co-locate both wind and concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage. In this work we examine the benefits and limits of using the dispatachability of thermal storage to increase the capacity factor of new transmission developed to access high quality solar and wind resources in remote locations.

  15. Regional variations in the health, environmental, and climate benefits of wind and solar generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siler-Evans, Kyle; Azevedo, Inês Lima; Morgan, M Granger; Apt, Jay

    2013-07-16

    When wind or solar energy displace conventional generation, the reduction in emissions varies dramatically across the United States. Although the Southwest has the greatest solar resource, a solar panel in New Jersey displaces significantly more sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and particulate matter than a panel in Arizona, resulting in 15 times more health and environmental benefits. A wind turbine in West Virginia displaces twice as much carbon dioxide as the same turbine in California. Depending on location, we estimate that the combined health, environmental, and climate benefits from wind or solar range from $10/MWh to $100/MWh, and the sites with the highest energy output do not yield the greatest social benefits in many cases. We estimate that the social benefits from existing wind farms are roughly 60% higher than the cost of the Production Tax Credit, an important federal subsidy for wind energy. However, that same investment could achieve greater health, environmental, and climate benefits if it were differentiated by region.

  16. Bioenergy and African transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynd, Lee R; Sow, Mariam; Chimphango, Annie Fa; Cortez, Luis Ab; Brito Cruz, Carlos H; Elmissiry, Mosad; Laser, Mark; Mayaki, Ibrahim A; Moraes, Marcia Afd; Nogueira, Luiz Ah; Wolfaardt, Gideon M; Woods, Jeremy; van Zyl, Willem H

    2015-01-01

    Among the world's continents, Africa has the highest incidence of food insecurity and poverty and the highest rates of population growth. Yet Africa also has the most arable land, the lowest crop yields, and by far the most plentiful land resources relative to energy demand. It is thus of interest to examine the potential of expanded modern bioenergy production in Africa. Here we consider bioenergy as an enabler for development, and provide an overview of modern bioenergy technologies with a comment on application in an Africa context. Experience with bioenergy in Africa offers evidence of social benefits and also some important lessons. In Brazil, social development, agricultural development and food security, and bioenergy development have been synergistic rather than antagonistic. Realizing similar success in African countries will require clear vision, good governance, and adaptation of technologies, knowledge, and business models to myriad local circumstances. Strategies for integrated production of food crops, livestock, and bioenergy are potentially attractive and offer an alternative to an agricultural model featuring specialized land use. If done thoughtfully, there is considerable evidence that food security and economic development in Africa can be addressed more effectively with modern bioenergy than without it. Modern bioenergy can be an agent of African transformation, with potential social benefits accruing to multiple sectors and extending well beyond energy supply per se. Potential negative impacts also cut across sectors. Thus, institutionally inclusive multi-sector legislative structures will be more effective at maximizing the social benefits of bioenergy compared to institutionally exclusive, single-sector structures.

  17. Plasma-field Coupling at Small Length Scales in Solar Wind Near 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livadiotis, G.; Desai, M. I.

    2016-10-01

    In collisionless plasmas such as the solar wind, the coupling between plasma constituents and the embedded magnetic field occurs on various temporal and spatial scales, and is primarily responsible for the transfer of energy between waves and particles. Recently, it was shown that the transfer of energy between solar wind plasma particles and waves is governed by a new and unique relationship: the ratio between the magnetosonic energy and the plasma frequency is constant, E ms/ω pl ˜ ℏ*. This paper examines the variability and substantial departure of this ratio from ℏ* observed at ˜1 au, which is caused by a dispersion of fast magnetosonic (FMS) waves. In contrast to the efficiently transferred energy in the fast solar wind, the lower efficiency of the slow solar wind can be caused by this dispersion, whose relation and characteristics are derived and studied. In summary, we show that (i) the ratio E ms/ω pl transitions continuously from the slow to the fast solar wind, tending toward the constant ℏ* (ii) the transition is more efficient for larger thermal, Alfvén, or FMS speeds; (iii) the fast solar wind is almost dispersionless, characterized by quasi-constant values of the FMS speed, while the slow wind is subject to dispersion that is less effective for larger wind or magnetosonic speeds; and (iv) the constant ℏ* is estimated with the best known precision, ℏ* ≈ (1.160 ± 0.083) × 10-22 Js.

  18. Signatures of Slow Solar Wind Streams from Active Regions in the Inner Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemzin, V.; Harra, L.; Urnov, A.; Kuzin, S.; Goryaev, F.; Berghmans, D.

    2013-08-01

    The identification of solar-wind sources is an important question in solar physics. The existing solar-wind models ( e.g., the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model) provide the approximate locations of the solar wind sources based on magnetic field extrapolations. It has been suggested recently that plasma outflows observed at the edges of active regions may be a source of the slow solar wind. To explore this we analyze an isolated active region (AR) adjacent to small coronal hole (CH) in July/August 2009. On 1 August, Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer observations showed two compact outflow regions in the corona. Coronal rays were observed above the active-region coronal hole (ARCH) region on the eastern limb on 31 July by STEREO-A/EUVI and at the western limb on 7 August by CORONAS- Photon/TESIS telescopes. In both cases the coronal rays were co-aligned with open magnetic-field lines given by the potential field source surface model, which expanded into the streamer. The solar-wind parameters measured by STEREO-B, ACE, Wind, and STEREO-A confirmed the identification of the ARCH as a source region of the slow solar wind. The results of the study support the suggestion that coronal rays can represent signatures of outflows from ARs propagating in the inner corona along open field lines into the heliosphere.

  19. Solar wind drivers of geomagnetic storms during more than four solar cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Ian G.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Using a classification of the near-Earth solar wind into three basic flow types: (1 High-speed streams associated with coronal holes at the Sun; (2 Slow, interstream solar wind; and (3 Transient flows originating with coronal mass ejections (CMEs at the Sun, including interplanetary CMEs and the associated upstream shocks and post-shock regions, we determine the drivers of geomagnetic storms of various size ranges based on the Kp index and the NOAA “G” criteria since 1964, close to the beginning of the space era, to 2011, encompassing more than four solar cycles (20–23. We also briefly discuss the occurrence of storms since the beginning of the Kp index in 1932, in the minimum before cycle 17. We note that the extended low level of storm activity during the minimum following cycle 23 is without precedent in this 80-year interval. Furthermore, the “typical” numbers of storm days/cycle quoted in the standard NOAA G storm table appear to be significantly higher than those obtained from our analysis, except for the strongest (G5 storms, suggesting that they should be revised downward.

  20. Full-Sun observations for identifying the source of the slow solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, David H; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry P

    2015-01-06

    Fast (>700 km s(-1)) and slow (~400 km s(-1)) winds stream from the Sun, permeate the heliosphere and influence the near-Earth environment. While the fast wind is known to emanate primarily from polar coronal holes, the source of the slow wind remains unknown. Here we identify possible sites of origin using a slow solar wind source map of the entire Sun, which we construct from specially designed, full-disk observations from the Hinode satellite, and a magnetic field model. Our map provides a full-Sun observation that combines three key ingredients for identifying the sources: velocity, plasma composition and magnetic topology and shows them as solar wind composition plasma outflowing on open magnetic field lines. The area coverage of the identified sources is large enough that the sum of their mass contributions can explain a significant fraction of the mass loss rate of the solar wind.

  1. Full-Sun observations for identifying the source of the slow solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, David H; Warren, Harry P

    2016-01-01

    Fast (>700 km/s) and slow (~400 km/s) winds stream from the Sun, permeate the heliosphere and influence the near-Earth environment. While the fast wind is known to emanate primarily from polar coronal holes, the source of the slow wind remains unknown. Here we identify possible sites of origin using a slow solar wind source map of the entire Sun, which we construct from specially designed, full- disk observations from the Hinode satellite, and a magnetic field model. Our map provides a full-Sun observation that combines three key ingredients for identifying the sources: velocity, plasma composition and magnetic topology and shows them as solar wind composition plasma outflowing on open magnetic field lines. The area coverage of the identified sources is large enough that the sum of their mass contributions can explain a significant fraction of the mass loss rate of the solar wind.

  2. SOLAR WIND COLLISIONAL AGE FROM A GLOBAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS SIMULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhiber, R; Usmanov, AV; Matthaeus, WH [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Goldstein, ML [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    Simple estimates of the number of Coulomb collisions experienced by the interplanetary plasma to the point of observation, i.e., the “collisional age”, can be usefully employed in the study of non-thermal features of the solar wind. Usually these estimates are based on local plasma properties at the point of observation. Here we improve the method of estimation of the collisional age by employing solutions obtained from global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations. This enables evaluation of the complete analytical expression for the collisional age without using approximations. The improved estimation of the collisional timescale is compared with turbulence and expansion timescales to assess the relative importance of collisions. The collisional age computed using the approximate formula employed in previous work is compared with the improved simulation-based calculations to examine the validity of the simplified formula. We also develop an analytical expression for the evaluation of the collisional age and we find good agreement between the numerical and analytical results. Finally, we briefly discuss the implications for an improved estimation of collisionality along spacecraft trajectories, including Solar Probe Plus.

  3. Modification of ices by cosmic rays and solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothard, Hermann; Domaracka, Alicja; Boduch, Philippe; Palumbo, Maria Elisabetta; Strazzulla, Giovanni; da Silveira, Enio F.; Dartois, Emmanuel

    2017-03-01

    Astrophysical ices are exposed to different radiation fields including photons, electrons and ions. The latter stem from interstellar cosmic rays (CR), the solar and stellar winds, shock waves or are trapped in the magnetospheres of giant planets. We briefly discuss the physics of energy deposition by ion ir radiation in condensed matter and experimental methods to study the induced effects. We then present results on radiation effects such as sputtering, amorphisation and compaction, dissociation of molecules, formation of new molecular species after radiolysis and by implantation of ions. The formation and radio-resistance of organic molecules, related to the question of the initial conditions for the emergence of life, are briefly discussed. This review is not meant to be comprehensive, but rather focusses on recent findings, with special emphasis on experiments with heavy multiply charged ion beams. These experiments aim in particular at simulating the effects of CRs on icy grains in dense molecular clouds, and on the formation of molecules on icy bodies in the Solar System.

  4. Solar wind and coronal structure near sunspot minimum - Pioneer and SMM observations from 1985-1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov, J. D.; Barnes, A.; Hundhausen, A. J.; Smith, E. J.

    1990-01-01

    Changes in solar wind speed and magnetic polarity observed at the Pioneer spacecraft are discussed here in terms of the changing magnetic geometry implied by SMM coronagraph observations over the period 1985-1987. The pattern of recurrent solar wind streams, the long-term average speed, and the sector polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field all changed in a manner suggesting both a temporal variation, and a changing dependence on heliographic latitude. Coronal observations during this epoch show a systematic variation in coronal structure and the magnetic structure imposed on the expanding solar wind. These observations suggest interpretation of the solar wind speed variations in terms of the familiar model where the speed increases with distance from a nearly flat interplanetary current sheet, and where this current sheet becomes aligned with the solar equatorial plane as sunspot minimum approaches, but deviates rapidly from that orientation after minimum.

  5. Earth's magnetosphere and outer radiation belt under sub-Alfvénic solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugaz, Noé; Farrugia, Charles J.; Huang, Chia-Lin; Winslow, Reka M.; Spence, Harlan E.; Schwadron, Nathan A.

    2016-10-01

    The interaction between Earth's magnetic field and the solar wind results in the formation of a collisionless bow shock 60,000-100,000 km upstream of our planet, as long as the solar wind fast magnetosonic Mach (hereafter Mach) number exceeds unity. Here, we present one of those extremely rare instances, when the solar wind Mach number reached steady values hours on 17 January 2013. Simultaneous measurements by more than ten spacecraft in the near-Earth environment reveal the evanescence of the bow shock, the sunward motion of the magnetopause and the extremely rapid and intense loss of electrons in the outer radiation belt. This study allows us to directly observe the state of the inner magnetosphere, including the radiation belts during a type of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling which is unusual for planets in our solar system but may be common for close-in extrasolar planets.

  6. The magnetic field in the pile-up region at Mars, and its variation with the solar wind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Olsen, Nils; Purucker, M.

    2003-01-01

    [1] The magnetic measurements from the Mars Global Surveyor satellite are used to study the magnetic field on the Martian dayside, and its variation with the solar wind. Because of the lack of solar wind measurements near Mars, solar wind measurements near Earth during a period centered on a Mars...... the solar wind dynamic pressure and the magnetic pressure in the pile-up region, and also a strong asymmetry with the Interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By-component, probably related to solar wind pick-up of planetary ions....

  7. Extremely high reflection of solar wind protons as neutral hydrogen atoms from regolith in space

    CERN Document Server

    Wieser, Martin; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Holmström, Mats; Bhardwaj, Anil; Sridharan, R; Dhanya, MB; Wurz, Peter; Schaufelberger, Audrey; Asamura, Kazushi; 10.1016/j.pss.2009.09.012

    2010-01-01

    We report on measurements of extremely high reflection rates of solar wind particles from regolith-covered lunar surfaces. Measurements by the Sub-keV Atom Reflecting Analyzer (SARA) instrument on the Indian Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft in orbit around the Moon show that up to 20% of the impinging solar wind protons are reflected from the lunar surface back to space as neutral hydrogen atoms. This finding, generally applicable to regolith-covered atmosphereless bodies, invalidates the widely accepted assumption that regolith almost completely absorbs the impinging solar wind.

  8. Decontaminating Solar Wind Samples with the Genesis Ultra-Pure Water Megasonic Wafer Spin Cleaner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaway, Michael J.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Allton, J. H.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2009-01-01

    The Genesis sample return capsule, though broken during the landing impact, contained most of the shattered ultra-pure solar wind collectors comprised of silicon and other semiconductor wafers materials. Post-flight analysis revealed that all wafer fragments were littered with surface particle contamination from spacecraft debris as well as soil from the impact site. This particulate contamination interferes with some analyses of solar wind. In early 2005, the Genesis science team decided to investigate methods for removing the surface particle contamination prior to solar wind analysis.

  9. Pioneer and Voyager observations of the solar wind at large heliocentric distances and latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazis, P. R.; Mihalov, J. D.; Barnes, A.; Lazarus, A. J.; Smith, E. J.

    1989-01-01

    Data obtained from the electrostatic analyzers aboard the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft and from the Faraday cup aboard Voyager 2 were used to study spatial gradients in the distant solar wind. Prior to mid-1985, both spacecraft observed nearly identical solar wind structures. After day 150 of 1985, the velocity structure at Voyager 2 became flatter, and the Voyager 2 velocities were smaller than those observed by Pioneer 11. It is suggested that these changes in the solar wind at low latitudes may be related to a change which occurred in the coronal hole structure in early 1985.

  10. On the Interpretation of Magnetic Helicity Signatures in the Dissipation Range of Solar Wind Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Howes, Gregory G

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of small-scale turbulent fluctuations in the solar wind find a non-zero right-handed magnetic helicity. This has been interpreted as evidence for ion cyclotron damping. However, theoretical and empirical evidence suggests that the majority of the energy in solar wind turbulence resides in low frequency anisotropic kinetic Alfven wave fluctuations that are not subject to ion cyclotron damping. We demonstrate that a dissipation range comprised of kinetic Alfven waves also produces a net right-handed fluctuating magnetic helicity signature consistent with observations. Thus, the observed magnetic helicity signature does not necessarily imply that ion cyclotron damping is energetically important in the solar wind.

  11. Assessing the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions from solar PV and wind energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nugent, Daniel; Sovacool, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    This paper critically screens 153 lifecycle studies covering a broad range of wind and solar photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation technologies to identify 41 of the most relevant, recent, rigorous, original, and complete assessments so that the dynamics of their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions...... profiles can be determined. When viewed in a holistic manner, including initial materials extraction, manufacturing, use and disposal/decommissioning, these 41 studies show that both wind and solar systems are directly tied to and responsible for GHG emissions. They are thus not actually emissions free......, this article uncovers best practices in wind and solar design and deployment that can better inform climate change mitigation efforts in the electricity sector...

  12. The Hunt for the Missing Modes: Revealing the True Nature of the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-29

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2015-0003 The Hunt for the Missing Modes: Revealing the True Nature of the Solar Wind James McLaughlin Northumbria University...To) 15 March 2013 – 31 August 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Hunt for the Missing Modes: Revealing the True Nature of the Solar Wind 5a. CONTRACT...for fast solar wind acceleration in the open-field corona. The development of this robust, versatile wave-tracking image-processing algorithm can

  13. Comparison of plasma sheet ion composition with the IMF and solar wind plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, W.

    Plasma sheet energetic ion data (0.1- to 16 keV/e) obtained by the Plasma Composition Experiment on ISEE-1 between 10 and 23 earth radii are compared with concurrent IMF and solar wind plasma data. The densities of H(+) and He(++) ions in the plasma sheet are found to be the highest, and the most nearly proportional to the solar wind density, when the IMF B(z) is not northward. The density of terrestrial O(+) ions increases strongly with increasing magnitude of the IMF, in apparent agreement with the notion that the IMF plays a fundamental role in the electric coupling between the solar wind and the ionosphere.

  14. The need for isotopic data on refractory elements in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, O. K.

    1986-01-01

    The Sun accounts for the bulk of material in the solar system. Information on the isotopic composition of elements in the solar wind is therefore essential for an understanding of the contribution made by each nucleogenetic component that has been identified in meteorites. Recent work suggests that isotopic data on the solar wind may also help us to understand the physical process that is concentrating light elements at the solar surface. Refractory and volatile elements would behave alike under the conditions of solar fractionation. Prolonged exposure of foils at 1AU from the sun would be a relatively inexpensively way to collect the quantity of solar wind implanted refractory elements needed to test this hypothesis.

  15. Probability density functions for the variable solar wind near the solar cycle minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Vörös,; Leitner, M; Narita, Y; Consolini, G; Kovács, P; Tóth, A; Lichtenberger, J

    2015-01-01

    Unconditional and conditional statistics is used for studying the histograms of magnetic field multi-scale fluctuations in the solar wind near the solar cycle minimum in 2008. The unconditional statistics involves the magnetic data during the whole year 2008. The conditional statistics involves the magnetic field time series splitted into concatenated subsets of data according to a threshold in dynamic pressure. The threshold separates fast stream leading edge compressional and trailing edge uncompressional fluctuations. The histograms obtained from these data sets are associated with both large-scale (B) and small-scale ({\\delta}B) magnetic fluctuations, the latter corresponding to time-delayed differences. It is shown here that, by keeping flexibility but avoiding the unnecessary redundancy in modeling, the histograms can be effectively described by a limited set of theoretical probability distribution functions (PDFs), such as the normal, log-normal, kappa and logkappa functions. In a statistical sense the...

  16. Hybrid Model of Inhomogeneous Solar Wind Plasma Heating by Alfven Wave Spectrum: Parametric Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.

    2010-01-01

    Observations of the solar wind plasma at 0.3 AU and beyond show that a turbulent spectrum of magnetic fluctuations is present. Remote sensing observations of the corona indicate that heavy ions are hotter than protons and their temperature is anisotropic (T(sub perpindicular / T(sub parallel) >> 1). We study the heating and the acceleration of multi-ion plasma in the solar wind by a turbulent spectrum of Alfvenic fluctuations using a 2-D hybrid numerical model. In the hybrid model the protons and heavy ions are treated kinetically as particles, while the electrons are included as neutralizing background fluid. This is the first two-dimensional hybrid parametric study of the solar wind plasma that includes an input turbulent wave spectrum guided by observation with inhomogeneous background density. We also investigate the effects of He++ ion beams in the inhomogeneous background plasma density on the heating of the solar wind plasma. The 2-D hybrid model treats parallel and oblique waves, together with cross-field inhomogeneity, self-consistently. We investigate the parametric dependence of the perpendicular heating, and the temperature anisotropy in the H+-He++ solar wind plasma. It was found that the scaling of the magnetic fluctuations power spectrum steepens in the higher-density regions, and the heating is channeled to these regions from the surrounding lower-density plasma due to wave refraction. The model parameters are applicable to the expected solar wind conditions at about 10 solar radii.

  17. Mars atmospheric losses induced by the solar wind: Comparison of observations with models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaisberg, Oleg

    2015-12-01

    With new results from Mars-Express on plasma environment of Mars and two new Mars satellites the study Martian atmospheric losses receives new attention. Paper summarizes experimental results concentrating on configuration of Martian magnetosphere and the measurements of planetary ion escape induced by the solar wind. Several plasma populations constituting solar wind induced mass loss have been identified and studied: pick-up ions in shocked solar wind flow and induced (accretion) tail, ions accelerated in the tail current sheet, and outflow of ionospheric ions. Measured ion flux values and calculations of the total escape rate including solar cycle variations are summarized. Several types of simulation of the solar wind with Mars are considered and results of representative models are given and compared with experimental results. These computer models allowed one to much better understand solar wind-Mars interaction. However, there is significant difference between total loss rates obtained from simulation and ones from measurements on the spacecraft. Both measurements and simulation provide significant flux values that are considered as an important factor of mass loss during cosmogonic time of the planet. The origin of each solar wind induced loss component and its contribution to total amount are discussed and compared with relevant computer models. Future progress in experiments and simulation is briefly discussed.

  18. Solar wind measurements near Mars and their implication in the Red Planet environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotignon, J. G.; Grard, R.; Barabash, S.; Lundin, R.; Dubinin, E.

    1996-02-01

    The Phobos 2 spacecraft was operational around Mars for almost two months. From 29 January to 27 March 1989, the Martian bow shock was crossed at least 200 times and the upstream regions extensively probed. The solar wind density and velocity deduced from the a.c. electric-field measurements performed with the PWS plasma and wave experiment are compared with those of the ASPERA 3-D plasma composition experiment. A reasonably good agreement is found between the 12 min averages of the plasma density numbers derived from PWS and ASPERA (considering the poor precision of the instruments): they differ by at most a factor of four. The solar wind density is found to decrease when the flow speed increases, in agreement with the stream structure of the solar wind, which results from heliomagnetic latitude dependencies of solar wind parameters. The solar wind ram pressure, which is essential to study the solar wind-Mars interaction, is also estimated: the absence of a clear relationship between this dynamic pressure and the bow shock location is confirmed. The bow shock observations performed during very high solar activity do not support the hypothesis that Mars possesses a significant intrinsic magnetic field.

  19. On the electron temperature downstream of the solar wind termination shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chashei, I.V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Fahr, H.J. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Argelander Inst. fuer Astronomie

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we study the temperatures of electrons convected with the solar wind to large solar distances and finally transported over the solar wind termination shock. Nearly nothing, unless at high energies in the cosmic ray regime, is known about the thermodynamical behaviour of these distant electrons from in situ plasma observations. Hence it is tacitly assumed these electrons, due to their adiabatic behaviour and vanishing heat conduction or energization processes, have rapidly cooled off to very low temperatures once they eventually arrive at the solar wind termination shock (at about 100 AU). In this paper we show that such electrons, however, at their passage over the termination shock due to the shock-electric field action undergo an overadiabatic heating and therefore appear on the downstream side as a substantially heated plasma species. Looking quantitatively into this heating process we find that solar wind electrons achieve temperatures of the order of 2-4 x 10{sup 6} K downstream of the termination shock, depending on the upstream solar wind bulk velocity and the shock compression ratio. Hence these electrons therewith play an important dynamical role in structuring this shock and determining the downstream plasma flow properties. Furthermore, they present an additional ionization source for incoming neutral interstellar hydrogen and excite X-ray emission. They also behave similar to cosmic ray electrons and extend to some limited region upstream of the shock of the order of 0.1 AU by spatial diffusion and thereby also modify the upstream solar wind properties. (orig.)

  20. Preface: Biocatalysis and Bioenergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book was assembled with the intent of bringing together current advances and in-depth review of biocatalysis and bioenergy with emphasis on biodiesel, bioethanol, biohydrogen and industrial products. Biocatalysis and bioenergy defined in this book include enzyme catalysis, biotransformation, b...

  1. Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectroscopy: A Key Capability for Understanding the Physics of Solar Wind Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Cranmer, S R; Alexander, D; Bhattacharjee, A; Breech, B A; Brickhouse, N S; Chandran, B D G; Dupree, A K; Esser, R; Gary, S P; Hollweg, J V; Isenberg, P A; Kahler, S W; Ko, Y -K; Laming, J M; Landi, E; Matthaeus, W H; Murphy, N A; Oughton, S; Raymond, J C; Reisenfeld, D B; Suess, S T; van Ballegooijen, A A; Wood, B E

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the physical processes responsible for accelerating the solar wind requires detailed measurements of the collisionless plasma in the extended solar corona. Some key clues about these processes have come from instruments that combine the power of an ultraviolet (UV) spectrometer with an occulted telescope. This combination enables measurements of ion emission lines far from the bright solar disk, where most of the solar wind acceleration occurs. Although the UVCS instrument on SOHO made several key discoveries, many questions remain unanswered because its capabilities were limited. This white paper summarizes these past achievements and also describes what can be accomplished with next-generation instrumentation of this kind.

  2. Solar activity variations of nocturnal thermospheric meridional winds over Indian longitude sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhav Haridas, M. K.; Manju, G.; Arunamani, T.

    2016-09-01

    The night time F-layer base height information from ionosondes located at two equatorial stations Trivandrum (TRV 8.5°N, 77°E) and Sriharikota (SHAR 13.7°N, 80.2°E) spanning over two decades are used to derive the climatology of equatorial nocturnal Thermospheric Meridional Winds (TMWs) prevailing during High Solar Activity (HSA) and Low Solar Activity (LSA) epochs. The important inferences from the analysis are 1) Increase in mean equatorward winds observed during LSA compared to HSA during pre midnight hours; 25 m/s for VE (Vernal Equinox) and 20 m/s for SS (Summer Solstice), AE (autumnal Equinox) and WS (Winter Solstice). 2) Mean wind response to Solar Flux Unit (SFU) is established quantitatively for all seasons for pre-midnight hours; rate of increase is 0.25 m/s/SFU for VE, 0.2 m/s/SFU for SS and WS and 0.08 m/s/SFU for AE. 3) Theoretical estimates of winds for the two epochs are performed and indicate the role of ion drag forcing as a major factor influencing TMWs. 4) Observed magnitude of winds and rate of flux dependencies are compared to thermospheric wind models. 5) Equinoctial asymmetry in TMWs is observed for HSA at certain times, with more equatorward winds during AE. These observations lend a potential to parameterize the wind components and effectively model the winds, catering to solar activity variations.

  3. 3D electron density distributions in the solar corona during solar minima: assessment for more realistic solar wind modeling

    CERN Document Server

    de Patoul, Judith; Riley, Pete

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the electron density distribution in the solar corona put constraints on the magnetic field configurations for coronal modeling and on initial conditions for solar wind modeling. We work with polarized SOHO/LASCO-C2 images from the last two recent minima of solar activity (1996-1997 and 2008-2010), devoid of coronal mass ejections. The goals are to derive the 4D electron density distributions in the corona by applying a newly developed time-dependent tomographic reconstruction method and to compare the results between the two solar minima and with two magnetohydrodynamic models. First, we confirm that the values of the density distribution in thermodynamic models are more realistic than in polytropic ones. The tomography provides more accurate distributions in the polar regions, and we find that the density in tomographic and thermodynamic solutions varies with the solar cycle in both polar and equatorial regions. Second, we find that the highest-density structures do not always correspond to the...

  4. Ancillary Services for the European Grid with High Shares of Wind and Solar Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hulle, Frans; Holttinen, Hannele; Kiviluoma, Juha

    2012-01-01

    With significantly increasing share of variable renewable power generation like wind and solar PV, the need in the power system for ancillary services supporting the network frequency, voltage, etc. changes. Turning this issue around, market opportunities will emerge for wind and solar PV...... technology to deliver such grid services. In the European power system, adequate market mechanisms need to be developed to ensure that there will be an efficient trading of these services. For that purpose a range of (economic) characteristics of wind (and solar) power as providers of grid services need......) conceptually analyzing system needs for ancillary services and at assessing the technical aspects of and cost of delivering these services by solar PV and wind power, in scenarios of high renewable penetration. (2) Investigation of the need for ancillary services in typical transmission and distribution...

  5. On the exergetic capacity factor of a windSolar power generation system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xydis, George

    2013-01-01

    production. In this paper, a detailed exergetic analysis aiming to identify the overall Exergetic Capacity Factor (ExCF) for a windsolar power generation system was done. ExCF, as a new parameter, can be used for better classification and evaluation of renewable energy sources (RES). All the energy...... and exergy characteristics of wind and solar energy were examined in order to identify the variables that affect the power output of the hybrid system. A validated open source PV optimization tool was also included in the analysis, It was shown that parameters as e.g. air density or tracking losses, low...... irradiation losses play a crucial role in identifying the real and net wind and solar power output while planning new renewable energy projects and in fact do play a significant role on the windsolar plant’s overall exergetic efficiency. In specific, it was found that air density varies from site to site...

  6. Seasonal optimal mix of wind and solar power in a future, highly renewable Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide, Dominik; Bremen, Lueder von; Greiner, Martin

    2010-01-01

    behaviors are able to counterbalance each other to a certain extent to follow the seasonal load curve. The best point of counterbalancing represents the seasonal optimal mix between wind and solar power generation. It leads to a pronounced minimum in required stored energy. For a 100% renewable Europe......The renewable power generation aggregated across Europe exhibits strong seasonal behaviors. Wind power generation is much stronger in winter than in summer. The opposite is true for solar power generation. In a future Europe with a very high share of renewable power generation those two opposite...... the seasonal optimal mix becomes 55% wind and 45% solar power generation. For less than 100% renewable scenarios the fraction of wind power generation increases and that of solar power generation decreases....

  7. Estimates of Sputter Yields of Solar-Wind Heavy Ions of Lunar Regolith Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, Abdulmasser F.; Adams, James H., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    At energies of approximately 1 keV/amu, solar-wind protons and heavy ions interact with the lunar surface materials via a number of microscopic interactions that include sputtering. Solar-wind induced sputtering is a main mechanism by which the composition of the topmost layers of the lunar surface can change, dynamically and preferentially. This work concentrates on sputtering induced by solar-wind heavy ions. Sputtering associated with slow (speeds the electrons speed in its first Bohr orbit) and highly charged ions are known to include both kinetic and potential sputtering. Potential sputtering enjoys some unique characteristics that makes it of special interest to lunar science and exploration. Unlike the yield from kinetic sputtering where simulation and approximation schemes exist, the yield from potential sputtering is not as easy to estimate. This work will present a preliminary numerical scheme designed to estimate potential sputtering yields from reactions relevant to this aspect of solar-wind lunar-surface coupling.

  8. Low-dimensionality and predictability of solar wind and global magnetosphere during magnetic storms

    CERN Document Server

    Zivkovic, Tatjana

    2011-01-01

    The storm index SYM-H, the solar wind velocity v, and interplanetary magnetic field Bz show no signatures of low-dimensional dynamics in quiet periods, but tests for determinism in the time series indicate that SYM-H exhibits a significant low-dimensional component during storm time, suggesting that self-organization takes place during magnetic storms. Even though our analysis yields no discernible change in determinism during magnetic storms for the solar wind parameters, there are significant enhancement of the predictability and exponents measuring persistence. Thus, magnetic storms are typically preceded by an increase in the persistence of the solar wind dynamics, and this increase is also present in the magnetospheric response to the solar wind.

  9. Large Storm Energy Deposition and Solar Wind Drivers: A Study of Geoeffectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, N. E.; Lopez, R. E.

    2004-12-01

    We examine the role of solar wind driving conditions in the deposition of large amounts of energy in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. Our database consists of eight storms ranging in size, including especially the October and November 2003 superstorms. We estimate energy deposition into the ring current, ionospheric Joule heating, and auroral precipitation for each event and compare with relevant solar wind data. Results suggest that the magnetosonic Mach number of the solar wind may be a useful parameter in identifying the potential for large amounts of energy deposition, possibly because of the role of the bow shock in modulating the magnetosheath field, and therefore its influence of reconnection rates. We use Dst, ionospheric indices, and MHD simulation results where available to investigate the magnetospheric response to different types of solar wind energy input. Our results are examined with a focus on superstorms and the driving conditions observed in connection with them.

  10. Growian 2 for more wind power and first European solar farm inaugurated

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    A wind power installation with a power of five megawatts to be used in the Federal Republic of Germany is described. The first European solar farm was inaugurated in Madrid, and its operation is discussed.

  11. Solar wind stream evolution at large heliocentric distances - Experimental demonstration and the test of a model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosling, J. T.; Hundhausen, A. J.; Bame, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    A stream propagation model which neglects all dissipation effects except those occurring at shock interfaces, was used to compare Pioneer-10 solar wind speed observations, during the time when Pioneer 10, the earth, and the sun were coaligned, with near-earth Imp-7 observations of the solar wind structure, and with the theoretical predictions of the solar wind structure at Pioneer 10 derived from the Imp-7 measurements, using the model. The comparison provides a graphic illustration of the phenomenon of stream steepening in the solar wind with the attendant formation of forward-reverse shock pairs and the gradual decay of stream amplitudes with increasing heliocentric distance. The comparison also provides a qualitative test of the stream propagation model.

  12. On capture and acceleration of heavy ions (a-particle) in high-speed solar wind

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG; Liting(宋礼庭); XIAO; Chijie(肖池阶)

    2002-01-01

    The α-particles and other heavy ions, as well es a few protons are observed to be faster than the main part of protons by about the local Alfven speed in the high-speed solar wind. It is suggested that when the velocity of the solar wind is equal to the local Alfven velocity, another Iow-frequency kinetic Alfvan wave will be excitated, and trap ail the α-particles and a few protons, so these ions have a local Alfven velocity faster than the other parts of the solar wind. The undamping kinetic Alfven waves change into Iow-frequency Alfven solitons in the solar wind. This model can explain the observation and give the conditions of wave excitated and ions trapped.

  13. Sensitive test for ion-cyclotron resonant heating in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Justin C; Maruca, Bennett A; Stevens, Michael L; Zaslavsky, Arnaud

    2013-03-01

    Plasma carrying a spectrum of counterpropagating field-aligned ion-cyclotron waves can strongly and preferentially heat ions through a stochastic Fermi mechanism. Such a process has been proposed to explain the extreme temperatures, temperature anisotropies, and speeds of ions in the solar corona and solar wind. We quantify how differential flow between ion species results in a Doppler shift in the wave spectrum that can prevent this strong heating. Two critical values of differential flow are derived for strong heating of the core and tail of a given ion distribution function. Our comparison of these predictions to observations from the Wind spacecraft reveals excellent agreement. Solar wind helium that meets the condition for strong core heating is nearly 7 times hotter than hydrogen on average. Ion-cyclotron resonance contributes to heating in the solar wind, and there is a close link between heating, differential flow, and temperature anisotropy.

  14. Comparative Validation of Realtime Solar Wind Forecasting Using the UCSD Heliospheric Tomography Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeice, Peter; Taktakishvili, Alexandra; Jackson, Bernard; Clover, John; Bisi, Mario; Odstrcil, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    The University of California, San Diego 3D Heliospheric Tomography Model reconstructs the evolution of heliospheric structures, and can make forecasts of solar wind density and velocity up to 72 hours in the future. The latest model version, installed and running in realtime at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center(CCMC), analyzes scintillations of meter wavelength radio point sources recorded by the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory(STELab) together with realtime measurements of solar wind speed and density recorded by the Advanced Composition Explorer(ACE) Solar Wind Electron Proton Alpha Monitor(SWEPAM).The solution is reconstructed using tomographic techniques and a simple kinematic wind model. Since installation, the CCMC has been recording the model forecasts and comparing them with ACE measurements, and with forecasts made using other heliospheric models hosted by the CCMC. We report the preliminary results of this validation work and comparison with alternative models.

  15. Examining Periodic Solar Wind Density Structures Observed in the SECCHI Heliospheric Imagers

    CERN Document Server

    Viall, Nicholeen M; Vourlidas, Angelos; Howard, Russell; 10.1007/s11207-010-9633-1

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of small-scale, periodic, solar-wind density enhancements (length-scales as small as \\approx 1000 Mm) observed in images from the Heliospheric Imager (HI) aboard STEREO A. We discuss their possible relationship to periodic fluctuations of the proton density that have been identified at 1 AU using in-situ plasma measurements. Specifically, Viall, Kepko, and Spence (2008) examined 11 years of in-situ solar-wind density measurements at 1 AU and demonstrated that not only turbulent structures, but also non-turbulent periodic density structures exist in the solar wind with scale sizes of hundreds to one thousand Mm. In a subsequent paper, Viall, Spence, and Kasper (2009) analyzed the {\\alpha} to proton solar-wind abundance ratio measured during one such event of periodic density structures, demonstrating that the plasma behavior was highly suggestive that either temporally or spatially varying coronal source plasma created those density structures. Large periodic density structures observed ...

  16. Simulations of the Solar Wind Interaction with the Atmosphere/Ionosphere of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledvina, Stephen; Brecht, Stephen H.; Bougher, Stephen W.

    2016-10-01

    The latest results of high resolution 3-D hybrid particle code simulations of the solar wind interacting with the atmosphere/ionosphere of Venus will be presented. The research is focused on understanding the how the solar wind interaction with Venus results in the subsequent ionospheric losses. In addition, the simulations focus on structures caused by the interaction particularly on the pole of the planet where the convection electric field points. A variety of simulation results will be presented each with varying solar wind parameters. The hybrid particle code HALFSHEL contains a variety of physical and chemical models which will also be discussed. These include a chemistry package that produces the ionosphere on grid resolution of 10 km altitude, atmospheric densities and dynamics from the VTGCM code and the Hall and Pedersen conductivities associated with plasma neutral collisions. The specific simulations to be presented trace solar wind protons, and ionospheric O+ and O2+.

  17. MESSENGER and Venus Express Observations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.; Acuna, Mario H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Barabash, Stas; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A.; Fraenz, Markus; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E.; Ho,George C.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Raines, Jim M.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Solomon, Sean C.; Zhang, Tielong; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    At 23:08 UTC on 5 June 2007 the MESSENGER spacecraft reached its closest approach altitude of 338 kin during its final flyby of Venus en route to its 2011 orbit insertion at Mercury. The availability of the simultaneous Venus Express solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field measurements provides a rare opportunity to examine the influence of upstream conditions on this planet's solar wind interaction. We present MESSENGER observations of new features of the Venus - solar wind interaction including hot flow anomalies upstream of the bow shock, a flux rope in the near-tail and a two-point determination of the timescale for magnetic flux transport through this induced magnetosphere. Citation: Stavin, J. A., et al. (2009), MESSENGER and Venus Express observations of the solar wind interaction with Venus,

  18. Beam tracking strategies for studies of kinetic scales in the solar wind with THOR-CSW

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Keyser, Johan; Lavraud, Benoit; Neefs, Eddy; Berkenbosch, Sophie; Anciaux, Michel; Maggiolo, Romain

    2016-04-01

    Modern plasma spectrometers for monitoring the solar wind attempt to intelligently track the energy and direction of the solar wind beam in order to obtain solar wind velocity distributions more efficiently. Such beam tracking strategies offer some benefits, but also have their limitations and drawbacks. Benefits include an improved resolution and/or a faster velocity distribution function acquisition time. Limitations are due to instrument characteristics that tend to be optimized for a particular range of particle energies and arrival directions. A drawback is the risk to miss an important part of the velocity distribution or to lose track of the beam altogether. A comparison is presented of different beam tracking strategies under consideration for the THOR-CSW instrument in order to highlight a number of design decisions and their impact on the acquired velocity distributions. The gain offered by beam tracking in terms of increased time resolution turns out to be essential for studies of solar wind physics at kinetic scales.

  19. Estimated solar wind-implanted helium-3 distribution on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. R.; Swindle, T.D.; Lucey, P.G.

    1999-01-01

    Among the solar wind-implanted volatiles present in the lunar regolith, 3 He is possibly the most valuable resource because of its potential as a fusion fuel. The abundance of 3 He in the lunar regolith at a given location depends on surface maturity, the amount of solar wind fluence, and titanium content, because ilmenite (FeTiO3) retains helium much better than other major lunar minerals. Surface maturity and TiO2 maps from Clementine multispectral data sets are combined here with a solar wind fluence model to produce a 3He abundance map of the Moon. Comparison of the predicted 3He values to landing site observations shows good correlation. The highest 3He abundances occur in the farside maria (due to greater solar wind fluence received) and in higher TiO2 nearside mare regions.

  20. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 3 – Frequency Response and Transient Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N. W. [GE Energy Management, Schenectady, NY (United States); Shao, M. [GE Energy Management, Schenectady, NY (United States); Pajic, S. [GE Energy Management, Schenectady, NY (United States); D' Aquila, R. [GE Energy Management, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Power system operators and utilities worldwide have concerns about the impact of high-penetration wind and solar generation on electric grid reliability (EirGrid 2011b, Hydro-Quebec 2006, ERCOT 2010). The stability of North American grids under these conditions is a particular concern and possible impediment to reaching future renewable energy goals. Phase 3 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-3) considers a 33% wind and solar annual energy penetration level that results in substantial changes to the characteristics of the bulk power system, including different power flow patterns, different commitment and dispatch of existing synchronous generation, and different dynamic behavior of wind and solar generation. WWSIS-3 evaluates two specific aspects of fundamental frequency system stability: frequency response and transient stability.

  1. Solar Wind Charge Exchange and O VIII emission toward MBM 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Richard J.; Wargelin, B. J.; Raymond, J. C.; Slavin, J. D.; Smith, R. K.; Kharchenko, V.

    2006-09-01

    A Chandra observation toward MBM-12, a nearby (MBM 12 during the Chandra observation. The Solar Wind Charge Exchange mechanism can account for essentially all of the O VIII emission seen in this observation.

  2. 5-minute Solar Oscillations and Ion Cyclotron Waves in the Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Guglielmi, Anatol; Dovbnya, Boris

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper we study impact of the photospheric 5-minute oscillations on the ion cyclotron waves in the solar wind. We proceed from the assumption that the ion cyclotron waves in solar wind are experiencing modulation with a characteristic period of 5 minutes under the influence of Alfven waves driven by photospheric motions. The theory presented in our paper predicts a deep frequency modulation of the ion cyclotron waves. The frequency modulation is expected mainly from variations in orientation of the IMF lines. In turn, the variations in orientation are caused by the Alfven waves, propagating from the Sun. To test the theoretical predictions we have analyzed records of the ultra-low-frequency (ULF) geoelectromagnetic waves in order to find the permanent quasi-monochromatic oscillations of natural origin in the Pc1-2 frequency band (0.1-5 Hz), the carrier frequency of which varies with time in a wide range. As a result we found the so-called "serpentine emission" (SE), which was observed in Antarct...

  3. The plasma structure of coronal hole solar wind: Origins and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.

    2016-06-01

    Whereas slow solar wind is known to be highly structured, the fast (coronal hole origin) wind is usually considered to be homogeneous. Using measurements from Helios 1 + 2, ACE, Wind, and Ulysses, structure in the coronal hole origin solar wind is examined from 0.3 AU to 2.3 AU. Care is taken to collect and analyze intervals of "unperturbed coronal hole plasma." In these intervals, solar wind structure is seen in the proton number density, proton temperature, proton specific entropy, magnetic field strength, magnetic field to density ratio, electron heat flux, helium abundance, heavy-ion charge-state ratios, and Alfvenicity. Typical structure amplitudes are factors of 2, far from homogeneous. Variations are also seen in the solar wind radial velocity. Using estimates of the motion of the solar wind origin footpoint on the Sun for the various spacecraft, the satellite time series measurements are converted to distance along the photosphere. Typical variation scale lengths for the solar wind structure are several variations per supergranule. The structure amplitude and structure scale sizes do not evolve with distance from the Sun from 0.3 to 2.3 AU. An argument is quantified that these variations are the scale expected for solar wind production in open magnetic flux funnels in coronal holes. Additionally, a population of magnetic field foldings (switchbacks, reversals) in the coronal hole plasma is examined: this population evolves with distance from the Sun such that the magnetic field is mostly Parker spiral aligned at 0.3 AU and becomes more misaligned with distance outward.

  4. Kinetic scale turbulence and dissipation in the solar wind: key observational results and future outlook

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in the solar wind. Turbulence causes kinetic and magnetic energy to cascade to small scales where they are eventually dissipated, adding heat to the plasma. The details of how this occurs are not well understood. This article reviews the evidence for turbulent dissipation and examines various diagnostics for identifying solar wind regions where dissipation is occurring. We also discuss how future missions will further enhance our understanding of the importance of tur...

  5. Can the Solar Wind be Driven by Magnetic Reconnection in the Sun's Magnetic Carpet?

    OpenAIRE

    Cranmer, Steven R.; van Ballegooijen, Adriaan A.

    2010-01-01

    The physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind remain unknown after many years of study. Some have suggested that the wind is driven by waves and turbulence in open magnetic flux tubes, and others have suggested that plasma is injected into the open tubes by magnetic reconnection with closed loops. In order to test the latter idea, we developed Monte Carlo simulations of the photospheric "magnetic carpet" and extrapolated the time-varying coronal field. These ...

  6. Effects of Solar Wind Conditions on the Plasma Wake Within a Polar Crater: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, M. I.; Farrell, W. M.; Stubbs, T. J.

    2011-01-01

    As the solar wind sweeps horizontally past a shadowed lunar crater it simultaneously diffuses toward the surface through an ambipolar process, forming a plasma wake (e.g., Figure 1). Importantly, the resulting electric field structure diverts solar wind protons toward the cold crater floor where they may represent a source of surficial hydrogen. We present a handful of two-dimensional kinetic simulations exploring the range of wake structures and surface particle fluxes possible under various background plasma conditions.

  7. A comparative study on 3-D solar wind structure observed by Ulysses and MHD simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Xueshang; XIANG Changqing; ZHONG Dingkun; FAN Quanlin

    2005-01-01

    During Ulysses' first rapid pole-to-pole transit from September 1994 to June 1995, its observations showed that middle- or high-speed solar winds covered all latitudes except those between -20° and +20° near the ecliptic plane,where the velocity was 300-450 km/s. At poleward 40°,however, only fast solar winds at the speed of 700-870 km/s were observed. In addition, the transitions from low-speed wind to high-speed wind or vice versa were abrupt. In this paper, the large-scale structure of solar wind observed by Ulysses near solar minimum is simulated by using the three-dimensional numerical MHD model. The model combines TVD Lax-Friedrich scheme and MacCormack Ⅱ scheme and decomposes the calculation region into two regions: one from 1 to 22 Rs and the other from 18 Rs to 1 AU.Based on the observations of the solar photospheric magnetic field and an addition of the volumetric heating to MHD equations, the large-scale solar wind structure mentioned above is reproduced by using the three-dimensional MHD model and the numerical results are roughly consistent with Ulysses' observations. Our simulation shows that the initial magnetic field topology and the addition of volume heating may govern the bimodal structure of solar wind observed by Ulysses and also demonstrates that the three-dimensional MHD numerical model used here is efficient in modeling the large-scale solar wind structure.

  8. Perturbations of the solar wind flow by radial and latitudinal pick-up ion pressure gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Fahr

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been found that pick-up ions at their dynamical incorporation into the solar wind modify the original conditions of the asymptotic solar wind plasma flow. In this respect, it has meanwhile been revealed in many papers that these type of solar wind modifications, i.e. deceleration and decrease of effective Mach number, are not only due to the pick-up ion loading effects, but also to the action of pick-up ion pressure gradients. Up to now only the effects of radial pick-up ion pressure gradients were considered, however, analogously but latitudinal pressure gradients also appear to be important. Here we study the effects of radial and latitudinal pick-up ion pressure gradients, occurring especially during solar minimum conditions at mid-latitude regions where slow solar wind streams change to fast solar wind streams. First, we give estimates of the latitudinal wind components connected with these gradients, and then after revealing its importance, present a more quantitative calculation of solar wind velocity and density perturbations resulting from these pressure forces. It is shown that the relative density perturbations near and in the ecliptic increase with radial distance and thus may well explain the measured non-spherically symmetric density decrease with distance. We also show that the solar wind decelerations actually seen with Voyager-1/2 are in conciliation with interstellar hydrogen densities of nH∞≥0.1cm-3, in contrast to earlier claims for nH∞=0.05cm-3.

  9. Models of Heliospheric solar wind charge exchange X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutroumpa, Dimitra

    2016-04-01

    The first models of the solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-ray production in the heliosphere were developed shortly after the discovery of SWCX emission at the end of 1990s. Since then, continuous monitoring of the global solar wind evolution through the solar cycle has allowed better constraints on its interaction with the interstellar neutrals. We have a fairly accurate description of the interstellar neutral density distributions in interplanetary space. However, the solar wind heavy ion fluxes, and especially their short term variability and propagation through interplanetary space, have remained relatively elusive due to the sparseness or lack of in situ data, especially towards high ecliptic latitudes. In this talk, I will present a summary the heliospheric SWCX modeling efforts, and an overview of the global solar cycle variability of heliospheric SWCX emission, while commenting on the difficulties of modeling the real-time variability of the heliospheric X-ray signal.

  10. ROSAT Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange with the Lunar Exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Snowden, S. L.; Benna, M.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, T. E.; Hills, H. Kent; Hodges, R. R.; Kuntz, K. D.; Porter, F. Scott; Read, A.; Robertson, I. P.; Sembay, S. F.; Sibeck, D. G.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Travnicek, P.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the ROSAT PSPC soft X-ray image of the Moon taken on 29 June 1990 by examining the radial profile of the count rate in three wedges, two wedges (one north and one south) 13-32 degrees off (19 degrees wide) the terminator towards the dark side and one wedge 38 degrees wide centered on the anti-solar direction. The radial profiles of both the north and the south wedges show substantial limb brightening that is absent in the 38 degree wide antisolar wedge. An analysis of the count rate increase associated with the limb brightening shows that its magnitude is consistent with that expected due to solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with the tenuous lunar atmosphere. Along with Mars, Venus, and Earth, the Moon represents another solar system body at which solar wind charge exchange has been observed. This technique can be used to explore the solar wind-lunar interaction.

  11. Electromagnetic waves near the proton cyclotron frequency in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Lan; Alexander, Robert; Wicks, Robert; Stevens, Michael; Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Russell, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Strong narrow-band electromagnetic waves around the proton cyclotron frequency have been found sporadically in the solar wind throughout the inner heliosphere. They are nearly-circularly polarized and propagate close to the magnetic field. Electromagnetic waves near the proton cyclotron frequency can be ion cyclotron waves or magnetosonic waves. They can play an important role in modulating the solar wind ion distribution, and contribute to the heating and acceleration of solar wind. Since the waves are left-hand or right-hand polarized in the spacecraft frame with similar characteristics, they are probably due to Doppler shift of a same type of waves, or there could be a mixture of waves with intrinsically different polarizations. Through the assistance of audification, we have studied the long-lasting low frequency wave events in 2005 using high-cadence magnetic field data from the Wind mission. The Solar Wind Experiment team of the Wind mission has provided the temperature anisotropies for core protons, beam protons, and alpha particles, as well as the beam drift for selected cases. We conduct wave dispersion analysis using these ion moments to examine if these waves can be explained by ion cyclotron anisotropy instability or ion beam instability related to the solar wind inhomogeneities.

  12. Influence of the ambient solar wind flow on the propagation behavior of interplanetary CMEs

    CERN Document Server

    Temmer, Manuela; Möstl, Christian; Veronig, Astrid M; Vrsnak, Bojan; Odstrcil, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    We study three CME/ICME events (2008 June 1-6, 2009 February 13-18, 2010 April 3-5) tracked from Sun to 1 AU in remote-sensing observations of STEREO Heliospheric Imagers and in situ plasma and magnetic field measurements. We focus on the ICME propagation in IP space that is governed by two forces, the propelling Lorentz force and the drag force. We address the question at which heliospheric distance range the drag becomes dominant and the CME gets adjusted to the solar wind flow. To this aim we analyze speed differences between ICMEs and the ambient solar wind flow as function of distance. The evolution of the ambient solar wind flow is derived from ENLIL 3D MHD model runs using different solar wind models, namely Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) and MHD-Around-A-Sphere (MAS). Comparing the measured CME kinematics with the solar wind models we find that the CME speed gets adjusted to the solar wind speed at very different heliospheric distances in the three events under study: from below 30 Rs, to beyond 1 AU, depend...

  13. Three-Fluid Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of the Solar Wind in the Outer Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Matthaeus, William H.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a three-fluid, fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model of the solar wind plasma in the outer heliosphere as a co-moving system of solar wind protons, electrons, and interstellar pickup protons, with separate energy equations for each species. Our approach takes into account the effects of electron heat conduction and dissipation of Alfvenic turbulence on the spatial evolution of the solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic fields. The turbulence transport model is based on the Reynolds decomposition of physical variables into mean and fluctuating components and uses the turbulent phenomenologies that describe the conversion of fluctuation energy into heat due to a turbulent cascade. We solve the coupled set of the three-fluid equations for the mean-field solar wind and the turbulence equations for the turbulence energy, cross helicity, and correlation length. The equations are written in the rotating frame of reference and include heating by turbulent dissipation, energy transfer from interstellar pickup protons to solar wind protons, and solar wind deceleration due to the interaction with the interstellar hydrogen. The numerical solution is constructed by the time relaxation method in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU. Initial results from the novel model are presented.

  14. Climatic implications of a rapid wind/solar transition

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartzman, Peter D; Zhang, Xiaochun

    2016-01-01

    A transition to a fully global renewable energy infrastructure is potentially possible in no more than a few decades, even using current wind/solar technologies. We demonstrate that at its completion this transition would terminate anthropogenic carbon emissions to the atmosphere derived from energy consumption in roughly 25 years as well as double current global energy production. This result would provide all human energy needs worldwide and additional energy required for climate adaptation as well as carbon sequestration from the atmosphere to bring down the atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration to safer levels. The implementation of this energy transition in the near future would maximize the probability for achieving a less than 2 deg C, with a potential 1.5 deg C limit, increase to global temperature over the pre-industrial level by 2100. Our best case scenario utilizes less than 3% of current annual global energy consumption per year with an annual reinvestment of 10% of its growing renewable ...

  15. Bibliometric Analysis of International Collaboration in Wind and Solar Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Sakata

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern technology is increasingly complex and demands an ever-widening range of knowledge and skills. No single country will possess all the knowledge and skills required for addressing global issues such as climate change. Technology collaboration between leading countries is important to promptly and efficiently address the problem. Previous studies have shown that a high level of collaboration is correlated with high paper productivity. This paper first aims to use objective data and create maps that enable us to see both the distribution of worldwide research competency and the relationship of international collaboration in clean energy research. In the international research network of wind power and solar cell, 4,189 institutions located in 121 countries and 6,600 institutions located in 125 countries are included respectively. This paper discusses various factors that would have an impact on research capability and support strong international relationships. With respect to research capability, governmental policies, stability of governmental commitment, natural conditions and historical and institutional differences have a significant impact on it. For research collaborations, factors such as geographical proximity, international science and technology policy, and developmental stage of technology have been brought to attention. This study demonstrates that bibliometrics is a methodology that is capable of providing a knowledge base that is useful in the development of the international science and technology policy and technological management strategy.

  16. Solar wind and substorm excitation of the wavy current sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, C.; Lester, M.; Fear, R. C.; Lucek, E.; Dandouras, I.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Singer, H.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2009-06-01

    Following a solar wind pressure pulse on 3 August 2001, GOES 8, GOES 10, Cluster and Polar observed dipolarizations of the magnetic field, accompanied by an eastward expansion of the aurora observed by IMAGE, indicating the occurrence of two substorms. Prior to the first substorm, the motion of the plasma sheet with respect to Cluster was in the ZGSM direction. Observations following the substorms show the occurrence of current sheet waves moving predominantly in the -YGSM direction. Following the second substorm, the current sheet waves caused multiple current sheet crossings of the Cluster spacecraft, previously studied by Zhang et al. (2002). We further this study to show that the velocity of the current sheet waves was similar to the expansion velocity of the substorm aurora and the expansion of the dipolarization regions in the magnetotail. Furthermore, we compare these results with the current sheet wave models of Golovchanskaya and Maltsev (2005) and Erkaev et al. (2008). We find that the Erkaev et al. (2008) model gives the best fit to the observations.

  17. SCALING OF THE ELECTRON DISSIPATION RANGE OF SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahraoui, F.; Belmont, G.; Rétino, A.; Robert, P.; De Patoul, J. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique-UPMC, Route de Saclay, F-92120 Palaiseau (France); Huang, S. Y. [School of Electronics and Information, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Goldstein, M. L., E-mail: fouad.sahraoui@lpp.polytechnique.fr [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 672, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Electron scale solar wind (SW) turbulence has attracted great interest in recent years. Considerable evidence exists that the turbulence is not fully dissipated near the proton scale, but continues cascading down to electron scales. However, the scaling of the magnetic energy spectra as well as the nature of the plasma modes involved at those small scales are still not fully determined. Here we survey 10 yr of the Cluster STAFF search-coil magnetometer waveforms measured in the SW and perform a statistical study of the magnetic energy spectra in the frequency range [1, 180] Hz. We found that 75% of the analyzed spectra exhibit breakpoints near the electron gyroscale ρ{sub e}, followed by steeper power-law-like spectra. We show that the scaling below the electron breakpoint cannot be determined unambiguously due to instrumental limitations that we discuss in detail. We compare our results to those reported in other studies and discuss their implications for the physical mechanisms involved and for theoretical modeling of energy dissipation in the SW.

  18. Scaling of the Electron Dissipation Range of Solar Wind Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahraoui, F.; Huang, S. Y.; Belmont, G.; Goldstein, M. L.; Rétino, A.; Robert, P.; De Patoul, J.

    2013-11-01

    Electron scale solar wind (SW) turbulence has attracted great interest in recent years. Considerable evidence exists that the turbulence is not fully dissipated near the proton scale, but continues cascading down to electron scales. However, the scaling of the magnetic energy spectra as well as the nature of the plasma modes involved at those small scales are still not fully determined. Here we survey 10 yr of the Cluster STAFF search-coil magnetometer waveforms measured in the SW and perform a statistical study of the magnetic energy spectra in the frequency range [1, 180] Hz. We found that 75% of the analyzed spectra exhibit breakpoints near the electron gyroscale ρ e , followed by steeper power-law-like spectra. We show that the scaling below the electron breakpoint cannot be determined unambiguously due to instrumental limitations that we discuss in detail. We compare our results to those reported in other studies and discuss their implications for the physical mechanisms involved and for theoretical modeling of energy dissipation in the SW.

  19. Plasma Beta Dependence of Magnetic Compressibility in Solar Wind Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.; Kiyani, K. H.; Sahraoui, F.

    2014-12-01

    The turbulent signature of MHD scales in the near-Earth solar wind are known to be primarily incompressible which manifests itself in magnetic field fluctuation vector components to be aligned primarily perpendicular to the background magnetic field -- so-called "Variance Anisotropy". This, and other facts, have been seen as evidence for a majority Alfvenic turbulence cascade; with a small component (10%) of compressible fluctuations. When one approaches scales on the order of the ion-inertial length and the Larmor radius, this behaviour changes and it is now becoming increasingly evident that the spectral break at these scales is also accompanied by an increase in magnetic compressibility. This has been attributed to a phase change in the physics at these scales -- from fluid to kinetic -- and in particular to the dominant role of the Hall-effect at sub-ion scales. We will be presenting results from the Cluster mission to show how this increase in the compressibility is dependent on the ion plasma beta and what implications this has for the physics at sub-ion scales in the context of prominent theories and models for kinetic plasma turbulence.

  20. Solar wind and substorm excitation of the wavy current sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Forsyth

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Following a solar wind pressure pulse on 3 August 2001, GOES 8, GOES 10, Cluster and Polar observed dipolarizations of the magnetic field, accompanied by an eastward expansion of the aurora observed by IMAGE, indicating the occurrence of two substorms. Prior to the first substorm, the motion of the plasma sheet with respect to Cluster was in the ZGSM direction. Observations following the substorms show the occurrence of current sheet waves moving predominantly in the −YGSM direction. Following the second substorm, the current sheet waves caused multiple current sheet crossings of the Cluster spacecraft, previously studied by Zhang et al. (2002. We further this study to show that the velocity of the current sheet waves was similar to the expansion velocity of the substorm aurora and the expansion of the dipolarization regions in the magnetotail. Furthermore, we compare these results with the current sheet wave models of Golovchanskaya and Maltsev (2005 and Erkaev et al. (2008. We find that the Erkaev et al. (2008 model gives the best fit to the observations.

  1. Space Weather and Solar Wind Studies with OWFA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, P. K.; Subrahmanya, C. R.; Chengalur, J. N.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we review the results of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations made with the legacy system of the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT) and compare them with the possibilities opened by the upgraded ORT, the Ooty Wide Field Array (OWFA). The stability and the sensitivity of the legacy system of ORT allowed the regular monitoring of IPS on a grid of large number of radio sources and the results of these studies have been useful to understand the physical processes in the heliosphere and space weather events, such as coronal mass ejections, interaction regions and their propagation effects. In the case of OWFA, its wide bandwidth of 38 MHz, the large field-of-view of 27° and increased sensitivity provide a unique capability for the heliospheric science at 326.5 MHz. IPS observations with the OWFA would allow one to monitor more than 5000 sources per day. This, in turn, will lead to much improved studies of space weather events and solar wind plasma, overcoming the limitations faced with the legacy system. We also highlight some of the specific aspects of the OWFA, potentially relevant for the studies of coronal plasma and its turbulence characteristics.

  2. Some features of the small-scale solar wind fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastenker, G.; Eiges, P.; Avanov, L.; Astafyeva, N.; Zurbuchen, Th.; Bochsler, P.

    1995-06-01

    We have investigated small-scale variations of the solar wind ion flux measured with Faraday cups onboard the Prognoz-8 satellite. These measurements have a high time resolution of 1.24 seconds for intervals with a duration of several hours and as high as 0.02 seconds for some periods of about 1 hour duration. The main goal of this work is the determination of the quantitative features of fast ion flux fluctuations using mainly spectral analysis but also other methods. We also identify their association with interplanetary plasma parameters. Particularly, it is shown that the slope of the power spectra in the frequency range from 1E-4 to 6E-2 Hz is close to the classical Kolmogorov (-5/3) law. We also discuss some intervals with a very high level of the relative amplitude of flux fluctuations (10-20 percent) which were observed near the Earth's bow shock in the foreshock region. The use of the wavelet method for the long time series allows us to study the temporal evolution of power spectra.

  3. Space Weather and Solar Wind Studies with OWFA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P. K. Manoharan; C. R. Subrahmanya; J. N. Chengalur

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we review the results of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations made with the legacy system of the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT) and compare them with the possibilities opened by the upgraded ORT, the Ooty Wide Field Array (OWFA). The stability and the sensitivity of the legacy system of ORT allowed the regular monitoring of IPS on a grid of large number of radio sources and the results of these studies have been useful to understand the physical processes in the heliosphere and space weather events, such as coronal mass ejections, interaction regions and their propagation effects. In the case of OWFA, its wide bandwidth of 38 MHz, the large field-of-view of $\\sim$27$^\\circ$ and increased sensitivity provide a unique capability for the heliospheric science at 326.5 MHz. IPS observations with the OWFA would allow one to monitor more than 5000 sources per day. This, in turn, will lead to much improved studies of space weather events and solar wind plasma, overcoming the limitations faced with the legacy system. We also highlight some of the specific aspects of the OWFA, potentially relevant for the studies of coronal plasma and its turbulence characteristics.

  4. A dynamical model of plasma turbulence in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, G G

    2015-05-13

    A dynamical approach, rather than the usual statistical approach, is taken to explore the physical mechanisms underlying the nonlinear transfer of energy, the damping of the turbulent fluctuations, and the development of coherent structures in kinetic plasma turbulence. It is argued that the linear and nonlinear dynamics of Alfvén waves are responsible, at a very fundamental level, for some of the key qualitative features of plasma turbulence that distinguish it from hydrodynamic turbulence, including the anisotropic cascade of energy and the development of current sheets at small scales. The first dynamical model of kinetic turbulence in the weakly collisional solar wind plasma that combines self-consistently the physics of Alfvén waves with the development of small-scale current sheets is presented and its physical implications are discussed. This model leads to a simplified perspective on the nature of turbulence in a weakly collisional plasma: the nonlinear interactions responsible for the turbulent cascade of energy and the formation of current sheets are essentially fluid in nature, while the collisionless damping of the turbulent fluctuations and the energy injection by kinetic instabilities are essentially kinetic in nature.

  5. Dynamic properties of small-scale solar wind plasma fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazantseva, M O; Budaev, V P; Zelenyi, L M; Zastenker, G N; Pavlos, G P; Safrankova, J; Nemecek, Z; Prech, L; Nemec, F

    2015-05-13

    The paper presents the latest results of the studies of small-scale fluctuations in a turbulent flow of solar wind (SW) using measurements with extremely high temporal resolution (up to 0.03 s) of the bright monitor of SW (BMSW) plasma spectrometer operating on astrophysical SPECTR-R spacecraft at distances up to 350,000 km from the Earth. The spectra of SW ion flux fluctuations in the range of scales between 0.03 and 100 s are systematically analysed. The difference of slopes in low- and high-frequency parts of spectra and the frequency of the break point between these two characteristic slopes was analysed for different conditions in the SW. The statistical properties of the SW ion flux fluctuations were thoroughly analysed on scales less than 10 s. A high level of intermittency is demonstrated. The extended self-similarity of SW ion flux turbulent flow is constantly observed. The approximation of non-Gaussian probability distribution function of ion flux fluctuations by the Tsallis statistics shows the non-extensive character of SW fluctuations. Statistical characteristics of ion flux fluctuations are compared with the predictions of a log-Poisson model. The log-Poisson parametrization of the structure function scaling has shown that well-defined filament-like plasma structures are, as a rule, observed in the turbulent SW flows.

  6. Energy spectrum transfer equations of solar wind turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, C.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    The recent studies of transfer equations for solar wind magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are reviewed with emphasis on the comparison with the statistical observational results. Helios and Voyager missions provide an opportunity to study the the radial evolution of the power spectrum. the cross-helicity the Alfven ratio and the minimum variance direction. Spectrum transfer equations are considered as a tool to explore the nature of this radial evolution of the fluctuations. The transfer equations are derived from incompressible MHD equations. Generally one needs to make assumptions about the nature of the fluctuations and the nature of the turbulent non-linear interactions to obtain numerical results which can be compared with the observations. Some special model results for several simple cases SUCH as for structures or strong mixing. for Alfven waves with weak turbulent interactions. and for a superposition of structures and Alfven waves. are discussed. The difference between the various approaches to derive and handle the transfer equations are also addressed. Finally some theoretical description of the compressible fluctuations are also briefly reviewed.

  7. Using Solar Business Models to Expand the Distributed Wind Market (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, S.

    2013-05-01

    This presentation to attendees at Wind Powering America's All-States Summit in Chicago describes business models that were responsible for rapid growth in the solar industry and that may be applicable to the distributed wind industry as well.

  8. Current-less solar wind driven dust acoustic instability in cometary plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vranjes, J. [Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Ringlaan 3, 1180 Brussels (Belgium)

    2011-08-15

    A quantitative analysis is presented of the dust acoustic wave instability driven by the solar and stellar winds. This is a current-less kinetic instability which develops in permeating plasmas, i.e.., when one quasi-neutral electron-ion wind plasma in its propagation penetrates through another quasi-neutral plasma which contains dust, electrons, and ions.

  9. 78 FR 19099 - Residential, Business, and Wind and Solar Resource Leases on Indian Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs 25 CFR Part 162 RIN 1076-AE73 Residential, Business, and Wind and Solar Resource... lease'' and clarifies two provisions for wind energy evaluation leases (WEELs). DATES: This...

  10. Spring-fall asymmetry of substorm strength, geomagnetic activity and solar wind: Implications for semiannual variation and solar hemispheric asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsula, K.; Tanskanen, E.; Love, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    We study the seasonal variation of substorms, geomagnetic activity and their solar wind drivers in 1993–2008. The number of substorms and substorm mean duration depict an annual variation with maxima in Winter and Summer, respectively, reflecting the annual change of the local ionosphere. In contradiction, substorm mean amplitude, substorm total efficiency and global geomagnetic activity show a dominant annual variation, with equinoctial maxima alternating between Spring in solar cycle 22 and Fall in cycle 23. The largest annual variations were found in 1994 and 2003, in the declining phase of the two cycles when high-speed streams dominate the solar wind. A similar, large annual variation is found in the solar wind driver of substorms and geomagnetic activity, which implies that the annual variation of substorm strength, substorm efficiency and geomagnetic activity is not due to ionospheric conditions but to a hemispherically asymmetric distribution of solar wind which varies from one cycle to another. Our results imply that the overall semiannual variation in global geomagnetic activity has been seriously overestimated, and is largely an artifact of the dominant annual variation with maxima alternating between Spring and Fall. The results also suggest an intimate connection between the asymmetry of solar magnetic fields and some of the largest geomagnetic disturbances, offering interesting new pathways for forecasting disturbances with a longer lead time to the future.

  11. Bioenergy Status Document 2011; Statusdocument Bio-energie 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bles, M.; Schepers, B.; Van Grinsven, A.; Bergsma, G.

    2011-03-15

    The Dutch status document on bio-energy has been updated with data for the year 2011. This document provides an overview of the amount of energy derived from biomass, a description of the current bio-energy policy framework and a discussion of the extent to which the Netherlands is on track for securing European renewable energy targets. The status document shows there has been a slight increase in the share of bio-energy in overall energy consumption as well as in the total amount of renewable energy generated (which now stands at a little over 4% of gross final consumption). The question, however, is whether this growth is sufficient to meet the European target of 14% renewables in 2020. The limited growth is due partly to the decrease in the amount of energy generated in the category 'other incineration'. In addition, there was a decline in the physical delivery of transport biofuels because certain types of fuel can be 'double-counted' in the records, although they do not contribute to the 14% target. This document provides an overview of the amount of energy derived from biomass, a description of the current bio-energy policy framework and a discussion of the extent to which the Netherlands is on track for securing European renewable energy targets [Dutch] Het statusdocument bio-energie 2011 geeft de huidige status weer van bioenergie in Nederland, inclusief trends en verwachtingen voor de toekomst. Het doel van dit document is inzicht verstrekken aan overheden en marktpartijen in de ontwikkelingen van bio-energie. De kabinetsdoelstellingen voor hernieuwbare energie zijn conform de doelstellingen uit de richtlijn voor hernieuwbare energie (2009/28/EG), die is vastgesteld door de EC. In 2020 moet 14% van het nationale bruto finaal eindgebruik afkomstig zijn van hernieuwbare bronnen, de Nederlandse overheid schat dat dat overeenkomt met 300 PJ. Naar schatting is in 2011 ongeveer 88 PJ aan hernieuwbare energie geproduceerd, ongeveer evenveel

  12. Dependence of Lunar Surface Charging on Solar Wind Plasma Conditions and Solar Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, T. J.; Farrell, W. M.; Halekas, J. S.; Burchill, J. K.; Collier, M. R.; Zimmerman, M. I.; Vondrak, R. R.; Delory, G. T.; Pfaff, R. F.

    2014-01-01

    The surface of the Moon is electrically charged by exposure to solar radiation on its dayside, as well as by the continuous flux of charged particles from the various plasma environments that surround it. An electric potential develops between the lunar surface and ambient plasma, which manifests itself in a near-surface plasma sheath with a scale height of order the Debye length. This study investigates surface charging on the lunar dayside and near-terminator regions in the solar wind, for which the dominant current sources are usually from the pohotoemission of electrons, J(sub p), and the collection of plasma electrons J(sub e) and ions J(sub i). These currents are dependent on the following six parameters: plasma concentration n(sub 0), electron temperature T(sub e), ion temperature T(sub i), bulk flow velocity V, photoemission current at normal incidence J(sub P0), and photo electron temperature T(sub p). Using a numerical model, derived from a set of eleven basic assumptions, the influence of these six parameters on surface charging - characterized by the equilibrium surface potential, Debye length, and surface electric field - is investigated as a function of solar zenith angle. Overall, T(sub e) is the most important parameter, especially near the terminator, while J(sub P0) and T(sub p) dominate over most of the dayside.

  13. Use of meteorological information in the risk analysis of a mixed wind farm and solar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengelkamp, H.-T.; Bendel, D.

    2010-09-01

    Use of meteorological information in the risk analysis of a mixed wind farm and solar power plant portfolio H.-T. Mengelkamp*,** , D. Bendel** *GKSS Research Center Geesthacht GmbH **anemos Gesellschaft für Umweltmeteorologie mbH The renewable energy industry has rapidly developed during the last two decades and so have the needs for high quality comprehensive meteorological services. It is, however, only recently that international financial institutions bundle wind farms and solar power plants and offer shares in these aggregate portfolios. The monetary value of a mixed wind farm and solar power plant portfolio is determined by legal and technical aspects, the expected annual energy production of each wind farm and solar power plant and the associated uncertainty of the energy yield estimation or the investment risk. Building an aggregate portfolio will reduce the overall uncertainty through diversification in contrast to the single wind farm/solar power plant energy yield uncertainty. This is similar to equity funds based on a variety of companies or products. Meteorological aspects contribute to the diversification in various ways. There is the uncertainty in the estimation of the expected long-term mean energy production of the wind and solar power plants. Different components of uncertainty have to be considered depending on whether the power plant is already in operation or in the planning phase. The uncertainty related to a wind farm in the planning phase comprises the methodology of the wind potential estimation and the uncertainty of the site specific wind turbine power curve as well as the uncertainty of the wind farm effect calculation. The uncertainty related to a solar power plant in the pre-operational phase comprises the uncertainty of the radiation data base and that of the performance curve. The long-term mean annual energy yield of operational wind farms and solar power plants is estimated on the basis of the actual energy production and it

  14. Mutual information between geomagnetic indices and the solar wind as seen by WIND - implications for propagation time estimates

    CERN Document Server

    March, T K; Dendy, R O

    2005-01-01

    The determination of delay times of solar wind conditions at the sunward libration point to effects on Earth is investigated using mutual information. This measures the amount of information shared between two timeseries. We consider the mutual information content of solar wind observations, from WIND, and the geomagnetic indices. The success of five commonly used schemes for estimating interplanetary propagation times is examined. Propagation assuming a fixed plane normal at 45 degrees to the GSE x-axis (i.e. the Parker Spiral estimate) is found to give optimal mutual information. The mutual information depends on the point in space chosen as the target for the propagation estimate, and we find that it is maximized by choosing a point in the nightside rather than dayside magnetosphere. In addition, we employ recurrence plot analysis to visualize contributions to the mutual information, this suggests that it appears on timescales of hours rather than minutes.

  15. Can the Solar Wind be Driven by Magnetic Reconnection in the Sun's Magnetic Carpet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranmer, Steven R.; van Ballegooijen, Adriaan A.

    2010-09-01

    The physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind remain unknown after many years of study. Some have suggested that the wind is driven by waves and turbulence in open magnetic flux tubes, and others have suggested that plasma is injected into the open tubes by magnetic reconnection with closed loops. In order to test the latter idea, we developed Monte Carlo simulations of the photospheric "magnetic carpet" and extrapolated the time-varying coronal field. These models were constructed for a range of different magnetic flux imbalance ratios. Completely balanced models represent quiet regions on the Sun and source regions of slow solar wind streams. Highly imbalanced models represent coronal holes and source regions of fast wind streams. The models agree with observed emergence rates, surface flux densities, and number distributions of magnetic elements. Despite having no imposed supergranular motions in the models, a realistic network of magnetic "funnels" appeared spontaneously. We computed the rate at which closed field lines open up (i.e., recycling times for open flux), and we estimated the energy flux released in reconnection events involving the opening up of closed flux tubes. For quiet regions and mixed-polarity coronal holes, these energy fluxes were found to be much lower than that which is required to accelerate the solar wind. For the most imbalanced coronal holes, the energy fluxes may be large enough to power the solar wind, but the recycling times are far longer than the time it takes the solar wind to accelerate into the low corona. Thus, it is unlikely that either the slow or fast solar wind is driven by reconnection and loop-opening processes in the magnetic carpet.

  16. Charge States and FIP Bias of the Solar Wind from Coronal Holes, Active Regions, and Quiet Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hui; Madjarska, Maria S.; Xia, LiDong; Li, Bo; Huang, ZhengHua; Wangguan, Zhipeng

    2017-02-01

    Connecting in situ measured solar-wind plasma properties with typical regions on the Sun can provide an effective constraint and test to various solar wind models. We examine the statistical characteristics of the solar wind with an origin in different types of source regions. We find that the speed distribution of coronal-hole (CH) wind is bimodal with the slow wind peaking at ∼400 km s‑1 and the fast at ∼600 km s‑1. An anti-correlation between the solar wind speeds and the O7+/O6+ ion ratio remains valid in all three types of solar wind as well during the three studied solar cycle activity phases, i.e., solar maximum, decline, and minimum. The {N}{Fe}/{N}{{O}} range and its average values all decrease with the increasing solar wind speed in different types of solar wind. The {N}{Fe}/{N}{{O}} range (0.06–0.40, first ionization potential (FIP) bias range 1–7) for active region wind is wider than for CH wind (0.06–0.20, FIP bias range 1–3), while the minimum value of {N}{Fe}/{N}{{O}} (∼ 0.06) does not change with the variation of speed, and it is similar for all source regions. The two-peak distribution of CH wind and the anti-correlation between the speed and O7+/O6+ in all three types of solar wind can be explained qualitatively by both the wave-turbulence-driven and reconnection-loop-opening (RLO) models, whereas the distribution features of {N}{Fe}/{N}{{O}} in different source regions of solar wind can be explained more reasonably by the RLO models.

  17. Concentration of interstellar pickup H(+) and He(+) in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloeckler, G.; Jokipii, J. R.; Giacalone, J.; Geiss, J.

    1994-01-01

    We present observations of interstellar pickup hydrogen and helium in the solar wind which show large, highly-correlated fluctuations in flux which are not correlated significantly with the solar-wind hydrogen flux. The correlation of the fluctuations in the two species implies that the fluctuations are caused by transport after ionization. The lack of correlation with the thermal flux means they are not caused by compressions of the wind. We present a new model which can naturally produce the observed fluctuations in the pickup ions.

  18. Integrating Wind And Solar With Hydrogen Producing Fuel Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmes, K.

    2007-01-01

    The often proposed solution for the fluctuating wind energy supply is the conversion of the surplus of wind energy into hydrogen by means of electrolysis. In this paper a patented alternative is proposed consisting of the integration of wind turbines with internal reforming fuel-cells, capable of co

  19. Pioneer 10 observation of the solar wind proton temperature heliocentric gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov, J. D.; Wolfe, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Solar wind isotropic proton temperatures as measured out to 12.2 AU heliocentric distance by the Ames plasma analyzer aboard Pioneer 10 are presented as consecutive averages over three Carrington solar rotations and discussed. The weighted least-squares fit of average temperature to heliocentric radial distance, R, yields the power law R sup -.52. These average proton temperatures are not correlated as well with Pioneer 10's heliocentric radial distance (-.85) as are the corresponding average Zurich sunspot numbers R sub z (-.95). Consequently, it is difficult to isolate the spatial gradient in the Pioneer 10 solar wind proton temperatures using that data alone.

  20. Recent Optical and SEM Characterization of Genesis Solar Wind Concentrator Diamond on Silicon Collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allton, Judith H.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Burkett, P. J.; Ross, D. K.; Gonzalez, C. P.; McNamara, K. M.

    2013-01-01

    One of the 4 Genesis solar wind concentrator collectors was a silicon substrate coated with diamond-like carbon (DLC) in which to capture solar wind. This material was designed for analysis of solar nitrogen and noble gases [1, 2]. This particular collector fractured during landing, but about 80% of the surface was recovered, including a large piece which was subdivided in 2012 [3, 4, 5]. The optical and SEM imaging and analysis described below supports the subdivision and allocation of the diamond-on-silicon (DOS) concentrator collector.

  1. Single-Fluid 2D Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of Solar Wind Structure in Comparison to Ulysses Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Two dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations with and without the momentum addi-tion respectively have been used to simulate the solar wind structure on the meridian plane. The results show that far away from the sun it isn't solar magnetic field that induces the concave solar wind speed. Instead, there may be the fast speed streamer driven by the momentum addition and an interface between high and low speed streamers. The interaction between high and low speed streamers causes the sharp division.

  2. Response of Earth and Venus ionospheres to corotating solar wind stream of 3 July 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, H.A. Jr.; Cloutier, P.A.; Dryer, M.; Suess, S.T.; Barnes, A.; Wolff, R.S.

    1985-06-01

    Corotating solar wind streams emanating from stable coronal structures provide an unique opportunity to compare the response of planetary ionospheres to the energy conveyed in the streams. For recurrent solar conditions the signal propagating outward along spiral paths in interplanetary space can at times exhibit rather similar content at quite different downstream locations in the ecliptic plane. Using solar wind measurements from plasma detectors on ISEE-3, Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) and Helios-A, as well as in-situ ion composition measurements from Bennett Ion Mass Spectrometers on the Atmosphere Explorer-E and PVO spacecraft, corotating stream interactions are examined at Earth and Venus.

  3. Can the Solar Wind be Driven by Magnetic Reconnection in the Sun's Magnetic Carpet?

    CERN Document Server

    Cranmer, Steven R

    2010-01-01

    The physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind remain unknown after many years of study. Some have suggested that the wind is driven by waves and turbulence in open magnetic flux tubes, and others have suggested that plasma is injected into the open tubes by magnetic reconnection with closed loops. In order to test the latter idea, we developed Monte Carlo simulations of the photospheric "magnetic carpet" and extrapolated the time-varying coronal field. These models were constructed for a range of different magnetic flux imbalance ratios. Completely balanced models represent quiet regions on the Sun and source regions of slow solar wind streams. Highly imbalanced models represent coronal holes and source regions of fast wind streams. The models agree with observed emergence rates, surface flux densities, and number distributions of magnetic elements. Despite having no imposed supergranular motions, a realistic network of magnetic "funnels" appeared spontaneously. We computed t...

  4. The S-Web Model for the Sources of the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2012-01-01

    Models for the origin of the slow solar wind must account for two seemingly contradictory observations: The slow wind has the composition of the closed-field corona, implying that it originates from the continuous opening and closing of flux at the boundary between open and closed field. On the other hand, the slow wind has large angular width, up to 60 degrees, suggesting that its source extends far from the open-closed boundary. We describe a model that can explain both observations. The key idea is that the source of the slow wind at the Sun is a network of narrow (possibly singular) open-field corridors that map to a web of separatrices (the S-Web) and quasi-separatrix layers in the heliosphere. We discuss the dynamics of the S-Web model and its implications for present observations and for the upcoming observations from Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus.

  5. Proton Heating in Solar Wind Compressible Turbulence with Collisions between Counter-propagating Waves

    CERN Document Server

    He, Jiansen; Marsch, Eckart; Chen, Christopher H K; Wang, Linghua; Pei, Zhongtian; Zhang, Lei; Salem, Chadi S; Bale, Stuart D

    2015-01-01

    Magnetohydronamic turbulence is believed to play a crucial role in heating the laboratorial, space, and astrophysical plasmas. However, the precise connection between the turbulent fluctuations and the particle kinetics has not yet been established. Here we present clear evidence of plasma turbulence heating based on diagnosed wave features and proton velocity distributions from solar wind measurements by the Wind spacecraft. For the first time, we can report the simultaneous observation of counter-propagating magnetohydrodynamic waves in the solar wind turbulence. Different from the traditional paradigm with counter-propagating Alfv\\'en waves, anti-sunward Alfv\\'en waves (AWs) are encountered by sunward slow magnetosonic waves (SMWs) in this new type of solar wind compressible turbulence. The counter-propagating AWs and SWs correspond respectively to the dominant and sub-dominant populations of the imbalanced Els\\"asser variables. Nonlinear interactions between the AWs and SMWs are inferred from the non-orth...

  6. Wind effects on convective heat loss from a cavity receiver for a parabolic concentrating solar collector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, R.Y. [California State Polytechnic Univ., Pomoma, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1993-09-01

    Tests were performed to determine the convective heat loss characteristics of a cavity receiver for a parabolid dish concentrating solar collector for various tilt angles and wind speeds of 0-24 mph. Natural (no wind) convective heat loss from the receiver is the highest for a horizontal receiver orientation and negligible with the reveler facing straight down. Convection from the receiver is substantially increased by the presence of side-on wind for all receiver tilt angles. For head-on wind, convective heat loss with the receiver facing straight down is approximately the same as that for side-on wind. Overall it was found that for wind speeds of 20--24 mph, convective heat loss from the receiver can be as much as three times that occurring without wind.

  7. Solar and wind opportunities for water desalination in the Arab regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Karaghouli, Ali; Renne, David; Kazmerski, Lawrence L. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Despite the abundance of renewable energy resources in the Arab region, the use of solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind is still in its technological and economic infancy. Great potential exists, but economic constraints have impeded more rapid growth for many applications. These technologies have certainly advanced technically over the last quarter century to the point where they should now be considered clean-energy alternatives to fossil fuels. For the Arab countries and many other regions of the world, potable water is becoming as critical a commodity as electricity. As renewable energy technologies advance and environmental concerns rise, these technologies are becoming more interesting partners for powering water desalination projects. We evaluate the current potential and viability of solar and wind, emphasizing the strict mandate for accurate, reliable site-specific resource data. Water desalination can be achieved through either thermal energy (using phase-change processes) or electricity (driving membrane processes), and these sources are best matched to the particular desalination technology. Desalination using solar thermal can be accomplished by multistage flash distillation, multi-effect distillation, vapor compression, freeze separation, and solar still methods. Concentrating solar power offers the best match to large-scale plants that require both high-temperature fluids and electricity. Solar and wind electricity can be effective energy sources for reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, and ultra- and nano-filtration. All these water desalination processes have special operational and high energy requirements that put additional requisites on the use of solar and wind to power these applications. We summarize the characteristics of the various desalination technologies. The effective match of solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind to each of these is discussed in detail. An economic analysis is provided that incorporates energy consumption

  8. Modeling the Young Sun's Solar Wind and its Interaction with Earth's Paleomagnetosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Sterenborg, M Glenn; Drake, Jeremy J; Gombosi, Tamas I; 10.1029/2010JA016036

    2011-01-01

    We present a focused parameter study of solar wind - magnetosphere interaction for the young Sun and Earth, $~3.5$ Ga ago, that relies on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations for both the solar wind and the magnetosphere. By simulating the quiescent young Sun and its wind we are able to propagate the MHD simulations up to Earth's magnetosphere and obtain a physically realistic solar forcing of it. We assess how sensitive the young solar wind is to changes in the coronal base density, sunspot placement and magnetic field strength, dipole magnetic field strength and the Sun's rotation period. From this analysis we obtain a range of plausible solar wind conditions the paleomagnetosphere may have been subject to. Scaling relationships from the literature suggest that a young Sun would have had a mass flux different from the present Sun. We evaluate how the mass flux changes with the aforementioned factors and determine the importance of this and several other key solar and magnetospheric variables with respect t...

  9. Momentum and energy transport by waves in the solar atmosphere and solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    The fluid equations for the solar wind are presented in a form which includes the momentum and energy flux of waves in a general and consistent way. The concept of conservation of wave action is introduced and is used to derive expressions for the wave energy density as a function of heliocentric distance. The explicit form of the terms due to waves in both the momentum and energy equations are given for radially propagating acoustic, Alfven, and fast mode waves. The effect of waves as a source of momentum is explored by examining the critical points of the momentum equation for isothermal spherically symmetric flow. We find that the principal effect of waves on the solutions is to bring the critical point closer to the sun's surface and to increase the Mach number at the critical point. When a simple model of dissipation is included for acoustic waves, in some cases there are multiple critical points.

  10. Differential kinetic dynamics and heating of ions in the turbulent solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Valentini, F; Stabile, S; Pezzi, O; Servidio, S; De Marco, R; Marcucci, F; Bruno, R; Lavraud, B; De Keyser, J; Consolini, G; Brienza, D; Sorriso-Valvo, L; Retinò, A; Vaivads, A; Salatti, M; Veltri, P

    2016-01-01

    The solar wind plasma is a fully ionized and turbulent gas ejected by the outer layers of the solar corona at very high speed, mainly composed by protons and electrons, with a small percentage of helium nuclei and a significantly lower abundance of heavier ions. Since particle collisions are practically negligible, the solar wind is typically not in a state of thermodynamic equilibrium. Such a complex system must be described through self-consistent and fully nonlinear models, taking into account its multi-species composition and turbulence. We use a kinetic hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell numerical code to reproduce the turbulent energy cascade down to ion kinetic scales, in typical conditions of the uncontaminated solar wind plasma, with the aim of exploring the differential kinetic dynamics of the dominant ion species, namely protons and alpha particles. We show that the response of different species to the fluctuating electromagnetic fields is different. In particular, a significant differential heating of alphas w...

  11. Study of the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling on different time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Badruddin,

    2013-01-01

    Solar wind-magnetosphere coupling, its causes and consequences have been studied for the last several decades. However, the assessment of continuously changing behaviour of the sun, plasma and field flows in the interplanetary space and their influence on geomagnetic activity is still a subject of intense research. Search for the best possible coupling function is also important for space weather prediction. We utilize four geomagnetic indices (ap, aa, AE and Dst) as parameters of geomagnetic activity level in the earth's magnetosphere. In addition to these indices, we utilize various solar wind plasma and field parameters for the corresponding periods. We analyse the geomagnetic activity and plasma/field parameters at yearly, half-yearly, 27-day, daily, 3-hourly, and hourly time resolutions. Regression analysis using geomagnetic and solar wind data of different time resolutions, over a continuous long period, and at different phases of solar activity (increasing including maximum/decreasing including minimum...

  12. Polar ionospheric responses to solar wind IMF changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhang

    Full Text Available Auroral and airglow emissions over Eureka (89° CGM during the 1997-98 winter show striking variations in relation to solar wind IMF changes. The period January 19 to 22, 1998, was chosen for detailed study, as the IMF was particularly strong and variable. During most of the period, Bz was northward and polar arcs were observed. Several overpasses by DMSP satellites during the four day period provided a clear picture of the particle precipitation producing the polar arcs. The spectral character of these events indicated excitation by electrons of average energy 300 to 500 eV. Only occasionally were electrons of average energy up to ~1 keV observed and these appeared transitory from the ground optical data. It is noted that polar arcs appear after sudden changes in IMF By, suggesting IMF control over arc initiation. When By is positive there is arc motion from dawn to dusk, while By is negative the motion is consistently dusk to dawn. F-region (anti-sunward convections were monitored through the period from 630.0 nm emissions. The convection speed was low (100-150 m/s when Bz was northward but increased to 500 m/s after Bz turned southward on January 20.

    Key words: Atmospheric composition and structure (airglow and aurora - Ionosphere (particle precipitation - Magnetospheric Physics (polar cap phenomena

  13. Modeling energy production of solar thermal systems and wind turbines for installation at corn ethanol plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrke, Elizabeth

    Nearly every aspect of human existence relies on energy in some way. Most of this energy is currently derived from fossil fuel resources. Increasing energy demands coupled with environmental and national security concerns have facilitated the move towards renewable energy sources. Biofuels like corn ethanol are one of the ways the U.S. has significantly reduced petroleum consumption. However, the large energy requirement of corn ethanol limits the net benefit of the fuel. Using renewable energy sources to produce ethanol can greatly improve its economic and environmental benefits. The main purpose of this study was to model the useful energy received from a solar thermal array and a wind turbine at various locations to determine the feasibility of applying these technologies at ethanol plants around the country. The model calculates thermal energy received from a solar collector array and electricity generated by a wind turbine utilizing various input data to characterize the equipment. Project cost and energy rate inputs are used to evaluate the profitability of the solar array or wind turbine. The current state of the wind and solar markets were examined to give an accurate representation of the economics of each industry. Eighteen ethanol plant locations were evaluated for the viability of a solar thermal array and/or wind turbine. All ethanol plant locations have long payback periods for solar thermal arrays, but high natural gas prices significantly reduce this timeframe. Government incentives will be necessary for the economic feasibility of solar thermal arrays. Wind turbines can be very profitable for ethanol plants in the Midwest due to large wind resources. The profitability of wind power is sensitive to regional energy prices. However, government incentives for wind power do not significantly change the economic feasibility of a wind turbine. This model can be used by current or future ethanol facilities to investigate or begin the planning process for a

  14. Exodus: redirecting Genesis for solar wind observations 4-8 million km from Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, J.; Barraclough, B.; Gosling, J.; Reisenfeld, D.; Wiens, R.; Liewer, P.; Murphy, N.

    2003-04-01

    Genesis is an ongoing NASA Discovery mission designed to collect samples of the solar wind at L1 and return them to Earth for analysis. After the return capsule is dropped off in September, 2004, the spacecraft, with its in situ solar wind ion and electron spectrometers, is available to perform a new solar wind mission. Spacecraft capabilities, including ample remaining Dv, allow it to achieve and maintain a distant retrograde orbit, a heliocentric orbit in which the spacecraft spends a significant amount of time ˜0.025 AU upstream and downstream of Earth (˜2.5x the Earth-L1 distance). From this orbit Genesis observations may be used, together with those from available L1 spacecraft, to compare solar wind parameters across important spatial scales. The multi-point collaborative studies will uniquely allow us to understand the propagation and evolution of solar wind plasma, as well as the internal spatial structure of large solar wind transients, for spacecraft separation distances of 0.025 to 0.05 AU. Such separation distances are significantly greater than can be attained between any pair of current and proposed satellites in Earth or in L1 halo orbits. At the same time the separations will be small enough to allow confident tracking of particular solar wind structures between spacecraft. In addition to groundbreaking science, the Genesis spacecraft would be a pathfinder for potential future space weather sentinels. We present a proposal to redirect the Genesis spacecraft after its prime mission is complete, and create a new, inexpensive mission: EXODUS.

  15. Modeling the Magnetospheric X-ray Emission from Solar Wind Charge Exchange with Verification from XMM-Newton Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-26

    solar wind energy into the magnetosphere [Milan et al., 2004]. Hence, modeling and testing of the terrestrial charge exchange process is necessary for...including theGUMICS-4 integral energy and estimated count rate output, the solar wind conditions, the EPIC light curve, and satellite positional...values in blue (solid red fit line). We observe that as expected, the fast solar wind correlates very well (r2 = 0.78), producing the power law fit shown

  16. Kinetic and Potential Sputtering of Lunar Regolith: The Contribution of the Heavy Highly Charged (Minority) Solar Wind Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, F. W.; Barghouty, A. F.

    2012-01-01

    Solar wind sputtering of the lunar surface helps determine the composition of the lunar exosphere and contributes to surface weathering. To date, only the effects of the two dominant solar wind constituents, H+ and He+, have been considered. The heavier, less abundant solar wind constituents have much larger sputtering yields because they have greater mass (kinetic sputtering) and they are highly charged (potential sputtering) Their contribution to total sputtering can therefore be orders of magnitude larger than their relative abundances would suggest

  17. In-flight performance and preliminary observational results of Solar Wind Ion Detectors (SWIDs) on Chang'E-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, L. G.; Wang, S. J.; Wang, X. Y.; Zhang, A. B.; Zhu, G. W.; Yu, D. J.; Ren, Q. Y.; Reme, H.; Aoustin, C.; Zhang, X. G.; Feng, Y. B.; Zeng, L.

    2012-03-01

    SWIDs (Solar Wind Ion Detectors, SWID-A and SWID-B) are two of the scientific instruments on Chang'E-1, the first Chinese lunar mission. SWIDs utilize top-hat electrostatic analyzer to measure the low energy (alpha beam in solar wind. This is the first double ion beams event reported near the Moon. The double ion beams appeared having relatively anisotropic characteristics due to the interaction between solar wind and the Moon.

  18. EVOLUTION OF INTERMITTENCY IN THE SLOW AND FAST SOLAR WIND BEYOND THE ECLIPTIC PLANE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wawrzaszek, A.; Macek, W. M. [Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Echim, M. [The Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Brussels (Belgium); Bruno, R., E-mail: anna.wawrzaszek@cbk.waw.pl, E-mail: marius.echim@oma.be, E-mail: macek@cbk.waw.pl, E-mail: roberto.bruno@iaps.inaf.it [Institute for Space Astrophysics and Planetology, Roma (Italy)

    2015-12-01

    We study intermittency as a departure from self-similarity of the solar wind magnetic turbulence and investigate the evolution with the heliocentric distance and latitude. We use data from the Ulysses spacecraft measured during two solar minima (1997–1998 and 2007–2008) and one solar maximum (1999–2001). In particular, by modeling a multifractal spectrum, we revealed the intermittent character of turbulence in the small-scale fluctuations of the magnetic field embedded in the slow and fast solar wind. Generally, at small distances from the Sun, in both the slow and fast solar wind, we observe the high degree of multifractality (intermittency) that decreases somewhat slowly with distance and slowly with latitude. The obtained results seem to suggest that generally intermittency in the solar wind has a solar origin. However, the fast and slow streams, shocks, and other nonlinear interactions can only be considered as the drivers of the intermittent turbulence. It seems that analysis shows that turbulence beyond the ecliptic plane evolves too slowly to maintain the intermittency with the distance and latitude. Moreover, we confirm that the multifractality and intermittency are at a lower level than in the ecliptic, as well as the existence of symmetry with respect to the ecliptic plane, suggesting that there are similar turbulent properties observed in the two hemispheres.

  19. Evolution of Intermittency in the Slow and Fast Solar Wind Beyond the Ecliptic Plane

    CERN Document Server

    Wawrzaszek, Anna; Macek, Wiesław M; Bruno, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We study intermittency as a departure from self-similarity of the solar wind magnetic turbulence and investigate the evolution with the heliocentric distance and latitude. We use data from the Ulysses spacecraft measured during two solar minima (1997-1998 and 2007-2008) and one solar maximum (1999-2001). In particular, by modeling a multifractal spectrum, we revealed the intermittent character of turbulence in the small-scale fluctuations of the magnetic field embedded in the slow and fast solar wind. Generally, at small distances from the Sun, in both the slow and fast solar wind, we observe the high degree of multifractality (intermittency) that decreases somewhat slowly with distance and slowly with latitude. The obtained results seem to suggest that generally intermittency in the solar wind has a solar origin. However, the fast and slow streams, shocks, and other nonlinear interactions can only be considered as the drivers of the intermittent turbulence. It seems that analysis shows that turbulence beyond...

  20. How ambitious can we be in contributing to the world’s energy needs with bioenergy, wind, solar and storage?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    As part of the DTU Climate Change Technologies Programme, DTU arranged a series of workshops and conferences on climate change technology focusing on assessment of and adaptation to climate changes as well as on mitigation of greenhouse gasses (GHG). Each workshop targeted a specific technology p...